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Sample records for immunodeficiency virus dna

  1. Accumulation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA in T cells: results of multiple infection events.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, H L; Zinkus, D M

    1990-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA synthesis was followed in a CD4+ line of T cells (C8166) grown in the presence or absence of a monoclonal antibody to CD4 that blocks infection By 48 h after infection, cultures grown in the presence of the antibody contained approximately 4 copies of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA per cell, whereas those grown in the absence of the antibody contained approximately 80 copies of viral DNA per cell. Most of the viral DNA in cultures grown in the absence of the antibody was present in a broad smear of apparently incomplete viral sequences. In cultures grown in the presence or absence of the antibody, the 9.6-kilobase linear duplex of viral DNA appeared to undergo integration within 24 h of its appearance. These results demonstrate that T cells accumulate unintegrated human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA as a result of multiple virions entering cells. Images PMID:2398529

  2. Repeatedly positive human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA polymerase chain reaction in human immunodeficiency virus-exposed seroreverting infants.

    PubMed

    Bakshi, S S; Tetali, S; Abrams, E J; Paul, M O; Pahwa, S G

    1995-08-01

    Three human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-exposed children who had repeatedly positive DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests for HIV in > or = 5 samples before seroreversion to HIV-negative status are reported. The children belong to a cohort of 210 infants who were born to HIV-infected mothers and were tested at intervals of 1 to 3 months by HIV viral culture, PCR, and p24 antigen; only the PCR was positive in > or = 5 samples in the children reported here. Their clinical features were indistinguishable from other seroreverters. All three children had a transient drop in CD4:CD8 ratio to < 1.0. The transiently positive DNA PCR in HIV-exposed infants may indicate either that HIV infection was eliminated by a strong host immune response or that infection was caused by an attenuated/defective strain of virus.

  3. Vaccination of rhesus macaques with a vif-deleted simian immunodeficiency virus proviral DNA vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Sparger, Ellen E. Dubie, Robert A.; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Cole, Kelly S.; Chang, W.L.; Luciw, Paul A.

    2008-05-10

    Studies in non-human primates, with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) and simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) have demonstrated that live-attenuated viral vaccines are highly effective; however these vaccine viruses maintain a low level of pathogenicity. Lentivirus attenuation associated with deletion of the viral vif gene carries a significantly reduced risk for pathogenicity, while retaining the potential for virus replication of low magnitude in the host. This report describes a vif-deleted simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)mac239 provirus that was tested as an attenuated proviral DNA vaccine by inoculation of female rhesus macaques. SIV-specific interferon-{gamma} enzyme-linked immunospot responses of low magnitude were observed after immunization with plasmid containing the vif-deleted SIV provirus. However, vaccinated animals displayed strong sustained virus-specific T cell proliferative responses and increasing antiviral antibody titers. These immune responses suggested either persistent vaccine plasmid expression or low level replication of vif-deleted SIV in the host. Immunized and unvaccinated macaques received a single high dose vaginal challenge with pathogenic SIVmac251. A transient suppression of challenge virus load and a greater median survival time was observed for vaccinated animals. However, virus loads for vaccinated and unvaccinated macaques were comparable by twenty weeks after challenge and overall survival curves for the two groups were not significantly different. Thus, a vif-deleted SIVmac239 proviral DNA vaccine is immunogenic and capable of inducing a transient suppression of pathogenic challenge virus, despite severe attenuation of the vaccine virus.

  4. Simultaneous multiorgan presence of human herpesvirus 8 and restricted lymphotropism of Epstein-Barr virus DNA sequences in a human immunodeficiency virus-negative immunodeficient infant.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Velasco, P; Ocejo-Vinyals, J G; Flores, R; Gómez-Román, J J; Lozano, M J; Leyva-Cobián, F

    2001-01-15

    Because a profound dysregulation of the immune system occurs in primary immunodeficiencies, viral infections are not uncommon. Human herpesvirus (HHV)-8 DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis, Southern blotting, and in situ hybridization (ISH) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and lymphoid organs (bone marrow, spleen, and lymph nodes) and endothelial and epithelial cells and macrophages from several organs (skin, lung, esophagus, intestine, choroid plexus [but not in brain or cerebellum], heart, striated muscle, liver, and kidney) of a human immunodeficiency virus-negative infant with DiGeorge anomaly who died of disseminated infection. Epstein-Barr virus DNA sequences were detected in the spleen and lymph nodes (by PCR and ISH) and in bone marrow (only by ISH) but not in blood or nonlymphoid organs. This report is believed to be the first of multiorgan dissemination of HHV-8 in a primary immunodeficiency.

  5. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Vpr protein binds to the uracil DNA glycosylase DNA repair enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Bouhamdan, M; Benichou, S; Rey, F; Navarro, J M; Agostini, I; Spire, B; Camonis, J; Slupphaug, G; Vigne, R; Benarous, R; Sire, J

    1996-01-01

    The role of the accessory gene product Vpr during human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection remains unclear. We have used the yeast two-hybrid system to identify cellular proteins that interact with Vpr and could be involved in its function. A cDNA clone which encodes the human uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG), a DNA repair enzyme involved in removal of uracil in DNA, has been isolated. Interaction between Vpr and UNG has been demonstrated by in vitro protein-protein binding assays using translated, radiolabeled Vpr and UNG recombinant proteins expressed as a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein. Conversely, purified UNG has been demonstrated to interact with Vpr recombinant protein expressed as a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments confirmed that Vpr and UNG are associated within cells expressing Vpr. By using a panel of C- and N-terminally deleted Vpr mutants, we have determined that the core protein of Vpr, spanning amino acids 15 to 77, is involved in the interaction with UNG. We also demonstrate by in vitro experiments that the enzymatic activity of UNG is retained upon interaction with Vpr. PMID:8551605

  6. Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... education Fact Sheet PFS005: Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus AUGUST 2015 • Reasons for Getting Tested • Who Should ... For More Information • Glossary Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that ...

  7. DNA Vaccination Affords Significant Protection against Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Infection without Inducing Detectable Antiviral Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Hosie, Margaret J.; Flynn, J. Norman; Rigby, Mark A.; Cannon, Celia; Dunsford, Thomas; Mackay, Nancy A.; Argyle, David; Willett, Brian J.; Miyazawa, Takayuki; Onions, David E.; Jarrett, Oswald; Neil, James C.

    1998-01-01

    To test the potential of a multigene DNA vaccine against lentivirus infection, we generated a defective mutant provirus of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) with an in-frame deletion in pol (FIVΔRT). In a first experiment, FIVΔRT DNA was administered intramuscularly to 10 animals, half of which also received feline gamma interferon (IFN-γ) DNA. The DNA was administered in four 100-μg doses at 0, 10, and 23 weeks. Immunization with FIVΔRT elicited cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) responses to FIV Gag and Env in the absence of a serological response. After challenge with homologous virus at week 26, all 10 of the control animals became seropositive and viremic but 4 of the 10 vaccinates remained seronegative and virus free. Furthermore, quantitative virus isolation and quantitative PCR analysis of viral DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells revealed significantly lower virus loads in the FIVΔRT vaccinates than in the controls. Immunization with FIVΔRT in conjunction with IFN-γ gave the highest proportion of protected cats, with only two of five vaccinates showing evidence of infection following challenge. In a second experiment involving two groups (FIVΔRT plus IFN-γ and IFN-γ alone), the immunization schedule was reduced to 0, 4, and 8 weeks. Once again, CTL responses were seen prior to challenge in the absence of detectable antibodies. Two of five cats receiving the proviral DNA vaccine were protected against infection, with an overall reduction in virus load compared to the five infected controls. These findings demonstrate that DNA vaccination can elicit protection against lentivirus infection in the absence of a serological response and suggest the need to reconsider efficacy criteria for lentivirus vaccines. PMID:9696827

  8. Evidence for Gene Expression by Unintegrated Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 DNA Species

    PubMed Central

    Brussel, Audrey; Sonigo, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    The integrated form of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) DNA is classically considered to be the sole template for viral gene expression. However, several studies have suggested that unintegrated viral DNA species could also support transcription. To determine the contribution of the different species of HIV-1 DNA to viral expression, we first monitored intracellular levels of various HIV-1 DNA and RNA species in a single-round infection assay. We observed that, in comparison to the precocity of HIV-1 DNA synthesis, viral expression was delayed, suggesting that only the HIV-1 DNA species that persist for a sufficient period of time would be transcribed efficiently. We next evaluated the transcriptional activity of the circular forms of HIV-1 DNA bearing two long terminal repeats, since these episomes were reported to exhibit an intrinsic molecular stability. Our results support the notion that these circular species of HIV-1 DNA are naturally transcribed during HIV-1 infection, thereby participating in virus replication. PMID:15452245

  9. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 evolution in vivo tracked by DNA heteroduplex mobility assays.

    PubMed Central

    Delwart, E L; Sheppard, H W; Walker, B D; Goudsmit, J; Mullins, J I

    1994-01-01

    High mutation rates and strong selective pressures imposed on human immunodeficiency viruses in vivo result in the formation of pools of genetic variants known as quasispecies. DNA heteroduplex mobility and tracking analyses were used to monitor the generation of HIV sequence diversity, to estimate quasispecies complexity, and to assess the turnover of genetic variants to approach an understanding of the relationship between viral quasispecies evolution in vivo and disease progression. Proviral DNA pools were nearly homogeneous soon after sexual transmission. The emergence and clearance of individual variants then occurred at different rates in different individuals. High quasispecies complexity was found in long-term-infected, asymptomatic individuals, while rapid CD4+ cell decline and AIDS were often, but not always, associated with lower quasispecies complexity. Proviral genetic variation was often low following in vitro culture, because of the outgrowth of one or a few variants that often became more abundant only later as proviruses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These studies provide insight into the dynamics of human immunodeficiency virus sequence changes in vivo and illustrate the utility of heteroduplex analysis for the study of phenomena associated with rapid genetic changes. Images PMID:8084001

  10. Mitochondrial DNA content, an inaccurate biomarker of mitochondrial alteration in human immunodeficiency virus-related lipodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Ji; Jardel, Claude; Barthélémy, Cyrille; Jan, Véronique; Bastard, Jean Philippe; Fillaut-Chapin, Sandrine; Houry, Sydney; Capeau, Jacqueline; Lombès, Anne

    2008-05-01

    Lipoatrophy is a prevalent side effect of antiretroviral treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Its mechanisms are still disputed but include mitochondrial toxicity and, in particular, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion induced by nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. To obtain an integrated evaluation of the mitochondrial alteration in lipoatrophy, we investigated the DNA, RNA, and protein levels in 15 samples of abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue from HIV-infected patients with peripheral lipoatrophy and compared the results with those for 15 samples from age- and body mass index-matched controls. The DNA and RNA analyses used PCR-based techniques, while proteins were quantified with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and measurement of activities with spectrophotometric assays. Depletion of mtDNA and mtDNA-encoded MT-CO2 mRNA was present, but normal levels of mtDNA-dependent activity (cytochrome c oxidase) and protein (MT-CO2p) showed that it was compensated for. An increase in nuclear-DNA-dependent mitochondrial activities (citrate synthase and malate dehydrogenase) and protein (COX4I1p), as well as transcriptional up-regulation of nuclear-DNA-encoded mitochondrial genes (COX4I1 and UCP2), demonstrated increased mitochondrial biogenesis. However, the expression of the known transcription factors of mitochondrial biogenesis (TFAM, NRF1, GABPA, PPARGC1A, PPARGC1B, and PPRC1) was normal or decreased. Increased amounts of activated caspase 3 and of DDIT3 mRNA showed the induction of apoptosis and oxidative stress, respectively. The mtDNA content did not correlate with any other mitochondrial parameter. In conclusion, mtDNA content does not appear to be an accurate biomarker of mitochondrial alteration in lipoatrophic adipose tissue. The preservation of mtDNA-dependent mitochondrial functions occurred despite severe mtDNA depletion. The presence of significant oxidative stress and apoptosis did not correlate with the mtDNA content.

  11. Mitochondrial DNA Content, an Inaccurate Biomarker of Mitochondrial Alteration in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Related Lipodystrophy▿

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Ji; Jardel, Claude; Barthélémy, Cyrille; Jan, Véronique; Bastard, Jean Philippe; Fillaut-Chapin, Sandrine; Houry, Sydney; Capeau, Jacqueline; Lombès, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Lipoatrophy is a prevalent side effect of antiretroviral treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Its mechanisms are still disputed but include mitochondrial toxicity and, in particular, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion induced by nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. To obtain an integrated evaluation of the mitochondrial alteration in lipoatrophy, we investigated the DNA, RNA, and protein levels in 15 samples of abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue from HIV-infected patients with peripheral lipoatrophy and compared the results with those for 15 samples from age- and body mass index-matched controls. The DNA and RNA analyses used PCR-based techniques, while proteins were quantified with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and measurement of activities with spectrophotometric assays. Depletion of mtDNA and mtDNA-encoded MT-CO2 mRNA was present, but normal levels of mtDNA-dependent activity (cytochrome c oxidase) and protein (MT-CO2p) showed that it was compensated for. An increase in nuclear-DNA-dependent mitochondrial activities (citrate synthase and malate dehydrogenase) and protein (COX4I1p), as well as transcriptional up-regulation of nuclear-DNA-encoded mitochondrial genes (COX4I1 and UCP2), demonstrated increased mitochondrial biogenesis. However, the expression of the known transcription factors of mitochondrial biogenesis (TFAM, NRF1, GABPA, PPARGC1A, PPARGC1B, and PPRC1) was normal or decreased. Increased amounts of activated caspase 3 and of DDIT3 mRNA showed the induction of apoptosis and oxidative stress, respectively. The mtDNA content did not correlate with any other mitochondrial parameter. In conclusion, mtDNA content does not appear to be an accurate biomarker of mitochondrial alteration in lipoatrophic adipose tissue. The preservation of mtDNA-dependent mitochondrial functions occurred despite severe mtDNA depletion. The presence of significant oxidative stress and apoptosis did not correlate with the mtDNA content. PMID

  12. Induction of Potent Immune Responses by Cationic Microparticles with Adsorbed Human Immunodeficiency Virus DNA Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    O'Hagan, Derek; Singh, Manmohan; Ugozzoli, Mildred; Wild, Carl; Barnett, Susan; Chen, Minchao; Schaefer, Mary; Doe, Barbara; Otten, Gillis R.; Ulmer, Jeffrey B.

    2001-01-01

    The effectiveness of cationic microparticles with adsorbed DNA at inducing immune responses was investigated in mice, guinea pigs, and rhesus macaques. Plasmid DNA vaccines encoding human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Gag and Env adsorbed onto the surface of cationic poly(lactide-coglycolide) (PLG) microparticles were shown to be substantially more potent than corresponding naked DNA vaccines. In mice immunized with HIV gag DNA, adsorption onto PLG increased CD8+ T-cell and antibody responses by ∼100- and ∼1,000-fold, respectively. In guinea pigs immunized with HIV env DNA adsorbed onto PLG, antibody responses showed a more rapid onset and achieved markedly higher enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and neutralizing titers than in animals immunized with naked DNA. Further enhancement of antibody responses was observed in animals vaccinated with PLG/DNA microparticles formulated with aluminum phosphate. The magnitude of anti-Env antibody responses induced by PLG/DNA particles was equivalent to that induced by recombinant gp120 protein formulated with a strong adjuvant, MF-59. In guinea pigs immunized with a combination vaccine containing HIV env and HIV gag DNA plasmids on PLG microparticles, substantially superior antibody responses were induced against both components, as measured by onset, duration, and titer. Furthermore, PLG formulation overcame an apparent hyporesponsiveness of the env DNA component in the combination vaccine. Finally, preliminary data in rhesus macaques demonstrated a substantial enhancement of immune responses afforded by PLG/DNA. Therefore, formulation of DNA vaccines by adsorption onto PLG microparticles is a powerful means of increasing vaccine potency. PMID:11533167

  13. A noninfectious simian/human immunodeficiency virus DNA vaccine that protects macaques against AIDS.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dinesh K; Liu, Zhenqian; Sheffer, Darlene; Mackay, Glenn A; Smith, Marilyn; Dhillon, Sukhbir; Hegde, Ramakrishna; Jia, Fenglan; Adany, Istvan; Narayan, Opendra

    2005-03-01

    Simian/human immunodeficiency virus SHIV(KU2) replicates with extremely high titers in macaques. In order to determine whether the DNA of the viral genome could be used as a vaccine if the DNA were rendered noninfectious, we deleted the reverse transcriptase gene from SHIVKU2 and inserted this DNA (DeltartSHIVKU2) into a plasmid that was then used to test gene expression and immunogenicity. Transfection of Jurkat and human embryonic kidney epithelial (HEK 293) cells with the DNA resulted in production of all of the major viral proteins and their precursors and transient export of a large quantity of the Gag p27 into the supernatant fluid. As expected, no infectious virus was produced in these cultures. Four macaques were injected intradermally with 2 mg of the DNA at 0, 8, and 18 weeks. The animals developed neutralizing antibodies and low enzyme-linked immunospot assay (E-SPOT) titers against SHIVKU2. These four animals and two unvaccinated control animals were then challenged with heterologous SHIV89.6P administered into their rectums. The two control animals developed viral RNA titers exceeding 10(6) copies/ml of plasma, and these titers were accompanied by the loss of CD4+ T cells by 2 weeks after challenge. The two control animals died at weeks 8 and 16, respectively. All four of the immunized animals became infected with the challenge virus but developed lower titers of viral RNA in plasma than the control animals, and the titers decreased over time in three of the four macaques. The fourth animal remained viremic and died at week 47. Whereas the control animals failed to develop E-SPOT responses, all four of the immunized animals developed anamnestic E-SPOT responses after challenge. The animal that died developed the highest E-SPOT response and was the only one that produced neutralizing antibodies against the challenge virus. These results established that noninfectious DNA of pathogenic SHIV could be used as a vaccine to prevent AIDS, even though the

  14. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA integration: fine structure target analysis using synthetic oligonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Hong, T; Murphy, E; Groarke, J; Drlica, K

    1993-01-01

    The target specificity of DNA strand transfer mediated by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase was examined in vitro with synthetic oligonucleotides. Although insertion occurred at most locations in the target, some sites were preferred over others by at least 15-fold. Changing the nucleotide sequence of the target changed the distribution of preferred sites in complex ways, some of which included changes in target preference distant from the sequence alteration. Alignment of target sequences revealed that adenosine is preferred adjacent to the insertion site. Strand transfer occurred to within 2 nucleotides of the 3' end and to within 3 nucleotides of the 5' end of the target. This suggests that only 2 or 3 nucleotides flanking the target site are required for integration; such restricted contact with target DNA would allow integrase to insert the two ends of viral DNA into two closely spaced sites in host DNA, consistent with the concerted in vivo integration reaction that generates a 5-bp target duplication. Images PMID:8419642

  15. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Integration Protein Expressed in Escherichia Coli Possesses Selective DNA Cleaving Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Paula A.; Fyfe, James A.

    1990-07-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) integration protein, a potential target for selective antiviral therapy, was expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified protein, free of detectable contaminating endonucleases, selectively cleaved double-stranded DNA oligonucleotides that mimic the U3 and the U5 termini of linear HIV DNA. Two nucleotides were removed from the 3' ends of both the U5 plus strand and the U3 minus strand; in both cases, cleavage was adjacent to a conserved CA dinucleotide. The reaction was metal-ion dependent, with a preference for Mn2+ over Mg2+. Reaction selectivity was further demonstrated by the lack of cleavage of an HIV U5 substrate on the complementary (minus) strand, an analogous substrate that mimics the U3 terminus of an avian retrovirus, and an HIV U5 substrate in which the conserved CA dinucleotide was replaced with a TA dinucleotide. Such an integration protein-mediated cleavage reaction is expected to occur as part of the integration event in the retroviral life cycle, in which a double-stranded DNA copy of the viral RNA genome is inserted into the host cell DNA.

  16. Chemokine-adjuvanted electroporated DNA vaccine induces substantial protection from simian immunodeficiency virus vaginal challenge.

    PubMed

    Kutzler, M A; Wise, M C; Hutnick, N A; Moldoveanu, Z; Hunter, M; Reuter, M A; Yuan, S; Yan, J; Ginsberg, A A; Sylvester, A; Pahar, B; Carnathan, D G; Kathuria, N; Khan, A S; Montefiori, D; Sardesai, N Y; Betts, M R; Mestecky, J; Marx, P A; Weiner, D B

    2016-01-01

    There have been encouraging results for the development of an effective HIV vaccine. However, many questions remain regarding the quality of immune responses and the role of mucosal antibodies. We addressed some of these issues by using a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) DNA vaccine adjuvanted with plasmid-expressed mucosal chemokines combined with an intravaginal SIV challenge in rhesus macaque (RhM) model. We previously reported on the ability of CCR9 and CCR10 ligand (L) adjuvants to enhance mucosal and systemic IgA and IgG responses in small animals. In this study, RhMs were intramuscularly immunized five times with either DNA or DNA plus chemokine adjuvant delivered by electroporation followed by challenge with SIVsmE660. Sixty-eight percent of all vaccinated animals (P<0.01) remained either uninfected or had aborted infection compared with only 14% in the vaccine naïve group. The highest protection was observed in the CCR10L chemokines group, where six of nine animals had aborted infection and two remained uninfected, leading to 89% protection (P<0.001). The induction of mucosal SIV-specific antibodies and neutralization titers correlated with trends in protection. These results indicate the need to further investigate the contribution of chemokine adjuvants to modulate immune responses and the role of mucosal antibodies in SIV/HIV protection.

  17. Chemokine Adjuvanted Electroporated-DNA Vaccine Induces Substantial Protection from Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Vaginal Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Hutnick, N A; Moldoveanu, Z; Hunter, M; Reuter, M; Yuan, S; Yan, J; Ginsberg, A; Sylvester, A; Pahar, B; Carnathan, D; Kathuria, N; Khan, A S; Montefiori, D; Sardesai, N Y; Betts, M R; Mestecky, J; Marx, P; Weiner, D B

    2015-01-01

    There have been encouraging results for the development of an effective HIV vaccine. However, many questions remain regarding the quality of immune responses and the role of mucosal antibodies. We addressed some of these issues by using a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) DNA vaccine adjuvanted with plasmid-expressed mucosal chemokines combined with an intravaginal SIV challenge in rhesus macaque (RhM) model. We previously reported on the ability of CCR9 and CCR10 ligand (L) adjuvants to enhance mucosal and systemic IgA and IgG in small animals. In this study, RhMs were intramuscularly immunized five times with either DNA or DNA plus chemokine adjuvant delivered by electroporation followed by challenge with SIVsmE660. Sixty-eight percent of all vaccinated animals (P=0.0016) remained either uninfected or had aborted infection compared to only 14% in the vaccine naïve group. The highest protection was observed in the CCR10L chemokines group, where 6 of 9 animals had aborted infection and two remained uninfected, leading to 89% protection (P=0.0003). The induction of mucosal SIV-specific antibodies and neutralization titers correlated with trends in protection. These results indicate the need to further investigate the contribution of chemokine adjuvants to modulate immune responses and the role of mucosal antibodies in SIV/HIV protection. PMID:25943275

  18. Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... incisions made in the mother’s abdomen and uterus. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV): A virus that attacks certain cells of the body’s immune system and causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Immune System: ...

  19. Epstein-Barr virus DNA loads in adult human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, Paul D.; Vilchez, Regis A.; Keitel, Wendy A.; Poston, David G.; Peng, Rong Sheng; White, Zoe S.; Visnegarwala, Fehmida; Lewis, Dorothy E.; Butel, Janet S.

    2003-01-01

    Patients with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection are at high risk of developing Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated lymphoma. However, little is known of the EBV DNA loads in patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Using a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay, we demonstrated that significantly more HIV-1-infected patients receiving HAART than HIV-1-uninfected volunteers had detectable EBV DNA in blood (57 [81%] of 70 vs. 11 [16%] of 68 patients; P=.001) and saliva (55 [79%] of 68 vs. 37 [54%] of 68 patients; P=.002). The mean EBV loads in blood and saliva samples were also higher in HIV-1-infected patients than in HIV-1-uninfected volunteers (P=.001). The frequency of EBV detection in blood was associated with lower CD4+ cell counts (P=.03) among HIV-1-infected individuals, although no differences were observed in the EBV DNA loads in blood or saliva samples in the HIV-1-infected group. Additional studies are needed to determine whether EBV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ cells play a role in the pathogenesis of EBV in HIV-1-infected patients receiving HAART.

  20. Epstein-Barr virus DNA loads in adult human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, Paul D.; Vilchez, Regis A.; Keitel, Wendy A.; Poston, David G.; Peng, Rong Sheng; White, Zoe S.; Visnegarwala, Fehmida; Lewis, Dorothy E.; Butel, Janet S.

    2003-01-01

    Patients with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection are at high risk of developing Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated lymphoma. However, little is known of the EBV DNA loads in patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Using a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay, we demonstrated that significantly more HIV-1-infected patients receiving HAART than HIV-1-uninfected volunteers had detectable EBV DNA in blood (57 [81%] of 70 vs. 11 [16%] of 68 patients; P=.001) and saliva (55 [79%] of 68 vs. 37 [54%] of 68 patients; P=.002). The mean EBV loads in blood and saliva samples were also higher in HIV-1-infected patients than in HIV-1-uninfected volunteers (P=.001). The frequency of EBV detection in blood was associated with lower CD4+ cell counts (P=.03) among HIV-1-infected individuals, although no differences were observed in the EBV DNA loads in blood or saliva samples in the HIV-1-infected group. Additional studies are needed to determine whether EBV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ cells play a role in the pathogenesis of EBV in HIV-1-infected patients receiving HAART.

  1. Immunogenicity analysis following human immunodeficiency virus recombinant DNA and recombinant vaccinia virus Tian Tan prime-boost immunization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cunxia; Du, Shouwen; Li, Chang; Wang, Yuhang; Wang, Maopeng; Li, Yi; Yin, Ronglan; Li, Xiao; Ren, Dayong; Qin, Yanqing; Ren, Jingqiang; Jin, Ningyi

    2013-06-01

    This study assessed and compared the immunogenicity of various immunization strategies in mice using combinations of recombinant DNA (pCCMp24) and recombinant attenuated vaccinia virus Tian Tan (rddVTT-CCMp24). Intramuscular immunization was performed on days 0 (prime) and 21 (boost). The immunogenicity of the vaccine schedules was determined by measuring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific binding antibody levels and cytokine (interleukin-2 and interleukin-4) concentrations in peripheral blood, analyzing lymphocyte proliferation capacity against HIV epitopes and CD4(+)/CD8(+) cell ratio, and monitoring interferon-gamma levels at different times post-immunization. The results showed that pCCMp24, rddVTT-CCMp24 and their prime-boost immunization induced humoral and cellular immune responses. The pCCMp24/rddVTT-CCMp24 immunization strategy increased CD8(+) T cells and induced more IFN-γ-secreting cells compared with single-shot rDNA. The prime-boost immunization strategy also induced the generation of cellular immunological memory to HIV epitope peptides. These results demonstrated that prime-boost immunization with rDNA and rddVTT-CCMp24 had a tendency to induce greater cellular immune response than single-shot vaccinations, especially IFN-γ response, providing a basis for further studies.

  2. Human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Anita

    2016-11-23

    What was the nature of the CPD activity, practice-related feedback and/or event and/or experience in your practice? The CPD article discussed the importance of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing and diagnosing the condition as early as possible, so that antiretroviral treatment can be initiated and patient outcomes improved.

  3. Vaccination with Inactivated Virus but Not Viral DNA Reduces Virus Load following Challenge with a Heterologous and Virulent Isolate of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Hosie, Margaret J.; Dunsford, Thomas; Klein, Dieter; Willett, Brian J.; Cannon, Celia; Osborne, Robert; MacDonald, Julie; Spibey, Norman; Mackay, Nancy; Jarrett, Oswald; Neil, James C.

    2000-01-01

    It has been shown that cats can be protected against infection with the prototypic Petaluma strain of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIVPET) using vaccines based on either inactivated virus particles or replication-defective proviral DNA. However, the utility of such vaccines in the field is uncertain, given the absence of consistent protection against antigenically distinct strains and the concern that the Petaluma strain may be an unrepresentative, attenuated isolate. Since reduction of viral pathogenicity and dissemination may be useful outcomes of vaccination, even in the absence of complete protection, we tested whether either of these vaccine strategies ameliorates the early course of infection following challenge with heterologous and more virulent isolates. We now report that an inactivated virus vaccine, which generates high levels of virus neutralizing antibodies, confers reduced virus loads following challenge with two heterologous isolates, FIVAM6 and FIVGL8. This vaccine also prevented the marked early decline in CD4/CD8 ratio seen in FIVGL8-infected cats. In contrast, DNA vaccines based on either FIVPET or FIVGL8, which induce cell-mediated responses but no detectable antiviral antibodies, protected a fraction of cats against infection with FIVPET but had no measurable effect on virus load when the infecting virus was FIVGL8. These results indicate that the more virulent FIVGL8 is intrinsically more resistant to vaccinal immunity than the FIVPET strain and that a broad spectrum of responses which includes virus neutralizing antibodies is a desirable goal for lentivirus vaccine development. PMID:11000209

  4. Mutations in the Primer Grip of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Reverse Transcriptase Impair Proviral DNA Synthesis and Virion Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qiang; Ottmann, Michele; Pechoux, Christine; Le Grice, Stuart; Darlix, Jean-Luc

    1998-01-01

    This report describes the effects of mutating highly conserved residues in the primer grip domain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (RT) on virus formation and infectivity. Among a series of RT mutant viruses, three (M230A, L234D, and W239A) were found to be noninfectious or very poorly infectious. Our data indicate that these mutations in RT caused severe defects in proviral DNA synthesis. Interestingly, assembly and maturation of mutant virus M230A were similar to those of the wild type, while mutants L234D and W239A showed impaired maturation. The immature morphology of RT mutants L234D and W239A is due at least in part to premature cleavage of the gag-pol precursor, prior to virion budding, indicating that intracellular stability of Pr160gag-pol is of key importance during virus assembly. PMID:9696874

  5. Infection of macrophages with lymphotropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 can be arrested after viral DNA synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Z B; Potash, M J; Simm, M; Shahabuddin, M; Chao, W; Gendelman, H E; Eden, E; Volsky, D J

    1993-01-01

    Lymphotropic strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), including HTLV-IIIB, replicate poorly in macrophages. We have shown previously that lymphotropic HIV-1 fuses equally well with T lymphocytes and macrophages (M. J. Potash, M. Zeira, Z.-B. Huang, T. Pearce, E. Eden, H. Gendelman, and D. J. Volsky, Virology 188:864-868, 1992), suggesting that events in the virus life cycle following virus-cell fusion limit virus replication. We report here that HIV-1 DNA is synthesized efficiently in either ADA or HTLV-IIIB infected alveolar macrophages or monocyte-derived macrophages within 24 h of virus infection, as observed by polymerase chain reaction for amplification of viral DNA sequences from the gag gene. Infection by a cloned lymphotropic HIV-1 strain, N1T-A, also leads to viral DNA synthesis. However, circular viral DNA was detected during strain ADA infection but not during HTLV-IIIB or N1T-A infection of monocyte-derived macrophages. These findings indicate that during replication of lymphotropic HIV-1 in macrophages, all steps of the virus life cycle up to and including reverse transcription take place and that defects in later events, including DNA migration to the nucleus, may account for the limited production of viral proteins. Images PMID:8411394

  6. Vaccination with inactivated virus but not viral DNA reduces virus load following challenge with a heterologous and virulent isolate of feline immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Hosie, M J; Dunsford, T; Klein, D; Willett, B J; Cannon, C; Osborne, R; Macdonald, J; Spibey, N; Mackay, N; Jarrett, O; Neil, J C

    2000-10-01

    It has been shown that cats can be protected against infection with the prototypic Petaluma strain of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV(PET)) using vaccines based on either inactivated virus particles or replication-defective proviral DNA. However, the utility of such vaccines in the field is uncertain, given the absence of consistent protection against antigenically distinct strains and the concern that the Petaluma strain may be an unrepresentative, attenuated isolate. Since reduction of viral pathogenicity and dissemination may be useful outcomes of vaccination, even in the absence of complete protection, we tested whether either of these vaccine strategies ameliorates the early course of infection following challenge with heterologous and more virulent isolates. We now report that an inactivated virus vaccine, which generates high levels of virus neutralizing antibodies, confers reduced virus loads following challenge with two heterologous isolates, FIV(AM6) and FIV(GL8). This vaccine also prevented the marked early decline in CD4/CD8 ratio seen in FIV(GL8)-infected cats. In contrast, DNA vaccines based on either FIV(PET) or FIV(GL8), which induce cell-mediated responses but no detectable antiviral antibodies, protected a fraction of cats against infection with FIV(PET) but had no measurable effect on virus load when the infecting virus was FIV(GL8). These results indicate that the more virulent FIV(GL8) is intrinsically more resistant to vaccinal immunity than the FIV(PET) strain and that a broad spectrum of responses which includes virus neutralizing antibodies is a desirable goal for lentivirus vaccine development.

  7. Safety Profile of the Merck Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Clade B gag DNA Plasmid Vaccine With and Without Adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Erin K; Brown, Elizabeth L; Leavitt, Randi Y; Mogg, Robin; Mehrotra, Devan V; Evans, Robert K; DiNubile, Mark J; Robertson, Michael N

    2014-03-01

    The immunogenicity results from 3 phase I trials of the Merck DNA human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine have previously been reported. Because preventive DNA vaccine strategies continue to be leveraged for diverse infections, the safety and tolerability results from these studies can inform the field moving forward, particularly regarding adverse reactions and adjuvants. No serious vaccine-related adverse events were reported during the 3-dose priming phase. Pain at the injection site was more common with adjuvanted formulations than with the phosphate-buffered saline diluent alone. Febrile reactions were usually low grade. Although the AlPO4 or CRL1005 adjuvants used in these studies did not significantly enhance the immunogenicity of the DNA vaccine, adverse events were numerically more common with adjuvanted formulations than without adjuvants.

  8. Enzyme-free and label-free ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of human immunodeficiency virus DNA in biological samples based on long-range self-assembled DNA nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xian; Hong, Cheng-Yi; Lin, Ya-Hui; Chen, Jing-Hua; Chen, Guo-Nan; Yang, Huang-Hao

    2012-10-02

    Biosensors based on nanomaterials have been used for detection of various biological molecules with high sensitivity and selectivity. Herein, we developed a simple and ultrasensitive electrochemical DNA biosensor using long-range self-assembled DNA nanostructures as carriers for signal amplification, which can achieve an impressive detection limit of 5 aM human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) DNA even in complex biological samples. In this study, we designed two auxiliary probes. A cascade of hybridization events between the two auxiliary probes can lead to long-range self-assembly and form micrometer-long one-dimensional DNA nanostructures. In the presence of target DNA, each copy of the target can act as a trigger to connect a DNA nanostructure to a capture probe on the electrode surface. Then, a great amount of redox indicator [Ru(NH(3))(6)](3+) can be electrostatically bound to the DNA nanostructures and eventually result in significantly amplified electrochemical signals.

  9. Mapping Viral DNA Specificity to the Central Region of Integrase by Using Functional Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1/Visna Virus Chimeric Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Katzman, Michael; Sudol, Malgorzata

    1998-01-01

    We previously described the construction and analysis of the first set of functional chimeric lentivirus integrases, involving exchange of the N-terminal, central, and C-terminal regions of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and visna virus integrase (IN) proteins. Based on those results, additional HIV-1/visna virus chimeric integrases were designed and purified. Each of the chimeric enzymes was functional in at least one oligonucleotide-based IN assay. Of a total of 12 chimeric IN proteins, 3 exhibit specific viral DNA processing, 9 catalyze insertion of viral DNA ends, 12 can reverse that reaction, and 11 are active for nonspecific alcoholysis. Functional data obtained with the processing assay indicate that the central region of the protein is responsible for viral DNA specificity. Target site selection for nonspecific alcoholysis again mapped to the central domain of IN, confirming our previous data indicating that this region can position nonviral DNA for nucleophilic attack. However, the chimeric proteins created patterns of viral DNA insertion distinct from that of either wild-type IN, suggesting that interactions between regions of IN influence target site selection for viral DNA integration. The results support a new model for the functional organization of IN in which viral DNA initially binds nonspecifically to the C-terminal portion of IN but the catalytic central region of the enzyme has a prominent role both in specific recognition of viral DNA ends and in positioning the host DNA for viral DNA integration. PMID:9499023

  10. Structure-based mutagenesis of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA attachment site: effects on integration and cDNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Brown, H E; Chen, H; Engelman, A

    1999-11-01

    Sequences at the ends of linear retroviral cDNA important for integration define the viral DNA attachment (att) site. Whereas determinants of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase important for replication in T lymphocytes have been extensively characterized, regions of the att site important for viral spread have not been thoroughly examined. Previous transposon-mediated footprinting of preintegration complexes isolated from infected cells revealed enhanced regions of bacteriophage Mu insertion near the ends of HIV-1 cDNA, in the regions of the att sites. Here, we identified the subterminal cDNA sequences cleaved during in vitro footprinting and used this structure-based information together with results of previous work to construct and characterize 24 att site mutant viruses. We found that although subterminal cDNA sequences contributed to HIV-1 replication, the identities of these bases were not critical for integration. In contrast, the phylogenetically conserved CA dinucleotides located at the ends of HIV-1 contributed significantly to virus replication and integration. Mutants containing one intact CA end displayed delays in peak virus growth compared to the wild type. In contrast, double mutant viruses lacking both CAs were replication defective. The A of the CA appeared to be the most critical determinant of integration, because two different U5 mutant viruses containing the substitution of TG for CA partially reverted by changing the G back to A. We also identified a U5 deletion mutant in which the CA played a crucial role in reverse transcription.

  11. Temporal aspects of DNA and RNA synthesis during human immunodeficiency virus infection: evidence for differential gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S Y; Byrn, R; Groopman, J; Baltimore, D

    1989-01-01

    The kinetics of retroviral DNA and RNA synthesis are parameters vital to understanding viral growth, especially for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which encodes several of its own regulatory genes. We have established a single-cycle growth condition for HIV in H9 cells, a human CD4+ lymphocyte line. The full-length viral linear DNA is first detectable by 4 h postinfection. During a one-step growth of HIV, amounts of viral DNA gradually increase until 8 to 12 h postinfection and then decrease. The copy number of unintegrated viral DNA is not extraordinarily high even at its peak. Most strikingly, there is a temporal program of RNA accumulation: the earliest RNA is greatly enriched in the 2-kilobase subgenomic mRNA species, while the level of 9.2-kilobase RNA which is both genomic RNA and mRNA remains low until after 24 h of infection. Virus production begins at about 24 h postinfection. Thus, viral DNA synthesis is as rapid as for other retroviruses, but viral RNA synthesis involves temporal alteration in the species that accumulate, presumably as a consequence of viral regulatory genes. Images PMID:2760980

  12. Activities of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Integration Protein In vitro: Specific Cleavage and Integration of HIV DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushman, Frederic D.; Craigie, Robert

    1991-02-01

    Growth of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) after infection requires the integration of a DNA copy of the viral RNA genome into a chromosome of the host. Here we present a simple in vitro system that carries out the integration reaction and the use of this system to probe the mechanism of integration. The only HIV protein necessary is the integration (IN) protein, which has been overexpressed in insect cells and then partially purified. DNA substrates are supplied as oligonucleotides that match the termini of the linear DNA product of reverse transcription. In the presence of HIV IN protein, oligonucleotide substrates are cleaved to generate the recessed 3' ends that are the precursor for integration, and the cleaved molecules are efficiently inserted into a DNA target. Analysis of reaction products reveals that HIV IN protein joins 3' ends of the viral DNA to 5' ends of cuts made by IN protein in the DNA target. We have also used this assay to characterize the sequences at the ends of the viral DNA involved in integration. The assay provides a simple screen for testing candidate inhibitors of HIV IN protein; some such inhibitors might have useful antiviral activity.

  13. DNA Repair Enzyme Uracil DNA Glycosylase Is Specifically Incorporated into Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Viral Particles through a Vpr-Independent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Willetts, Karen E.; Rey, Françoise; Agostini, Isabelle; Navarro, Jean-Marc; Baudat, Yves; Vigne, Robert; Sire, Joséphine

    1999-01-01

    The Vpr protein, encoded by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genome, is one of the nonstructural proteins packaged in large amounts into viral particles. We have previously reported that Vpr associates with the DNA repair enzyme uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG). In this study, we extended these observations by investigating whether UDG is incorporated into virions and whether this incorporation requires the presence of Vpr. Our results, with highly purified viruses, show that UDG is efficiently incorporated either into wild-type virions or into Vpr-deficient HIV-1 virions, indicating that Vpr is not involved in UDG packaging. Using an in vitro protein-protein binding assay, we reveal a direct interaction between the precursor form of UDG and the viral integrase (IN). Finally, we demonstrate that IN-defective viruses fail to incorporate UDG, indicating that IN is required for packaging of UDG into virions. PMID:9882380

  14. Feline immunodeficiency virus latency

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Despite highly effective anti-retroviral therapy, HIV is thought to persist in patients within long-lived cellular reservoirs in the form of a transcriptionally inactive (latent) integrated provirus. Lentiviral latency has therefore come to the forefront of the discussion on the possibility of a cure for HIV infection in humans. Animal models of lentiviral latency provide an essential tool to study mechanisms of latency and therapeutic manipulation. Of the three animal models that have been described, the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-infected cat is the most recent and least characterized. However, several aspects of this model make it attractive for latency research, and it may be complementary to other model systems. This article reviews what is known about FIV latency and chronic FIV infection and how it compares with that of other lentiviruses. It thereby offers a framework for the usefulness of this model in future research aimed at lentiviral eradication. PMID:23829177

  15. Pharmacological Inhibition of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV)

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Hakimeh; Bienzle, Dorothee

    2012-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a member of the retroviridae family of viruses and causes an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in domestic and non-domestic cats worldwide. Genome organization of FIV and clinical characteristics of the disease caused by the virus are similar to those of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Both viruses infect T lymphocytes, monocytes and macrophages, and their replication cycle in infected cells is analogous. Due to marked similarity in genomic organization, virus structure, virus replication and disease pathogenesis of FIV and HIV, infection of cats with FIV is a useful tool to study and develop novel drugs and vaccines for HIV. Anti-retroviral drugs studied extensively in HIV infection have targeted different steps of the virus replication cycle: (1) inhibition of virus entry into susceptible cells at the level of attachment to host cell surface receptors and co-receptors; (2) inhibition of fusion of the virus membrane with the cell membrane; (3) blockade of reverse transcription of viral genomic RNA; (4) interruption of nuclear translocation and viral DNA integration into host genomes; (5) prevention of viral transcript processing and nuclear export; and (6) inhibition of virion assembly and maturation. Despite much success of anti-retroviral therapy slowing disease progression in people, similar therapy has not been thoroughly investigated in cats. In this article we review current pharmacological approaches and novel targets for anti-lentiviral therapy, and critically assess potentially suitable applications against FIV infection in cats. PMID:22754645

  16. Diagnostic value of amplification of human cytomegalovirus DNA from gastrointestinal biopsies from human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

    PubMed Central

    Cotte, L; Drouet, E; Bissuel, F; Denoyel, G A; Trepo, C

    1993-01-01

    In order to assess the value of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) DNA amplification of gastrointestinal biopsies, we studied 57 human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with and without gastrointestinal HCMV diseases. After DNA extraction, a 406-bp fragment from the unique short region of the HCMV genome was amplified by 35 cycles of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and semiquantified from 80 to 80,000 HCMV genomic copies. Among 12 non-AIDS patients, the PCR assay was negative for 11 of 12 duodenal and 8 of 8 colorectal samples. It was also negative for 28 of 31 duodenal and 12 of 15 colorectal samples from 31 AIDS patients without gastrointestinal HCMV diseases. Among 14 AIDS patients with gastrointestinal HCMV diseases, the PCR assay was positive for 12 of 12 patients with HCMV duodenitis and for 13 of 13 patients with HCMV colitis. Results were dichotomized between high and low HCMV-DNA copy numbers. For duodenitis, sensitivity was 92% and specificity was 100%. For colitis, sensitivity was 92% and specificity was 93%. Specificity and sensitivity were not influenced by shedding status for HCMV or by other gastrointestinal infections. HCMV DNA amplification of gastrointestinal biopsies is a sensitive and specific tool for the diagnosis of gastrointestinal HCMV diseases in AIDS patients. Images PMID:8396587

  17. Comparative evaluation of the cytomegalovirus DNA load in polymorphonuclear leukocytes and plasma of human immunodeficiency virus-infected subjects.

    PubMed

    Boivin, G; Handfield, J; Toma, E; Murray, G; Lalonde, R; Bergeron, M G

    1998-02-01

    The cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA load was determined in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) and plasma samples from 106 human immunodeficiency virus-infected subjects at risk of developing CMV disease (group 1) and from 27 AIDS patients with documented CMV disease (group 2). For both groups, the number of CMV copies in PMNL was significantly higher than in plasma when results were derived from an equivalent blood volume (P < .001, PMNL vs. plasma). Additionally, group 2 (symptomatic) patients had a greater viral DNA load than group 1 (asymptomatic) subjects (P < .001 for both PMNL and plasma). The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of qualitative polymerase chain reaction using PMNL (PCR-PMNL) for the presence of CMV disease were 100%, 58%, 38%, and 100%, respectively, compared with 70%, 93%, 74%, and 92% for qualitative PCR-plasma and 93%, 92%, 76%, and 98% for quantitative PCR-PMNL using a cutoff of 16,000 copies/mL. Thus, the best strategy for diagnosing CMV disease in these individuals relies on quantitative assessment of the viral DNA load in PMNL.

  18. Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

    MedlinePlus

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task ... final recommendation statement on Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) . This final recommendation statement applies to all ...

  19. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 DNA Decay Dynamics With Early, Long-term Virologic Control of Perinatal Infection.

    PubMed

    Uprety, Priyanka; Patel, Kunjal; Karalius, Brad; Ziemniak, Carrie; Chen, Ya Hui; Brummel, Sean S; Siminski, Suzanne; Van Dyke, Russell B; Seage, George R; Persaud, Deborah

    2017-06-01

    Early antiretroviral therapy (ART) limits proviral reservoirs, a goal for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) remission strategies. Whether this is an immediate or long-term effect of virologic suppression (VS) in perinatal infection is unknown. We quantified HIV-1 DNA longitudinally for up to 14 years in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) among 61 perinatally HIV-1-infected youths in the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study who achieved VS at different ages. Participants in group 1 (n = 13) were <1 year of age and in group 2 (n = 48) from 1 through 5 years of age at VS. Piecewise linear mixed-effects regression models assessed the effect of age at VS on HIV-1 DNA trajectories during VS. In the first 2 years following VS, HIV-1 DNA levels decreased by -0.25 (95% confidence interval [CI], -.36 to -.13) log10 copies/million PBMCs per year and was faster with early VS by age 1 year compared with after age 1 (-0.50 and -0.15 log10 copies/million PBMCs per year, respectively). Between years 2 and 14 from VS, HIV-1 DNA decayed by -0.05 (95% CI, -.06 to -.03) log10 copies/million PBMCs per year and was no longer significantly different between groups. The estimated mean half-life of HIV-1 DNA from VS was 15.9 years and was shorter for group 1 compared to group 2 at 5.9 years and 18.8 years, respectively (P = .09). Adjusting for CD4 cell counts had no effect on decay estimates. Early effective, long-term ART initiated from infancy leads to decay of HIV-1-infected cells to exceedingly low concentrations desired for HIV-1 remission strategies.

  20. Frequent detection of papillomavirus DNA in clinically normal skin of cats infected and noninfected with feline immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Munday, John S; Witham, Adrian I

    2010-06-01

    Feline cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) often contain felis domesticus papillomavirus type 2 (FdPV-2) DNA. While this may suggest FdPV-2 causes feline SCC development, the proportion of cats that are asymptomatically infected by this PV is unknown. Infection by feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is associated with high rates of cutaneous SCC development, possibly due to increased PV infection. This study examines the frequency of cutaneous asymptomatic FdPV-2 infections in cats and compares the rate of FdPV-2 infection in 22 FIV-positive cats with that in 22 FIV-negative cats. FdPV-2 sequences were detected in 39% of skin swabs. One or both swabs contained FdPV-2 DNA from 52% of the cats. FIV status, age or sex of the cat did not significantly influence FdPV-2 infection. Cats that shared a household with a PV-infected cat could remain uninfected suggesting infection depends more on host factors than exposure to the PV. These results indicate that asymptomatic FdPV-2 infections are common in cats, but do not provide evidence that FdPV-2 causes feline SCC development.

  1. The core and carboxyl-terminal domains of the integrase protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 each contribute to nonspecific DNA binding.

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, A; Hickman, A B; Craigie, R

    1994-01-01

    The integrase protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 removes two nucleotides from the 3' ends of reverse-transcribed human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA (3' processing) and covalently inserts the processed ends into a target DNA (DNA strand transfer). Mutant integrase proteins that lack the amino-and/or carboxyl-terminal domains are incapable of catalyzing 3' processing and DNA strand transfer but are competent for an apparent reversal of the DNA strand transfer reaction (disintegration) in vitro. Here, we investigate the binding of integrase to DNA by UV cross-linking. Cross-linked complexes form with a variety of DNA substrates independent of the presence of divalent metal ion. Analysis with amino- and carboxyl-terminal deletion mutant proteins shows that residues 213 to 266 of the 288-residue protein are required for efficient cross-linking in the absence of divalent metal ion. Carboxyl-terminal deletion mutants that lack this region efficiently cross-link only to the branched disintegration DNA substrate, and this reaction is dependent on the presence of metal ion. Both the core and C-terminal domains of integrase therefore contribute to nonspecific DNA binding. Images PMID:8057470

  2. Enhanced potency of plasmid DNA microparticle human immunodeficiency virus vaccines in rhesus macaques by using a priming-boosting regimen with recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Otten, Gillis R; Schaefer, Mary; Doe, Barbara; Liu, Hong; Srivastava, Indresh; Megede, Jan zur; Kazzaz, Jina; Lian, Ying; Singh, Manmohan; Ugozzoli, Mildred; Montefiori, David; Lewis, Mark; Driver, David A; Dubensky, Thomas; Polo, John M; Donnelly, John; O'Hagan, Derek T; Barnett, Susan; Ulmer, Jeffrey B

    2005-07-01

    DNA vaccines have been used widely in experimental primate models of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), but their effectiveness has been limited. In this study, we evaluated three technologies for increasing the potency of DNA vaccines in rhesus macaques. These included DNA encoding Sindbis virus RNA replicons (pSINCP), cationic poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) microparticles for DNA delivery, and recombinant protein boosting. The DNA-based pSINCP replicon vaccines encoding HIV Gag and Env were approximately equal in potency to human cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter-driven conventional DNA vaccines (pCMV). The PLG microparticle DNA delivery system was particularly effective at enhancing antibody responses induced by both pCMV and pSINCP vaccines and had less effect on T cells. Recombinant Gag and Env protein boosting elicited rapid and strong recall responses, in some cases to levels exceeding those seen after DNA or DNA/PLG priming. Of note, Env protein boosting induced serum-neutralizing antibodies and increased frequencies of gamma interferon-producing CD4 T cells severalfold. Thus, PLG microparticles are an effective means of delivering DNA vaccines in nonhuman primates, as demonstrated for two different types of DNA vaccines encoding two different antigens, and are compatible for use with DNA prime-protein boost regimens.

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus infection and pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Terzi, Eirini; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Dryllis, Georgios; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsiouda, Theodora; Madesis, Athanasios; Karaiskos, Theodoros

    2014-01-01

    Pneumothorax is a serious and relatively frequent complication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection that may associate with increased morbidity and mortality and may prove difficult to manage, especially in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). PMID:25337392

  4. Expression and Immunogenicity of Sequence-Modified Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Subtype B pol and gagpol DNA Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    zur Megede, Jan; Otten, Gillis R.; Doe, Barbara; Liu, Hong; Leung, Louisa; Ulmer, Jeffrey B.; Donnelly, John J.; Barnett, Susan W.

    2003-01-01

    Control of the worldwide AIDS pandemic may require not only preventive but also therapeutic immunization strategies. To meet this challenge, the next generation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccines must stimulate broad and durable cellular immune responses to multiple HIV antigens. Results of both natural history studies and virus challenge studies with macaques indicate that responses to both Gag and Pol antigens are important for the control of viremia. Previously, we reported increased Rev-independent expression and improved immunogenicity of DNA vaccines encoding sequence-modified Gag derived from the HIV-1SF2 strain (J. zur Megede, M. C. Chen, B. Doe, M. Schaefer, C. E. Greer, M. Selby, G. R. Otten, and S. W. Barnett, J. Virol. 74: 2628-2635, 2000). Here we describe results of expression and immunogenicity studies conducted with novel sequence-modified HIV-1SF2 GagPol and Pol vaccine antigens. These Pol antigens contain deletions in the integrase coding region and were mutated in the reverse transcriptase (RT) coding region to remove potentially deleterious enzymatic activities. The resulting Pol sequences were used alone or in combination with sequence-modified Gag. In the latter, the natural translational frameshift between the Gag and Pol coding sequences was either retained or removed. Smaller, in-frame fusion gene cassettes expressing Gag plus RT or protease plus RT also were evaluated. Expression of Gag and Pol from GagPol fusion gene cassettes appeared to be reduced when the HIV protease was active. Therefore, additional constructs were evaluated in which mutations were introduced to attenuate or inactivate the protease activity. Nevertheless, when these constructs were delivered to mice as DNA vaccines, similar levels of CD8+ T-cell responses to Gag and Pol epitopes were observed regardless of the level of protease activity. Overall, the cellular immune responses against Gag induced in mice immunized with multigenic gagpol plasmids

  5. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Research Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-11-30

    disease process itself, on a realistic appraisal of the course and nature of the global epidemic, and on an accurlate assessment of the strengths and... natural history of a Anef SIVPBj isolate in macaques including virus load measurements, immune function and disease outcome. c) Determine if a Anef...an excellent animal model for human immunodeficiency disease in that the nature and course of the clinical disease are comparable and the immune

  6. Vaccine-Induced Immunity in Baboons by Using DNA and Replication-Incompetent Adenovirus Type 5 Vectors Expressing a Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 gag Gene

    PubMed Central

    Casimiro, Danilo R.; Tang, Aimin; Chen, Ling; Fu, Tong-Ming; Evans, Robert K.; Davies, Mary-Ellen; Freed, Daniel C.; Hurni, William; Aste-Amezaga, Jose M.; Guan, Liming; Long, Romnie; Huang, Lingyi; Harris, Virginia; Nawrocki, Denise K.; Mach, Henryk; Troutman, Robert D.; Isopi, Lynne A.; Murthy, Krishna K.; Rice, Karen; Wilson, Keith A.; Volkin, David B.; Emini, Emilio A.; Shiver, John W.

    2003-01-01

    The cellular immunogenicity of formulated plasmid DNA and replication-defective human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vaccine vectors expressing a codon-optimized human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gag gene was examined in baboons. The Ad5 vaccine was capable of inducing consistently strong, long-lived CD8+-biased T-cell responses and in vitro cytotoxic activities. The DNA vaccine-elicited immune responses were weaker than those elicited by the Ad5 vaccine and highly variable; formulation with chemical adjuvants led to moderate increases in the levels of Gag-specific T cells. Increasing the DNA-primed responses with booster doses of either Ad5 or modified vaccinia virus Ankara vaccines suggests a difference in the relative levels of cytotoxic and helper responses. The implications of these results are discussed. PMID:12805466

  7. Expanded Breadth of the T-Cell Response to Mosaic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Envelope DNA Vaccination▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Wing-Pui; Wu, Lan; Wallstrom, Timothy C.; Fischer, Will; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Ko, Sung-Youl; Letvin, Norman L.; Haynes, Barton F.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Korber, Bette; Nabel, Gary J.

    2009-01-01

    An effective AIDS vaccine must control highly diverse circulating strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Among HIV-1 gene products, the envelope (Env) protein contains variable as well as conserved regions. In this report, an informatic approach to the design of T-cell vaccines directed to HIV-1 Env M group global sequences was tested. Synthetic Env antigens were designed to express mosaics that maximize the inclusion of common potential T-cell epitope (PTE) 9-mers and minimize the inclusion of rare epitopes likely to elicit strain-specific responses. DNA vaccines were evaluated using intracellular cytokine staining in inbred mice with a standardized panel of highly conserved 15-mer PTE peptides. One-, two-, and three-mosaic sets that increased theoretical epitope coverage were developed. The breadth and magnitude of T-cell immunity stimulated by these vaccines were compared to those for natural strain Envs; additional comparisons were performed on mutant Envs, including gp160 or gp145 with or without V regions and gp41 deletions. Among them, the two- or three-mosaic Env sets elicited the optimal CD4 and CD8 responses. These responses were most evident in CD8 T cells; the three-mosaic set elicited responses to an average of eight peptide pools, compared to two pools for a set of three natural Envs. Synthetic mosaic HIV-1 antigens can therefore induce T-cell responses with expanded breadth and may facilitate the development of effective T-cell-based HIV-1 vaccines. PMID:19109395

  8. Expanded breadth of the T-cell response to mosaic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope DNA vaccination.

    PubMed

    Kong, Wing-Pui; Wu, Lan; Wallstrom, Timothy C; Fischer, Will; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Ko, Sung-Youl; Letvin, Norman L; Haynes, Barton F; Hahn, Beatrice H; Korber, Bette; Nabel, Gary J

    2009-03-01

    An effective AIDS vaccine must control highly diverse circulating strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Among HIV-1 gene products, the envelope (Env) protein contains variable as well as conserved regions. In this report, an informatic approach to the design of T-cell vaccines directed to HIV-1 Env M group global sequences was tested. Synthetic Env antigens were designed to express mosaics that maximize the inclusion of common potential T-cell epitope (PTE) 9-mers and minimize the inclusion of rare epitopes likely to elicit strain-specific responses. DNA vaccines were evaluated using intracellular cytokine staining in inbred mice with a standardized panel of highly conserved 15-mer PTE peptides. One-, two-, and three-mosaic sets that increased theoretical epitope coverage were developed. The breadth and magnitude of T-cell immunity stimulated by these vaccines were compared to those for natural strain Envs; additional comparisons were performed on mutant Envs, including gp160 or gp145 with or without V regions and gp41 deletions. Among them, the two- or three-mosaic Env sets elicited the optimal CD4 and CD8 responses. These responses were most evident in CD8 T cells; the three-mosaic set elicited responses to an average of eight peptide pools, compared to two pools for a set of three natural Envs. Synthetic mosaic HIV-1 antigens can therefore induce T-cell responses with expanded breadth and may facilitate the development of effective T-cell-based HIV-1 vaccines.

  9. Ability of herpes simplex virus vectors to boost immune responses to DNA vectors and to protect against challenge by simian immunodeficiency virus

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Amitinder . E-mail: amitinder_kaur@hms.harvard.edu; Sanford, Hannah B.; Garry, Deirdre; Lang, Sabine; Klumpp, Sherry A.; Watanabe, Daisuke; Bronson, Roderick T.; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Rosati, Margherita; Pavlakis, George N.; Felber, Barbara K.; Knipe, David M.; Desrosiers, Ronald C.

    2007-01-20

    The immunogenicity and protective capacity of replication-defective herpes simplex virus (HSV) vector-based vaccines were examined in rhesus macaques. Three macaques were inoculated with recombinant HSV vectors expressing Gag, Env, and a Tat-Rev-Nef fusion protein of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). Three other macaques were primed with recombinant DNA vectors expressing Gag, Env, and a Pol-Tat-Nef-Vif fusion protein prior to boosting with the HSV vectors. Robust anti-Gag and anti-Env cellular responses were detected in all six macaques. Following intravenous challenge with wild-type, cloned SIV239, peak and 12-week plasma viremia levels were significantly lower in vaccinated compared to control macaques. Plasma SIV RNA in vaccinated macaques was inversely correlated with anti-Rev ELISPOT responses on the day of challenge (P value < 0.05), anti-Tat ELISPOT responses at 2 weeks post challenge (P value < 0.05) and peak neutralizing antibody titers pre-challenge (P value 0.06). These findings support continued study of recombinant herpesviruses as a vaccine approach for AIDS.

  10. Pediatric human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: an overview.

    PubMed

    Layton, T L; Davis-McFarland, E

    2000-01-01

    This article covers the epidemiological manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) in children, demographic statistics, and information on the three modes of virus transmission. The various opportunistic diseases and neurological dysfunction that characterize pediatric HIV are described. The Center for Disease Control pediatric HIV classification system is presented, and the developmental disorders often found in children with HIV are discussed. The Universal Disease Precautions of the American Speech and Hearing Association (ASHA) for clinicians is also presented.

  11. Reinfection results in accumulation of unintegrated viral DNA in cytopathic and persistent human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of CEM cells

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    High levels of unintegrated viral DNA accumulate during human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of CEM T cells. Reinfection of already infected cells is required to attain these levels and reinfection also promotes the development of HIV-induced cytopathology. Rates of virus production, however, are independent of the accumulation of unintegrated viral DNA. Neutralizing antibody added soon after infection reduced viral DNA levels without appreciably affecting the production of cell-free viral p24 antigen or reverse transcriptase activity. Only 50 pM AZT were required to reduce the accumulation of unintegrated viral DNA by 50% in contrast to the 25 nM required to inhibit virus production by 50%. Cytopathology, as measured by number of syncytia in infected cell cultures, was correlated with highly elevated levels of unintegrated viral DNA. The minimal levels of unintegrated viral DNA present constitutively in the persistently infected HCEM cell line were consonant with the absence of cytopathic effects in these cells. These data demonstrate that inhibiting the reinfection of already infected cells modulates cytopathic HIV-1 infection to a form that is persistent and noncytopathic. PMID:2212939

  12. Mutations in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 polypurine tract (PPT) reduce the rate of PPT cleavage and plus-strand DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, M J; Julias, J G; Hughes, S H

    2008-05-01

    Previously, we analyzed the effects of point mutations in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) polypurine tract (PPT) and found that some mutations affected both titer and cleavage specificity. We used HIV-1 vectors containing two PPTs and the D116N integrase active-site mutation in a cell-based assay to measure differences in the relative rates of PPT processing and utilization. The relative rates were measured by determining which of the two PPTs in the vector is used to synthesize viral DNA. The results indicate that mutations that have subtle effects on titer and cleavage specificity can have dramatic effects on rates of PPT generation and utilization.

  13. Antiviral Drugs for Viruses Other Than Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Razonable, Raymund R.

    2011-01-01

    Most viral diseases, with the exception of those caused by human immunodeficiency virus, are self-limited illnesses that do not require specific antiviral therapy. The currently available antiviral drugs target 3 main groups of viruses: herpes, hepatitis, and influenza viruses. With the exception of the antisense molecule fomivirsen, all antiherpes drugs inhibit viral replication by serving as competitive substrates for viral DNA polymerase. Drugs for the treatment of influenza inhibit the ion channel M2 protein or the enzyme neuraminidase. Combination therapy with Interferon-α and ribavirin remains the backbone treatment for chronic hepatitis C; the addition of serine protease inhibitors improves the treatment outcome of patients infected with hepatitis C virus genotype 1. Chronic hepatitis B can be treated with interferon or a combination of nucleos(t)ide analogues. Notably, almost all the nucleos(t) ide analogues for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B possess anti–human immunodeficiency virus properties, and they inhibit replication of hepatitis B virus by serving as competitive substrates for its DNA polymerase. Some antiviral drugs possess multiple potential clinical applications, such as ribavirin for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C and respiratory syncytial virus and cidofovir for the treatment of cytomegalovirus and other DNA viruses. Drug resistance is an emerging threat to the clinical utility of antiviral drugs. The major mechanisms for drug resistance are mutations in the viral DNA polymerase gene or in genes that encode for the viral kinases required for the activation of certain drugs such as acyclovir and ganciclovir. Widespread antiviral resistance has limited the clinical utility of M2 inhibitors for the prevention and treatment of influenza infections. This article provides an overview of clinically available antiviral drugs for the primary care physician, with a special focus on pharmacology, clinical uses, and adverse effects. PMID

  14. Antiviral drugs for viruses other than human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Razonable, Raymund R

    2011-10-01

    Most viral diseases, with the exception of those caused by human immunodeficiency virus, are self-limited illnesses that do not require specific antiviral therapy. The currently available antiviral drugs target 3 main groups of viruses: herpes, hepatitis, and influenza viruses. With the exception of the antisense molecule fomivirsen, all antiherpes drugs inhibit viral replication by serving as competitive substrates for viral DNA polymerase. Drugs for the treatment of influenza inhibit the ion channel M(2) protein or the enzyme neuraminidase. Combination therapy with Interferon-α and ribavirin remains the backbone treatment for chronic hepatitis C; the addition of serine protease inhibitors improves the treatment outcome of patients infected with hepatitis C virus genotype 1. Chronic hepatitis B can be treated with interferon or a combination of nucleos(t)ide analogues. Notably, almost all the nucleos(t) ide analogues for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B possess anti-human immunodeficiency virus properties, and they inhibit replication of hepatitis B virus by serving as competitive substrates for its DNA polymerase. Some antiviral drugs possess multiple potential clinical applications, such as ribavirin for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C and respiratory syncytial virus and cidofovir for the treatment of cytomegalovirus and other DNA viruses. Drug resistance is an emerging threat to the clinical utility of antiviral drugs. The major mechanisms for drug resistance are mutations in the viral DNA polymerase gene or in genes that encode for the viral kinases required for the activation of certain drugs such as acyclovir and ganciclovir. Widespread antiviral resistance has limited the clinical utility of M(2) inhibitors for the prevention and treatment of influenza infections. This article provides an overview of clinically available antiviral drugs for the primary care physician, with a special focus on pharmacology, clinical uses, and adverse effects.

  15. Pediatric human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Domachowske, J B

    1996-01-01

    In the past decade, an increase in pediatric human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has had a substantial impact on childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide. The vertical transmission of HIV from mother to infant accounts for the vast majority of these cases. Identification of HIV-infected pregnant women needs to be impoved so that appropriate therapy can be initiated for both mothers and infants. While recent data demonstrate a dramatic decrease in HIV transmission from a subset of women treated with zidovudine during pregnancy, further efforts at reducing transmission are desperately needed. This review focuses on vertically transmitted HIV infection in children, its epidemiology, diagnostic criteria, natural history, and clinical manifestations including infectious and noninfectious complications. An overview of the complex medical management of these children ensues, including the use of antiretroviral therapy. Opportunistic infection prophylaxis is reviewed, along with the important role of other supportive therapies. PMID:8894346

  16. Susceptibility Testing by Polymerase Chain Reaction DNA Quantitation: A Method to Measure Drug Resistance of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Isolates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eron, Joseph J.; Gorczyca, Paul; Kaplan, Joan C.; D'Aquila, Richard T.

    1992-04-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) DNA quantitation (PDQ) susceptibility testing rapidly and directly measures nucleoside sensitivity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates. PCR is used to quantitate the amount of HIV-1 DNA synthesized after in vitro infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The relative amounts of HIV-1 DNA in cell lysates from cultures maintained at different drug concentrations reflect drug inhibition of virus replication. The results of PDQ susceptibility testing of 2- or 3-day cultures are supported by assays measuring HIV-1 p24 antigen production in supernatants of 7- or 10-day cultures. DNA sequence analyses to identify mutations in the reverse transcriptase gene that cause resistance to 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine also support the PDQ results. With the PDQ method, both infectivity titration and susceptibility testing can be performed on supernatants from primary cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. PDQ susceptibility testing should facilitate epidemiologic studies of the clinical significance of drug-resistant HIV-1 isolates.

