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Sample records for immunodeficiency virus hiv-infected

  1. Slow Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Infectivity Correlated with Low HIV Coreceptor Levels

    PubMed Central

    Bristow, Cynthia L.

    2001-01-01

    The absolute number of CD4+ lymphocytes in blood is prognostic for disease progression, yet the cell surface density of CD4 receptors or chemokine receptors on a single cell has not previously been found to be predictive of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infectivity outcome. It has recently been shown that human leukocyte elastase (HLE) and its ligand α1 proteinase inhibitor (α1PI; α1 antitrypsin) act as HIV fusion cofactors. The present study shows that decreased HIV infectivity is significantly correlated with decreased cell surface density of HLE but not with decreased CD4 nor chemokine receptors. In vitro HIV infectivity outcome in this study was predicted by the surface density of HLE on mononuclear phagocytes but not on lymphocytes. The set point HLE surface density was in part determined by α1PI. Decreased circulating α1PI was correlated with increased cell surface HLE and with increased HIV infectivity. The correlation of HIV infectivity outcome with surface HLE and circulating α1PI supports the utility of these HIV cofactors in diagnostic analysis and therapeutic intervention. PMID:11527806

  2. Comparison of the safety, vaccine virus shedding, and immunogenicity of influenza virus vaccine, trivalent, types A and B, live cold-adapted, administered to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected and non-HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed

    King, J C; Treanor, J; Fast, P E; Wolff, M; Yan, L; Iacuzio, D; Readmond, B; O'Brien, D; Mallon, K; Highsmith, W E; Lambert, J S; Belshe, R B

    2000-02-01

    Fifty-seven human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected (CDC class A1-2) and 54 non-HIV-infected adults, not prescreened for influenza susceptibility, were randomized to receive trivalent live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) or placebo intranasally. LAIV was safe and well tolerated with no serious adverse events attributable to vaccine. Reactogenicity rates were similar in LAIV and placebo recipients except that runny nose/nasal congestion was significantly more common in LAIV recipients regardless of HIV status. No prolonged shedding of LAIV was observed in HIV-infected participants. HIV RNA levels were not increased and CD4 counts were not decreased in HIV-infected LAIV recipients compared with placebo recipients after immunization. Shedding of LAIV and increases in antibody titers were infrequent, consistent with prior experience in unscreened adults. The data suggest that inadvertent vaccination with LAIV in relatively asymptomatic HIV-infected adults would not be associated with frequent significant adverse events.

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antigen testing to detect HIV infection in female sex workers in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Chan, R K; Ali, K; Thoe, S Y

    1995-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is characterised by seroconversion after a ¿window¿ period of 2 to 3 months. After this period antibodies are usually detectable by screening tests (enzyme immunoassay or particle agglutination) confirmed by Western blot analysis. We studied 1000 newly enrolled female sex workers who had not been previously tested for HIV to assess the usefulness of HIV antigen testing to improve the efficacy of HIV infection detection. Blood was taken at enrollment for HIV antigen and HIV antibody testing. The Abbott HIVAG-1 test was used to detect antigen; antibody detection was by the Abbott recombinant HIV-1/HIV-2 3rd generation enzyme immunoassay (EIA) test, the Fujirebio Serodia-HIV particle agglutination (PA) test for screening, and the Diagnostic Biotechnology HIV Blot 2.2 Western blot (WB) test for antibody confirmation. Of the 1000 samples, 26 were positive for HIV antibody testing (26/26 for EIA, 25/25 for PA, 26/26 for WB), giving a prevalence rate of 2.6%, Of these 26 seropositive samples 1 was positive on HIV antigen testing. There were no samples which were antigen-positive and antibody-negative. HIV antigen testing does not add to increased efficacy of HIV detection among female sex workers in Singapore.

  4. Intensifying Antiretroviral Therapy With Raltegravir and Maraviroc During Early Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Infection Does Not Accelerate HIV Reservoir Reduction.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Mario; Benko, Erika; Yue, Feng Yun; Kim, Connie J; Huibner, Sanja; Lee, Terry; Singer, Joel; Pankovich, Jim; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Kaul, Rupert; Kandel, Gabor; Kovacs, Colin

    2015-12-01

    Background.  Persistent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) within the CD4(+) T-cell reservoir is an obstacle to eradication. We hypothesized that adding raltegravir and maraviroc to standard combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) during early HIV infection could substantially reduce viral reservoirs as a step towards eradication. Methods.  A prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled pilot trial enrolled 32 participants with documented early (<6 months) HIV infection to either standard cART (emtricitabine/tenofovir/lopinavir/ritonavir) or intensive cART (standard regimen + raltegravir/maraviroc). Human immunodeficiency virus reservoirs were assessed at baseline and at 48 weeks by (1) proviral DNA, (2) cell-associated RNA, and (3) replication-competent virus, all from purified blood CD4(+) T cells, and (4) gut proviral DNA. A multiassay algorithm (MAA) on baseline sera estimated timing of infection. Results.  Thirty individuals completed the study to the 48-week endpoint. The reduction in blood proviral burden was -1.03 log DNA copies/10(6) CD4(+) T cells versus -.84 log in the standard and intensive groups, respectively (P = .056). Overall, there was no significant difference in the rate of decline of HIV-associated RNA, replication-competent virus in blood CD4(+) T cells, nor proviral gut HIV DNA to 48 weeks. Individuals who presented with more recent HIV infection had significantly lower virus reservoirs, and cART tended to reduce their reservoirs to a greater extent. Conclusions.  Intensive cART led to no additional reduction in the blood virus reservoir at 48 weeks compared with standard cART. Human immunodeficiency virus reservoir size is smaller earlier in HIV infection. Other novel treatment strategies in combination with early cART will be needed to eliminate the HIV latent reservoir.

  5. Frequency of human immunodeficiency virus type-2 in hiv infected patients in Maputo City, Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The HIV/AIDS pandemic is primarily caused by HIV-1. Another virus type, HIV-2, is found mainly in West African countries. We hypothesized that population migration and mobility in Africa may have facilitated the introduction and spreading of HIV-2 in Mozambique. The presence of HIV-2 has important implications for diagnosis and choice of treatment of HIV infection. Hence, the aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of HIV-2 infection and its genotype in Maputo, Mozambique. HIV-infected individuals (N = 1,200) were consecutively enrolled and screened for IgG antibodies against HIV-1 gp41 and HIV-2 gp36 using peptide-based enzyme immunoassays (pepEIA). Specimens showing reactivity on the HIV-2 pepEIA were further tested using the INNO-LIA immunoblot assay and HIV-2 PCR targeting RT and PR genes. Subtype analysis of HIV-2 was based on the protease gene. After screening with HIV-2 pepEIA 1,168 were non-reactive and 32 were reactive to HIV-2 gp36 peptide. Of this total, 30 specimens were simultaneously reactive to gp41 and gp36 pepEIA while two samples reacted solely to gp36 peptide. Only three specimens containing antibodies against gp36 and gp105 on the INNO-LIA immunoblot assay were found to be positive by PCR to HIV-2 subtype A. The proportion of HIV-2 in Maputo City was 0.25% (90%CI 0.01-0.49). The HIV epidemic in Southern Mozambique is driven by HIV-1, with HIV-2 also circulating at a marginal rate. Surveillance program need to improve HIV-2 diagnosis and consider periodical survey aiming to monitor HIV-2 prevalence in the country. PMID:21849066

  6. Saquinavir-mediated inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in SCID mice implanted with human fetal thymus and liver tissue: an in vivo model for evaluating the effect of drug therapy on HIV infection in lymphoid tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Pettoello-Mantovani, M; Kollmann, T R; Raker, C; Kim, A; Yurasov, S; Tudor, R; Wiltshire, H; Goldstein, H

    1997-01-01

    Treatment with protease inhibitors alone or in combination with inhibitors of reverse transcriptase potently suppresses levels of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA in plasma and thereby may significantly delay the progression of HIV-mediated disease. To investigate the effect of treatment with the protease inhibitor saquinavir on HIV replication in the lymphoid tissues, we used a SCID-hu mouse model that we developed, in which human thymic and liver tissues (hu-thy/liv) were implanted under both kidney capsules in SCID mice (thy/liv-SCID-hu mice). These mice are populated in the periphery with large numbers of human T cells and develop disseminated HIV infection after intraimplant injection. thy/liv-SCID-hu mice with established HIV infection that were treated for 1 month with saquinavir had a significantly lower viral load present in the implanted hu-thy/liv and mouse spleen than did the untreated HIV-infected thy/liv-SCID-hu mice. To examine the capacity of acute treatment with saquinavir to prevent HIV infection, some thy/liv-SCID-hu mice were inoculated with HIV and then immediately started on saquinavir. Although treated mice had markedly lower viral loads in the thy/liv implants and spleens, HIV infection was not completely prevented. Thus, the effect of antiviral therapy on HIV infection in the major site of HIV replication, the lymphoid tissues, can be readily evaluated in our thy/liv-SCID-hu mice. These mice should prove to be a useful model for determining the in vivo effectiveness of different therapeutic interventions on acute and chronic HIV infection. PMID:9303378

  7. Noncirrhotic portal hypertension in a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Gouvêa, Aída de Fátima Thomé Barbosa; Machado, Daisy Maria; Beltrão, Suênia Cordeiro de Vasconcelos; do Carmo, Fabiana Bononi; Mattar, Regina Helena Guedes Motta; Succi, Regina Célia de Menezes

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To alert the pediatrician who is following up HIV-infected patients about the possibility of non-cirrhotic portal hypertension (NCPH) in this period of life, in order to avoid the catastrophic consequences of this disease as bleeding esophageal varices. CASE DESCRIPTION: A 13 years old HIV-infected patient by vertical route was receiving didanosine (ddI) for 12 years. Although the HIV viral load had been undetectable for 12 years, this patient showed gradual decrease of CD4+ T cells, prolonged thrombocytopenia and high alkaline phosphatase. Physical examination detected splenomegaly, which triggered the investigation that led to the diagnosis of severe liver fibrosis by transient elastography, probably due to hepatic toxicity by prolonged use of ddI. COMMENTS: This is the first case of NCPH in HIV-infected adolescent described in Brazil. Although, the NCPH is a rare disease entity in seropositive patients in the pediatric age group, it should be investigated in patients on long-term ddI or presenting clinical and laboratories indicators of portal hypertension, as splenomegaly, thrombocytopenia and increased alkaline phosphatase. PMID:25913495

  8. Autochthonous Visceral Leishmaniasis in a Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Infected Patient: The First in Thailand and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Suankratay, Chusana; Suwanpimolkul, Gompol; Wilde, Henry; Siriyasatien, Padet

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of visceral leishmaniasis in a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected 37-year-old Thai fisherman who presented with nephritonephrotic syndrome, fever, anemia, and thrombocytopenia. Bone marrow biopsy revealed many amastigotes within macrophages. Kidney biopsy showed membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and nucleotide sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer 1 of the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene in blood and kidney biopsy specimens showed Leishmania species previously described in a Thai patient with visceral leishmaniasis. Only four autochthonous cases of leishmaniasis have been reported in Thailand since 1996. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of autochthonous visceral leishmaniasis in an HIV-infected Thai. With an increasing number of patients with autochthonous leishmaniasis in association with the presence of potential vector, it remains to be determined whether this vector-borne disease will become an emerging infectious disease in Thailand. PMID:20064986

  9. Epstein-Barr virus and human immunodeficiency virus serological responses and viral burdens in HIV-infected patients treated with HAART

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Sullivan, Cathal E.; Peng, RongSheng; Cole, Kelly Stefano; Montelaro, Ronald C.; Sturgeon, Timothy; Jenson, Hal B.; Ling, Paul D.; Butel, J. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) associated non-Hodgkin lymphoma is recognized as a complication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Little is known regarding the influence of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on the biology of EBV in this population. To characterize the EBV- and HIV-specific serological responses together with EBV DNA levels in a cohort of HIV-infected adults treated with HAART, a study was conducted to compare EBV and HIV serologies and EBV DNA copy number (DNAemia) over a 12-month period after the commencement of HAART. All patients were seropositive for EBV at baseline. Approximately 50% of patients had detectable EBV DNA at baseline, and 27/30 had detectable EBV DNA at some point over the follow-up period of 1 year. Changes in EBV DNA copy number over time for any individual were unpredictable. Significant increases in the levels of Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen (EBNA) and Epstein-Barr early antigen (EA) antibodies were demonstrated in the 17 patients who had a good response to HAART. Of 29 patients with paired samples tested, four-fold or greater increases in titers were detected for EA in 12/29 (41%), for EBNA in 7/29 (24%), for VCA-IgG in 4/29 (14%); four-fold decreases in titers were detected in 2/29 (7%) for EA and 12/29 (41%) for EBNA. A significant decline in the titer of anti-HIV antibodies was also demonstrated. It was concluded that patients with advanced HIV infection who respond to HAART have an increase in their EBV specific antibodies and a decrease in their HIV-specific antibodies. For the cohort overall, there was a transient increase in EBV DNA levels that had declined by 12 months. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Confusion in Education: Teachers' Issues Regarding Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Infection in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradford, Virginia M.

    A discussion is presented on the problems and conflicts that arise over the question of admitting children with Human Immunodefiency Virus (HIV) to the school classroom. Legal, educational, and ethical questions are involved, including the applicability of federal statutes regarding the handicapped, the right to confidentiality, public safety, and…

  11. Current lead natural products for the chemotherapy of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, E

    2000-09-01

    A large variety of natural products have been described as anti-HIV agents, and for a portion thereof the target of interaction has been identified. Cyanovirin-N, a 11-kDa protein from Cyanobacterium (blue-green alga) irreversibly inactivates HIV and also aborts cell-to-cell fusion and transmission of HIV, due to its high-affinity interaction with gp120. Various sulfated polysaccharides extracted from seaweeds (i.e., Nothogenia fastigiata, Aghardhiella tenera) inhibit the virus adsorption process. Ingenol derivatives may inhibit virus adsorption at least in part through down-regulation of CD4 molecules on the host cells. Inhibition of virus adsorption by flavanoids such as (-)epicatechin and its 3-O-gallate has been attributed to an irreversible interaction with gp120 (although these compounds are also known as reverse transcriptase inhibitors). For the triterpene glycyrrhizin (extracted from the licorice root Glycyrrhiza radix) the mode of anti-HIV action may at least in part be attributed to interference with virus-cell binding. The mannose-specific plant lectins from Galanthus, Hippeastrum, Narcissus, Epipac tis helleborine, and Listera ovata, and the N-acetylgl ucosamine-specific lectin from Urtica dioica would primarily be targeted at the virus-cell fusion process. Various other natural products seem to qualify as HIV-cell fusion inhibitors: the siamycins [siamycin I (BMY-29304), siamycin II (RP 71955, BMY 29303), and NP-06 (FR901724)] which are tricyclic 21-amino-acid peptides isolated from Streptomyces spp that differ from one another only at position 4 or 17 (valine or isoleucine in each case); the betulinic acid derivative RPR 103611, and the peptides tachyplesin and polyphemusin which are highly abundant in hemocyte debris of the horseshoe crabs Tachypleus tridentatus and Limulus polyphemus, i.e., the 18-amino-acid peptide T22 from which T134 has been derived. Both T22 and T134 have been shown to block T-tropic X4 HIV-1 strains through a specific

  12. Medical examination of aliens--removal of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection from definition of communicable disease of public health significance. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2009-11-01

    Through this final rule, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), is amending its regulations to remove "Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection" from the definition of communicable disease of public health significance and remove references to "HIV" from the scope of examinations for aliens. Prior to this final rule, aliens with HIV infection were considered to have a communicable disease of public health significance and were thus inadmissible to the United States per the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). While HIV infection is a serious health condition, it is not a communicable disease that is a significant public health risk for introduction, transmission, and spread to the U.S. population through casual contact. As a result of this final rule, aliens will no longer be inadmissible into the United States based solely on the ground they are infected with HIV, and they will not be required to undergo HIV testing as part of the required medical examination for U.S. immigration.

