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Sample records for immunodeficiency virus antibody

  1. Immunoassay for detection of antibodies to simian immunodeficiency virus and human immunodeficiency virus in serum.

    PubMed

    Otsyula, M G; Yee, J A; Suleman, M A; Marx, P A; Jennings, M B

    1996-04-01

    We developed a simple, inexpensive, rapid assay for the detection of antibodies to simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in serum. The immunoassay uses inactivated SIV and HIV-1 gp41 transmembrane recombinant protein as antigenic adsorbents on a nitrocellulose filter membrane. Diluted serum, with the addition of Protein-A-Gold, is gravity-filtered through the filter membrane, blocked, and buffer-washed. Antibodies to HIV or SIV or both in serum bind to the appropriate antigen, and the resulting antigen-antibody complex reacts with Protein-A-Gold to produce a readable pink color. Field evaluation of the test on 30 human and 70 nonhuman primate sera in Kenya and Zaire indicated that the test had at least 93 and 90% correlation with Western blot sensitivity and specificity respectively. Prior refrigeration of the test kit and incubation of sera during testing were not required. This result indicates that the test may be a rapid, economical, and simple test for detecting HIV, SIV, or both in serum. This immunoassay can be useful for carrying out HIV and SIV serosurveys in countries with limited or no laboratory facilities. PMID:8723237

  2. Human immunodeficiency virus antibody test and seroprevalence in psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Naber, D; Pajonk, F G; Perro, C; Löhmer, B

    1994-05-01

    Psychiatric inpatients are at risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Investigations in the United States revealed seroprevalence rates of 5.5-8.9%. Therefore, inclusion of HIV antibody testing in routine laboratory screening is sometimes suggested. To investigate this issue for inpatients in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Munich, the incidence, reason for HIV testing and results were analyzed. Of 12,603 patients, hospitalized from 1985 to 1993, 4.9% (623 patients, 265 in risk groups) underwent the HIV test after informed consent. Thirty patients (4.8% of those tested) were found to be positive, but only in 5 cases (all of risk groups) was infection newly detected. Data indicate that, in psychiatry, HIV testing is reasonable only in patients in risk groups or if clinical variables suggest HIV infection.

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus antibody test and seroprevalence in psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Naber, D; Pajonk, F G; Perro, C; Löhmer, B

    1994-05-01

    Psychiatric inpatients are at risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Investigations in the United States revealed seroprevalence rates of 5.5-8.9%. Therefore, inclusion of HIV antibody testing in routine laboratory screening is sometimes suggested. To investigate this issue for inpatients in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Munich, the incidence, reason for HIV testing and results were analyzed. Of 12,603 patients, hospitalized from 1985 to 1993, 4.9% (623 patients, 265 in risk groups) underwent the HIV test after informed consent. Thirty patients (4.8% of those tested) were found to be positive, but only in 5 cases (all of risk groups) was infection newly detected. Data indicate that, in psychiatry, HIV testing is reasonable only in patients in risk groups or if clinical variables suggest HIV infection. PMID:8067276

  4. A monoclonal antibody to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 which mediates cellular cytotoxicity and neutralization.

    PubMed Central

    Broliden, P A; Ljunggren, K; Hinkula, J; Norrby, E; Akerblom, L; Wahren, B

    1990-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were raised against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120. One MAb, P4/D10, was found to mediate highly efficient antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and virus neutralization. The reactivity was located to a major neutralizing region (amino acids 304 to 323) on gp120. Five other MAbs with a similar epitopic reactivity did not show any antibody-dependent cellulan cytotoxicity activity but had a virus-neutralizing capacity. PMID:2296090

  5. Simple in vitro methods for titrating feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and FIV neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Tozzini, F; Matteucci, D; Bandecchi, P; Baldinotti, F; Poli, A; Pistello, M; Siebelink, K H; Ceccherini-Nelli, L; Bendinelli, M

    1992-06-01

    The feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) readily produced syncytia in Crandell feline kidney (CrFK) cells adapted to a medium containing 0.5% fetal calf serum, a variety of growth factors and other supplements. This finding has been exploited to develop simple and sensitive virus titration and neutralization assays. High titre neutralizing antibodies were detected in cats infected naturally and experimentally with FIV, but not in uninfected animals.

  6. Prevalence of feline leukemia virus and antibodies to feline immunodeficiency virus in cats in Norway.

    PubMed

    Ueland, K; Lutz, H

    1992-02-01

    Serum samples from 224 Norwegian cats were analyzed for the presence of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) p27 common core antigen, and for antibodies to feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). Ninety specimens originated from the serum bank at the central referral clinic at the Norwegian College of Veterinary Medicine, which had been collected during the years 1983-1989; 67 sera were submitted from veterinarian practitioners; while 67 sera originated from cats presented for euthanasia. The cats were classified into one "healthy" and one "sick" group. Only 2.2% of sick cats and 1.2% of healthy cats showed FeLV antigenemia, a finding which is lower than which has been reported from many other countries. The prevalence of FIV antibodies was 10.1% in sick cats and 5.9% in healthy cats. Antibodies to FIV was most prevalent in male cats (14.7%) than in female cats (2.1%), and more prevalent among domestic cats (12.0%) compared to pedigree cats (2.4%). Antibodies to FIV in the cats demonstrated increasing prevalence with increasing age. It may be concluded that FeLV causes minor problems in Norwegian cats, while FIV is present in a similar prevalence to what is reported from other countries. PMID:1316024

  7. Interactions between natural killer cells and antibody Fc result in enhanced antibody neutralization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Forthal, Donald N; Landucci, Gary; Phan, Tran B; Becerra, Juan

    2005-02-01

    Antibodies can prevent lentivirus infections in animals and may play a role in controlling viral burden in established infection. In preventing and particularly in controlling infection, antibodies likely function in the presence of large quantities of virus. In this study, we explored the mechanisms by which antibodies neutralize large inocula of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) on different target cells. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) from HIV-infected patients was tested for neutralizing activity against primary R5 strains of HIV-1 at inocula ranging from 100 to 20,000 50% tissue culture infective doses. At all virus inocula, inhibition by antibody was enhanced when target cells for virus growth were monocyte-depleted, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) rather than CD4(+) lymphocytes. However, enhanced inhibition on PBMCs was greatest with larger amounts of virus. Depleting PBMCs of natural killer (NK) cells, which express Fc receptors for IgG (FcgammaRs), abrogated the enhanced antibody inhibition, whereas adding NK cells to CD4(+) lymphocytes restored inhibition. There was no enhanced inhibition on PBMCs when F(ab')(2) was used. Further experiments demonstrated that the release of beta-chemokines, most likely through FcgammaR triggering of NK cells, contributed modestly to the antiviral activity of antibody on PBMCs and that antibody-coated virus adsorbed to uninfected cells provided a target for NK cell-mediated inhibition of HIV-1. These results indicate that Fc-FcgammaR interactions enhance the ability of antibody to neutralize HIV-1. Since FcgammaR-bearing cells are always present in vivo, FcgammaR-mediated antibody function may play a role in the ability of antibody to control lentivirus infection.

  8. Interactions between Natural Killer Cells and Antibody Fc Result in Enhanced Antibody Neutralization of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Forthal, Donald N.; Landucci, Gary; Phan, Tran B.; Becerra, Juan

    2005-01-01

    Antibodies can prevent lentivirus infections in animals and may play a role in controlling viral burden in established infection. In preventing and particularly in controlling infection, antibodies likely function in the presence of large quantities of virus. In this study, we explored the mechanisms by which antibodies neutralize large inocula of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) on different target cells. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) from HIV-infected patients was tested for neutralizing activity against primary R5 strains of HIV-1 at inocula ranging from 100 to 20,000 50% tissue culture infective doses. At all virus inocula, inhibition by antibody was enhanced when target cells for virus growth were monocyte-depleted, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) rather than CD4+ lymphocytes. However, enhanced inhibition on PBMCs was greatest with larger amounts of virus. Depleting PBMCs of natural killer (NK) cells, which express Fc receptors for IgG (FcγRs), abrogated the enhanced antibody inhibition, whereas adding NK cells to CD4+ lymphocytes restored inhibition. There was no enhanced inhibition on PBMCs when F(ab′)2 was used. Further experiments demonstrated that the release of β-chemokines, most likely through FcγR triggering of NK cells, contributed modestly to the antiviral activity of antibody on PBMCs and that antibody-coated virus adsorbed to uninfected cells provided a target for NK cell-mediated inhibition of HIV-1. These results indicate that Fc-FcγR interactions enhance the ability of antibody to neutralize HIV-1. Since FcγR-bearing cells are always present in vivo, FcγR-mediated antibody function may play a role in the ability of antibody to control lentivirus infection. PMID:15681406

  9. Bispecific Antibodies that Mediate Killing of Cells Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus of Any Strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Jorg; Lotscher, Erika; Steimer, Kathelyn S.; Capon, Daniel J.; Baenziger, Jurg; Jack, Hans-Martin; Wabl, Matthias

    1991-06-01

    Although AIDS patients lose human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific cytotoxic T cells, their remaining CD8-positive T lymphocytes maintain cytotoxic function. To exploit this fact we have constructed bispecific antibodies that direct cytotoxic T lymphocytes of any specificity to cells that express gp120 of HIV. These bispecific antibodies comprise one heavy/light chain pair from an antibody to CD3, linked to a heavy chain whose variable region has been replaced with sequences from CD4 plus a second light chain. CD3 is part of the antigen receptor on T cells and is responsible for signal transduction. In the presence of these bispecific antibodies, T cells of irrelevant specificity effectively lyse HIV-infected cells in vitro.

  10. Epitope specificity of human immunodeficiency virus-1 antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity [ADCC] responses.

    PubMed

    Pollara, Justin; Bonsignori, Mattia; Moody, M Anthony; Pazgier, Marzena; Haynes, Barton F; Ferrari, Guido

    2013-07-01

    Antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity [ADCC] has been suggested to play an important role in control of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 [HIV-1] viral load and protection from infection. ADCC antibody responses have been mapped to multiple linear and conformational epitopes within the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins gp120 and gp41. Many epitopes targeted by antibodies that mediate ADCC overlap with those recognized by antibodies capable of virus neutralization. In addition, recent studies conducted with human monoclonal antibodies derived from HIV-1 infected individuals and HIV-1 vaccine-candidate vaccinees have identified a number of antibodies that lack the ability to capture primary HIV-1 isolates or mediate neutralizing activity, but are able to bind to the surface of infected CD4+ T cells and mediate ADCC. Of note, the conformational changes in the gp120 that may not exclusively relate to binding of the CD4 molecule are important in exposing epitopes recognized by ADCC responses. Here we discuss the HIV-1 envelope epitopes targeted by ADCC antibodies in the context of the potential protective capacities of ADCC. PMID:24191939

  11. Antibodies to CD4 in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, M; Ardman, B; Basiripour, L; Lu, Y C; Blohm, D; Haseltine, W; Sodroski, J

    1989-01-01

    The attachment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) to target cells is mediated by a specific interaction between the viral envelope glycoprotein (gp120) and the CD4 receptor. Here we report that approximately 10% of HIV-1-infected individuals produce antibodies that recognize the extracellular portion of the CD4 molecule. Carboxyl-terminal deletions of CD4 that do not affect HIV-1 gp120 binding eliminate recognition of CD4 by patient antisera. In contrast, mutations in the amino-terminal domain of CD4 that attenuate HIV-1 gp120 binding do not diminish CD4 recognition by patient antisera. These results suggest that HIV-1 infection can generate antibodies directed against a region of the viral receptor distinct from the virus-binding domain. Images PMID:2541442

  12. Expression of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Neutralizing Antibody Fragments Using Human Vaginal Lactobacillus

    PubMed Central

    Marcobal, Angela; Liu, Xiaowen; Zhang, Wenlei; Dimitrov, Antony S.; Jia, Letong; Lee, Peter P.; Fouts, Timothy R.; Parks, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Eradication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) by vaccination with epitopes that produce broadly neutralizing antibodies is the ultimate goal for HIV prevention. However, generating appropriate immune responses has proven difficult. Expression of broadly neutralizing antibodies by vaginal colonizing lactobacilli provides an approach to passively target these antibodies to the mucosa. We tested the feasibility of expressing single-chain and single-domain antibodies (dAbs) in Lactobacillus to be used as a topical microbicide/live biotherapeutic. Lactobacilli provide an excellent platform to express anti-HIV proteins. Broadly neutralizing antibodies have been identified against epitopes on the HIV-1 envelope and have been made into active antibody fragments. We tested single-chain variable fragment m9 and dAb-m36 and its derivative m36.4 as prototype antibodies. We cloned and expressed the antibody fragments m9, m36, and m36.4 in Lactobacillus jensenii-1153 and tested the expression levels and functionality. We made a recombinant L. jensenii 1153-1128 that expresses dAb-m36.4. All antibody fragments m9, m36, and m36.4 were expressed by lactobacilli. However, we noted the smaller m36/m36.4 were expressed to higher levels, ≥3 μg/ml. All L. jensenii-expressed antibody fragments bound to gp120/CD4 complex; Lactobacillus-produced m36.4 inhibited HIV-1BaL in a neutralization assay. Using a TZM-bl assay, we characterized the breadth of neutralization of the m36.4. Delivery of dAbs by Lactobacillus could provide passive transfer of these antibodies to the mucosa and longevity at the site of HIV-1 transmission. PMID:26950606

  13. Broadly Neutralizing Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Antibody Gene Transfer Protects Nonhuman Primates from Mucosal Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Kevin O.; Wang, Lingshu; Joyce, M. Gordon; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Balazs, Alejandro B.; Cheng, Cheng; Ko, Sung-Youl; Kong, Wing-Pui; Rudicell, Rebecca S.; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Duan, Lijie; Foulds, Kathryn E.; Donaldson, Mitzi; Xu, Ling; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Todd, John-Paul; Baltimore, David; Roederer, Mario; Haase, Ashley T.; Kwong, Peter D.; Rao, Srinivas S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) can prevent lentiviral infection in nonhuman primates and may slow the spread of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Although protection by passive transfer of human bnAbs has been demonstrated in monkeys, durable expression is essential for its broader use in humans. Gene-based expression of bnAbs provides a potential solution to this problem, although immune responses to the viral vector or to the antibody may limit its durability and efficacy. Here, we delivered an adeno-associated viral vector encoding a simianized form of a CD4bs bnAb, VRC07, and evaluated its immunogenicity and protective efficacy. The expressed antibody circulated in macaques for 16 weeks at levels up to 66 μg/ml, although immune suppression with cyclosporine (CsA) was needed to sustain expression. Gene-delivered simian VRC07 protected against simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) infection in monkeys 5.5 weeks after treatment. Gene transfer of an anti-HIV antibody can therefore protect against infection by viruses that cause AIDS in primates when the host immune responses are controlled. IMPORTANCE Sustained interventions that can prevent HIV-1 infection are needed to halt the spread of the HIV-1 pandemic. The protective capacity of anti-HIV antibody gene therapy has been established in mouse models of HIV-1 infection but has not been established for primates. We show here a proof-of-concept that gene transfer of anti-HIV antibody genes can protect against infection by viruses that cause AIDS in primates when host immune responses are controlled. PMID:26041300

  14. Vaccine induced antibodies to the first variable loop of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120, mediate antibody-dependent virus inhibition in macaques.

    PubMed

    Bialuk, Izabela; Whitney, Stephen; Andresen, Vibeke; Florese, Ruth H; Nacsa, Janos; Cecchinato, Valentina; Valeri, Valerio W; Heraud, Jean-Michel; Gordon, Shari; Parks, Robyn Washington; Montefiori, David C; Venzon, David; Demberg, Thorsten; Guroff, Marjorie Robert-; Landucci, Gary; Forthal, Donald N; Franchini, Genoveffa

    2011-12-01

    The role of antibodies directed against the hyper variable envelope region V1 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), has not been thoroughly studied. We show that a vaccine able to elicit strain-specific non-neutralizing antibodies to this region of gp120 is associated with control of highly pathogenic chimeric SHIV(89.6P) replication in rhesus macaques. The vaccinated animal that had the highest titers of antibodies to the amino terminus portion of V1, prior to challenge, had secondary antibody responses that mediated cell killing by antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), as early as 2 weeks after infection and inhibited viral replication by antibody-dependent cell-mediated virus inhibition (ADCVI), by 4 weeks after infection. There was a significant inverse correlation between virus level and binding antibody titers to the envelope protein, (R=-0.83, p=0.015), and ADCVI (R=-0.84 p=0.044). Genotyping of plasma virus demonstrated in vivo selection of three SHIV(89.6P) variants with changes in potential N-linked glycosylation sites in V1. We found a significant inverse correlation between virus levels and titers of antibodies that mediated ADCVI against all the identified V1 virus variants. A significant inverse correlation was also found between neutralizing antibody titers to SHIV(89.6) and virus levels (R=-0.72 p=0.0050). However, passive inoculation of purified immunoglobulin from animal M316, the macaque that best controlled virus, to a naïve macaque, resulted in a low serum neutralizing antibodies and low ADCVI activity that failed to protect from SHIV(89.6P) challenge. Collectively, while our data suggest that anti-envelope antibodies with neutralizing and non-neutralizing Fc(R-dependent activities may be important in the control of SHIV replication, they also demonstrate that low levels of these antibodies alone are not sufficient to protect from infection.

  15. CD4-Mimetic Small Molecules Sensitize Human Immunodeficiency Virus to Vaccine-Elicited Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Madani, Navid; Princiotto, Amy M.; Schön, Arne; LaLonde, Judith; Feng, Yu; Freire, Ernesto; Park, Jongwoo; Courter, Joel R.; Jones, David M.; Robinson, James; Liao, Hua-Xin; Moody, M. Anthony; Permar, Sallie; Haynes, Barton; Smith, Amos B.; Wyatt, Richard

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Approaches to prevent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) transmission are urgently needed. Difficulties in eliciting antibodies that bind conserved epitopes exposed on the unliganded conformation of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer represent barriers to vaccine development. During HIV-1 entry, binding of the gp120 Env to the initial receptor, CD4, triggers conformational changes in Env that result in the formation and exposure of the highly conserved gp120 site for interaction with the coreceptors, CCR5 and CXCR4. The DMJ compounds (+)-DMJ-I-228 and (+)-DMJ-II-121 bind gp120 within the conserved Phe 43 cavity near the CD4-binding site, block CD4 binding, and inhibit HIV-1 infection. Here we show that the DMJ compounds sensitize primary HIV-1, including transmitted/founder viruses, to neutralization by monoclonal antibodies directed against CD4-induced (CD4i) epitopes and the V3 region, two gp120 elements involved in coreceptor binding. Importantly, the DMJ compounds rendered primary HIV-1 sensitive to neutralization by antisera elicited by immunization of rabbits with HIV-1 gp120 cores engineered to assume the CD4-bound state. Thus, small molecules like the DMJ compounds may be useful as microbicides to inhibit HIV-1 infection directly and to sensitize primary HIV-1 to neutralization by readily elicited antibodies. IMPORTANCE Preventing HIV-1 transmission is a priority for global health. Eliciting antibodies that can neutralize many different strains of HIV-1 is difficult, creating problems for the development of a vaccine. We found that certain small-molecule compounds can sensitize HIV-1 to particular antibodies. These antibodies can be elicited in rabbits. These results suggest an approach to prevent HIV-1 sexual transmission in which a virus-sensitizing microbicide is combined with a vaccine. PMID:24696475

  16. Neutralising antibody response in domestic cats immunised with a commercial feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Bęczkowski, Paweł M.; Harris, Matthew; Techakriengkrai, Navapon; Beatty, Julia A.; Willett, Brian J.; Hosie, Margaret J.

    2015-01-01

    Across human and veterinary medicine, vaccines against only two retroviral infections have been brought to market successfully, the vaccines against feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). FeLV vaccines have been a global success story, reducing virus prevalence in countries where uptake is high. In contrast, the more recent FIV vaccine was introduced in 2002 and the degree of protection afforded in the field remains to be established. However, given the similarities between FIV and HIV, field studies of FIV vaccine efficacy are likely to advise and inform the development of future approaches to HIV vaccination. Here we assessed the neutralising antibody response induced by FIV vaccination against a panel of FIV isolates, by testing blood samples collected from client-owned vaccinated Australian cats. We examined the molecular and phenotypic properties of 24 envs isolated from one vaccinated cat that we speculated might have become infected following natural exposure to FIV. Cats vaccinated against FIV did not display broadly neutralising antibodies, suggesting that protection may not extend to some virulent recombinant strains of FIV circulating in Australia. PMID:25613718

  17. Neutralising antibody response in domestic cats immunised with a commercial feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) vaccine.

    PubMed

    Bęczkowski, Paweł M; Harris, Matthew; Techakriengkrai, Navapon; Beatty, Julia A; Willett, Brian J; Hosie, Margaret J

    2015-02-18

    Across human and veterinary medicine, vaccines against only two retroviral infections have been brought to market successfully, the vaccines against feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). FeLV vaccines have been a global success story, reducing virus prevalence in countries where uptake is high. In contrast, the more recent FIV vaccine was introduced in 2002 and the degree of protection afforded in the field remains to be established. However, given the similarities between FIV and HIV, field studies of FIV vaccine efficacy are likely to advise and inform the development of future approaches to HIV vaccination. Here we assessed the neutralising antibody response induced by FIV vaccination against a panel of FIV isolates, by testing blood samples collected from client-owned vaccinated Australian cats. We examined the molecular and phenotypic properties of 24 envs isolated from one vaccinated cat that we speculated might have become infected following natural exposure to FIV. Cats vaccinated against FIV did not display broadly neutralising antibodies, suggesting that protection may not extend to some virulent recombinant strains of FIV circulating in Australia.

  18. Human monoclonal antibody that recognizes the V3 region of human immunodeficiency virus gp120 and neutralizes the human T-lymphotropic virus type IIIMN strain.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, C F; Silver, S; Profy, A T; Putney, S D; Langlois, A; Weinhold, K; Robinson, J E

    1990-01-01

    We describe a human IgG1 monoclonal antibody (N701.9b) derived by Epstein-Barr virus transformation of B cells from a human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive asymptomatic donor. This antibody was shown to recognize the principal neutralizing domain contained within the V3 region of gp120 of the MN strain of human immunodeficiency virus and MN-like strains, as determined by binding to the PB-1 fragment of MN gp120 and to synthetic peptides corresponding to the V3 region of MN and related virus strains. The epitope identified by monoclonal antibody N701.9b was mapped to a segment of V3 containing at least 7 amino acids (amino acids 316-322), which is located in the "tip" and "right" side of the V3 loop of the MN strain. Furthermore, this antibody manifested potent type-specific fusion-inhibitory activity against the MN strain but not against the IIIB or RF virus strains. This antibody also neutralized four virus isolates that had MN-like V3 region sequences and failed to neutralize three other strains containing unrelated V3 region sequences. Our findings confirm that the V3 region stimulates type-specific neutralizing antibody during natural human immunodeficiency virus infection in humans. The potential clinical use of this antibody is discussed. PMID:1700435

  19. Structure of a human monoclonal antibody Fab fragment against gp41 of human immunodeficiency virus type

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, X. M.; Ruker, F.; Casale, E.; Carter, D. C.

    1992-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of a human monoclonal antibody (Fab), which binds specifically to a major epitope of the transmembrane protein gp41 of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1, has been determined by crystallographic methods to a resolution of 2.7 A. It has been previously determined that this antibody recognizes the epitope SGKLICTTAVPWNAS, belongs to the subclass IgG1 (kappa), and exhibits antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. The quaternary structure of the Fab is in an extended conformation with an elbow bend angle between the constant and variable domains of 175 degrees. Structurally, four of the hypervariable loops can be classified according to previously recognized canonical structures. The third hypervariable loops of the heavy (H3) and light chain (L3) are structurally distinct. Hypervariable loop H3, residues 102H-109H, is unusually extended from the surface. The complementarity-determining region forms a hydrophobic binding pocket that is created primarily from hypervariable loops L3, H3, and H2.

  20. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 IgA antibody in breast milk and serum.

    PubMed

    Duprat, C; Mohammed, Z; Datta, P; Stackiw, W; Ndinya-Achola, J O; Kreiss, J K; Holmes, K K; Plummer, F A; Embree, J E

    1994-07-01

    Breast-feeding plays a potentially significant role in mother to child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). The additional transmission risk attributable to breast-feeding and the factors that enhance or inhibit transmission are presently unknown. One mechanism by which breast milk might inhibit HIV-1 transmission is the presence of specific antibodies directed against HIV-1 in breast milk of seropositive mothers. In this study serum and breast milk samples from women in Nairobi, Kenya, were tested to determine the prevalence of HIV-1 IgA antibodies. A Western blot test developed in our laboratory was used to detect anti-HIV-1 immunoglobulin A in serum and anti-HIV-1 secretory IgA (sIgA) in breast milk. Ninety-four percent of 63 HIV-1 seropositive women had anti-HIV-1 IgA in serum and 59% had anti-HIV-1 sIgA in their breast milk. No significant associations with maternal characteristics or serum anti-HIV-1 IgA or IgG banding patterns and the presence of anti-HIV-1 sIgA in breast milk were found. No protective effect of anti-HIV-1 sIgA was seen regarding mother to child transmission; however, further studies are necessary to determine the effect of these antibodies in maternal sera or in breast milk on the efficacy of HIV-1 transmission.

  1. Chimeric gag-V3 virus-like particles of human immunodeficiency virus induce virus-neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Luo, L; Li, Y; Cannon, P M; Kim, S; Kang, C Y

    1992-01-01

    A 41-kDa unprocessed human immunodeficiency virus 2 (HIV-2) gag precursor protein that has a deletion of a portion of the viral protease assembles as virus-like particles by budding through the cytoplasmic membrane of recombinant baculovirus-infected insect cells. We have constructed six different combinations of chimeric genes by coupling the truncated HIV-2 gag gene to the neutralizing domain (V3) or the neutralizing and the CD4 binding domains (V3+CD4BD) of gp120 env gene sequences from HIV-1 or HIV-2. The env gene sequences were inserted either into the middle of the gag gene or at the 3' terminus of the gag gene. Virus-like particles were formed by chimeric gene products only when the env gene sequences were linked to the 3' terminus of the gag gene. Insertion of env gene sequence in the middle of the gag gene resulted in high-level chimeric gene expression but without the formation of virus-like particles. Three different chimeric genes [gag gene with HIV-1 V3 (1V3), gag gene with HIV-2 V3 (2V3), and gag gene with HIV-2 V3+CD4BD (2V3+CD4BD)] formed virus-like particles that were secreted into the cell culture medium. In contrast, the HIV-1 V3+CD4BD/HIV-2 gag construct did not form virus-like particles. The chimeric gag-env particles had spherical morphology and the size was slightly larger than that of the gag particles, but the chimeric particles were similar to the mature HIV particles. Western blot analysis showed that the gag-env chimeric proteins were recognized by antibodies in HIV-positive human serum and rabbit anti-gp120 serum. Rabbit anti-gag 1V3 and anti-gag 2V3 sera reacted with authentic gp120 of HIV-1 and HIV-2, respectively, and neutralized homologous HIV infectivity. Our results show that precursor gag protein has potential as a carrier for the presentation of foreign epitopes in good immunological context. The gag protein is highly immunogenic and has the ability to carry large foreign inserts; as such, it offers an attractive approach for

  2. AIDS and prevalence of antibody to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in high risk groups in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Traisupa, A; Wongba, C; Taylor, D N

    1987-04-01

    Since September 1984, six cases of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and 11 cases of AIDS related complex (ARC) have been reported in Thailand. All people with AIDS were homosexual or bisexual men; two were Thai and the rest were European or American. Nine of the 11 people with ARC were homosexual or bisexual men, one was the female sexual partner of a man with AIDS, and one was a Thai man who had lived in the United States of America for several years, but denied having had any homosexual contact. Nine of the 11 people with ARC were Thai. In a survey in April 1985 at a resort area near Bangkok, antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) (confirmed by western blot) were detected in 2.4% of 127 homosexual men and none of 77 female prostitutes. In a more extensive survey in October 1985, antibodies were detected in 0.8% of 720 homosexual men, but none of 2880 female prostitutes or 309 sexually active heterosexual men. HIV has been introduced into Thailand primarily by homosexual transmission. The public health policy of Thailand concerning AIDS is discussed.

  3. Induction of Murine Mucosal CCR5-Reactive Antibodies as an Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Barassi, C.; Soprana, E.; Pastori, C.; Longhi, R.; Buratti, E.; Lillo, F.; Marenzi, C.; Lazzarin, A.; Siccardi, A. G.; Lopalco, L.

    2005-01-01

    The genital mucosa is the main site of initial human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) contact with its host. In spite of repeated sexual exposure, some individuals remain seronegative, and a small fraction of them produce immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA autoantibodies directed against CCR5, which is probably the cause of the CCR5-minus phenotype observed in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of these subjects. These antibodies recognize the 89-to-102 extracellular loop of CCR5 in its native conformation. The aim of this study was to induce infection-preventing mucosal anti-CCR5 autoantibodies in individuals at high risk of HIV infection. Thus, we generated chimeric immunogens containing the relevant CCR5 peptide in the context of the capsid protein of Flock House virus, a presentation system in which it is possible to engineer conformationally constrained peptide in a highly immunogenic form. Administered in mice via the systemic or mucosal route, the immunogens elicited anti-CCR5 IgG and IgA (in sera and vaginal fluids). Analogous to exposed seronegative individuals, mice producing anti-CCR5 autoantibodies express significantly reduced levels of CCR5 on the surfaces of CD4+ cells from peripheral blood and vaginal washes. In vitro studies have shown that murine IgG and IgA (i) specifically bind human and mouse CD4+ lymphocytes and the CCR5-transfected U87 cell line, (ii) down-regulate CCR5 expression of CD4+ cells from both humans and untreated mice, (iii) inhibit Mip-1β chemotaxis of CD4+ CCR5+ lymphocytes, and (iv) neutralize HIV R5 strains. These data suggest that immune strategies aimed at generating anti-CCR5 antibodies at the level of the genital mucosa might be feasible and represent a strategy to induce mucosal HIV-protective immunity. PMID:15890924

  4. Densitometric analysis of Western blot (immunoblot) assays for human immunodeficiency virus antibodies and correlation with clinical status.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, G; Amiraian, K; Frey, H; Stevens, R W; Berns, D S

    1987-01-01

    Western blot assays for antibodies directed against components of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were examined with a densitometer and integrator. Antibody responses to seven HIV proteins were determined from the areas under the peaks of bands on blots from 430 seropositive individuals. Antibody responses corresponded qualitatively and quantitatively with clinical status. The Western blot assays examined were done on single specimens from individuals in one of four clinical states: asymptomatic with no risk factor identified, asymptomatic with risk factor(s) identified, AIDS-related complex, and AIDS. The ratios of gp41 antibody to p24 antibody and of gp41 antibody to total HIV antibodies increased, and the number of total HIV antibodies decreased progressively in these populations. Parameters were assigned to characterize the typical response found in AIDS: gp41 antibody/p24 antibody ratio, greater than or equal to 2.0; gp41 antibody/total HIV antibodies ratio, greater than or equal to 0.30; and number of total HIV antibodies, less than or equal to 25.0 signal units. Parameter match increased with progression of clinical status. These parameters were applied in a brief follow-up study of 34 HIV-infected asymptomatic individuals who developed AIDS-related complex or AIDS. Initial specimens showed a stronger correlation than our population data base had predicted, suggesting that the parameters have prognostic value. Densitometric analysis of antibody responses on Western blot assays of single or serial specimens should prove useful to physicians in staging and monitoring HIV-infected individuals and in predicting which individuals will progress to AIDS. Images PMID:2444624

  5. Chimpanzees Immunized with Recombinant Soluble CD4 Develop Anti-Self CD4 Antibody Responses with Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Mamoru; Boyson, Jonathan E.; Lord, Carol I.; Letvin, Norman L.

    1992-06-01

    In view of the efficiency with which human immunodeficiency virus replication can be blocked in vitro with anti-CD4 antibodies, the elicitation of an anti-CD4 antibody response through active immunization might represent a useful therapeutic strategy for AIDS. Here we demonstrate that immunization of chimpanzees with recombinant soluble human CD4 elicited an anti-CD4 antibody response. The elicited antibody bound self CD4 on digitonin-treated but not freshly isolated lymphocytes. Nevertheless, this antibody blocked human immunodeficiency virus replication in chimpanzee and human lymphocytes. These observations suggest that immunization with recombinant soluble CD4 from human immunodeficiency virus-infected humans may be feasible and therapeutically beneficial.

  6. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against human immunodeficiency virus type 2 gp120.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, S; Matsumi, S; Yoshimura, K; Morikita, T; Murakami, T; Takatsuki, K

    1995-06-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were obtained by immunizing mice with synthetic peptides corresponding to the third variable (V3) or the third conserved (C3) domain of the external envelope protein (gp120) of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2ROD). One MAb, designated B2C, which was raised against V3 peptide NKI26, bound to the surface of HIV-2-infected cells but not to their uninfected counterparts. B2C was capable of neutralizing cell-free and cell-associated virus infection in an isolate-specific fashion. The antibody-binding epitope was mapped to a 6-amino-acid peptide in the V3 variable domain which had the core sequence His-Tyr-Gln. Two MAbs, 2H1B and 2F19C, which were raised against the C3 peptide TND27 reacted with gp120 of HIV-2ROD in a Western immunoblot assay. The C3 epitopes recognized by these two MAbs appeared inaccessible because of their poor reactivity in a surface immunofluorescence assay. Although partial inhibition of syncytium formation was observed in the presence of the anti-C3 MAbs, their neutralizing activity appeared weak. Finally, the effects of these MAbs against CD4-gp120 binding were assessed. Partial inhibition of CD4-gp120 binding was observed in the presence of high concentrations of B2C. On the other hand, no inhibition of CD4-gp120 binding was observed in the presence of anti-C3 MAbs. Since complete neutralization could be achieved at a concentration corresponding to that of partial binding inhibition by B2C, some different mechanisms may be involved in the B2C-mediated neutralization. These results, taken together, indicated that analogous to the function of the V3 region of HIV-1, the V3 region of HIV-2ROD contained at least a type-specific fusion-inhibiting neutralizing epitope. In this respect, the V3 sequence of HIV-2 may be a useful target in an animal model for HIV vaccine development.

  7. A simple saliva-based test for detecting antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Schramm, W; Angulo, G B; Torres, P C; Burgess-Cassler, A

    1999-07-01

    This study was performed to determine the feasibility of using saliva as a diagnostic medium for the detection of antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2 under nonlaboratory conditions and to evaluate the performance characteristics of such a test. We developed for this purpose a self-contained kit (Saliva. Strip [ST]), which combines the collection and processing, as well as the analysis, of the specimen. The kit's performance was evaluated in a blinded study. Saliva collection was facilitated with a specially designed device that contains a sample adequacy indicator, and immunochromatography test strips were used for the analysis. A total of 1,336 matched serum and saliva specimens (684 reactive and 652 nonreactive specimens) were tested. We tested sera using an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and a rapid strip test. Sera reactive in one of the assays were also analyzed by Western blotting. Sensitivity and specificity were 99.4 and 99.4%, respectively, for ST, 100 and 99.1%, respectively, for EIA, and 99.7 and 100%, respectively, for the serum strip test. The saliva test performed well when HIV-2-positive sera or a low-titer performance panel (HIV-1) of serum or plasma specimens were diluted (1:2,000) in nonreactive saliva. Because the methodology we present here uses a noninvasively obtained medium, the methodology may be suitable for use in the field where laboratory support and personnel are limited, such as community outreach programs, doctors' offices, surveillance studies, and community hospitals. PMID:10391866

  8. Antibody responses to defined epitopes in the Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1-encoded transactivator protein among human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

    PubMed Central

    Tedeschi, R; Dillner, J; De Paoli, P

    1996-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1-encoded replication activator (ZEBRA) is a key mediator of reactivation from latency to the viral productive cycle. In the present study, the serum antibody responses against three defined ZEBRA epitopes (designated ZEBRA-1, -19, and -22) were determined for 50 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-seropositive patients and 100 matched healthy control subjects. The anti-ZEBRA responses were more commonly found among HIV-seropositive patients than among healthy controls for all the three ZEBRA epitopes tested (P < 0.0003, P < 0.003, and P < 0.001, respectively). Comparison of ZEBRA antibody levels with the degree of immunodeficiency (CD4 cell counts), CDC grouping, and HIV p24 antigen positivity showed little association, suggesting that induction of ZEBRA antibodies is an early event after HIV infection. PMID:8705686

  9. Intra-Blood-Brain Barrier Synthesis of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Antigen and Antibody in Humans and Chimpanzees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudsmit, Jaap; Epstein, Leon G.; Paul, Deborah A.; van der Helm, Hayo J.; Dawson, George J.; Asher, David M.; Yanagihara, Richard; Wolff, Axel V.; Gibbs, Clarence J.; Carleton Gajdusek, D.

    1987-06-01

    The presence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antigens in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was associated with progressive encephalopathy in adult and pediatric patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). HIV antigen was detected in CSF from 6 of 7 AIDS patients with progressive encephalopathy. By contrast, HIV antigen, whether free or complexed, was detected in CSF from only 1 of 18 HIV antibody seropositive patients without progressive encephalopathy and from 0 of 8 experimentally infected chimpanzees without clinical signs. Intra-blood-brain barrier synthesis of HIV-specific antibody was demonstrated in the majority of patients with AIDS (9/12) or at risk for AIDS (8/13) as well as in the experimentally infected chimpanzees, indicating HIV-specific B-cell reactivity in the brain without apparent neurological signs. In 6 of 11 patients with HIV infection, antibodies synthesized in the central nervous system were directed against HIV envelope proteins. Active viral expression appears to be necessary for both the immunodeficiency and progressive encephalopathy associated with HIV infection.

  10. Autologous and heterologous neutralizing antibody responses following initial seroconversion in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Moog, C; Fleury, H J; Pellegrin, I; Kirn, A; Aubertin, A M

    1997-01-01

    In the course of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, patients develop a strong and persistent immune response characterized by the production of HIV-specific antibodies. The aim of our study was to analyze the appearance of autologous and heterologous neutralizing antibodies in the sera of HIV-infected individuals. For this purpose, primary strains have been isolated from 18 HIV-1-infected subjects prior to seroconversion (in one case) or within 1 to 8 months after seroconversion. Sera, collected at the same time as the virus was isolated and at various times after isolation, have been analyzed for their ability to neutralize the autologous primary strains isolated early after infection, heterologous primary isolates, and cell-line adapted strains. Our neutralization assay, which combines serial dilutions of virus and serial dilutions of sera, is based on the determination of the serum dilution at which a fixed reduction in virus titer (90%) occurs. We have shown that (i) we could not detect autologous neutralizing antibodies in sera collected at the same time as we isolated viruses; (ii) we detected neutralizing antibodies against the autologous strains about 1 year after seroconversion, occasionally after 8 months, but sera were not always available to exclude the presence of neutralizing antibodies at earlier times; (iii) after 1 year, the neutralization response was highly specific to virus present during the early phase of HIV infection; and (iv) heterologous neutralization of primary isolates was detected later (after about 2 years). These results reveal the enormous diversity of neutralization determinants on primary isolates as well as a temporal evolution of the humoral response generating cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies. PMID:9094648

  11. Crystallization of the Fab from a human monoclonal antibody against gp 41 of human immunodeficiency virus type I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casale, Elena; He, Xiao-Min; Snyder, Robert S.; Carter, Daniel C.; Wenisch, Elisabeth; Jungbauer, Alois; Tauer, Christa; Ruker, Florian; Righetti, Pier Giorgio

    1990-01-01

    A monoclonal IgG antibody directed against gp 41 from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) has been crystallized in both intact and Fab forms. Crystals of the intact antibody grow as tetragonal-like prisms too small for conventional X-ray analysis. However, the Fab portion of the antibody produces suitable platelike crystals which belong to the space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) with unit cell constants of a = 66.5 A, b = 74.3 A, and c = 105.3 A. There is one molecule of Fab in the asymmetric unit. The Fab crystals show diffraction to d-spacings less than 3.0 A.

  12. Protection of Macaques against Pathogenic Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus 89.6PD by Passive Transfer of Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Mascola, John R.; Lewis, Mark G.; Stiegler, Gabriela; Harris, Dawn; VanCott, Thomas C.; Hayes, Deborah; Louder, Mark K.; Brown, Charles R.; Sapan, Christine V.; Frankel, Sarah S.; Lu, Yichen; Robb, Merlin L.; Katinger, Hermann; Birx, Deborah L.

    1999-01-01

    The role of antibody in protection against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) has been difficult to study in animal models because most primary HIV-1 strains do not infect nonhuman primates. Using a chimeric simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) based on the envelope of a primary isolate (HIV-89.6), we performed passive-transfer experiments in rhesus macaques to study the role of anti-envelope antibodies in protection. Based on prior in vitro data showing neutralization synergy by antibody combinations, we evaluated HIV immune globulin (HIVIG), and human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 2F5 and 2G12 given alone, compared with the double combination 2F5/2G12 and the triple combination HIVIG/2F5/2G12. Antibodies were administered 24 h prior to intravenous challenge with the pathogenic SHIV-89.6PD. Six control monkeys displayed high plasma viremia, rapid CD4+-cell decline, and clinical AIDS within 14 weeks. Of six animals given HIVIG/2F5/2G12, three were completely protected; the remaining three animals became SHIV infected but displayed reduced plasma viremia and near normal CD4+-cell counts. One of three monkeys given 2F5/2G12 exhibited only transient evidence of infection; the other two had marked reductions in viral load. All monkeys that received HIVIG, 2F5, or 2G12 alone became infected and developed high-level plasma viremia. However, compared to controls, monkeys that received HIVIG or MAb 2G12 displayed a less profound drop in CD4+ T cells and a more benign clinical course. These data indicate a general correlation between in vitro neutralization and protection and suggest that a vaccine that elicits neutralizing antibody should have a protective effect against HIV-1 infection or disease. PMID:10196297

  13. A comparison of three methods for detection of antibodies against the major core protein p24 of human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Lindhardt, B O; Pedersen, C; Ulrich, K; Kusk, P

    1988-12-01

    The native major core protein p24 of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was immunoaffinity purified by a monoclonal antibody and used to develop an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (inELISA) for detecting p24 antibodies in human sera. Its ability to detect p24 antibodies was compared to that of the immunoblotting test (IBT) and a commercial available competition ELISA (compELISA) employing recombinant HIV core protein. In tests on 60 serum samples the overall agreement of the inELISA and the IBT was 93.3%. Fifty-two samples were p24 antibody positive in both the inELISA and the IBT and of these 24 (46.2%) were positive in the compELISA. All compELISA positive samples were derived from healthy individuals, whereas of the 28 (53.8%) compELISA negative samples 1 was from a patient with acute HIV infection, 18 from healthy individuals and 9 from ARC/AIDS patients. The compELISA was able to distinguish among healthy persons with normal or low T-helper cell count (P = 0.048), as was the inELISA when p24 antibodies were titrated (P = 0.027). The inELISA equals IBT in specificity and sensitivity, is convenient and is very suitable for titration of p24 antibodies.

  14. Purified envelope glycoproteins from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 variants induce individual, type-specific neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Nara, P L; Robey, W G; Pyle, S W; Hatch, W C; Dunlop, N M; Bess, J W; Kelliher, J C; Arthur, L O; Fischinger, P J

    1988-01-01

    Repeated immunizations of goats, horses, or chimpanzees with envelope glycoprotein gp120 isolated from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) resulted in type-specific neutralizing-antibody responses, which began to decay approximately 20 days following the administration of antigen. This was true repeatedly for serum samples from animals hyperimmunized with gp120s from either the HTLV-IIIB (IIIB) or the envelope-divergent HTLV-IIIRF (RF) HIV-1 isolates. Animals previously immunized with the IIIB gp120 were then inoculated with purified RF gp120. The first response in these animals was an anamnestic resurgence of neutralizing antibody to IIIB without detectable neutralizing antibody for RF. However, with later RF gp120 boosts, the IIIB neutralizing-antibody titers fell and an RF type-specific neutralizing-antibody response developed. When assessed with other HIV-1 variants, no group-specific neutralizing antibody was seen in any of the vaccination protocols evaluated. These results will pose real obstacles in the development of an effective vaccine for HIV. PMID:3392769

  15. Potent Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Replication by an Intracellular Anti-Rev Single-Chain Antibody

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Lingxun; Bagasra, Omar; Laughlin, Mark A.; Oakes, Joseph W.; Pomerantz, Roger J.

    1994-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has a complex life cycle, which has made it a difficult target for conventional therapeutic modalities. A single-chain antibody moiety, directed against the HIV-1 regulatory protein Rev, which rescues unspliced viral RNA from the nucleus of infected cells, has now been developed. This anti-Rev single-chain construct (SFv) consists of both light and heavy chain variable regions of an anti-Rev monoclonal antibody, which, when expressed intracellularly within human cells, potently inhibits HIV-1 replication. This intracellular SFv molecule is demonstrated to specifically antagonize Rev function. Thus, intracellular SFv expression, against a retroviral regulatory protein, may be useful as a gene therapeutic approach to combat HIV-1 infections.

  16. Comparison of saliva and serum for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 antibody testing in Uganda using a rapid recombinant assay.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, R M; Piwowar, E M; Katongole-Mbidde, E; Muzawalu, W; Rugera, S; Abima, J; Stramer, S L; Kataaha, P; Jackson, B

    1996-01-01

    The accuracy and acceptability of saliva human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) antibody testing were compared with serum testing in a study of paired specimens from HIV-1-seropositive and HIV-1-seronegative Ugandan adults attending a clinic for sexually transmitted diseases. Saliva collection was performed with the Omni-sal device (Saliva Diagnostic Systems, Vancouver, Wash.), and antibody testing was performed by a rapid filter paper assay (Test-Pack; Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, Ill.). Relative to serum testing, the sensitivity of saliva testing was 95% (195 of 205) and the specificity was 99% (295 of 297). The sensitivity of saliva testing was higher for patients with elevated levels of beta-2 microglobulin in sera and greater numbers of HIV-1-related symptoms. Pre- and poststudy interviews indicated that saliva testing did not foster inordinate fears of saliva exposure. The development of saliva tests that are inexpensive and do not require electricity is needed. PMID:8914752

  17. Comprehensive Cross-Clade Neutralization Analysis of a Panel of Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Binley, James M.; Wrin, Terri; Korber, Bette; Zwick, Michael B.; Wang, Meng; Chappey, Colombe; Stiegler, Gabriela; Kunert, Renate; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Katinger, Hermann; Petropoulos, Christos J.; Burton, Dennis R.

    2004-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) are potentially important tools in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccine design. A few rare MAbs have been intensively studied, but we still have a limited appreciation of their neutralization breadth. Using a pseudovirus assay, we evaluated MAbs from clade B-infected donors and a clade B HIV+ plasma against 93 viruses from diverse backgrounds. Anti-gp120 MAbs exhibited greater activity against clade B than non-B viruses, whereas anti-gp41 MAbs exhibited broad interclade activity. Unexpectedly, MAb 4E10 (directed against the C terminus of the gp41 ectodomain) neutralized all 90 viruses with moderate potency. MAb 2F5 (directed against an epitope adjacent to that of 4E10) neutralized 67% of isolates, but none from clade C. Anti-gp120 MAb b12 (directed against an epitope overlapping the CD4 binding site) neutralized 50% of viruses, including some from almost every clade. 2G12 (directed against a high-mannose epitope on gp120) neutralized 41% of the viruses, but none from clades C or E. MAbs to the gp120 V3 loop, including 447-52D, neutralized a subset of clade B viruses (up to 45%) but infrequently neutralized other clades (≤7%). MAbs b6 (directed against the CD4 binding site) and X5 (directed against a CD4-induced epitope of gp120) neutralized only sensitive primary clade B viruses. The HIV+ plasma neutralized 70% of the viruses, including some from all major clades. Further analysis revealed five neutralizing immunotypes that were somewhat associated with clades. As well as the significance for vaccine design, our data have implications for passive-immunization studies in countries where clade C viruses are common, given that only MAbs b12 and 4E10 were effective against viruses from this clade. PMID:15542675

  18. Combined intra- and extracellular immunization against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection with a human anti-gp120 antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, S Y; Khouri, Y; Bagley, J; Marasco, W A

    1994-01-01

    In this study, a human CD4+ T lymphocyte line was transduced to secrete Fab fragments of a broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibody F105 that reacts with the CD4-binding site of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope protein. In the transduced cells infected with HIV-1, the nascent Fab fragments bind intracellularly to the HIV-1 envelope protein and inhibit HIV-1 production. The secreted Fab fragments are able to neutralize cell-free HIV-1. In addition, the nascent Fab fragments can inhibit HIV-1 production by binding intracellularly to envelope mutants that escape neutralization by extracellular F105 antibody. The combined intra- and extracellular binding activities of the expressed Fab fragments result in the efficient blocking of cytopathic syncytium formation and infectious virus production. Thus, these antibody-producing T lymphocytes are not only resistant to HIV-1 infection but also can protect surrounding lymphocytes by secreting neutralizing antibodies. This novel strategy of combining intracellular and extracellular immunization may be useful for gene therapy of AIDS and other diseases. Images PMID:8016092

  19. Neutralizing Antibodies in Sera from Macaques Infected with Chimeric Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Containing the Envelope Glycoproteins of either a Laboratory-Adapted Variant or a Primary Isolate of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Montefiori, David C.; Reimann, Keith A.; Wyand, Michael S.; Manson, Kelledy; Lewis, Mark G.; Collman, Ronald G.; Sodroski, Joseph G.; Bolognesi, Dani P.; Letvin, Norman L.

    1998-01-01

    The magnitude and breadth of neutralizing antibodies raised in response to infection with chimeric simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) in rhesus macaques were evaluated. Infection with either SHIV-HXB2, SHIV-89.6, or SHIV-89.6PD raised high-titer neutralizing antibodies to the homologous SHIV (SHIV-89.6P in the case of SHIV-89.6PD-infected animals) and significant titers of neutralizing antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains MN and SF-2. With few exceptions, however, titers of neutralizing antibodies to heterologous SHIV were low or undetectable. The antibodies occasionally neutralized heterologous primary isolates of HIV-1; these antibodies required >40 weeks of infection to reach detectable levels. Notable was the potent neutralization of the HIV-1 89.6 primary isolate by serum samples from SHIV-89.6-infected macaques. These results demonstrate that SHIV-HXB2, SHIV-89.6, and SHIV-89.6P possess highly divergent, strain-specific neutralization epitopes. The results also provide insights into the requirements for raising neutralizing antibodies to primary isolates of HIV-1. PMID:9525675

  20. Monitoring human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients by ratio of antibodies to gp41 and p24.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, G; Amiraian, K; Frey, H; Wethers, J; Stevens, R W; Berns, D S

    1989-01-01

    Antibody responses of 85 patients to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 antigens were quantitated by densitometric analysis of Western blot (immunoblot) assays. All patients had been classified into the following three clinical categories: asymptomatic (ASY), acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related complex (ARC), or AIDS. Fifty of the patients were monitored for 6 to 29 months. The gp41/p24 antibody ratio was examined in three studies. In the first study, initial specimens from each patient were analyzed. The mean gp41/p24 antibody ratios were 1.5 (ASY), 3.2 (ARC), and 5.4 (AIDS). Of ASY patients, 79% had antibody ratios of less than 2.0. In contrast, 72% of patients with AIDS had ratios of greater than or equal to 2.0. In the second study, serially obtained specimens from ASY, ARC, and AIDS patients were analyzed. These patients were further grouped according to progression of their clinical condition. Of ASY patients whose clinical condition progressed to ARC, 80% consistently had ratios of greater than or equal to 2.0. Of ARC patients whose clinical condition progressed to AIDS, 71% consistently had ratios of greater than or equal to 2.0. Of AIDS patients who died during the study, 100% consistently had ratios of greater than or equal to 2.0. No patients were treated with azidothymidine during the first two studies. In the third study, AIDS patients were monitored before and during treatment with azidothymidine. During treatment, ratios stabilized or improved transiently in five of seven patients. In these three studies, a gp41/p24 antibody ratio of less than 2.0 correlated with a benign clinical state and a ratio of greater than or equal to 2.0 correlated with AIDS or progression to AIDS. Images PMID:2501350

  1. Determining the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) status of FIV-vaccinated cats using point-of-care antibody kits.

    PubMed

    Westman, Mark E; Malik, Richard; Hall, Evelyn; Sheehy, Paul A; Norris, Jacqueline M

    2015-10-01

    This study challenges the commonly held view that the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection status of FIV-vaccinated cats cannot be determined using point-of-care antibody test kits due to indistinguishable antibody production in FIV-vaccinated and naturally FIV-infected cats. The performance of three commercially available point-of-care antibody test kits was compared in a mixed population of FIV-vaccinated (n=119) and FIV-unvaccinated (n=239) cats in Australia. FIV infection status was assigned by considering the results of all antibody kits in concert with results from a commercially available PCR assay (FIV RealPCR™). Two lateral flow immunochromatography test kits (Witness FeLV/FIV; Anigen Rapid FIV/FeLV) had excellent overall sensitivity (100%; 100%) and specificity (98%; 100%) and could discern the true FIV infection status of cats, irrespective of FIV vaccination history. The lateral flow ELISA test kit (SNAP FIV/FeLV Combo) could not determine if antibodies detected were due to previous FIV vaccination, natural FIV infection, or both. The sensitivity and specificity of FIV RealPCR™ for detection of viral and proviral nucleic acid was 92% and 99%, respectively. These results will potentially change the way veterinary practitioners screen for FIV in jurisdictions where FIV vaccination is practiced, especially in shelter scenarios where the feasibility of mass screening is impacted by the cost of testing. PMID:26459979

  2. Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... incisions made in the mother’s abdomen and uterus. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV): A virus that attacks certain cells of the body’s immune system and causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Immune System: ...

  3. Vaccine-Elicited V3 Loop-Specific Antibodies in Rhesus Monkeys and Control of a Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Expressing a Primary Patient Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Isolate Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Letvin, Norman L.; Robinson, Suzanne; Rohne, Daniela; Axthelm, Michael K.; Fanton, John W.; Bilska, Miroslawa; Palker, Thomas J.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F.; Montefiori, David C.

    2001-01-01

    Vaccine-elicited antibodies specific for the third hypervariable domain of the surface gp120 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) (V3 loop) were assessed for their contribution to protection against infection in the simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)/rhesus monkey model. Peptide vaccine-elicited anti-V3 loop antibody responses were examined for their ability to contain replication of SHIV-89.6, a nonpathogenic SHIV expressing a primary patient isolate HIV-1 envelope, as well as SHIV-89.6P, a pathogenic variant of that virus. Low-titer neutralizing antibodies to SHIV-89.6 that provided partial protection against viremia following SHIV-89.6 infection were generated. A similarly low-titer neutralizing antibody response to SHIV-89.6P that did not contain viremia after infection with SHIV-89.6P was generated, but a trend toward protection against CD4+ T-lymphocyte loss was seen in these infected monkeys. These observations suggest that the V3 loop on some primary patient HIV-1 isolates may be a partially effective target for neutralizing antibodies induced by peptide immunogens. PMID:11287566

  4. Antiviral Antibodies and T Cells Are Present in the Foreskin of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Rothaeusler, Kristina; Ma, Zhong-Min; Qureshi, Huma; Carroll, Timothy D.; Rourke, Tracy; McChesney, Michael B.

    2012-01-01

    No information exists regarding immune responses to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in the foreskin or glans of the human penis, although this is a key tissue for HIV transmission. To address this gap, we characterized antiviral immune responses in foreskin of male rhesus macaques (RMs) inoculated with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) strain SIVmac251 by penile foreskin exposure. We found a complete population of immune cells in the foreskin and glans of normal RMs, although B cells were less common than CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. IgG-secreting cells were detected by enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay in cell suspensions made from the foreskin. In the foreskin and glans of SIV-infected RMs, although B cells were less common than CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, SIV-specific IgG antibody was present in foreskin secretions. In addition, cytokine-secreting SIV-specific CD8+ T cells were readily found in cell suspensions made from the foreskin. Although potential HIV target cells were found in and under the epithelium covering all penile surfaces, the presence of antiviral effector B and T cells in the foreskin suggests that vaccines may be able to elicit immunity in this critical site to protect men from acquiring HIV. PMID:22532691

  5. Specific proliferative T cell responses and antibodies elicited by vaccination with simian immunodeficiency virus Nef do not confer protection against virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Wade-Evans, A M; Stott, J; Hanke, T; Stebbings, R; Berry, N; Lines, J; Sangster, R; Silvera, P; Walker, B; MacManus, S; Davis, G; Cowie, J; Arnold, C; Hull, R; Almond, N

    2001-11-01

    The efficacy of immunizing with a combination of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Nef vaccines was evaluated. Four vaccinates received three intradermal immunizations with recombinant vaccinia virus that expressed SIV Nef, followed by three intramuscular immunizations with rDNA also expressing SIV Nef. Finally, the four vaccinates received two subcutaneous boosts with recombinant SIV Nef protein. This immunization protocol elicited anti-Nef antibodies in all of the vaccinates as well as specific proliferative responses. However, specific cytotoxic T cell responses were not detected before virus challenge. All vaccinates were challenged intravenously with 10 MID(50) of SIVmacJ5 along with four controls. All eight subjects became infected after SIV challenge and there were no group-specific differences in virus load as measured by virus titration and vRNA analysis. The results of this study support indirectly the report from Gallimore and colleagues (Nat Med 1995;1:1667) suggesting that CD8(+) T lymphocyte responses are required for Nef-based vaccines to restrict SIV infection. If Nef-based vaccines are to be beneficial in controlling infection with immunodeficiency viruses, then it will be necessary to develop more effective immunization protocols that elicit potent CD8(+) cell responses reproducibly.

  6. Field testing and comparative evaluation of rapid, visually read screening assays for antibody to human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Spielberg, F; Kabeya, C M; Ryder, R W; Kifuani, N K; Harris, J; Bender, T R; Heyward, W L; Quinn, T C

    1989-03-18

    Five rapid, visually read assays for detection of antibody against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) were evaluated on fresh serum samples from 4000 prospective blood donors at Mama Yemo Hospital, Kinshasa, Zaïre. The sensitivity of the assays, based on 214 specimens positive by western blot, ranged from 84.6% to 99.1%. The specificity, based on 3664 samples negative by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or western blot, ranged from 92.7% to 98.8%. Three readers scored each test result independently; disagreement about test interpretation occurred in 1.2-8.3% of the specimens. There was no correlation between assay performance and assay principle (agglutination or dot immunobinding) or antigen source (viral lysate or recombinant). Assays such as these can be readily implemented in a developing country transfusion centre, where blood screening by ELISA is not practicable.

  7. Immune escape by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 from neutralizing antibodies: evidence for multiple pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, B A; Reitz, M S; Wilson, C A; Aldrich, K; Davis, A E; Robert-Guroff, M

    1993-01-01

    Sera from many HIV-1-infected individuals contain broadly reactive, specific neutralizing antibodies. Despite their broad reactivity, variant viruses, resistant to neutralization, can be selected in vitro in the presence of such antisera. We have previously shown that neutralization resistance of an escape mutant with an amino acid substitution in the transmembrane protein (A582T) occurs because of alteration of a conformational epitope that is recognized by neutralizing antibodies directed against the CD4 binding site. In this report we demonstrate that immune escape via a single-amino-acid substitution (A281V) within a conserved region of the envelope glycoprotein gp120 confers neutralization resistance against a broadly reactive neutralizing antiserum from a seropositive individual. We show this alteration affects V3 and additional regions unrelated to V3 or the CD4 binding site. Together with previous studies on escape mutants selected in vitro, our findings suggest that immune-selective pressure can arise by multiple pathways. PMID:7693973

  8. Use of polymerase chain reaction and quantitative antibody tests in children born to human immunodeficiency virus-1-infected mothers.

    PubMed

    Newell, M L; Loveday, C; Dunn, D; Kaye, S; Tedder, R; Peckham, C; De Maria, A; Giaquinto, C; Omeñaca, F; Canosa, C

    1995-12-01

    The diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in children born to HIV-infected mothers is complicated by the presence of passively acquired maternal antibodies, and exclusion of infection in these infants remains problematic. The use of genome detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and the quantification of anti-HIV-1 antibodies were examined as methods for early diagnosis. Blood samples were taken from 84 non-breast-fed infants of HIV-infected mothers in five Italian and Spanish centres, a subgroup of children enrolled in the European Collaborative Study (ECS) for whom clinical and immunological information has been documented from birth. Whole blood was added to glycigel cryopreservative, stored, and tested in the United Kingdom by a nested PCR method. Antibody to HIV-1 was detected and quantified by titration using a gelatin particle agglutination test. PCR sensitivity and specificity were assessed. Twenty-one of the 84 children tested were infected. The estimated PCR sensitivity ranged from 0% (95% CI 0-26%) on day 1, 57% (19-85) on day 7, to 63% (33-92) on day 30. The negative predictive value of PCR ranged from 85% (83-88) on day 0 to 98% (94-100) at 3 months of age. On average, the level of maternal antibody halved every 33 days (31-36.5) in uninfected children. Between 6 and 9 months of age, increases in antibody titres in infected children were not more informative than absolute levels. These findings suggest that antibody measurement may supplement genomic diagnosis and that this collection method provides an alternative to the use of dried blood spots.

  9. Structure of a human monoclonal antibody Fab fragment against gp41 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Xiao M.; Rueker, Florian; Casale, Elena; Carter, Daniel C.

    1992-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of a human monoclonal antibody (Fab), which binds specifically to a major epitope of the transmembrane protein gp41 of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1, has been determined by crystallographic methods to a resolution of 2.7 A. It has been previously determined that this antibody recognizes the epitope SGKLICTTAVPWNAS, belongs to the subclass IgG1 (kappa), and exhibits antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. The quaternary structure of the Fab is in an extended conformation with an elbow bend angle between the constant and variable domains of 175 deg. Structurally, four of the hypervariable loops can be classified according to previously recognized canonical structures. The third hypervariable loops of the heavy (H3) and light chain (L3) are structurally distinct. Hypervariable loop H3, residues 102H-109H, is unusually extended from the surface. The complementarity-determining region forms a hydrophobic binding pocket that is created primarily from hypervariable loops L3, H3, and H2.

  10. Vaccine-induced virus-neutralizing antibodies and cytotoxic T cells do not protect macaques from experimental infection with simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac32H (J5).

    PubMed Central

    Hulskotte, E G; Geretti, A M; Siebelink, K H; van Amerongen, G; Cranage, M P; Rud, E W; Norley, S G; de Vries, P; Osterhaus, A D

    1995-01-01

    To gain further insight into the ability of subunit vaccines to protect monkeys from experimental infection with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), two groups of cynomolgus macaques were immunized with either recombinant SIVmac32H-derived envelope glycoproteins (Env) incorporated into immune-stimulating complexes (iscoms) (group A) or with these SIV Env iscoms in combination with p27gag iscoms and three Nef lipopeptides (group B). Four monkeys immunized with recombinant feline immunodeficiency virus Env iscoms served as controls (group C). Animals were immunized intramuscularly at weeks 0, 4, 10, and 16. Two weeks after the last immunization, monkeys were challenged intravenously with 50 monkey 50% infectious doses of virus derived from the J5 molecular clone of SIVmac32H propagated in monkey peripheral blood mononuclear cells. High titers of SIV-neutralizing antibodies were induced in the monkeys of groups A and B. In addition, p27gag-specific antibodies were detected in the monkeys of group B. Vaccine-induced cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte precursors against Env, Gag, and Nef were detected on the day of challenge in the monkeys of group B. Env-specific cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte precursors were detected in one monkey from group A. In spite of the observed antibody and T-cell responses, none of the monkeys was protected from experimental infection. In addition, longitudinal determination of cell-associated virus loads at weeks 2, 4, 6, 9, and 12 postchallenge revealed no significant differences between vaccinated and control monkeys. These findings illustrate the need to clarify the roles of the different arms of the immune system in conferring protection against primate lentivirus infections. PMID:7666529

  11. Absence of cytotoxic antibody to human immunodeficiency virus-infected cells in humans and its induction in animals after infection or immunization with purified envelope glycoprotein gp120

    SciTech Connect

    Nara, P.L.; Robey, W.G.; Gonda, M.A.; Carter, S.G.; Fischinger, P.J.

    1987-06-01

    The presence of antibody-dependent complement-mediated cytotoxicity (ACC) was assessed in humans and chimpanzees, which are capable of infection with human immunodeficiency virus isolate HTLV-IIIb, and examined in the goat after immunization with the major viral glycoprotein (gp120) of HTLV-IIIb. In infected humans no antibody mediating ACC was observed regardless of the status of disease. Even healthy individuals with high-titer, broadly reactive, neutralizing antibodies has no ACC. In contrast, chimpanzees infected with HTLV-IIIb, from whom virus could be isolated, not only had neutralizing antibody but also antibodies broadly reactive in ACC, even against distantly related human immunodeficiency virus isolates, as well as against their own reisolated virus. In the goat, the gp120 of HTLV-IIIb induced a highly type-specific response as measured by both ACC and flow cytofluorometry of live infected H9 cells. Normal human cells were not subject to ACC by animal anti-HTLV-III gp120-specific sera. Induction of ACC and neutralizing antibody were closely correlated in the animal experimental models but not in humans. The presence of ACC in gp120-inoculated goats and HTLV-III-infected chimpanzees represent a qualitative difference that may be important in the quest for the elicitation of a protective immunity in humans.

  12. Soluble human CD4 elicits an antibody response in rhesus monkeys that inhibits simian immunodeficiency virus replication

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Mamoru; Chen, Zheng W.; Tsubota, Hiroshi; Lord, C.I.; Levine, C.G.; Letvin, N.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Rhesus monkeys infected with the simian immunodeficiency virus of macaques (SIV{sub mac}) demonstrate significant virologic and clinical improvement as a result of treatment with human recombinant soluble CD4 (rsCD4). The authors show that human rsCD4 does not efficiently inhibit SIV{sub mac} replication in bone marrow macrophages of rhesus monkeys and does not significantly augment bone marrow hematopoietic colony formation in vitro. However, plasma of human rsCD4-treated rhesus monkeys does exhibit significant anti-SIV{sub mac} activity in vitro. Plasma of these animals efficiently blocks SIV{sub mac} replicaton in peripheral blood lymphocytes and bone marrow macrophages. It also increases granulocyte/macrophage colony formation in vitro by bone marrow cells of SIV{sub mac}-infected monkeys. This plasma and the IgG fraction of plasma from a rhesus monkey immunized with human rsCD4 in adjuvant demonstrate reactivity with a soluble form of the rhesus monkey CD4 molecule, exhibit binding to CD4{sup +} but not CD8{sup +} concanavalin A-activated rhesus monkey peripheral blood lymphocytes, and precipitate the CD4 molecule from surface-labeled activated rhesus monkey peripheral blood lymphocytes. Moreover, anti-viral activity is demonstrable in the IgG fraction of plasma from a human rsCD4-immunized monkey. These studies raise the possibility that a modified human CD4 molecule serving as an immunogen might elicit an antibody response that could potentially induce a beneficial therapeutic response in human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals.

  13. Variable epitope libraries: new vaccine immunogens capable of inducing broad human immunodeficiency virus type 1-neutralizing antibody response.

    PubMed

    Charles-Niño, Claudia; Pedroza-Roldan, Cesar; Viveros, Monica; Gevorkian, Goar; Manoutcharian, Karen

    2011-07-18

    The extreme antigenic variability of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) leads to immune escape of the virus, representing a major challenge in the design of effective vaccine. We have developed a novel concept for immunogen construction based on introduction of massive mutations within the epitopes targeting antigenically variable pathogens and diseases. Previously, we showed that these immunogens carrying large combinatorial libraries of mutated epitope variants, termed as variable epitope libraries (VELs), induce potent, broad and long lasting CD8+IFN-γ+ T-cell response. Moreover, we demonstrated that these T cells recognize more than 50% of heavily mutated variants (5 out of 10 amino acid positions were mutated in each epitope variant) of HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop-derived cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitope (RGPGRAFVTI) in mice. The constructed VELs had complexities of 10000 and 12500 individual members, generated as plasmid DNA or as M13 phage display combinatorial libraries, respectively, and with structural composition RGPGXAXXXX or XGXGXAXVXI, where X is any of 20 natural amino acids. Here, we demonstrated that sera from mice immunized with these VELs are capable of neutralizing 5 out of 10 viral isolates from Tier 2 reference panel of subtype B envelope clones, including HIV-1 isolates which are known to be resistant to neutralization by several potent monoclonal antibodies, described previously. These data indicate the feasibility of the application of immunogens based on VEL concept as an alternative approach for the development of molecular vaccines against antigenically variable pathogens.

  14. Env-Expressing Autologous T Lymphocytes Induce Neutralizing Antibody and Afford Marked Protection against Feline Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Pistello, Mauro; Bonci, Francesca; Zabogli, Elisa; Conti, Francesca; Freer, Giulia; Maggi, Fabrizio; Stevenson, Mario; Bendinelli, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    The envelope (Env) glycoproteins of HIV and other lentiviruses possess neutralization and other protective epitopes, yet all attempts to induce protective immunity using Env as the only immunogen have either failed or afforded minimal levels of protection. In a novel prime-boost approach, specific-pathogen-free cats were primed with a plasmid expressing Env of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and then boosted with their own T lymphocytes transduced ex vivo to produce the same Env and interleukin 15 (3 × 106 to 10 × 106 viable cells/cat). After the boost, the vaccinees developed elevated immune responses, including virus-neutralizing antibodies (NA). Challenge with an ex vivo preparation of FIV readily infected all eight control cats (four mock vaccinated and four naïve) and produced a marked decline in the proportion of peripheral CD4 T cells. In contrast, five of seven vaccinees showed little or no traces of infection, and the remaining two had reduced viral loads and underwent no changes in proportions of CD4 T cells. Interestingly, the viral loads of the vaccinees were inversely correlated to the titers of NA. The findings support the concept that Env is a valuable immunogen but needs to be administered in a way that permits the expression of its full protective potential. PMID:20130057

  15. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Prevention.

    PubMed

    Davis, Teaniese Latham; DiClemente, Ralph

    2016-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that causes AIDS. Surveillance data from 2012 indicate an estimated 1.2 million people aged 13 years and older were living with HIV infection in the United States, and 12.8% do not know their status. There are approximately 50,000 new HIV infections annually. With no available cure for HIV, primary prevention to reduce incident cases of HIV is essential. Strategies to prevent HIV transmission include reducing sexual risk behavior and needle sharing. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has multiple resources available for primary and secondary prevention to reduce disease transmission and severity. PMID:26980130

  16. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Escape from Cyclotriazadisulfonamide-Induced CD4-Targeted Entry Inhibition Is Associated with Increased Neutralizing Antibody Susceptibility▿

    PubMed Central

    Vermeire, Kurt; Van Laethem, Kristel; Janssens, Wouter; Bell, Thomas W.; Schols, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    Continuous specific downmodulation of CD4 receptor expression in T lymphocytes by the small molecule cyclotriazadisulfonamide (CADA) selected for the CADA-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NL4.3 virus containing unique mutations in the C4 and V5 regions of gp120, likely stabilizing the CD4-binding conformation. The amino acid changes in Env were associated with decreased susceptibility to anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody treatment of the cells and with higher susceptibility of the virus to soluble CD4. In addition, the acquired ability of a CADA-resistant virus to infect cells with low CD4 expression was associated with an increased susceptibility of the virus to neutralizing antibodies from sera of several HIV-1-infected patients. PMID:19570853

  17. Preclinical and Clinical Performance of the Efoora Test, a Rapid Test for Detection of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Specific Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Arens, Max Q.; Mundy, Linda M.; Amsterdam, Daniel; Barrett, J. Tom; Bigg, Dan; Bruckner, David; Hanna, Bruce; Prince, Harry; Purington, Timothy; Hanna, Todd; Hewitt, Ross; Kalinka, Carolyn; Koppes, Thomas; Maxwell, Sarz; Moe, Ardis; Doymaz, Mehmet; Poulter, Melinda; Saber-Tehrani, Maryam; Simard, Lorenzo; Wilkins-Carmody, Donna; Vidaver, John; Berger, Cheryl; Davis, Alan H.; Alzona, Mortimer T.