  17. Effective Induction of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Specific Systemic and Mucosal Immune Responses in Primates by Vaccination with Proviral DNA Producing Intact but Noninfectious Virions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shainn-Wei; Kozlowski, Pamela A.; Schmelz, Gretchen; Manson, Kelledy; Wyand, Michael S.; Glickman, Rhona; Montefiori, David; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Johnson, R. Paul; Neutra, Marian R.; Aldovini, Anna

    2000-01-01

    We report a pilot evaluation of a DNA vaccine producing genetically inactivated simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) particles in primates, with a focus on eliciting mucosal immunity. Our results demonstrate that DNA vaccines can be used to stimulate strong virus-specific mucosal immune responses in primates. The levels of immunoglobulin A (IgA) detected in rectal secretions of macaques that received the DNA vaccine intradermally and at the rectal mucosa were the most striking of all measured immune responses and were higher than usually achieved through natural infection. However, cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses were generally low and sporadically present in different animals. Upon rectal challenge with cloned SIVmac239, resistance to infection was observed, but some animals with high SIV-specific IgA levels in rectal secretions became infected. Our results suggest that high levels of IgA alone are not sufficient to prevent the establishment of chronic infection, although mucosal IgA responses may have a role in reducing the infectivity of the initial viral inoculum. PMID:11044096

  18. A T7exonuclease-assisted target recycling amplification with graphene oxide acting as the signal amplifier for fluorescence polarization detection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) DNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lijun; Tian, Jianniao; Yang, Wen; Zhao, Yanchun; Zhao, Shulin

    2016-03-01

    We report a fluorescence polarization (FP) platform for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) DNA detection based on T7exonuclease-assisted target recycling amplification with graphene oxide (GO) acting as a FP signal amplifier. In the sensing method, the presence of the target DNA leads to target recycling with the assistance of T7exonuclease, furthermore, the amplification products are absorbed onto the surface of GO, so the all FP values are enhanced by GO. More importantly, this FP sensor exhibits high detection sensitivity; under optimal conditions, the change in FP is linear with the concentration of the target DNA within a concentration range of 50-2000 pmol/L, and the detection limit of this method is as low as 38.6 pmol/L. This FP sensor also exhibits high selectivity, even single-base mismatched DNA can be effectively discriminated from complementary target DNA. Above all, the proposed FP sensor may serve as a general platform for the sensitive assay of disease-related genes. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Persistent immune responses induced by a human immunodeficiency virus DNA vaccine delivered in association with electroporation in the skin of nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Martinon, Frédéric; Kaldma, Katrin; Sikut, Rein; Culina, Slobodan; Romain, Gabrielle; Tuomela, Mari; Adojaan, Maarja; Männik, Andres; Toots, Urve; Kivisild, Toomas; Morin, Julie; Brochard, Patricia; Delache, Benoît; Tripiciano, Antonella; Ensoli, Fabrizio; Stanescu, Ioana; Le Grand, Roger; Ustav, Mart

    2009-11-01

    Strategies to improve vaccine efficacy are still required, especially in the case of chronic infections, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). DNA vaccines have potential advantages over conventional vaccines; however, low immunological efficacy has been demonstrated in many experiments involving large animals and in clinical trials. To improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines, we have designed a plasmid vector exploiting the binding capacity of the bovine papillomavirus E2 protein and we have used electroporation (EP) to increase DNA uptake after intradermal inoculation. We demonstrated, in nonhuman primates (NHPs), efficient induction of anti-HIV immunity with an improved DNA vaccine vector encoding an artificial fusion protein, consisting of several proteins and selected epitopes from HIV-1. We show that a DNA vaccine delivery method combining intradermal injection and noninvasive EP dramatically increased expression of the vaccine antigen selectively in the epidermis, and our observations strongly suggest the involvement of Langerhans cells in the strength and quality of the anti-HIV immune response. Although the humoral responses to the vaccine were transient, the cellular responses were exceptionally robust and persisted, at high levels, more than 2 years after the last vaccine boost. The immune responses were characterized by the induction of significant proportions of T cells producing both interferon-gamma and interleukin-2 cytokines, in both subpopulations, CD4(+) and CD8(+). This strategy is an attractive approach for vaccination in humans because of its high efficacy and the possible use of newly developed devices for EP.

  20. Mutations in the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Polypurine Tract (PPT) Reduce the Rate of PPT Cleavage and Plus-Strand DNA Synthesis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    McWilliams, M. J.; Julias, J. G.; Hughes, S. H.

    2008-01-01

    Previously, we analyzed the effects of point mutations in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) polypurine tract (PPT) and found that some mutations affected both titer and cleavage specificity. We used HIV-1 vectors containing two PPTs and the D116N integrase active-site mutation in a cell-based assay to measure differences in the relative rates of PPT processing and utilization. The relative rates were measured by determining which of the two PPTs in the vector is used to synthesize viral DNA. The results indicate that mutations that have subtle effects on titer and cleavage specificity can have dramatic effects on rates of PPT generation and utilization. PMID:18321979

  1. Virus-Like Particles Displaying Trimeric Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) Envelope gp160 Enhance the Breadth of DNA/Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara SIV Vaccine-Induced Antibody Responses in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Smita S.; Gangadhara, Sailaja; Victor, Blandine; Shen, Xiaoying; Chen, Xuemin; Nabi, Rafiq; Kasturi, Sudhir P.; Sabula, Michael J.; Labranche, Celia C.; Reddy, Pradeep B. J.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Montefiori, David C.; Spearman, Paul; Pulendran, Bali; Kozlowski, Pamela A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The encouraging results of the RV144 vaccine trial have spurred interest in poxvirus prime-protein boost human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine modalities as a strategy to induce protective immunity. Because vaccine-induced protective immunity is critically determined by HIV envelope (Env) conformation, significant efforts are directed toward generating soluble trimeric Env immunogens that assume native structures. Using the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-macaque model, we tested the immunogenicity and efficacy of sequential immunizations with DNA (D), modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) (M), and protein immunogens, all expressing virus-like particles (VLPs) displaying membrane-anchored trimeric Env. A single VLP protein boost displaying trimeric gp160 adjuvanted with nanoparticle-encapsulated Toll-like receptor 4/7/8 (TLR4/7/8) agonists, administered 44 weeks after the second MVA immunization, induced up to a 3-fold increase in Env-specific IgG binding titers in serum and mucosa. Importantly, the VLP protein boost increased binding antibody against scaffolded V1V2, antibody-dependent phagocytic activity against VLP-coated beads, and antibody breadth and neutralizing antibody titers against homologous and heterologous tier 1 SIVs. Following 5 weekly intrarectal SIVmac251 challenges, two of seven DNA/MVA and VLP (DM+VLP)-vaccinated animals were completely protected compared to productive infection in all seven DM-vaccinated animals. Vaccinated animals demonstrated stronger acute viral pulldown than controls, but a trend for higher acute viremia was observed in the DM+VLP group, likely due to a slower recall of Gag-specific CD8 T cells. Our findings support immunization with VLPs containing trimeric Env as a strategy to augment protective antibody but underscore the need for optimal engagement of CD8 T cells to achieve robust early viral control. IMPORTANCE The development of an effective HIV vaccine remains a global necessity for preventing HIV

  2. Towards detecting the human immunodeficiency virus using microcantilever sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alodhayb, Abdullah; Brown, Nicole; Saydur Rahman, S. M.; Harrigan, Richard; Beaulieu, L. Y.

    2013-04-01

    Detecting the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is difficult because the virus is prone to mutations and is in low concentrations in the body. Inside the HIV virion are two well characterized single stranded (ss) RNA molecules (viral genome) that feature both variable regions and regions that are conserved under virus mutation. In this work, microcantilever sensors have been employed as potential HIV detectors by targeting a conserved sequence of the viral genome by attempting to detect target ssDNA and ssRNA molecules that are significantly longer than the ssDNA molecules functionalized on the cantilever.

  3. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Research (AIDS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-15

    human TO cells, but peak expression was only 1 /10- 1 /100th that of human cells. Semi-quantitative PCR analyses indicated that the low virus expression... human TO cells, but peak expression was only 1 /101/100th that of human cells. Semi-quantitative PCR analyses indicated that the low virus expression...vaccine development, t~e study of selected simian- human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) chiaeric viruses ; the refinement of diagnostic strategies for

  4. Human immunodeficiency virus and menopause.

    PubMed

    Kanapathipillai, Rupa; Hickey, Martha; Giles, Michelle

    2013-09-01

    This article aims to review currently available evidence for women infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and menopause and to propose clinical management algorithms. Key studies addressing HIV and menopause have been reviewed, specifically age of menopause onset in HIV-infected women, frequency of menopausal symptoms, comorbidities associated with HIV and aging (including cardiovascular disease and bone disease), treatment of menopausal symptoms, and prevention of comorbidities in HIV-infected women. Studies suggest an earlier onset of menopause in HIV-infected women, with increased frequency of symptoms. Cardiovascular disease risk may be increased in this population, with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and chronic inflammation associated with HIV, contributing to increased risk. Chronic inflammation and cART have been independently implicated in bone disease. No published data have assessed the safety and efficacy of hormone therapy in relation to symptoms of menopause, cardiovascular risk, and bone disease among HIV-infected women. Few studies on menopause have been conducted in HIV-infected women compared with HIV-uninfected women. Many questions regarding age of menopause onset, frequency of menopausal symptoms and associated complications such as bone disease and cardiovascular disease, and efficacy of treatment among HIV-infected women remain. The incidence and severity of some of these factors may be increased in the setting of HIV and cART.

  5. Simple, Sensitive, and Specific Detection of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Subtype B DNA in Dried Blood Samples for Diagnosis in Infants in the Field

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Ingrid A.; Drennan, Kathryn D.; Melvin, Ann J.; Mohan, Kathey M.; Herz, Arnd M.; Alarcón, Jorge; Piscoya, Julia; Velázquez, Carlos; Frenkel, Lisa M.

    2001-01-01

    The detection of virus is used to diagnose human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in infants due to the persistence of maternal antibodies for a year or more. An HIV-1 DNA PCR assay with simple specimen collection and processing was developed and evaluated. Whole blood was collected on filter paper that lysed cells and bound the DNA, eliminating specimen centrifugation and extraction procedures. The DNA remained bound to the filter paper during PCR amplification. Assays of copy number standards showed reproducible detection of 5 to 10 copies of HIV-1 in 5 μl of whole blood. The sensitivity of the assay did not decrease after storage of the standards on filter paper for 3 months at room temperature or after incubation at 37 or 45°C for 20 h. The primers used for nested PCR of the HIV-1 pol gene amplified templates from a reference panel of multiple HIV-1 subtypes but did not amplify a subtype A or a subtype C virus from children living in Seattle. The assay had a sensitivity of 98.4% and a specificity of 98.3% for testing of 122 specimens from 35 HIV-1-infected and 16 uninfected children and 43 seronegative adults living in Washington. The assay had a sensitivity of 99% and a specificity of 100% for testing of 102 HIV-1-positive (as determined by enzyme immunoassay) Peruvian women and 6 seropositive and 34 seronegative infants. This assay, with adsorption of whole blood to filter paper and no specimen processing, provides a practical, economical, sensitive, and specific method for the diagnosis of HIV-1 subtype B infection in infants. PMID:11136743

  6. Critical Role for Env as well as Gag-Pol in Control of a Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus 89.6P Challenge by a DNA Prime/Recombinant Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Amara, Rama Rao; Smith, James M.; Staprans, Silvija I.; Montefiori, David C.; Villinger, Francois; Altman, John D.; O'Neil, Shawn P.; Kozyr, Natalia L.; Xu, Yan; Wyatt, Linda S.; Earl, Patricia L.; Herndon, James G.; McNicholl, Janet M.; McClure, Harold M.; Moss, Bernard; Robinson, Harriet L.

    2002-01-01

    Cellular immune responses against epitopes in conserved Gag and Pol sequences of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 have become popular targets for candidate AIDS vaccines. Recently, we used a simian-human immunodeficiency virus model (SHIV 89.6P) with macaques to demonstrate the control of a pathogenic mucosal challenge by priming with Gag-Pol-Env-expressing DNA and boosting with Gag-Pol-Env-expressing recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (rMVA). Here we tested Gag-Pol DNA priming and Gag-Pol rMVA boosting to evaluate the contribution of anti-Env immune responses to viral control. The Gag-Pol vaccine raised frequencies of Gag-specific T cells similar to those raised by the Gag-Pol-Env vaccine. Following challenge, these rapidly expanded to counter the challenge infection. Despite this, the control of the SHIV 89.6P challenge was delayed and inconsistent in the Gag-Pol-vaccinated group and all of the animals underwent severe and, in most cases, sustained loss of CD4+ cells. Interestingly, most of the CD4+ cells that were lost in the Gag-Pol-vaccinated group were uninfected cells. We suggest that the rapid appearance of binding antibody for Env in Gag-Pol-Env-vaccinated animals helped protect uninfected CD4+ cells from Env-induced apoptosis. Our results highlight the importance of immune responses to Env, as well as to Gag-Pol, in the control of immunodeficiency virus challenges and the protection of CD4+ cells. PMID:12021347

  7. Mutations proximal to the minor groove-binding track of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase differentially affect utilization of RNA versus DNA as template.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Timothy S; Darden, Tom; Prasad, Vinayaka R

    2003-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT), like all retroviral RTs, is a versatile DNA polymerase that can copy both RNA and DNA templates. In spite of extensive investigations into the structure-function of this enzyme, the structural basis for this dual template specificity is poorly understood. Biochemical studies with two mutations in HIV-1 RT that affect residues contacting the template-primer now provide some insight into this specialized property. The mutations are N255D and N265D, both adjoining the minor groove-binding track, in the thumb region. The N265D substitution led to a loss of processive polymerization on DNA but not on RNA, whereas N255D drastically reduced processive synthesis on both templates. This differential template usage was accompanied by a rapid dissociation of the N265D variant on DNA but not RNA templates, whereas the N255D variant rapidly dissociated from both templates. Molecular dynamics modeling suggested that N265D leads to a loss of template strand-specific hydrogen bonding, indicating that this is a key determinant of the differential template affinity. The N255D substitution caused local changes in conformation and a consequent loss of interaction with the primer, leading to a loss of processive synthesis with both templates. We conclude that N265 is part of a subset of template-enzyme contacts that enable RT to utilize DNA templates in addition to RNA templates and that such residues play an important role in facilitating processive DNA synthesis on both RNA and DNA templates.

  8. Different Patterns of Immune Responses but Similar Control of a Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus 89.6P Mucosal Challenge by Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara (MVA) and DNA/MVA Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Amara, Rama Rao; Villinger, Francois; Staprans, Silvija I.; Altman, John D.; Montefiori, David C.; Kozyr, Natalia L.; Xu, Yan; Wyatt, Linda S.; Earl, Patricia L.; Herndon, James G.; McClure, Harold M.; Moss, Bernard; Robinson, Harriet L.

    2002-01-01

    Recently we demonstrated the control of a mucosal challenge with a pathogenic chimera of simian and human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-89.6P) by priming with a Gag-Pol-Env-expressing DNA and boosting with a Gag-Pol-Env-expressing recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (DNA/MVA) vaccine. Here we evaluate the ability of the MVA component of this vaccine to serve as both a prime and a boost for an AIDS vaccine. The same immunization schedule, MVA dose, and challenge conditions were used as in the prior DNA/MVA vaccine trial. Compared to the DNA/MVA vaccine, the MVA-only vaccine raised less than 1/10 the number of vaccine-specific T cells but 10-fold-higher titers of binding antibody for Env. Postchallenge, the animals vaccinated with MVA alone increased their CD8 cell numbers to levels that were similar to those seen in DNA/MVA-vaccinated animals. However, they underwent a slower emergence and contraction of antiviral CD8 T cells and were slower to generate neutralizing antibodies than the DNA/MVA-vaccinated animals. Despite this, by 5 weeks postchallenge, the MVA-only-vaccinated animals had achieved as good control of the viral infection as the DNA/MVA group, a situation that has held up to the present time in the trial (48 weeks postchallenge). Thus, MVA vaccines, as well as DNA/MVA vaccines, merit further evaluation for their ability to control the current AIDS pandemic. PMID:12097576

  9. DNA and Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara Vaccines Encoding Multiple Cytotoxic and Helper T-Lymphocyte Epitopes of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Are Safe but Weakly Immunogenic in HIV-1-Uninfected, Vaccinia Virus-Naive Adults

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Mark J.; deCamp, Allan; Hay, Christine Mhorag; De Rosa, Stephen C.; Noonan, Elizabeth; Livingston, Brian D.; Fuchs, Jonathan D.; Kalams, Spyros A.; Cassis-Ghavami, Farah L.

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated a DNA plasmid-vectored vaccine and a recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara vaccine (MVA-mBN32), each encoding cytotoxic and helper T-lymphocyte epitopes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial in 36 HIV-1-uninfected adults using a heterologous prime-boost schedule. HIV-1-specific cellular immune responses, measured as interleukin-2 and/or gamma interferon production, were induced in 1 (4%) of 28 subjects after the first MVA-mBN32 immunization and in 3 (12%) of 25 subjects after the second MVA-mBN32 immunization. Among these responders, polyfunctional T-cell responses, including the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha and perforin, were detected. Vaccinia virus-specific antibodies were induced to the MVA vector in 27 (93%) of 29 and 26 (93%) of 28 subjects after the first and second immunizations with MVA-mBN32. These peptide-based vaccines were safe but were ineffective at inducing HIV-1-specific immune responses and induced much weaker responses than MVA vaccines expressing the entire open reading frames of HIV-1 proteins. PMID:22398243

  10. DNA and modified vaccinia virus Ankara vaccines encoding multiple cytotoxic and helper T-lymphocyte epitopes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are safe but weakly immunogenic in HIV-1-uninfected, vaccinia virus-naive adults.

    PubMed

    Gorse, Geoffrey J; Newman, Mark J; deCamp, Allan; Hay, Christine Mhorag; De Rosa, Stephen C; Noonan, Elizabeth; Livingston, Brian D; Fuchs, Jonathan D; Kalams, Spyros A; Cassis-Ghavami, Farah L

    2012-05-01

    We evaluated a DNA plasmid-vectored vaccine and a recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara vaccine (MVA-mBN32), each encoding cytotoxic and helper T-lymphocyte epitopes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial in 36 HIV-1-uninfected adults using a heterologous prime-boost schedule. HIV-1-specific cellular immune responses, measured as interleukin-2 and/or gamma interferon production, were induced in 1 (4%) of 28 subjects after the first MVA-mBN32 immunization and in 3 (12%) of 25 subjects after the second MVA-mBN32 immunization. Among these responders, polyfunctional T-cell responses, including the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha and perforin, were detected. Vaccinia virus-specific antibodies were induced to the MVA vector in 27 (93%) of 29 and 26 (93%) of 28 subjects after the first and second immunizations with MVA-mBN32. These peptide-based vaccines were safe but were ineffective at inducing HIV-1-specific immune responses and induced much weaker responses than MVA vaccines expressing the entire open reading frames of HIV-1 proteins.

  11. Simultaneous Detection of Multiplex-Amplified Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 RNA, Hepatitis C Virus RNA, and Hepatitis B Virus DNA Using a Flow Cytometer Microsphere-Based Hybridization Assay

    PubMed Central

    Defoort, J.-P.; Martin, M.; Casano, B.; Prato, S.; Camilla, C.; Fert, V.

    2000-01-01

    The feasibility of performing a multiplex assay for the detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNAs and hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA is demonstrated. This assay is based (i) on the coamplification of a 142-bp fragment from the gag region of the HIV-1 genome and a 142-bp HIV-1 quantitation standard fragment, a 244-bp fragment from the 5′ noncoding region of the HCV genome, and a 104-bp fragment from the pre-C and C gene regions of the HBV genome, using three sets of specific primers; (ii) on the capacity of these four biotinylated PCR products to hybridize to their specific oligonucleotide probe-coated microspheres; and (iii) on the ability of the flow cytometer to discriminate between distinct fluorescent-microsphere categories. Absence of cross-hybridization between the unrelated oligonucleotide probes and PCR products generated by the multiplex reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and the highly sensitive detection method allowed us to assess unambiguously the HIV-1 viral load and the infectious status of 35 serologically well-established clinical samples and 20 seronegative blood donor plasma samples tested. The results indicate that multiplex RT-PCR and flow cytometer microsphere-based hybridization assays, when combined, provide a rapid, sensitive, and specific method for the quantitation and detection of the major viral agents of infectious diseases in a single plasma sample. PMID:10698998

  12. Decoy approach using RNA-DNA chimera oligonucleotides to inhibit the regulatory function of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Rev protein.

    PubMed Central

    Nakaya, T; Iwai, S; Fujinaga, K; Sato, Y; Otsuka, E; Ikuta, K

    1997-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) encodes two regulatory proteins, Tat and Rev, that bind to target RNA sequences. These are the trans-activation responsive (TAR) RNA and the Rev-responsive element (RRE), respectively. The Rev protein shifts RNA synthesis to viral transcripts by binding to the RRE within the env gene. In the present study we prepared a RNA-DNA chimera consisting of 29 or 31 nucleotides to inhibit the Rev regulatory function by means of the decoy approach. The chimera oligonucleotides (anti-Rev oligonucleotides [AROs]) contained an RNA "bubble" structure (13 oligonucleotides; the Rev-binding element in RRE) that bound Rev with a high affinity in an in vitro assay. The controls were RNA-DNA chimera oligonucleotides (negative control oligonucleotides [NCOs]) similar to ARO, but without the bubble structure, that bound with considerably less affinity to Rev. When the inhibitory effects of these decoys on HIV-1 replication were examined, we found that AROs, but no NCOs, reduced more than 90% of the HIV-1 production generated by productively infected human T-cell lines. The production of primary HIV-1 isolates in healthy donor-derived peripheral blood mononuclear cells was also similarly inhibited by AROs. In addition, the induction of viral mRNAs and antigens in latently HIV-1-infected ACH-2 cells by tumor necrosis factor alpha was specifically inhibited by AROs, but not by NCOs. No apparent cytotoxicity was caused by either decoy. Thus, the use of a Rev-binding element-based decoy, the RNA-DNA chimera oligonucleotide, may represent a safer approach to gene therapy for reducing the virus load in HIV-1-infected individuals. PMID:9021186

  13. Isolation and partial characterization of infectious molecular clones of feline immunodeficiency virus obtained directly from bone marrow DNA of a naturally infected cat.

    PubMed Central

    Siebelink, K H; Chu, I H; Rimmelzwaan, G F; Weijer, K; Osterhaus, A D; Bosch, M L

    1992-01-01

    Replication-competent molecular clones of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) were isolated directly from the DNA of bone marrow cells of a naturally FIV-infected cat. After transfection in a feline kidney cell line (CrFK) and subsequent cocultivation with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), the viral progeny of the clones was infectious for PBMC but not for CrFK cells. PBMC infected with these clones showed syncytium formation, a decrease in cell viability, and gradual loss of CD4+ cells. The restriction maps of these clones differed from those obtained for previously described molecular clones of FIV derived from cats in the United States. The predicted amino acid sequence similarity of the envelope genes of the two clones was 99.3%, whereas the similarities of the sequences of the clones to those of two molecular clones from the United States, Petaluma and PPR, were 86 and 88%, respectively. Most of the differences between the amino acid sequences of the two clones and those of the clones from the United States were found in five different hypervariable (HV) regions, HV-1 through HV-5. The viral progeny of one of these clones was inoculated into two specific-pathogen-free cats. The animals seroconverted, and the virus could be reisolated from their PBMC. Images PMID:1309891

  14. Evaluation of infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 by using nonisotopic solution hybridization for detection of polymerase chain reaction-amplified proviral DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Coutlée, F; Saint-Antoine, P; Olivier, C; Voyer, H; Kessous-Elbaz, A; Berrada, F; Bégin, P; Giroux, L; Viscidi, R

    1991-01-01

    A convenient assay combining solution hybridization and enzyme immunoassay for DNA-RNA hybrids (polymerase chain reaction-enzyme immunoassay [PCR-EIA]) was developed to detect human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) provirus amplified by the PCR and was compared with oligomer hybridization with 32P-labeled SK19. In PCR-EIA, a fragment of the HIV-1 gag gene from peripheral blood mononuclear cells was first amplified with primer pair SK38/SK39 or O1/O2. PCR-amplified material was reacted in solution with a biotinylated RNA probe. Biotinylated hybrids were measured in a microtiter-plate EIA with antibiotin antibody and a beta-D-galactosidase-conjugated monoclonal antibody to DNA-RNA hybrids. Ten copies of HIV-1 DNA could be detected by PCR-EIA by using two different sets of primers. HIV-1 DNA was detected in 104 of 108 peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples by using SK38/39 and oligomer hybridization, in 104 of 108 samples by using SK38/SK39 and PCR-EIA, and in 104 of 108 samples by using O1/O2 and PCR-EIA. HIV-1 provirus was detected in 107 of 108 samples by using a combination of two sets of primers. One sample from a seropositive patient was negative in all three PCR assays, and six samples gave discordant results between primer pairs. Six of the latter samples scored negative in a PCR for beta-globin but became positive when the sample was diluted before amplification. When applied to clinical samples, PCR-EIA generated results similar to those of an isotopic assay for detection of amplified DNA. Images PMID:1774250

  15. Primate immunodeficiency virus classification and nomenclature: Review.

    PubMed

    Foley, Brian T; Leitner, Thomas; Paraskevis, Dimitrios; Peeters, Martine

    2016-12-01

    The International Committee for the Taxonomy and Nomenclature of Viruses does not rule on virus classifications below the species level. The definition of species for viruses cannot be clearly defined for all types of viruses. The complex and interesting epidemiology of Human Immunodeficiency Viruses demands a detailed and informative nomenclature system, while at the same time it presents challenges such that many of the rules need to be flexibly applied or modified over time. This review outlines the nomenclature system for primate lentiviruses and provides an update on new findings since the last review was written in 2000.

  16. Primate immunodeficiency virus classification and nomenclature: Review

    DOE PAGES

    Foley, Brian T.; Leitner, Thomas; Paraskevis, Dimitrios; ...

    2016-10-24

    The International Committee for the Taxonomy and Nomenclature of Viruses does not rule on virus classifications below the species level. The definition of species for viruses cannot be clearly defined for all types of viruses. The complex and interesting epidemiology of Human Immunodeficiency Viruses demands a detailed and informative nomenclature system, while at the same time it presents challenges such that many of the rules need to be flexibly applied or modified over time. As a result, this review outlines the nomenclature system for primate lentiviruses and provides an update on new findings since the last review was written inmore » 2000.« less

  17. Primate immunodeficiency virus classification and nomenclature: Review

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Brian T.; Leitner, Thomas; Paraskevis, Dimitrios; Peeters, Martine

    2016-10-24

    The International Committee for the Taxonomy and Nomenclature of Viruses does not rule on virus classifications below the species level. The definition of species for viruses cannot be clearly defined for all types of viruses. The complex and interesting epidemiology of Human Immunodeficiency Viruses demands a detailed and informative nomenclature system, while at the same time it presents challenges such that many of the rules need to be flexibly applied or modified over time. As a result, this review outlines the nomenclature system for primate lentiviruses and provides an update on new findings since the last review was written in 2000.

  18. Antiviral therapy for human immunodeficiency virus infections.

    PubMed Central

    De Clercq, E

    1995-01-01

    Depending on the stage of their intervention with the viral replicative cycle, human immunodeficiency virus inhibitors could be divided into the following groups: (i) adsorption inhibitors (i.e., CD4 constructs, polysulfates, polysulfonates, polycarboxylates, and polyoxometalates), (ii) fusion inhibitors (i.e., plant lectins, succinylated or aconitylated albumins, and betulinic acid derivatives), (iii) uncoating inhibitors (i.e., bicyclams), (iv) reverse transcription inhibitors acting either competitively with the substrate binding site (i.e., dideoxynucleoside analogs and acyclic nucleoside phosphonates) or allosterically with a nonsubstrate binding site (i.e., non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors), (v) integration inhibitors, (vi) DNA replication inhibitors, (vii) transcription inhibitors (i.e., antisense oligodeoxynucleotides and Tat antagonists), (viii) translation inhibitors (i.e., antisense oligodeoxynucleotides and ribozymes), (ix) maturation inhibitors (i.e., protease inhibitors, myristoylation inhibitors, and glycosylation inhibitors), and finally, (x) budding (assembly/release) inhibitors. Current knowledge, including the therapeutic potential, of these various inhibitors is discussed. In view of their potential clinical the utility, the problem of virus-drug resistance and possible strategies to circumvent this problem are also addressed. PMID:7542558

  19. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) proviral DNA load in purified CD4+ cells by LightCycler® Real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Kabamba-Mukadi, Benoît; Henrivaux, Philippe; Ruelle, Jean; Delferrière, Nicole; Bodéus, Monique; Goubau, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    Background The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) proviral DNA persists in infected cells, even after prolonged successful HAART. In the present study, a relative quantification assay of HIV-1 proviral DNA by LightCycler® real-time PCR based on SYBR Green I detection was developed in comparison to the number of purified CD4+ cells as estimated by the quantification of the β-globin gene. Methods The ability of the designed gag primers to quantify HIV-1 Group M and the PCR efficiency were assessed on HIV-1 reference isolate subtypes A, B, C and D. The 8E5 cell line containing a single defective copy of HIV-1 proviral DNA was used as a standard for both the HIV-1 target gene and the β-globin reference gene. The assay was applied on thirty consecutive patient samples received for RNA viral load determinations and on retrospective samples from fifteen patients undergoing 2 years of structured treatment interruption (STI). Results The lower limit of quantification was 50 HIV-1 DNA proviral copies per CD4+ cell sample. The dynamic range was from 50 to 106 HIV-1 DNA copies per CD4+ cell sample with intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variability ranging from 3.1% to 37.1%. The β-globin reference gene was quantified down to a limit of 1.5 pg of DNA/μl (approximately 5 cells) with intra- and interassay coefficients of variability ranging from 1.8% to 21%. DNA proviral load varies widely among HIV-1 infected patients. Proviral load and plasma viral load rebound were high in STI patients who took longer to achieve an undetectable plasma viral load under therapy. A statistically significant correlation was observed between DNA proviral load and RNA steady state viral load in STI patients (p-value = 0,012). Conclusion We have developed a fast, sensitive and specific relative quantification assay of HIV-1 proviral DNA in purified CD4+ cells. The assay enables the monitoring of HIV-1 proviral load, which may be useful to monitor therapy efficacy especially in

  20. UV-induced DNA damage is an intermediate step in UV-induced expression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1, collagenase, c-fos, and metallothionein

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, B.; Rahmsdorf, H.J.; Steffen, A.; Litfin, M.; Herrlich, P. )

    1989-11-01

    UV irradiation of human and murine cells enhances the transcription of several genes. Here we report on the primary target of relevant UV absorption, on pathways leading to gene activation, and on the elements receiving the UV-induced signal in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) long terminal repeat, in the gene coding for collagenase, and in the cellular oncogene fos. In order to induce the expression of genes, UV radiation needs to be absorbed by DNA and to cause DNA damage of the kind that cannot be repaired by cells from patients with xeroderma pigmentosum group A. UV-induced activation of the three genes is mediated by the major enhancer elements (located between nucleotide positions -105 and -79 of HIV-1, between positions -72 and -65 of the collagenase gene, and between positions -320 and -299 of fos). These elements share no apparent sequence motif and bind different trans-acting proteins; a member of the NF kappa B family binds to the HIV-1 enhancer, the heterodimer of Jun and Fos (AP-1) binds to the collagenase enhancer, and the serum response factors p67 and p62 bind to fos. DNA-binding activities of the factors recognizing the HIV-1 and collagenase enhancers are augmented in extracts from UV-treated cells. The increase in activity is due to posttranslational modification. While AP-1 resides in the nucleus and must be modulated there, NF kappa B is activated in the cytoplasm, indicating the existence of a cytoplasmic signal transduction pathway triggered by UV-induced DNA damage. In addition to activation, new synthesis of AP-1 is induced by UV radiation.

  1. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and human immunodeficiency virus infection in Nevada.

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, J. Q.; Semiatin, S. L.

    1991-01-01

    We summarize information from three sets of epidemiologic data: the Nevada AIDS [acquired immunodeficiency syndrome] Surveillance System, which contains information about every case identified within the state boundaries through September 1989; the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seroprevalence reporting systems, which currently include data on all HIV-positive reports submitted statewide to public health authorities; and surveys on the knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of Nevadans concerning HIV-related disease. The Nevada State AIDS Task Force outlined major policy recommendations, nearly half of which concerned testing; only 2 dealt with preventing HIV transmission. Greater efforts should go into education, particularly directed toward groups at greatest risk of exposure to HIV, and to improve community-based care of infected persons. PMID:2024509

  2. Thermal inactivation of bovine immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, E C; Keil, D; Coats, K S

    1996-01-01

    Cell-associated bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) and cell-free BIV were subjected to increasing temperatures, including pasteurization conditions. To determine the effect of heat treatment on BIV viability, reverse transcriptase activity and infectivity of the heat-treated virus were assessed. BIV was inactivated by heating to 47 degrees C for 30 min and by low- and high-temperature pasteurization conditions. PMID:8900024

  3. Robust vaccine-elicited cellular immune responses in breast milk following systemic simian immunodeficiency virus DNA prime and live virus vector boost vaccination of lactating rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Wilks, Andrew B; Christian, Elizabeth C; Seaman, Michael S; Sircar, Piya; Carville, Angela; Gomez, Carmen E; Esteban, Mariano; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Barouch, Dan H; Letvin, Norman L; Permar, Sallie R

    2010-12-01

    Breast milk transmission of HIV remains an important mode of infant HIV acquisition. Enhancement of mucosal HIV-specific immune responses in milk of HIV-infected mothers through vaccination may reduce milk virus load or protect against virus transmission in the infant gastrointestinal tract. However, the ability of HIV/SIV strategies to induce virus-specific immune responses in milk has not been studied. In this study, five uninfected, hormone-induced lactating, Mamu A*01(+) female rhesus monkey were systemically primed and boosted with rDNA and the attenuated poxvirus vector, NYVAC, containing the SIVmac239 gag-pol and envelope genes. The monkeys were boosted a second time with a recombinant Adenovirus serotype 5 vector containing matching immunogens. The vaccine-elicited immunodominant epitope-specific CD8(+) T lymphocyte response in milk was of similar or greater magnitude than that in blood and the vaginal tract but higher than that in the colon. Furthermore, the vaccine-elicited SIV Gag-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocyte polyfunctional cytokine responses were more robust in milk than in blood after each virus vector boost. Finally, SIV envelope-specific IgG responses were detected in milk of all monkeys after vaccination, whereas an SIV envelope-specific IgA response was only detected in one vaccinated monkey. Importantly, only limited and transient increases in the proportion of activated or CCR5-expressing CD4(+) T lymphocytes in milk occurred after vaccination. Therefore, systemic DNA prime and virus vector boost of lactating rhesus monkeys elicits potent virus-specific cellular and humoral immune responses in milk and may warrant further investigation as a strategy to impede breast milk transmission of HIV.

  4. The Epidemiology of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasner, Peter D.; Kaslow, Richard A.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews epidemiology and natural history of human immunodeficiency virus-Type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Discusses early and late clinical manifestations, diagnosis of infection, incubation and latency periods, and survival time. Reviews data from published literature on distribution of HIV infection in adult United States population and factors that…

  5. Women at Risk for Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quadagno, David; And Others

    This article reports results from a survey among women at risk for contracting Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) as well as transmitting it in a vertical (to offspring) and horizontal (sexual partner or intravenous [IV] drug usage) mode. Little is known about the extent of HIV knowledge, sexual behaviors, and IV drug usage for women at risk for…

  6. Women at Risk for Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quadagno, David; And Others

    This article reports results from a survey among women at risk for contracting Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) as well as transmitting it in a vertical (to offspring) and horizontal (sexual partner or intravenous [IV] drug usage) mode. Little is known about the extent of HIV knowledge, sexual behaviors, and IV drug usage for women at risk for…

  7. Bovine immunodeficiency virus: facts and questions.

    PubMed

    Belloc, C; Polack, B; Schwartz-Cornil, I; Brownlie, J; Lévy, D

    1996-01-01

    Bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) is a lentivirus whose serologic prevalence is worldwide. Little is known about its impact on animal health status, pathogenesis and mode of transmission. Understanding BIV biology implies isolation of new viral strains and long-term studies on experimentally-infected cows and surrogate hosts such as rabbits.

  8. Human immunodeficiency virus and infertility treatment.

    PubMed

    2010-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus is a serious but manageable chronic disease that affects persons of reproductive age, many of whom express a desire for biologic parenthood. This document is a revision of the original document of the same name, published in 2002 and reviewed in 2006. Copyright (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. The Epidemiology of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasner, Peter D.; Kaslow, Richard A.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews epidemiology and natural history of human immunodeficiency virus-Type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Discusses early and late clinical manifestations, diagnosis of infection, incubation and latency periods, and survival time. Reviews data from published literature on distribution of HIV infection in adult United States population and factors that…

  10. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus in South America

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Bruno M.; Hagiwara, Mitika K.; Cruz, Juliano C. M.; Hosie, Margaret J.

    2012-01-01

    The rapid emergence of AIDS in humans during the period between 1980 and 2000 has led to extensive efforts to understand more fully similar etiologic agents of chronic and progressive acquired immunodeficiency disease in several mammalian species. Lentiviruses that have gene sequence homology with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have been found in different species (including sheep, goats, horses, cattle, cats, and several Old World monkey species). Lentiviruses, comprising a genus of the Retroviridae family, cause persistent infection that can lead to varying degrees of morbidity and mortality depending on the virus and the host species involved. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) causes an immune system disease in domestic cats (Felis catus) involving depletion of the CD4+ population of T lymphocytes, increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections, and sometimes death. Viruses related to domestic cat FIV occur also in a variety of nondomestic felids. This is a brief overview of the current state of knowledge of this large and ancient group of viruses (FIVs) in South America. PMID:22590677

  11. Oral Manifestations of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Joel B.; Mathias, Richard G.

    1988-01-01

    The AIDS epidemic continues. All health-care workers, including physicians and dental personnel, may be instrumental in recognizing risk factors associated with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection. Oral signs and symptoms of HIV infection may be the first presentation of the disease or may develop during the course of the disease and require management. Knowledge of the signs, symptoms and associated infections and tumours is needed to assist in recognition, diagnosis, and treatment. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13 PMID:21253078

  12. Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Related Retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Nájera, Rafael; Herrera, M. I.; Andrés, R. de

    1987-01-01

    This paper summarizes the current knowledge on the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and related retroviruses, describing basic characteristics of this new group of viruses such as morphologic and genetic structure, biological and cultural properties, virus growth characteristics, genetic variability and virus replication. The discovery of new human and simian retroviruses has prompted the World Health Organization (WHO) to convene a group of experts to establish criteria for their characterization. This will allow rapid identification of new variants that may arise and allow public health measures to be implemented accordingly. Different approaches are made to nomenclature in view of the evolution of knowledge about these viruses, and a system of nomenclature has been proposed by the WHO working group. This system, inspired by the one developed for the influenza viruses, is practical and descriptive, providing information on the origins of the organism and its type. Images PMID:2829446

  13. Genetic regulation of human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Steffy, K; Wong-Staal, F

    1991-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has a complex life cycle in which both cellular and virus-encoded factors participate to determine the level of virus production. Two of the viral genes, tat and rev, are essential for virus replication and encode novel trans-activators that interact specifically with their cognate RNA target elements. Elucidation of their mechanisms of action is likely to expand our knowledge of gene regulation at transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels in the eukaryotic cell. Several viral genes (vif, vpu, and vpr) facilitate virus infection and/or release and may play a role in target cell tropism and infection in vivo. The functions of yet other viral genes (nef, vpt) remain unclear. Recent data also suggest that the tat gene product may have a role in HIV pathogenesis that goes beyond trans-activating virus expression. It can potentially impact on uninfected cells as a diffusible molecule and alter the growth of different cell types. PMID:1886517

  14. Integration Site Choice of a Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Vector

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yubin; Moressi, Christopher J.; Scheetz, Todd E.; Xie, Litao; Tran, Diane Thi; Casavant, Thomas L.; Ak, Prashanth; Benham, Craig J.; Davidson, Beverly L.; McCray, Paul B.

    2006-01-01

    We mapped 226 unique integration sites in human hepatoma cells following gene transfer with a feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-based lentivirus vector. FIV integrated across the entire length of the transcriptional units. Microarray data indicated that FIV integration favored actively transcribed genes. Approximately 21% of FIV integrations within transcriptional units occurred in genes regulated by the LEDGF/p75 transcriptional coactivator. DNA in regions of FIV insertion sites exhibited a “bendable” structure and a pattern of duplex destabilization favoring strand separation. FIV integration preferences are more similar to those of primate lentiviruses and distinct from those of Moloney murine leukemia virus, avian sarcoma leukosis virus, and foamy virus. PMID:16912328

  15. Kinetics of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) DNA and RNA synthesis during primary HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed Central

    Graziosi, C; Pantaleo, G; Butini, L; Demarest, J F; Saag, M S; Shaw, G M; Fauci, A S

    1993-01-01

    HIV-1 replication and viral burden in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) have been reported to be high in primary infection but generally very low during the prolonged period of clinical latency. It is uncertain precisely when this transition occurs during the HIV-1 infection and what the relationship is between the changes in HIV-1 replication versus the clearance of infected cells in the overall control of viral replication. In the present study, the kinetics of viral burden (i.e., frequency of HIV-1-infected cells) and replication during primary and early-chronic infection were analyzed in PBMC of four acutely infected individuals. High frequencies of HIV-1-infected cells and high levels of virus replication were observed in PBMC after primary HIV-1 infection. Down-regulation of virus replication in PBMC was observed in all four patients coincident with the emergence of HIV-1-specific immune responses. Other parameters of virus replication, such as circulating plasma p24 antigen and plasma viremia showed similar kinetics. In contrast, a significant decline in viral burden in PBMC was observed in only one of four patients. These results indicate that the down-regulation in the levels of virus replication associated with the clinical transition from acute to chronic infection does not necessarily reflect a reduction in viral burden, thus suggesting the involvement of additional factors. Identification of these factors will be important in elucidating the host mechanisms involved in the early control of HIV-1 infection and disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8341646

  16. GM-CSF DNA: an adjuvant for higher avidity IgG, rectal IgA, and increased protection against the acute phase of a SHIV-89.6P challenge by a DNA/MVA immunodeficiency virus vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Lilin; Vödrös, Dalma; Kozlowski, Pamela A.; Montefiori, David C.; Wilson, Robert L.; Akerstrom, Vicki L.; Chennareddi, Lakshmi; Yu, Tianwei; Kannanganat, Sunil; Ofielu, Lazarus; Villinger, Francois; Wyatt, Linda S.; Moss, Bernard; Amara, Rama Rao; Robinson, Harriet L.

    2007-01-01

    Single intradermal or intramuscular inoculations of GM-CSF DNA with the DNA prime for a simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-89.6 vaccine, which consists of DNA priming followed by modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) boosting, increased protection of both the blood and intestines against the acute phase of an intrarectal SHIV-89.6P challenge. GM-CSF appeared to contribute to protection by enhancing two antibody responses: the avidity maturation of anti-Env IgG in blood (p=<0.01) and the presence of long lasting anti-viral IgA in rectal secretions (p<0.01). The avidity of anti-Env IgG showed strong correlations with protection both pre and post challenge. Animals with the highest avidity anti-Env Ab had 1000-fold reductions in peak viremia over those with the lowest avidity anti-Env Ab. The enhanced IgA response was associated with the best protection, but did not achieve significance. PMID:17698160

  17. Systematic review of vestibular disorders related to human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Heinze, B; Swanepoel, D W; Hofmeyr, L M

    2011-09-01

    Disorders of the auditory and vestibular system are often associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. However, the extent and nature of these vestibular manifestations are unclear. To systematically review the current peer-reviewed literature on vestibular manifestations and pathology related to human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Systematic review of peer-reviewed articles related to vestibular findings in individuals with human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Several electronic databases were searched. We identified 442 records, reduced to 210 after excluding duplicates and reviews. These were reviewed for relevance to the scope of the study. We identified only 13 reports investigating vestibular functioning and pathology in individuals affected by human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. This condition can affect both the peripheral and central vestibular system, irrespective of age and viral disease stage. Peripheral vestibular involvement may affect up to 50 per cent of patients, and central vestibular involvement may be even more prevalent. Post-mortem studies suggest direct involvement of the entire vestibular system, while opportunistic infections such as oto- and neurosyphilis and encephalitis cause secondary vestibular dysfunction resulting in vertigo, dizziness and imbalance. Patients with human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome should routinely be monitored for vestibular involvement, to minimise functional limitations of quality of life.

  18. DNA Aptamers to Human Immunodeficiency Virus Reverse Transcriptase Selected by a Primer-Free SELEX Method: Characterization and Comparison with Other Aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Yi-Tak

    2012-01-01

    A 30-nucleotide DNA aptamer (5′-AGGAAGGCTTTAGGTCTGAGATCTCGGAAT-3′, denoted PF1) selected for high affinity to human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase (HIV RT) using a primer-free SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) method was characterized to determine features promoting tight binding. PF1's equilibrium dissociation constant for RT was ∼80 nM, over 10-fold lower than a random 30-mer. Changing the 2 terminal diguanosine repeats (underlined above) to diadenosine or dithymidine modestly decreased binding. Any changes to the 2 central diguanosines dramatically decreased binding. Binding was highly sensitive to length, with any truncations that deleted part of the 4 diguanosine motifs resulting in a 6-fold or more decrease in affinity. Even a construct with all the diguanosine motifs but lacking the 5′ terminal A and 3 nucleotides at the 3′ end showed ∼3-fold binding decrease. Changes to the nucleotides between the diguanosines, even those that did not alter PF1's low secondary structure (free energy of folding ΔG=−0.61 kcal/mol), dramatically decreased binding, suggesting sequence specificity. Despite the diguanosine motifs, circular dichroism (CD) spectra indicated that PF1 did not form a G-quartet. PF1 inhibited HIV RT synthesis with a half-maximal inhibitory value (IC50) of ∼60 nM. Larger, more structured RT DNA aptamers based on the HIV polypurine tract and those that formed G-quartets (denoted S4 and R1T) were more potent inhibitors, with IC50 values of ∼4 and ∼1 nM, respectively. An RNA pseudoknot aptamer (denoted 1.1) showed an IC50 near 4 nM. Competition binding assays with PF1 and several previously characterized RT aptamers indicated that they all bound at or near the primer–template pocket. These other more structured and typically larger aptamers bound more tightly than PF1 to RT based on filter binding assays. Results indicate that PF1 represents a new class of RT aptamers that are

  19. Human immunodeficiency virus infection and the liver.

    PubMed

    Crane, Megan; Iser, David; Lewin, Sharon R

    2012-03-27

    Liver disease in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals encompasses the spectrum from abnormal liver function tests, liver decompensation, with and without evidence of cirrhosis on biopsy, to non-alcoholic liver disease and its more severe form, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and hepatocellular cancer. HIV can infect multiple cells in the liver, leading to enhanced intrahepatic apoptosis, activation and fibrosis. HIV can also alter gastro-intestinal tract permeability, leading to increased levels of circulating lipopolysaccharide that may have an impact on liver function. This review focuses on recent changes in the epidemiology, pathogenesis and clinical presentation of liver disease in HIV-infected patients, in the absence of co-infection with hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus, with a specific focus on issues relevant to low and middle income countries.

  20. Genetic diversity of Argentine isolates of feline immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Pecoraro, M R; Tomonaga, K; Miyazawa, T; Kawaguchi, Y; Sugita, S; Tohya, Y; Kai, C; Etcheverrigaray, M E; Mikami, T

    1996-09-01

    We report the nucleotide sequence and genetic diversity of part of the envelope (env) gene of four strains of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) isolated from Argentine domestic cats. The DNA encoding the V3 to V5 regions of the env gene of the FIV isolates were amplified by PCR, cloned and sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the Argentine isolates did not cluster into a single group; one isolate clustered with subtype B FIV isolated in the USA and Japan, whereas the others formed a new cluster of FIV which might represent a prototype sequence for subtype E.

  1. Cellular Restriction Factors of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Zielonka, Jörg; Münk, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    Lentiviruses are known for their narrow cell- and species-tropisms, which are determined by cellular proteins whose absence or presence either support viral replication (dependency factors, cofactors) or inhibit viral replication (restriction factors). Similar to Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the cat lentivirus Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is sensitive to recently discovered cellular restriction factors from non-host species that are able to stop viruses from replicating. Of particular importance are the cellular proteins APOBEC3, TRIM5α and tetherin/BST-2. In general, lentiviruses counteract or escape their species’ own variant of the restriction factor, but are targeted by the orthologous proteins of distantly related species. Most of the knowledge regarding lentiviral restriction factors has been obtained in the HIV-1 system; however, much less is known about their effects on other lentiviruses. We describe here the molecular mechanisms that explain how FIV maintains its replication in feline cells, but is largely prevented from cross-species infections by cellular restriction factors. PMID:22069525

  2. Early pathogenesis of transmucosal feline immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Obert, Leslie A; Hoover, Edward A

    2002-06-01

    To identify the early target cells and tissues in transmucosal feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection, cats were exposed to a clade C FIV isolate via the oral-nasal or vaginal mucosa and multiple tissues were examined by virus isolation coculture (VI), DNA PCR, catalyzed tyramide signal-amplified in situ hybridization (TSA-ISH), and immunohistochemistry between days 1 and 12 postinoculation (p.i.). FIV RNA was detected in tonsil and oral or vaginal mucosa as early as 1 day p.i. by TSA-ISH and in retropharyngeal, tracheobronchial, or external iliac lymph nodes and sometimes in spleen or blood mononuclear cells by day 2, indicating that regional and distant spread of virus-infected cells occurred rapidly after mucosal exposure. By day 8, viral RNA, DNA, and culturable virus were uniformly detected in regional and distant tissues, connoting systemic infection. TSA-ISH proved more sensitive than DNA PCR in detecting early FIV-infected cells. In mucosal tissues, the earliest demonstrable FIV-bearing cells were either within or subjacent to the mucosal epithelium or were in germinal centers of regional lymph nodes. The FIV(+) cells were of either of two morphological types, large stellate or small round. Those FIV RNA(+) cells which could be colabeled for a phenotype marker, were labeled for either dendritic-cell-associated protein p55 or T-lymphocyte receptor antigen CD3. These studies indicate that FIV crosses mucous membranes within hours after exposure and rapidly traffics via dendritic and T cells to systemic lymphoid tissues, a pathway similar to that thought to occur in the initial phase of infection by the human and simian immunodeficiency viruses.

  3. Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-19

    Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)," September 11, 1987 (hereby canceled) 1d) Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs) Memorandum, ’) "The DoD HTLV -III...Testing Blood and Plasma for Antibodies to HTLV -III," July 17, 1985 (hereby canceled) (f) DoD Instruction 1438.4, "Compliance with Host Nation Human...partial or complete cutaneous anergy. In staging, if the CD4 number is 400 cells per mm3 , or greater, the individual shall be placed in stage 1 or 2

  4. Molecular Epidemiology of Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    During the evolution of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), transmissions between humans and primates resulted in multiple HIV lineages in humans. This evolution has been rapid, giving rise to a complex classification and allowing for worldwide spread and intermixing of subtypes, which has consequently led to dozens of circulating recombinant forms. In the Republic of Korea, 12,522 cases of HIV infection have been reported between 1985, when AIDS was first identified, and 2015. This review focuses on the evolution of HIV infection worldwide and the molecular epidemiologic characteristics of HIV in Korea. PMID:28332348

  5. Depoliticize Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection: A Commentary

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Public-health policy is inconsistent in its approach to the sexually transmitted disease human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Nearly every health agency has politicized the reporting, finding, and contacting of HIV cases. There is also no consistency among the various state health departments and the various federal health agencies. Until we have a uniform health policy that treats HIV infection as every other reportable sexually transmitted disease, we will make little progress toward controlling its inevitable increase in both cases and costs. PMID:18475369

  6. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp 41 mutations in proviral DNA among antiretroviral treatment-naive individuals from India.

    PubMed

    Sen, Sourav; Tripathy, S P; Sahni, A K; Gupta, R M; Kapila, K; Chopra, G S; Chimanpure, Vaishali M; Patil, Ajit A; Paranjape, R S

    2009-05-01

    The HIV-1 gp41 has been identified as an important target for the immune response, for the development of antiviral and vaccine strategies, and for epidemiologic studies. This study describes the HIV-1 env gp41 region mutations, associated with enfuvirtide (ENF) resistance, in proviral DNA from PBMCs in antiretroviral treatment-naive individuals from Pune, India. Twenty-one antiretroviral drug-naive chronically HIV-1-infected individuals were enrolled. The study sequences belonged to subtype C (n = 17), subtype A1 (n = 2), and CRF_AE (n = 2). In subtype B-infected individuals, the various HR1 region substitutions in env gp41 that have been associated with ENF resistance include A30V, L33S/T/V, L34M, G36D/E/S/V, I37T/K/V, V38A/M/E/G, Q39R, Q40H, N42T/D, N43D/K/S, L44M, L45M, R46M, L54M, and Q56K/R as well as N126K and S138A in the HR2 region. The study sequences did not reveal any ENF resistance-associated mutations at env gp41 amino acid positions: 36 to 45. The presence of L54M and Q56K in combination is associated with 5-fold reduced sensitivity to inhibition by ENF. The mutation L54M was seen in seven subtype C and two CRF_AE study sequences. Q56K was observed in a subtype A1 sequence. All the study sequences harbored N42S, a natural polymorphism associated with increased susceptibility to ENF. Of the mutations V38A and N140I, known to provide immunologic gain, the latter was observed in four subtype C sequences. This is the first study from India highlighting the presence of certain mutations in Indian subtype C env gp41, which may play a role in the evolution of subtype-specific variations in the resistance to ENF and associated immune response.

  7. Hematologic disorders associated with human immunodeficiency virus and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Cosby, Cecily D

    2007-01-01

    Nurses encounter patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection at various stages of their infection and in a variety of settings. This article focuses on the most common hematologic disorders associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, which can precipitate complications and frequently accompany hospitalization. It is important for nurses to have a solid foundation as to the cause of these disorders, their impact on quality of life and outcomes, and management strategies.

  8. DNA-dependent protein kinase interacts functionally with the RNA polymerase II complex recruited at the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) long terminal repeat and plays an important role in HIV gene expression.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Shilpi; Ochem, Alex; Tyagi, Mudit

    2011-07-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), a nuclear protein kinase that specifically requires association with DNA for its kinase activity, plays important roles in the regulation of different DNA transactions, including transcription, replication and DNA repair, as well as in the maintenance of telomeres. Due to its large size, DNA-PK is also known to facilitate the activities of other factors by providing the docking platform at their site of action. In this study, by running several chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we demonstrate the parallel distribution of DNA-PK with RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) along the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) provirus before and after activation with tumour necrosis factor alpha. The association between DNA-PK and RNAP II is also long-lasting, at least for up to 4 h (the duration analysed in this study). Knockdown of endogenous DNA-PK using specific small hairpin RNAs expressed from lentiviral vectors resulted in significant reduction in HIV gene expression and replication, demonstrating the importance of DNA-PK for HIV gene expression. Sequence analysis of the HIV-1 Tat protein revealed three potential target sites for phosphorylation by DNA-PK and, by using kinase assays, we confirmed that Tat is an effective substrate of DNA-PK. Through peptide mapping, we found that two of these three potential phosphorylation sites are recognized and phosphorylated by DNA-PK. Mutational studies on the DNA-PK target sites of Tat further demonstrated the functional significance of the Tat-DNA-PK interaction. Thus, overall our results clearly demonstrate the functional interaction between DNA-PK and RNAP II during HIV transcription.

  9. Replication of biotinylated human immunodeficiency viruses.

    PubMed

    Belshan, Michael; Matthews, John M; Madson, Christian J

    2011-01-01

    Previous work demonstrated recently the adaptation of the Escherichia coli biotin ligase BirA - biotin acceptor sequence (BAS) labeling system to produce human immunodeficiency virus type 1 viruses with biotinylated integrase (NLXIN(B)) and matrix (NLXMA(B)) proteins (Belshan et al., 2009). This report describes the construction of an HIV permissive cell line stably expressing BirA (SupT1.BirA). Consistent with the results in the previous report, NLXMA(B) replicated similar to wild-type levels and expressed biotinylated Gag and MA proteins in the SupT1.BirA cells, whereas the replication of NLXIN(B) was reduced severely. Three additional HIV type 2 (HIV-2) viruses were constructed with the BAS inserted into the vpx and vpr accessory genes. Two BAS insertions were made into the C-terminal half of the Vpx, including one internal insertion, and one at the N-terminus of Vpr. All three viruses were replication competent in the SupT1.BirA cells and their target proteins biotinylated efficiently and incorporated into virions. These results demonstrate the potential utility of the biotinylation system to label and capture HIV protein complexes in the context of replicating virus.

  10. Vectors derived from simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV).

    PubMed

    Nègre, Didier; Cosset, François-Loïc

    2002-11-01

    In contrast to other retroviruses, lentiviruses have the unique property of infecting non-proliferating cells. Thus vectors derived from lentiviruses are promising tools for in vivo gene delivery applications. Vectors derived from human primate and non-primate lentiviruses have recently been described and, unlike retroviral vectors derived from murine leukemia viruses, lead to stable integration of the transgene into quiescent cells in various organs. Despite all the safety safeguards that have been progressively introduced in lentiviral vectors, the clinical acceptance of vectors derived from pathogenic lentiviruses is subject to debate. It is therefore essential to design vectors derived from a wide range of lentivirus types and to comparatively examine their properties in terms of transduction efficiency and bio-safety. Here, we review the properties of lentiviral vectors derived from simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV).

  11. Human immunodeficiency virus integration in a cell-free system.

    PubMed Central

    Ellison, V; Abrams, H; Roe, T; Lifson, J; Brown, P

    1990-01-01

    Integration of the viral genome into the nuclear DNA of a host cell plays a pivotal role in the replication of retroviruses. We have developed an in vitro method for studying the biochemistry of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) integration by using extracts from HIV-infected cells. Analysis of the reaction products showed that HIV integration in vitro accurately reproduces the in vivo process. Integration occurred without apparent specificity for the target sequence, and the integrated provirus was directly flanked by a 5-base-pair duplication of DNA from the target site. HIV integration did not require a high-energy cofactor, and the enzymatic activities required for integration were recovered with the viral DNA when cell extracts were fractionated by gel exclusion chromatography. Images PMID:2335814

  12. Hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency virus coinfections.

    PubMed

    Dodig, M; Tavill, A S

    2001-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has become a major contributor to morbidity and mortality in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). It is estimated that 30% to 50% of patients with HIV are coinfected with HCV. Advances in antiretroviral therapy and improved life expectancy of HIV patients have resulted in an emergence of HCV-induced liver disease as a leading cause of significant morbidity and death in this population. Clinically, hepatitis C is a more severe disease in HIV-infected individuals, characterized by rapid progression toward end-stage liver disease. Highly active antiretroviral therapy is the mainstay of current acquired immunodeficiency syndrome management. One of the limiting side effects of combination therapy for HIV is hepatotoxicity, which is more common and often more serious in patients with underlying liver disease. Management of coinfected patients has no strict guidelines, but it is generally accepted that HIV infection needs to be treated before HCV. Hepatitis C in coinfected individuals is probably best treated using combination therapy (interferon alpha and ribavirin). It appears that combination therapy can safely be administered to this population and that previous concerns about ribavirin/zidovudine antagonism are unsubstantiated in clinical practice. Although initial results using only interferon alpha showed poor results in HIV coinfected patients, combination therapy seems to be as effective as in the general population. All HIV-HCV coinfected patients should be vaccinated against hepatitis B and hepatitis A; vaccines are safe and effective.

  13. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 nucleocapsid protein promotes efficient strand transfer and specific viral DNA synthesis by inhibiting TAR-dependent self-priming from minus-strand strong-stop DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Guo, J; Henderson, L E; Bess, J; Kane, B; Levin, J G

    1997-01-01

    During the first strand transfer in reverse transcription, minus-strand strong-stop DNA [(-) SSDNA] is annealed to the 3' end of the acceptor RNA in a reaction mediated by base-pairing between terminal repeat sequences in the RNA and their complement in the DNA. The large stem-loop structure in the repeat region known as TAR could interfere with this annealing reaction. We have developed an in vitro human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) system to investigate the effect of TAR on strand transfer. Mutational analysis demonstrates that the presence of TAR in the donor and acceptor templates inhibits strand transfer and is correlated with extensive synthesis of heterogeneous DNAs formed by self-priming from (-) SSDNA. These DNAs are not precursors to the transfer product. Interestingly, products of self-priming are not detected in HIV-1 endogenous reactions; this suggests that virions contain a component which prevents self-priming. Our results show that the viral nucleocapsid protein (NC), which can destabilize secondary structures, drastically reduces self-priming and dramatically increases the efficiency of strand transfer. In addition, the data suggest that the ability to eliminate self-priming is a general property of NC which is manifested during reverse transcriptase pausing at sites of secondary structure in the template. We conclude that this activity of NC is critical for achieving highly efficient and specific viral DNA synthesis. Our findings raise the possibility that inactivation of NC could provide a new approach for targeting reverse transcription in anti-HIV therapy. PMID:9188585

  14. Ultrastructure and morphogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Nakai, M; Goto, T

    1996-08-01

    The ultrastructure and morphogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) were elucidated by observation with several techniques including immunoelectron microscopy and cryo-microscopy. The virus particle consists of an envelope, a core and matrix. The virus particles were observed extracellularly as having one of three profiles: (1) a centric or an eccentric electron-dense core, (2) rod-shaped electron-dense core, and (3) doughnut-shaped. HIV-1 particles in the hydrated state were observed by high resolution electron cryo-microscopy to be globular, and the lipid membrane was clearly resolved as a bilayer. Many projections around the circumference were seen to be knob-like. The shapes and sizes of the projections, especially head parts, were found to vary in each projection. By isolation with Nonidet P40 and glutaraldehyde, HIV-1 cores were confirmed to consist of p24 protein by immunogold labeling. When the virus enters the cell, two entry modes were found: membrane fusion and endocytosis. No structures resembling virus particles could be seen in the cytoplasm after viral entry. In HIV-1-infected cells, positive reactions by immuno-labeling suggest that HIV-1 Gag may be produced in membrane-bound structures and transported to the cell surface by cytoskeletons. Then a crescent electron-dense layer was first formed underneath the cell membrane. Finally, the virus particle was released from the cell surface. Several cell clones producing defective particles were isolated from MT-4/HIV-1 cells. Among them, doughnut-shaped or teardrop-shaped particles were seen to be produced in the extracellular space. In the doughnut-shaped particles, Gag p17 and p24 proteins faced each other against the inner electron dense ring, suggesting that the inner ring consists of a precursor Gag protein.

  15. Persistent infection of rabbits with bovine immunodeficiency-like virus.

    PubMed Central

    Pifat, D Y; Ennis, W H; Ward, J M; Oberste, M S; Gonda, M A

    1992-01-01

    Chronic infection of rabbits was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of bovine immunodeficiency-like virus (BIV)-infected cells. Ten BIV-infected animals were monitored serologically for up to 2 years. Results of serologic and virus rescue assays indicated that all animals became infected and demonstrated a rapid and sustained BIV-specific humoral response. BIV was rescued by cocultivation from spleen, lymph nodes, and peripheral blood leukocytes of infected animals. Viral DNA in immune tissues was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction amplification of BIV sequences. These data and specific immunohistochemical staining of mononuclear cells of the spleen for BIV antigen suggest that the infection is targeted to immune system cells. Images PMID:1318416

  16. Human immunodeficiency virus infection in childhood.

    PubMed

    Blokzijl, M L

    1988-03-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome is associated with considerable morbidity in infants and children. It is caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) which can be transmitted vertically from mother to infant early in pregnancy. Transmission might also occur via breast milk. Although the exact transmission rate of HIV from mother to infant is not known, HIV can become a major threat to child survival. This threat is already present in Africa where high seroprevalences have been reported among infants and young children. Transmission via blood products is decreasing due to reliable methods of screening donors for HIV antibody. Where these tests are not available, parenteral transmission will increase the incidence of HIV infection. The clinical picture of HIV infection in children presents with failure to thrive, pulmonary interstitial pneumonitis, hepatosplenomegaly and recurrent bacterial infections. These are common manifestations of diseases prevalent in children in Africa where malnutrition and recurrent parasitic infections already cause immunosuppression. Recognition of the syndrome is therefore difficult. There is no available cure for HIV infection. Supportive treatment and relief of pain and suffering are the only means of management at present. Prevention of spread of the illness to infants and young children is therefore of paramount importance.

  17. Pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Levy, J A

    1993-01-01

    The lentivirus human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) causes AIDS by interacting with a large number of different cells in the body and escaping the host immune response against it. HIV is transmitted primarily through blood and genital fluids and to newborn infants from infected mothers. The steps occurring in infection involve an interaction of HIV not only with the CD4 molecule on cells but also with other cellular receptors recently identified. Virus-cell fusion and HIV entry subsequently take place. Following virus infection, a variety of intracellular mechanisms determine the relative expression of viral regulatory and accessory genes leading to productive or latent infection. With CD4+ lymphocytes, HIV replication can cause syncytium formation and cell death; with other cells, such as macrophages, persistent infection can occur, creating reservoirs for the virus in many cells and tissues. HIV strains are highly heterogeneous, and certain biologic and serologic properties determined by specific genetic sequences can be linked to pathogenic pathways and resistance to the immune response. The host reaction against HIV, through neutralizing antibodies and particularly through strong cellular immune responses, can keep the virus suppressed for many years. Long-term survival appears to involve infection with a relatively low-virulence strain that remains sensitive to the immune response, particularly to control by CD8+ cell antiviral activity. Several therapeutic approaches have been attempted, and others are under investigation. Vaccine development has provided some encouraging results, but the observations indicate the major challenge of preventing infection by HIV. Ongoing research is necessary to find a solution to this devastating worldwide epidemic. Images PMID:8464405

  18. Human immunodeficiency virus induced oral candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Warrier, S. Aravind; Sathasivasubramanian, S.

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a worldwide health problem, which affects in both developing and developed countries. The oral lesions caused due to this disease can drastically change the life of the patient, in terms of quality. We can also know the progression of the disease and also the important immune status of the patient. Lots of information on HIV is known in the developed countries and very less reports are available in the developing countries. The morbidity of HIV disease is due to its association with opportunistic fungal infection and the most common among them is oral candidiasis. Here, we present a case report on an apparently healthy male patient of 39 years, who had oral candidiasis and was one of the indicators for HIV infection. PMID:26538978

  19. Bacterial Respiratory Infections Complicating Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Charles; Anderson, Ronald

    2016-04-01

    Opportunistic bacterial and fungal infections of the lower respiratory tract, most commonly those caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus), Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and Pneumocystis jirovecii, remain the major causes of mortality in those infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Bacterial respiratory pathogens most prevalent in those infected with HIV, other than M. tuberculosis, represent the primary focus of the current review with particular emphasis on the pneumococcus, the leading cause of mortality due to HIV infection in the developed world. Additional themes include (1) risk factors; (2) the predisposing effects of HIV-mediated suppression on pulmonary host defenses, possibly intensified by smoking; (3) clinical and laboratory diagnosis, encompassing assessment of disease severity and outcome; and (4) antibiotic therapy. The final section addresses current recommendations with respect to pneumococcal immunization in the context of HIV infection, including an overview of the rationale underpinning the current "prime-boost" immunization strategy based on sequential administration of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine 13 and pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine 23.