  13. Diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection: multicenter evaluation of a newly developed anti-HIV 1 and 2 enzyme immunoassay.

    PubMed Central

    Hess, G; Avillez, F; Lourenco, M H; D'Agostino, F; Cambie, G; Piot, P; Vercauteren, G; Michl, U; Melchior, W; Bayer, H

    1994-01-01

    A new anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and 2 (anti-HIV 1 and 2) test is described. It uses recombinant p24 and peptides covering gp32, gp41, and gp120 to identify HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections. This test has been shown to be specific (99.5%) and sensitive (99.8%). In this respect, the assay was equal or superior to anti-HIV 1 and 2 tests run as references. The test was able to discriminate sera from patients with HIV infections from those from uninfected individuals with excellence; it also exerted high intra- and interassay precisions. The "modular" concept of the test allows the use of single components (gp32 or gp41) to separate between HIV-2 and HIV-1 infections, respectively. PMID:8150950

  14. A preliminary survey for human immunodeficient virus (HIV) infections in tuberculosis and melioidosis patients in Ubon Ratchathani, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kanai, K; Kurata, T; Akksilp, S; Auwanit, W; Chaowagul, V; Naigowit, P

    1992-01-01

    A preliminary survey was conducted for the prevalence of HIV infections in pulmonary tuberculosis and melioidosis patients in Ubon Ratchathani province, in Thailand, the second largest province in population which supplies labors to Bangkok metropolis. In this province, tuberculosis is prevalent in a higher rate than in most other provinces and melioidosis is endemic. Four HIV-seropositives were found in a total of 551 suspected and culture-positive cases of pulmonary tuberculosis, while no HIV-seropositive was found in 121 melioidosis patients. In view of the rapidly expanding HIV-infections in Thailand, a strict watch will be needed on the future epidemiological status of HIV-infection in tuberculous patient.

  15. Trends in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) counseling, testing, and antiretroviral treatment of HIV-infected women and perinatal transmission in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Fiscus, S A; Adimora, A A; Schoenbach, V J; McKinney, R; Lim, W; Rupar, D; Kenny, J; Woods, C; Wilfert, C; Johnson, V A

    1999-07-01

    Since 1993, trends in perinatal human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission have been monitored by use of chart review of patients identified at a central diagnostic laboratory. In the population studied, either pre- or postnatal antiretroviral therapy to the infant increased from 21% in 1993 to 95% in 1997. Concurrently, the number of HIV-infected infants declined from 25 in 1993 to 4 in 1997. The complete Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group Protocol 076 regimen was the most effective in reducing transmission (3.1%). Twenty-two of 35 infants who became infected in 1995-1997 had mothers who did not receive antiretroviral therapy, although counseling practices improved with time. In 1995, 87% of the mothers of HIV-seropositive infants were counseled, whereas in 1997, 96% were counseled (P<.005). None of 59 infants tested had high-level phenotypic zidovudine resistance, although 5 (8.8%) of 57 infants had virus isolates with at least one mutation in the reverse transcriptase gene associated with reduced phenotypic susceptibility to zidovudine.

  16. Human immunodeficiency virus infection and pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Terzi, Eirini; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Dryllis, Georgios; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsiouda, Theodora; Madesis, Athanasios; Karaiskos, Theodoros

    2014-01-01

    Pneumothorax is a serious and relatively frequent complication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection that may associate with increased morbidity and mortality and may prove difficult to manage, especially in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). PMID:25337392

  17. Tuberculosis Incidence and Risk Factors Among Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Infected Adults Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy in a Large HIV Program in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Chang, Charlotte A; Meloni, Seema Thakore; Eisen, Geoffrey; Chaplin, Beth; Akande, Patrick; Okonkwo, Prosper; Rawizza, Holly E; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric; Kanki, Phyllis J

    2015-12-01

    Background.  Despite the benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART), tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of mortality among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons in Africa. Nigeria bears the highest TB burden in Africa and second highest HIV burden globally. This long-term multicenter study aimed to determine the incidence rate and predictors of TB in adults in the Harvard/AIDS Prevention Initiative in Nigeria (APIN) and President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Nigeria ART program. Methods.  This retrospective evaluation used data collected from 2004 to 2012 through the Harvard/APIN PEPFAR program. Risk factors for incident TB were determined using multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression with time-dependent covariates. Results.  Of 50 320 adults enrolled from 2005 to 2010, 11 092 (22%) had laboratory-confirmed active TB disease at ART initiation, and 2021 (4%) developed active TB after commencing ART. During 78 228 total person-years (PY) of follow-up, the TB incidence rate was 25.8 cases per 1000 PY (95% confidence interval [CI], 24.7-27.0) overall, and it decreased significantly both with duration on ART and calendar year. Risk factors at ART initiation for incident TB included the following: earlier ART enrollment year, tenofovir-containing initial ART regimen, and World Health Organization clinical stage above 1. Time-updated risk factors included the following: low body mass index, low CD4(+) cell count, unsuppressed viral load, anemia, and ART adherence below 80%. Conclusions.  The rate of incident TB decreased with longer duration on ART and over the program years. The strongest TB risk factors were time-updated clinical markers, reinforcing the importance of consistent clinical and laboratory monitoring of ART patients in prompt diagnosis and treatment of TB and other coinfections. PMID:26613097

  18. Tuberculosis Incidence and Risk Factors Among Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Infected Adults Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy in a Large HIV Program in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Charlotte A.; Meloni, Seema Thakore; Eisen, Geoffrey; Chaplin, Beth; Akande, Patrick; Okonkwo, Prosper; Rawizza, Holly E.; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric; Kanki, Phyllis J.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Despite the benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART), tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of mortality among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons in Africa. Nigeria bears the highest TB burden in Africa and second highest HIV burden globally. This long-term multicenter study aimed to determine the incidence rate and predictors of TB in adults in the Harvard/AIDS Prevention Initiative in Nigeria (APIN) and President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Nigeria ART program. Methods. This retrospective evaluation used data collected from 2004 to 2012 through the Harvard/APIN PEPFAR program. Risk factors for incident TB were determined using multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression with time-dependent covariates. Results. Of 50 320 adults enrolled from 2005 to 2010, 11 092 (22%) had laboratory-confirmed active TB disease at ART initiation, and 2021 (4%) developed active TB after commencing ART. During 78 228 total person-years (PY) of follow-up, the TB incidence rate was 25.8 cases per 1000 PY (95% confidence interval [CI], 24.7–27.0) overall, and it decreased significantly both with duration on ART and calendar year. Risk factors at ART initiation for incident TB included the following: earlier ART enrollment year, tenofovir-containing initial ART regimen, and World Health Organization clinical stage above 1. Time-updated risk factors included the following: low body mass index, low CD4+ cell count, unsuppressed viral load, anemia, and ART adherence below 80%. Conclusions. The rate of incident TB decreased with longer duration on ART and over the program years. The strongest TB risk factors were time-updated clinical markers, reinforcing the importance of consistent clinical and laboratory monitoring of ART patients in prompt diagnosis and treatment of TB and other coinfections. PMID:26613097

  19. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Prevention.

    PubMed

    Davis, Teaniese Latham; DiClemente, Ralph

    2016-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that causes AIDS. Surveillance data from 2012 indicate an estimated 1.2 million people aged 13 years and older were living with HIV infection in the United States, and 12.8% do not know their status. There are approximately 50,000 new HIV infections annually. With no available cure for HIV, primary prevention to reduce incident cases of HIV is essential. Strategies to prevent HIV transmission include reducing sexual risk behavior and needle sharing. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has multiple resources available for primary and secondary prevention to reduce disease transmission and severity. PMID:26980130

  20. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Infected Patients Accept Finger Stick Blood Collection for Point-Of-Care CD4 Testing

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Lesley; Potgieter, Joachim; Kestens, Luc; Stevens, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction HIV-infected patients require antiretroviral treatment for life. To improve access to care, CD4 enumeration and viral load tests have been redesigned to be used as point-of-care techniques using finger-stick blood. Accurate CD4 counting in capillary blood requires a free flowing blood drop that is achieved by blade incision. The aim of this study was to assess the attitude of the patients toward blade-based finger-stick blood donation. Methods Four hundred and ninety-nine patients were included (299 patients from South Africa and 200 from Belgium). They completed a questionnaire to express their preference for finger stick or venipuncture, after undergoing both. The South African patient cohort was divided in two groups, receiving either single or multiple finger stick for CD4 and other HIV-related tests. The Belgian patients received a single finger stick for CD4 testing, and were asked to respond directly and again after two days. Results The majority of the patients preferred the finger stick to the venipuncture. The perceived pain using the blade was superior to a small needle, but similar to a large needle. They preferred up to three finger sticks over one venipuncture. Up to 30% of the patients changed their mind over two days. The main reason for choosing a finger stick was continued bleeding after venipuncture. The most cited objection to finger stick was pain/soreness. Conclusion Patient perceptions support the implementation of donating capillary blood with blade-based finger stick during CD4 point-of-care testing. PMID:27556894

  1. Virus burden in long-term survivors of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a determinant of anti-HIV CD8+ lymphocyte activity.

    PubMed

    Ferbas, J; Kaplan, A H; Hausner, M A; Hultin, L E; Matud, J L; Liu, Z; Panicali, D L; Nerng-Ho, H; Detels, R; Giorgi, J V

    1995-08-01

    Persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) for > 8 years were studied to delineate virologic and immunologic attributes of long-term survival. Whereas those with 300-700 CD4+ cells/microL often had circulating cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) against HIV antigens, those with > 1000 CD4+ cells/microL did not. The subjects with > 1000 CD4+ cells/microL had low virus burden, low levels of Gag-specific CTL precursors, and minimal CD8+ cell activation. Overall, elevated levels of CD8+ cells, CD38 antigen expression on CD8+ cells, and anti-HIV functions were correlated with increased virus burden, provirus load, and HIV plasma RNA levels. A factor that suppressed HIV replication was spontaneously secreted from CD8+ cells of most subjects but not from those with high CD4+ cell counts. CD8+ cell activities, therefore, may reflect chronic viral stimulation of the immune system. Long-term survivors with high levels of CD4+ cells maintained control of viral replication but lacked the CD8+ cell activities.

  2. Activation of a beta-galactosidase recombinant provirus: application to titration of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and HIV-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Rocancourt, D; Bonnerot, C; Jouin, H; Emerman, M; Nicolas, J F

    1990-06-01

    A quantitative bioassay for human immunodeficiency viruses has been developed on the basis of the ability of the tat gene to transactivate the expression of an integrated beta-galactosidase gene in a HeLa-CD4+ cell line. Infection by a single virion of HIV-1 or HIV-2 corresponds to a unique blue syncytium or a cell cluster detected after fixation and addition of 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside (a beta-galactosidase substrate). The number of infected lymphoid cells in a culture (stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes and cell lines) can also be quantified by cell-to-cell transmission of HIV into the HeLa-CD4(+)-beta-galactosidase monolayer. Infections by simian immunodeficiency viruses are similarly detected. This assay has been used to determine the dose response of drugs, the half-life of HIV at 37 degrees C, and the appearance of infectious particles after virus infection.

  3. Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jake; Goetz, Matthew Bidwell

    2016-08-01

    Improved survival with combination antiretroviral therapy has led to a dramatic increase in the number of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals 50 years of age or older such that by 2020 more than 50% of HIV-infected persons in the United States will be above this age. Recent studies confirm that antiretroviral therapy should be offered to all HIV-infected patients regardless of age, symptoms, CD4+ cell count, or HIV viral load. However, when compared with HIV-uninfected populations, even with suppression of measurable HIV replication, older individuals are at greater risk for cardiovascular disease, malignancies, liver disease, and other comorbidities.

  4. Ocular syphilis in patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, John P; Huang, Lynn L; Rosberger, Daniel F

    2015-06-01

    As Acquired Immunodeficiency Disease (AIDS) turns thirty-years old, much progress has been made. 56,000 new cases of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection are expected in Americans this year. At least half or more will be in African Americans. Reports of the association between syphilis and HIV infection are well documented. We present a case of bilateral optic neuritis and panuveitis as the initial presentation in a previously undiagnosed patient with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and syphilis. PMID:27269502

  5. Modulation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific immune response by using efavirenz, nelfinavir, and stavudine in a rescue therapy regimen for HIV-infected, drug-experienced patients.

    PubMed

    Trabattoni, Daria; Lo Caputo, Sergio; Biasin, Mara; Seminari, Elena; Di Pietro, Massimo; Ravasi, Giovanni; Mazzotta, Francesco; Maserati, Renato; Clerici, Mario

    2002-09-01

    Analysis of the virologic and immunomodulatory effects of an association of efavirenz (EFV), nelfinavir (NFV), and stavudine (d4T) was performed in 18 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-experienced patients who failed multiple therapeutic protocols. Patients (<500 CD4(+) cells/ micro l; >10,000 HIV copies/ml) were nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-naive and were treated for 10 months with EFV (600 mg/day) in association with NFV (750 mg three times daily) and d4T (30 or 40 mg twice daily). Measurement of HIV peptide- and mitogen-stimulated production of interleukin-2 (IL-2), gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), IL-4, and IL-10 as well as quantitation of mRNA for the same cytokines in unstimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells were performed at baseline and 2 weeks (t1), 2 months (t2), and 10 months (t3) into therapy. The results showed that HIV-specific (but not mitogen-stimulated) IL-2 and IFN-gamma production was augmented and IL-10 production was reduced in patients who received EFV, NFV, and d4T. Therapy was also associated with a reduction in HIV RNA in plasma and an increase in CD4(+) cell count. These changes occurred in the first year of therapy (t2 and t3) and were confirmed by quantitation of cytokine-specific mRNA. Therapy with EFV, NFV, and d4T increases HIV-specific type 1 cytokine production as well as CD4 counts and reduces plasma viremia. This therapeutic regimen may be considered for use in cases of advanced HIV infection.