    2005-01-01

    Barriers to effective diagnostic testing for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection can be reduced with simple, reliable, and rapid detection methods. Our objective was to determine the accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of a new rapid, lateral-flow immunochromatographic HIV-1 antibody detection device. Preclinical studies were performed using seroconversion, cross-reaction, and interference panels, archived clinical specimens, and fresh whole blood. In a multicenter, prospective clinical trial, a four-sample matrix of capillary (fingerstick) whole-blood specimens and venous whole blood, plasma, and serum was tested for HIV-1 antibodies with the Efoora HIV rapid test (Efoora Inc., Buffalo Grove, IL) and compared with an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) (Abbott Laboratories) licensed by the Food and Drug Administration. Western blot and nucleic acid test supplemental assays were employed to adjudicate discordant samples. Preclinical testing of seroconversion panels showed that antibodies were often detected earlier by the rapid test than by a reference EIA. No significant interference or cross-reactions were observed. Testing of 4,984 archived specimens yielded a sensitivity of 99.2% and a specificity of 99.7%. A prospective multicenter clinical study with 2,954 adult volunteers demonstrated sensitivity and specificity for the Efoora HIV rapid test of 99.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 99.3 and 99.98%) and 99.0% (95% CI, 98.5 and 99.4%), respectively. Reactive rapid HIV-1 antibody detection was confirmed in 99.6% of those with a known HIV infection (n = 939), 5.2% of those in the high-risk group (n = 1,003), and 0.1% of those in the low-risk group (n = 1,012). For 21 (0.71%) patients, there was discordance between the results of the rapid test and the confirmatory EIA/Western blot tests. We conclude that the Efoora HIV rapid test is a simple, rapid assay for detection of HIV-1 antibodies, with high sensitivity and specificity compared to a standardized

  18. Monoclonal antibodies against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase: epitope mapping and differential effects on integrase activities in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Nilsen, B M; Haugan, I R; Berg, K; Olsen, L; Brown, P O; Helland, D E

    1996-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase (IN) catalyzes the integration of viral DNA into the host chromosome, an essential step in retroviral replication. As a tool to study the structure and function of this enzyme, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against HIV-1 IN were produced. Epitope mapping demonstrated that the 17 MAbs obtained could be divided into seven different groups, and the selection of MAbs representing these groups were tested for their effect on in vitro activities of IN. Four groups of MAbs recognized epitopes within the region of amino acids (aa) 1 to 16, 17 to 38, or 42 to 55 in and around the conserved HHCC motif near the N terminus of IN. MAbs binding to these epitopes inhibited end processing and DNA joining and either stimulated or had little effect on disintegration and reintegration activities of IN. Two MAbs binding to epitopes within the region of aa 56 to 102 in the central core or aa 186 to 250 in the C-terminal half of the protein showed only minor effects on the in vitro activities of IN. Three Mabs which recognized on epitope within the region of aa262 to 271 of HIV-1 IN cross-reacted with HIV-2 IN. MAbs binding to this epitope clearly inhibited end processing and DNA joining and stimulated or had little effect on disintegration. In contrast to the N-terminal-specific MAbs, these C-terminal-specific MAbs abolished reintegration activity of IN. PMID:8627677

  19. The neutralization sensitivity of viruses representing human immunodeficiency virus type 1 variants of diverse subtypes from early in infection is dependent on producer cell, as well as characteristics of the specific antibody and envelope variant.

    PubMed

    Provine, Nicholas M; Cortez, Valerie; Chohan, Vrasha; Overbaugh, Julie

    2012-05-25

    Neutralization properties of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) are often defined using pseudoviruses grown in transformed cells, which are not biologically relevant HIV-1 producer cells. Little information exists on how these viruses compare to viruses produced in primary lymphocytes, particularly for globally relevant HIV-1 strains. Therefore, replication-competent chimeras encoding envelope variants from the dominant HIV-1 subtypes (A, C, and D) obtained early after infection were generated and the neutralization properties explored. Pseudoviruses generated in 293T cells were the most sensitive to antibody neutralization. Replicating viruses generated in primary lymphocytes were most resistant to neutralization by plasma antibodies and most monoclonal antibodies (b12, 4E10, 2F5, VRC01). These differences were not associated with differences in envelope content. Surprisingly, the virus source did not impact neutralization sensitivity of most viruses to PG9. These findings suggest that producer cell type has a major effect on neutralization sensitivity, but in an antibody dependent manner.

  20. Epitopes for Broad and Potent Neutralizing Antibody Responses during Chronic Infection with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Nandi, Avishek; Lavine, Christine L.; Wang, Pengcheng; Lipchina, Inna; Goepfert, Paul A.; Shaw, George M.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Montefiori, David C.; Haynes, Barton F.; Easterbrook, Philippa; Robinson, James E.; Sodroski, Joseph G.; Yang, Xinzhen

    2009-01-01

    Neutralizing antibody (nAb) response is sporadic and has limited potency and breadth during infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). In rare cases, broad and potent nAbs are actually induced in vivo. Identifying specific epitopes targeted by such broad and potent nAb response is valuable in guiding the design of a prophylactic vaccine aimed to induce nAb. In this study, we have defined neutralizing epitope usage in 7 out of 17 subjects with broad and potent nAbs by using targeted mutagenesis in known neutralizing epitopes of HIV-1 glycoproteins and by using in vitro depletion of serum neutralizing activity by various recombinant HIV-1 glycoproteins. Consistent with recent reports, the CD4 binding site (CD4BS) is targeted by nAbs in vivo (4 of the 7 subjects with defined neutralizing epitopes). The new finding from this study is that epitopes in the gp120 outer domain are also targeted by nAbs in vivo (5 of the 7 subjects). The outer domain epitopes include glycan-dependent epitopes (2 subjects), conserved non-linear epitope in the V3 region (2 subjects), and a CD4BS epitope composed mainly of the elements in the outer domain (1 subject). Importantly, we found indication for epitope poly-specificity, a dual usage of the V3 and CD4BS epitopes, in only one subject. This study provides a more complete profile of epitope usage for broad and potent nAb responses during HIV-1 infection. PMID:19922969

  1. Molecular characterization of five human anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 antibody heavy chains reveals extensive somatic mutation typical of an antigen-driven immune response.

    PubMed Central

    Andris, J S; Johnson, S; Zolla-Pazner, S; Capra, J D

    1991-01-01

    We report the heavy chain variable region sequences from the cDNAs of five previously described monoclonal cell lines producing human antibodies specific for the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and detail the molecular characteristics, germ-line origins, and extent of somatic mutation among these antibodies. Three of the five heavy chain variable regions derive from the VHIV gene family, but each has arisen from a different heavy chain variable region (VH) gene segment within the VHIV family. In addition, one is derived from a VHI gene segment, and one is derived from a VHV gene segment. Since four of the five antibodies arise from known germ-line VH elements, a precise determination of the extent of somatic variation is possible. The amount of variation from the closest germ-line sequence ranges from 4.5% to 14.8% among these antibodies, most of which is concentrated in the complementarity-determining regions. In general, the diversity (D) segments are long, characteristic of D-D fusions and/or extensive terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase activity; however, definitive homologies cannot be found with the known germ-line D segments. Joining (JH) gene segment utilization appears random. The use of five different germ-line VH gene segments and extensive somatic mutation provides evidence that a polyclonal, antigen-driven immune response occurs during the natural infection with human immunodeficiency virus. PMID:1909030

  2. Epidemiologic characteristics of blood donors with antibody to human immunodeficiency virus: Thailand.

    PubMed

    Nuchprayoon, C; Tanprasert, S; Chumnijarakij, T; Thanomchat, S; O'Prasert, B; Adulwijit, S

    1995-03-01

    Of 782,190 volunteer blood donors in Bangkok and nearby areas, who were screened for infection with human immunodeficiency type 1 (HIV-1) from January 1988 through December 1992, 3,219 tested positive on both enzyme immuno assay and Western blot assay. The identification variables of the donor were collected. The majority of HIV seropositive blood donors were male. The average age (median) of HIV seropositive was 26-29 years all through 1988-2992. The prevalence of HIV seropositive in male donors was higher than that in females. HIV seropositivity was confirmed in blood donations from first-time male donors in this study during 1988-1992. This rate has increased progressively from 0.87/1,000 in 1988 to 15.95/1,000 in 1992 with much higher rates in repeat donors. The repeat male donors increased from 0.77/1,000 in 1988 to 5.26/1,000 in 1991 and since then showed a decreased rate to 3.93/1,000 in 1992. Female donors were infected with HIV more frequently with the prevalence by sex ratio M:F rising from 27:1 in 1988 to 6.6:1 in 1992. Comparing the seropositive rate between first time and repeat female donors, the results showed an increase in rate from 0.11/1,000 in 1990 to 2.02/1,000 in 1992, but essentially the same rate in report donors. A majority of HIV seropositive blood donors (1990-1992) lived in Bangkok (42-49%) and among those who lived in one eastern province (Samut Prakan), 90-93% lived in the industrial areas. Of those who lived in Chon Buri Province, 73-88% lived in Sattaheep District, which is a naval base.

  3. New Automated Chemiluminescence Immunoassay for Simultaneous but Separate Detection of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Antigens and Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    López Roa, Paula; Suárez, Marisol; Bouza, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    The recently launched Liaison XL Murex HIV Ab/Ag assay (DiaSorin S.p.A) uses chemiluminescence immunoassay technology for the combined qualitative determination of p24 antigen of HIV-1 and specific antibodies to both HIV-1 and HIV-2. We studied 571 serum samples from those submitted to our laboratory for HIV screening. The samples were divided into 3 subsets: subset A, 365 samples collected prospectively during 1 week; subset B, 158 samples from confirmed HIV-positive patients; and subset C, 48 samples with a positive screening result but a negative or indeterminate confirmatory test result. Our standard screening/confirmatory algorithm was used as a reference. In subset A (prospective), 5 samples were positive and 360 negative by the standard procedure. Liaison XL Murex HIV Ab/Ag correctly identified all 5 positive samples (100%) and 357 negative samples (99.2%). In subset B (confirmed positive), all 158 positive samples were in total agreement in both procedures. In subset C (screen positive only), Liaison XL Murex HIV Ab/Ag yielded accurate results in 42 out of 48 samples (87.5%). Global sensitivity and specificity for Liaison XL Murex HIV Ab/Ag (all subsets included) were 98.3% and 98.5%, respectively. Considering only nonselected prospective samples and confirmed positive samples (subsets A and B), the corresponding sensitivity and specificity values were 100% and 99.2%, respectively. The new fully automated HIV screening test showed high sensitivity and specificity compared to our standard algorithm. Its added advantage of being able to detect HIV-1 and HIV-2 antibodies and p24 antigen separately could prove useful in the diagnosis of early infections. PMID:24574285

  4. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Primary Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Primary Infection Information for adults A A ... weeks following exposure to HIV (the human immunodeficiency virus). Chronic infection with this virus can cause AIDS ( ...

  5. Design, intracellular expression, and activity of a human anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120 single-chain antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Marasco, W A; Haseltine, W A; Chen, S Y

    1993-01-01

    A single-chain antibody, derived from a human monoclonal antibody that recognizes the CD4 binding region of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope protein, has been designed for intracellular expression in eukaryotic cells. The single-chain antibody is composed of an immunoglobulin heavy-chain leader sequence and heavy- and light-chain variable regions that are joined by an interchain linker. The antibody is stably expressed and retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and is not toxic to the cells. The antibody binds to the envelope protein within the cell and inhibits processing of the envelope precursor and syncytia formation. The infectivity of the HIV-1 particles produced by cells that express the single-chain antibody is substantially reduced. These studies illustrate the feasibility of designing antibodies that bind and inactivate molecules intracellularly. Antibodies that act on target molecules within cells should provide a useful tool for research as well as for control of infectious and other diseases. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8356098

  6. A modified ELISA and western blot accurately determine anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 antibodies in oral fluids obtained with a special collecting device.

    PubMed

    Emmons, W W; Paparello, S F; Decker, C F; Sheffield, J M; Lowe-Bey, F H

    1995-06-01

    Serum and saliva from 195 known human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-seropositive patients and 198 military personnel undergoing annual HIV serologic testing were evaluated in a prospective, blinded fashion for anti-HIV-1 antibodies. Oral specimens, collected with a device designed to concentrate oral mucosal transudate from whole saliva, were tested by a modified ELISA and by Western blot. Serum was tested in a standard manner. All 195 HIV-1-seropositive subjects had detectable anti-HIV-1 antibodies in their saliva by ELISA; 190 saliva samples were positive by Western blot and 5 were indeterminate. None of the 198 military personnel were positive by ELISA of serum or oral fluid. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for ELISA of saliva were each 100%. The serologic testing of oral mucosal transudate appears to be a simple, safe, sensitive, and specific method for detecting anti-HIV-1 antibodies.

  7. Complement mediates human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of a human T cell line in a CD4- and antibody-independent fashion.

    PubMed

    Boyer, V; Desgranges, C; Trabaud, M A; Fischer, E; Kazatchkine, M D

    1991-05-01

    Incubation of the human T cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV)-IIIB and HTLV-RF strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) with normal seronegative human serum under conditions that allow complement activation resulted in enhancement of infection of the MT2 human T cell line cultured in the presence of low amounts of virus. Infection of MT2 cells was assessed by measuring reverse transcriptase activity in supernatants at day 9 of culture. Complement activation by viral suspensions occurred through the alternative pathway. Opsonization of HTLV-RF viral particles with complement was sufficient to allow a productive infection to occur in cells exposed to suboptimal amounts of virus. Infection of MT2 cells with suboptimal amounts of serum-opsonized HIV-1 was suppressed by blocking the C3dg receptor (CR2, CD21) on MT2 cells with monoclonal anti-CR2 antibody and rabbit F(ab')2 anti-mouse immunoglobulin antibodies. Blocking of the gp120-binding site on CD4 under similar experimental conditions had no inhibitory effect on infection of MT2 cells with opsonized virus. Opsonization of HIV-1 with seronegative serum also resulted in a CR2-mediated enhancement of the infection of normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells and T lymphocytes. These results indicate that complement in the absence of antibody may enhance infection of C3 receptor-bearing T cells with HIV-1, and that the interaction of opsonized virus with the CR2 receptor may result by itself in the infection of target T cells in a CD4- and antibody-independent fashion. PMID:1827139

  8. Human Rhinovirus Type 14:Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) V3 Loop Chimeras from a Combinatorial Library Induce Potent Neutralizing Antibody Responses against HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Allen D.; Geisler, Sheila C.; Chen, Anne A.; Resnick, Dawn A.; Roy, Birgit M.; Lewi, Paul J.; Arnold, Edward; Arnold, Gail Ferstandig

    1998-01-01

    In an effort to develop a useful AIDS vaccine or vaccine component, we have generated a combinatorial library of chimeric viruses in which the sequence IGPGRAFYTTKN from the V3 loop of the MN strain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is displayed in many conformations on the surface of human rhinovirus 14 (HRV14). The V3 loop sequence was inserted into a naturally immunogenic site of the cold-causing HRV14, bridged by linkers consisting of zero to three randomized amino acids on each side. The library of chimeric viruses obtained was subjected to a variety of immunoselection schemes to isolate viruses that provided the most useful presentations of the V3 loop sequence for potential use in a vaccine against HIV. The utility of the presentations was assessed by measures of antigenicity and immunogenicity. Most of the immunoselected chimeras examined were potently neutralized by each of the four different monoclonal anti-V3 loop antibodies tested. Seven of eight chimeric viruses were able to elicit neutralizing antibody responses in guinea pigs against the MN and ALA-1 strains of HIV-1. Three of the chimeras elicited HIV neutralization titers that exceeded those of all but a small number of previously described HIV immunogens. These results indicate that HRV14:HIV-1 chimeras may serve as useful immunogens for stimulating immunity against HIV-1. This method can be used to flexibly reconstruct varied immunogens on the surface of a safe and immunogenic vaccine vehicle. PMID:9420270

  9. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/mass spectrometry mapping of human immunodeficiency virus-gp120 epitopes recognized by a limited polyclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Jeyarajah, S; Parker, C E; Summer, M T; Tomer, K B

    1998-02-01

    In this study we have applied epitope excision and epitope extraction strategies, combined with matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, to determine the fine structure of epitopes recognized by a polyclonal antibody to human immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein gp120. This is the first application of this approach to epitope mapping on a large, heavily glycosylated protein. In the epitope excision method, gp120 in the native form is first bound to the antibody immobilized on sepharose beads and cleaved with endoproteinase enzymes. In the epitope extraction method, the gp120 was first proteolytically cleaved and then allowed to react with the immobilized antibody. The fragments that remain bound to the antibody, after repeated washing to remove the unbound peptides, contain the antigenic region that is recognized by the antibody, and the bound peptides in both methods can be characterized by direct analysis of the immobilized antibody by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization/mass spectrometry. In this study we have carried out epitope excision and extraction experiments with three different enzymes and have identified residues 472-478 as a major epitope. In addition, antigenic regions containing minor epitopes have also been identified.

  10. Antibodies with specificity to native gp120 and neutralization activity against primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates elicited by immunization with oligomeric gp160.

    PubMed Central

    VanCott, T C; Mascola, J R; Kaminski, R W; Kalyanaraman, V; Hallberg, P L; Burnett, P R; Ulrich, J T; Rechtman, D J; Birx, D L

    1997-01-01

    Current human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope vaccine candidates elicit high antibody binding titers with neutralizing activity against T-cell line-adapted but not primary HIV-1 isolates. Serum antibodies from these human vaccine recipients were also found to be preferentially directed to linear epitopes within gp120 that are poorly exposed on native gp120. Systemic immunization of rabbits with an affinity-purified oligomeric gp160 protein formulated with either Alhydrogel or monophosphoryl lipid A-containing adjuvants resulted in the induction of high-titered serum antibodies that preferentially bound epitopes exposed on native forms of gp120 and gp160, recognized a restricted number of linear epitopes, efficiently bound heterologous strains of monomeric gp120 and cell surface-expressed oligomeric gp120/gp41, and neutralized several strains of T-cell line-adapted HIV-1. Additionally, those immune sera with the highest oligomeric gp160 antibody binding titers had neutralizing activity against some primary HIV-1 isolates, using phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cell targets. Induction of an antibody response preferentially reactive with natively folded gp120/gp160 was dependent on the tertiary structure of the HIV-1 envelope immunogen as well as its adjuvant formulation, route of administration, and number of immunizations administered. These studies demonstrate the capacity of a soluble HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein vaccine to elicit an antibody response capable of neutralizing primary HIV-1 isolates. PMID:9151820

  11. Antibodies of symptomatic human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected individuals are directed to the V3 domain of noninfectious and not of infectious virions present in autologous serum.

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, M; Petersen, H; Wachsmuth, C; Müller, H; Hufert, F T; Schmitz, H

    1994-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine the antibody specificity for the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) V3 domains of infectious and noninfectious virions present in the serum of AIDS patients. To accomplish this, HIV-1 was isolated in the presence of autologous antibodies from the serum samples of six AIDS patients in HIV-1-negative donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells by short-term cultivation. The isolated virus, defined as the infectious cell-free virus (iCFV), was characterized by sequence analysis of the proviral DNA coding for the third hypervariable (V3) region of the external glycoprotein gp120. This was carried out by amplifying and cloning the V3 region. In all six cases studied, 20 randomly selected V3 clones derived from the proviral DNA of the iCFV, 20 clones from patient cell-free virus, and 20 clones from cell-integrated virus were sequenced to study the distribution and frequency of the intrapatient virus population. The number of major virus variants in the six patients ranged from three to nine. The various V3 sequences found in the AIDS patients showed the typical amino acid pattern of the syncytium-inducing and non-syncytium-inducing viral phenotypes characteristic for the late stage of infection. However, only one patient-specific iCFV variant was detected within the 20 V3 clones analyzed per virus isolation. For the six patients a total of 34 V3-loop variants, either iCFV or non-iCFV, was observed. All 34 V3-loop sequences were expressed as glutathione-S-transferase fusion proteins (V3-GST). The autologous antibody response to the V3-GST fusion proteins was studied by Western immunoblot analysis. A strong antibody response to almost all non-iCFV V3-GST proteins was found in the sera of the six patients. In contrast, the autologous antibody response to the six iCFV V3 loops was undetectable (in four patients) or very faint (in two patients) compared with that to the non-iCFV V3 loops. Five of the six iCFV loops showed

  12. A humanized, nondepleting anti-CD4 antibody that blocks virus entry inhibits virus replication in rhesus monkeys chronically infected with simian immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Reimann, Keith A; Khunkhun, Rajinder; Lin, Wenyu; Gordon, Wayne; Fung, Michael

    2002-07-20

    Therapeutic approaches that interfere with viral entry hold promise in preventing or treating HIV infection. Hu5A8, a humanized monoclonal antibody against CD4, was previously shown to inhibit HIV and SIV replication in vitro and was safely administered to rhesus monkeys without depleting CD4(+) T cells. This antibody completely suppressed replication of six different SIVmac 251 primary isolates in vitro. Twice weekly administration of 3-mg/kg doses of hu5A8 for 2 to 4 weeks to SIV-infected rhesus monkeys resulted in sustained plasma antibody levels of > or =20 microg/ml during treatment and 5- to 50-fold decreases in plasma viremia, although suppression of viral replication was transient. Two of three treated monkeys developed antibody responses against the administered monoclonal antibody. Loss of antiviral effect was not temporally associated with anti-hu5A8 antibody responses or due to activation of CD4(+) T cells by hu5A8. However, SIV isolated after hu5A8 treatment was approximately 5-fold more resistant to suppression by hu5A8 than SIV isolates obtained from the same monkeys before treatment. The rapid development of resistance may have resulted from SIV variants that infect cells by a CD4-independent mechanism. These results support the overall concept of anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody treatment to suppress AIDS virus replication in vivo while demonstrating important issues as to its clinical feasibility.

  13. Development of Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies and Their Mapping by Monomeric gp120 in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Infected Humans and Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus SHIVSF162P3N-Infected Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Manxue; Lu, Hong; Markowitz, Martin; Cheng-Mayer, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT To improve our understanding of the similarities and differences between neutralizing antibodies elicited by simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-infected rhesus macaques and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected humans, we examined the plasma of 13 viremic macaques infected with SHIVSF162P3N and 85 HIV-1-infected humans with known times of infection. We identified 5 macaques (38%) from 1 to 2 years postinfection (p.i.) with broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against tier 2 HIV-1. In comparison, only 2 out of 42 (5%) human plasma samples collected in a similar time frame of 1 to 3 years p.i. exhibited comparable neutralizing breadths and potencies, with the number increasing to 7 out of 21 (30%) after 3 years p.i. Plasma mapping with monomeric gp120 identified only 2 out of 9 humans and 2 out of 4 macaques that contained gp120-reactive neutralizing antibodies, indicating distinct specificities in these plasma samples, with most of them recognizing the envelope trimer (including gp41) rather than the gp120 monomer. Indeed, a total of 20 gp120-directed monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) isolated from a human subject (AD358) and a Chinese rhesus macaque (GB40) displayed no or limited neutralizing activity against tier 2 strains. These isolated MAbs, mapped to the CD4-binding site, the V3 loop, the inner domain, and the C5 region of gp120, revealed genetic similarity between the human and macaque immunoglobulin genes used to encode some V3-directed MAbs. These results also support the use of envelope trimer probes for efficient isolation of HIV-1 bnAbs. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 vaccine research can benefit from understanding the development of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) in rhesus macaques, commonly used to assess vaccine immunogenicity and efficacy. Here, we examined 85 HIV-1-infected humans and 13 SHIVSF162P3N-infected macaques for bnAbs and found that, similar to HIV-1-infected humans, bnAbs in SHIV-infected macaques are also rare

  14. Strain specificity and binding affinity requirements of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies to the C4 domain of gp120 from human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, G R; Byrn, R; Wilkes, D M; Fox, J A; Hobbs, M R; Hastings, R; Wessling, H C; Norcross, M A; Fendly, B M; Berman, P W

    1993-01-01

    The binding properties of seven CD4-blocking monoclonal antibodies raised against recombinant gp120 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 strain MN (HIV-1MN) and two CD4-blocking monoclonal antibodies to recombinant envelope glycoproteins gp120 and gp160 of substrain IIIB of HIVLAI were analyzed. With a panel of recombinant gp120s from seven diverse HIV-1 isolates, eight of the nine antibodies were found to be strain specific and one was broadly cross-reactive. Epitope mapping revealed that all nine antibodies bound to epitopes located in the fourth conserved domain (C4) of gp120. Within this region, three distinct epitopes could be identified: two were polymorphic between HIV-1 strains, and one was highly conserved. Studies with synthetic peptides demonstrated that the conserved epitope, recognized by antibody 13H8, was located between residues 431 and 439. Site-directed mutagenesis of gp120 demonstrated that residue 429 and/or 432 was critical for the binding of the seven antibodies to gp120 from HIV-1MN. Similarly, residues 423 and 429 were essential for the binding of monoclonal antibody 5C2 raised against gp120 from HIV-1IIIB. The amino acids located at positions 423 and 429 were found to vary between strains of HIV-1 as well as between molecular clones derived from the MN and LAI isolates of HIV-1. Polymorphism at these positions prevented the binding of virus-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and raised the possibility that HIV-1 neutralization serotypes may be defined on the basis of C4 domain sequences. Analysis of the binding characteristics of the CD4-blocking antibodies demonstrated that their virus-neutralizing activity was directly proportional to their gp120-binding affinity. These studies account for the strain specificity of antibodies to the C4 domain of gp120 and demonstrate for the first time that antibodies to this region can be as effective as those directed to the principal neutralizing determinant (V3 domain) in neutralizing HIV-1

  15. Fine definition of the epitope on the gp41 glycoprotein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 for the neutralizing monoclonal antibody 2F5.

    PubMed

    Parker, C E; Deterding, L J; Hager-Braun, C; Binley, J M; Schülke, N; Katinger, H; Moore, J P; Tomer, K B

    2001-11-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), in combination with proteolytic protection assays, has been used to identify the functional epitope on human immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein gp41 for the broadly neutralizing anti-gp41 human monoclonal antibody 2F5. In this protection assay-based procedure, a soluble gp140 protein with a stabilizing intermolecular disulfide bond between the gp120 and gp41 subunits (SOS gp140) was affinity bound to immobilized 2F5 under physiological conditions. A combination of proteolytic enzymatic cleavages was then performed to remove unprotected residues. Residues of SOS gp140 protected by their binding to 2F5 were then identified based on their molecular weights as determined by direct MALDI-MS of the immobilized antibody beads. The epitope, NEQELLELDKWASLWN, determined by this MALDI-MS protection assay approach consists of 16 amino acid residues near the C terminus of gp41. It is significantly longer than the ELDKWA core epitope previously determined for 2F5 by peptide enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. This new knowledge of the structure of the 2F5 epitope may facilitate the design of vaccine antigens intended to induce antibodies with the breadth and potency of action of the 2F5 monoclonal antibody. PMID:11602730

  16. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase by the Fab fragment of a specific monoclonal antibody suggests that different multimerization states are required for different enzymatic functions.

    PubMed

    Barsov, E V; Huber, W E; Marcotrigiano, J; Clark, P K; Clark, A D; Arnold, E; Hughes, S H

    1996-07-01

    We have characterized a murine monoclonal antibody (MAb 35), which was raised against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integration protein (IN), and the corresponding Fab 35. Although MAb 35 does not inhibit HIV-1 IN, Fab 35 does. MAb 35 (and Fab 35) binds to an epitope in the C-terminal region of HIV-1 IN. Fab 35 inhibits 3'-end processing, strand transfer, and disintegration; however, DNA binding is not affected. The available data suggest that Fab 35 inhibits enzymatic activities of IN by interfering with the ability of IN to form multimers that are enzymatically active. This implies that the C-terminal region of HIV-1 IN participates in interactions that are essential for the multimerization of IN. Titration of the various IN-mediated enzymatic activities suggests that different degrees of multimerization are required for different activities of HIV-1 IN.

  17. Nonpathogenic Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Klatt, Nichole R.; Silvestri, Guido; Hirsch, Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    The simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) are a diverse group of viruses that naturally infect a wide range of African primates, including African green monkeys (AGMs) and sooty mangabey monkeys (SMs). Although natural infection is widespread in feral populations of AGMs and SMs, this infection generally does not result in immunodeficiency. However, experimental inoculation of Asian macaques results in an immunodeficiency syndrome remarkably similar to human AIDS. Thus, natural nonprogressive SIV infections appear to represent an evolutionary adaptation between these animals and their primate lentiviruses. Curiously, these animals maintain robust virus replication but have evolved strategies to avoid disease progression. Adaptations observed in these primates include phenotypic changes to CD4+ T cells, limited chronic immune activation, and altered mucosal immunity. It is probable that these animals have achieved a unique balance between T-cell renewal and proliferation and loss through activation-induced apoptosis, and virus-induced cell death. A clearer understanding of the mechanisms underlying the lack of disease progression in natural hosts for SIV infection should therefore yield insights into the pathogenesis of AIDS and may inform vaccine design. PMID:22315718

  18. Human immunodeficiency virus infection and pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Terzi, Eirini; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Dryllis, Georgios; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsiouda, Theodora; Madesis, Athanasios; Karaiskos, Theodoros

    2014-01-01

    Pneumothorax is a serious and relatively frequent complication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection that may associate with increased morbidity and mortality and may prove difficult to manage, especially in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). PMID:25337392

  19. Detection of antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus type I by using synthetic peptides and time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay (TR-FIA).

    PubMed

    Lombardi, V R; Libonatti, O; Alimandi, M; Ansotegui, I; Scarlatti, G; Moschese, V; Wigzell, H; Rossi, P

    1992-03-01

    A simple, rapid, reproducible and sensitive peptide-Time-Resolved-Fluoroimmunoassay (TR-FIA) method is described which allows the detection of antibodies to the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1). By using a panel of synthetic peptide antigens that covered env, gag and pol amino acid sequences, a 20 amino acid peptide (GIWGCSGKLICTTAVPWNAS) describing an immunodominant and conserved domain on the gp41 region of the BH10 clone was found to be the most reactive in this study. Optimal conditions for antigen concentration, serum dilution and incubation time were established. The peptide-TR-FIA is specific, as assessed by testing HIV-1 positive sera which included samples from AIDS, ARC patients and HIV-positive drug users. The test was used to detect HIV antibodies in 250 well characterized HIV-1 positive sera and 50 normal sera. Peptide-TR-FIA results indicate that the env peptide was highly reactive with HIV-positive sera showing a sensitivity of 100%. None of the 50 control sera showed positive reactivity against the synthetic peptide. Furthermore the peptide-TR-FIA allowed a fine titration of antibodies to defined epitopes of immunodominant HIV structural proteins that usually cannot be achieved by peptide-ELISA assays.

  20. Stability of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 antibodies in whole blood dried on filter paper and stored under various tropical conditions in Kinshasa, Zaire.

    PubMed

    Behets, F; Kashamuka, M; Pappaioanou, M; Green, T A; Ryder, R W; Batter, V; George, J R; Hannon, W H; Quinn, T C

    1992-05-01

    The use of whole-blood spots on filter paper for the detection of antibody to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) was evaluated during a 20-week period under a variety of storage environments simulating the harsh tropical field conditions in Kinshasa, Zaire. During the first 6 weeks of storage, all replicates of high- and low-titer HIV-1-positive reference samples remained positive by enzyme immunoassay and Western blotting (immunoblotting), and all replicates of HIV-1-negative samples remained negative under all storage conditions. However, hot and humid storage conditions for up to 20 weeks caused a progressive decline in enzyme immunoassay optical density ratio values, which was particularly noticeable in samples with a low HIV-1 antibody titer. Harsh tropical operational conditions did not cause any repeatedly false-positive results during the 20-week storage period. The use of gas-impermeable bags with desiccant for the storage of blood spots on filter paper improved the stability of HIV-1 antibody detection over time and is recommended for the storage of whole-blood spots on filter paper in harsh tropical field settings.

  1. Multicenter Evaluation of a New, Automated Enzyme-Linked Immunoassay for Detection of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Specific Antibodies and Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Sickinger, Eva; Stieler, Myriam; Kaufman, Boris; Kapprell, Hans-Peter; West, Daniel; Sandridge, Arnold; Devare, Sushil; Schochetman, Gerald; Hunt, J. C.; Daghfal, David

    2004-01-01

    A collaborative multicenter study was conducted to evaluate the sensitivity, specificity, and precision of a three-step, fully automated, qualitative microparticle-based enzyme-linked immunoassay (AxSYM HIV Ag/Ab Combo; Abbott Laboratories), designed to simultaneously detect (i) antibodies against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and/or type 2 (HIV-2) and (ii) HIV p24 antigen. A significant reduction in the HIV seroconversion window was achieved by combining detection of HIV antibodies and antigen into a single assay format. For 22 selected, commercial HIV seroconversion panels, the mean time of detection with the combined-format HIV antigen-antibody assay was reduced by 6.15 days compared to that with a similar third-generation single-format HIV antibody assay. The quantitative sensitivity of the combination assay for the p24 antigen (17.5 pg/ml by use of the p24 quantitative panel VIH SFTS96′) was nearly equivalent to that of single-format antigen tests. The combination assay demonstrated sensitive (100%) detection of anti-HIV immunoglobulin in specimens from individuals in CDC stages A, B, and C and from individuals infected with different HIV-1 group M subtypes, group O, or HIV-2. The apparent specificity for hospitalized patients (n = 1,938) was 99.90%. In a random population of 7,900 volunteer blood donors, the specificity (99.87%) was comparable to that of a third-generation single-format HIV antibody assay (99.92%) on the same donor specimens. In addition, the combination assay was robust to potential interfering specimens. The precision of the combination was high, with intra- and interrun variances of ≤9.3% for each precision panel specimen or assay control and ≤5.3% for the negative assay control. PMID:14715727

  2. Production and characterization of high-affinity human monoclonal antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoproteins in a mouse model expressing human immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Neil C; Davies, Sarah L; Jeffs, Simon A; Vieira, Sueli M; Sattentau, Quentin J

    2007-02-01

    Human (Hu) monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoproteins (Env) are useful tools in the structural and functional analysis of Env, are under development both as potential prophylaxis and as therapy for established HIV-1 infection, and have crucial roles in guiding the design of preventative vaccines. Despite representing more than 50% of infections globally, no MAbs have been generated in any species against C clade HIV-1 Env. To generate HuMAbs to a novel Chinese C clade Env vaccine candidate (primary isolate strain HIV-1(97CN54)), we used BAB5 mice that express a human immunoglobulin (Ig) M antibody repertoire in place of endogenous murine immunoglobulins. When immunized with HIV-1(97CN54) Env, these mice developed antigen-specific IgM antibodies. Hybridoma fusions using splenocytes from these mice enabled the isolation of two Env-specific IgM HuMAbs: N3C5 and N03B11. N3C5 bound to HIV-1 Env from clades A and C, whereas N03B11 bound two geographically distant clade C isolates but not Env from other clades. These HuMAbs bind conformational epitopes within the immunodominant region of the gp41 ectodomain. N3C5 weakly neutralized the autologous isolate in the absence of complement and weakly enhanced infection in the presence of complement. N03B11 has no effect on infectivity in either the presence or the absence of complement. These novel HuMAbs are useful reagents for the study of HIV-1 Env relevant to the global pandemic, and mice producing human immunoglobulin present a tool for the production of such antibodies.

  3. Acute Infections, Cost per Infection and Turnaround Time in Three United States Hospital Laboratories Using Fourth-Generation Antigen-Antibody Human Immunodeficiency Virus Immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Wesolowski, Laura G; Nasrullah, Muazzam; Coombs, Robert W; Rosenberg, Eric; Ethridge, Steven F; Hutchinson, Angela B; Dragavon, Joan; Rychert, Jennifer; Nolte, Frederick S; Madory, James E; Werner, Barbara G

    2016-01-01

    Background.  To improve clinical and public health outcomes through early human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) detection, fourth-generation antigen/antibody immunoassay (4IA) and supplemental testing results must be returned rapidly. Methods.  We examined HIV testing data at Harborview Medical Center (HMC), Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), and the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), which used 4IA and supplemental antibody and nucleic acid tests (NATs). At MGH and MUSC, HIV-1 Western blot (WB) and HIV-2 testing were conducted at a reference laboratory. We compared time from specimen collection to laboratory result for established (positive WB) and acute infections (reactive 4IA, negative/indeterminate WB, detectable NAT), and we calculated testing cost per positive-test result. Results.  From 3731 (MUSC) to 19 774 (MGH) tests were conducted; 0.01% (MGH) to 0.05% (HMC) were acute infections. Each laboratory had reactive 4IA, WB-negative, or indeterminate specimens without NAT (ie, potential acute infections). Time to result was 1.5 (HMC) to 5.2 days (MGH) for acute and 1.0 (HMC) to 5.2 days (MGH) for established infections. Costs were $1054 (MGH) to $1521 (MUSC). Conclusions.  Conducting supplemental testing in-house lowered turnaround times, which may be further reduced with rapid HIV-1/HIV-2 differentiation tests. Hospitals may benefit from quantitative NATs not requiring physician orders, so all potential acute infections receive NAT.

  4. Acute Infections, Cost per Infection and Turnaround Time in Three United States Hospital Laboratories Using Fourth-Generation Antigen-Antibody Human Immunodeficiency Virus Immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Wesolowski, Laura G; Nasrullah, Muazzam; Coombs, Robert W; Rosenberg, Eric; Ethridge, Steven F; Hutchinson, Angela B; Dragavon, Joan; Rychert, Jennifer; Nolte, Frederick S; Madory, James E; Werner, Barbara G

    2016-01-01

    Background.  To improve clinical and public health outcomes through early human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) detection, fourth-generation antigen/antibody immunoassay (4IA) and supplemental testing results must be returned rapidly. Methods.  We examined HIV testing data at Harborview Medical Center (HMC), Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), and the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), which used 4IA and supplemental antibody and nucleic acid tests (NATs). At MGH and MUSC, HIV-1 Western blot (WB) and HIV-2 testing were conducted at a reference laboratory. We compared time from specimen collection to laboratory result for established (positive WB) and acute infections (reactive 4IA, negative/indeterminate WB, detectable NAT), and we calculated testing cost per positive-test result. Results.  From 3731 (MUSC) to 19 774 (MGH) tests were conducted; 0.01% (MGH) to 0.05% (HMC) were acute infections. Each laboratory had reactive 4IA, WB-negative, or indeterminate specimens without NAT (ie, potential acute infections). Time to result was 1.5 (HMC) to 5.2 days (MGH) for acute and 1.0 (HMC) to 5.2 days (MGH) for established infections. Costs were $1054 (MGH) to $1521 (MUSC). Conclusions.  Conducting supplemental testing in-house lowered turnaround times, which may be further reduced with rapid HIV-1/HIV-2 differentiation tests. Hospitals may benefit from quantitative NATs not requiring physician orders, so all potential acute infections receive NAT. PMID:26798766

  5. Evolution of the human immunodeficiency virus type 2 envelope in the first years of infection is associated with the dynamics of the neutralizing antibody response

    DOE PAGES

    Rocha, Cheila; Calado, Rita; Borrego, Pedro; Marcelino, José Maria; Bártolo, Inês; Rosado, Lino; Cavaco-Silva, Patrícia; Gomes, Perpétua; Família, Carlos; Quintas, Alexandre; et al

    2013-10-24

    Background: therapy and the majority of HIV-2 infected individuals survive as elite controllers with normal CD4+ T cell counts and low or undetectable plasma viral load. Neutralizing antibodies (Nabs) are thought to play a central role in HIV-2 evolution and pathogenesis. However, the dynamic of the Nab response and resulting HIV-2 escape during acute infection and their impact in HIV-2 evolution and disease progression remain largely unknown. Our objective was to characterize the Nab response and the molecular and phenotypic evolution of HIV-2 in association with Nab escape in the first years of infection in two children infected at birth.more » As a result, CD4+ T cells decreased from about 50% to below 30% in both children in the first five years of infection and the infecting R5 viruses were replaced by X4 viruses within the same period. With antiretroviral therapy, viral load in child 1 decreased to undetectable levels and CD4+ T cells recovered to normal levels, which have been sustained at least until the age of 12. In contrast, viral load increased in child 2 and she progressed to AIDS and death at age 9. Beginning in the first year of life, child 1 raised high titers of antibodies that neutralized primary R5 isolates more effectively than X4 isolates, both autologous and heterologous. Child 2 raised a weak X4-specific Nab response that decreased sharply as disease progressed. Rate of evolution, nucleotide and amino acid diversity, and positive selection, were significantly higher in the envelope of child 1 compared to child 2. Rates of R5-to-X4 tropism switch, of V1 and V3 sequence diversification, and of convergence of V3 to a β-hairpin structure were related with rate of escape from the neutralizing antibodies. Finally, our data suggests that the molecular and phenotypic evolution of the human immunodeficiency virus type 2 envelope are related with the dynamics of the neutralizing antibody response providing further support for a model in which Nabs

  6. Evolution of the human immunodeficiency virus type 2 envelope in the first years of infection is associated with the dynamics of the neutralizing antibody response

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, Cheila; Calado, Rita; Borrego, Pedro; Marcelino, José Maria; Bártolo, Inês; Rosado, Lino; Cavaco-Silva, Patrícia; Gomes, Perpétua; Família, Carlos; Quintas, Alexandre; Skar, Helena; Leitner, Thomas; Barroso, Helena; Taveira, Nuno

    2013-10-24

    Background: therapy and the majority of HIV-2 infected individuals survive as elite controllers with normal CD4+ T cell counts and low or undetectable plasma viral load. Neutralizing antibodies (Nabs) are thought to play a central role in HIV-2 evolution and pathogenesis. However, the dynamic of the Nab response and resulting HIV-2 escape during acute infection and their impact in HIV-2 evolution and disease progression remain largely unknown. Our objective was to characterize the Nab response and the molecular and phenotypic evolution of HIV-2 in association with Nab escape in the first years of infection in two children infected at birth. As a result, CD4+ T cells decreased from about 50% to below 30% in both children in the first five years of infection and the infecting R5 viruses were replaced by X4 viruses within the same period. With antiretroviral therapy, viral load in child 1 decreased to undetectable levels and CD4+ T cells recovered to normal levels, which have been sustained at least until the age of 12. In contrast, viral load increased in child 2 and she progressed to AIDS and death at age 9. Beginning in the first year of life, child 1 raised high titers of antibodies that neutralized primary R5 isolates more effectively than X4 isolates, both autologous and heterologous. Child 2 raised a weak X4-specific Nab response that decreased sharply as disease progressed. Rate of evolution, nucleotide and amino acid diversity, and positive selection, were significantly higher in the envelope of child 1 compared to child 2. Rates of R5-to-X4 tropism switch, of V1 and V3 sequence diversification, and of convergence of V3 to a β-hairpin structure were related with rate of escape from the neutralizing antibodies. Finally, our data suggests that the molecular and phenotypic evolution of the human immunodeficiency virus type 2 envelope are related with the dynamics of the neutralizing antibody response providing further support

  7. Exploration of antigenic variation in gp120 from clades A through F of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 by using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, J P; McCutchan, F E; Poon, S W; Mascola, J; Liu, J; Cao, Y; Ho, D D

    1994-01-01

    The reactivities of a panel of 14 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) with monomeric gp120 derived from 67 isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 of clades A through F were assessed by using an antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The MAbs used were all raised against gp120 or gp120 peptides from clade B viruses and were directed at a range of epitopes relevant to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 neutralization: the V2 and V3 loops, discontinuous epitopes overlapping the CD4-binding site, and two other discontinuous epitopes. Four of the five V3 MAbs showed modest cross-reactivity within clade B but very limited reactivity with gp120s from other clades. These reactivity patterns are consistent with the known primary sequence requirements for the binding of these MAbs. One V3 human MAb (19b), however, was much more broadly reactive than the others, binding to 19 of 29 clade B and 10 of 12 clade E gp120s. The 19b epitope is confined to the flanks of the V3 loop, and these sequences are relatively conserved in clade B and E viruses. In contrast to the limited reactivity of V3 MAbs, CD4-binding site MAbs were much more broadly reactive across clades, two of these MAbs (205-46-9 and 21h) being virtually pan-reactive across clades A through F. Another human MAb (A-32) to a discontinuous epitope was also pan-reactive. The CD4-binding site is strongly conserved between clades; but when considering the epitopes near the CD4-binding site, clade D gp120 appears to be the most closely related to clade B and clade E appears to be the least related. A tentative rank order for these epitopes is B/D-A/C-E/F. V2 MAbs reacted sporadically within and between clades, and no clear pattern was observable. While results from binding assays do not predict neutralization serotypes, they suggest that there may be antigenic subtypes related, but not identical, to the genetic subtypes. PMID:7525988

  8. Immunofluorescence, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, particle agglutination and western blot for the detection of antibody to human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Auwanit, W; Ayuthaya, P I; Balachandra, K; Jayavasu, C; Phanthumachinda, B; Ikuta, K; Yamanishi, K; Kanai, K

    1990-03-01

    Immunofluorescence assay (IFA) has been applied for detection of antibody to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). To compare the IFA with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and particle agglutination (PA), we examined the antibody response to HIV-1 in 475 sera from AIDS, PGL and ARC patients as well as several risk groups and healthy persons by three methods. The positive results by any methods were confirmed by western blot (WB). The results by all methods were well correlated on the sera from 45 asymptomatic male homosexuals and 70 female prostitutes. There were some false positive results by ELISA in the sera from prisoners and healthy persons. Four sera from drug abusers were positive only by PA and IFA and were negative by ELISA. All were WB-inconclusive. Particle agglutination and IFA results were compared with western blot analysis on 208 ELISA-positive sera. All IFA-strongly positive sera (84%) were positive by western blot. The sera with weakly positive, negative and inconclusive results by IFA (16%) were possibly any of positive, inconclusive or negative by western blot. By PA, 200 of 208 (97%) sera were PA-positive and 1% of these sera were WB-inconclusive while the PA-negative sera were either negative or inconclusive by western blot. These results suggested that PA is a simple and sensitive method for screening of HIV-1 antibody while IFA could be a primary confirmatory test and western blot would then be used for confirming any IFA-negative or inconclusive results.

  9. Adolescents and human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J R

    1992-12-01

    As of March 31, 1992, individuals 13 to 19 years of age had been diagnosed with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome; over one third were diagnosed in the past 2 years alone. Because of the long incubation period from initial infection to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome diagnosis, the majority of young adults with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome were probably initially infected as adolescents. In 1991, 34% of adolescents with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome were female, and their predominant mode of transmission was heterosexual contact. Human immunodeficiency virus seroprevalence studies of adolescents show a male-to-female ratio approaching 1:1, with many human immunodeficiency virus-infected adolescent women identifying none of the standard risk. Factors such as sexual and drug experimentation, risk taking, and sense of invulnerability so characteristic of adolescence put adolescents at special risk for human immunodeficiency virus. There is no published information on if or how clinical manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus disease in adolescents might differ from those seen in adults. Medical care should be broad-based and should include access to clinical trials for new drug treatments. General knowledge levels about acquired immunodeficiency syndrome are high among US adolescents, but behavioral changes have lagged behind. All adolescents should be targeted for intensive education about human immunodeficiency virus along with interventions designed to enhance their general coping, communication, and decision-making skills.

  10. Detection of specific antibodies in gingival crevicular transudate by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed Central

    Soto-Ramírez, L E; Hernández-Gómez, L; Sifuentes-Osornio, J; Barriga-Angulo, G; Duarte de Lima, D; López-Portillo, M; Ruiz-Palacios, G M

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this open and multicenter trial was to determine the usefulness of antibody detection by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in gingival crevicular transudate (GCT), which was collected with an investigational device (Orasure; Epitope, Beaverton, Oreg.), for the diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection and to compare it with antibody detection in serum. A total of 1,880 individuals were tested, as follows: 354 HIV-1-infected individuals (111 asymptomatics individuals and 243 individuals with AIDS), 46 individuals with autoimmune diseases (AD), 296 individuals with dental diseases, 42 individuals with other chronic diseases, and 1,142 healthy individuals. Sera from 356 individuals and GCT from 354 individuals were positive for HIV-1 antibodies. There were two false-negative gingival samples, one from an HIV-1-positive asymptomatic individual and one from a patient with AIDS. HIV-1 antibodies were unexpectedly detected in both serum and GCT of two individuals, one with dental disease and one with pulmonary tuberculosis. None of the sera or GCTs from healthy subjects or patients with AD were positive. Compared with the serum assay, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the GCT assay were 99.5, 100, 100, and 99.9%, respectively. Of 355 paired serum-GCT samples that were HIV-1 positive by ELISA and that were tested by Western blot (immunoblot), all were positive for HIV-1 by using the U.S. Public Health Service interpretation criteria, while among gingival samples, 301 were positive, 52 were indeterminate, and 2 were negative. Of 82 negative paired samples selected at random, 80 were negative by Western blotting of serum and GCT and 2 were indeterminate by Western blotting of serum and negative by Western blotting of GCT (a healthy blood donor and a patient with dermatopolymyositis). Testing for HIV-1 antibodies in GCT is a simple and reliable screening procedure in populations with

  11. Quantitative model of antibody- and soluble CD4-mediated neutralization of primary isolates and T-cell line-adapted strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Klasse, P J; Moore, J P

    1996-01-01

    Primary isolates (PI) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are considerably less sensitive than T-cell line-adapted strains to neutralization by soluble CD4 and by most cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies to the viral envelope (Env) glycoprotein, as well as by postinfection and postvaccination sera (J. P. Moore and D. D. Ho, AIDS 9 [suppl. A]:5117-5136, 1995). We developed a quantitative model to explain the neutralization resistance of PI. The factors incorporated into the model are the dissociation constants for the binding of the neutralizing agent to native Env oligomers, the number of outer Env molecules on the viral surface (which decreases by shedding), and the minimum number of Env molecules required for attachment and fusion. We conclude that modest differences in all these factors can, when combined, explain a relative neutralization resistance of PI versus T-cell line-adapted strains that sometimes amounts to several orders of magnitude. The hypothesis that neutralization of HIV is due to the reduction below a minimum number of the Env molecules on a virion available for attachment and fusion is at odds with single- and few-hit neutralization theories. Our analysis of these ideas favors the hypothesis that neutralization of HIV is instead a competitive blocking of interactions with cellular factors, including adsorption receptors. PMID:8648701

  12. Characterization of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies to linear and conformation-dependent epitopes within the first and second variable domains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120.

    PubMed Central

    McKeating, J A; Shotton, C; Cordell, J; Graham, S; Balfe, P; Sullivan, N; Charles, M; Page, M; Bolmstedt, A; Olofsson, S

    1993-01-01

    A number of linear and conformation-dependent neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have been mapped to the first and second variable (V1 and V2) domains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp120. The majority of these MAbs are as effective at neutralizing HIV-1 infectivity as MAbs to the V3 domain and the CD4 binding site. The linear MAbs bind to amino acid residues 162 to 171, and changes at residues 183/184 (PI/SG) and 191/192/193 (YSL/GSS) within the V2 domain abrogate the binding of the two conformation-dependent MAbs, 11/68b and CRA-4, respectively. Surprisingly, a change at residue 435 (Y/H or Y/S), in a region of gp120 near the CD4 binding site (M. Kowalski, J. Potz, L. Basiripour, T. Dorfman, W. C. Goh, E. Terwilliger, A. Dayton, C. Rosen, W. Haseltine, and J. Sodroski, Science 237:1351-1355, 1987; L. A. Lasky, G. M. Nakamura, D. H. Smith, C. Fennie, C. Shimasaki, E. Patzer, P. Berman, T. Gregory, and D. Capon, Cell 50:975-985, 1987; and U. Olshevsky, E. Helseth, C. Furman, J. Li, W. Haseltine, and J. Sodroski, J. Virol. 64:5701-5707, 1990), abrogated gp120 recognition by both of the conformation-dependent MAbs. However, both MAbs 11/68b and CRA-4 were able to bind to HIV-1 V1V2 chimeric fusion proteins expressing the V1V2 domains in the absence of C4, suggesting that residues in C4 are not components of the epitopes but that amino acid changes in C4 may affect the structure of the V1V2 domains. This is consistent with the ability of soluble CD4 to block 11/68b and CRA-4 binding to both native cell surface-expressed gp120 and recombinant gp120 and suggests that the binding of the neutralizing MAbs to the virus occurs prior to receptor interaction. Since the reciprocal inhibition, i.e., antibody inhibition of CD4-gp120 binding, was not observed, the mechanism of neutralization is probably not a blockade of virus-receptor interaction. Finally, we demonstrate that linear sequences from the V2 region are immunogenic in HIV-1-infected individuals

  13. Cross-clade neutralization of primary isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 by human monoclonal antibodies and tetrameric CD4-IgG.

    PubMed Central

    Trkola, A; Pomales, A B; Yuan, H; Korber, B; Maddon, P J; Allaway, G P; Katinger, H; Barbas, C F; Burton, D R; Ho, D D

    1995-01-01

    We have tested three human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) IgG1b12, 2G12, and 2F5) to the envelope glycoproteins of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), and a tetrameric CD4-IgG molecule (CD4-IgG2), for the ability to neutralize primary HIV-1 isolates from the genetic clades A through F and from group O. Each of the reagents broadly and potently neutralized B-clade isolates. The 2F5 MAb and the CD4-IgG2 molecule also neutralized strains from outside the B clade, with the same breadth and potency that they showed against B-clade strains. The other two MAbs were able to neutralize a significant proportion of strains from outside the B clade, although there was a reduction in their efficacy compared with their activity against B-clade isolates. Neutralization of isolates by 2F5 correlated with their possession of the LDKW motif in a segment of gp41 near the membrane-spanning domain. The other two MAbs and CD4-IgG2 recognize discontinuous binding sites on gp120, and so no comparison between genetic sequence and virus neutralization was possible. Our data show that a vaccine based on the induction of humoral immunity that is broadly active across the genetic clades is not impossible if immunogens that express the epitopes for MAbs such as 2F5, 2G12, and IgG1b12 in immunogenic configurations can be created. Furthermore, if the three MAbs and CD4-IgG2 produce clinical benefit in immunotherapeutic trials in the United States or Europe, they may also do so elsewhere in the world. PMID:7474069

  14. Evaluation of Novel Multiplex Antibody Kit for Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1/2 and Hepatitis C Virus Using Sol-Gel Based Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Seung Gyu; Jang, Jin Woo; Lee, Jong Han; Lim, Chae Seung; Kim, Jinhong; Ki, Yeona; Jo, Minjoung; Kim, Soyoun

    2015-01-01

    Background. Microarrays enable high-throughput screening (HTS) of disease-related molecules, including important signaling proteins/peptides and small molecules that are in low abundance. In this study, we developed a multiplex blood bank screening platform, referred to as the Hi3-1 assay, for simultaneous detection of human immunodeficiency virus 1/2 (HIV 1/2) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). Methods. The Hi3-1 assay was tested using four panels (Panel 1, n = 4,581 patient samples; Panel 2, n = 15 seroconversion samples; Panel 3, n = 4 performance samples; and Panel 4, n = 251 purchased positive control samples), and the results were collected by the Department of Laboratory Medicine, Korea University Medical College, Republic of Korea. The present study compares the sensitivity of the multiplex detection platform for both HIV and HCV using a sol-gel based microarray, which was based on a reference test (Architect HIV Ag/Ab Combo and Architect anti-HCV assays), in Korean patients. Results. The sensitivity of the multiplex detection platform for both HIV and HCV was 100%, and the specificity was 99.96% for HIV and 99.76% for HCV, which is equivalent to that of the reference test. Conclusion. We have successfully applied a novel screening technology to multiplex HIV and HCV diagnoses in a blood bank screening test. PMID:26457305

  15. Absence of Active Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Clinics in Zambia and Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Wandeler, Gilles; Mulenga, Lloyd; Hobbins, Michael; Joao, Candido; Sinkala, Edford; Hector, Jonas; Aly, Musa; Chi, Benjamin H.; Egger, Matthias; Vinikoor, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the prevalence of replicating hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in sub-Saharan Africa. Among 1812 individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus, no patient in rural Mozambique and 4 patients in urban Zambia were positive for anti-HCV antibodies. Of these, none had confirmed HCV replication. PMID:27047986

  16. Pediatric human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Domachowske, J B

    1996-01-01

    In the past decade, an increase in pediatric human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has had a substantial impact on childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide. The vertical transmission of HIV from mother to infant accounts for the vast majority of these cases. Identification of HIV-infected pregnant women needs to be impoved so that appropriate therapy can be initiated for both mothers and infants. While recent data demonstrate a dramatic decrease in HIV transmission from a subset of women treated with zidovudine during pregnancy, further efforts at reducing transmission are desperately needed. This review focuses on vertically transmitted HIV infection in children, its epidemiology, diagnostic criteria, natural history, and clinical manifestations including infectious and noninfectious complications. An overview of the complex medical management of these children ensues, including the use of antiretroviral therapy. Opportunistic infection prophylaxis is reviewed, along with the important role of other supportive therapies. PMID:8894346

  17. Detection and titration of human herpesvirus-8-specific antibodies in sera from blood donors, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients, and Kaposi's sarcoma patients using a whole virus enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Chatlynne, L G; Lapps, W; Handy, M; Huang, Y Q; Masood, R; Hamilton, A S; Said, J W; Koeffler, H P; Kaplan, M H; Friedman-Kien, A; Gill, P S; Whitman, J E; Ablashi, D V

    1998-07-01

    A human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with a whole virus lysate as antigen was developed and used to measure the seroprevalence rate and levels of IgG antibodies to HHV-8 in sera/plasma of various patient groups and blood donors. The virus antigen was prepared from the KS-1 cell line, which produces lytic virus, and therefore contains a broad array of viral proteins. Seroprevalence studies using this ELISA showed the following: 10 of 91 blood donors (11%) had an average HHV-8 antibody titer of 118; 67 of 72 (93%) classic Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) patients were positive with an average titer of 14,111; and 57 of 62 (92%) KS/human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients were positive with an average titer of 4,000. A study on a very limited number of serial serum samples from patients before and after diagnosis with KS showed highly elevated antibody titers to HHV-8 virus after KS lesions developed. Preliminary data show that 50% of the sera from HIV-1(+) homosexual patients contain IgG antibodies to HHV-8 suggesting that this population is at high risk for developing KS. Antibody results correlated well with the confirmatory immunofluorescent assays (IFA) using KS-1 cells as the substrate. This HHV-8 IgG antibody detection ELISA is sensitive and specific and does not cross-react with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) or other human herpesviruses. The results of this HHV-8 antibody survey suggest that this rapid ELISA assay can be used to screen large numbers of sera to find those at risk for developing KS.

  18. Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Task Force learned about the potential benefits and harms of this screening: (1) Everyone aged 15 to ... the disease to other people. Potential Benefits and Harms of Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) The ...

  19. Comparison of sensitivities and specificities of latex agglutination and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of antibodies to the human immunodeficiency virus in African sera.

    PubMed

    Francis, H L; Kabeya, M; Kafuama, N; Riggins, C; Colebunders, R; Ryder, R; Curran, J; Izaley, L; Quinn, T C

    1988-11-01

    The sensitivities, specificities, and positive and negative predictive values of the Cambridge BioScience Corp. (Worcester, Mass.) human immunodeficiency virus latex agglutination assay were compared by using three different blood preparations. By using the manufacturer's standard test method with diluted sera, the sensitivity of latex agglutination was 100%, the specificity was 99.58%, and the positive and negative predictive values were 99.26 and 100%, respectively. Use of diluted whole blood or undiluted whole blood did not significantly affect the sensitivity (mean, 99.72%), specificity (mean, 99.47%), positive predictive value (mean, 99.07%), or negative predictive value (mean, 99.89%). The latex agglutination assay is a simple, rapid assay for the detection of human immunodeficiency virus that would be useful in Third World countries or other areas where enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays are not available or cannot be used.

  20. Prevalence of antibodies to feline parvovirus, calicivirus, herpesvirus, coronavirus, and immunodeficiency virus and of feline leukemia virus antigen and the interrelationship of these viral infections in free-ranging lions in east Africa.

    PubMed

    Hofmann-Lehmann, R; Fehr, D; Grob, M; Elgizoli, M; Packer, C; Martenson, J S; O'Brien, S J; Lutz, H

    1996-09-01

    While viral infections and their impact are well studied in domestic cats, only limited information is available on their occurrence in free-ranging lions. The goals of the present study were (i) to investigate the prevalence of antibodies to feline calicivirus (FCV), herpesvirus (FHV), coronavirus (FCoV), parvovirus (FPV), and immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) antigen in 311 serum samples collected between 1984 and 1991 from lions inhabiting Tanzania's national parks and (ii) to evaluate the possible biological importance and the interrelationship of these viral infections. Antibodies to FCV, never reported previously in free-ranging lions, were detected in 70% of the sera. In addition, a much higher prevalence of antibodies to FCoV (57%) was found than was previously reported in Etosha National Park and Kruger National Park. Titers ranged from 25 to 400. FeLV antigen was not detectable in any of the serum samples. FCoV, FCV, FHV, and FIV were endemic in the Serengeti, while a transient elevation of FPV titers pointed to an outbreak of FPV infection between 1985 and 1987. Antibody titers to FPV and FCV were highly prevalent in the Serengeti (FPV, 75%; FCV, 67%) but not in Ngorongoro Crater (FPV, 27%; FCV, 2%). These differences could be explained by the different habitats and biological histories of the two populations and by the well-documented absence of immigration of lions from the Serengeti plains into Ngorongoro Crater after 1965. These observations indicate that, although the pathological potential of these viral infections seemed not to be very high in free-ranging lions, relocation of seropositive animals by humans to seronegative lion populations must be considered very carefully.

  1. Comparison of commercial kits for the detection of antibody to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Chikwem, J O; Mohammed, I; Ola, T O

    1990-03-01

    Four commercial kits for the detection of antibodies to HIV-1 were compared with regard to their sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value. The Wellcozyme competitive enzyme immunoassay was the least sensitive (62.5%), while Roche EIA, was the most sensitive (100%). All the commercial kits gave false negative results except the Roche EIA system. The Serodia particle agglutination test had the least positive predictive value of 26.9% while Roche EIA had the highest (88.9%). Our results show that commercial HIV-I antibody test kits are not equally sensitive in detecting positive sera. The practice of using Wellcozyme EIA alone for screening blood meant for transfusion should be discouraged because it does not detect all positive sera and might therefore increase the chances of transfusing HIV-I positive blood. The Roche EIA system appears to be the most reliable for screening blood. Test systems which detect HIV-2 should also be used for screening blood meant for transfusion.

  2. Pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Levy, J A

    1993-01-01

    The lentivirus human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) causes AIDS by interacting with a large number of different cells in the body and escaping the host immune response against it. HIV is transmitted primarily through blood and genital fluids and to newborn infants from infected mothers. The steps occurring in infection involve an interaction of HIV not only with the CD4 molecule on cells but also with other cellular receptors recently identified. Virus-cell fusion and HIV entry subsequently take place. Following virus infection, a variety of intracellular mechanisms determine the relative expression of viral regulatory and accessory genes leading to productive or latent infection. With CD4+ lymphocytes, HIV replication can cause syncytium formation and cell death; with other cells, such as macrophages, persistent infection can occur, creating reservoirs for the virus in many cells and tissues. HIV strains are highly heterogeneous, and certain biologic and serologic properties determined by specific genetic sequences can be linked to pathogenic pathways and resistance to the immune response. The host reaction against HIV, through neutralizing antibodies and particularly through strong cellular immune responses, can keep the virus suppressed for many years. Long-term survival appears to involve infection with a relatively low-virulence strain that remains sensitive to the immune response, particularly to control by CD8+ cell antiviral activity. Several therapeutic approaches have been attempted, and others are under investigation. Vaccine development has provided some encouraging results, but the observations indicate the major challenge of preventing infection by HIV. Ongoing research is necessary to find a solution to this devastating worldwide epidemic. Images PMID:8464405

  3. Immune suppression in calves with bovine immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, S; Wood, C; Xue, W; Krukenberg, S M; Chen, Q; Minocha, H C

    1997-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) infection on immune functions and possible interactions between BIV and other bovine viruses in calves. Ten calves were inoculated intravenously with BIV, and five served as controls. An increased lymphocyte proliferation to BIV gag protein was demonstrated 2 to 6 weeks after BIV inoculation (P < 0.05). Lymphocyte subset differentiation revealed a decreased CD4/CD8 ratio (P < 0.05) during weeks 2 to 7, suggesting a possible immune dysfunction in BIV-infected calves. When the calves were inoculated with bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1), the antibody response to BHV-1 in BIV-infected calves was delayed and the antibody titers were significantly lower (P < 0.05). Injection of bovine viral diarrhea virus vaccine also elicited a lower neutralizing antibody response in BIV-infected calves. The results indicated that immune suppression occurred in BIV-infected calves. PMID:9067663

  4. Sicca complex and infection with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Couderc, L J; D'Agay, M F; Danon, F; Harzic, M; Brocheriou, C; Clauvel, J P

    1987-05-01

    Five male patients with the persistent generalized lymphadenopathy syndrome also had a sicca complex. Salivary gland biopsy specimens showed diffuse lymphocytic infiltration of the glandular parenchyma. Serum autoantibodies and rheumatoid factor were not detected. All patients had IgG antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus and IgG to the viral capsid antigen of Epstein-Barr virus. These five patients had benign lymphocytic infiltrates in other organs (lung, liver, and kidneys). Sicca complex may be one of the various manifestations of the lymphoid hyperplasia noted in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. In these patients, the sicca complex showed specific features related to male predominance, lack of serum autoantibodies, and peripheral-blood T-lymphocyte subset distribution.

  5. Infection of macrophages and dendritic cells with primary R5-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 inhibited by natural polyreactive anti-CCR5 antibodies purified from cervicovaginal secretions.

    PubMed

    Eslahpazir, Jobin; Jenabian, Mohammad-Ali; Bouhlal, Hicham; Hocini, Hakim; Carbonneil, Cédric; Grésenguet, Gérard; Mbopi Kéou, François-Xavier; LeGoff, Jérôme; Saïdi, Héla; Requena, Mary; Nasreddine, Nadine; de Dieu Longo, Jean; Kaveri, Srinivas V; Bélec, Laurent

    2008-05-01

    Heterosexual contact is the primary mode of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 (HIV-1) transmission worldwide. The chemokine receptor CCR5 is the major coreceptor that is associated with the mucosal transmission of R5-tropic HIV-1 during sexual intercourse. The CCR5 molecule is thus a target for antibody-based therapeutic strategies aimed at blocking HIV-1 entry into cells. We have previously demonstrated that polyreactive natural antibodies (NAbs) from therapeutic preparations of immunoglobulin G and from human breast milk contain NAbs directed against CCR5. Such antibodies inhibit the infection of human macrophages and T lymphocytes by R5-tropic isolates of HIV in vitro. In the present study, we demonstrate that human immunoglobulins from the cervicovaginal secretions of HIV-seronegative or HIV-seropositive women contain NAbs directed against the HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5. Natural affinity-purified anti-CCR5 antibodies bound to CCR5 expressed on macrophages and dendritic cells and further inhibited the infection of macrophages and dendritic cells with primary and laboratory-adapted R5-tropic HIV but not with X4-tropic HIV. Natural anti-CCR5 antibodies moderately inhibited R5-tropic HIV transfer from monocyte-derived dendritic cells to autologous T cells. Our results suggest that mucosal anti-CCR5 antibodies from healthy immunocompetent donors may hamper the penetration of HIV and may be suitable for use in the development of novel passive immunotherapy regimens in specific clinical settings of HIV infection. PMID:18353923

  6. Increases in Entamoeba histolytica Antibody-Positive Rates in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected and Noninfected Patients in Japan: A 10-Year Hospital-Based Study of 3,514 Patients.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, Yasuaki; Nagata, Naoyoshi; Watanabe, Koji; Tsukada, Kunihisa; Teruya, Katsuji; Kikuchi, Yoshimi; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Akiyama, Junichi; Uemura, Naomi; Oka, Shinichi

    2016-09-01

    Serological evidence of the epidemiological trends in Entamoeba histolytica infection is scarce, especially in nonendemic countries. We aimed to determine the antibody-positive rates over a 10-year period, and compare the trends between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected and -noninfected patients. We reviewed 3,514 patients who underwent antibody testing during the study periods, which were divided into five annual categories: 2004-2005, 2006-2007, 2008-2009, 2010-2011, and 2012-2013. Anti-E. histolytica antibody was assessed by indirect immunofluorescence assay. The antibody-positive rate increased yearly from 2004-2005 to 2012-2013 (P < 0.001), although there was no increase in the annual number of antibody tests. This trend was seen among males (18.6-28.3%; P < 0.01), females (5.4-28.2%; P < 0.01), HIV-infected patients (18.4-26.9%; P < 0.001), and non-HIV-infected patients (14.6-36.8%; P < 0.001), and HIV-infected men who have sex with men (19.4-29.1%; P < 0.001). Among antibody-positive patients, there was a significant increase in the proportion of patients with high (≥ 1,600) titers (0.7-12.9%; P < 0.001), whereas this trend was not seen in patients with low (100) or intermediate (200-800) titers (P = 0.282 and 0.409, respectively). This large hospital-based study demonstrated that positive anti-E. histolytica antibody rates increased over 10 years, even though the annual number of antibody tests remained constant. Moreover, this trend was identified in non-high-risk patients (females and non-HIV-infected patients) as well as in high-risk patients. The proportion of patients with high antibody titers significantly increased among the antibody-positive patients. PMID:27296390

  7. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and human immunodeficiency virus infection in Nevada.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, J Q; Semiatin, S L

    1991-01-01

    We summarize information from three sets of epidemiologic data: the Nevada AIDS [acquired immunodeficiency syndrome] Surveillance System, which contains information about every case identified within the state boundaries through September 1989; the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seroprevalence reporting systems, which currently include data on all HIV-positive reports submitted statewide to public health authorities; and surveys on the knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of Nevadans concerning HIV-related disease. The Nevada State AIDS Task Force outlined major policy recommendations, nearly half of which concerned testing; only 2 dealt with preventing HIV transmission. Greater efforts should go into education, particularly directed toward groups at greatest risk of exposure to HIV, and to improve community-based care of infected persons.

  8. Identifying possible sites for antibody neutralization escape: Implications for unique functional properties of the C-terminal tail of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 gp41.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhifeng; Huang, Yushen; Tan, Yue; Yu, Yang; Wang, Junyi; Chen, Ying-Hua

    2016-07-01

    A previous amino acid sequence analyses from our laboratory reported nine potential sites in gp41 glycoprotein of HIV-1 that may contribute to virus escape from antibody neutralization. Besides four sites found outside the membrane of HIV-1 virus, five located in the C-terminal tail of gp41 specifically in the lentivirus lytic peptides motifs (LLPs). To further study the bioinformatical results, the virus infectivity assay and the standard neutralization assay were conducted on conservatively mutated virus. Two sites in the LLP3 domain stood out with the ability to alter the resistance of HIV-1 virus to certain broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). While the glycoprotein incorporation on the viral membrane and the interaction of the LLP3 domain with the lipid membrane remained unaltered, the increase in neutralization resistance of the mutant virus was associated with the changes on Env conformation. Our findings demonstrate different sensibility of bNAbs to mutations in the C-terminal tail and indicate an unrecognized potential role for even minor sequence variation in the C-terminal tail in modulating the antigenicity of the ectodomain of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein complex.

  9. Women at Risk for Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quadagno, David; And Others

    This article reports results from a survey among women at risk for contracting Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) as well as transmitting it in a vertical (to offspring) and horizontal (sexual partner or intravenous [IV] drug usage) mode. Little is known about the extent of HIV knowledge, sexual behaviors, and IV drug usage for women at risk for…

  10. Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jake; Goetz, Matthew Bidwell

    2016-08-01

    Improved survival with combination antiretroviral therapy has led to a dramatic increase in the number of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals 50 years of age or older such that by 2020 more than 50% of HIV-infected persons in the United States will be above this age. Recent studies confirm that antiretroviral therapy should be offered to all HIV-infected patients regardless of age, symptoms, CD4+ cell count, or HIV viral load. However, when compared with HIV-uninfected populations, even with suppression of measurable HIV replication, older individuals are at greater risk for cardiovascular disease, malignancies, liver disease, and other comorbidities.