  20. Human immunodeficiency virus-negative plasmablastic lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Li; Zhang, Xudong; Dong, Meng; Li, Ling; Wang, Xinhua; Zhang, Lei; Fu, Xiaorui; Sun, Zhenchang; Wu, Jingjing; Li, Zhaoming; Chang, Yu; Wang, Yingjun; Zhou, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Mingzhi; Chen, Qingjiang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL) is a rare subtype of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related non-Hodgkin's lymphoma that predominantly manifests in the oral cavity. Patient concerns: Three cases of HIV-negative PBL were reported. Diagnoses: HIV-negative PBL Interventions: The patient had undergone chemotherapy. Outcomes: Clinical outcomes were very poor in Cases 1 and 3; Case 2, whose diagnosis suggested no bone marrow involvement, is still alive. Lessons subsections: These cases served to broaden the reported clinical spectrum of HIV-negative PBL. Clinicians and pathologists need to be familiar with lymphoma in the identified extra-oral PBL variation and there levant differential diagnosis procedures for this particular disease. PMID:28207555

  1. Resumption of virus production after human immunodeficiency virus infection of T lymphocytes in the presence of azidothymidine.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M S; Brian, E L; Pagano, J S

    1987-01-01

    The new antiviral agent, azidothymidine (AZT; BW A509U), is currently the only successful drug in use for patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The effect of this thymidine analog, 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine, on the replication of the lymphadenopathy-associated virus strain of the human immunodeficiency virus was evaluated by using susceptible H9 and Jurkat cells. Cells were pretreated with concentrations of drug ranging from 0.5 to 100 microM, infected, and maintained in medium containing drug. Virus production was assayed by reverse transcriptase assays, and virus-specific DNA was analyzed by Southern blots probed with cloned human immunodeficiency virus sequences. At 4 to 8 days postinfection, infected cells without drug reached a peak of reverse transcriptase activity that was sustained. Increasing concentrations of AZT caused increasing delays in virus production; however, replicate cultures at nontoxic levels of the drug (up to 25 microM) eventually produced as much virus as did non-drug-treated infected cells, despite the continued presence of the drug. Levels of intracellular, unintegrated, virus-specific DNA paralleled reverse transcriptase levels. Virus-caused cytopathic effect was likewise delayed in drug-treated cultures. Virus recovered from H9 cultures after 25 microM AZT treatment did not appear resistant to AZT. Images PMID:2446006

  2. Sequential priming with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) DNA vaccines, with or without encoded cytokines, and a replicating adenovirus-SIV recombinant followed by protein boosting does not control a pathogenic SIVmac251 mucosal challenge.

    PubMed

    Demberg, Thorsten; Boyer, Jean D; Malkevich, Nina; Patterson, L Jean; Venzon, David; Summers, Ebonita L; Kalisz, Irene; Kalyanaraman, V S; Lee, Eun Mi; Weiner, David B; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2008-11-01

    Previously, combination DNA/nonreplicating adenovirus (Ad)- or poxvirus-vectored vaccines have strongly protected against SHIV(89.6P), DNAs expressing cytokines have modulated immunity elicited by DNA vaccines, and replication-competent Ad-recombinant priming and protein boosting has strongly protected against simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) challenge. Here we evaluated a vaccine strategy composed of these promising components. Seven rhesus macaques per group were primed twice with multigenic SIV plasmid DNA with or without interleukin-12 (IL-12) DNA or IL-15 DNA. After a multigenic replicating Ad-SIV immunization, all groups received two booster immunizations with SIV gp140 and SIV Nef protein. Four control macaques received control DNA plasmids, empty Ad vector, and adjuvant. All vaccine components were immunogenic, but the cytokine DNAs had little effect. Macaques that received IL-15-DNA exhibited higher peak anti-Nef titers, a more rapid anti-Nef anamnestic response postchallenge, and expanded CD8(CM) T cells 2 weeks postchallenge compared to the DNA-only group. Other immune responses were indistinguishable between groups. Overall, no protection against intrarectal challenge with SIV(mac251) was observed, although immunized non-Mamu-A*01 macaques as a group exhibited a statistically significant 1-log decline in acute viremia compared to non-Mamu-A*01 controls. Possible factors contributing to the poor outcome include administration of cytokine DNAs to sites different from the Ad recombinants (intramuscular and intratracheal, respectively), too few DNA priming immunizations, a suboptimal DNA delivery method, failure to ensure delivery of SIV and cytokine plasmids to the same cell, and instability and short half-life of the IL-15 component. Future experiments should address these issues to determine if this combination approach is able to control a virulent SIV challenge.

  3. Evolution of feline immunodeficiency virus Gag proteins.

    PubMed

    Burkala, Evan; Poss, Mary

    2007-10-01

    We evaluated the predicted biochemical properties of Gag proteins from a diverse group of feline immunodeficiency viruses (FIV) to determine how different evolutionary histories of virus and host have changed or constrained these important structural proteins. Our data are based on FIV sequences derived from domestic cat (FIVfca), cougar (FIVpco), and lions (FIVple). Analyses consisted of determining the selective forces acting at each position in the protein and the comparing predictions for secondary structure, charge, hydrophobicity and flexibility for matrix, capsid and nucleocapsid, and the C-terminal peptide, which comprise the Gag proteins. We demonstrate that differences among the FIV Gag proteins have largely arisen by neutral evolution, although many neutrally evolving regions have maintained biochemical features. Regions with predicted differences in biochemical features appear to involve intramolecular interactions and structural elements that undergo conformational changes during particle maturation. In contrast, the majority of sites involved in intermolecular contacts on the protein surface are constrained by purifying selection. There is also conservation of sites that interact with host proteins associated with cellular trafficking and particle budding. NC is the only protein with evidence of positive selection, two of which occur in the N-terminal region responsible for RNA binding and interaction with host proteins.

  4. Development of vivo of genetic variability of simian immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Baier, M; Dittmar, M T; Cichutek, K; Kurth, R

    1991-01-01

    Rapid development of genetic variability may contribute to the pathogenicity of lentiviruses as it may allow escape from immune surveillance and/or from suppression of virus replication. Although apathogenic in African green monkeys, simian immunodeficiency virus isolated from African green monkeys is shown to display extensive genetic variability and defectiveness in the V1- and V2-like variable domains of the external envelope protein comparable to that known for human immunodeficiency virus. However, in contrast to the situation in human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals, a predominant major virus variant was detected neither in a monkey naturally infected for more than 10 years nor in two monkeys infected with a molecular virus clone for 15-20 months. Extensive variability evolves from a single genotype with a maximal rate of 7.7 mutations per 1000 nucleotides per year. A remarkable selection for nonsynonymous mutations that accounts for 92% of all changes indicates continuous selection of variants. Images PMID:1896460

  5. Generation of hybrid human immunodeficiency virus by homologous recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, A; York, D; Jannoun-Nasr, R; Kalyanaraman, S; Swan, D; Benson, J; Bohan, C; Luciw, P A; Schnoll, S; Robinson, R A

    1989-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1, isolated from diverse sources, exhibits genomic diversity. The mechanisms by which the genomic diversity takes place in individuals exposed to multiple virus isolates is yet to be elucidated. Genetic variation, in general, might result from mutagenic events such as point mutations, rearrangements (insertions and deletions), and recombination. In an attempt to evaluate the process of genetic diversity, we designed experiments to analyze recombination between HIV DNAs by using DNA transfection in cell cultures. Here we report the successful recombination between truncated HIV proviral DNAs with an overlap homology of 53 base pairs that leads to the formation of viable hybrid virus. Recombination was also seen between exogenous DNA introduced into cells and homologous HIV sequences resident in the cells. These results indicate that recombination among various HIV isolates may play a significant role in the generation of genetic diversity of HIV. Further, the method used here enables the construction of hybrid HIV genomes to identify the viral determinants responsible for tropism, replication, and cytopathic effects. Images PMID:2474834

  6. Simian immunodeficiency virus infection of CD8+ lymphocytes in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Dean, G A; Reubel, G H; Pedersen, N C

    1996-01-01

    To determine the lymphoid target cells of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in vivo, peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and lymph node lymphocytes (LNL) were positively selected (>97% purity) for surface expression of CD4, CD8, or CD20 and then analyzed for SIV provirus using semiquantitative DNA amplification. We found provirus in CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes but none in CD20+ lymphocytes. During acute SIV infection (< or = 214 days postinoculation), the percentage of PBL and LNL CD4+ cells containing proviral DNA ranged from 0.2 to 20% and from 0.2 to 2%, respectively. Proviral burden in the CD8+ population of either PBL or LNL ranged from 0.01 to 0.2%. Virus isolation by cocultivation was positive for both CD4+ and CD8+ purified populations. No difference in proviral burden was observed between PBL and LNL subsets during acute SIV infection. Up to 19.4% of positively selected CD8+ cells also expressed CD4, and thus the provirus may reside within a dual-positive population. This dual-positive population may represent activated lymphocytes that are particularly susceptible to infection and may provide an opportunity for virus entry into the CD8+ CD4- lymphocytes in vivo. PMID:8764081

  7. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) in Military Service Members

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-07

    quantitative nucleic acid result for HIV infection according to a Food and Drug Administration-approved test. ...07 JUN 2013 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) in Military...and Readiness (USD(P&R)),” June 23, 2008 (b) DoD Instruction 6485.01, “Human Immunodeficiency Virus ,” October 17, 2006 (hereby cancelled) (c) DoD

  8. Guanine α-carboxy nucleoside phosphonate (G-α-CNP) shows a different inhibitory kinetic profile against the DNA polymerases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and herpes viruses.

    PubMed

    Balzarini, Jan; Menni, Michael; Das, Kalyan; van Berckelaer, Lizette; Ford, Alan; Maguire, Nuala M; Liekens, Sandra; Boehmer, Paul E; Arnold, Eddy; Götte, Matthias; Maguire, Anita R

    2017-07-15

    α-Carboxy nucleoside phosphonates (α-CNPs) are modified nucleotides that represent a novel class of nucleotide-competing reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NcRTIs). They were designed to act directly against HIV-1 RT without the need for prior activation (phosphorylation). In this respect, they differ from the nucleoside or nucleotide RTIs [N(t)RTIs] that require conversion to their triphosphate forms before being inhibitory to HIV-1 RT. The guanine derivative (G-α-CNP) has now been synthesized and investigated for the first time. The (L)-(+)-enantiomer of G-α-CNP directly and competitively inhibits HIV-1 RT by interacting with the substrate active site of the enzyme. The (D)-(-)-enantiomer proved inactive against HIV-1 RT. In contrast, the (+)- and (-)-enantiomers of G-α-CNP inhibited herpes (i.e. HSV-1, HCMV) DNA polymerases in a non- or uncompetitive manner, strongly indicating interaction of the (L)-(+)- and the (D)-(-)-G-α-CNPs at a location different from the polymerase substrate active site of the herpes enzymes. Such entirely different inhibition profile of viral polymerases is unprecedented for a single antiviral drug molecule. Moreover, within the class of α-CNPs, subtle differences in their sensitivity to mutant HIV-1 RT enzymes were observed depending on the nature of the nucleobase in the α-CNP molecules. The unique properties of the α-CNPs make this class of compounds, including G-α-CNP, direct acting inhibitors of multiple viral DNA polymerases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Integration Preference Is Similar to That of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Crise, Bruce; Li, Yuan; Yuan, Chiuchin; Morcock, David R.; Whitby, Denise; Munroe, David J.; Arthur, Larry O.; Wu, Xiaolin

    2005-01-01

    Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) is a useful model for studying human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) pathogenesis and vaccine efficacy. As with all other retroviruses, integration is a necessary step in the replication cycle of SIV. The location of the retrovirus integration site is known to impact on viral gene expression, establishment of viral latency, and other aspects of the replication cycle of a retrovirus. In this study, 148 SIV provirus integration sites were sequenced and mapped in the human genome. Our analysis showed that SIV integration, like that of HIV type 1 (HIV-1), exhibited a strong preference for actively transcribed regions in the genome (A. R. Schroder et al., Cell 110:521-529, 2002) and no preference for the CpG islands or transcription start sites, in contrast to observations for murine leukemia virus (X. Wu et al., Science 300:1749-1751, 2003). The parallel integration target site preferences of SIV and HIV-1 suggest that these lentiviruses may share similar mechanisms for target site selection and that SIV serves as an accurate model of HIV-1 with respect to integration. PMID:16160146

  10. Induction of human immunodeficiency virus type-1-specific immunity with a novel gene transport unit (GTU)-MultiHIV DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Blazevic, Vesna; Männik, Andres; Malm, Maria; Sikut, Rein; Valtavaara, Minna; Toots, Urve; Ustav, Mart; Krohn, Kai

    2006-07-01

    A multiHIV fusion gene expressing an antigenic fusion protein composed of regulatory HIV-1 proteins Rev, Nef, and Tat, as well as Gag p17/p24 and a stretch of 11 cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope clusters from Pol and Env, was cloned into a novel DNA vector named the Gene Transport Unit (GTU). A mouse H-2(d)-restricted HIV-1 gp120 epitope (RGPGRAFVTI) was cloned into the fusion gene as well. In addition to the HIV- 1 genes the GTU codes for a nuclear anchoring protein (bovine papilloma virus E2), ensuring the long maintenance of the vector and a high expression level of the selected immunogens. BALB/c mice were immunized with the GTU-MultiHIV DNA construct by different routes and regimens of immunization to assess the immunogenicity of the DNA vaccine in vivo. Mice developed strong CD8(+) CTL responses to HIV-1 Env and Gag measured by an ELISPOT-IFN-gamma assay and chromium release assay. In addition, T cell responses to regulatory proteins Rev, Nef, and Tat were induced. Antibody responses were detected to each of the HIV antigens encoded by the DNA construct. Minimal doses of the GTU-MultiHIV DNA delivered by gene gun were potent in inducing significant HIV-specific CTL responses. The equivalent doses of the conventional plasmid expressing MultiHIV DNA delivered by gene gun failed to do so. An ideal DNA vaccine should yield high expression of the viral antigens for a prolonged period of time, and expression of the multiple viral antigens is probably required for the induction of a broad and protective immune response. The GTU-MultiHIV DNA vaccine described is a good vaccine candidate that meets the above criteria.

  11. Breast-feeding and human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Sharma, U K; Willingham, F F

    1997-01-01

    Breast-feeding provides nutritional, immunological, and psychological benefits. It protects children from mortality and morbidity associated with diarrheal diseases, pneumonia and other infections. Breast feeding has also been shown to prolong the interval between births and thereby improve child survival and maternal health. However, studies suggest that in certain populations, breast feeding may account for nearly 14% of perinatal human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission. It is therefore important that the risk of HIV-1 infection through breast feeding be weighed against the morbidity and mortality associated with bottle feeding. This paper discusses the literature dealing with breast feeding in women with HIV-1 infection. Specifically, the review addresses the issues surrounding infant mortality in areas of different HIV-1 prevalence where breast-feeding or bottle-feeding may be employed. Analysis suggests that the benefits of breast-feeding or bottle-feeding may be employed. Analysis suggests that the benefits of breast-feeding can substantially outweigh the putative risk of HIV-1 transmission unless the prevalence of HIV-1 infection is high or the difference in mortality between breast-fed and bottle-fed infants is very low.

  12. Human immunodeficiency virus infection in tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Theuer, C P; Hopewell, P C; Elias, D; Schecter, G F; Rutherford, G W; Chaisson, R E

    1990-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) serology was performed in non-Asian-born patients 18-65 years old with newly diagnosed tuberculosis at a county tuberculosis clinic, and demographic and clinical features of HIV-seropositive and HIV-seronegative patients were compared. Sixty of 128 eligible patients agreed to participate, of whom 17 (28%) were seropositive. Risk of HIV was associated with homosexual contact, intravenous drug use, or both; however, 4 (24%) of the 17 seropositives denied risk behaviors. Significantly more blacks (48%) than whites (10%) or Latinos (20%) were HIV-seropositive (P less than .01). Site of disease, tuberculin reactivity, response to therapy, drug toxicity, and relapse did not differ significantly between groups. HIV-seropositive patients had significantly lower median CD4+ cell counts (326/mm3, range 23-742/mm3, vs. 929/mm3, range 145-2962/mm3, P less than .0005) and median CD4+:CD8+ ratios (0.50, range 0.14-1.07 vs. 1.54, range 0.35-4.36, P less than .0001). HIV infection is associated with clinically typical tuberculosis and HIV screening of tuberculosis patients is recommended in areas where HIV is endemic.

  13. Bone health and human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Jason J; Manlangit, Kristine; Squires, Kathleen E

    2013-06-01

    Low bone mineral density is common among persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, and studies reporting increased fracture rates in this patient population are emerging. The causes of low bone mineral density, osteoporosis, and fractures in persons with HIV are likely multifactorial, involving traditional risk factors, HIV infection, and exposure to antiretroviral treatment. Specific antiretrovirals such as tenofovir may cause a greater loss of bone mineral density compared with other agents and have recently been linked to an increased risk for fracture. As a result, recent treatment guidelines suggest that clinicians consider avoiding tenofovir as initial therapy in postmenopausal women. Evaluating bone mineral density and vitamin D status in persons with HIV may be important steps in identifying those requiring pharmacotherapy; however, the appropriate timing for bone mineral density and vitamin D screening is uncertain, as is the appropriate method of replacing vitamin D in HIV-positive patients who are deficient. Further study is necessary to definitively determine the approach to evaluating bone health and managing low bone mineral density and vitamin D deficiency in patients with HIV infection.

  14. [Cerebral infarction in human immunodeficiency virus infection].

    PubMed

    Blanche, P; Toulon, P; de La Blanchardière, A; Sicard, D

    1995-06-03

    Patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) appear to have a high risk of ischaemic cerebral events. We observed two cases of cerebral infarction in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). In the first case, a 38-year-old homosexual with no cardiovascular risk other than smoking presented with rapidly progressive hemiparesia. Brain CT-scan visualized two infarcts in the territory of the right sylvian artery and the arteriography an occlusion of the internal carotid artery. In the second, a 37-year-old homosexual, hospitalization was required for a left-sided pure sensitive epilepsy seizure. There was no cardiovascular risk other than smoking. Magnetic resonance imaging showed parietal ischaemia and thrombus in the left atrium without atrial hypertrophy was seen at transoesophageal echocardiography. In both cases, there was no evidence of endocarditis, dissection of the neck vessels or disseminated intravascular coagulation nor of associated viral or bacterial infectious complication of AIDS. Angiographic findings eliminated cerebral vascularitis. Among the perturbed haemostasis factors previously reported in HIV+ patients, we observed free proteins S deficiency (68 and 43%) and heparin cofactor II deficiency (54 and 40%). Serum albumin was 33 and 32 g/l respectively. Outcome was favourable in both cases with anticoagulant therapy. These coagulation anomalies would not appear sufficient to explain cerebral infarction. Other mechanisms including immune complexed deposition, direct HIV toxicity for endothelial cells or the effect of cytokines on smooth muscles fibres and fibroblasts are probably more important causal factors.

  15. Frequent transmission of immunodeficiency viruses among bobcats and pumas.

    PubMed

    Franklin, S P; Troyer, J L; Terwee, J A; Lyren, L M; Boyce, W M; Riley, S P D; Roelke, M E; Crooks, K R; Vandewoude, S

    2007-10-01

    With the exception of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which emerged in humans after cross-species transmissions of simian immunodeficiency viruses from nonhuman primates, immunodeficiency viruses of the family Lentiviridae represent species-specific viruses that rarely cross species barriers to infect new hosts. Among the Felidae, numerous immunodeficiency-like lentiviruses have been documented, but only a few cross-species transmissions have been recorded, and these have not been perpetuated in the recipient species. Lentivirus seroprevalence was determined for 79 bobcats (Lynx rufus) and 31 pumas (Puma concolor) from well-defined populations in Southern California. Partial genomic sequences were subsequently obtained from 18 and 12 seropositive bobcats and pumas, respectively. Genotypes were analyzed for phylogenic relatedness and genotypic composition among the study set and archived feline lentivirus sequences. This investigation of feline immunodeficiency virus infection in bobcats and pumas of Southern California provides evidence that cross-species infection has occurred frequently among these animals. The data suggest that transmission has occurred in multiple locations and are most consistent with the spread of the virus from bobcats to pumas. Although the ultimate causes remain unknown, these transmission events may occur as a result of puma predation on bobcats, a situation similar to that which fostered transmission of HIV to humans, and likely represent the emergence of a lentivirus with relaxed barriers to cross-species transmission. This unusual observation provides a valuable opportunity to evaluate the ecological, behavioral, and molecular conditions that favor repeated transmissions and persistence of lentivirus between species.

  16. The Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Infectivity and Mechanisms of Pathogenesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fauci, Anthony S.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses how the infection of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) results in a profound immunosuppression due predominantly to a selective depletion of helper/inducer T lymphocytes that express the receptor for the virus, as well as neuropsychiatric abnormalities in the brain. (TW)

  17. The Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Infectivity and Mechanisms of Pathogenesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fauci, Anthony S.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses how the infection of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) results in a profound immunosuppression due predominantly to a selective depletion of helper/inducer T lymphocytes that express the receptor for the virus, as well as neuropsychiatric abnormalities in the brain. (TW)

  18. Macrophages in Progressive Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    DiNapoli, Sarah R.; Hirsch, Vanessa M.

    2016-01-01

    The cells that are targeted by primate lentiviruses (HIV and simian immunodeficiency virus [SIV]) are of intense interest given the renewed effort to identify potential cures for HIV. These viruses have been reported to infect multiple cell lineages of hematopoietic origin, including all phenotypic and functional CD4 T cell subsets. The two most commonly reported cell types that become infected in vivo are memory CD4 T cells and tissue-resident macrophages. Though viral infection of CD4 T cells is routinely detected in both HIV-infected humans and SIV-infected Asian macaques, significant viral infection of macrophages is only routinely observed in animal models wherein CD4 T cells are almost entirely depleted. Here we review the roles of macrophages in lentiviral disease progression, the evidence that macrophages support viral replication in vivo, the animal models where macrophage-mediated replication of SIV is thought to occur, how the virus can interact with macrophages in vivo, pathologies thought to be attributed to viral replication within macrophages, how viral replication in macrophages might contribute to the asymptomatic phase of HIV/SIV infection, and whether macrophages represent a long-lived reservoir for the virus. PMID:27307568

  19. Tumorigenic DNA viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, G.

    1989-01-01

    The eighth volume of Advances in Viral Oncology focuses on the three major DNA virus groups with a postulated or proven tumorigenic potential: papillomaviruses, animal hepatitis viruses, and the Epstein-Bar virus. In the opening chapters, the contributors analyze the evidence that papillomaviruses and animal hepatitis viruses are involved in tumorigenesis and describe the mechanisms that trigger virus-host cell interactions. A detailed section on the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) - comprising more than half the book - examines the transcription and mRNA processing patterns of the virus genome; the mechanisms by which EBV infects lymphoid and epithelial cells; the immunological aspects of the virus; the actions of EBV in hosts with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome; and the involvement of EBV in the etiology of Burkitt's lymphoma.

  20. Human immunodeficiency virus, herpes virus infections, and pulmonary vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Flores, Sonia C; Almodovar, Sharilyn

    2013-01-01

    The following state-of-the-art seminar was delivered as part of the Aspen Lung Conference on Pulmonary Hypertension and Vascular Diseases held in Aspen, Colorado in June 2012. This paper will summarize the lecture and present results from a nonhuman primate model of infection with Simian (Human) Immunodeficiency Virus - nef chimeric virions as well as the idea that polymorphisms in the HIV-1 nef gene may be driving the immune response that results in exuberant inflammation and aberrant endothelial cell (EC) function. We will present data gathered from primary HIV nef isolates where we tested the biological consequences of these polymorphisms and how their presence in human populations may predict patients at risk for developing this disease. In this article, we also discuss how a dysregulated immune system, in conjunction with a viral infection, could contribute to pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Both autoimmune diseases and some viruses are associated with defects in the immune system, primarily in the function of regulatory T cells. These T-cell defects may be a common pathway in the formation of plexiform lesions. Regardless of the route by which viruses may lead to PAH, it is important to recognize their role in this rare disease.

  1. Human immunodeficiency virus, herpes virus infections, and pulmonary vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Sonia C.; Almodovar, Sharilyn

    2013-01-01

    The following state-of-the-art seminar was delivered as part of the Aspen Lung Conference on Pulmonary Hypertension and Vascular Diseases held in Aspen, Colorado in June 2012. This paper will summarize the lecture and present results from a nonhuman primate model of infection with Simian (Human) Immunodeficiency Virus - nef chimeric virions as well as the idea that polymorphisms in the HIV-1 nef gene may be driving the immune response that results in exuberant inflammation and aberrant endothelial cell (EC) function. We will present data gathered from primary HIV nef isolates where we tested the biological consequences of these polymorphisms and how their presence in human populations may predict patients at risk for developing this disease. In this article, we also discuss how a dysregulated immune system, in conjunction with a viral infection, could contribute to pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Both autoimmune diseases and some viruses are associated with defects in the immune system, primarily in the function of regulatory T cells. These T-cell defects may be a common pathway in the formation of plexiform lesions. Regardless of the route by which viruses may lead to PAH, it is important to recognize their role in this rare disease. PMID:23662195

  2. Mutational analysis of the human immunodeficiency virus: the orf-B region down-regulates virus replication.

    PubMed Central

    Luciw, P A; Cheng-Mayer, C; Levy, J A

    1987-01-01

    Mutations were made by recombinant DNA techniques in an infectious molecular clone of the human immunodeficiency virus San Francisco isolate 2 (HIVSF2) [formerly the prototype isolate of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-associated retrovirus (ARV-2)]. The effect of these changes on the replicative and cytopathologic properties of the virus was studied by transfecting modified virus clones into cultured human cells. Mutations in the gag, pol, env, and tat regions precluded virus replication and cytopathology in lymphoid cells. A mutation in orf-A dramatically reduced but did not abolish virus replication. Mutant viruses with deletions in the orf-B region were highly cytopathic and replicated to approximately 5-fold higher levels than wild-type virus. They also produced approximately 5-fold more viral DNA in infected lymphoid cells than did wild-type virus. Thus, the orf-B region may function to down-regulate virus replication. This mutational analysis of the HIVSF2 genome is a means of assessing genes regulating viral replication and cytopathology. Images PMID:2434956

  3. Induction of Interleukin-6 During Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    is induced by a harbored HIV capable of replicating in T cells but not in variety of stimuli, including bacteria , viruses , and other monocyte...different signals, such as bacteria , serum IL-6 levels. bacterial products, viruses , and certain cytokines." IL-6 stimulates liver cell cultures to produce a...COVERED "’I’ ~ ~ ~ ~ 99 Reprint1 111 111111 itli S. FUNDING NUMBERS Induction of Interleukin-6 During Human Immunodeficiency . G/ ) Virus Infection

  4. Neurosyphilis in a Man with Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghani, Khosro; Kallini, Joseph R.

    2014-01-01

    The authors describe a 33-year-old man with human immunodeficiency virus who developed erythematous macules on the palms and soles with subsequent headaches, papilledema, and iritis. They review the salient characteristics of neurosyphilis with a focus on human immunodeficiency virus-positive individuals. The incidence of syphilis has increased since the year 2000 in African Americans, Hispanics, and men who have sex with men. Treponema pallidum is the causative agent of this disease—a fastidious, slowly growing, microaerophilic spirochete. Sexual contact is the most common mode of transmission. The rapid plasma reagin, Venereal Disease Research Laboratory assay, and fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption assay are commonly used to diagnose syphilis. The mainstay treatment is penicillin. Special considerations exist in the natural history and management of syphilis in the setting of human immunodeficiency virus. PMID:25161759

  5. Spatial analysis of feline immunodeficiency virus infection in cougars.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, David C; Waller, Lance A; Biek, Roman

    2010-07-01

    The cougar (Puma concolor) is a large predatory feline found widely in the Americas that is susceptible to feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a fast-evolving lentivirus found in wild feline species that is analogous to simian immunodeficiency viruses in wild primates and belongs to the same family of viruses as human immunodeficiency virus. FIV infection in cougars can lead to a weakened immune system that creates opportunities for other infecting agents. FIV prevalence and lineages have been studied previously in several areas in the western United States, but typically without spatially explicit statistical techniques. To describe the distribution of FIV in a sample of cougars located in the northern Rocky Mountain region of North America, we first used kernel density ratio estimation to map the log relative risk of FIV. The risk surface showed a significant cluster of FIV in northwestern Montana. We also used Bayesian cluster models for genetic data to investigate the spatial structure of the feline immunodeficiency virus with virus genetic sequence data. A result of the models was two spatially distinct FIV lineages that aligned considerably with an interstate highway in Montana. Our results suggest that the use of spatial information and models adds novel insight when investigating an infectious animal disease. The results also suggest that the influence of landscape features likely plays an important role in the spatiotemporal spread of an infectious disease within wildlife populations.

  6. Microbial Translocation and Inflammation Occur in Hyperacute Immunodeficiency Virus Infection and Compromise Host Control of Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    DiNapoli, Sarah R.; Greene, Justin M.; Lehrer-Brey, Gabrielle; Gieger, Samantha M.; Buechler, Connor R.; Crosno, Kristin A.; Peterson, Eric J.; Wiseman, Roger W.; Estes, Jacob D.; Sacha, Jonah B.; Brenchley, Jason M.; O’Connor, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Within the first three weeks of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, virus replication peaks in peripheral blood. Despite the critical, causal role of virus replication in determining transmissibility and kinetics of progression to acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), there is limited understanding of the conditions required to transform the small localized transmitted founder virus population into a large and heterogeneous systemic infection. Here we show that during the hyperacute “pre-peak” phase of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in macaques, high levels of microbial DNA transiently translocate into peripheral blood. This, heretofore unappreciated, hyperacute-phase microbial translocation was accompanied by sustained reduction of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-specific antibody titer, intestinal permeability, increased abundance of CD4+CCR5+ T cell targets of virus replication, and T cell activation. To test whether increasing gastrointestinal permeability to cause microbial translocation would amplify viremia, we treated two SIV-infected macaque ‘elite controllers’ with a short-course of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)–stimulating a transient increase in microbial translocation and a prolonged recrudescent viremia. Altogether, our data implicates translocating microbes as amplifiers of immunodeficiency virus replication that effectively undermine the host’s capacity to contain infection. PMID:27926931

  7. Distinct replicative and cytopathic characteristics of human immunodeficiency virus isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Fenyö, E M; Morfeldt-Månson, L; Chiodi, F; Lind, B; von Gegerfelt, A; Albert, J; Olausson, E; Asjö, B

    1988-01-01

    According to their capacity to replicate in vitro, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) isolates can be divided into two major groups, rapid/high and slow/low. Rapid/high viruses can easily be transmitted to a variety of cell lines of T-lymphoid (CEM, H9, and Jurkat) and monocytoid (U937) origin. In contrast, slow/low viruses replicate transiently, if at all, in these cell lines. Except for a few isolates, the great majority of slow/low viruses replicate in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and Jurkat-tatIII cells constitutively expressing the tatIII gene of HIV-1. The viruses able to replicate efficiently cause syncytium formation and are regularly isolated from immunodeficient patients. Poorly replicating HIV isolates, often obtained from individuals with no or mild disease, show syncytium formation and single-cell killing simultaneously or, with some isolates, cell killing only. Images PMID:2459416

  8. Inhibition of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome virus by oligodeoxynucleoside methylphosphonates.

    PubMed Central

    Sarin, P S; Agrawal, S; Civeira, M P; Goodchild, J; Ikeuchi, T; Zamecnik, P C

    1988-01-01

    Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides containing internucleoside methylphosphonate linkages were examined for their ability to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-induced syncytium formation and virus expression. HIV inhibitory activity was found to be dependent on both chain length and the number of phosphonate residues. Introduction of 18 phosphonate groups in an oligomer of chain length 20 significantly increased HIV inhibitory activity relative to the parent oligonucleotide, whereas 5 such groups showed little or no increase in the HIV inhibition capacity. Methylphosphonate-linked oligomers are more stable to nuclease degradation and hence could be potentially useful in the treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. PMID:3174646

  9. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ... Disease Agents § 610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an... calendar days after a donor tests reactive for evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)...

  10. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ... Disease Agents § 610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an... calendar days after a donor tests reactive for evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)...

  11. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ... Disease Agents § 610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an... calendar days after a donor tests reactive for evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)...

  12. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ... Disease Agents § 610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an... calendar days after a donor tests reactive for evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)...

  13. Presence of human immunodeficiency virus nucleic acids in wastewater and their detection by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, S A; Farrah, S R; Chaudhry, G R

    1992-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) released by infected individuals or present in human and hospital wastes can potentially cause contamination problems. The presence of HIV-1 was investigated in 16 environmental samples, including raw wastewater, sludge, final effluent, soil, and pond water, collected from different locations. A method was developed to extract total nucleic acids in intact form directly from the raw samples or from the viral concentrates of the raw samples. The isolated nucleic acids were analyzed for the presence of HIV-1 by using in vitro amplification of the target sequences by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. HIV-1-specific proviral DNA and viral RNA were detected in the extracted nucleic acids obtained from three wastewater samples by this method. The specificity of the PCR-amplified products was determined by Southern blot hybridization with an HIV-1-specific oligonucleotide probe, SK19. The isolated nucleic acids from wastewater samples were also screened for the presence of poliovirus type 1, representing a commonly found enteric virus, and simian immunodeficiency virus, representing, presumably, rare viruses. While poliovirus type 1 viral RNA was found in all of the wastewater samples, none of the samples yielded a simian immunodeficiency virus-specific product. No PCR-amplified product was yielded when wastewater samples were directly used for the detection of HIV-1 and poliovirus type 1. The wastewater constituents appeared to be inhibitory to the enzymes reverse transcriptase and DNA polymerase.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:1476440

  14. Identification of a novel retroviral gene unique to human immunodeficiency virus type 2 and simian immunodeficiency virus SIVMAC.

    PubMed Central

    Kappes, J C; Morrow, C D; Lee, S W; Jameson, B A; Kent, S B; Hood, L E; Shaw, G M; Hahn, B H

    1988-01-01

    Human and simian immunodeficiency-associated retroviruses are extraordinarily complex, containing at least five genes, tat, art, sor, R, and 3' orf, in addition to the structural genes gag, pol, and env. Recently, nucleotide sequence analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) and simian immunodeficiency virus SIVMAC revealed the existence of still another open reading frame, termed X, which is highly conserved between these two viruses but absent from HIV-1. In this report, we demonstrate for the first time that the X open reading frame represents a functional retroviral gene in both HIV-2 and SIVMAC and that it encodes a virion-associated protein of 14 and 12 kilodaltons, respectively. We also describe the production of recombinant TrpE/X fusion proteins in Escherichia coli and show that sera from some HIV-2-infected individuals specifically recognize these proteins. Images PMID:3136256

  15. 76 FR 58517 - Public Health Service Guideline for Reducing Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ... Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV... Guideline for Reducing Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), and... Draft Guideline provides evidence-based recommendations for reducing unexpected transmission of HIV,...

  16. 76 FR 72417 - Public Health Service Guideline for Reducing Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-23

    ... Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Through Solid Organ... (PHS) Guideline for Reducing Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV... evidence-based recommendations for reducing unexpected transmission of HIV, HBV and HCV from deceased...

  17. Correlates of mother-to-child human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission: association with maternal plasma HIV-1 RNA load, genital HIV-1 DNA shedding, and breast infections.

    PubMed

    John, G C; Nduati, R W; Mbori-Ngacha, D A; Richardson, B A; Panteleeff, D; Mwatha, A; Overbaugh, J; Bwayo, J; Ndinya-Achola, J O; Kreiss, J K

    2001-01-15

    To determine the effects of plasma, genital, and breast milk human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and breast infections on perinatal HIV-1 transmission, a nested case-control study was conducted within a randomized clinical trial of breast-feeding and formula feeding among HIV-1-seropositive mothers in Nairobi, Kenya. In analyses comparing 92 infected infants with 187 infants who were uninfected at 2 years, maternal viral RNA levels >43,000 copies/mL (cohort median) were associated with a 4-fold increase in risk of transmission (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.2-7.2). Maternal cervical HIV-1 DNA (odds ratio [OR], 2.4; 95% CI, 1.3-4.4), vaginal HIV-1 DNA (OR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.1-4.7), and cervical or vaginal ulcers (OR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.2-5.8) were significantly associated with infant infection, independent of plasma virus load. Breast-feeding (OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.0-2.9) and mastitis (relative risk [RR], 3.9; 95% CI, 1.2-12.7) were associated with increased transmission overall, and mastitis (RR, 21.8; 95% CI, 2.3-211.0) and breast abscess (RR, 51.6; 95% CI, 4.7-571.0) were associated with late transmission (occurring >2 months postpartum). Use of methods that decrease infant exposure to HIV-1 in maternal genital secretions or breast milk may enhance currently recommended perinatal HIV-1 interventions.

  18. Routine screening of blood donations at Qingdao central blood bank, China, for hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA with a real-time, multiplex nucleic acid test for HBV, hepatitis C virus, and human immunodeficiency virus Types 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhongsi; Xu, Lei; Liu, Li; Feng, Qiuxia; Zhang, Longmu; Ma, Weijuan; Saldanha, John; Wang, Mingmin; Zhao, Lin

    2013-10-01

    The Roche cobas TaqScreen MPX test was used to evaluate the rate of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-negative donations that were hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA reactive from June 2010 to January 2011 in Qingdao, China. HBsAg-negative samples from 65,800 voluntary blood donors were tested with the cobas TaqScreen MPX test in pools of 6 on the Roche cobas s 201 blood screening platform. Samples positive for HBV DNA and negative for HBsAg were quantitated with the Roche COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HBV test. In addition, serologic tests for HBsAg, hepatitis B surface antibody, anti-hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc), anti-hepatitis B e antigen (anti-HBe), and hepatitis B e antigen (HBe) were done using the Roche electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. A total of 80 nucleic acid amplification technology (NAT) test-reactive pools were identified and 59 pools (74%) resolved to a reactive sample. All samples were HBV DNA reactive and the viral load in each sample was quantitated. The viral loads of the samples ranged from less than 20 to 34,600 IU/mL; 13 samples (22%) had viral loads of more than 20 IU/mL, 27 samples (45.8%) had viral loads of less than 20 IU/mL, and 19 samples (32.2%) had undetectable viral loads. Of the 59 NAT-reactive samples, 40 (67.8%) were anti-HBc positive. Fifteen of the 59 samples could not be confirmed as NAT reactive either by an alternative NAT test or by serology. The HBV NAT yield in blood donors in Qingdao is 0.06% (38/65,800). This study confirmed the value of NAT for interdicting HBV-positive donations and preventing transfusion-transmitted HBV infections. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  19. Frequent transmission of immunodeficiency viruses among bobcats and pumas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franklin, S.P.; Troyer, J.L.; TerWee, J.A.; Lyren, L.M.; Boyce, W.M.; Riley, S.P.D.; Roelke, M.E.; Crooks, K.R.; VandeWoude, S.

    2007-01-01

    With the exception of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which emerged in humans after cross-species transmissions of simian immunodeficiency viruses from nonhuman primates, immunodeficiency viruses of the family Lentiviridae represent species-specific viruses that rarely cross species barriers to infect new hosts. Among the Felidae, numerous immunodeficiency-like lentiviruses have been documented, but only a few cross-species transmissions have been recorded, and these have not been perpetuated in the recipient species. Lentivirus seroprevalence was determined for 79 bobcats (Lynx rufus) and 31 pumas (Puma concolor) from well-defined populations in Southern California. Partial genomic sequences were subsequently obtained from 18 and 12 seropositive bobcats and pumas, respectively. Genotypes were analyzed for phylogenic relatedness and genotypic composition among the study set and archived feline lentivirus sequences. This investigation of feline immunodeficiency virus infection in bobcats and pumas of Southern California provides evidence that cross-species infection has occurred frequently among these animals. The data suggest that transmission has occurred in multiple locations and are most consistent with the spread of the virus from bobcats to pumas. Although the ultimate causes remain unknown, these transmission events may occur as a result of puma predation on bobcats, a situation similar to that which fostered transmission of HIV to humans, and likely represent the emergence of a lentivirus with relaxed barriers to cross-species transmission. This unusual observation provides a valuable opportunity to evaluate the ecological, behavioral, and molecular conditions that favor repeated transmissions and persistence of lentivirus between species. Copyright ?? 2007, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. The Presidential Commission on the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Epidemic Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Presidential Commission on the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Epidemic, Washington, DC.

    This document presents findings of the Presidential Commission on the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) epidemic. The executive summary lists 20 major findings and recommendations which together comprise a comprehensive national strategy for managing the HIV epidemic. The commission recommends: (1) replacement of the obsolete term "AIDS"…

  1. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated to human immunodeficiency virus].

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Gutiérrez, José Luis; Santos-Martínez, Luis Efren; Rodríguez-Silverio, Juan; Baranda-Tovar, Francisco Martín; Rivera-Rosales, Rosa María; Flores-Murrieta, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    From the advent of the highly effective antiretroviral treatment, the life expectancy of patients with human immunodeficiency virus has increased significantly. At present, the causes of death are non-infectious complications. Between them, the pulmonary arterial hypertension has a special importance. It is important early detection to establish the therapeutic, with the objective of preventing a fatal outcome to future.

  2. Symptoms of Autonomic Dysfunction in Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Dominic; Nakamoto, Beau K.; Sullivan, Katherine; Sletten, David M.; Fujii, Satomi; Umekawa, Sari; Kocher, Morgan; Kallianpur, Kalpana J.; Shikuma, Cecilia M.; Low, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    This retrospective study evaluated the frequencies of symptoms associated with autonomic dysfunction in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients on stable combined antiretroviral therapy. Patients infected with HIV reported higher frequencies of dysautonomia symptoms compared with HIV-negative patients, particularly in the autonomic domains related to urinary, sleep, gastroparesis, secretomotor, pupillomotor, and male sexual dysfunction. PMID:26269797

  3. Risk Assessment for Human Immunodeficiency Virus among Pregnant Hispanic Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, David K.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Assessed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk status of pregnant Hispanic adolescents in New York City. One-third of 87 adolescents were identified as being at increased risk for HIV infection. Sexual risk-taking behavior was most common factor that increased HIV risk. Birthplace and nationality were significantly associated with HIV risk…

  4. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Associated Sporadic Nonfamilial Porphyria Cutanea Tarda

    PubMed Central

    Guha, Sibashish Kamal; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Saha, Abanti; Lal, Niharika Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT), a relatively uncommon metabolic disease, is the most common cutaneous porphyria. Here, we present the case of a patient diagnosed with sporadic, nonfamilial PCT that presented with classical cutaneous findings and multiple risk factors, including alcohol abuse, human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS, that have been strongly associated with the sporadic form of PCT. PMID:27293254

  5. Altered Virome and Bacterial Microbiome in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Cynthia L; Gootenberg, David B; Zhao, Guoyan; Handley, Scott A; Ghebremichael, Musie S; Lim, Efrem S; Lankowski, Alex; Baldridge, Megan T; Wilen, Craig B; Flagg, Meaghan; Norman, Jason M; Keller, Brian C; Luévano, Jesús Mario; Wang, David; Boum, Yap; Martin, Jeffrey N; Hunt, Peter W; Bangsberg, David R; Siedner, Mark J; Kwon, Douglas S; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-03-09

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with increased intestinal translocation of microbial products and enteropathy as well as alterations in gut bacterial communities. However, whether the enteric virome contributes to this infection and resulting immunodeficiency remains unknown. We characterized the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome in a cohort of Ugandan patients, including HIV-uninfected or HIV-infected subjects and those either treated with anti-retroviral therapy (ART) or untreated. Low peripheral CD4 T cell counts were associated with an expansion of enteric adenovirus sequences and this increase was independent of ART treatment. Additionally, the enteric bacterial microbiome of patients with lower CD4 T counts exhibited reduced phylogenetic diversity and richness with specific bacteria showing differential abundance, including increases in Enterobacteriaceae, which have been associated with inflammation. Thus, immunodeficiency in progressive HIV infection is associated with alterations in the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome, which may contribute to AIDS-associated enteropathy and disease progression.

  6. Comparison of Levels of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 RNA in Plasma as Measured by the NucliSens Nucleic Acid Sequence-Based Amplification and Quantiplex Branched-DNA Assays

    PubMed Central

    Ginocchio, C. C.; Tetali, S.; Washburn, D.; Zhang, F.; Kaplan, M. H.

    1999-01-01

    This study compared levels of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA in plasma as measured by the Quantiplex branched-DNA and NucliSens nucleic acid sequence-based amplification assays. RNA was detectable in 118 of 184 samples (64.13%) by the Quantiplex assay and in 171 of 184 samples (92.94%) by the NucliSens assay. Regression analysis indicated that a linear relationship existed between the two sets of values (P < 0.0001), although the Quantiplex and NucliSens values were significantly different (P < 0.001), with the NucliSens values being approximately 0.323 log higher. Spearman correlation analysis indicated that the overall changes in patient viral load patterns were highly correlative between the two assays: r = 0.912, P < 0.0001. The lower limits of sensitivity were determined to be approximately 100 copies/ml and 1,200 to 1,400 copies/ml for the NucliSens and Quantiplex assays, respectively. PMID:10074556

  7. Comparison of levels of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA in plasma as measured by the NucliSens nucleic acid sequence-based amplification and Quantiplex branched-DNA assays.

    PubMed

    Ginocchio, C C; Tetali, S; Washburn, D; Zhang, F; Kaplan, M H

    1999-04-01

    This study compared levels of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA in plasma as measured by the Quantiplex branched-DNA and NucliSens nucleic acid sequence-based amplification assays. RNA was detectable in 118 of 184 samples (64.13%) by the Quantiplex assay and in 171 of 184 samples (92.94%) by the NucliSens assay. Regression analysis indicated that a linear relationship existed between the two sets of values (P < 0.0001), although the Quantiplex and NucliSens values were significantly different (P < 0.001), with the NucliSens values being approximately 0.323 log higher. Spearman correlation analysis indicated that the overall changes in patient viral load patterns were highly correlative between the two assays: r = 0.912, P < 0.0001. The lower limits of sensitivity were determined to be approximately 100 copies/ml and 1,200 to 1,400 copies/ml for the NucliSens and Quantiplex assays, respectively.

  8. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection of Neural Xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovich, Therese A.; Lazar, Eliot; Blumberg, Benjamin M.; Saito, Yoshihiro; Eskin, Thomas A.; Reichman, Richard; Baram, David A.; del Cerro, Coca; Gendelman, Howard E.; del Cerro, Manuel; Epstein, Leon G.

    1992-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is highly specific for its human host. To study HIV-1 infection of the human nervous system, we have established a small animal model in which second-trimester (11 to 17.5 weeks) human fetal brain or neural retina is transplanted to the anterior chamber of the eye of immunosuppressed adult rats. The human xenografts vascularized, formed a blood-brain barrier, and differentiated, forming neurons and glia. The xenografts were infected with cell-free HIV-1 or with HIV-1-infected human monocytes. Analysis by polymerase chain reaction revealed HIV-1 sequences in DNA from xenograft tissue exposed to HIV-1 virions, and in situ hybridization demonstrated HIV-1 mRNA localized in macrophages and multinucleated giant cells. Pathological damage was observed only in neural xenografts containing HIV-1-infected human monocytes, supporting the hypothesis that these cells mediate neurotoxicity. This small animal model allows the study of direct and indirect effects of HIV-1 infection on developing human fetal neural tissues, and it should prove useful in evaluating antiviral therapies, which must ultimately target HIV-1 infection of the brain.

  9. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 nef quasispecies in pathological tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Blumberg, B M; Epstein, L G; Saito, Y; Chen, D; Sharer, L R; Anand, R

    1992-01-01

    The role of the nef gene in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is poorly understood. To provide a basis for studies on the role of nef in AIDS, we used targeted polymerase chain reaction amplification and DNA sequencing to determine the structure of nef genes in pathologic tissue from HIV-1-infected children and adults. We find that the nef reading frame is open in 92% of clones derived from both brain and lymphocytic tissue of children, suggesting that nef is expressed in these tissues. One HIV-1 clone, BRVA, obtained by coculture from the brain of an adult AIDS patient with progressive dementia, was previously shown to contain a duplicated region in nef. We show here that similar duplications are widespread in both adults and children with AIDS. However, coculture strongly selects against the broad spectrum of nef quasispecies found in tissue. These findings suggest functional selection for nef quasispecies in pathologic tissues during HIV-1 infection of the human host. Images PMID:1501274

  10. Low Plasma Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2 Viral Load Is Independent of Proviral Load: Low Virus Production In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Popper, Stephen J.; Sarr, Abdoulaye Dieng; Guèye-Ndiaye, Aïssatou; Mboup, Souleymane; Essex, Myron E.; Kanki, Phyllis J.

    2000-01-01

    Levels of virus in the plasma are closely related to the pathogenicity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). HIV-2 is much less pathogenic than HIV-1, and infection with HIV-2 leads to significantly lower plasma viral load. To identify the source of this difference, we measured both viral RNA and proviral DNA in matched samples from 34 HIV-2-infected individuals. Nearly half had undetectable viral RNA loads (<100 copies/ml), but levels of proviral DNA were relatively high and confirmed that quantities of provirus in HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection were similar. Overall, HIV-2 proviral DNA load did not correlate with viral RNA load, and higher viral RNA load was associated with increased production of plasma virus from the proviral template. These results suggest that low viral load in HIV-2 infection is due to decreased rates of viral production, rather than differences in target cell infectivity. PMID:10627569

  11. Oral immunization with recombinant listeria monocytogenes controls virus load after vaginal challenge with feline immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Rosemary; Howard, Kristina E; Nordone, Sushila; Burkhard, MaryJo; Dean, Gregg A

    2004-08-01

    Recombinant Listeria monocytogenes has many attractive characteristics as a vaccine vector against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Wild-type and attenuated Listeria strains expressing HIV Gag have been shown to induce long-lived mucosal and systemic T-cell responses in mice. Using the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) model of HIV we evaluated recombinant L. monocytogenes in a challenge system. Five cats were immunized with recombinant L. monocytogenes that expresses the FIV Gag and delivers an FIV Env-expressing DNA vaccine (LMgag/pND14-Lc-env). Control cats were either sham immunized or immunized with wild-type L. monocytogenes (LM-wt). At 1 year after vaginal challenge, provirus could not be detected in any of the nine tissues evaluated from cats immunized with the recombinant bacteria but was detected in at least one tissue in 8 of 10 control animals. Virus was isolated from bone marrow of four of five LMgag/pND14-Lc-env-immunized cats by use of a stringent coculture system but required CD8(+) T-cell depletion, indicating CD8(+) T-cell suppression of virus replication. Control animals had an inverted CD4:CD8 ratio in mesenteric lymph node and were depleted of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) intestinal epithelial T cells, while LMgag/pND14-Lc-env-immunized animals showed no such abnormalities. Vaginal FIV-specific immunoglobulin A was present at high titer in three LMgag/pND14-Lc-env-immunized cats before challenge and in all five at 1 year postchallenge. This study demonstrates that recombinant L. monocytogenes conferred some control of viral load after vaginal challenge with FIV.

  12. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes specific for the simian immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Letvin, N L; Schmitz, J E; Jordan, H L; Seth, A; Hirsch, V M; Reimann, K A; Kuroda, M J

    1999-08-01

    A non-human primate model for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus monkey, was used to explore the role of the AIDS virus-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response in disease pathogenesis. This CTL response was measured using the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I/peptide tetramer technology. Large numbers of tetramer-binding CD8+ T lymphocytes were demonstrable not only in the peripheral blood, but in lymph nodes and even in semen of chronically SIV-infected monkeys. The central role of these effector T lymphocytes in containing SIV spread during primary infection was demonstrated by showing that early SIV clearance during primary infection correlated with the emergence of the tetramer binding CD8+ T lymphocytes and that in vivo depletion of CD8+ lymphocytes eliminated the ability of the infected monkeys to contain SIV replication. These observations suggest that an effective AIDS vaccine should elicit a potent virus-specific CTL response. In fact, a live, recombinant SIV vaccine constructed using the attenuated pox virus vector modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) elicited a high-frequency CTL response, comparable in magnitude to that elicited by SIV infection itself. This suggests that vaccine modalities such as MVA may prove useful in creating an effective human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine. These studies also indicate the power of both the SIV/macaque model and MHC class I/peptide tetramers for assessing AIDS vaccine strategies.

  13. The neuropathogenesis of feline immunodeficiency virus infection: Barriers to overcome

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Nicola F.; Meeker, Rick B.; Hudson, Lola C.; Callanan, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), like human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1, is a neurotropic lentivirus, and both natural and experimental infections are associated with neuropathology. FIV enters the brain early following experimental infection, most likely via the blood-brain and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barriers. The exact mechanism of entry, and the factors that influence this entry, are not fully understood. As FIV is a recognised model of HIV-1 infection, understanding such mechanisms is important, particularly as HIV enters the brain early in infection. Furthermore, the development of strategies to combat this central nervous system (CNS) infection requires an understanding of the interactions between the virus and the CNS. In this review the results of both in vitro and in vivo FIV studies are assessed in an attempt to elucidate the mechanisms of viral entry into the brain. PMID:20418131

  14. Economic consequences for Medicaid of human immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Baily, Mary Ann; Bilheimer, Linda; Wooldridge, Judith; well, Kathryn Lang; Greenberg, Warren

    1990-01-01

    Medicaid is currently a major source of financing for health care for those with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and to a lesser extent, for those with other manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. It is likely to become even more important in the future. This article focuses on the structure of Medicaid in the context of the HIV epidemic, covering epidemiological issues, eligibility, service coverage and use, and reimbursement. A simple methodology for estimating HI\\'-related Medicaid costs under alternative assumptions about the future is also explained. PMID:10113503

  15. Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis Secondary to Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Histoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Castelli, Anthony A.; Rosenthal, David G.; Bender Ignacio, Rachel; Chu, Helen Y.

    2015-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) in immunocompromised hosts is a fulminant syndrome of immune activation with high rates of mortality that may be triggered by infections or immunodeficiency. Rapid diagnosis and treatment of the underlying disorder is necessary to prevent progression to multiorgan failure and death. We report a case of HLH in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus, disseminated histoplasmosis, Mycobacterium avium complex, and Escherichia coli bacteremia. We discuss management of acutely ill patients with HLH and treatment of the underlying infection versus initiation of HLH-specific chemotherapy. PMID:26566535

  16. Human immunodeficiency virus can productively infect cultured human glial cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng-Mayer, C; Rutka, J T; Rosenblum, M L; McHugh, T; Stites, D P; Levy, J A

    1987-05-01

    Six isolates of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) showed differences in their ability to productively infect glioma-derived cell lines and early-passage human brain cell cultures. Susceptibility to HIV infection correlated well with the expression of the astrocyte marker glial fibrillary acidic protein. The CD4 molecule was expressed on some, but not all, of the brain-derived cells; however, no correlation was observed between CD4 protein expression and susceptibility to virus infection. The results show that HIV can productively infect human brain cells, particularly those of glial origin, and suggest that these cell types in the brain can harbor the virus.

  17. Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Liver Disease Forum 2010: Conference Proceedings

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Kenneth E.; Thomas, David L.; Chung, Raymond T.

    2013-01-01

    Liver disease continues to represent a critical mediator of morbidity and mortality in those with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The frequent presence and overlap of concomitant injurious processes, including hepatitis C virus and hepatitis B virus infections, hepatoxicity associated with antiretroviral therapeutic agents, alcohol, and other toxins, in the setting of immunosuppression lead to rapid fibrotic progression and early development of end-stage liver disease. This conference summary describes the proceedings of a state-of-the-art gathering of international experts designed to highlight the status of current research in epidemiology, natural history, pathogenesis, and treatment of HIV and liver disease. PMID:21898501

  18. Spinal cord toxoplasmosis in human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    García-García, Concepción; Castillo-Álvarez, Federico; Azcona-Gutiérrez, José M; Herraiz, María J; Ibarra, Valvanera; Oteo, José A

    2015-05-01

    Neurological complications in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) are still common, even in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Opportunistic infections, immune reconstitution, the virus itself, antiretroviral drugs and neurocognitive disorders have to be considered when establishing the differential diagnosis. Toxoplasmic encephalitis remains the major cause of space-occupying lesions in the brain of patients with HIV/AIDS; however, spinal cord involvement has been reported infrequently. Here, we review spinal cord toxoplasmosis in HIV infection and illustrate the condition with a recent case from our hospital. We suggest that most patients with HIV/AIDS and myelitis with enhanced spine lesions, multiple brain lesions and positive serology for Toxoplasma gondii should receive immediate empirical treatment for toxoplasmosis, and a biopsy should be performed in those cases without clinical improvement or with deterioration.

  19. Persistent infection of macaques with simian-human immunodeficiency viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Li, J T; Halloran, M; Lord, C I; Watson, A; Ranchalis, J; Fung, M; Letvin, N L; Sodroski, J G

    1995-01-01

    Chimeric simian-human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIV) containing the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) tat, rev, env, and, in some cases, vpu genes were inoculated into eight cynomolgus monkeys. Viruses could be consistently recovered from the CD8-depleted peripheral blood lymphocytes of all eight animals for at least 2 months. After this time, virus isolation varied among the animals, with viruses continuing to be isolated from some animals beyond 600 days after inoculation. The level of viral RNA in plasma during acute infection and the frequency of virus isolation after the initial 2-month period were higher for the Vpu-positive viruses. All of the animals remained clinically healthy, and the absolute numbers of CD4-positive lymphocytes were stable. Antibodies capable of neutralizing HIV-1 were generated at high titers in animals exhibiting the greatest consistency of virus isolation. Strain-specific HIV-1-neutralizing antibodies were initially elicited, and then more broadly neutralizing antibodies were elicited. env sequences from two viruses isolated more than a year after infection were analyzed. In the Vpu-negative SHIV, for which virus loads were lower, a small amount of env variation, which did not correspond to that found in natural HIV-1 variants, was observed. By contrast, in the Vpu-positive virus, which was consistently isolated from the host animal, extensive variation of the envelope glycoproteins in the defined variable gp120 regions was observed. Escape from neutralization by CD4 binding site monoclonal antibodies was observed for the viruses with the latter envelope glycoproteins, and the mechanism of escape appears to involve decreased binding of the antibody to the monomeric gp120 glycoproteins. The consistency with which SHIV infection of cynomolgus monkeys is initiated and the similarities in the neutralizing antibody response to SHIV and HIV-1 support the utility of this model system for the study of HIV-1 prophylaxis. PMID

  20. Multiple effects of mutations in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase on viral replication.

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, A; Englund, G; Orenstein, J M; Martin, M A; Craigie, R

    1995-01-01

    The integration of a DNA copy of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genome into a chromosome of an infected cell is a pivotal step in virus replication. Integration requires the activity of the virus-encoded integrase, which enters the cell as a component of the virion. Results of numerous mutagenesis studies have identified amino acid residues and protein domains of HIV-1 integrase critical for in vitro activity, but only a few of these mutants have been studied for their effects on HIV replication. We have introduced site-directed changes into an infectious DNA clone of HIV-1 and show that integrase mutations can affect virus replication at a variety of steps. We identified mutations that altered virion morphology, levels of particle-associated integrase and reverse transcriptase, and viral DNA synthesis. One replication-defective mutant virus which had normal morphology and protein composition displayed increased levels of circular viral DNA following infection of a T-cell line. This virus also had a significant titer in a CD4-positive indicator cell assay, which requires the viral Tat protein. Although unintegrated viral DNA can serve as a template for Tat expression in infected indicator cells, this level of expression is insufficient to support a spreading viral infection in CD4-positive lymphocytes. PMID:7535863

  1. DNA Prime-Boost Vaccine Regimen To Increase Breadth, Magnitude, and Cytotoxicity of the Cellular Immune Responses to Subdominant Gag Epitopes of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus and HIV.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xintao; Valentin, Antonio; Dayton, Frances; Kulkarni, Viraj; Alicea, Candido; Rosati, Margherita; Chowdhury, Bhabadeb; Gautam, Rajeev; Broderick, Kate E; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Martin, Malcolm A; Mullins, James I; Pavlakis, George N; Felber, Barbara K

    2016-11-15

    HIV sequence diversity and the propensity of eliciting immunodominant responses targeting variable regions of the HIV proteome are hurdles in the development of an effective AIDS vaccine. An HIV-derived conserved element (CE) p24(gag) plasmid DNA (pDNA) vaccine is able to redirect immunodominant responses to otherwise subdominant and often more vulnerable viral targets. By homology to the HIV immunogen, seven CE were identified in SIV p27(Gag) Analysis of 31 rhesus macaques vaccinated with full-length SIV gag pDNA showed inefficient induction (58% response rate) of cellular responses targeting these CE. In contrast, all 14 macaques immunized with SIV p27CE pDNA developed robust T cell responses recognizing CE. Vaccination with p27CE pDNA was also critical for the efficient induction and increased the frequency of Ag-specific T cells with cytotoxic potential (granzyme B(+) CD107a(+)) targeting subdominant CE epitopes, compared with the responses elicited by the p57(gag) pDNA vaccine. Following p27CE pDNA priming, two booster regimens, gag pDNA or codelivery of p27CE+gag pDNA, significantly increased the levels of CE-specific T cells. However, the CE+gag pDNA booster vaccination elicited significantly broader CE epitope recognition, and thus, a more profound alteration of the immunodominance hierarchy. Vaccination with HIV molecules showed that CE+gag pDNA booster regimen further expanded the breadth of HIV CE responses. Hence, SIV/HIV vaccine regimens comprising CE pDNA prime and CE+gag pDNA booster vaccination significantly increased cytotoxic T cell responses to subdominant highly conserved Gag epitopes and maximized response breadth. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  2. DNA Prime-Boost Vaccine Regimen To Increase Breadth, Magnitude, and Cytotoxicity of the Cellular Immune Responses to Subdominant Gag Epitopes of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus and HIV

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xintao; Valentin, Antonio; Dayton, Frances; Kulkarni, Viraj; Alicea, Candido; Rosati, Margherita; Chowdhury, Bhabadeb; Gautam, Rajeev; Broderick, Kate E.; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Martin, Malcolm A.; Mullins, James I.

    2016-01-01

    HIV sequence diversity and the propensity of eliciting immunodominant responses targeting variable regions of the HIV proteome are hurdles in the development of an effective AIDS vaccine. An HIV-derived conserved element (CE) p24gag plasmid DNA (pDNA) vaccine is able to redirect immunodominant responses to otherwise subdominant and often more vulnerable viral targets. By homology to the HIV immunogen, seven CE were identified in SIV p27Gag. Analysis of 31 rhesus macaques vaccinated with full-length SIV gag pDNA showed inefficient induction (58% response rate) of cellular responses targeting these CE. In contrast, all 14 macaques immunized with SIV p27CE pDNA developed robust T cell responses recognizing CE. Vaccination with p27CE pDNA was also critical for the efficient induction and increased the frequency of Ag-specific T cells with cytotoxic potential (granzyme B+ CD107a+) targeting subdominant CE epitopes, compared with the responses elicited by the p57gag pDNA vaccine. Following p27CE pDNA priming, two booster regimens, gag pDNA or codelivery of p27CE+gag pDNA, significantly increased the levels of CE-specific T cells. However, the CE+gag pDNA booster vaccination elicited significantly broader CE epitope recognition, and thus, a more profound alteration of the immunodominance hierarchy. Vaccination with HIV molecules showed that CE+gag pDNA booster regimen further expanded the breadth of HIV CE responses. Hence, SIV/HIV vaccine regimens comprising CE pDNA prime and CE+gag pDNA booster vaccination significantly increased cytotoxic T cell responses to subdominant highly conserved Gag epitopes and maximized response breadth. PMID:27733554

  3. Breakthrough Virus Neutralization Resistance as a Correlate of Protection in a Nonhuman Primate Heterologous Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Vaccine Challenge Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Fang-Hua; Mason, Rosemarie; Welles, Hugh; Learn, Gerald H; Keele, Brandon F; Roederer, Mario; Bar, Katharine J

    2015-12-01

    Comprehensive assessments of immune correlates of protection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine trials are essential to vaccine design. Neutralization sieve analysis compares the neutralization sensitivity of the breakthrough transmitted/founder (TF) viruses from vaccinated and control animals to infer the molecular mechanisms of vaccine protection. Here, we report a robust neutralization sieve effect in a nonhuman primate simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) vaccine trial (DNA prime/recombinant adenovirus type 5 [rAd5] boost) (VRC-10-332) that demonstrated substantial protective efficacy and revealed a genetic signature of neutralization resistance in the C1 region of env. We found significant enrichment for neutralization resistance in the vaccine compared to control breakthrough TF viruses when tested with plasma from vaccinated study animals, plasma from chronically SIV-infected animals, and a panel of SIV-specific monoclonal antibodies targeting six discrete Env epitopes (P < 0.008 for all comparisons). Neutralization resistance was significantly associated with the previously identified genetic signature of resistance (P < 0.0001), and together, the results identify virus neutralization as a correlate of protection. These findings further demonstrate the in vivo relevance of our previous in vitro analyses of the SIVsmE660 challenge stock, which revealed a broad range of neutralization sensitivities of its component viruses. In sum, this report demonstrates proof-of-concept that phenotypic sieve analyses can elucidate mechanistic correlates of immune protection following vaccination and raises a cautionary note for SIV and SHIV (simian-human immunodeficiency virus) vaccine studies that employ challenge strains with envelope glycoproteins that fail to exhibit neutralization resistance profiles typical of TF viruses. With more than 2 million new infections annually, the development of an effective vaccine against HIV-1 is a global health priority

  4. Breakthrough Virus Neutralization Resistance as a Correlate of Protection in a Nonhuman Primate Heterologous Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Vaccine Challenge Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Fang-Hua; Mason, Rosemarie; Welles, Hugh; Learn, Gerald H.; Keele, Brandon F.; Roederer, Mario

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Comprehensive assessments of immune correlates of protection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine trials are essential to vaccine design. Neutralization sieve analysis compares the neutralization sensitivity of the breakthrough transmitted/founder (TF) viruses from vaccinated and control animals to infer the molecular mechanisms of vaccine protection. Here, we report a robust neutralization sieve effect in a nonhuman primate simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) vaccine trial (DNA prime/recombinant adenovirus type 5 [rAd5] boost) (VRC-10-332) that demonstrated substantial protective efficacy and revealed a genetic signature of neutralization resistance in the C1 region of env. We found significant enrichment for neutralization resistance in the vaccine compared to control breakthrough TF viruses when tested with plasma from vaccinated study animals, plasma from chronically SIV-infected animals, and a panel of SIV-specific monoclonal antibodies targeting six discrete Env epitopes (P < 0.008 for all comparisons). Neutralization resistance was significantly associated with the previously identified genetic signature of resistance (P < 0.0001), and together, the results identify virus neutralization as a correlate of protection. These findings further demonstrate the in vivo relevance of our previous in vitro analyses of the SIVsmE660 challenge stock, which revealed a broad range of neutralization sensitivities of its component viruses. In sum, this report demonstrates proof-of-concept that phenotypic sieve analyses can elucidate mechanistic correlates of immune protection following vaccination and raises a cautionary note for SIV and SHIV (simian-human immunodeficiency virus) vaccine studies that employ challenge strains with envelope glycoproteins that fail to exhibit neutralization resistance profiles typical of TF viruses. IMPORTANCE With more than 2 million new infections annually, the development of an effective vaccine against HIV-1 is a global

  5. Health Administrator Perspectives on Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Prevention and Services at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren-Jeanpiere, Lari; Jones, Sandra; Sutton, Madeline Y.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Due to the disproportionate impact of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) among African American young adults, the authors explored (1) number of historically black college and university (HBCU) campuses with existing HIV prevention policies and services and (2) perceived barriers for implementing…

  6. Health Administrator Perspectives on Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Prevention and Services at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren-Jeanpiere, Lari; Jones, Sandra; Sutton, Madeline Y.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Due to the disproportionate impact of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) among African American young adults, the authors explored (1) number of historically black college and university (HBCU) campuses with existing HIV prevention policies and services and (2) perceived barriers for implementing…

  7. env Sequences of Simian Immunodeficiency Viruses from Chimpanzees in Cameroon Are Strongly Related to Those of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Group N from the Same Geographic Area

    PubMed Central

    Corbet, Sylvie; Müller-Trutwin, Michaela C.; Versmisse, Pierre; Delarue, Severine; Ayouba, Ahidjo; Lewis, John; Brunak, Soren; Martin, Paul; Brun-Vezinet, Françoise; Simon, François; Barre-Sinoussi, Françoise; Mauclere, Philippe

    2000-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) group N from Cameroon is phylogenetically close, in env, to the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) cpz-gab from Gabon and SIVcpz-US of unknown geographic origin. We screened 29 wild-born Cameroonian chimpanzees and found that three (Cam3, Cam4, and Cam5) were positive for HIV-1 by Western blotting. Mitochondrial DNA sequence analysis demonstrated that Cam3 and Cam5 belonged to Pan troglodytes troglodytes and that Cam4 belonged to P. t. vellerosus. Genetic analyses of the viruses together with serological data demonstrated that at least one of the two P. t. troglodytes chimpanzees (Cam5) was infected in the wild, and revealed a horizontal transmission between Cam3 and Cam4. These data confirm that P. t. troglodytes is a natural host for HIV-1-related viruses. Furthermore, they show that SIVcpz can be transmitted in captivity, from one chimpanzee subspecies to another. All three SIVcpz-cam viruses clustered with HIV-1 N in env. The full Cam3 SIVcpz genome sequence showed a very close phylogenetic relationship with SIVcpz-US, a virus identified in a P. t. troglodytes chimpanzee captured nearly 40 years earlier. Like SIVcpz-US, SIVcpz-cam3 was closely related to HIV-1 N in env, but not in pol, supporting the hypothesis that HIV-1 N results from a recombination event. SIVcpz from chimpanzees born in the wild in Cameroon are thus strongly related in env to HIV-1 N from Cameroon, demonstrating the geographic coincidence of these human and simian viruses and providing a further strong argument in favor of the origin of HIV-1 being in chimpanzees. PMID:10590144

  8. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus replication by antisense oligodeoxynucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Goodchild, J; Agrawal, S; Civeira, M P; Sarin, P S; Sun, D; Zamecnik, P C

    1988-01-01

    Twenty different target sites within human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA were selected for studies of inhibition of HIV replication by antisense oligonucleotides. Target sites were selected based on their potential capacity to block recognition functions during viral replication. Antisense oligomers complementary to sites within or near the sequence repeated at the ends of retrovirus RNA (R region) and to certain splice sites were most effective. The effect of antisense oligomer length on inhibiting virus replication was also investigated, and preliminary toxicity studies in mice show that these compounds are toxic only at high levels. The results indicate potential usefulness for these oligomers in the treatment of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and AIDS-related complex either alone or in combination with other drugs. PMID:3041414

  9. Thirty years of the human immunodeficiency virus epidemic and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Younai, Fariba S

    2013-01-01

    After more than 30 years of battling a global epidemic, the prospect of eliminating human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as the most challenging infectious disease of the modern era is within our reach. Major scientific discoveries about the virus responsible for this immunodeficiency disease state, including its pathogenesis, transmission patterns and clinical course, have led to the development of potent antiretroviral drugs that offer great hopes in HIV treatment and prevention. Although these agents and many others still in development and testing are capable of effectively suppressing viral replication and survival, the medical management of HIV infection at the individual and the population levels remains challenging. Timely initiation of antiretroviral drugs, adherence to the appropriate therapeutic regimens, effective use of these agents in the pre and post-exposure prophylaxis contexts, treatment of comorbid conditions and addressing social and psychological factors involved in the care of individuals continue to be important considerations. PMID:24136672

  10. Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Replication by Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodchild, John; Agrawal, Sudhir; Civeira, Maria P.; Sarin, Prem S.; Sun, Daisy; Zamecnik, Paul C.