  6. Modulation of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Specific Immune Response by Using Efavirenz, Nelfinavir, and Stavudine in a Rescue Therapy Regimen for HIV-Infected, Drug-Experienced Patients

    PubMed Central

    Trabattoni, Daria; Lo Caputo, Sergio; Biasin, Mara; Seminari, Elena; Di Pietro, Massimo; Ravasi, Giovanni; Mazzotta, Francesco; Maserati, Renato; Clerici, Mario

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of the virologic and immunomodulatory effects of an association of efavirenz (EFV), nelfinavir (NFV), and stavudine (d4T) was performed in 18 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-experienced patients who failed multiple therapeutic protocols. Patients (<500 CD4+ cells/μl; >10,000 HIV copies/ml) were nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-naive and were treated for 10 months with EFV (600 mg/day) in association with NFV (750 mg three times daily) and d4T (30 or 40 mg twice daily). Measurement of HIV peptide- and mitogen-stimulated production of interleukin-2 (IL-2), gamma interferon (IFN-γ), IL-4, and IL-10 as well as quantitation of mRNA for the same cytokines in unstimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells were performed at baseline and 2 weeks (t1), 2 months (t2), and 10 months (t3) into therapy. The results showed that HIV-specific (but not mitogen-stimulated) IL-2 and IFN-γ production was augmented and IL-10 production was reduced in patients who received EFV, NFV, and d4T. Therapy was also associated with a reduction in HIV RNA in plasma and an increase in CD4+ cell count. These changes occurred in the first year of therapy (t2 and t3) and were confirmed by quantitation of cytokine-specific mRNA. Therapy with EFV, NFV, and d4T increases HIV-specific type 1 cytokine production as well as CD4 counts and reduces plasma viremia. This therapeutic regimen may be considered for use in cases of advanced HIV infection. PMID:12204968

  7. The Pediatric Pulmonary and Cardiovascular Complications of Vertically Transmitted Human Immunodeficiency Virus (P2C2 HIV) Infection Study: Design and Methods

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The P2C2 HIV Study is a prospective natural history study initiated by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute in order to describe the types and incidence of cardiovascular and pulmonary disorders that occur in children with vertically transmitted HIV infection (i.e., transmitted from mother to child in utero or perinatally). This article describes the study design and methods. Patients were recruited from five clinical centers in the United States. The cohort is composed of 205 infants and children enrolled after 28 days of age (Group I) and 612 fetuses and infants of HIV-infected mothers, enrolled prenatally (73%) or postnatally at age <28 days (Group II). The maternal-to-infant transmission rate in Group II was 17%. The HIV-negative infants in Group II (Group IIb) serves as a control group for the HIV-infected children (Group IIa). The cohort is followed at specified intervals for clinical examination, cardiac, pulmonary, immunologic, and infectious studies and for intercurrent illnesses. In Group IIa, the cumulative loss-to-follow-up rate at 3 years was 10.5%, and the 3-year cumulative mortality rate was 24.9%. The findings will be relevant to clinical and epidemiologic aspects of HIV infection in children. PMID:8892497

  8. Increased regulatory T cell counts in HIV-infected nonresponders to hepatitis B virus vaccine.

    PubMed

    del Pozo Balado, María del Mar; Leal, Manuel; Méndez Lagares, Gema; Mata, Rosario C; López-Cortés, Luis F; Viciana, Pompeyo; Pacheco, Yolanda M

    2010-08-15

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) coinfection is a main cause of liver-related mortality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected subjects. Unfortunately, HIV-infected subjects show a low rate of response to standard HBV vaccination (23%-56%), in contrast to rates >90% found in the general population, and the underlying causes (particularly cellular and molecular causes) are still unknown. We hypothesized that an increased frequency of regulatory T (T(reg)) cells could be involved in the low rate of seroconversion in HIV-infected subjects. Forty HIV-infected subjects were enrolled in the Assistance Vaccination Program against HBV of the Infectious Diseases Service from the Virgen del Rocío University Hospital, Seville, Spain. Freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells from baseline were immunophenotyped for T(reg) cells, CD4, and CD8 T cells in both naive and memory subpopulations and activation degree, as well as recent thymic emigrants. Baseline T(reg) cell frequency was found independently associated with the final nonresponse to HBV vaccine in HIV-infected subjects. Furthermore, a negative correlation between baseline frequency of T(reg) cells and antibody titers in the final response was found. These findings suggest an active role played by T(reg) cells on the immunization antigen-specific T and/or B cell responses with the final consequence of a B cell anti-HBs lower production.

  9. Pediatric human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Domachowske, J B

    1996-01-01

    In the past decade, an increase in pediatric human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has had a substantial impact on childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide. The vertical transmission of HIV from mother to infant accounts for the vast majority of these cases. Identification of HIV-infected pregnant women needs to be impoved so that appropriate therapy can be initiated for both mothers and infants. While recent data demonstrate a dramatic decrease in HIV transmission from a subset of women treated with zidovudine during pregnancy, further efforts at reducing transmission are desperately needed. This review focuses on vertically transmitted HIV infection in children, its epidemiology, diagnostic criteria, natural history, and clinical manifestations including infectious and noninfectious complications. An overview of the complex medical management of these children ensues, including the use of antiretroviral therapy. Opportunistic infection prophylaxis is reviewed, along with the important role of other supportive therapies. PMID:8894346

  10. Nontyphoidal Salmonellosis, Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection, and Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Piggott, Damani A.; Carroll, Karen C.; Lim, Michael; Melia, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella infection and stroke are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with increased risk in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected population. We report a rare case of ischemic stroke associated with Salmonella enteritidis subdural empyema in an older HIV-infected patient with multimorbidity, despite surgery and treatment with susceptible antimicrobial drugs. PMID:27419176

  11. Nontyphoidal Salmonellosis, Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection, and Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Piggott, Damani A; Carroll, Karen C; Lim, Michael; Melia, Michael T

    2016-04-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella infection and stroke are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with increased risk in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected population. We report a rare case of ischemic stroke associated with Salmonella enteritidis subdural empyema in an older HIV-infected patient with multimorbidity, despite surgery and treatment with susceptible antimicrobial drugs. PMID:27419176

  12. A Single Quantifiable Viral Load Is Predictive of Virological Failure in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Infected Patients on Combination Antiretroviral Therapy: The Austrian HIV Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Leierer, Gisela; Grabmeier-Pfistershammer, Katharina; Steuer, Andrea; Sarcletti, Mario; Geit, Maria; Haas, Bernhard; Taylor, Ninon; Kanatschnig, Manfred; Rappold, Michaela; Ledergerber, Bruno; Zangerle, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background. Viral loads (VLs) detectable at low levels are not uncommon in patients on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). We investigated whether a single quantifiable VL predicted virological failure (VF). Methods. We analyzed patients receiving standard regimens with at least 1 VL measurement below the limit of quantification (BLQ) in their treatment history. The first VL measurement after 6 months of unmodified cART served as baseline VL for the subsequent analyses of the time to reach single VL levels of ≥200, ≥400, and ≥1000 copies/mL. Roche TaqMan 2.0 was used to quantify human immunodeficiency virus-1 ribonucleic acid. Factors associated with VF were determined by Cox proportional hazards models. Results. Of 1614 patients included in the study, 68, 44, and 34 experienced VF ≥200, ≥400, and ≥1000 copies/mL, respectively. In multivariable analyses, compared with patients who were BLQ, a detectable VL ≤ 50 and VL 51–199 copies/mL predicted VF ≥ 200 copies/mL (hazards ratio [HR] = 2.19, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.06–4.55 and HR = 4.21, 95% CI = 2.15–8.22, respectively). In those with VL 51–199 copies/mL, a trend for an increased risk of VF ≥400 and VF ≥1000 copies/mL could be found (HR = 2.13, 95% CI = 0.84–5.39 and HR = 2.52, 95% CI = 0.96–6.60, respectively). Conclusions. These findings support closer monitoring and adherence counseling for patients with a single measurement of quantifiable VL <200 copies/mL. PMID:27419163

  13. Testing an optimized community-based human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk reduction and antiretroviral adherence intervention for HIV-infected injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Copenhaver, Michael M; Lee, I-Ching; Margolin, Arthur; Bruce, Robert D; Altice, Frederick L

    2011-01-01

    The authors conducted a preliminary study of the 4-session Holistic Health for HIV (3H+), which was adapted from a 12-session evidence-based risk reduction and antiretroviral adherence intervention. Improvements were found in the behavioral skills required to properly adhere to HIV medication regimens. Enhancements were found in all measured aspects of sex-risk reduction outcomes, including HIV knowledge, motivation to reduce sex-risk behavior, behavioral skills related to engaging in reduced sexual risk, and reduced risk behavior. Improvements in drug use outcomes included enhancements in risk reduction skills as well as reduced heroin and cocaine use. Intervention effects also showed durability from post-intervention to the follow-up assessment point. Females responded particularly well in terms of improvements in risk reduction skills and risk behavior. This study suggests that an evidence-based behavioral intervention may be successfully adapted for use in community-based clinical settings where HIV-infected drug users can be more efficiently reached.

  14. The latency rate of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV6) in positive and negative human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection of intravenous drug users (IVDU).

    PubMed

    Jayavasu, C; Balachandra, K; Wongchuree, S; Kositanont, U; Warachit, P

    1997-03-01

    The seropositive and latency rates of HHV6 among IVDU with positive and negative HIV and control group were demonstrated. By immunofluorescent antibody test, no differences in the seropositive rates were found among these three groups. All groups had seropositive rate at the average 89% and GMT antibody 1:26. This meant that most of them had previous infection with HHV6. In addition, HHV6-DNA was determined and classified into subgroups: HHV6A and HHV6B, by polymerase chain reaction. The prevalence of HHV6-DNA indicated HHV6 latency in vivo. High latency rate of HHV6 was found in all three groups (the average 54%). Moreover, HHV6B (49%) had a higher frequency than HHV6A (5%); HHV6a was found only in IVDU with or without HIV infection. The result suggested that the HHV6 latency in IVDU with positive HIV may possibly transactivate HIV. The pathogenesis of HHV6 in AIDS patients should be further investigated. However, this research finding is useful for treatment, health care, prevention and control of AIDS in case of dual infections and latency of herpesvirus infection in AIDS.

  15. Septic arthritis in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Rivera, J; Monteagudo, I; Lopez-Longo, J; Sanchez-Atrio, A

    1992-12-01

    We have evaluated the presence and characteristics of septic arthritis in intravenous (iv) drug users with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Sixteen patients with both HIV infection and septic arthritis were studied and compared with 5 patients with septic arthritis but no HIV infection. Clinical profile, laboratory findings at the time of onset, localization, causative organisms, mean hospitalization time and presence of complications were the same in HIV positive and HIV negative patients. Staphylococcus aureus was the most commonly isolated organism in both groups. We conclude that septic arthritis in HIV infected iv drug users is not uncommon, it is produced by the same organisms and presents similar characteristics to the ones found in iv drug users without HIV infection. Therefore, the presence of HIV infection does not appear to modify the characteristics of septic arthritis.

  16. Decrease in serial prevalence of coinfection with hepatitis C virus among HIV-infected patients in Spain, 1997-2006.

    PubMed

    Pérez Cachafeiro, Santiago; Del Amo, Julia; Iribarren, Jose A; Salavert Lleti, Miguel; Gutiérrez, Félix; Moreno, Ana; Labarga, Pablo; Pineda, Juan A; Vidal, Francesc; Berenguer, Juan; Moreno, Santiago

    2009-05-15

    The prevalence of injection drug use decreased from 67.3% in 1997 to 14.5% in 2006 among Spanish patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). A parallel decrease in the prevalence of coinfection with hepatitis C virus was observed, from 73.8% in 1997 to 19.8% in 2006. This steady decrease in the prevalence of coinfection among Spanish patients was caused by a change in transmission routes of HIV infection.

  17. Adherence to hepatitis A virus vaccination in HIV-infected men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Kourkounti, Sofia; Paparizos, Vassilios; Leuow, Kirsten; Paparizou, Eleni; Antoniou, Christina

    2015-10-01

    Although vaccination against hepatitis A virus (HAV) is essential for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, the uptake of HAV vaccine is reported to be very low. From 2007 to 2012, 912 HIV-infected men in Athens, Greece were screened for exposure to HAV. Two doses of an HAV vaccine were recommended to 569 eligible patients. Reminder cards with scheduled vaccination visits were given to each patient. Among eligible patients, 62.2% (354/569) received both doses. Patients who were fully vaccinated compared with non-adherent patients were natives, older, had undetectable HIV viral load, higher CD4 T cell counts and lower nadir CD4 T cell counts. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that the patient's country of origin (p = 0.024; OR = 2.712; 95% CI, 1.139-6.457), CD4 T cell count (p < 0.001) and nadir CD4 T cell count (p < 0.001) were factors directly associated with adherence. In conclusion, adherence to HAV vaccination was better than in previously published data. Because many of the factors related to vaccination completion are parameters of HIV infection, it appears that physician interest in HIV care and vaccination planning is crucial to enhancing vaccine uptake.

  18. Hepatitis C virus infection in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Sulkowski, Mark S

    2004-09-01

    Because of shared routes of transmission, hepatitis C and HIV coinfection is common in the United States, affecting 15% to 30% of HIV-infected individuals. In the era of highly effective antiretroviral therapy, hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related liver disease has emerged as a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Accordingly, the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the American Association for the Study of Liver Disease guidelines for the management of HCV recommend that patients with HIV/HCV undergo medical evaluation for HCV-related liver disease and consideration for HCV treatment and, if indicated, orthotopic liver transplantation. However, the treatment of patients with HIV/HCV is complicated by the relatively high prevalence of medical and psychiatric comorbidities and the challenges of anti-HCV therapy in the setting of HIV disease and antiretroviral therapy. Nonetheless, recently completed randomized controlled trials provide evidence of the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of HCV treatment with pegylated interferon-alpha plus ribavirin in HIV-infected individuals. This review focuses on the epidemiology, natural history, and management of HCV in the HIV-infected patient.