  11. Pathogenesis of experimentally induced feline immunodeficiency virus infection in cats.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, J K; Sparger, E; Ho, E W; Andersen, P R; O'Connor, T P; Mandell, C P; Lowenstine, L; Munn, R; Pedersen, N C

    1988-08-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV; formerly, feline T-lymphotropic lentivirus) is a typical lentivirus resembling human and simian immunodeficiency viruses in morphologic features, protein structure, and reverse transcriptase enzyme. It is antigenically dissimilar, however. The virus is tropic for primary and permanent feline T-lymphoblastoid cells and Crandell feline kidney cells. The virus did not grow in other permanent feline non-lymphoblastoid cells that were tested, or in lymphoid and non-lymphoid cells from man, dogs, mice, and sheep. During short-term inoculation studies in cats, the feline immunodeficiency-like syndrome found in nature was not experimentally induced, but a distinct primary phase of infection was observed. Fever and neutropenia were observed 4 to 5 weeks after inoculation; fever lasted several days, and neutropenia persisted from 1 to 9 weeks. Generalized lymphadenopathy that persisted for 2 to 9 months appeared at the same time. Antibodies to FIV appeared 2 weeks after inoculation and then plateaued. Virus was reisolated from the blood of all infected cats within 4 to 5 weeks after inoculation and persisted indefinitely in the face of humoral antibody response. Virus was recovered from blood, plasma, CSF and saliva, but not from colostrum or milk. Contact transmission was achieved slowly in one colony of naturally infected cats, but not between experimentally infected and susceptible specific-pathogen-free cats kept together for periods as long as 4 to 14 months. The infection was transmitted readily, however, by parenteral inoculation with blood, plasma, or infective cell culture fluids. In utero and lactogenic transmission were not observed in kittens born to naturally or experimentally infected queens. Lymphadenopathy observed during the initial stage of FIV infection was ascribed to lymphoid hyperplasia and follicular dysplasia. A myeloproliferative disorder was observed in 1 cat with experimentally induced infection. PMID:2459996

  12. Prospective study of cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to influenza and antibodies to human T lymphotropic virus-III in homosexual men. Selective loss of an influenza-specific, human leukocyte antigen-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte response in human T lymphotropic virus-III positive individuals with symptoms of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, G M; Salahuddin, S Z; Markham, P D; Joseph, L J; Payne, S M; Kriebel, P; Bernstein, D C; Biddison, W E; Sarngadharan, M G; Gallo, R C

    1985-01-01

    Peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) from 18 homosexual men who did not have acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and from 9 heterosexual men were repetitively tested for their ability to generate HLA self-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to influenza virus (flu-self) over a 2-yr period. The sera of the same donors were tested for antibodies to human T lymphotropic virus-III (HTLV-III). Six of the homosexual and none of the heterosexual donors consistently generated weak cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to flu-self. Seven of the homosexual and none of the heterosexual donors were seropositive for antibodies to HTLV-III. No obvious correlation was detected between weak flu-self cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses and antibodies to HTLV-III. However, one homosexual donor generated no detectable cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity to flu-self, although he was a strong responder to HLA-alloantigens. This donor had an OKT4:OKT8 ratio of 0.4 and was seropositive for HTLV-III antigens; HTLV-III virus was identified in his PBL; and he developed AIDS during the course of this study. A second donor with lymphadenopathy and who was seropositive for HTLV-III antigens exhibited marginal cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity to flu-self which he subsequently lost. PBL from two patients, one with Kaposi's sarcoma and one with generalized lymphadenopathy, were also tested for cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to flu-self and to alloantigens. Both donors failed to generate cytotoxic T lymphocyte to flu-self, but generated strong cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to alloantigens. The selective loss of an HLA-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte response without loss of HLA alloantigenic cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity may be an important functional immunologic characteristic in the development of AIDS. PMID:2997287

  13. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus in South America

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Bruno M.; Hagiwara, Mitika K.; Cruz, Juliano C. M.; Hosie, Margaret J.

    2012-01-01

    The rapid emergence of AIDS in humans during the period between 1980 and 2000 has led to extensive efforts to understand more fully similar etiologic agents of chronic and progressive acquired immunodeficiency disease in several mammalian species. Lentiviruses that have gene sequence homology with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have been found in different species (including sheep, goats, horses, cattle, cats, and several Old World monkey species). Lentiviruses, comprising a genus of the Retroviridae family, cause persistent infection that can lead to varying degrees of morbidity and mortality depending on the virus and the host species involved. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) causes an immune system disease in domestic cats (Felis catus) involving depletion of the CD4+ population of T lymphocytes, increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections, and sometimes death. Viruses related to domestic cat FIV occur also in a variety of nondomestic felids. This is a brief overview of the current state of knowledge of this large and ancient group of viruses (FIVs) in South America. PMID:22590677

  14. Poor specific antibody response immunodeficiency (dysgammaglobulinemia) predates systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Al Hamzi, H; Al Shaikh, A; Arnaout, R K

    2013-08-01

    Poor specific antibody response is a well-known primary immunodeficiency that is related to hypogammaglobulinemia or common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). The co-existence of CVID or hypogammaglobulinemia and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has been rarely described. In all reported cases, the diagnosis of SLE antedates CVID. We report a 15-year-old Saudi girl who was diagnosed with poor specific antibody response at age 6 years in the form of poor or no antibody response and dysgammaglobulinemia. She developed SLE with musculoskeletal and hematological manifestations, positive antinuclear antibody and high anti-dsDNA nine years later. She was treated with rituximab with good response.

  15. A novel antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity epitope in gp120 is identified by two monoclonal antibodies isolated from a long-term survivor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed Central

    Alsmadi, O; Herz, R; Murphy, E; Pinter, A; Tilley, S A

    1997-01-01

    Two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), 42F and 43F, were isolated some 14 months apart from a single long-term survivor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. These MAbs were found to be indistinguishable in terms of their isotypes, specificities, affinities, and biological activities. Both 42F and 43F directed substantial antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) against cells infected with four divergent lab-adapted strains of HIV-1, but no neutralizing activity against these strains was detectable. The ability of MAbs 42F and 43F, as well as that of MAbs against two other gp120 epitopes, to direct ADCC against uninfected CD4+ cells to which recombinant gp120SF2 had been adsorbed (i.e., "innocent bystanders") was demonstrated to be less efficient by at least an order of magnitude than their ability to direct ADCC against HIV-1-infected cells. Flow cytometry analyses showed that 42F and 43F also bind to native primary isolate Envs from clades B and E expressed on cell surfaces. By direct binding and competition assays, it was demonstrated that the 42F/43F epitope lies in a domain of gp120 outside the previously described CD4-binding site and V3 loop ADCC epitope clusters. Immunoblot analysis revealed that the 42F/43F epitope is not dependent on disulfide bonds or N-linked glycans in gp120. Epitope mapping of 42F and 43F by binding to linear peptides demonstrated specificity of these MAbs for a sequence of 10 amino acids in the C5 domain comprising residues 491 to 500 (Los Alamos National Laboratory numbering for the HXB2 strain). Thus, 42F and 43F define a new ADCC epitope in gp120. Because of the relative conservation of this epitope and the fact that it appears to have been significantly immunogenic in the individual from which these MAbs were derived, it may prove to be a useful component of HIV vaccines. Furthermore, these MAbs may be used as tools to probe the potential importance of ADCC as an antiviral activity in HIV-1 infection. PMID

  16. Env-2dCD4 S60C complexes act as super immunogens and elicit potent, broadly neutralizing antibodies against clinically relevant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1).

    PubMed

    Killick, Mark A; Grant, Michelle L; Cerutti, Nichole M; Capovilla, Alexio; Papathanasopoulos, Maria A

    2015-11-17

    The ability to induce a broadly neutralizing antibody (bNAb) response following vaccination is regarded as a crucial aspect in developing an effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). The bNAbs target the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) which is exposed on the virus surface, thereby preventing cell entry. To date, conventional vaccine approaches such as the use of Env-based immunogens have been unsuccessful. We expressed, purified, characterized and evaluated the immunogenicity of several unique HIV-1 subtype C Env immunogens in small animals. Here we report that vaccine immunogens based on Env liganded to a two domain CD4 variant, 2dCD4(S60C) are capable of consistently eliciting potent, broadly neutralizing antibody responses in New Zealand white rabbits against a panel of clinically relevant HIV-1 pseudoviruses. This was irrespective of the Env protein subtype and context. Importantly, depletion of the anti-CD4 antibodies appeared to abrogate the neutralization activity in the rabbit sera. Taken together, this data suggests that the Env-2dCD4(S60C) complexes described here are "super" immunogens, and potentially immunofocus antibody responses to a unique epitope spanning the 2dCD4(60C). Recent data from the two available anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies, Ibalizumab and CD4-Ig (and bispecific variants thereof) have highlighted that the use of these broad and potent entry inhibitors could circumvent the need for a conventional vaccine targeting HIV-1. Overall, the ability of the unique Env-2dCD4(S60C) complexes to elicit potent bNAb responses has not been described previously, reinforcing that further investigation for their utility in preventing and controlling HIV-1/SIV infection is warranted. PMID:26432912

  17. Cross-Reactive Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Neutralizing Human Monoclonal Antibody That Recognizes a Novel Conformational Epitope on gp41 and Lacks Reactivity against Self-Antigens ▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mei-Yun; Vu, Bang K.; Choudhary, Anil; Lu, Hong; Humbert, Michael; Ong, Helena; Alam, Munir; Ruprecht, Ruth M.; Quinnan, Gerald; Jiang, Shibo; Montefiori, David C.; Mascola, John R.; Broder, Christopher C.; Haynes, Barton F.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2008-01-01

    Broadly cross-reactive human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-neutralizing antibodies are infrequently elicited in infected humans. The two best-characterized gp41-specific cross-reactive neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies, 4E10 and 2F5, target linear epitopes in the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) and bind to cardiolipin and several other autoantigens. It has been hypothesized that, because of such reactivity to self-antigens, elicitation of 2F5 and 4E10 and similar antibodies by vaccine immunogens based on the MPER could be affected by tolerance mechanisms. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a novel anti-gp41 monoclonal antibody, designated m44, which neutralized most of the 22 HIV type 1 (HIV-1) primary isolates from different clades tested in assays based on infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells by replication-competent virus but did not bind to cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a Biacore assay nor to any protein or DNA autoantigens tested in Luminex assays. m44 bound to membrane-associated HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Envs), to recombinant Envs lacking the transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail (gp140s), and to gp41 structures containing five-helix bundles and six-helix bundles, but not to N-heptad repeat trimers, suggesting that the C-heptad repeat is involved in m44 binding. In contrast to 2F5, 4E10, and Z13, m44 did not bind to any significant degree to denatured gp140 and linear peptides derived from gp41, suggesting a conformational nature of the epitope. This is the first report of a gp41-specific cross-reactive HIV-1-neutralizing human antibody that does not have detectable reactivity to autoantigens. Its novel conserved conformational epitope on gp41 could be helpful in the design of vaccine immunogens and as a target for therapeutics. PMID:18480433

  18. Probing the structure of the V2 domain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 surface glycoprotein gp120 with a panel of eight monoclonal antibodies: human immune response to the V1 and V2 domains.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, J P; Sattentau, Q J; Yoshiyama, H; Thali, M; Charles, M; Sullivan, N; Poon, S W; Fung, M S; Traincard, F; Pinkus, M

    1993-01-01

    We have analyzed a panel of eight murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that depend on the V2 domain for binding to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp120. Each MAb is sensitive to amino acid changes within V2, and some are affected by substitutions elsewhere. With one exception, the MAbs were not reactive with peptides from the V2 region, or only poorly so. Hence their ability to bind recombinant strain IIIB gp120 depended on the preservation of native structure. Three MAbs cross-reacted with strain RF gp120, but only one cross-reacted with MN gp120, and none bound SF-2 gp120. Four MAbs neutralized HIV-1 IIIB with various potencies, and the one able to bind MN gp120 neutralized that virus. Peptide serology indicated that antibodies cross-reactive with the HxB2 V1 and V2 regions are rarely present in HIV-1-positive sera, but the relatively conserved segment between the V1 and V2 loops was recognized by antibodies in a significant fraction of sera. Antibodies able to block the binding of V2 MAbs to IIIB or MN gp120 rarely exist in sera from HIV-1-infected humans; more common in these sera are antibodies that enhance the binding of V2 MAbs to gp120. This enhancement effect of HIV-1-positive sera can be mimicked by several human MAbs to different discontinuous gp120 epitopes. Soluble CD4 enhanced binding of one V2 MAb to oligomeric gp120 but not to monomeric gp120, perhaps by inducing conformational changes in the oligomer. PMID:7690418

  19. 78 FR 46969 - Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient-Focused Drug Development and Human Immunodeficiency Virus...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ... Development and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Cure Research; Reopening of Comment Period AGENCY: Food and Drug... Virus (HIV) Patient-Focused Drug Development and HIV Cure Research,'' published in the Federal Register of May 21, 2013 (78 FR 29755). In that notice, FDA requested public comment regarding...

  20. Crystals of a ternary complex of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase with a monoclonal antibody Fab fragment and double-stranded DNA diffract x-rays to 3.5-A resolution.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobo-Molina, A; Clark, A D; Williams, R L; Nanni, R G; Clark, P; Ferris, A L; Hughes, S H; Arnold, E

    1991-01-01

    Two crystal forms of complexes have been grown that contain human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase and a monoclonal antibody Fab fragment. One of the crystal forms (form II, space group P3112, a = 168.7 A, c = 220.3 A) diffracts x-rays to 3.5-A resolution and appears suitable for moderate-resolution structure determination. The form II crystals have the unusual property that their maximum resolution of diffraction and resistance to radiation damage are enhanced by either crystallization in the presence of or soaking with double-stranded DNA primer-template mimics. These crystals may permit structural studies of catalytically relevant complexes and eventually enable us to experimentally observe successive steps in the reverse transcription process. Images PMID:1720554

  1. Follicular dendritic cells and human immunodeficiency virus infectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Sonya L.; Tew, J. Grant; Tew, John G.; Szakal, Andras K.; Burton, Gregory F.

    1995-10-01

    LARGE amounts of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) localize on follicular dendritic cells (FDC) in the follicles of secondary lymphoid tissues following viral infection1,2. During clinical latency, active viral infection occurs primarily at these sites3,4. As HIV on FDC is in the form of immune complexes5, some of which may be formed with neutralizing antibody, we investigated whether HIV on FDC is infectious. We report here that HIV on FDC is highly infectious. Furthermore, FDC can convert neutralized HIV into an infectious form even in the presence of a vast excess of neutralizing antibody. Thus FDC may provide a mechanism whereby HIV infection can continue in the presence of neutralizing antibody.

  2. Neuromyelitis optica in patients with coexisting human immunodeficiency virus infections.

    PubMed

    Feyissa, Anteneh M; Singh, Parbhdeep; Smith, Robert G

    2013-09-01

    Two patients with known human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections and receiving antiretroviral treatment developed neuromyelitis optica (Devic's disease). One patient tested positive for serum aquaporin-4 immunoglobulin G antibodies. Both patients were treated with high dose pulsed intravenous methylprednisolone followed by standard sessions of plasma exchange both at the onset attack and during disease relapses. For maintenance therapy, one patient received rituximab infusions and the second patient received mycophenolate mofetil orally. Despite treatment, both patients are currently wheelchair-bound due to severe paraparesis. Neuromyelitis optica can occur in the course of HIV infection and poses an ongoing therapeutic challenge.

  3. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection and Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic is clearly one of the most serious health-care crises in the professional lives of contemporary physicians. It cannot be regarded as a curiosity to be dealt with by inner-city infectious-disease experts, but rather must be considered a problem for all health-care providers and a problem in which the obstetrician-gynecologist has a special role to play. PMID:18475370

  4. Inflammatory joint disease and human immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Forster, S M; Seifert, M H; Keat, A C; Rowe, I F; Thomas, B J; Taylor-Robinson, D; Pinching, A J; Harris, J R W

    1988-01-01

    Nine men positive for antibody to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who developed peripheral, non-erosive arthritis were followed up. The clinical features were compatible with reactive arthritis but were atypical in several respects: the joint symptoms were generally severe, persistent, and unresponsive to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The onset of arthritis was associated with various infections, none of which are known to be associated with the development of reactive arthritis. HLA typing was performed for three patients, all of whom were positive for HLA-B27. HIV was isolated from the synovial fluid of one patient. No patient had AIDS before developing arthritis, but four progressed to having AIDS after a mean of 7·5 months, and two died. Arthritis resolved in only one patient. The possibility of HIV infection should be considered in all patients with conditions suggesting reactive arthritis. Synovitis in patients with severe immunodeficiency has important pathogenetic implications. PMID:3135044

  5. Tissue tropism of simian immunodeficiency virus in rhesus monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Wyand, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) is a T-lymphotropic lentivirus that is genetically, immunologically, and morphologically related to the human immunodeficiency viruses type 1 and 2 (HIV-1, HIV-2). In rhesus monkeys, SIV induces a progressively fatal immunodeficiency syndrome strikingly similar to human acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The tissue and cellular tropism of SIV was determined by immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization using a 3.48 kilobase SIV envelope gene probe labeled with biotin, {sup 35}S, or {sup 3}H. Probes labeled with {sup 35}S nonspecifically bound to tissue eosinophils and produced poor signal resolution compared to tritium labeled probes. Biotin labeled probes did not detect SIV under similar hybridization conditions. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues produced strong hybridization signal with superior morphology compared to frozen tissues. Gastrointestinal, respiratory, and lymphoid tissues most frequently contained SIV RNA. The distribution of SIV did not correlate with sex, or viral inoculum, but was most extensive in animals with SIV induced granulomatous encephalitis. SIV was most frequently observed in lymphocytes and macrophages. In the brain focal granulomas were composed almost entirely of EBM11+, lysozyme+, macrophages which contained large amounts of SIV RNA and p27 core protein detected by the monoclonal antibody R1C7. Cells away from granulomas in the brain parenchyma and around blood vessels contained virus and were compatible with oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. Lymph nodes in follicular hyperplasia contained small numbers of SIV positive cells compatible with lymphocytes in the paracortex and mantle zones as well as in cells of the germinal center. Lymph nodes in various stages of follicular depletion with expanded paracortices contained large numbers of cells with SIV RNA in lymphocytes and macrophages.

  6. Three amino acid residues in the envelope of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 CRF07_BC regulate viral neutralization susceptibility to the human monoclonal neutralizing antibody IgG1b12.

    PubMed

    Nie, Jianhui; Zhao, Juan; Chen, Qingqing; Huang, Weijin; Wang, Youchun

    2014-10-01

    The CD4 binding site (CD4bs) of envelope glycoprotein (Env) is an important conserved target for anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) neutralizing antibodies. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies IgG1 b12 (b12) could recognize conformational epitopes that overlap the CD4bs of Env. Different virus strains, even derived from the same individual, showed distinct neutralization susceptibility to b12. We examined the key amino acid residues affecting b12 neutralization susceptibility using single genome amplification and pseudovirus neutralization assay. Eleven amino acid residues were identified that affect the sensitivity of Env to b12. Through site-directed mutagenesis, an amino acid substitution at position 182 in the V2 region of Env was confirmed to play a key role in regulating the b12 neutralization susceptibility. The introduction of V182L to a resistant strain enhanced its sensitivity to b12 more than twofold. Correspondingly, the introduction of L182V to a sensitive strain reduced its sensitivity to b12 more than tenfold. Amino acid substitution at positions 267 and 346 could both enhance the sensitivity to b12 more than twofold. However, no additive effect was observed when the three site mutageneses were introduced into the same strain, and the sensitivity was equivalent to the single V182L mutation. CRF07_BC is a major circulating recombinant form of HIV-1 prevalent in China. Our data may provide important information for understanding the molecular mechanism regulating the neutralization susceptibility of CRF07_BC viruses to b12 and may be helpful for a vaccine design targeting the CD4bs epitopes.

  7. 78 FR 29755 - Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient-Focused Drug Development and Human Immunodeficiency Virus...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-21

    ... (78 FR 21613), FDA published a document that announced the disease ] areas for meetings in fiscal... immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Patient-Focused Drug Development and HIV Cure Research. Patient-Focused Drug... Fee Act (PDUFA V). FDA is interested in obtaining patient input on the impact of HIV on daily...

  8. Multivariate analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 neutralization data.

    PubMed Central

    Nyambi, P N; Nkengasong, J; Lewi, P; Andries, K; Janssens, W; Fransen, K; Heyndrickx, L; Piot, P; van der Groen, G

    1996-01-01

    We report on the use of spectral map analysis of the inter- and intraclade neutralization data of 14 sera of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals and 16 primary isolates, representing genetic clades A to H in group M and group O. This multivariate analysis has been used previously to study the interaction between drugs and receptors and between viruses and antiviral compounds. The analysis reveals the existence of neutralization clusters, not correlated with the known genetic clades. The structural factors that have been identified may correlate with the most important neutralization epitopes. Three key primary HIV-1 isolates, which allow discrimination of sera that are likely or unlikely to neutralize primary isolates from most of the genetic clades, were identified. Our method of analysis will facilitate the evaluation as well as the design of suitable HIV-1 vaccines, which induce high-titer interclade cross-neutralizing antibodies. PMID:8709250

  9. Endemic mycosis complicating human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Sarosi, G A; DAvies, S F

    1996-01-01

    Persons infected with the human immunodeficiency virus are prone to the development of many fungal diseases. Normal hosts with intact immunity usually recover from infection by these less-invasive fungi. In persons with compromised T-cell-mediated immunity, however, widespread dissemination from a pulmonary focus occurs. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of the three major North American mycoses, histoplasmosis, blastomycosis, and coccidioidomycosis. In most cases, amphotericin B is the initial drug of choice, followed by one of the azoles for lifelong maintenance therapy. PMID:8732733

  10. Lipid management in human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Myerson, Merle

    2015-05-01

    The development and use of antiretroviral medications to treat patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has dramatically changed the course of this disease from one that was fatal to a chronic and more manageable condition. Recommendations and guidelines for the general population are presented in this review with suggestions as to how they may be applied to this patient population. Issues for which there is little or no information available are noted to highlight the many gaps in our knowledge regarding diagnosis and management of dyslipidemia for patients living with HIV.

  11. Depoliticize Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection: A Commentary

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Public-health policy is inconsistent in its approach to the sexually transmitted disease human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Nearly every health agency has politicized the reporting, finding, and contacting of HIV cases. There is also no consistency among the various state health departments and the various federal health agencies. Until we have a uniform health policy that treats HIV infection as every other reportable sexually transmitted disease, we will make little progress toward controlling its inevitable increase in both cases and costs. PMID:18475369

  12. Ocular syphilis in patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, John P; Huang, Lynn L; Rosberger, Daniel F

    2015-06-01

    As Acquired Immunodeficiency Disease (AIDS) turns thirty-years old, much progress has been made. 56,000 new cases of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection are expected in Americans this year. At least half or more will be in African Americans. Reports of the association between syphilis and HIV infection are well documented. We present a case of bilateral optic neuritis and panuveitis as the initial presentation in a previously undiagnosed patient with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and syphilis. PMID:27269502

  13. Vaccination of Rhesus Macaques with Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin Env V3 Elicits Neutralizing Antibody-Mediated Protection against Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus with a Homologous but Not a Heterologous V3 Motif

    PubMed Central

    Someya, Kenji; Cecilia, Dayaraj; Ami, Yasushi; Nakasone, Tadashi; Matsuo, Kazuhiro; Burda, Sherri; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Yoshino, Naoto; Kaizu, Masahiko; Ando, Shuji; Okuda, Kenji; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Yamazaki, Shudo; Yamamoto, Naoki; Honda, Mitsuo

    2005-01-01

    Although the correlates of vaccine-induced protection against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are not fully known, it is presumed that neutralizing antibodies (NAb) play a role in controlling virus infection. In this study, we examined immune responses elicited in rhesus macaques following vaccination with recombinant Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin expressing an HIV-1 Env V3 antigen (rBCG Env V3). We also determined the effect of vaccination on protection against challenge with either a simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-MN) or a highly pathogenic SHIV strain (SHIV-89.6PD). Immunization with rBCG Env V3 elicited significant levels of NAb for the 24 weeks tested that were predominantly HIV-1 type specific. Sera from the immunized macaques neutralized primary HIV-1 isolates in vitro, including HIV-1BZ167/X4, HIV-1SF2/X4, HIV-1CI2/X4, and, to a lesser extent, HIV-1MNp/X4, all of which contain a V3 sequence homologous to that of rBCG Env V3. In contrast, neutralization was not observed against HIV-1SF33/X4, which has a heterologous V3 sequence, nor was it found against primary HIV-1 R5 isolates from either clade A or B. Furthermore, the viral load in the vaccinated macaques was significantly reduced following low-dose challenge with SHIV-MN, and early plasma viremia was markedly decreased after high-dose SHIV-MN challenge. In contrast, replication of pathogenic SHIV-89.6PD was not affected by vaccination in any of the macaques. Thus, we have shown that immunization with an rBCG Env V3 vaccine elicits a strong, type-specific V3 NAb response in rhesus macaques. While this response was not sufficient to provide protection against a pathogenic SHIV challenge, it was able to significantly reduce the viral load in macaques following challenge with a nonpathogenic SHIV. These observations suggest that rBCG vectors have the potential to deliver an appropriate virus immunogen for desirable immune elicitations. PMID:15650171

  14. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Testing and False Disclosures in Heterosexual College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marelich, William D.; Clark, Tonya

    2004-01-01

    The authors assessed factors that motivate individuals to report negative human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody test results, although they had never been tested. In particular, they investigated sexual intimacy motives associated with the needs for affiliation, sex, and dominance as contributing factors for faulty disclosures. Participants…

  15. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections in Infants Affected by Primary Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Capretti, Maria Grazia; Lazzarotto, Tiziana; Faldella, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies are rare inherited disorders that may lead to frequent and often severe acute respiratory infections. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the most frequent pathogens during early infancy and the infection is more severe in immunocompromised infants than in healthy infants, as a result of impaired T- and B-cell immune response unable to efficaciously neutralize viral replication, with subsequent increased viral shedding and potentially lethal lower respiratory tract infection. Several authors have reported a severe clinical course after RSV infections in infants and children with primary and acquired immunodeficiencies. Environmental prophylaxis is essential in order to reduce the infection during the epidemic season in hospitalized immunocompromised infants. Prophylaxis with palivizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against the RSV F protein, is currently recommended in high-risk infants born prematurely, with chronic lung disease or congenital heart disease. Currently however the prophylaxis is not routinely recommended in infants with primary immunodeficiency, although some authors propose the extension of prophylaxis to this high risk population. PMID:25089282

  16. Seroprevalence of feline leukemia virus and feline immunodeficiency virus infection among cats in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Little, Susan; Sears, William; Lachtara, Jessica; Bienzle, Dorothee

    2009-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine the seroprevalence of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection among cats in Canada and to identify risk factors for seropositivity. Signalment, lifestyle factors, and test results for FeLV antigen and FIV antibody were analyzed for 11 144 cats from the 10 Canadian provinces. Seroprevalence for FIV antibody was 4.3% and seroprevalence for FeLV antigen was 3.4%. Fifty-eight cats (0.5%) were seropositive for both viruses. Seroprevalence varied geographically. Factors such as age, gender, health status, and lifestyle were significantly associated with risk of FeLV and FIV seropositivity. The results suggest that cats in Canada are at risk of retrovirus infection and support current recommendations that the retrovirus status of all cats should be known. PMID:19721785

  17. Neutralization Properties of Simian Immunodeficiency Viruses Infecting Chimpanzees and Gorillas

    PubMed Central

    Barbian, Hannah J.; Decker, Julie M.; Bibollet-Ruche, Frederic; Galimidi, Rachel P.; West, Anthony P.; Learn, Gerald H.; Parrish, Nicholas F.; Iyer, Shilpa S.; Li, Yingying; Pace, Craig S.; Song, Ruijiang; Huang, Yaoxing; Denny, Thomas N.; Mouquet, Hugo; Martin, Loic; Acharya, Priyamvada; Zhang, Baoshan; Kwong, Peter D.; Mascola, John R.; Verrips, C. Theo; Strokappe, Nika M.; Rutten, Lucy; McCoy, Laura E.; Weiss, Robin A.; Brown, Corrine S.; Jackson, Raven; Silvestri, Guido; Connors, Mark; Burton, Dennis R.; Shaw, George M.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Bjorkman, Pamela J.; Ho, David D.; Farzan, Michael

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Broadly cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies (bNabs) represent powerful tools to combat human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Here, we examined whether HIV-1-specific bNabs are capable of cross-neutralizing distantly related simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) infecting central (Pan troglodytes troglodytes) (SIVcpzPtt) and eastern (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) (SIVcpzPts) chimpanzees (n = 11) as well as western gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) (SIVgor) (n = 1). We found that bNabs directed against the CD4 binding site (n = 10), peptidoglycans at the base of variable loop 3 (V3) (n = 5), and epitopes at the interface of surface (gp120) and membrane-bound (gp41) envelope glycoproteins (n = 5) failed to neutralize SIVcpz and SIVgor strains. In addition, apex V2-directed bNabs (n = 3) as well as llama-derived (heavy chain only) antibodies (n = 6) recognizing both the CD4 binding site and gp41 epitopes were either completely inactive or neutralized only a fraction of SIVcpzPtt strains. In contrast, one antibody targeting the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of gp41 (10E8), functional CD4 and CCR5 receptor mimetics (eCD4-Ig, eCD4-Igmim2, CD4-218.3-E51, and CD4-218.3-E51-mim2), as well as mono- and bispecific anti-human CD4 (iMab and LM52) and CCR5 (PRO140, PRO140-10E8) receptor antibodies neutralized >90% of SIVcpz and SIVgor strains with low-nanomolar (0.13 to 8.4 nM) potency. Importantly, the latter antibodies blocked virus entry not only in TZM-bl cells but also in Cf2Th cells expressing chimpanzee CD4 and CCR5 and neutralized SIVcpz in chimpanzee CD4+ T cells, with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) ranging from 3.6 to 40.5 nM. These findings provide new insight into the protective capacity of anti-HIV-1 bNabs and identify candidates for further development to combat SIVcpz infection. PMID:25900654

  18. Immunogenicity and efficacy of immunodeficiency virus-like particles pseudotyped with the G protein of vesicular stomatitis virus

    SciTech Connect

    Kuate, Seraphin; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane; Stoiber, Heribert; Nchinda, Godwin; Floto, Anja; Franz, Monika; Sauermann, Ulrike; Bredl, Simon; Deml, Ludwig; Ignatius, Ralf; Norley, Steve; Racz, Paul; Tenner-Racz, Klara; Steinman, Ralph M.; Wagner, Ralf; Uberla, Klaus . E-mail: klaus.ueberla@ruhr-uni-bochum.de

    2006-07-20

    Vaccination with exogenous antigens such as recombinant viral proteins, immunodeficiency virus-derived whole inactivated virus particles, or virus-like particles (VLP) has generally failed to provide sufficient protection in animal models for AIDS. Pseudotyping VLPs with the vesicular stomatitis virus G protein (VSV-G), which is known to mediate entry into dendritic cells, might allow more efficient stimulation of immune responses. Therefore, we pseudotyped noninfectious immunodeficiency virus-like particles with VSV-G and carried out a preliminary screen of their immunogenicity and vaccination efficacy. Incorporation of VSV-G into HIV-1 VLPs led to hundred-fold higher antibody titers to HIV-1 Gag and enhancement of T cell responses in mice. Repeated vaccination of rhesus monkeys for 65 weeks with VSV-G pseudotyped simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-like particles (VLP[G]) provided initial evidence for efficient suppression of viral load after mucosal challenge with the SIVmac239 virus. Challenge of monkeys after a 28 week vaccination regimen with VLP[G] led to a reduction in peak viremia, but persistent suppression of viral load was not achieved. Due to limitations in the number of animals available for this study, improved efficacy of VSV-G pseudotyped VLPs in nonhuman primates could not be demonstrated. However, mouse experiments revealed that pseudotyping of VLPs with fusion-competent VSV-G clearly improves their immunogenicity. Additional strategies, particularly adjuvants, should be considered to provide greater protection against a challenge with pathogenic immunodeficiency virus.

  19. Update: routine screening for antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus, civilian applicants for U.S. military service and U.S. Armed Forces, active and reserve components, January 2010-June 2015.

    PubMed

    2015-08-01

    This report contains an update through June 2015 of the results of routine screening for antibodies to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among civilian applicants for military service and among members of the active and reserve components of the U.S. Armed Forces. Seroprevalences among civilian applicants in 2014 and the first half of 2015 (0.21 and 0.22 per 1,000 tested, respectively) were markedly lower than in 2012 (0.28 per 1,000 tested). In nearly every component of every military service, seroprevalences in 2014 and 2015 were either lower than, or relatively similar to, prevalences in prior years; however, in the Army National Guard, seroprevalences increased each year and approximately doubled from 2010 (0.18 per 1,000 tested) to 2014-2015 (0.36-0.39 per 1,000 tested). Among active and reserve component service members, seroprevalences continue to be higher among Army and Navy members and males than their respective counterparts.

  20. Update: Routine screening for antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus, civilian applicants for U.S. military service and U.S. Armed Forces, active and reserve components, January 2011-June 2016.

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    This report contains an update through June 2016 of the results of routine screening for antibodies to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among civilian applicants for military service and among members of the active and reserve components of the U.S. Armed Forces. During the surveillance period, annual seroprevalences among civilian applicants for military service peaked in 2015 (0.31 per 1,000 tested), up 29% from 2014 (0.24 per 1,000 tested). Seroprevalences among Marine Corps reservists, Navy active component service members, and Navy reservists also peaked in 2015. In the Army National Guard and the reserve component of the Marine Corps, full-year seroprevalences have trended upward since 2011. Overall (January 2011-June 2016) seroprevalences were highest for Army reservists, Army National Guard members, Navy active component members, and Navy reservists. Among active and reserve component service members, seroprevalences continue to be higher among Army and Navy members and males than their respective counterparts. PMID:27682627

  1. Functional epitope analysis of the human CD4 molecule: antibodies that inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gene expression bind to the immunoglobulin CDR3-like region of CD4.

    PubMed Central

    Benkirane, M; Hirn, M; Carrière, D; Devaux, C

    1995-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that monoclonal antibody (MAb) 13B8-2, specific for the immunoglobulin (Ig) complementary determining region 3 (CDR3)-like region of the CD4 molecule, inhibits viral transcription in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected CEM cells and HIV type 1 (HIV-1) promoter activity. Here, we have studied the capacity of several MAb specific for the D1 domain of CD4, including anti-CDR2-like (Leu-3a and ST4) and anti-CDR3-like (13B8-2 and ST40) MAb, and for the D2 domain of CD4 (BL4) to inhibit both provirus transcription in HIV-1LAI-infected CEM cells and transcription of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene under control of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat in transiently transfected CEM cells. We found that HIV-1 promoter activity and provirus transcription are inhibited only by MAb that bind to the CDR3-like region in domain 1 of CD4. Moreover, we demonstrated that the Fab fragment of an anti-CDR3-like region-specific anti-CD4 MAb is a powerful inhibitor of HIV-1 promoter activity. These results have implications for understanding the role of the CDR3-like region in CD4 T-cell signaling, which controls provirus transcription. PMID:7474106

  2. Antiviral Drugs for Viruses Other Than Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Razonable, Raymund R.

    2011-01-01

    Most viral diseases, with the exception of those caused by human immunodeficiency virus, are self-limited illnesses that do not require specific antiviral therapy. The currently available antiviral drugs target 3 main groups of viruses: herpes, hepatitis, and influenza viruses. With the exception of the antisense molecule fomivirsen, all antiherpes drugs inhibit viral replication by serving as competitive substrates for viral DNA polymerase. Drugs for the treatment of influenza inhibit the ion channel M2 protein or the enzyme neuraminidase. Combination therapy with Interferon-α and ribavirin remains the backbone treatment for chronic hepatitis C; the addition of serine protease inhibitors improves the treatment outcome of patients infected with hepatitis C virus genotype 1. Chronic hepatitis B can be treated with interferon or a combination of nucleos(t)ide analogues. Notably, almost all the nucleos(t) ide analogues for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B possess anti–human immunodeficiency virus properties, and they inhibit replication of hepatitis B virus by serving as competitive substrates for its DNA polymerase. Some antiviral drugs possess multiple potential clinical applications, such as ribavirin for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C and respiratory syncytial virus and cidofovir for the treatment of cytomegalovirus and other DNA viruses. Drug resistance is an emerging threat to the clinical utility of antiviral drugs. The major mechanisms for drug resistance are mutations in the viral DNA polymerase gene or in genes that encode for the viral kinases required for the activation of certain drugs such as acyclovir and ganciclovir. Widespread antiviral resistance has limited the clinical utility of M2 inhibitors for the prevention and treatment of influenza infections. This article provides an overview of clinically available antiviral drugs for the primary care physician, with a special focus on pharmacology, clinical uses, and adverse effects. PMID

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus induced oral candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Warrier, S Aravind; Sathasivasubramanian, S

    2015-08-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a worldwide health problem, which affects in both developing and developed countries. The oral lesions caused due to this disease can drastically change the life of the patient, in terms of quality. We can also know the progression of the disease and also the important immune status of the patient. Lots of information on HIV is known in the developed countries and very less reports are available in the developing countries. The morbidity of HIV disease is due to its association with opportunistic fungal infection and the most common among them is oral candidiasis. Here, we present a case report on an apparently healthy male patient of 39 years, who had oral candidiasis and was one of the indicators for HIV infection.

  4. Vaccination of rhesus macaques with a vif-deleted simian immunodeficiency virus proviral DNA vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Sparger, Ellen E. Dubie, Robert A.; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Cole, Kelly S.; Chang, W.L.; Luciw, Paul A.

    2008-05-10

    Studies in non-human primates, with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) and simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) have demonstrated that live-attenuated viral vaccines are highly effective; however these vaccine viruses maintain a low level of pathogenicity. Lentivirus attenuation associated with deletion of the viral vif gene carries a significantly reduced risk for pathogenicity, while retaining the potential for virus replication of low magnitude in the host. This report describes a vif-deleted simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)mac239 provirus that was tested as an attenuated proviral DNA vaccine by inoculation of female rhesus macaques. SIV-specific interferon-{gamma} enzyme-linked immunospot responses of low magnitude were observed after immunization with plasmid containing the vif-deleted SIV provirus. However, vaccinated animals displayed strong sustained virus-specific T cell proliferative responses and increasing antiviral antibody titers. These immune responses suggested either persistent vaccine plasmid expression or low level replication of vif-deleted SIV in the host. Immunized and unvaccinated macaques received a single high dose vaginal challenge with pathogenic SIVmac251. A transient suppression of challenge virus load and a greater median survival time was observed for vaccinated animals. However, virus loads for vaccinated and unvaccinated macaques were comparable by twenty weeks after challenge and overall survival curves for the two groups were not significantly different. Thus, a vif-deleted SIVmac239 proviral DNA vaccine is immunogenic and capable of inducing a transient suppression of pathogenic challenge virus, despite severe attenuation of the vaccine virus.

  5. Nature of Nonfunctional Envelope Proteins on the Surface of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Penny L.; Crooks, Emma T.; Porter, Lauren; Zhu, Ping; Cayanan, Charmagne S.; Grise, Henry; Corcoran, Paul; Zwick, Michael B.; Franti, Michael; Morris, Lynn; Roux, Kenneth H.; Burton, Dennis R.; Binley, James M.

    2006-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) neutralizing antibodies are thought be distinguished from nonneutralizing antibodies by their ability to recognize functional gp120/gp41 envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimers. The antibody responses induced by natural HIV-1 infection or by vaccine candidates tested to date consist largely of nonneutralizing antibodies. One might have expected a more vigorous neutralizing response, particularly against virus particles that bear functional trimers. The recent surprising observation that nonneutralizing antibodies can specifically capture HIV-1 may provide a clue relating to this paradox. Specifically, it was suggested that forms of Env, to which nonneutralizing antibodies can bind, exist on virus surfaces. Here, we present evidence that HIV-1 particles bear nonfunctional gp120/gp41 monomers and gp120-depleted gp41 stumps. Using a native electrophoresis band shift assay, we show that antibody-trimer binding predicts neutralization and that the nonfunctional forms of Env may account for virus capture by nonneutralizing antibodies. We hypothesize that these nonfunctional forms of Env on particle surfaces serve to divert the antibody response, helping the virus to evade neutralization. PMID:16474158

  6. Antiviral therapy for human immunodeficiency virus infections.

    PubMed Central

    De Clercq, E

    1995-01-01

    Depending on the stage of their intervention with the viral replicative cycle, human immunodeficiency virus inhibitors could be divided into the following groups: (i) adsorption inhibitors (i.e., CD4 constructs, polysulfates, polysulfonates, polycarboxylates, and polyoxometalates), (ii) fusion inhibitors (i.e., plant lectins, succinylated or aconitylated albumins, and betulinic acid derivatives), (iii) uncoating inhibitors (i.e., bicyclams), (iv) reverse transcription inhibitors acting either competitively with the substrate binding site (i.e., dideoxynucleoside analogs and acyclic nucleoside phosphonates) or allosterically with a nonsubstrate binding site (i.e., non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors), (v) integration inhibitors, (vi) DNA replication inhibitors, (vii) transcription inhibitors (i.e., antisense oligodeoxynucleotides and Tat antagonists), (viii) translation inhibitors (i.e., antisense oligodeoxynucleotides and ribozymes), (ix) maturation inhibitors (i.e., protease inhibitors, myristoylation inhibitors, and glycosylation inhibitors), and finally, (x) budding (assembly/release) inhibitors. Current knowledge, including the therapeutic potential, of these various inhibitors is discussed. In view of their potential clinical the utility, the problem of virus-drug resistance and possible strategies to circumvent this problem are also addressed. PMID:7542558

  7. Evolution of feline immunodeficiency virus Gag proteins.

    PubMed

    Burkala, Evan; Poss, Mary

    2007-10-01

    We evaluated the predicted biochemical properties of Gag proteins from a diverse group of feline immunodeficiency viruses (FIV) to determine how different evolutionary histories of virus and host have changed or constrained these important structural proteins. Our data are based on FIV sequences derived from domestic cat (FIVfca), cougar (FIVpco), and lions (FIVple). Analyses consisted of determining the selective forces acting at each position in the protein and the comparing predictions for secondary structure, charge, hydrophobicity and flexibility for matrix, capsid and nucleocapsid, and the C-terminal peptide, which comprise the Gag proteins. We demonstrate that differences among the FIV Gag proteins have largely arisen by neutral evolution, although many neutrally evolving regions have maintained biochemical features. Regions with predicted differences in biochemical features appear to involve intramolecular interactions and structural elements that undergo conformational changes during particle maturation. In contrast, the majority of sites involved in intermolecular contacts on the protein surface are constrained by purifying selection. There is also conservation of sites that interact with host proteins associated with cellular trafficking and particle budding. NC is the only protein with evidence of positive selection, two of which occur in the N-terminal region responsible for RNA binding and interaction with host proteins.

  8. Methods for assessing feline immunodeficiency virus infection, infectivity and purification.

    PubMed

    Ammersbach, Melanie; Bienzle, Dorothee

    2011-10-15

    Infection of cats with the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) recapitulates many aspects of infection of humans with HIV, including highly activated but ineffectual immune responses. Infected hosts remain seropositive for life, and detection of antibodies is the mainstay of diagnosis. However, to quantify virus for research or prognosis, viral proteins, nucleic acids or enzymes, are typically measured by ELISA, PCR or activity, respectively. While such assays are in wide use, they do not distinguish whole, infectious viral particles from defective or disrupted viruses. Titers of infectious viral particles may be estimated from tissue culture infectious doses or by enumerating cell-associated viral proteins, viral transcriptional activity or formation of syncytia. To analyze the viral proteome and the incorporation of host components into viral envelopes, pure lentiviral preparations are required. Methods for purifying lentiviruses include ultracentrifugation to separate particles by size, mass and/or density; chromatography to separate particles by charge, affinity or size; and additional removal of extraviral proteins and exosomes through subtilisin digestion or immunoaffinity. This article reviews advantages and disadvantages of different approaches to purification of lentiviruses with special reference to suitability for FIV, and highlights effects of purification on immune responses and immune assays. PMID:21715023

  9. Human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: correlation but not causation.

    PubMed Central

    Duesberg, P H

    1989-01-01

    AIDS is an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome defined by a severe depletion of T cells and over 20 conventional degenerative and neoplastic diseases. In the U.S. and Europe, AIDS correlates to 95% with risk factors, such as about 8 years of promiscuous male homosexuality, intravenous drug use, or hemophilia. Since AIDS also correlates with antibody to a retrovirus, confirmed in about 40% of American cases, it has been hypothesized that this virus causes AIDS by killing T cells. Consequently, the virus was termed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and antibody to HIV became part of the definition of AIDS. The hypothesis that HIV causes AIDS is examined in terms of Koch's postulates and epidemiological, biochemical, genetic, and evolutionary conditions of viral pathology. HIV does not fulfill Koch's postulates: (i) free virus is not detectable in most cases of AIDS; (ii) virus can only be isolated by reactivating virus in vitro from a few latently infected lymphocytes among millions of uninfected ones; (iii) pure HIV does not cause AIDS upon experimental infection of chimpanzees or accidental infection of healthy humans. Further, HIV violates classical conditions of viral pathology. (i) Epidemiological surveys indicate that the annual incidence of AIDS among antibody-positive persons varies from nearly 0 to over 10%, depending critically on nonviral risk factors. (ii) HIV is expressed in less than or equal to 1 of every 10(4) T cells it supposedly kills in AIDS, whereas about 5% of all T cells are regenerated during the 2 days it takes the virus to infect a cell. (iii) If HIV were the cause of AIDS, it would be the first virus to cause a disease only after the onset of antiviral immunity, as detected by a positive "AIDS test." (iv) AIDS follows the onset of antiviral immunity only after long and unpredictable asymptomatic intervals averaging 8 years, although HIV replicates within 1 to 2 days and induces immunity within 1 to 2 months. (v) HIV supposedly causes AIDS

  10. Laboratory Evaluation of a Point-of-Care Downward-Flow Assay for Simultaneous Detection of Antibodies to Treponema pallidum and Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    PubMed

    Herbst de Cortina, S; Bristow, C C; Vargas, S K; Perez, D G; Konda, K A; Caceres, C F; Klausner, J D

    2016-07-01

    Combining the detection of syphilis and HIV antibodies into one point-of-care test integrates syphilis screening into already existing HIV screening programs, which may be particularly beneficial in settings such as antenatal care. Using the INSTI Multiplex downward-flow immunoassay, we tested 200 stored serum samples from high-risk patients enrolled in a longitudinal study on HIV infection and syphilis in Peruvian men who have sex with men and transgender women. This rapid assay detected HIV and Treponema pallidum serum antibodies with sensitivities of 100% (95% confidence interval [CI], 95.9% to 100%) and 87.4% (95% CI, 81.4% to 92.0%), respectively, and specificities of 95.5% (95% CI, 89.9% to 98.5%) and 97.0% (95% CI, 84.2% to 99.9%), respectively (n = 200). The sensitivity for syphilis antibody detection was higher in patients with a rapid plasma reagin titer of ≥1:8 (97.3%) than in those with a titer of ≤1:4 (90%) or a nonreactive titer (66.7%). PMID:27147725

  11. Inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus integrase.

    PubMed Central

    Fesen, M R; Kohn, K W; Leteurtre, F; Pommier, Y

    1993-01-01

    In an effort to further extend the number of targets for development of antiretroviral agents, we have used an in vitro integrase assay to investigate a variety of chemicals, including topoisomerase inhibitors, antimalarial agents, DNA binders, naphthoquinones, the flavone quercetin, and caffeic acid phenethyl ester as potential human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase inhibitors. Our results show that although several topoisomerase inhibitors--including doxorubicin, mitoxantrone, ellipticines, and quercetin--are potent integrase inhibitors, other topoisomerase inhibitors--such as amsacrine, etoposide, teniposide, and camptothecin--are inactive. Other intercalators, such as chloroquine and the bifunctional intercalator ditercalinium, are also active. However, DNA binding does not correlate closely with integrase inhibition. The intercalator 9-aminoacridine and the polyamine DNA minor-groove binders spermine, spermidine, and distamycin have no effect, whereas the non-DNA binders primaquine, 5,8-dihydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone, and caffeic acid phenethyl ester inhibit the integrase. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester was the only compound that inhibited the integration step to a substantially greater degree than the initial cleavage step of the enzyme. A model of 5,8-dihydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone interaction with the zinc finger region of the retroviral integrase protein is proposed. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8460151

  12. [Cerebral infarction in human immunodeficiency virus infection].

    PubMed

    Blanche, P; Toulon, P; de La Blanchardière, A; Sicard, D

    1995-06-01

    Patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) appear to have a high risk of ischaemic cerebral events. We observed two cases of cerebral infarction in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). In the first case, a 38-year-old homosexual with no cardiovascular risk other than smoking presented with rapidly progressive hemiparesia. Brain CT-scan visualized two infarcts in the territory of the right sylvian artery and the arteriography an occlusion of the internal carotid artery. In the second, a 37-year-old homosexual, hospitalization was required for a left-sided pure sensitive epilepsy seizure. There was no cardiovascular risk other than smoking. Magnetic resonance imaging showed parietal ischaemia and thrombus in the left atrium without atrial hypertrophy was seen at transoesophageal echocardiography. In both cases, there was no evidence of endocarditis, dissection of the neck vessels or disseminated intravascular coagulation nor of associated viral or bacterial infectious complication of AIDS. Angiographic findings eliminated cerebral vascularitis. Among the perturbed haemostasis factors previously reported in HIV+ patients, we observed free proteins S deficiency (68 and 43%) and heparin cofactor II deficiency (54 and 40%). Serum albumin was 33 and 32 g/l respectively. Outcome was favourable in both cases with anticoagulant therapy. These coagulation anomalies would not appear sufficient to explain cerebral infarction. Other mechanisms including immune complexed deposition, direct HIV toxicity for endothelial cells or the effect of cytokines on smooth muscles fibres and fibroblasts are probably more important causal factors. PMID:7638144

  13. The Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Infectivity and Mechanisms of Pathogenesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fauci, Anthony S.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses how the infection of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) results in a profound immunosuppression due predominantly to a selective depletion of helper/inducer T lymphocytes that express the receptor for the virus, as well as neuropsychiatric abnormalities in the brain. (TW)

  14. An anti-CCR5 monoclonal antibody and small molecule CCR5 antagonists synergize by inhibiting different stages of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 entry

    SciTech Connect

    Safarian, Diana; Carnec, Xavier; Tsamis, Fotini; Kajumo, Francis; Dragic, Tatjana . E-mail: tdragic@aecom.yu.edu

    2006-09-01

    HIV-1 coreceptors are attractive targets for novel antivirals. Here, inhibition of entry by two classes of CCR5 antagonists was investigated. We confirmed previous findings that HIV-1 isolates vary greatly in their sensitivity to small molecule inhibitors of CCR5-mediated entry, SCH-C and TAK-779. In contrast, an anti-CCR5 monoclonal antibody (PA14) similarly inhibited entry of diverse viral isolates. Sensitivity to small molecules was V3 loop-dependent and inversely proportional to the level of gp120 binding to CCR5. Moreover, combinations of the MAb and small molecules were highly synergistic in blocking HIV-1 entry, suggesting different mechanisms of action. This was confirmed by time course of inhibition experiments wherein the PA14 MAb and small molecules were shown to inhibit temporally distinct stages of CCR5 usage. We propose that small molecules inhibit V3 binding to the second extracellular loop of CCR5, whereas PA14 preferentially inhibits subsequent events such as CCR5 recruitment into the fusion complex or conformational changes in the gp120-CCR5 complex that trigger fusion. Importantly, our findings suggest that combinations of CCR5 inhibitors with different mechanisms of action will be central to controlling HIV-1 infection and slowing the emergence of resistant strains.

  15. Neuromuscular complications of human immunodeficiency virus infection and antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, R G

    1994-01-01

    At least 4 distinct peripheral neuropathy syndromes occur in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. The most common, painful sensory neuropathy, may be related to the viral infection or may be medication induced and is treated symptomatically. The other 3, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, mononeuropathy multiplex (some patients), and the progressive polyradiculopathies related to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, may all respond to appropriate therapy. Both inflammatory myopathy and zidovudine myopathy also abate with early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:8048229

  16. Molecular and biological aspects of the bovine immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Corredor, Andrea G; St-Louis, Marie-Claude; Archambault, Denis

    2010-01-01

    The bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) was isolated in 1969 from a cow, R-29, with a wasting syndrome suggesting bovine leucosis. The virus, first designated bovine visna-like virus, remained unstudied until HIV was discovered in 1983. Then, it was demonstrated in 1987 that the bovine R-29 isolate was a lentivirus with striking similarity to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Moreover, BIV has the most complex genomic structure among all identified lentiviruses shown by several regulatory/accessory genes encoding proteins, some of which are involved in the regulation of virus gene expression. This manuscript aims to review biological and molecular aspects of BIV, with emphasis on regulatory/accessory viral genes/proteins which are involved in virus expression. PMID:20210777

  17. Seroprevalence of human herpesvirus 8 in human immunodeficiency virus 1-positive and human immunodeficiency virus 1-negative populations in Japan.

    PubMed

    Fujii, T; Taguchi, H; Katano, H; Mori, S; Nakamura, T; Nojiri, N; Nakajima, K; Tadokoro, K; Juji, T; Iwamoto, A

    1999-02-01

    To determine the seroprevalence of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8) among human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1)-positive (HIV-1+) and HIV-1-negative (HIV-1-) populations in Japan, 276 HIV-1+ patients and 1,000 HIV-1- blood donors were enrolled in this study. Antibodies against HHV8 latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) were examined through indirect immunofluorescent assay by using a B-cell line that was infected latently with HHV8 (body cavity-based lymphoma 1). An HHV8- and Epstein-Barr virus-negative B-cell line (Ramos) was used as a control. Thirty-two seropositive cases against LANA (anti-LANA+) were identified among the 276 HIV-1+ patients who were studied. Five cases were foreigners living in Japan. The risk factor of all 27 Japanese cases was unprotected sexual intercourse, and the great majority of these cases (23 in 27; 85%) reported homosexual/bisexual behavior. Anti-LANA+ status correlated with the presence of sexually transmitted diseases, such as amoeba and HBV infection, further suggesting male homosexual behavior as the main route of HHV8 transmission in Japan. Only two LANA+ cases were identified among 1,000 HIV- blood donors in Japan; thus, seroprevalence of HHV8 identified by LANA was estimated to be 0.2% among HIV-1- populations in this country. PMID:9892401

  18. Human immunodeficiency virus, herpes virus infections, and pulmonary vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Sonia C.; Almodovar, Sharilyn

    2013-01-01

    The following state-of-the-art seminar was delivered as part of the Aspen Lung Conference on Pulmonary Hypertension and Vascular Diseases held in Aspen, Colorado in June 2012. This paper will summarize the lecture and present results from a nonhuman primate model of infection with Simian (Human) Immunodeficiency Virus - nef chimeric virions as well as the idea that polymorphisms in the HIV-1 nef gene may be driving the immune response that results in exuberant inflammation and aberrant endothelial cell (EC) function. We will present data gathered from primary HIV nef isolates where we tested the biological consequences of these polymorphisms and how their presence in human populations may predict patients at risk for developing this disease. In this article, we also discuss how a dysregulated immune system, in conjunction with a viral infection, could contribute to pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Both autoimmune diseases and some viruses are associated with defects in the immune system, primarily in the function of regulatory T cells. These T-cell defects may be a common pathway in the formation of plexiform lesions. Regardless of the route by which viruses may lead to PAH, it is important to recognize their role in this rare disease. PMID:23662195

  19. Evidence of feline immunodeficiency virus, feline leukemia virus, and Toxoplasma gondii in feral cats on Mauna Kea, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Danner, R.M.; Goltz, Dan M.; Hess, S.C.; Banko, P.C.

    2007-01-01

    We determined prevalence to feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) antibodies, feline leukemia virus (FeLV) antigen, and Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in feral cats (Felis catus) on Mauna Kea Hawaii from April 2002 to May 2004. Six of 68 (8.8%) and 11 of 68 (16.2%) cats were antibody positive to FIV and antigen positive for FeLV, respectively; 25 of 67 (37.3%) cats were seropositive to T. gondii. Antibodies to FeLV and T. gondii occurred in all age and sex classes, but FIV occurred only in adult males. Evidence of current or previous infections with two of these infectious agents was detected in eight of 64 cats (12.5%). Despite exposure to these infectious agents, feral cats remain abundant throughout the Hawaiian Islands. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2007.

  20. Evidence of feline immunodeficiency virus, feline leukemia virus, and Toxoplasma gondii in feral cats on Mauna Kea, Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Danner, Raymond M; Goltz, Daniel M; Hess, Steven C; Banko, Paul C

    2007-04-01

    We determined prevalence to feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) antibodies, feline leukemia virus (FeLV) antigen, and Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in feral cats (Felis catus) on Mauna Kea Hawaii from April 2002 to May 2004. Six of 68 (8.8%) and 11 of 68 (16.2%) cats were antibody positive to FIV and antigen positive for FeLV, respectively; 25 of 67 (37.3%) cats were seropositive to T. gondii. Antibodies to FeLV and T. gondii occurred in all age and sex classes, but FIV occurred only in adult males. Evidence of current or previous infections with two of these infectious agents was detected in eight of 64 cats (12.5%). Despite exposure to these infectious agents, feral cats remain abundant throughout the Hawaiian Islands.

  1. Evidence of feline immunodeficiency virus, feline leukemia virus, and Toxoplasma gondii in feral cats on Mauna Kea, Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Danner, Raymond M; Goltz, Daniel M; Hess, Steven C; Banko, Paul C

    2007-04-01

    We determined prevalence to feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) antibodies, feline leukemia virus (FeLV) antigen, and Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in feral cats (Felis catus) on Mauna Kea Hawaii from April 2002 to May 2004. Six of 68 (8.8%) and 11 of 68 (16.2%) cats were antibody positive to FIV and antigen positive for FeLV, respectively; 25 of 67 (37.3%) cats were seropositive to T. gondii. Antibodies to FeLV and T. gondii occurred in all age and sex classes, but FIV occurred only in adult males. Evidence of current or previous infections with two of these infectious agents was detected in eight of 64 cats (12.5%). Despite exposure to these infectious agents, feral cats remain abundant throughout the Hawaiian Islands. PMID:17495320

  2. A molecularly cloned, pathogenic, neutralization-resistant simian immunodeficiency virus, SIVsmE543-3.

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, V; Adger-Johnson, D; Campbell, B; Goldstein, S; Brown, C; Elkins, W R; Montefiori, D C

    1997-01-01

    An infectious molecular clone of simian immunodeficiency virus SIVsm was derived from a biological isolate obtained late in disease from an immunodeficient rhesus macaque (E543) with SIV-induced encephalitis. The molecularly cloned virus, SIVsmE543-3, replicated well in macaque peripheral blood mononuclear cells and monocyte-derived macrophages and resisted neutralization by heterologous sera which broadly neutralized genetically diverse SIV variants in vitro. SIVsmE543-3 was infectious and induced AIDS when inoculated intravenously into pig-tailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina). Two of four infected macaques developed no measurable SIV-specific antibody and succumbed to a wasting syndrome and SIV-induced meningoencephalitis by 14 and 33 weeks postinfection. The other two macaques developed antibodies reactive in Western blot and virus neutralization assays. One macaque was sacrificed at 1 year postinoculation, and the survivor has evidence of immunodeficiency, characterized by persistently low CD4 lymphocyte subsets in the peripheral blood. Plasma samples from these latter animals neutralized SIVsmE543-3 but with much lower efficiency than neutralization of other related SIV strains, confirming the difficulty by which this molecularly cloned virus is neutralized in vitro. SIVsmE543-3 will provide a valuable reagent for studying SIV-induced encephalitis, mapping determinants of neutralization, and determining the in vivo significance of resistance to neutralization in vitro. PMID:8995688

  3. Spatial analysis of feline immunodeficiency virus infection in cougars.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, David C; Waller, Lance A; Biek, Roman

    2010-07-01

    The cougar (Puma concolor) is a large predatory feline found widely in the Americas that is susceptible to feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a fast-evolving lentivirus found in wild feline species that is analogous to simian immunodeficiency viruses in wild primates and belongs to the same family of viruses as human immunodeficiency virus. FIV infection in cougars can lead to a weakened immune system that creates opportunities for other infecting agents. FIV prevalence and lineages have been studied previously in several areas in the western United States, but typically without spatially explicit statistical techniques. To describe the distribution of FIV in a sample of cougars located in the northern Rocky Mountain region of North America, we first used kernel density ratio estimation to map the log relative risk of FIV. The risk surface showed a significant cluster of FIV in northwestern Montana. We also used Bayesian cluster models for genetic data to investigate the spatial structure of the feline immunodeficiency virus with virus genetic sequence data. A result of the models was two spatially distinct FIV lineages that aligned considerably with an interstate highway in Montana. Our results suggest that the use of spatial information and models adds novel insight when investigating an infectious animal disease. The results also suggest that the influence of landscape features likely plays an important role in the spatiotemporal spread of an infectious disease within wildlife populations.

  4. Spatial Analysis of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Cougars

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, David C.; Waller, Lance A.; Biek, Roman

    2010-01-01

    The cougar (Puma concolor) is a large predatory feline found widely in the Americas that is susceptible to feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a fast-evolving lentivirus found in wild feline species that is analogous to simian immunodeficiency viruses in wild primates and belongs to the same family of viruses as human immunodeficiency virus. FIV infection in cougars can lead to a weakened immune system that creates opportunities for other infecting agents. FIV prevalence and lineages have been studied previously in several areas in the western United States, but typically without spatially explicit statistical techniques. To describe the distribution of FIV in a sample of cougars located in the northern Rocky Mountain region of North America, we first used kernel density ratio estimation to map the log relative risk of FIV. The risk surface showed a significant cluster of FIV in northwestern Montana. We also used Bayesian cluster models for genetic data to investigate the spatial structure of the feline immunodeficiency virus with virus genetic sequence data. A result of the models was two spatially distinct FIV lineages that aligned considerably with an interstate highway in Montana. Our results suggest that the use of spatial information and models adds novel insight when investigating an infectious animal disease. The results also suggest that the influence of landscape features likely plays an important role in the spatiotemporal spread of an infectious disease within wildlife populations. PMID:21197421

  5. Epstein-Barr virus antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    EBV antibody test; EBV serology ... a lab, where a lab specialist looks for antibodies to the Epstein-Barr virus. In the first stages of an illness, little antibody may be detected. For this reason, the test ...

  6. Reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus during early infection with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, M A; Kingsley, L A; Atchison, R W; Belle, S; Breinig, M C; Ho, M; Rinaldo, C R

    1991-01-01

    Reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in early human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection was investigated in 49 homosexual men who seroconverted to HIV (cases) as compared with 49 matched controls who remained seronegative to HIV during a longitudinal study. EBV infection was reactivated in cases 6 months, but not 12 months, prior to HIV seroconversion as compared with controls and remained reactivated during 18 months of follow-up after HIV seroconversion, as shown by increases in immunoglobulin (Ig) G antibody titers to EBV early antigen. Antibody titers to EBV viral capsid antigen did not differ between cases and controls prior to the time of seroconversion to HIV but were significantly increased among cases by the first seropositive study visit and remained elevated during the 18 months after HIV seroconversion. Total serum IgG levels were increased in cases at the visit of seroconversion, and during 18 months of follow-up, but did not correlate with enhanced IgG production specific for EBV antigens. Significant decreases in numbers of CD4+ cells and increases in numbers of CD8+ cells during this early phase of HIV infection were not associated with changes in patterns of EBV antibody responses. Reactivation of EBV beginning 6 months before HIV seroconversion may have implications regarding the role of this herpesvirus in the pathogenesis of HIV. PMID:1650790

  7. Seroprevalence of bovine immunodeficiency virus and bovine leukemia virus in draught animals in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Meas, S; Ohashi, K; Tum, S; Chhin, M; Te, K; Miura, K; Sugimoto, C; Onuma, M

    2000-07-01

    Since bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV), known as bovine lentivirus, has been detected in dairy and beef cattle in various countries around the world, a prevalence study of antibodies to BIV and bovine leukemia virus (BLV) was conducted in draught animals in five provinces in Cambodia, where protozoan parasite infections were suspected in some animals. To clarify the status of draught animals including Haryana, Brahman, mixed-breed, local breed cattle and muscle water buffaloes, a total of 544 cattle and 42 buffaloes were tested, and 26.3 and 16.7%, respectively, were found positive for anti-BIV p26 antibodies determined by Western blotting. There were 5.3% positive for anti-BLV antibodies detected by immunodiffusion test among the cattle, but no reactors among buffaloes and no dual infection for both BIV and BLV was determined in this study. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from BIV-seropositive cattle were found to have BIV-provirus DNA, as detected by polymerase chain reaction and subsequent Southern blot hybridization. This is the first evidence for the presence of BIV and BLV infections in draught animals in tropical countries such as Cambodia. This wide distribution of BIV suggests its association with problems in animal health as reported worldwide, and that a primary BIV infection can predispose death of affected animals by other aggressive pathogens or stresses.

  8. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Disease Agents § 610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ... calendar days after a donor tests reactive for evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)...

  9. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Disease Agents § 610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ... calendar days after a donor tests reactive for evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)...

  10. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Disease Agents § 610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ... calendar days after a donor tests reactive for evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)...

  11. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Disease Agents § 610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ... calendar days after a donor tests reactive for evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)...

  12. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Disease Agents § 610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ... calendar days after a donor tests reactive for evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)...

  13. Additive Effect of Neutralizing Antibody and Antiviral Drug Treatment in Preventing Virus Escape and Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, Peter; Senn, Beatrice M.; Klenerman, Paul; Kalinke, Ulrich; Hengartner, Hans; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.

    2000-01-01

    Poorly cytopathic or noncytopathic viruses can escape immune surveillance and establish a chronic infection. Here we exploited the strategy of combining antiviral drug treatment with the induction of a neutralizing antibody response to avoid the appearance of neutralization-resistant virus variants. Despite the fact that H25 immunoglobulin transgenic mice infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus mounted an early neutralizing antibody response, the virus escaped from neutralization and persisted. After ribavirin treatment of H25 transgenic mice, the appearance of neutralization-resistant virus was prevented and virus was cleared. Thus, the combination of virus-neutralizing antibodies and chemotherapy efficiently controlled the infection, whereas each defense line alone did not. Similar additive effects may be unexpectedly efficient and beneficial in humans after infections with persistent viruses such as hepatitis C virus and hepatitis B virus and possibly human immunodeficiency virus. PMID:10846070

  14. Hepatitis B and human immunodeficiency virus co-infection

    PubMed Central

    Phung, Bao-Chau; Sogni, Philippe; Launay, Odile

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B and human immunodeficiency virus (HBV and HIV) infection share transmission patterns and risk factors, which explains high prevalence of chronic HBV infection in HIV infected patients. The natural course of HBV disease is altered by the HIV infection with less chance to clear acute HBV infection, faster progression to cirrhosis and higher risk of liver-related death in HIV-HBV co-infected patients than in HBV mono-infected ones. HIV infected patients with chronic hepatitis B should be counseled for liver damage and surveillance of chronic hepatitis B should be performed to screen early hepatocellular carcinoma. Noninvasive tools are now available to evaluate liver fibrosis. Isolated hepatitis B core antibodies (anti-HBc) are a good predictive marker of occult HBV infection. Still the prevalence and significance of occult HBV infection is controversial, but its screening may be important in the management of antiretroviral therapy. Vaccination against HBV infection is recommended in non-immune HIV patients. The optimal treatment for almost all HIV-HBV co-infected patients should contain tenofovir plus lamivudine or emtricitabine and treatment should not be stopped to avoid HBV reactivation. Long term tenofovir therapy may lead to significant decline in hepatitis B surface Antigen. The emergence of resistant HBV strains may compromise the HBV therapy and vaccine therapy. PMID:25516647

  15. Functional role of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 vpu.

    PubMed Central

    Terwilliger, E F; Cohen, E A; Lu, Y C; Sodroski, J G; Haseltine, W A

    1989-01-01

    To investigate the role of vpu in the replication and cytopathicity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), infectious proviruses were constructed that were isogenic except for the ability to produce the protein product of vpu. The vpu-encoded protein is shown to decrease the rate of syncytium formation and cell killing in infected CD4+ human T cells, to increase greatly the export of virus particles from infected cells, and to reduce the rate of accumulation of cell-associated viral proteins. The vpu protein complements in trans the defect in a vpu- HIV-1 provirus but does not affect the simian immunodeficiency virus, which lacks vpu. These observations suggest that vpu may contribute to the AIDS epidemic by increasing the transmission efficiency of the virus. Images PMID:2472639

  16. Frequent transmission of immunodeficiency viruses among bobcats and pumas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franklin, S.P.; Troyer, J.L.; TerWee, J.A.; Lyren, L.M.; Boyce, W.M.; Riley, S.P.D.; Roelke, M.E.; Crooks, K.R.; VandeWoude, S.

    2007-01-01

    With the exception of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which emerged in humans after cross-species transmissions of simian immunodeficiency viruses from nonhuman primates, immunodeficiency viruses of the family Lentiviridae represent species-specific viruses that rarely cross species barriers to infect new hosts. Among the Felidae, numerous immunodeficiency-like lentiviruses have been documented, but only a few cross-species transmissions have been recorded, and these have not been perpetuated in the recipient species. Lentivirus seroprevalence was determined for 79 bobcats (Lynx rufus) and 31 pumas (Puma concolor) from well-defined populations in Southern California. Partial genomic sequences were subsequently obtained from 18 and 12 seropositive bobcats and pumas, respectively. Genotypes were analyzed for phylogenic relatedness and genotypic composition among the study set and archived feline lentivirus sequences. This investigation of feline immunodeficiency virus infection in bobcats and pumas of Southern California provides evidence that cross-species infection has occurred frequently among these animals. The data suggest that transmission has occurred in multiple locations and are most consistent with the spread of the virus from bobcats to pumas. Although the ultimate causes remain unknown, these transmission events may occur as a result of puma predation on bobcats, a situation similar to that which fostered transmission of HIV to humans, and likely represent the emergence of a lentivirus with relaxed barriers to cross-species transmission. This unusual observation provides a valuable opportunity to evaluate the ecological, behavioral, and molecular conditions that favor repeated transmissions and persistence of lentivirus between species. Copyright ?? 2007, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Oral Immunization with Recombinant Vaccinia Virus Prime and Intramuscular Protein Boost Provides Protection against Intrarectal Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Challenge in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Thippeshappa, Rajesh; Tian, Baoping; Cleveland, Brad; Guo, Wenjin; Polacino, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) acquisition occurs predominantly through mucosal transmission. We hypothesized that greater mucosal immune responses and protective efficacy against mucosal HIV-1 infection may be achieved by prime-boost immunization at mucosal sites. We used a macaque model to determine the safety, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy of orally delivered, replication-competent but attenuated recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing full-length HIV-1 SF162 envelope (Env) or simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Gag-Pol proteins. We examined the dose and route that are suitable for oral immunization with recombinant vaccinia viruses. We showed that sublingual inoculation of two vaccinia virus-naive pigtailed macaques with 5 × 108 PFU of recombinant vaccinia viruses was safe. However, sublingual inoculation with a higher dose or tonsillar inoculation resulted in secondary oral lesions, indicating the need to optimize the dose and route for oral immunization with replication-competent vaccinia virus vectors. Oral priming alone elicited antibody responses to vaccinia virus and to the SF162 Env protein. Intramuscular immunization with the SF162 gp120 protein at either 20 or 21 weeks postpriming resulted in a significant boost in antibody responses in both systemic and mucosal compartments. Furthermore, we showed that immune responses induced by recombinant vaccinia virus priming and intramuscular protein boosting provided protection against intrarectal challenge with the simian-human immunodeficiency virus SHIV-SF162-P4. PMID:26718849

  18. Infection of bovine immunodeficiency virus and bovine leukemia virus in water buffalo and cattle populations in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Meas, S; Seto, J; Sugimoto, C; Bakhsh, M; Riaz, M; Sato, T; Naeem, K; Ohashi, K; Onuma, M

    2000-03-01

    A survey of antibodies to bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) known as bovine lentivirus and bovine leukemia virus (BLV) was conducted with samples from water buffalo and cattle populations in Pakistan. A total of 370 water buffaloes and 76 cattle were tested, and 10.3% and 15.8%, respectively, were found positive for anti-BIV p26 antibodies determined by Western blotting, while 0.8% of water buffaloes and no cattle were positive for anti-BLV antibodies determined by immunodiffusion test. BIV-seropositive water buffaloes and cattle were found to have BIV proviral DNA in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells determined by nested polymerase chain reaction. This is the first report of BIV infections in water buffaloes.