    1988-08-01

    Twenty different target sites within human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA were selected for studies of inhibition of HIV replication by antisense oligonucleotides. Target sites were selected based on their potential capacity to block recognition functions during viral replication. Antisense oligomers complementary to sites within or near the sequence repeated at the ends of retrovirus RNA (R region) and to certain splice sites were most effective. The effect of antisense oligomer length on inhibiting virus replication was also investigated, and preliminary toxicity studies in mice show that these compounds are toxic only at high levels. The results indicate potential usefulness for these oligomers in the treatment of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and AIDS-related complex either alone or in combination with other drugs.

  11. Recovery of the human immunodeficiency virus from fibreoptic bronchoscopes.

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, P J; Gor, D; Clarke, J R; Chadwick, M V; Gazzard, B; Jeffries, D J; Gaya, H; Collins, J V

    1991-01-01

    Ten bronchoscopes that had been used on patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome were sampled to determine the nature and extent of microbial contamination. Samples were taken by irrigating the suction biopsy channel with modified viral transport medium and by swabbing the insertion tube. Sampling was repeated after they had been cleaned in detergent and after two minutes' disinfection in 2% alkaline glutaraldehyde. Before being cleaned the seven bronchoscopes tested by polymerase chain reaction were contaminated with the human immunodeficiency virus, though infectivity and antigen assays gave negative results. Other organisms identified were hepatitis B virus (1), commensal bacteria (9), and Pneumocystis carinii (4). Mean bacterial contamination was 2.27 log colony forming organisms per millilitre. Cleaning the bronchoscope before disinfection removed all detectable contaminants with a reduction in bacterial growth of up to 8 log colony forming units/ml. PMID:1858078

  12. Pathobiology of human papillomaviruses in human immunodeficiency virus - Infected persons.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurti, Uma; Unger, Elizabeth R

    2017-07-01

    There is a complex interrelationship between human papillomaviruses (HPV) and human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) that has been recognized from the start of the HIV epidemic. Cervical cancer was used as a surveillance indicator for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) before definitive identification of the viral etiology of either condition were known. Careful epidemiologic studies combined with clinical and laboratory measures of HPV, HPV-associated disease, and HIV have helped us understand many aspects of the relationship between these two virus groups; however, questions remain. The histopathology associated with HPV is identical in HIV-positive and negative patients though the lesions are more frequent, with higher frequency of multiple HPV types, and persistent in HIV infected individuals. In this review we will briefly explain the pathobiology of HPV in HIV-infected persons and the potential impact of secondary (screening) and primary (vaccination) prevention to reduce HPV-associated disease in those infected with HIV. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Molecular biology of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    SciTech Connect

    Haseltine, W.A. )

    1991-07-01

    The immunodeficiency virus type 1 ia a complex retrovirus. In addition to genes that specify the proteins of the virus particle and the replicative enzymes common to all retroviruses, HIV-1 specifies at least six additional proteins that regulate the virus cycle. Two of these regulatory genes, tat and rev, specify proteins essential for replication. These proteins bind to specific sequences of newly synthesized virus RNA and profoundly affect virus protein expression. Tat and rev appear to be prototypes of novel eukaryotic regulatory proteins. These two genes may play a central role in regulating the rate of virus replication. Three other viral genes, vif, vpu, and vpr, affect the assembly and replication capacity of newly made virus particles. These genes may play a critical role in spread of the virus from tissue to tissue and from person to person. Our understanding of the contribution of each of the virus structural proteins and regulatory genes to the complex life cycle of the virus in natural infections is incomplete. However, enough insight has been gained into the structure and function of each of these components to provide a firm basis for rational antiviral drug development.

  14. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Modified To Package Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Vpx Efficiently Infects Macrophages and Dendritic Cells▿†

    PubMed Central

    Sunseri, Nicole; O'Brien, Meagan; Bhardwaj, Nina; Landau, Nathaniel R.

    2011-01-01

    The lentiviral accessory protein Vpx is thought to facilitate the infection of macrophages and dendritic cells by counteracting an unidentified host restriction factor. Although human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) does not encode Vpx, the accessory protein can be provided to monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC) in virus-like particles, dramatically enhancing their susceptibility to HIV-1. Vpx and the related accessory protein Vpr are packaged into virions through a virus-specific interaction with the p6 carboxy-terminal domain of Gag. We localized the minimal Vpx packaging motif of simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac239 p6 to a 10-amino-acid motif and introduced this sequence into an infectious HIV-1 provirus. The chimeric virus packaged Vpx that was provided in trans and was substantially more infectious on MDDC and MDM than the wild-type virus. We further modified the virus by introducing the Vpx coding sequence in place of nef. The resulting virus produced Vpx and replicated efficiently in MDDC and MDM. The virus also induced a potent type I interferon response in MDDC. In a coculture system, the Vpx-containing HIV-1 was more efficiently transmitted from MDDC to T cells. These findings suggest that in vivo, Vpx may facilitate transmission of the virus from dendritic cells to T cells. In addition, the chimeric virus could be used to design dendritic cell vaccines that induce an enhanced innate immune response. This approach could also be useful in the design of lentiviral vectors that transduce these relatively resistant cells. PMID:21507971

  15. Antiretroviral therapy reduces neurodegeneration in human immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Alex K.; Ellis, Ronald J.; Umlauf, Anya; Gouaux, Ben; Soontornniyomkij, Virawudh; Letendre, Scott L.; Achim, Cristian L.; Masliah, Eliezer; Grant, Igor; Moore, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of virally-suppressive antiretroviral therapy on cortical neurodegeneration and associated neurocognitive impairment. Design Retrospective, postmortem observational study. Methods Clinical neuropsychological and postmortem neuropathology data were analyzed in 90 human immunodeficiency virus-infected volunteers from the general community who had never undergone antiretroviral therapy (n=7, “naïve”) or who had undergone antiretroviral therapy and whose plasma viral load was detectable (n = 64 “unsuppressed”) or undetectable (n = 19, “suppressed”) at the last clinical visit prior to death. Subjects were predominately male (74/90, 82%) with a mean age of 44.7 years (SD 9.8). Cortical neurodegeneration was quantified by measuring microtubule-associated protein (MAP2) and synaptophysin (SYP) density in midfrontal cortex tissue sections. Results The suppressed group had higher SYP density than the naïve group (p = 0.007) and higher MAP2 density than the unsuppressed group (p = 0.04). The suppressed group had lower odds of human immunodeficiency virus-associated neurocognitive disorders than naïve (OR 0.07, p = 0.03). Higher SYP was associated with lower likelihood of human immunodeficiency virus-associated neurocognitive disorders in univariable (OR 0.8, p=0.03) and multivariable models after controlling for antiretroviral treatment and brain human immunodeficiency virus p24 protein levels (OR 0.72, p=0.01). Conclusions We conclude that virally suppressive antiretroviral treatment protects against cortical neurodegeneration. Further, we find evidence supporting the causal chain from treatment-mediated peripheral and central nervous system viral load suppression to reduced neurodegeneration and improved neurocognitive outcomes. PMID:25686681

  16. Nonvertical, nonsexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus in children.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Paula; Pedro, Alinia; Le Bozec, Soazig; Macassa, Eugenia; Salvador, Sergio; Biberfeld, Gunnel; Blanche, Stéphane; Andersson, Sören

    2010-03-01

    In a cohort of 450 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children followed up in Maputo, Mozambique, 22 were born to HIV-uninfected mothers and had no history of sexual abuse. A case record review of these nonvertically, nonsexually infected children as well as a case-control study strongly suggests health care as possible source of infection for many of these children. This facet of the pediatric HIV epidemic should not be overlooked.

  17. Disseminated Histoplasmosis in Early Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Bagla, Prabhava; Sarria, Juan C

    2017-03-01

    Early human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection leads to transient immunosuppression followed by a quasi-homeostatic state with slow progression towards AIDS. Histoplasmosis has never been reported in early HIV. We present a case of disseminated histoplasmosis with documented recent seroconversion and review the literature regarding other opportunistic infections in early HIV. Copyright © 2017 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Role of Interleukin 32 in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Reactivation and Its Link to Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Herpes Simplex Virus Coinfection.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Pedro M M; Preston-Hurlburt, Paula; Keller, Marla J; Vudattu, Nalini; Espinoza, Lilia; Altrich, Michelle; Anastos, Kathryn; Herold, Kevan C; Herold, Betsy C

    2017-02-15

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2; herpes) exacerbates human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) by unclear mechanisms. These studies tested the impact of HSV-2 on systemic T-cells and HIV reservoirs. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HIV-infected women on antiretroviral therapy who were HSV-2 seropositive or seronegative and HIV-uninfected controls were analyzed by flow cytometry. Cell-associated HIV DNA and RNA were quantified in the absence or presence of activating stimuli, recombinant interleukin 32γ (IL-32γ), and a RUNX1 inhibitor. RNA was assessed by nanostring. CD4, but not CD8, T-cell phenotypes differed in HIV+/HSV-2+ versus HIV+/HSV-2- (overall P = .002) with increased frequency of CCR5+, CXCR4+, PD-1+, and CD69+ and decreased frequency of CCR10+ and CCR6+ T-cells. The changes were associated with higher HIV DNA. Paradoxically, IL-32, a proinflammatory cytokine, was lower in subpopulations of CD4+ T-cells in HSV-2+ versus HSV-2- women. Recombinant IL-32γ blocked HIV reactivation in CD4+ T-cells and was associated with an increase in RUNX1 expression; the blockade was overcome by a RUNX1 inhibitor. Herpes is associated with phenotypic changes in CD4+ T-cells, including a decrease in IL-32, which may contribute to increased HIV reservoirs. Blocking IL-32 may facilitate HIV reactivation to improve shock and kill strategies.

  19. Human Herpesvirus 8 DNA Load in Leukocytes of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Subjects: Correlation with the Presence of Kaposi’s Sarcoma and Response to Anticytomegalovirus Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Boivin, Guy; Gaudreau, Annie; Toma, Emil; Lalonde, Richard; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Murray, Gilles; Handfield, Julie; Bergeron, Michel G.

    1999-01-01

    Specific human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) DNA sequences were found in leukocytes of 12 of 29 (41.4%) AIDS subjects with Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS), whereas they were found in 4 of 43 (9.3%) AIDS subjects without KS (P = 0.003), although the peak HHV-8 DNA load in PCR-positive subjects with KS (mean, 425 copies per 0.2 μg of DNA) did not significantly differ from the one found in PCR-positive patients without KS (mean, 218 copies). The use of intravenous ganciclovir or foscarnet therapy to treat cytomegalovirus disease did not affect the HHV-8 DNA load in seven patients for whom serial samples were analyzed. PMID:9925538

  20. Human herpesvirus 8 DNA load in leukocytes of human immunodeficiency virus-infected subjects: correlation with the presence of Kaposi's sarcoma and response to anticytomegalovirus therapy.

    PubMed

    Boivin, G; Gaudreau, A; Toma, E; Lalonde, R; Routy, J P; Murray, G; Handfield, J; Bergeron, M G

    1999-02-01

    Specific human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) DNA sequences were found in leukocytes of 12 of 29 (41.4%) AIDS subjects with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), whereas they were found in 4 of 43 (9.3%) AIDS subjects without KS (P = 0.003), although the peak HHV-8 DNA load in PCR-positive subjects with KS (mean, 425 copies per 0.2 microgram of DNA) did not significantly differ from the one found in PCR-positive patients without KS (mean, 218 copies). The use of intravenous ganciclovir or foscarnet therapy to treat cytomegalovirus disease did not affect the HHV-8 DNA load in seven patients for whom serial samples were analyzed.

  1. Live, attenuated simian immunodeficiency virus vaccines elicit potent resistance against a challenge with a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 chimeric virus.

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, R; Siemon, C; Czajak, S C; Desrosiers, R C; Martin, M A

    1997-01-01

    Three rhesus macaques, previously immunized with SIVdelta3 or SIVdelta2, each an attenuated derivative of SIVmac239, and two naive monkeys were challenged with 30,000 50% tissue culture infective doses of SHIV, an SIV/human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) chimeric virus bearing the dual-tropic envelope of HIV-1DH12. By several criteria, including virus isolation, serological assays, and PCR (both DNA and reverse transcriptase), SHIV levels were reduced to barely detectable levels in the circulating blood of vaccinated animals. The resistant SIV-vaccinated macaques had no preexisting neutralizing antibodies directed against SHIV, nor did they produce neutralizing antibodies at any time over a 14-month observation period following SHIV challenge. Interestingly, SIV sequences, derived from the vaccine, could be amplified from numerous tissue samples collected at the conclusion of the experiment, 60 weeks postchallenge, but SHIV-specific sequences (viz., HIV-1 env) could not. These results demonstrate that live attenuated SIV vaccines provide strong long-term protection even against challenge strains with highly divergent envelope sequences. PMID:9343164

  2. [Vaccination against the human immunodeficiency virus].

    PubMed

    Girard, M; Pialoux, G

    1995-06-15

    Much progress has been made in recent years in the development of anti-VIH vaccines. Nearly 20 such vaccines have reached phase 1 clinical study in seronegative volunteers. The responses invoked by these vaccines are, however, mediocre, both in quality (lack of cross over neutralisation in isolated "wild" viruses) and in their levels and length of action. New formulations of vaccines are under study, but their development is long and difficult, and researchers are still disarmed by the problem of the variability of the virus. Several years of study, both clinical and fundamental, will be necessary before an effective vaccine against HIV-1 is available.

  3. The Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Infectivity and Mechanisms of Pathogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauci, Anthony S.

    1988-02-01

    Infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) results in a profound immunosuppression due predominantly to a selective depletion of helper/inducer T lymphocytes that express the receptor for the virus (the CD4 molecule). HIV also has tropism for the brain leading to neuropsychiatric abnormalities. Besides inducing cell death, HIV can interfere with T4 cell function by various mechanisms. The monocyte serves as a reservoir for HIV and is relatively refractory to its cytopathic effects. HIV can exist in a latent or chronic form which can be converted to a productive infection by a variety of inductive signals.

  4. Oral lesions associated with human immunodeficiency virus disease.

    PubMed

    Patton, Lauren L

    2013-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated oral disease among people living with HIV infection includes oral candidiasis, oral hairy leukoplakia, Kaposi sarcoma, oral warts, herpes simplex virus ulcers, major aphthous ulcers or ulcers not otherwise specified, HIV salivary gland disease, and atypical gingival and periodontal diseases. Diagnosis of some oral lesions is based on clinical appearance and behavior, whereas others require biopsy, culture, or imaging for definitive diagnosis. Management strategies including pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic approaches are discussed in this article. Dentists also need to be cognizant of the potential oral side effects of HIV antiretroviral medications.

  5. Candida Esophagitis in a Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1-Positive Elite Controller With Hepatitis C Virus Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Anders; Shieh, Eugenie; Brinkley, Sherilyn; Blankson, Joel N.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of Candida esophagitis in a human immunodeficiency virus elite controller with a preserved CD4 count, a population in which opportunistic infections are almost never seen. The patient has hepatitis C virus coinfection and compensated cirrhosis, suggesting a possible multifactorial etiology of immune dysregulation. PMID:25734179

  6. Absence of Active Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Clinics in Zambia and Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Wandeler, Gilles; Mulenga, Lloyd; Hobbins, Michael; Joao, Candido; Sinkala, Edford; Hector, Jonas; Aly, Musa; Chi, Benjamin H.; Egger, Matthias; Vinikoor, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the prevalence of replicating hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in sub-Saharan Africa. Among 1812 individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus, no patient in rural Mozambique and 4 patients in urban Zambia were positive for anti-HCV antibodies. Of these, none had confirmed HCV replication. PMID:27047986

  7. Inactivation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in blood samples stored as high-salt lysates.

    PubMed

    Zolg, J W; Lanciotti, R S; Wendlinger, M; Meyer, W A

    1990-09-01

    Blood samples to be tested for the presence of parasite DNA by using specific DNA probes are routinely stored in our laboratory as high-salt lysates (HSL). To safeguard against the risk of accidental infection with etiological agents such as the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) while manipulating large numbers of blood samples in preparation for DNA probing, we determined the residual infectivity of HIV-1 after exposure to HSL components. Both high-titer virus stocks or provirus-carrying cells, suspended either in tissue culture medium or freshly drawn blood, were completely inactivated upon contact with the HSL components. This was verified by the absence of any detectable HIV-1-specific antigen in the supernatants of long-term cultures and the absence of virus-specific DNA fragments after amplification by polymerase chain reaction with DNA from such cultures as target DNA. These results support the conclusion that the virus is in fact completely inactivated by contact with the HSL components, rendering blood specimens stored as HSL noninfectious in regard to HIV-1.

  8. In Vivo Monocyte Tropism of Pathogenic Feline Immunodeficiency Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Dow, Steven W.; Mathiason, Candace K.; Hoover, Edward A.

    1999-01-01

    Virus-infected monocytes rarely are detected in the bloodstreams of animals or people infected with immunodeficiency-inducing lentiviruses, yet tissue macrophages are thought to be a major reservoir of virus-infected cells in vivo. We have identified feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) clinical isolates that are pathogenic in cats and readily transmitted vertically. We report here that five of these FIV isolates are highly monocytotropic in vivo. However, while FIV-infected monocytes were numerous in the blood of experimentally infected cats, viral antigen was not detectable in freshly isolated cells. Only after a short-term (at least 12-h) in vitro monocyte culture were FIV antigens detectable (by immunocytochemical analysis or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). In vitro experiments suggested that monocyte adherence provided an important trigger for virus antigen expression. In the blood of cats infected with a prototype monocytotropic isolate (FIV subtype B strain 2542), infected monocytes appeared within 2 weeks, correlating with high blood mononuclear-cell-associated viral titers and CD4 cell depletion. By contrast, infected monocytes could not be detected in the blood of cats infected with a less pathogenic FIV strain (FIV subtype A strain Petaluma). We concluded that some strains of FIV are monocytotropic in vivo. Moreover, this property may relate to virus virulence, vertical transmission, and infection of tissue macrophages. PMID:10400783

  9. Expression in yeast of a cDNA clone encoding a transmembrane glycoprotein gp41 fragment (a.a. 591-642) bearing the major immunodominant domain of human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Gairin, J E; Madaule, P; Traincard, F; Barrès, E; Rossier, J

    1991-04-01

    A cDNA clone corresponding to the gp41 gene fragment nucl. 7573-7730 of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) was selected from a random HIV-1 genomic library expressed in yeast. This clone encodes a 52-residue long peptide (amino acid (a.a.)) 591-642) bearing the major immunodominant domain (a.a. 598-609) of the HIV-1 transmembrane glycoprotein gp41. Expression of the recombinant peptide pSE-env591-642 was driven by the alpha-mating factor leader sequence contained in a plasmid pSE-x allowing the synthesis and secretion of foreign gene product in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Time-course analysis of the secretion into culture medium revealed an optimal production of the glycoprotein fragment at 28-30 h with no observable cytotoxicity. The secreted peptide is highly glycosylated with NH2-terminal heterogeneity probably due to different post-translational modifications. The secreted peptide shows an extreme antigenicity since in ELISA assays, as few as 5 microliters/well of crude supernatant are sufficient to obtain a strong detection by monoclonal antibodies or by 100% of sera from HIV-infected individuals. The purified glycopeptide pSE-env591-642 binds to a monoclonal antibody directed against the immunodominant epitope (a.a. 603-609) with an affinity similar to that of the complete glycoprotein gp160 (Kd values within the 10(-10) M range) and with a 100-fold higher affinity than that of a linear peptide fragment SP-env584-609. These results indicate that overexpression in yeast can efficiently provide an abundant source of highly antigenic gp41 protein fragment pSE-env591-642 which retains the antigenic properties of the native gp160 protein. Such a recombinant peptide should therefore be considered as a good candidate for antigen in HIV detection tests.

  10. ACOG Committee Opinion No. 536: Human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and women of color.

    PubMed

    2012-09-01

    In the United States, most new cases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) occur among women of color (primarily African American and Hispanic women). Most women of color acquire the disease from heterosexual contact, often from a partner who has undisclosed risk factors for HIV infection. Safe sex practices, especially consistent condom use, must be emphasized for all women, including women of color. A combination of testing, education, and brief behavioral interventions can help reduce the rate of HIV infection and its complications among women of color. In addition,biomedical interventions such as early treatment of patients infected with HIV and pre-exposure antiretroviral prophylaxis of high-risk individuals offer promise for future reductions in infections.

  11. Brazilian response to the human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome epidemic among injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Fábio; Doneda, Denise; Gandolfi, Denise; Nemes, Maria Inês Battistella; Andrade, Tarcísio; Bueno, Regina; Piconez e Trigueiros, Daniela

    2003-12-15

    The Brazilian response to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic is being observed all over the world because of its success. Understanding the role of injection drug users (IDUs) in the epidemic and the political response thereto is a key factor in the control of the epidemic in Brazil. This paper summarizes some of the most important analyses of the Brazilian response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic among and from IDUs. Key elements of the response include the support of the Brazilian Universal Public Health System, the provision of universal access to highly active antiretroviral therapy, and the creation of harm reduction projects that are politically and financially supported by the federal government. The response among and from IDUs is a key element in overall control of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. The response to the epidemic among and from IDUs has been headed in the correct direction since its beginning and is now being intensively expanded.

  12. Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome knowledge and risk factors in Ethiopian military personnel.

    PubMed

    Bakhireva, Ludmila N; Abebe, Yegeremu; Brodine, Stephanie K; Kraft, Heidi S; Shaffer, Richard A; Boyer, Cherrie B

    2004-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS)-related knowledge and behaviors were assessed in face-to-face structured interviews with 314 Ethiopian military personnel. A significant finding of this research was the association between HIV/AIDS knowledge and risky sexual behavior. That is, military personnel who had inaccurate knowledge about HIV/AIDS transmission and prevention were 3.4 times as likely to engage in combined sexual risk behaviors compared with personnel with accurate knowledge, after controlling for age, military rank, and marital status (odds ratio, 3.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.86-6.22). This finding highlights the potential value of educational programs in slowing the spread of HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa.

  13. Novel aptamer inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    DeStefano, Jeffrey J; Nair, Gauri R

    2008-06-01

    Primer-template-based double-stranded nucleic acids capable of binding human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase (HIV-RT) with high affinity were used as starting material to develop small single-stranded loop-back DNA aptamers. The original primer-templates were selected using a SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment) approach and consisted of 46- and 50-nt primer and template strands, respectively. The major determinant of the approximately 10-fold tighter binding in selected sequences relative to control primer-templates was a run of 6.8 G residues at the 3' primer end. Sixty, thirty-seven, twenty-seven, and twenty-two nucleotide loop-back single-stranded versions that retained the base pairs near the 3' primer terminus were constructed. Both the 60- and 37-nt versions retained high affinity for RT with K(d) values of approximately 0.44 nM and 0.66 nM, respectively. Random sequence primer-templates of the same length had K(d)s of approximately 20 nM and approximately 161 nM. The shorter 27- and 22-nt aptamers bound with reduced affinity. Several modifications of the 37-nt aptamer were also tested including changes to the terminal 3' G nucleotide and internal bases in the G run, replacement of specific nucleotides with phosphothioates, and alterations to the 5' overhang. Optimal binding required a 4- to 5-nt overhang, and internal changes within the G run had a pronounced negative effect on binding. Phosphothioate nucleotides or the presence of a 3' dideoxy G residue did not alter affinity. The 37-nt aptamer was a potent inhibitor of HIV-RT in vitro and functioned by blocking binding of other primer-templates.

  14. Lymphoid organs function as major reservoirs for human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Pantaleo, G; Graziosi, C; Butini, L; Pizzo, P A; Schnittman, S M; Kotler, D P; Fauci, A S

    1991-01-01

    The total number of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected circulating CD4+ T lymphocytes is considered to be a reflection of the HIV burden at any given time during the course of HIV infection. However, the low frequency of HIV-infected circulating CD4+ T lymphocytes and the low level or absence of plasma viremia in the early stages of infection do not correlate with the progressive immune dysfunction characteristic of HIV infection. In this study, we have determined whether HIV-infected circulating CD4+ T lymphocytes are a correct reflection of the total pool of HIV-infected CD4+ T cells (i.e., HIV burden). To this end, HIV burden has been comparatively analyzed in peripheral blood and lymphoid tissues (lymph nodes, adenoids, and tonsils) from the same patients. The presence of HIV-1 DNA in mononuclear cells isolated simultaneously from peripheral blood and lymphoid tissues of the same patients was determined by polymerase chain reaction amplification. We found that the frequency of HIV-1-infected cells in unfractionated or sorted CD4+ cell populations isolated from lymphoid tissues was significantly higher (0.5-1 log10 unit) than the frequency in peripheral blood. Comparable results were obtained in five HIV seropositive patients in the early stages of disease and in one patient with AIDS. These results demonstrate that a heavy viral load does reside in the lymphoid organs, indicating that they may function as major reservoirs for HIV. In addition, the finding of a heavy viral load in the lymphoid organs of patients in the early stages of disease may explain the progressive depletion of CD4+ T lymphocytes and the immune dysfunction associated with the early stages of HIV infection. Images PMID:1682922

  15. Tissue tropism of simian immunodeficiency virus in rhesus monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Wyand, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) is a T-lymphotropic lentivirus that is genetically, immunologically, and morphologically related to the human immunodeficiency viruses type 1 and 2 (HIV-1, HIV-2). In rhesus monkeys, SIV induces a progressively fatal immunodeficiency syndrome strikingly similar to human acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The tissue and cellular tropism of SIV was determined by immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization using a 3.48 kilobase SIV envelope gene probe labeled with biotin, {sup 35}S, or {sup 3}H. Probes labeled with {sup 35}S nonspecifically bound to tissue eosinophils and produced poor signal resolution compared to tritium labeled probes. Biotin labeled probes did not detect SIV under similar hybridization conditions. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues produced strong hybridization signal with superior morphology compared to frozen tissues. Gastrointestinal, respiratory, and lymphoid tissues most frequently contained SIV RNA. The distribution of SIV did not correlate with sex, or viral inoculum, but was most extensive in animals with SIV induced granulomatous encephalitis. SIV was most frequently observed in lymphocytes and macrophages. In the brain focal granulomas were composed almost entirely of EBM11+, lysozyme+, macrophages which contained large amounts of SIV RNA and p27 core protein detected by the monoclonal antibody R1C7. Cells away from granulomas in the brain parenchyma and around blood vessels contained virus and were compatible with oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. Lymph nodes in follicular hyperplasia contained small numbers of SIV positive cells compatible with lymphocytes in the paracortex and mantle zones as well as in cells of the germinal center. Lymph nodes in various stages of follicular depletion with expanded paracortices contained large numbers of cells with SIV RNA in lymphocytes and macrophages.

  16. Quantitation of cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA in leukocytes of human immunodeficiency virus-infected subjects with and without CMV disease by using PCR and the SHARP Signal Detection System.

    PubMed

    Boivin, G; Handfield, J; Murray, G; Toma, E; Lalonde, R; Lazar, J G; Bergeron, M G

    1997-02-01

    We report the development of a simple and rapid PCR assay for quantitation of the cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA load in polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Using this system, a very good correlation was found between a high number of CMV copies in the blood and the presence of CMV disease in subjects with AIDS.

  17. Quantitation of cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA in leukocytes of human immunodeficiency virus-infected subjects with and without CMV disease by using PCR and the SHARP Signal Detection System.

    PubMed Central

    Boivin, G; Handfield, J; Murray, G; Toma, E; Lalonde, R; Lazar, J G; Bergeron, M G

    1997-01-01

    We report the development of a simple and rapid PCR assay for quantitation of the cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA load in polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Using this system, a very good correlation was found between a high number of CMV copies in the blood and the presence of CMV disease in subjects with AIDS. PMID:9003635

  18. Post-translational intracellular trafficking determines the type of immune response elicited by DNA vaccines expressing Gag antigen of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1).

    PubMed

    Wallace, Aaron; West, Kim; Rothman, Alan L; Ennis, Francis A; Lu, Shan; Wang, Shixia

    2013-10-01

    In the current study, immune responses induced by Gag DNA vaccines with different designs were evaluated in Balb/C mice. The results demonstrated that the DNA vaccine with the full length wild type gag gene (Wt-Gag) mainly produced Gag antigens intracellularly and induced a higher level of cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses, as measured by IFN-gamma ELISPOT, intracellular cytokine staining (ICS), and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) assays against a dominant CD8(+) T cell epitope (AMQMLKETI). In contrast, the addition of a tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) leader sequence significantly improved overall Gag protein expression/secretion and Gag-specific antibody responses; however, Gag-specific CMI responses were decreased. The mutation of zinc-finger motif changed Gag protein expression patterns and reduced the ability to generate both CMI and antibody responses against Gag. These findings indicate that the structure and post-translational processing of antigens expressed by DNA vaccines play a critical role in eliciting optimal antibody or CMI responses.

  19. Post-translational intracellular trafficking determines the type of immune response elicited by DNA vaccines expressing Gag antigen of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1)

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Aaron; West, Kim; Rothman, Alan L; Ennis, Francis A; Lu, Shan; Wang, Shixia

    2013-01-01

    In the current study, immune responses induced by Gag DNA vaccines with different designs were evaluated in Balb/C mice. The results demonstrated that the DNA vaccine with the full length wild type gag gene (Wt-Gag) mainly produced Gag antigens intracellularly and induced a higher level of cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses, as measured by IFN-gamma ELISPOT, intracellular cytokine staining (ICS), and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) assays against a dominant CD8+ T cell epitope (AMQMLKETI). In contrast, the addition of a tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) leader sequence significantly improved overall Gag protein expression/secretion and Gag-specific antibody responses; however, Gag-specific CMI responses were decreased. The mutation of zinc-finger motif changed Gag protein expression patterns and reduced the ability to generate both CMI and antibody responses against Gag. These findings indicate that the structure and post-translational processing of antigens expressed by DNA vaccines play a critical role in eliciting optimal antibody or CMI responses. PMID:23941868

  20. Aminosugar derivatives as potential anti-human immunodeficiency virus agents.

    PubMed Central

    Karpas, A; Fleet, G W; Dwek, R A; Petursson, S; Namgoong, S K; Ramsden, N G; Jacob, G S; Rademacher, T W

    1988-01-01

    Recent data suggest that aminosugar derivatives which inhibit glycoprotein processing have potential anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) activity. These inhibitory effects may be due to disruption of cell fusion and subsequent cell-cell transmission of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) virus. Free virus particles able to bind CD4-positive cells are still produced in the presence of these compounds with only partial reduction of infectivity. We now report a method to score in parallel both the degree of antiviral activity and the effect on cell division of aminosugar derivatives. We find that (i) the compounds 1,4-dideoxy-1,4-imino-L-arabinitol and N-(5-carboxymethyl-1-pentyl)-1,5-imino-L-fucitol partially inhibit the cytopathic effect (giant cell formation, etc.) of HIV and yield of infectious virus; (ii) the compounds N-methyldeoxynojirimycin and N-ethyldeoxynojirimycin reduce the yield of infectious HIV by an order of four and three logarithms, respectively; and (iii) one compound, N-butyldeoxynojirimycin, of the 47 compounds previously screened reduces infectious viral particles by a logarithmic order greater than five at noncytotoxic concentrations. In addition, long-term growth of infected cells in the presence of N-butyldeoxynojirimycin gradually decreases the proportion of infected cells, leading to eventual elimination of HIV from culture. This result suggests that replication is associated with cytolysis. The ability to break the cycle of replication and reinfection has important implications in the chemotherapy of AIDS. PMID:3264071

  1. NMR structure of the myristylated feline immunodeficiency virus matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lola A; Cox, Cassiah; Baptiste, Janae; Summers, Holly; Button, Ryan; Bahlow, Kennedy; Spurrier, Vaughn; Kyser, Jenna; Luttge, Benjamin G; Kuo, Lillian; Freed, Eric O; Summers, Michael F

    2015-04-30

    Membrane targeting by the Gag proteins of the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV types-1 and -2) is mediated by Gag's N-terminally myristylated matrix (MA) domain and is dependent on cellular phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. To determine if other lentiviruses employ a similar membrane targeting mechanism, we initiated studies of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a widespread feline pathogen with potential utility for development of human therapeutics. Bacterial co-translational myristylation was facilitated by mutation of two amino acids near the amino-terminus of the protein (Q5A/G6S; myrMAQ5A/G6S). These substitutions did not affect virus assembly or release from transfected cells. NMR studies revealed that the myristyl group is buried within a hydrophobic pocket in a manner that is structurally similar to that observed for the myristylated HIV-1 protein. Comparisons with a recent crystal structure of the unmyristylated FIV protein [myr(-)MA] indicate that only small changes in helix orientation are required to accommodate the sequestered myr group. Depletion of PI(4,5)P2 from the plasma membrane of FIV-infected CRFK cells inhibited production of FIV particles, indicating that, like HIV, FIV hijacks the PI(4,5)P2 cellular signaling system to direct intracellular Gag trafficking during virus assembly.

  2. Clinical aspects of feline immunodeficiency and feline leukemia virus infection.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Katrin

    2011-10-15

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) are retroviruses with a global impact on the health of domestic cats. The two viruses differ in their potential to cause disease. FIV can cause an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome that increases the risk of developing opportunistic infections, neurological diseases, and tumors. In most naturally infected cats, however, FIV itself does not cause severe clinical signs, and FIV-infected cats may live many years without any health problems. FeLV is more pathogenic, and was long considered to be responsible for more clinical syndromes than any other agent in cats. FeLV can cause tumors (mainly lymphoma), bone marrow suppression syndromes (mainly anemia) and lead to secondary infectious diseases caused by suppressive effects of the virus on bone marrow and the immune system. Today, FeLV is less important as a deadly infectious agent as in the last 20 years prevalence has been decreasing in most countries. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. NMR Structure of the Myristylated Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Matrix Protein

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lola A.; Cox, Cassiah; Baptiste, Janae; Summers, Holly; Button, Ryan; Bahlow, Kennedy; Spurrier, Vaughn; Kyser, Jenna; Luttge, Benjamin G.; Kuo, Lillian; Freed, Eric O.; Summers, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane targeting by the Gag proteins of the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV types-1 and -2) is mediated by Gag’s N-terminally myristylated matrix (MA) domain and is dependent on cellular phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. To determine if other lentiviruses employ a similar membrane targeting mechanism, we initiated studies of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a widespread feline pathogen with potential utility for development of human therapeutics. Bacterial co-translational myristylation was facilitated by mutation of two amino acids near the amino-terminus of the protein (Q5A/G6S; myrMAQ5A/G6S). These substitutions did not affect virus assembly or release from transfected cells. NMR studies revealed that the myristyl group is buried within a hydrophobic pocket in a manner that is structurally similar to that observed for the myristylated HIV-1 protein. Comparisons with a recent crystal structure of the unmyristylated FIV protein [myr(-)MA] indicate that only small changes in helix orientation are required to accommodate the sequestered myr group. Depletion of PI(4,5)P2 from the plasma membrane of FIV-infected CRFK cells inhibited production of FIV particles, indicating that, like HIV, FIV hijacks the PI(4,5)P2 cellular signaling system to direct intracellular Gag trafficking during virus assembly. PMID:25941825

  4. Cardiac Disease Associated with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Bloomfield, Gerald S; Leung, Claudia

    2017-02-01

    Over the last 2 decades human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has become a chronic disease requiring long-term management. Aging, antiretroviral therapy, chronic inflammation, and several other factors contribute to the increased risk of cardiovascular disease in patients infected with HIV. In low-income and middle-income countries where antiretroviral therapy access is limited, cardiac disease is most commonly related to opportunistic infections and end-stage manifestations of HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, including HIV-associated cardiomyopathy, pericarditis, and pulmonary arterial hypertension. Cardiovascular screening, prevention, and risk factor management are important factors in the management of patients infected with HIV worldwide. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Pulmonary complications in children with human immunodeficiency virus infection].

    PubMed

    Brockmann V, Pablo; Viviani S, Támara; Peña D, Anamaría

    2007-08-01

    Pulmonary complications in children infected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are common and may be the first manifestation of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The aim of our study was to review pulmonary diseases and complications in pediatric patients with HIV infection in a large tertiary hospital in Santiago, Chile. We performed a retrospective, descriptive analysis of 17 patients with HIV infection controlled at the Hospital Dr. Sótero del Rio. Respiratory complications/diseases were: overall pneumonia (n: 14), recurrent pneumonia (n: 10), citomegalovirus associated pneumonia (n: 4), Pneumocystis jiroveci associated pneumonia (n: 1) pulmonary tuberculosis (n: 1), lymphoid interstitial pneumonia (n: 3) and chronic pulmonary disease (n: 7). Microorganisms isolated were mostly atypical and frequently associated with severe and chronic pulmonary damage. A high degree of suspicion is required to detect atypical microorganisms promptly, in order to rapidly implement pathogen targeted therapy that could potentially decrease the possibility of sequelae.

  6. Rehabilitation in adults with human immunodeficiency virus-related diseases.

    PubMed

    O'Dell, M W; Dillon, M E

    1992-06-01

    The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome is a fatal disorder of cell-mediated immunity caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). As many as one million Americans infected with HIV can expect improved survival with more advanced treatment approaches. Complications of HIV infection occur in the brain, spinal cord, muscle, nerve, joints and other organ systems, which lead to extensive impairments. As survival increases, rehabilitation professionals can anticipate a greater number of referrals for the assessment and management of physical disability in persons with HIV infection. This article reviews HIV-related disease, impairment, disability and handicap pertinent to rehabilitation medicine. An agenda for future research is also proposed. Current knowledge and models or rehabilitation care can be applied to HIV-related physical disability in an effort to improve overall quality of life.

  7. Human immunodeficiency virus and the substance abuser: public policy considerations.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, P; Fernandez, F

    1994-05-01

    Until recently, the abuse of intravenous drugs was perceived as a problem of the United States, and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic was seen mainly as a sexually transmitted disease that tended to affect homosexuals from industrialized nations. However, these perceptions are no longer valid. At present, the abuse of intravenous drugs constitutes the second most common cause of AIDS in the United States and in Europe. This trend has led to a review of the current strategies in the fight against infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We analyzed the current epidemiologic trends regarding infection with HIV; we examined the behavioral manifestations of intravenous drug users, particularly from a sexual point of view; and finally, we reviewed the most relevant governmental public policy positions related to drug abuse, specially that focusing on "damage control."

  8. Occult hepatitis B virus infection among Mexican human immunodeficiency virus-1-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Muñoz, Ma Teresa; Maldonado-Rodriguez, Angelica; Rojas-Montes, Othon; Torres-Ibarra, Rocio; Gutierrez-Escolano, Fernanda; Vazquez-Rosales, Guillermo; Gomez, Alejandro; Muñoz, Onofre; Torres, Javier; Lira, Rosalia

    2014-10-07

    To determine the frequency of occult hepatitis B infection (OHBI) in a group of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1+/ hepatitis B surface antigen negative (HBsAg)- patients from Mexico. We investigated the presence of OHBI in 49 HIV-1+/HBsAg- patients. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA was analyzed using nested PCR to amplify the Core (C) region and by real-time PCR to amplify a region of the S and X genes. The possible associations between the variables and OHBI were investigated using Pearson's χ(2) and/or Fisher's exact test. We found that the frequency of OHBI was 49% among the group of 49 HIV-1+/HBsAg- patients studied. The presence of OHBI was significantly associated with the HIV-1 RNA viral load [odds ratio (OR) = 8.75; P = 0.001; 95%CI: 2.26-33.79] and with HIV-antiretroviral treatment with drugs that interfere with HBV replication (lamivudine, tenofovir or emtricitabine) (OR = 0.25; P = 0.05; 95%CI: 0.08-1.05). The OHBI frequency is high among 49 Mexican HIV-1+/HBsAg- patients and it was more frequent in patients with detectable HIV RNA, and less frequent in patients who are undergoing HIV-ARV treatment with drugs active against HBV.

  9. Occult hepatitis B virus infection among Mexican human immunodeficiency virus-1-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Muñoz, Ma Teresa; Maldonado-Rodriguez, Angelica; Rojas-Montes, Othon; Torres-Ibarra, Rocio; Gutierrez-Escolano, Fernanda; Vazquez-Rosales, Guillermo; Gomez, Alejandro; Muñoz, Onofre; Torres, Javier; Lira, Rosalia

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the frequency of occult hepatitis B infection (OHBI) in a group of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1+/ hepatitis B surface antigen negative (HBsAg)- patients from Mexico. METHODS: We investigated the presence of OHBI in 49 HIV-1+/HBsAg- patients. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA was analyzed using nested PCR to amplify the Core (C) region and by real-time PCR to amplify a region of the S and X genes. The possible associations between the variables and OHBI were investigated using Pearson’s χ2 and/or Fisher’s exact test. RESULTS: We found that the frequency of OHBI was 49% among the group of 49 HIV-1+/HBsAg- patients studied. The presence of OHBI was significantly associated with the HIV-1 RNA viral load [odds ratio (OR) = 8.75; P = 0.001; 95%CI: 2.26-33.79] and with HIV-antiretroviral treatment with drugs that interfere with HBV replication (lamivudine, tenofovir or emtricitabine) (OR = 0.25; P = 0.05; 95%CI: 0.08-1.05). CONCLUSION: The OHBI frequency is high among 49 Mexican HIV-1+/HBsAg- patients and it was more frequent in patients with detectable HIV RNA, and less frequent in patients who are undergoing HIV-ARV treatment with drugs active against HBV. PMID:25309083

  10. Epstein-Barr virus-associated smooth muscle tumours after transplantation, infection with human immunodeficiency virus and congenital immunodeficiency syndromes.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Kais; Maecker-Kolhoff, Britta; Donnerstag, Frank; Laenger, Florian; Kreipe, Hans; Jonigk, Danny

    2013-01-01

    Smooth muscle tumours (SMT) after transplantation (PTSMT) or associated with congenital immunodeficiency syndromes (CI-SMT) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-SMT) are rare. The majority of PTSMT and CI-SMT are associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), while some HIV-SMT can be EBV-negative. SMT in immunodeficient states may present with unspecific symptoms which are mainly related to tumour localisation. In PTSMT, >50% of tumours manifest in the liver/transplant liver, but in general PTSMT, HIV-SMT and CI-SMT can occur at any site as single or multiple tumours. Multiple tumour manifestations do not define metastatic disease as PTSMT can occur synchronously and/or metachronously. PTSMT can originate from the recipient as well as from the donor. Morphologically, most tumours, in particular PTSMT, lack marked histological atypia or tumour necrosis, while some HIV-SMT and CI-SMT can present as sarcoma-like variants, but histomorphology does not predict clinical aggressiveness or tumourbiological behaviour. In PTSMT, surgery and reduced immunosuppression show comparable overall survival rates, while poor prognosis is mainly associated with intracranial manifestation and non-resectable tumours. In HIV-SMT and CI-SMT, surgery should be performed. In all 3 tumour types, adverse prognosis is mainly related to comorbidities associated with immunosuppression but not with the extent of histological atypia or tumour size. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Extensive astrocyte infection is prominent in human immunodeficiency virus-associated dementia.

    PubMed

    Churchill, Melissa J; Wesselingh, Steven L; Cowley, Daniel; Pardo, Carlos A; McArthur, Justin C; Brew, Bruce J; Gorry, Paul R

    2009-08-01

    Astrocyte infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is considered rare, so astrocytes are thought to play a secondary role in HIV neuropathogenesis. By combining double immunohistochemistry, laser capture microdissection, and highly sensitive multiplexed polymerase chain reaction to detect HIV DNA in single astrocytes in vivo, we showed that astrocyte infection is extensive in subjects with HIV-associated dementia, occurring in up to 19% of GFAP+ cells. In addition, astrocyte infection frequency correlated with the severity of neuropathological changes and proximity to perivascular macrophages. Our data indicate that astrocytes can be extensively infected with HIV, and suggest an important role for HIV-infected astrocytes in HIV neuropathogenesis.

  12. Inactivation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) by ionizing radiation in body fluids and serological evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Bigbee, P.D.; Sarin, P.S.; Humphreys, J.C.; Eubanks, W.G.; Sun, D.; Hocken, D.G.; Thornton, A.; Adams, D.E.; Simic, M.G. )

    1989-11-01

    A method to use ionizing radiation to inactivate HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) in human body fluids was studied in an effort to reduce the risk of accidental infection to forensic science laboratory workers. Experiments conducted indicate that an X-ray absorbed dose of 25 krad was required to completely inactivate HIV. This does not alter forensically important constituents such as enzymes and proteins in body fluids. This method of inactivation of HIV cannot be used on body fluids which will be subjected to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) typing.

  13. Endocarditis caused by Rochalimaea quintana in a patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Spach, D H; Callis, K P; Paauw, D S; Houze, Y B; Schoenknecht, F D; Welch, D F; Rosen, H; Brenner, D J

    1993-01-01

    Rochalimaea quintana and Rochalimaea henselae are closely related, fastidious, gram-negative rickettsiae. Thus far, the spectrum of human Rochalimaea sp. infections has not included endocarditis. We describe a 50-year-old human immunodeficiency virus-positive man who developed endocarditis caused by R. quintana. DNA relatedness studies, which compared our patient's blood culture isolate with known Rochalimaea species, identified the organism as R. quintana. Our report expands the spectrum of Rochalimaea sp. infections and identifies a new infectious cause of endocarditis. PMID:8458964

  14. Plasmoblastic lymphoma associated with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Emoke; Krenács, L; Bagdi, Eniko; Pávai, Z; Macarie, I; Nagy, Elod-Erno; Demian, Smaranda

    2008-01-01

    Plasmoblastic lymphoma (PBL) is a subtype of the diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, typically present as extranodal disease associated with human immune deficiency virus (HIV) infection. PBLs are often the initial manifestation of AIDS. Here we present a case of PBL concerning the oral cavity. A 34-year-old woman presented a tumor in the oral cavity that involved the maxilla and gingiva (confirmed by CT-scan). The gingival biopsy showed a massive infiltration by large lymphoid cells with round, vesicular nuclei, prominent nucleoli, fine chromatin and an significant amount of basophilic cytoplasm which express CD79a, CD138, cytoplasmic lambda light chain and LCA, without staining for CD20, CD38, CD3 and CTK. Serological analysis confirmed HIV positivity. PBLs lack most B-lineage markers, but many express CD79a in at least some of the cells, therefore generate difficulties in differential diagnosis. Overall assessment and correlation of the histopathological and immunohistochemical features with the clinical findings and serology investigation are the most helpful diagnostic tools and can lead to the final diagnosis.

  15. Lymphatic Dissemination of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus after Penile Inoculation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhong-Min; Dutra, Joseph; Fritts, Linda

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is primarily transmitted by heterosexual contact, and approximately equal numbers of men and women worldwide are infected with the virus. Understanding the biology of HIV acquisition and dissemination in men exposed to the virus by insertive penile intercourse is likely to help with the rational design of vaccines that can limit or prevent HIV transmission. To characterize the target cells and dissemination pathways involved in establishing systemic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection, we necropsied male rhesus macaques at 1, 3, 7, and 14 days after penile SIV inoculation and quantified the levels of unspliced SIV RNA and spliced SIV RNA in tissue lysates and the number of SIV RNA-positive cells in tissue sections. We found that penile (glans, foreskin, coronal sulcus) T cells and, to a lesser extent, macrophages and dendritic cells are primary targets of infection and that SIV rapidly reaches the regional lymph nodes. At 7 days after inoculation, SIV had disseminated to the blood, systemic lymph nodes, and mucosal lymphoid tissues. Further, at 7 days postinoculation (p.i.), spliced SIV RNA levels were the highest in the genital lymph nodes, indicating that this is the site where the infection is initially amplified. By 14 days p.i., spliced SIV RNA levels were high in all tissues, but they were the highest in the gastrointestinal tract, indicating that the primary site of virus replication had shifted from the genital lymph nodes to the gut. The stepwise pattern of virus replication and dissemination described here suggests that vaccine-elicited immune responses in the genital lymph nodes could help prevent infection after penile SIV challenge. IMPORTANCE To be the most effective, vaccines should produce antiviral immune responses in the anatomic sites of virus replication. Thus, understanding the path taken by HIV from the mucosal surfaces, which are the site of virus exposure, to the deeper tissues where

  16. Trends in contraceptive use among women with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mengyang; Peipert, Jeffrey F; Zhao, Qiuhong; Wilson, Tracey E; Weber, Kathleen M; Sanchez-Keeland, Lorraine; DʼSouza, Gypsyamber; Young, Mary; Watts, D Heather; Keller, Marla J; Cohan, Deborah; Massad, L Stewart

    2012-10-01

    To estimate trends in contraceptive use, especially long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) and condoms, among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-seropositive and HIV-seronegative women. Human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive and HIV-seronegative women in a multicenter longitudinal cohort were interviewed semiannually between 1998 and 2010 about sexual behaviors and contraceptive use. Trends in contraceptive use by women aged 18-45 years who were at risk for unintended pregnancy but not trying to conceive were analyzed using generalized estimating equations. Condoms were the dominant form of contraception for HIV-seropositive women and showed little change across time. Less than 15% of these women used no contraception. Between 1998 and 2010, LARC use increased among HIV-seronegative women from 4.8% (6 of 126) to 13.5% (19 of 141, P=.02), but not significantly among seropositive women (0.9% [4 of 438] to 2.8% [6 of 213], P=.09). Use of highly effective contraceptives, including pills, patches, rings, injectable progestin, implants, and intrauterine devices, ranged from 15.2% (53 of 348) in 1998 to 17.4% (37 of 213) in 2010 (P=.55). Human immunodeficiency virus-seronegative but not HIV-seropositive LARC users were less likely than nonusers to use condoms consistently (hazard ratio 0.51, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.32-0.81, P=.004 for seronegative women; hazard ratio 1.09, 95% CI 0.96-1.23 for seropositive women). Although most HIV-seropositive women use contraception, they rely primarily on condoms and have not experienced the increase in LARC use seen among seronegative women. Strategies to improve simultaneous use of condoms and LARC are needed to minimize risk of unintended pregnancy as well as HIV transmission and acquisition of sexually transmitted infections. II.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked immunodeficiency with magnesium defect, Epstein-Barr virus infection, and neoplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... X-linked immunodeficiency with magnesium defect, Epstein-Barr virus infection, and neoplasia Printable PDF Open All Close ... X-linked immunodeficiency with magnesium defect, Epstein-Barr virus infection, and neoplasia (typically known by the acronym ...

  18. Oligodeoxynucleoside phosphoramidates and phosphorothioates as inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, S; Goodchild, J; Civeira, M P; Thornton, A H; Sarin, P S; Zamecnik, P C

    1988-01-01

    Modified oligodeoxynucleotides complementary to RNA of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) were tested for their ability to inhibit virally induced syncytium formation and expression of viral p24 protein. The modifications of oligomers include replacement of backbone phosphodiester groups with phosphorothioates and various phosphoramidates. All oligomers were found to be active. Oligomers with complete replacement of phosphodiesters with phosphoramidate or phosphorothioate groups were more active at the micromolar range than were unmodified oligomers of the same sequence. In addition, modified and unmodified homooligonucleotides also showed inhibition of HIV-1 replication. It is suggested that different classes of oligonucleotides may inhibit HIV replication by different mechanisms. PMID:3174622

  19. Multifactorial Nature of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Disease: Implications for Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauci, Anthony S.

    1993-11-01

    The immunopathogenic mechanisms underlying human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease are extremely complex; the disease process is multifactorial with multiple overlapping phases. Viral burden is substantial and viral replication occurs throughout the entire course of HIV infection. Inappropriate immune activation and elevated secretion of certain cytokines compound the pathogenic process. Profound immunosuppression ultimately occurs together with a disruption of the microenvironment of the immune system, which is probably unable to regenerate spontaneously. Thus, therapeutic strategies in HIV disease must not be unidimensional, but rather must be linked to the complex pathogenic components of the disease and must address where feasible each of the recognized pathoclenic processes for the possibility of therapeutic intervention.

  20. First molecular characterization of feline immunodeficiency virus in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Oğuzoğlu, Tuba Ciğdem; Timurkan, Mehmet Ozkan; Muz, Dilek; Kudu, Ayşegül; Numanbayraktaroğlu, Başak; Sadak, Seda; Burgu, Ibrahim

    2010-11-01

    In this study, strains of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), designated TR-D, TR-Mo and TR-Mi, isolated from three cats in Turkey, were characterized. PCR products (859 bp) from the envelope (env) gene region were amplified and sequenced, and possible geographical differences in the env gene region of Turkish FIV strains are discussed. Phylogenetic analysis of two strains showed that FIV subtype B was present in Turkey. Phylogenetic analysis showed that one new Turkish FIV strain occupies a separate branch from known clusters (subtypes A to E) from the USA, Canada, Europe and Japan.

  1. Finding a cure for human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Blankson, Joel N; Siliciano, Janet D; Siliciano, Robert F

    2014-12-01

    Remarkable advances have been made in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection, but in the entire history of the epidemic, only 1 patient has been cured. Herein we review the fundamental mechanisms that render HIV-1 infection difficult to cure and then discuss recent clinical and experimental situations in which some form of cure has been achieved. Finally, we consider approaches that are currently being taken to develop a general cure for HIV-1 infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Primary Care of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient.

    PubMed

    Buckhold, Fred R

    2015-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a disease that affects 1 million patients in the United States. Many excellent drug regimens exist that effectively suppress the viral load and improve immune function, but there are consequences of long-term antiviral therapy. In addition, patients with HIV tend to have much higher rates of chronic disease, substance abuse, and cancer. Thus, while expert care in the treatment of HIV remains critical, the skill set of a primary care provider in the prevention, detection, and management of acute and chronic illness is vital to the care of the HIV patient.

  3. [Lopinavir/ritonavir in human immunodeficiency virus-infected women].

    PubMed

    Téllez, María Jesús

    2014-11-01

    There are clear sex-related biological differences between men and women. Diseases that affect the two sexes differently are studied separately. However, some diseases affect both men and women, but their incidence or outcome are clearly different. In human immunodeficiency virus infection, the potential differences in the effects of antiretroviral therapy are poorly characterized and few studies have been designed to elucidate these differences. Moreover, women are usually poorly represented in clinical trials of antiretroviral drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Fungal, Viral, and Parasitic Pneumonias Associated with Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    PubMed

    Skalski, Joseph H; Limper, Andrew H

    2016-04-01

    Respiratory illness is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The spectrum of pulmonary disease that can affect patients with HIV is wide and includes opportunistic infection with many fungal, viral, and parasitic organisms. This article reviews the clinical presentation; approach to diagnosis; and management of fungal, viral, and parasitic pneumonias that can develop in patients with HIV including respiratory disease caused by Aspergillus, Cryptococcus, Histoplasma, Coccidioides, Cytomegalovirus, Toxoplasma, and Strongyloides. Because clinical symptoms and radiographic patterns are often insensitive at distinguishing these pulmonary infections, this review particularly focuses on specific host risk factors and diagnostic testing to consider when approaching HIV patients with respiratory illness.

  5. Neuromyelitis optica in patients with coexisting human immunodeficiency virus infections.

    PubMed

    Feyissa, Anteneh M; Singh, Parbhdeep; Smith, Robert G

    2013-09-01

    Two patients with known human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections and receiving antiretroviral treatment developed neuromyelitis optica (Devic's disease). One patient tested positive for serum aquaporin-4 immunoglobulin G antibodies. Both patients were treated with high dose pulsed intravenous methylprednisolone followed by standard sessions of plasma exchange both at the onset attack and during disease relapses. For maintenance therapy, one patient received rituximab infusions and the second patient received mycophenolate mofetil orally. Despite treatment, both patients are currently wheelchair-bound due to severe paraparesis. Neuromyelitis optica can occur in the course of HIV infection and poses an ongoing therapeutic challenge.

  6. Inner architecture of human and simian immunodeficiency viruses.

    PubMed

    Fukui, T; Imura, S; Goto, T; Nakai, M

    1993-07-01

    The cores of human and simian immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and SIV) were observed by negative staining after isolation of the core with Nonidet P40 and glutaraldehyde. Four kinds of cores were found: asymmetric and symmetric sectoral shapes, a bar shape, and a triangular shape. These results were confirmed by the examination of ultrathin sections of whole virions. In some virions, the connection between the core and the envelope was observed after freeze fracturing. Its structure was considered to be characteristic of an intermediate stage of viral maturation. The HIV-1 core was reacted with anti-HIV-1 p24 mouse monoclonal antibody.

  7. Human immunodeficiency virus associated plasmablastic lymphoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Dinkar; Pandit, Siddharth; Jasphin, Shiny; Shetty, Akhil S.

    2016-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) is the third common malignant lesion of the oral region. Plasmablastic lymphomas are rare, aggressive neoplasms occurring mostly in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected individual which accounts for approximately 2.6% of all NHL. It usually presents as a diffuse growth and with diffuse pattern of histological presentation. It is very difficult to differentiate this lymphoma from other NHL. Immunohistochemical evaluation of various markers is an important criteria of the diagnostic protocol. Here, we describe a case of plasmablastic lymphoma in a 50-year-old female HIV-infected patient. The diagnosis was based on histopathological examination and immunophenotyping. PMID:27795651

  8. Prevalence of enteric viruses in human immunodeficiency virus seropositive patients in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    González, G G; Pujol, F H; Liprandi, F; Deibis, L; Ludert, J E

    1998-08-01

    The prevalence of enteric viruses associated with gastroenteritis was determined in 125 stool samples from patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), with or without diarrhea. Diagnostic assays included enzyme immunoassays for the identification of rotavirus, adenovirus, and Norwalk virus; polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis for atypical rotaviruses and picobirnaviruses and polymerase chain reaction for astrovirus. Enteric viruses were detected in 6.4% (8 of 125) of the stools collected: five (4.0%) samples positive for adenoviruses, and three (2.3%) samples positive for picobirnaviruses were detected. No rotavirus, astrovirus, or Norwalk virus were observed. Only one of the viruses identified (adenovirus) was found in a sample from a patient with diarrhea. Viruses were detected in 10% of the patients with AIDS, 14% of the symptomatic patients, and none of the asymptomatic persons. These results do not support a major role for enteric viruses in the diarrhea suffered by HIV-infected patients.

  9. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid...

  11. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid...

  13. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ requirements. 610.46 Section 610.46 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Disease Agents § 610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. 866.3950 Section 866.3950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a...

  15. Respiratory syncytial virus infections in infants affected by primary immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Lanari, Marcello; Vandini, Silvia; Capretti, Maria Grazia; Lazzarotto, Tiziana; Faldella, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies are rare inherited disorders that may lead to frequent and often severe acute respiratory infections. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the most frequent pathogens during early infancy and the infection is more severe in immunocompromised infants than in healthy infants, as a result of impaired T- and B-cell immune response unable to efficaciously neutralize viral replication, with subsequent increased viral shedding and potentially lethal lower respiratory tract infection. Several authors have reported a severe clinical course after RSV infections in infants and children with primary and acquired immunodeficiencies. Environmental prophylaxis is essential in order to reduce the infection during the epidemic season in hospitalized immunocompromised infants. Prophylaxis with palivizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against the RSV F protein, is currently recommended in high-risk infants born prematurely, with chronic lung disease or congenital heart disease. Currently however the prophylaxis is not routinely recommended in infants with primary immunodeficiency, although some authors propose the extension of prophylaxis to this high risk population.

  16. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections in Infants Affected by Primary Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Capretti, Maria Grazia; Lazzarotto, Tiziana; Faldella, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies are rare inherited disorders that may lead to frequent and often severe acute respiratory infections. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the most frequent pathogens during early infancy and the infection is more severe in immunocompromised infants than in healthy infants, as a result of impaired T- and B-cell immune response unable to efficaciously neutralize viral replication, with subsequent increased viral shedding and potentially lethal lower respiratory tract infection. Several authors have reported a severe clinical course after RSV infections in infants and children with primary and acquired immunodeficiencies. Environmental prophylaxis is essential in order to reduce the infection during the epidemic season in hospitalized immunocompromised infants. Prophylaxis with palivizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against the RSV F protein, is currently recommended in high-risk infants born prematurely, with chronic lung disease or congenital heart disease. Currently however the prophylaxis is not routinely recommended in infants with primary immunodeficiency, although some authors propose the extension of prophylaxis to this high risk population. PMID:25089282

  17. Homologous interference resulting from the presence of defective particles of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Bernier, R; Tremblay, M

    1995-01-01

    Defective particles are naturally occurring virus mutants that lack one or more genes required for viral replication. Such viruses may affect positively or negatively the symptoms of the disease. Thus, it is of great interest to measure the role played by defective particles in the process of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection since accumulating evidence indicates that a great proportion of HIV genomes are defective. We used defective particles produced by two stable cellular clones (UHC-8 and UHC-18) to investigate whether they can affect replication of infectious viral particles generated by a human T-cell line transfected with a molecular HIV-1 clone. Progeny virus harvested from UHC-8 cells has no reverse transcriptase and integrase proteins, while UHC-18 has no reverse transcriptase protein. We demonstrate here that coinoculation of a T-lymphoid cell line and of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with defective and infectious particles leads to a dramatic inhibition of virus replication. Defective particles do not interfere with virus production from proviral DNA. Rather, the inhibition of reinfection events seems to be their mechanism of action. This model closely parallels the in vivo conditions and demonstrates that defective particles may limit the spread of infection and progression of the disease by reducing the yield of infectious virus. PMID:7983721

  18. Effects of dimethyl prostaglandin A1 on herpes simplex virus and human immunodeficiency virus replication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; McGrath, M. S.; Hanks, D.; Erickson, S.; Pulliam, L.

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the direct effect of dimethyl prostaglandin A1 (dmPGA1) on the replication of herpes simplex virus (HSV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). dmPGA1 significantly inhibited viral replication in both HSV and HIV infection systems at concentrations of dmPGA1 that did not adversely alter cellular DNA synthesis. The 50% inhibitory concentration (ID50) for several HSV type 1 (HSV-1) strains ranged from 3.8 to 5.6 micrograms/ml for Vero cells and from 4.6 to 7.3 micrograms/ml for human foreskin fibroblasts. The ID50s for two HSV-2 strains varied from 3.8 to 4.5 micrograms/ml for Vero cells; the ID50 was 5.7 micrograms/ml for human foreskin fibroblasts. We found that closely related prostaglandins did not have the same effect on the replication of HSV; dmPGE2 and dmPGA2 caused up to a 60% increase in HSV replication compared with that in untreated virus-infected cells. HIV-1 replication in acutely infected T cells (VB line) and chronically infected macrophages was assessed by quantitative decreases in p24 concentration. The effective ID50s were 2.5 micrograms/ml for VB cells acutely infected with HIV-1 and 5.2 micrograms/m for chronically infected macrophages. dmPGA1 has an unusual broad-spectrum antiviral activity against both HSV and HIV-1 in vitro and offers a new class of potential therapeutic agents for in vivo use.