  19. Pediatric Pulmonary and Cardiovascular Complications of Vertically Transmitted HIV Infection (P2C2)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-13

    Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome; Lung Diseases; Cardiovascular Diseases; Heart Diseases; Heart Failure; HIV Infections; Cytomegalovirus Infections; Pneumocystis Carinii Infections; Ebstein-Barr Virus Infections

  20. Rapid Progression to Decompensated Cirrhosis, Liver Transplant, and Death in HIV-Infected Men After Primary Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Fierer, Daniel S.; Dieterich, Douglas T.; Fiel, M. Isabel; Branch, Andrea D.; Marks, Kristen M.; Fusco, Dahlene N.; Hsu, Ricky; Smith, Davey M.; Fierer, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    Background. We and others have shown that primary hepatitis C (HCV) infection in men infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) causes early-onset liver fibrosis; however, little is known about the long-term natural history of the liver disease in these HIV-infected men. Methods. We followed a cohort of HIV-infected men with primary HCV infection in New York City. Results. Four men who were not cured after their primary HCV infection developed decompensated cirrhosis within 17 months to 6 years after primary HCV infection. Three died within 8 years of primary HCV infection, and 1 survived after liver transplant done 2 years after primary HCV infection. Three of the 4 men had AIDS at the time of primary HCV infection, and the most rapid progression occurred in the 2 men with the lowest CD4 counts at the time of HCV infection. Liver histopathology was most consistent with HCV-induced damage even though some had exposures to other potential hepatotoxins. Conclusions. Primary HCV infection resulted in decompensated cirrhosis and death within 2–8 years in 4 HIV-infected men. The rapid onset of fibrosis due to primary HCV infection in HIV-infected men cannot therefore be considered benign. The rate of continued progression to liver failure may be proportional to the degree of underlying immunocompromise caused by HIV infection. More research is needed to better define the mechanisms behind accelerated liver damage. PMID:23264364

  1. Cirrhosis, Liver Transplantation and HIV Infection Are Risk Factors Associated with Hepatitis E Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Riveiro-Barciela, Mar; Buti, María; Homs, María; Campos-Varela, Isabel; Cantarell, Carmen; Crespo, Manuel; Castells, Lluís; Tabernero, David; Quer, Josep; Esteban, Rafael; Rodriguez-Frías, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute and chronic hepatitis E have been associated with high mortality and development of cirrhosis, particularly in solid-organ recipients and patients infected by human immunodeficiency virus. However, data regarding the epidemiology of hepatitis E in special populations is still limited. Aims Investigate seroprevalence and possible factors associated with HEV infection in a large cohort of immunosuppressed patients. Methods Cross-sectional study testing IgG anti-HEV in serum samples from 1373 consecutive individuals: 332 liver-transplant, 296 kidney-transplant, 6 dual organ recipients, 301 non-transplanted patients with chronic liver disease, 238 HIV-infected patients and 200 healthy controls. Results IgG anti-HEV was detected in 3.5% controls, 3.7% kidney recipients, 7.4% liver transplant without cirrhosis and 32.1% patients who developed post-transplant cirrhosis (p<0.01). In patients with chronic liver disease, IgG anti-HEV was also statistically higher in those with liver cirrhosis (2% vs 17.5%, p<0.01). HIV-infected patients showed an IgG anti-HEV rate of 9.2%, higher than those patients without HIV infection (p<0.03). Multivariate analysis showed that the factors independently associated with anti-HEV detection were liver cirrhosis, liver transplantation and HIV infection (OR: 7.6, 3.1 and 2.4). HCV infection was a protective factor for HEV infection (OR: 0.4). Conclusions HEV seroprevalence was high in liver transplant recipients, particularly those with liver cirrhosis. The difference in anti-HEV prevalence between Liver and Kidney transplanted cases suggests an association with advanced liver disease. Further research is needed to ascertain whether cirrhosis is a predisposing factor for HEV infection or whether HEV infection may play a role in the pathogeneses of cirrhosis. PMID:25068388

  2. Hepatitis C Virus Infection in HIV-infected Patients.

    PubMed

    Sulkowski, Mark S.

    2001-10-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a spherical enveloped RNA virus of the Flaviviridae family, classified within the Hepacivirus genus. Since its discovery in 1989, HCV has been recognized as a major cause of chronic hepatitis and hepatic fibrosis that progresses in some patients to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. In the United States, approximately 4 million people have been infected with HCV, and 10,000 HCV-related deaths occur each year. Due to shared routes of transmission, HCV and HIV co-infection are common, affecting approximately one third of all HIV-infected persons in the United States. In addition, HIV co-infection is associated with higher HCV RNA viral load and a more rapid progression of HCV-related liver disease, leading to an increased risk of cirrhosis. HCV infection may also impact the course and management of HIV disease, particularly by increasing the risk of antiretroviral drug-induced hepatotoxicity. Thus, chronic HCV infection acts as an opportunistic disease in HIV-infected persons because the incidence of infection is increased and the natural history of HCV infection is accelerated in co-infected persons. Strategies to prevent primary HCV infection and to modify the progression of HCV-related liver disease are urgently needed among HIV/HCV co-infected individuals.

  3. Hepatitis C virus infection in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Sulkowski, Mark S

    2007-10-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a spherical enveloped RNA virus of the Flaviviridae family, classified within the Hepacivirus genus. Since its discovery in 1989, HCV has been recognized as a major cause of chronic hepatitis and hepatic fibrosis that progresses in some patients to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. In the United States, approximately 4 million people have been infected with HCV, and 10,000 HCVrelated deaths occur each year. Due to shared routes of transmission, HCV and HIV co-infection are common, affecting approximately one third of all HIV-infected persons in the United States. In addition, HIV co-infection is associated with higher HCV RNA viral load and a more rapid progression of HCV-related liver disease, leading to an increased risk of cirrhosis. HCV infection may also impact the course and management of HIV disease, particularly by increasing the risk of antiretroviral drug-induced hepatotoxicity. Thus, chronic HCV infection acts as an opportunistic disease in HIV-infected persons because the incidence of infection is increased and the natural history of HCV infection is accelerated in co-infected persons. Strategies to prevent primary HCV infection and to modify the progression of HCV-related liver disease are urgently needed among HIV/HCV co-infected individuals.

  4. Case Study: Delirium in an Adolescent Girl with Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharko, Alexander M.; Baker, Eva H.; Kothari, Priti; Khattak, Hina; Lancaster, Duniya

    2006-01-01

    Delirium and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated dementia are well recognized neuropsychiatric consequences of HIV infection in adults. Almost nothing is known regarding the management of delirium in HIV-infected children and adolescents. HIV-related progressive encephalopathy is thought to represent the pediatric form of HIV-associated…

  5. Altered Virome and Bacterial Microbiome in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Cynthia L; Gootenberg, David B; Zhao, Guoyan; Handley, Scott A; Ghebremichael, Musie S; Lim, Efrem S; Lankowski, Alex; Baldridge, Megan T; Wilen, Craig B; Flagg, Meaghan; Norman, Jason M; Keller, Brian C; Luévano, Jesús Mario; Wang, David; Boum, Yap; Martin, Jeffrey N; Hunt, Peter W; Bangsberg, David R; Siedner, Mark J; Kwon, Douglas S; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with increased intestinal translocation of microbial products and enteropathy as well as alterations in gut bacterial communities. However, whether the enteric virome contributes to this infection and resulting immunodeficiency remains unknown. We characterized the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome in a cohort of Ugandan patients, including HIV-uninfected or HIV-infected subjects and those either treated with anti-retroviral therapy (ART) or untreated. Low peripheral CD4 T cell counts were associated with an expansion of enteric adenovirus sequences and this increase was independent of ART treatment. Additionally, the enteric bacterial microbiome of patients with lower CD4 T counts exhibited reduced phylogenetic diversity and richness with specific bacteria showing differential abundance, including increases in Enterobacteriaceae, which have been associated with inflammation. Thus, immunodeficiency in progressive HIV infection is associated with alterations in the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome, which may contribute to AIDS-associated enteropathy and disease progression. PMID:26962942

  6. Altered Virome and Bacterial Microbiome in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Cynthia L; Gootenberg, David B; Zhao, Guoyan; Handley, Scott A; Ghebremichael, Musie S; Lim, Efrem S; Lankowski, Alex; Baldridge, Megan T; Wilen, Craig B; Flagg, Meaghan; Norman, Jason M; Keller, Brian C; Luévano, Jesús Mario; Wang, David; Boum, Yap; Martin, Jeffrey N; Hunt, Peter W; Bangsberg, David R; Siedner, Mark J; Kwon, Douglas S; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with increased intestinal translocation of microbial products and enteropathy as well as alterations in gut bacterial communities. However, whether the enteric virome contributes to this infection and resulting immunodeficiency remains unknown. We characterized the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome in a cohort of Ugandan patients, including HIV-uninfected or HIV-infected subjects and those either treated with anti-retroviral therapy (ART) or untreated. Low peripheral CD4 T cell counts were associated with an expansion of enteric adenovirus sequences and this increase was independent of ART treatment. Additionally, the enteric bacterial microbiome of patients with lower CD4 T counts exhibited reduced phylogenetic diversity and richness with specific bacteria showing differential abundance, including increases in Enterobacteriaceae, which have been associated with inflammation. Thus, immunodeficiency in progressive HIV infection is associated with alterations in the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome, which may contribute to AIDS-associated enteropathy and disease progression.

  7. Telaprevir in the Treatment of Acute Hepatitis C Virus Infection in HIV-Infected Men

    PubMed Central

    Fierer, Daniel S.; Dieterich, Douglas T.; Mullen, Michael P.; Branch, Andrea D.; Uriel, Alison J.; Carriero, Damaris C.; van Seggelen, Wouter O.; Hijdra, Rosanne M.; Cassagnol, David G.; Akil, Bisher; Bailey, Juan; Bellman, Paul; Bowers, Daniel; Bungay, Krisczar; Burger, Susanne; Carpenter, Ward; Chavez, Robert; Chow, Rita; Cohen, Robert; Dalton, Patrick; Dellosso, John; Demidont, Adrian; Dillon, Stephen; Donlon, Eileen; Farrow, Terry; Gardenier, Donald; Guadron, Rodolfo; Haber, Stuart; Higgins, Lawrence; Hitzeman, Lawrence; Hsu, Ricky; Huprikar, Shirish; Inada, Victor; Jacob, Sneha; Johnson, Livette; Johnston, Barbara; Kaminsky, Donald; Klein, Oscar; Kwong, Jeffrey; Lares-Guia, Jose; Leach, Eric; Levine, Randy; Linetskaya, Irina; Litvinova, Larisa; Malhotra, Amisha; Mandell, William; Markowitz, Martin; Mayer, Gal; Meraz, Eddie; Mortensen, Erik; Ng, Michel; Olivieri, Joseph; Paolino, Charles; Photangtham, Punyadech; Psevdos, George; Radix, Anita; Rapaport, Steven; Rodriguez-Caprio, Gabriela; Shay, William; Somasundaram, Nirupama; Sorra, Lembitu; Stivala, Alicia; Tran, Richie; Urbina, Antonio; Vail, Rona; Wallach, Francis; Wang, Wen; Weiss, Susan; Wiener, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Background. There is an international epidemic of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected men who have sex with men. Sustained virologic response (SVR) rates with pegylated interferon and ribavirin treatment are higher in these men during acute HCV than during chronic HCV, but treatment is still lengthy and SVR rates are suboptimal. Methods. We performed a pilot study of combination therapy with telaprevir, pegylated interferon, and ribavirin in acute genotype 1 HCV infection in HIV-infected men. Men who were treated prior to the availability of, or ineligible for, telaprevir were the comparator group. The primary endpoint was SVR12, defined as an HCV viral load <5 IU/mL at least 12 weeks after completing treatment. Results. In the telaprevir group, 84% (16/19) of men achieved SVR12 vs 63% (30/48) in the comparator group. Among men with SVR, median time to undetectable viral load was week 2 in the telaprevir group vs week 4 in the comparator group, and 94% vs 53% had undetectable viral loads at week 4. Most patients (81%) who achieved SVR in the telaprevir group received ≤12 weeks of treatment and there were no relapses after treatment. The overall safety profile was similar to that known for telaprevir-based regimens. Conclusions. Incorporating telaprevir into treatment of acute genotype 1 HCV in HIV-infected men halved the treatment duration and increased the SVR rate. Larger studies should be done to confirm these findings. Clinicians should be alert to detect acute HCV infection of HIV-infected men to take advantage of this effective therapy and decrease further transmission in this epidemic. PMID:24336914

  8. An Unusual Case of Primary Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Presenting as Mononucleosis-like Syndrome and Acute Aseptic Meningoencephalitis. Report of a Case and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Corti, Marcelo; Gilardi, Leonardo

    2014-07-01

    Clinical presentation of primary human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection includes a wide spectrum of manifestations from asymptomatic infection to a symptomatic and severe illness. Central nervous system involvement should be always considered as a severe clinical form of primary HIV infection. Physicians should be aware to the broad clinical spectrum of primary HIV infection. We report a case of a female with diagnosis of mononucleosis-like syndrome and acute aseptic meningoencephalitis during primary HIV infection.

  9. An Unusual Case of Primary Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Presenting as Mononucleosis-like Syndrome and Acute Aseptic Meningoencephalitis. Report of a Case and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Corti, Marcelo; Gilardi, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Clinical presentation of primary human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection includes a wide spectrum of manifestations from asymptomatic infection to a symptomatic and severe illness. Central nervous system involvement should be always considered as a severe clinical form of primary HIV infection. Physicians should be aware to the broad clinical spectrum of primary HIV infection. We report a case of a female with diagnosis of mononucleosis-like syndrome and acute aseptic meningoencephalitis during primary HIV infection. PMID:25374871

  10. Symptoms of Autonomic Dysfunction in Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Dominic; Nakamoto, Beau K.; Sullivan, Katherine; Sletten, David M.; Fujii, Satomi; Umekawa, Sari; Kocher, Morgan; Kallianpur, Kalpana J.; Shikuma, Cecilia M.; Low, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    This retrospective study evaluated the frequencies of symptoms associated with autonomic dysfunction in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients on stable combined antiretroviral therapy. Patients infected with HIV reported higher frequencies of dysautonomia symptoms compared with HIV-negative patients, particularly in the autonomic domains related to urinary, sleep, gastroparesis, secretomotor, pupillomotor, and male sexual dysfunction. PMID:26269797

  11. ACOG Committee Opinion No. 536: Human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and women of color.

    PubMed

    2012-09-01

    In the United States, most new cases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) occur among women of color (primarily African American and Hispanic women). Most women of color acquire the disease from heterosexual contact, often from a partner who has undisclosed risk factors for HIV infection. Safe sex practices, especially consistent condom use, must be emphasized for all women, including women of color. A combination of testing, education, and brief behavioral interventions can help reduce the rate of HIV infection and its complications among women of color. In addition,biomedical interventions such as early treatment of patients infected with HIV and pre-exposure antiretroviral prophylaxis of high-risk individuals offer promise for future reductions in infections.

  12. Tuberculous meningitis in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Sinha, Manish Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis is the most common opportunistic infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected persons. HIV-infected patients have a high incidence of tuberculous meningitis as well. The exact incidence and prevalence of tuberculous meningitis in HIV-infected patients are not known. HIV infection does not significantly alter the clinical manifestations, laboratory, radiographic findings, or the response to therapy. Still, some differences have been noted. For example, the histopathological examination of exudates in HIV-infected patients shows fewer lymphocytes, epithelioid cells, and Langhan's type of giant cells. Larger numbers of acid-fast bacilli may be seen in the cerebral parenchyma and meninges. The chest radiograph is abnormal in up to 46% of patients with tuberculous meningitis. Tuberculous meningitis is likely to present with cerebral infarcts and mass lesions. Cryptococcal meningitis is important in differential diagnosis. The recommended duration of treatment in HIV-infected patients is 9-12 months. The benefit of adjunctive corticosteroids is uncertain. Antiretroviral therapy and antituberculosis treatment should be initiated at the same time, regardless of CD4 cell counts. Tuberculous meningitis may be a manifestation of paradoxical tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Some studies have demonstrated a significant impact of HIV co-infection on mortality from tuberculous meningitis. HIV-infected patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculous meningitis have significantly higher mortality. The best way to prevent HIV-associated tuberculous meningitis is to diagnose and isolate infectious cases of tuberculosis promptly and administer appropriate treatment.