  19. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Associated Sporadic Nonfamilial Porphyria Cutanea Tarda.

    PubMed

    Guha, Sibashish Kamal; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Saha, Abanti; Lal, Niharika Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT), a relatively uncommon metabolic disease, is the most common cutaneous porphyria. Here, we present the case of a patient diagnosed with sporadic, nonfamilial PCT that presented with classical cutaneous findings and multiple risk factors, including alcohol abuse, human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS, that have been strongly associated with the sporadic form of PCT. PMID:27293254

  20. Titration of feline immunodeficiency virus-based lentiviral vector preparations.

    PubMed

    Saenz, Dyana T; Barraza, Román; Loewen, Nils; Teo, Wulin; Poeschla, Eric M

    2012-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-based lentiviral vectors are useful for introducing integrated transgenes into nondividing human cells. This protocol describes methods for measuring and calculating vector titers in transducing units (TU)/mL. Alternate methods are provided for green fluorescent protein (GFP) vectors and for β-galactosidase vectors.

  1. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Associated Sporadic Nonfamilial Porphyria Cutanea Tarda

    PubMed Central

    Guha, Sibashish Kamal; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Saha, Abanti; Lal, Niharika Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT), a relatively uncommon metabolic disease, is the most common cutaneous porphyria. Here, we present the case of a patient diagnosed with sporadic, nonfamilial PCT that presented with classical cutaneous findings and multiple risk factors, including alcohol abuse, human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS, that have been strongly associated with the sporadic form of PCT. PMID:27293254

  2. Nontyphoidal Salmonellosis, Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection, and Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Piggott, Damani A.; Carroll, Karen C.; Lim, Michael; Melia, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella infection and stroke are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with increased risk in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected population. We report a rare case of ischemic stroke associated with Salmonella enteritidis subdural empyema in an older HIV-infected patient with multimorbidity, despite surgery and treatment with susceptible antimicrobial drugs. PMID:27419176

  3. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated to human immunodeficiency virus].

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Gutiérrez, José Luis; Santos-Martínez, Luis Efren; Rodríguez-Silverio, Juan; Baranda-Tovar, Francisco Martín; Rivera-Rosales, Rosa María; Flores-Murrieta, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    From the advent of the highly effective antiretroviral treatment, the life expectancy of patients with human immunodeficiency virus has increased significantly. At present, the causes of death are non-infectious complications. Between them, the pulmonary arterial hypertension has a special importance. It is important early detection to establish the therapeutic, with the objective of preventing a fatal outcome to future. PMID:25577549

  4. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated to human immunodeficiency virus].

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Gutiérrez, José Luis; Santos-Martínez, Luis Efren; Rodríguez-Silverio, Juan; Baranda-Tovar, Francisco Martín; Rivera-Rosales, Rosa María; Flores-Murrieta, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    From the advent of the highly effective antiretroviral treatment, the life expectancy of patients with human immunodeficiency virus has increased significantly. At present, the causes of death are non-infectious complications. Between them, the pulmonary arterial hypertension has a special importance. It is important early detection to establish the therapeutic, with the objective of preventing a fatal outcome to future.

  5. Symptoms of Autonomic Dysfunction in Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Dominic; Nakamoto, Beau K.; Sullivan, Katherine; Sletten, David M.; Fujii, Satomi; Umekawa, Sari; Kocher, Morgan; Kallianpur, Kalpana J.; Shikuma, Cecilia M.; Low, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    This retrospective study evaluated the frequencies of symptoms associated with autonomic dysfunction in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients on stable combined antiretroviral therapy. Patients infected with HIV reported higher frequencies of dysautonomia symptoms compared with HIV-negative patients, particularly in the autonomic domains related to urinary, sleep, gastroparesis, secretomotor, pupillomotor, and male sexual dysfunction. PMID:26269797

  6. The Presidential Commission on the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Epidemic Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Presidential Commission on the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Epidemic, Washington, DC.

    This document presents findings of the Presidential Commission on the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) epidemic. The executive summary lists 20 major findings and recommendations which together comprise a comprehensive national strategy for managing the HIV epidemic. The commission recommends: (1) replacement of the obsolete term "AIDS"…

  7. Nontyphoidal Salmonellosis, Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection, and Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Piggott, Damani A; Carroll, Karen C; Lim, Michael; Melia, Michael T

    2016-04-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella infection and stroke are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with increased risk in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected population. We report a rare case of ischemic stroke associated with Salmonella enteritidis subdural empyema in an older HIV-infected patient with multimorbidity, despite surgery and treatment with susceptible antimicrobial drugs. PMID:27419176

  8. Altered Virome and Bacterial Microbiome in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Cynthia L; Gootenberg, David B; Zhao, Guoyan; Handley, Scott A; Ghebremichael, Musie S; Lim, Efrem S; Lankowski, Alex; Baldridge, Megan T; Wilen, Craig B; Flagg, Meaghan; Norman, Jason M; Keller, Brian C; Luévano, Jesús Mario; Wang, David; Boum, Yap; Martin, Jeffrey N; Hunt, Peter W; Bangsberg, David R; Siedner, Mark J; Kwon, Douglas S; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with increased intestinal translocation of microbial products and enteropathy as well as alterations in gut bacterial communities. However, whether the enteric virome contributes to this infection and resulting immunodeficiency remains unknown. We characterized the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome in a cohort of Ugandan patients, including HIV-uninfected or HIV-infected subjects and those either treated with anti-retroviral therapy (ART) or untreated. Low peripheral CD4 T cell counts were associated with an expansion of enteric adenovirus sequences and this increase was independent of ART treatment. Additionally, the enteric bacterial microbiome of patients with lower CD4 T counts exhibited reduced phylogenetic diversity and richness with specific bacteria showing differential abundance, including increases in Enterobacteriaceae, which have been associated with inflammation. Thus, immunodeficiency in progressive HIV infection is associated with alterations in the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome, which may contribute to AIDS-associated enteropathy and disease progression. PMID:26962942

  9. Altered Virome and Bacterial Microbiome in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Cynthia L; Gootenberg, David B; Zhao, Guoyan; Handley, Scott A; Ghebremichael, Musie S; Lim, Efrem S; Lankowski, Alex; Baldridge, Megan T; Wilen, Craig B; Flagg, Meaghan; Norman, Jason M; Keller, Brian C; Luévano, Jesús Mario; Wang, David; Boum, Yap; Martin, Jeffrey N; Hunt, Peter W; Bangsberg, David R; Siedner, Mark J; Kwon, Douglas S; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with increased intestinal translocation of microbial products and enteropathy as well as alterations in gut bacterial communities. However, whether the enteric virome contributes to this infection and resulting immunodeficiency remains unknown. We characterized the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome in a cohort of Ugandan patients, including HIV-uninfected or HIV-infected subjects and those either treated with anti-retroviral therapy (ART) or untreated. Low peripheral CD4 T cell counts were associated with an expansion of enteric adenovirus sequences and this increase was independent of ART treatment. Additionally, the enteric bacterial microbiome of patients with lower CD4 T counts exhibited reduced phylogenetic diversity and richness with specific bacteria showing differential abundance, including increases in Enterobacteriaceae, which have been associated with inflammation. Thus, immunodeficiency in progressive HIV infection is associated with alterations in the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome, which may contribute to AIDS-associated enteropathy and disease progression.

  10. Progressive immune dysfunction in cats experimentally infected with feline immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Torten, M; Franchini, M; Barlough, J E; George, J W; Mozes, E; Lutz, H; Pedersen, N C

    1991-01-01

    Within 6 months of infection with the Petaluma isolate of feline immunodeficiency virus, specific-pathogen-free domestic cats exhibited a decrease in the percentage and number of circulating CD4+ lymphocytes and in the CD4+/CD8+ T-cell ratio, along with a marginally significant depression of pokeweed mitogen-induced lymphocyte proliferation in vitro. There was no loss of responsiveness to concanavalin A during this stage, and the cats were capable of mounting a satisfactory antibody response to a T-dependent, synthetic polypeptide immunogen. The pokeweed mitogen response deficit became clearly demonstrable by 11 to 12 months postinfection. A decline in the lymphocyte proliferative response to concanavalin A and a diminished ability to mount an in vivo antibody response to the T-dependent immunogen evolved by 25 to 44 months postinfection. Virus infection did not affect the ability of cats to mount an antibody response to a T-independent synthetic polypeptide immunogen. These data indicate that feline immunodeficiency virus produces a slowly progressive deterioration of T-cell function but does not affect the ability of B cells to recognize and respond to a T-independent antigenic stimulus. PMID:1673159

  11. Species-Specific, Postentry Barriers to Primate Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Wolfgang; Schubert, David; LaBonte, Jason; Munson, Linda; Gibson, Susan; Scammell, Jonathan; Ferrigno, Paul; Sodroski, Joseph

    1999-01-01

    By using replication-defective vectors derived from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac), and murine leukemia virus (MuLV), all of which were pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) G glycoprotein, the efficiency of postentry, early infection events was examined in target cells of several mammalian species. Titers of HIV-1 vectors were significantly lower than those of SIVmac and MuLV vectors in most cell lines and primary cells from Old World monkeys. By contrast, most New World monkey cells exhibited much lower titers for the SIVmac vector compared with those of the HIV-1 vector. Prosimian cells were resistant to both HIV-1 and SIVmac vectors, although the MuLV vector was able to infect these cells. Cells from other mammalian species were roughly equivalent in susceptibility to the three vectors, with the exception of rabbit cells, which were specifically resistant to the HIV-1 vector. The level of HIV-1 vector expression was very low in transduced cells of rodent, rabbit, cow, and pig origin. Early postentry restriction of primate immunodeficiency virus infection exhibits patterns largely coincident with species borders and applies to diverse cell types within an individual host, suggesting the involvement of species-specific, widely expressed cellular factors. PMID:10559316

  12. Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis Secondary to Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Histoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Castelli, Anthony A.; Rosenthal, David G.; Bender Ignacio, Rachel; Chu, Helen Y.

    2015-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) in immunocompromised hosts is a fulminant syndrome of immune activation with high rates of mortality that may be triggered by infections or immunodeficiency. Rapid diagnosis and treatment of the underlying disorder is necessary to prevent progression to multiorgan failure and death. We report a case of HLH in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus, disseminated histoplasmosis, Mycobacterium avium complex, and Escherichia coli bacteremia. We discuss management of acutely ill patients with HLH and treatment of the underlying infection versus initiation of HLH-specific chemotherapy. PMID:26566535

  13. The Significance of a Common Idiotype (1F7) on Antibodies against Human Immune Deficiency Virus Type 1 and Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Sybille; Parsons, Matthew S.; Kohler, Heinz; Grant, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we trace the concept and potential functional role of regulatory idiotypes in the immune response to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), simian immunodeficiency virus, and hepatitis C virus (HCV). A major idiotype involved in these viral infections is recognized and defined by a murine monoclonal antibody (1F7). Antibodies expressing the idiotype defined by 1F7 are dominant in HIV-1 infection and are also found on many broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1. This regulatory idiotypic axis offers opportunities for exploitation in vaccine development for HIV-1, HCV, and other chronic viral infections. PMID:26904499

  14. Spinal cord toxoplasmosis in human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    García-García, Concepción; Castillo-Álvarez, Federico; Azcona-Gutiérrez, José M; Herraiz, María J; Ibarra, Valvanera; Oteo, José A

    2015-05-01

    Neurological complications in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) are still common, even in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Opportunistic infections, immune reconstitution, the virus itself, antiretroviral drugs and neurocognitive disorders have to be considered when establishing the differential diagnosis. Toxoplasmic encephalitis remains the major cause of space-occupying lesions in the brain of patients with HIV/AIDS; however, spinal cord involvement has been reported infrequently. Here, we review spinal cord toxoplasmosis in HIV infection and illustrate the condition with a recent case from our hospital. We suggest that most patients with HIV/AIDS and myelitis with enhanced spine lesions, multiple brain lesions and positive serology for Toxoplasma gondii should receive immediate empirical treatment for toxoplasmosis, and a biopsy should be performed in those cases without clinical improvement or with deterioration.

  15. Plaque staining assay for non- or weakly cytotoxic human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Matsui, T; Nakashima, H; Yoshiyama, H; Kobayashi, N; Yamamoto, N

    1987-07-01

    Cells infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) were selectively stained with peroxidase-coupled antibodies in a recently developed plaque assay for HIV. The numbers of plaques formed with the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III strain of HIV were exactly the same in stained (immunologically detectable) and unstained (visible) dishes. However, four times more plaques were visualized in stained dishes than in unstained dishes when the YU-6 and acquired immune deficiency syndrome-associated retrovirus strains of HIV were used. Linear relationship was observed between the number of stained plaques and the virus concentrations in the titration of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III and YU-6. The assay should be useful for the titration of HIV, especially for non- or weakly cytopathic strains of HIV.

  16. Perinatally infected adolescents living with human immunodeficiency virus (perinatally human immunodeficiency virus)

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Maria Leticia S; Cardoso, Claudete A

    2015-01-01

    The availability of highly potent antiretroviral treatment during the last decades has transformed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection into a chronic disease. Children that were diagnosed during the first months or years of life and received treatment, are living longer and better and are presently reaching adolescence and adulthood. Perinatally HIV-infected adolescents (PHIV) and young adults may present specific clinical, behavior and social characteristics and demands. We have performed a literature review about different aspects that have to be considered in the care and follow-up of PHIV. The search included papers in the MEDLINE database via PubMed, located using the keywords “perinatally HIV-infected” AND “adolescents”. Only articles published in English or Portuguese from 2003 to 2014 were selected. The types of articles included original research, systematic reviews, and quantitative or qualitative studies; case reports and case series were excluded. Results are presented in the following topics: “Puberal development and sexual maturation”, “Growth in weight and height”, “Bone metabolism during adolescence”, “Metabolic complications”, “Brain development, cognition and mental health”, “Reproductive health”, “Viral drug resistance” and “Transition to adult outpatient care”. We hope that this review will support the work of pediatricians, clinicians and infectious diseases specialists that are receiving these subjects to continue treatment. PMID:26279988

  17. Disinfection of Goldmann tonometers against human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Pepose, J S; Linette, G; Lee, S F; MacRae, S

    1989-07-01

    Goldmann tonometer tips were inoculated with 5 X 10(5) IU of cell-free or cell-associated human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (lymphadenopathy virus type 1 isolate) or 10(4) plaque-forming units of herpes simplex virus type 1 (McKrae strain) or type 2 (Hicks strain). In an effort to mimic a "worst case" clinical scenario, each respective virus was allowed to air dry on the tonometer tip for 10 minutes. Inoculated tonometers were then (1) not treated, (2) wiped with a disposable (Kim-wipe) tissue or sterile gauze; (3) wiped with sterile gauze soaked with 3% hydrogen peroxide; or (4) wiped with a 70% isopropyl alcohol swab. The hydrogen peroxide treatment and the alcohol wipes both completely disinfected the tonometer tips for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, whereas wiping with a sterile gauze or tissue was not effective. Wiping the Goldmann tonometer tip with an isopropyl alcohol swab and then allowing the alcohol to evaporate provides a ready and efficient means of inactivating these three enveloped viruses.

  18. Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus-Neutralizing Antibodies in Different Immunoglobulin Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Rabel, Philip O.; Planitzer, Christina B.; Farcet, Maria R.

    2012-01-01

    Patients with primary immunodeficiency (PIDs) depend on the presence of a variety of antibody specificities in intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). Using the tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), geographic variability in IVIG antibody content was shown. Care should therefore be exercised when treating PIDs in a given geography, as only locally sourced plasma contains the antibody specificities against the circulating pathogens in the given locality. PMID:22379062

  19. Leishmania and human immunodeficiency virus coinfection: the first 10 years.

    PubMed Central

    Alvar, J; Cañavate, C; Gutiérrez-Solar, B; Jiménez, M; Laguna, F; López-Vélez, R; Molina, R; Moreno, J

    1997-01-01

    Over 850 Leishmania-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection cases have been recorded, the majority in Europe, where 7 to 17% of HIV-positive individuals with fever have amastigotes, suggesting that Leishmania-infected individuals without symptoms will express symptoms of leishmaniasis if they become immunosuppressed. However, there are indirect reasons and statistical data demonstrating that intravenous drug addiction plays a specific role in Leishmania infantum transmission: an anthroponotic cycle complementary to the zoonotic one has been suggested. Due to anergy in patients with coinfection, L. infantum dermotropic zymodemes are isolated from patient viscera and a higher L. infantum phenotypic variability is seen. Moreover, insect trypanosomatids that are currently considered nonpathogenic have been isolated from coinfected patients. HIV infection and Leishmania infection each induce important analogous immunological changes whose effects are multiplied if they occur concomitantly, such as a Th1-to-Th2 response switch; however, the consequences of the viral infection predominate. In fact, a large proportion of coinfected patients have no detectable anti-Leishmania antibodies. The microorganisms share target cells, and it has been demonstrated in vitro how L. infantum induces the expression of latent HIV-1. Bone marrow culture is the most useful diagnostic technique, but it is invasive. Blood smears and culture are good alternatives. PCR, xenodiagnosis, and circulating-antigen detection are available only in specialized laboratories. The relationship with low levels of CD4+ cells conditions the clinical presentation and evolution of disease. Most patients have visceral leishmaniasis, but asymptomatic, cutaneous, mucocutaneous, diffuse cutaneous, and post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis can be produced by L. infantum. The digestive and respiratory tracts are frequently parasitized. The course of coinfection is marked by a high relapse rate. There is a lack

  20. Health Administrator Perspectives on Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Prevention and Services at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren-Jeanpiere, Lari; Jones, Sandra; Sutton, Madeline Y.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Due to the disproportionate impact of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) among African American young adults, the authors explored (1) number of historically black college and university (HBCU) campuses with existing HIV prevention policies and services and (2) perceived barriers for implementing…

  1. Severe immunodeficiency associated with a human immunodeficiency virus 1 NEF/3'-long terminal repeat transgene

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    We have generated several transgenic mouse strains carrying a human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) NEF/3' long terminal repeat (LTR) transgene under control of a T cell-specific promoter-enhancer element, showing a depletion of CD4+ T cells in the thymus and periphery. The immunological functions of the line with the most dramatic changes in lymphocyte populations, B6/338L, were analyzed in greater detail. The presence of the transgene in the heterozygous animal is associated with a dominant severe immunodeficiency. Older animals develop lymph- adenopathy and splenomegaly. CD4+CD8+ and CD4+CD8- single positive thymocytes already are depleted in these mice at the earliest stages in ontogeny, and peripheral T cells are reduced in frequency and present cell surface marker expression, which is characteristic for memory and activated T cells. The immunological response of B6/338L mice to several viral infections is also greatly impaired. Thus, the HIV-1 NEF/3' LTR as transgene in T cells can cause immunodeficiency and disease with striking similarities to a known retrovirus-induced immunodeficiency called murine AIDS (H. C. Morse III, S. K. Chattopadhyay, M. Makino, T. N. Frederickson, A. W. Hugin, and J. W. Hartley. 1992. AIDS. 6:607). PMID:8113676

  2. Plasma viral RNA load predicts disease progression in accelerated feline immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Diehl, L J; Mathiason-Dubard, C K; O'Neil, L L; Hoover, E A

    1996-01-01

    Viral RNA load has been shown to indicate disease stage and predict the rapidity of disease progression in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals. We had previously demonstrated that feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) RNA levels in plasma correlate with disease stage in infected cats. Here we expand upon those observations by demonstrating that plasma virus load is 1 to 2 logs higher in cats with rapidly progressive FIV disease than in long-term survivors. Differences in plasma FIV RNA levels are evident by 1 to 2 weeks after infection and are consistent throughout infection. We also evaluated humoral immune responses in FIV-infected cats for correlation with survival times. Total anti-FIV antibody titers did not differ between cats with rapidly progressive FIV disease and long-term survivors. These findings indicate that virus replication plays an important role in FIV disease progression, as it does in HIV-1 disease progression. The parallels in virus loads and disease progressions between HIV-1 and FIV support the idea that the accelerated disease model is well suited for the study of therapeutic agents directed at reducing lentiviral replication. PMID:8642679

  3. Thirty years of the human immunodeficiency virus epidemic and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Younai, Fariba S

    2013-01-01

    After more than 30 years of battling a global epidemic, the prospect of eliminating human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as the most challenging infectious disease of the modern era is within our reach. Major scientific discoveries about the virus responsible for this immunodeficiency disease state, including its pathogenesis, transmission patterns and clinical course, have led to the development of potent antiretroviral drugs that offer great hopes in HIV treatment and prevention. Although these agents and many others still in development and testing are capable of effectively suppressing viral replication and survival, the medical management of HIV infection at the individual and the population levels remains challenging. Timely initiation of antiretroviral drugs, adherence to the appropriate therapeutic regimens, effective use of these agents in the pre and post-exposure prophylaxis contexts, treatment of comorbid conditions and addressing social and psychological factors involved in the care of individuals continue to be important considerations. PMID:24136672

  4. Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Replication by Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodchild, John; Agrawal, Sudhir; Civeira, Maria P.; Sarin, Prem S.; Sun, Daisy; Zamecnik, Paul C.

    1988-08-01

    Twenty different target sites within human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA were selected for studies of inhibition of HIV replication by antisense oligonucleotides. Target sites were selected based on their potential capacity to block recognition functions during viral replication. Antisense oligomers complementary to sites within or near the sequence repeated at the ends of retrovirus RNA (R region) and to certain splice sites were most effective. The effect of antisense oligomer length on inhibiting virus replication was also investigated, and preliminary toxicity studies in mice show that these compounds are toxic only at high levels. The results indicate potential usefulness for these oligomers in the treatment of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and AIDS-related complex either alone or in combination with other drugs.

  5. Molecular biology of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    SciTech Connect

    Haseltine, W.A. )

    1991-07-01

    The immunodeficiency virus type 1 ia a complex retrovirus. In addition to genes that specify the proteins of the virus particle and the replicative enzymes common to all retroviruses, HIV-1 specifies at least six additional proteins that regulate the virus cycle. Two of these regulatory genes, tat and rev, specify proteins essential for replication. These proteins bind to specific sequences of newly synthesized virus RNA and profoundly affect virus protein expression. Tat and rev appear to be prototypes of novel eukaryotic regulatory proteins. These two genes may play a central role in regulating the rate of virus replication. Three other viral genes, vif, vpu, and vpr, affect the assembly and replication capacity of newly made virus particles. These genes may play a critical role in spread of the virus from tissue to tissue and from person to person. Our understanding of the contribution of each of the virus structural proteins and regulatory genes to the complex life cycle of the virus in natural infections is incomplete. However, enough insight has been gained into the structure and function of each of these components to provide a firm basis for rational antiviral drug development.

  6. Site-directed ELISA identifies a highly antigenic region of the simian immunodeficiency virus transmembrane glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Johnson, P R; Parks, D E; Norrby, E; Lerner, R A; Purcell, R H; Chanock, R M

    1988-06-01

    The transmembrane glycoprotein (gp32) of the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) contains a highly antigenic region that includes amino acid residues 606-628. A synthetic peptide representing this region was highly immunoreactive with sera from SIV-infected primates in a site-directed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). This reactivity extended across four primate species from three genera and identified infection with at least two distinct isolates of SIV. This site-directed ELISA represents a simple, accessible method with broad specificity for screening large numbers of primates for antibodies against SIV.

  7. Antiretroviral therapy reduces neurodegeneration in human immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Alex K.; Ellis, Ronald J.; Umlauf, Anya; Gouaux, Ben; Soontornniyomkij, Virawudh; Letendre, Scott L.; Achim, Cristian L.; Masliah, Eliezer; Grant, Igor; Moore, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of virally-suppressive antiretroviral therapy on cortical neurodegeneration and associated neurocognitive impairment. Design Retrospective, postmortem observational study. Methods Clinical neuropsychological and postmortem neuropathology data were analyzed in 90 human immunodeficiency virus-infected volunteers from the general community who had never undergone antiretroviral therapy (n=7, “naïve”) or who had undergone antiretroviral therapy and whose plasma viral load was detectable (n = 64 “unsuppressed”) or undetectable (n = 19, “suppressed”) at the last clinical visit prior to death. Subjects were predominately male (74/90, 82%) with a mean age of 44.7 years (SD 9.8). Cortical neurodegeneration was quantified by measuring microtubule-associated protein (MAP2) and synaptophysin (SYP) density in midfrontal cortex tissue sections. Results The suppressed group had higher SYP density than the naïve group (p = 0.007) and higher MAP2 density than the unsuppressed group (p = 0.04). The suppressed group had lower odds of human immunodeficiency virus-associated neurocognitive disorders than naïve (OR 0.07, p = 0.03). Higher SYP was associated with lower likelihood of human immunodeficiency virus-associated neurocognitive disorders in univariable (OR 0.8, p=0.03) and multivariable models after controlling for antiretroviral treatment and brain human immunodeficiency virus p24 protein levels (OR 0.72, p=0.01). Conclusions We conclude that virally suppressive antiretroviral treatment protects against cortical neurodegeneration. Further, we find evidence supporting the causal chain from treatment-mediated peripheral and central nervous system viral load suppression to reduced neurodegeneration and improved neurocognitive outcomes. PMID:25686681

  8. Heterogeneity in neutralization sensitivities of viruses comprising the simian immunodeficiency virus SIVsmE660 isolate and vaccine challenge stock.

    PubMed

    Lopker, Michael; Easlick, Juliet; Sterrett, Sarah; Decker, Julie M; Barbian, Hannah; Learn, Gerald; Keele, Brandon F; Robinson, James E; Li, Hui; Hahn, Beatrice H; Shaw, George M; Bar, Katharine J

    2013-05-01

    The sooty mangabey-derived simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) strain E660 (SIVsmE660) is a genetically heterogeneous, pathogenic isolate that is commonly used as a vaccine challenge strain in the nonhuman primate (NHP) model of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Though it is often employed to assess antibody-based vaccine strategies, its sensitivity to antibody-mediated neutralization has not been well characterized. Here, we utilize single-genome sequencing and infectivity assays to analyze the neutralization sensitivity of the uncloned SIVsmE660 isolate, individual viruses comprising the isolate, and transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses arising from low-dose mucosal inoculation of macaques with the isolate. We found that the SIVsmE660 isolate overall was highly sensitive to neutralization by SIV-infected macaque plasma samples (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] < 10(-5)) and monoclonal antibodies targeting V3 (IC50 < 0.01 μg/ml), CD4-induced (IC50 < 0.1 μg/ml), CD4 binding site (IC50 ~ 1 μg/ml), and V4 (IC50, ~5 μg/ml) epitopes. In comparison, SIVmac251 and SIVmac239 were highly resistant to neutralization by these same antibodies. Differences in neutralization sensitivity between SIVsmE660 and SIVmac251/239 were not dependent on the cell type in which virus was produced or tested. These findings indicate that in comparison to SIVmac251/239 and primary HIV-1 viruses, SIVsmE660 generally exhibits substantially less masking of antigenically conserved Env epitopes. Interestingly, we identified a minor population of viruses (~10%) in both the SIVsmE660 isolate and T/F viruses arising from it that were substantially more resistant (>1,000-fold) to antibody neutralization and another fraction (~20%) that was intermediate in neutralization resistance. These findings may explain the variable natural history and variable protection afforded by heterologous Env-based vaccines in rhesus macaques challenged by high-dose versus low-dose SIVsmE660

  9. Human immunodeficiency virus prevention with youth.

    PubMed

    McBride, Dominica F; Bell, Carl C

    2011-03-01

    For years, the HIV pandemic was seemingly mysterious and uncontrollable. However, it is now known that with technology, this virus can be stopped from becoming fatal, and with prevention further infection can be stopped. With the application of certain principles and knowledge, this pandemic can be turned into something much less nocuous and pervasive. Various researchers and programs have effectively demonstrated this reality, showing the possibilities of ameliorating the propagation of this virus through prevention. This article reviews the risk and protective factors associated with HIV-related behaviors and describes various effective prevention programs.

  10. The Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Infectivity and Mechanisms of Pathogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauci, Anthony S.

    1988-02-01

    Infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) results in a profound immunosuppression due predominantly to a selective depletion of helper/inducer T lymphocytes that express the receptor for the virus (the CD4 molecule). HIV also has tropism for the brain leading to neuropsychiatric abnormalities. Besides inducing cell death, HIV can interfere with T4 cell function by various mechanisms. The monocyte serves as a reservoir for HIV and is relatively refractory to its cytopathic effects. HIV can exist in a latent or chronic form which can be converted to a productive infection by a variety of inductive signals.

  11. Brazilian response to the human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome epidemic among injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Fábio; Doneda, Denise; Gandolfi, Denise; Nemes, Maria Inês Battistella; Andrade, Tarcísio; Bueno, Regina; Piconez e Trigueiros, Daniela

    2003-12-15

    The Brazilian response to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic is being observed all over the world because of its success. Understanding the role of injection drug users (IDUs) in the epidemic and the political response thereto is a key factor in the control of the epidemic in Brazil. This paper summarizes some of the most important analyses of the Brazilian response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic among and from IDUs. Key elements of the response include the support of the Brazilian Universal Public Health System, the provision of universal access to highly active antiretroviral therapy, and the creation of harm reduction projects that are politically and financially supported by the federal government. The response among and from IDUs is a key element in overall control of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. The response to the epidemic among and from IDUs has been headed in the correct direction since its beginning and is now being intensively expanded.

  12. ACOG Committee Opinion No. 536: Human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and women of color.

    PubMed

    2012-09-01

    In the United States, most new cases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) occur among women of color (primarily African American and Hispanic women). Most women of color acquire the disease from heterosexual contact, often from a partner who has undisclosed risk factors for HIV infection. Safe sex practices, especially consistent condom use, must be emphasized for all women, including women of color. A combination of testing, education, and brief behavioral interventions can help reduce the rate of HIV infection and its complications among women of color. In addition,biomedical interventions such as early treatment of patients infected with HIV and pre-exposure antiretroviral prophylaxis of high-risk individuals offer promise for future reductions in infections.

  13. Herpes simplex virus type 1 infection in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID).

    PubMed

    Minagawa, H; Sakuma, S; Mohri, S; Mori, R; Watanabe, T

    1988-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection in mutant mice with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice), i.e., mice in which the differentiation of both T and B lymphocytes is severely impaired, was studied. All control (infected and not treated with antibodies or with immune spleen cells) SCID mice were dead by 17 days after intracutaneous injection in the right midflank with 1 x 10(5) PFU of a virulent HSV-1 strain, Hayashida. Immunization with an avirulent strain of HSV-1 (SKa) did not protect them from death or prolong the survival time. Tissue virus titration of infected mice killed at various times after inoculation detected infectious virus in various organs, dorsal root ganglia, spinal cord, brain, kidney and adrenal gland in addition to the inoculation site of the skin in SCID mice, whereas virus could be detected only in the inoculation site and the nervous tissues in euthymic BALB/c mice, and in the adrenal gland from only one out of 17 nude mice. Human gamma globulin containing neutralizing antibody against HSV-1 prolonged the survival time but did not protect SCID mice from death. Transfer of spleen cells from immunized BALB/c mice protected the infected SCID mice from death. Treatment of spleen cells with anti-Thy 1.2 monoclonal antibody and complement abolished the protection.

  14. Limited Protection from a Pathogenic Chimeric Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Challenge following Immunization with Attenuated Simian Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Mark G.; Yalley-Ogunro, Jake; Greenhouse, Jack J.; Brennan, Terry P.; Jiang, Jennifer Bo; VanCott, Thomas C.; Lu, Yichen; Eddy, Gerald A.; Birx, Deborah L.

    1999-01-01

    Two live attenuated single-deletion mutant simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) constructs, SIV239Δnef and SIVPBj6.6Δnef, were tested for their abilities to stimulate protective immunity in macaques. During the immunization period the animals were examined for specific immune responses and virus growth. Each construct generated high levels of specific immunity in all of the immunized animals. The SIV239Δnef construct was found to grow to high levels in all immunized animals, with some animals remaining positive for virus isolation and plasma RNA throughout the immunization period. The SIVPBj6.6Δnef was effectively controlled by all of the immunized animals, with virus mostly isolated only during the first few months following immunization and plasma RNA never detected. Following an extended period of immunization of over 80 weeks, the animals were challenged with a pathogenic simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) isolate, SIV89.6PD, by intravenous injection. All of the SIV239Δnef-immunized animals became infected with the SHIV isolate; two of five animals eventually controlled the challenge and three of five animals, which failed to check the immunizing virus, progressed to disease state before the unvaccinated controls. One of five animals immunized with SIVPBj6.6Δnef totally resisted infection by the challenge virus, while three others limited its growth and the remaining animal became persistently infected and eventually died of a pulmonary thrombus. These data indicate that vaccination with attenuated SIV can protect macaques from disease and in some cases from infection by a divergent SHIV. However, if animals are unable to control the immunizing virus, potential damage that can accelerate the disease course of a pathogenic challenge virus may occur. PMID:9882330

  15. NMR Structure of the Myristylated Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Matrix Protein

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lola A.; Cox, Cassiah; Baptiste, Janae; Summers, Holly; Button, Ryan; Bahlow, Kennedy; Spurrier, Vaughn; Kyser, Jenna; Luttge, Benjamin G.; Kuo, Lillian; Freed, Eric O.; Summers, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane targeting by the Gag proteins of the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV types-1 and -2) is mediated by Gag’s N-terminally myristylated matrix (MA) domain and is dependent on cellular phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. To determine if other lentiviruses employ a similar membrane targeting mechanism, we initiated studies of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a widespread feline pathogen with potential utility for development of human therapeutics. Bacterial co-translational myristylation was facilitated by mutation of two amino acids near the amino-terminus of the protein (Q5A/G6S; myrMAQ5A/G6S). These substitutions did not affect virus assembly or release from transfected cells. NMR studies revealed that the myristyl group is buried within a hydrophobic pocket in a manner that is structurally similar to that observed for the myristylated HIV-1 protein. Comparisons with a recent crystal structure of the unmyristylated FIV protein [myr(-)MA] indicate that only small changes in helix orientation are required to accommodate the sequestered myr group. Depletion of PI(4,5)P2 from the plasma membrane of FIV-infected CRFK cells inhibited production of FIV particles, indicating that, like HIV, FIV hijacks the PI(4,5)P2 cellular signaling system to direct intracellular Gag trafficking during virus assembly. PMID:25941825

  16. Prevalence of occult hepatitis C virus infection in the Iranian patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Bokharaei-Salim, Farah; Keyvani, Hossein; Esghaei, Maryam; Zare-Karizi, Shohreh; Dermenaki-Farahani, Sahar-Sadat; Hesami-Zadeh, Khashayar; Fakhim, Shahin

    2016-11-01

    Occult hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a new form of chronic HCV infection described by the presence of the genomic HCV-RNA in liver biopsy and/or peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples, and undetectable levels or absence of HCV-RNA and in the absence or presence of anti HCV antibodies in the plasma specimens. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the occurrence of occult HCV infection (OCI) among Iranian subjects infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) using RT-nested PCR. From March 2014 until April 2015, 109 Iranian patients with established HIV infection were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. After extraction of viral RNA from the plasma and PBMC samples, HCV-RNA status was examined by RT-nested PCR using primers from the 5'-NTR. HCV genotyping was conducted using RFLP analysis. For the confirmation of HCV genotyping by RFLP method, the PCR products were sequenced. Of the 109 patients, 50 were positive for antibodies against HCV. The HCV-RNA was detected in PBMC specimens in 6 (10.2%) out of the total 59 patients negative for anti-HCV Abs and undetectable plasma HCV-RNA and also from 4 (8.0%) out of the total 50 patients positive for anti-HCV Abs and undetectable plasma HCV-RNA. HCV genotyping analysis showed that 6 (60.0%) patients were infected with HCV subtype 3a, 3 (30.0%) were infected with HCV subtype 1a and 1 (10.0%) patient was infected with HCV subtype 1b. This study revealed the incidence of OCI (9.2%) in HIV-infected Iranian patients. Hence, designing prospective studies focusing on the detection of OCI in these patients would provide more information. J. Med. Virol. 88:1960-1966, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Prevalence of occult hepatitis C virus infection in the Iranian patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Bokharaei-Salim, Farah; Keyvani, Hossein; Esghaei, Maryam; Zare-Karizi, Shohreh; Dermenaki-Farahani, Sahar-Sadat; Hesami-Zadeh, Khashayar; Fakhim, Shahin

    2016-11-01

    Occult hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a new form of chronic HCV infection described by the presence of the genomic HCV-RNA in liver biopsy and/or peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples, and undetectable levels or absence of HCV-RNA and in the absence or presence of anti HCV antibodies in the plasma specimens. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the occurrence of occult HCV infection (OCI) among Iranian subjects infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) using RT-nested PCR. From March 2014 until April 2015, 109 Iranian patients with established HIV infection were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. After extraction of viral RNA from the plasma and PBMC samples, HCV-RNA status was examined by RT-nested PCR using primers from the 5'-NTR. HCV genotyping was conducted using RFLP analysis. For the confirmation of HCV genotyping by RFLP method, the PCR products were sequenced. Of the 109 patients, 50 were positive for antibodies against HCV. The HCV-RNA was detected in PBMC specimens in 6 (10.2%) out of the total 59 patients negative for anti-HCV Abs and undetectable plasma HCV-RNA and also from 4 (8.0%) out of the total 50 patients positive for anti-HCV Abs and undetectable plasma HCV-RNA. HCV genotyping analysis showed that 6 (60.0%) patients were infected with HCV subtype 3a, 3 (30.0%) were infected with HCV subtype 1a and 1 (10.0%) patient was infected with HCV subtype 1b. This study revealed the incidence of OCI (9.2%) in HIV-infected Iranian patients. Hence, designing prospective studies focusing on the detection of OCI in these patients would provide more information. J. Med. Virol. 88:1960-1966, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27463051

  18. Effective ex vivo neutralization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in plasma by recombinant immunoglobulin molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Gauduin, M C; Allaway, G P; Maddon, P J; Barbas, C F; Burton, D R; Koup, R A

    1996-01-01

    We tested the ability of human monoclonal antibodies (immunoglobulin G1b12 [IgG1b12] and 19b) and CD4-based molecules (CD4-IgG2 and soluble CD4 [sCD4]) to neutralize human immunodeficiency virus type 1 directly from the plasma of seropositive donors in an ex vivo neutralization assay. IgG1b12 and CD4-IgG2, at concentrations from 1 to 25 micrograms/ml, were found to be effective at reducing the HIV-1 titer in most plasma samples. When viruses recovered from plasma samples were expanded to produce virus stocks, no correlation between the neutralization sensitivities to IgG1b12 and CD4-IgG2 of the in vitro passaged stocks and those of the ex vivo neutralizations performed directly on the plasma was observed. These differences could be due to changes in neutralization sensitivity that occur after one passage of the virus in vitro, or they could be related to the presence of complement or antibodies in the plasma. Furthermore, differences in expression of adhesion molecules on plasma-derived and phytohemagglutinin-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cell-derived viruses could be involved. These studies suggest that IgG1b12 and CD4-IgG2 have broad and potent neutralizing activity in both in vitro and ex vivo neutralization assays and should be considered for use as potential immunoprophylactic or therapeutic agents. PMID:8642690

  19. Review of testing for human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Bylund, D J; Ziegner, U H; Hooper, D G

    1992-06-01

    The performance of HIV testing requires meticulous attention to preanalytic, analytic, and postanalytic variables, especially matters of patient confidentiality. Laboratory directors must pay strict attention to quality control and quality assurance practices. Careful attention to these considerations can produce a screening program in low-prevalence populations that has an extremely low false-positive rate, with a positive predictive value of greater than 99%. Issuing a clear and concise laboratory report to the clinician is important. The Fifth Consensus Conference on Testing for Human Retroviruses of the Association of State and Territorial Public Health Laboratory Directors, March 1990, has recommended that ELISA be reported as reactive or nonreactive; IFA as reactive, nonreactive, or nonspecific, and WB as reactive, nonreactive, or indeterminate. It is recommended that the terms positive and negative be reserved for the summary interpretation given at the conclusion of the HIV-1 antibody testing algorithm. The testing algorithm used for HIV antibody screening at Scripps Clinic is shown in Figure 3. Other algorithms for complete testing on a single sample only or on two separate samples are reported. We agree with others that the patient should not be counseled for infection with HIV until a reactive confirmatory test(s) establishes a positive diagnosis. Certain special situations in diagnostic testing deserve comment. Establishing the diagnosis of HIV infection can be difficult in seronegative persons with acute infection. Polymerase chain reaction, viral culture or antigen detection may be useful tests in this situation. However, careful interpretation of test results and close correlation with patient risk factors are important to establish the proper diagnosis. Reports of seronegative persons, some remaining seronegative over a protracted time, have raised concerns over the transfusional risk of HIV infection. Blood donor screening programs are using

  20. Idiopathic genital ulcers in women infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J; Clark, R A; Watts, D H; Till, M; Arrastia, C; Schuman, P; Cohn, S E; Young, M; Bessen, L; Greenblatt, R; Vogler, M; Swindells, S; Boyer, P

    1996-12-01

    A national survey of investigators caring for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women was undertaken to describe the clinical presentation of idiopathic genital ulcer disease. Patients with negative syphilis and herpes simplex testing and/or negative genital ulcer biopsy were included in this study. Study participants (n = 29) were generally severely immunocompromised (median CD4 cell count was 50/mm3, and 68% had an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome [AIDS]-defining opportunistic process). Thirty-seven percent had coexistent oral ulcers and 19% had their genital ulcer progress to fistula formation (four rectovaginal and one vaginal-perineal). There was generally a favorable response to topical, systemic, and intralesional steroid treatment. This study suggests that idiopathic or probable aphthous genital ulcers in women have similar clinical characteristics to aphthous oroesophageal ulcers. Although infrequent, these genital ulcers can cause severe morbidity. Further research is warranted to better define the pathophysiology and optimal management.

  1. Inactivation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 by alcohols.

    PubMed

    van Bueren, J; Larkin, D P; Simpson, R A

    1994-10-01

    Alcohols are commonly used as disinfectants for skin, surfaces and immersion of some medical instruments. Measurements of the activity of alcohols against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) must take account of the compatibility of neutralizers used to stop the disinfectant reaction, and of toxicity to the cell line used to detect residual virus. We have developed protocols to measure the efficacy of alcohols against HIV in suspension and dried onto surfaces in the presence of high and low protein concentrations. High titres of HIV in suspension were rapidly inactivated by 70% ethanol, independent of the protein load. When virus was dried onto a glass surface, the rate of inactivation decreased when high levels of protein were present. Due to its rapid evaporation, a spray or a wipe with alcohol cannot be guaranteed to disinfect a surface contaminated with blood or other body fluids without preliminary cleaning.

  2. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antigen testing to detect HIV infection in female sex workers in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Chan, R K; Ali, K; Thoe, S Y

    1995-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is characterised by seroconversion after a ¿window¿ period of 2 to 3 months. After this period antibodies are usually detectable by screening tests (enzyme immunoassay or particle agglutination) confirmed by Western blot analysis. We studied 1000 newly enrolled female sex workers who had not been previously tested for HIV to assess the usefulness of HIV antigen testing to improve the efficacy of HIV infection detection. Blood was taken at enrollment for HIV antigen and HIV antibody testing. The Abbott HIVAG-1 test was used to detect antigen; antibody detection was by the Abbott recombinant HIV-1/HIV-2 3rd generation enzyme immunoassay (EIA) test, the Fujirebio Serodia-HIV particle agglutination (PA) test for screening, and the Diagnostic Biotechnology HIV Blot 2.2 Western blot (WB) test for antibody confirmation. Of the 1000 samples, 26 were positive for HIV antibody testing (26/26 for EIA, 25/25 for PA, 26/26 for WB), giving a prevalence rate of 2.6%, Of these 26 seropositive samples 1 was positive on HIV antigen testing. There were no samples which were antigen-positive and antibody-negative. HIV antigen testing does not add to increased efficacy of HIV detection among female sex workers in Singapore.

  3. A lion lentivirus related to feline immunodeficiency virus: epidemiologic and phylogenetic aspects.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, E W; Yuhki, N; Packer, C; O'Brien, S J

    1994-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a novel lentivirus that is genetically homologous and functionally analogous to the human AIDS viruses, human immunodeficiency virus types 1 and 2. FIV causes immunosuppression in domestic cats by destroying the CD4 T-lymphocyte subsets in infected hosts. A serological survey of over 400 free-ranging African and Asian lions (Panthera leo) for antibodies to FIV revealed endemic lentivirus prevalence with an incidence of seropositivity as high as 90%. A lion lentivirus (FIV-Ple) was isolated by infection of lion lymphocytes in vitro. Seroconversion was documented in two Serengeti lions, and discordance of mother-cub serological status argues against maternal transmission (in favor of horizontal spread) as a major route of infection among lions. A phylogenetic analysis of cloned FIV-Ple pol gene sequences from 27 lions from four African populations (from the Serengeti reserve, Ngorongoro Crater, Lake Manyara, and Kruger Park) revealed remarkably high intra- and interindividual genetic diversity at the sequence level. Three FIV-Ple phylogenetic clusters or clades were resolved with phenetic, parsimony, and likelihood analytical procedures. The three clades, which occurred not only together in the same population but throughout Africa, were as divergent from each other as were homologous pol sequences of lentivirus isolated from distinct feline species, i.e., puma and domestic cat. The FIV-Ple clades, however, were more closely related to each other than to other feline lentiviruses (monophyletic for lion species), suggesting that the ancestors of FIV-Ple evolved in allopatric (geographically isolated) lion populations that converged recently. To date, there is no clear evidence of FIV-Ple-associated pathology, raising the possibility of a historic genetic accommodation of the lion lentivirus and its host leading to a coevolved host-parasite symbiosis (or commensalism) in the population similar to that hypothesized for endemic

  4. Plasmoblastic lymphoma associated with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Emoke; Krenács, L; Bagdi, Eniko; Pávai, Z; Macarie, I; Nagy, Elod-Erno; Demian, Smaranda

    2008-01-01

    Plasmoblastic lymphoma (PBL) is a subtype of the diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, typically present as extranodal disease associated with human immune deficiency virus (HIV) infection. PBLs are often the initial manifestation of AIDS. Here we present a case of PBL concerning the oral cavity. A 34-year-old woman presented a tumor in the oral cavity that involved the maxilla and gingiva (confirmed by CT-scan). The gingival biopsy showed a massive infiltration by large lymphoid cells with round, vesicular nuclei, prominent nucleoli, fine chromatin and an significant amount of basophilic cytoplasm which express CD79a, CD138, cytoplasmic lambda light chain and LCA, without staining for CD20, CD38, CD3 and CTK. Serological analysis confirmed HIV positivity. PBLs lack most B-lineage markers, but many express CD79a in at least some of the cells, therefore generate difficulties in differential diagnosis. Overall assessment and correlation of the histopathological and immunohistochemical features with the clinical findings and serology investigation are the most helpful diagnostic tools and can lead to the final diagnosis.

  5. Plasmoblastic lymphoma associated with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Emoke; Krenács, L; Bagdi, Eniko; Pávai, Z; Macarie, I; Nagy, Elod-Erno; Demian, Smaranda

    2008-01-01

    Plasmoblastic lymphoma (PBL) is a subtype of the diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, typically present as extranodal disease associated with human immune deficiency virus (HIV) infection. PBLs are often the initial manifestation of AIDS. Here we present a case of PBL concerning the oral cavity. A 34-year-old woman presented a tumor in the oral cavity that involved the maxilla and gingiva (confirmed by CT-scan). The gingival biopsy showed a massive infiltration by large lymphoid cells with round, vesicular nuclei, prominent nucleoli, fine chromatin and an significant amount of basophilic cytoplasm which express CD79a, CD138, cytoplasmic lambda light chain and LCA, without staining for CD20, CD38, CD3 and CTK. Serological analysis confirmed HIV positivity. PBLs lack most B-lineage markers, but many express CD79a in at least some of the cells, therefore generate difficulties in differential diagnosis. Overall assessment and correlation of the histopathological and immunohistochemical features with the clinical findings and serology investigation are the most helpful diagnostic tools and can lead to the final diagnosis. PMID:18758634

  6. Enteric ganglionitis in rhesus macaques infected with simian immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Orandle, Marlene S; Veazey, Ronald S; Lackner, Andrew A

    2007-06-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) disease is a debilitating feature of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection that can occur in the absence of histopathological abnormalities or identifiable enteropathogens. However, the mechanisms of GI dysfunction are poorly understood. The present study was undertaken to characterize changes in resident and inflammatory cells in the enteric nervous system (ENS) of macaques during the acute stage of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection to gain insight into potential pathogenic mechanisms of GI disease. Ganglia from duodenum, ileum, and colon were examined in healthy and acutely infected macaques by using a combination of routine histology, double-label immunofluorescence and in situ hybridization. Evaluation of tissues from infected macaques showed progressive infiltration of myenteric ganglia by CD3+ T cells and IBA1+ macrophages beginning as early as 8 days postinfection. Quantitative image analysis revealed that the severity of myenteric ganglionitis increased with time after SIV infection and, in general, was more severe in ganglia from the small intestine than in ganglia from the colon. Despite an abundance of inflammatory cells in myenteric ganglia during acute infection, the ENS was not a target for virus infection. This study provides evidence that the ENS may be playing a role in the pathogenesis of GI disease and enteropathy in HIV-infected people.

  7. Lymphatic Dissemination of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus after Penile Inoculation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhong-Min; Dutra, Joseph; Fritts, Linda

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is primarily transmitted by heterosexual contact, and approximately equal numbers of men and women worldwide are infected with the virus. Understanding the biology of HIV acquisition and dissemination in men exposed to the virus by insertive penile intercourse is likely to help with the rational design of vaccines that can limit or prevent HIV transmission. To characterize the target cells and dissemination pathways involved in establishing systemic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection, we necropsied male rhesus macaques at 1, 3, 7, and 14 days after penile SIV inoculation and quantified the levels of unspliced SIV RNA and spliced SIV RNA in tissue lysates and the number of SIV RNA-positive cells in tissue sections. We found that penile (glans, foreskin, coronal sulcus) T cells and, to a lesser extent, macrophages and dendritic cells are primary targets of infection and that SIV rapidly reaches the regional lymph nodes. At 7 days after inoculation, SIV had disseminated to the blood, systemic lymph nodes, and mucosal lymphoid tissues. Further, at 7 days postinoculation (p.i.), spliced SIV RNA levels were the highest in the genital lymph nodes, indicating that this is the site where the infection is initially amplified. By 14 days p.i., spliced SIV RNA levels were high in all tissues, but they were the highest in the gastrointestinal tract, indicating that the primary site of virus replication had shifted from the genital lymph nodes to the gut. The stepwise pattern of virus replication and dissemination described here suggests that vaccine-elicited immune responses in the genital lymph nodes could help prevent infection after penile SIV challenge. IMPORTANCE To be the most effective, vaccines should produce antiviral immune responses in the anatomic sites of virus replication. Thus, understanding the path taken by HIV from the mucosal surfaces, which are the site of virus exposure, to the deeper tissues where

  8. An env gene derived from a primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolate confers high in vivo replicative capacity to a chimeric simian/human immunodeficiency virus in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Reimann, K A; Li, J T; Voss, G; Lekutis, C; Tenner-Racz, K; Racz, P; Lin, W; Montefiori, D C; Lee-Parritz, D E; Lu, Y; Collman, R G; Sodroski, J; Letvin, N L

    1996-01-01

    To explore the roles played by specific human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genes in determining the in vivo replicative capacity of AIDS viruses, we have examined the replication kinetics and virus-specific immune responses in rhesus monkeys following infection with two chimeric simian/human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIVs). These viruses were composed of simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac239 expressing HIV-1 env and the associated auxiliary HIV-1 genes tat, vpu, and rep. Virus replication was assessed during primary infection of rhesus monkeys by measuring plasma SIVmac p27 levels and by quantifying virus replication in lymph nodes using in situ hybridization. SHIV-HXBc2, which expresses the HIV-1 env of a T-cell-tropic, laboratory-adapted strain of HIV-1 (HXBc2), replicated well in rhesus monkey peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) in vitro but replicated only to low levels when inoculated in rhesus monkeys. In contrast, SHIV-89.6 was constructed with the HIV-1 env gene of a T-cell- and macrophage-tropic clone of a patient isolate of HIV-1 (89.6). This virus replicated to a lower level in monkey PBL in vitro but replicated to a higher degree in monkeys during primary infection. Moreover, monkeys infected with SHIV-89.6 developed an inversion in the PBL CD4/CD8 ratio coincident with the clearance of primary viremia. The differences in the in vivo consequences of infection by these two SHIVs could not be explained by differences in the immune responses elicited by these viruses, since infected animals had comparable type-specific neutralizing antibody titers, proliferative responses to recombinant HIV-1 gp120, and virus-specific cytolytic effector T-cell responses. With the demonstration that a chimeric SHIV can replicate to high levels during primary infection in rhesus monkeys, this model can now be used to define genetic determinants of HIV-1 pathogenicity. PMID:8627800

  9. The human immunodeficiency virus reduces network capacity: acoustic noise effect

    PubMed Central

    Tomasi, Dardo; Chang, Linda; de Castro Caparelli, Elisabeth; Telang, Frank; Ernst, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Increased acoustic noise (AN) during working memory (WM) leads to increased brain activation in healthy individuals, and may have greater impact in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients. Compared to controls, HIV subjects showed reduced AN-activation and lower neuronal marker N-acetylaspartate in prefrontal and parietal cortices. Competing use of the WM network between AN and cognitive load showed lower dynamic range of the hemodynamic responses in prefrontal and parietal cortices in HIV patients. These findings suggest reduced reserve capacity of the WM network in HIV patients and additional stress (e.g. AN) might exhaust the impaired network for more demanding tasks. PMID:16437575

  10. Management of dyslipidemia in patients with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Shalit, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Dyslipidemias are more common in the patient population with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) has dramatically reduced HIV-associated morbidity and mortality and has transformed HIV disease into a chronic, manageable condition. As a result, non-AIDS-related illnesses, including cardiovascular diseases, are now the leading causes of death in the HIV-infected population. Optimizing fasting lipid parameters plays an important role in reducing cardiovascular risk in this population. This review focuses on the management of dyslipidemia in HIV-infected individuals treated with combination ART.

  11. Antiretroviral Therapy for Prevention of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Kalapila, Aley G; Marrazzo, Jeanne

    2016-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is considered a chronic medical condition. Several new drugs are available, including fixed-dose combination tablets, that have greatly simplified combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens to treat HIV, while increasing the life-expectancy of infected individuals. In the last decade, multiple well-regarded studies have established the benefits of using ART in high-risk, HIV-negative persons to prevent HIV acquisition. The primary care provider must not only understand commonly encountered issues pertaining to ART, such as toxicities and drug interactions, but also needs to be aware of using ART for HIV prevention. PMID:27235622

  12. Early Pathogenesis of Transmucosal Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Obert, Leslie A.; Hoover, Edward A.

    2002-01-01

    To identify the early target cells and tissues in transmucosal feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection, cats were exposed to a clade C FIV isolate via the oral-nasal or vaginal mucosa and multiple tissues were examined by virus isolation coculture (VI), DNA PCR, catalyzed tyramide signal-amplified in situ hybridization (TSA-ISH), and immunohistochemistry between days 1 and 12 postinoculation (p.i.). FIV RNA was detected in tonsil and oral or vaginal mucosa as early as 1 day p.i. by TSA-ISH and in retropharyngeal, tracheobronchial, or external iliac lymph nodes and sometimes in spleen or blood mononuclear cells by day 2, indicating that regional and distant spread of virus-infected cells occurred rapidly after mucosal exposure. By day 8, viral RNA, DNA, and culturable virus were uniformly detected in regional and distant tissues, connoting systemic infection. TSA-ISH proved more sensitive than DNA PCR in detecting early FIV-infected cells. In mucosal tissues, the earliest demonstrable FIV-bearing cells were either within or subjacent to the mucosal epithelium or were in germinal centers of regional lymph nodes. The FIV+ cells were of either of two morphological types, large stellate or small round. Those FIV RNA+ cells which could be colabeled for a phenotype marker, were labeled for either dendritic-cell-associated protein p55 or T-lymphocyte receptor antigen CD3. These studies indicate that FIV crosses mucous membranes within hours after exposure and rapidly traffics via dendritic and T cells to systemic lymphoid tissues, a pathway similar to that thought to occur in the initial phase of infection by the human and simian immunodeficiency viruses. PMID:12021364

  13. Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy of Oligomeric Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 gp140

    PubMed Central

    Earl, Patricia L.; Sugiura, Wataru; Montefiori, David C.; Broder, Christopher C.; Lee, Susan A.; Wild, Carl; Lifson, Jeffrey; Moss, Bernard

    2001-01-01

    The biologically active form of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope (Env) glycoprotein is oligomeric. We previously described a soluble HIV-1 IIIB Env protein, gp140, with a stable oligomeric structure composed of uncleaved gp120 linked to the ectodomain of gp41 (P. L. Earl, C. C. Broder, D. Long, S. A. Lee, J. Peterson, S. Chakrabarti, R. W. Doms, and B. Moss, J. Virol. 68:3015–3026, 1994). Here we compared the antibody responses of rabbits to gp120 and gp140 that had been produced and purified in an identical manner. The gp140 antisera exhibited enhanced cross-reactivity with heterologous Env proteins as well as greater neutralization of HIV-1 compared to the gp120 antisera. To examine both immunogenicity and protective efficacy, we immunized rhesus macaques with oligomeric gp140. Strong neutralizing antibodies against a homologous virus and modest neutralization of heterologous laboratory-adapted isolates were elicited. No neutralization of primary isolates was observed. However, a substantial fraction of the neutralizing activity could not be blocked by a V3 loop peptide. After intravenous challenge with simian-HIV virus SHIV-HXB2, three of the four vaccinated macaques exhibited no evidence of virus replication. PMID:11134278

  14. Challenge of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) immunized with human immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein gp120.

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, L O; Bess, J W; Waters, D J; Pyle, S W; Kelliher, J C; Nara, P L; Krohn, K; Robey, W G; Langlois, A J; Gallo, R C

    1989-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the causative agent of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, infects humans and chimpanzees. To determine the efficacy of immunization for preventing infection, chimpanzees were immunized with gp120 purified from human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type IIIB (HTLV-IIIB)-infected cell membranes and challenged with the homologous virus, HTLV-IIIB. A challenge stock of HTLV-IIIB was prepared by using unconcentrated HTLV-IIIB produced in H9 cells. The titer of the virus from this stock on human and chimpanzee peripheral blood mononuclear cells and in human lymphoid cell lines was determined; a cell culture infectivity of 10(4) was assigned. All chimpanzees inoculated intravenously with 40 cell culture infectious units or more became infected, as demonstrated by virus isolation and seroconversion. One of two chimpanzees inoculated with 4 cell culture infectious units became infected. Chimpanzees immunized with gp120 formulated in alum developed antibodies which precipitated gp120 and neutralized HTLV-IIIB. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from gp120-vaccinated and HIV-infected animals showed a significantly greater response in proliferation assays with HIV proteins than did peripheral blood mononuclear cells from nonvaccinated and non-HIV-infected chimpanzees. Two of the gp120-alum-immunized chimpanzees were challenged with virus from the HTLV-IIIB stock. One animal received 400 cell culture infectious units, and one received 40 infectious units. Both animals became infected with HIV, indicating that the immune response elicited by immunization with gp120 formulated in alum was not effective in preventing infection with HIV-1. PMID:2555541

  15. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid...

  20. Ocelots on Barro Colorado Island Are Infected with Feline Immunodeficiency Virus but Not Other Common Feline and Canine Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Samuel P.; Kays, Roland W.; Moreno, Ricardo; TerWee, Julie A.; Troyer, Jennifer L.; VandeWoude, Sue

    2011-01-01

    Transmission of pathogens from domestic animals to wildlife populations (spill-over) has precipitated local wildlife extinctions in multiple geographic locations. Identifying such events before they cause population declines requires differentiating spillover from endemic disease, a challenge complicated by a lack of baseline data from wildlife populations that are isolated from domestic animals. We tested sera collected from 12 ocelots (Leopardus pardalis) native to Barro Colorado Island, Panama, which is free of domestic animals, for antibodies to feline herpes virus, feline calicivirus, feline corona virus, feline panleukopenia virus, canine distemper virus, and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), typically a species-specific infection. Samples also were tested for feline leukemia virus antigens. Positive tests results were only observed for FIV; 50% of the ocelots were positive. We hypothesize that isolation of this population has prevented introduction of pathogens typically attributed to contact with domestic animals. The high density of ocelots on Barro Colorado Island may contribute to a high prevalence of FIV infection, as would be expected with increased contact rates among conspecifics in a geographically restricted population. PMID:18689668

  1. Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Hepatitis C Virus Coinfection in Spain: Prevalence and Patient Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Berenguer, Juan; Rivero, Antonio; Jarrín, Inmaculada; Núñez, María J.; Vivancos, María J.; Crespo, Manel; Téllez, María J.; Domingo, Pere; Iribarren, José A.; Artero, Arturo; Márquez, Manuel; Santos, Ignacio; Moreno, Javier; Montero, Marta; González-García, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibodies (Abs) and active HCV infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected (HIV+) patients in Spain in 2015. This was a cross-sectional study. Methods. The study was performed in 41 centers in 2015. Sample size was estimated for an accuracy of 2%, the number of patients from each hospital was determined by proportional allocation, and patients were selected using simple random sampling. Results. The reference population was 35 791 patients, and the sample size was 1867 patients. Hepatitis C virus serostatus was known in 1843 patients (98.7%). Hepatitis C virus-Abs were detected in 695 patients (37.7%), in whom the main route of HIV acquisition was injection drug use (75.4%). Of these 695 patients, 402 had HCV RNA, 170 had had a sustained viral response (SVR) after anti-HCV therapy, and 102 cleared HCV spontaneously. Hepatitis C virus-ribonucleic acid results were unknown in 21 cases. Genotype distribution (known in 367 patients) was 1a in 143 patients (39.0%), 4 in 90 (24.5%) patients, 1b in 69 (18.8%) patients, 3 in 57 (15.5%) patients, 2 in 5 (1.4%) patients, and mixed in 3 (0.8%) patients. Liver cirrhosis was present in 93 patients (23.1%) with active HCV infection and in 39 (22.9%) patients with SVR after anti-HCV therapy. Conclusions. The prevalence of HCV-Abs and active HCV infection in HIV+ patients in Spain is 37.7% and 22.1%, respectively; these figures are significantly lower than those recorded in 2002 and 2009. The predominant genotypes in patients with active HCV infection were 1a and 4. A high percentage of patients had cirrhosis. Cirrhosis is also common in patients with SVR after anti-HCV therapy. PMID:27186584

  2. Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Hepatitis C Virus Coinfection in Spain: Prevalence and Patient Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Berenguer, Juan; Rivero, Antonio; Jarrín, Inmaculada; Núñez, María J; Vivancos, María J; Crespo, Manel; Téllez, María J; Domingo, Pere; Iribarren, José A; Artero, Arturo; Márquez, Manuel; Santos, Ignacio; Moreno, Javier; Montero, Marta; González-García, Juan

    2016-03-01

    Background.  The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibodies (Abs) and active HCV infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected (HIV+) patients in Spain in 2015. This was a cross-sectional study. Methods.  The study was performed in 41 centers in 2015. Sample size was estimated for an accuracy of 2%, the number of patients from each hospital was determined by proportional allocation, and patients were selected using simple random sampling. Results.  The reference population was 35 791 patients, and the sample size was 1867 patients. Hepatitis C virus serostatus was known in 1843 patients (98.7%). Hepatitis C virus-Abs were detected in 695 patients (37.7%), in whom the main route of HIV acquisition was injection drug use (75.4%). Of these 695 patients, 402 had HCV RNA, 170 had had a sustained viral response (SVR) after anti-HCV therapy, and 102 cleared HCV spontaneously. Hepatitis C virus-ribonucleic acid results were unknown in 21 cases. Genotype distribution (known in 367 patients) was 1a in 143 patients (39.0%), 4 in 90 (24.5%) patients, 1b in 69 (18.8%) patients, 3 in 57 (15.5%) patients, 2 in 5 (1.4%) patients, and mixed in 3 (0.8%) patients. Liver cirrhosis was present in 93 patients (23.1%) with active HCV infection and in 39 (22.9%) patients with SVR after anti-HCV therapy. Conclusions.  The prevalence of HCV-Abs and active HCV infection in HIV+ patients in Spain is 37.7% and 22.1%, respectively; these figures are significantly lower than those recorded in 2002 and 2009. The predominant genotypes in patients with active HCV infection were 1a and 4. A high percentage of patients had cirrhosis. Cirrhosis is also common in patients with SVR after anti-HCV therapy. PMID:27186584

  3. Safety and Immunogenicity of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis {Delta}lysA {Delta}panCD Vaccine in Domestic Cats Infected with Feline Immunodeficiency Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)+ and FIV- cats (n = 4/group) received 2 x 10**6 cfu Mycobacterium tuberculosis Delta-lysA Delta-panCD intramuscularly. Vaccination elicited antibody responses; albeit, at lower levels in FIV+ cats as compared to FIV- cats. Delayed-type hypersensitivity responses ...

  4. Quantitation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection kinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrov, D S; Willey, R L; Sato, H; Chang, L J; Blumenthal, R; Martin, M A

    1993-01-01

    Tissue culture infections of CD4-positive human T cells by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) proceed in three stages: (i) a period following the initiation of an infection during which no detectable virus is produced; (ii) a phase in which a sharp increase followed by a peak of released progeny virions can be measured; and (iii) a final period when virus production declines. In this study, we have derived equations describing the kinetics of HIV-1 accumulation in cell culture supernatants during multiple rounds of infection. Our analyses indicated that the critical parameter affecting the kinetics of HIV-1 infection is the infection rate constant k = Inn/ti, where n is the number of infectious virions produced by one cell (about 10(2)) and ti is the time required for one complete cycle of virus infection (typically 3 to 4 days). Of particular note was our finding that the infectivity of HIV-1 during cell-to-cell transmission is 10(2) to 10(3) times greater than the infectivity of cell-free virus stocks, the inocula commonly used to initiate tissue culture infections. We also demonstrated that the slow infection kinetics of an HIV-1 tat mutant is not due to a longer replication time but reflects the small number of infectious particles produced per cycle. PMID:8445728

  5. Recombination in feline immunodeficiency virus genomes from naturally infected cougars.

    PubMed

    Bruen, Trevor C; Poss, Mary

    2007-08-01

    Recombination contributes significantly to diversity within virus populations and ultimately to viral evolution. Here we use a recently developed statistical test to perform exploratory analysis of recombination in fourteen feline immunodeficiency virus (FIVpco) genomes derived from a wild population of cougars. We use both the global and local Phi statistical test as an overall guide to predict where recombination may have occurred. Further analyses, including similarity plots and phylogenetic incongruence tests, confirmed that three FIVpco lineages were derived from recombinant events. Interestingly, the regions of mosaic origin were clustered in the area encoding lentiviral accessory genes and largely spared the viral structural genes. Because some of the mosaic strains are currently geographically disparate, our data indicate that the dispersal of cougars infected with these strains was preceded by recombination events. These results suggest that recombination has played an important role in the evolution of FIVpco for this wild population of cougars.

  6. Primary pulmonary hypertension associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Golpe, R.; Fernandez-Infante, B.; Fernandez-Rozas, S.

    1998-01-01

    Several cardiorespiratory diseases can complicate human immunodeficiency virus infection. Primary pulmonary hypertension is a rare clinical disorder which carries a bad prognosis. More than 90 cases of HIV-associated primary pulmonary hypertension have been reported to date. Although its pathogenesis remains unknown, some evidence suggests a possible role for the virus itself in its development. Genetic susceptibility may also be implicated. The clinical and histopathologic features of this entity do not differ from those of classic primary pulmonary hypertension. The diagnosis requires a high degree of clinical suspicion and a careful evaluation to rule out causes of secondary pulmonary hypertension. In addition to supportive measures, anticoagulation and vasodilators have been used to treat this disorder, although sufficient data regarding long-term results with these therapies are lacking. PMID:9799910

  7. Partial protection by vaccination with recombinant feline immunodeficiency virus surface glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Leutenegger, C M; Hofmann-Lehmann, R; Holznagel, E; Cuisinier, A M; Wolfensberger, C; Duquesne, V; Cronier, J; Allenspach, K; Aubert, A; Ossent, P; Lutz, H

    1998-02-10

    In an effort to induce a strong immune response that might protect against feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) challenge infection, three groups of five specified pathogen-free (spf) cats each were immunized subcutaneously with different FIV antigen preparations. Immunizations were done at weeks 0, 2, and 4 with 100 microg of recombinant SU from an FIV Zurich 2 (FIV Z2) strain expressed by E. coli (group 1) or the baculovirus expression system (groups 2 and 3) adsorbed on aluminum hydroxyde and administered with QS-21 (groups 1 and 2) or Freund's adjuvant together with the recombinant nucleocapsid protein (protein NC) of rabies virus (group 3). Protein NC was described to act as an exogenous superantigen. Group 3 cats demonstrated the highest detectable antibody response to the vaccine antigen as determined by ELISA and Western blot analysis. All immunized cats together with seven control animals were challenged with 20 CID50 of cat lymphocyte-grown FIV Z2 3 weeks following the last immunization. Whereas virus was readily recovered from peripheral blood lymphocytes of seven of seven nonvaccinated control cats following this challenge dose, virus was not recovered from two cats of groups 1 and 2. All cats in groups 2 and 3 showed a provirus load significantly decreased to 3% of that of controls up to week 8 after challenge infection. Eleven of 15 vaccinated cats and 5 of 7 control cats developed virus-neutralizing antibodies by week 8 after challenge infection. The two cats negative on virus isolation remained seronegative, developed no detectable virus-neutralizing activities, but were repeatedly positive in provirus PCR. Moreover, starting at week 1 after challenge, both cats showed the lowest provirus load in their respective groups. These results indicate that immunization with recombinant FIV SU in conjunction with appropriate adjuvants may lead to partial protection against FIV challenge infection.

  8. Pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Breen, Elizabeth Crabb

    2002-09-01

    In persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and/or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), the immune system becomes dysfunctional in many ways. There is both immunodeficiency due to the loss of CD4-positive T helper cells and hyperactivity as a result of B-cell activation. Likewise, both decreases and increases are seen in the production and/or activity of cytokines. Cytokine changes in HIV infection have been assessed by a variety of techniques, ranging from determination of cytokine gene expression at the mRNA level to secretion of cytokine proteins in vivo and in vitro. Changes in cytokine levels in HIV-infected persons can affect the function of the immune system, and have the potential to directly impact the course of HIV disease by enhancing or suppressing HIV replication. In particular, the balance between the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, which up-regulate HIV expression, and IL-10, which can act both as an anti-inflammatory cytokine and a B-cell stimulatory factor, may play an important role in the progression to AIDS. In light of its ability to suppress the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and, under some conditions, suppress HIV replication, increased IL-10 may be viewed as beneficial in slowing HIV disease progression. However, an association between increased IL-10 and the development of AIDS-associated B-cell lymphoma highlights the bifunctional nature of IL-10 as both an anti-inflammatory and B-cell-stimulatory cytokine that could have beneficial and detrimental effects on the course of HIV infection and AIDS.

  9. Cardiac dysfunction in patients seropositive for the human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, J. E.; Slife, D. M.; Anders, G. T.; Bailey, S. R.; Blanton, H. M.; McAllister, C. K.; Latham, R. D.