  19. Effects of dimethyl prostaglandin A1 on herpes simplex virus and human immunodeficiency virus replication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; McGrath, M. S.; Hanks, D.; Erickson, S.; Pulliam, L.

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the direct effect of dimethyl prostaglandin A1 (dmPGA1) on the replication of herpes simplex virus (HSV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). dmPGA1 significantly inhibited viral replication in both HSV and HIV infection systems at concentrations of dmPGA1 that did not adversely alter cellular DNA synthesis. The 50% inhibitory concentration (ID50) for several HSV type 1 (HSV-1) strains ranged from 3.8 to 5.6 micrograms/ml for Vero cells and from 4.6 to 7.3 micrograms/ml for human foreskin fibroblasts. The ID50s for two HSV-2 strains varied from 3.8 to 4.5 micrograms/ml for Vero cells; the ID50 was 5.7 micrograms/ml for human foreskin fibroblasts. We found that closely related prostaglandins did not have the same effect on the replication of HSV; dmPGE2 and dmPGA2 caused up to a 60% increase in HSV replication compared with that in untreated virus-infected cells. HIV-1 replication in acutely infected T cells (VB line) and chronically infected macrophages was assessed by quantitative decreases in p24 concentration. The effective ID50s were 2.5 micrograms/ml for VB cells acutely infected with HIV-1 and 5.2 micrograms/m for chronically infected macrophages. dmPGA1 has an unusual broad-spectrum antiviral activity against both HSV and HIV-1 in vitro and offers a new class of potential therapeutic agents for in vivo use.

  20. Quantitation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection kinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrov, D S; Willey, R L; Sato, H; Chang, L J; Blumenthal, R; Martin, M A

    1993-01-01

    Tissue culture infections of CD4-positive human T cells by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) proceed in three stages: (i) a period following the initiation of an infection during which no detectable virus is produced; (ii) a phase in which a sharp increase followed by a peak of released progeny virions can be measured; and (iii) a final period when virus production declines. In this study, we have derived equations describing the kinetics of HIV-1 accumulation in cell culture supernatants during multiple rounds of infection. Our analyses indicated that the critical parameter affecting the kinetics of HIV-1 infection is the infection rate constant k = Inn/ti, where n is the number of infectious virions produced by one cell (about 10(2)) and ti is the time required for one complete cycle of virus infection (typically 3 to 4 days). Of particular note was our finding that the infectivity of HIV-1 during cell-to-cell transmission is 10(2) to 10(3) times greater than the infectivity of cell-free virus stocks, the inocula commonly used to initiate tissue culture infections. We also demonstrated that the slow infection kinetics of an HIV-1 tat mutant is not due to a longer replication time but reflects the small number of infectious particles produced per cycle. PMID:8445728

  1. Feline immunodeficiency virus clade C mucosal transmission and disease courses.

    PubMed

    Obert, L A; Hoover, E A

    2000-05-01

    The transmissibility and pathogenicity of a clade C feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV-C) was examined via the oral-nasal, vaginal, or rectal mucosa. FIV-C was transmissible by all three mucosal routes. Vaginal transmission was most efficient (100%), oral exposure resulted in a 80% infection rate, and rectal transmission was least effective (44%). In contrast to previous intravenous passage studies, a broader range of host-virus relationships was observed after mucosal exposure. Three categories of FIV-C infection were defined: (1) rapidly progressive infection marked by high virus burdens and rapid CD4+ cell depletion (43% of vaginally exposed animals); (2) conventional (typical) infection featuring slowly progressive CD4+ cell decline (61% of all exposed animals); and (3) regressive (transient) infection marked by low and then barely detectable virus burdens and no CD4+ cell alterations (22% of rectally inoculated cats). These disease courses appear to have parallels in mucosal HIV and SIV infections, emphasizing the importance of the virus-mucosa interface in lentiviral pathogenesis.

  2. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Model for Designing HIV/AIDS Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Janet K.; Sanou, Missa P.; Abbott, Jeffrey R.; Coleman, James K.

    2013-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) discovered in 1986 is a lentivirus that causes AIDS in domestic cats. FIV is classified into five subtypes (A–E), and all subtypes and circulating intersubtype recombinants have been identified throughout the world. A commercial FIV vaccine, consisting of inactivated subtype-A and –D viruses (Fel-O-Vax FIV, Fort Dodge Animal Health), was released in the United States in 2002. The United States Department of Agriculture approved the commercial release of Fel-O-Vax FIV based on two efficacy trials using 105 laboratory cats and a major safety trial performed on 689 pet cats. The prototype and commercial FIV vaccines had broad prophylactic efficacy against global FIV subtypes and circulating intersubtype recombinants. The mechanisms of cross-subtype efficacy are attributed to FIV-specific T-cell immunity. Findings from these studies are being used to define the prophylactic epitopes needed for an HIV-1 vaccine for humans. PMID:20210778

  3. FELINE IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS (FIV) IN WILD PALLAS’ CATS

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Meredith A.; Munkhtsog, Bariushaa; Troyer, Jennifer L.; Ross, Steve; Sellers, Rani; Fine, Amanda E.; Swanson, William F.; Roelke, Melody E.; O’Brien1, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a feline lentivirus related to HIV, causes immune dysfunction in domestic and wild cats. The Pallas’ cat is the only species from Asia known to harbor a species-specific strain of FIV designated FIVOma in natural populations. Here, a 25% seroprevalence of FIV is reported from 28 wild Mongolian Pallas’ cats sampled from 2000-2008. Phylogenetic analysis of proviral RT-Pol from eight FIVOma isolates from Mongolia, Russia, China and Kazakhstan reveals a unique monophyletic lineage of the virus within the Pallas’ cat population, most closely related to the African cheetah and leopard FIV strains. Histopathological examination of lymph node and spleen from infected and uninfected Pallas’ cats suggests that FIVOma causes immune depletion in its’ native host. PMID:19926144

  4. BST-2 Mediated Restriction of Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Autumn; Lau, David; Mitchell, Richard S.; Hill, M. Sarah; Schmitt, Kimberly; Guatelli, John C.; Stephens, Edward B.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic simian-human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIV)contain HIV-1 Vpu and SIV Nef, both shown to counteract BST-2 (HM1.24; CD317; tetherin) inhibition of virus release in a species-specific manner. We show that human and pig-tailed BST-2 (ptBST-2) restrict SHIV. We found that sequential “humanize” of the transmembrane domain (TMD) of the pig-tailed BST-2 (ptBST-2) protein resulted in a fluctuation in sensitivity to HIV-1 Vpu. Our results also show that the length of the TMD in human and ptBST-2 proteins is important for BST-2 restriction and susceptibility to Vpu. Taken together, our results emphasize the importance of tertiary structure in BST-2 antagonism and suggests that the HIV-1 Vpu transmembrane domain may have additional functions in vivo unrelated to BST-2 antagonism. PMID:20708210

  5. Nef proteins from simian immunodeficiency viruses are tetherin antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fengwen; Wilson, Sam J.; Langford, Wilmina; Virgen, Beatriz; Gregory, Devon; Johnson, Marc; Munch, Jan; Kirchhoff, Frank; Bieniasz, Paul D.; Hatziioannou, Theodora

    2010-01-01

    The tetherin/BST2/CD317 protein blocks the release of HIV-1 and other enveloped viruses by inducing tethering of nascent particles to infected cell surfaces. The HIV-1 Vpu protein antagonizes the antiviral activity of human but not monkey tetherins and many simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) do not encode Vpu. Here, we show that the apparently ‘missing’ anti-tetherin activity in SIVs has been acquired by several SIV Nef proteins. Specifically, SIVMAC/SIVSMM, SIVAGM and SIVBLU Nef proteins can suppress tetherin activity. Notably, tetherin antagonism by SIV Nef proteins is species-specific, is genetically separable from other Nef activities and is most evident with simian rather than human tetherin proteins. Accordingly, a critical determinant of sensitivity to SIVMAC Nef in the tetherin cytoplasmic tail is variable in nonhuman primate tetherins and deleted in human tetherin, likely due to selective pressures imposed by viral antagonists, perhaps including Nef proteins. PMID:19501037

  6. Recombination in feline immunodeficiency virus genomes from naturally infected cougars.

    PubMed

    Bruen, Trevor C; Poss, Mary

    2007-08-01

    Recombination contributes significantly to diversity within virus populations and ultimately to viral evolution. Here we use a recently developed statistical test to perform exploratory analysis of recombination in fourteen feline immunodeficiency virus (FIVpco) genomes derived from a wild population of cougars. We use both the global and local Phi statistical test as an overall guide to predict where recombination may have occurred. Further analyses, including similarity plots and phylogenetic incongruence tests, confirmed that three FIVpco lineages were derived from recombinant events. Interestingly, the regions of mosaic origin were clustered in the area encoding lentiviral accessory genes and largely spared the viral structural genes. Because some of the mosaic strains are currently geographically disparate, our data indicate that the dispersal of cougars infected with these strains was preceded by recombination events. These results suggest that recombination has played an important role in the evolution of FIVpco for this wild population of cougars.

  7. BST-2 mediated restriction of simian-human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Autumn; Lau, David; Mitchell, Richard S; Hill, M Sarah; Schmitt, Kimberly; Guatelli, John C; Stephens, Edward B

    2010-10-25

    Pathogenic simian-human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIV) contain HIV-1 Vpu and SIV Nef, both shown to counteract BST-2 (HM1.24; CD317; tetherin) inhibition of virus release in a species-specific manner. We show that human and pig-tailed BST-2 (ptBST-2) restrict SHIV. We found that sequential "humanization" of the transmembrane domain (TMD) of the pig-tailed BST-2 (ptBST-2) protein resulted in a fluctuation in sensitivity to HIV-1 Vpu. Our results also show that the length of the TMD in human and ptBST-2 proteins is important for BST-2 restriction and susceptibility to Vpu. Taken together, our results emphasize the importance of tertiary structure in BST-2 antagonism and suggests that the HIV-1 Vpu transmembrane domain may have additional functions in vivo unrelated to BST-2 antagonism.

  8. Primary pulmonary hypertension associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Golpe, R.; Fernandez-Infante, B.; Fernandez-Rozas, S.

    1998-01-01

    Several cardiorespiratory diseases can complicate human immunodeficiency virus infection. Primary pulmonary hypertension is a rare clinical disorder which carries a bad prognosis. More than 90 cases of HIV-associated primary pulmonary hypertension have been reported to date. Although its pathogenesis remains unknown, some evidence suggests a possible role for the virus itself in its development. Genetic susceptibility may also be implicated. The clinical and histopathologic features of this entity do not differ from those of classic primary pulmonary hypertension. The diagnosis requires a high degree of clinical suspicion and a careful evaluation to rule out causes of secondary pulmonary hypertension. In addition to supportive measures, anticoagulation and vasodilators have been used to treat this disorder, although sufficient data regarding long-term results with these therapies are lacking. PMID:9799910

  9. Primary pulmonary hypertension associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Golpe, R; Fernandez-Infante, B; Fernandez-Rozas, S

    1998-07-01

    Several cardiorespiratory diseases can complicate human immunodeficiency virus infection. Primary pulmonary hypertension is a rare clinical disorder which carries a bad prognosis. More than 90 cases of HIV-associated primary pulmonary hypertension have been reported to date. Although its pathogenesis remains unknown, some evidence suggests a possible role for the virus itself in its development. Genetic susceptibility may also be implicated. The clinical and histopathologic features of this entity do not differ from those of classic primary pulmonary hypertension. The diagnosis requires a high degree of clinical suspicion and a careful evaluation to rule out causes of secondary pulmonary hypertension. In addition to supportive measures, anticoagulation and vasodilators have been used to treat this disorder, although sufficient data regarding long-term results with these therapies are lacking.

  10. Alternative nucleophilic substrates for the endonuclease activities of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase

    SciTech Connect

    Ealy, Julie B.; Sudol, Malgorzata; Krzeminski, Jacek; Amin, Shantu; Katzman, Michael

    2012-11-10

    Retroviral integrase can use water or some small alcohols as the attacking nucleophile to nick DNA. To characterize the range of compounds that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase can accommodate for its endonuclease activities, we tested 45 potential electron donors (having varied size and number or spacing of nucleophilic groups) as substrates during site-specific nicking at viral DNA ends and during nonspecific nicking reactions. We found that integrase used 22 of the 45 compounds to nick DNA, but not all active compounds were used for both activities. In particular, 13 compounds were used for site-specific and nonspecific nicking, 5 only for site-specific nicking, and 4 only for nonspecific nicking; 23 other compounds were not used for either activity. Thus, integrase can accommodate a large number of nucleophilic substrates but has selective requirements for its different activities, underscoring its dynamic properties and providing new information for modeling and understanding integrase.

  11. Lentivirus vectors using human and simian immunodeficiency virus elements.

    PubMed

    White, S M; Renda, M; Nam, N Y; Klimatcheva, E; Zhu, Y; Fisk, J; Halterman, M; Rimel, B J; Federoff, H; Pandya, S; Rosenblatt, J D; Planelles, V

    1999-04-01

    Lentivirus vectors based on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 (HIV-1) constitute a recent development in the field of gene therapy. A key property of HIV-1-derived vectors is their ability to infect nondividing cells. Although high-titer HIV-1-derived vectors have been produced, concerns regarding safety still exist. Safety concerns arise mainly from the possibility of recombination between transfer and packaging vectors, which may give rise to replication-competent viruses with pathogenic potential. We describe a novel lentivirus vector which is based on HIV, simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and which we refer to as HIV/SIVpack/G. In this system, an HIV-1-derived genome is encapsidated by SIVmac core particles. These core particles are pseudotyped with VSV glycoprotein G. Because the nucleotide homology between HIV-1 and SIVmac is low, the likelihood of recombination between vector elements should be reduced. In addition, the packaging construct (SIVpack) for this lentivirus system was derived from SIVmac1A11, a nonvirulent SIV strain. Thus, the potential for pathogenicity with this vector system is minimal. The transduction ability of HIV/SIVpack/G was demonstrated with immortalized human lymphocytes, human primary macrophages, human bone marrow-derived CD34(+) cells, and primary mouse neurons. To our knowledge, these experiments constitute the first demonstration that the HIV-1-derived genome can be packaged by an SIVmac capsid. We demonstrate that the lentivirus vector described here recapitulates the biological properties of HIV-1-derived vectors, although with increased potential for safety in humans.

  12. Lentivirus Vectors Using Human and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Elements

    PubMed Central

    White, Sarah M.; Renda, Matthew; Nam, Na-Yon; Klimatcheva, Ekaterina; Zhu, Yonghong; Fisk, Jennifer; Halterman, Mark; Rimel, Bobbie J.; Federoff, Howard; Pandya, Snehal; Rosenblatt, Joseph D.; Planelles, Vicente

    1999-01-01

    Lentivirus vectors based on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 (HIV-1) constitute a recent development in the field of gene therapy. A key property of HIV-1-derived vectors is their ability to infect nondividing cells. Although high-titer HIV-1-derived vectors have been produced, concerns regarding safety still exist. Safety concerns arise mainly from the possibility of recombination between transfer and packaging vectors, which may give rise to replication-competent viruses with pathogenic potential. We describe a novel lentivirus vector which is based on HIV, simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and which we refer to as HIV/SIVpack/G. In this system, an HIV-1-derived genome is encapsidated by SIVmac core particles. These core particles are pseudotyped with VSV glycoprotein G. Because the nucleotide homology between HIV-1 and SIVmac is low, the likelihood of recombination between vector elements should be reduced. In addition, the packaging construct (SIVpack) for this lentivirus system was derived from SIVmac1A11, a nonvirulent SIV strain. Thus, the potential for pathogenicity with this vector system is minimal. The transduction ability of HIV/SIVpack/G was demonstrated with immortalized human lymphocytes, human primary macrophages, human bone marrow-derived CD34+ cells, and primary mouse neurons. To our knowledge, these experiments constitute the first demonstration that the HIV-1-derived genome can be packaged by an SIVmac capsid. We demonstrate that the lentivirus vector described here recapitulates the biological properties of HIV-1-derived vectors, although with increased potential for safety in humans. PMID:10074131

  13. Transmission of human immunodeficiency virus in a dental practice.

    PubMed

    Ciesielski, C; Marianos, D; Ou, C Y; Dumbaugh, R; Witte, J; Berkelman, R; Gooch, B; Myers, G; Luo, C C; Schochetman, G

    1992-05-15

    To determine if patients of a dentist with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) became infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) during their dental care and, if so, to identify possible mechanisms of transmission. Retrospective epidemiologic follow-up of the dentist, his office practice, and his former patients. The practice of a dentist with AIDS in Florida. A dentist with AIDS, his health care providers and employees, and former patients of the dentist, including eight HIV-infected patients. Identification of risks for HIV transmission (if present), degree of genetic relatedness of the viruses, and identification of infection control and other office practices. Five of the eight HIV-infected patients had no confirmed exposures to HIV other than the dental practice and were infected with HIV strains that were closely related to those of the dentist. Each of the five had invasive dental procedures, done by the dentist after he was diagnosed with AIDS. Four of these five patients shared visit days (P greater than 0.2). Breaches in infection control and other dental office practices to explain these transmissions could not be identified. Although the specific incident that resulted in HIV transmission to these patients remains uncertain, the epidemiologic evidence supports direct dentist-to-patient transmission rather than a patient-to-patient route.

  14. Cardiac Surgery in Patients Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Abad, Cipriano; Cárdenes, Miguel Angel; Jiménez, Pedro Conrado; Armas, Mario-Vicente; Betancor, Pedro

    2000-01-01

    From January 1991 through December 1999, 5 consecutive patients who were infected with human immunodeficiency virus presented in need of cardiac surgery. All were men; the median age was 44 years. Two of them presented with mitral and aortic infectious valve endocarditis, 1 with tricuspid endocarditis, 1 with prosthetic valve endocarditis, and 1 with pericarditis and pericardial tamponade. Under cardiopulmonary bypass, the 4 patients with endocarditis underwent these procedures: mitral and aortic valve replacement (2), tricuspid valve replacement (1), and aortic valve replacement (reoperation) and concomitant repair of a mycotic ascending aortic aneurysm (1). In the patient who had pericardial effusion, subxifoid pericardiostomy and drainage were performed, and a pericardial window was created. There was no intraoperative mortality. The patient with pericardial effusion died 8 days after surgery; he was in septic shock and had multiple organ failure. Two deaths occurred at 2 and 63 months, due to hemoptysis and sudden death, respectively. The 2 patients who underwent double valve replacement are alive and in good condition after a median follow-up of 71 months. Cardiac surgery is indicated in selected patients infected by the human immunodeficiency virus. These patients are frequently drug abusers or homosexual. Valvular endocarditis is the most common finding. Hospital morbidity and mortality rates are higher than usual in this group of patients. PMID:11198308

  15. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 by triciribine involves the accessory protein nef.

    PubMed

    Ptak, Roger G; Gentry, Brian G; Hartman, Tracy L; Watson, Karen M; Osterling, M Clayton; Buckheit, Robert W; Townsend, Leroy B; Drach, John C

    2010-04-01

    Triciribine (TCN) is a tricyclic nucleoside that inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication by a unique mechanism not involving the inhibition of enzymes directly involved in viral replication. This activity requires the phosphorylation of TCN to its 5' monophosphate by intracellular adenosine kinase. New testing with a panel of HIV and simian immunodeficiency virus isolates, including low-passage-number clinical isolates and selected subgroups of HIV-1, multidrug resistant HIV-1, and HIV-2, has demonstrated that TCN has broad antiretroviral activity. It was active in cell lines chronically infected with HIV-1 in which the provirus was integrated into chromosomal DNA, thereby indicating that TCN inhibits a late process in virus replication. The selection of TCN-resistant HIV-1 isolates resulted in up to a 750-fold increase in the level of resistance to the drug. DNA sequence analysis of highly resistant isolate HIV-1(H10) found five point mutations in the HIV-1 gene nef, resulting in five different amino acid changes. DNA sequencing of the other TCN-resistant isolates identified at least one and up to three of the same mutations observed in isolate HIV-1(H10). Transfer of the mutations from TCN-resistant isolate HIV-1(H10) to wild-type virus and subsequent viral growth experiments with increasing concentrations of TCN demonstrated resistance to the drug. We conclude that TCN is a late-phase inhibitor of HIV-1 replication and that mutations in nef are necessary and sufficient for TCN resistance.

  16. Pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Breen, Elizabeth Crabb

    2002-09-01

    In persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and/or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), the immune system becomes dysfunctional in many ways. There is both immunodeficiency due to the loss of CD4-positive T helper cells and hyperactivity as a result of B-cell activation. Likewise, both decreases and increases are seen in the production and/or activity of cytokines. Cytokine changes in HIV infection have been assessed by a variety of techniques, ranging from determination of cytokine gene expression at the mRNA level to secretion of cytokine proteins in vivo and in vitro. Changes in cytokine levels in HIV-infected persons can affect the function of the immune system, and have the potential to directly impact the course of HIV disease by enhancing or suppressing HIV replication. In particular, the balance between the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, which up-regulate HIV expression, and IL-10, which can act both as an anti-inflammatory cytokine and a B-cell stimulatory factor, may play an important role in the progression to AIDS. In light of its ability to suppress the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and, under some conditions, suppress HIV replication, increased IL-10 may be viewed as beneficial in slowing HIV disease progression. However, an association between increased IL-10 and the development of AIDS-associated B-cell lymphoma highlights the bifunctional nature of IL-10 as both an anti-inflammatory and B-cell-stimulatory cytokine that could have beneficial and detrimental effects on the course of HIV infection and AIDS.

  17. Molecularly cloned feline immunodeficiency virus NCSU1 JSY3 induces immunodeficiency in specific-pathogen-free cats.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, J S; English, R V; Ritchey, J W; Davidson, M G; Wasmoen, T; Levy, J K; Gebhard, D H; Tompkins, M B; Tompkins, W A

    1996-01-01

    A full-length feline immunodeficiency virus NCSU1 (FIV-NCSU1) genome (JSY3) was cloned directly from FIV-NCSU1-infected feline CD4+ lymphocyte (FCD4E) genomic DNA and identified by PCR amplification with 5' long terminal repeat, gag, env, and 3' long terminal repeat primer sets. Supernatant from FCD4E cells cocultured with JSY3-transfected Crandell feline kidney (CrFK) cells was used as an inoculum. Cell-free JSY3 virus was cytopathogenic for FCD4E lymphocytes but did not infect CrFK cells in vitro. To determine in vivo infectivity and pathogenesis, six young adult specific-pathogen-free cats were inoculated with cell-free JSY3 virus. Provirus was detected at 2 weeks postinfection (p.i.) and was still detectable at 25 weeks p.i. as determined by gag region PCR-Southern blot analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cell lysates. Infectious virus was recovered from peripheral blood mononuclear cells at 6 and 25 weeks p.i., and an antibody response to FIV was detected by 4 weeks. In the acute phase of infection, JSY3 provirus was found only in the CD4+ lymphocyte subset; however, by 14 weeks p.i., the greatest provirus burden was detected in B lymphocytes. All six cats were panlymphopenic at 2 weeks p.i., CD4+/CD8+ ratios were inverted by 6 weeks p.i., and five of the six cats developed lymphadenopathy by 10 weeks p.i. To determine if the JSY3 molecular clone caused immunodeficiency similar to that of the parental wild-type FIV-NCSU1, the cats were challenged with the low-virulence ME49 strain of Toxoplasma gondii at 29 weeks p.i. Five of six cats developed clinical signs consistent with generalized toxoplasmosis, and three of six cats developed acute respiratory distress and required euthanasia. Histopathologic examination of the severely affected cats revealed generalized inflammatory reactions and the presence of T. gondii tachyzoites in multiple tissues. None of the six age- and sex-matched specific-pathogen-free cats inoculated with only T. gondii developed

  18. Nuclear entry of DNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Fay, Nikta; Panté, Nelly

    2015-01-01

    DNA viruses undertake their replication within the cell nucleus, and therefore they must first deliver their genome into the nucleus of their host cells. Thus, trafficking across the nuclear envelope is at the basis of DNA virus infections. Nuclear transport of molecules with diameters up to 39 nm is a tightly regulated process that occurs through the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Due to the enormous diversity of virus size and structure, each virus has developed its own strategy for entering the nucleus of their host cells, with no two strategies alike. For example, baculoviruses target their DNA-containing capsid to the NPC and subsequently enter the nucleus intact, while the hepatitis B virus capsid crosses the NPC but disassembles at the nuclear side of the NPC. For other viruses such as herpes simplex virus and adenovirus, although both dock at the NPC, they have each developed a distinct mechanism for the subsequent delivery of their genome into the nucleus. Remarkably, other DNA viruses, such as parvoviruses and human papillomaviruses, access the nucleus through an NPC-independent mechanism. This review discusses our current understanding of the mechanisms used by DNA viruses to deliver their genome into the nucleus, and further presents the experimental evidence for such mechanisms. PMID:26029198

  19. Prevention and treatment of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Daniel R.; Salomon, Joshua A.

    2005-01-01

    Strategies for confronting the epidemic of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) have included a range of different approaches that focus on prevention and treatment. However, debate persists over what levels of emphasis are appropriate for the different components of the global response. This paper presents an overview of this debate and briefly summarizes the evidence on a range of interventions designed to prevent the spread of HIV infection, paying particular attention to voluntary counselling and testing, treatment for sexually transmitted infections and prevention of mother-to-child transmission. We also review the experience with antiretroviral therapy to date in terms of response rates and survival rates, adherence, drug resistance, behavioural change and epidemiological impact. Although various studies have identified strategies with proven effectiveness in reducing the risks of HIV infection and AIDS mortality, considerable uncertainties remain. Successful integration of treatment and prevention of HIV/AIDS will require a balanced approach and rigorous monitoring of the impact of programmes in terms of both individual and population outcomes. PMID:15744406

  20. Gene-based immunotherapy for human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dropulic, Boro; June, Carl H

    2006-06-01

    More than 40 million people are infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and a successful vaccine is at least a decade away. Although highly active antiretroviral therapy prolongs life, the maintenance of viral latency requires life-long treatment and results in cumulative toxicities and viral escape mutants. Gene therapy offers the promise to cure or prevent progressive HIV infection by interfering with HIV replication and CD4+ cell decline long term in the absence of chronic chemotherapy, and approximately 2 million HIV-infected individuals live in settings where there is sufficient infrastructure to support its application with current technology. Although the development of HIV/AIDS gene therapy has been slow, progress in a number of areas is evident, so that studies to date have significantly advanced the field of gene-based immunotherapy. Advances have helped to define a series of ongoing and planned trials that may shed light on potential mechanisms for the successful clinical gene therapy of HIV.

  1. Molecular detection of bovine immunodeficiency virus in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) from the Amazon region, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Albernaz, Tatiane Teles; Leite, Rômulo Cerqueira; Reis, Jenner Karlison Pimenta; de Sousa Rodrigues, Ana Paula; da Cunha Kassar, Telissa; Resende, Claudia Fideles; de Oliveira, Cairo Henrique Sousa; Silva, Rafaela das Mercês; Salvarani, Felipe Masiero; Barbosa, José Diomedes

    2015-12-01

    Bovine immunodeficiency is a chronic progressive disease caused by a lentivirus that affects cattle and buffaloes. Although the infection has been described in cattle in some countries, including in Brazil, there are only two reports of infection in buffaloes: one in Pakistan and one in Cambodia. The aim of the present study was to survey the occurrence of bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) in water buffaloes from the Amazon region, Pará state, Brazil. BIV proviral DNA was surveyed in 607 whole blood samples of water buffaloes from 10 farms located in the state of Pará using semi-nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (PCR-SN) to amplify the pol region of the viral genome. Of the 607 samples tested, 27 (4.4 %) were positive for BIV proviral DNA. The amplified fragments were confirmed by sequence analysis after cloning and nucleotide sequencing. The sequence obtained had 99 % similarity to the reference strain (R-29). The present study provides important epidemiological data because BIV was detected for the first time in water buffaloes in Brazil. Further, the results suggest the possibility of the virus being a risk factor for herd health because it may be a potential causal agent of chronic disease and, also may be associated to other infectious diseases.

  2. Kinetics of human immunodeficiency virus budding and assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Nguyen, Toan

    2009-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) belongs to a large family of RNA viruses, retroviruses. Unlike budding of regular enveloped viruses, retroviruses bud concurrently with the assembly of retroviral capsids on the cell membrane. The kinetics of HIV (and other retroviruses) budding and assembly is therefore strongly affected by the elastic energy of the membrane and fundamentally different from regular viruses. The main result of this work shows that the kinetics is tunable from a fast budding process to a slow and effectively trapped partial budding process, by varying the attractive energy of retroviral proteins (call Gags), relative to the membrane elastic energy. When the Gag-Gag attraction is relatively high, the membrane elastic energy provides a kinetic barrier for the two pieces of the partial capsids to merge. This energy barrier determines the slowest step in the kinetics and the budding time. In the opposite limit, the membrane elastic energy provides not only a kinetic energy barrier, but a free energy barrier. The budding and assembly is effectively trapped at local free energy minimum, corresponding to a partially budded state. The time scale to escape from this metastable state is exponentially large. In both cases, our result fit with experimental measurements pretty well.

  3. Antiretroviral Therapy in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Sooty Mangabeys: Implications for AIDS Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Calascibetta, Francesca; Micci, Luca; Carnathan, Diane; Lawson, Benton; Vanderford, Thomas H.; Bosinger, Steven E.; Easley, Kirk; Chahroudi, Ann; Mackel, Joseph; Keele, Brandon F.; Long, Samuel; Lifson, Jeffrey; Paiardini, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected sooty mangabeys (SMs) do not develop AIDS despite high levels of viremia. Key factors involved in the benign course of SIV infection in SMs are the absence of chronic immune activation and low levels of infection of CD4+ central memory (TCM) and stem cell memory (TSCM) T cells. To better understand the role of virus replication in determining the main features of SIV infection in SMs, we treated 12 SMs with a potent antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimen for 2 to 12 months. We observed that ART suppressed viremia to <60 copies/ml of plasma in 10 of 12 animals and induced a variable decrease in the level of cell-associated SIV DNA in peripheral blood (average changes of 0.9-, 1.1-, 1.5-, and 3.7-fold for CD4+ transitional memory [TTM], TCM, effector memory [TEM], and TSCM cells, respectively). ART-treated SIV-infected SMs showed (i) increased percentages of circulating CD4+ TCM cells, (ii) increased levels of CD4+ T cells in the rectal mucosa, and (iii) significant declines in the frequencies of HLA-DR+ CD8+ T cells in the blood and rectal mucosa. In addition, we observed that ART interruption resulted in rapid viral rebound in all SIV-infected SMs, indicating that the virus reservoir persists for at least a year under ART despite lower infection levels of CD4+ TCM and TSCM cells than those seen in pathogenic SIV infections of macaques. Overall, these data indicate that ART induces specific immunological changes in SIV-infected SMs, thus suggesting that virus replication affects immune function even in the context of this clinically benign infection. IMPORTANCE Studies of natural, nonpathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection of African monkeys have provided important insights into the mechanisms responsible for the progression to AIDS during pathogenic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection of humans and SIV infection of Asian macaques. In this study, for the first time, we treated SIV

  4. Characterization of human immunodeficiency viruses resistant to oxathiolane-cytosine nucleosides.

    PubMed

    Schinazi, R F; Lloyd, R M; Nguyen, M H; Cannon, D L; McMillan, A; Ilksoy, N; Chu, C K; Liotta, D C; Bazmi, H Z; Mellors, J W

    1993-04-01

    The (-) enantiomers of 2',3'-dideoxy-5-fluoro-3'-thiacytidine [(-)-FTC] and 2',3'-dideoxy-3'-thiacytidine [(-)-BCH-189] were recently shown to inhibit selectively human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and hepatitis B virus in vitro. In the current study, the potential for HIV type 1 (HIV-1) resistance to these compounds was evaluated by serial passage of the virus in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and MT-2 cells in the presence of increasing drug concentrations. Highly drug-resistant HIV-1 variants dominated the replicating virus population after two or more cycles of infection. The resistant variants were cross-resistant to (-)-FTC, (-)-BCH-189, and their (+) congeners but remained susceptible to 2',3'-dideoxycytidine, 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine, 3'-fluoro-3'-deoxythymidine, 2',3'-dideoxyinosine, phosphonoformate, the TIBO compound R82150, and the bis(heteroaryl)piperazine derivative U-87201E. Reverse transcriptase derived from drug-resistant viral particles was 15- to 50-fold less susceptible to the 5'-triphosphates of FTC and BCH-189 compared with enzyme from parental drug-susceptible virus. DNA sequence analysis of the reverse transcriptase gene amplified from resistant viruses consistently identified mutations at codon 184 from Met (ATG) to Val (GTG or GTA) or Ile (ATA). Sequence analysis of amplified reverse transcriptase from a patient who had received (-)-BCH-189 therapy for 4 months demonstrated a mixture of the Met-184-to-Val (GTG) mutation and the parental genotype, indicating that the Met-184 mutation can occur in vivo.

  5. Non-M Variants of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Mourez, Thomas; Simon, François

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The AIDS pandemic that started in the early 1980s is due to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) group M (HIV-M), but apart from this major group, many divergent variants have been described (HIV-1 groups N, O, and P and HIV-2). The four HIV-1 groups arose from independent cross-species transmission of the simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) SIVcpz, infecting chimpanzees, and SIVgor, infecting gorillas. This, together with human adaptation, accounts for their genomic, phylogenetic, and virological specificities. Nevertheless, the natural course of non-M HIV infection seems similar to that of HIV-M. The virological monitoring of infected patients is now possible with commercial kits, but their therapeutic management remains complex. All non-M variants were principally described for patients linked to Cameroon, where HIV-O accounts for 1% of all HIV infections; only 15 cases of HIV-N infection and 2 HIV-P infections have been reported. Despite improvements in our knowledge, many fascinating questions remain concerning the origin, genetic evolution, and slow spread of these variants. Other variants may already exist or may arise in the future, calling for close surveillance. This review provides a comprehensive, up-to-date summary of the current knowledge on these pathogens, including the historical background of their discovery; the latest advances in the comprehension of their origin and spread; and clinical, therapeutic, and laboratory aspects that may be useful for the management and the treatment of patients infected with these divergent viruses. PMID:23824367

  6. The life-cycle of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Goto, T; Nakai, M; Ikuta, K

    1998-01-01

    The life-cycle of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been studied using several techniques including immunoelectron microscopy and cryomicroscopy. The HIV-1 particle consists of an envelope, a core and the region between the core and the envelope (matrix). Virus particles in the extracellular space are observed as having various profiles: a central or an eccentric round electron-dense core, a bar-shaped electron-dense core, and immature doughnut-shaped particle. HIV-1 particles in the hydrated state were observed by high-resolution electron cryomicroscopy to be spherical and the lipid membrane was clearly resolved as a bilayer. Projections around the circumference were seen to be knob-like. The shapes and sizes of the projections, especially the head parts, were found to vary with each projection. HIV-1 cores were isolated with a mixture of Nonidet P40 and glutaraldehyde, and were confirmed to consist of HIV-1 Gag p24 protein by immunogold labelling. On infection, the HIV-1 virus was found to enter the cell in two ways: membrane fusion and endocytosis. After viral entry, no structures resembling virus particles could be seen in the cytoplasm. In the infected cells, positive reactions by immunolabelling suggest that HIV-1 Gag is produced in membrane-bound structures and transported to the cell surface by the cytoskeletons. A crescent electron-dense layer is then formed underneath the cell membrane. Finally, the virus particle is released from the cell surface and found extracellularly to be a complete virus particle with an electron-dense core. However, several cell clones producing defective mature, doughnut-shaped (immature) or teardrop-shaped particles were found to be produced in the extracellular space. In the doughnut-shaped particles, Gag p17 and p24 proteins exist facing each other against an inner electron-dense ring, suggesting that the inner ring consists of a precursor Gag protein showing a defect at the viral proteinase.

  7. Molecular characterization of gag proteins from simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVMne).

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, L E; Benveniste, R E; Sowder, R; Copeland, T D; Schultz, A M; Oroszlan, S

    1988-01-01

    A simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) designated SIVMne was isolated from a pig-tailed macaque with lymphoma housed at the University of Washington Regional Primate Research Center, Seattle. To better establish the relationship of SIVMne to other immunodeficiency viruses, we purified and determined the partial amino acid sequences of six structural proteins (p1, p2, p6, p8, p16, and p28) from SIVMne and compared these amino acid sequences to the translated nucleotide sequences of SIVMac and human immunodeficiency virus types 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2). A total of 125 residues of SIVMne amino acid sequence were compared to the predicted amino acid sequences of the gag precursors of SIV and HIVs. In the compared regions 92% of the SIVMne amino acids were identical to predicted residues of SIVMac, 83% were identical to predicted residues of HIV-2, and 41% were identical to predicted residues of HIV-1. These data reveal that the six SIVMne proteins are proteolytic cleavage products of the gag precursor (Pr60gag) and that their order in the structure of Pr60gag is p16-p28-p2-p8-p1-p6. Rabbit antisera prepared against purified p28 and p16 were shown to cross-react with proteins of 60, 54, and 47 kilodaltons present in the viral preparation and believed to be SIVMne Pr60gag and intermediate cleavage products, respectively. SIVMne p16 was shown to contain covalently bound myristic acid, and p8 was identified as a nucleic acid-binding protein. The high degree of amino acid sequence homology between SIVs and HIV-2 around proven proteolytic cleavage sites in SIV Pr60gag suggests that proteolytic processing of the HIV-2 gag precursor is probably very similar to processing of the SIV gag precursor. Peptide bonds cleaved during proteolytic processing of the SIV gag precursor were similar to bonds cleaved during processing of HIV-1 gag precursors, suggesting that the SIV and HIV viral proteases have similar cleavage site specificities. Images PMID:3292789

  8. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii and concurrent Bartonella spp., feline immunodeficiency virus, feline leukemia virus, and Dirofilaria immitis infections in Egyptian cats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Toxoplasma gondii and Bartonella spp. are zoonotic pathogens of cats. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV), and Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLv) are related to Human Immunodeficiency Virus, and Human Leukemia Virus, respectively, and these viruses are immunosuppressive. In the present study, the prevalen...

  9. Development of Methods for Coordinate Measurement of Total Cell-Associated and Integrated Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) DNA Forms in Routine Clinical Samples: Levels Are Not Associated with Clinical Parameters, but Low Levels of Integrated HIV-1 DNA May Be Prognostic for Continued Successful Therapy▿

    PubMed Central

    Carr, J. M.; Cheney, K. M.; Coolen, C.; Davis, A.; Shaw, D.; Ferguson, W.; Chang, G.; Higgins, G.; Burrell, C.; Li, P.

    2007-01-01

    We have adapted our established Alu PCR assay for proviral DNA and PCR for total cellular DNA to a real-time PCR format and applied these to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive specimens collected for routine determination of the plasma viral load (pVL). In a cohort of five patients, measurements of integrated viral load (iVL) and cell-associated viral load (cVL) in CD4+ cells isolated by a single positive selection step were not indicative of HIV DNA levels in the circulation, and further analysis was performed on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). In a cohort of 46 samples total cVL was quantitated in most samples, but iVL could be quantitated in only 47.8%, since in 26% iVL was undetectable and in 21.7% the results were invalid due to high levels of unintegrated HIV DNA. There was no correlation of cVL or iVL with pVL, CD4 count, or duration of successful antiretroviral treatment. Out of 26 patients with undetectable pVL, 4 patients failed therapy within the subsequent 12 months and had higher than average iVL, but this was not the case for cVL. Among nine patients with long-term undetectable pVL, no consistent decline in cVL or iVL was seen with time, and changes in cVL and iVL within a patient could be concordant or discordant. These results show that cVL and iVL can be coordinately measured in PBMC from clinical samples but do not correlate with pVL, CD4 counts, or length of suppressive antiretroviral therapy. Interestingly, a high iVL (but not a high cVL) in patients with undetectable pVL was associated with subsequent treatment failure. PMID:17314225

  10. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura might be an early hematologic manifestation of undiagnosed human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Hsien-Feng; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liao, Kuan-Fu

    2017-03-01

    Little research focuses on the association between immune thrombocytopenic purpura and human immunodeficiency virus infection in Taiwan. This study investigated whether immune thrombocytopenic purpura might be an early hematologic manifestation of undiagnosed human immunodeficiency virus infection in Taiwan. We conducted a retrospective population-based cohort study using data of individuals enrolled in Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. There were 5472 subjects aged 1-84 years with a new diagnosis of immune thrombocytopenic purpura as the purpura group since 1998-2010 and 21,887 sex-matched and age-matched, randomly selected subjects without immune thrombocytopenic purpura as the non-purpura group. The incidence of human immunodeficiency virus infection at the end of 2011 was measured in both groups. We used the multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model to measure the hazard ratio and 95 % confidence interval (CI) for the association between immune thrombocytopenic purpura and human immunodeficiency virus infection. The overall incidence of human immunodeficiency virus infection was 6.47-fold higher in the purpura group than that in the non-purpura group (3.78 vs. 0.58 per 10,000 person-years, 95 % CI 5.83-7.18). After controlling for potential confounding factors, the adjusted HR of human immunodeficiency virus infection was 6.3 (95 % CI 2.58-15.4) for the purpura group, as compared with the non-purpura group. We conclude that individuals with immune thrombocytopenic purpura are 6.47-fold more likely to have human immunodeficiency virus infection than those without immune thrombocytopenic purpura. We suggest not all patients, but only those who have risk factors for human immunodeficiency virus infection should receive testing for undiagnosed human immunodeficiency virus infection when they develop immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

  11. Conserved serines in simian immunodeficiency virus capsid are required for virus budding.

    PubMed

    Rue, Sarah M; Roos, Jason W; Clements, Janice E; Barber, Sheila A

    2005-05-25

    The simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) capsid protein (CA), a constituent of the Pr55Gag polyprotein, is phosphorylated in virions but not in virus-producing cells (Rue, S.M., Roos, J.W., Tarwater, P.M., Clements, J.E., Barber, S.A., 2005. Phosphorylation and proteolytic cleavage of gag proteins in budded simian immunodeficiency virus. J. Virol. 79 (4), 2484-2492.). Using phosphoamino acid analysis of CA, we show that serine is the primary phosphate acceptor. A series of substitution mutants of serines in the CA domain of Pr55Gag were constructed in the infectious viral clone SIVmac239. These virus mutants were examined for defects in virus replication and virion infectivity, release, and morphology, as well as alterations in phosphorylation of CA-containing proteins. Although the virus mutants exhibited a number of replication defects, none of these defects could be directly attributed to aberrant CA phosphorylation. A novel defect was a block in early budding, which was common among several virus mutants with substitutions in the CA N terminus. Together, these results indicate that certain residues in the CA N terminus are crucial for early budding events.

  12. Oral Manifestations of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pakfetrat, Atessa; Falaki, Farnaz; Delavarian, Zahra; Dalirsani, Zohreh; Sanatkhani, Majid; Zabihi Marani, Mahsa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Oral lesions are among the earliest clinical manifestations of human immunodeficiency (HIV) infection and are important in early diagnosis and for monitoring the progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of oral lesions and their relationship with a number of factors in HIV/AIDS patients attending an HIV center. Materials and Methods: A total of 110 HIV-positive patients were examined to investigate the prevalence of oral lesions according to the criteria established by the European Community Clearing House on Oral Problems Related to HIV Infection. An independent T-test was used for correlation of oral lesions with CD4+ count and a χ2 test was used for analysis of the relationship of co-infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV), sexual contact, route of transmission, history of drug abuse, and history of incarceration. Results: Most of the cases were male patients (82.7%). The mean age across all participants was 36.2±8.1 years. Rampant carries, severe periodontitis and oral candidiasis were the most notable oral lesions. Oral lesions were more prevalent in patients between 26–35 years of age. There was a significant difference between patients with and without pseudomembranous candidiasis and angular cheilitis according to mean level of CD4+. Conclusion: The most common oral presentations were severe periodontitis, pseudomembranous candidiasis and xerostomia. PMID:25745611

  13. Human bites and the risk of human immunodeficiency virus transmission.

    PubMed

    Pretty, I A; Anderson, G S; Sweet, D J

    1999-09-01

    The risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission following a bite injury is important to many groups of people. The first are those who are likely to be bitten as an occupational risk, such as police officers and institutional staff. Another group are represented by the victims and perpetrators of crimes involving biting, both in attack and defense situations. The possibility of these bites transmitting a potentially fatal disease is of interest to the physicians who treat such patients and the legal system which may have to deal with the repercussions of such a transmission. Bite injuries represent 1% of all emergency department admissions in the United States, and human bites are the third most common following those of dogs and cats. The worldwide epidemic of HIV and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) continues, with >5 million new cases last year and affecting 1 in 100 sexually active adults. A review of the literature concerning human bites, HIV and AIDS, HIV in saliva, and case examples was performed to examine the current opinion regarding the transmission of HIV via this route. A bite from an HIV-seropositive individual that breaks the skin or is associated with a previous injury carries a risk of infection for the bitten individual.

  14. Oral lesions in infection with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Coogan, Maeve M.; Greenspan, John; Challacombe, Stephen J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the importance of oral lesions as indicators of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and as predictors of progression of HIV disease to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Oral manifestations are among the earliest and most important indicators of infection with HIV. Seven cardinal lesions, oral candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia, Kaposi sarcoma, linear gingival erythema, necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, which are strongly associated with HIV infection, have been identified and internationally calibrated, and are seen in both developed and developing countries. They may provide a strong indication of HIV infection and be present in the majority of HIV-infected people. Antiretroviral therapy may affect the prevalence of HIV-related lesions. The presence of oral lesions can have a significant impact on health-related quality of life. Oral health is strongly associated with physical and mental health and there are significant increases in oral health needs in people with HIV infection, especially in children, and in adults particularly in relation to periodontal diseases. International collaboration is needed to ensure that oral aspects of HIV disease are taken into account in medical programmes and to integrate oral health care with the general care of the patient. It is important that all health care workers receive education and training on the relevance of oral health needs and the use of oral lesions as surrogate markers in HIV infection. PMID:16211162

  15. Very low prevalence of bovine immunodeficiency virus infection in western Canadian cattle.

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, G C; Johnston, J B; Nickel, D D; Jacobs, R M; Olson, M; Power, C

    2001-01-01

    Bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) is a lentivirus that causes disease in cattle. Despite the large cattle industry in western Canada, the presence of BIV has not been examined to date. Genomic DNA, derived from semen and buffy coat samples, was analyzed by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using specific primers for the gag, pol, and env genes of BIV. Despite utilizing a procedure that detected a minimum of 10 proviral copies, BIV sequences were not amplified in any of 317 buffy coat and 50 semen samples that were obtained from an archive that included 27 cattle breeds, collected from different sources in Alberta (1980-1999). In the 367 DNA samples examined, there was no evidence of BIV infection, suggesting that the prevalence of BIV infection was very low. Images Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:11227201

  16. Absence of infection with human immunodeficiency virus in Peruvian prostitutes.

    PubMed

    Golenbock, D T; Guerra, J; Pfister, J; Golubjatnikov, R; Tejada, A; Abugattas, J; Kemper, R; Maki, D G

    1988-12-01

    We serologically tested 140 female prostitutes (mean age, 30 years) from the port city of Callao, Peru, for evidence of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Chlamydia trachomatis, Treponema pallidum, herpes simplex viruses (HSV) I and II, and hepatitis B virus. The women had worked as prostitutes for an average of 5 years; one-fourth serviced foreign visitors exclusively, mainly sailors. Only 4 women used condoms, and only 1 woman gave a history of parenteral narcotic abuse, although 53% were regularly exposed to unsterile needles outside the medical setting for injections of vitamins, antibiotics, or steroids; another 29% are thought to probably use unsterile needles. None of the 140 prostitutes screened was seropositive for HIV, despite a very high prevalence of antibody to T. pallidum (24%), C. trachomatis (97%), HSV I and II (100%), and hepatitis B (51%); 5% were HbsAg positive. These data indicate that HIV has not yet been introduced into female prostitutes in the Peruvian port city. We believe that widespread use of unsterile needles in developing countries, such as Peru, represents a serious health threat and will amplify the spread of HIV, once introduced.

  17. Methods for assessing feline immunodeficiency virus infection, infectivity and purification.

    PubMed

    Ammersbach, Melanie; Bienzle, Dorothee

    2011-10-15

    Infection of cats with the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) recapitulates many aspects of infection of humans with HIV, including highly activated but ineffectual immune responses. Infected hosts remain seropositive for life, and detection of antibodies is the mainstay of diagnosis. However, to quantify virus for research or prognosis, viral proteins, nucleic acids or enzymes, are typically measured by ELISA, PCR or activity, respectively. While such assays are in wide use, they do not distinguish whole, infectious viral particles from defective or disrupted viruses. Titers of infectious viral particles may be estimated from tissue culture infectious doses or by enumerating cell-associated viral proteins, viral transcriptional activity or formation of syncytia. To analyze the viral proteome and the incorporation of host components into viral envelopes, pure lentiviral preparations are required. Methods for purifying lentiviruses include ultracentrifugation to separate particles by size, mass and/or density; chromatography to separate particles by charge, affinity or size; and additional removal of extraviral proteins and exosomes through subtilisin digestion or immunoaffinity. This article reviews advantages and disadvantages of different approaches to purification of lentiviruses with special reference to suitability for FIV, and highlights effects of purification on immune responses and immune assays.

  18. Analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Gag ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Gottwein, Eva; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg

    2005-07-01

    Ubiquitin is important for the release of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and several other retroviruses, but the functional significance of Gag ubiquitination is unknown. To address this problem, we decided to analyze Gag ubiquitination in detail. A low percentage of the HIV-1 p6 protein has previously been shown to be ubiquitinated, and published mutagenesis data suggested that Gag ubiquitination is largely lost upon mutation of the two lysine residues in p6. In this study, we show that Gag proteins lacking the p6 domain or the two lysine residues within p6 are ubiquitinated at levels comparable to those of the wild-type Gag protein. We detected monoubiquitinated forms of the matrix (MA), capsid (CA), and nucleocapsid (NC) proteins in mature virus preparations. Protease digestion of Gag polyproteins extracted from immature virions indicated that ubiquitinated MA, CA, and possibly NC are as abundant as ubiquitinated p6. The HIV-1 late-domain motifs PTAP and LRSLF were not required for Gag ubiquitination, and mutation of the PTAP motif even resulted in an increase in the amount of Gag-Ub conjugates detected. Finally, at steady state, ubiquitinated Gag proteins were not enriched in either membrane-associated or virus-derived Gag fractions. In summary, these results indicate that HIV-1 Gag can be monoubiquitinated in all domains and that ubiquitination of lysine residues outside p6 may thus contribute to viral release and/or infectivity.

  19. Resistance of previously infected chimpanzees to successive challenges with a heterologous intraclade B strain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, R; Siemon, C; Cho, M W; Arthur, L O; Nigida, S M; Matthews, T; Sawyer, L A; Schultz, A; Murthy, K K; Israel, Z; Javadian, A; Frost, P; Kennedy, R C; Lane, H C; Martin, M A

    1996-01-01

    To test whether the protective effects of attenuated simian immunodeficiency virus vaccines in macaques were applicable to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-chimpanzee system, two groups of animals, previously infected with HIV-1(IIIB) or HIV-1(SF2) were each challenged with a heterologous clade B virus, HIV-1(DH12). Following challenge, the parameters measured included virus isolation (from plasma, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and lymph node tissue); quantitative DNA PCR using primers capable of distinguishing HIV-1(IIIB), HIV-1(SF2), and HIV-1(DH12) from one another; and serologic assays to monitor changes in binding and neutralizing antibodies. In contrast to an HIV-1-naive chimpanzee that rapidly became infected following the inoculation of HIV-1(DH12), the two chimpanzees previously infected with HIV-1(IIIB) resisted repeated and escalating inoculations of HIV-1(DH12), as monitored by virus isolation and PCR. The two animals previously infected with HIV-1(SF2) became infected with HIV-1(DH12) but in contrast to the case with the HIV-1-naive chimpanzee, no cell-free viral RNA was detected in the plasma by the branched DNA procedure and levels of peripheral blood mononuclear cell-associated viral DNA were reduced 35- to 50-fold. PMID:8676459

  20. The Effects of a Kansas Education Class on Students' Knowledge and Attitudes of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sager, R. Warren, Jr.

    This study was undertaken to investigate the knowledge and attitudes of 8th, 9th, and 10th grade Kansas students pertaining to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Attitudes and knowledge of 9th and 10th grade students who had participated in a Sex Respect Class offered in the 9th grade were compared…

  1. Human immunodeficiency virus antibody test and seroprevalence in psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Naber, D; Pajonk, F G; Perro, C; Löhmer, B

    1994-05-01

    Psychiatric inpatients are at risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Investigations in the United States revealed seroprevalence rates of 5.5-8.9%. Therefore, inclusion of HIV antibody testing in routine laboratory screening is sometimes suggested. To investigate this issue for inpatients in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Munich, the incidence, reason for HIV testing and results were analyzed. Of 12,603 patients, hospitalized from 1985 to 1993, 4.9% (623 patients, 265 in risk groups) underwent the HIV test after informed consent. Thirty patients (4.8% of those tested) were found to be positive, but only in 5 cases (all of risk groups) was infection newly detected. Data indicate that, in psychiatry, HIV testing is reasonable only in patients in risk groups or if clinical variables suggest HIV infection.

  2. Conjunctival Flora of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patients on Antiretroviral Treatment.

    PubMed

    Giles, Kagmeni; Bilong, Yannick; Dohvoma, Andin Viola; Ebana, Steve Robert; Gonsu, Hortance

    2017-01-01

    To determine the conjunctival flora of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients on antiretroviral treatment (ART). A total of 104 conjunctival swabs from 104 HIV patients on ART underwent microbiological evaluation to describe the flora. There were 71 (68.26%) women and 33 (31.74%) men. The mean age was 42.9 ± 9.77 (range: 22-70) years. Negative cultures were found in 39 (37.50%) cases. Bacterial growth occurred in 65 (62.50%) cases. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus was found in 59 eyes (90.76%), and coagulase-positive in 3 eyes (4.61%). There was a significant correlation between the duration of ART, the degrees of immunosuppression, and bacterial growth. Knowledge of the conjunctival flora in HIV patients may provide a better guideline in the choice of antibiotic for the management of ocular surface infections.

  3. Self Antigen Prognostic for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Bristow, Cynthia L.; Patel, Hirenkumar; Arnold, Roland R.

    2001-01-01

    We have recently found that an extracellular protein, α1 proteinase inhibitor (α1PI; α1 antitrypsin), is required for in vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infectivity outcome. We show here in a study of HIV-seropositive patients that decreased viral load is significantly correlated with decreased circulating α1PI. In the asymptomatic category of HIV disease, 100% of patients manifest deficient levels of active α1PI, a condition known to lead to degenerative lung diseases and a dramatically reduced life span. Further, HIV-associated α1PI deficiency is correlated with circulating anti-α1PI immunoglobulin G. These results suggest that preventing HIV-associated α1PI deficiency may provide a strategic target for preventing HIV-associated pathophysiology. PMID:11527807

  4. Emerging bone problems in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Mondy, Kristin; Tebas, Pablo

    2003-04-01

    Recently, a high incidence of osteopenia and osteoporosis has been observed in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This problem appears to be more frequent in patients receiving potent antiretroviral therapy. Other bone-related complications in HIV-infected individuals, including avascular necrosis of the hip and compression fracture of the lumbar spine, have also been reported. People living with HIV have significant alterations in bone metabolism, regardless of whether they are receiving potent antiretroviral therapy. The underlying mechanisms to account for these observations remain unknown, although studies are underway to examine the relationship between the bone abnormalities and other complications associated with HIV and antiretroviral therapy. HIV-infected patients with osteopenia or osteoporosis should be treated similarly to HIV-seronegative patients with appropriate use of nutritional supplements (calcium and vitamin D) and exercise. Hormone replacement and antiresorptive therapies might be also indicated.

  5. Sexual Assault: A Report on Human Immunodeficiency Virus Postexposure Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, William F.; Ackerman, Gary E.; Zoellner, Cindy L.; Sheffield, Jeanne S.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this report is to describe an urban county hospital human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection prevention protocol offering prophylactic combination antiretroviral medications to female victims of sexual assault. A retrospective chart review was conducted from June, 2007 through June, 2008 of 151 women who were prescribed antiretroviral prophylaxis by protocol. All women receiving HIV prophylaxis initially screened HIV seronegative. Of the 58 women who reported taking any HIV prophylaxis, 36 (62%) were HIV screened at 12 and/or 24 weeks and none had HIV seroconverted. Although the initiation of an HIV post exposure prophylaxis protocol for sexual assault in a county hospital population is feasible, patient follow-up for counseling and HIV serostatus evaluation is an identified barrier PMID:20706678

  6. The Molecular Basis for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Latency.

    PubMed

    Mbonye, Uri; Karn, Jonathan

    2017-09-29

    Although potent combination antiretroviral therapy can effectively block viral replication in the host, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) persists due to the existence of latent but replication-competent proviruses residing primarily in a very small population of resting memory CD4(+) T cells. Viral latency is established when the expression of the autoregulatory viral trans-activating factor Tat is reduced to subthreshold levels. The absence of Tat reduces HIV transcription and protein production to levels that make the host cell invisible to the immune system and refractory to antiretroviral treatment. Key host cell mechanisms that drive HIV into latency are sequestration of transcription initiation factors, establishment of epigenetic barriers inactivating the proviral promoter, and blockage of the assembly of the host elongation factor P-TEFb. This comprehensive understanding of the molecular control of HIV transcription is leading to the development of optimized combinatorial reactivation and immune surveillance strategies designed to purge the latent viral reservoir.

  7. Human immunodeficiency virus antibodies and the vaccine problem.

    PubMed

    Chiodi, F; Weiss, R A

    2014-05-01

    Despite the great advances made in controlling human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection with antiretroviral drug treatment, a safe and efficacious HIV vaccine has yet to be developed. Here, we discuss why clinical trials and vaccine development for HIV have so far been disappointing, with an emphasis on the lack of protective antibodies. We review approaches for developing appropriate HIV immunogens and the stimulation of long-lasting B-cell responses with antibody maturation. We conclude that candidate reagents in the pipeline for HIV vaccine development are unlikely to be particularly effective. Although the major funders of HIV vaccine research and development are placing increasing emphasis on clinical product development, a genuine breakthrough in preventing HIV infection through vaccines is more likely to come from novel immunogen research.

  8. Prevalence of seizures in children infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Samia, Pauline; Petersen, Reneva; Walker, Kathleen G; Eley, Brian; Wilmshurst, Jo M

    2013-03-01

    A retrospective study of 354 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients identified a subgroup of 27 children with seizures (7.6%, 95% confidence interval: 5.1%-10.9%). Of the total group, 13% (n = 46) had identifiable neurologic deficits and 30% (n = 107) had developmental delay. Both observations were significantly more frequent in the subgroup of patients with seizures (P < .001). The median age of patients with seizures was 20 months (range, 8-87 months) and the median baseline CD4 percentage was 13.5% (interquartile range, 8%-23%). Seizures were treated with sodium valproate (n = 11), phenobarbital (n = 3), diazepam (n = 2), lamotrigine (n = 1), and carbamazepine (n = 1). Combination therapy was required for 5 children. Suboptimal valproic acid levels were recorded for 3 patients. When resources are available, antiepileptic drug level monitoring is advised for children who require both antiepileptic and antiretroviral medications to facilitate optimal seizure management.

  9. [Physician-patient relationship in human immunodeficiency virus infection].

    PubMed

    Bryn, A; Merckx, M A

    1995-03-15

    Since the middle of this century--with, among other, the discoveries of penicillin and of streptomycin--doctors have tended to consider themselves as powerfully armed against transmissible diseases that caused so many premature deaths. The surge of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has bluntly faced us with a situation we have not been prepared for, but that was the daily duty of our predecessors: to care for an epidemic disease, yet without the ability to cure it; to treat infection until it provokes death unavoidably. In the face of this renewed challenge we must reconstruct forgotten relationships that we have not learnt, and that we must adapt to the circumstances of our time and to the peculiar modes of HIV transmission. This daily facet of HIV infection is not the least. It is presented here through the testimonies of a general practitioner and a psychiatrist, with the hope that any doctor will find them thoughtful and helpful.

  10. Human immunodeficiency virus and migrant labor in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Jochelson, K; Mothibeli, M; Leger, J P

    1991-01-01

    The authors investigate the impact of the migrant labor system on heterosexual relationships on South African mines and assess the implications for the future transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The migrant labor system has created a market for prostitution in mining towns and geographic networks of relationships within and between urban and rural communities. A section of the migrant workforce and a group of women dependent on prostitution for economic support appear especially vulnerable to contracting HIV infection since they are involved in multiple sexual encounters with different, changing partners, usually without condom protection. Furthermore, sexually transmitted disease morbidity is extensive in the general and mineworker populations. Historically, migration facilitated the transmission of sexually transmitted diseases and may act similarly for HIV. Problems of combating the HIV epidemic in South Africa are discussed.

  11. Secondary abdominal pregnancy in human immunodeficiency virus-positive woman

    PubMed Central

    Manyanga, Hudson; Lwakatare, Flora

    2016-01-01

    We report on an abdominal pregnancy in human immunodeficiency virus-positive mother, currently on antiretroviral therapy, which was discovered incidentally while training the obstetric ultrasound capacity building program. Although abdominal pregnancy is a rare form of ectopic pregnancy, it may be more common in women with HIV infection because they tend to have a higher rate of sexually transmitted diseases than the general population. The positive diagnosis of abdominal pregnancy is difficult to establish and is usually missed during prenatal assessment particularly in settings that lack routine ultrasound examination as is the case in most developing countries. For the management of abdominal pregnancy, surgical intervention is recommended and removal of the placenta is a key controversy. Ultrasonography is considered the front-line and most effective imaging method and an awareness with a high index of suspicion of abdominal pregnancy is vital for reducing associated high maternal and even higher perinatal mortality. PMID:27896258

  12. In vitro assembly of the feline immunodeficiency virus Gag polyprotein.

    PubMed

    Affranchino, José L; González, Silvia A

    2010-06-01

    The retroviral Gag protein is the only viral product that is necessary for the assembly of virions in mammalian cells. We have established an in vitro assembly system to study the assembly properties of purified feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) Gag protein expressed in bacteria. Under fully defined conditions, the FIV Gag protein assembles into spherical particles of 33 nm in diameter which are morphologically similar to authentic immature particles, albeit smaller than virions. The in vitro assembly of FIV Gag into particles was found to be resistant to the addition of Triton X-100 and required the presence of RNA. Notably, we found that an amino acid substitution in the nucleocapsid domain of Gag that impairs RNA binding and blocks virion production in vivo, also abrogates Gag assembly in vitro. The development of an in vitro assembly system for FIV Gag protein will facilitate the study of the mechanisms by which this protein assembles into immature particles.

  13. Eosinophilia in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Chou, Andrew; Serpa, Jose A

    2015-09-01

    Eosinophilia is not uncommonly encountered in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), particularly at initiation of care or among those with advanced disease. The clinical manifestation most commonly associated with eosinophilia in this patient population is skin rash. Management of these patients is challenging due to a paucity of data evaluating diagnostic testing and therapeutic strategies. Patients born in or with significant travel to parasite-endemic countries are more likely to have tissue-invasive helminthes, such as Strongyloides or Schistosoma. Patients without such risk factors are unlikely to have parasitic infections and frequently will have self-resolution of eosinophilia. When a detailed history, physical exam, and diagnostic work-up are unrevealing, we sometimes consider empirical therapy with ivermectin. Praziquantel may also be considered for those at risk for schistosomiasis.

  14. Eosinophilia in Patients Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Andrew; Serpa, Jose A.

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilia is not uncommonly encountered in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV); particularly at initiation of care or among those with advanced disease. The clinical manifestation most commonly associated with eosinophilia in this patient population is skin rash. Management of these patients is challenging due to a paucity of data evaluating diagnostic testing and therapeutic strategies. Patients born in or with significant travel to parasite-endemic countries are more likely to have tissue-invasive helminthes, such as Strongyloides or Schistosoma. Patients without such risk factors are unlikely to have parasitic infections and frequently will have self-resolution of eosinophilia. When a detailed history, physical exam and diagnostic work-up is unrevealing, we sometimes consider empirical therapy with ivermectin. Praziquantel may also be considered for those at risk for schistosomiasis. PMID:26126686

  15. [Disclosure of human immunodeficiency virus diagnosis in children and adolescents affected by it and their caregivers].

    PubMed

    Malanca, Adriana; Foradori, Irene; Stankievich, Erica; Pandullo, Hugo; Losso, Marcelo

    2017-04-01

    Children and adolescents need to know about their health or that of their parents. However, families affected by human immunodeficiency virus often delay disclosure of diagnosis for fear of stigma or discrimination or simply because they wonder when and how to communicate it. We present the experience of implementing a program to "reveal" the human immunodeficiency virus diagnosis to children, adolescents and caregivers. The aim was to describe and understand the impact of disclosure and to collaborate on actions to improve comprehensive care for families living with human immunodeficiency virus.

  16. Evaluation of recombinant influenza virus-simian immunodeficiency virus vaccines in macaques.

    PubMed

    Sexton, Amy; De Rose, Robert; Reece, Jeanette C; Alcantara, Sheilajen; Loh, Liyen; Moffat, Jessica M; Laurie, Karen; Hurt, Aeron; Doherty, Peter C; Turner, Stephen J; Kent, Stephen J; Stambas, John

    2009-08-01

    There is an urgent need for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccines that induce robust mucosal immunity. Influenza A viruses (both H1N1 and H3N2) were engineered to express simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) CD8 T-cell epitopes and evaluated following administration to the respiratory tracts of 11 pigtail macaques. Influenza virus was readily detected from respiratory tract secretions, although the infections were asymptomatic. Animals seroconverted to influenza virus and generated CD8 and CD4 T-cell responses to influenza virus proteins. SIV-specific CD8 T-cell responses bearing the mucosal homing marker beta7 integrin were induced by vaccination of naïve animals. Further, SIV-specific CD8 T-cell responses could be boosted by recombinant influenza virus-SIV vaccination of animals with already-established SIV infection. Sequential vaccination with influenza virus-SIV recombinants of different subtypes (H1N1 followed by H3N2 or vice versa) produced only a limited boost in immunity, probably reflecting T-cell immunity to conserved internal proteins of influenza A virus. SIV challenge of macaques vaccinated with an influenza virus expressing a single SIV CD8 T cell resulted in a large anamnestic recall CD8 T-cell response, but immune escape rapidly ensued and there was no impact on chronic SIV viremia. Although our results suggest that influenza virus-HIV vaccines hold promise for the induction of mucosal immunity to HIV, broader antigen cover will be needed to limit cytotoxic T-lymphocyte escape.

  17. 78 FR 46969 - Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient-Focused Drug Development and Human Immunodeficiency Virus...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ... Virus (HIV) Patient-Focused Drug Development and HIV Cure Research,'' published in the Federal Register...' perspective on current approaches to managing HIV, symptoms experienced because of HIV or its treatment, and issues related to HIV cure research. FDA is reopening the comment period to allow interested...