  13. Human immunodeficiency virus induced oral candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Warrier, S Aravind; Sathasivasubramanian, S

    2015-08-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a worldwide health problem, which affects in both developing and developed countries. The oral lesions caused due to this disease can drastically change the life of the patient, in terms of quality. We can also know the progression of the disease and also the important immune status of the patient. Lots of information on HIV is known in the developed countries and very less reports are available in the developing countries. The morbidity of HIV disease is due to its association with opportunistic fungal infection and the most common among them is oral candidiasis. Here, we present a case report on an apparently healthy male patient of 39 years, who had oral candidiasis and was one of the indicators for HIV infection.

  14. HIV Infection Legal Issues: An Introduction for Developmental Services. Technical Report on Developmental Disabilities and HIV Infection, Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, David C.; Decker, Curtis L.

    As agencies and programs serving individuals with developmental disabilities are called upon to serve a new population of individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, they will be forced to confront complex legal questions. This paper discusses the legal frameworks in which individuals with HIV infection are considered eligible…

  15. Current oral manifestations of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Navazesh, M

    2001-02-01

    The oral manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus infection have changed drastically since the introduction of the highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) in developed countries. Recent studies have documented significant reductions in morbidity and mortality rates among HIV-infected patients on HAART. This article focuses on the latest information about the oral manifestations of HIV infection and will discuss the impact of HAART.

  16. Depoliticize Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection: A Commentary

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Public-health policy is inconsistent in its approach to the sexually transmitted disease human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Nearly every health agency has politicized the reporting, finding, and contacting of HIV cases. There is also no consistency among the various state health departments and the various federal health agencies. Until we have a uniform health policy that treats HIV infection as every other reportable sexually transmitted disease, we will make little progress toward controlling its inevitable increase in both cases and costs. PMID:18475369

  17. The severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model of human immunodeficiency virus encephalitis: deficits in cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Griffin, William C; Middaugh, Lawrence D; Cook, Jennifer E; Tyor, William R

    2004-04-01

    The severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) encephalitis exhibits many of the histopathological and pathophysiological features of human HIV-associated dementia (HAD). Although deficits that may resemble HAD in humans have been reported for HIV-infected SCID mice, the cognitive deficit aspect of the model has very limited empirical support. Here, the authors report that HIV-infected SCID mice display cognitive deficits on a task requiring the animal to learn and remember the spatial relationship of cues in its environment in order to locate a submerged platform in a Morris water maze. The cognitive deficits manifest as longer latencies to locate the platform on the last day of the maze acquisition period and during a retention test 8 days later. Control experiments indicated that the poor performance by HIV-infected mice in comparison to controls was not due to impaired motor function or swimming ability, impaired visual acuity, or increased susceptibility to fatigue. Thus, the increased times required for HIV-infected mice to locate the submerged platform during the acquisition and memory tests likely reflect a cognitive deficit, rather than sensorimotor or emotional abnormalities. These behavioral deficits are associated with significant increases in astrogliosis and microgliosis in the HIV-infected mice. The results of this study strengthen the SCID mouse model of HIV encephalitis by definitively establishing cognitive deficits for the model in addition to its previously reported neuropathological features.

  18. Neuromyelitis optica in patients with coexisting human immunodeficiency virus infections.

    PubMed

    Feyissa, Anteneh M; Singh, Parbhdeep; Smith, Robert G

    2013-09-01

    Two patients with known human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections and receiving antiretroviral treatment developed neuromyelitis optica (Devic's disease). One patient tested positive for serum aquaporin-4 immunoglobulin G antibodies. Both patients were treated with high dose pulsed intravenous methylprednisolone followed by standard sessions of plasma exchange both at the onset attack and during disease relapses. For maintenance therapy, one patient received rituximab infusions and the second patient received mycophenolate mofetil orally. Despite treatment, both patients are currently wheelchair-bound due to severe paraparesis. Neuromyelitis optica can occur in the course of HIV infection and poses an ongoing therapeutic challenge.

  19. Management of dyslipidemia in patients with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Shalit, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Dyslipidemias are more common in the patient population with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) has dramatically reduced HIV-associated morbidity and mortality and has transformed HIV disease into a chronic, manageable condition. As a result, non-AIDS-related illnesses, including cardiovascular diseases, are now the leading causes of death in the HIV-infected population. Optimizing fasting lipid parameters plays an important role in reducing cardiovascular risk in this population. This review focuses on the management of dyslipidemia in HIV-infected individuals treated with combination ART.

  20. Oral lesions in infection with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Coogan, Maeve M.; Greenspan, John; Challacombe, Stephen J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the importance of oral lesions as indicators of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and as predictors of progression of HIV disease to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Oral manifestations are among the earliest and most important indicators of infection with HIV. Seven cardinal lesions, oral candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia, Kaposi sarcoma, linear gingival erythema, necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, which are strongly associated with HIV infection, have been identified and internationally calibrated, and are seen in both developed and developing countries. They may provide a strong indication of HIV infection and be present in the majority of HIV-infected people. Antiretroviral therapy may affect the prevalence of HIV-related lesions. The presence of oral lesions can have a significant impact on health-related quality of life. Oral health is strongly associated with physical and mental health and there are significant increases in oral health needs in people with HIV infection, especially in children, and in adults particularly in relation to periodontal diseases. International collaboration is needed to ensure that oral aspects of HIV disease are taken into account in medical programmes and to integrate oral health care with the general care of the patient. It is important that all health care workers receive education and training on the relevance of oral health needs and the use of oral lesions as surrogate markers in HIV infection. PMID:16211162

  1. Immunology of Pediatric HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, Nicole H.; Aldrovandi, Grace M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Most infants born to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women escape HIV infection. Infants evade infection despite an immature immune system and, in the case of breastfeeding, prolonged repetitive, exposure. If infants become infected, the course of their infection and response to treatment differs dramatically depending upon the timing (in utero, intrapartum, or during breastfeeding) and potentially the route of their infection. Perinatally acquired HIV infection occurs during a critical window of immune development. HIV’s perturbation of this dynamic process may account for the striking age-dependent differences in HIV disease progression. HIV infection also profoundly disrupts the maternal immune system upon which infants rely for protection and immune instruction. Therefore, it is not surprising that infants who escape HIV infection still suffer adverse effects. In this review, we highlight the unique aspects of pediatric HIV transmission and pathogenesis with a focus on mechanisms by which HIV infection during immune ontogeny may allow discovery of key elements for protection and control from HIV. PMID:23772619

  2. Amebic liver abscess and human immunodeficiency virus infection: a report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Liu, C J; Hung, C C; Chen, M Y; Lai, Y P; Chen, P J; Huang, S H; Chen, D S

    2001-07-01

    Invasive amebiasis rarely occurs in homosexual men and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals and has not been regarded as a beacon for concomitant HIV infection. We encountered a bisexual man with a protracted course of amebic liver abscess and amebic colitis. In the presence of fever, generalized lymphadenopathy, and elevated serum aminotransferase levels, HIV infection was suspected and then confirmed by a de novo seroconversion of HIV antibody. Subsequently, we noted two consecutive patients with amebic liver abscess, also later found to be infected with HIV. The ameba obtained from these three cases was identified as Entamoeba histolytica by amplification of 16S ribosomal RNA by polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing. This observation suggests that amebic liver abscess and colitis can be presentations for HIV infection in the Far East. Thus, the local patients with invasive amebiasis, especially those with a protracted course or with risk factors of HIV infection, should be tested for HIV.

  3. HLA Immunogenotype Determines Persistent Human Papillomavirus Virus Infection in HIV-Infected Patients Receiving Antiretroviral Treatment.

    PubMed

    Meys, Rhonda; Purdie, Karin J; de Koning, Maurits N C; Quint, Koen D; Little, Ann-Margaret; Baker, Finnuala; Francis, Nick; Asboe, David; Hawkins, David; Marsh, Steven G E; Harwood, Catherine A; Gotch, Frances M; Bunker, Christopher B

    2016-06-01

    A proportion of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients develop persistent, stigmatizing human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cutaneous and genital warts and anogenital (pre)cancer. This is the first study to investigate immunogenetic variations that might account for HPV susceptibility and the largest to date to categorize the HPV types associated with cutaneous warts in HIV-positive patients. The HLA class I and II allele distribution was analyzed in 49 antiretroviral (ART)-treated HIV-positive patients with persistent warts, 42 noninfected controls, and 46 HIV-positive controls. The allele HLA-B*44 was more frequently identified in HIV-positive patients with warts (P = .004); a susceptible haplotype (HLA-B*44, HLA-C*05; P = .001) and protective genes (HLA-DQB1*06; P = .03) may also contribute. Cutaneous wart biopsy specimens from HIV-positive patients harbored common wart types HPV27/57, the unusual wart type HPV7, and an excess of Betapapillomavirus types (P = .002), compared with wart specimens from noninfected controls. These findings suggest that HLA testing might assist in stratifying those patients in whom vaccination should be recommended. PMID:26908737

  4. Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... incisions made in the mother’s abdomen and uterus. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV): A virus that attacks certain cells of the body’s immune system and causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Immune System: ...

  5. Knowledge and Awareness of Acute Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Among Mobile App-Using Men Who Have Sex With Men: A Missed Public Health Opportunity

    PubMed Central

    Siegler, Aaron J.; Sanchez, Travis; Sineath, R. Craig; Grey, Jeremy; Kahle, Erin; Sullivan, Patrick S.

    2015-01-01

    In a national online survey, we assessed awareness and knowledge of acute human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection manifestation among 1748 men who have sex with men (MSM). Only 39% of respondents were aware that acute HIV infection may be accompanied by symptoms. Education and increased access to acute HIV testing may facilitate MSM to appropriately seek acute HIV testing. PMID:26034766

  6. Testicular dysfunction in human immunodeficiency virus-infected men.

    PubMed

    Poretsky, L; Can, S; Zumoff, B

    1995-07-01

    This review pertains to gonadal function in men with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, who often exhibit clinical and biochemical evidence of hypogonadism. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism appears to be the most commonly encountered abnormality, although complete anterior pituitary insufficiency and primary gonadal failure have been reported. Levels of sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) are either unchanged or increased. Plasma levels of estrogens, progesterone, androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S), and prolactin vary. Pathologically, except for involvement by opportunistic infections, no significant abnormality in the hypothalamic-pituitary area has been described, but evidence of orchitis is commonly present. The cause(s) of these abnormalities remains unclear. The possible factors leading to hypogonadism in HIV-infected men include HIV infection itself, opportunistic infections, chronic debilitating illness, and effects of cytokines on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Further studies are needed to clarify the cause(s) of testicular dysfunction in HIV-infected men and its clinical significance, treatment, relevance to the progression of HIV infection, and influence on the immune system.

  7. Pediatric HIV Infection and Developmental Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidel, John F.

    This paper presents an overview of the developmental disabilities associated with pediatric Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection, and examines efficacious practices for assessment and intervention programming. The focus population is early childhood into school age. The paper describes the complex array of challenges presented by these…

  8. Public Opinion, Public Policy, and HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Jane

    1989-01-01

    A four-stage framework for considering the development of public policy in regard to the issue of HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) infection is offered. The phases are denial, irrationality, acceptance, and the development of a rational response. Federal antidiscrimination policies which include persons with HIV infections as disabled are…

  9. Chikungunya infection in a human immunodeficiency virus-infected kidney transplant recipient returning to Italy from the Dominican Republic.

    PubMed

    Dalla Gasperina, D; Balsamo, M L; Garavaglia, S D; Rovida, F; Baldanti, F; Grossi, P A

    2015-12-01

    Since December 2013, chikungunya virus (CHIKV) spread in many countries of the Western Hemisphere, and during the last year some cases of infected European travelers, coming back from the Caribbean, have been reported. The risk of acquiring severe travel-related illness is higher in immunocompromised subjects, such as patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection or solid organ transplant recipients. We reported the first case, to our knowledge, of CHIKV infection in an HIV-infected kidney transplant recipient.

  10. Programmatic Implications of Acute and Early HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Suthar, Amitabh B; Granich, Reuben M; Kato, Masaya; Nsanzimana, Sabin; Montaner, Julio S G; Williams, Brian G

    2015-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection includes acute, early, chronic, and late stages. Acute HIV infection lasts approximately 3 weeks and early HIV infection, which includes acute HIV infection, lasts approximately 7 weeks. Many testing and blood screening algorithms detect HIV antibodies about 3 weeks after HIV infection. Incidence estimates are based on results of modeling, cohort studies, surveillance, and/or assays. Viral load is the key modifiable risk factor for HIV transmission and peaks during acute and early HIV infection. Empirical evidence characterizing the impact of acute and early HIV infection on the spread of the HIV epidemic are limited. Time trends of HIV prevalence collected from concentrated and generalized epidemics suggest that acute and early HIV infection may have a limited role in population HIV transmission. Collectively, these data suggest that acute and early HIV infection is relatively short and does not currently require fundamentally different programmatic approaches to manage the HIV/AIDS epidemic in most settings. Research and surveillance will inform which epidemic contexts and phases may require tailored strategies for these stages of HIV infection.