    1991-01-01

    To confirm the presence of cardiac dysfunction in a group of patients seropositive for the human immunodeficiency virus with either dyspnea on exertion or a reduced anaerobic threshold, 9 patients with no history of opportunistic infection underwent exercise right-sided heart catheterization. When compared with 13 control patients previously exercised in the same manner, the patients showed elevated exercise pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (14.6 +/- 3.3 mm of mercury versus 9.9 +/- 3.3 mm of mercury; P less than .005) and right atrial pressure (10.1 +/- 2.1 mm of mercury versus 4.7 +/- 3.2 mm of mercury; P less than .001) at a similar exercise oxygen consumption and cardiac index. Of the 9 patients, 8 had at least 1 catheterization value outside the 95% confidence limits for the control group and 4 patients had multiple abnormalities. Values for blood CD4 lymphocytes were 0.2 x 10(9) per liter or more for 7 of the 9. One patient underwent endomyocardial biopsy with findings consistent with a cardiomyopathy. We conclude that cardiac disease may occur at any immunologic stage of human immunodeficiency virus infection. These observations suggest an effect of this disease on the heart. Images PMID:1771874

  10. Prevention and treatment of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Daniel R.; Salomon, Joshua A.

    2005-01-01

    Strategies for confronting the epidemic of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) have included a range of different approaches that focus on prevention and treatment. However, debate persists over what levels of emphasis are appropriate for the different components of the global response. This paper presents an overview of this debate and briefly summarizes the evidence on a range of interventions designed to prevent the spread of HIV infection, paying particular attention to voluntary counselling and testing, treatment for sexually transmitted infections and prevention of mother-to-child transmission. We also review the experience with antiretroviral therapy to date in terms of response rates and survival rates, adherence, drug resistance, behavioural change and epidemiological impact. Although various studies have identified strategies with proven effectiveness in reducing the risks of HIV infection and AIDS mortality, considerable uncertainties remain. Successful integration of treatment and prevention of HIV/AIDS will require a balanced approach and rigorous monitoring of the impact of programmes in terms of both individual and population outcomes. PMID:15744406

  11. The severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model of human immunodeficiency virus encephalitis: deficits in cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Griffin, William C; Middaugh, Lawrence D; Cook, Jennifer E; Tyor, William R

    2004-04-01

    The severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) encephalitis exhibits many of the histopathological and pathophysiological features of human HIV-associated dementia (HAD). Although deficits that may resemble HAD in humans have been reported for HIV-infected SCID mice, the cognitive deficit aspect of the model has very limited empirical support. Here, the authors report that HIV-infected SCID mice display cognitive deficits on a task requiring the animal to learn and remember the spatial relationship of cues in its environment in order to locate a submerged platform in a Morris water maze. The cognitive deficits manifest as longer latencies to locate the platform on the last day of the maze acquisition period and during a retention test 8 days later. Control experiments indicated that the poor performance by HIV-infected mice in comparison to controls was not due to impaired motor function or swimming ability, impaired visual acuity, or increased susceptibility to fatigue. Thus, the increased times required for HIV-infected mice to locate the submerged platform during the acquisition and memory tests likely reflect a cognitive deficit, rather than sensorimotor or emotional abnormalities. These behavioral deficits are associated with significant increases in astrogliosis and microgliosis in the HIV-infected mice. The results of this study strengthen the SCID mouse model of HIV encephalitis by definitively establishing cognitive deficits for the model in addition to its previously reported neuropathological features.

  12. Fatal encephalitis due to BK virus in a patient with common variable immunodeficiency: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bakri, Faris G; Bahou, Yacoub G; Al-Sammarrai, Firas A; Hadidy, Azmy; Gharaibeh, Almutez; Zaid, Ghida K; Mahafzah, Azmi; Samara, Osama A; Ababneh, Nidaa A; Zak, Imad

    2013-08-01

    Encephalitis due to BK virus is a rare condition. Here, we describe a young male patient with common variable immunodeficiency who developed fatal encephalitis due to BK virus. The patient presented initially with ocular symptoms that were followed by behavioral changes and spastic quadriparesis. Diagnosis was made by the compatible clinical findings and detection of viral DNA by polymerase chain reaction in the cerebrospinal fluid. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of BK virus encephalitis in a patient with common variable immunodeficiency. We suggest that BK virus should be suspected in cases of encephalitis; particularly in patients with immunodeficiency.

  13. Septic arthritis in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Rivera, J; Monteagudo, I; Lopez-Longo, J; Sanchez-Atrio, A

    1992-12-01

    We have evaluated the presence and characteristics of septic arthritis in intravenous (iv) drug users with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Sixteen patients with both HIV infection and septic arthritis were studied and compared with 5 patients with septic arthritis but no HIV infection. Clinical profile, laboratory findings at the time of onset, localization, causative organisms, mean hospitalization time and presence of complications were the same in HIV positive and HIV negative patients. Staphylococcus aureus was the most commonly isolated organism in both groups. We conclude that septic arthritis in HIV infected iv drug users is not uncommon, it is produced by the same organisms and presents similar characteristics to the ones found in iv drug users without HIV infection. Therefore, the presence of HIV infection does not appear to modify the characteristics of septic arthritis.

  14. Human immunodeficiency virus infection in heterosexual intravenous drug users in San Francisco.

    PubMed Central

    Chaisson, R E; Moss, A R; Onishi, R; Osmond, D; Carlson, J R

    1987-01-01

    To investigate the risk of infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in San Francisco, the prevalence of antibodies to HIV was determined in 281 heterosexual intravenous drug users recruited from community-based settings. Ten per cent of subjects had ELISA and Western blot confirmed seropositivity for antibodies (95 per cent CI 6.8-14.2 per cent). Analysis of behavioral factors revealed an increased risk of seropositivity in addicts who reported regularly sharing needles when injecting, particularly those sharing with two or more persons (odds ratio = 5.43; 95 per cent CI 1.08-52.5). Blacks and Latinos also had a greater prevalence of seropositivity than Whites, and this finding persisted after adjustment for needle sharing (adjusted odds ratio = 2.8; 95 per cent CI .84-8.59). Seropositivity was not associated with age, sex, duration of drug use, or history of prostitution. These data indicate that a new epidemic of AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) in intravenous drug users, similar to that which has occurred among homosexuals in San Francisco, is possible. The relatively low seroprevalence in 1985 provides health officials an important opportunity to intervene and attempt to prevent widespread infection of drug users with HIV. PMID:3467596

  15. Kinetics of human immunodeficiency virus budding and assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Nguyen, Toan

    2009-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) belongs to a large family of RNA viruses, retroviruses. Unlike budding of regular enveloped viruses, retroviruses bud concurrently with the assembly of retroviral capsids on the cell membrane. The kinetics of HIV (and other retroviruses) budding and assembly is therefore strongly affected by the elastic energy of the membrane and fundamentally different from regular viruses. The main result of this work shows that the kinetics is tunable from a fast budding process to a slow and effectively trapped partial budding process, by varying the attractive energy of retroviral proteins (call Gags), relative to the membrane elastic energy. When the Gag-Gag attraction is relatively high, the membrane elastic energy provides a kinetic barrier for the two pieces of the partial capsids to merge. This energy barrier determines the slowest step in the kinetics and the budding time. In the opposite limit, the membrane elastic energy provides not only a kinetic energy barrier, but a free energy barrier. The budding and assembly is effectively trapped at local free energy minimum, corresponding to a partially budded state. The time scale to escape from this metastable state is exponentially large. In both cases, our result fit with experimental measurements pretty well.

  16. Heat shock protein-based therapeutic strategies against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, B G; Wainberg, M A

    1999-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (hsps) and cyclophilins (CypA) are intracellular chaperone molecules that facilitate protein folding and assembly. These proteins are selectively expressed in cells following exposure to a range of stress stimuli, including viral infection. Hsp species are highly immunogenic, eliciting humoral, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL), and natural killer (NK) cell responses against viruses, tumours, and infectious diseases. This review discusses the roles of stress proteins in immunity and viral life cycles, vis-à-vis the development of Hsp-based therapeutic strategies against human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection. Cumulative findings are cited implicating the requirement of CypA in HIV-1 replication and formation of infectious virions. Studies by our group show the upregulated expression of hsp27 and hsp70 during single-cycle HIV infections. These species redistribute to the cell surface following HIV-infection and heat stress, serving as targets for NK and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Co-immunoprecipitation and Western blot studies show that hsp27, hsp70, and hsp78 complex with HIV-1 viral proteins intracellularly. Hsp70, hsp56, and CypA are assembled into HIV-1 virions. The ability of hsps to interact with HIV-1 viral proteins, combined with their inherent adjuvant and immunogenic properties, indicates that hsps may serve as vehicles for antigen delivery and the design of vaccines against acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. PMID:10231014

  17. Detachment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 from germinal centers by blocking complement receptor type 2.

    PubMed

    Kacani, L; Prodinger, W M; Sprinzl, G M; Schwendinger, M G; Spruth, M; Stoiber, H; Döpper, S; Steinhuber, S; Steindl, F; Dierich, M P

    2000-09-01

    After the transition from the acute to the chronic phase of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, complement mediates long-term storage of virions in germinal centers (GC) of lymphoid tissue. The contribution of particular complement receptors (CRs) to virus trapping in GC was studied on tonsillar specimens from HIV-infected individuals. CR2 (CD21) was identified as the main binding site for HIV in GC. Monoclonal antibodies (MAb) blocking the CR2-C3d interaction were shown to detach 62 to 77% of HIV type 1 from tonsillar cells of an individual in the presymptomatic stage. Although they did so at a lower efficiency, these antibodies were able to remove HIV from tonsillar cells of patients under highly active antiretroviral therapy, suggesting that the C3d-CR2 interaction remains a primary entrapment mechanism in treated patients as well. In contrast, removal of HIV was not observed with MAb blocking CR1 or CR3. Thus, targeting CR2 may facilitate new approaches toward a reduction of residual virus in GC.

  18. Detachment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 from germinal centers by blocking complement receptor type 2.

    PubMed

    Kacani, L; Prodinger, W M; Sprinzl, G M; Schwendinger, M G; Spruth, M; Stoiber, H; Döpper, S; Steinhuber, S; Steindl, F; Dierich, M P

    2000-09-01

    After the transition from the acute to the chronic phase of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, complement mediates long-term storage of virions in germinal centers (GC) of lymphoid tissue. The contribution of particular complement receptors (CRs) to virus trapping in GC was studied on tonsillar specimens from HIV-infected individuals. CR2 (CD21) was identified as the main binding site for HIV in GC. Monoclonal antibodies (MAb) blocking the CR2-C3d interaction were shown to detach 62 to 77% of HIV type 1 from tonsillar cells of an individual in the presymptomatic stage. Although they did so at a lower efficiency, these antibodies were able to remove HIV from tonsillar cells of patients under highly active antiretroviral therapy, suggesting that the C3d-CR2 interaction remains a primary entrapment mechanism in treated patients as well. In contrast, removal of HIV was not observed with MAb blocking CR1 or CR3. Thus, targeting CR2 may facilitate new approaches toward a reduction of residual virus in GC. PMID:10933708

  19. Chemical inactivation of recombinant vaccinia viruses and the effects on antigenicity and immunogenicity of recombinant simian immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Hulskotte, E G; Dings, M E; Norley, S G; Osterhaus, A D

    1997-12-01

    The efficiency of paraformaldehyde (PFA) and binary ethylenimine (BEI) in inactivating recombinant vaccinia virus (rVV), present in baby hamster kidney cells expressing simian immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoproteins (SIV-Env), was measured in a series of inactivation studies. Both compounds were shown to be effective in reducing rVV titres. The use of standard 3-day titration assays proved to be inadequate to measure PFA inactivation, since upon prolonged incubation, residual rVV infectivity was detected in cultures negative at 3 days. Different procedures using PFA or BEI were selected to assess their influence on the antigenicity and immunogenicity or rVV expressed SIV-Env. Antigenicity, as defined by the ability to react with a panel of monoclonal antibodies recognizing major antigenic sites, and immunogenicity, as defined by the ability to induce SIV envelope specific and virus neutralizing serum antibodies in rats, proved to be preserved after either inactivation procedure. These data show that both protocols using PFA or BEI can be used successfully as part of the procedures to remove residual rVV infectivity.

  20. Development of simian immunodeficiency virus isolation, titration, and neutralization assays which use whole blood from rhesus monkeys and an antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Lohman, B L; Higgins, J; Marthas, M L; Marx, P A; Pedersen, N C

    1991-10-01

    Assays that use rhesus macaque whole blood and an antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) p27 core protein were developed for the isolation of SIV from the blood of infected animals, the titration of infectivity of SIV inocula, and the quantitation of virus neutralizing antibodies in serum. These assays required small amounts of whole blood, were adaptable to a microtiter format, and used substrates mainly of rhesus macaque origin.

  1. Bioluminescent imaging of vaccinia virus infection in immunocompetent and immunodeficient rats as a model for human smallpox

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qiang; Fan, Changfa; Zhou, Shuya; Guo, Yanan; Zuo, Qin; Ma, Jian; Liu, Susu; Wu, Xi; Peng, Zexu; Fan, Tao; Guo, Chaoshe; Shen, Yuelei; Huang, Weijin; Li, Baowen; He, Zhengming; Wang, Youchun

    2015-01-01

    Due to the increasing concern of using smallpox virus as biological weapons for terrorist attack, there is renewed interest in studying the pathogenesis of human smallpox and development of new therapies. Animal models are highly demanded for efficacy and safety examination of new vaccines and therapeutic drugs. Here, we demonstrated that both wild type and immunodeficient rats infected with an engineered vaccinia virus carrying Firefly luciferase reporter gene (rTV-Fluc) could recapitulate infectious and clinical features of human smallpox. Vaccinia viral infection in wild type Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats displayed a diffusible pattern in various organs, including liver, head and limbs. The intensity of bioluminescence generated from rTV-Fluc correlated well with viral loads in tissues. Moreover, neutralizing antibodies had a protective effect against virus reinfection. The recombination activating gene 2 (Rag2) knockout rats generated by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) technology were further used to examine the infectivity of the rTV-Fluc in immunodeficient populations. Here we demonstrated that Rag2-/- rats were more susceptible to rTV-Fluc than SD rats with a slower virus clearance rate. Therefore, the rTV-Fluc/SD rats and rTV-Fluc/Rag2-/- rats are suitable visualization models, which recapitulate wild type or immunodeficient populations respectively, for testing human smallpox vaccine and antiviral drugs. PMID:26235050

  2. Bioluminescent imaging of vaccinia virus infection in immunocompetent and immunodeficient rats as a model for human smallpox.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Fan, Changfa; Zhou, Shuya; Guo, Yanan; Zuo, Qin; Ma, Jian; Liu, Susu; Wu, Xi; Peng, Zexu; Fan, Tao; Guo, Chaoshe; Shen, Yuelei; Huang, Weijin; Li, Baowen; He, Zhengming; Wang, Youchun

    2015-01-01

    Due to the increasing concern of using smallpox virus as biological weapons for terrorist attack, there is renewed interest in studying the pathogenesis of human smallpox and development of new therapies. Animal models are highly demanded for efficacy and safety examination of new vaccines and therapeutic drugs. Here, we demonstrated that both wild type and immunodeficient rats infected with an engineered vaccinia virus carrying Firefly luciferase reporter gene (rTV-Fluc) could recapitulate infectious and clinical features of human smallpox. Vaccinia viral infection in wild type Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats displayed a diffusible pattern in various organs, including liver, head and limbs. The intensity of bioluminescence generated from rTV-Fluc correlated well with viral loads in tissues. Moreover, neutralizing antibodies had a protective effect against virus reinfection. The recombination activating gene 2 (Rag2) knockout rats generated by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) technology were further used to examine the infectivity of the rTV-Fluc in immunodeficient populations. Here we demonstrated that Rag2-/- rats were more susceptible to rTV-Fluc than SD rats with a slower virus clearance rate. Therefore, the rTV-Fluc/SD rats and rTV-Fluc/Rag2-/- rats are suitable visualization models, which recapitulate wild type or immunodeficient populations respectively, for testing human smallpox vaccine and antiviral drugs. PMID:26235050

  3. Bioluminescent imaging of vaccinia virus infection in immunocompetent and immunodeficient rats as a model for human smallpox.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Fan, Changfa; Zhou, Shuya; Guo, Yanan; Zuo, Qin; Ma, Jian; Liu, Susu; Wu, Xi; Peng, Zexu; Fan, Tao; Guo, Chaoshe; Shen, Yuelei; Huang, Weijin; Li, Baowen; He, Zhengming; Wang, Youchun

    2015-08-03

    Due to the increasing concern of using smallpox virus as biological weapons for terrorist attack, there is renewed interest in studying the pathogenesis of human smallpox and development of new therapies. Animal models are highly demanded for efficacy and safety examination of new vaccines and therapeutic drugs. Here, we demonstrated that both wild type and immunodeficient rats infected with an engineered vaccinia virus carrying Firefly luciferase reporter gene (rTV-Fluc) could recapitulate infectious and clinical features of human smallpox. Vaccinia viral infection in wild type Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats displayed a diffusible pattern in various organs, including liver, head and limbs. The intensity of bioluminescence generated from rTV-Fluc correlated well with viral loads in tissues. Moreover, neutralizing antibodies had a protective effect against virus reinfection. The recombination activating gene 2 (Rag2) knockout rats generated by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) technology were further used to examine the infectivity of the rTV-Fluc in immunodeficient populations. Here we demonstrated that Rag2-/- rats were more susceptible to rTV-Fluc than SD rats with a slower virus clearance rate. Therefore, the rTV-Fluc/SD rats and rTV-Fluc/Rag2-/- rats are suitable visualization models, which recapitulate wild type or immunodeficient populations respectively, for testing human smallpox vaccine and antiviral drugs.

  4. Feline immunodeficiency virus: an interesting model for AIDS studies and an important cat pathogen.

    PubMed Central

    Bendinelli, M; Pistello, M; Lombardi, S; Poli, A; Garzelli, C; Matteucci, D; Ceccherini-Nelli, L; Malvaldi, G; Tozzini, F

    1995-01-01

    The lentivirus feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a widespread pathogen of the domestic cat that is mainly transmitted through bites, although other means of transmission are also possible. Its prevalence ranges from 1 to 10% in different cat populations throughout the world, thus representing a large reservoir of naturally infected animals. FIV resembles the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in many respects. Similarities include the structural features of the virion, the general organization and great variability of the genome, the life cycle in the infected host, and most importantly, the pathogenic potential. Infection is associated with laboratory signs of immunosuppression as well as with a large variety of superinfections, tumors, and neurological manifestations. Our understanding of FIV is steadily improving and is providing important clues to the pathogenesis of immunodeficiency-inducing lentiviruses. The cellular receptor for FIV is different from the feline equivalent of the human CD4 molecule used by HIV; nevertheless, the major hallmark of infection is a progressive loss of CD4+ T lymphocytes as in HIV infection. The mechanisms by which FIV escapes the host's immune responses are being actively investigated. FIV causes lysis of infected T cells and also appears to predispose these cells to apoptosis. Infection of macrophages and other cell types has also been documented. For reasons yet to be understood, antibody-mediated neutralization of fresh FIV isolates is very inefficient both in vitro and in vivo. Vaccination studies have provided some encouraging results, but the difficulties encountered appear to match those met in HIV vaccine development. FIV susceptibility to antiviral agents is similar to that of HIV, thus providing a valuable system for in vivo preclinical evaluation of therapies. It is concluded that in many respects FIV is an ideal model for AIDS studies. PMID:7704896

  5. Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Wild-Caught Chimpanzees from Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Nerrienet, Eric; Santiago, Mario L.; Foupouapouognigni, Yacouba; Bailes, Elizabeth; Mundy, Nicolas I.; Njinku, Bernadette; Kfutwah, Anfumbom; Muller-Trutwin, Michaela C.; Barre-Sinoussi, Françoise; Shaw, George M.; Sharp, Paul M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Ayouba, Ahidjo

    2005-01-01

    Simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVcpz) infecting chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) in west central Africa are the closest relatives to all major variants of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 ([HIV-1]; groups M, N and O), and have thus been implicated as the source of the human infections; however, information concerning the prevalence, geographic distribution, and subspecies association of SIVcpz still remains limited. In this study, we tested 71 wild-caught chimpanzees from Cameroon for evidence of SIVcpz infection. Thirty-nine of these were of the central subspecies (Pan troglodytes troglodytes), and 32 were of the Nigerian subspecies (Pan troglodytes vellerosus), as determined by mitochondrial DNA analysis. Serological analysis determined that one P. t. troglodytes ape (CAM13) harbored serum antibodies that cross-reacted strongly with HIV-1 antigens; all other apes were seronegative. To characterize the newly identified virus, 14 partially overlapping viral fragments were amplified from fecal virion RNA and concatenated to yield a complete SIVcpz genome (9,284 bp). Phylogenetic analyses revealed that SIVcpzCAM13 fell well within the radiation of the SIVcpzPtt group of viruses, as part of a clade including all other SIVcpzPtt strains as well as HIV-1 groups M and N. However, SIVcpzCAM13 clustered most closely with SIVcpzGAB1 from Gabon rather than with SIVcpzCAM3 and SIVcpzCAM5 from Cameroon, indicating the existence of divergent SIVcpzPtt lineages within the same geographic region. These data, together with evidence of recombination among ancestral SIVcpzPtt lineages, indicate long-standing endemic infection of central chimpanzees and reaffirm a west central African origin of HIV-1. Whether P. t. vellerosus apes are naturally infected with SIVcpz requires further study. PMID:15613358

  6. Oral lesions in infection with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Coogan, Maeve M.; Greenspan, John; Challacombe, Stephen J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the importance of oral lesions as indicators of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and as predictors of progression of HIV disease to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Oral manifestations are among the earliest and most important indicators of infection with HIV. Seven cardinal lesions, oral candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia, Kaposi sarcoma, linear gingival erythema, necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, which are strongly associated with HIV infection, have been identified and internationally calibrated, and are seen in both developed and developing countries. They may provide a strong indication of HIV infection and be present in the majority of HIV-infected people. Antiretroviral therapy may affect the prevalence of HIV-related lesions. The presence of oral lesions can have a significant impact on health-related quality of life. Oral health is strongly associated with physical and mental health and there are significant increases in oral health needs in people with HIV infection, especially in children, and in adults particularly in relation to periodontal diseases. International collaboration is needed to ensure that oral aspects of HIV disease are taken into account in medical programmes and to integrate oral health care with the general care of the patient. It is important that all health care workers receive education and training on the relevance of oral health needs and the use of oral lesions as surrogate markers in HIV infection. PMID:16211162

  7. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii and concurrent Bartonella spp., feline immunodeficiency virus, feline leukemia virus, and Dirofilaria immitis infections in Egyptian cats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii and Bartonella spp. are zoonotic pathogens of cats. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV), and Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLv) are related to Human Immunodeficiency Virus, and Human Leukemia Virus, respectively, and these viruses are immunosuppressive. In the present study, the prevalen...

  8. Simian immunodeficiency virus infection of CD8+ lymphocytes in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Dean, G A; Reubel, G H; Pedersen, N C

    1996-01-01

    To determine the lymphoid target cells of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in vivo, peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and lymph node lymphocytes (LNL) were positively selected (>97% purity) for surface expression of CD4, CD8, or CD20 and then analyzed for SIV provirus using semiquantitative DNA amplification. We found provirus in CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes but none in CD20+ lymphocytes. During acute SIV infection (< or = 214 days postinoculation), the percentage of PBL and LNL CD4+ cells containing proviral DNA ranged from 0.2 to 20% and from 0.2 to 2%, respectively. Proviral burden in the CD8+ population of either PBL or LNL ranged from 0.01 to 0.2%. Virus isolation by cocultivation was positive for both CD4+ and CD8+ purified populations. No difference in proviral burden was observed between PBL and LNL subsets during acute SIV infection. Up to 19.4% of positively selected CD8+ cells also expressed CD4, and thus the provirus may reside within a dual-positive population. This dual-positive population may represent activated lymphocytes that are particularly susceptible to infection and may provide an opportunity for virus entry into the CD8+ CD4- lymphocytes in vivo. PMID:8764081

  9. Conserved serines in simian immunodeficiency virus capsid are required for virus budding.

    PubMed

    Rue, Sarah M; Roos, Jason W; Clements, Janice E; Barber, Sheila A

    2005-05-25

    The simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) capsid protein (CA), a constituent of the Pr55Gag polyprotein, is phosphorylated in virions but not in virus-producing cells (Rue, S.M., Roos, J.W., Tarwater, P.M., Clements, J.E., Barber, S.A., 2005. Phosphorylation and proteolytic cleavage of gag proteins in budded simian immunodeficiency virus. J. Virol. 79 (4), 2484-2492.). Using phosphoamino acid analysis of CA, we show that serine is the primary phosphate acceptor. A series of substitution mutants of serines in the CA domain of Pr55Gag were constructed in the infectious viral clone SIVmac239. These virus mutants were examined for defects in virus replication and virion infectivity, release, and morphology, as well as alterations in phosphorylation of CA-containing proteins. Although the virus mutants exhibited a number of replication defects, none of these defects could be directly attributed to aberrant CA phosphorylation. A novel defect was a block in early budding, which was common among several virus mutants with substitutions in the CA N terminus. Together, these results indicate that certain residues in the CA N terminus are crucial for early budding events.

  10. Renal involvement in feline immunodeficiency virus infection: a clinicopathological study.

    PubMed

    Poli, A; Abramo, F; Taccini, E; Guidi, G; Barsotti, P; Bendinelli, M; Malvaldi, G

    1993-01-01

    Renal tissues from 15 cats naturally infected with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) were examined histologically, immunohistochemically and ultrastructurally. Renal function and urinary proteins were also studied. Kidney abnormalities were found in 12 cats and were characterized by mesangial widening with segmental to diffuse glomerulosclerosis and presence of IgM and C3, and scanty IgG deposits in the mesangium. Tubulointerstitial lesions were also present. In 6 cats the lesions were severe enough to cause marked increase in blood urea nitrogen and creatinine, and heavy glomerular nonselective proteinuria. These findings suggest that a renal involvement is a frequent occurrence in FIV-infected cats. As the histopathological features observed were similar to those described in HIV-infected patients, FIV-infected cats may represent a valuable model for a better understanding of HIV-associated nephropathy in humans. PMID:8321363

  11. Human immunodeficiency virus and migrant labor in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Jochelson, K; Mothibeli, M; Leger, J P

    1991-01-01

    The authors investigate the impact of the migrant labor system on heterosexual relationships on South African mines and assess the implications for the future transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The migrant labor system has created a market for prostitution in mining towns and geographic networks of relationships within and between urban and rural communities. A section of the migrant workforce and a group of women dependent on prostitution for economic support appear especially vulnerable to contracting HIV infection since they are involved in multiple sexual encounters with different, changing partners, usually without condom protection. Furthermore, sexually transmitted disease morbidity is extensive in the general and mineworker populations. Historically, migration facilitated the transmission of sexually transmitted diseases and may act similarly for HIV. Problems of combating the HIV epidemic in South Africa are discussed. PMID:2004869

  12. Seroprevalence of human immunodeficiency virus among inpatient pretrial detainees.

    PubMed

    Schwartz-Watts, D; Montgomery, L D; Morgan, D W

    1995-01-01

    Medical records of inpatients discharged from a forensic unit in Columbia, South Carolina, from January 1991 to December 1991 were reviewed to determine the incidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositivity. Results were linked to age, gender, ethnicity, history of intravenous drug use, and Axis I diagnoses. HIV status was obtained for 74 percent of patients 18 to 55 years of age. The incidence of HIV seropositivity among patients tested was 5.5 percent, which is greater than 40 times the incidence for the general population in South Carolina. Intravenous drug use was reported for 33 percent of the seropositive males. We conclude that inpatient pretrial detainees are at increased risk for HIV infection. HIV testing should be mandated at all facilities housing detainees. Further studies are needed to determine any factors about these patients that can be linked to seropositivity.

  13. Human immunodeficiency virus and migrant labor in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Jochelson, K; Mothibeli, M; Leger, J P

    1991-01-01

    The authors investigate the impact of the migrant labor system on heterosexual relationships on South African mines and assess the implications for the future transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The migrant labor system has created a market for prostitution in mining towns and geographic networks of relationships within and between urban and rural communities. A section of the migrant workforce and a group of women dependent on prostitution for economic support appear especially vulnerable to contracting HIV infection since they are involved in multiple sexual encounters with different, changing partners, usually without condom protection. Furthermore, sexually transmitted disease morbidity is extensive in the general and mineworker populations. Historically, migration facilitated the transmission of sexually transmitted diseases and may act similarly for HIV. Problems of combating the HIV epidemic in South Africa are discussed.

  14. Glanzmann Thrombasthenia Associated with Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Patient

    PubMed Central

    Manne, Rakesh Kumar; Natarajan, Kannan; Patil, Rajendra; Prathi, Venkata Sarath; Beeraka, Swapna Sridevi; Kolaparthi, Venkata Suneel Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Glanzmann's thrombasthenia (GT) is an autosomal recessive inherited platelet function defect characterized by normal platelet count, prolonged bleeding time and abnormal clot retraction. This disease typically presents in infancy or early childhood and has proven to have very good prognosis. In this case study, a 22-year-old GT patient who also developed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection after sometime is reported. The patient showed oral manifestations of gingival hyperplasia and petechial lesions. Unfortunately the detection of both thrombasthenia and HIV were done at considerably late stages which contributed to a poor prognosis. The patient died of cardiopulmonary arrest secondary to HIV, thrombasthenia and thrombocytopenia. The importance of early detection, supportive care and communication between the general and oral physician in management of the GT is also discussed. PMID:24829739

  15. Eosinophilia in Patients Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Andrew; Serpa, Jose A.

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilia is not uncommonly encountered in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV); particularly at initiation of care or among those with advanced disease. The clinical manifestation most commonly associated with eosinophilia in this patient population is skin rash. Management of these patients is challenging due to a paucity of data evaluating diagnostic testing and therapeutic strategies. Patients born in or with significant travel to parasite-endemic countries are more likely to have tissue-invasive helminthes, such as Strongyloides or Schistosoma. Patients without such risk factors are unlikely to have parasitic infections and frequently will have self-resolution of eosinophilia. When a detailed history, physical exam and diagnostic work-up is unrevealing, we sometimes consider empirical therapy with ivermectin. Praziquantel may also be considered for those at risk for schistosomiasis. PMID:26126686

  16. Thrombotic microangiopathy and human immunodeficiency virus in the era of eculizumab.

    PubMed

    Jin, Anna; Boroujerdi-Rad, Laleh; Shah, Gaurang; Chen, Joline L T

    2016-08-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs) include thrombotic thromobocytopenic purpura and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Among these conditions, atypical HUS is now recognized to be a disease of alternative complement pathway dysregulation. Eculizumab is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to the complement protein C5 and prevents the cleavage of C5 to C5a and C5b. Eculizumab has been used as a novel treatment for complement-mediated TMA. We present a case of a patient with human immunodeficiency virus infection who developed TMA and was successfully treated with eculizumab. The effect of long-term treatment with this new medication is unknown, and further studies are needed to establish guidelines in the management of this condition. PMID:27478600

  17. Amebic liver abscess and human immunodeficiency virus infection: a report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Liu, C J; Hung, C C; Chen, M Y; Lai, Y P; Chen, P J; Huang, S H; Chen, D S

    2001-07-01

    Invasive amebiasis rarely occurs in homosexual men and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals and has not been regarded as a beacon for concomitant HIV infection. We encountered a bisexual man with a protracted course of amebic liver abscess and amebic colitis. In the presence of fever, generalized lymphadenopathy, and elevated serum aminotransferase levels, HIV infection was suspected and then confirmed by a de novo seroconversion of HIV antibody. Subsequently, we noted two consecutive patients with amebic liver abscess, also later found to be infected with HIV. The ameba obtained from these three cases was identified as Entamoeba histolytica by amplification of 16S ribosomal RNA by polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing. This observation suggests that amebic liver abscess and colitis can be presentations for HIV infection in the Far East. Thus, the local patients with invasive amebiasis, especially those with a protracted course or with risk factors of HIV infection, should be tested for HIV.

  18. Characterization of Primary Isolate-Like Variants of Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, John M.; Earl, Patricia L.; Moss, Bernard; Reimann, Keith A.; Wyand, Michael S.; Manson, Kelledy H.; Bilska, Miroslawa; Zhou, Jin Tao; Pauza, C. David; Parren, Paul W. H. I.; Burton, Dennis R.; Sodroski, Joseph G.; Letvin, Norman L.; Montefiori, David C.

    1999-01-01

    Several different strains of simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) that contain the envelope glycoproteins of either T-cell-line-adapted (TCLA) strains or primary isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are now available. One of the advantages of these chimeric viruses is their application to studies of HIV-1-specific neutralizing antibodies in preclinical AIDS vaccine studies in nonhuman primates. In this regard, an important consideration is the spectrum of antigenic properties exhibited by the different envelope glycoproteins used for SHIV construction. The antigenic properties of six SHIV variants were characterized here in neutralization assays with recombinant soluble CD4 (rsCD4), monoclonal antibodies, and serum samples from SHIV-infected macaques and HIV-1-infected individuals. Neutralization of SHIV variants HXBc2, KU2, 89.6, and 89.6P by autologous and heterologous sera from SHIV-infected macaques was restricted to an extent that these viruses may be considered heterologous to one another in their major neutralization determinants. Little or no variation was seen in the neutralization determinants on SHIV variants 89.6P, 89.6PD, and SHIV-KB9. Neutralization of SHIV HXBc2 by sera from HXBc2-infected macaques could be blocked with autologous V3-loop peptide; this was less true in the case of SHIV 89.6 and sera from SHIV 89.6-infected macaques. The poorly immunogenic but highly conserved epitope for monoclonal antibody IgG1b12 was a target for neutralization on SHIV variants HXBc2, KU2, and 89.6 but not on 89.6P and KB9. The 2G12 epitope was a target for neutralization on all five SHIV variants. SHIV variants KU2, 89.6, 89.6P, 89.6PD, and KB9 exhibited antigenic properties characteristic of primary isolates by being relatively insensitive to neutralization in peripheral blood mononuclear cells with serum samples from HIV-1-infected individuals and 12-fold to 38-fold less sensitive to inhibition with recombinant soluble CD4 than TCLA

  19. Changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in human immunodeficiency virus-infected homosexual men.

    PubMed

    Croxson, T S; Chapman, W E; Miller, L K; Levit, C D; Senie, R; Zumoff, B

    1989-02-01

    Serum total testosterone, total 17 beta-estradiol, LH, FSH, and PRL concentrations were measured by RIA in 59 homosexual men infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (32 clinically healthy antibody-positive men (HH+), 20 men with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), and 7 men with AIDS-related complex (ARC). The results were compared with those of 26 antibody-negative homosexual men (HH-) who served as controls. The mean serum total testosterone concentration was significantly lower in the men with AIDS [414 +/- 230 (+/- SD) ng/dL (14.5 +/- 8.0)] than in the HH- men [550 +/- 172 ng/dL (19.0 +/- 6.0 nmol/L); P less than 0.05]. The mean serum LH level was significantly higher in the men with AIDS (26 +/- 14 vs. 14 +/- 4 IU/L in HH- men; P less than 0.01) and slightly but significantly higher in the men with ARC (19 +/- 8 IU/L; 0.10 greater than P greater than 0.05). Serum FSH also was significantly higher in the men with AIDS (P less than 0.05). Serum PRL was significantly higher in the men with ARC (10 +/- 2 micrograms/L; P less than 0.05) and AIDS (16 +/- 10 micrograms/L; P less than 0.001) than in the HH- men (8 +/- 3 micrograms/L). Serum sex hormone-binding globulin levels were similar in HH- men and men with AIDS as were serum T responses to hCG administration for 2 days. These results suggest that alterations of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis indicative of primary hypogonadism accompany human immunodeficiency virus infection in homosexual men.

  20. Viral Epitopes and Monoclonal Antibodies: Isolation of Blocking Antibodies that Inhibit Virus Neutralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Richard J.; Schochetman, Gerald

    1981-07-01

    The inability of pathogenic animal viruses to be completely neutralized by antibodies can lead to chronic viral infections in which infectious virus persists even in the presence of excess neutralizing antibody. A mechanism that results in this nonneutralized fraction of virus was defined by the topographical relationships of viral epitopes identified with monoclonal antibodies wherein monoclonal antibodies bind to virus and sterically block the binding of neutralizing antibodies.

  1. Inducible human immunodeficiency virus type 1 packaging cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, H; Rabson, A B; Kaul, M; Ron, Y; Dougherty, J P

    1996-01-01

    Packaging cell lines are important tools for transferring genes into eukaryotic cells. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-based packaging cell lines are difficult to obtain, in part owing to the problem that some HIV-1 proteins are cytotoxic in a variety of cells. To overcome this, we have developed an HIV-1-based packaging cell line which has an inducible expression system. The tetracycline-inducible expression system was utilized to control the expression of the Rev regulatory protein, which in turn controls the expression of the late proteins including Gag, Pol, and Env. Western blotting (immunoblotting) demonstrated that the expression of p24gag and gp120env from the packaging cells peaked on days 6 and 7 postinduction. Reverse transcriptase activity could be detected by day 4 after induction and also peaked on days 6 and 7. Defective vector virus could be propagated, yielding titers as high as 7 x 10(3) CFU/ml, while replication-competent virus was not detectable at any time. Thus, the cell line should enable the transfer of specific genes into CD4+ cells and should be a useful tool for studying the biology of HIV-1. We have also established an inducible HIV-1 Env-expressing cell line which could be used to propagate HIV-1 vectors that require only Env in trans. The env-minus vector virus titer produced from the Env-expressing cells reached 2 x 10(4) CFU/ml. The inducible HIV-1 Env-expressing cell line should be a useful tool for the study of HIV-1 Env as well. PMID:8676479

  2. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Populations in Blood and Semen

    PubMed Central

    Delwart, Eric L.; Mullins, James I.; Gupta, Phalguni; Learn, Gerald H.; Holodniy, Mark; Katzenstein, David; Walker, Bruce D.; Singh, Mandaleshwar K.

    1998-01-01

    Transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) usually results in outgrowth of viruses with macrophage-tropic phenotype and consensus non-syncytium-inducing (NSI) V3 loop sequences, despite the presence of virus with broader host range and the syncytium-inducing (SI) phenotype in the blood of many donors. We examined proviruses in contemporaneous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and nonspermatozoal semen mononuclear cells (NSMC) of five HIV-1-infected individuals to determine if this preferential outgrowth could be due to compartmentalization and thus preferential transmission of viruses of the NSI phenotype from the male genital tract. Phylogenetic reconstructions of ∼700-bp sequences covering the second constant region through the fifth variable region (C2 to V5) of the viral envelope gene revealed distinct variant populations in the blood versus the semen in two patients with AIDS and in one asymptomatic individual (patient 613), whereas similar variant populations were found in both compartments in two other asymptomatic individuals. Variants with amino acids in the V3 loop that predict the SI phenotype were found in both AIDS patients and in patient 613; however, the distribution of these variants between the two compartments was not consistent. SI variants were found only in the PBMC of one AIDS patient but only in the NSMC of the other, while they were found in both compartments in patient 613. It is therefore unlikely that restriction of SI variants from the male genital tract accounts for the observed NSI transmission bias. Furthermore, no evidence for a semen-specific signature amino acid sequence was detected. PMID:9420266

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 populations in blood and semen.

    PubMed

    Delwart, E L; Mullins, J I; Gupta, P; Learn, G H; Holodniy, M; Katzenstein, D; Walker, B D; Singh, M K

    1998-01-01

    Transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) usually results in outgrowth of viruses with macrophage-tropic phenotype and consensus non-syncytium-inducing (NSI) V3 loop sequences, despite the presence of virus with broader host range and the syncytium-inducing (SI) phenotype in the blood of many donors. We examined proviruses in contemporaneous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and non-spermatozoal semen mononuclear cells (NSMC) of five HIV-1-infected individuals to determine if this preferential outgrowth could be due to compartmentalization and thus preferential transmission of viruses of the NSI phenotype from the male genital tract. Phylogenetic reconstructions of approximately 700-bp sequences covering the second constant region through the fifth variable region (C2 to V5) of the viral envelope gene revealed distinct variant populations in the blood versus the semen in two patients with AIDS and in one asymptomatic individual (patient 613), whereas similar variant populations were found in both compartments in two other asymptomatic individuals. Variants with amino acids in the V3 loop that predict the SI phenotype were found in both AIDS patients and in patient 613; however, the distribution of these variants between the two compartments was not consistent. SI variants were found only in the PBMC of one AIDS patient but only in the NSMC of the other, while they were found in both compartments in patient 613. It is therefore unlikely that restriction of SI variants from the male genital tract accounts for the observed NSI transmission bias. Furthermore, no evidence for a semen-specific signature amino acid sequence was detected.

  4. Serological responses in chimpanzees inoculated with human immunodeficiency virus glycoprotein (gp120) subunit vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, L.O.; Pyle, S.W.; Nara, P.L.; Bess, J.W. Jr.; Gonda, M.A.; Kelliher, J.C.; Gilden, R.V.; Robey, W.G.; Bolognesi, D.P.; Gallo, R.C.

    1987-12-01

    The major envelope glycoprotein of a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been purified and was utilized as a prototype vaccine in chimpanzees. The 120,000-dalton glycoprotein (gp120) was purified from membranes of human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV)-IIIB-infected cells and the final preparation contained low levels to no detectable HTLV-IIIB core antigen (p24) and low levels of endotoxin. Chimpanzees inoculated with gp120 responded by developing antibodies that precipitated radiolabeled gp120 and neutralized in vitro infection of HTLV-IIIB. Antibodies to HTLV-IIIB p24 were not detected in the gp120-immunized chimpanzees. Peripheral blood leukocytes from the vaccinated animals were examined for T4/sup +/ and T8/sup +/ cells, and no decrease in the T4/T8 ratio was found, indicating that immunization with a ligand (gp120) that binds to T4 has not detectable adverse effect on the population of T4/sup +/ cells. The only current animal model that can be reproducibly infected with HIV is the chimpanzee. Immunization of chimpanzees with HIV proteins will provide an experimental system for testing the effectiveness of prototype vaccines for preventing HIV infection in vivo.

  5. Broadly neutralizing antibodies against influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Laursen, Nick S.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite available antivirals and vaccines, influenza infections continue to be a major cause of mortality worldwide. Vaccination generally induces an effective, but strain-specific antibody response. As the virus continually evolves, new vaccines have to be administered almost annually when a novel strain becomes dominant. Furthermore, the sporadic emerging resistance to neuraminidase inhibitors among circulating strains suggests an urgent need for new therapeutic agents. Recently, several cross-reactive antibodies have been described, which neutralize an unprecedented spectrum of influenza viruses. These broadly neutralizing antibodies generally target conserved functional regions on the major influenza surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA). The characterization of their neutralization breadth and epitopes on HA could stimulate the development of new antibody-based antivirals and broader influenza vaccines. PMID:23583287

  6. Host Anti-antibody Responses Following Adeno-associated Virus-mediated Delivery of Antibodies Against HIV and SIV in Rhesus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Navio, José M; Fuchs, Sebastian P; Pedreño-López, Sònia; Rakasz, Eva G; Gao, Guangping; Desrosiers, Ronald C

    2016-02-01

    Long-term delivery of antibodies against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors is a promising approach for the prevention or treatment of HIV infection. However, host antibody responses to the delivered antibody are a serious concern that could significantly limit the applicability of this approach. Here, we describe the dynamics and characteristics of the anti-antibody responses in monkeys that received either rhesus anti-simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) antibodies (4L6 or 5L7) in prevention trials or a combination of rhesusized human anti-HIV antibodies (1NC9/8ANC195/3BNC117 or 10-1074/10E8/3BNC117) in therapy trials, all employing AAV1 delivery of IgG1. Eight out of eight monkeys that received the anti-HIV antibodies made persisting antibody responses to all three antibodies in the mix. Six out of six uninfected monkeys that received the anti-SIV antibody 4L6 and three out of six of those receiving anti-SIV antibody 5L7 also generated anti-antibodies. Both heavy and light chains were targeted, predominantly or exclusively to variable regions, and reactivity to complementarity-determining region (CDR)-H3 peptide could be demonstrated. There was a highly significant correlation of the magnitude of anti-antibody responses with the degree of sequence divergence of the delivered antibody from germline. Our results suggest the need for effective strategies to counteract the problem of antibody responses to AAV-delivered antibodies.

  7. 76 FR 72417 - Public Health Service Guideline for Reducing Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Public Health Service Guideline for Reducing Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Through Solid Organ Transplantation AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC),...

  8. 76 FR 58517 - Public Health Service Guideline for Reducing Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Public Health Service Guideline for Reducing Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Through Solid Organ Transplantation AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC),...

  9. Seroprevalence of feline leukemia virus, feline immunodeficiency virus and heartworm infection among owned cats in tropical Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Pacheco, Antonio; Aguilar-Caballero, Armando J; Colin-Flores, Rafael F; Acosta-Viana, Karla Y; Guzman-Marin, Eugenia; Jimenez-Coello, Matilde

    2014-06-01

    Several infectious agents may be distributed within a healthy population of cats where diverse risk factors predispose them to come into contact with pathogens. Blood samples from 227 owned cats in Merida, Mexico, were collected with the objective of determining the seroprevalence and associated risk factors of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and Dirofilaria immitis antigen, and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) antibody. Serological detection of FeLV and D immitis antigens, and FIV antibodies was performed using the commercial kit SNAP Feline Triple Test. The prevalence was found to be 7.5% for FeLV, 2.5% for FIV and 0% for D immitis. Adult cats were at a higher risk of coming into contact with FeLV (P <0.01) than younger cats. Owing to its low prevalence, a risk factor analysis was not performed for FIV. The prevalence of retroviral infections found in this study was low, but within the limits reported in the different geographical areas of the world. Cases of filariosis in the domestic cats of Merida, Mexico, may be absent or very low; however, the low sample size may have influenced these results. PMID:24196568

  10. 75 FR 51273 - Expanded Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Testing for Disproportionately Affected Populations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Expanded Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Testing for Disproportionately Affected Populations AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and... funding available to make awards under the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Funding...

  11. Cytoskeletal proteins inside human immunodeficiency virus type 1 virions.

    PubMed Central

    Ott, D E; Coren, L V; Kane, B P; Busch, L K; Johnson, D G; Sowder, R C; Chertova, E N; Arthur, L O; Henderson, L E

    1996-01-01

    We have identified three types of cytoskeletal proteins inside human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) virions by analyzing subtilisin-digested particles. HIV-1 virions were digested with protease, and the treated particles were isolated by sucrose density centrifugation. This method removes both exterior viral proteins and proteins associated with microvesicles that contaminate virion preparations. Since the proteins inside the virion are protected from digestion by the viral lipid envelope, they can be isolated and analyzed after treatment. Experiments presented here demonstrated that this procedure removed more than 95% of the protein associated with microvesicles. Proteins in digested HIV-1(MN) particles from infected H9 and CEM(ss) cell lines were analyzed by high-pressure liquid chromatography, protein sequencing, and immunoblotting. The data revealed that three types of cytoskeletal proteins are present in virions at different concentrations relative to the molar level of Gag: actin (approximately 10 to 15%), ezrin and moesin (approximately 2%), and cofilin (approximately 2 to 10%). Our analysis of proteins within virus particles detected proteolytic fragments of alpha-smooth muscle actin and moesin that were cleaved at sites which might be recognized by HIV-1 protease. These cleavage products are not present in microvesicles from uninfected cells. Therefore, these processed proteins are most probably produced by HIV-1 protease digestion. The presence of these fragments, as well as the incorporation of a few specific cytoskeletal proteins into virions, suggests an active interaction between cytoskeletal and viral proteins. PMID:8892894

  12. Role of liver transplantation in human immunodeficiency virus positive patients

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Deepak; Agarwal, Kosh

    2015-01-01

    End-stage liver disease (ESLD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality amongst human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals. Chronic hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, drug-induced hepatotoxicity related to combined anti-retro-viral therapy, alcohol related liver disease and non-alcohol related fatty liver disease appear to be the leading causes. It is therefore, anticipated that more HIV-positive patients with ESLD will present as potential transplant candidates. HIV infection is no longer a contraindication to liver transplantation. Key transplantation outcomes such as rejection and infection rates as well as medium term graft and patient survival match those seen in the non-HIV infected patients in the absence of co-existing HCV infection. HIV disease does not seem to be negatively impacted by transplantation. However, HIV-HCV co-infection transplant outcomes remain suboptimal due to recurrence. In this article, we review the key challenges faced by this patient cohort in the pre- and post-transplant period. PMID:26604639

  13. Analysis of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 RNA packageome.

    PubMed

    Eckwahl, Matthew J; Arnion, Helene; Kharytonchyk, Siarhei; Zang, Trinity; Bieniasz, Paul D; Telesnitsky, Alice; Wolin, Sandra L

    2016-08-01

    All retroviruses package cellular RNAs into virions. Studies of murine leukemia virus (MLV) revealed that the major host cell RNAs encapsidated by this simple retrovirus were LTR retrotransposons and noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). Several classes of ncRNAs appeared to be packaged by MLV shortly after synthesis, as precursors to tRNAs, small nuclear RNAs, and small nucleolar RNAs were all enriched in virions. To determine the extent to which the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) packages similar RNAs, we used high-throughput sequencing to characterize the RNAs within infectious HIV-1 virions produced in CEM-SS T lymphoblastoid cells. We report that the most abundant cellular RNAs in HIV-1 virions are 7SL RNA and transcripts from numerous divergent and truncated members of the long interspersed element (LINE) and short interspersed element (SINE) families of retrotransposons. We also detected precursors to several tRNAs and small nuclear RNAs as well as transcripts derived from the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) intergenic spacers. We show that packaging of a pre-tRNA requires the nuclear export receptor Exportin 5, indicating that HIV-1 recruits at least some newly made ncRNAs in the cytoplasm. Together, our work identifies the set of RNAs packaged by HIV-1 and reveals that early steps in HIV-1 assembly intersect with host cell ncRNA biogenesis pathways. PMID:27247436

  14. Natural simian immunodeficiency virus transmission in mandrills: a family affair?

    PubMed Central

    Fouchet, David; Verrier, Delphine; Ngoubangoye, Barthélémy; Souquière, Sandrine; Makuwa, Maria; Kazanji, Mirdad; Gonzalez, Jean-Paul; Pontier, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how pathogens spread and persist in the ecosystem is critical for deciphering the epidemiology of diseases of significance for global health and the fundamental mechanisms involved in the evolution of virulence and host resistance. Combining long-term behavioural and epidemiological data collected in a naturally infected mandrill population and a Bayesian framework, the present study investigated unknown aspects of the eco-epidemiology of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), the recent ancestor of HIV. Results show that, in contrast to what is expected from aggressive and sexual transmission (i.e. the two commonly accepted transmission modes for SIV), cases of SIVmnd-1 subtype were significantly correlated among related individuals (greater than 30% of the observed cases). Challenging the traditional view of SIV, this finding suggests the inheritance of genetic determinants of susceptibility to SIV and/or a role for behavioural interactions among maternal kin affecting the transmission of the virus, which would highlight the underappreciated role of sociality in the spread of infectious diseases. Outcomes of this study also provide novel insights into the role of host social structure in the evolution of pathogens. PMID:22673358

  15. Complementation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) gag particle formation.

    PubMed

    Zhoa, Y; Jones, I M; Hockley, D J; Nermut, M V; Roy, P

    1994-03-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus gag precursor protein Pr55Gag exhibits the ability of particle assembly when expressed using recombinant baculoviruses. In order to delineate the sequences required for particle formation, two mutants of Gag (D1 and D2) were constructed in which 10 amino acids within the CA domain were deleted. Both mutants yielded stable high levels of Gag antigen following expression in Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells. Electron microscopy of sections through infected cells revealed that neither mutant was able to assemble particles although targeting of the protein to the plasma membrane still occurred. The Gag antigen that accumulated beneath the plasma membrane exhibited distinctive morphologies when compared to each other and to parental (Pr46Gag) particles. Particle assembly was rescued when S. frugiperda cells were coinfected with both AcD1 and AcD2 viruses, or with AcD1 and a carboxyl-terminal deletion of Gag (Pr41.5) which was previously shown not to form particles (J.B.M., D.J. Hockley, M.V. Nermot, and I.M. Jones, 1992, J. Gen. Virol. 73, 3079-3086). The genetic complementation of Gag-driven assembly is discussed.

  16. Neutralization breadth and potency of serum derived from recently human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected Thai individuals.

    PubMed

    Chaitaveep, Nithinart; Utachee, Piraporn; Chuenchitra, Thippawan; Karasavvan, Nicos; Takeda, Naokazu; Kameoka, Masanori

    2016-05-01

    Neutralizing antibody responses play important roles in controlling several viral infections including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Potent and broad neutralizing antibody responses have been reported in some HIV-1-infected individuals; therefore, elucidating the mechanisms underlying neutralizing antibody responses will provide important information for the development of anti-HIV-1 vaccines. We herein performed a comparative study on the neutralization breadth and potency of serum samples collected from Thai individuals recently and chronically infected with HIV-1. Neutralization tests using a series of envelope glycoproteins (Env)-recombinant viruses revealed that although several serum samples derived from recently infected individuals did not show any HIV-1-specific neutralizing activity, the remaining serum samples exhibited neutralizing activity not only for recombinant viruses with CRF01_AE Env, but also for viruses with subtypes B and C Env. Furthermore, some serum samples derived from recently infected individuals showed the neutralization potency. Our results may provide a deeper insight into the characteristics of neutralizing antibody responses that develop during the course of HIV-1 infection among individuals in Thailand.

  17. Productive Infection of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells by Feline Immunodeficiency Virus: Implications for Vector Development

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, James; Power, Christopher

    1999-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a lentivirus causing immune suppression and neurological disease in cats. Like primate lentiviruses, FIV utilizes the chemokine receptor CXCR4 for infection. In addition, FIV gene expression has been demonstrated in immortalized human cell lines. To investigate the extent and mechanism by which FIV infected primary and immortalized human cell lines, we compared the infectivity of two FIV strains, V1CSF and Petaluma, after cell-free infection. FIV genome was detected in infected human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and macrophages at 21 and 14 days postinfection, respectively. Flow cytometry analysis of FIV-infected human PBMC indicated that antibodies to FIV p24 recognized 12% of the cells. Antibodies binding the CCR3 chemokine receptor maximally inhibited infection of human PBMC by both FIV strains compared to antibodies to CXCR4 or CCR5. Reverse transcriptase levels increased in FIV-infected human PBMC, with detection of viral titers of 101.3 to 102.1 50% tissue culture infective doses/106 cells depending on the FIV strain examined. Cell death in human PBMC infected with either FIV strain was significantly elevated relative to uninfected control cultures. These findings indicate that FIV can productively infect primary human cell lines and that viral strain specificity should be considered in the development of an FIV vector for gene therapy. PMID:9971834

  18. Localization of human immunodeficiency virus antigens in infected cells by scanning/transmission-immunogold techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, M.I.; Santa Maria, I.; de Andres, R.; Najera, R.

    1988-01-01

    An application of high resolution scanning/transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and gold-labelling techniques for the rapid detection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in infected cells has been developed. Experimental in vitro studies for detecting two HIV structural proteins, gp41 and p17, were performed following an indirect labeling procedure that uses monoclonal anti-p17 and anti-gp41 antibodies as primary antibodies and 40 nm gold-linked goat antimouse IgG as secondary antibodies. The cells were then studied by STEM in the scanning mode. Unambiguous localization of the viral antigens was possible by combining the three-dimensional image provided by the secondary electron image and the atomic number-dependent backscattered electron image for the identification of the gold marker. This technique combines both the morphological information and the rapid procedures of scanning electron microscopy with the precise and sensitive antigen detection provided by the use of STEM and immunological methods. The preliminary results of its application to the study of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from four anti-HIV-seropositive patients showing the presence of specific labeling in all of them suggest that it might prove useful for early detection of HIV infection before seroconversion, as well as for quantitative studies.

  19. Chemokine Adjuvanted Electroporated-DNA Vaccine Induces Substantial Protection from Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Vaginal Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Hutnick, N A; Moldoveanu, Z; Hunter, M; Reuter, M; Yuan, S; Yan, J; Ginsberg, A; Sylvester, A; Pahar, B; Carnathan, D; Kathuria, N; Khan, A S; Montefiori, D; Sardesai, N Y; Betts, M R; Mestecky, J; Marx, P; Weiner, D B

    2015-01-01

    There have been encouraging results for the development of an effective HIV vaccine. However, many questions remain regarding the quality of immune responses and the role of mucosal antibodies. We addressed some of these issues by using a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) DNA vaccine adjuvanted with plasmid-expressed mucosal chemokines combined with an intravaginal SIV challenge in rhesus macaque (RhM) model. We previously reported on the ability of CCR9 and CCR10 ligand (L) adjuvants to enhance mucosal and systemic IgA and IgG in small animals. In this study, RhMs were intramuscularly immunized five times with either DNA or DNA plus chemokine adjuvant delivered by electroporation followed by challenge with SIVsmE660. Sixty-eight percent of all vaccinated animals (P=0.0016) remained either uninfected or had aborted infection compared to only 14% in the vaccine naïve group. The highest protection was observed in the CCR10L chemokines group, where 6 of 9 animals had aborted infection and two remained uninfected, leading to 89% protection (P=0.0003). The induction of mucosal SIV-specific antibodies and neutralization titers correlated with trends in protection. These results indicate the need to further investigate the contribution of chemokine adjuvants to modulate immune responses and the role of mucosal antibodies in SIV/HIV protection. PMID:25943275

  20. Differentiation between human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2 isolates by nonradioisotopic reverse transcriptase-typing assay.

    PubMed Central

    Urabe, T; Sano, K; Nakano, T; Odawara, F; Lee, M H; Otake, T; Okubo, S; Hayami, M; Misaki, H; Baba, M

    1994-01-01

    We tested whether human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) could be differentiated from HIV-2 by a reverse transcriptase (RT)-typing assay that measured the reduction of enzyme activity owing to specific antibody. RT-inhibiting antibody was examined for HIV type specificity by a new nonradioisotopic RT assay. Antibodies from four rabbits immunized with recombinant HIV-1 RT and from 23 HIV-1-seropositive individuals all specifically inhibited the enzyme activities of two HIV-1 strains (LAV-1 and GH-3), three zidovudine-resistant HIV-1 mutants, and a recombinant HIV-1 RT. However, none of these antisera affected the activities of six HIV-2 strains (GH-1, GH-2, GH-4, GH-5, GH-6, LAV-2ROD), Rous-associated virus type 2, and DNA polymerase I from Escherichia coli. In contrast, HIV-2 antibody from a rabbit immunized with disrupted GH-1 virions blocked the enzyme activities of the six HIV-2 strains but not those of the three HIV-1 strains, Rous-associated virus type 2, or DNA polymerase I. These results indicate that the antigenic domains of HIV-1 and HIV-2 RTs recognized by their inhibiting antibodies are distinct from each other and are highly conserved. Clinical HIV isolates from 18 HIV-1-seropositive individuals and 3 HIV-2-seropositive Ghanaian individuals were identified as HIV-1 and HIV-2, respectively, by the nonradioisotopic RT-typing assay. Images PMID:7527425

  1. BK virus infection in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Ledesma, J; Muñoz, P; Garcia de Viedma, D; Cabrero, I; Loeches, B; Montilla, P; Gijon, P; Rodriguez-Sanchez, B; Bouza, E

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the prevalence of BK virus (BKV) infection in HIV-positive patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in our hospital. The presence of BKV was analysed in urine and plasma samples from 78 non-selected HIV-infected patients. Clinical data were recorded using a pre-established protocol. We used a nested PCR to amplify a specific region of the BKV T-large antigen. Positive samples were quantified using real-time PCR. Mean CD4 count in HIV-infected patients was 472 cells/mm3 and median HIV viral load was <50 copies/mL. BKV viraemia was detected in only 1 HIV-positive patient, but 57.7% (45 out of 78) had BKV viruria, which was more common in patients with CD4 counts>500 cells/mm3 (74.3% vs 25.7%; p=0.007). Viruria was present in 21.7% of healthy controls (5 out of 23 samples, p=0.02). All viral loads were low (<100 copies/mL), and we could not find any association between BKV infection and renal or neurological manifestations. We provide an update on the prevalence of BKV in HIV-infected patients treated with HAART. BKV viruria was more common in HIV-infected patients; however, no role for BKV has been demonstrated in this population.

  2. The spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infection in patients with factor IX deficiency (Christmas disease)

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, J M; Variakojis, D; Phair, J P; Green, D

    1987-06-01

    Early reports suggested that hemophiliacs with factor IX deficiency (Christmas Disease) may be at less risk for developing the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) than patients with classic hemophilia. We evaluated 12 factor IX deficient patients for clinical and immunologic abnormalities related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Antibody to HIV was not detected in these patients prior to 1982. By 1985, 66 percent (eight of 12) patients were seropositive. All three concentrates available commercially before 1985 were associated with seropositivity. Furthermore, seropositive hemophiliacs had received on average significantly more factor IX concentrate than seronegative hemophiliacs (27,825 +/- 17,976 (S.D.) versus 1,250 +/- 1,500 factor units/year, (p less than 0.02). Half of the seropositive individuals had generalized lymphadenopathy with splenomegaly. Two seropositive patients have developed AIDS, one with cryptococcal meningitis and another with a large cell immunoblastic lymphoma. Infection with HIV has occurred with high frequency in hemophiliacs who received unmodified factor IX concentrates.

  3. Nucleoside inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prem L; Nurpeisov, Viktoria; Hernandez-Santiago, Brenda; Beltran, Thierry; Schinazi, Raymond F

    2004-01-01

    The development of novel compounds that can effectively inhibit both wild type and the most consensus resistant strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is the primary focus in HIV disease management. Combination therapy, comprising at least three classes of drugs, has become the standard of care for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or HIV-infected individuals. The drug cocktail can comprise all three classes of HIV inhibitors, including nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI), non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) and protease inhibitors (PI). Due to their competitive mode of inhibition and requirement for metabolic activation, almost all NRTI drugs lack the virological potency of NNRTI or PI drugs. However, data from clinical trials indicate that sustained viral suppression could not be achieved with NRTI, NNRTI or PIs alone. Therefore, the NRTIs will remain essential components of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for the foreseeable future, because they enhance the virological potency of the regimen, they do not bind excessively to protein and most regimens are small pills/tablets given once a day. It has become apparent in recent years that the prolonged use of certain NRTIs exhibits adverse events as a class, limiting the length of time for which they can be safely used. Of major clinical concern is their association with the potentially fatal lactic acidaemia and hepatic steatosis. These class events, as well as individual drug effects, such as peripheral neuropathy, are linked to delayed mitochondrial destruction. In addition to toxicity, the development of resistance-conferring mutations against exposure to nucleoside analogs currently in use influences long-term therapeutic benefits. Of critical importance for the evaluation of new NRTIs are recent studies showing that the efficiency of discrimination or excision by pyrophosphorolysis in the presence of nucleotides of a given NRTI is a key

  4. Foci of Endemic Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Wild-Living Eastern Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii)

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Mario L.; Lukasik, Magdalena; Kamenya, Shadrack; Li, Yingying; Bibollet-Ruche, Frederic; Bailes, Elizabeth; Muller, Martin N.; Emery, Melissa; Goldenberg, David A.; Lwanga, Jeremiah S.; Ayouba, Ahidjo; Nerrienet, Eric; McClure, Harold M.; Heeney, Jonathan L.; Watts, David P.; Pusey, Anne E.; Collins, D. Anthony; Wrangham, Richard W.; Goodall, Jane; Brookfield, John F. Y.; Sharp, Paul M.; Shaw, George M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.

    2003-01-01

    Simian immunodeficiency virus of chimpanzees (SIVcpz) is the immediate precursor to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), yet remarkably, the distribution and prevalence of SIVcpz in wild ape populations are unknown. Studies of SIVcpz infection rates in wild chimpanzees are complicated by the species' endangered status and by its geographic location in remote areas of sub-Saharan Africa. We have developed sensitive and specific urine and fecal tests for SIVcpz antibody and virion RNA (vRNA) detection and describe herein the first comprehensive prevalence study of SIVcpz infection in five wild Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii communities in east Africa. In Kibale National Park in Uganda, 31 (of 52) members of the Kanyawara community and 39 (of ∼145) members of the Ngogo community were studied; none were found to be positive for SIVcpz infection. In Gombe National Park in Tanzania, 15 (of 20) members of the Mitumba community, 51 (of 55) members of the Kasekela community, and at least 10 (of ∼20) members of the Kalande community were studied. Seven individuals were SIVcpz antibody and/or vRNA positive, and two others had indeterminate antibody results. Based on assay sensitivities and the numbers and types of specimens analyzed, we estimated the prevalence of SIVcpz infection to be 17% in Mitumba (95% confidence interval, 10 to 40%), 5% in Kasekela (95% confidence interval, 4 to 7%), and 30% in Kalande (95% confidence interval, 15 to 60%). For Gombe as a whole, the SIVcpz prevalence was estimated to be 13% (95% confidence interval, 7 to 25%). SIVcpz infection was confirmed in five chimpanzees by PCR amplification of partial pol and gp41/nef sequences which revealed a diverse group of viruses that formed a monophyletic lineage within the SIVcpzPts radiation. Although none of the 70 Kibale chimpanzees tested SIVcpz positive, we estimated the likelihood that a 10% or higher prevalence existed but went undetected because of sampling and assay limitations; this

  5. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii and concurrent Bartonella spp., feline immunodeficiency virus, feline leukemia virus, and Dirofilaria immitis infections in Egyptian cats.

    PubMed

    Al-Kappany, Y M; Lappin, M R; Kwok, O C H; Abu-Elwafa, S A; Hilali, M; Dubey, J P

    2011-04-01

    Toxoplasma gondii and Bartonella spp. are zoonotic pathogens of cats. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLv) are related to human immunodeficiency virus and human leukemia virus, respectively, and these viruses are immunosuppressive. In the present study, the prevalence of antibodies to T. gondii , Bartonella spp., FIV, as well as FeLv and Dirofilaria immitis antigens was determined in sera from feral cats (Felis catus) from Cairo, Egypt. Using a modified agglutination test, antibodies to T. gondii were found in 172 (95.5%) of the 180 cats with titers of 1∶5 in 9, 1∶10 in 9, 1∶20 in 3, 1∶40 in 5, 1∶80 in 5, 1∶160 in 15, 1∶320 in 22, and 1∶640 or higher in 104. Thus, 57.4% had high T. gondii titers. Antibodies to Bartonella spp. were found in 105 (59.6%) of 178, with titers of 1∶64 in 45, 1∶128 in 39, 1∶256 in 13, 1∶512 in 3, 1∶1,024 in 4, and 1∶2,048 in 1 cat. Antibodies to FIV were detected in 59 (33.9%) of 174 cats. Of 174 cats tested, antigens to FeLv, and D. immitis were detected in 8 (4.6%) and 6 (3.4%) cats, respectively. The results indicate a high prevalence of T. gondii, Bartonella spp., and FIV infections in cats from Cairo, Egypt. This is the first report of Bartonella spp., and D. immitis infection in cats in Egypt. PMID:21506874

  6. Resistance of previously infected chimpanzees to successive challenges with a heterologous intraclade B strain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, R; Siemon, C; Cho, M W; Arthur, L O; Nigida, S M; Matthews, T; Sawyer, L A; Schultz, A; Murthy, K K; Israel, Z; Javadian, A; Frost, P; Kennedy, R C; Lane, H C; Martin, M A

    1996-01-01

    To test whether the protective effects of attenuated simian immunodeficiency virus vaccines in macaques were applicable to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-chimpanzee system, two groups of animals, previously infected with HIV-1(IIIB) or HIV-1(SF2) were each challenged with a heterologous clade B virus, HIV-1(DH12). Following challenge, the parameters measured included virus isolation (from plasma, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and lymph node tissue); quantitative DNA PCR using primers capable of distinguishing HIV-1(IIIB), HIV-1(SF2), and HIV-1(DH12) from one another; and serologic assays to monitor changes in binding and neutralizing antibodies. In contrast to an HIV-1-naive chimpanzee that rapidly became infected following the inoculation of HIV-1(DH12), the two chimpanzees previously infected with HIV-1(IIIB) resisted repeated and escalating inoculations of HIV-1(DH12), as monitored by virus isolation and PCR. The two animals previously infected with HIV-1(SF2) became infected with HIV-1(DH12) but in contrast to the case with the HIV-1-naive chimpanzee, no cell-free viral RNA was detected in the plasma by the branched DNA procedure and levels of peripheral blood mononuclear cell-associated viral DNA were reduced 35- to 50-fold. PMID:8676459

  7. Epstein-Barr and human immunodeficiency viruses in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related primary central nervous system lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Morgello, S.

    1992-01-01

    The prevalence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma was examined. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) extracted from 12 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumors was used as substrate for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Targets for amplification were the EBNA-1 region of EBV, the gag region of HIV, and a single copy cellular sequence as a control. The cases studied were autopsy and surgical specimens collected between the years 1985 and 1989. By the working formulation for non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, five had large cell, four had mixed large and small cleaved cell, two had small cleaved cell, and one had an unclassified histology. Epstein-Barr virus was detected in 6 of 12 tumors studied. Human immunodeficiency virus was not detected in any of the tumors. The presence of EBV was not correlated with any particular histologic tumor type. It is concluded that EBV, not HIV, can be detected in a large percentage (50%) of AIDS-related primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphomas. This viral association may be significant in light of the demonstrated ability of EBV to induce lymphoid tumors in experimental mammalian systems. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1323221

  8. Epitopes of human immunodeficiency virus regulatory proteins tat, nef, and rev are expressed in normal human tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Parmentier, H. K.; van Wichen, D. F.; Meyling, F. H.; Goudsmit, J.; Schuurman, H. J.

    1992-01-01

    The expression of regulatory proteins tat, rev, and nef of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) and tat of HIV-2 was studied in frozen sections of lymph nodes from HIV-1-infected individuals, and various tissues from uninfected persons. In HIV-1-positive lymph nodes, monoclonal antibodies to HIV-1-tat stained solitary cells in the germinal centers and interfollicular zones, and vascular endothelium. Staining by an anti-nef monoclonal antibody was restricted to follicular dendritic cells, whereas anti-rev antibody bound to fibriohistiocytes and high endothelial venules. The antibodies used labeled several cell types in tissues from uninfected individuals. Anti-HIV-1-tat antibodies labeled blood vessels and Hassall's corpuscles in skin and thymus; goblet cells in intestinal tissue and trachea; neural cells in brain and spinal cord; and zymogen-producing cells in pancreas. Anti-rev antibody stained high endothelial venules, Hassall's corpuscles and histiocytes. One anti-nef antibody solely stained follicular dendritic cells in spleen, tonsil, lymph node and Peyer's patches, whereas two other anti-nef antibodies bound to astrocytes, solitary cells in the interfollicular zones of lymph nodes, and skin cells. The current results hamper the immunohistochemical study for pathogenetic and diagnostic use of HIV regulatory protein expression in infected tissue specimens or cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1279980

  9. Immunization of simian immunodeficiency virus-infected rhesus monkeys with soluble human CD4 elicits an antiviral response.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, M; Levine, C G; Shen, L; Fisher, R A; Letvin, N L

    1991-01-01

    Since the CD4 molecule is a high-affinity cell-surface receptor for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), it has been suggested that a soluble truncated form of CD4 may compete with cell-surface CD4 for HIV binding and thus be of use in the therapy of AIDS. We have utilized the simian immunodeficiency virus of macaques (SIVmac)-infected rhesus monkeys to explore another possible therapeutic application of CD4 in AIDS--the use of recombinant soluble CD4 (rsCD4) as an immunogen. SIVmac-infected rhesus monkeys immunized with human rsCD4 developed not only an anti-human CD4 but also an anti-rhesus monkey CD4 antibody response. Coincident with the generation of this antibody response, SIVmac could not be isolated easily from peripheral blood lymphocytes and bone marrow macrophages of these animals. Furthermore, the decreased number of both granulocyte/macrophage and erythrocyte colonies grown from the bone marrow of these immunized monkeys rose to normal levels. These findings suggest that a modified human CD4 molecule serving as an immunogen might elicit an antibody response in man that could induce a beneficial therapeutic response in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:2052546

  10. Examination of variables affecting syncytium formation by, and serum neutralization of, feline immunodeficiency virus on CrFK cells.