  18. Autoimmune hepatitis in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)

    PubMed Central

    Kia, Leila; Beattie, Adam; Green, Richard M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Chronic liver disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with HIV. However, autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) in patients with HIV has rarely been reported. Our aim was to evaluate a cohort of patients with HIV and AIH and identify clinical presentations and outcomes. Patient Concerns: Management of autoimmune hepatitis in context of human immunodeficiency virus, long-term outcomes, and safety in setting of underlying immunocompromised state. Diagnoses: Autoimmune Hepatitis, Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Hepatotoxicity, Liver Injury, Liver Transplantation. Interventions: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of patients with HIV and AIH based on histological, serologic, biochemical demographic, and clinical data. Outcomes: Five patients were identified with autoimmune hepatitis; 4 of 5 were women, and all were African or African-American. The age at the time of AIH diagnosis was 46.6 ± 13.4 years. All patients acquired HIV sexually and all had CD4 counts >250 cells/uL (456–1011 cells/uL) and undetectable HIV viral loads at the time of AIH diagnosis. One patient presented with acute liver failure necessitating liver transplantation and developed AIH posttransplantation. At the time of diagnosis, the AST were 350 ± 448 U/L, ALT 247 ± 190 U/L, bilirubin 7 ± 12 mg/dL, and alkaline phosphatase 126 ± 53 U/L. All patients had histologic evidence of AIH on liver biopsies. Patients were successfully treated with prednisone and azathioprine, without a decrease in CD4 <250 cells/uL, infectious complications or significant side effects. Lessons: AIH occurs in patients with well-controlled HIV. In our patient cohort, immunosuppressive therapy with prednisone and azathioprine was safe and effective in inducing remission, without significant complications or development of opportunistic infections. PMID:28207511

  19. Impact of Mucosal Inflammation on Oral Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui-Ling; Hodara, Vida L.; Chu, Lianrui; Parodi, Laura M.; Smith, Lisa M.; Sexton, Valerie; Cappelli, David; Sodora, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    Mucosal tissues are the primary route of transmission for most respiratory and sexually transmitted diseases, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). There is epidemiological evidence that genital mucosal inflammation leads to enhanced HIV type 1 (HIV-1) transmission. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of periodontal inflammation on oral HIV transmission using a nonhuman primate model of teeth ligature-induced periodontitis. Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) was nontraumatically applied to the gingiva after moderate gingivitis was identified through clinical and immunologic analyses (presence of inflammatory cytokines). Overall oral SIV infection rates were similar in the gingivitis-induced and control groups (5 infections following 12 SIV administrations for each), although more macaques were infected with multiple viral variants in the gingivitis group. SIV infection also affected the levels of antiviral and inflammatory cytokines in the gingival crevicular fluid, and a synergistic effect was observed, with alpha interferon and interferon-inducible protein 10 undergoing significant elevations following SIV infection in macaques with gingivitis compared to controls. These increases in antiviral and inflammatory immune modulators in the SIV-infected gingivitis macaques could also be observed in blood plasma, although the effects at both compartments were generally restricted to the acute phase of the infection. In conclusion, while moderate gingivitis was not associated with increased susceptibility to oral SIV infection, it resulted in elevated levels of cytokines in the oral mucosa and plasma of the SIV-infected macaques. These findings suggest a synergy between mucosal inflammation and SIV infection, creating an immune milieu that impacts the early stages of the SIV infection with potential implications for long-term pathogenesis. PMID:23175379

  20. Chimeric adenovirus type 5/35 vector encoding SIV gag and HIV env genes affords protective immunity against the simian/human immunodeficiency virus in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Someya, Kenji; Xin, Ke-Qin; Ami, Yasushi; Izumi, Yasuyuki; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Ohta, Shinrai; Yamamoto, Naoki; Honda, Mitsuo; Okuda, Kenji

    2007-10-25

    Replication-defective adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) vector-based vaccines are widely known to induce strong immunity against immunodeficiency viruses. To exploit this immunogenicity while overcoming the potential problem of preexisting immunity against human adenoviruses type 5, we developed a recombinant chimeric adenovirus type 5 with type 35 fiber vector (rAd5/35). We initially produced a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) gag DNA plasmid (rDNA-Gag), a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) 89.6 env DNA plasmid (rDNA-Env) and a recombinant Ad5/35 vector encoding the SIV gag and HIV env gene (rAd5/35-Gag and rAd5/35-Env). Prime-boost vaccination with rDNA-Gag and -Env followed by high doses of rAd5/35-Gag and -Env elicited higher levels of cellular immune responses than did rDNAs or rAd5/35s alone. When challenged with a pathogenic simian human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV), animals receiving a prime-boost regimen or rAd5/35s alone maintained a higher number of CD4(+) T cells and remarkably suppressed plasma viral RNA loads. These findings suggest the clinical promise of an rAd5/35 vector-based vaccine.

  1. Knowledge and attitude regarding human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in dermatological outpatients.

    PubMed

    Kouznetsov, L; Kuznetsov, A V; Ruzicka, T; Matterne, U; Wienecke, R; Zippel, S A

    2009-08-01

    Dermatologists are often the first-line specialists who recognize and diagnose human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection because of pathognomic skin signs. It is therefore important to investigate attitudes and knowledge regarding HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) amongst dermatological patients in order to provide information for dermatologists and to draw their attention to the issues. Awareness of HIV/AIDS, its prevention, and hypothetical behaviour were surveyed in dermatological outpatients. The anonymous cross-sectional survey was conducted with consecutive German-speaking outpatients aged 18-65 years, who registered at the dermatological outpatient's clinic (excluding venereology, genitourinary or HIV medicine) of the University of Munich (Germany). Three hundred forty-seven (77.5%) questionnaires were accepted for analysis. Most of the patients knew about HIV incurability (89.4%), HIV transmissibility during needle sharing (95.3%), or vaginal (87.4%) and anal intercourse (79.5%), as well as about HIV prevention by condom use (97.8%), and use of single needles (76.2%). However, knowledge gaps and misconceptions were detected regarding the risk of HIV transmission during oral sex, and the efficacy of sexual fidelity and avoidance of blood transfusions in HIV prevention. The lowest knowledge level (< 50% correct answers) was detected in patients aged 50-59 years, in unemployed, divorced/widowed, and in those without or with incomplete school education. Patient education about HIV/AIDS in dermatological ambulant settings should be performed differentially with regard to socio-demographic factors, and focused on the topic of oral sexual HIV transmission and on some other specific misconceptions.

  2. Science and ethics of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome controversies in Africa.

    PubMed

    Brewster, David

    2011-09-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) epidemic in Africa has raised important ethical issues for both researchers and clinicians. The most notorious controversy has been related to the zidovudine (AZT) trials in Africa in the late 1990s, in which the control groups were given a placebo rather than an effective drug to prevent vertical transmission. This raised concerns in the sponsoring country about exploitation of subjects, injustice and an ethical double standard between donor countries and resource-poor settings. However, the real double standard is between clinical practice standards in Western versus African countries, which must be addressed as part of the increasing global inequity of wealth both between countries and also within countries. There are important limitations to ethical declarations, principles and guidelines on their own without contextual ethical reasoning. The focus on research ethics with the HIV epidemic has led to a relative neglect of ethical issues in clinical practice. Although the scientific advances in HIV/AIDS have changed the ethical issues since the 1990s, there has also been progress in the bioethics of HIV/AIDS in terms of ethical review capability by local committees as well as in exposure to ethical issues by clinicians and researchers in Africa. However, serious concerns remain about the overregulation of research by bureaucratic agencies which could discourage African research on specifically African health issues. There is also a need for African academic institutions and researchers to progressively improve their research capacity with the assistance of research funders and donor agencies.

  3. Histoplasmosis in Patients With Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS)

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Albert M.; Sanchez, Alejandro; Farabi, Alireza; Hage, Chadi; Baddley, John W.; Jhaveri, Malhar; Greenberg, Richard N.; Bamberger, David M.; Rodgers, Mark; Crawford, Timothy N.; Wheat, L. Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Although discontinuation of suppressive antifungal therapy for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-associated histoplasmosis is accepted for patients with immunologic recovery, there have been no published studies of this approach in clinical practice, and minimal characterization of individuals who relapse with this disease. We performed a multicenter retrospective cohort study to determine the outcome in AIDS patients following discontinuation of suppressive antifungal therapy for histoplasmosis. Ninety-seven patients were divided into a physician-discontinued suppressive therapy group (PD) (38 patients) and a physician-continued suppressive therapy group (PC) (59 patients). The 2 groups were not statistically different at baseline, but at discontinuation of therapy and at the most recent follow-up there were significant differences in adherence to therapy, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA, and urinary Histoplasma antigen concentration. There was no relapse or death attributed to histoplasmosis in the PD group compared with 36% relapse (p < 0.0001) and 5% death (p = 0.28) in the PC group. Relapse occurred in 53% of the nonadherent patients but not in the adherent patients (p < 0.0001). Sixty-seven percent of patients with initial central nervous system (CNS) histoplasmosis relapsed compared to 15% of patients without CNS involvement (p = 0.0004), which may be accounted for by nonadherence. In addition, patients with antigenuria above 2.0 ng/mL at 1-year follow-up were 12.82 times (95% confidence interval, 2.91–55.56) more likely to relapse compared to those with antigenuria below 2.0 ng/mL. Discontinuation of antifungal therapy was safe in adherent patients who completed at least 1 year of antifungal treatment, and had CD4 counts >150 cells/mL, HIV RNA <400 c/mL, Histoplasma antigenuria <2 ng/mL (equivalent to <4.0 units in second-generation method), and no CNS histoplasmosis. PMID:24378739

  4. Activation of tat-defective human immunodeficiency virus by ultraviolet light

    SciTech Connect

    Sadaie, M.R.; Tschachler, E.; Valerie, K.; Rosenberg, M.; Felber, B.K.; Pavlakis, G.N.; Klotman, M.E.; Wong-Staal, F. )

    1990-05-01

    Ultraviolet light (UV) is known to cause activation of gene expression from the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) promoter. To address the question of whether tat-defective HIV-1 provirus could be rescued by UV irradiation we examined its effect on HeLa cells containing integrated proviruses with tat mutations. Exposure of these cells to an optimal dose of UV resulted in the production of infectious viruses. The degree of UV activation and reversion to infectious virus appeared to depend on the nature of the original tat mutation. Two of the mutants required cocultivation with tat-expressing cells to fully generate replication competent viruses, while a third mutant required only cocultivation with H9 cells. Sequencing of cDNA from cells infected with this last mutant demonstrated that the parental mutant sequence was retained and that genotypic revertants to the wild-type as well as new mutant sequences were generated. These results suggest that tat-defective HIV-1 provirus can be activated by UV and can subsequently revert to wild-type virus. This study raises the possibility that UV exposure of immune cells in the skin plays a role in the activation of defective HIV-1 in vivo.

  5. Nevirapine-resistant human immunodeficiency virus: kinetics of replication and estimated prevalence in untreated patients.

    PubMed Central

    Havlir, D V; Eastman, S; Gamst, A; Richman, D D

    1996-01-01

    The nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor nevirapine rapidly selects for mutant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in vivo. The most common mutation occurs at amino acid residue 181 in patients receiving monotherapy. After the initiation of nevirapine therapy, plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples were collected at frequent intervals and assayed for HIV RNA levels and the proportion of virus containing a mutation at residue 181. HIV RNA levels remained stable for the first 24 h after initiation of therapy and rapidly declined between 1 and 7 days. There was a consistent maximum decrease of 2 log10 HIV RNA copies per ml of plasma (range, 1.96 to 2.43) from baseline after 2 weeks in all monotherapy subjects. The estimated median half-life of HIV RNA was 1.11 days (range, 0.63 to 1.61). After 14 days of therapy, HIV RNA levels began to increase and 181 mutant virus was detected. The estimated doubling time of the emerging virus population ranged from 1.80 to 5.73 days. Viral DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells turned over from wild type to the mutant with a mutation at residue 181 significantly more slowly than did HIV RNA in plasma. In two subjects, the calculated prevalence of the 181 mutant virus prior to treatment was 7 and 133 per 10,000 copies of plasma HIV RNA. PMID:8892912

  6. 75 FR 22814 - Guidance for Industry: Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ...: Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV... availability of a document entitled ``Guidance for Industry: Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) for Human... Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Nucleic Acid Test (NAT) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) NAT, on...

  7. Capsid proteins from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac can coassemble into mature cores of infectious viruses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianbo; Pathak, Vinay K; Peng, Weiqun; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2008-09-01

    We have recently shown that the Gag polyproteins from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2 can coassemble and functionally complement each other. During virion maturation, the Gag polyproteins undergo proteolytic cleavage to release mature proteins including capsid (CA), which refolds and forms the outer shell of a cone-shaped mature core. Less than one-half of the CA proteins present within the HIV-1 virion are required to form the mature core. Therefore, it is unclear whether the mature core in virions containing both HIV-1 and HIV-2 Gag consists of CA proteins from a single virus or from both viruses. To determine whether CA proteins from two different viruses can coassemble into mature cores of infectious viruses, we exploited the specificity of the tripartite motif 5alpha protein from the rhesus monkey (rhTRIM5alpha) for cores containing HIV-1 CA (hCA) but not the simian immunodeficiency virus SIV(mac) CA protein (sCA). If hCA and sCA cannot coassemble into the same core when equal amounts of sCA and hCA are coexpressed, the infectivities of such virus preparations in cells should be inhibited less than twofold by rhTRIM5alpha. However, if hCA and sCA can coassemble into the same core structure to form a mixed core, rhTRIM5alpha would be able to recognize such cores and significantly restrict virus infectivity. We examined the restriction phenotypes of viruses containing both hCA and sCA. Our results indicate that hCA and sCA can coassemble into the same mature core to produce infectious virus. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of functional coassembly of heterologous CA protein into the retroviral core.

  8. First Molecular Characterization of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus in Domestic Cats from Mainland China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jilei; Wang, Liang; Li, Jing; Kelly, Patrick; Price, Stuart; Wang, Chengming

    2017-01-01

    The feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a retrovirus of the Lentivirus genus that was initially isolated from a colony of domestic cats in California in 1986 and has now been recognized as a common feline pathogen worldwide. To date, there is only one recent serology-based report on FIV in mainland China which was published in 2016. We designed this study to investigate the molecular prevalence and diversity of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) in domestic cats from mainland China. We studied the prevalence of FIV in whole blood samples of 615 domestic cats in five cities (Beijing, Guangzhou, Nanjing, Shanghai and Yangzhou) of mainland China and examined them using FRET-PCR (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer-Polymerase Chain Reaction) and regular PCRs for the gag and env genes. Overall, 1.3% (8/615) of the cats were positive for provirus DNA with nucleotide analysis using PCRs for the gag and env sequences showing the cats were infected with FIV subtype A. This is the first molecular characterization of FIV in mainland China and the first description of subtype A in continental Asia. PMID:28107367

  9. Human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: correlation but not causation.

    PubMed Central

    Duesberg, P H

    1989-01-01

    AIDS is an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome defined by a severe depletion of T cells and over 20 conventional degenerative and neoplastic diseases. In the U.S. and Europe, AIDS correlates to 95% with risk factors, such as about 8 years of promiscuous male homosexuality, intravenous drug use, or hemophilia. Since AIDS also correlates with antibody to a retrovirus, confirmed in about 40% of American cases, it has been hypothesized that this virus causes AIDS by killing T cells. Consequently, the virus was termed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and antibody to HIV became part of the definition of AIDS. The hypothesis that HIV causes AIDS is examined in terms of Koch's postulates and epidemiological, biochemical, genetic, and evolutionary conditions of viral pathology. HIV does not fulfill Koch's postulates: (i) free virus is not detectable in most cases of AIDS; (ii) virus can only be isolated by reactivating virus in vitro from a few latently infected lymphocytes among millions of uninfected ones; (iii) pure HIV does not cause AIDS upon experimental infection of chimpanzees or accidental infection of healthy humans. Further, HIV violates classical conditions of viral pathology. (i) Epidemiological surveys indicate that the annual incidence of AIDS among antibody-positive persons varies from nearly 0 to over 10%, depending critically on nonviral risk factors. (ii) HIV is expressed in less than or equal to 1 of every 10(4) T cells it supposedly kills in AIDS, whereas about 5% of all T cells are regenerated during the 2 days it takes the virus to infect a cell. (iii) If HIV were the cause of AIDS, it would be the first virus to cause a disease only after the onset of antiviral immunity, as detected by a positive "AIDS test." (iv) AIDS follows the onset of antiviral immunity only after long and unpredictable asymptomatic intervals averaging 8 years, although HIV replicates within 1 to 2 days and induces immunity within 1 to 2 months. (v) HIV supposedly causes AIDS

  10. Inducible human immunodeficiency virus type 1 packaging cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, H; Rabson, A B; Kaul, M; Ron, Y; Dougherty, J P

    1996-01-01

    Packaging cell lines are important tools for transferring genes into eukaryotic cells. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-based packaging cell lines are difficult to obtain, in part owing to the problem that some HIV-1 proteins are cytotoxic in a variety of cells. To overcome this, we have developed an HIV-1-based packaging cell line which has an inducible expression system. The tetracycline-inducible expression system was utilized to control the expression of the Rev regulatory protein, which in turn controls the expression of the late proteins including Gag, Pol, and Env. Western blotting (immunoblotting) demonstrated that the expression of p24gag and gp120env from the packaging cells peaked on days 6 and 7 postinduction. Reverse transcriptase activity could be detected by day 4 after induction and also peaked on days 6 and 7. Defective vector virus could be propagated, yielding titers as high as 7 x 10(3) CFU/ml, while replication-competent virus was not detectable at any time. Thus, the cell line should enable the transfer of specific genes into CD4+ cells and should be a useful tool for studying the biology of HIV-1. We have also established an inducible HIV-1 Env-expressing cell line which could be used to propagate HIV-1 vectors that require only Env in trans. The env-minus vector virus titer produced from the Env-expressing cells reached 2 x 10(4) CFU/ml. The inducible HIV-1 Env-expressing cell line should be a useful tool for the study of HIV-1 Env as well. PMID:8676479

  11. Presentation of severe combined immunodeficiency with respiratory syncytial virus and pneumocystis co-infection.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Pinilla, Nerea; Allende-Martínez, Luis; Corral Sánchez, María Dolores; Arocena, Jaime de Inocencio; González-Granado, Luis Ignacio

    2015-04-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency can cause severe, life-threatening viral, bacterial and fungal infections at an early age. We report a case of a 4-month-old boy with co-infection by respiratory syncytial virus and Pneumocystis jiroveci infection that led to recognition of severe combined immunodeficiency.

  12. Identification of a uniquely immunodominant, cross-reacting site in the human immunodeficiency virus endonuclease protein.

    PubMed Central

    Björling, E; Utter, G; Stålhandske, P; Norrby, E; Chiodi, F

    1991-01-01

    One of the features of the life cycle of retroviruses is insertion of the proviral DNA into host chromosomes. A protein encoded by the 3' end of the pol gene of the virus genome has been shown to possess endonuclease activity (D. P. Grandgenett, A. C. Vora, and R. D. Schiff, Virology 89:119-132, 1978), which is necessary for DNA integration. Sera from the majority of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals react with endonuclease protein p31 in serological tests (J. S. Allan, J. E. Coligan, T.-H. Lee, F. Barin, P. J. Kanki, S. M'Boup, M. F. McLane, J. E. Groopman, and M. Essex, Blood 69:331-333, 1987; E. F. Lillehoj, F. H. R. Salazar, R. J. Mervis, M. G. Raum, H. W. Chan, N. Ahmad, and S. Venkatesan, J. Virol. 62:3053-3058, 1988; K. S. Steimer, K. W. Higgins, M. A. Powers, J. C. Stephans, A. Gyenes, G. George-Nascimento, P. A. Liciw, P. J. Barr, R. A. Hallewell, and R. Sanchez-Pescador, J. Virol. 58:9-16, 1986). It is not known, however, which part of the protein represents the target(s) for antibody response. To study this, we synthesized peptides and used them in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay system to map the reactivity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) antibody-positive sera to the different regions of the HIV endonuclease. A uniquely antigenic, HIV-1- and HIV-2-cross-reacting site was identified in the central part of this protein from Phe-663 to Trp-670. PMID:2072463

  13. Infection of brain-derived cells with the human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Chiodi, F; Fuerstenberg, S; Gidlund, M; Asjö, B; Fenyö, E M

    1987-01-01

    A malignant glioma cell line was infected with the human T-lymphotropic virus type IIIB isolate of the human immunodeficiency virus. Infection appeared to be latent rather than productive. Through contact with monocytic or lymphoid cells, the virus present in the glioma cells could be transmitted and gave rise to a fully productive infection. Images PMID:3644020

  14. DNA Virus Replication Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Melanie; Speiseder, Thomas; Dobner, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Viruses employ a variety of strategies to usurp and control cellular activities through the orchestrated recruitment of macromolecules to specific cytoplasmic or nuclear compartments. Formation of such specialized virus-induced cellular microenvironments, which have been termed viroplasms, virus factories, or virus replication centers, complexes, or compartments, depends on molecular interactions between viral and cellular factors that participate in viral genome expression and replication and are in some cases associated with sites of virion assembly. These virus-induced compartments function not only to recruit and concentrate factors required for essential steps of the viral replication cycle but also to control the cellular mechanisms of antiviral defense. In this review, we summarize characteristic features of viral replication compartments from different virus families and discuss similarities in the viral and cellular activities that are associated with their assembly and the functions they facilitate for viral replication. PMID:24257611

  15. 75 FR 51273 - Expanded Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Testing for Disproportionately Affected Populations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Expanded Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Testing for Disproportionately Affected Populations AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). ACTION: Notice. Notice of Intent to...

  16. Antiviral agents for non-human immunodeficiency virus infections.

    PubMed

    Keating, M R

    1999-12-01

    Several new agents for treating viral infections have been developed in recent years. All available agents are virustatic, inhibiting specific steps in the process of viral replication. No agent is active against nonreplicating or latent viruses. Acyclovir is useful in the treatment of genital herpes, herpes simplex encephalitis, mucocutaneous herpetic infection, varicella infection in the immunosuppressed host, and herpes zoster infection in the normal and the immunosuppressed host. It can also be used for prevention of herpesvirus infection in immunocompromised patients. Ganciclovir is indicated for the treatment of cytomegalovirus retinitis in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and is effective in the treatment and prevention of cytomegalovirus infection in other immunocompromised patients. Famciclovir and valacyclovir are effective in the management of herpes simplex and varicella-zoster infection. Amantadine and rimantadine are useful therapeutically and prophylactically in the management of influenza A virus infection. Chronic hepatitis B infection can respond to lamivudine therapy, and the optimal treatment of hepatitis C is the combination of interferon alfa and ribavirin. Despite pronounced toxic effects, foscarnet and cidofovir are effective antiviral agents in specific settings.

  17. Tripeptide interference with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Höglund, Stefan; Su, Jin; Reneby, Sara Sandin; Végvári, Akos; Hjertén, Stellan; Sintorn, Ida-Maria; Foster, Hillary; Wu, Yi-Pyng; Nyström, Ingela; Vahlne, Anders

    2002-11-01

    Capsid assembly during virus replication is a potential target for antiviral therapy. The Gag polyprotein is the main structural component of retroviral particles, and in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), it contains the sequences for the matrix, capsid, nucleocapsid, and several small polypeptides. Here, we report that at a concentration of 100 micro M, 7 of 83 tripeptide amides from the carboxyl-terminal sequence of the HIV-1 capsid protein p24 suppressed HIV-1 replication (>80%). The three most potent tripeptides, glycyl-prolyl-glycine-amide (GPG-NH(2)), alanyl-leucyl-glycine-amide (ALG-NH(2)), and arginyl-glutaminyl-glycine-amide (RQG-NH(2)), were found to interact with p24. With electron microscopy, disarranged core structures of HIV-1 progeny were extensively observed when the cells were treated with GPG-NH(2) and ALG-NH(2). Furthermore, nodular structures of approximately the same size as the broad end of HIV-1 conical capsids were observed at the plasma membranes of treated cells only, possibly indicating an arrest of the budding process. Corresponding tripeptides with nonamidated carboxyl termini were not biologically active and did not interact with p24.

  18. Jejunal enteropathy associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection: quantitative histology.

    PubMed Central

    Batman, P A; Miller, A R; Forster, S M; Harris, J R; Pinching, A J; Griffin, G E

    1989-01-01

    Jejunal biopsy specimens from 20 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive male homosexual patients were analysed and compared with those of a control group to determine whether the abnormalities were caused by the virus or by opportunistic infection. The degree of villous atrophy was estimated with a Weibel eyepiece graticule, and this correlated strongly with the degree of crypt hyperplasia, which was assessed by deriving the mean number of enterocytes in the crypts. The density of villous intraepithelial lymphocytes fell largely within the normal range, either when expressed in relation to the number of villous enterocytes or in relation to the length of muscularis mucosae. Villous enterocytes showed mild non-specific abnormalities. Pathogens were sought in biopsy sections and in faeces. Crypt hyperplastic villous atrophy occurred at all clinical stages of HIV disease and in the absence of detectable enteropathogens. An analogy was drawn between HIV enteropathy and the small bowel changes seen in experimental graft-versus-host disease. It is suggested that the pathogenesis of villous atrophy is similar in the two states, the damage to the jejunal mucosa in HIV enteropathy being inflicted by an immune reaction mounted in the lamina propria against cells infected with HIV. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 PMID:2703544

  19. Natural simian immunodeficiency virus transmission in mandrills: a family affair?

    PubMed Central

    Fouchet, David; Verrier, Delphine; Ngoubangoye, Barthélémy; Souquière, Sandrine; Makuwa, Maria; Kazanji, Mirdad; Gonzalez, Jean-Paul; Pontier, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how pathogens spread and persist in the ecosystem is critical for deciphering the epidemiology of diseases of significance for global health and the fundamental mechanisms involved in the evolution of virulence and host resistance. Combining long-term behavioural and epidemiological data collected in a naturally infected mandrill population and a Bayesian framework, the present study investigated unknown aspects of the eco-epidemiology of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), the recent ancestor of HIV. Results show that, in contrast to what is expected from aggressive and sexual transmission (i.e. the two commonly accepted transmission modes for SIV), cases of SIVmnd-1 subtype were significantly correlated among related individuals (greater than 30% of the observed cases). Challenging the traditional view of SIV, this finding suggests the inheritance of genetic determinants of susceptibility to SIV and/or a role for behavioural interactions among maternal kin affecting the transmission of the virus, which would highlight the underappreciated role of sociality in the spread of infectious diseases. Outcomes of this study also provide novel insights into the role of host social structure in the evolution of pathogens. PMID:22673358

  20. Role of liver transplantation in human immunodeficiency virus positive patients

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Deepak; Agarwal, Kosh

    2015-01-01

    End-stage liver disease (ESLD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality amongst human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals. Chronic hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, drug-induced hepatotoxicity related to combined anti-retro-viral therapy, alcohol related liver disease and non-alcohol related fatty liver disease appear to be the leading causes. It is therefore, anticipated that more HIV-positive patients with ESLD will present as potential transplant candidates. HIV infection is no longer a contraindication to liver transplantation. Key transplantation outcomes such as rejection and infection rates as well as medium term graft and patient survival match those seen in the non-HIV infected patients in the absence of co-existing HCV infection. HIV disease does not seem to be negatively impacted by transplantation. However, HIV-HCV co-infection transplant outcomes remain suboptimal due to recurrence. In this article, we review the key challenges faced by this patient cohort in the pre- and post-transplant period. PMID:26604639

  1. [Genetic diversity of human immunodeficiency viruses and antiretroviral therapy].

    PubMed

    Bobkova, M R

    2016-01-01

    The lecture is devoted to the analysis of the state-of-the-art of the impact of genetic diversity of human immunodeficiency (HIV) viruses on the pattern of infection and the efficiency of antiretroviral therapy (ART). It provides brief information on the origin and evolution of HIV and on the current classification of their genetic variants. The molecular epidemiological situation of HIV infection in Russia and nearby states and the major molecular HIV variants that are dominant in these countries, as well as their origin and prevalence trends are characterized. How the diversity of HIV can affect the efficiency of diagnosis, the transmission of the virus, and the pattern of HIV pathogenesis are briefly reviewed. The comparative data available in the world's scientific literature on these topics are given. More detailed attention is given to the possible causes of varying therapeutic effects against different HIV subtypes, as well as to the specific features of the formation and phenotyping manifestation of ART drug resistance mutations. There is evidence for the necessity of forming a unified follow-up system for treated HIV-infected patients during ART scaling, including in an effort to evaluate the impact of the specific features of the HIV genome on the efficiency of treatment regimens used in Russia.

  2. Neutralization Properties of Simian Immunodeficiency Viruses Infecting Chimpanzees and Gorillas

    PubMed Central

    Barbian, Hannah J.; Decker, Julie M.; Bibollet-Ruche, Frederic; Galimidi, Rachel P.; West, Anthony P.; Learn, Gerald H.; Parrish, Nicholas F.; Iyer, Shilpa S.; Li, Yingying; Pace, Craig S.; Song, Ruijiang; Huang, Yaoxing; Denny, Thomas N.; Mouquet, Hugo; Martin, Loic; Acharya, Priyamvada; Zhang, Baoshan; Kwong, Peter D.; Mascola, John R.; Verrips, C. Theo; Strokappe, Nika M.; Rutten, Lucy; McCoy, Laura E.; Weiss, Robin A.; Brown, Corrine S.; Jackson, Raven; Silvestri, Guido; Connors, Mark; Burton, Dennis R.; Shaw, George M.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Bjorkman, Pamela J.; Ho, David D.; Farzan, Michael

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Broadly cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies (bNabs) represent powerful tools to combat human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Here, we examined whether HIV-1-specific bNabs are capable of cross-neutralizing distantly related simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) infecting central (Pan troglodytes troglodytes) (SIVcpzPtt) and eastern (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) (SIVcpzPts) chimpanzees (n = 11) as well as western gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) (SIVgor) (n = 1). We found that bNabs directed against the CD4 binding site (n = 10), peptidoglycans at the base of variable loop 3 (V3) (n = 5), and epitopes at the interface of surface (gp120) and membrane-bound (gp41) envelope glycoproteins (n = 5) failed to neutralize SIVcpz and SIVgor strains. In addition, apex V2-directed bNabs (n = 3) as well as llama-derived (heavy chain only) antibodies (n = 6) recognizing both the CD4 binding site and gp41 epitopes were either completely inactive or neutralized only a fraction of SIVcpzPtt strains. In contrast, one antibody targeting the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of gp41 (10E8), functional CD4 and CCR5 receptor mimetics (eCD4-Ig, eCD4-Igmim2, CD4-218.3-E51, and CD4-218.3-E51-mim2), as well as mono- and bispecific anti-human CD4 (iMab and LM52) and CCR5 (PRO140, PRO140-10E8) receptor antibodies neutralized >90% of SIVcpz and SIVgor strains with low-nanomolar (0.13 to 8.4 nM) potency. Importantly, the latter antibodies blocked virus entry not only in TZM-bl cells but also in Cf2Th cells expressing chimpanzee CD4 and CCR5 and neutralized SIVcpz in chimpanzee CD4+ T cells, with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) ranging from 3.6 to 40.5 nM. These findings provide new insight into the protective capacity of anti-HIV-1 bNabs and identify candidates for further development to combat SIVcpz infection. PMID:25900654

  3. BK virus infection in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Ledesma, J; Muñoz, P; Garcia de Viedma, D; Cabrero, I; Loeches, B; Montilla, P; Gijon, P; Rodriguez-Sanchez, B; Bouza, E

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the prevalence of BK virus (BKV) infection in HIV-positive patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in our hospital. The presence of BKV was analysed in urine and plasma samples from 78 non-selected HIV-infected patients. Clinical data were recorded using a pre-established protocol. We used a nested PCR to amplify a specific region of the BKV T-large antigen. Positive samples were quantified using real-time PCR. Mean CD4 count in HIV-infected patients was 472 cells/mm3 and median HIV viral load was <50 copies/mL. BKV viraemia was detected in only 1 HIV-positive patient, but 57.7% (45 out of 78) had BKV viruria, which was more common in patients with CD4 counts>500 cells/mm3 (74.3% vs 25.7%; p=0.007). Viruria was present in 21.7% of healthy controls (5 out of 23 samples, p=0.02). All viral loads were low (<100 copies/mL), and we could not find any association between BKV infection and renal or neurological manifestations. We provide an update on the prevalence of BKV in HIV-infected patients treated with HAART. BKV viruria was more common in HIV-infected patients; however, no role for BKV has been demonstrated in this population.

  4. Functional domains within the human immunodeficiency virus type 2 envelope protein required to enhance virus production.

    PubMed

    Abada, Paolo; Noble, Beth; Cannon, Paula M

    2005-03-01

    Primate lentiviruses code for a protein that stimulates virus production. In human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the activity is provided by the accessory protein, Vpu, while in HIV-2 and simian immunodeficiency virus it is a property of the envelope (Env) glycoprotein. Using a group of diverse retroviruses and cell types, we have confirmed the functional equivalence of the two proteins. However, despite these similarities, the two proteins have markedly different functional domains. While the Vpu activity is associated primarily with its membrane-spanning region, we have determined that the HIV-2 Env activity requires both the cytoplasmic tail and ectodomain of the protein, with the membrane-spanning domain being less important. Within the Env cytoplasmic tail, we further defined the necessary sequence as a membrane-proximal tyrosine-based motif. Providing the two Env regions separately as distinct CD8 chimeric proteins did not increase virus release. This suggests that the two domains must be either contained within a single protein or closely associated within a multiprotein oligomer, such as the Env trimer, in order to function. Finally, we observed that wild-type levels of incorporation of the HIV-2 Env into budding viruses were not required for this activity.

  5. Functional Domains within the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2 Envelope Protein Required To Enhance Virus Production

    PubMed Central

    Abada, Paolo; Noble, Beth; Cannon, Paula M.

    2005-01-01

    Primate lentiviruses code for a protein that stimulates virus production. In human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the activity is provided by the accessory protein, Vpu, while in HIV-2 and simian immunodeficiency virus it is a property of the envelope (Env) glycoprotein. Using a group of diverse retroviruses and cell types, we have confirmed the functional equivalence of the two proteins. However, despite these similarities, the two proteins have markedly different functional domains. While the Vpu activity is associated primarily with its membrane-spanning region, we have determined that the HIV-2 Env activity requires both the cytoplasmic tail and ectodomain of the protein, with the membrane-spanning domain being less important. Within the Env cytoplasmic tail, we further defined the necessary sequence as a membrane-proximal tyrosine-based motif. Providing the two Env regions separately as distinct CD8 chimeric proteins did not increase virus release. This suggests that the two domains must be either contained within a single protein or closely associated within a multiprotein oligomer, such as the Env trimer, in order to function. Finally, we observed that wild-type levels of incorporation of the HIV-2 Env into budding viruses were not required for this activity. PMID:15731257

  6. An unexpected diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus-2 infection in an overseas visitor: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sohail, Asma; Van Leer, Lyndal; Holmes, Natasha

    2017-03-04

    Human immunodeficiency virus 2 infection is endemic in West Africa but is also found in parts of Europe, North and South America, and India where it is thought to have been introduced secondary to migration and commercial trade ties. It is less common than Human immunodeficiency virus 1, with differences in pathogenicity, lower rates of transmission, longer asymptomatic period and slower progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Human immunodeficiency virus 2 is also associated with diagnostic challenges given the lack of commercially available diagnostic tests, and management challenges given intrinsic resistance to many anti-retroviral therapies. We describe a case of a 65 year old South Indian female, visiting her family in Australia, who presented with weight loss, pancytopaenia and generalised lymphadenopathy on a background of newly diagnosed congestive cardiac failure. Multiple investigations were performed to elucidate the cause of her presentation, with the eventual unexpected diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus 2. She was commenced on anti-retroviral treatment and made a remarkable recovery. We describe the challenges associated with diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus 2 due to lack of commercially available diagnostics, as well as the treatment and management challenges including the fact that human immunodeficiency virus 2 is intrinsically resistant to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Human immunodeficiency virus 2 infection should be considered in patients who present with symptoms and signs that do not point towards a clear diagnosis, such as unexplained pancytopaenia or lymphadenopathy, and who have risk factors such as being from an endemic area or having had blood transfusions, especially prior to the commencement of blood-borne virus screening of blood donors.

  7. The interaction between herpes simplex virus and human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Celum, Connie L

    2004-04-01

    Many studies indicate that herpes simplex virus (HSV) seropositivity increases the risk of acquiring HIV, with fewer studies also indicating that HSV-2 infection increases the risk of transmitting HIV. In a recent meta-analysis, HSV-2 infection increased the risk of HIV-acquisition two-fold. This increased risk may occur by HSV-2 reactivation disrupting the epithelial barrier and recruiting activated CD4 cells, which are target cells for HIV infection, into the lesion. In vivo and in vitro studies assessing the effect of HSV-2 on HIV transmission demonstrate that HIV-infected CD4 cells are recruited to HSV-infected lesions and that HSV regulatory proteins (ICP0, ICP4, VP16) may upregulate HIV replication, thus increasing the frequency and titre of mucosal HIV shedding. This may occur during both clinical and asymptomatic HSV reactivation. Plausibly, antiherpetic therapy could reduce HIV transmission by decreasing HIV plasma load and/or mucosal HIV shedding, but a proof-of-concept trial is needed to demonstrate this. It also appears that individuals co-infected with HIV and HSV-2 have more frequent HSV recurrences than individuals infected with HSV-2 alone. There is a strong correlation between decreasing CD4 count and increasing rates of HSV reactivation, suggesting that reactivation is linked to immunosuppression. The IHMF recommends that individuals with HIV should be serologically tested for HSV-2. HSV-2 infection should be targeted as a modifiable risk factor for HIV acquisition by testing, counselling and preventing acquisition through behavioural interventions, treatment and antiviral suppression.

  8. A human immunodeficiency virus peer education program for adolescent females.

    PubMed

    Slap, G B; Plotkin, S L; Khalid, N; Michelman, D F; Forke, C M

    1991-09-01

    Black adolescent females living in urban environments are at high risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Our objectives were to develop an HIV peer education program and to pilot-test its effect on knowledge and sexual behavior. Between September 1989 and March 1990, all females aged 12-19 years attending an inner-city, hospital-based adolescent clinic were invited to meet individually with trained peer educators (10 females aged 16-19 years) to discuss acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and its prevention. Each participant completed a modified version of the AIDS Knowledge and Attitudes Survey immediately before and 2-6 weeks after the counseling session. Of the 283 counseled patients, 241 (85%) completed the follow-up questionnaire and comprised the study sample. Mean age was 15.6 years, mean Hollingshead (parental occupational) score was 3.4, and 216 (90%) patients were black. Baseline knowledge about routes of transmission was high and did not improve on follow-up. Comparison of individual baseline and follow-up responses revealed improvements (p less than 0.05) in routes by which HIV is not transmitted, methods of prevention, individuals at risk, and general information about AIDS. The improvement in total score between baseline and follow-up was 38% for patients with low baseline scores, 13% for middle scores, and 3% for high scores (p less than 0.05). At baseline, 50 (21%) patients reported sexual intercourse within the preceding 2 weeks, compared to 33 (14%) at follow-up (p less than 0.05). Of the sexually active patients, 22 (44%) reported no condom use at baseline, compared to 11 (33%) at follow-up (p less than 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. [Study of molecular function of proteins in human immunodeficiency virus].

    PubMed

    Fujita, Mikako

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has no more than nine genes expressing approximately twenty proteins. When T lymphocytes and macrophages in a body are infected with HIV, these proteins work in turn at specific time and location, causing acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), a disease yet to be overcome. Since the elucidation of molecular mechanism of HIV proteins should lead to remedy of AIDS, the author has been engaged in the study of HIV protein in the past decade. Described herein are viral protein X (Vpx), uniquely found in HIV-2, and its homologous protein Vpr found both in HIV-1 and -2. We found that Vpx enhances genome nuclear import in T lymphocytes, and is critical for reverse transcription of viral RNA in macrophages. This finding on the function in macrophages corrected long-term misleading belief. Furthermore, functional region mapping of Vpx was performed. In 2011, the protein SAMHD1 was identified as the host restriction factor counteracted by Vpx, by foreign researchers. After that, our independent study demonstrated the presence of SAMHD1-independent functions of Vpx in T cells, in addition to its SAMHD1-dependent functions in macrophages. Another topic of this review is Gag protein. Recently, it has reported by overseas researchers that PI(4,5)P2 (one of phosphoinositide) regulates Pr55(Gag) localization and assembly. In this study, we determined the binding affinity between N-terminal MA domain of Pr55(Gag) and various phosphoinositide derivatives using surface plasmon resonance. The results suggested that both negatively charged inositol phosphates and hydrophobic acyl chain are required for the MA binding.

  10. Detection of feline immunodeficiency virus in saliva and plasma by cultivation and polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Matteucci, D; Baldinotti, F; Mazzetti, P; Pistello, M; Bandecchi, P; Ghilarducci, R; Poli, A; Tozzini, F; Bendinelli, M

    1993-03-01

    The rates of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) isolation from saliva, plasma, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of infected cats were compared; isolation rates were 18, 14, and 81%, respectively, in naturally infected cats and 25, 57, and 100%, respectively, in experimentally infected animals. There was no obvious relationship between isolation rate and clinical stage or between isolation rate and the titer of neutralizing antibody in serum. Virus could be isolated from one salivary gland as early as 1 week postinfection and, on a more regular basis, starting at 3 weeks postinfection, when, however, most other tissues were also positive. Polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that FIV genomes are present in saliva and plasma more frequently than expected on the basis of isolation data. Saliva was also found to contain viral DNA, indicating that it may harbor virus-infected cells as well as free virus. The addition of plasma but not of saliva to PBMC cultures delayed FIV growth. Isolation from plasma may be hampered by FIV neutralizing antibody and by the cytotoxic activity of this fluid for the PBMC used as a cell substrate.

  11. An inducible transcription factor activates expression of human immunodeficiency virus in T cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabel, Gary; Baltimore, David

    1987-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) production from latently infected T lymphocytes can be induced with compounds that activate the cells to secrete lymphokines1,2. The elements in the HIV genome which control activation are not known but expression might be regulated through a variety of DNA elements. The cis-acting control elements of the viral genome are enhancer and promoter regions. The virus also encodes trans-acting factors specified by the tat-III (refs 3-6) and art genes7. We have examined whether products specific to activated T cells might stimulate viral transcription by binding to regions on viral DNA. Activation of T cells, which increases HIV expression up to 50-fold, correlated with induction of a DNA binding protein indistinguishable from a recognized transcription factor, called NF-κB (ref. 8), with binding sites in the viral enhancer. Mutation of these binding sites abolished inducibility. That NF-κB acts in synergy with the viral tat-III gene product to enhance HIV expression in T cells may have implications for the pathogenesis of AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome).

  12. Profound CD4+ T lymphocytopenia in human immunodeficiency virus negative individuals, improved with anti-human herpes virus treatment.

    PubMed

    Díaz Betancourt, María Lilia; Klínger Hernández, Julio César; Niño Castaño, Victoria Eugenia

    2012-10-01

    Lymphocytopenia and CD4+ T lymphocytopenia can be associated with many bacterial, fungal, parasite and viral infections. They can also be found in autoimmune and neoplastic diseases, common variable immunodeficiency syndrome, physical, psychological and traumatic stress, malnutrition and immunosuppressive therapy. Besides, they can also be brought into relation, without a known cause, with idiopathic CD4+ T lymphocytopenia. Among viral infections, the Retrovirus, specially the human immunodeficiency virus, is the most frequently cause. However, many acute viral infections, including cytomegalovirus and Epstein Barr virus can be associated with transient lymphocytopenia and CD4+ T lymphocytopenia. As is well known, transient lymphocytopenia and CD4+ T lymphocytopenia are temporary and overcome when the disease improves. Nonetheless, severe CD4+ T Lymphocytopenia associated with chronic infections by human herpes virus has not been reported. We describe 6 cases of human immunodeficiency virus negative patients, with chronic cytomegalovirus and Epstein Barr virus infections and profound lymphocytopenia with clinical symptoms of cellular immunodeficiency. These patients improved rapidly with ganciclovir or valganciclovir treatment. We claim here that it is important to consider the chronic human herpes virus infection in the differential diagnosis of profoundly CD4+ T lymphocytopenia etiology, when human immunodeficiency virus is absent, in order to start effective treatment and to determine, in future studies, the impact of chronic human herpes virus infection in human beings' health.

  13. Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Disruption through Altered Mucosal MicroRNA Expression in Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Gaulke, Christopher A.; Porter, Matthew; Han, Yan-Hong; Sankaran-Walters, Sumathi; Grishina, Irina; George, Michael D.; Dang, Angeline T.; Ding, Shou-Wei; Jiang, Guochun; Korf, Ian

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epithelial barrier dysfunction during human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has largely been attributed to the rapid and severe depletion of CD4+ T cells in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Although it is known that changes in mucosal gene expression contribute to intestinal enteropathy, the role of small noncoding RNAs, specifically microRNA (miRNA), has not been investigated. Using the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected nonhuman primate model of HIV pathogenesis, we investigated the effect of viral infection on miRNA expression in intestinal mucosa. SIV infection led to a striking decrease in the expression of mucosal miRNA compared to that in uninfected controls. This decrease coincided with an increase in 5′-3′-exoribonuclease 2 protein and alterations in DICER1 and Argonaute 2 expression. Targets of depleted miRNA belonged to molecular pathways involved in epithelial proliferation, differentiation, and immune response. Decreased expression of several miRNA involved in maintaining epithelial homeostasis in the gut was localized to the proliferative crypt region of the intestinal epithelium. Our findings suggest that SIV-induced decreased expression of miRNA involved in epithelial homeostasis, disrupted expression of miRNA biogenesis machinery, and increased expression of XRN2 are involved in the development of epithelial barrier dysfunction and gastroenteropathy. IMPORTANCE MicroRNA (miRNA) regulate the development and function of intestinal epithelial cells, and many viruses disrupt normal host miRNA expression. In this study, we demonstrate that SIV and HIV disrupt expression of miRNA in the small intestine during infection. The depletion of several key miRNA is localized to the proliferative crypt region of the gut epithelium. These miRNA are known to control expression of genes involved in inflammation, cell death, and epithelial maturation. Our data indicate that this disruption might be caused by altered expression of mi

  14. Impact of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection on Chimpanzee Population Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Rudicell, Rebecca S.; Holland Jones, James; Wroblewski, Emily E.; Learn, Gerald H.; Li, Yingying; Robertson, Joel D.; Greengrass, Elizabeth; Grossmann, Falk; Kamenya, Shadrack; Pintea, Lilian; Mjungu, Deus C.; Lonsdorf, Elizabeth V.; Mosser, Anna; Lehman, Clarence; Collins, D. Anthony; Keele, Brandon F.; Goodall, Jane; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Pusey, Anne E.; Wilson, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Like human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), simian immunodeficiency virus of chimpanzees (SIVcpz) can cause CD4+ T cell loss and premature death. Here, we used molecular surveillance tools and mathematical modeling to estimate the impact of SIVcpz infection on chimpanzee population dynamics. Habituated (Mitumba and Kasekela) and non-habituated (Kalande) chimpanzees were studied in Gombe National Park, Tanzania. Ape population sizes were determined from demographic records (Mitumba and Kasekela) or individual sightings and genotyping (Kalande), while SIVcpz prevalence rates were monitored using non-invasive methods. Between 2002–2009, the Mitumba and Kasekela communities experienced mean annual growth rates of 1.9% and 2.4%, respectively, while Kalande chimpanzees suffered a significant decline, with a mean growth rate of −6.5% to −7.4%, depending on population estimates. A rapid decline in Kalande was first noted in the 1990s and originally attributed to poaching and reduced food sources. However, between 2002–2009, we found a mean SIVcpz prevalence in Kalande of 46.1%, which was almost four times higher than the prevalence in Mitumba (12.7%) and Kasekela (12.1%). To explore whether SIVcpz contributed to the Kalande decline, we used empirically determined SIVcpz transmission probabilities as well as chimpanzee mortality, mating and migration data to model the effect of viral pathogenicity on chimpanzee population growth. Deterministic calculations indicated that a prevalence of greater than 3.4% would result in negative growth and eventual population extinction, even using conservative mortality estimates. However, stochastic models revealed that in representative populations, SIVcpz, and not its host species, frequently went extinct. High SIVcpz transmission probability and excess mortality reduced population persistence, while intercommunity migration often rescued infected communities, even when immigrating females had a chance of being SIVcpz

  15. Reevaluation of possible outcomes of infections with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Tamalet, C; Colson, P; Decroly, E; Dhiver, C; Ravaux, I; Stein, A; Raoult, D

    2016-04-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that HIV infection can result in several possible incomes, including a very small proportion of individuals whose HIV replication is controlled after treatment interruption (known as HIV posttreatment controllers) or spontaneously without any treatment (known as HIV elite controllers). Both types of individuals are HIV RNA negative but HIV DNA positive, with living virus which can be stimulated ex vivo. A review was conducted to assess the literature on yet rarer cases with detectable integrated HIV DNA without HIV infectious virus in HIV-seropositive or -negative individuals. Three categories of patients were identified: (a) HIV-seropositive individuals with apparent spontaneous cure from their HIV infection, (b) HIV-seronegative children born to HIV-infected mothers and (c) highly exposed seronegative adults. Validity criteria were proposed to assess the presence of integrated HIV DNA as possible or unquestionable in these three categories. Only three articles among the 22 ultimately selected fulfilled these criteria. Among the highly exposed seronegative subjects, some individuals were described as being without integrated HIV DNA, probably because these subjects were not investigated using relevant, highly sensitive methods. Finally, we propose a definition of spontaneous cure of HIV infection based on clinical, immunologic and virologic criteria. Copyright © 2016 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Variability of human immunodeficiency virus-1 in the female genital reservoir during genital reactivation of herpes simplex virus type 2.

    PubMed

    LeGoff, J; Roques, P; Jenabian, M-A; Charpentier, C; Brochier, C; Bouhlal, H; Gresenguet, G; Frost, E; Pepin, J; Mayaud, P; Belec, L

    2015-09-01

    Clinical and subclinical genital herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) reactivations have been associated with increases in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 genital shedding. Whether HSV-2 shedding contributes to the selection of specific genital HIV-1 variants remains unknown. We evaluated the genetic diversity of genital and blood HIV-1 RNA and DNA in 14 HIV-1/HSV-2-co-infected women, including seven with HSV-2 genital reactivation, and seven without as controls. HIV-1 DNA and HIV-1 RNA env V1-V3 sequences in paired blood and genital samples were compared. The HSV-2 selection pressure on HIV was estimated according to the number of synonymous substitutions (dS), the number of non-synonymous substitutions (dN) and the dS/dN ratio within HIV quasi-species. HIV-1 RNA levels in cervicovaginal secretions were higher in women with HSV-2 replication than in controls (p0.02). Plasma HIV-1 RNA and genital HIV-1 RNA and DNA were genetically compartmentalized. No differences in dS, dN and the dS/dN ratio were observed between the study groups for either genital HIV-1 RNA or plasma HIV-1 RNA. In contrast, dS and dN in genital HIV-1 DNA were significantly higher in patients with HSV-2 genital reactivation (p <0.01 and p <0.05, respectively). The mean of the dS/dN ratio in genital HIV-1 DNA was slightly higher in patients with HSV-2 genital replication, indicating a trend for purifying selection (p 0.056). HSV-2 increased the genetic diversity of genital HIV-1 DNA. These observations confirm molecular interactions between HSV-2 and HIV-1 at the genital tract level. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. An updated nation-wide epidemiological survey of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yuki; Nakamura, Yuichi; Ura, Asami; Hirata, Momoko; Sakuma, Masato; Sakata, Yoshimi; Nishigaki, Kazuo; Tsujimoto, Hajime; Setoguchi, Asuka; Endo, Yasuyuki

    2010-08-01

    An updated nation-wide epidemiological survey of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection was conducted in Japan. Blood samples were collected from 1,770 outdoor accessing cats from March to October 2008. Serologically, 410 cats (23.2%) were positive for anti-FIV antibody. Proviral DNA of the FIV env V3-V5 region isolated from 348 cases could be phylogenetically analyzed. The present study disclosed a geographic distribution of four subtypes (A, B, C and D) of FIV in Japan. Even though an FIV vaccine was introduced in Japan, we do not currently know whether this vaccine is effective against all strains of FIV in Japan or not. Therefore, close attention still has to be paid to epidemic and genotypic trends of FIV.

  18. Human immunodeficiency virus infection of cells arrested in the cell cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, P; Hensel, M; Emerman, M

    1992-01-01

    Cell proliferation is necessary for proviral integration and productive infection of most retroviruses. Nevertheless, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can infect non-dividing macrophages. This ability to grow in non-dividing cells is not specific to macrophages because, as we show here, CD4+ HeLa cells arrested at stage G2 of the cell cycle can be infected by HIV-1. Proliferation is necessary for these same cells to be infected by a murine retrovirus, MuLV. HIV-1 integrates into the arrested cell DNA and produces viral RNA and protein in a pattern similar to that in normal cells. In addition, our data suggest that the ability to infect non-dividing cells is due to one of the HIV-1 core virion proteins. HIV infection of non-dividing cells distinguishes lentiviruses from other retroviruses and is likely to be important in the natural history of HIV infection. Images PMID:1322294

  19. Identification and analysis of antisense RNA target regions of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Rittner, K; Sczakiel, G

    1991-01-01

    Antisense RNA, transcribed intracellularly from constitutive expression cassettes, inhibits the replication of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) as demonstrated by a quantitative microinjection assay in human SW480 cells. Infectious proviral HIV-1 DNA was co-microinjected together with a fivefold molar excess of plasmids expressing antisense RNA complementary to a set of ten different HIV-1 target regions. The most inhibitory antisense RNA expression plasmids were targeted against a 1 kb region within the gag open reading frame and against a 562 base region containing the coding sequences for the regulatory viral proteins tat and rev. Experimental evidence is presented that the antisense principle is the inhibitory mechanism in this assay system. PMID:2027749

  20. Antiretroviral activities of protease inhibitors against murine leukemia virus and simian immunodeficiency virus in tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Black, P L; Downs, M B; Lewis, M G; Ussery, M A; Dreyer, G B; Petteway, S R; Lambert, D M

    1993-01-01

    Rationally designed synthetic inhibitors of retroviral proteases inhibit the processing of viral polyproteins in cultures of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected T lymphocytes and, as a result, inhibit the infectivity of HIV-1 for such cultures. The ability of HIV-1 protease inhibitors to suppress replication of the C-type retrovirus Rauscher murine leukemia virus (R-MuLV) and the HIV-related lentivirus simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) was examined in plaque reduction assays and syncytium reduction assays, respectively. Three of seven compounds examined blocked production of infectious R-MuLV, with 50% inhibitory concentrations of < or = 1 microM. Little or no cellular cytotoxicity was detectable at concentrations up to 100 microM. The same compounds which inhibited the infectivity of HIV-1 also produced activity against SIV and R-MuLV. Electron microscopic examination revealed the presence of many virions with atypical morphologies in cultures treated with the active compounds. Morphometric analysis demonstrated that the active compounds reduced the number of membrane-associated virus particles. These results demonstrate that synthetic peptide analog inhibitors of retroviral proteases significantly inhibit proteolytic processing of the gag polyproteins of R-MuLV and SIV and inhibit the replication of these retroviruses. These results are similar to those for inhibition of HIV-1 infectivity by these compounds, and thus, R-MuLV and SIV might be suitable models for the in vivo evaluation of the antiretroviral activities of these protease inhibitors.

  1. Antiretroviral activities of protease inhibitors against murine leukemia virus and simian immunodeficiency virus in tissue culture.

    PubMed Central

    Black, P L; Downs, M B; Lewis, M G; Ussery, M A; Dreyer, G B; Petteway, S R; Lambert, D M

    1993-01-01

    Rationally designed synthetic inhibitors of retroviral proteases inhibit the processing of viral polyproteins in cultures of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected T lymphocytes and, as a result, inhibit the infectivity of HIV-1 for such cultures. The ability of HIV-1 protease inhibitors to suppress replication of the C-type retrovirus Rauscher murine leukemia virus (R-MuLV) and the HIV-related lentivirus simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) was examined in plaque reduction assays and syncytium reduction assays, respectively. Three of seven compounds examined blocked production of infectious R-MuLV, with 50% inhibitory concentrations of < or = 1 microM. Little or no cellular cytotoxicity was detectable at concentrations up to 100 microM. The same compounds which inhibited the infectivity of HIV-1 also produced activity against SIV and R-MuLV. Electron microscopic examination revealed the presence of many virions with atypical morphologies in cultures treated with the active compounds. Morphometric analysis demonstrated that the active compounds reduced the number of membrane-associated virus particles. These results demonstrate that synthetic peptide analog inhibitors of retroviral proteases significantly inhibit proteolytic processing of the gag polyproteins of R-MuLV and SIV and inhibit the replication of these retroviruses. These results are similar to those for inhibition of HIV-1 infectivity by these compounds, and thus, R-MuLV and SIV might be suitable models for the in vivo evaluation of the antiretroviral activities of these protease inhibitors. Images PMID:8381640

  2. Human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus/hepatitis B virus co-infection in Southern Brazil: clinical and epidemiological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Raboni, Sonia Mara; Tuon, Felipe Francisco; Beloto, Nayara Carvalho Polido; Demeneck, Henrique; Oliveira, Andre; Largura, Denis; Sagrado, Andressa Gervasoni; Lima, Bárbara Perdonsini; Franzoni, João Paulo; Pedroso, Maria Lucia

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus and human immunodeficiency virus share a similar transmission pathway and are often diagnosed in the same patient. These patients tend to have a faster progression of hepatic fibrosis. This cross-sectional study describes the demographic features and clinical profile of human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis co-infected patients in Paraná, Southern Brazil. A total of 93 human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients attending a tertiary care academic hospital in Southern Brazil were included. Clinical, demographic and epidemiological data were evaluated. Hepatitis B virus and/or hepatitis C virus positive serology was found in 6.6% of patients. The anti-hepatitis C virus serum test was positive in 85% (79/93) of patients, and the infection was confirmed in 72% of the cases. Eighteen patients (19%) were human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis B virus positive (detectable HBsAg). Among co-infected patients, there was a high frequency of drug use, and investigations for the detection of co-infection were conducted late. A low number of patients were eligible for treatment and, although the response to antiretroviral therapy was good, there was a very poor response to hepatitis therapy. Our preliminary findings indicate the need for protocols aimed at systematic investigation of hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients, thus allowing for early detection and treatment of co-infected patients.

  3. Iatrogenic colorectal Kaposi sarcoma complicating a refractory ulcerative colitis in a human immunodeficiency negative-virus patient.

    PubMed

    Hamzaoui, Lamine; Kilani, Houda; Bouassida, Mahdi; Mahmoudi, Moufida; Chalbi, Emna; Siai, Karima; Ezzine, Heykel; Touinsi, Hassen; Azzouz, Mohamed M'saddak; Sassi, Sadok

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma is a mesenchymal tumor associated to a human herpes virus-8. It often occurs in human immunodeficiency virus-positive subjects. Colorectal localization is rare. We report the case of a colorectal Kaposi sarcoma complicating a refractory ulcerative colitis treated with surgery after the failure of immunomodulator therapy in a human immunodeficiency virus-negative heterosexual man.

  4. 38 CFR 1.487 - Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient... the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient. (a) Subject to... determine whether the patient is infected with such virus, identified as being a sexual partner of such...

  5. 38 CFR 1.487 - Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient... the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient. (a) Subject to... determine whether the patient is infected with such virus, identified as being a sexual partner of such...

  6. 38 CFR 1.487 - Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient... the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient. (a) Subject to... determine whether the patient is infected with such virus, identified as being a sexual partner of such...

  7. 38 CFR 1.487 - Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient... the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient. (a) Subject to... determine whether the patient is infected with such virus, identified as being a sexual partner of such...

  8. 38 CFR 1.487 - Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient... the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient. (a) Subject to... determine whether the patient is infected with such virus, identified as being a sexual partner of such...

  9. Lessons from the history of the human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome epidemic among Spanish drug injectors.

    PubMed

    De La Fuente, L; Bravo, M J; Barrio, G; Parras, F; Suárez, M; Rodés, A; Noguer, I

    2003-12-15

    In Spain, approximately 10 years passed between the time when human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) harm-reduction programs should have been developed with sufficient coverage to have an optimum impact on public health (before the HIV/AIDS epidemic's explosion in 1984) and the date of their actual implementation. This delay yielded an enormous cost for the country. The introduction of the virus in drug injector networks during a period of widespread diffusion of heroin injection and the lack of political awareness of the growing problem were 2 important factors that contributed to the important diffusion of the HIV infection among Spanish injection drug users. Lessons can be learned that may be of great interest in countries or territories facing similar challenges now and in the future.

  10. Real-Time PCR Assay for Clinical Management of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients with Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Bossolasco, Simona; Gaiera, Giovanni; Olchini, Davide; Gulletta, Maurizio; Martello, Leonardo; Bestetti, Arabella; Bossi, Laura; Germagnoli, Luca; Lazzarin, Adriano; Uberti-Foppa, Caterina; Cinque, Paola

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of a real-time PCR for Leishmania DNA in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and Leishmania coinfection, Leishmania DNA levels were measured in whole peripheral blood from 25 HIV-infected patients with clinical features suggestive of visceral leishmaniasis. Leishmania DNA was detected in 10 of 25 patients with microscopically confirmed visceral leishmaniasis and in none of those without this disease. Following treatment with liposomal amphotericin B, a clinical response was observed in 9 of 10 patients, in association with significantly decreased parasite loads. Seven patients relapsed clinically a median of 110 days after the end of treatment, in association with substantial increases in Leishmania DNA levels. Leishmania DNA levels correlated with the clinical course of visceral leishmaniasis, and their measurement at diagnosis and during and after treatment seems to be useful in the clinical management of HIV-infected patients with this disease. PMID:14605142

  11. Characterization of a "kissing" hairpin complex derived from the human immunodeficiency virus genome.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, K Y; Tinoco, I

    1994-01-01

    Base-pair formation between two hairpin loops--a "kissing" complex--is an RNA-folding motif that links two elements of RNA secondary structure. It is also a unique protein recognition site involved in regulation of ColE1 plasmid DNA replication. The trans-activation response element (TAR), a hairpin and bulge at the 5' end of the untranslated leader region of the human immunodeficiency virus 1 mRNA, enhances the transcription of the virus and is necessary for viral replication. Gel electrophoresis and absorbance melting curves indicate that a synthesized RNA hairpin (Tar*-16) with a loop sequence complementary to the TAR loop sequence (CUGGGA) associates specifically with a 16-nucleotide TAR hairpin (Tar-16) to form a stable complex. RNase T1 probing indicates that the three guanines in the Tar-16 loop become inaccessible in the complex. NMR imino proton spectra reveal that 5 base pairs are formed between the two hairpin loops (Tar-16 and Tar*-16); only the adenine at the 3' terminus of the TAR loop does not form a base pair with the 5'-terminal uracil of the complementary loop. A 14-nucleotide hairpin [CCUA(UCCCAG)UAGG] with a loop sequence complementary to the TAR loop is conserved within the gag gene of human immunodeficiency virus 1. A synthesized RNA hairpin corresponding to this conserved sequence also binds to the Tar-16 hairpin with high affinity. It is possible that the same RNA loop-loop interaction occurs during the viral life cycle. Images PMID:8078946

  12. Immune reconstitution syndrome in a human immunodeficiency virus infected child due to giardiasis leading to shock

    PubMed Central

    Nandy, Sneha; Shah, Ira

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome has been reported in association with tuberculosis, herpes zoster (shingles), Cryptococcus neoformans, Kaposi's sarcoma, Pneumocystis pneumonia, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, herpes simplex virus, Histoplasma capsulatum, human papillomavirus, and Cytomegalovirus. However, it has never been documented with giardiasis. We present a 7-year-old HIV infected girl who developed diarrhea and shock following the initiation of antiretroviral therapy, and her stool showed the presence of giardiasis. PMID:26985424

  13. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Monoclonal Antibodies Suppress Acute Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Viremia and Limit Seeding of Cell-Associated Viral Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Pegu, Amarendra; Wang, Keyun; McGinnis, Kathleen; Nason, Martha; Foulds, Kathryn; Letukas, Valerie; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Chen, Xuejun; Todd, John Paul; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Rao, Srinivas; Michael, Nelson L.; Robb, Merlin L.; Mascola, John R.; Koup, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) administered shortly after human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection can suppress viremia and limit seeding of the viral reservoir, but lifelong treatment is required for the majority of patients. Highly potent broadly neutralizing HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) can reduce plasma viremia when administered during chronic HIV-1 infection, but the therapeutic potential of these antibodies during acute infection is unknown. We tested the ability of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein-specific broadly neutralizing MAbs to suppress acute simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) replication in rhesus macaques. Four groups of macaques were infected with SHIV-SF162P3 and received (i) the CD4-binding-site MAb VRC01; (ii) a combination of a more potent clonal relative of VRC01 (VRC07-523) and a V3 glycan-dependent MAb (PGT121); (iii) daily cART, all on day 10, just prior to expected peak plasma viremia; or (iv) no treatment. Daily cART was initiated 11 days after MAb administration and was continued for 13 weeks in all treated animals. Over a period of 11 days after a single administration, MAb treatment significantly reduced peak viremia, accelerated the decay slope, and reduced total viral replication compared to untreated controls. Proviral DNA in lymph node CD4 T cells was also diminished after treatment with the dual MAb. These data demonstrate the virological effect of potent MAbs and support future clinical trials that investigate HIV-1-neutralizing MAbs as adjunctive therapy with cART during acute HIV-1 infection. IMPORTANCE Treatment of chronic HIV-1 infection with potent broadly neutralizing HIV-1 MAbs has been shown to significantly reduce plasma viremia. However, the antiviral effect of MAb treatment during acute HIV-1 infection is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that MAbs targeting the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein both suppress acute SHIV plasma viremia and limit CD4 T cell-associated viral DNA. These

  14. Modeling the Effects of Morphine on Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Dynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Vaidya, Naveen K.; Ribeiro, Ruy M.; Perelson, Alan S.; ...