  11. An Update on Heart Transplantation in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients.

    PubMed

    Agüero, F; Castel, M A; Cocchi, S; Moreno, A; Mestres, C A; Cervera, C; Pérez-Villa, F; Tuset, M; Cartañà, R; Manzardo, C; Guaraldi, G; Gatell, J M; Miró, J M

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases have become a significant cause of morbidity in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Heart transplantation (HT) is a well-established treatment of end-stage heart failure (ESHF) and is performed in selected HIV-infected patients in developed countries. Few data are available on the prognosis of HIV-infected patients undergoing HT in the era of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) because current evidence is limited to small retrospective cohorts, case series, and case reports. Many HT centers consider HIV infection to be a contraindication for HT; however, in the era of cART, HT recipients with HIV infection seem to achieve satisfactory outcomes without developing HIV-related events. Consequently, selected HIV-infected patients with ESHF who are taking effective cART should be considered candidates for HT. The present review provides epidemiological data on ESHF in HIV-infected patients from all published experience on HT in HIV-infected patients since the beginning of the epidemic. The practical management of these patients is discussed, with emphasis on the challenging issues that must be addressed in the pretransplant (including HIV criteria) and posttransplant periods. Finally, proposals are made for future management and research priorities. PMID:26523614

  12. HIV infection connected to rising anal cancer rates in men in the U.S.

    Cancer.gov

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection contributes substantially to the epidemic of anal cancer in men, but not women in the United States, according to new research from NCI. Chart shows overall incidence rates of anal cancers in general population

  13. Prevalent and Incident Hepatitis C Virus Infection Among HIV-Infected Men Who Have Sex With Men Engaged in Primary Care in a Boston Community Health Center

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Shikha; Taylor, Lynn E.; Grasso, Chris; Mayer, Kenneth H.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Sexually transmitted hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is an emerging epidemic among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected men who have sex with men (MSM). HCV may be underrecognized in this population, historically thought to be at low risk. Methods. We determined the prevalence and incidence of HCV among HIV-infected men at Fenway Health between 1997 and 2009. We describe characteristics associated with HCV. Results. Of 1171 HIV-infected men, of whom 96% identify as MSM, 1068 (91%) were screened for HCV and 64 (6%) had a positive HCV antibody (Ab) result at initial screening. Among the 995 men whose initial HCV Ab result was negative, 62% received no further HCV Ab testing. Among the 377 men who had ≥1 additional HCV Ab test, 23 (6%) seroconverted over 1408 person-years, for an annualized incidence of 1.63 per 100 person-years (95% confidence interval, .97–2.30). Among the 87 HIV-infected MSM diagnosed with prevalent or incident HCV, 33% reported history of injection drug use, 46% noninjection drug use (NIDU), and 70% sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Sixty-four (74%) of HCV-infected MSM developed chronic HCV; 22 (34%) initiated HCV treatment and 13 (59%) of treated persons achieved a sustained virologic response (SVR). Conclusions. Prevalent and incident HCV, primarily acquired through nonparenteral means, was common in this HIV-infected population despite engagement in care. STIs and NIDU were common among HIV/HCV-coinfected MSM. SVR rates were high among those who underwent HCV treatment. All sexually active and/or substance-using HIV-infected MSM should receive routine and repeated HCV screening to allow for early diagnosis and treatment of HCV. PMID:23386630

  14. Construction and Use of a Replication-Competent Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) that Expresses the Chloramphenicol Acetyltransferase Enzyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terwilliger, E. F.; Godin, B.; Sodroski, J. G.; Haseltine, W. A.

    1989-05-01

    The construction and properties of an infectious human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that expresses the bacterial gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase are described. This virus can be used in vitro to screen for drugs that inhibit HIV infection. The marked virus may also be used to trace the routes of infection from the site of inoculation in animal experiments.

  15. Immune reconstitution syndrome in a human immunodeficiency virus infected child due to giardiasis leading to shock.

    PubMed

    Nandy, Sneha; Shah, Ira

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome has been reported in association with tuberculosis, herpes zoster (shingles), Cryptococcus neoformans, Kaposi's sarcoma, Pneumocystis pneumonia, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, herpes simplex virus, Histoplasma capsulatum, human papillomavirus, and Cytomegalovirus. However, it has never been documented with giardiasis. We present a 7-year-old HIV infected girl who developed diarrhea and shock following the initiation of antiretroviral therapy, and her stool showed the presence of giardiasis. PMID:26985424

  16. Hepatitis B virus coinfection in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: A review

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hsin-Yun; Sheng, Wang-Huei; Tsai, Mao-Song; Lee, Kuan-Yeh; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Hung, Chien-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a leading cause of chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide. Due to the shared modes of transmission, coinfection with HBV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is not uncommon. It is estimated that 10% of HIV-infected patients worldwide are coinfected with HBV. In areas where an HBV vaccination program is implemented, the HBV seroprevalence has declined significantly. In HIV/HBV-coinfected patients, HBV coinfection accelerates immunologic and clinical progression of HIV infection and increases the risk of hepatotoxicity when combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) is initiated, while HIV infection increases the risk of hepatitis events, cirrhosis, and end-stage liver disease related to chronic HBV infection. With the advances in antiviral therapy, concurrent, successful long-term suppression of HIV and HBV replication can be achieved in the cART era. To reduce the disease burden of HBV infection among HIV-infected patients, adoption of safe sex practices, avoidance of sharing needles and diluent, HBV vaccination and use of cART containing tenofovir disoproxil fumarate plus emtricitabine or lamivudine are the most effective approaches. However, due to HIV-related immunosuppression, using increased doses of HBV vaccine and novel approaches to HBV vaccination are needed to improve the immunogenicity of HBV vaccine among HIV-infected patients. PMID:25356024

  17. Increased Hepatitis E Virus Seroprevalence Correlates with Lower CD4+ Cell Counts in HIV-Infected Persons in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Debes, José D.; Martínez Wassaf, Maribel; Pisano, María Belén; Isa, María Beatriz; Lotto, Martin; Marianelli, Leonardo G.; Frassone, Natalia; Ballari, Estefania; Bohjanen, Paul R.; Hansen, Bettina E.; Ré, Viviana

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a single-stranded RNA virus that can cause hepatitis in an epidemic fashion. HEV usually causes asymptomatic or limited acute infections in immunocompetent individuals, whereas in immunosuppressed individuals such as transplant recipients, HEV can cause chronic infections. The risks and outcomes of HEV co-infection in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are poorly characterized. We used a third generation immunoassay to measure serum IgG antibodies specific for HEV in 204 HIV-infected individuals from Argentina and a control group of 433 HIV-negative individuals. We found 15 of 204 (7.3%, 95%CI 3.74–10.96%) individuals in the HIV-positive group to have positive HEV IgG levels suggestive of previous infection, compared to 19 of 433 (4.4%, 95% CI 2.5–6.3%) individuals in the HIV-negative control group (p = 0.12). Among HIV-positive individuals, those with HEV seropositivity had lower CD4 counts compared to those that were HEV seronegative (average CD4 count of 234 vs 422 mm3, p = 0.01), indicating that patients with lower CD4 counts were more likely to be HEV IgG positive. Moreover, HEV seropositivity in patients with CD4 counts <200 mm3 was 16%, compared to 4.5% in those with CD4 counts >200 mm3 (p = 0.012). We found a positive PCR result for HEV in one individual. Our study found that increased seroprevalence of HEV IgG correlated with lower CD4 counts in HIV-infected patients in Argentina. PMID:27467394

  18. Increased Hepatitis E Virus Seroprevalence Correlates with Lower CD4+ Cell Counts in HIV-Infected Persons in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Debes, José D; Martínez Wassaf, Maribel; Pisano, María Belén; Isa, María Beatriz; Lotto, Martin; Marianelli, Leonardo G; Frassone, Natalia; Ballari, Estefania; Bohjanen, Paul R; Hansen, Bettina E; Ré, Viviana

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a single-stranded RNA virus that can cause hepatitis in an epidemic fashion. HEV usually causes asymptomatic or limited acute infections in immunocompetent individuals, whereas in immunosuppressed individuals such as transplant recipients, HEV can cause chronic infections. The risks and outcomes of HEV co-infection in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are poorly characterized. We used a third generation immunoassay to measure serum IgG antibodies specific for HEV in 204 HIV-infected individuals from Argentina and a control group of 433 HIV-negative individuals. We found 15 of 204 (7.3%, 95%CI 3.74-10.96%) individuals in the HIV-positive group to have positive HEV IgG levels suggestive of previous infection, compared to 19 of 433 (4.4%, 95% CI 2.5-6.3%) individuals in the HIV-negative control group (p = 0.12). Among HIV-positive individuals, those with HEV seropositivity had lower CD4 counts compared to those that were HEV seronegative (average CD4 count of 234 vs 422 mm3, p = 0.01), indicating that patients with lower CD4 counts were more likely to be HEV IgG positive. Moreover, HEV seropositivity in patients with CD4 counts <200 mm3 was 16%, compared to 4.5% in those with CD4 counts >200 mm3 (p = 0.012). We found a positive PCR result for HEV in one individual. Our study found that increased seroprevalence of HEV IgG correlated with lower CD4 counts in HIV-infected patients in Argentina. PMID:27467394

  19. Condom use prevents genital ulcers in women working as prostitutes. Influence of human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cameron, D W; Ngugi, E N; Ronald, A R; Simonsen, J N; Braddick, M; Bosire, M; Kimata, J; Kamala, J; Ndinya-Achola, J O; Waiyaki, P G

    1991-01-01

    Control of genital ulcer disease (GUD) is a proposed intervention to slow the dissemination of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Programs for the control of sexually transmitted diseases (STD) should focus on groups of high-frequency transmitters, such as prostitutes and their clientele. This study illustrates the interaction between the prevalence of chancroid, use of barrier prophylaxis against STDs, and HIV infection in a population of female prostitutes in Nairobi. Four hundred and twenty three women were evaluated. Despite the increased use of condoms, the prevalence of genital ulcers remained constant between 1986-87 and 1987-88. Genital ulcer disease was simultaneously associated with HIV infection (adjusted odds ratio: 3.7, P less than .01) whereas it was independently and inversely associated with more consistent condom use (P less than .01). The authors conclude that genital ulcer disease can be controlled in these populations but concurrent HIV infection increases the difficulty of this intervention.

  20. Pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Breen, Elizabeth Crabb

    2002-09-01

    In persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and/or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), the immune system becomes dysfunctional in many ways. There is both immunodeficiency due to the loss of CD4-positive T helper cells and hyperactivity as a result of B-cell activation. Likewise, both decreases and increases are seen in the production and/or activity of cytokines. Cytokine changes in HIV infection have been assessed by a variety of techniques, ranging from determination of cytokine gene expression at the mRNA level to secretion of cytokine proteins in vivo and in vitro. Changes in cytokine levels in HIV-infected persons can affect the function of the immune system, and have the potential to directly impact the course of HIV disease by enhancing or suppressing HIV replication. In particular, the balance between the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, which up-regulate HIV expression, and IL-10, which can act both as an anti-inflammatory cytokine and a B-cell stimulatory factor, may play an important role in the progression to AIDS. In light of its ability to suppress the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and, under some conditions, suppress HIV replication, increased IL-10 may be viewed as beneficial in slowing HIV disease progression. However, an association between increased IL-10 and the development of AIDS-associated B-cell lymphoma highlights the bifunctional nature of IL-10 as both an anti-inflammatory and B-cell-stimulatory cytokine that could have beneficial and detrimental effects on the course of HIV infection and AIDS.

  1. Spatial working memory in asymptomatic HIV-infected subjects.

    PubMed

    Grassi, B; Garghentini, G; Campana, A; Grassi, E; Bertelli, S; Cinque, P; Epifani, M; Lazzarin, A; Scarone, S

    1999-01-01

    Many clinical and research findings converge to indicate that frontal lobe, basal ganglia, and related neuronal connections are primarily involved in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection; frontal lobe, mainly the prefrontal cortex, has a specialized role in working memory processes. This study focused on neuropsychological evaluation of the spatial component of working memory in a sample of 34 asymptomatic HIV-infected subjects as compared with 34 age- and sex-matched seronegative control subjects. A computer-administered test assessing spatial working memory was used for the neuropsychological evaluation. The findings did not show any spatial working memory impairment during the asymptomatic phase of HIV infection.

  2. Prevalence and Predictors of Thyroid Dysfunction in Patients with HIV Infection and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: An Indian Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Neera; Sharma, Lokesh Kumar; Dutta, Deep; Gadpayle, Adesh Kisanji; Anand, Atul; Gaurav, Kumar; Mukherjee, Sabyasachi; Bansal, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    Background. Predictors of thyroid dysfunction in HIV are not well determined. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and predictors of thyroid dysfunction in HIV infected Indians. Methods. Consecutive HIV patients, 18–70 years of age, without any severe comorbid state, having at least 1-year follow-up at the antiretroviral therapy clinic, underwent clinical assessment and hormone assays. Results. From initially screened 527 patients, 359 patients (61.44 ± 39.42 months' disease duration), having good immune function [CD4 count >200 cell/mm3: 90.25%; highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART): 88.58%], were analyzed. Subclinical hypothyroidism (ScH) was the commonest thyroid dysfunction (14.76%) followed by sick euthyroid syndrome (SES) (5.29%) and isolated low TSH (3.1%). Anti-TPO antibody (TPOAb) was positive in 3.90%. Baseline CD4 count had inverse correlation with TPOAb after adjusting for age and body mass index. Stepwise linear regression revealed baseline CD4 count, TPOAb, and tuberculosis to be best predictors of ScH after adjusting for age, weight, duration of HIV, and history of opportunistic fungal and viral infections. Conclusion. Burden of thyroid dysfunction in chronic HIV infection with stable immune function is lower compared to pre-HAART era. Thyroid dysfunction is primarily of nonautoimmune origin, predominantly ScH. Severe immunodeficiency at disease onset, TPOAb positivity, and tuberculosis were best predictors of ScH. PMID:26798547

  3. [Antiretroviral therapy in human immunodeficiency virus infection: an update].

    PubMed

    Chaix, F; Goujard, C

    2009-06-01

    Since the onset of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic, the care of infected patients improved dramatically. Whereas the disease was almost always fatal, the development of new drugs and new therapeutic strategies now allow a prolonged survival. However, the complexity of patient care is increasing and physicians face new clinical events and treatment toxicities. Recent molecules and follow-up according to the recent French recommendations will be presented here. The objectives of the treatment is to decrease mortality and morbidity of the HIV infection, by restoring near normal CD4+ T cell counts and qualitative T CD4+ responses, associated with a sustained reduction in viral replication. This objective must be reached by minimizing toxicity of antiretroviral drugs. Newly developed drugs that are better-tolerated and new therapeutic classes should improve outcome at all stages of HIV infection. Whereas viral eradication remains unrealistic and protective vaccines will not be soon available, direct consequences of long term HIV infection and issues related to an ageing HIV infected population raise up new research topics. Prevention of new infections, improvement in the precocity of care by a better-targeted screening and assessment of therapy before an established immune deficiency appear as the main priorities for the coming years. PMID:19237230

  4. Hepatitis B and human immunodeficiency virus co-infection

    PubMed Central

    Phung, Bao-Chau; Sogni, Philippe; Launay, Odile

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B and human immunodeficiency virus (HBV and HIV) infection share transmission patterns and risk factors, which explains high prevalence of chronic HBV infection in HIV infected patients. The natural course of HBV disease is altered by the HIV infection with less chance to clear acute HBV infection, faster progression to cirrhosis and higher risk of liver-related death in HIV-HBV co-infected patients than in HBV mono-infected ones. HIV infected patients with chronic hepatitis B should be counseled for liver damage and surveillance of chronic hepatitis B should be performed to screen early hepatocellular carcinoma. Noninvasive tools are now available to evaluate liver fibrosis. Isolated hepatitis B core antibodies (anti-HBc) are a good predictive marker of occult HBV infection. Still the prevalence and significance of occult HBV infection is controversial, but its screening may be important in the management of antiretroviral therapy. Vaccination against HBV infection is recommended in non-immune HIV patients. The optimal treatment for almost all HIV-HBV co-infected patients should contain tenofovir plus lamivudine or emtricitabine and treatment should not be stopped to avoid HBV reactivation. Long term tenofovir therapy may lead to significant decline in hepatitis B surface Antigen. The emergence of resistant HBV strains may compromise the HBV therapy and vaccine therapy. PMID:25516647

  5. Cancer prevention in HIV-infected populations.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Priscila H; Montezuma-Rusca, Jairo M; Yarchoan, Robert; Uldrick, Thomas S

    2016-02-01

    People living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are living longer since the advent of effective combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). While cART substantially decreases the risk of developing some cancers, HIV-infected individuals remain at high risk for Kaposi sarcoma, lymphoma, and several solid tumors. Currently HIV-infected patients represent an aging group, and malignancies have become a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Tailored cancer-prevention strategies are needed for this population. In this review we describe the etiologic agents and pathogenesis of common malignancies in the setting of HIV, as well as current evidence for cancer prevention strategies and screening programs. PMID:26970136

  6. First detection of autochthonous Zika virus transmission in a HIV-infected patient in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Calvet, Guilherme A; Filippis, Ana Maria B; Mendonça, Marcos Cesar L; Sequeira, Patricia C; Siqueira, Andre M; Veloso, Valdilea G; Nogueira, Rita M; Brasil, Patrícia

    2016-01-01

    Since May 2015, Brazil's Ministry of Health has reported autochthonous transmission of Zika virus (ZIKV) in some states of the country. Simultaneous circulation of Dengue, Chikungunya and ZIKV in the country hinder both the diagnosis and the therapeutic approach of patients seeking care with acute febrile illnesses especially in patients with comorbidities. The association between HIV infection and endemic diseases has been described especially in tropical regions with varying levels of complications, although there has been no report of ZIKV in HIV-infected patients. We report the first autochthonous case of laboratory confirmed ZIKV infection in a HIV-infected patient in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. He evolved with only mild symptoms and recovered well without major laboratory abnormalities. Phylogenetic analysis of the ZIKV detected in the patient sera clustered within the Asian clade. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that Zika virus co-infection is reported in a HIV-infected patient.