    PubMed

    Bandecchi, P; Pistello, M; Matteucci, D; Lombardi, S; Bendinelli, M; Tozzini, F

    1995-07-01

    The feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) induces syncytia in Crandell feline kidney (CrFK) cells grown in low fetal bovine serum-containing medium. This finding has allowed the development of sensitive FIV titration and neutralization assays using syncytium formation as an indicator of infection. In this report we examine several variables that can influence number and size of syncytia. In addition, by performing assays under rigidly controlled culture conditions, we confirm that serum neutralization assays based on FIV-induced syncytium formation in CrFK cells detect broadly reactive neutralizing antibodies.

  11. Envelope residue 375 substitutions in simian–human immunodeficiency viruses enhance CD4 binding and replication in rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Wang, Shuyi; Kong, Rui; Ding, Wenge; Lee, Fang-Hua; Parker, Zahra; Kim, Eunlim; Learn, Gerald H.; Hahn, Paul; Policicchio, Ben; Brocca-Cofano, Egidio; Deleage, Claire; Hao, Xingpei; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Gorman, Jason; Gardner, Matthew; Lewis, Mark G.; Hatziioannou, Theodora; Santra, Sampa; Apetrei, Cristian; Pandrea, Ivona; Alam, S. Munir; Liao, Hua-Xin; Shen, Xiaoying; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Farzan, Michael; Chertova, Elena; Keele, Brandon F.; Estes, Jacob D.; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Doms, Robert W.; Montefiori, David C.; Haynes, Barton F.; Sodroski, Joseph G.; Kwong, Peter D.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Shaw, George M.

    2016-01-01

    Most simian–human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIVs) bearing envelope (Env) glycoproteins from primary HIV-1 strains fail to infect rhesus macaques (RMs). We hypothesized that inefficient Env binding to rhesus CD4 (rhCD4) limits virus entry and replication and could be enhanced by substituting naturally occurring simian immunodeficiency virus Env residues at position 375, which resides at a critical location in the CD4-binding pocket and is under strong positive evolutionary pressure across the broad spectrum of primate lentiviruses. SHIVs containing primary or transmitted/founder HIV-1 subtype A, B, C, or D Envs with genotypic variants at residue 375 were constructed and analyzed in vitro and in vivo. Bulky hydrophobic or basic amino acids substituted for serine-375 enhanced Env affinity for rhCD4, virus entry into cells bearing rhCD4, and virus replication in primary rhCD4 T cells without appreciably affecting antigenicity or antibody-mediated neutralization sensitivity. Twenty-four RMs inoculated with subtype A, B, C, or D SHIVs all became productively infected with different Env375 variants—S, M, Y, H, W, or F—that were differentially selected in different Env backbones. Notably, SHIVs replicated persistently at titers comparable to HIV-1 in humans and elicited autologous neutralizing antibody responses typical of HIV-1. Seven animals succumbed to AIDS. These findings identify Env–rhCD4 binding as a critical determinant for productive SHIV infection in RMs and validate a novel and generalizable strategy for constructing SHIVs with Env glycoproteins of interest, including those that in humans elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies or bind particular Ig germ-line B-cell receptors. PMID:27247400

  12. Improbability of Effective Vaccination Against Human Immunodeficiency Virus Because of Its Intracellular Transmission and Rectal Portal of Entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabin, Albert B.

    1992-09-01

    The worldwide effort to produce a vaccine against AIDS continues to disregard the fact that even human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific neutralizing antibodies and cell-mediated immunity are ineffective against virus within cells without viral antigens on the cell membrane-and that much of HIV infection is transmitted in this manner. According to a recent report, a simian immunodeficiency virus vaccine that protected monkeys against an intravenous challenge with cell-free virus was, as predicted, ineffective against an intravenous challenge with the same amount of virus in infected cells. Moreover, antibody and HIV have been found to coexist in cell-free plasma from asymptomatic and symptomatic patients. Excluding direct introduction of HIV into the bloodstream, the most common and efficient form of transmission of HIV infection is by receptive anal intercourse, and semen contains large numbers of infected cells per milliliter. Recent reports showing that colorectal cells can be persistently infected by HIV and that HIV RNA and cDNA are present in the cells of the colon of dead AIDS patients indicate that either cell-free or intracellular HIV has the capacity to multiply at the portal of entry in the colorectal area without interference from neutralizing antibodies. The available data provide no basis for testing any HIV vaccine in human beings either before or after infection. The main challenge is to find a way to kill cells with chromosomally integrated HIV cDNA without harming normal cells, perhaps by identifying repressor proteins that might be produced by the cells with integrated HIV cDNA and thus could become specific targets for cell-killing drugs.

  13. Human immunodeficiency virus superinfection and recombination: current state of knowledge and potential clinical consequences.

    PubMed

    Blackard, Jason T; Cohen, Daniel E; Mayer, Kenneth H

    2002-04-15

    Superinfection with multiple strains or subtypes of the human and simian immunodeficiency viruses has been documented. Recent increases in the prevalences of both unprotected anal intercourse and sexually transmitted diseases among men who have sex with men indicate that these men continue to practice unsafe sex and, therefore, are at risk for superinfection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Recurrent exposure to HIV among seropositive individuals who engage in high-risk behaviors can have serious consequences, because superinfection is a necessary first step for viral recombination to occur. Recombination may produce more virulent viruses, drug-resistant viruses, or viruses with altered cell tropism. Additionally, recombinant viruses and superinfection can accelerate disease progression and increase the likelihood of sexual transmission by increasing virus load in the blood and genital tract. The extent of superinfection and recombination in persons living with HIV is unknown. The implications of HIV superinfection and the generation of recombinant viruses are discussed. PMID:11915000

  14. Role of Active and Inactive Cytotoxic Immune Response in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Toro Zapata, Hernan Dario; Caicedo Casso, Angelica Graciela; Bichara, Derdei; Lee, Sunmi

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Mathematical models can be helpful to understand the complex dynamics of human immunodeficiency virus infection within a host. Most of work has studied the interactions of host responses and virus in the presence of active cytotoxic immune cells, which decay to zero when there is no virus. However, recent research highlights that cytotoxic immune cells can be inactive but never be depleted. Methods We propose a mathematical model to investigate the human immunodeficiency virus dynamics in the presence of both active and inactive cytotoxic immune cells within a host. We explore the impact of the immune responses on the dynamics of human immunodeficiency virus infection under different disease stages. Results Standard mathematical and numerical analyses are presented for this new model. Specifically, the basic reproduction number is computed and local and global stability analyses are discussed. Conclusion Our results can give helpful insights when designing more effective drug schedules in the presence of active and inactive immune responses. PMID:24955306

  15. Immune reconstitution syndrome in a human immunodeficiency virus infected child due to giardiasis leading to shock.

    PubMed

    Nandy, Sneha; Shah, Ira

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome has been reported in association with tuberculosis, herpes zoster (shingles), Cryptococcus neoformans, Kaposi's sarcoma, Pneumocystis pneumonia, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, herpes simplex virus, Histoplasma capsulatum, human papillomavirus, and Cytomegalovirus. However, it has never been documented with giardiasis. We present a 7-year-old HIV infected girl who developed diarrhea and shock following the initiation of antiretroviral therapy, and her stool showed the presence of giardiasis. PMID:26985424

  16. Modeling the Effects of Morphine on Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Naveen K.; Ribeiro, Ruy M.; Perelson, Alan S.; Kumar, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Complications of HIV-1 infection in individuals who utilize drugs of abuse is a significant problem, because these drugs have been associated with higher virus replication and accelerated disease progression as well as severe neuropathogenesis. To gain further insight it is important to quantify the effects of drugs of abuse on HIV-1 infection dynamics. Here, we develop a mathematical model that incorporates experimentally observed effects of morphine on inducing HIV-1 co-receptor expression. For comparison we also considered viral dynamic models with cytolytic or noncytolytic effector cell responses. Based on the small sample size Akaike information criterion, these models were inferior to the new model based on changes in co-receptor expression. The model with morphine affecting co-receptor expression agrees well with the experimental data from simian immunodeficiency virus infections in morphine-addicted macaques. Our results show that morphine promotes a target cell subpopulation switch from a lower level of susceptibility to a state that is about 2-orders of magnitude higher in susceptibility to SIV infection. As a result, the proportion of target cells with higher susceptibility remains extremely high in morphine conditioning. Such a morphine-induced population switch not only has adverse effects on the replication rate, but also results in a higher steady state viral load and larger CD4 count drops. Moreover, morphine conditioning may pose extra obstacles to controlling viral load during antiretroviral therapy, such as pre-exposure prophylaxis and post infection treatments. This study provides, for the first time, a viral dynamics model, viral dynamics parameters, and related analytical and simulation results for SIV dynamics under drugs of abuse. PMID:27668463

  17. Detection of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) nucleic acids in FIV-seronegative cats.

    PubMed Central

    Dandekar, S; Beebe, A M; Barlough, J; Phillips, T; Elder, J; Torten, M; Pedersen, N

    1992-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine the rate of viral transmission among naive specific-pathogen-free (SPF) cats living in close contact with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-infected cats. Twenty SPF cats were housed in the same rooms with experimentally FIV-infected seropositive and virus culture-positive cats for 2 to 4 years and were monitored for the presence of FIV nucleic acids and antibodies. Only 1 of the 20 cats became seropositive and virus culture positive and developed signs of disease. Genomic DNA from bone marrow and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of 10 of 19 healthy-appearing seronegative cats became positive for FIV DNA by the polymerase chain reaction. Twenty-eight SPF cats housed as groups in separate quarters and never exposed to FIV-infected cats were uniformly negative for FIV DNA. FIV RNA transcripts were detected in concanavalin A-stimulated PBMC cultures from 4 of 10 FIV DNA-positive, seronegative cats by in situ hybridization. PBMC from three of four naive SPF cats acquired FIV nucleic acids after the cats were transfused with blood and bone marrow from FIV genome-positive, seronegative donors. Three of five FIV-seronegative cats housed for years with naturally FIV-infected cats in a private household were also found to harbor FIV DNA, indicating that the same phenomenon occurred in the field. These findings demonstrate that cats living in close contact with FIV-infected seropositive cats can acquire FIV nucleic acids without developing detectable levels of serum antibodies or disease. Images PMID:1318395

  18. Molecular Epidemiology of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Wild-Living Gorillas▿

    PubMed Central

    Neel, Cécile; Etienne, Lucie; Li, Yingying; Takehisa, Jun; Rudicell, Rebecca S.; Ndong Bass, Innocent; Moudindo, Joseph; Mebenga, Aimé; Esteban, Amandine; Van Heuverswyn, Fran; Liegeois, Florian; Kranzusch, Philip J.; Walsh, Peter D.; Sanz, Crickette M.; Morgan, David B.; Ndjango, Jean-Bosco N.; Plantier, Jean-Christophe; Locatelli, Sabrina; Gonder, Mary K.; Leendertz, Fabian H.; Boesch, Christophe; Todd, Angelique; Delaporte, Eric; Mpoudi-Ngole, Eitel; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Peeters, Martine

    2010-01-01

    Chimpanzees and gorillas are the only nonhuman primates known to harbor viruses closely related to HIV-1. Phylogenetic analyses showed that gorillas acquired the simian immunodeficiency virus SIVgor from chimpanzees, and viruses from the SIVcpz/SIVgor lineage have been transmitted to humans on at least four occasions, leading to HIV-1 groups M, N, O, and P. To determine the geographic distribution, prevalence, and species association of SIVgor, we conducted a comprehensive molecular epidemiological survey of wild gorillas in Central Africa. Gorilla fecal samples were collected in the range of western lowland gorillas (n = 2,367) and eastern Grauer gorillas (n = 183) and tested for SIVgor antibodies and nucleic acids. SIVgor antibody-positive samples were identified at 2 sites in Cameroon, with no evidence of infection at 19 other sites, including 3 in the range of the Eastern gorillas. In Cameroon, based on DNA and microsatellite analyses of a subset of samples, we estimated the prevalence of SIVgor to be 1.6% (range, 0% to 4.6%), which is significantly lower than the prevalence of SIVcpzPtt in chimpanzees (5.9%; range, 0% to 32%). All newly identified SIVgor strains formed a monophyletic lineage within the SIVcpz radiation, closely related to HIV-1 groups O and P, and clustered according to their field site of origin. At one site, there was evidence for intergroup transmission and a high intragroup prevalence. These isolated hot spots of SIVgor-infected gorilla communities could serve as a source for human infection. The overall low prevalence and sporadic distribution of SIVgor could suggest a decline of SIVgor in wild populations, but it cannot be excluded that SIVgor is still more prevalent in other parts of the geographical range of gorillas. PMID:19906908

  19. [Antiretroviral therapy in human immunodeficiency virus infection: an update].

    PubMed

    Chaix, F; Goujard, C

    2009-06-01

    Since the onset of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic, the care of infected patients improved dramatically. Whereas the disease was almost always fatal, the development of new drugs and new therapeutic strategies now allow a prolonged survival. However, the complexity of patient care is increasing and physicians face new clinical events and treatment toxicities. Recent molecules and follow-up according to the recent French recommendations will be presented here. The objectives of the treatment is to decrease mortality and morbidity of the HIV infection, by restoring near normal CD4+ T cell counts and qualitative T CD4+ responses, associated with a sustained reduction in viral replication. This objective must be reached by minimizing toxicity of antiretroviral drugs. Newly developed drugs that are better-tolerated and new therapeutic classes should improve outcome at all stages of HIV infection. Whereas viral eradication remains unrealistic and protective vaccines will not be soon available, direct consequences of long term HIV infection and issues related to an ageing HIV infected population raise up new research topics. Prevention of new infections, improvement in the precocity of care by a better-targeted screening and assessment of therapy before an established immune deficiency appear as the main priorities for the coming years. PMID:19237230

  20. Tuberculous meningitis in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Sinha, Manish Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis is the most common opportunistic infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected persons. HIV-infected patients have a high incidence of tuberculous meningitis as well. The exact incidence and prevalence of tuberculous meningitis in HIV-infected patients are not known. HIV infection does not significantly alter the clinical manifestations, laboratory, radiographic findings, or the response to therapy. Still, some differences have been noted. For example, the histopathological examination of exudates in HIV-infected patients shows fewer lymphocytes, epithelioid cells, and Langhan's type of giant cells. Larger numbers of acid-fast bacilli may be seen in the cerebral parenchyma and meninges. The chest radiograph is abnormal in up to 46% of patients with tuberculous meningitis. Tuberculous meningitis is likely to present with cerebral infarcts and mass lesions. Cryptococcal meningitis is important in differential diagnosis. The recommended duration of treatment in HIV-infected patients is 9-12 months. The benefit of adjunctive corticosteroids is uncertain. Antiretroviral therapy and antituberculosis treatment should be initiated at the same time, regardless of CD4 cell counts. Tuberculous meningitis may be a manifestation of paradoxical tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Some studies have demonstrated a significant impact of HIV co-infection on mortality from tuberculous meningitis. HIV-infected patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculous meningitis have significantly higher mortality. The best way to prevent HIV-associated tuberculous meningitis is to diagnose and isolate infectious cases of tuberculosis promptly and administer appropriate treatment.

  1. Stability of the gorilla microbiome despite simian immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Andrew H; Peeters, Martine; Ayouba, Ahidjo; Ngole, Eitel Mpoudi; Esteban, Amadine; Hahn, Beatrice H; Ochman, Howard

    2015-02-01

    Simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) have been discovered in over 45 primate species; however, the pathogenic potential of most SIV strains remains unknown due to difficulties inherent in observing wild populations. Because those SIV infections that are pathogenic have been shown to induce changes in the host's gut microbiome, monitoring the microbiota present in faecal samples can provide a noninvasive means for studying the effects of SIV infection on the health of wild-living primates. Here, we examine the effects of SIVgor, a close relative of SIVcpz of chimpanzees and HIV-1 of humans, on the gut bacterial communities residing within wild gorillas, revealing that gorilla gut microbiomes are exceptionally robust to SIV infection. In contrast to the microbiomes of HIV-1-infected humans and SIVcpz-infected chimpanzees, SIVgor-infected gorilla microbiomes exhibit neither rises in the frequencies of opportunistic pathogens nor elevated rates of microbial turnover within individual hosts. Regardless of SIV infection status, gorilla microbiomes assort into enterotypes, one of which is compositionally analogous to those identified in humans and chimpanzees. The other gorilla enterotype appears specialized for a leaf-based diet and is enriched in environmentally derived bacterial genera. We hypothesize that the acquisition of this gorilla-specific enterotype was enabled by lowered immune system control over the composition of the microbiome. Our results indicate differences between the pathology of SIVgor and SIVcpz/HIV-1 infections, demonstrating the utility of investigating host microbial ecology as a means for studying disease in wild primates of high conservation priority.

  2. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection of Neural Xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovich, Therese A.; Lazar, Eliot; Blumberg, Benjamin M.; Saito, Yoshihiro; Eskin, Thomas A.; Reichman, Richard; Baram, David A.; del Cerro, Coca; Gendelman, Howard E.; del Cerro, Manuel; Epstein, Leon G.

    1992-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is highly specific for its human host. To study HIV-1 infection of the human nervous system, we have established a small animal model in which second-trimester (11 to 17.5 weeks) human fetal brain or neural retina is transplanted to the anterior chamber of the eye of immunosuppressed adult rats. The human xenografts vascularized, formed a blood-brain barrier, and differentiated, forming neurons and glia. The xenografts were infected with cell-free HIV-1 or with HIV-1-infected human monocytes. Analysis by polymerase chain reaction revealed HIV-1 sequences in DNA from xenograft tissue exposed to HIV-1 virions, and in situ hybridization demonstrated HIV-1 mRNA localized in macrophages and multinucleated giant cells. Pathological damage was observed only in neural xenografts containing HIV-1-infected human monocytes, supporting the hypothesis that these cells mediate neurotoxicity. This small animal model allows the study of direct and indirect effects of HIV-1 infection on developing human fetal neural tissues, and it should prove useful in evaluating antiviral therapies, which must ultimately target HIV-1 infection of the brain.

  3. Testicular dysfunction in human immunodeficiency virus-infected men.

    PubMed

    Poretsky, L; Can, S; Zumoff, B

    1995-07-01

    This review pertains to gonadal function in men with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, who often exhibit clinical and biochemical evidence of hypogonadism. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism appears to be the most commonly encountered abnormality, although complete anterior pituitary insufficiency and primary gonadal failure have been reported. Levels of sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) are either unchanged or increased. Plasma levels of estrogens, progesterone, androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S), and prolactin vary. Pathologically, except for involvement by opportunistic infections, no significant abnormality in the hypothalamic-pituitary area has been described, but evidence of orchitis is commonly present. The cause(s) of these abnormalities remains unclear. The possible factors leading to hypogonadism in HIV-infected men include HIV infection itself, opportunistic infections, chronic debilitating illness, and effects of cytokines on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Further studies are needed to clarify the cause(s) of testicular dysfunction in HIV-infected men and its clinical significance, treatment, relevance to the progression of HIV infection, and influence on the immune system.

  4. Selective destruction of cells infected with human immunodeficiency virus

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K.; Ward, Thomas E.

    2003-09-30

    Compositions and methods for selectively killing a cell containing a viral protease are disclosed. The composition is a variant of a protein synthesis inactivating toxin wherein a viral protease cleavage site is interposed between the A and B chains. The variant of the type II ribosome-inactivating protein is activated by digestion of the viral protease cleavage site by the specific viral protease. The activated ribosome-inactivating protein then kills the cell by inactivating cellular ribosomes. A preferred embodiment of the invention is specific for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and uses ricin as the ribosome-inactivating protein. In another preferred embodiment of the invention, the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein is modified by attachment of one or more hydrophobic agents. The hydrophobic agent facilitates entry of the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein into cells and can lead to incorporation of the ribosome-inactivating protein into viral particles. Still another preferred embodiment of the invention includes a targeting moiety attached to the variants of the ribosome-inactivating protein to target the agent to HIV infectable cells.

  5. Selective Destruction Of Cells Infected With The Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K.; Ward, Thomas E.

    2006-03-28

    Compositions and methods for selectively killing a cell containing a viral protease are disclosed. The composition is a varient of a protein synthesis inactivating toxin wherein a viral protease cleavage site is interposed between the A and B chains. The variant of the type II ribosome-inactivating protein is activated by digestion of the viral protease cleavage site by the specific viral protease. The activated ribosome-inactivating protein then kills the cell by inactivating cellular ribosomes. A preferred embodiment of the invention is specific for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and uses ricin as the ribosome-inactivating protein. In another preferred embodiment of the invention, the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein is modified by attachment of one or more hydrophobic agents. The hydrophobic agent facilitates entry of the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein into cells and can lead to incorporation of the ribosome-inactivating protein into viral particles. Still another preferred embodiment of the invention includes a targeting moiety attached to the variants of the ribosome-inactivating protein to target the agent to HIV infectable cells.

  6. Update on kidney transplantation in human immunodeficiency virus infected recipients.

    PubMed

    Nashar, Khaled; Sureshkumar, Kalathil K

    2016-07-01

    Improved survival of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients with chronic kidney disease following the introduction of antiretroviral therapy resulted in the need to revisit the topic of kidney transplantation in these patients. Large cohort studies have demonstrated favorable outcomes and proved that transplantation is a viable therapeutic option. However, HIV-infected recipients had higher rates of rejection. Immunosuppressive therapy did not negatively impact the course of HIV infection. Some of the immunosuppressive drugs used following transplantation exhibit antiretroviral effects. A close collaboration between infectious disease specialists and transplant professionals is mandatory in order to optimize transplantation outcomes in these patients. Transplantation from HIV(+) donors to HIV(+) recipients has been a subject of intense debate. The HIV Organ Policy Equity act provided a platform to research this area further and to develop guidelines. The first HIV(+) to HIV(+) kidney transplant in the United States and the first HIV(+) to HIV(+) liver transplant in the world were recently performed at the Johns Hopkins University Medical Center. PMID:27458559

  7. Inhibition of productive human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection by cobalamins.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, J B; Sauls, D L; Misukonis, M A; Shugars, D C

    1995-08-15

    Various cobalamins act as important enzyme cofactors and modulate cellular function. We investigated cobalamins for their abilities to modify productive human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection of hematopoietic cells in vitro. We show that hydroxocobalamin (OH-Cbl), methylcobalamin (Me-Cbl), and adenosylcobalamin Ado-Cbl (Ado-Cbl) inhibit HIV-1 infection of normal human blood monocytes and lymphocytes. The inhibitory effects were noted when analyzing the monocytotropic strains HIV-1-BaL and HIV-1-ADA as well as the lymphocytotropic strain HIV-1-LAI. Cobalamins did not modify binding of gp120 to CD4 or block early steps in viral life cycle, inhibit reverse transcriptase, inhibit induction of HIV-1 expression from cells with established or latent infection, or modify monocyte interferon-alpha production. Because of the ability to achieve high blood and tissue levels of cobalamins in vivo and the general lack of toxicity, cobalamins should be considered as potentially useful agents for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:7632933

  8. Recombination increases human immunodeficiency virus fitness, but not necessarily diversity.

    PubMed

    Vijay, N N V; Vasantika; Ajmani, Rahul; Perelson, Alan S; Dixit, Narendra M

    2008-06-01

    Recombination can facilitate the accumulation of mutations and accelerate the emergence of resistance to current antiretroviral therapies for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Yet, since recombination can also dissociate favourable combinations of mutations, the benefit of recombination to HIV remains in question. The confounding effects of mutation, multiple infections of cells, random genetic drift and fitness selection that underlie HIV evolution render the influence of recombination difficult to unravel. We developed computer simulations that mimic the genomic diversification of HIV within an infected individual and elucidate the influence of recombination. We find, interestingly, that when the effective population size of HIV is small, recombination increases both the diversity and the mean fitness of the viral population. When the effective population size is large, recombination increases viral fitness but decreases diversity. In effect, recombination enhances (lowers) the likelihood of the existence of multi-drug resistant strains of HIV in infected individuals prior to the onset of therapy when the effective population size is small (large). Our simulations are consistent with several recent experimental observations, including the evolution of HIV diversity and divergence in vivo. The intriguing dependencies on the effective population size appear due to the subtle interplay of drift, selection and epistasis, which we discuss in the light of modern population genetics theories. Current estimates of the effective population size of HIV have large discrepancies. Our simulations present an avenue for accurate determination of the effective population size of HIV in vivo and facilitate establishment of the benefit of recombination to HIV.

  9. Syphilis, leprosy, and human immunodeficiency virus coinfection: a challenging diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Souza, Claudia Fd; Bornhausen-Demarch, Eduardo; Prata, Aline G; de Andrade, Felipe C; Fernandes, Mariana P; Lopes, Marcia Ra; Nery, José Ac

    2013-08-01

    The association between syphilis, leprosy, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is not well documented, and the emergence of isolated cases raises the interest and indicates that this triple coinfection can occur. We report the case of a 42-year-old man from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, who presented with erythematous papules on the trunk, back, and upper and lower extremities; an erythematous plaque on the upper abdomen; and an erythematous violaceous plaque on the right thigh with altered sensitivity. Laboratory investigation showed a reagent VDRL test (1:512) and positive test results for Treponema pallidum hemagglutination. Treatment with benzathine penicillin (2,400,000 U intramuscularly) was started (2 doses 1 week apart). On follow-up 40 days later, the lesions showed partial improvement with persistence of the plaques on the right thigh and upper abdomen as well as a new similar plaque on the back. Further laboratory examinations showed negative bacilloscopy, positive HIV test, and histologic findings consistent with tuberculoid leprosy. The patient was started on multidrug therapy for paucibacillary leprosy with clinical improvement; the patient also was monitored by the HIV/AIDS department. We emphasize the importance of clinical suspicion for a coinfection case despite the polymorphism of these diseases as well as the precise interpretation of laboratory and histopathology examinations to correctly manage atypical cases. PMID:24087779

  10. Update on kidney transplantation in human immunodeficiency virus infected recipients

    PubMed Central

    Nashar, Khaled; Sureshkumar, Kalathil K

    2016-01-01

    Improved survival of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients with chronic kidney disease following the introduction of antiretroviral therapy resulted in the need to revisit the topic of kidney transplantation in these patients. Large cohort studies have demonstrated favorable outcomes and proved that transplantation is a viable therapeutic option. However, HIV-infected recipients had higher rates of rejection. Immunosuppressive therapy did not negatively impact the course of HIV infection. Some of the immunosuppressive drugs used following transplantation exhibit antiretroviral effects. A close collaboration between infectious disease specialists and transplant professionals is mandatory in order to optimize transplantation outcomes in these patients. Transplantation from HIV+ donors to HIV+ recipients has been a subject of intense debate. The HIV Organ Policy Equity act provided a platform to research this area further and to develop guidelines. The first HIV+ to HIV+ kidney transplant in the United States and the first HIV+ to HIV+ liver transplant in the world were recently performed at the Johns Hopkins University Medical Center. PMID:27458559

  11. Markers predicting progression of human immunodeficiency virus-related disease.

    PubMed Central

    Tsoukas, C M; Bernard, N F

    1994-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) interacts with the immune system throughout the course of infection. For most of the disease process, HIV activates the immune system, and the degree of activation can be assessed by measuring serum levels of molecules such as beta 2-microglobulin and neopterin, as well as other serum and cell surface phenotype markers. The levels of some of these markers correlate with clinical progression of HIV disease, and these markers may be useful as surrogate markers for development of clinical AIDS. Because the likelihood and timing of development of clinical AIDS following seroconversion, for any particular individual, are not readily predictable, the use of nonclinical disease markers has become critically important to patient management. Surrogate markers of HIV infection are, by definition, measurable traits that correlate with disease progression. An ideal marker should identify patients at highest risk of disease progression, provide information on how long an individual has been infected, help in staging HIV disease, predict development of opportunistic infections associated with AIDS, monitor the therapeutic efficacy of immunomodulating or antiviral treatments, and the easily quantifiable, reliable, clinically available, and affordable. This review examines the current state of knowledge and the role of surrogate markers in the natural history and treatment of HIV infection. The clinical usefulness of each marker is assessed with respect to the criteria outlined for the ideal surrogate marker for HIV disease progression. PMID:8118788

  12. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of neural xenografts.

    PubMed Central

    Cvetkovich, T A; Lazar, E; Blumberg, B M; Saito, Y; Eskin, T A; Reichman, R; Baram, D A; del Cerro, C; Gendelman, H E; del Cerro, M

    1992-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is highly specific for its human host. To study HIV-1 infection of the human nervous system, we have established a small animal model in which second-trimester (11 to 17.5 weeks) human fetal brain or neural retina is transplanted to the anterior chamber of the eye of immunosuppressed adult rats. The human xenografts vascularized, formed a blood-brain barrier, and differentiated, forming neurons and glia. The xenografts were infected with cell-free HIV-1 or with HIV-1-infected human monocytes. Analysis by polymerase chain reaction revealed HIV-1 sequences in DNA from xenograft tissue exposed to HIV-1 virions, and in situ hybridization demonstrated HIV-1 mRNA localized in macrophages and multinucleated giant cells. Pathological damage was observed only in neural xenografts containing HIV-1-infected human monocytes, supporting the hypothesis that these cells mediate neurotoxicity. This small animal model allows the study of direct and indirect effects of HIV-1 infection on developing human fetal neural tissues, and it should prove useful in evaluating antiviral therapies, which must ultimately target HIV-1 infection of the brain. Images PMID:1594627

  13. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of the brain.

    PubMed Central

    Atwood, W J; Berger, J R; Kaderman, R; Tornatore, C S; Major, E O

    1993-01-01

    Direct infection of the central nervous system by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the causative agent of AIDS, was not appreciated in the early years of the AIDS epidemic. Neurological complications associated with AIDS were largely attributed to opportunistic infections that arose as a result of the immunocompromised state of the patient and to depression. In 1985, several groups succeeded in isolating HIV-1 directly from brain tissue. Also that year, the viral genome was completely sequenced, and HIV-1 was found to belong to a neurotropic subfamily of retrovirus known as the Lentivirinae. These findings clearly indicated that direct HIV-1 infection of the central nervous system played a role in the development of AIDS-related neurological disease. This review summarizes the clinical manifestations of HIV-1 infection of the central nervous system and the related neuropathology, the tropism of HIV-1 for specific cell types both within and outside of the nervous system, the possible mechanisms by which HIV-1 damages the nervous system, and the current strategies for diagnosis and treatment of HIV-1-associated neuropathology. Images PMID:8269391

  14. Exercise dysfunction in patients seropositive for the human immunodeficiency virus

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.E.; Anders, G.T.; Blanton, H.M.; Hawkes, C.E.; Bush, B.A.; McAllister, C.K.; Matthews, J.I. )

    1990-03-01

    To confirm the presence of exercise dysfunction in patients seropositive for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), 32 such patients without AIDS were evaluated with cardiopulmonary exercise testing, pulmonary function testing, bronchoalveolar lavage, chest roentgenography, and gallium scanning. No evidence of pulmonary opportunistic infection was found. When compared to an otherwise similar group of HIV-seronegative controls, the patients exercised to a significantly lower workload (195 +/- 30 versus 227 +/- 31 W, p less than 0.001). The ventilatory anaerobic threshold (VAT) values were also significantly lower for the patients (49.2 +/- 13.0 versus 61.9 +/- 9.1% of maximum predicted VO2, p less than 0.001). Nine of the patients had VAT values less than the 95% confidence interval for the controls. This subgroup exercised to a significantly lower maximum VO2 (69.9 +/- 11.2 versus 95.9 +/- 17.5% of maximum predicted VO2, p less than 0.001) and workload (165 +/- 21 versus 227 +/- 31 W) when compared to the control group. These patients demonstrated a mild tachypnea throughout exercise relative to the controls and had a significant increase in the slope of the heart rate to VO2 relationship. These findings are most consistent with a limitation of oxygen delivery to exercising muscles, which may represent occult cardiac disease in this group.

  15. A Vaccine against CCR5 Protects a Subset of Macaques upon Intravaginal Challenge with Simian Immunodeficiency Virus SIVmac251

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Zoe; Jayashankar, Kartika; Peabody, Julianne; Montefiori, David; LaBranche, Celia C.; Keele, Brandon F.; Jensen, Kara; Abel, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    As an alternative to targeting human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), we have developed vaccines targeting CCR5, a self-protein critically involved in HIV replication and pathogenesis. By displaying peptides derived from CCR5 at high density on the surface of virus-like particles, we can efficiently induce high-titer IgG antibodies against this self-molecule. Here, we investigated whether prophylactic immunization of rhesus macaques with a particle-based vaccine targeting two regions of macaque CCR5 could prevent or suppress vaginal infection with highly virulent SIVmac251. Twelve macaques were vaccinated with a bacteriophage Qß-based vaccine targeting macaque CCR5 (Qß.CCR5). Six control animals were immunized with the Qß platform alone. All animals immunized with Qß.CCR5 developed high-titer anti-CCR5 antibody responses. Macaques were vaginally challenged with a high dose of SIVmac251. The mean peak viral RNA levels in the vaccinated groups were 30-fold lower than in the control group (106.8 versus 108.3 copies/ml plasma). Three of the 12 vaccinated macaques dramatically suppressed simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) replication: peak viral loads were low (103 to 104 RNA copies/ml), and SIV RNA became undetectable from 6 weeks onward. No viral RNA or DNA could be detected in colon and lymph node biopsy specimens collected 13 months after challenge. In vivo depletion of CD8+ cells failed to induce a viral rebound. However, once anti-CCR5 antibody responses had waned, the 3 animals became infected after intravaginal and/or intravenous rechallenge. In conclusion, vaccination against CCR5 was associated with dramatic suppression of virus replication in a subset (25%) of macaques. These data support further research of vaccination against CCR5 to combat HIV infection. PMID:24307581

  16. Effects of long terminal repeat mutations on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Y; Stenzel, M; Sodroski, J G; Haseltine, W A

    1989-01-01

    The effects of deletions within three functional regions of the long terminal repeat of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 upon the ability of the long terminal repeat to direct production of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene product and upon the ability of viruses that carry the mutations to replicate in human cell lines was investigated. The results show that the enhancer and TATAA sequences were required for efficient virus replication. Deletion of the negative regulatory element (NRE) yielded a virus that replicated more rapidly than did an otherwise isogeneic NRE-positive virus. The suppressive effect of the NRE did not depend upon the negative regulatory gene (nef), as both NRE-positive and NRE-negative viruses were defective for nef. We conclude that factors specified by the cell interact with the NRE sequences to retard human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication. PMID:2760991

  17. Prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus infection among transgender men in Rawalpindi (Pakistan)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Transgender males are at high risk for sexually transmitted diseases including AIDS caused by the notorious Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), yet little consideration is given by the policy makers, researchers and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) towards this sensitive issue in Pakistan. Methods In this study, we have investigated the prevalence of HIV infection among 306 transgender males with a median age of 29 years (range 15–64 years) residing in Rawalpindi, Pakistan. Rapid HIV antibody-screening methods including the strip test and Enzyme Linked Immuno-absorbent tests were employed to detect HIV antibodies among the subjects. For further confirmation, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) was carried out. Statistical analytical techniques utilized included logistic regression and chi-square. Results HIV-1 was found to be the predominant viral subtype. PCR confirmed 21.6% (Confidence Interval 0.17-0.26) of the respondents were reported being HIV positive. 15.7% of the transgender men who shave at home and 13.7% of the transgender men who were educated below 5th grade were found to have HIV. Conclusion This study shows a very high prevalence of HIV among transgender males. Unawareness among these individuals about the ramifications of this infection owes largely to lack of education. The spread rate is alarming and HIV epidemic is imminent if awareness is not widespread. PMID:23039269

  18. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus infection by agents that interfere with thiol-disulfide interchange upon virus-receptor interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Ryser, H J; Levy, E M; Mandel, R; DiSciullo, G J

    1994-01-01

    The cell surface of mammalian cells is capable of reductively cleaving disulfide bonds of exogenous membrane-bound macromolecules (for instance, the interchain disulfide of diphtheria toxin), and inhibiting this process with membrane-impermeant sulfhydryl reagents prevents diphtheria toxin cytotoxicity. More recently it was found that the same membrane function can be inhibited by bacitracin, an inhibitor of protein disulfide-isomerase (PDI), and by monoclonal antibodies against PDI, suggesting that PDI catalyzes a thiol-disulfide interchange between its thiols and the disulfides of membrane-bound macromolecules. We provide evidence that the same reductive process plays a role in the penetration of membrane-bound human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and show that HIV infection of human lymphoid cells is markedly inhibited by the membrane-impermeant sulfhydryl blocker 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid), by bacitracin, and by anti-PDI antibodies. The results imply that HIV and its target cell engage in a thiol-disulfide interchange mediated by PDI and that the reduction of critical disulfides in viral envelope glycoproteins may be the initial event that triggers conformational changes required for HIV entry and cell infection. These findings suggest additional approaches to impede cell infection by HIV. PMID:8183947

  19. Hepatitis C Screening in People With Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Lessons Learned From Syphilis Screening.

    PubMed

    Wurcel, Alysse G; Chen, Daniel D; Fitzpatrick, Rosemary E; Grasberger, Paula E; Kirshner, Caleb H; Anderson, Jordan E; Chui, Kenneth K H; Knox, Tamsin A

    2016-01-01

    Background.  The incidence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is increasing in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive men who have sex with men (MSM). New guidelines recommend annual screening for HCV, similar to recommendations for syphilis screening with rapid plasma reagin (RPR). Methods.  This study compares the frequency of repeat HCV antibody (Ab) testing to repeat RPR testing in a retrospective chart review of 359 HCVAb-negative people living with HIV (PLWH) observed in an Infectious Diseases clinic. Patients were classified into risk groups based on sexual risk factors. Results.  Although 85% of PLWH had repeat syphilis screening, less than two thirds had repeat HCVAb screening. The MSM status was associated with increased HCVAb and RPR testing (adjusted odds ratio, 2.6 and 5.9, respectively). Seven persons had incident HCV infection: 3 were MSM, and 4 had symptoms or abnormal laboratory results to prompt testing. Conclusions.  Failure to find incident HCV infection in PLWH represents missed opportunities to cure HCV infection and prevent progressive liver disease. Further quality improvement studies are necessary to develop physician-focused interventions to increase HCV screening rates in PLWH.

  20. Hepatitis C Screening in People With Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Lessons Learned From Syphilis Screening

    PubMed Central

    Wurcel, Alysse G.; Chen, Daniel D.; Fitzpatrick, Rosemary E.; Grasberger, Paula E.; Kirshner, Caleb H.; Anderson, Jordan E.; Chui, Kenneth K. H.; Knox, Tamsin A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The incidence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is increasing in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive men who have sex with men (MSM). New guidelines recommend annual screening for HCV, similar to recommendations for syphilis screening with rapid plasma reagin (RPR). Methods. This study compares the frequency of repeat HCV antibody (Ab) testing to repeat RPR testing in a retrospective chart review of 359 HCVAb-negative people living with HIV (PLWH) observed in an Infectious Diseases clinic. Patients were classified into risk groups based on sexual risk factors. Results. Although 85% of PLWH had repeat syphilis screening, less than two thirds had repeat HCVAb screening. The MSM status was associated with increased HCVAb and RPR testing (adjusted odds ratio, 2.6 and 5.9, respectively). Seven persons had incident HCV infection: 3 were MSM, and 4 had symptoms or abnormal laboratory results to prompt testing. Conclusions. Failure to find incident HCV infection in PLWH represents missed opportunities to cure HCV infection and prevent progressive liver disease. Further quality improvement studies are necessary to develop physician-focused interventions to increase HCV screening rates in PLWH. PMID:26885544

  1. In vitro infection of natural killer cells with different human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Chehimi, J; Bandyopadhyay, S; Prakash, K; Perussia, B; Hassan, N F; Kawashima, H; Campbell, D; Kornbluth, J; Starr, S E

    1991-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are a discrete subset of leukocytes, distinct from T and B lymphocytes. NK cells mediate spontaneous non-MHC-restricted killing of a wide variety of target cells without prior sensitization and appear to be involved in initial protection against certain viral infections. Depressed NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity, one of the many immunological defects observed in AIDS patients, may contribute to secondary virus infections. Here we report that clonal and purified polyclonal populations of NK cells, which expressed neither surface CD4 nor CD4 mRNA, were susceptible to infection with various isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Viral replication was demonstrated by detection of p24 antigen intracellularly and in culture supernatants, by the presence of HIV DNA within infected cells, and by the ability of supernatants derived from HIV-infected NK cells to infect peripheral blood mononuclear cells or CD4+ cell lines. Infection of NK cells was not blocked by anti-CD4 or anti-Fc gamma RIII monoclonal antibodies. NK cells from HIV-infected and uninfected cultures were similar in their ability to lyse three different target cells. Considerable numbers of cells died in HIV-infected NK cell cultures. These results suggest that loss of NK cells in AIDS patients is a direct effect of HIV infection but that reduced NK cell function involves another mechanism. The possibility that NK cells serve as a potential reservoir for HIV-1 must be considered. Images PMID:1672164

  2. Anti-(human immunodeficiency virus) activity of polyoxotungstates and their inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, P S; Jones, C J; Mahmood, N; Evans, I G; Goff, M; Cooper, R; Hay, A J

    1995-01-01

    Heteropolyoxotungstates of the Keggin class containing different heteroatoms were tested for inhibition of two strains of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1); they exhibited varying antiviral activity. Compounds containing boron were inactive, only one of those containing phosphorus showed selective anti-viral activity, whereas all silicon-containing compounds exhibited significant anti-viral activity in C8166 cells infected with the IIIB strain. Their effectiveness was some 10-fold higher in JM cells with selectivity indices of about 2000. The silicotungstates were effective inhibitors of HIV reverse transcriptase, showing greater inhibition with RNA/DNA template primers than with DNA/DNA template.primer. Kinetic analysis demonstrated that they inhibit the enzyme by different mechanisms, as, of the four compounds examined, two competed with template.primer and two competed with deoxynucleoside triphosphate. Inhibition of DNA polymerase activity by these compounds was compared using polymerases from different sources, including human; although not necessarily most specific for HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, they did not inhibit all DNA polymerases to a similar degree. PMID:7536411

  3. Selective Interactions of Polyanions with Basic Surfaces on Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 gp120

    PubMed Central

    Moulard, Maxime; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues; Mondor, Isabelle; Roca, Guillaume; Wyatt, Richard; Sodroski, Joseph; Zhao, Lu; Olson, William; Kwong, Peter D.; Sattentau, Quentin J.

    2000-01-01

    It is well established that the gp120 V3 loop of T-cell-line-adapted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) binds both cell-associated and soluble polyanions. Virus infectivity is increased by interactions between HIV-1 and heparan sulfate proteoglycans on some cell types, and soluble polyanions such as heparin and dextran sulfate neutralize HIV-1 in vitro. However, the analysis of gp120-polyanion interactions has been limited to T-cell-line-adapted, CXCR4-using virus and virus-derived gp120, and the polyanion binding ability of gp120 regions other than the V3 loop has not been addressed. Here we demonstrate by monoclonal-antibody inhibition, labeled heparin binding, and surface plasmon resonance studies that a second site, most probably corresponding to the newly defined, highly conserved coreceptor binding region on gp120, forms part of the polyanion binding surface. Consistent with the binding of polyanions to the coreceptor binding surface, dextran sulfate interfered with the gp120-CXCR4 association while having no detectable effect on the gp120-CD4 interaction. The interaction between polyanions and X4 or R5X4 gp120 was readily detectable, whereas weak or undetectable binding was observed with R5 gp120. Analysis of mutated forms of X4 gp120 demonstrated that the V3 loop is the major determinant for polyanion binding whereas other regions, including the V1/V2 loop structure and the NH2 and COOH termini, exert a more subtle influence. A molecular model of the electrostatic potential of the conserved coreceptor binding region confirmed that it is basic but that the overall charge on this surface is dominated by the V3 loop. These results demonstrate a selective interaction of gp120 with polyanions and suggest that the conserved coreceptor binding surface may present a novel and conserved target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:10644368

  4. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes response dynamics after prime-boost vaccine regimens with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 canarypox and pseudovirions.

    PubMed

    Arp, J; Rovinski, B; Sambhara, S; Tartaglia, J; Dekaban, G

    1999-01-01

    Virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) may represent significant immune mechanisms in the control of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and, therefore, CTL induction may be a fundamental goal in the development of an efficacious acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) vaccine. In the current study, prime-boost protocols were used to investigate the potential of noninfectious human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) pseudovirions (HIV PSV) in enhancing HIV-specific CTL responses in Balb/c mice primed with the recombinant canarypox vector, vCP205, encoding HIV-1 gp120 (MN strain) in addition to Gag/Protease (HIB strain). The prime-boost immunization regimens were administered intramuscularly and involved injections of vCP205 followed by boosts with HIV PSV. Previous vaccination strategies solely involving vCP205 had induced good cellular immune responses in uninfected human volunteers, despite some limitations. The use of genetically engineered HIV PSV was a logical step in the evaluation of whole noninfectious virus or inactivated virus vaccine strategies, particularly as a potential boosting agent for vCP205-primed recipients. Based on this current study, HIV PSV appeared to have the capability to effectively induce and boost cell-mediated HIV-1-specific responses. In order to observe the immune effects of HIV PSV in a prime-boost immunization strategy, both HIV vaccine immunogens required careful titration in vivo. This suggests that careful consideration should be given to the optimization of immunization protocols destined for human use.

  5. REVIEW OF CONTROL OF HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS INFECTION IN NIGERIA.

    PubMed

    Dami, N; Shehu, N Y; Dami, S; Iroezindu, M O

    2015-01-01

    The global scourge of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is inundating, especially in sub-Saharan Africa and in particular Nigeria which is home to 10% of the world's HIV-infected persons. The target of the millennium development goal 6 is to halt and reverse the spread of HIV/AIDS by 2015. HIV control in Nigeria was initially shrouded in denial and apathy. Subsequently, a more pragmatic approach was launched during the tenure of President Olusegun Obasanjo. Several policies were formulated. The national prevalence of HIV witnessed some progressive decline and is currently 4.1%. There is now improvement in both HIV awareness and counselling and testing. Greater access to antiretroviral therapy and other support services have also been witnessed with over 300,000 persons currently on drugs. Notable achievements have been recorded in prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTC). However, with increased access to antiretroviral therapy, antiretroviral drug resistance has become inevitable. Acquired drug resistance is high-82% and transmitted drug resistance ranges between 0.7 and 4.5%. The achievements were largely facilitated by international partnerships which have become more streamlined in recent years. A sustained shift to indigenously sourced financial and manpower resource has become imperative. It is also important to integrate HIV facilities with other existing health care facilities for sustainability and cost-effectiveness. In an attempt to strengthen the national response, President Goodluck Ebele Jonathan launched the President's Comprehensive Response Plan for HIV/AIDS in Nigeria. It is hoped that this well-articulated policy would be well implemented to significantly reverse the epidemic. PMID:27487603

  6. Declined Neural Efficiency in Cognitively Stable Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Thomas; Yakupov, Renat; Nakama, Helenna; Crocket, Grace; Cole, Michael; Watters, Michael; Ricardo-Dukelow, Mary Lynn; Chang, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine whether brain activation changes in clinically and neurocognitively normal human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected and in HIV-seronegative control (SN) participants over a 1-year period. Methods Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was performed in 32 SN and 31 HIV patients (all with stable combination antiretroviral treatment) at baseline and after 1 year. Each participant performed a set of visual attention tasks with increasing attentional load (from tracking two, three, or four balls). All HIV and SN participants had normal neuropsychological function at both examinations. Results Over 1 year, HIV patients showed no change in their neurocognitive status or in task performance during fMRI. However, HIV patients showed significant 1-year increases in fMRI signals in the prefrontal and posterior parietal cortices for the more difficult tasks, whereas SN control participants showed only decreases in brain activation in these regions. This resulted in significant interactions between HIV status and time of study in left insula, left parietal, left temporal, and several frontal regions (left and right middle frontal gyrus, and anterior cingulate). Interpretation Because fMRI task performance remained unchanged in both groups, the HIV patients appeared to maintain performance by increasing usage of the attention network, whereas the control participants reduced usage of the attention network after 1 year. These findings suggest improved efficiency or a practice effect in the SN participants but declined efficiency of the neural substrate in HIV patients, possibly because of ongoing brain injury associated with the HIV infection, despite their apparent stable clinical course. PMID:19334060

  7. Measuring domestic violence in human immunodeficiency virus-positive women

    PubMed Central

    Patrikar, Seema; Verma, AK; Bhatti, VK; Shatabdi, S

    2012-01-01

    Background Violence affects the lives of millions of women worldwide, in all socioeconomic classes. Violence and the fear of violence are emerging as important risk factor contributing to the vulnerability to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection for women. The objective of the present cross sectional study is to compare the experiences of domestic violence between HIV-positive and HIV-negative married women seeking treatment in a tertiary care hospital. Methods The study is conducted in a tertiary care hospital in Pune on a randomly selected 150 married women (75 HIV-positive and 75 HIV-negative). Informed consent was obtained from all the women and also a trained counsellor was present during the process of data collection. The data was collected by interview method by taking precautions as laid down in the World Health Organization's ethical and safety recommendations for research on domestic violence and using modified conflict tactics scale (CTS). The definition of violence followed is as per the Declaration on the Elimination of Violence against Women, adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in 1993. Results The percentage of women reporting domestic violence is 44.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 36.84–52.68). The proportion of physical, emotional and sexual violence reported is 38% (95% CI = 30.49–45.96), 24% (95% CI = 17.67–31.31), and 14.7% (95% CI = 9.66–21.02), respectively. The odds of reporting violence of all forms is significantly higher among HIV-positive women than among HIV-negative women (P<0.05). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression is carried out to examine the possible predictors of domestic violence. Conclusion The findings suggest high proportion of HIV-positive women report violence then HIV-negative women which must be addressed through multilevel prevention approaches. PMID:24669053

  8. REVIEW OF CONTROL OF HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS INFECTION IN NIGERIA.

    PubMed

    Dami, N; Shehu, N Y; Dami, S; Iroezindu, M O

    2015-01-01

    The global scourge of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is inundating, especially in sub-Saharan Africa and in particular Nigeria which is home to 10% of the world's HIV-infected persons. The target of the millennium development goal 6 is to halt and reverse the spread of HIV/AIDS by 2015. HIV control in Nigeria was initially shrouded in denial and apathy. Subsequently, a more pragmatic approach was launched during the tenure of President Olusegun Obasanjo. Several policies were formulated. The national prevalence of HIV witnessed some progressive decline and is currently 4.1%. There is now improvement in both HIV awareness and counselling and testing. Greater access to antiretroviral therapy and other support services have also been witnessed with over 300,000 persons currently on drugs. Notable achievements have been recorded in prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTC). However, with increased access to antiretroviral therapy, antiretroviral drug resistance has become inevitable. Acquired drug resistance is high-82% and transmitted drug resistance ranges between 0.7 and 4.5%. The achievements were largely facilitated by international partnerships which have become more streamlined in recent years. A sustained shift to indigenously sourced financial and manpower resource has become imperative. It is also important to integrate HIV facilities with other existing health care facilities for sustainability and cost-effectiveness. In an attempt to strengthen the national response, President Goodluck Ebele Jonathan launched the President's Comprehensive Response Plan for HIV/AIDS in Nigeria. It is hoped that this well-articulated policy would be well implemented to significantly reverse the epidemic.

  9. Exercise and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) Infection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, DeSales; Jackson, Catherine G. R.; Greenleaf, John E.

    1995-01-01

    The human immune system is highly efficient and remarkably protective when functioning properly. Similar to other physiological systems, it functions best when the body is maintained with a balanced diet, sufficient rest and a moderately stress-free lifestyle. It can be disrupted by inappropriate drug use and extreme emotion or exertion. The functioning of normal or compromised immune systems can be enhanced by properly prescribed moderate exercise conditioning regimens in healthy people, and in some human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1)-infected patients but not in others who unable to complete an interval training program. Regular exercise conditioning in healthy people reduces cardiovascular risk factors, increases stamina, facilitates bodyweight control, and reduces stress by engendering positive feelings of well-being. Certain types of cancer may also be suppressed by appropriate exercise conditioning. Various exercise regimens are being evaluated as adjunct treatments for medicated patients with the HIV-1 syndrome. Limited anecdotal evidence from patients suggests that moderate exercise conditioning is per se responsible for their survival well beyond expectancy. HIV-1-infected patients respond positively, both physiologically and psychologically, to moderate exercise conditioning. However, the effectiveness of any exercise treatment programme depends on its mode, frequency, intensity and duration when prescribed o complement the pathological condition of the patient. The effectiveness of exercise conditioning regimens in patients with HIV-1 infection is reviewed in this article. In addition, we discuss mechanisms and pathways, involving the interplay of psychological and physiological factors, through which the suppressed immune system can be enhanced. The immune modulators discussed are endogenous opioids, cytokines, neurotransmitters and other hormones. Exercise conditioning treatment appears to be more effective when combined with other stress management

  10. Phylogenetic Analysis of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2 Group B

    PubMed Central

    Cella, Eleonora; Lo Presti, Alessandra; Giovanetti, Marta; Veo, Carla; Lai, Alessia; Dicuonzo, Giordano; Angeletti, Silvia; Ciotti, Marco; Zehender, Gianguglielmo; Ciccozzi, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Context: Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) infections are mainly restricted to West Africa; however, in the recent years, the prevalence of HIV-2 is a growing concern in some European countries and the Southwestern region of India. Despite the presence of different HIV-2 groups, only A and B Groups have established human-to-human transmission chains. Aims: This work aimed to evaluate the phylogeographic inference of HIV-2 Group B worldwide to estimate their data of origin and the population dynamics. Materials and Methods: The evolutionary rates, the demographic history for HIV-2 Group B dataset, and the phylogeographic analysis were estimated using a Bayesian approach. The viral gene flow analysis was used to count viral gene out/in flow among different locations. Results: The root of the Bayesian maximum clade credibility tree of HIV-2 Group B dated back to 1957. The demographic history of HIV-2 Group B showed that the epidemic remained constant up to 1970 when started an exponential growth. From 1985 to early 2000s, the epidemic reached a plateau, and then it was characterized by two bottlenecks and a new plateau at the end of 2000s. Phylogeographic reconstruction showed that the most probable location for the root of the tree was Ghana. Regarding the viral gene flow of HIV-2 Group B, the only observed viral gene flow was from Africa to France, Belgium, and Luxembourg. Conclusions: The study gives insights into the origin, history, and phylogeography of HIV-2 Group B epidemic. The growing number of infections of HIV-2 worldwide indicates the need for strengthening surveillance. PMID:27621561

  11. Phylogenetic Analysis of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2 Group B

    PubMed Central

    Cella, Eleonora; Lo Presti, Alessandra; Giovanetti, Marta; Veo, Carla; Lai, Alessia; Dicuonzo, Giordano; Angeletti, Silvia; Ciotti, Marco; Zehender, Gianguglielmo; Ciccozzi, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Context: Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) infections are mainly restricted to West Africa; however, in the recent years, the prevalence of HIV-2 is a growing concern in some European countries and the Southwestern region of India. Despite the presence of different HIV-2 groups, only A and B Groups have established human-to-human transmission chains. Aims: This work aimed to evaluate the phylogeographic inference of HIV-2 Group B worldwide to estimate their data of origin and the population dynamics. Materials and Methods: The evolutionary rates, the demographic history for HIV-2 Group B dataset, and the phylogeographic analysis were estimated using a Bayesian approach. The viral gene flow analysis was used to count viral gene out/in flow among different locations. Results: The root of the Bayesian maximum clade credibility tree of HIV-2 Group B dated back to 1957. The demographic history of HIV-2 Group B showed that the epidemic remained constant up to 1970 when started an exponential growth. From 1985 to early 2000s, the epidemic reached a plateau, and then it was characterized by two bottlenecks and a new plateau at the end of 2000s. Phylogeographic reconstruction showed that the most probable location for the root of the tree was Ghana. Regarding the viral gene flow of HIV-2 Group B, the only observed viral gene flow was from Africa to France, Belgium, and Luxembourg. Conclusions: The study gives insights into the origin, history, and phylogeography of HIV-2 Group B epidemic. The growing number of infections of HIV-2 worldwide indicates the need for strengthening surveillance.

  12. Antibody neutralization of retargeted measles viruses.

    PubMed

    Lech, Patrycja J; Pappoe, Roland; Nakamura, Takafumi; Tobin, Gregory J; Nara, Peter L; Russell, Stephen J

    2014-04-01

    The measles virus (MV) vaccine lineage is a promising oncolytic but prior exposure to the measles vaccine or wild-type MV strains limits treatment utility due to the presence of anti-measles antibodies. MV entry can be redirected by displaying a polypeptide ligand on the Hemagglutinin (H) C-terminus. We hypothesized that retargeted MV would escape neutralization by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) recognizing the H receptor-binding surface and be less susceptible to neutralization by human antisera. Using chimeric H proteins, with and without mutations that ablate MV receptor binding, we show that retargeted MVs escape mAbs that target the H receptor-binding surface by virtue of mutations that ablate infection via SLAM and CD46. However, C-terminally displayed domains do not mediate virus entry in the presence of human antibodies that bind to the underlying H domain. In conclusion, utility of retargeted oncolytic measles viruses does not extend to evasion of human serum neutralization.

  13. Rapid Development of gp120-Focused Neutralizing B Cell Responses during Acute Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection of African Green Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Amos, Joshua D.; Himes, Jonathon E.; Armand, Lawrence; Gurley, Thaddeus C.; Martinez, David R.; Colvin, Lisa; Beck, Krista; Overman, R. Glenn; Liao, Hua-Xin; Moody, M. Anthony

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The initial phases of acute human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection may be critical for development of effective envelope (Env)-specific antibodies capable of impeding the establishment of the latent pool of HIV-1-infected CD4+ T cells, preventing virus-induced immune hyperactivation to limit disease progression and blocking vertical virus transmission. However, the initial systemic HIV-1 Env-specific antibody response targets gp41 epitopes and fails to control acute-phase viremia. African-origin, natural simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) hosts do not typically progress to AIDS and rarely postnatally transmit virus to their infants, despite high milk viral loads. Conversely, SIV-infected rhesus macaques (RMs), Asian-origin nonnatural SIV hosts, sustain pathogenic SIV infections and exhibit higher rates of postnatal virus transmission. In this study, of acute SIV infection, we compared the initial systemic Env-specific B cell responses of AGMs and RMs in order to probe potential factors influencing the lack of disease progression observed in AGMs. AGMs developed higher-magnitude plasma gp120-specific IgA and IgG responses than RMs, whereas RMs developed more robust gp140-directed IgG responses. These gp120-focused antibody responses were accompanied by rapid autologous neutralizing responses during acute SIV infection in AGMs compared to RMs. Moreover, acute SIV infection elicited a higher number of circulating Env-specific memory B cells in peripheral blood of AGMs than in the blood of RMs. These findings indicate that AGMs have initial systemic Env-specific B cell responses to SIV infection distinct from those of a nonnatural SIV host, resulting in more functional SIV-specific humoral responses, which may be involved in impairing pathogenic disease progression and minimizing postnatal transmission. IMPORTANCE Due to the worldwide prevalence of HIV-1 infections, development of a vaccine to prevent infection or limit the viral reservoir

  14. Infection of brain microglial cells by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 is CD4 dependent.

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, C A; Watkins, B A; Kufta, C; Dubois-Dalcq, M

    1991-01-01

    In the central nervous system of AIDS patients, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infects primarily microglia, a cell type of bone marrow origin. Moreover, microglial cells isolated from adult human brain support the replication of macrophage-adapted strains of HIV type 1 (HIV-1) (B.A. Watkins, H.H. Dorn, W.B. Kelly, R.C. Armstrong, B. Potts, F. Michaels, C.V. Kufta, and M. Dubois-Dalcq, Science 249:549-553, 1990). To determine whether the CD4 receptor, which is expressed in brain, mediates the entry of HIV-1 in microglial cells, we analyzed CD4 transcript expression in cultured microglia using highly sensitive polymerase chain reaction detection of cDNAs synthesized from RNA. With this method, CD4 transcripts could be detected in cultured microglia--as well as in various human brain regions and cultured macrophages used as positive controls--along with transcripts for the LDL and Fc receptors which are characteristic of cells of the macrophage lineage. We then attempted to block viral entry into microglial cells using anti-CD4 antibodies or soluble CD4 (sCD4), which recognize binding sites on CD4 and HIV-1 glycoprotein gp120, respectively. Cultures were pretreated with blocking antibodies (Leu-3a, OKT4A) or virus was preincubated with sCD4 prior to infection with HIV-1 strain AD87(M) or BaL. With either viral strain, these treatments resulted in the prevention of infection or significant and dose-dependent reduction in the number of infected cells and in the levels of reverse transcriptase or p24 antigen released in the medium. Thus, brain-derived microglial cells, which are the primary target of HIV-1 infection in the brain, express the CD4 receptor and this receptor is effectively used for viral entry in vitro. Images PMID:1702842

  15. Dual Simian Foamy Virus/Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infections in Persons from Côte d’Ivoire

    PubMed Central

    Switzer, William M.; Tang, Shaohua; Zheng, HaoQiang; Shankar, Anupama; Sprinkle, Patrick S.; Sullivan, Vickie; Granade, Timothy C.; Heneine, Walid

    2016-01-01

    Zoonotic transmission of simian retroviruses in West-Central Africa occurring in primate hunters has resulted in pandemic spread of human immunodeficiency viruses (HIVs) and human T-lymphotropic viruses (HTLVs). While simian foamy virus (SFV) and simian T- lymphotropic virus (STLV)-like infection were reported in healthy persons exposed to nonhuman primates (NHPs) in West-Central Africa, less is known about the distribution of these viruses in Western Africa and in hospitalized populations. We serologically screened for SFV and STLV infection using 1,529 specimens collected between 1985 and 1997 from Côte d’Ivoire patients with high HIV prevalence. PCR amplification and analysis of SFV, STLV, and HIV/SIV sequences from PBMCs was used to investigate possible simian origin of infection. We confirmed SFV antibodies in three persons (0.2%), two of whom were HIV-1-infected. SFV polymerase (pol) and LTR sequences were detected in PBMC DNA available for one HIV-infected person. Phylogenetic comparisons with new SFV sequences from African guenons showed infection likely originated from a Chlorocebus sabaeus monkey endemic to Côte d’Ivoire. 4.6% of persons were HTLV seropositive and PCR testing of PBMCs from 15 HTLV seroreactive persons identified nine with HTLV-1 and one with HTLV-2 LTR sequences. Phylogenetic analysis showed that two persons had STLV-1-like infections, seven were HTLV-1, and one was an HTLV-2 infection. 310/858 (53%), 8/858 (0.93%), and 18/858 (2.1%) were HIV-1, HIV-2, and HIV-positive but undifferentiated by serology, respectively. No SIV sequences were found in persons with HIV-2 antibodies (n = 1) or with undifferentiated HIV results (n = 7). We document SFV, STLV-1-like, and dual SFV/HIV infection in Côte d’Ivoire expanding the geographic range for zoonotic simian retrovirus transmission to West Africa. These findings highlight the need to define the public health consequences of these infections. Studying dual HIV-1/SFV infections in

  16. Dual Simian Foamy Virus/Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infections in Persons from Côte d'Ivoire.

    PubMed

    Switzer, William M; Tang, Shaohua; Zheng, HaoQiang; Shankar, Anupama; Sprinkle, Patrick S; Sullivan, Vickie; Granade, Timothy C; Heneine, Walid

    2016-01-01

    Zoonotic transmission of simian retroviruses in West-Central Africa occurring in primate hunters has resulted in pandemic spread of human immunodeficiency viruses (HIVs) and human T-lymphotropic viruses (HTLVs). While simian foamy virus (SFV) and simian T- lymphotropic virus (STLV)-like infection were reported in healthy persons exposed to nonhuman primates (NHPs) in West-Central Africa, less is known about the distribution of these viruses in Western Africa and in hospitalized populations. We serologically screened for SFV and STLV infection using 1,529 specimens collected between 1985 and 1997 from Côte d'Ivoire patients with high HIV prevalence. PCR amplification and analysis of SFV, STLV, and HIV/SIV sequences from PBMCs was used to investigate possible simian origin of infection. We confirmed SFV antibodies in three persons (0.2%), two of whom were HIV-1-infected. SFV polymerase (pol) and LTR sequences were detected in PBMC DNA available for one HIV-infected person. Phylogenetic comparisons with new SFV sequences from African guenons showed infection likely originated from a Chlorocebus sabaeus monkey endemic to Côte d'Ivoire. 4.6% of persons were HTLV seropositive and PCR testing of PBMCs from 15 HTLV seroreactive persons identified nine with HTLV-1 and one with HTLV-2 LTR sequences. Phylogenetic analysis showed that two persons had STLV-1-like infections, seven were HTLV-1, and one was an HTLV-2 infection. 310/858 (53%), 8/858 (0.93%), and 18/858 (2.1%) were HIV-1, HIV-2, and HIV-positive but undifferentiated by serology, respectively. No SIV sequences were found in persons with HIV-2 antibodies (n = 1) or with undifferentiated HIV results (n = 7). We document SFV, STLV-1-like, and dual SFV/HIV infection in Côte d'Ivoire expanding the geographic range for zoonotic simian retrovirus transmission to West Africa. These findings highlight the need to define the public health consequences of these infections. Studying dual HIV-1/SFV infections in

  17. Replication of an acutely lethal simian immunodeficiency virus activates and induces proliferation of lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Fultz, P N

    1991-01-01

    A variant of simian immunodeficiency virus from sooty mangabey monkeys (SIVsmm), termed SIVsmmPBj14, was previously identified and shown to induce acute disease and death within 1 to 2 weeks of inoculation of pig-tailed macaques and mangabey monkeys (P. N. Fultz, H. M. McClure, D. C. Anderson, and W. M. Switzer, AIDS Res. Hum. Retroviruses 5:397-409, 1989). SIVsmmPBj14 differed from its parent virus, SIVsmm9, not only in pathogenicity but also in multiple in vitro properties. As a first approach to understanding the biological and molecular mechanisms responsible for the acute disease and death induced by this variant, virus-host cell interactions of SIVsmmPBj14 and SIVsmm9 were studied. Initial rates of replication of the two viruses were identical in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from normal pig-tailed macaques and mangabey monkeys, but SIVsmmPBj14 infection always resulted in higher yields of virus than did SIVsmm9 infection, as assessed by levels of reverse transcriptase activity in culture supernatants. Surprisingly, despite its cytopathicity for macaque and mangabey CD4+ cells, replication of SIVsmmPBj14 was accompanied by up to 10-fold increases in number of viable cells compared with cell numbers in uninfected or SIVsmm9-infected cultures. Furthermore, SIVsmmPBj14 was shown to infect and replicate in resting PBMC just as efficiently as in mitogen-stimulated PBMC, irrespective of whether exogenous interleukin-2 (IL-2) or antibodies that neutralized IL-2 were added to culture media. Accumulation of virus in culture supernatants of resting PBMC preceded by several days the appearance of activated cells which expressed the IL-2 receptor alpha subunit (CD25), suggesting that activation of cells was not essential for replication. The ability to activate and to induce simian PBMC to proliferate appeared specific for the acutely lethal variant because incorporation of [3H]thymidine by PBMC from naive animals was observed only upon incubation

  18. Variants selected by treatment of human immunodeficiency virus-infected cells with an immunotoxin

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    An immunotoxin has been made by coupling anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope antibody 907 to ricin A chain (907-RAC). 907 recognizes an epitope within the immunodominant PB-1 loop of gp120. Variant cells were selected by cloning persistently infected H9/human T lymphocyte virus IIIB cells in the presence of the immunotoxin. Clones resistant to 907-RAC arose at a frequency of 0.1-1.0%. Seven clones were selected for intensive analysis. When studied, these clones fell into two distinct groups, members of which appeared to be identical, suggesting that the variation arose before the selection process. In contrast to the parent cells, none of the cloned variants produced infectious HIV. The first set of clones, designated the "E" variants, expressed decreased levels of the HIV envelope on the cell surface. However, levels of intracellular HIV antigens and reverse transcriptase were equal to or greater than that of the parental cell line. Radioimmunoprecipitation demonstrated that the gp160 was truncated to 145 kD (gp120 was normal length), capable of binding to CD4, and, unlike normal gp160, was released in its unprocessed form into the cellular supernatant. Sequence analysis demonstrated that a deletion at codon 687 of the envelope gene resulted in the production of this truncated protein. Ultrastructural analysis of E variants demonstrated some budding forms of virus, but also large numbers of HIV within intracellular vesicles. The second set of variants, the "F" series, produced no HIV antigens, reverse transcriptase, nor was there ultrastructural evidence of virus. However, proviral DNA was present. Virus could not be induced with agents known to activate latent HIV. These cells also lacked cell surface CD4 and could not be infected with HIV. These studies demonstrate that variation in HIV can affect the phenotype of the cells carrying the altered virus, allowing for escape from immunologic destruction. The E variants may serve as prototypes for

  19. Susceptibility of human immunodeficiency virus to antiviral agents measured by infectious virus yield reduction.

    PubMed

    Dianzani, F; Capobianchi, M R; Antonelli, G; Amicucci, P; De Marco, F

    1989-01-01

    Under single growth cycle conditions in C8166 lymphoblastoid cells human immunodeficiency virus shows a replication curve which is completed at 24 h post-infection. At lower multiplicity of infection virus yield peaks at approximately 72 h post-infection but in both cases the titer of the virus released in the medium is negligible with respect to that which remains cell-associated. A method based on back-titration of virus in cryolysates of C8166 cells infected with HIV and treated with antiviral compounds has been used to evaluate HIV sensitivity to such agents. Under single growth cycle conditions dose response curves appear linear and permit rapid and accurate determination of the endpoint activity. Under multiple growth cycle conditions the inhibitory activity may be measured during the exponential growth phase, at 48 h post-infection. This method, which directly measures production of infectious virus rather than indirect probes of viral replication such as reverse transcriptase or antigen production, offers the advantage of a precise determination of the degree of activity of antivirals also acting on viral assembly or release.

  20. Dual infection with dengue virus 3 and human immunodeficiency virus 1 in Havana, Cuba.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Daniel; Limonta, Daniel; Bandera, Juan Francisco; Perez, Jorge; Kouri, Gustavo; Guzman, Maria G

    2009-01-01

    Although dengue virus (DEN) endemic regions overlap with human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV) high incidence areas, little has been documented on HIV and DEN mixed infection. Here we report DEN/HIV concurrent infections recorded during the DEN-3 epidemic in 2001-2002 in Havana. Serologic-confirmed DEN is described in two HIV-infected subjects with dengue fever symptoms. Although patients had dengue disease, the CD4+ cells remained within normal levels and no accelerated progression of HIV disease was observed. To our knowledge, DEN cases caused by DEN-3 in HIV-infected individuals have not been reported previously. Further research is needed to diagnose this likely underreported mixed viral infection in DEN endemic areas.

  1. Vpr Protein of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Forms Cation-Selective Channels in Planar Lipid Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piller, S. C.; Ewart, G. D.; Premkumar, A.; Cox, G. B.; Gage, P. W.

    1996-01-01

    A small (96-aa) protein, virus protein R (Vpr), of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 contains one hydrophobic segment that could form a membrane-spanning helix. Recombinant Vpr, expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography, formed ion channels in planar lipid bilayers when it was added to the cis chamber and when the trans chamber was held at a negative potential. The channels were more permeable to Na+ than to Cl- ions and were inhibited when the trans potential was made positive. Similar channel activity was caused by Vpr that had a truncated C terminus, but the potential dependence of channel activity was no longer seen. Antibody raised to a peptide mimicking part of the C terminus of Vpr (AbC) inhibited channel activity when added to the trans chamber but had no effect when added to the cis chamber. Antibody to the N terminus of Vpr (AbN) increased channel activity when added to the cis chamber but had no effect when added to the trans chamber. The effects of potential and antibodies on channel activity are consistent with a model in which the positive C-terminal end of dipolar Vpr is induced to traverse the bilayer membrane when the opposite (trans) side of the membrane is at a negative potential. The C terminus of Vpr would then be available for interaction with AbC in the trans chamber, and the N terminus would be available for interaction with AbN in the cis chamber. The ability of Vpr to form ion channels in vitro suggests that channel formation by Vpr in vivo is possible and may be important in the life cycle of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and/or may cause changes in cells that contribute to AIDS-related pathologies.