    2016-09-26

    Complications of HIV-1 infection in individuals who utilize drugs of abuse is a significant problem, because these drugs have been associated with higher virus replication and accelerated disease progression as well as severe neuropathogenesis. To gain further insight it is important to quantify the effects of drugs of abuse on HIV-1 infection dynamics. Here, we develop a mathematical model that incorporates experimentally observed effects of morphine on inducing HIV-1 co-receptor expression. For comparison we also considered viral dynamic models with cytolytic or noncytolytic effector cell responses. Based on the small sample size Akaike information criterion, these models were inferior tomore » the new model based on changes in co-receptor expression. The model with morphine affecting co-receptor expression agrees well with the experimental data from simian immunodeficiency virus infections in morphine-addicted macaques. Our results show that morphine promotes a target cell subpopulation switch from a lower level of susceptibility to a state that is about 2-orders of magnitude higher in susceptibility to SIV infection. As a result, the proportion of target cells with higher susceptibility remains extremely high in morphine conditioning. Such a morphine-induced population switch not only has adverse effects on the replication rate, but also results in a higher steady state viral load and larger CD4 count drops. Moreover, morphine conditioning may pose extra obstacles to controlling viral load during antiretroviral therapy, such as pre-exposure prophylaxis and post infection treatments. In conclusion, this study provides, for the first time, a viral dynamics model, viral dynamics parameters, and related analytical and simulation results for SIV dynamics under drugs of abuse.« less

  15. Characterization of human immunodeficiency viruses resistant to oxathiolane-cytosine nucleosides.

    PubMed Central

    Schinazi, R F; Lloyd, R M; Nguyen, M H; Cannon, D L; McMillan, A; Ilksoy, N; Chu, C K; Liotta, D C; Bazmi, H Z; Mellors, J W

    1993-01-01

    The (-) enantiomers of 2',3'-dideoxy-5-fluoro-3'-thiacytidine [(-)-FTC] and 2',3'-dideoxy-3'-thiacytidine [(-)-BCH-189] were recently shown to inhibit selectively human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and hepatitis B virus in vitro. In the current study, the potential for HIV type 1 (HIV-1) resistance to these compounds was evaluated by serial passage of the virus in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and MT-2 cells in the presence of increasing drug concentrations. Highly drug-resistant HIV-1 variants dominated the replicating virus population after two or more cycles of infection. The resistant variants were cross-resistant to (-)-FTC, (-)-BCH-189, and their (+) congeners but remained susceptible to 2',3'-dideoxycytidine, 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine, 3'-fluoro-3'-deoxythymidine, 2',3'-dideoxyinosine, phosphonoformate, the TIBO compound R82150, and the bis(heteroaryl)piperazine derivative U-87201E. Reverse transcriptase derived from drug-resistant viral particles was 15- to 50-fold less susceptible to the 5'-triphosphates of FTC and BCH-189 compared with enzyme from parental drug-susceptible virus. DNA sequence analysis of the reverse transcriptase gene amplified from resistant viruses consistently identified mutations at codon 184 from Met (ATG) to Val (GTG or GTA) or Ile (ATA). Sequence analysis of amplified reverse transcriptase from a patient who had received (-)-BCH-189 therapy for 4 months demonstrated a mixture of the Met-184-to-Val (GTG) mutation and the parental genotype, indicating that the Met-184 mutation can occur in vivo. Images PMID:7684216

  16. Five recombinant simian immunodeficiency virus pseudotypes lead to exclusive transduction of retinal pigmented epithelium in rat.

    PubMed

    Duisit, Ghislaine; Conrath, Hervé; Saleun, Sylvie; Folliot, Sebastien; Provost, Nathalie; Cosset, François-Loïc; Sandrin, Virginie; Moullier, Philippe; Rolling, Fabienne

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate lentiviral vector-mediated rat retinal transduction using simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) pseudotyped with envelope proteins from vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein (VSV-G), Mokola virus G protein (MK-G), amphotropic murine leukemia virus envelope (4070A-Env), influenza A virus hemagglutinin (HA), lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus G protein (LCMV-G), and RD114 retrovirus envelope (RD114-Env). The six pseudotyped lentivirus vectors carried CMV-driven green fluorescent protein (GFP) or beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) reporter genes. Intravitreal and subretinal injections of each pseudotyped recombinant SIV were performed in cohorts of Wistar rats. Our results showed that no transgene expression was detected after intravitreal injection of each pseudotyped SIV vector. Also, no transduction could be detected following subretinal injection of RD114 pseudotyped SIV vectors. However, selective transduction of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells was repeatedly obtained after subretinal delivery of VSV-G, MK-G, 4070A-Env, HA, and LCMV-G pseudotyped SIV. GFP expression was maximum as soon as 4 days postadministration for VSV-G, MK-G, 4070A-Env, and HA pseudotypes, with no evidence of pseudotransduction for VSV-G. Maximum transgene expression was observed 3 weeks postinjection for LCMV-6. Importantly, HA and VSV-G pseudotyped SIV lead to such a high level of transgene expression that GFP-related toxicity occurred. Therefore, when a high level of GFP synthesis is achieved, replacement of enhanced GFP (egfp, Aequorea victoria) by a low-toxicity GFP (Renilla reniformis) cDNA is necessary to allow long-term expression.

  17. Generation of hybrid human immunodeficiency virus utilizing the cotransfection method and analysis of cellular tropism.

    PubMed Central

    Velpandi, A; Nagashunmugam, T; Murthy, S; Cartas, M; Monken, C; Srinivasan, A

    1991-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) isolated from infected individuals show tremendous genetic and biologic diversity. To delineate the genetic determinants underlying specific biologic characteristics, such as rate of replication, cytopathic effects, and ability to infect macrophages and T4 lymphoid cells, generation of hybrid HIV using viruses which exhibit distinct biologic features is essential. To develop methods for generating hybrid HIV, we constructed truncated HIV proviral DNA plasmids. Upon digestion with restriction enzymes, these plasmid DNAs were cotransfected into human rhabdomyosarcoma cells to generate hybrid HIV. The hybrid HIVs derived by this method were infectious upon transmission to both phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes and established human leukemic T-cell lines. The virus derived from molecular clone pHXB2 (HIVHTLV-III) productively infected CEMx174 cells. On the other hand, molecular clone pARV (HIVSF2)-derived virus did not show productive infection of CEMx174 cells when used as a cell-free virus. The hybrid HIV containing the 3' end of the genome from pARV and the 5' end of the genome from pHXB2 was effective in infecting CEMx174 cells, but the converse hybrid containing 5' pARV and 3' pHXB2 was not effective in infecting CEMx174 cells. These results suggest that differences in the genes outside of env and nef play a role in the ability of the virus to infect a certain cell type. The intracellular ligation method should be useful in the analysis of related and unrelated HIV-1 isolates with common restriction enzyme cleavage sites. Images PMID:1678438

  18. Update on kidney transplantation in human immunodeficiency virus infected recipients

    PubMed Central

    Nashar, Khaled; Sureshkumar, Kalathil K

    2016-01-01

    Improved survival of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients with chronic kidney disease following the introduction of antiretroviral therapy resulted in the need to revisit the topic of kidney transplantation in these patients. Large cohort studies have demonstrated favorable outcomes and proved that transplantation is a viable therapeutic option. However, HIV-infected recipients had higher rates of rejection. Immunosuppressive therapy did not negatively impact the course of HIV infection. Some of the immunosuppressive drugs used following transplantation exhibit antiretroviral effects. A close collaboration between infectious disease specialists and transplant professionals is mandatory in order to optimize transplantation outcomes in these patients. Transplantation from HIV+ donors to HIV+ recipients has been a subject of intense debate. The HIV Organ Policy Equity act provided a platform to research this area further and to develop guidelines. The first HIV+ to HIV+ kidney transplant in the United States and the first HIV+ to HIV+ liver transplant in the world were recently performed at the Johns Hopkins University Medical Center. PMID:27458559

  19. Selective Destruction Of Cells Infected With The Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K.; Ward, Thomas E.

    2006-03-28

    Compositions and methods for selectively killing a cell containing a viral protease are disclosed. The composition is a varient of a protein synthesis inactivating toxin wherein a viral protease cleavage site is interposed between the A and B chains. The variant of the type II ribosome-inactivating protein is activated by digestion of the viral protease cleavage site by the specific viral protease. The activated ribosome-inactivating protein then kills the cell by inactivating cellular ribosomes. A preferred embodiment of the invention is specific for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and uses ricin as the ribosome-inactivating protein. In another preferred embodiment of the invention, the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein is modified by attachment of one or more hydrophobic agents. The hydrophobic agent facilitates entry of the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein into cells and can lead to incorporation of the ribosome-inactivating protein into viral particles. Still another preferred embodiment of the invention includes a targeting moiety attached to the variants of the ribosome-inactivating protein to target the agent to HIV infectable cells.

  20. Selective destruction of cells infected with human immunodeficiency virus

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K.; Ward, Thomas E.

    2003-09-30

    Compositions and methods for selectively killing a cell containing a viral protease are disclosed. The composition is a variant of a protein synthesis inactivating toxin wherein a viral protease cleavage site is interposed between the A and B chains. The variant of the type II ribosome-inactivating protein is activated by digestion of the viral protease cleavage site by the specific viral protease. The activated ribosome-inactivating protein then kills the cell by inactivating cellular ribosomes. A preferred embodiment of the invention is specific for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and uses ricin as the ribosome-inactivating protein. In another preferred embodiment of the invention, the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein is modified by attachment of one or more hydrophobic agents. The hydrophobic agent facilitates entry of the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein into cells and can lead to incorporation of the ribosome-inactivating protein into viral particles. Still another preferred embodiment of the invention includes a targeting moiety attached to the variants of the ribosome-inactivating protein to target the agent to HIV infectable cells.

  1. Cardiovascular disease associated with human immunodeficiency virus: a review.

    PubMed

    Costa, Luísa Amado; Almeida, Ana G

    2015-01-01

    The cardiovascular manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection have changed significantly following the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimens. On one hand, HAART has altered the course of HIV disease, with longer survival of HIV-infected patients, and cardiovascular complications of HIV infection such as myocarditis have been reduced. On the other hand, HAART is associated with an increase in the prevalence of both peripheral and coronary arterial disease. As longevity increases in HIV-infected individuals, long-term effects, such as cardiovascular disease, are emerging as leading health issues in this population. In the present review article, we discuss HIV-associated cardiovascular disease, focusing on epidemiology, etiopathogenesis, diagnosis, prognosis, management and therapy. Cardiovascular involvement in treatment-naive patients is still important in situations such as non-adherence to treatment, late initiation of treatment, and/or limited access to HAART in developing countries. We therefore describe the cardiovascular consequences in treatment-naive patients and the potential effect of antiretroviral treatment on their regression, as well as the metabolic and cardiovascular implications of HAART regimens in HIV-infected individuals.

  2. Pediatric Human Immunodeficiency Virus Screening in an African District Hospital

    PubMed Central

    De Baets, A. J.; Edidi, B. S.; Kasali, M. J.; Beelaert, G.; Schrooten, W.; Litzroth, A.; Kolsteren, P.; Denolf, D.; Fransen, K.

    2005-01-01

    In order to evaluate alternative tests and strategies to simplify pediatric human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) screening at the district hospital level, a cross-sectional exploratory study was organized in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Venous and capillary phlebotomies were performed on 941 Congolese children, aged 1 month to 12 years (153 children under 18 months and 788 children more than 18 months old). The HIV prevalence rate was 4.7%. An algorithm for children more than 18 months old, using serial rapid tests (Determine, InstantScreen, and Uni-Gold) performed on capillary blood stored in EDTA tubes, had a sensitivity of 100.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 88.9 to 100.0%) and a specificity of 100.0% (95% CI, 99.5 to 100.0%). The results of this study suggest that the ultrasensitive p24 antigen assay may be performed on capillary plasma stored on filter paper (sensitivity and specificity, 100.0%; n = 87) instead of venous plasma (sensitivity, 92.3%; specificity, 100.0%; n = 150). The use of glucolets (instruments used to perform capillary phlebotomies), instead of syringes and needles, may reduce procedural pain and the risk of needle stick injuries at a comparable cost. Compared to the reference, HIV could have been correctly excluded based on one rapid test for at least 90% of these children. The results of this study point towards underutilized opportunities to simplify phlebotomy and pediatric HIV screening. PMID:15642990

  3. Management of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Advanced Age

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Meredith; Justice, Amy C.; Lampiris, Harry W.; Valcour, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Importance Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients treated with antiretroviral therapy now have increased life expectancy and develop chronic illnesses that are often seen in older HIV-negative patients. Objective To address emerging issues related to aging with HIV. Screening older adults for HIV, diagnosis of concomitant diseases, management of multiple comorbid medical illnesses, social isolation, polypharmacy, and factors associated with end-of-life care are reviewed. Evidence Acquisition Published guidelines and consensus statements were reviewed. PubMed and PsycINFO were searched between January 2000 and February 2013. Articles not appearing in the search that were referenced by reviewed articles were also evaluated. Findings The population of older HIV-positive patients is rapidly expanding. It is estimated that by 2015 one-half of the individuals in the United States with HIV will be older than age 50. Older HIV-infected patients are prone to having similar chronic diseases as their HIV-negative counterparts, as well as illnesses associated with co-infections. Medical treatments associated with these conditions, when added to an antiretroviral regimen, increase risk for polypharmacy. Care of aging HIV-infected patients involves a need to balance a number of concurrent comorbid medical conditions. Conclusions and Relevance HIV is no longer a fatal disease. Management of multiple comorbid diseases is a common feature associated with longer life expectancy in HIV-positive patients. There is a need to better understand how to optimize the care of these patients. PMID:23549585

  4. Human immunodeficiency virus serostatus and the risk of postextraction complications.

    PubMed

    Dodson, T B; Perrott, D H; Gongloff, R K; Kaban, L B

    1994-04-01

    Despite the increasing prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease in the population and the increasing likelihood that HIV-positive (HIV+) patients may have an extraction, little is known about the risk of postoperative complications in this group. The goal of this investigation was to assess the risk of postoperative complications in HIV+ patients after tooth extraction. The study was designed as a retrospective cohort study with a sample consisting of 145 males who underwent tooth extraction. The patients' medical and dental records were reviewed to identify HIV serostatus, to document the frequency and type of postoperative complications, and to collect data on potential confounding variables. Forty-four patients were identified as HIV+. The postoperative complication rate in HIV+ patients was 20.9% and for HIV-negative (HIV-) patients 2.9% (relative risk = 7.0, 95% confidence interval = 2.0-25.0, P = 0.001). Furthermore, as the manifestations of the symptoms of HIV infection became more severe, the postextraction complication rate also increased (P = 0.008). The results of this study suggest that HIV+ patients have an increased risk of postextraction complications and as the level of HIV disease increases, the risk of complications also increases. While the findings of this study are consistent with studies based on case series, prospective cohort studies are required to confirm the findings.

  5. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of the brain.

    PubMed Central

    Atwood, W J; Berger, J R; Kaderman, R; Tornatore, C S; Major, E O

    1993-01-01

    Direct infection of the central nervous system by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the causative agent of AIDS, was not appreciated in the early years of the AIDS epidemic. Neurological complications associated with AIDS were largely attributed to opportunistic infections that arose as a result of the immunocompromised state of the patient and to depression. In 1985, several groups succeeded in isolating HIV-1 directly from brain tissue. Also that year, the viral genome was completely sequenced, and HIV-1 was found to belong to a neurotropic subfamily of retrovirus known as the Lentivirinae. These findings clearly indicated that direct HIV-1 infection of the central nervous system played a role in the development of AIDS-related neurological disease. This review summarizes the clinical manifestations of HIV-1 infection of the central nervous system and the related neuropathology, the tropism of HIV-1 for specific cell types both within and outside of the nervous system, the possible mechanisms by which HIV-1 damages the nervous system, and the current strategies for diagnosis and treatment of HIV-1-associated neuropathology. Images PMID:8269391

  6. Frailty in people aging with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection.

    PubMed

    Brothers, Thomas D; Kirkland, Susan; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Falutz, Julian; Theou, Olga; Johnston, B Lynn; Rockwood, Kenneth

    2014-10-15

    The increasing life spans of people infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) reflect enormous treatment successes and present new challenges related to aging. Even with suppression of viral loads and immune reconstitution, HIV-positive individuals exhibit excess vulnerability to multiple health problems that are not AIDS-defining. With the accumulation of multiple health problems, it is likely that many people aging with treated HIV infection may be identified as frail. Studies of frailty in people with HIV are currently limited but suggest that frailty might be feasible and useful as an integrative marker of multisystem vulnerability, for organizing care and for comprehensively measuring the impact of illness and treatment on overall health status. This review explains how frailty has been conceptualized and measured in the general population, critically reviews emerging data on frailty in people with HIV infection, and explores how the concept of frailty might inform HIV research and care. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Federal spending for illness caused by the human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Winkenwerder, W; Kessler, A R; Stolec, R M

    1989-06-15

    Is the federal government devoting sufficient resources to fighting the epidemic of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, and are these resources being spent appropriately? Some observers contend that the amounts have been inadequate, but until now there has been no overall accounting of federal activities and spending to combat the epidemic. We report expenditure data collected from federal agencies for the years 1982 to 1989. In all, $5.5 billion will have been spent on HIV-related illness during this period by the federal government, nearly 60 percent of it by the U.S. Public Health Service. Federal spending on HIV-related illness in 1989 will reach $2.2 billion, representing over one third of all estimated national (public and private) HIV expenditures, and tripling state expenditures. In 1992, federal spending on the epidemic will reach an estimated $4.3 billion. Although sizable, this will be just 1.8 percent of all 1992 federal health dollars. Similarly, in 1992, national (public and private) spending on HIV-related illness will consume roughly 1.6 percent of all health-related costs in the United States. Federal spending for HIV research and prevention is similar to funding for other major diseases, including some conditions, such as cancer and heart disease, that now have a greater impact on mortality.

  8. Global Considerations in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Respiratory Disease.

    PubMed

    Rylance, Jamie; Meghji, Jamilah; Miller, Robert F; Ferrand, Rashida A

    2016-04-01

    Respiratory tract infection, particularly tuberculosis, is a major cause of mortality among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has resulted in a dramatic increase in survival, although coverage of HIV treatment remains low in many parts of the world. There is a concurrent growing burden of chronic noninfectious respiratory disease as a result of increased survival. Many risk factors associated with the development of respiratory disease, such as cigarette smoking and intravenous drug use, are overrepresented among people living with HIV. In addition, there is emerging evidence that HIV infection may directly cause or accelerate the course of chronic lung disease. This review summarizes the clinical spectrum and epidemiology of respiratory tract infections and noninfectious pulmonary pathologies, and factors that explain the global variation in HIV-associated respiratory disease. The potential for enhancing diagnoses of noninfective chronic conditions through the use of clinical algorithms is discussed. We also consider issues in assessment and management of HIV-related respiratory disease in view of the increasing global scale up of ART. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  9. Schistosomiasis and Human Immunodeficiency Virus in Men in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Downs, Jennifer A; de Dood, Claudia J; Dee, Hannah E; McGeehan, Megan; Khan, Hijab; Marenga, Abena; Adel, Patrick E; Faustine, Edward; Issarow, Benson; Kisanga, Emmanuel F; Kisigo, Godfrey Alfred; Ngahyolerwa, Salvius; Zahoro, Frank; Miyaye, Donald; Magawa, Ruth Gideon; Mngara, Julius; Lee, Myung Hee; Corstjens, Paul L A M; van Dam, Govert J; Fitzgerald, Daniel W

    2017-02-06

    Schistosomiasis is a parasitic worm infection that affects over 260 million individuals worldwide. Women with schistosome infections have been demonstrated to have a 4-fold increase in the odds of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection compared with women without schistosome infections. A relationship between schistosome and HIV infections has not been clearly defined in men. Among 674 men aged 18-50 years living in rural Tanzania, we identified 429 (63.6%) who had a schistosome infection as defined by serum positivity for schistosome circulating anodic antigen, visualization of parasite eggs in urine or stool, or both. HIV infection was identified in 38 (5.6%). The odds of HIV infection was 1.3 [95% confidence interval = 0.6-2.5] (P = 0.53) among men with any schistosome infection (Schistosoma haematobium or Schistosoma mansoni), and it was 1.4 [0.6-3.3] (P = 0.43) among men with S. haematobium infection. Men with S. haematobium infection were significantly more likely to report the symptom of hemospermia than men without S. haematobium infection. We conclude that schistosome infections appear to have little to no association with HIV infection in men.

  10. Tuberculous meningitis in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Sinha, Manish Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis is the most common opportunistic infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected persons. HIV-infected patients have a high incidence of tuberculous meningitis as well. The exact incidence and prevalence of tuberculous meningitis in HIV-infected patients are not known. HIV infection does not significantly alter the clinical manifestations, laboratory, radiographic findings, or the response to therapy. Still, some differences have been noted. For example, the histopathological examination of exudates in HIV-infected patients shows fewer lymphocytes, epithelioid cells, and Langhan's type of giant cells. Larger numbers of acid-fast bacilli may be seen in the cerebral parenchyma and meninges. The chest radiograph is abnormal in up to 46% of patients with tuberculous meningitis. Tuberculous meningitis is likely to present with cerebral infarcts and mass lesions. Cryptococcal meningitis is important in differential diagnosis. The recommended duration of treatment in HIV-infected patients is 9-12 months. The benefit of adjunctive corticosteroids is uncertain. Antiretroviral therapy and antituberculosis treatment should be initiated at the same time, regardless of CD4 cell counts. Tuberculous meningitis may be a manifestation of paradoxical tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Some studies have demonstrated a significant impact of HIV co-infection on mortality from tuberculous meningitis. HIV-infected patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculous meningitis have significantly higher mortality. The best way to prevent HIV-associated tuberculous meningitis is to diagnose and isolate infectious cases of tuberculosis promptly and administer appropriate treatment.

  11. [Discrimination and homophobia associated to the human immunodeficiency virus epidemic].

    PubMed

    Orozco-Núñez, Emanuel; Alcalde-Rabanal, Jacqueline Elizabeth; Ruiz-Larios, José Arturo; Sucilla-Pérez, Héctor; García-Cerde, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    To describe a political mapping on discrimination and homophobia associated to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the context of public institutions in Mexico. The political mapping was conducted in six Mexican states. Stakeholders who were involved in HIV actions from public and private sectors were included. Semistructured interviews were applied to explore homophobia and discrimination associated with HIV. Information was systematized using the Policy Maker software, which is a good support for analyzing health policies. Discriminatory and homophobic practices in the public domain occurred, damaging people´s integrity via insults, derision and hate crimes. Most stakeholders expressed a supportive position to prevent discrimination and homophobia and some of them had great influence on policy-making decisions. It was found that state policy frameworks are less specific in addressing these issues. Homophobia and discrimination associated to HIV are still considered problematic in Mexico. Homophobia is a very sensitive issue that requires further attention. Also, an actual execution of governmental authority requires greater enforcement of laws against discrimination and homophobia.

  12. Exercise dysfunction in patients seropositive for the human immunodeficiency virus

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.E.; Anders, G.T.; Blanton, H.M.; Hawkes, C.E.; Bush, B.A.; McAllister, C.K.; Matthews, J.I. )

    1990-03-01

    To confirm the presence of exercise dysfunction in patients seropositive for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), 32 such patients without AIDS were evaluated with cardiopulmonary exercise testing, pulmonary function testing, bronchoalveolar lavage, chest roentgenography, and gallium scanning. No evidence of pulmonary opportunistic infection was found. When compared to an otherwise similar group of HIV-seronegative controls, the patients exercised to a significantly lower workload (195 +/- 30 versus 227 +/- 31 W, p less than 0.001). The ventilatory anaerobic threshold (VAT) values were also significantly lower for the patients (49.2 +/- 13.0 versus 61.9 +/- 9.1% of maximum predicted VO2, p less than 0.001). Nine of the patients had VAT values less than the 95% confidence interval for the controls. This subgroup exercised to a significantly lower maximum VO2 (69.9 +/- 11.2 versus 95.9 +/- 17.5% of maximum predicted VO2, p less than 0.001) and workload (165 +/- 21 versus 227 +/- 31 W) when compared to the control group. These patients demonstrated a mild tachypnea throughout exercise relative to the controls and had a significant increase in the slope of the heart rate to VO2 relationship. These findings are most consistent with a limitation of oxygen delivery to exercising muscles, which may represent occult cardiac disease in this group.

  13. Immunopathogenesis of Oropharyngeal Candidiasis in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    de Repentigny, Louis; Lewandowski, Daniel; Jolicoeur, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Oropharyngeal and esophageal candidiases remain significant causes of morbidity in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, despite the dramatic ability of antiretroviral therapy to reconstitute immunity. Notable advances have been achieved in understanding, at the molecular level, the relationships between the progression of HIV infection, the acquisition, maintenance, and clonality of oral candidal populations, and the emergence of antifungal resistance. However, the critical immunological defects which are responsible for the onset and maintenance of mucosal candidiasis in patients with HIV infection have not been elucidated. The devastating impact of HIV infection on mucosal Langerhans' cell and CD4+ cell populations is most probably central to the pathogenesis of mucosal candidiasis in HIV-infected patients. However, these defects may be partly compensated by preserved host defense mechanisms (calprotectin, keratinocytes, CD8+ T cells, and phagocytes) which, individually or together, may limit Candida albicans proliferation to the superficial mucosa. The availability of CD4C/HIV transgenic mice expressing HIV-1 in immune cells has provided the opportunity to devise a novel model of mucosal candidiasis that closely mimics the clinical and pathological features of candidal infection in human HIV infection. These transgenic mice allow, for the first time, a precise cause-and-effect analysis of the immunopathogenesis of mucosal candidiasis in HIV infection under controlled conditions in a small laboratory animal. PMID:15489345

  14. Global Impact of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Gayle, Helene D.; Hill, Gena L.

    2001-01-01

    This review provides information on the epidemiology, economic impact, and intervention strategies for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS pandemic in developing countries. According to the World Health Organization and the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) at the end of 1999, an estimated 34.3 million people were living with HIV/AIDS. Most of the people living with HIV, 95% of the global total, live in developing countries. Examples of the impact of HIV/AIDS in Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Caribbean, and the Newly Independent States provide insight into the demographics, modes of exposure, treatment and prevention options, and the economic effect of the epidemic on the global community. The epidemic in each region of the world is influenced by the specific risk factors that are associated with the spread of HIV/AIDS and the responses that have evolved to address it. These influences are important in developing HIV/AIDS policies and programs to effectively address the global pandemic. PMID:11292641

  15. Herpes zoster ophthalmicus in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Margolis, T P; Milner, M S; Shama, A; Hodge, W; Seiff, S

    1998-03-01

    To investigate the ocular complications of herpes zoster ophthalmicus in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. This was a retrospective cohort study of 48 HIV-infected patients (48 eyes) treated at San Francisco General Hospital for herpes zoster ophthalmicus from December 1985 through March 1994. All patients were initially treated with either intravenous or oral acyclovir. The median CD4 lymphocyte count at diagnosis was 48 per mm3 (range, 2 to 490 per mm3). Fifteen patients (31%) had mild or no ocular involvement. Seventeen patients (35%) had stromal keratitis, mostly mild, and two (4)% developed chronic infectious pseudodendritic keratitis. Twenty-four study patients (50%) had iritis, but only three (6%) had elevations in intraocular pressure. Two patients (4%) developed postherpetic neuralgia, and two others (4%) had zoster-associated central nervous system disease. Only two patients (4%) developed necrotizing retinitis, both in the form of the progressive outer retinal necrosis syndrome. Excluding the patients with retinitis and central nervous system disease, the rate of sight-threatening complications in our series was lower than expected. Almost one third of study patients had no ocular complications or only mild surface epithelial disease. Although the relatively low incidence of sight-threatening disease in our study population may have been a consequence of aggressive management with acyclovir, chronic infectious pseudodendritic keratitis, retinitis, and central nervous system disease, complications of ophthalmic zoster whose pathogenesis is largely a consequence of active viral replication, were particularly devastating and difficult to manage.

  16. [Changes in vertically transmitted human immunodeficiency virus infection Chile].

    PubMed

    Chávez P, Ana; Alvarez P, Ana M; Wu H, Elba; Peña D, Anamaría; Vizueta R, Eloísa

    2007-10-01

    The identification of various risk factors of vertical human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission resulted in the development of strategies whose aim was to decrease the mother's viral load, to reduce her child's exposure to it during delivery, and to avoid the subsequent viral exposure due to breastfeeding. The administration of antiretroviral treatment during pregnancy, delivery and to the neonate (PACTG 076) proved to be useful. At a first stage, zidovudine was used. A triple combination therapy was then administered. Initially, the viral transmission in mothers who were enrolled in protocols for vertically transmitted HIV prophylaxis was reduced to 9.5%, whereas the last measurement carried out between 1998 and 2005, the initial figure was brought down to 2%. Nevertheless, the delivery of infected children whose mother's HIV status was unknown is still considered likely to happen. The main step to be taken to reduce HIV infection among children is to perform universal HIV tests during pregnancy, so that HIV positive pregnant patients conveniently receive proper prophylaxis. We look forward to achieving this by following the new prevention guidelines of vertically-transmitted HIV infection, developed by the Comisión Nacional del SIDA of the Chilean Health Ministry.

  17. Proteinuria in paediatric patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Giacomet, Vania; Erba, Paola; Di Nello, Francesca; Coletto, Sonia; Viganò, Alessandra; Zuccotti, GianVincenzo

    2013-01-01

    In human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected people kidney disease is as an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Clinical features of kidney damage in HIV-infected patients range from asymptomatic microalbuminuria to nephrotic syndrome. The lack of specific clinical features despite the presence of heavy proteinuria may mask the renal involvement. Indeed, it is important in HIV patients to monitor renal function to early discover a possible kidney injury. After the introduction of antiretroviral therapy, mortality and morbidity associated to HIV-infection have shown a substantial reduction, although a variety of side effects for long-term use of highly active antiretroviral therapy, including renal toxicity, has emerged. Among more than 20 currently available antiretroviral agents, many of them can occasionally cause reversible or irreversible nephrotoxicity. At now, three antiretroviral agents, i.e., indinavir, atazanavir and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate have a well established association with direct nephrotoxicity. This review focuses on major causes of proteinuria and other pathological findings related to kidney disease in HIV-infected children and adolescents. PMID:24303454

  18. Proteinuria in paediatric patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Giacomet, Vania; Erba, Paola; Di Nello, Francesca; Coletto, Sonia; Viganò, Alessandra; Zuccotti, Gianvincenzo

    2013-04-16

    In human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected people kidney disease is as an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Clinical features of kidney damage in HIV-infected patients range from asymptomatic microalbuminuria to nephrotic syndrome. The lack of specific clinical features despite the presence of heavy proteinuria may mask the renal involvement. Indeed, it is important in HIV patients to monitor renal function to early discover a possible kidney injury. After the introduction of antiretroviral therapy, mortality and morbidity associated to HIV-infection have shown a substantial reduction, although a variety of side effects for long-term use of highly active antiretroviral therapy, including renal toxicity, has emerged. Among more than 20 currently available antiretroviral agents, many of them can occasionally cause reversible or irreversible nephrotoxicity. At now, three antiretroviral agents, i.e., indinavir, atazanavir and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate have a well established association with direct nephrotoxicity. This review focuses on major causes of proteinuria and other pathological findings related to kidney disease in HIV-infected children and adolescents.

  19. [The lungs in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection].

    PubMed

    Barić, D; Vrkić, L

    1997-01-01

    This report describes a case of two patients who were admitted to the Zadar hospital and according to clinical symptoms directed to the Department of Lung Diseases. Both patients were temporarily employed abroad. It has been established that they were infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). One of the patients has been moved to the Department of Infectious Diseases and later to Zagreb, while the other has returned abroad. On admission to the hospital of the Zadar Medical Center none of them answered the question about being engaged in risky behavior. In 1990 there were 699 registered patients hospitalized and 745 registered in the protocol of the Outpatient Clinic of the Department of Lung Diseases. 0.069% of patients were HIV-1-infected. In 1991, there were 520 hospitalized and 453 outpatients, whereas 0.102% were HIV-1-infected and registered subjects. It must be pointed out that these are only numbers of registration and not subjects, because there were patients who were examined or hospitalized twice or more times during the corresponding calendar year. The aim of this study was to point to a new differentially-diagnostic problem present especially at the Department of Lung Diseases after AIDS has become part of our reality. There still remains a problem in regard to detection of HIV-1 seropositivity in patients at departments with opportunistic infections such as tuberculosis.

  20. Human immunodeficiency virus-1 protein tat and methamphetamine interactions.

    PubMed

    Theodore, Shaji; Stolberg, Stephanie; Cass, Wayne A; Maragos, William F

    2006-08-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) affects the central nervous system (CNS) in approximately 30% of infected individuals and basal ganglia structures seem to be most affected. The HIV-1-transactivating protein, Tat, has been suggested to be pathogenically relevant in HIV-1-induced neuronal injury. The abuse of methamphetamine (METH), which is great among this patient population, also affects the basal ganglia, causing degeneration of dopaminergic terminals. In previous studies, we demonstrated that coexposure to these two toxins caused a synergistic loss of striatal dopamine and binding to the dopamine transporter (DAT), suggesting a loss of dopamine terminals. Because the loss of dopamine and DAT, however, do not necessarily reflect dopamine terminal degeneration, we have used silver staining and TH immunohistochemistry to further examine this issue. We have also examined the glial reaction using GFAP as a marker of astrocyte activation and OX-42 as a marker of activated microglia. Lastly, we have begun to explore the mechanism of synergy by investigating the role that the cytokine TNF-alpha might play in Tat + METH synergy. Our data indicate that the synergistic loss of dopamine is likely the result of dopamine terminal degeneration. This injury is not a direct result of the number of activated glia but does involve TNF-alpha.

  1. Cannabinoid administration attenuates the progression of simian immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Molina, Patricia E; Winsauer, Peter; Zhang, Ping; Walker, Edith; Birke, Leslie; Amedee, Angela; Stouwe, Curtis Vande; Troxclair, Dana; McGoey, Robin; Varner, Kurt; Byerley, Lauri; LaMotte, Lynn

    2011-06-01

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC), the primary psychoactive component in marijuana, is FDA approved to ameliorate AIDS-associated wasting. Because cannabinoid receptors are expressed on cells of the immune system, chronic Δ(9)-THC use may impact HIV disease progression. We examined the impact of chronic Δ(9)-THC administration (0.32 mg/kg im, 2 × daily), starting 28 days prior to inoculation with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV(mac251); 100 TCID(50)/ml, iv), on immune and metabolic indicators of disease during the initial 6 month asymptomatic phase of infection in rhesus macaques. SIV(mac251) inoculation resulted in measurable viral load, decreased lymphocyte CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio, and increased CD8(+) proliferation. Δ(9)-THC treatment of SIV-infected animals produced minor to no effects in these parameters. However, chronic Δ(9)-THC administration decreased early mortality from SIV infection (p = 0.039), and this was associated with attenuation of plasma and CSF viral load and retention of body mass (p = NS). In vitro, Δ(9)-THC (10 μm) decreased SIV (10 TCID(50)) viral replication in MT4-R5 cells. These results indicate that chronic Δ(9)-THC does not increase viral load or aggravate morbidity and may actually ameliorate SIV disease progression. We speculate that reduced levels of SIV, retention of body mass, and attenuation of inflammation are likely mechanisms for Δ(9)-THC-mediated modulation of disease progression that warrant further study.

  2. [The incidence of oral candidiasis in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome from Yunnan, China].

    PubMed

    Wen, Yan; Li, Chengwen; Pei, Junhaoxiang; Bai, Jinsong; Yang, Xianghong; Duan, Kaiwen

    2014-08-01

    To assess the incidence of oral candidiasis and its influencing factors in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). An oral examination was conducted in the 1 566 HIV/AIDS patients in the Third Hospital of Kunming from March 2008 to September 2012 (M/F: 1 062/504, age range: 0.2 to 84.0 years old). The HIV viral load (HIV- RNA) and peripheral blood CD4 count were respectively analyzed by Bayer Q340 fluorescence signal surveying instrument (bDNA method) and flow cytometry analysis. The information on usage of highly active anti-retroviral (HAART) drugs and transmission of HIV were obtained through questionnaires. The incidence of oral candidiasis in patients with different HIV-RNA levels and CD4 count and the use of HAART was analyzed and compared. The total incidence of oral candidosis was 31.0% (486/1 566) and there was no difference in sex. The oral lesions were presented by three types, psudomembranous candidosis (PC), erythematous candidosis (EC) and angular cheilitis (AC), and the morbidity was 13.9% (217/1 566), 17.0% (267/1 566) and 4.9% (77/1 566), respectively. The average level of CD4 count in psudomembranous candidosis, erythematous candidosis and angular cheilitis [81.0 (146.0), 74.0 (152.0) and 69.0 (121.5) cell/µl] showed no significant difference (P > 0.05). The incidence of oral candidiasis in non-HAART and HAART subjects were 36.3% (402/1 107) and 18.3% (84/459), respectively (P = 0.000). The CD4 count and absolute counts of HIV viral load in oral candidiasis patients and non-oral candidiasis patients had significant difference (Z = -10.261, P = 0.000 and Z = -4.762, P = 0.000). The morbidity of oral candidiasis in HIV/AIDS patients in Yunnan Province was high, including PC, EC and AC and hyperplastic candidosis was not detected. The incidence was related to the degree of immune suppression and HIV viral load.

  3. Feline leukemia virus and feline immunodeficiency virus in Canada: Recommendations for testing and management

    PubMed Central

    Little, Susan; Bienzle, Dorothee; Carioto, Lisa; Chisholm, Hugh; O’Brien, Elizabeth; Scherk, Margie

    2011-01-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) are common and important infectious disease agents of cats in Canada. Seroprevalence data for FeLV and FIV in various populations of Canadian cats are reviewed and recommendations for testing and management of infections by these viruses in cats in Canada are presented. Retrovirus testing in Canada is infrequent in comparison with the United States, and efforts should be focused on reducing physical and other barriers to testing, and on education of veterinarians, veterinary team members, and cat owners regarding the importance of testing. New test methodologies for FeLV and FIV are emerging, and should be independently evaluated in order to provide practitioners with information on test reliability. Finally, more information is needed on FIV subtypes in Canada to improve diagnostics and vaccines, and to provide information on disease outcomes. PMID:22294790

  4. Seroprevalence of feline leukemia virus and feline immunodeficiency virus infection among cats in Canada.

    PubMed

    Little, Susan; Sears, William; Lachtara, Jessica; Bienzle, Dorothee

    2009-06-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine the seroprevalence of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection among cats in Canada and to identify risk factors for seropositivity. Signalment, lifestyle factors, and test results for FeLV antigen and FIV antibody were analyzed for 11 144 cats from the 10 Canadian provinces. Seroprevalence for FIV antibody was 4.3% and seroprevalence for FeLV antigen was 3.4%. Fifty-eight cats (0.5%) were seropositive for both viruses. Seroprevalence varied geographically. Factors such as age, gender, health status, and lifestyle were significantly associated with risk of FeLV and FIV seropositivity. The results suggest that cats in Canada are at risk of retrovirus infection and support current recommendations that the retrovirus status of all cats should be known.

  5. Feline leukemia virus and feline immunodeficiency virus in Canada: recommendations for testing and management.

    PubMed

    Little, Susan; Bienzle, Dorothee; Carioto, Lisa; Chisholm, Hugh; O'Brien, Elizabeth; Scherk, Margie

    2011-08-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) are common and important infectious disease agents of cats in Canada. Seroprevalence data for FeLV and FIV in various populations of Canadian cats are reviewed and recommendations for testing and management of infections by these viruses in cats in Canada are presented. Retrovirus testing in Canada is infrequent in comparison with the United States, and efforts should be focused on reducing physical and other barriers to testing, and on education of veterinarians, veterinary team members, and cat owners regarding the importance of testing. New test methodologies for FeLV and FIV are emerging, and should be independently evaluated in order to provide practitioners with information on test reliability. Finally, more information is needed on FIV subtypes in Canada to improve diagnostics and vaccines, and to provide information on disease outcomes.

  6. Shedding new light on viruses: super-resolution microscopy for studying human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Müller, Barbara; Heilemann, Mike

    2013-10-01

    For more than 70 years electron microscopy (EM) techniques have played an important role in investigating structures of enveloped viruses. By contrast, use of fluorescence microscopy (FM) methods for this purpose was limited by the fact that the size of virus particles is generally around or below the diffraction limit of light microscopy. Various super-resolution (SR) fluorescence imaging techniques developed over the past two decades bypass the diffraction limit of light microscopy, allowing visualization of subviral details and bridging the gap between conventional FM and EM methods. We summarize here findings on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) obtained using SR-FM techniques. Although the number of published studies is currently limited and some of the pioneering analyses also covered methodological or descriptive aspects, recent publications clearly indicate the potential to approach open questions in HIV-1 replication from a new angle.

  7. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus in early infected and chronically infected cells by antisense oligodeoxynucleotides and their phosphorothioate analogues.

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, S; Ikeuchi, T; Sun, D; Sarin, P S; Konopka, A; Maizel, J; Zamecnik, P C

    1989-01-01

    Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides, both the phosphorothioate analogues and unmodified oligomers of the same sequence, inhibit replication and expression of human immunodeficiency virus already growing in tissue cultures of MOLT-3 cells with much greater efficacy than do mismatched ("random") oligomers and homooligomers of the same length and with the same internucleotide modification. This preferential inhibitory effect is elicited in as short a time as 4-24 hr postinfection. Likewise, antisense oligomers exhibit greater inhibitory effects on human immunodeficiency virus in chronically infected cells than do mismatched oligomers and homooligomers. Phosphorothioate antisene oligomers are up to 100 times more potent than unmodified oligomers of the same sequence in these inhibitory assays. These results, in major respects, confirm and extend those recently published by Matsukura et al. [Matsukura, M., Zon, G., Shinozuka, K., Robert-Guroff, M., Shimada, T., Stein, C. A., Mitsuza, H., Wong-Staal, F., Cohen, J. S. & Broder, S. (1989) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 86, 4244-4248]. They also point out the importance of computer analysis of sequences though to be random but that in reality contain significant areas of likely hybridization, either to the viral genome or to the complementary DNA strand synthesized from it. They thus reinforce the concept that specific base pairing is a crucial feature of oligonucleotide inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus. PMID:2682627

  8. Role of the N-Terminal Zinc Finger of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Nucleocapsid Protein in Virus Structure and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Tanchou, Valérie; Decimo, Didier; Péchoux, Christine; Lener, Daniela; Rogemond, Véronique; Berthoux, Lionel; Ottmann, Michèle; Darlix, Jean-Luc

    1998-01-01

    Nucleocapsid protein (NCp7) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 is found covering the genomic RNA in the interior of the viral particle. It is a highly basic protein with two zinc fingers of the form CX2CX4HX4C which exhibit strong affinity for a zinc cation. To study the structure-function relationship of the N-terminal zinc finger of NCp7, this domain was either deleted or changed to CX2CX4CX4C. We examined virus formation and structure as well as proviral DNA synthesis. Our data show that these two NC mutations result in the formation of particles with an abnormal core morphology and impair the end of proviral DNA synthesis, leading to noninfectious viruses. PMID:9557738

  9. Extracellular Vpr protein increases cellular permissiveness to human immunodeficiency virus replication and reactivates virus from latency.

    PubMed Central

    Levy, D N; Refaeli, Y; Weiner, D B

    1995-01-01

    The vpr gene product of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus is a virion-associated regulatory protein that has been shown using vpr mutant viruses to increase virus replication, particularly in monocytes/macrophages. We have previously shown that vpr can directly inhibit cell proliferation and induce cell differentiation, events linked to the control of HIV replication, and also that the replication of a vpr mutant but not that of wild-type HIV type 1 (HIV-1) was compatible with cellular proliferation (D. N. Levy, L. S. Fernandes, W. V. Williams, and D. B. Weiner, Cell 72:541-550, 1993). Here we show that purified recombinant Vpr protein, in concentrations of < 100 pg/ml to 100 ng/ml, increases wild-type HIV-1 replication in newly infected transformed cell lines via a long-lasting increase in cellular permissiveness to HIV replication. The activity of extracellular Vpr protein could be completely inhibited by anti-Vpr antibodies. Extracellular Vpr also induced efficient HIV-1 replication in newly infected resting peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Extracellular Vpr transcomplemented a vpr mutant virus which was deficient in replication in promonocytic cells, restoring full replication competence. In addition, extracellular Vpr reactivated HIV-1 expression in five latently infected cell lines of T-cell, B-cell, and promonocytic origin which normally express very low levels of HIV RNA and protein, indicating an activation of translational or pretranslational events in the virus life cycle. Together, these results describe a novel pathway governing HIV replication and a potential target for the development of anti-HIV therapeutics. PMID:7815499

  10. HIV and Sports. American Academy of Pediatrics Policy Statement. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) Virus in the Athletic Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physician and Sportsmedicine, 1992

    1992-01-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics policy statement on participation of athletes with human immunodeficiency virus suggests they be allowed to participate in competitive sports until disease transmission is found to occur in sport settings. The article discusses physician and coach roles and recommends precautions regarding body fluids and…

  11. Transcarinal needle aspiration in the diagnosis of mediastinal adenitis in a patient infected with the human immunodeficiency virus

    PubMed Central

    Serdà, G Julià; de Castro, F Rodriguez; Sánchez-Alarcos, J M Fernandez; Luna, J Caminero; López, F Diaz; Navarro, P Cabrera

    1990-01-01

    Tuberculous mediastinal lymphadenopathy in a patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was diagnosed by means of transcarinal needle aspiration via a fibreoptic bronchoscope. Images PMID:2382248

  12. Relevance of feline calicivirus, feline immunodeficiency virus, feline leukemia virus, feline herpesvirus and Bartonella henselae in cats with chronic gingivostomatitis.

    PubMed

    Belgard, Sylvia; Truyen, Uwe; Thibault, Jean-Christophe; Sauter-Louis, Carola; Hartmann, Katrin

    2010-01-01

    Despite its common occurrence, the aetiology of chronic gingivostomatitis in cats remains uncertain. Aetiology is likely multifactorial, and several infectious agents may be associated with chronic gingivostomatitis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of feline calicivirus (FCV), feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), feline leukemia virus (FeLV), feline herpesvirus (FHV), and Bartonella henselae (B. henselae) in cats with chronic gingivostomatitis and in an age-matched control group. In addition, other factors, e. g., environmental conditions were investigated. In 52 cats with chronic gingivostomatitis and 50 healthy age-matched control cats, the presence of FCV ribonucleic acid (RNA), and FHV deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) (polymerase chain reaction [PCR] from oropharyngeal swabs), and B. henselae DNA (PCR from oropharyngeal swabs and blood), as well as FeLV antigen (serum), and antibodies against FCV, B. henselae, and FIV (serum) were examined. FCV RNA was significantly more common in cats with chronic gingivostomatitis (53.8%, p < 0.001) than in controls (14.0%); a significant difference was also found in the prevalence of antibodies to FCV between the cats with chronic gingivostomatitis (78.8%, p = 0.023) and controls (58.0%). Of the other infectious agents investigated, there was no significant difference in the prevalence between the cats with chronic gingivostomatitis and the controls. The results of this study allow the conclusion that FCV, but no other infectious agents, is commonly associated with chronic gingivostomatitis in cats.

  13. Co-infections with hepatitis B and C viruses in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Rebbani, K; Ouladlahsen, A; Bensghir, A; Akil, A; Lamdini, H; Issouf, H; Brahim, I; Kitab, B; Fakhir, F Z; Wakrim, L; Marhoum El Filali, K; Himmich, H; Ezzikouri, S; Benjelloun, S

    2013-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are major public health concerns. We aimed to determine the prevalence of HBV and HCV infections among HIV-infected patients, and to identify the main circulating hepatitis strains in Morocco. The study was carried out in 503 HIV-infected patients. Our survey indicated that the prevalence of HIV/hepatitis co-infection was 10.6%; 5.2% of patients were HBV surface antigen positive, and 5.4% of patients were anti-HCV positive. Among the HBV surface antigen-positive group, HBV DNA sequencing identified exclusively genotype D (D1: 26.7%; D7: 73.3%) in accordance with what is found in the general population. In contrast, sequencing of HCV isolates produced an unusual subtype distribution with a decreasing order of prevalence: 1a, 3a (both 23.5%), 1b, 4a (both 17.6%), 1c (11.8%) and 6h (6%).

  14. Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis in a Child with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Co-Infection

    PubMed Central

    Maurya, Pradeep Kumar; Thakkar, Mayur Deepak; Kulshreshtha, Dinkar; Singh, Ajai Kumar; Thacker, Anup Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is a fatal infectious disease of childhood caused by persistence of the measles virus in the brain. The effect of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection on subacute sclerosing panencephalitis remains elusive and rare. We report a child who developed subacute sclerosing panencephalitis following a short latency period and a rapidly progressive course with HIV co-infection. PMID:27777245

  15. Immunogenicity and efficacy of immunodeficiency virus-like particles pseudotyped with the G protein of vesicular stomatitis virus

    SciTech Connect

    Kuate, Seraphin; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane; Stoiber, Heribert; Nchinda, Godwin; Floto, Anja; Franz, Monika; Sauermann, Ulrike; Bredl, Simon; Deml, Ludwig; Ignatius, Ralf; Norley, Steve; Racz, Paul; Tenner-Racz, Klara; Steinman, Ralph M.; Wagner, Ralf; Uberla, Klaus . E-mail: klaus.ueberla@ruhr-uni-bochum.de

    2006-07-20

    Vaccination with exogenous antigens such as recombinant viral proteins, immunodeficiency virus-derived whole inactivated virus particles, or virus-like particles (VLP) has generally failed to provide sufficient protection in animal models for AIDS. Pseudotyping VLPs with the vesicular stomatitis virus G protein (VSV-G), which is known to mediate entry into dendritic cells, might allow more efficient stimulation of immune responses. Therefore, we pseudotyped noninfectious immunodeficiency virus-like particles with VSV-G and carried out a preliminary screen of their immunogenicity and vaccination efficacy. Incorporation of VSV-G into HIV-1 VLPs led to hundred-fold higher antibody titers to HIV-1 Gag and enhancement of T cell responses in mice. Repeated vaccination of rhesus monkeys for 65 weeks with VSV-G pseudotyped simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-like particles (VLP[G]) provided initial evidence for efficient suppression of viral load after mucosal challenge with the SIVmac239 virus. Challenge of monkeys after a 28 week vaccination regimen with VLP[G] led to a reduction in peak viremia, but persistent suppression of viral load was not achieved. Due to limitations in the number of animals available for this study, improved efficacy of VSV-G pseudotyped VLPs in nonhuman primates could not be demonstrated. However, mouse experiments revealed that pseudotyping of VLPs with fusion-competent VSV-G clearly improves their immunogenicity. Additional strategies, particularly adjuvants, should be considered to provide greater protection against a challenge with pathogenic immunodeficiency virus.

  16. Humoral immune response to the entire human immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein made in insect cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rusche, J.R.; Lynn, D.L.; Robert-Guroff, M.; Langlois, A.J.; Lyerly, H.K.; Carson, H.; Krohn, K.; Ranki, A.; Gallo, R.C.; Bolognesi, D.P.; Putney, S.D.

    1987-10-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus envelope gene was expressed in insect cells by using a Baculovirus expression vector. The protein has an apparent molecular mass of 160 kDa, appears on the surface of infected insect cells, and does not appear to be cleaved to glycoproteins gp120 and gp41. Goats immunized with the 160-kDa protein have high titers of antibody that neutralizes virus infection as measured by viral gene expression or cell cytolysis. In addition, immune sera can block fusion of human immunodeficiency virus-infected cells in culture. Both neutralization and fusion-blocking activities are bound to and eluted from immobilized gp120.

  17. Clinical significance of “anti-HBc alone” in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Rodríguez, Mª Teresa; Sopeña, Bernardo; Crespo, Manuel; Rivera, Alberto; del Blanco, Teresa González; Ocampo, Antonio; Martínez-Vázquez, César

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prevalence and clinical relevance of isolated antibodies to hepatitis B core antigen as the only marker of infection (“anti-HBc alone”) among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type-1 infected patients. Occult hepatitis B infection frequency was also evaluated. METHODS: Three hundred and forty eight histories from 2388 HIV-positive patients were randomly reviewed. Patients with serological markers of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection were classified into three groups: past hepatitis, “anti-HBc alone” and chronic hepatitis. Determination of DNA from HBV, and RNA and genotype from hepatitis C virus (HCV) were performed on “anti-HBc alone” patients. RESULTS: One hundred and eighty seven (53.7%) HIV-positive patients had markers of HBV infection: 118 past infection (63.1%), 14 chronic hepatitis (7.5%) and 55 “anti-HBc alone” (29.4%). Younger age [2.3-fold higher per every 10 years younger; 95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.33-4.00] and antibodies to HCV infection [odds ratio (OR) 2.87; 95% CI 1.10-7.48] were factors independently associated with the “anti-HBc alone” pattern. No differences in liver disease frequency were detected between both groups. Serum levels of anti-HBs were not associated with HCV infection (nor viral replication or HCV genotype), or with HIV replication or CD4 level. No “anti-HBc alone” patient tested positive for HBV DNA. CONCLUSION: “Anti-HBc alone” prevalence in HIV-positive patients was similar to previously reported data and was associated with a younger age and with antibodies to HCV infection. In clinical practice, HBV DNA determination should be performed only in those patients with clinical or analytical signs of liver injury. PMID:19291824

  18. A Critical Review of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection--And Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome-Related Research: The Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practice of Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Janice M.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Reviews the research literature related to nurses' knowledge, attitudes, and practices concerning acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), human immunodeficiency virus infection, and care of people with AIDS. Gaps in knowledge and negative, fearful attitudes were identified; negative fears and attitudes decreased with the gain in accurate…

  19. Enteric Virus Infections and Diarrhea in Healthy and Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Children

    PubMed Central

    Liste, Mary B.; Natera, Ivelisse; Suarez, José A.; Pujol, Flor H.; Liprandi, Ferdinando; Ludert, Juan E.

    2000-01-01

    Forty-three stool samples from 27 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-seropositive children and 38 samples from 38 HIV-negative children, collected during a 15-month period, were examined for enteric viruses. Diagnostic assays included enzyme immunoassays for rotavirus, adenovirus, and Norwalk virus; polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis for picobirnavirus and atypical rotavirus; and PCR for astrovirus and enterovirus. Specimens from HIV-positive children were more likely than those of HIV-negative children to have enterovirus (56 versus 21%; P < 0.0002) and astrovirus (12 versus 0%; P < 0.02), but not rotavirus (5 versus 8%; P > 0.5). No adenoviruses, picobirnaviruses, or Norwalk viruses were found. The rates of virus-associated diarrhea were similar among HIV-positive and HIV-negative children. Enteroviruses were excreted for up to 6 months in HIV-positive children; however, no evidence for prolonged excretion of poliovirus vaccine was observed. These results suggest that although infection with enterovirus and astrovirus may be frequent in HIV-infected children, enteric viruses are not associated with the diarrhea frequently suffered by these children. PMID:10921942

  20. Mutations in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Nucleocapsid Protein Zinc Fingers Cause Premature Reverse Transcription ▿

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, James A.; Bosche, William J.; Shatzer, Teresa L.; Johnson, Donald G.; Gorelick, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) requires that its genome be reverse transcribed into double-stranded DNA for productive infection of cells. This process requires not only reverse transcriptase but also the nucleocapsid protein (NC), which functions as a nucleic acid chaperone. Reverse transcription generally begins once the core of the virion enters the cytoplasm of a newly infected cell. However, some groups have reported the presence of low levels of viral DNA (vDNA) within particles prior to infection, the significance and function of which is controversial. We report here that several HIV-1 NC mutants, which we previously identified as being replication defective, contain abnormally high levels of intravirion DNA. These findings were further reinforced by the inability of these NC mutants to perform endogenous reverse transcription (ERT), in contrast to the readily measurable ERT activity in wild-type HIV-1. When either of the NC mutations is combined with a mutation that inactivates the viral protease, we observed a significant reduction in the amount of intravirion DNA. Interestingly, we also observed high levels of intravirion DNA in the context of wild-type NC when we delayed budding by means of a PTAP(−) (Pro-Thr-Ala-Pro) mutation. Premature reverse transcription is most probably occurring before these mutant virions bud from producer cells, but we fail to see any evidence that the NC mutations alter the timing of Pr55Gag processing. Critically, our results also suggest that the presence of intravirion vDNA could serve as a diagnostic for identifying replication-defective HIV-1. PMID:18667500

  1. Mutations in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 nucleocapsid protein zinc fingers cause premature reverse transcription.

    PubMed

    Thomas, James A; Bosche, William J; Shatzer, Teresa L; Johnson, Donald G; Gorelick, Robert J

    2008-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) requires that its genome be reverse transcribed into double-stranded DNA for productive infection of cells. This process requires not only reverse transcriptase but also the nucleocapsid protein (NC), which functions as a nucleic acid chaperone. Reverse transcription generally begins once the core of the virion enters the cytoplasm of a newly infected cell. However, some groups have reported the presence of low levels of viral DNA (vDNA) within particles prior to infection, the significance and function of which is controversial. We report here that several HIV-1 NC mutants, which we previously identified as being replication defective, contain abnormally high levels of intravirion DNA. These findings were further reinforced by the inability of these NC mutants to perform endogenous reverse transcription (ERT), in contrast to the readily measurable ERT activity in wild-type HIV-1. When either of the NC mutations is combined with a mutation that inactivates the viral protease, we observed a significant reduction in the amount of intravirion DNA. Interestingly, we also observed high levels of intravirion DNA in the context of wild-type NC when we delayed budding by means of a PTAP((-)) (Pro-Thr-Ala-Pro) mutation. Premature reverse transcription is most probably occurring before these mutant virions bud from producer cells, but we fail to see any evidence that the NC mutations alter the timing of Pr55(Gag) processing. Critically, our results also suggest that the presence of intravirion vDNA could serve as a diagnostic for identifying replication-defective HIV-1.

  2. In vitro suppression of normal human bone marrow progenitor cells by human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, H N; Crumpacker, C S; Chatis, P A

    1991-01-01

    Incubation of normal human nonadherent and T-cell-depleted bone marrow cells with HIVIIIB at multiplicities of infection (MOI) ranging from 0.0001:1 to 1:1 reverse transcriptase (RT) units resulted in the dose-dependent suppression of the in vitro growth of erythroid burst-forming unit (BFU-E), granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM), and T-lymphocyte (CFU-TL) colonies of progenitor cells. Maximum inhibition of colony formation was observed at a 1:1 ratio of virus to bone marrow cells. At this MOI, BFU-E and CFU-GM colonies were inhibited by 60 to 80%, while CFU-TL colonies were totally suppressed. Inhibition of colony formation was also observed at an MOI of 0.1:1 but not with further log dilutions of the virus. Incubation of the virus with antibody to gp160 resulted in the complete reversal of stem cell suppression and the normalization of colony growth in vitro. For BFU-E and CFU-GM colonies, this reversal was observed with dilutions of antibody up to 1:100 and was no longer observed at titers greater than 1:500. The CFU-TL colony number normalized at titers between 1:10 and 1:50. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) also suppressed by 50% the growth of colonies derived from CD34+ stem cell fractions. Infection of CD34+ cells and T-cell-depleted, nonadherent cell fractions was demonstrated by detection with HIV-specific DNA probe following amplification by polymerase chain reaction. The results suggest that HIV can directly infect human bone marrow progenitor cells and affect their ability to proliferate and give rise to colonies in vitro. The results indicate a direct role for the virus in bone marrow suppression and a possible mechanism for the cytopenias observed in patients with AIDS. Images PMID:2002542

  3. Clinical outcomes of routine opt-out antenatal human immunodeficiency virus screening: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ibekwe, Everistus; Haigh, Carol; Duncan, Fiona; Fatoye, Francis

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the clinical outcome of routine screening of human immunodeficiency virus in antenatal clinic settings. Despite the growing advances in human immunodeficiency virus management, nearly 30% of the estimated 1·5 million seropositive pregnant women are undiagnosed. Routine opt-out testing is a strategy endorsed by the World Health Organization in to increase testing rates in clinical settings. A systematic review of relevant published literature. A comprehensive electronic search for relevant studies in Science Direct, MEDLINE, SCOPUS, CINAHL and PubMed was conducted with search terms (Box 2). Hand searches were also conducted for additional resources. There were no geographical restrictions. Searches were restricted to English language and studies conducted between 1998-2015; totaling 1097 were retrieved and carefully appraised for review. Eighteen studies were eligible for review: eight from Africa, five from the United States, three from Europe, one from Australia and one from Asia. Fourteen studies reported increases in human immunodeficiency virus testing rate. Following the introduction of routine testing, human immunodeficiency virus testing rates increased from values ranging from 68-99·9% with median value of 88%. The comparison studies reported testing uptake of 22-93·5% with median value of 59%. Maternal human immunodeficiency virus case detection rates nearly doubled following adoption of routine testing at values of 99 and 45% during opt-in. Linkage to treatment and care for prevention of vertical transmission was reported on six studies, and results ranged between 12·9-77·2%. The findings show that irrespective of human immunodeficiency virus epidemiological scenarios, routine testing gave more women opportunity to learn their human immunodeficiency virus status and take measures for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus. Future studies should focus on identifying strategies to improving linkages to

  4. Postnatal transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1: the breast-feeding dilemma.

    PubMed

    Van de Perre, P

    1995-08-01

    Human milk has been considered only recently as a source of transmission for the human immunodeficiency virus. The estimated postnatal transmission rate from mothers who acquired human immunodeficiency virus infection while lactating is 26% (95% confidence interval 13% to 39%) and may be in the range of 8% to 18% from mothers who were infected before becoming pregnant. Risk factors for postnatal transmission include maternal immune deficiency and the presence of human immunodeficiency virus-infected cells in milk. Some milk factors may be protective against postnatal transmission such as specific immunoglobulin A and immunoglobulin M and a molecule able to inhibit the binding of human immunodeficiency virus to CD4. In addition to its safety and its birth-spacing properties, breast-feeding provides immunologic protection and an ideal nutritional content to the infant. In a poor hygienic environment artificial feeding dramatically increases morbidity and mortality from diarrheal diseases and respiratory infections. Consequently, according to our current knowledge the World Health Organization and the United Nations Children's Fund reasonably recommend continuing breast-feeding promotion in women living in settings where infectious diseases and malnutrition are the primary causes of infant deaths such as in many developing countries. In settings where infectious diseases and malnutrition are not the primary causes of infant deaths, such as in most of the settings in the developed world, the advisory group recommends against breast-feeding for mothers with proved human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection.

  5. Glycosylation of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Influences Immune-Tissue Targeting during Primary Infection, Leading to Immunodeficiency or Viral Control

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Chie; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Hagen, Shoko I.; Tsunetsugu-Yokota, Yasuko; Villinger, Francois; Ansari, Aftab A.; Suzuki, Yasuo; Nagai, Yoshiyuki; Picker, Louis J.

    2012-01-01

    Glycans of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) play pivotal roles in modulating virus-target cell interactions. We have previously reported that, whereas SIVmac239 is pathogenic, its deglycosylated essentially nonpathogenic mutant (Δ5G) serves as a live-attenuated vaccine, although both replicate similarly during primary infection. These findings prompted us to determine whether such a polarized clinical outcome was due to differences in the immune tissues targeted by these viruses, where functionally and phenotypically different memory CD4+ T cells reside. The results showed that Δ5G replicates in secondary lymphoid tissue (SLT) at 1- to 2-log-lower levels than SIVmac239, whereas SIVmac239-infected but not Δ5G-infected animals deplete CXCR3+ CCR5+ transitional memory (TrM) CD4+ T cells. An early robust Δ5G replication was localized to small intestinal tissue, especially the lamina propria (effector site) rather than isolated lymphoid follicles (inductive site) and was associated with the induction and depletion of CCR6+ CXCR3− CCR5+ effector memory CD4+ T cells. These results suggest that differential glycosylation of Env dictates the type of tissue-resident CD4+ T cells that are targeted, which leads to pathogenic infection of TrM-Th1 cells in SLT and nonpathogenic infection of Th17 cells in the small intestine, respectively. PMID:22718828

  6. A peptide library expressed in yeast reveals new major epitopes from human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Madaule, P; Gairin, J E; Bénichou, S; Rossier, J

    1991-04-01

    In order to characterize novel human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) continuous epitopes, we designed a simple method, based on recombinant DNA, providing a complete set of peptides derived from HIV-1. A library (4 x 10(4) clones) was first constructed in a new expression/secretion vector, using as inserts small fragments of HIV-1 DNA (50-150 bp) generated by random DNAse I cleavage. This peptide library, expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, was screened with sera of HIV-1 infected individuals and human and murine anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies. Plasmids from immunoreactive colonies were recovered and the sequences of the HIV-1 derived inserts were determined. By using human sera, we have detected classical HIV-1 epitopes and identified two novel major epitopes, which may be used to improve diagnostic tests, localized in the p24 core protein and in the endonuclease. In addition, four minor epitopes were also defined by screening the library with monoclonal antibodies: in the protease, in the p17 core protein, in gp120 and near the C-terminal of gp41. This method is general and can be used for any protein from which a cloned cDNA is available.

  7. Human immunodeficiency virus testing practices among buprenorphine-prescribing physicians.

    PubMed

    Edelman, E Jennifer; Dinh, An T; Moore, Brent A; Schottenfeld, Richard S; Fiellin, David A; Sullivan, Lynn E

    2012-06-01

    Despite the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations for annual HIV testing of at-risk populations, including those with substance use disorders, there are no data on the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing practices of buprenorphine-prescribing physicians. To describe HIV testing practices among buprenorphine-prescribing physicians. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of physicians enrolled in a national system to support buprenorphine prescribing between July and August 2008. The electronic survey included questions on demographics; clinical training and experience; clinical practice; patient characteristics; and physician screening practices, including HIV testing. Only 46% of 382 respondent physicians conducted HIV testing. On univariate analysis, physicians who conducted HIV testing were more likely to report addiction specialty training (33% vs 19%, P = 0.001), practicing in addiction settings (28% vs 16%, P = 0.006), and having treated more than 50 patients with buprenorphine (50% vs 31%, P < 0.0001) than those who did not. Compared with physicians who did not conduct HIV testing, physicians who conducted HIV testing had a lower proportion of buprenorphine patients who were white (75% vs 82%, P = 0.01) or dependent upon prescription opioids (57% vs 70%, P < 0.0001). In multivariate analysis, physicians who conducted HIV testing were more likely to have treated more than 50 patients with buprenorphine (odds ratio = 1.777, 95% CI 1.011-3.124) and had fewer patients dependent upon prescription opioids (odds ratio = 0.986 95% CI 0.975-0.998) than physicians who did not. Interventions to increase HIV testing among physicians prescribing buprenorphine are needed.

  8. Exercise and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) Infection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, DeSales; Jackson, Catherine G. R.; Greenleaf, John E.