  7. Routine vaccination and vaccine-preventable infections in children born to human immunodeficiency virus-infected mothers. European Collaborative Study.

    PubMed

    Dunn, D T; Newell, M L; Peckham, C S; Vanden Eijden, S

    1998-04-01

    Information on vaccinations and vaccine-preventable infections collected in a prospective study of children born to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected mothers was analysed for reports of adverse reactions and to estimate the clinical efficacy of vaccines. No vaccinated, HIV-infected child developed measles (56 child-years' follow-up), mumps (33), rubella (33) or pertussis (239), and only one adverse reaction - to Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) - was reported. These findings provide limited evidence of the safety and efficacy of routine vaccination of HIV-infected children. PMID:9628307

  8. Overt and occult hepatitis B virus infection among treatment-naïve HIV-infected patients in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marina Pedroso; Lemes, Pollyanne Sousa; Matos, Márcia Alves Dias; Del-Rios, Nativa Helena Alves; Carneiro, Megmar Aparecida Santos; Silva, Ágabo Macedo Costa; Lopes, Carmen Luci Rodrigues; Teles, Sheila Araújo; Aires, Rodrigo Sebba; Lago, Bárbara Vieira; Araujo, Natalia Motta; Martins, Regina Maria Bringel

    2016-07-01

    Although hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection is common, only few data are available on HBV among HIV patients including occult hepatitis B infection (OBI), regardless of serological markers. This study aims to determine the prevalence of OBI and overall HBV infection, associated factors, HBV genotypes, and surface (S) gene mutations in a population of treatment-naïve HIV-infected patients in Brazil. A cross-sectional study was conducted in treatment-naïve HIV-infected patients in Central Brazil. All samples were tested for HBV serological markers and HBV DNA. Sequence analysis of the S gene and overlapping polymerase gene was preformed. Overall, 25.1% (127/505) of the patients had markers of current or previous HBV infection, which was associated with age over 40 years, history of injection drug use, and homosexual sex. The hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) seroprevalence was 4.9% (25/505). HBV DNA was detected in 39 out of 505 patients: 20 of them were HBsAg-positive and 19 were HBsAg-negative, resulting in an OBI prevalence of 3.8%. Patients with OBI had significantly higher HCV seropositivity rate compared to HBsAg-positive patients. Sequencing of the S gene revealed Y100C, T131N, and D144A mutations. One patient had the M204I and L180M drug-resistance mutations (polymerase). HBV genotypes A (A1, A2), D (D2, D3), and F (F2) were identified. In conclusion, OBI represented almost half of all HBV infections with detectable HBV DNA, suggesting that hepatitis B diagnosis in HIV patients should include in addition to serological markers the detection of HBV DNA. PMID:27061406

  9. Overt and occult hepatitis B virus infection among treatment-naïve HIV-infected patients in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marina Pedroso; Lemes, Pollyanne Sousa; Matos, Márcia Alves Dias; Del-Rios, Nativa Helena Alves; Carneiro, Megmar Aparecida Santos; Silva, Ágabo Macedo Costa; Lopes, Carmen Luci Rodrigues; Teles, Sheila Araújo; Aires, Rodrigo Sebba; Lago, Bárbara Vieira; Araujo, Natalia Motta; Martins, Regina Maria Bringel

    2016-07-01

    Although hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection is common, only few data are available on HBV among HIV patients including occult hepatitis B infection (OBI), regardless of serological markers. This study aims to determine the prevalence of OBI and overall HBV infection, associated factors, HBV genotypes, and surface (S) gene mutations in a population of treatment-naïve HIV-infected patients in Brazil. A cross-sectional study was conducted in treatment-naïve HIV-infected patients in Central Brazil. All samples were tested for HBV serological markers and HBV DNA. Sequence analysis of the S gene and overlapping polymerase gene was preformed. Overall, 25.1% (127/505) of the patients had markers of current or previous HBV infection, which was associated with age over 40 years, history of injection drug use, and homosexual sex. The hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) seroprevalence was 4.9% (25/505). HBV DNA was detected in 39 out of 505 patients: 20 of them were HBsAg-positive and 19 were HBsAg-negative, resulting in an OBI prevalence of 3.8%. Patients with OBI had significantly higher HCV seropositivity rate compared to HBsAg-positive patients. Sequencing of the S gene revealed Y100C, T131N, and D144A mutations. One patient had the M204I and L180M drug-resistance mutations (polymerase). HBV genotypes A (A1, A2), D (D2, D3), and F (F2) were identified. In conclusion, OBI represented almost half of all HBV infections with detectable HBV DNA, suggesting that hepatitis B diagnosis in HIV patients should include in addition to serological markers the detection of HBV DNA.

  10. [The efficiency of combined therapy of herpes virus infection in HIV infected patients].

    PubMed

    Papuashvili, M N; Shchelkanov, M Iu

    2004-01-01

    The target of the case study was to investigate the efficiency of an alternative combined therapy scheme of herpes simplex infections versus the routine therapy by acyclovir or famvir as applicable to HIV-infected patients. leukinferon was shown to induce the antoherpetic acyclovir efficiency. The use of the latter concurrently with cycloferon for the treatment of infections provoked by herpes simple virus-1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 in HIV-infected patients prolongs the remission period in case of the above opportunistic infections. The leukinferon anti-herpetic efficiency is, obviously, related with the phagocytosis stimulation and with its positive influence exerted on hemopoiesis. The combined therapy can be stated to be most effective in HIV, clinical stages B1 and 2.

  11. International travel and HIV infection.

    PubMed Central

    von Reyn, C. F.; Mann, J. M.; Chin, J.

    1990-01-01

    Although human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a worldwide problem, its prevalence and pattern vary from country to country. Accordingly, the risk to international travellers of acquiring HIV infection also varies widely in different parts of the world, and depends principally on their behaviour. The risk of sexual acquisition of HIV infection can be virtually eliminated by avoiding penetrative sexual intercourse with intravenous drug users and persons who have had multiple sexual partners (such as prostitutes) or reduced by the use of condoms. The risk of parenteral exposure to HIV can be reduced by avoiding parenteral drug use and behaviour that is likely to lead to injury (with its attendant risk of requiring blood transfusion) and by seeking medical facilities with adequate capabilities to screen blood donors for HIV and to sterilize instruments. HIV screening of international travellers is an ineffective, costly, and impractical public health strategy for limiting the worldwide spread of HIV infection. Travellers infected with HIV require specialized advice regarding health precautions, prophylactic medications, and immunization. PMID:2194689

  12. Spatiotemporal dynamics of HIV infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strain, Matthew Carl

    Mathematical models of the dynamics of infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have contributed to tremendous advances over the past 20 years. This thesis extends this previous work by exploring the importance of spatial heterogeneity in HIV infection both in vitro and in vivo in patients treated with highly-active antiretroviral therapy. Viral infections propagate locally in space, yet HIV infection has been widely regarded as equilibrated over the entire body of an infected patient. This dissertation constructs and explores a cellular automata model of viral spread at the cellular level. Coupling the automata to a blood compartment represented by a differential equation leads to a whole-body model of HIV infection that explicitly includes spatial effects at both the cellular and tissue levels. These models are tested by comparison with experimental data. A central prediction of the spatial model is that, due to competition between Brownian motion and viral lability, HIV infectivity increases with target cell density. This production is verified in a series of in vitro experiments in cell culture. The predicted independence of inhibitory concentrations of antiretoviral agents is verified for nevirapine, but azidothymidine inhibits HIV replication less efficiently in more dense cultures. These in vitro results suggest that systems allowing cell concentrations closer to tissue densities would better reflect virus replication kinetics, although standard measures of relative drug susceptibility may accurately reflect in vivo conditions. The coupled spatial model of in vivo dynamics is compared with novel mathematical analysis of experiments in HIV-infected patients. These analyses indicate that HIV DNA provides a useful marker of the size of long-lived cellular reservoirs of HIV. Levels of HIV DNA in peripheral blood are predictive of the average rate of residual virus production after years of treatment, regardless of whether patients initiate therapy

  13. Human immunodeficiency virus antibody test and seroprevalence in psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Naber, D; Pajonk, F G; Perro, C; Löhmer, B

    1994-05-01

    Psychiatric inpatients are at risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Investigations in the United States revealed seroprevalence rates of 5.5-8.9%. Therefore, inclusion of HIV antibody testing in routine laboratory screening is sometimes suggested. To investigate this issue for inpatients in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Munich, the incidence, reason for HIV testing and results were analyzed. Of 12,603 patients, hospitalized from 1985 to 1993, 4.9% (623 patients, 265 in risk groups) underwent the HIV test after informed consent. Thirty patients (4.8% of those tested) were found to be positive, but only in 5 cases (all of risk groups) was infection newly detected. Data indicate that, in psychiatry, HIV testing is reasonable only in patients in risk groups or if clinical variables suggest HIV infection.

  14. Human immunodeficiency virus and migrant labor in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Jochelson, K; Mothibeli, M; Leger, J P

    1991-01-01

    The authors investigate the impact of the migrant labor system on heterosexual relationships on South African mines and assess the implications for the future transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The migrant labor system has created a market for prostitution in mining towns and geographic networks of relationships within and between urban and rural communities. A section of the migrant workforce and a group of women dependent on prostitution for economic support appear especially vulnerable to contracting HIV infection since they are involved in multiple sexual encounters with different, changing partners, usually without condom protection. Furthermore, sexually transmitted disease morbidity is extensive in the general and mineworker populations. Historically, migration facilitated the transmission of sexually transmitted diseases and may act similarly for HIV. Problems of combating the HIV epidemic in South Africa are discussed. PMID:2004869

  15. Human immunodeficiency virus and migrant labor in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Jochelson, K; Mothibeli, M; Leger, J P

    1991-01-01

    The authors investigate the impact of the migrant labor system on heterosexual relationships on South African mines and assess the implications for the future transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The migrant labor system has created a market for prostitution in mining towns and geographic networks of relationships within and between urban and rural communities. A section of the migrant workforce and a group of women dependent on prostitution for economic support appear especially vulnerable to contracting HIV infection since they are involved in multiple sexual encounters with different, changing partners, usually without condom protection. Furthermore, sexually transmitted disease morbidity is extensive in the general and mineworker populations. Historically, migration facilitated the transmission of sexually transmitted diseases and may act similarly for HIV. Problems of combating the HIV epidemic in South Africa are discussed.

  16. Human immunodeficiency virus antibody test and seroprevalence in psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Naber, D; Pajonk, F G; Perro, C; Löhmer, B

    1994-05-01

    Psychiatric inpatients are at risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Investigations in the United States revealed seroprevalence rates of 5.5-8.9%. Therefore, inclusion of HIV antibody testing in routine laboratory screening is sometimes suggested. To investigate this issue for inpatients in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Munich, the incidence, reason for HIV testing and results were analyzed. Of 12,603 patients, hospitalized from 1985 to 1993, 4.9% (623 patients, 265 in risk groups) underwent the HIV test after informed consent. Thirty patients (4.8% of those tested) were found to be positive, but only in 5 cases (all of risk groups) was infection newly detected. Data indicate that, in psychiatry, HIV testing is reasonable only in patients in risk groups or if clinical variables suggest HIV infection. PMID:8067276

  17. Current Practices of Screening for Incident Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Infection Among HIV-Infected, HCV-Uninfected Individuals in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Freiman, J. Morgan; Huang, Wei; White, Laura F.; Geng, Elvin H.; Hurt, Christopher B.; Taylor, Lynn E.; Overton, E. Turner; Cachay, Edward R.; Kitahata, Mari M.; Moore, Richard D.; Rodriguez, Benigno; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Linas, Benjamin P.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected, hepatitis C virus (HCV)-uninfected patients are at risk for incident HCV infection, but little is known about screening practices for incident HCV among HIV-infected individuals in HIV primary care clinics. Methods. We used data from the Center for AIDS Research Network of Integrated Clinical Systems (CNICS) to investigate historical trends in screening for incident HCV infection among HIV-infected patients who were HCV-uninfected at enrollment in care. We used descriptive measures and Poisson regression to identify factors associated with screening for HCV infection (using HCV antibody or RNA), performed temporal analyses to assess changes in screening over time, and investigated the frequency with which elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels were followed by diagnostic HCV testing. Results. Among 17 090 patients registered at CNICS sites between 2000 and 2011, 14 534 (85%) received HCV antibody screening within 3 months of enrolling in care, and 9077 met all of the inclusion criteria. Only 55.6% ever received additional HCV screening. HCV screening increased over time, but not uniformly at all sites. Only 26.7% of first-time ALT elevations to >100 IU/L were followed up within 12 months by HCV antibody or RNA testing. Conclusions. Although most HIV-infected patients were screened for prevalent HCV infection at enrollment in care, only half who were HCV uninfected were screened again. Screening varied between sites, even when controlling for demographics and risk behaviors. Patients with new ALT elevations to >100 IU/L were seldom assessed for incident HCV infection. Guidelines are needed to help HIV providers know whom to screen, how frequently to screen, and which screening test to use. PMID:25186591

  18. Public Policy Affirmations Affecting the Planning and Implementation of Developmental Services for Children and Adults with HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crocker, Allen C., Comp.; And Others

    The increasing number of individuals infected with symptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has created a need to examine public policy issues and to further efforts in planning, implementing, and evaluating services for individuals with HIV infection and their families. A working conference was convened, which identified several…

  19. Association of alpha interferon production with natural killer cell lysis of U937 cells infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Rappocciolo, G; Toso, J F; Torpey, D J; Gupta, P; Rinaldo, C R

    1989-01-01

    Mononuclear leukocytes from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-seronegative and -seropositive homosexual men lysed HIV-infected U937 cells to a significantly greater degree than uninfected U937 cells. Depletion of cell subsets with monoclonal antibodies and complement indicated that the effector cells were primarily of the CD16+ phenotype. Acid-stable alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) production induced by the HIV-infected cells correlated with, although was not an absolute requisite for, preferential lysis of the infected targets. The activity of these CD16+, natural killer (NK) cells decreased in relation to the duration of HIV infection and the presence of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Pretreatment of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HIV-seronegative subjects, but not HIV-seropositive men, with IFN-alpha or recombinant interleukin-2 enhanced lysis of both uninfected and HIV-infected U937 cells. These results suggest that IFN-alpha-associated, NK-like mechanisms are active in the cytotoxic response against HIV-infected cells and that HIV infection results in an early and progressive depression of such responses. Prospective investigations may be useful in determining the role of this NK cell response in the natural history and pathogenesis of HIV infection and the efficacy of therapeutic modalities. PMID:2913035

  20. Spinal cord toxoplasmosis in human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    García-García, Concepción; Castillo-Álvarez, Federico; Azcona-Gutiérrez, José M; Herraiz, María J; Ibarra, Valvanera; Oteo, José A

    2015-05-01

    Neurological complications in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) are still common, even in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Opportunistic infections, immune reconstitution, the virus itself, antiretroviral drugs and neurocognitive disorders have to be considered when establishing the differential diagnosis. Toxoplasmic encephalitis remains the major cause of space-occupying lesions in the brain of patients with HIV/AIDS; however, spinal cord involvement has been reported infrequently. Here, we review spinal cord toxoplasmosis in HIV infection and illustrate the condition with a recent case from our hospital. We suggest that most patients with HIV/AIDS and myelitis with enhanced spine lesions, multiple brain lesions and positive serology for Toxoplasma gondii should receive immediate empirical treatment for toxoplasmosis, and a biopsy should be performed in those cases without clinical improvement or with deterioration.