  2. Temporal association of cellular immune responses with the initial control of viremia in primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Koup, R A; Safrit, J T; Cao, Y; Andrews, C A; McLeod, G; Borkowsky, W; Farthing, C; Ho, D D

    1994-01-01

    Virologic and immunologic studies were performed on five patients presenting with primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) precursors specific for cells expressing antigens of HIV-1 Gag, Pol, and Env were detected at or within 3 weeks of presentation in four of the five patients and were detected in all five patients by 3 to 6 months after presentation. The one patient with an absent initial CTL response had prolonged symptoms, persistent viremia, and low CD4+ T-cell count. Neutralizing antibody activity was absent at the time of presentation in all five patients. These findings suggest that cellular immunity is involved in the initial control of virus replication in primary HIV-1 infection and indicate a role for CTL in protective immunity to HIV-1 in vivo. PMID:8207839

  3. Transmissibility of human immunodeficiency virus in haemophilic and non-haemophilic children living in a private school in France.

    PubMed

    Berthier, A; Chamaret, S; Fauchet, R; Fonlupt, J; Genetet, N; Gueguen, M; Pommereuil, M; Ruffault, A; Montagnier, L

    1986-09-13

    In a study of the transmissibility of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in haemophilic and non-haemophilic children living together in a boarding school in France, half of the haemophilic children had seroconverted by the end of a 3-year study period. By contrast none of the non-haemophilic children seroconverted. All children had had close casual contact, some of them for several years. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) markers detected in all polytransfused haemophiliacs were found in 4 of 20 control children in the school, whereas all healthy youngsters living with their families were HBV negative. This study adds support to the theory that transmissibility of HIV among casual contacts is low and that there is no reason to exclude HIV-antibody carriers from communities.

  4. Retention of viral infectivity after extensive mutation of the highly conserved immunodominant domain of the feline immunodeficiency virus envelope.

    PubMed Central

    Pancino, G; Sonigo, P

    1997-01-01

    In lentiviruses, including human immunodeficiency virus and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), the principal immunodominant domain (PID) of the transmembrane glycoprotein elicits a strong humoral response in infected hosts. The PID is marked by the presence of two cysteines that delimit a sequence, composed of five to seven amino acids in different lentiviruses, which is highly conserved among isolates of the same lentiviral species. While the conservation of the sequence suggests the presence of functional constraints, the conservation of the immunodominance among divergent lentiviruses raises the hypothesis of a selective advantage for the infecting virus conferred by the host humoral response against this domain. We and others have previously shown that an appropriate structure of the PID is required for the production of a functional envelope. In the present work, we analyzed virological functions and immune reactivity of the envelope after random mutagenesis of the PID of FIV. We obtained nine mutant envelopes which were correctly processed and retained fusogenic ability. Mutation of the two C-terminal residues of the PID sequence between the cysteines in a molecular clone of FIV abolished infectivity. In contrast, three molecular clones containing extensive mutations in the four N-terminal amino acids were infectious. However, the mutations affected PID reactivity with sera from infected cats. Our results suggest that functional constraints, although existent, are not sufficient to account for PID sequence conservation. Such conservation may also result from positive selection by anti-PID antibodies which enhance infection. PMID:9151822

  5. Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Disease Course Is Predicted by the Extent of Virus Replication during Primary Infection

    PubMed Central

    Staprans, Silvija I.; Dailey, Peter J.; Rosenthal, Ann; Horton, Chris; Grant, Robert M.; Lerche, Nicholas; Feinberg, Mark B.

    1999-01-01

    To elucidate the relationship between early viral infection events and immunodeficiency virus disease progression, quantitative-competitive and branched-DNA methods of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) RNA quantitation were cross-validated and used to measure viremia following infection of rhesus macaques with the pathogenic SIVmac251 virus isolate. Excellent correlation between the methods suggests that both accurately approximate SIV copy number. Plasma viremia was evident 4 days postinfection, and rapid viral expansion led to peak viremia levels of 107 to 109 SIV RNA copies/ml by days 8 to 17. Limited resolution of primary viremia was accompanied by relatively short, though variable, times to the development of AIDS (81 to 630 days). The persistent high-level viremia observed following intravenous inoculation of SIVmac251 explains the aggressive disease course in this model. Survival analyses demonstrated that the disease course is established 8 to 17 days postinfection, when peak viremia is observed. The most significant predictor of disease progression was the extent of viral decline following peak viremia; larger decrements in viremia were associated with both lower steady-state viremia (P = 0.0005) and a reduced hazard of AIDS (P = 0.004). The data also unexpectedly suggested that following SIVmac251 infection, animals with the highest peak viremia were better able to control virus replication rather than more rapidly developing disease. Analysis of early viral replication dynamics should help define host responses that protect from disease progression and should provide quantitative measures to assess the extent to which protective responses may be induced by prophylactic vaccination. PMID:10233944

  6. Neutralizing IgG at the Portal of Infection Mediates Protection against Vaginal Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Katja; Veazey, Ronald S.; Warrier, Ranjit; Hraber, Peter; Doyle-Meyers, Lara A.; Buffa, Viviana; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F.; Shaw, George M.

    2013-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies may have critical importance in immunity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. However, the amount of protective antibody needed at mucosal surfaces has not been fully established. Here, we evaluated systemic and mucosal pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of 2F5 IgG and 2F5 Fab fragments with respect to protection against vaginal challenge with simian-human immunodeficiency virus-BaL in macaques. Antibody assessment demonstrated that 2F5 IgG was more potent than polymeric forms (IgM and IgA) across a range of cellular and tissue models. Vaginal challenge studies demonstrated a dose-dependent protection for 2F5 IgG and no protection with 2F5 Fab despite higher vaginal Fab levels at the time of challenge. Animals receiving 50 or 25 mg/kg of body weight 2F5 IgG were completely protected, while 3/5 animals receiving 5 mg/kg were protected. In the control animals, infection was established by a minimum of 1 to 4 transmitted/founder (T/F) variants, similar to natural human infection by this mucosal route; in the two infected animals that had received 5 mg 2F5 IgG, infection was established by a single T/F variant. Serum levels of 2F5 IgG were more predictive of sterilizing protection than measured vaginal levels. Fc-mediated antiviral activity did not appear to influence infection of primary target cells in cervical explants. However, PK studies highlighted the importance of the Fc portion in tissue biodistribution. Data presented in this study may be important in modeling serum levels of neutralizing antibodies that need to be achieved by either vaccination or passive infusion to prevent mucosal acquisition of HIV-1 infection in humans. PMID:23966410

  7. Personal and psychosocial characteristics associated with psychiatric conditions among women with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Sherbourne, Cathy; Griffith Forge, Nell; Kung, Fuan-Yue; Orlando, Maria; Tucker, Joan

    2003-01-01

    This study presents information on correlates of mental health and substance abuse problems among women with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a particularly vulnerable, poor and minority population. Data are from 847 women in the HIV Cost and Services Utilization Study, a national probability sample of adults with known human immunodeficiency virus infection. Fifty-five percent of women manifested a probable psychiatric condition. Results indicated that increased risk for psychiatric conditions among these women was associated with younger age, having acquired immunodeficiency virus (rather than asymptomatic), using avoidant coping strategies, reporting increased conflict with others, and prior physical abuse, needing income assistance, and putting off going to the doctor because of caring for someone else. Findings suggest we need to address women's need for safety from assaultive partners and that we may need special programs for women burdened with having to care for others.

  8. Decline in CD4+ cell numbers in cats with naturally acquired feline immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann-Fezer, G; Thum, J; Ackley, C; Herbold, M; Mysliwietz, J; Thefeld, S; Hartmann, K; Kraft, W

    1992-03-01

    T-cell subsets were studied by fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis in 57 feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-seropositive cats with naturally acquired FIV infection to see whether CD4(+)-CD8+ alterations were comparable to those observed in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. CD4+ values were decreased and CD8+ values were increased. The CD4+/CD8+ ratio was reduced to 1.6, compared with 3.3 in 33 FIV-seronegative control cats. Variance analysis of data showed a significant influence of FIV seropositivity, sex, and spaying of female cats on CD4+ values. CD8+ values were significantly influenced by FIV seropositivity, age, and breed. These findings indicate a similarity between FIV and human immunodeficiency virus infections, as far as alterations of T-cell subsets are concerned. PMID:1310760

  9. Recent key advances in human immunodeficiency virus medicine and implications for China

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In this article we summarize several recent major developments in human immunodeficiency virus treatment, prevention, outcome, and social policy change. Updated international guidelines endorse more aggressive treatment strategies and safer antiretroviral drugs. New antiretroviral options are being tested. Important lessons were learned in the areas of human immunodeficiency virus vaccines and microbicide gels from clinical studies, and additional trials in prevention, especially pre-exposure prophylaxis, are nearing completion. Insight into the role of the virus in the pathogenesis of diseases traditionally thought to be unrelated to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome has become a driving force for earlier and universal therapy. Lastly, we review important achievements of and future challenges facing China as she steps into her eighth year of the National Free Antiretroviral Treatment Program. PMID:20500898

  10. Successful Orthotopic Heart Transplantation and Immunosuppressive Management in 2 Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Seropositive Patients.

    PubMed

    Conte, Antonio Hernandez; Kittleson, Michelle M; Dilibero, Deanna; Hardy, W David; Kobashigawa, Jon A; Esmailian, Fardad

    2016-02-01

    Few orthotopic heart transplantations have been performed in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus since the first such case was reported in 2001. Since that time, advances in highly active antiretroviral therapy have resulted in potent and durable suppression of the causative human immunodeficiency virus-accompanied by robust immune reconstitution, reversal of previous immunodeficiency, a marked decrease in opportunistic and other infections, and near-normal long-term survival. Although human immunodeficiency virus infection is not an absolute contraindication, few centers in the United States and Canada have performed heart transplantations in this patient population; these patients have been de facto excluded from this procedure in North America. Re-evaluation of the reasons for excluding these patients from cardiac transplantation is warranted in light of such significant advances in antiretroviral therapy. This case report documents successful orthotopic heart transplantation in 2 patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus, and we describe their antiretroviral therapy and immunosuppressive management challenges. Both patients were doing well without sequelae 43 and 38 months after transplantation.

  11. Persistent Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Drives Differentiation, Aberrant Accumulation, and Latent Infection of Germinal Center Follicular T Helper Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huanbin; Wang, Xiaolei; Malam, Naomi; Aye, Pyone P.; Alvarez, Xavier; Lackner, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT CD4+ follicular T helper (Tfh) cells play a prominent role in humoral immune responses, but the mechanisms of their accumulation and infection in AIDS remain unclear. Here we found that germinal center (GC) Tfh cells, defined here as CXCR5+ PD-1HIGH CD4+ T cells, do not express the HIV coreceptor CCR5 yet serve as a latent reservoir in GCs. With disease progression, an expansion of GC Tfh cells is accompanied by increases in dysfunctional CD8+ T cells. In contrast, Tfh precursor (CXCR5− CD4+ T) cells in lymph nodes do express CCR5 and differentiate into GC Tfh cells following interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-21 stimulation, and viral DNA is detectable in fully differentiated GC Tfh cells ex vivo. This suggests that SIV-infected GC Tfh cells may be derived from Tfh precursor cell subsets that become infected in marginal zones and then migrate into GCs as fully mature GC Tfh cells that serve as persistent virus reservoirs. These findings suggest that viral persistence in lymph nodes drives compensatory differentiation, aberrant accumulation, and latent infection of GC Tfh cells, resulting in marked impairment of humoral immune responses. IMPORTANCE Generation of antibodies that can effectively eliminate viruses requires interactions of B cells with highly specialized T cells in GCs of lymphoid tissues called follicular T helper cells. Here we show that in simian immunodeficiency virus infection, these cells are initially infected in a precursor stage that leads to alterations in their homing, accumulation, and function that may be responsible for the inability of human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients to generate effective antibody responses. PMID:26608323

  12. The human immunodeficiency virus-reverse transcriptase inhibition activity of novel pyridine/pyridinium-type fullerene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Yasuno, Takumi; Ohe, Tomoyuki; Takahashi, Kyoko; Nakamura, Shigeo; Mashino, Tadahiko

    2015-08-15

    In the present study, we describe the synthesis of a novel set of pyridine/pyridinium-type fullerene derivatives. The products were assessed for human immunodeficiency virus-reverse transcriptase inhibition activities. All novel fullerene derivatives showed potent human immunodeficiency virus-reverse transcriptase inhibition without cytotoxicity.

  13. 38 CFR 1.487 - Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... partner and that the disclosure is necessary to protect the health of the spouse or sexual partner. (c) A... related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient... the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient. (a) Subject...

  14. 38 CFR 1.487 - Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... partner and that the disclosure is necessary to protect the health of the spouse or sexual partner. (c) A... related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient... the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient. (a) Subject...

  15. 38 CFR 1.487 - Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... partner and that the disclosure is necessary to protect the health of the spouse or sexual partner. (c) A... related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient... the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient. (a) Subject...

  16. 38 CFR 1.486 - Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to public...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to public health authorities. 1.486 Section 1... immunodeficiency virus to public health authorities. (a) In the case of any record which is maintained in connection with the performance of any program or activity relating to infection with the HIV,...

  17. 38 CFR 1.486 - Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to public...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to public health authorities. 1.486 Section 1... immunodeficiency virus to public health authorities. (a) In the case of any record which is maintained in connection with the performance of any program or activity relating to infection with the HIV,...

  18. 38 CFR 1.487 - Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient... the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient. (a) Subject to... indicating that a patient is infected with the HIV if the disclosure is made to the spouse of the patient,...

  19. 38 CFR 1.487 - Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient... the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient. (a) Subject to... indicating that a patient is infected with the HIV if the disclosure is made to the spouse of the patient,...

  20. Practice Bulletin No. 167 Summary: Gynecologic Care for Women and Adolescents With Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    PubMed

    2016-10-01

    In the United States in 2013, there were an estimated 226,000 women and adolescents living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (1). Women with HIV are living longer, healthier lives, so the need for routine and problem-focused gynecologic care has increased. The purpose of this document is to educate clinicians about basic health screening and care, family planning, prepregnancy care, and managing common gynecologic problems for women and adolescents who are infected with HIV. For information on screening guidelines, refer to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' Committee Opinion No. 596, Routine Human Immunodeficiency Virus Screening (2). PMID:27661642

  1. Practice Bulletin No. 167: Gynecologic Care for Women and Adolescents With Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    PubMed

    2016-10-01

    In the United States in 2013, there were an estimated 226,000 women and adolescents living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (1). Women with HIV are living longer, healthier lives, so the need for routine and problem-focused gynecologic care has increased. The purpose of this document is to educate clinicians about basic health screening and care, family planning, prepregnancy care, and managing common gynecologic problems for women and adolescents who are infected with HIV. For information on screening guidelines, refer to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' Committee Opinion No. 596, Routine Human Immunodeficiency Virus Screening (2). PMID:27661659

  2. C5A Protects Macaques from Vaginal Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Veazey, Ronald S.; Chatterji, Udayan; Bobardt, Michael; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi E.; Li, Jian; Wang, Xiaolei

    2015-01-01

    A safe and effective vaginal microbicide could decrease human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission in women. Here, we evaluated the safety and microbicidal efficacy of a short amphipathic peptide, C5A, in a rhesus macaque model. We found that a vaginal application of C5A protects 89% of the macaques from a simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-162P3) challenge. We observed no signs of lesions or inflammation in animals vaginally treated with repeated C5A applications. With its noncellular cytotoxic activity and rare mechanism of action, C5A represents an attractive microbicidal candidate. PMID:26552985

  3. Inhibition of simian immunodeficiency virus by foamy virus vectors expressing siRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jeonghae; Nadeau, Peter; Zucali, James R.; Johnson, Calvin M.; Mergia, Ayalew . E-mail: mergiaa@mail.vetmed.ufl.edu

    2005-12-20

    Viral vectors available for gene therapy are either inefficient or suffer from safety concerns for human applications. Foamy viruses are non-pathogenic retroviruses that offer several unique opportunities for gene transfer in various cell types from different species. In this report, we describe the use of simian foamy virus type 1 (SFV-1) vector to examine the efficacy of therapeutic genes. Hairpin short-interfering RNA (siRNA) that targets the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) rev/env was placed under the control of the PolIII U6 snRNA promoter for expression and screened for silencing target genes using cognate target-reporter fusions. We have identified an effective siRNA (designated R2) which reduces the rev and env gene expression by 89% and 95%, respectively. Using the simian foamy virus type 1 (SFV-1) based vector, we delivered the PolIII expressed R2 siRNA into cultured cells and challenged with SIV. The results show that the R2 siRNA is a potent inhibitor of SIV replication as determined by p27 expression and reverse transcriptase assays. Vectors based on a non-pathogenic SFV-1 vector may provide a safe and efficient alternative to currently available vectors, and the SIV model will help devise protocols for effective anti-HIV gene therapy.

  4. Pharmacologic management of human immunodeficiency virus wasting syndrome.

    PubMed

    Badowski, Melissa; Pandit, Neha Sheth

    2014-08-01

    Pharmacologic interventions for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) wasting have been studied since the 1990s, but the results of these interventions have been difficult to compare because the studies used different HIV wasting definitions and assessed various patient outcomes. Thus, we performed a systematic review of the current literature to identify studies that evaluated pharmacologic management of HIV wasting and to compare and contrast treatment options. Further, we provide a comprehensive review of these treatment options and describe the definition of HIV wasting used in each study, the outcomes assessed, and whether antiretroviral therapy was used during the HIV wasting treatment. Literature searches of the PubMed/Medline (1946-2014) and Google Scholar databases were performed, and a review of the bibliographies of retrieved articles was performed to identify additional references. Only English-language articles pertaining to humans and HIV-infected individuals were evaluated. Thirty-six studies were identified that assessed pharmacologic interventions to treat HIV wasting. Appetite stimulants, such as megestrol acetate, have been shown to increase total body weight (TBW) and body mass index in HIV-infected patients with wasting. Studies evaluating dronabinol showed conflicting data on TBW increases, but the drug may have minimal benefit on body composition compared with other appetite stimulants. Testosterone has been shown to be effective in HIV wasting for those who suffer from hypogonadism. Recombinant human growth hormone has been evaluated for HIV wasting and has shown promising results for TBW and lean body mass increases. Thalidomide has been studied; however, its use is limited due to its toxicities. Although megestrol acetate and dronabinol are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of HIV wasting, it is important to recognize other comorbidities such as depression or hypogonadism that may contribute to the

  5. Shedding of Hepatitis C Virus in Semen of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Men

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Samuel S.; Gianella, Sara; Yip, Marcus J-S.; van Seggelen, Wouter O.; Gillies, Robert D.; Foster, Andrew L.; Barbati, Zachary R.; Smith, Davey M.; Fierer, Daniel S.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The epidemic of sexually transmitted hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) has been documented for over a decade. Despite this, there is no consensus as to the risk factors for sexual acquisition of HCV in these men. Methods. We obtained paired semen and blood samples at 2-week intervals from HIV-infected MSM with recent and chronic HCV infection and quantified HCV in semen. Results. Hepatitis C virus was quantified in 59 semen specimens from 33 men. Hepatitis C virus was shed in 16 (27%) of semen specimens from 11 (33%) of the men. Median HCV viral load (VL) in semen was 1.49 log10 IU/mL. Hepatitis C virus VL in blood was significantly higher at the time of HCV shedding in semen than when HCV shedding in semen was not detected (P = .002). Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between the HCV VL in blood and semen overall (rs = 0.41; P = .001), and in the subgroup with recent HCV infection (rs = 0.37; P = .02), but not in the subgroup with chronic HCV infection (rs = 0.34; P = .1). Conclusions. One third of HIV-infected MSM coinfected with HCV shed HCV into their semen. Based on the HCV VL in semen in this study, an average ejaculate would deliver up to 6630 IU of virus into the rectum of the receptive partner. Therefore, our data strongly support that condoms should be used during anal intercourse among MSM to prevent transmission of HCV. PMID:27186582

  6. Shedding of Hepatitis C Virus in Semen of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Men.

    PubMed

    Turner, Samuel S; Gianella, Sara; Yip, Marcus J-S; van Seggelen, Wouter O; Gillies, Robert D; Foster, Andrew L; Barbati, Zachary R; Smith, Davey M; Fierer, Daniel S

    2016-03-01

    Background.  The epidemic of sexually transmitted hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) has been documented for over a decade. Despite this, there is no consensus as to the risk factors for sexual acquisition of HCV in these men. Methods.  We obtained paired semen and blood samples at 2-week intervals from HIV-infected MSM with recent and chronic HCV infection and quantified HCV in semen. Results.  Hepatitis C virus was quantified in 59 semen specimens from 33 men. Hepatitis C virus was shed in 16 (27%) of semen specimens from 11 (33%) of the men. Median HCV viral load (VL) in semen was 1.49 log10 IU/mL. Hepatitis C virus VL in blood was significantly higher at the time of HCV shedding in semen than when HCV shedding in semen was not detected (P = .002). Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between the HCV VL in blood and semen overall (rs = 0.41; P = .001), and in the subgroup with recent HCV infection (rs = 0.37; P = .02), but not in the subgroup with chronic HCV infection (rs = 0.34; P = .1). Conclusions.  One third of HIV-infected MSM coinfected with HCV shed HCV into their semen. Based on the HCV VL in semen in this study, an average ejaculate would deliver up to 6630 IU of virus into the rectum of the receptive partner. Therefore, our data strongly support that condoms should be used during anal intercourse among MSM to prevent transmission of HCV. PMID:27186582

  7. Normal immune function and inability to isolate virus in culture in an individual with long-term human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Greenough, T C; Somasundaran, M; Brettler, D B; Hesselton, R M; Alimenti, A; Kirchhoff, F; Panicali, D; Sullivan, J L

    1994-04-01

    A detailed, longitudinal study was undertaken to investigate the immunological and virological features of an individual with hemophilia infected with human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) for 10 years without disease. Methods applied to serial samples of peripheral blood included Western blot analysis, neutralizing antibody assays, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) titration, HIV-1 specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) assays, viral cultures, and PCR with sequence analysis of viral regulatory genes. Strong antibody responses against HIV-1 antigens as measured by Western blot and ADCC assays have persisted throughout infection. Repeated attempts to isolate HIV-1 using sensitive culture techniques and to demonstrate viremia with standard PCR methods have failed. Using the "booster" PCR technique, a period of viremia in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was demonstrated. Concurrent with detection of circulating virus, titers of neutralizing antibodies and circulating HIV-1-specific CTLs became measurable. Sequencing studies of a portion of the viral genome showed no significant abnormalities of the regulatory genes. In this individual, the combination of low viral load in the peripheral blood and a strong, responsive immune system is associated with long-term, disease-free coexistence with HIV-1 infection.

  8. Purification and characterization of an active human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNase H domain.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J S; Roth, M J

    1993-01-01

    We have expressed and purified from Escherichia coli a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNase H domain consisting of amino acids 400 to 560 of reverse transcriptase with either an N- or C-terminal polyhistidine tag. The native protease cleavage site of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase is between amino acids 440 and 441. Purification on Ni(2+)-nitrilotriacetate agarose resulted in a highly active RNase H domain dependent on MnCl2 rather than MgCl2. Activity was unambiguously attributed to the purified proteins by an in situ RNase H gel assay. Residues 400 to 426, which include a stretch of tryptophans, did not contribute to RNase H activity, and the polyhistidine tag was essential for activity. Despite the requirement for a histidine tag, the recombinant RNase H proteins retained characteristics of the wild-type heterodimer, as determined by examining activity in the presence of several known inhibitors of HIV-1 RNase H, including ribonucleoside vanadyl complexes, dAMP, and a monoclonal antibody. Importantly, the isolated RNase H domain produced the same specific cleavage in tRNA(3Lys) removal as HIV-1 heterodimer, leaving the 3'-rA (adenosine 5' phosphate) residue of a model tRNA attached to the adjacent U5 sequence. This HIV-1 RNase H domain sedimented as a monomer in a glycerol gradient. Images PMID:7685407

  9. Specific interaction of aurintricarboxylic acid with the human immunodeficiency virus/CD4 cell receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Schols, D.; Baba, M.; Pauwels, R.; Desmyter, J.; De Clercq, E. )

    1989-05-01

    The triphenylmethane derivative aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA), but not aurin, selectively prevented the binding of OKT4A/Leu-3a monoclonal antibody (mAb) and, to a lesser extent, OKT4 mAb to the CD4 cell receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). The effect was seen within 1 min at an ATA concentration of 10 {mu}M in various T4{sup +} cells (MT-4, U-937, peripheral blood lymphocytes, and monocytes). It was dose-dependent and reversible. ATA prevented the attachment of radiolabeled HIV-1 particles to MT-4 cells, which could be expected as the result of its specific binding to the HIV/CD4 receptor. Other HIV inhibitors such as suramin, fuchsin acid, azidothymidine, dextran sulfate, heparin, and pentosan polysulfate did not affect OKT4A/Leu-3a mAb binding to the CD4 receptor, although the sulfated polysaccharides suppressed HIV-1 adsorption to the cells at concentrations required for complete protection against HIV-1 cytopathogenicity. Thus, ATA is a selective marker molecule for the CD4 receptor. ATA also interfered with the staining of membrane-associated HIV-1 glycoprotein gp120 by a mAb against it. These unusual properties of a small molecule of nonimmunological origin may have important implications for the study of CD4/HIV/AIDS pathogenesis and possibly treatment.

  10. Two distinct CCR5 domains can mediate coreceptor usage by human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Doranz, B J; Lu, Z H; Rucker, J; Zhang, T Y; Sharron, M; Cen, Y H; Wang, Z X; Guo, H H; Du, J G; Accavitti, M A; Doms, R W; Peiper, S C

    1997-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR5 is the major fusion coreceptor for macrophage-tropic strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). To define the structures of CCR5 that can support envelope (Env)-mediated membrane fusion, we analyzed the activity of homologs, chimeras, and mutants of human CCR5 in a sensitive gene reporter cell-cell fusion assay. Simian, but not murine, homologs of CCR5 were fully active as HIV-1 fusion coreceptors. Chimeras between CCR5 and divergent chemokine receptors demonstrated the existence of two distinct regions of CCR5 that could be utilized for Env-mediated fusion, the amino-terminal domain and the extracellular loops. Dual-tropic Env proteins were particularly sensitive to alterations in the CCR5 amino-terminal domain, suggesting that this domain may play a pivotal role in the evolution of coreceptor usage in vivo. We identified individual residues in both functional regions, Asp-11, Lys-197, and Asp-276, that contribute to coreceptor function. Deletion of a highly conserved cytoplasmic motif rendered CCR5 incapable of signaling but did not abrogate its ability to function as a coreceptor, implying the independence of fusion and G-protein-mediated chemokine receptor signaling. Finally, we developed a novel monoclonal antibody to CCR5 to assist in future studies of CCR5 expression. PMID:9261347

  11. Circadian rhythms of circulating NK cells in healthy and human immunodeficiency virus-infected men.

    PubMed

    Bourin, P; Mansour, I; Doinel, C; Roué, R; Rouger, P; Levi, F

    1993-08-01

    Antiviral immunity involves NK cells, which circulate rhythmically every 24 hours. We have investigated circadian and 12-hour rhythms in the peripheral count of circulating NK cells in 15 men infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and 13 healthy controls. We analyzed three phenotypes using double-labeling with monoclonal antibodies and flow cytometry assessment: CD3- CD16+, CD3-CD57+, and CD2+CD3-. A statistical validation of time-dependent differences was achieved if significance (p < 0.05) was validated both with analysis of variance and cosinor. The circadian rhythm had a similar asymmetric waveform for the three phenotypes and is homogeneous on an individual basis. The circulating NK cell count peaked in the early morning and was low at night. A circadian rhythm and a circahemidian harmonic characterized all phenotypes in healthy subjects. We considered two groups of HIV-infected men: those who were asymptomatic (eight) and those with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) (seven). Circadian changes in NK cell count were similar in both subgroups and in healthy controls. The circadian pattern was also consistent among individual patients. Asymptomatic HIV-infected men (early-stage disease) exhibited more pronounced 12-hour rhythmicity than did patients with AIDS or controls. The circulation of NK cells does not appear to share the same synchronizer(s) as other circulating T- or B-lymphocyte subsets. Thus, HIV infection gradually abolished circadian rhythmicity in circulating T and B cells, whereas it did not disturb that in NK cells.

  12. Barriers to human immunodeficiency virus related risk reduction among male street prostitutes.

    PubMed

    Simon, P M; Morse, E V; Balson, P M; Osofsky, H J; Gaumer, H R

    1993-01-01

    Two hundred eleven male street prostitutes between the ages of 18 and 51 years were interviewed and tested for antibodies to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Economic, social, and emotional barriers to the reduction of HIV-related risk behavior were examined within the context of several concepts present in the Health Belief Model (HBM). Three lifestyle factors were found to function as barriers to engaging in risk reduction behavior. Subjects who were more economically dependent on prostitution, perceived less control over the hustling encounter, and reported increased pleasure from sexual activity with their customers were more likely to engage in risk-taking behavior. Prostitutes' perception of the severity of HIV infection was not significantly associated with their risk behavior. Unexpected findings indicated that increases in perceived susceptibility to HIV and perceived benefit of condom use for HIV prevention were significantly related to increased risk-taking behavior. Practical applications of findings in the design and implementation of future HIV-related preventive health education programs are discussed. PMID:8491637

  13. Viral multiplicity of attachment and its implications for human immunodeficiency virus therapies.

    PubMed Central

    Spouge, J L

    1994-01-01

    The multiplicity of attachment (MOA) of a virion in any particular time interval is the average number of cellular attachment opportunities that must be blocked to keep the virion in suspension. MOA is usually proportional to incubation time and cell concentration. Low MOA (like low multiplicity of infection) is required for reproducible assay of adsorptive blockers, and high MOA by itself can produce spurious synergies between adsorptive blockers, e.g., soluble CD4 (sCD4) and some antibodies. Poliovirus and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) data show that viral neutralization conforms quantitatively to MOA and kinetic theory over large ranges of incubation times and target cell concentrations. Extrapolating sCD4 data beyond conditions achievable in vitro to those in vivo predicts that sCD4 concentrations above the strain-specific sCD4-gp120 dissociation constant are required to block lymphoid HIV significantly, in at least semiquantitative agreement with clinical results. The extrapolation is applicable to humoral neutralization data as well. MOA analysis also indicates that although completely stopping the attachment of individual virions to cells may still be an effective therapeutic strategy against established HIV infection, merely retarding attachment probably is not. The concept of MOA holds great promise for improving the therapeutic relevance of in vitro data and can be applied to any infectious agent, to many processes that impair or enhance infection steps, and to many assay end points, not just infection. PMID:8107240

  14. Feline immunodeficiency virus and puma lentivirus in Florida panthers (Puma concolor coryi): epidemiology and diagnostic issues.

    PubMed

    Miller, D L; Taylor, S K; Rotstein, D S; Pough, M B; Barr, M C; Baldwin, C A; Cunningham, M; Roelke, M; Ingram, D

    2006-04-01

    This study documents the seroprevalence of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and puma lentivirus (PLV) in free-ranging and captive Florida panthers (Puma concolor coryi) (n = 51) and translocated Texas cougars (P. concolor stanleyana) (n = 10) from 1985 to 1998. The sera were tested for anti-FIV antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blot tests. The ELISAs were read kinetically (KELA) and the sera were retrospectively examined by PLV peptide ELISA. Eleven panthers and one cougar were positive by KELA; 4 panthers and 4 cougars were equivocal; 35 panthers and 5 cougars were negative; and 1 panther had no data. Seven of the 11 KELA-positive panthers were also positive by Western blot tests and all but one were positive by PLV peptide ELISA. Ten KELA-negative and Western blot-negative cats, were positive by PLV peptide ELISA. KELA results varied within cats from one sample period to the next, but PLV peptide ELISA results were consistent. Territorial sympatry and mating behaviour, noted from radiotelemetry location data on the cats, may have contributed to viral transmission between seropositive animals. These findings suggest that Florida panthers and the introduced Texas cougars have been exposed to FIV and/or PLV.

  15. Prevention of immunodeficiency virus induced CD4+ T-cell depletion by prior infection with a non-pathogenic virus

    SciTech Connect

    TerWee, Julie A.; Carlson, Jennifer K.; Sprague, Wendy S.; Sondgeroth, Kerry S.; Shropshire, Sarah B.; Troyer, Jennifer L.; VandeWoude, Sue

    2008-07-20

    Immune dysregulation initiated by a profound loss of CD4+ T-cells is fundamental to HIV-induced pathogenesis. Infection of domestic cats with a non-pathogenic lentivirus prevalent in the puma (puma lentivirus, PLV or FIV{sub PCO}) prevented peripheral blood CD4+ T-cell depletion caused by subsequent virulent FIV infection. Maintenance of this critical population was not associated with a significant decrease in FIV viremia, lending support to the hypothesis that direct viral cytopathic effect is not the primary cause of immunodeficiency. Although this approach was analogous to immunization with a modified live vaccine, correlates of immunity such as a serum-neutralizing antibody or virus-specific T-cell proliferative response were not found in protected animals. Differences in cytokine transcription profile, most notably in interferon gamma, were observed between the protected and unprotected groups. These data provide support for the importance of non-adaptive enhancement of the immune response in the prevention of CD4+ T-cell loss.

  16. Neutralizing Polyclonal IgG Present during Acute Infection Prevents Rapid Disease Onset in Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus SHIVSF162P3-Infected Infant Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Jaworski, J. Pablo; Kobie, James; Brower, Zachary; Malherbe, Delphine C.; Landucci, Gary; Sutton, William F.; Guo, Biwei; Reed, Jason S.; Leon, Enrique J.; Engelmann, Flora; Zheng, Bo; Legasse, Al; Park, Byung; Dickerson, Mary; Lewis, Anne D.; Colgin, Lois M. A.; Axthelm, Michael; Messaoudi, Ilhem; Sacha, Jonah B.; Burton, Dennis R.; Forthal, Donald N.; Hessell, Ann J.

    2013-01-01

    Simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) models for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection have been widely used in passive studies with HIV neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) to test for protection against infection. However, because SHIV-infected adult macaques often rapidly control plasma viremia and any resulting pathogenesis is minor, the model has been unsuitable for studying the impact of antibodies on pathogenesis in infected animals. We found that SHIVSF162P3 infection in 1-month-old rhesus macaques not only results in high persistent plasma viremia but also leads to very rapid disease progression within 12 to 16 weeks. In this model, passive transfer of high doses of neutralizing IgG (SHIVIG) prevents infection. Here, we show that at lower doses, SHIVIG reduces both plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-associated viremia and mitigates pathogenesis in infected animals. Moreover, production of endogenous NAbs correlated with lower set-point viremia and 100% survival of infected animals. New SHIV models are needed to investigate whether passively transferred antibodies or antibodies elicited by vaccination that fall short of providing sterilizing immunity impact disease progression or influence immune responses. The 1-month-old rhesus macaque SHIV model of infection provides a new tool to investigate the effects of antibodies on viral replication and clearance, mechanisms of B cell maintenance, and the induction of adaptive immunity in disease progression. PMID:23885083

  17. Role of CD4 epitopes outside the gp120-binding site during entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, J H; Stumbles, P; Signoret, N; Somoza, C; Puklavec, M; Sattentau, Q J; Barclay, A N; James, W

    1997-01-01

    CD4 is the primary receptor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The binding site for the surface glycoprotein of HIV type 1 (HIV-1), gp120, has been mapped to the C'-C" region of domain 1 of CD4. Previously, we have shown that a mutant of rat CD4, in which this region was exchanged for that of human CD4, is able to mediate infection of human cells by HIV-1, suggesting that essential interactions between HIV and CD4 are confined to this region. Our observations appeared to conflict with mutagenesis and antibody studies which implicate regions of CD4 outside the gp120-binding site in postbinding events during viral entry. In order to resolve this issue, we have utilized a panel of anti-rat CD4 monoclonal antibodies in conjunction with the rat-human chimeric CD4 to distinguish sequence-specific from steric effects. We find that several antibodies to rat CD4 inhibit HIV infection in cells expressing the chimeric CD4 and that this is probably due to steric hinderance. In addition, we demonstrate that replacement of the rat CDR3-like region with its human homolog does not increase the affinity of the rat-human chimeric CD4 for gp120 or affect the exposure of gp41 following binding to CD4, providing further evidence that this region does not play a crucial role during entry of virus. PMID:8995673

  18. Role of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus in Lymphomagenesis--Going Alone or Colluding?

    PubMed

    Kaye, Sarah; Wang, Wenqi; Miller, Craig; McLuckie, Alicia; Beatty, Julia A; Grant, Chris K; VandeWoude, Sue; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle

    2016-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a naturally occurring lentivirus of domestic and nondomestic feline species. Infection in domestic cats leads to immune dysfunction via mechanisms similar to those caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and, as such, is a valuable natural animal model for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in humans. An association between FIV and an increased incidence of neoplasia has long been recognized, with frequencies of up to 20% in FIV-positive cats recorded in some studies. This is similar to the rate of neoplasia seen in HIV-positive individuals, and in both species neoplasia typically requires several years to arise. The most frequently reported type of neoplasia associated with FIV infection is lymphoma. Here we review the possible mechanisms involved in FIV lymphomagenesis, including the possible involvement of coinfections, notably those with gamma-herpesviruses.

  19. Kinetics and inhibition of reverse transcriptase from human and simian immunodeficiency viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, J C; Chernow, M; Boehme, R E; Suttmann, R T; McRoberts, M J; Prisbe, E J; Matthews, T R; Marx, P A; Chuang, R Y; Chen, M S

    1988-01-01

    Reverse transcriptase from the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) was found to have kinetic behavior similar to that of enzyme from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Michaelis constants for the substrates TTP and dGTP and inhibition constants for the inhibitors 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine 5'-triphosphate, 2',3'-dideoxythymidine 5'-triphosphate, and 2'-3'-dideoxyguanosine 5'-triphosphate were obtained for SIV reverse transcriptase and were found to be similar to the corresponding values for HIV reverse transcriptase. Thus, the interaction of SIV reverse transcriptase with nucleotide analogs appears to be indistinguishable from that of the HIV enzyme, suggesting that SIV/simian acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (SAIDS) is a potentially good model of AIDS. PMID:2469388

  20. Pregnancy and Human Herpesvirus 8 Reactivation in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Infected Women▿

    PubMed Central

    Lisco, Andrea; Barbierato, Massimo; Fiore, Josè R.; Gasperini, Paola ; Favia, Anna; Volpe, Anna; Chironna, Maria; Pastore, Giuseppe; Chieco-Bianchi, Luigi; Calabrò, Maria Luisa

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the impact of pregnancy on human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) reactivation in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected women, the HHV-8 DNA presence and load were analyzed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and cervicovaginal secretions (CVSs) from 15 pregnant women coinfected with HIV-1 and HHV-8. HHV-8 detection was analyzed in relation to anti-HHV-8 antibodies and HIV-1-related parameters. Nucleotide sequence analysis of an ORFK1 hypervariable region of the HHV-8 strains was performed. HHV-8 was detected in maternal PBMCs (5/15 women) from the second trimester and in CVSs (5/15 women) mainly from the third trimester. The HHV-8 load significantly increased late in pregnancy in both maternal compartments and was associated with a significant increase in HIV-1 shedding in the genital tract. Antilytic antibodies were significantly more common in HHV-8 DNA-positive women. An elevated HHV-8 load was found in the PBMCs of an infant born to a mother with large amounts of HHV-8 in both compartments at delivery. Different ORFK1 subtypes were found in maternal samples, whereas the same subtype was identified in the mother-child pair. These data suggest that pregnancy may induce HHV-8 replication in HIV-1-infected women. An augmented HHV-8 load may, in turn, influence mother-to-child transmission, since one of the HIV-1-infected mothers with HHV-8 reactivation transmitted her ORFK1 subtype to the infant, who showed a high level of HHV-8 viremia indicative of a primary infection. This finding documents for the first time the perinatal transmission of a specific HHV-8 subtype. Vertical transmission may thus play a role in HHV-8 spread also in areas of subendemicity among HIV-1-infected women. PMID:16943357

  1. Intracellular proteins of feline immunodeficiency virus and their antigenic relationship with equine infectious anaemia virus proteins.

    PubMed

    Egberink, H F; Ederveen, J; Montelaro, R C; Pedersen, N C; Horzinek, M C; Koolen, M J

    1990-03-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) grown in cat lymphocyte and thymocyte cultures was labelled with L-[35S]methionine or [3H]glucosamine and virus-coded proteins were identified using immunoprecipitation. Polypeptides with apparent Mr values of 15K, 24K, 43K, 50K, 120K and 160K were detected. An additional polypeptide of 10K was detected by Western blot analysis. The two highest Mr species sometimes appeared as one band, of which only the 120K polypeptide was glycosylated. In the presence of tunicamycin gp120 was no longer detectable and a non-glycosylated precursor of 75K was found instead. Pulse-chase experiments suggested that the smaller polypeptides p24 and p15 are cleavage products of both p160 and p50. Western blot analysis using a rabbit serum directed against p26 of equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV) and an anti-EIAV horse serum from a field case of infection revealed a cross-reactivity with p24 of FIV. Cat sera collected late after experimental FIV infection recognized p26 of EIAV, indicating a reciprocal cross-reactivity. PMID:1690264

  2. Identification and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection of CD1d-Restricted Macaque Natural Killer T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Motsinger, Alison; Azimzadeh, Agnes; Stanic, Aleksandar K.; Johnson, R. Paul; Van Kaer, Luc; Joyce, Sebastian; Unutmaz, Derya

    2003-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells express a highly conserved T-cell receptor (TCR) and recognize glycolipids in the context of CD1d molecules. We recently demonstrated that CD4+ NKT cells are highly susceptible to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection and are selectively depleted in HIV-infected individuals. Here, we identified macaque NKT cells using CD1d tetramers and human Vα24 antibodies. Similar to human NKT cells, α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer)-pulsed dendritic cells activate and expand macaque NKT cells. Upon restimulation with α-GalCer-pulsed CD1d+ cells, macaque NKT cells secreted high levels of cytokines, a characteristic of these T cells. Remarkably, the majority of resting and activated macaque NKT cells expressed CD8, and a smaller portion expressed CD4. Macaque NKT cells also expressed the HIV-1/simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) coreceptor CCR5, and the CD4+ subset was susceptible to SIV infection. Identification of macaque NKT cells has major implications for delineating the role of these cells in nonhuman primate disease models of HIV as well as other pathological conditions, such as allograft rejection and autoimmunity. PMID:12829854

  3. Seroprevalence of Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C and Human Immunodeficiency Viruses among Thalassemia Patients in West North of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Valizadeh, N; Noroozi, M; Hejazi, S; Nateghi, Sh; Hashemi, A

    2015-01-01

    Background Thalassemia patients that are conventionally treated by a regular transfusion regimen are exposed to blood born viral infections.The aim of this study was to investigate the seroprevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among all multitransfused thalassemia patients in west north of Iran. Material and Methods A retrospective study was conducted in February 2014, on 32 patients in Urmia, suffering from transfusion dependent thalassemia were admitted to Motahari and Emam Khomeini hospitals. Patients’ medical records were studied for HBs antigen and seropositivity for HCV, and HIV antibodies. Results Out of 32transfusion dependent thalassemia patients aged between 5-17years, 18 (56.25%) and14 (43.75%) were male and female, respectively. All of them were found seronegative for HBs antigen, HCV, and HIV antibodies. Conclusion It seems that screening of blood products is efficient in Urmia, capital of West Azarbaijan, Iran for prevention of blood born viral infections. PMID:26705453

  4. Platelet activation and platelet-monocyte aggregate formation contribute to decreased platelet count during acute simian immunodeficiency virus infection in pig-tailed macaques.

    PubMed

    Metcalf Pate, Kelly A; Lyons, Claire E; Dorsey, Jamie L; Shirk, Erin N; Queen, Suzanne E; Adams, Robert J; Gama, Lucio; Morrell, Craig N; Mankowski, Joseph L

    2013-09-01

    Platelets are key participants in innate immune responses to pathogens. As a decrease in circulating platelet count is one of the initial hematologic indicators of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, we sought to determine whether decline in platelet number during acute infection results from decreased production, increased antibody-mediated destruction, or increased platelet activation in a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)/macaque model. During acute SIV infection, circulating platelets were activated with increased surface expression of P-selection, CD40L and major histocompatibility complex class I. Platelet production was maintained and platelet autoantibodies were not detected during acute infection. Concurrent with a decrease in platelet numbers and an increase in circulating monocytes, platelets were found sequestered in platelet-monocyte aggregates, thereby contributing to the decline in platelet counts. Because the majority of circulating CD16(+) monocytes formed complexes with platelets during acute SIV infection, a decreased platelet count may represent platelet participation in the innate immune response to HIV.

  5. Feline leukemia virus and feline immunodeficiency virus infections in a cat with lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Shelton, G H; McKim, K D; Cooley, P L; Dice, P F; Russell, R G; Grant, C K

    1989-01-15

    Lymphoma was diagnosed in a 7-year-old domestic cat found to be infected with FeLV and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). The cat was affected by chronic disorders suggestive of immunosuppression, including gingivitis, periodontitis, keratitis, and abscesses. Despite treatment, peripheral keratitis of the left eye progressed, resulting in uveitis, chronic glaucoma, and eventual corneal rupture. Microscopic retinal and optic disk pathologic processes also were suspected. Abnormal jaw movements that were believed to be indicative of neurologic disease were observed. Approximately 17 months later, the cat developed generalized lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and bilateral renomegaly. Lymphoblastic lymphoma and glomerulonephritis were diagnosed histologically. Manganese- and magnesium-dependent reverse transcriptase activity were detected in supernatants from lymph node and spleen mononuclear cell cultures, suggesting T-lymphocyte infection with FeLV and FIV. PMID:2537274

  6. Acute Effects of Pathogenic Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Challenge on Vaccine-Induced Cellular and Humoral Immune Responses to Gag in Rhesus Macaques†

    PubMed Central

    Steger, Krista K.; Waterman, Paul M.; Pauza, C. David

    1999-01-01

    Simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) infection in macaques provides a convenient model for testing vaccine efficacy and for understanding viral pathogenesis in AIDS. We immunized macaques with recombinant, Salmonella typhimurium (expressing Gag) or soluble Gag in adjuvant to generate T-cell-dependent lymphoproliferative or serum antibody responses. Immunized animals were challenged by intrarectal inoculation with SHIV89.6PD. Virus infection was accompanied by rapid losses of lymphoproliferative responses to Gag or phytohemagglutinin. By 8 weeks, mitogen responses recovered to near normal levels but antigen-specific immunity remained at low or undetectable levels. Serum antibody levels were elevated initially by virus exposure but soon dropped well below levels achieved by immunization. Our studies show a rapid depletion of preexisting Gag-specific CD4+ T cells that prevent or limit subsequent antiviral cellular and humoral immune responses during acute SHIV infection. PMID:9971763

  7. Hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus and human immunodeficiency virus infection in undocumented migrants and refugees in southern Italy, January 2012 to June 2013.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Nicola; Alessio, Loredana; Gualdieri, Luciano; Pisaturo, Mariantonietta; Sagnelli, Caterina; Caprio, Nunzio; Maffei, Rita; Starace, Mario; Angelillo, Italo Francesco; Pasquale, Giuseppe; Sagnelli, Evangelista

    2015-01-01

    Screening of undocumented migrants or refugees for hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections has been offered free of charge and free from bureaucratic procedures since 2012 at four primary-level clinical centres in Naples and Caserta, Italy. Of 926 undocumented migrants and refugees visiting one of the primary-level clinical centres from January 2012 to June 2013, 882 (95%) were screened for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), total hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc) and antibodies against HCV and HIV. Of the 882 individuals enrolled, 78 (9%) were HBsAg positive, 35 (4%) anti-HCV positive and 11 (1%) anti-HIV positive (single infections); seven (1%) had more than one infection (three were HBsAg positive). Of the 801 HBsAg-negative patients, 373 (47%) were anti-HBc positive. The HBsAg-positivity rate was high (14%; 62/444) in individuals from sub-Saharan Africa and intermediate in those from eastern Europe (6%; 12/198), northern Africa (2%; 2/80) and Bangladesh, India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka (the 'India-Pakistan area') (3%; 4/126). Anti-HCV was detected in 9/126 (7%) individuals originating from the India-Pakistan area, in 12/198 (6%) from eastern Europe, in 17/444 (4%) from sub-Saharan and in 2/80 (2%) from northern Africa. The HBV, HCV and HIV infections in the undocumented migrants and refugees screened serve as a reminder to the Italian healthcare authorities to carry out extensive screening and educational programmes for these populations. PMID:26530499

  8. Hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus and human immunodeficiency virus infection in undocumented migrants and refugees in southern Italy, January 2012 to June 2013.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Nicola; Alessio, Loredana; Gualdieri, Luciano; Pisaturo, Mariantonietta; Sagnelli, Caterina; Caprio, Nunzio; Maffei, Rita; Starace, Mario; Angelillo, Italo Francesco; Pasquale, Giuseppe; Sagnelli, Evangelista

    2015-01-01

    Screening of undocumented migrants or refugees for hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections has been offered free of charge and free from bureaucratic procedures since 2012 at four primary-level clinical centres in Naples and Caserta, Italy. Of 926 undocumented migrants and refugees visiting one of the primary-level clinical centres from January 2012 to June 2013, 882 (95%) were screened for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), total hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc) and antibodies against HCV and HIV. Of the 882 individuals enrolled, 78 (9%) were HBsAg positive, 35 (4%) anti-HCV positive and 11 (1%) anti-HIV positive (single infections); seven (1%) had more than one infection (three were HBsAg positive). Of the 801 HBsAg-negative patients, 373 (47%) were anti-HBc positive. The HBsAg-positivity rate was high (14%; 62/444) in individuals from sub-Saharan Africa and intermediate in those from eastern Europe (6%; 12/198), northern Africa (2%; 2/80) and Bangladesh, India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka (the 'India-Pakistan area') (3%; 4/126). Anti-HCV was detected in 9/126 (7%) individuals originating from the India-Pakistan area, in 12/198 (6%) from eastern Europe, in 17/444 (4%) from sub-Saharan and in 2/80 (2%) from northern Africa. The HBV, HCV and HIV infections in the undocumented migrants and refugees screened serve as a reminder to the Italian healthcare authorities to carry out extensive screening and educational programmes for these populations.

  9. Human immunodeficiency virus contains an epitope immunoreactive with thymosin. cap alpha. /sub 1/ and the 30-amino acid synthetic p17 group-specific antigen peptide HGP-30

    SciTech Connect

    Naylor, P.H.; Naylor, C.W.; Badamchian, M.; Wada, S.; Goldstein, A.L.; Wang, S.S.; Sun, D.K.; Thornton, A.H.; Sarin, P.S.

    1987-05-01

    The authors have reported that an antiserum prepared against thymosin ..cap alpha../sub 1/ (which shares a region of homology with the p17 protein of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-associated human immunodeficiency virus) effectively neutralized the AIDs virus and prevented its replication in H9 cells. Using HPLC and immunoblot analysis, they have identified from a clone B, type III human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV-IIIB) extracts a protein with a molecular weight of 17,000 that is immunoreactive with thymosin ..cap alpha../sub 1/. In contrast, no immunoreactivity was found in retroviral extracts from a number of nonhuman species including feline, bovine, simian, gibbon, and murine retroviruses. Heterologous antiserum prepared against a 30-amino acid synthetic peptide analogue (HGP-30) does not cross-react with thymosin ..cap alpha../sub 1/ but does react specifically with the p17 protein of the AIDS virus in a manner identical to that seen with an HTLV-IIIB p17-specific monoclonal antibody. The demonstration that this synthetic analogue is immunogenic and that antibodies to HGP-30 cross-react not only with synthetic peptide but also with the HTLV-IIIB p17 viral protein provides an additional, and potentially more specific, candidate for development of a synthetic peptide vaccine for AIDS. In addition, the p17 synthetic peptide (HGP-3) may prove to be useful in a diagnostic assay for the detection of AIDS virus infection in seronegative individuals.

  10. Genetic and phylogenetic divergence of feline immunodeficiency virus in the puma (Puma concolor).

    PubMed

    Carpenter, M A; Brown, E W; Culver, M; Johnson, W E; Pecon-Slattery, J; Brousset, D; O'Brien, S J

    1996-10-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a lentivirus which causes an AIDS-like disease in domestic cats (Felis catus). A number of other felid species, including the puma (Puma concolor), carry a virus closely related to domestic cat FIV. Serological testing revealed the presence of antibodies to FIV in 22% of 434 samples from throughout the geographic range of the puma. FIV-Pco pol gene sequences isolated from pumas revealed extensive sequence diversity, greater than has been documented in the domestic cat. The puma sequences formed two highly divergent groups, analogous to the clades which have been defined for domestic cat and lion (Panthera leo) FIV. The puma clade A was made up of samples from Florida and California, whereas clade B consisted of samples from other parts of North America, Central America, and Brazil. The difference between these two groups was as great as that reported among three lion FIV clades. Within puma clades, sequence variation is large, comparable to between-clade differences seen for domestic cat clades, allowing recognition of 15 phylogenetic lineages (subclades) among puma FIV-Pco. Large sequence divergence among isolates, nearly complete species monophyly, and widespread geographic distribution suggest that FIV-Pco has evolved within the puma species for a long period. The sequence data provided evidence for vertical transmission of FIV-Pco from mothers to their kittens, for coinfection of individuals by two different viral strains, and for cross-species transmission of FIV from a domestic cat to a puma. These factors may all be important for understanding the epidemiology and natural history of FIV in the puma.

  11. Genetic and phylogenetic divergence of feline immunodeficiency virus in the puma (Puma concolor).

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, M A; Brown, E W; Culver, M; Johnson, W E; Pecon-Slattery, J; Brousset, D; O'Brien, S J

    1996-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a lentivirus which causes an AIDS-like disease in domestic cats (Felis catus). A number of other felid species, including the puma (Puma concolor), carry a virus closely related to domestic cat FIV. Serological testing revealed the presence of antibodies to FIV in 22% of 434 samples from throughout the geographic range of the puma. FIV-Pco pol gene sequences isolated from pumas revealed extensive sequence diversity, greater than has been documented in the domestic cat. The puma sequences formed two highly divergent groups, analogous to the clades which have been defined for domestic cat and lion (Panthera leo) FIV. The puma clade A was made up of samples from Florida and California, whereas clade B consisted of samples from other parts of North America, Central America, and Brazil. The difference between these two groups was as great as that reported among three lion FIV clades. Within puma clades, sequence variation is large, comparable to between-clade differences seen for domestic cat clades, allowing recognition of 15 phylogenetic lineages (subclades) among puma FIV-Pco. Large sequence divergence among isolates, nearly complete species monophyly, and widespread geographic distribution suggest that FIV-Pco has evolved within the puma species for a long period. The sequence data provided evidence for vertical transmission of FIV-Pco from mothers to their kittens, for coinfection of individuals by two different viral strains, and for cross-species transmission of FIV from a domestic cat to a puma. These factors may all be important for understanding the epidemiology and natural history of FIV in the puma. PMID:8794304

  12. The protective rate of the feline immunodeficiency virus vaccine: An Australian field study.

    PubMed

    Westman, M E; Malik, R; Hall, E; Harris, M; Norris, J M

    2016-09-01

    A case-control field study was undertaken to determine the level of protection conferred to client-owned cats in Australia against feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) using a commercial vaccine. 440 cats with outdoor access from five Australian states/territories underwent testing, comprising 139 potential cases (complete course of primary FIV vaccinations and annual boosters for three or more years), and 301 potential controls (age, sex and postcode matched FIV-unvaccinated cats). FIV status was determined using a combination of antibody testing (using point-of-care test kits) and nucleic acid amplification, as well as virus isolation in cases where results were discordant and in all suspected FIV-vaccinated/FIV-infected cats ('vaccine breakthroughs'). Stringent inclusion criteria were applied to both 'cases' and 'controls'; 89 FIV-vaccinated cats and 212 FIV-unvaccinated cats ultimately satisfied the inclusion criteria. Five vaccine breakthroughs (5/89; 6%), and 25 FIV-infected controls (25/212; 12%) were identified, giving a vaccine protective rate of 56% (95% CI -20 to 84). The difference in FIV prevalence rates between the two groups was not significant (P=0.14). Findings from this study raise doubt concerning the efficacy of Fel-O-Vax FIV® under field conditions. Screening for FIV infection may be prudent before annual FIV re-vaccination and for sick FIV-vaccinated cats. Owners should not rely on vaccination alone to protect cats against the risk of acquiring FIV infection; other measures such as cat curfews, the use of 'modular pet parks' or keeping cats exclusively indoors, are recommended. PMID:27522177

  13. Serotyping of primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates from diverse geographic locations by flow cytometry.

    PubMed Central

    Zolla-Pazner, S; O'Leary, J; Burda, S; Gorny, M K; Kim, M; Mascola, J; McCutchan, F

    1995-01-01

    The immunologic relatedness of the various human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) clades was determined with 13 human anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to six immunogenic regions of the HIV-1 structural proteins. The immunoreactivity of the native, oligomeric viral envelope glycoproteins expressed on the surfaces of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells infected in vitro with primary isolates from clades A through E was determined by flow cytometry. Some epitopes in the immunodominant region of gp41 and the C terminus of gp120 appear to be HIV-1 group specific in that they are expressed on the surfaces of cells in cultures infected with the majority of viruses tested from clades A to E. Epitopes within the V3 region appear to be clade restricted. Surprisingly, one MAb to an epitope in the C terminus of gp120 was entirely clade B specific. Staining with anti-V2 and anti-CD4 binding domain (CD4bd) reagents was infrequently detected. Anti-CD4bd MAbs stained only CD4-negative T cells because the CD4bd of gp120 appeared to be complexed with membrane CD4. When present, the epitopes of V2 and the CD4bd appeared to be expressed on cells infected with various clades. Thus, the results suggest that MAbs to gp41, the C terminus, and the V3 loop of gp120 are most useful in serotyping primary isolates of HIV-1, providing group-specific, clade-restricted, and clade-specific reagents. The use of the immunofluorescent method with the reagents described herein distinguishes infection with clade B from that with all other HIV-1 clades. With additional MAbs, this technique will allow a broadly applicable, reproducible, and practical method for serotyping HIV-1. PMID:7745728

  14. Statin Effects to Reduce Hepatosteatosis as Measured by Computed Tomography in Patients With Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Janet; Lu, Michael T.; Kim, Elli A.; Nou, Eric; Hallett, Travis R.; Park, Jakob; Hoffmann, Udo; Grinspoon, Steven K.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatosteatosis is highly prevalent among patients living with human immunodeficiency virus. In a 1-year, randomized, double-blind trial of atorvastatin or placebo, atorvastatin increased liver/spleen ratio among patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, indicating a reduction in hepatosteatosis. This reduction in hepatosteatosis is associated with reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol with statin therapy. PMID:27419149

  15. Evaluation of Serum Creatinine Changes With Integrase Inhibitor Use in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lindeman, Tara A.; Duggan, Joan M.; Sahloff, Eric G.

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective chart review evaluated changes in serum creatinine and creatinine clearance (CrCl) after initiation of an integrase inhibitor (INSTI)-based regimen as initial treatment in human immunodeficiency virus-infected adults. Serum creatinine and CrCl changes were similar to those seen in clinical trials for INSTIs. No renal-related serious adverse events or discontinuations occurred. PMID:27092314

  16. Case Study: Delirium in an Adolescent Girl with Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharko, Alexander M.; Baker, Eva H.; Kothari, Priti; Khattak, Hina; Lancaster, Duniya

    2006-01-01

    Delirium and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated dementia are well recognized neuropsychiatric consequences of HIV infection in adults. Almost nothing is known regarding the management of delirium in HIV-infected children and adolescents. HIV-related progressive encephalopathy is thought to represent the pediatric form of HIV-associated…

  17. Prevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Testing and Associated Risk Factors in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennison, Olivia; Wu, Qishan; Ickes, Melinda

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study documents the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing in a sample of college students and examines associated demographic and behavioral characteristics. Participants: College students aged 18 or older were randomly selected to participate in a health behavior survey at a southeastern university in September…

  18. Association of human immunodeficiency virus-induced immunosuppression with human papillomavirus infection and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Henry, M J; Stanley, M W; Cruikshank, S; Carson, L

    1989-02-01

    Human papillomavirus infection plays an important causal role in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and carcinoma. The rate of infection with human papillomavirus as well as the incidence of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and carcinoma are increased in immunosuppressed patients. We report a possible association between infection with human immunodeficiency virus and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia with human papillomavirus infection.

  19. Statin Effects to Reduce Hepatosteatosis as Measured by Computed Tomography in Patients With Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    PubMed

    Lo, Janet; Lu, Michael T; Kim, Elli A; Nou, Eric; Hallett, Travis R; Park, Jakob; Hoffmann, Udo; Grinspoon, Steven K

    2016-04-01

    Hepatosteatosis is highly prevalent among patients living with human immunodeficiency virus. In a 1-year, randomized, double-blind trial of atorvastatin or placebo, atorvastatin increased liver/spleen ratio among patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, indicating a reduction in hepatosteatosis. This reduction in hepatosteatosis is associated with reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol with statin therapy. PMID:27419149

  20. In Vivo Replication Capacity Rather Than In Vitro Macrophage Tropism Predicts Efficiency of Vaginal Transmission of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus or Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Christopher J.; Marthas, Marta; Greenier, Jennifer; Lu, Ding; Dailey, Peter J.; Lu, Yichen

    1998-01-01

    We used the rhesus macaque model of heterosexual human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission to test the hypothesis that in vitro measures of macrophage tropism predict the ability of a primate lentivirus to initiate a systemic infection after intravaginal inoculation. A single atraumatic intravaginal inoculation with a T-cell-tropic molecular clone of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), SIVmac239, or a dualtropic recombinant molecular clone of SIV, SIVmac239/1A11/239, or uncloned dualtropic SIVmac251 or uncloned dualtropic simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) 89.6-PD produced systemic infection in all rhesus macaques tested. However, vaginal inoculation with a dualtropic molecular clone of SIV, SIVmac1A11, resulted in transient viremia in one of two rhesus macaques. It has previously been shown that 12 intravaginal inoculations with SIVmac1A11 resulted in infection of one of five rhesus macaques (M. L. Marthas, C. J. Miller, S. Sutjipto, J. Higgins, J. Torten, B. L. Lohman, R. E. Unger, H. Kiyono, J. R. McGhee, P. A. Marx, and N. C. Pedersen, J. Med. Primatol. 21:99–107, 1992). In addition, SHIV HXBc2, which replicates in monkey macrophages, does not infect rhesus macaques following multiple vaginal inoculations, while T-cell-tropic SHIV 89.6 does (Y. Lu, P. B. Brosio, M. Lafaile, J. Li, R. G. Collman, J. Sodroski, and C. J. Miller, J. Virol. 70:3045–3050, 1996). These results demonstrate that in vitro measures of macrophage tropism do not predict if a SIV or SHIV will produce systemic infection after intravaginal inoculation of rhesus macaques. However, we did find that the level to which these viruses replicate in vivo after intravenous inoculation predicts the outcome of intravaginal inoculation with each virus. PMID:9525652

  1. Replication-Competent Rhabdoviruses with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Coats and Green Fluorescent Protein: Entry by a pH-Independent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Boritz, Eli; Gerlach, Jennifer; Johnson, J. Erik; Rose, John K.

    1999-01-01

    We describe a replication-competent, recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) in which the gene encoding the single transmembrane glycoprotein (G) was deleted and replaced by an env-G hybrid gene encoding the extracellular and transmembrane domains of a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope protein fused to the cytoplasmic domain of VSV G. An additional gene encoding a green fluorescent protein was added to permit rapid detection of infection. This novel surrogate virus infected and propagated on cells expressing the HIV receptor CD4 and coreceptor CXCR4. Infection was blocked by SDF-1, the ligand for CXCR4, by antibody to CD4 and by HIV-neutralizing antibody. This virus, unlike VSV, entered cells by a pH-independent pathway and thus supports a pH-independent pathway of HIV entry. Additional recombinants carrying hybrid env-G genes derived from R5 or X4R5 HIV strains also showed the coreceptor specificities of the HIV strains from which they were derived. These surrogate viruses provide a simple and rapid assay for HIV-neutralizing antibodies as well as a rapid screen for molecules that would interfere with any stage of HIV binding or entry. The viruses might also be useful as HIV vaccines. Our results suggest wide applications of other surrogate viruses based on VSV. PMID:10400792

  2. Amelioration of established Sendai viral pneumonia in the nude mouse using a monoclonal antibody to the virus fusion protein.

    PubMed Central

    Carthew, P.; Riley, J.; Dinsdale, D.

    1989-01-01

    The pathological effect of parainfluenza type I (Sendai virus) is known to be a bronchopneumonia, which becomes a chronic pneumonia in the immunodeficient athymic (nude) mouse. The severity of this established chronic pneumonia can be dramatically altered by providing the nude mouse with humoral monoclonal antibodies which are neutralizing, and are directed against the fusion protein, of the virus. The alveolitis, which is a significant part of the pathology, is suppressed due to a reduction (greater than 90%) in the number of virus-infected alveolar macrophages present in the alveoli. This clearly identifies the infected alveolar macrophage as the primary effector cell in the pathogenesis of alveolitis caused by parainfluenza virus type I. The implications of using virus-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies, which have little immunomodulatory toxicity, in the treatment of viral pneumonias are discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:2557882

  3. Epidemiological profiles of human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus infections in Malian women: Risk factors and relevance of disparities

    PubMed Central

    Bouare, Nouhoum; Gothot, Andre; Delwaide, Jean; Bontems, Sebastien; Vaira, Dolores; Seidel, Laurence; Gerard, Paul; Gerard, Christiane

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To document the epidemiologic patterns and risk factors of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections in Mali in order to develop prevention means for both diseases. METHODS: Two prospective studies were conducted in Bamako in 2009 among 1000 pregnant women (i.e., young women) who consulted six reference health centers, and in 2010, among 231 older women who attended general practice in two hospitals. Antibody tests and molecular analysis (performed only for HCV) were used to quantify the frequencies of both infections. The data were collected from patients recruited through a questionnaire. Transmission risk factors of both diseases were identified by univariate and multivariate analysis. RESULTS: HCV seroprevalence was 0.2% for young and 6.5% for older women. HIV prevalence was similar in both populations (4.1% vs 6.1%). In older women, the analysis of risk factors highlighted an association between HCV infection and episodes of hospitalization (P < 0.01). The study did not show an association between HIV infection and the variables such as hospitalization, transfusion, tattoo, dental care, and endoscopy. A significant decrease of HIV seroprevalence was detected in young women who used condoms for contraception more than for other purposes (P < 0.01). By contrast, HIV seroprevalence was significantly increased in young women using condoms mainly to prevent sexual infections rather than for contraception (P < 0.01). No HCV/HIV coinfection was detected in our study. CONCLUSION: Risk factors and epidemiologic data of HIV and HCV as well as the absence of co-infection strongly suggest epidemiological disparities between these diseases. PMID:23671724

  4. Envelope-specific B-cell populations in African green monkeys chronically infected with simian immunodeficiency virus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ruijun; Martinez, David R.; Nguyen, Quang N.; Pollara, Justin; Arifin, Trina; Stolarchuk, Christina; Foulger, Andrew; Amos, Josh D.; Parks, Robert; Himes, Jonathon E.; Wang, Minyue; Edwards, Regina W.; Trama, Ashley M.; Vandergrift, Nathan; Colvin, Lisa; Dewar, Ken; Juretic, Nikoleta; Wasserscheid, Jessica; Ferrari, Guido; Liao, Hua-Xin; Permar, Sallie R.

    2016-01-01

    African green monkeys (AGMs) are natural primate hosts of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). Interestingly, features of the envelope-specific antibody responses in SIV-infected AGMs are distinct from that of HIV-infected humans and SIV-infected rhesus monkeys, including gp120-focused responses and rapid development of autologous neutralization. Yet, the lack of genetic tools to evaluate B-cell lineages hinders potential use of this unique non-human primate model for HIV vaccine development. Here we define features of the AGM Ig loci and compare the proportion of Env-specific memory B-cell populations to that of HIV-infected humans and SIV-infected rhesus monkeys. AGMs appear to have a higher proportion of Env-specific memory B cells that are mainly gp120 directed. Furthermore, AGM gp120-specific monoclonal antibodies display robust antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and CD4-dependent virion capture activity. Our results support the use of AGMs to model induction of functional gp120-specific antibodies by HIV vaccine strategies. PMID:27381634

  5. Modelling Virus and Antibody Dynamics during Dengue Virus Infection Suggests a Role for Antibody in Virus Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Clapham, Hannah E; Dorigatti, Ilaria; Simmons, Cameron P; Ferguson, Neil M

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is an infection of increasing global importance, yet uncertainty remains regarding critical aspects of its virology, immunology and epidemiology. One unanswered question is how infection is controlled and cleared during a dengue infection. Antibody is thought to play a role, but little past work has examined the kinetics of both virus and antibody during natural infections. We present data on multiple virus and antibody titres measurements recorded sequentially during infection from 53 Vietnamese dengue patients. We fit mechanistic mathematical models of the dynamics of viral replication and the host immune response to these data. These models fit the data well. The model with antibody removing virus fits the data best, but with a role suggested for ADCC or other infected cell clearance mechanisms. Our analysis therefore shows that the observed viral and antibody kinetics are consistent with antibody playing a key role in controlling viral replication. This work gives quantitative insight into the relationship between antibody levels and the efficiency of viral clearance. It will inform the future development of mechanistic models of how vaccines and antivirals might modify the course of natural dengue infection. PMID:27213681

  6. Frequent perinatal transmission of feline immunodeficiency virus by chronically infected cats.

    PubMed Central

    O'Neil, L L; Burkhard, M J; Hoover, E A

    1996-01-01

    Vertical transmission of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) was studied in cats infected with either of two FIV clinical isolates (FIV-B-2542 or FIV-AB-2771) prior to breeding and conception. Queens infected 4 to 30 months (mean = 14 months) prior to conception transmitted FIV to 59 of 83 (71%) kittens; 50.6% were virus positive on the day of birth. To examine potential routes of FIV transmission from mother to offspring, kittens were delivered via either vaginal or cesarean birth and nursed by either their virus-infected natural mothers or uninfected surrogate mothers. Comparison of FIV infection rates at birth with those at 6 months of age in kittens delivered by cesarean and surrogate raised demonstrated that late in utero transmission occurred in approximately 20% of kittens. Comparison of kittens nursed by FIV mothers with those by uninfected surrogate mothers demonstrated a 13.5% increase in infection rate of kittens exposed to milk-borne virus. Isolation of virus from 40% of maternal vaginal wash samples and the slightly greater infection rate in vaginally versus cesarean-delivered surrogate-nursed kittens suggested that intrapartum transmission may occur. In addition, we found that low maternal CD4 count (<200 cells per microl), longer duration of maternal infection (>15 months), and maternal symptoms of clinical immunodeficiency correlated with increased rates of mother-to-kitten FIV transmission, paralleling observations in human immunodeficiency virus-infected women. We conclude that FIV infection provides a model in which to explore aspects of human immunodeficiency virus vertical transmission and intervention difficult to address in human patients. PMID:8627764

  7. Efavirenz Therapy in Rhesus Macaques Infected with a Chimera of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Containing Reverse Transcriptase from Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Hofman, Michael J.; Higgins, Joanne; Matthews, Timothy B.; Pedersen, Niels C.; Tan, Chalet; Schinazi, Raymond F.; North, Thomas W.