    1995-01-01

    The human immune system is highly efficient and remarkably protective when functioning properly. Similar to other physiological systems, it functions best when the body is maintained with a balanced diet, sufficient rest and a moderately stress-free lifestyle. It can be disrupted by inappropriate drug use and extreme emotion or exertion. The functioning of normal or compromised immune systems can be enhanced by properly prescribed moderate exercise conditioning regimens in healthy people, and in some human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1)-infected patients but not in others who unable to complete an interval training program. Regular exercise conditioning in healthy people reduces cardiovascular risk factors, increases stamina, facilitates bodyweight control, and reduces stress by engendering positive feelings of well-being. Certain types of cancer may also be suppressed by appropriate exercise conditioning. Various exercise regimens are being evaluated as adjunct treatments for medicated patients with the HIV-1 syndrome. Limited anecdotal evidence from patients suggests that moderate exercise conditioning is per se responsible for their survival well beyond expectancy. HIV-1-infected patients respond positively, both physiologically and psychologically, to moderate exercise conditioning. However, the effectiveness of any exercise treatment programme depends on its mode, frequency, intensity and duration when prescribed o complement the pathological condition of the patient. The effectiveness of exercise conditioning regimens in patients with HIV-1 infection is reviewed in this article. In addition, we discuss mechanisms and pathways, involving the interplay of psychological and physiological factors, through which the suppressed immune system can be enhanced. The immune modulators discussed are endogenous opioids, cytokines, neurotransmitters and other hormones. Exercise conditioning treatment appears to be more effective when combined with other stress management

  9. Leishmania and human immunodeficiency virus coinfection: the first 10 years.

    PubMed Central

    Alvar, J; Cañavate, C; Gutiérrez-Solar, B; Jiménez, M; Laguna, F; López-Vélez, R; Molina, R; Moreno, J

    1997-01-01

    Over 850 Leishmania-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection cases have been recorded, the majority in Europe, where 7 to 17% of HIV-positive individuals with fever have amastigotes, suggesting that Leishmania-infected individuals without symptoms will express symptoms of leishmaniasis if they become immunosuppressed. However, there are indirect reasons and statistical data demonstrating that intravenous drug addiction plays a specific role in Leishmania infantum transmission: an anthroponotic cycle complementary to the zoonotic one has been suggested. Due to anergy in patients with coinfection, L. infantum dermotropic zymodemes are isolated from patient viscera and a higher L. infantum phenotypic variability is seen. Moreover, insect trypanosomatids that are currently considered nonpathogenic have been isolated from coinfected patients. HIV infection and Leishmania infection each induce important analogous immunological changes whose effects are multiplied if they occur concomitantly, such as a Th1-to-Th2 response switch; however, the consequences of the viral infection predominate. In fact, a large proportion of coinfected patients have no detectable anti-Leishmania antibodies. The microorganisms share target cells, and it has been demonstrated in vitro how L. infantum induces the expression of latent HIV-1. Bone marrow culture is the most useful diagnostic technique, but it is invasive. Blood smears and culture are good alternatives. PCR, xenodiagnosis, and circulating-antigen detection are available only in specialized laboratories. The relationship with low levels of CD4+ cells conditions the clinical presentation and evolution of disease. Most patients have visceral leishmaniasis, but asymptomatic, cutaneous, mucocutaneous, diffuse cutaneous, and post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis can be produced by L. infantum. The digestive and respiratory tracts are frequently parasitized. The course of coinfection is marked by a high relapse rate. There is a lack

  10. Human immunodeficiency virus disclosure and patient confidentiality in orthopaedic procedures.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Michael P; Farrell, Caroline L; Garrett, Margaret R; Khanuja, Harpal S

    2009-12-01

    A thirty-two-year-old man with hemophilia whose chief complaint was knee pain was referred by his hematologist for consideration of a total knee arthroplasty. On his initial visit, the patient was seen and evaluated with his pregnant wife and their infant child present in the examination room at his request. During the review of systems and past medical history, the treating surgeon inquired into the status of his human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) viral load and CD4 count. At that point, the patient denied ever testing positive for HIV. Later, in a private discussion, the patient confirmed his HIV-positive status. He admitted that his wife was unaware of his history, and he stated that he did not wish her to know. The surgeon explained to the patient that his HIV history posed a major health risk to his wife and children and encouraged him to discuss it with her. The surgeon sought the advice of the institution's legal counsel. It was explained that, according to state law, the surgeon was not obliged to, but could, inform the patient's wife of the situation. At the next visit, the surgeon again asked the patient to discuss the situation with his spouse. The patient agreed to do so. To confirm that the information had been conveyed, the surgeon asked the patient to return with his wife to discuss the patient's HIV status and the informed consent pertinent to total knee arthroplasty. When the patient did not return, the surgeon notified the referring hematologist of the situation.

  11. Feline immunodeficiency virus infection in cats of Japan.

    PubMed

    Ishida, T; Washizu, T; Toriyabe, K; Motoyoshi, S; Tomoda, I; Pedersen, N C

    1989-01-15

    A seroepidemiologic survey for feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection was conducted in Japan. Between June and December 1987, individual sera (n = 3,323) were submitted by veterinary practitioners from many parts of the country. Specimens were from 1,739 cats with clinical signs suggestive of FIV infection and from 1,584 healthy-appearing cats seen by the same practitioners. The overall FIV infection rate among cats in Japan was 960/3,323 cats (28.9%). The infection rate was more than 3 times higher in the clinically ill cats, compared with that in the healthy cats of the same cohort (43.9 vs 12.4%). Male cats were 1.5 times as likely to be infected as were females. Almost all FIV-infected cats were domestic cats (as opposed to purebred cats). Complete clinical history was available for 700 of 960 FIV-infected cats. Of these 700 FIV-infected cats, 626 (89.4%) were clinically ill, and the remainder did not have clinical signs of disease. The mean age at the time of FIV diagnosis for the 700 cats was 5.2 years, with younger mean age for males (4.9 years) than for females (5.8 years). Most of the infected cats (94.7%) were either allowed to run outdoors or had lived outdoors before being brought into homes. The mortality for FIV-infected cats during the 6 months after diagnosis was 14.7%, and the mean age at the time of death was 5.7 years. Concurrent FeLV infection was seen in 12.4% of the FIV-infected cats, but this was not much different from the historical incidence of FeLV infection in similar groups of cats not infected with FIV.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Stroke in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Tipping, Brent; de Villiers, Linda; Wainwright, Helen; Candy, Sally; Bryer, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Objective To report the nature of stroke in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in a region with high HIV seroprevalence and describe HIV associated vasculopathy. Methods Patients with first ever stroke, infected with HIV and prospectively included in the stroke register of the Groote Schuur Hospital/University of Cape Town stroke unit were identified and reviewed. Results Between 2000 and 2006, 67 of the 1087 (6,1%) stroke patients were HIV infected. Of these, 91% (n = 61) were younger than 46 years. Cerebral infarction occurred in 96% (n = 64) of the HIV positive patients and intracerebral haemorrhage in 4% (n = 3). HIV infected young stroke patients did not demonstrate hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidaemia or smoking as significant risk factors for ischaemic stroke. Infection as a risk factor for stroke was significantly more common in HIV positive patients (p = 0.018, OR 6.4, CI 3.1 to 13.2). In 52 (81%) patients with ischaemic stroke, an aetiology was determined. Primary aetiologies comprised infectious meningitides/vasculitides in 18 (28%) patients, coagulopathy in 12 (19%) patients and cardioembolism in nine (14%) patients. Multiple aetiologies were present in seven (11%) patients with ischaemic stroke. HIV associated vasculopathy was identified in 13 (20%) patients. The HIV associated vasculopathy manifested either extracranially (seven patients) as total or significant carotid occlusion or intracranially (six patients) as medium vessel occlusion, with or without fusiform aneurysmal dilation, stenosis and vessel calibre variation. Conclusion Investigation of HIV infected patients presenting with stroke will determine an aetiology in the majority of patients. In our cohort, 20% of patients demonstrated evidence of an HIV associated vasculopathy. PMID:17470469

  13. Discovering human immunodeficiency virus mutational pathways using temporal Bayesian networks.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Leal, Pablo; Rios-Flores, Alma; Avila-Rios, Santiago; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo; Gonzalez, Jesus A; Fiedler-Cameras, Lindsey; Orihuela-Espina, Felipe; Morales, Eduardo F; Sucar, L Enrique

    2013-03-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is one of the fastest evolving organisms in the planet. Its remarkable variation capability makes HIV able to escape from multiple evolutionary forces naturally or artificially acting on it, through the development and selection of adaptive mutations. Although most drug resistance mutations have been well identified, the dynamics and temporal patterns of appearance of these mutations can still be further explored. The use of models to predict mutational pathways as well as temporal patterns of appearance of adaptive mutations could greatly benefit clinical management of individuals under antiretroviral therapy. We apply a temporal nodes Bayesian network (TNBN) model to data extracted from the Stanford HIV drug resistance database in order to explore the probabilistic relationships between drug resistance mutations and antiretroviral drugs unveiling possible mutational pathways and establishing their probabilistic-temporal sequence of appearance. In a first experiment, we compared the TNBN approach with other models such as static Bayesian networks, dynamic Bayesian networks and association rules. TNBN achieved a 64.2% sparser structure over the static network. In a second experiment, the TNBN model was applied to a dataset associating antiretroviral drugs with mutations developed under different antiretroviral regimes. The learned models captured previously described mutational pathways and associations between antiretroviral drugs and drug resistance mutations. Predictive accuracy reached 90.5%. Our results suggest possible applications of TNBN for studying drug-mutation and mutation-mutation networks in the context of antiretroviral therapy, with direct impact on the clinical management of patients under antiretroviral therapy. This opens new horizons for predicting HIV mutational pathways in immune selection with relevance for antiretroviral drug development and therapy plan. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  14. Delayed Presentation for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Care Among Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Neel R.; Skanderson, Melissa; Gordon, Kirsha S.; Concato, John; Justice, Amy C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite the effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy, nearly half of patients entering human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) care have advanced disease. Many attribute this delay to poor access to healthcare. Others argue that delays will persist until routine screening is adopted. The Veterans Health Administration (VA) is a unique laboratory to examine whether access to comprehensive health benefits results in earlier entry into HIV care. Methods Retrospective observational study of 4368 HIV-positive patients entering HIV care during 1998–2002 at VA medical centers nationwide. Outcomes of interest: rates of acquired immune deficiency syndrome in year of presentation; duration of VA utilization before HIV presentation; presence of “clinical triggers,” signaling greater risk of HIV infection, before presentation. Results Fifty-one percent (n = 2211) of all patients presented with CD4 counts of <200 cells/mm3. Thirty-nine percent (n = 1697) of all patients used other VA services before presentation for HIV care, with median duration of 3.6 years (interquartile range 25–75: 2.2–5.1 year) and 6 physician visits [interquartile range (IQR), 25–75: 2–18 visits] between first utilization and HIV presentation. No difference existed in the percentage presenting with CD4 counts <200 cells/mm3 among those with and without prior VA healthcare (50% vs. 51%, P = 0.76). Only 13% of those with prior VA healthcare demonstrated a clinical trigger before HIV presentation. Conclusions More than half of veterans entered HIV care with an acquired immune deficiency syndrome diagnosis at presentation irrespective of whether they had previously established healthcare in the VA. Access to care does not seem to be the primary cause of delayed HIV presentation. Widespread HIV screening is needed to improve rates of early detection. PMID:18049352

  15. Stability of the gorilla microbiome despite simian immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Andrew H; Peeters, Martine; Ayouba, Ahidjo; Ngole, Eitel Mpoudi; Esteban, Amadine; Hahn, Beatrice H; Ochman, Howard

    2015-02-01

    Simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) have been discovered in over 45 primate species; however, the pathogenic potential of most SIV strains remains unknown due to difficulties inherent in observing wild populations. Because those SIV infections that are pathogenic have been shown to induce changes in the host's gut microbiome, monitoring the microbiota present in faecal samples can provide a noninvasive means for studying the effects of SIV infection on the health of wild-living primates. Here, we examine the effects of SIVgor, a close relative of SIVcpz of chimpanzees and HIV-1 of humans, on the gut bacterial communities residing within wild gorillas, revealing that gorilla gut microbiomes are exceptionally robust to SIV infection. In contrast to the microbiomes of HIV-1-infected humans and SIVcpz-infected chimpanzees, SIVgor-infected gorilla microbiomes exhibit neither rises in the frequencies of opportunistic pathogens nor elevated rates of microbial turnover within individual hosts. Regardless of SIV infection status, gorilla microbiomes assort into enterotypes, one of which is compositionally analogous to those identified in humans and chimpanzees. The other gorilla enterotype appears specialized for a leaf-based diet and is enriched in environmentally derived bacterial genera. We hypothesize that the acquisition of this gorilla-specific enterotype was enabled by lowered immune system control over the composition of the microbiome. Our results indicate differences between the pathology of SIVgor and SIVcpz/HIV-1 infections, demonstrating the utility of investigating host microbial ecology as a means for studying disease in wild primates of high conservation priority. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Feline immunodeficiency virus env gene evolution in experimentally infected cats.

    PubMed

    Kraase, Martin; Sloan, Richard; Klein, Dieter; Logan, Nicola; McMonagle, Linda; Biek, Roman; Willett, Brian J; Hosie, Margaret J

    2010-03-15

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), an immunosuppressive lentivirus found in cats worldwide, is studied to illuminate mechanisms of lentiviral pathogenesis and to identify key components of protective immunity. During replication, lentiviruses accumulate errors of nucleotide mis-incorporation due to the low-fidelity of reverse transcriptase and recombination between viral variants, resulting in the emergence of a complex viral "quasispecies". In patients infected with HIV-1, env sequences may vary by up to 10% and the detection of quasispecies with greater heterogeneity is associated with higher viral loads and reduced CD4+ T cell numbers [1], indicating that transmission of more complex quasispecies may lead to disease progression. However, little is known about how FIV evolves as disease progresses, or why some cats develop AIDS rapidly while disease progression is slow in others. The aim of this study was to determine whether disease progression may be governed by viral evolution and to examine the diversity of viral variants emerging following infection with an infectious molecular clone. The FIV env gene encoding the envelope glycoprotein (Env) was examined at early (12 weeks) and late (322 weeks) stages of FIV infection in two groups of cats infected experimentally with the FIV-GL8 molecular clone. Viral variants were detected within quasispecies in cats in the late stages of FIV infection that contained differing amino acid compositions in several variable loops of Env, some of which were identified as determinants of receptor usage and resistance to neutralization. Therefore these results indicate that the FIV env gene evolves during the course of infection, giving rise to variants that resist neutralization and likely lead to disease progression.

  17. Exercise and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) Infection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, DeSales; Jackson, Catherine G. R.; Greenleaf, John E.

    1995-01-01

    The human immune system is highly efficient and remarkably protective when functioning properly. Similar to other physiological systems, it functions best when the body is maintained with a balanced diet, sufficient rest and a moderately stress-free lifestyle. It can be disrupted by inappropriate drug use and extreme emotion or exertion. The functioning of normal or compromised immune systems can be enhanced by properly prescribed moderate exercise conditioning regimens in healthy people, and in some human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1)-infected patients but not in others who unable to complete an interval training program. Regular exercise conditioning in healthy people reduces cardiovascular risk factors, increases stamina, facilitates bodyweight control, and reduces stress by engendering positive feelings of well-being. Certain types of cancer may also be suppressed by appropriate exercise conditioning. Various exercise regimens are being evaluated as adjunct treatments for medicated patients with the HIV-1 syndrome. Limited anecdotal evidence from patients suggests that moderate exercise conditioning is per se responsible for their survival well beyond expectancy. HIV-1-infected patients respond positively, both physiologically and psychologically, to moderate exercise conditioning. However, the effectiveness of any exercise treatment programme depends on its mode, frequency, intensity and duration when prescribed o complement the pathological condition of the patient. The effectiveness of exercise conditioning regimens in patients with HIV-1 infection is reviewed in this article. In addition, we discuss mechanisms and pathways, involving the interplay of psychological and physiological factors, through which the suppressed immune system can be enhanced. The immune modulators discussed are endogenous opioids, cytokines, neurotransmitters and other hormones. Exercise conditioning treatment appears to be more effective when combined with other stress management

  18. REVIEW OF CONTROL OF HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS INFECTION IN NIGERIA.

    PubMed

    Dami, N; Shehu, N Y; Dami, S; Iroezindu, M O

    2015-01-01

    The global scourge of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is inundating, especially in sub-Saharan Africa and in particular Nigeria which is home to 10% of the world's HIV-infected persons. The target of the millennium development goal 6 is to halt and reverse the spread of HIV/AIDS by 2015. HIV control in Nigeria was initially shrouded in denial and apathy. Subsequently, a more pragmatic approach was launched during the tenure of President Olusegun Obasanjo. Several policies were formulated. The national prevalence of HIV witnessed some progressive decline and is currently 4.1%. There is now improvement in both HIV awareness and counselling and testing. Greater access to antiretroviral therapy and other support services have also been witnessed with over 300,000 persons currently on drugs. Notable achievements have been recorded in prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTC). However, with increased access to antiretroviral therapy, antiretroviral drug resistance has become inevitable. Acquired drug resistance is high-82% and transmitted drug resistance ranges between 0.7 and 4.5%. The achievements were largely facilitated by international partnerships which have become more streamlined in recent years. A sustained shift to indigenously sourced financial and manpower resource has become imperative. It is also important to integrate HIV facilities with other existing health care facilities for sustainability and cost-effectiveness. In an attempt to strengthen the national response, President Goodluck Ebele Jonathan launched the President's Comprehensive Response Plan for HIV/AIDS in Nigeria. It is hoped that this well-articulated policy would be well implemented to significantly reverse the epidemic.

  19. Ocular findings in human immunodeficiency virus patients in Washington, DC.

    PubMed

    Kaleem, Mona A; Ramsahai, Shweta; Del Fierro, Katrina; Rasul, Samad; Onumah, Chavon; Lerebours, Valerie; Gajjala, Jhansi; Copeland, Robert A; Jones, Leslie S

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the prevalence of ocular diseases in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients in Washington, DC in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). This was a cross-sectional study of patients with HIV who were seen by the ophthalmology consultation service between September 2003 and May 2011 at a single academic institution in Washington, DC. Medical history and ophthalmic findings were reviewed. Patients with complete laboratory data dated within 3 months of their presenting eye examination were included. Descriptive statistics were performed. The records of 151 patients were included in the final analysis. All patients had complete laboratory data dated within 3 months of their presenting eye examination. Sixty-eight (45 %) patients and fifty-eight (50 %) of those with a diagnosis of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) were diagnosed with an HIV-related ophthalmic disease. The leading anterior segment disease was herpes zoster ophthalmicus and the leading posterior segment disease was HIV retinopathy. Of the 151 included patients, 78 (52 %) were receiving HAART at the time of the examination. Thirty-one (42 %) of those not receiving HAART were diagnosed with an HIV-related ophthalmic disease. In this study, we find that the overall prevalence of ocular disease has decreased since the introduction of HAART. However, HIV patients continue to be predisposed to developing ophthalmic disease at higher rates than the general population. Visual dysfunction remains an important source of morbidity in HIV patients, particularly in those with AIDS. Measures for improvement include increased communication between infectious disease specialists and ophthalmologists to ensure adherence to HAART and routine eye examinations.

  20. Measuring domestic violence in human immunodeficiency virus-positive women.

    PubMed

    Patrikar, Seema; Verma, Ak; Bhatti, Vk; Shatabdi, S

    2012-04-01

    Violence affects the lives of millions of women worldwide, in all socioeconomic classes. Violence and the fear of violence are emerging as important risk factor contributing to the vulnerability to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection for women. The objective of the present cross sectional study is to compare the experiences of domestic violence between HIV-positive and HIV-negative married women seeking treatment in a tertiary care hospital. The study is conducted in a tertiary care hospital in Pune on a randomly selected 150 married women (75 HIV-positive and 75 HIV-negative). Informed consent was obtained from all the women and also a trained counsellor was present during the process of data collection. The data was collected by interview method by taking precautions as laid down in the World Health Organization's ethical and safety recommendations for research on domestic violence and using modified conflict tactics scale (CTS). The definition of violence followed is as per the Declaration on the Elimination of Violence against Women, adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in 1993. The percentage of women reporting domestic violence is 44.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 36.84-52.68). The proportion of physical, emotional and sexual violence reported is 38% (95% CI = 30.49-45.96), 24% (95% CI = 17.67-31.31), and 14.7% (95% CI = 9.66-21.02), respectively. The odds of reporting violence of all forms is significantly higher among HIV-positive women than among HIV-negative women (P<0.05). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression is carried out to examine the possible predictors of domestic violence. The findings suggest high proportion of HIV-positive women report violence then HIV-negative women which must be addressed through multilevel prevention approaches.

  1. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Subtypes Prevalence in Central China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe; Li, Wen-jie

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To study the epidemic characteristics, transmission sources and routes of various subtypes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and sequence variations in Henan, central China. To provide theoretical foundation for Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) prevention strategy in this region where the primary HIV transmission route was through former paid blood donation. Materials and Methods HIV-1 gene env and gag were amplified by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from uncultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from 1,287 HIV-1 confirmed samples in Henan. Results Among 1,287 samples, 5 HIV-1 strains were found including subtypes B' (95.9%), C (0.47%) and recombinant subtypes CRF 07_BC (1.09%), CRF 08_BC (1.79%) and CRF 01_AE (0.78%). Phylogenetic tree analysis found that 1,234 Henan subtype B' were closely related to those commonly found in Thailand, and were distantly related to other international subtypes. The dominant strain in former blood plasma donors (FPDs) was subtype B', and the dominant strains in sexual transmission were subtype B' and BC. Among HIV patients who were most likely infected through routes other than paid blood donation, the percentage of non-B' subtypes was much higher than those of FPD. Conclusion These findings suggest that the prevailing strain of HIV-1 in Henan is subtype B', similar to the B' subtype found in Thailand. In addition, for the first time we found subtypes C and recombinant subtypes CRF07_BC, CRF08_BC and CRF01_AE in this region. Indicating that the subtype feature of HIV-1 became more complicated than before in central China. PMID:19881967

  2. Ensuring accurate testing for human immunodeficiency virus in Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    Kyaw, Latt Latt; Wada, Koji; Oo, Khin Yi; Tin, Htay Htay; Yoshihara, Namiko

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Problem Until 2005, the quality of rapid diagnostic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing was not monitored and no regular technical support was provided to hospital laboratories in Myanmar. Approach The national reference laboratory introduced a national external quality assessment scheme. The scheme involved (i) training laboratory technicians in HIV testing and in the requirements of the quality assessment system; (ii) implementing a biannual proficiency panel testing programme; (iii) on-site assessments of poorly-performing laboratories to improve testing procedures; and (iv) development of national guidelines. Local setting In 2011, a total of 422 public hospitals in Myanmar had laboratories providing HIV tests. In addition, private laboratories supported by nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) conducted HIV testing. Relevant changes The scheme was started in 65 public laboratories in 2005. In 2012, it had expanded nationwide to 347 laboratories, including 33 NGO laboratories. During the expansion of the scheme, laboratory response rates were greater than 90% and the proportion of laboratories reporting at least one aberrant result improved from 9.2% (6/65) in 2005 to 5.4% (17/316) in 2012. Lessons learnt National testing guidelines and a reference laboratory are needed to successfully implement quality assurance of HIV testing services. On-site assessments are crucial for all participating laboratories and the only source for insight on the causes of aberrant results; lessons that the reference laboratory can share nationally. Proficiency testing helps laboratory technicians to maintain HIV testing skills by ensuring that they regularly encountered HIV-positive samples. PMID:25558106

  3. Phylogenetic Analysis of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2 Group B

    PubMed Central

    Cella, Eleonora; Lo Presti, Alessandra; Giovanetti, Marta; Veo, Carla; Lai, Alessia; Dicuonzo, Giordano; Angeletti, Silvia; Ciotti, Marco; Zehender, Gianguglielmo; Ciccozzi, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Context: Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) infections are mainly restricted to West Africa; however, in the recent years, the prevalence of HIV-2 is a growing concern in some European countries and the Southwestern region of India. Despite the presence of different HIV-2 groups, only A and B Groups have established human-to-human transmission chains. Aims: This work aimed to evaluate the phylogeographic inference of HIV-2 Group B worldwide to estimate their data of origin and the population dynamics. Materials and Methods: The evolutionary rates, the demographic history for HIV-2 Group B dataset, and the phylogeographic analysis were estimated using a Bayesian approach. The viral gene flow analysis was used to count viral gene out/in flow among different locations. Results: The root of the Bayesian maximum clade credibility tree of HIV-2 Group B dated back to 1957. The demographic history of HIV-2 Group B showed that the epidemic remained constant up to 1970 when started an exponential growth. From 1985 to early 2000s, the epidemic reached a plateau, and then it was characterized by two bottlenecks and a new plateau at the end of 2000s. Phylogeographic reconstruction showed that the most probable location for the root of the tree was Ghana. Regarding the viral gene flow of HIV-2 Group B, the only observed viral gene flow was from Africa to France, Belgium, and Luxembourg. Conclusions: The study gives insights into the origin, history, and phylogeography of HIV-2 Group B epidemic. The growing number of infections of HIV-2 worldwide indicates the need for strengthening surveillance. PMID:27621561

  4. Measuring domestic violence in human immunodeficiency virus-positive women

    PubMed Central

    Patrikar, Seema; Verma, AK; Bhatti, VK; Shatabdi, S

    2012-01-01

    Background Violence affects the lives of millions of women worldwide, in all socioeconomic classes. Violence and the fear of violence are emerging as important risk factor contributing to the vulnerability to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection for women. The objective of the present cross sectional study is to compare the experiences of domestic violence between HIV-positive and HIV-negative married women seeking treatment in a tertiary care hospital. Methods The study is conducted in a tertiary care hospital in Pune on a randomly selected 150 married women (75 HIV-positive and 75 HIV-negative). Informed consent was obtained from all the women and also a trained counsellor was present during the process of data collection. The data was collected by interview method by taking precautions as laid down in the World Health Organization's ethical and safety recommendations for research on domestic violence and using modified conflict tactics scale (CTS). The definition of violence followed is as per the Declaration on the Elimination of Violence against Women, adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in 1993. Results The percentage of women reporting domestic violence is 44.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 36.84–52.68). The proportion of physical, emotional and sexual violence reported is 38% (95% CI = 30.49–45.96), 24% (95% CI = 17.67–31.31), and 14.7% (95% CI = 9.66–21.02), respectively. The odds of reporting violence of all forms is significantly higher among HIV-positive women than among HIV-negative women (P<0.05). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression is carried out to examine the possible predictors of domestic violence. Conclusion The findings suggest high proportion of HIV-positive women report violence then HIV-negative women which must be addressed through multilevel prevention approaches. PMID:24669053

  5. The level of risk of transmission of human immunodeficiency virus between patients and dental staff.

    PubMed

    Scully, C; Porter, S

    1991-02-09

    Almost a decade into the epidemic of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) there is adequate evidence to address the concerns of dental staff about possible transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) between patient and staff. This paper reviews that evidence and demonstrates that the risk of HIV transmission to health care workers is extremely low. Worldwide there are no reported proven cases of occupational transmission of HIV to dental staff.

  6. Listeria monocytogenes meningitis in a human immunodeficiency virus-positive patient undergoing hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Calubiran, O V; Horiuchi, J; Klein, N C; Cunha, B A

    1990-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes bacteremia without meningitis has been reported in patients who have undergone long-term hemodialysis and have transfusional iron overload. On the other hand, cases of Listeria bacteremia without meningitis have occurred sporadically among the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome population, mostly homosexuals. There have been no reports of Listeria meningitis occurring among persons who are antibody positive to human immunodeficiency virus or are intravenous drug abusers having chronic renal failure and undergoing hemodialysis. This patient represents the first case of Listeria bacteremia and meningitis to occur in an intravenous drug abuser who is human immunodeficient antibody positive, is receiving hemodialysis, and has transfusional iron overload.

  7. Alcohol use disorder and its impact on chronic hepatitis C virus and human immunodeficiency virus infections

    PubMed Central

    Fuster, Daniel; Sanvisens, Arantza; Bolao, Ferran; Rivas, Inmaculada; Tor, Jordi; Muga, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol use disorder (AUD) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection frequently co-occur. AUD is associated with greater exposure to HCV infection, increased HCV infection persistence, and more extensive liver damage due to interactions between AUD and HCV on immune responses, cytotoxicity, and oxidative stress. Although AUD and HCV infection are associated with increased morbidity and mortality, HCV antiviral therapy is less commonly prescribed in individuals with both conditions. AUD is also common in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, which negatively impacts proper HIV care and adherence to antiretroviral therapy, and liver disease. In addition, AUD and HCV infection are also frequent within a proportion of patients with HIV infection, which negatively impacts liver disease. This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding pathological interactions of AUD with hepatitis C infection, HIV infection, and HCV/HIV co-infection, as well as relating to AUD treatment interventions in these individuals. PMID:27872681

  8. A review of feline leukemia virus and feline immunodeficiency virus seroprevalence in cats in Canada.

    PubMed

    Little, Susan

    2011-10-15

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) are common and important infectious diseases of cats in Canada. Prevalence data are necessary to define prophylactic, management, and therapeutic measures for stray, feral and owned cats. Recently, comprehensive data on the seroprevalence of retrovirus infections of cats in Canada have become available and are reviewed. Further investigation into geographic variations in retrovirus seroprevalence within Canada is warranted, and may provide information to improve recommendations for testing and prevention. As well, more information is needed on FIV subtypes in Canada to improve diagnostics and vaccines, as well as to provide information on disease outcomes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Slow CD4+ T-Cell Recovery in Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Hepatitis B Virus-Coinfected Patients Initiating Truvada-Based Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Motswedi; Gaseitsiwe, Simani; Moyo, Sikhulile; Thami, Kerapetse P.; Mohammed, Terence; Setlhare, Ditiro; Sebunya, Theresa K.; Powell, Eleanor A.; Makhema, Joseph; Blackard, Jason T.; Marlink, Richard; Essex, Max; Musonda, Rosemary M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection has emerged as an important cause of morbidity and mortality. We determined the response to Truvada-based first-line combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in HIV/HBV-coinfected verus HIV-monoinfected patients in Botswana. Methods. Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg), HBV e antigen (HBeAg), and HBV deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) load were determined from baseline and follow-up visits in a longitudinal cART cohort of Truvada-based regimen. We assessed predictors of HBV serostatus and viral suppression (undetectable HBV DNA) using logistic regression techniques. Results. Of 300 participants, 28 were HBsAg positive, giving an HIV/HBV prevalence of 9.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 6.3–13.2), and 5 of these, 17.9% (95% CI, 6.1–36.9), were HBeAg positive. There was a reduced CD4+ T-cell gain in HIV/HBV-coinfected compared with HIV-monoinfected patients. Hepatitis B virus surface antigen and HBeAg loss was 38% and 60%, respectively, at 24 months post-cART initiation. The HBV DNA suppression rates increased with time on cART from 54% to 75% in 6 and 24 months, respectively. Conclusions. Human immunodeficiency virus/HBV coinfection negatively affected immunologic recovery compared with HIV-1C monoinfection. Hepatitis B virus screening before cART initiation could help improve HBV/HIV treatment outcomes and help determine treatment options when there is a need to switch regimens. PMID:27800524

  10. Improbability of Effective Vaccination Against Human Immunodeficiency Virus Because of Its Intracellular Transmission and Rectal Portal of Entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabin, Albert B.

    1992-09-01

    The worldwide effort to produce a vaccine against AIDS continues to disregard the fact that even human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific neutralizing antibodies and cell-mediated immunity are ineffective against virus within cells without viral antigens on the cell membrane-and that much of HIV infection is transmitted in this manner. According to a recent report, a simian immunodeficiency virus vaccine that protected monkeys against an intravenous challenge with cell-free virus was, as predicted, ineffective against an intravenous challenge with the same amount of virus in infected cells. Moreover, antibody and HIV have been found to coexist in cell-free plasma from asymptomatic and symptomatic patients. Excluding direct introduction of HIV into the bloodstream, the most common and efficient form of transmission of HIV infection is by receptive anal intercourse, and semen contains large numbers of infected cells per milliliter. Recent reports showing that colorectal cells can be persistently infected by HIV and that HIV RNA and cDNA are present in the cells of the colon of dead AIDS patients indicate that either cell-free or intracellular HIV has the capacity to multiply at the portal of entry in the colorectal area without interference from neutralizing antibodies. The available data provide no basis for testing any HIV vaccine in human beings either before or after infection. The main challenge is to find a way to kill cells with chromosomally integrated HIV cDNA without harming normal cells, perhaps by identifying repressor proteins that might be produced by the cells with integrated HIV cDNA and thus could become specific targets for cell-killing drugs.

  11. Utilization of C-C chemokine receptor 5 by the envelope glycoproteins of a pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus, SIVmac239.

    PubMed Central

    Marcon, L; Choe, H; Martin, K A; Farzan, M; Ponath, P D; Wu, L; Newman, W; Gerard, N; Gerard, C; Sodroski, J

    1997-01-01

    We examined chemokine receptors for the ability to facilitate the infection of CD4-expressing cells by viruses containing the envelope glycoproteins of a pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus, SIVmac239. Expression of either human or simian C-C chemokine receptor CCR5 allowed the SIVmac239 envelope glycoproteins to mediate virus entry and cell-to-cell fusion. Thus, distantly related immunodeficiency viruses such as SIV and the primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates can utilize CCR5 as an entry cofactor. PMID:9032394

  12. Functional complementation of nucleocapsid and late domain PTAP mutants of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 during replication.

    PubMed

    Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Gorelick, Robert J; Leavitt, Maria G; Pathak, Vinay K; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2008-06-05

    During human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) assembly, the nucleocapsid (NC) and the PTAP motif in p6 of Gag play important roles in RNA encapsidation and virus release, respectively. We have previously demonstrated that functional complementation occurs between an NC mutant and a PTAP mutant to rescue viral replication. In this report, we examined the amounts of functional NC and PTAP motif that are required during virus replication. When NC and PTAP mutants were coexpressed at 5:1, 5:5, and 1:5 ratios, virus titers were rescued at 5%, 51%, and 86% of the wild-type level, respectively. These results indicate that HIV-1 requires a small amount of functional PTAP motif but far more functional NC to complete efficient replication. Further analyses reveal that RNA packaging can be significantly rescued in viruses containing a small amount of functional NC. However, most of the NC proteins must be functional to generate the wild-type level of R-U5 DNA product. Once the R-U5 product is generated, viruses containing half of the functional NC can complete reverse transcription and DNA integration at near-wild-type efficiency. These results define the quantitative requirements of NC and p6 during HIV-1 replication and provide insights into the requirement for the development of anti-HIV strategies using NC and p6 as targets.

  13. Functional Complementation of Nucleocapsid and Late Domain PTAP Mutants of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 during Replication

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaitchik, Olga A.; Gorelick, Robert J.; Leavitt, Maria G.; Pathak, Vinay K.; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2008-01-01

    During human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) assembly, the nucleocapsid (NC) and the PTAP motif in p6 of Gag play important roles in RNA encapsidation and virus release, respectively. We have previously demonstrated that functional complementation occurs between an NC mutant and a PTAP mutant to rescue viral replication. In this report, we examined the amounts of functional NC and PTAP motif that are required during virus replication. When NC and PTAP mutants were coexpressed at 5:1, 5:5, and 1:5 ratios, virus titers were rescued at 5%, 51%, and 86% of the wild-type level, respectively. These results indicate that HIV-1 requires a small amount of functional PTAP motif but far more functional NC to complete efficient replication. Further analyses reveal that RNA packaging can be significantly rescued in viruses containing a small amount of functional NC. However, most of the NC proteins must be functional to generate the wild-type level of R-U5 DNA product. Once the R-U5 product is generated, viruses containing half of the functional NC can complete reverse transcription and DNA integration at near-wild-type efficiency. These results define the quantitative requirements of NC and p6 during HIV-1 replication and provide insights into the requirement for the development of anti-HIV strategies using NC and p6 as targets. PMID:18353416

  14. Identification of a hexapeptide inhibitor of the human immunodeficiency virus integrase protein by using a combinatorial chemical library.

    PubMed Central

    Puras Lutzke, R A; Eppens, N A; Weber, P A; Houghten, R A; Plasterk, R H

    1995-01-01

    Integration of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) DNA into the human genome requires the virus-encoded integrase (IN) protein, and therefore the IN protein is a suitable target for antiviral strategies. To find a potent HIV IN inhibitor, we screened a "synthetic peptide combinatorial library." We identified a hexapeptide with the sequence HCKFWW that inhibits IN-mediated 3'-processing and integration with an IC50 of 2 microM. The peptide is active on IN proteins from other retroviruses such as HIV-2, feline immunodeficiency virus, and Moloney murine leukemia virus, supporting the notion that a conserved region of IN is targeted. The hexapeptide was also tested in the disintegration reaction. This phosphoryl-transfer reaction can be carried out by the catalytic core of IN alone, and the peptide HCKFWW was found to inhibit this reaction, suggesting that the hexapeptide acts at or near the catalytic site of IN. Identification of an IN hexapeptide inhibitor provides proof of concept for the approach, and, moreover, this peptide may be useful for structure-function analysis of IN. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8524782

  15. A novel human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protein, tev, shares sequences with tat, env, and rev proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Benko, D M; Schwartz, S; Pavlakis, G N; Felber, B K

    1990-01-01

    We have characterized a novel 28-kilodalton protein, p28tev, detected in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected cells. tev is recognized by both tat and rev monospecific antibodies. tev is initiated at the tat AUG and contains the first exon of tat at its amino terminus, a small portion of env in the middle, and the second exon of rev at its carboxy terminus. A cDNA clone producing tev was cloned and expressed in human cells. Sequence analysis revealed that the tev mRNA is generated by splicing to a novel exon located in the env region. This identifies a fourth class of multiply spliced human immunodeficiency virus mRNAs, produced in infected and transfected cells. tev is regulated during the virus life cycle similarly to the other regulatory proteins, tat, rev, and nef, and displays both tat and rev activities in functional assays. Since tev contains important functional domains of tat and rev and is produced very early after transfection, it may be an important regulator in the initial phase of virus expression. Another rev-related protein, p18(6)Drev, containing env and rev sequences, was characterized and was found not to have detectable rev activity. Images PMID:2186172

  16. Strong, but Age-Dependent, Protection Elicited by a Deoxyribonucleic Acid/Modified Vaccinia Ankara Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Chamcha, Venkateswarlu; Kannanganat, Sunil; Gangadhara, Sailaja; Nabi, Rafiq; Kozlowski, Pamela A; Montefiori, David C; LaBranche, Celia C; Wrammert, Jens; Keele, Brandon F; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Sahu, Sujata; Lifton, Michelle; Santra, Sampa; Basu, Rahul; Moss, Bernard; Robinson, Harriet L; Amara, Rama Rao

    2016-01-01

    Background.  In this study, we analyzed the protective efficacy of a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) macaque 239 (SIVmac239) analogue of the clinically tested GOVX-B11 deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)/modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) human immunodeficiency virus vaccine. Methods.  The tested vaccine used a DNA immunogen mutated to mimic the human vaccine and a regimen with DNA deliveries at weeks 0 and 8 and MVA deliveries at weeks 16 and 32. Twelve weekly rectal challenges with 0.3 animal infectious doses of SIV sootey mangabey E660 (SIVsmE660) were administered starting at 6 months after the last immunization. Results.  Over the first 6 rectal exposures to SIVsmE660, <10-year-old tripartite motif-containing protein 5 (TRIM5)α-permissive rhesus macaques showed an 80% reduction in per-exposure risk of infection as opposed to a 46% reduction in animals over 10 years old; and, over the 12 challenges, they showed a 72% as opposed to a 10% reduction. Analyses of elicited immune responses suggested that higher antibody responses in the younger animals had played a role in protection. Conclusions.  The simian analogue of the GOVX-B11 HIV provided strong protection against repeated rectal challenges in young adult macaques.

  17. Strong, but Age-Dependent, Protection Elicited by a Deoxyribonucleic Acid/Modified Vaccinia Ankara Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Chamcha, Venkateswarlu; Kannanganat, Sunil; Gangadhara, Sailaja; Nabi, Rafiq; Kozlowski, Pamela A.; Montefiori, David C.; LaBranche, Celia C.; Wrammert, Jens; Keele, Brandon F.; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Sahu, Sujata; Lifton, Michelle; Santra, Sampa; Basu, Rahul; Moss, Bernard; Robinson, Harriet L.; Amara, Rama Rao

    2016-01-01

    Background. In this study, we analyzed the protective efficacy of a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) macaque 239 (SIVmac239) analogue of the clinically tested GOVX-B11 deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)/modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) human immunodeficiency virus vaccine. Methods. The tested vaccine used a DNA immunogen mutated to mimic the human vaccine and a regimen with DNA deliveries at weeks 0 and 8 and MVA deliveries at weeks 16 and 32. Twelve weekly rectal challenges with 0.3 animal infectious doses of SIV sootey mangabey E660 (SIVsmE660) were administered starting at 6 months after the last immunization. Results. Over the first 6 rectal exposures to SIVsmE660, <10-year-old tripartite motif-containing protein 5 (TRIM5)α-permissive rhesus macaques showed an 80% reduction in per-exposure risk of infection as opposed to a 46% reduction in animals over 10 years old; and, over the 12 challenges, they showed a 72% as opposed to a 10% reduction. Analyses of elicited immune responses suggested that higher antibody responses in the younger animals had played a role in protection. Conclusions. The simian analogue of the GOVX-B11 HIV provided strong protection against repeated rectal challenges in young adult macaques. PMID:27006959

  18. Use of a Small Molecule CCR5 Inhibitor in Macaques to Treat Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection or Prevent Simian–Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Veazey, Ronald S.; Klasse, Per Johan; Ketas, Thomas J.; Reeves, Jacqueline D.; Piatak, Michael; Kunstman, Kevin; Kuhmann, Shawn E.; Marx, Preston A.; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Dufour, Jason; Mefford, Megan; Pandrea, Ivona; Wolinsky, Steven M.; Doms, Robert W.; DeMartino, Julie A.; Siciliano, Salvatore J.; Lyons, Kathy; Springer, Martin S.; Moore, John P.

    2003-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) fuses with cells after sequential interactions between its envelope glycoproteins, CD4 and a coreceptor, usually CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) or CXC receptor 4 (CXCR4). CMPD 167 is a CCR5-specific small molecule with potent antiviral activity in vitro. We show that CMPD 167 caused a rapid and substantial (4–200-fold) decrease in plasma viremia in six rhesus macaques chronically infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) strains SIVmac251 or SIVB670, but not in an animal infected with the X4 simian–human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV), SHIV-89.6P. In three of the SIV-infected animals, viremia reduction was sustained. In one, there was a rapid, but partial, rebound and in another, there was a rapid and complete rebound. There was a substantial delay (>21 d) between the end of therapy and the onset of full viremia rebound in two animals. We also evaluated whether vaginal administration of gel-formulated CMPD 167 could prevent vaginal transmission of the R5 virus, SHIV-162P4. Complete protection occurred in only 2 of 11 animals, but early viral replication was significantly less in the 11 CMPD 167-recipients than in 9 controls receiving carrier gel. These findings support the development of small molecule CCR5 inhibitors as antiviral therapies, and possibly as components of a topical microbicide to prevent HIV-1 sexual transmission. PMID:14623909

  19. 38 CFR 1.486 - Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to public...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to public health authorities. 1.486 Section 1... immunodeficiency virus to public health authorities. (a) In the case of any record which is maintained in...

  20. 38 CFR 1.486 - Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to public...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to public health authorities. 1.486 Section 1... immunodeficiency virus to public health authorities. (a) In the case of any record which is maintained in...

  1. 38 CFR 1.486 - Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to public...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to public health authorities. 1.486 Section 1... immunodeficiency virus to public health authorities. (a) In the case of any record which is maintained in...

  2. 38 CFR 1.486 - Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to public...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to public health authorities. 1.486 Section 1... immunodeficiency virus to public health authorities. (a) In the case of any record which is maintained in...

  3. 38 CFR 1.486 - Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to public...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to public health authorities. 1.486 Section 1... immunodeficiency virus to public health authorities. (a) In the case of any record which is maintained in...

  4. Successful Orthotopic Heart Transplantation and Immunosuppressive Management in 2 Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Seropositive Patients.

    PubMed

    Conte, Antonio Hernandez; Kittleson, Michelle M; Dilibero, Deanna; Hardy, W David; Kobashigawa, Jon A; Esmailian, Fardad

    2016-02-01

    Few orthotopic heart transplantations have been performed in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus since the first such case was reported in 2001. Since that time, advances in highly active antiretroviral therapy have resulted in potent and durable suppression of the causative human immunodeficiency virus-accompanied by robust immune reconstitution, reversal of previous immunodeficiency, a marked decrease in opportunistic and other infections, and near-normal long-term survival. Although human immunodeficiency virus infection is not an absolute contraindication, few centers in the United States and Canada have performed heart transplantations in this patient population; these patients have been de facto excluded from this procedure in North America. Re-evaluation of the reasons for excluding these patients from cardiac transplantation is warranted in light of such significant advances in antiretroviral therapy. This case report documents successful orthotopic heart transplantation in 2 patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus, and we describe their antiretroviral therapy and immunosuppressive management challenges. Both patients were doing well without sequelae 43 and 38 months after transplantation.

  5. Methamphetamine and human immunodeficiency virus protein Tat synergize to destroy dopaminergic terminals in the rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Theodore, S; Cass, W A; Maragos, W F

    2006-02-01

    Dysfunction of the dopaminergic system accompanied by loss of dopamine in the striatum is a major feature of human immunodeficiency virus-1-associated dementia. Previous studies have shown that human immunodeficiency virus-1-associated dementia patients with a history of drug abuse have rapid neurological progression, prominent psychomotor slowing, more severe encephalitis and more severe dendritic and neuronal damage in the frontal cortex compared with human immunodeficiency virus-1-associated dementia patients without a history of drug abuse. In a previous study, we showed that methamphetamine and human immunodeficiency virus-1 protein Tat interact to produce a synergistic decline in dopamine levels in the rat striatum. The present study was carried out to understand the underlying cause for the loss of dopamine. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered saline, methamphetamine, Tat or Tat followed by methamphetamine 24 h later. Two and seven days later the animals were killed and tissue sections from striatum were processed for silver staining to examine terminal degeneration while sections from striatum and substantia nigra were processed for tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity. Striatal tissue was also analyzed by Western blotting for tyrosine hydroxylase protein levels. Compared with controls, methamphetamine+Tat-treated animals showed extensive silver staining and loss of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity and protein levels in the ipsilateral striatum. There was no apparent loss of tyrosine hydroxylase in the substantia nigra. Markers for oxidative stress were significantly increased in striatal synaptosomes from Tat+methamphetamine group compared with controls. The results indicate that methamphetamine and Tat interact to produce an enhanced injury to dopaminergic nerve terminals in the striatum with sparing of the substantia nigra by a mechanism involving oxidative stress. These findings suggest a possible mode of interaction between methamphetamine

  6. UV activation of human immunodeficiency virus gene expression in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, J; Cepeda, M; Tschachler, E; Napolitano, L A; Jay, G

    1992-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with a clinical latency of as long as 10 years before the development of disease. One explanation for this delay is the requirement of cofactors such as other DNA or RNA viruses, cytokines critical for immune modulation, or environmental UV light. At least in tissue culture studies, these agents are capable of inducing HIV gene expression in cell lines which either harbor the entire viral genome or contain a reporter gene under the control of the viral long terminal repeat regulatory region. The role of these cofactors in terminating clinical latency and inducing disease has been difficult to ascertain because of the lack of an appropriate animal model. We now report that UV light can markedly induce HIV gene expression in transgenic mice carrying both the cis-acting (long terminal repeat) and trans-acting (the tat gene) elements which are essential for viral transactivation and replication in infected cells. Our finding may explain the clinical observations that cutaneous lesions in HIV-infected individuals are often seen in the sunlight exposed areas of the skin, including the face and neck. Images PMID:1727473

  7. Hepatitis B virus genotype G: prevalence and impact in patients co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Dao, Doan Y; Balko, Jody; Attar, Nahid; Neak, Enayet; Yuan, He-Jun; Lee, William M; Jain, Mamta K

    2011-09-01

    Relatively little is known about the role of hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotype G (HBV/G) in patients co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and HBV. This study examined the prevalence and association of HBV/G to liver fibrosis in co-infected patients. HBV genotypes were determined by direct sequencing of the HBV surface gene or Trugene® HBV 1.0 assay in 133 patients infected with HIV/HBV. Quantitative testing of HBV-DNA, HBeAg, and anti-HBe were performed using the Versant® HBV 3.0 (for DNA) and the ADVIA®Centaur assay. The non-invasive biomarkers Fib-4 and APRI were used to assess fibrosis stage. Genotype A was present in 103/133 (77%) of the cohort, genotype G in 18/133 (14%) with genotypes D in 8/133, (6%), F 2/133 (1.5%), and H 2/133 (1.5%). Genotype G was associated with hepatitis B e antigen-positivity and high HBV-DNA levels. Additionally, HBV/G (OR 8.25, 95% CI 2.3-29.6, P = 0.0012) was associated with advanced fibrosis score using Fib-4, whereas, being black was not (OR 0.19, 95% CI 0.05-0.07, P = 0.01). HBV/G in this population exhibited a different phenotype than expected for pure G genotypes raising the question of recombination or mixed infections. The frequent finding of HBV/G in co-infected patients and its association with more advanced fibrosis, suggests that this genotype leads to more rapid liver disease progression. Further studies are needed to understand why this genotype occurs more frequently and what impact it has on liver disease progression in patients with HBV/HIV.

  8. Simian immunodeficiency virus mutants resistant to serum neutralization arise during persistent infection of rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, D P; Collignon, C; Desrosiers, R C

    1993-01-01

    We previously described the pattern of sequence variation in gp120 following persistent infection of rhesus monkeys with the pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac239 molecular clone (D.P.W. Burns and R.C. Desrosiers, J. Virol. 65:1843, 1991). Sequence changes were confined largely to five variable regions (V1 to V5), four of which correspond to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp120 variable regions. Remarkably, 182 of 186 nucleotide substitutions that were documented in these variable regions resulted in amino acid changes. This is an extremely nonrandom pattern, which suggests selective pressure driving amino acid changes in discrete variable domains. In the present study, we investigated whether neutralizing-antibody responses are one selective force responsible at least in part for the observed pattern of sequence variation. Variant env sequences called 1-12 and 8-22 obtained 69 and 93 weeks after infection of a rhesus monkey with cloned SIVmac239 were recombined into the parental SIVmac239 genome, and variant viruses were generated by transfection of cultured cells with cloned DNA. The 1-12 and 8-22 recombinants differ from the parental SIVmac239 at 18 amino acid positions in gp120 and at 5 and 10 amino acid positions, respectively, in gp41. Sequential sera from the monkey infected with cloned SIVmac239 from which the 1-12 and 8-22 variants were isolated showed much higher neutralizing antibody titers to cloned SIVmac239 than to the cloned 1-12 and 8-22 variants. For example, at 55 weeks postinfection the neutralizing antibody titer against SIVmac239 was 640 while those to the variant viruses were 40 and less than 20. Two other rhesus monkeys infected with cloned SIVmac239 showed a similar pattern. Rhesus monkeys were also experimentally infected with the cloned variants so that the type-specific nature of the neutralizing antibody responses could be verified. Indeed, each of these monkeys showed neutralizing-antibody responses of much

  9. Feline immunodeficiency virus, feline leukemia virus and Bartonella species in stray cats on St Kitts, West Indies.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Patrick J; Moura, Lenita; Miller, Tanya; Thurk, Jaime; Perreault, Nicole; Weil, Adriana; Maggio, Ricardo; Lucas, Helene; Breitschwerdt, Edward

    2010-06-01

    Stray cats trapped in various areas of Basseterre, the capital of St Kitts in the West Indies, were tested for infection with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) using commercial kits. Of 99 (51 male and 48 female) cats trapped in 2006/7, 15% (12 males and three females) were positive for FIV while none were positive for FeLV. Of 72 (41 males and 31 females) cats trapped in 2009, 14% (nine males and one female) were positive for FIV while none were positive for FeLV. Polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed DNA of Bartonella species in whole blood collected from 60/95 (63%) cats trapped in 2006/7. Sequencing of the 16S-23S rRNA gene intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) region of a convenience sample of nine amplicons and the 11 isolates made from 43 blood samples which were cultured using Bartonella alpha Proteobacteria (BAPGM) enrichment medium revealed B henselae (14) and B clarridgeiae (six).

  10. Inhibition of simian immunodeficiency virus by foamy virus vectors expressing siRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jeonghae; Nadeau, Peter; Zucali, James R.; Johnson, Calvin M.; Mergia, Ayalew . E-mail: mergiaa@mail.vetmed.ufl.edu

    2005-12-20

    Viral vectors available for gene therapy are either inefficient or suffer from safety concerns for human applications. Foamy viruses are non-pathogenic retroviruses that offer several unique opportunities for gene transfer in various cell types from different species. In this report, we describe the use of simian foamy virus type 1 (SFV-1) vector to examine the efficacy of therapeutic genes. Hairpin short-interfering RNA (siRNA) that targets the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) rev/env was placed under the control of the PolIII U6 snRNA promoter for expression and screened for silencing target genes using cognate target-reporter fusions. We have identified an effective siRNA (designated R2) which reduces the rev and env gene expression by 89% and 95%, respectively. Using the simian foamy virus type 1 (SFV-1) based vector, we delivered the PolIII expressed R2 siRNA into cultured cells and challenged with SIV. The results show that the R2 siRNA is a potent inhibitor of SIV replication as determined by p27 expression and reverse transcriptase assays. Vectors based on a non-pathogenic SFV-1 vector may provide a safe and efficient alternative to currently available vectors, and the SIV model will help devise protocols for effective anti-HIV gene therapy.

  11. Primary Neuritic Hansen's Disease presenting as Ulnar Nerve Abscess in a Human Immunodeficiency Virus Positive Patient.

    PubMed

    Karjigi, S; Herakal, K; Murthy, S C; Bathina, A; Kusuma, M R; Nikhil, K R Y

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy has been increasingly known to have an enigmatic relationship with human immunodeficiency virus infection. Co-infection may result in atypical manifestations of leprosy. A 45-year old human immunodeficiency virus-positive male; agricultural laborer presented with a swelling over right elbow, right hand deformity, generalized itching and recurrent vesicles overthe perinasal area. Clinical and investigational findings were consistent with mononeuritic type of Hansen's disease with right sided silent ulnar nerve abscess, partial claw hand. CD4+ count of the patientwas 430 cells/cmm. This patient also hadherpes simplex labialis, with HIV-associated pruritus. To the best of our knowledge such an atypical presentation has not been reported earlier.

  12. Disseminated varicella zoster virus in an immunized child as the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-defining illness.

    PubMed

    Chilek, Katherine; Routhouska, Shannon; Tamburro, Joan

    2010-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) immunization aids in the prevention of future VZV infections in immunocompetent patients; however, severely immunocompromised patients remain at increased risk of VZV infection. We report a case of a 10-year-old boy previously immunized to Varicella who presented with herpes zoster with hematogenous dissemination as the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome-defining illness. Disseminated VZV is more commonly seen in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals with more advanced disease, as was the case with our patient. Disseminated VZV infection in a previously immunized child should raise suspicion for underlying immunosuppression.

  13. C5A Protects Macaques from Vaginal Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Challenge.

    PubMed

    Veazey, Ronald S; Chatterji, Udayan; Bobardt, Michael; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi E; Li, Jian; Wang, Xiaolei; Gallay, Philippe A

    2015-11-09

    A safe and effective vaginal microbicide could decrease human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission in women. Here, we evaluated the safety and microbicidal efficacy of a short amphipathic peptide, C5A, in a rhesus macaque model. We found that a vaginal application of C5A protects 89% of the macaques from a simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-162P3) challenge. We observed no signs of lesions or inflammation in animals vaginally treated with repeated C5A applications. With its noncellular cytotoxic activity and rare mechanism of action, C5A represents an attractive microbicidal candidate.

  14. Broad-spectrum antiviral activity including human immunodeficiency and hepatitis C viruses mediated by a novel retinoid thiosemicarbazone derivative.

    PubMed

    Kesel, Andreas J

    2011-05-01

    Aromatic aldehyde-derived thiosemicarbazones 4-6, the S-substituted modified thiosemicarbazones 7/8, and a vitamin A-derived (retinoid) thiosemicarbazone derivative 12 were investigated as inhibitors of human hepatitis C virus (HCV) subgenomic RNA replicon Huh7 ET (luc-ubi-neo/ET) replication. Compounds 4-6 and 12 were found to be potent suppressors of HCV RNA replicon replication. The trifluoromethoxy-substituted thiosemicarbazone 6 and the retinoid thiosemicarbazone derivative 12 were even superior in selectivity to the included reference agent recombinant human alpha-interferon-2b, showing potencies in the nanomolar range of concentration. In addition, compounds 5, 6, 8 and 12 were tested as inhibitors of cytopathic effect (CPE) induced by human varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and/or human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). Compounds 4-6, 8 and 12 were additionally examined as inhibitors of CPE induced by cowpox virus and vaccinia virus. Thiosemicarbazone 4 was inhibitory on cowpox and vaccinia virus replication comparable in potency and selectivity to the reference agent cidofovir. Retinoid thiosemicarbazone derivative 12 was active as micromolar inhibitor of VZV, HCMV, and, in addition, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. These results indicate that thiosemicarbazone derivatives are appropriate lead structures to be evaluated in targeted antiviral therapies for hepatitis C (STAT-C), and that the vitamin A-related thiosemicarbazone derivative 12 emerges as a broad-spectrum antiviral agent, co-suppressing the multiplication of important RNA and DNA viruses.

  15. Brain Macrophages in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected, Antiretroviral-Suppressed Macaques: a Functional Latent Reservoir.

    PubMed

    Avalos, Claudia R; Abreu, Celina M; Queen, Suzanne E; Li, Ming; Price, Sarah; Shirk, Erin N; Engle, Elizabeth L; Forsyth, Ellen; Bullock, Brandon T; Mac Gabhann, Feilim; Wietgrefe, Stephen W; Haase, Ashley T; Zink, M Christine; Mankowski, Joseph L; Clements, Janice E; Gama, Lucio

    2017-08-15

    A human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection cure requires an understanding of the cellular and anatomical sites harboring virus that contribute to viral rebound upon treatment interruption. Despite antiretroviral therapy (ART), HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) are reported in HIV-infected individuals on ART. Biomarkers for macrophage activation and neuronal damage in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of HIV-infected individuals demonstrate continued effects of HIV in brain and suggest that the central nervous system (CNS) may serve as a viral reservoir. Using a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)/macaque model for HIV encephalitis and AIDS, we evaluated whether infected cells persist in brain despite ART. Eight SIV-infected pig-tailed macaques were virally suppressed with ART, and plasma and CSF viremia levels were analyzed longitudinally. To assess whether virus persisted in brain macrophages (BrMΦ) in these macaques, we used a macrophage quantitative viral outgrowth assay (MΦ-QVOA), PCR, and in situ hybridization (ISH) to measure the frequency of infected cells and the levels of viral RNA and DNA in brain. Viral RNA in brain tissue of suppressed macaques was undetectable, although viral DNA was detected in all animals. The MΦ-QVOA demonstrated that the majority of suppressed animals contained latently infected BrMΦ. We also showed that virus produced in the MΦ-QVOAs was replication competent, suggesting that latently infected BrMΦ are capable of reestablishing productive infection upon treatment interruption. This report provides the first confirmation of the presence of replication-competent SIV in BrMΦ of ART-suppressed macaques and suggests that the highly debated issue of viral latency in macrophages, at least in brain, has been addressed in SIV-infected macaques treated with ART.IMPORTANCE Resting CD4(+) T cells are currently the only cells that fit the definition of a latent reservoir. However, recent evidence suggests that HIV

  16. Optimization of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Treatment During Incarceration

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Jaimie P.; Cepeda, Javier; Wu, Johnny; Trestman, Robert L.; Altice, Frederick L.; Springer, Sandra A.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) management in correctional settings is logistically feasible, but HIV-related outcomes before release have not been recently systematically examined. OBJECTIVE To evaluate HIV treatment outcomes throughout incarceration, including jail and prison. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective cohort study of longitudinally linked demographic, pharmacy, and laboratory data on 882 prisoners within the Connecticut Department of Correction (2005–2012) with confirmed HIV infection, who were continually incarcerated 90 days or more, had at least 2 HIV-1 RNA and CD4 lymphocyte measurements, and were prescribed antiretroviral therapy. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Three electronic databases (correctional, laboratory, and pharmacy) were integrated to assess HIV viral suppression (HIV-1 RNA levels, <400 copies/mL) on intake and release. Secondary outcomes were mean change in log-transformed HIV-1 RNA levels and mean change in CD4 lymphocyte count during incarceration. Demographic characteristics, prescribed pharmacotherapies, receipt of directly observed therapy, and duration of incarceration were analyzed as possible explanatory variables for HIV viral suppression in logistic regression models. RESULTS Among 882 HIV-infected prisoners with 1185 incarceration periods, mean HIV-1 RNA level decreased by 1.1 log10 and CD4 lymphocyte count increased by 98 cells/μL over time, with a higher proportion achieving viral suppression by release compared with entry (70.0% vs 29.8%; P < .001); 36.9% of antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens were changed during incarceration. After adjusting for baseline HIV-1 RNA level, prerelease viral suppression correlated with female sex (adjusted odds ratio, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.26–2.59) and psychiatric disorder severity below the sample median (adjusted odds ratio, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.12–1.99), but not race/ethnicity, incarceration duration, ART regimen or dosing strategy, or directly observed therapy

  17. Shedding of Hepatitis C Virus in Semen of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Men

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Samuel S.; Gianella, Sara; Yip, Marcus J-S.; van Seggelen, Wouter O.; Gillies, Robert D.; Foster, Andrew L.; Barbati, Zachary R.; Smith, Davey M.; Fierer, Daniel S.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The epidemic of sexually transmitted hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) has been documented for over a decade. Despite this, there is no consensus as to the risk factors for sexual acquisition of HCV in these men. Methods. We obtained paired semen and blood samples at 2-week intervals from HIV-infected MSM with recent and chronic HCV infection and quantified HCV in semen. Results. Hepatitis C virus was quantified in 59 semen specimens from 33 men. Hepatitis C virus was shed in 16 (27%) of semen specimens from 11 (33%) of the men. Median HCV viral load (VL) in semen was 1.49 log10 IU/mL. Hepatitis C virus VL in blood was significantly higher at the time of HCV shedding in semen than when HCV shedding in semen was not detected (P = .002). Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between the HCV VL in blood and semen overall (rs = 0.41; P = .001), and in the subgroup with recent HCV infection (rs = 0.37; P = .02), but not in the subgroup with chronic HCV infection (rs = 0.34; P = .1). Conclusions. One third of HIV-infected MSM coinfected with HCV shed HCV into their semen. Based on the HCV VL in semen in this study, an average ejaculate would deliver up to 6630 IU of virus into the rectum of the receptive partner. Therefore, our data strongly support that condoms should be used during anal intercourse among MSM to prevent transmission of HCV. PMID:27186582

  18. Regulation of the reverse transcriptase of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 by dNTPs.

    PubMed Central

    West, A B; Roberts, T M; Kolodner, R D

    1992-01-01

    Reverse transcriptase (RNA-directed DNA polymerase, EC 2.7.7.49) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 has been examined with respect to the steady-state kinetics of polymerization of dNTPs into product DNA. With dNTPs as variable substrate, the kinetics of polymerization deviated from standard Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Substrate inhibition was observed at high substrate concentrations and negative cooperativity was seen at lower substrate concentrations. Examination of incorporation of substrate dNMPs in the presence of nucleotides not complementing the template demonstrated that dNTPs may act as noncompetitive inhibitors, as well as substrate. The Ki of the enzyme for dNTPs was 104 microM. A working model is presented that accounts for the substrate inhibition. In this model, the reverse transcriptase is a multisubunit holoenzyme, where noncompetitive inhibition is mediated by one subunit binding nucleotide and down-regulating the enzymatically active 64-kDa subunit. With additional assumptions, this model can accommodate the negative cooperativity observed. Images PMID:1384060

  19. Recombination in Eukaryotic Single Stranded DNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Darren P.; Biagini, Philippe; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Golden, Michael; Roumagnac, Philippe; Varsani, Arvind

    2011-01-01

    Although single stranded (ss) DNA viruses that infect humans and their domesticated animals do not generally cause major diseases, the arthropod borne ssDNA viruses of plants do, and as a result seriously constrain food production in most temperate regions of the world. Besides the well known plant and animal-infecting ssDNA viruses, it has recently become apparent through metagenomic surveys of ssDNA molecules that there also exist large numbers of other diverse ssDNA viruses within almost all terrestrial and aquatic environments. The host ranges of these viruses probably span the tree of life and they are likely to be important components of global ecosystems. Various lines of evidence suggest that a pivotal evolutionary process during the generation of this global ssDNA virus diversity has probably been genetic recombination. High rates of homologous recombination, non-homologous recombination and genome component reassortment are known to occur within and between various different ssDNA virus species and we look here at the various roles that these different types of recombination may play, both in the day-to-day biology, and in the longer term evolution, of these viruses. We specifically focus on the ecological, biochemical and selective factors underlying patterns of genetic exchange detectable amongst the ssDNA viruses and discuss how these should all be considered when assessing the adaptive value of recombination during ssDNA virus evolution. PMID:21994803

  20. Recombination in eukaryotic single stranded DNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Martin, Darren P; Biagini, Philippe; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Golden, Michael; Roumagnac, Philippe; Varsani, Arvind

    2011-09-01

    Although single stranded (ss) DNA viruses that infect humans and their domesticated animals do not generally cause major diseases, the arthropod borne ssDNA viruses of plants do, and as a result seriously constrain food production in most temperate regions of the world. Besides the well known plant and animal-infecting ssDNA viruses, it has recently become apparent through metagenomic surveys of ssDNA molecules that there also exist large numbers of other diverse ssDNA viruses within almost all terrestrial and aquatic environments. The host ranges of these viruses probably span the tree of life and they are likely to be important components of global ecosystems. Various lines of evidence suggest that a pivotal evolutionary process during the generation of this global ssDNA virus diversity has probably been genetic recombination. High rates of homologous recombination, non-homologous recombination and genome component reassortment are known to occur within and between various different ssDNA virus species and we look here at the various roles that these different types of recombination may play, both in the day-to-day biology, and in the longer term evolution, of these viruses. We specifically focus on the ecological, biochemical and selective factors underlying patterns of genetic exchange detectable amongst the ssDNA viruses and discuss how these should all be considered when assessing the adaptive value of recombination during ssDNA virus evolution.

  1. Disseminated cutaneous leishmaniasis resembling post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania donovani in three patients co-infected with visceral leishmaniasis and human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Gelanew, Tesfaye; Hurissa, Zewdu; Diro, Ermias; Kassahun, Aysheshm; Kuhls, Katrin; Schönian, Gabriele; Hailu, Asrat

    2011-06-01

    We report paired strains of Leishmania parasites, one from the viscera and the other from skin lesions that were isolated from three patients with visceral leishmaniasis and disseminated cutaneous leishmaniasis that were co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus. The causative parasites were characterized by polymerase chain reaction-restriction length polymorphism of the ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer 1 and by a panel of multilocus microsatellite markers. We demonstrated that the causative agent was Leishmania donovani in all cases, irrespective of the phenotype of the disease. The paired strains from viscera and skin lesions of the same patients showed genetic identity across the 14 microsatellite markers investigated. These findings demonstrate that the skin lesions in these human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients with visceral leishmaniasis were caused by dissemination of viscerotropic L. donovani parasites as a consequence of severe immunosuppression. However, in all three patients, rapid clearance of the skin lesions was observed after antimonial therapy.

  2. Molecular Evolution Analysis of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Envelope in Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Macaques: Implications for Challenge Dose Selection ▿

    PubMed Central

    Varela, Mariana; Landskron, Lisa; Lai, Rachel P. J.; McKinley, Trevelyan J.; Bogers, Willy M.; Verschoor, Ernst J.; Dubbes, Rob; Barnett, Susan W.; Frost, Simon D. W.; Heeney, Jonathan L.

    2011-01-01

    Since the demonstration that almost 80% of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infections result from the transmission of a single variant from the donor, biological features similar to those of HIV mucosal transmission have been reported for macaques inoculated with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). Here we describe the early diversification events and the impact of challenge doses on viral kinetics and on the number of variants transmitted in macaques infected with the chimeric simian/human immunodeficiency virus SHIVsf162p4. We show that there is a correlation between the dose administered and the number of variants transmitted and that certain inoculum variants are preferentially transmitted. This could provide insight into the viral determinants of transmission and could aid in vaccine development. Challenge through the mucosal route with high doses results in the transmission of multiple variants in all the animals. Such an unrealistic scenario could underestimate potential intervention measures. We thus propose the use of molecular evolution analysis to aid in the determination of challenge doses that better mimic the transmission dynamics seen in natural HIV-1 infection. PMID:21795341

  3. The Hepatitis B Virus Genotype Affects the Persistence of Viral Replication in Immunodeficient NOG Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Yoshinobu; Miyagi, Takuya; Hikita, Hayato; Yoshioka, Teppei; Mukai, Kaori; Nawa, Takatoshi; Sakamori, Ryotaro; Ohkawa, Kazuyoshi; Hiramatsu, Naoki; Takahashi, Takeshi; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Ry