    2004-01-01

    The specificity of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NNRTIs) for the RT of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has prevented the use of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in the study of NNRTIs and NNRTI-based highly active antiretroviral therapy. However, a SIV-HIV-1 chimera (RT-SHIV), in which the RT from SIVmac239 was replaced with the RT-encoding region from HIV-1, is susceptible to NNRTIs and is infectious to rhesus macaques. We have evaluated the antiviral activity of efavirenz against RT-SHIV and the emergence of efavirenz-resistant mutants in vitro and in vivo. RT-SHIV was susceptible to efavirenz with a mean effective concentration of 5.9 ± 4.5 nM, and RT-SHIV variants selected with efavirenz in cell culture displayed 600-fold-reduced susceptibility. The efavirenz-resistant mutants of RT-SHIV had mutations in RT similar to those of HIV-1 variants that were selected under similar conditions. Efavirenz monotherapy of RT-SHIV-infected macaques produced a 1.82-log-unit decrease in plasma viral-RNA levels after 1 week. The virus load rebounded within 3 weeks in one treated animal and more slowly in a second animal. Virus isolated from these two animals contained the K103N and Y188C or Y188L mutations. The RT-SHIV-rhesus macaque model may prove useful for studies of antiretroviral drug combinations that include efavirenz. PMID:15328115

  8. Detection of Schmallenberg virus serum neutralising antibodies.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Karen L; La Rocca, S Anna; Khatri, Meenakshi; Johnson, Nicholas; Steinbach, Falko; Fooks, Anthony R

    2013-03-01

    Schmallenberg virus (SBV) emerged in continental Europe in late 2011, and further work is required to assess the prevalence of SBV throughout Europe. Since its detection in Germany, SBV has now been detected in other European countries, including the United Kingdom. Infection with SBV can cause mild clinical signs in ruminants, including diarrhoea and reduced milk yield. However, the virus can have a devastating effect on the developing foetus leading to malformation in newborn offspring. This is a feature shared by other members of the Simbu group of orthobunyaviruses. Since disease in adult animals can be inapparent, serology offers the best method for monitoring for the presence of SBV and assisting in livestock management. This protocol describes a method for initial titration of SBV on African Green Monkey kidney (Vero) cells, and a plaque reduction neutralisation test (PRNT) for the detection of neutralising antibodies against SBV in cattle and sheep sera. This assay can be used to screen ruminant sera in order to confirm exposure to the virus, and the results obtained are comparable to a recently developed commercial enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Thus, these two assays constitute an effective diagnostic tool-box for providing confirmation of exposure to SBV.

  9. A constant threat for HIV: Fc-engineering to enhance broadly neutralizing antibody activity for immunotherapy of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nimmerjahn, Falk

    2015-08-01

    Passive immunotherapy with polyclonal or hyperimmune serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) preparations provides an efficient means of protecting immunocompromised patients from microbial infections. More recently, the use of passive immunotherapy to prevent or to treat established infections with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has gained much attention, due to promising preclinical data obtained in monkey and humanized mouse in vivo model systems, demonstrating that the transfer of HIV-specific antibodies can not only prevent HIV infection, but also diminish virus load during chronic infection. Furthermore, an array of broadly neutralizing HIV-specific antibodies has become available and the importance of the IgG constant region as a critical modulator of broadly neutralizing activity has been demonstrated. The aim of this review is to summarize the most recent findings with regard to the molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for antibody-mediated clearance of HIV infection, and to discuss how this may help to improve HIV therapy via optimizing Fcγ-receptor-dependent activities of HIV-specific antibodies.

  10. Prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus, hepatitis B virus and syphilis among individuals attending anonymous testing for HIV in Luanda, Angola.

    PubMed

    Guimarães Nebenzahl, H; Lopes, A; Castro, R; Pereira, F

    2013-01-24

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and syphilis remain major infections around the world. In Angola there are about 166 000 individuals living with HIV, representing a prevalence of 1.98% in adults between 15 and 49 years of age. In a 2003 study in Luanda, 4.5% of pregnant women had antibodies to HIV and 8.1% to HBV, and 5.4% were infected with Treponema pallidum. Objectives. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of HIV-1 and 2, HBV, HCV and T. pallidum serological markers, and hence the prevalence of these infections, in individuals attending a sexually transmitted disease clinic in Luanda, Angola, and the burden of these infections in the Angolan population. Methods. Individuals attending a centre for anonymous testing for HIV were randomly included in the study. All samples were tested for HBV surface antigen (HBsAg), anti-HCV and anti-HIV-1 and 2 antibodies and antibodies to T. pallidum. Results. A total of 431 individuals (262 women and 169 men) were studied, of whom 10.0% (43/431) were seropositive for T. pallidum and 4.6% had active syphilis; 8.8% (38/431) were seropositive for HIV-1 and/or HIV-2 (of these, 78.9% were HIV-1-positive, 2.6% HIV-2-positive and 18.4% co-infected); 9.3% (40/431) were HBsAg-positive, while 8.1% (35/431) had antibodies to HCV. Of 102 patients with positive results, 26 (25.5%, or 6.0% of the total of 431 patients) were positive for more than one of the organisms studied. Rates of co-infection were as follows: 2.3% (10/431) for HIV/HBV, 0.9% (4/431) for HIV/HCV, and 0.9% (4/431) for HCV/HBV. Three individuals with active syphilis had viral co-infection, hepatitis B in 1 case and HIV in 2. Five individuals (1.2% of the total) were seropositive for three infections, HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C in 3 cases and HIV, hepatitis C and syphilis in 2. Conclusions. A high prevalence of co-infection with the infections studied was found in this population, including HIV

  11. Recursion-based depletion of human immunodeficiency virus-specific naive CD4(+) T cells may facilitate persistent viral replication and chronic viraemia leading to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Tetsuo; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Okada, Seiji; Matano, Tetsuro

    2016-09-01

    Although antiretroviral therapy has made human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection a controllable disease, it is still unclear how viral replication persists in untreated patients and causes CD4(+) T-cell depletion leading to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in several years. Theorists tried to explain it with the diversity threshold theory in which accumulated mutations in the HIV genome make the virus so diverse that the immune system will no longer be able to recognize all the variants and fail to control the viraemia. Although the theory could apply to a number of cases, macaque AIDS models using simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) have shown that failed viral control at the set point is not always associated with T-cell escape mutations. Moreover, even monkeys without a protective major histocompatibility complex (MHC) allele can contain replication of a super infected SIV following immunization with a live-attenuated SIV vaccine, while those animals are not capable of fighting primary SIV infection. Here we propose a recursion-based virus-specific naive CD4(+) T-cell depletion hypothesis through thinking on what may happen in individuals experiencing primary immunodeficiency virus infection. This could explain the mechanism for impairment of virus-specific immune response in the course of HIV infection.

  12. Recursion-based depletion of human immunodeficiency virus-specific naive CD4(+) T cells may facilitate persistent viral replication and chronic viraemia leading to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Tetsuo; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Okada, Seiji; Matano, Tetsuro

    2016-09-01

    Although antiretroviral therapy has made human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection a controllable disease, it is still unclear how viral replication persists in untreated patients and causes CD4(+) T-cell depletion leading to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in several years. Theorists tried to explain it with the diversity threshold theory in which accumulated mutations in the HIV genome make the virus so diverse that the immune system will no longer be able to recognize all the variants and fail to control the viraemia. Although the theory could apply to a number of cases, macaque AIDS models using simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) have shown that failed viral control at the set point is not always associated with T-cell escape mutations. Moreover, even monkeys without a protective major histocompatibility complex (MHC) allele can contain replication of a super infected SIV following immunization with a live-attenuated SIV vaccine, while those animals are not capable of fighting primary SIV infection. Here we propose a recursion-based virus-specific naive CD4(+) T-cell depletion hypothesis through thinking on what may happen in individuals experiencing primary immunodeficiency virus infection. This could explain the mechanism for impairment of virus-specific immune response in the course of HIV infection. PMID:27515208

  13. Mechanism of human antibody-mediated neutralization of Marburg virus.

    PubMed

    Flyak, Andrew I; Ilinykh, Philipp A; Murin, Charles D; Garron, Tania; Shen, Xiaoli; Fusco, Marnie L; Hashiguchi, Takao; Bornholdt, Zachary A; Slaughter, James C; Sapparapu, Gopal; Klages, Curtis; Ksiazek, Thomas G; Ward, Andrew B; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Bukreyev, Alexander; Crowe, James E

    2015-02-26

    The mechanisms by which neutralizing antibodies inhibit Marburg virus (MARV) are not known. We isolated a panel of neutralizing antibodies from a human MARV survivor that bind to MARV glycoprotein (GP) and compete for binding to a single major antigenic site. Remarkably, several of the antibodies also bind to Ebola virus (EBOV) GP. Single-particle EM structures of antibody-GP complexes reveal that all of the neutralizing antibodies bind to MARV GP at or near the predicted region of the receptor-binding site. The presence of the glycan cap or mucin-like domain blocks binding of neutralizing antibodies to EBOV GP, but not to MARV GP. The data suggest that MARV-neutralizing antibodies inhibit virus by binding to infectious virions at the exposed MARV receptor-binding site, revealing a mechanism of filovirus inhibition. PMID:25723164

  14. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infections in alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Om; Mason, Andrew; Luftig, Ronald B; Bautista, Abraham P

    2002-07-01

    Approximately 400,000 individuals in the United States are co-infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and it is likely that almost one in two of these subjects consumes alcohol. The majority of these patients suffer an accelerated course of liver disease as manifested by the onset of cirrhosis within 5 to 10 years of developing HCV infection, as well as an increased risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It is thought that chronic alcohol abuse mediates liver damage as a result of increased production of free radicals and proinflammatory cytokines. In the setting of chronic HCV infection, alcohol ingestion has an additional effect of diminishing immune clearance and increasing viral burden to hasten the onset of cirrhosis and HCC. Likewise, chronic HCV and HIV-1 co-infection results in a net increase in HCV burden; higher prevalence rates of HCV transmission to sexual partners and offspring, as well as an accelerated progression to end stage liver disease as compared to individuals with HCV infection alone. Thus, the synergistic effects of alcohol abuse and HIV-1 greatly impact on the morbidity and mortality for patients with HCV coinfection. Ultimately, this cumulative disease process will require far more aggressive management with abstinence and counseling for alcohol abuse; highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for HIV infection and combination anti-viral therapy for HCV infection to stem the rapid progression to end stage liver disease. PMID:12086918

  15. Hepatitis B virus coinfection in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: A review

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hsin-Yun; Sheng, Wang-Huei; Tsai, Mao-Song; Lee, Kuan-Yeh; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Hung, Chien-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a leading cause of chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide. Due to the shared modes of transmission, coinfection with HBV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is not uncommon. It is estimated that 10% of HIV-infected patients worldwide are coinfected with HBV. In areas where an HBV vaccination program is implemented, the HBV seroprevalence has declined significantly. In HIV/HBV-coinfected patients, HBV coinfection accelerates immunologic and clinical progression of HIV infection and increases the risk of hepatotoxicity when combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) is initiated, while HIV infection increases the risk of hepatitis events, cirrhosis, and end-stage liver disease related to chronic HBV infection. With the advances in antiviral therapy, concurrent, successful long-term suppression of HIV and HBV replication can be achieved in the cART era. To reduce the disease burden of HBV infection among HIV-infected patients, adoption of safe sex practices, avoidance of sharing needles and diluent, HBV vaccination and use of cART containing tenofovir disoproxil fumarate plus emtricitabine or lamivudine are the most effective approaches. However, due to HIV-related immunosuppression, using increased doses of HBV vaccine and novel approaches to HBV vaccination are needed to improve the immunogenicity of HBV vaccine among HIV-infected patients. PMID:25356024

  16. Insights into human immunodeficiency virus-hepatitis B virus co-infection in India

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Runu; Pal, Ananya

    2015-01-01

    Shared routes of transmission lead to frequent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-hepatitis B virus (HBV) co-infection in a host which results in about 10% of HIV positive individuals to have chronic hepatitis B infection worldwide. In post-antiretroviral therapy era, liver diseases have emerged as the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected individuals and HBV co-infection have become the major health issue among this population particularly from the regions with endemic HBV infection. In setting of HIV-HBV co-infection, HIV significantly impacts the natural history of HBV infection, its disease profile and the treatment outcome in negative manner. Moreover, the epidemiological pattern of HBV infection and the diversity in HBV genome (genotypic and phenotypic) are also varied in HIV co-infected subjects as compared to HBV mono-infected individuals. Several reports on the abovementioned issues are available from developed parts of the world as well as from sub-Saharan African countries. In contrast, most of these research areas remained unexplored in India despite having considerable burden of HIV and HBV infections. This review discusses present knowledge from the studies on HIV-HBV co-infection in India and relevant reports from different parts of the world. Issues needed for the future research relevant to HIV-HBV co-infection in India are also highlighted here, including a call for further investigations on this field of study. PMID:26279986

  17. Liver fibrosis in human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis C virus coinfection: Diagnostic methods and clinical impact

    PubMed Central

    Sagnelli, Caterina; Martini, Salvatore; Pisaturo, Mariantonietta; Pasquale, Giuseppe; Macera, Margherita; Zampino, Rosa; Coppola, Nicola; Sagnelli, Evangelista

    2015-01-01

    Several non-invasive surrogate methods have recently challenged the main role of liver biopsy in assessing liver fibrosis in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-monoinfected and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HCV-coinfected patients, applied to avoid the well-known side effects of liver puncture. Serological tests involve the determination of biochemical markers of synthesis or degradation of fibrosis, tests not readily available in clinical practice, or combinations of routine tests used in chronic hepatitis and HIV/HCV coinfection. Several radiologic techniques have also been proposed, some of which commonly used in clinical practice. The studies performed to compare the prognostic value of non-invasive surrogate methods with that of the degree of liver fibrosis assessed on liver tissue have not as yet provided conclusive results. Each surrogate technique has shown some limitations, including the risk of over- or under-estimating the extent of liver fibrosis. The current knowledge on liver fibrosis in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients will be summarized in this review article, which is addressed in particular to physicians involved in this setting in their clinical practice. PMID:26523204

  18. International military human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome policies and programs: strengths and limitations in current practice.

    PubMed

    Yeager, R; Hendrix, C W; Kingma, S

    2000-02-01

    A survey was conducted to evaluate military human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) policies and programs in 119 countries. Ninety-eight percent of the 62 respondents provide prevention education, 95% in group settings but only 53% individually. Predeployment briefings are more common than postdeployment briefings. Condoms are promoted more often than provided. Seventy-eight respondents report some form of mandatory HIV testing, and 58% perform mandatory recruit testing, with recruitment denied to HIV-positive individuals in 17%. Counseling accompanies mandatory testing less than voluntary testing. In-service care for AIDS patients is universal. Many military prevention programs can be improved through postdeployment briefings and proactive interventions involving education, condom distribution, and counseling combined with testing. Mandatory testing is often inconsistent with stated goals, and AIDS care policies may strain military budgets. Testing based on cost-benefit assessments may increase efficiency in military HIV control. Military budgets may benefit from greater civil-military cost sharing in AIDS care. PMID:10709366

  19. International military human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome policies and programs: strengths and limitations in current practice.

    PubMed

    Yeager, R; Hendrix, C W; Kingma, S

    2000-02-01

    A survey was conducted to evaluate military human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) policies and programs in 119 countries. Ninety-eight percent of the 62 respondents provide prevention education, 95% in group settings but only 53% individually. Predeployment briefings are more common than postdeployment briefings. Condoms are promoted more often than provided. Seventy-eight respondents report some form of mandatory HIV testing, and 58% perform mandatory recruit testing, with recruitment denied to HIV-positive individuals in 17%. Counseling accompanies mandatory testing less than voluntary testing. In-service care for AIDS patients is universal. Many military prevention programs can be improved through postdeployment briefings and proactive interventions involving education, condom distribution, and counseling combined with testing. Mandatory testing is often inconsistent with stated goals, and AIDS care policies may strain military budgets. Testing based on cost-benefit assessments may increase efficiency in military HIV control. Military budgets may benefit from greater civil-military cost sharing in AIDS care.

  20. New clinical and histological patterns of acute disseminated histoplasmosis in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ollague Sierra, Jose E; Ollague Torres, Jose M

    2013-04-01

    Histoplasmosis has attained increasing relevance in the past 3 decades because of the appearance of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In most immunocompetent persons, the infection is asymptomatic or can produce a respiratory condition with symptoms and radiological images similar to those observed in pulmonary tuberculosis; in non-HIV+ immunocompromised patients, it can cause respiratory symptoms or evolve into a disseminated infection. The same can occur in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients. We have observed a series of HIV+ patients with AIDS who presented with cutaneous histoplasmosis and in whom the clinical and histopathological features were highly unusual, including variable mucocutaneous lesions that were difficult to diagnose clinically. These patients displayed unusual, previously undescribed, histological patterns, including lichenoid pattern, nodular pseudomyxoid pattern, pyogenic granuloma-like pattern, perifollicular pattern, and superficial (S), mid (M), and deep perivascular dermatitis; and more commonly encountered patterns, such as histiocytic lobular panniculitis and focal nodular dermatitis. The novel histopathological patterns of cutaneous involvement by histoplasmosis seen in these patients resembled other common inflammatory and infectious conditions and required a high level of suspicion and the application of special stains for organisms for confirmation. These new, clinical, and histological findings do not seem to be commonly encountered in HIV- patients infected with the fungus but seem to be displayed most prominently in HIV+ patients with AIDS.

  1. Rapid Tests and the Diagnosis of Visceral Leishmaniasis and Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Coinfection.

    PubMed

    Barbosa Júnior, Walter Lins; Ramos de Araújo, Paulo Sérgio; Dias de Andrade, Luiz; Aguiar Dos Santos, Ana Maria; Lopes da Silva, Maria Almerice; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Medeiros, Zulma

    2015-11-01

    After the emergence of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), the number of visceral leishmaniasis (VL)-HIV/AIDS coinfections has increased worldwide. Herein, we assessed the usefulness of an rK39-based immunochromatographic test (rK39 ICT) (DiaMed-IT LEISH(®); DiaMed AG, Cressier-sur-Morat, Switzerland) and a latex agglutination test (KAtex; Kalon Biological, Guildford, United Kingdom) for urinary antigen detection to diagnose VL in 15 HIV/AIDS patients from northeastern Brazil. VL diagnosis was based on clinical findings, cytology, serology, parasite DNA, and/or urinary antigen detection. VL was confirmed in seven out of 15 HIV/AIDS patients. Only three patients were positive in bone marrow cytology, three patients were conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) positive, while six were real-time PCR positive. All patients were direct agglutination test (DAT) (Royal Tropical Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands) positive; of these, four were positive by rK39 ICT and five by KAtex. Large-scale studies are needed to validate the use of the KAtex in the national public health laboratory network in Brazil, aiming at improving the diagnosis of VL in HIV/AIDS patients in this country.

  2. Rapid Tests and the Diagnosis of Visceral Leishmaniasis and Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Coinfection.

    PubMed

    Barbosa Júnior, Walter Lins; Ramos de Araújo, Paulo Sérgio; Dias de Andrade, Luiz; Aguiar Dos Santos, Ana Maria; Lopes da Silva, Maria Almerice; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Medeiros, Zulma

    2015-11-01

    After the emergence of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), the number of visceral leishmaniasis (VL)-HIV/AIDS coinfections has increased worldwide. Herein, we assessed the usefulness of an rK39-based immunochromatographic test (rK39 ICT) (DiaMed-IT LEISH(®); DiaMed AG, Cressier-sur-Morat, Switzerland) and a latex agglutination test (KAtex; Kalon Biological, Guildford, United Kingdom) for urinary antigen detection to diagnose VL in 15 HIV/AIDS patients from northeastern Brazil. VL diagnosis was based on clinical findings, cytology, serology, parasite DNA, and/or urinary antigen detection. VL was confirmed in seven out of 15 HIV/AIDS patients. Only three patients were positive in bone marrow cytology, three patients were conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) positive, while six were real-time PCR positive. All patients were direct agglutination test (DAT) (Royal Tropical Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands) positive; of these, four were positive by rK39 ICT and five by KAtex. Large-scale studies are needed to validate the use of the KAtex in the national public health laboratory network in Brazil, aiming at improving the diagnosis of VL in HIV/AIDS patients in this country. PMID:26416105

  3. Contact of human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected and uninfected CD4+ T lymphocytes is highly cytolytic for both cells.

    PubMed Central

    Heinkelein, M; Sopper, S; Jassoy, C

    1995-01-01

    Individuals infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) experience a marked loss of CD4+ T lymphocytes, leading to fatal immunodeficiency. The mechanisms causing the depletion of these cells are not yet understood. In this study, we observed that CD4+ T lymphocytes from HIV type 1 (HIV-1)-infected and uninfected individuals rapidly lysed B lymphoblasts expressing the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein on the cell surface and Jurkat cells expressing the complete virus. Contact of uninfected CD4+ T cells with envelope glycoprotein-expressing cells also resulted in the lysis of the uninfected CD4+ T cells. Cytolysis did not require priming or in vitro stimulation of the CD4+ T cells and was not restricted by major histocompatibility complex molecules. Cytotoxicity was inhibited by soluble CD4 and anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies that block binding of CD4 to gp120. In addition, neutralizing anti-CD4 and anti-gp120 monoclonal antibodies which block postbinding membrane fusion events and syncytium formation also inhibited cell lysis, suggesting that identical mechanisms in HIV-infected cultures underlie cell-cell fusion and the cytolysis observed. However, cytotoxicity was not always accompanied by the formation of visible syncytia. Rapid cell lysis after contact of uninfected and HIV-1-infected CD4+ T cells may explain CD4+ T-cell depletion in the absence of detectable syncytia in infected individuals. Moreover, because of its vigor, lysis of envelope-expressing targets by contact with unprimed CD4+ T lymphocytes may at first glance resemble antigen-specific immune responses and should be excluded when cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses in infected individuals and vaccinees are evaluated. PMID:7474110

  4. Comparison of Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium wrairi by reactivity with monoclonal antibodies and ability to infect severe combined immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Chrisp, C E; Mason, P; Perryman, L E

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-three monoclonal antibodies raised to Cryptosporidium parvum and 12 raised to C. wrairi reacted with equal intensity with the heterologous species. Despite demonstration of a close immunologic relationship between these two species, C. wrairi did not induce persistent infection in severe combined immunodeficient mice as did C. parvum. PMID:7806379

  5. Evaluation of viral-lysate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits for detecting human immunodeficiency virus (type 1) infections using human sera standardized by quantitative western blotting.

    PubMed

    Hardy, C T; Damrow, T A; Villareal, D B; Kenny, G E

    1992-06-01

    The first generation of proprietary reagents for detecting antibodies to the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) used as antigen partially purified virus from cell culture lysates. These tests, which are still in use, may vary in their antibody measurement capabilities if different proportions of the viral polypeptides are present in the viral lysate mixtures. We determined the quantities of antibodies in the serum of persons infected with HIV-1 by dilution analysis using 3 ELISA kits: Abbott [A], Du Pont [D], Genetic Systems [G]. The proportionate antibody titres of each serum to p24gag and gp160env/120env were established by quantitative Western blotting. Serum antibody titres were high, frequently over 1:10,000, a result observed both by ELISA and Western blot. For Kit D, sera with high proportions of antibody to p24gag produced antibody titration curves with steep slopes whereas shallower slopes were found in sera with high proportions of antibody to gp160env. In contrast, Kit A gave steeper slopes with sera enriched for gp160env antibodies. Kit G gave results with slopes intermediate between Kits A and D. Serum antibody titres differed between kits depending upon the proportion and concentration of antibodies in a given serum to gp160env and p24gag. The findings that both the concentration and proportion of antibodies to specific viral polypeptides in human sera markedly affect the signal intensity produced by proprietary ELISAs suggest the need for several control sera which reflect the diversity of human serum responses. Standardization of human reference sera by quantitative Western blotting will assist in evaluation and quality control of ELISA tests.

  6. Effects of dimethyl prostaglandin A1 on herpes simplex virus and human immunodeficiency virus replication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; McGrath, M. S.; Hanks, D.; Erickson, S.; Pulliam, L.

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the direct effect of dimethyl prostaglandin A1 (dmPGA1) on the replication of herpes simplex virus (HSV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). dmPGA1 significantly inhibited viral replication in both HSV and HIV infection systems at concentrations of dmPGA1 that did not adversely alter cellular DNA synthesis. The 50% inhibitory concentration (ID50) for several HSV type 1 (HSV-1) strains ranged from 3.8 to 5.6 micrograms/ml for Vero cells and from 4.6 to 7.3 micrograms/ml for human foreskin fibroblasts. The ID50s for two HSV-2 strains varied from 3.8 to 4.5 micrograms/ml for Vero cells; the ID50 was 5.7 micrograms/ml for human foreskin fibroblasts. We found that closely related prostaglandins did not have the same effect on the replication of HSV; dmPGE2 and dmPGA2 caused up to a 60% increase in HSV replication compared with that in untreated virus-infected cells. HIV-1 replication in acutely infected T cells (VB line) and chronically infected macrophages was assessed by quantitative decreases in p24 concentration. The effective ID50s were 2.5 micrograms/ml for VB cells acutely infected with HIV-1 and 5.2 micrograms/m for chronically infected macrophages. dmPGA1 has an unusual broad-spectrum antiviral activity against both HSV and HIV-1 in vitro and offers a new class of potential therapeutic agents for in vivo use.

  7. An Orphan Seven-Transmembrane Domain Receptor Expressed Widely in the Brain Functions as a Coreceptor for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Edinger, Aimee L.; Hoffman, Trevor L.; Sharron, Matthew; Lee, Benhur; Yi, Yanji; Choe, Wonkyu; Kolson, Dennis L.; Mitrovic, Branka; Zhou, Yiqing; Faulds, Daryl; Collman, Ronald G.; Hesselgesser, Joseph; Horuk, Richard; Doms, Robert W.

    1998-01-01

    Both CD4 and an appropriate coreceptor are necessary for infection of cells by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and most strains of HIV-2. The chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 are the major HIV-1 coreceptors, although some virus strains can also utilize alternative coreceptors such as CCR3 to infect cells. In contrast, most if not all simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) strains use CCR5 as a coreceptor, and many SIV strains can use CCR5 independently of CD4. In addition, several orphan seven-transmembrane receptors which can serve as HIV-1 and SIV coreceptors have been identified. Here we report that APJ, an orphan seven-transmembrane domain receptor with homology to the angiotensin receptor family, functions as a coreceptor for a number of HIV-1 and SIV strains. APJ was expressed widely in the human brain and in NT2N neurons. APJ transcripts were also detected by reverse transcription-PCR in the CD4-positive T-cell line C8166, but not in peripheral blood leukocytes, microglia, phytohemagglutinin (PHA)- or PHA/interleukin-2-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells, monocytes, or monocyte-derived macrophages. The widespread distribution of APJ in the central nervous system coupled with its use as a coreceptor by some HIV-1 strains indicates that it may play a role in neuropathogenesis. PMID:9733831

  8. Infectious Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Subtype C from an African Isolate: Rhesus Macaque Model

    PubMed Central

    Ndung'u, Thumbi; Lu, Yichen; Renjifo, Boris; Touzjian, Neal; Kushner, Nicholas; Pena-Cruz, Victor; Novitsky, Vladimir A.; Lee, Tun-Hou; Essex, Max

    2001-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtype C is responsible for more than 56% of all infections in the HIV and AIDS pandemic. It is the predominant subtype in the rapidly expanding epidemic in southern Africa. To develop a relevant model that would facilitate studies of transmission, pathogenesis, and vaccine development for this subtype, we generated SHIVMJ4, a simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) chimera based on HIV-1 subtype C. SHIVMJ4 contains the majority of env, the entire second exon of tat, and a partial sequence of the second exon of rev, all derived from a CCR5-tropic, primary isolate envelope clone from southern Africa. SHIVMJ4 replicated efficiently in human, rhesus, and pig-tailed macaque peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in vitro but not in CEMx174 cells. To assess in vivo infectivity, SHIVMJ4 was intravenously inoculated into four rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). All four animals became infected as determined through virus isolation, PCR analysis, and viral loads of 107 to 108 copies of viral RNA per ml of plasma during the primary infection phase. We have established a CCR5-tropic SHIVMJ4/rhesus macaque model that may be useful in the studies of HIV-1 subtype C immunology and biology and may also facilitate the evaluation of vaccines to control the spread of HIV-1 subtype C in southern Africa and elsewhere. PMID:11689623

  9. Monoclonal antibody therapy for Junin virus infection.

    PubMed

    Zeitlin, Larry; Geisbert, Joan B; Deer, Daniel J; Fenton, Karla A; Bohorov, Ognian; Bohorova, Natasha; Goodman, Charles; Kim, Do; Hiatt, Andrew; Pauly, Michael H; Velasco, Jesus; Whaley, Kevin J; Altmann, Friedrich; Gruber, Clemens; Steinkellner, Herta; Honko, Anna N; Kuehne, Ana I; Aman, M Javad; Sahandi, Sara; Enterlein, Sven; Zhan, Xiaoguo; Enria, Delia; Geisbert, Thomas W

    2016-04-19

    Countermeasures against potential biothreat agents remain important to US Homeland Security, and many of these pharmaceuticals could have dual use in the improvement of global public health. Junin virus, the causative agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF), is an arenavirus identified as a category A high-priority agent. There are no Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs available for preventing or treating AHF, and the current treatment option is limited to administration of immune plasma. Whereas immune plasma demonstrates the feasibility of passive immunotherapy, it is limited in quantity, variable in quality, and poses safety risks such as transmission of transfusion-borne diseases. In an effort to develop a monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based alternative to plasma, three previously described neutralizing murine mAbs were expressed as mouse-human chimeric antibodies and evaluated in the guinea pig model of AHF. These mAbs provided 100% protection against lethal challenge when administered 2 d after infection (dpi), and one of them (J199) was capable of providing 100% protection when treatment was initiated 6 dpi and 92% protection when initiated 7 dpi. The efficacy of J199 is superior to that previously described for all other evaluated drugs, and its high potency suggests that mAbs like J199 offer an economical alternative to immune plasma and an effective dual use (bioterrorism/public health) therapeutic. PMID:27044104

  10. Monoclonal antibody therapy for Junin virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Zeitlin, Larry; Geisbert, Joan B.; Deer, Daniel J.; Fenton, Karla A.; Bohorov, Ognian; Bohorova, Natasha; Goodman, Charles; Kim, Do; Hiatt, Andrew; Pauly, Michael H.; Velasco, Jesus; Whaley, Kevin J.; Altmann, Friedrich; Gruber, Clemens; Steinkellner, Herta; Honko, Anna N.; Kuehne, Ana I.; Aman, M. Javad; Sahandi, Sara; Enterlein, Sven; Zhan, Xiaoguo; Enria, Delia; Geisbert, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    Countermeasures against potential biothreat agents remain important to US Homeland Security, and many of these pharmaceuticals could have dual use in the improvement of global public health. Junin virus, the causative agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF), is an arenavirus identified as a category A high-priority agent. There are no Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs available for preventing or treating AHF, and the current treatment option is limited to administration of immune plasma. Whereas immune plasma demonstrates the feasibility of passive immunotherapy, it is limited in quantity, variable in quality, and poses safety risks such as transmission of transfusion-borne diseases. In an effort to develop a monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based alternative to plasma, three previously described neutralizing murine mAbs were expressed as mouse-human chimeric antibodies and evaluated in the guinea pig model of AHF. These mAbs provided 100% protection against lethal challenge when administered 2 d after infection (dpi), and one of them (J199) was capable of providing 100% protection when treatment was initiated 6 dpi and 92% protection when initiated 7 dpi. The efficacy of J199 is superior to that previously described for all other evaluated drugs, and its high potency suggests that mAbs like J199 offer an economical alternative to immune plasma and an effective dual use (bioterrorism/public health) therapeutic. PMID:27044104

  11. Construction and Use of a Replication-Competent Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) that Expresses the Chloramphenicol Acetyltransferase Enzyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terwilliger, E. F.; Godin, B.; Sodroski, J. G.; Haseltine, W. A.

    1989-05-01

    The construction and properties of an infectious human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that expresses the bacterial gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase are described. This virus can be used in vitro to screen for drugs that inhibit HIV infection. The marked virus may also be used to trace the routes of infection from the site of inoculation in animal experiments.

  12. Kinetics of infected cell appearance as a determinant of number of human immunodeficiency virus-1 infectious units.

    PubMed

    Cory, J M; Ohlsson-Wilhelm, B M; Steck, M E; Smithgall, M D; Rozday, V; Eyster, M E; Rapp, F

    1989-02-01

    In order to optimize detection of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1)-infected cells, the temporal appearance of virus antigens in newly infected H9 cell cultures was examined. Analyses were accomplished by indirect immunofluorescence labeling with each of 10 monoclonal antibodies and evaluation by flow cytometry. Of the antibodies examined, those specific for HIV-1 capsid protein p24, matrix protein p17, or their precursor molecule p55 allowed the earliest and most sensitive detection in infected cells fixed to allow detection of intracellular antigen. Discrimination of infected cells from uninfected cells was much less sensitive when three antibodies specific for HIV-1 glycoproteins were used to detect intracellular or cell surface antigen. In several experiments involving the time course of infection, we observed no differences in cell numbers between infected and uninfected H9 cultures initiated at identical cell concentrations. We hypothesized that it might be possible to quantitate infectious HIV-1 virions from the kinetics of infected cell appearance. Straight-line relationships between the log p24-positive cells and the time after infection were observed. These quantitative observations were employed to calculate the number of infectious units originally added to the culture that were capable of infecting H9 cells. The production of infectious virus, but not of cytopathic effects, was required. The results of this novel approach to the titration of infectious HIV-1 particles agreed well with those from median cell culture infective dose determination. This method could be employed with other infectious agents for which detection of cell-associated antigens is possible in cell cultures not destroyed by infection.

  13. Serological survey of Toxoplasma gondii, Dirofilaria immitis, Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) and Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) infections in pet cats in Bangkok and vicinities, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Sukhumavasi, Woraporn; Bellosa, Mary L; Lucio-Forster, Araceli; Liotta, Janice L; Lee, Alice C Y; Pornmingmas, Pitcha; Chungpivat, Sudchit; Mohammed, Hussni O; Lorentzen, Leif; Dubey, J P; Bowman, Dwight D

    2012-08-13

    The seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii, Dirofilaria immitis (heartworm), feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infections was examined using serum or plasma samples from 746 pet cats collected between May and July 2009 from clinics and hospitals located in and around Bangkok, Thailand. The samples were tested for heartworm, FIV, and FeLV using a commercial ELISA. Of the 746 samples, 4.6% (34/746) were positive for heartworm antigen, 24.5% (183/746) had circulating FeLV antigen, and 20.1% (150/746) had antibodies against FIV. In addition, the first 348 submitted samples were tested for T. gondii antibodies using a modified agglutination test (MAT, cut off 1:25); 10.1% (35/348) were seropositive. Of the 348 cats sampled for all four pathogens, 11, 10, and 1 were positive for T. gondii antibodies and FIV antibodies, FeLV antigen, or D. immitis antigen, respectively. Of the 35 T. gondii-seropositive cats, 42.9% (15/35) were co-infected with at least one of the other three pathogens. The presence of antibodies to FIV was significantly associated with both age and gender, while FeLV antigen presence was only associated with age. In the case of FIV, males were twice as likely to be infected as females, and cats over 10 years of age were 13.5 times more likely to be infected than cats less than 1 year of age. FeLV antigen was more common in younger cats, with cats over 10 years of age being 10 times less likely to be FeLV positive than cats under 1 year of age. This is the first survey for these four pathogens affecting feline health in Thailand. PMID:22497870

  14. Circadian rhythms of circulating NK cells in healthy and human immunodeficiency virus-infected men.

    PubMed

    Bourin, P; Mansour, I; Doinel, C; Roué, R; Rouger, P; Levi, F

    1993-08-01

    Antiviral immunity involves NK cells, which circulate rhythmically every 24 hours. We have investigated circadian and 12-hour rhythms in the peripheral count of circulating NK cells in 15 men infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and 13 healthy controls. We analyzed three phenotypes using double-labeling with monoclonal antibodies and flow cytometry assessment: CD3- CD16+, CD3-CD57+, and CD2+CD3-. A statistical validation of time-dependent differences was achieved if significance (p < 0.05) was validated both with analysis of variance and cosinor. The circadian rhythm had a similar asymmetric waveform for the three phenotypes and is homogeneous on an individual basis. The circulating NK cell count peaked in the early morning and was low at night. A circadian rhythm and a circahemidian harmonic characterized all phenotypes in healthy subjects. We considered two groups of HIV-infected men: those who were asymptomatic (eight) and those with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) (seven). Circadian changes in NK cell count were similar in both subgroups and in healthy controls. The circadian pattern was also consistent among individual patients. Asymptomatic HIV-infected men (early-stage disease) exhibited more pronounced 12-hour rhythmicity than did patients with AIDS or controls. The circulation of NK cells does not appear to share the same synchronizer(s) as other circulating T- or B-lymphocyte subsets. Thus, HIV infection gradually abolished circadian rhythmicity in circulating T and B cells, whereas it did not disturb that in NK cells. PMID:8403073

  15. Productive nonlytic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication in a newly established human leukemia cell line.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, R; Bekesi, J G; Tarcsafalvi, A; Sperber, K; Deak, G; Choi, H S; Paronetto, F; Holland, J F; Acs, G

    1992-11-01

    We have isolated a lymphoid cell line, MDS, from the pleural exudate of a patient with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. The cells are biphenotypic, containing various T-cell and myeloid markers, and are surface negative for CD4 and CD8 but have low CD4 mRNA. The cells grow in suspension with a doubling time of 15 hr, have been karyotyped as trisomy 21, are negative for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), and are tumorigenic in the nude mouse. We have isolated two stable HIV-1-producing cell lines, MDS-T, by transfecting MDS cells with pHXBc2, and MDS-I, by infecting MDS cells with HIV-1IIIB. In 24 hr, 1 x 10(5) MDS-T or MDS-I cells produce 46 ng of p24 per ml and reverse transcriptase that is capable of incorporating 0.2 pmol of [32P]TTP into oligo(dT).poly(A). Ultrastructural studies showed numerous mature viral particles in MDS-T and MDS-I cells that are capable of infecting T cells. HIV-1 infection could be inhibited by 25% in the MDS cells with the anti-CD4 antibody Leu 3a. For over a year MDS-T and MDS-I cells have been producing high concentrations of HIV-1 in culture. A subclone derived from the MDS cells behaves like the parent cells when transfected or infected with HIV-1. In contrast to other T-cell lines, neither phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate nor tumor necrosis factor alpha stimulated the replication of HIV-1, whereas bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate or interferon alpha caused 50% and 80% inhibition of reverse transcriptase production, respectively. These chronically infected T-cell lines are a useful model system to study the effect of anti-HIV agents and cellular factors required for HIV-1 replication.

  16. RD6-2198, a novel betain-type fluoroalkylated oligomer, inhibits the replications of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and other enveloped viruses.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, M; Ashida, N; Okamoto, M; Mizuta, T; Ide, T; Hanasaki, Y; Katsuura, K; Sawada, H; Shigeta, S; Konno, K; Yokota, T; Baba, M

    1998-05-01

    We have examined a novel betain-type fluoroalkylated oligomer, RD6-2198, for its inhibitory effects on the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and other enveloped viruses, including herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2, respectively) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in cell cultures. We have found that the compound is a potent and selective inhibitor of these viruses. RD6-2198 inhibited the replication of HIV-1IIIB at a concentration of 0.85 microg/ml with a selectivity index greater than 59 in MT-4 cells. Furthermore, its 50% effective concentration (EC50) values for HSV-1, HSV-2 and RSV, were 0.51, 0.94 and 3.0 microg/ml, respectively. We found that the RD6-2198 suppressed the gp120-CD4 interaction (as monitored by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method). RD6-2198 also inhibited the binding of anti-gp120 monoclonal antibody to gp120 expressed on MOLT-4/IIIB cells (MOLT-4 cells chronically infected with HIV-1IIIB). However, the compound did not inhibit the interaction of anti-CD4 antibody with CD4. These results suggest that RD6-2198 interacts with the viral envelope glycoprotein and thereby inhibits the viral adsorption process. In addition, RD6-2198 was also found to suppress the proliferation of MOLT-4/IIIB cells. When applied topically, RD6-2198 at a concentration of 10 mg/ml completely protected mice from an intravaginal HSV-2 infection. PMID:9707376

  17. Association of alpha interferon production with natural killer cell lysis of U937 cells infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Rappocciolo, G; Toso, J F; Torpey, D J; Gupta, P; Rinaldo, C R

    1989-01-01

    Mononuclear leukocytes from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-seronegative and -seropositive homosexual men lysed HIV-infected U937 cells to a significantly greater degree than uninfected U937 cells. Depletion of cell subsets with monoclonal antibodies and complement indicated that the effector cells were primarily of the CD16+ phenotype. Acid-stable alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) production induced by the HIV-infected cells correlated with, although was not an absolute requisite for, preferential lysis of the infected targets. The activity of these CD16+, natural killer (NK) cells decreased in relation to the duration of HIV infection and the presence of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Pretreatment of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HIV-seronegative subjects, but not HIV-seropositive men, with IFN-alpha or recombinant interleukin-2 enhanced lysis of both uninfected and HIV-infected U937 cells. These results suggest that IFN-alpha-associated, NK-like mechanisms are active in the cytotoxic response against HIV-infected cells and that HIV infection results in an early and progressive depression of such responses. Prospective investigations may be useful in determining the role of this NK cell response in the natural history and pathogenesis of HIV infection and the efficacy of therapeutic modalities. PMID:2913035

  18. Envelope glycoprotein gp120 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 alters ion transport in astrocytes: implications for AIDS dementia complex.

    PubMed Central

    Benos, D J; Hahn, B H; Bubien, J K; Ghosh, S K; Mashburn, N A; Chaikin, M A; Shaw, G M; Benveniste, E N

    1994-01-01

    Infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is often complicated by a variety of neurological abnormalities. The most common clinical syndrome, termed acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) dementia complex, presents as a subcortical dementia with cognitive, motor, and behavioral disturbances and is unique to HIV-1 infection. The pathogenesis of this syndrome is poorly understood but is believed to involve interactions among virally infected macrophages/microglia, astrocytes, and neurons. In this study, we show that exposure of primary rat and human astrocytes to heat-activated HIV-1 virions, or to eukaryotically expressed HIV-1 and HIV-2 envelope glycoproteins (gp120) stimulates amiloride-sensitive Na+/H+ antiport, potassium conductance, and glutamate efflux. These effects are blocked specifically by amiloride, an inhibitor of Na+/H+ antiport and by the selective removal of gp120 with immobilized monoclonal antibody. As a result of modulation of astrocytic function by gp120, the ensuing neuronal depolarization and glutamate exposure could activate both voltage-gated and N-methyl-D-aspartate-regulated Ca2+ channels, leading to increases in intraneuronal Ca2+ and neuronal death. These findings implicate the astrocyte directly in the pathogenesis of AIDS dementia complex. PMID:8290553

  19. A case of human immunodeficiency virus infection with cerebellar ataxia that suggested by an association with autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Shigeto; Kondo, Takayuki; Nakamura, Takashi; Nakagawa, Tomokazu; Matsumoto, Sadayuki

    2016-04-28

    We report a case of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection that showed subacute progressive cerebellar ataxia without HIV encephalopathy or other encephalopathies, including progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy or encephalitis of other human herpes virus (HHV) infections. A 43-year-old man exhibited unsteady gait. Neurological examination disclosed ataxia of the trunk and lower extremities. Personality change and dementia were absent. Magnetic resonance imaging did not reveal any abnormal finding, including of the cerebellum. The serum HIV-1-RNA was 1.2 × 10(5) copies/ml, and the absolute CD4 lymphocyte count was 141 cells/ml. Remarkably, the serum anti-Yo antibody, as an anti-cerebellar antibody of paraneoplastic syndrome, and anti-gliadin antibody, associated with celiac disease or gluten ataxia, were positive. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) immunoglobulin G index was 1.2 (< 0.8), and oligoclonal bands were present. PCR of the CSF was negative for HIV, JC virus, other HHVs, and mycosis. Previous reports presented HIV-infected patients with concurrent autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus, anti-phospholipid syndrome, autoimmune thrombocytopenia, vasculitis, polymyositis and dermatomyositis, sarcoidosis, Graves' disease, and hepatic diseases. These might have been present in patients with a CD4 T lymphocyte count of more than 200 cells/ml. On the other hand, paraneoplastic syndrome, gluten ataxia, cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody, and Hashimoto's encephalopathy might manifest as autoimmune cerebellar ataxia. As regards the association of HIV infection and autoimmune cerebellar ataxia, a previous report suggested that anti-gliadin antibody was detected in about 30% of HIV-infected children, though there is no reference to an association with cerebellar ataxia. Moreover, to our knowledge, detection of anti-Yo antibody in an HIV-infected patient with cerebellar ataxia has not been reported

  20. Simian immunodeficiency virus-specific CD8+ lymphocyte response in acutely infected rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Yasutomi, Y; Reimann, K A; Lord, C I; Miller, M D; Letvin, N L

    1993-01-01

    To assess the possible role of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in containing the spread of human immunodeficiency virus in acutely infected individuals, the temporal evolution of the virus-specific CD8+ lymphocyte response was defined in simian immunodeficiency virus of macaques (SIVmac)-infected rhesus monkeys. A brief period of SIVmac plasma antigenemia was seen 9 to 16 days following intravenous infection with SIVmac, ending as the absolute number of CD8+ peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) increased. In a prospective assessment of the ability of CD8+ lymphocytes of these monkeys to suppress SIVmac replication in autologous PBLs, inhibitory activity was detected as early as 4 days, with a more pronounced effect 12 to 16 days following infection. SIVmac Gag- and Nef-specific CD8+ effector cell activities were demonstrable in PBLs of animals by 2 weeks following virus inoculation. In fact, SIVmac-specific CTL precursors were documented in the PBLs of rhesus monkeys 4 to 6 days after SIVmac infection. These studies indicate that AIDS virus-specific CD8+ CTLs are present in PBLs within days of infection and may play an important role in containing the early spread of virus. PMID:8437240

  1. Primary Neuritic Hansen's Disease presenting as Ulnar Nerve Abscess in a Human Immunodeficiency Virus Positive Patient.

    PubMed

    Karjigi, S; Herakal, K; Murthy, S C; Bathina, A; Kusuma, M R; Nikhil, K R Y

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy has been increasingly known to have an enigmatic relationship with human immunodeficiency virus infection. Co-infection may result in atypical manifestations of leprosy. A 45-year old human immunodeficiency virus-positive male; agricultural laborer presented with a swelling over right elbow, right hand deformity, generalized itching and recurrent vesicles overthe perinasal area. Clinical and investigational findings were consistent with mononeuritic type of Hansen's disease with right sided silent ulnar nerve abscess, partial claw hand. CD4+ count of the patientwas 430 cells/cmm. This patient also hadherpes simplex labialis, with HIV-associated pruritus. To the best of our knowledge such an atypical presentation has not been reported earlier. PMID:26999990

  2. Interactions of cellular proteins involved in the transcriptional regulation of the human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, J A; Wu, F K; Mitsuyasu, R; Gaynor, R B

    1987-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a human retrovirus which is the etiologic agent of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. To study the cellular factors involved in the transcriptional regulation of this virus, we performed DNase I footprinting of the viral LTR using partially purified HeLa cell extracts. Five regions of the viral LTR appear critical for DNA binding of cellular proteins. These include the negative regulatory, enhancer, SP1, TATA and untranslated regions. Deletion mutagenesis of these binding domains has significant effects on the basal level of transcription and the ability to be induced by the viral tat protein. Mutations of either the negative regulatory or untranslated regions affect factor binding to the enhancer region. In addition, oligonucleotides complementary to several of the binding domains specifically compete for factor binding. These results suggest that interactions between several distinct cellular proteins are required for HIV transcriptional regulation. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. PMID:3428273

  3. Interactions of cellular proteins involved in the transcriptional regulation of the human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Garcia, J A; Wu, F K; Mitsuyasu, R; Gaynor, R B

    1987-12-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a human retrovirus which is the etiologic agent of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. To study the cellular factors involved in the transcriptional regulation of this virus, we performed DNase I footprinting of the viral LTR using partially purified HeLa cell extracts. Five regions of the viral LTR appear critical for DNA binding of cellular proteins. These include the negative regulatory, enhancer, SP1, TATA and untranslated regions. Deletion mutagenesis of these binding domains has significant effects on the basal level of transcription and the ability to be induced by the viral tat protein. Mutations of either the negative regulatory or untranslated regions affect factor binding to the enhancer region. In addition, oligonucleotides complementary to several of the binding domains specifically compete for factor binding. These results suggest that interactions between several distinct cellular proteins are required for HIV transcriptional regulation.

  4. Complete genome analysis of hepatitis B virus in human immunodeficiency virus infected and uninfected South Africans.

    PubMed

    Gededzha, Maemu P; Muzeze, Muxe; Burnett, Rosemary J; Amponsah-Dacosta, Edina; Mphahlele, M Jeffrey; Selabe, Selokela G

    2016-09-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections are highly endemic in South Africa. Data on the complete genome sequences of HBV in HIV-positive patients in South Africa are scanty. This study characterized the complete HBV genome isolated from both HIV-positive and negative patients at the Dr George Mukhari Academic Hospital (DGMAH), Pretoria. Serum samples from nine (five HIV-positive and four HIV-negative) patients attending the DGMAH from 2007 to 2011 were serologically tested, amplified, and sequenced for complete genome. Phylogenetic tree was constructed using MEGA6.0. Mutations were analyzed by comparing the sequences with genotype-matched GenBank references. Eight patients were HBsAg positive, with only one from the HIV positive group being negative. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete genome sequences classified them into five genotypes; A1 (n = 4), A2 (n = 1), C1 (n = 2), D1 (n = 1), and D3 (n = 1). Deletions up to 35 nucleotides in length were identified in this study. No drug resistance mutations were identified in the P ORF, while the L217R mutation was identified in one subgenotype A2 sequence. The double (A1762T/G1764A) and triple (T1753C/A1762T/G1764A) mutations in the Basal core promoter were identified in four and two sequences, respectively. In the core region, mutation G1888A was identified in four of the subgenotype A1 sequences. In conclusion, this study has added to the limited South African data on HBV genotypes and mutations in HBV/HIV co-infected and HBV mono-infected patients, based on complete HBV genome analysis. Subgenotype A1 was predominant, and no drug-resistant mutants were detected in the study. J. Med. Virol. 88:1560-1566, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Classification of hepatitis C virus and human immunodeficiency virus-1 sequences with the branching index.

    PubMed

    Hraber, Peter; Kuiken, Carla; Waugh, Mark; Geer, Shaun; Bruno, William J; Leitner, Thomas

    2008-09-01

    Classification of viral sequences should be fast, objective, accurate and reproducible. Most methods that classify sequences use either pair-wise distances or phylogenetic relations, but cannot discern when a sequence is unclassifiable. The branching index (BI) combines distance and phylogeny methods to compute a ratio that quantifies how closely a query sequence clusters with a subtype clade. In the hypothesis-testing framework of statistical inference, the BI is compared with a threshold to test whether sufficient evidence exists for the query sequence to be classified among known sequences. If above the threshold, the null hypothesis of no support for the subtype relation is rejected and the sequence is taken as belonging to the subtype clade with which it clusters on the tree. This study evaluates statistical properties of the BI for subtype classification in hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1). Pairs of BI values with known positive- and negative-test results were computed from 10,000 random fragments of reference alignments. Sampled fragments were of sufficient length to contain phylogenetic signals that grouped reference sequences together properly into subtype clades. For HCV, a threshold BI of 0.71 yields 95.1% agreement with reference subtypes, with equal false-positive and false-negative rates. For HIV-1, a threshold of 0.66 yields 93.5% agreement. Higher thresholds can be used where lower false-positive rates are required. In synthetic recombinants, regions without breakpoints are recognized accurately; regions with breakpoints do not represent any known subtype uniquely. Web-based services for viral subtype classification with the BI are available online.

  6. Depletion of the surface CD4 molecule by the envelope protein of human immunodeficiency virus expressed in a human CD4 sup + monocytoid cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, Ikuo; Koga, Yasuhiro; Oh-Hori, Nobuhira; Kimura, Genki; Nomoto, Kikuo ); Onodera, Kazukiyo )

    1989-09-01

    A CD4{sup +} human monocytoid cell line, U937, was transfected with a constructed plasmid which has the envelope gene of human immunodeficiency virus under the transcriptional control of the human metallothionein IIA promoter and was cloned thereafter. These cloned cell lines (EH and EL cells) expressed the viral gp160 in the cytoplasm. The expression of surface CD4 antigen examined by Leu3a and OKT4 monoclonal antibodies, however, disappeared completely in EH cells, which produce a larger amount of gp160, while diminishing only partly in EL cells, which produce a smaller amount of gp160. These results indicate that the level of expression of surface CD4 antigen correlates inversely with the amount of intracellular gp160. Moreover, immunoprecipitation studies using lysate from EH cells showed that OKT4 monoclonal antibody precipitated a significant number of CD4 molecules even after surface CD4 disappeared. However, Leu3a monoclonal antibody, which recognizes the binding site for envelope protein, could not precipitate any CD4 molecules in the same cell lysate. Taken together, these results suggested that CD4 molecules are still synthesized normally after the augmented production of gp160 in the cells but form a complex with the envelope protein in the cytoplasm and become unable to be transported to the cell surface, resulting in the observed depletion of surface CD4 antigen. This mechanism may explain the decrease or absence of surface CD4 antigens in human lymphocytes infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

  7. Twenty years of human immunodeficiency virus care at the Mayo Clinic: Past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Nathan W; Badley, Andrew D; Kasten, Mary J; Sampath, Rahul; Temesgen, Zelalem; Whitaker, Jennifer A; Wilson, John W; Yao, Joseph D; Zeuli, John; Rizza, Stacey A

    2016-05-12

    The Mayo human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Clinic has been providing patient centered care for persons living with HIV in Minnesota and beyond for the past 20 years. Through multidisciplinary engagement, vital clinical outcomes such as retention in care, initiation of antiretroviral therapy and virologic suppression are maximized. In this commentary, we describe the history of the Mayo HIV Clinic and its best practices, providing a "Mayo Model" of HIV care that exceeds national outcomes and may be applicable in other settings.

  8. Pre-exposure prophylaxis for human immunodeficiency virus: the past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Castel, Amanda D; Magnus, Manya; Greenberg, Alan E

    2014-12-01

    This article presents an overview of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention. The authors describe the past animal and human research that has been conducted that informs our current understanding of PrEP; summarize ongoing research in the area, including describing new regimens and delivery mechanisms being studied for PrEP; and highlight key issues that must be addressed in order to implement and optimize the use of this HIV prevention tool.

  9. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Coat Protein Neurotoxicity Mediated by Nitric Oxide in Primary Cortical Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.; Uhl, George R.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    1993-04-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 coat protein, gp120, kills neurons in primary cortical cultures at low picomolar concentrations. The toxicity requires external glutamate and calcium and is blocked by glutamate receptor antagonists. Nitric oxide (NO) contributes to gp120 toxicity, since nitroarginine, an inhibitor of NO synthase, prevents toxicity as does deletion of arginine from the incubation medium and hemoglobin, which binds NO. Superoxide dismutase also attenuates toxicity, implying a role for superoxide anions.

  10. Characterization of regionally associated feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) in bobcats (Lynx rufus).

    PubMed

    Lagana, Danielle M; Lee, Justin S; Lewis, Jesse S; Bevins, Sarah N; Carver, Scott; Sweanor, Linda L; McBride, Roy; McBride, Caleb; Crooks, Kevin R; VandeWoude, Sue

    2013-07-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) classically infects felid species with highly divergent species-specific FIVs. However, recent studies have detected an FIV strain infecting both bobcats (Lynx rufus) and pumas (Puma concolor) in California and Florida. To further investigate this observation, we evaluated FIV from bobcats in Florida (n=25) and Colorado (n=80) between 2008 and 2011. Partial viral sequences from five Florida bobcats cluster with previously published sequences from Florida panthers. We did not detect FIV in Colorado bobcats.

  11. Human immunodeficiency virus testing for patient-based and population-based diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Albritton, W L; Vittinghoff, E; Padian, N S

    1996-10-01

    Laboratory testing for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been introduced for individual patient-based diagnosis as well as high-risk and low-risk population-based screening. The choice of test, confirmatory algorithm, and interpretative criteria used depend on the clinical setting. In the context of general population-based testing, factors affecting test performance will have to be considered carefully in the development of testing policy. PMID:8843247

  12. A fusion inhibitor prevents spread of immunodeficiency viruses, but not activation of virus-specific T cells, by dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Frank, I; Stössel, H; Gettie, A; Turville, S G; Bess, J W; Lifson, J D; Sivin, I; Romani, N; Robbiani, M

    2008-06-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in innate immune responses, and their interactions with T cells are critical for the induction of adaptive immunity. However, immunodeficiency viruses are efficiently captured by DCs and can be transmitted to and amplified in CD4(+) T cells, with potentially deleterious effects on the induction of immune responses. In DC-T-cell cocultures, contact with CD4(+), not CD8(+), T cells preferentially facilitated virus movement to and release at immature and mature DC-T-cell contact sites. This occurred within 5 min of DC-T-cell contact. While the fusion inhibitor T-1249 did not prevent virus capture by DCs or the release of viruses at the DC-T-cell contact points, it readily blocked virus transfer to and amplification in CD4(+) T cells. Higher doses of T-1249 were needed to block the more robust replication driven by mature DCs. Virus accumulated in DCs within T-1249-treated cocultures but these DCs were actually less infectious than DCs isolated from untreated cocultures. Importantly, T-1249 did not interfere with the stimulation of virus-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses when present during virus-loading of DCs or for the time of the DC-T-cell coculture. These results provide clues to identifying strategies to prevent DC-driven virus amplification in CD4(+) T cells while maintaining virus-specific immunity, an objective critical in the development of microbicides and therapeutic vaccines.

  13. Evidence for Persistent, Occult Infection in Neonatal Macaques following Perinatal Transmission of Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus SF162P3▿

    PubMed Central

    Jayaraman, Pushpa; Zhu, Tuofu; Misher, Lynda; Mohan, Deepika; Kuller, LaRene; Polacino, Patricia; Richardson, Barbra A.; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Anderson, David; Hu, Shiu-Lok; Haigwood, Nancy L.

    2007-01-01

    To model human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) perinatal transmission, we studied infection of simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) SF162P3 in 10 pregnant Macaca nemestrina females and their offspring. Four of nine infants born to and suckled by these dams had evidence of infection, a transmission rate of 44.4% (95% confidence interval, 13.7% to 78.8%). We quantified transplacentally acquired and de novo Env-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgM, and neutralizing antibodies in newborns. Transmission of escape variants was confirmed. In utero infection (n = 1) resulted in high viremia, depletion of peripheral CD4+ T cells, and rapid evolution of env in blood and tissues. Peripartum or postpartum SHIV infection (n = 3) resulted in postacute viral control that was undetectable by very sensitive multiplex PCR, despite increasing antibodies. Seropositive infants with highly controlled viremia had homogeneous peripheral blood env sequences, and their tissues had <3 copies per million cells. A high incidence of seropositive virus-low or -negative SHIV infection in infant macaques has implications for HIV type 1 perinatal transmission and detection. PMID:17079310

  14. Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors that potently and specifically block human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication.

    PubMed Central

    Romero, D L; Busso, M; Tan, C K; Reusser, F; Palmer, J R; Poppe, S M; Aristoff, P A; Downey, K M; So, A G; Resnick, L

    1991-01-01

    Certain bis(heteroaryl)piperazines (BHAPs) are potent inhibitors of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) at concentrations lower by 2-4 orders of magnitude than that which inhibits normal cellular DNA polymerase activity. Combination of a BHAP with nucleoside analog HIV-1 RT inhibitors suggested that together these compounds inhibited RT synergistically. In three human lymphocytic cell systems using several laboratory and clinical HIV-1 isolates, the BHAPs blocked HIV-1 replication with potencies nearly identical to those of 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine or 2',3'-dideoxyadenosine; in primary cultures of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, concentrations of these antiviral agents were lower by at least 3-4 orders of magnitude than cytotoxic levels. The BHAPs do not inhibit replication of HIV-2, the simian or feline immunodeficiency virus, or Rauscher murine leukemia virus in culture. Evaluation of a BHAP in HIV-1-infected SCID-hu mice (severe combined immunodeficient mice implanted with human fetal lymph node) showed that the compound could block HIV-1 replication in vivo. The BHAPs are readily obtained synthetically and have been extensively characterized in preclinical evaluations. These compounds hold promise for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. Images PMID:1717988

  15. Seroprevalence and genomic divergence of circulating strains of feline immunodeficiency virus among Felidae and Hyaenidae species.

    PubMed

    Troyer, Jennifer L; Pecon-Slattery, Jill; Roelke, Melody E; Johnson, Warren; VandeWoude, Sue; Vazquez-Salat, Nuria; Brown, Meredith; Frank, Laurence; Woodroffe, Rosie; Winterbach, Christiaan; Winterbach, Hanlie; Hemson, Graham; Bush, Mitch; Alexander, Kathleen A; Revilla, Eloy; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2005-07-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infects numerous wild and domestic feline species and is closely related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). Species-specific strains of FIV have been described for domestic cat (Felis catus), puma (Puma concolor), lion (Panthera leo), leopard (Panthera pardus), and Pallas' cat (Otocolobus manul). Here, we employ a three-antigen Western blot screening (domestic cat, puma, and lion FIV antigens) and PCR analysis to survey worldwide prevalence, distribution, and genomic differentiation of FIV based on 3,055 specimens from 35 Felidae and 3 Hyaenidae species. Although FIV infects a wide variety of host species, it is confirmed to be endemic in free-ranging populations of nine Felidae and one Hyaenidae species. These include the large African carnivores (lion, leopard, cheetah, and spotted hyena), where FIV is widely distributed in multiple populations; most of the South American felids (puma, jaguar, ocelot, margay, Geoffroy's cat, and tigrina), which maintain a lower FIV-positive level throughout their range; and two Asian species, the Pallas' cat, which has a species-specific strain of FIV, and the leopard cat, which has a domestic cat FIV strain in one population. Phylogenetic analysis of FIV proviral sequence demonstrates that most species for which FIV is endemic harbor monophyletic, genetically distinct species-specific FIV strains, suggesting that FIV transfer between cat species has occurred in the past but is quite infrequent today.

  16. Seroprevalence and Genomic Divergence of Circulating Strains of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus among Felidae and Hyaenidae Species†

    PubMed Central

    Troyer, Jennifer L.; Pecon-Slattery, Jill; Roelke, Melody E.; Johnson, Warren; VandeWoude, Sue; Vazquez-Salat, Nuria; Brown, Meredith; Frank, Laurence; Woodroffe, Rosie; Winterbach, Christiaan; Winterbach, Hanlie; Hemson, Graham; Bush, Mitch; Alexander, Kathleen A.; Revilla, Eloy; O'Brien, Stephen J.

    2005-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infects numerous wild and domestic feline species and is closely related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). Species-specific strains of FIV have been described for domestic cat (Felis catus), puma (Puma concolor), lion (Panthera leo), leopard (Panthera pardus), and Pallas' cat (Otocolobus manul). Here, we employ a three-antigen Western blot screening (domestic cat, puma, and lion FIV antigens) and PCR analysis to survey worldwide prevalence, distribution, and genomic differentiation of FIV based on 3,055 specimens from 35 Felidae and 3 Hyaenidae species. Although FIV infects a wide variety of host species, it is confirmed to be endemic in free-ranging populations of nine Felidae and one Hyaenidae species. These include the large African carnivores (lion, leopard, cheetah, and spotted hyena), where FIV is widely distributed in multiple populations; most of the South American felids (puma, jaguar, ocelot, margay, Geoffroy's cat, and tigrina), which maintain a lower FIV-positive level throughout their range; and two Asian species, the Pallas' cat, which has a species-specific strain of FIV, and the leopard cat, which has a domestic cat FIV strain in one population. Phylogenetic analysis of FIV proviral sequence demonstrates that most species for which FIV is endemic harbor monophyletic, genetically distinct species-specific FIV strains, suggesting that FIV transfer between cat species has occurred in the past but is quite infrequent today. PMID:15956574

  17. Cocaine-mediated enhancement of virus replication in macrophages: implications for human immunodeficiency virus-associated dementia.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Navneet K; Williams, Rachel; Peng, Fuwang; Tsai, Yi-Jou; Dhillon, Sukhbir; Nicolay, Brandon; Gadgil, Milind; Kumar, Anil; Buch, Shilpa J

    2007-12-01

    Injection drug use has been recognized as a major risk factor for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) from the outset of the epidemic. Cocaine, one of the most widely abused drugs in the United States, can both impair the functions of macrophages and CD4(+) lymphocytes and also activate human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 expression in these cells. Because the brain is the target organ for both cocaine and HIV, the objective of the present study was to explore the effects of cocaine on virus replication in macrophages, the target cells for the virus in the central nervous system (CNS). Cocaine markedly enhanced virus production in simian human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-infected monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) and in U1 cells, a chronically infected promonocytic cell line as monitored by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunocytochemistry. Cocaine treatment also resulted in the activation of nuclear factor (NF)-kappa B and transcriptional activation of the HIV-LTR (long terminal repeat) gag-GFP (green fluorescent protein). Analyses of chemokines in cocaine-treated macrophages by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Luminex assays suggested increased expression of interleukin (IL)-10, a cytokine that is known to promote HIV replication in MDMs. In addition to enhancing IL-10 expression, cocaine also caused an up-regulation of the macrophage activation marker, human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR, in MDMs. The synergistic effect of cocaine on virus replication and its enhancement of host activation markers suggest that cocaine functions at multiple pathways to accelerate HIV-associated dementia (HAD). PMID:18097880

  18. [Oral plasmablastic lymphoma in a human immunodeficiency virus positive child: a case report].

    PubMed

    Astolfo, María Florencia; D'Antonio, Federico; Dartiguelongue, Juan B; Arabolaza, María N; Cheistwer, Ariel; De Matteo, Elena; Torrado, Lidia; Martínez Iriart, Emilio

    2016-04-01

    Plasmablastic lymphoma is a rare and aggressive subtype of diffuse large B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, originally described in the oral cavity of male adults with acquired immune deficiency syndrome. It is composed of neoplastic ceils which resemble immunoblasts but present immunophenotype distinctive of plasma cell and Epstein-Barr virus latent infection. In children, it is an even rarer disease. We present a case of oral plasmablastic lymphoma in a vertically transmitted human immunodeficiency virus-positive five-year-old child.

  19. Epstein-Barr virus and human immunodeficiency virus serological responses and viral burdens in HIV-infected patients treated with HAART

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Sullivan, Cathal E.; Peng, RongSheng; Cole, Kelly Stefano; Montelaro, Ronald C.; Sturgeon, Timothy; Jenson, Hal B.; Ling, Paul D.; Butel, J. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) associated non-Hodgkin lymphoma is recognized as a complication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Little is known regarding the influence of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on the biology of EBV in this population. To characterize the EBV- and HIV-specific serological responses together with EBV DNA levels in a cohort of HIV-infected adults treated with HAART, a study was conducted to compare EBV and HIV serologies and EBV DNA copy number (DNAemia) over a 12-month period after the commencement of HAART. All patients were seropositive for EBV at baseline. Approximately 50% of patients had detectable EBV DNA at baseline, and 27/30 had detectable EBV DNA at some point over the follow-up period of 1 year. Changes in EBV DNA copy number over time for any individual were unpredictable. Significant increases in the levels of Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen (EBNA) and Epstein-Barr early antigen (EA) antibodies were demonstrated in the 17 patients who had a good response to HAART. Of 29 patients with paired samples tested, four-fold or greater increases in titers were detected for EA in 12/29 (41%), for EBNA in 7/29 (24%), for VCA-IgG in 4/29 (14%); four-fold decreases in titers were detected in 2/29 (7%) for EA and 12/29 (41%) for EBNA. A significant decline in the titer of anti-HIV antibodies was also demonstrated. It was concluded that patients with advanced HIV infection who respond to HAART have an increase in their EBV specific antibodies and a decrease in their HIV-specific antibodies. For the cohort overall, there was a transient increase in EBV DNA levels that had declined by 12 months. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Immunotyping of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV): an Approach to Immunologic Classification of HIV

    PubMed Central

    Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Gorny, Miroslaw K.; Nyambi, Phillipe N.; VanCott, Thomas C.; Nádas, Arthur

    1999-01-01

    Because immunologic classification of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) might be more relevant than genotypic classification for designing polyvalent vaccines, studies were undertaken to determine whether immunologically defined groups of HIV (“immunotypes”) could be identified. For these experiments, the V3 region of the 120-kDa envelope glycoprotein (gp120) was chosen for study. Although antibodies (Abs) to V3 may not play a major protective role in preventing HIV infection, identification of a limited number of immunologically defined structures in this extremely variable region would set a precedent supporting the hypothesis that, despite its diversity, the HIV family, like the V3 region, might be divisible into immunotypes. Consequently, the immunochemical reactivities of 1,176 combinations of human anti-V3 monoclonal Abs (MAbs) and V3 peptides, derived from viruses of several clades, were studied. Extensive cross-clade reactivity was observed. The patterns of reactivities of 21 MAbs with 50 peptides from clades A through H were then analyzed by a multivariate statistical technique. To test the validity of the mathematical approach, a cluster analysis of the 21 MAbs was performed. Five groups were identified, and these MAb clusters corresponded to classifications of these same MAbs based on the epitopes which they recognize. The concordance between the MAb clusters identified by mathematical analysis and by their specificities supports the validity of the mathematical approach. Therefore, the same mathematical technique was used to identify clusters within the 50 peptides. Seven groups of peptides, each containing peptides from more than one clade, were defined. Inspection of the amino acid sequences of the peptides in each of the mathematically defined peptide clusters revealed unique “signature sequences” that suggest structural motifs characteristic of each V3-based immunotype. The results suggest that cluster analysis of immunologic data

  1. Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Replication by a Dual CCR5/CXCR4 Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Princen, Katrien; Hatse, Sigrid; Vermeire, Kurt; Aquaro, Stefano; De Clercq, Erik; Gerlach, Lars-Ole; Rosenkilde, Mette; Schwartz, Thue W.; Skerlj, Renato; Bridger, Gary; Schols, Dominique

    2004-01-01

    Here we report that the N-pyridinylmethyl cyclam analog AMD3451 has antiviral activity against a wide variety of R5, R5/X4, and X4 strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2 (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] ranging from 1.2 to 26.5 μM) in various T-cell lines, CCR5- or CXCR4-transfected cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and monocytes/macrophages. AMD3451 also inhibited R5, R5/X4, and X4 HIV-1 primary clinical isolates in PBMCs (IC50, 1.8 to 7.3 μM). A PCR-based viral entry assay revealed that AMD3451 blocks R5 and X4 HIV-1 infection at the virus entry stage. AMD3451 dose-dependently inhibited the intracellular Ca2+ signaling induced by the CXCR4 ligand CXCL12 in T-lymphocytic cells and in CXCR4-transfected cells, as well as the Ca2+ flux induced by the CCR5 ligands CCL5, CCL3, and CCL4 in CCR5-transfected cells. The compound did not interfere with chemokine-induced Ca2+ signaling through CCR1, CCR2, CCR3, CCR4, CCR6, CCR9, or CXCR3 and did not induce intracellular Ca2+ signaling by itself at concentrations up to 400 μM. In freshly isolated monocytes, AMD3451 inhibited the Ca2+ flux induced by CXCL12 and CCL4 but not that induced by CCL2, CCL3, CCL5, and CCL7. The CXCL12- and CCL3-induced chemotaxis was also dose-dependently inhibited by AMD3451. Furthermore, AMD3451 inhibited CXCL12- and CCL3L1-induced endocytosis in CXCR4- and CCR5-transfected cells. AMD3451, in contrast to the specific CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100, did not inhibit but enhanced the binding of several anti-CXCR4 monoclonal antibodies (such as clone 12G5) at the cell surface, pointing to a different interaction with CXCR4. AMD3451 is the first low-molecular-weight anti-HIV agent with selective HIV coreceptor, CCR5 and CXCR4, interaction. PMID:15542651

  2. Peptidomimetic therapeutic agents targeting the protease enzyme of the human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Tsantrizos, Youla S

    2008-10-01

    During the past two decades, great strides have been made in the design of peptidomimetic drugs for the trea