  1. Hypogonadism in the HIV-infected man.

    PubMed

    Rochira, Vincenzo; Guaraldi, Giovanni

    2014-09-01

    Androgen deficiency occurs frequently in men with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Antiretroviral treatments had reduced the prevalence of male hypogonadism. The pathogenesis of testosterone (T) deficiency in HIV is multifactorial. Several mechanisms have been proposed; among them, drugs, fat redistribution, and a poor health status could explain the mechanism leading to gonadotropins inhibition and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. The diagnosis of hypogonadism in HIV-infected men should be made based on clinical symptoms and a specific workup including T measurement. The interpretation of the results of biochemical testing is more difficult in men with HIV due to several confounding factors. T treatment should be offered to HIV-infected men with documented clinical hypogonadism and symptoms, especially if they are losing lean mass. PMID:25169563

  2. Antiretroviral Therapy for Prevention of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Kalapila, Aley G; Marrazzo, Jeanne

    2016-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is considered a chronic medical condition. Several new drugs are available, including fixed-dose combination tablets, that have greatly simplified combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens to treat HIV, while increasing the life-expectancy of infected individuals. In the last decade, multiple well-regarded studies have established the benefits of using ART in high-risk, HIV-negative persons to prevent HIV acquisition. The primary care provider must not only understand commonly encountered issues pertaining to ART, such as toxicities and drug interactions, but also needs to be aware of using ART for HIV prevention. PMID:27235622

  3. Perinatally infected adolescents living with human immunodeficiency virus (perinatally human immunodeficiency virus)

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Maria Leticia S; Cardoso, Claudete A

    2015-01-01

    The availability of highly potent antiretroviral treatment during the last decades has transformed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection into a chronic disease. Children that were diagnosed during the first months or years of life and received treatment, are living longer and better and are presently reaching adolescence and adulthood. Perinatally HIV-infected adolescents (PHIV) and young adults may present specific clinical, behavior and social characteristics and demands. We have performed a literature review about different aspects that have to be considered in the care and follow-up of PHIV. The search included papers in the MEDLINE database via PubMed, located using the keywords “perinatally HIV-infected” AND “adolescents”. Only articles published in English or Portuguese from 2003 to 2014 were selected. The types of articles included original research, systematic reviews, and quantitative or qualitative studies; case reports and case series were excluded. Results are presented in the following topics: “Puberal development and sexual maturation”, “Growth in weight and height”, “Bone metabolism during adolescence”, “Metabolic complications”, “Brain development, cognition and mental health”, “Reproductive health”, “Viral drug resistance” and “Transition to adult outpatient care”. We hope that this review will support the work of pediatricians, clinicians and infectious diseases specialists that are receiving these subjects to continue treatment. PMID:26279988

  4. Vulvar carcinoma in a 12-year-old girl with vertically acquired human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Giaquinto, C; Del Mistro, A; De Rossi, A; Bertorelle, R; Giacomet, V; Ruga, E; Minucci, D

    2000-10-01

    We report the first case of a girl with vertically acquired human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, who developed invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva at 12 years of age. Lesions resembling bowenoid papulosis covered the perianal area as well. She underwent a nonmutilating surgical excision of the infiltrating lesion. More than 3 years later, her clinical condition is excellent, although dysplastic, noninfiltrating multifocal lesions persist. This case highlights the need to perform careful periodic genital examinations in all HIV-infected children and adolescents born to HIV-positive mothers.

  5. Bubble continuous positive airway pressure in a human immunodeficiency virus-infected infant

    PubMed Central

    McCollum, E. D.; Smith, A.; Golitko, C. L.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY World Health Organization-classified very severe pneumonia due to Pneumocystis jirovecii infection is recognized as a life-threatening condition in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected infants. We recount the use of nasal bubble continuous positive airway pressure (BCPAP) in an HIV-infected African infant with very severe pneumonia and treatment failure due to suspected infection with P. jirovecii. We also examine the potential implications of BCPAP use in resource-poor settings with a high case index of acute respiratory failure due to HIV-related pneumonia, but limited access to mechanical ventilation. PMID:21396221

  6. Role of dendritic cells in immunopathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Weissman, D; Fauci, A S

    1997-01-01

    The role of dendritic cells (DC) in the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease has been a subject of considerable interest for several years. Initial studies focused on the infection, dysfunction, and depletion of DC in HIV-infected individuals. More recent studies have begun to identify the functional role of DC in the initiation and propagation of viral replication in T cells in HIV-infected individuals. This review discusses recent data regarding the role of DC in HIV disease with the aim of delineating basic immunopathogenic principles of infection and the development of therapeutic strategies. PMID:9105759

  7. Parotid manifestations of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Zeitlen, S; Shaha, A

    1991-08-01

    A lump in the parotid region is generally a salivary tumor unless proved otherwise. Recently with an epidemic of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and AIDS-related complex (ARC), a large number of pathologies are noticed in the parotid region. These conditions generally involve the intraparotid and periparotid lymph nodes. Hyperplastic lymphadenopathy and the benign lymphoepithelial lesions are the most common variants. Our knowledge regarding these new conditions is just evolving. There remains a therapeutic dilemma starting from observation only to local excision and superficial or total parotidectomy. These lesions must be kept in mind when we evaluate a patient with risk factors for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection.

  8. Thirty years of the human immunodeficiency virus epidemic and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Younai, Fariba S

    2013-01-01

    After more than 30 years of battling a global epidemic, the prospect of eliminating human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as the most challenging infectious disease of the modern era is within our reach. Major scientific discoveries about the virus responsible for this immunodeficiency disease state, including its pathogenesis, transmission patterns and clinical course, have led to the development of potent antiretroviral drugs that offer great hopes in HIV treatment and prevention. Although these agents and many others still in development and testing are capable of effectively suppressing viral replication and survival, the medical management of HIV infection at the individual and the population levels remains challenging. Timely initiation of antiretroviral drugs, adherence to the appropriate therapeutic regimens, effective use of these agents in the pre and post-exposure prophylaxis contexts, treatment of comorbid conditions and addressing social and psychological factors involved in the care of individuals continue to be important considerations. PMID:24136672

  9. Dual infection with dengue virus 3 and human immunodeficiency virus 1 in Havana, Cuba.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Daniel; Limonta, Daniel; Bandera, Juan Francisco; Perez, Jorge; Kouri, Gustavo; Guzman, Maria G

    2009-01-01

    Although dengue virus (DEN) endemic regions overlap with human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV) high incidence areas, little has been documented on HIV and DEN mixed infection. Here we report DEN/HIV concurrent infections recorded during the DEN-3 epidemic in 2001-2002 in Havana. Serologic-confirmed DEN is described in two HIV-infected subjects with dengue fever symptoms. Although patients had dengue disease, the CD4+ cells remained within normal levels and no accelerated progression of HIV disease was observed. To our knowledge, DEN cases caused by DEN-3 in HIV-infected individuals have not been reported previously. Further research is needed to diagnose this likely underreported mixed viral infection in DEN endemic areas.

  10. Enteric ganglionitis in rhesus macaques infected with simian immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Orandle, Marlene S; Veazey, Ronald S; Lackner, Andrew A

    2007-06-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) disease is a debilitating feature of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection that can occur in the absence of histopathological abnormalities or identifiable enteropathogens. However, the mechanisms of GI dysfunction are poorly understood. The present study was undertaken to characterize changes in resident and inflammatory cells in the enteric nervous system (ENS) of macaques during the acute stage of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection to gain insight into potential pathogenic mechanisms of GI disease. Ganglia from duodenum, ileum, and colon were examined in healthy and acutely infected macaques by using a combination of routine histology, double-label immunofluorescence and in situ hybridization. Evaluation of tissues from infected macaques showed progressive infiltration of myenteric ganglia by CD3+ T cells and IBA1+ macrophages beginning as early as 8 days postinfection. Quantitative image analysis revealed that the severity of myenteric ganglionitis increased with time after SIV infection and, in general, was more severe in ganglia from the small intestine than in ganglia from the colon. Despite an abundance of inflammatory cells in myenteric ganglia during acute infection, the ENS was not a target for virus infection. This study provides evidence that the ENS may be playing a role in the pathogenesis of GI disease and enteropathy in HIV-infected people.

  11. The Experience of Children with Hemophilia and HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Christopher S.

    1994-01-01

    Children with hemophilia and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection are not a transmission risk to other children, and they can help enact best practices for school attendance by other such children. The article examines the National Hemophilia Foundation's work to promote appropriate inclusion of students with hemophilia and HIV in all…

  12. Medical School Policies Regarding Medical Students and HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tesch, Bonnie; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A telephone survey of 42 medical schools in areas of high, medium, and low incidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) investigated school policies concerning prevention and reporting of HIV infection, confidentiality, screening, limiting clinical activities, counseling, vaccination, prophylactic drug administration, and disability and health…

  13. Talaromyces (Penicillium) marneffei infection in non-HIV-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jasper FW; Lau, Susanna KP; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Woo, Patrick CY

    2016-01-01

    Talaromyces (Penicillium) marneffei is an important pathogenic thermally dimorphic fungus causing systemic mycosis in Southeast Asia. The clinical significance of T. marneffei became evident when the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome epidemic arrived in Southeast Asia in 1988. Subsequently, a decline in the incidence of T. marneffei infection among HIV-infected patients was seen in regions with access to highly active antiretroviral therapy and other control measures for HIV. Since the 1990s, an increasing number of T. marneffei infections have been reported among non-HIV-infected patients with impaired cell-mediated immunity. Their comorbidities included primary adult-onset immunodeficiency due to anti-interferon-gamma autoantibodies and secondary immunosuppressive conditions including other autoimmune diseases, solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantations, T-lymphocyte-depleting immunsuppressive drugs and novel anti-cancer targeted therapies such as anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies and kinase inhibitors. Moreover, improved immunological diagnostics identified more primary immunodeficiency syndromes associated with T. marneffei infection in children. The higher case-fatality rate of T. marneffei infection in non-HIV-infected than HIV-infected patients might be related to delayed diagnosis due to the lack of clinical suspicion. Correction of the underlying immune defects and early use of antifungals are important treatment strategies. Clinicians should be familiar with the changing epidemiology and clinical management of T. marneffei infection among non-HIV-infected patients. PMID:26956447

  14. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Primary Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Primary Infection Information for adults A A ... weeks following exposure to HIV (the human immunodeficiency virus). Chronic infection with this virus can cause AIDS ( ...

  15. Sexual Transmission of Hepatitis C Virus Between HIV Infected Subjects and Their Main Heterosexual Partners

    PubMed Central

    Alipour, Abbas; Rezaianzadeh, Abbas; Hasanzadeh, Jafar; Rajaeefard, Abdorreza; Davarpanah, Mohammad Ali

    2013-01-01

    Background Overall, 60-70% of the hepatitis c virus (HCV) transmission routes is parenteral, and in 30-40% of the cases is unknown (e.g. sexual route). Knowing these routes in HIV infected dyads is very important due to clinical and methodological reasons. Objectives The present study aimed to identify and quantitatively investigate HIV-infected individuals and their main heterosexual partners regarding the risk factors of HCV transmission. Patients and Methods One hundred sixty eight of 984 couples were chosen through random generated numbers using a computer program from behavioral consultation center in Shiraz, Iran. We used actor partner independent model (APIM) and multilevel analysis to assess multiple risk factors for HCV, while partitioning the source of risk at the individual and couple levels. Results Age of the index samples was 38.71 ± 7 years, and 33.2 ± 6.3 for their main heterosexual partners; the mean duration of sexual relationship for couples was 11.9 (median = 8.5) years. Multivariate analysis showed that actor risk factor of intravenous drug using (IDU) (AOR= 13.03; 95% CI: 3.9- 43.82) and actor cofactors of HIV positivity (AOR = 7.1; 95% CI: 1.37- 36.97), razor sharing (AOR = 4.81; 95% CI: 1.84- 12.55), sex (AOR = 8.83; 95% CI: 3.16- 24.87), and condom use in sexual activity with main partner (AOR = 0.15; 95% CI: 0.02- 0.44) were associated with actor HCV positivity. Conclusions Health care providers need to pay special attention to sexual transmission of HCV among HIV-infected individuals, and should recommend control/preventive measures for HCV sexual transmission. PMID:24348647

  16. Update on kidney transplantation in human immunodeficiency virus infected recipients.

    PubMed

    Nashar, Khaled; Sureshkumar, Kalathil K

    2016-07-01

    Improved survival of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients with chronic kidney disease following the introduction of antiretroviral therapy resulted in the need to revisit the topic of kidney transplantation in these patients. Large cohort studies have demonstrated favorable outcomes and proved that transplantation is a viable therapeutic option. However, HIV-infected recipients had higher rates of rejection. Immunosuppressive therapy did not negatively impact the course of HIV infection. Some of the immunosuppressive drugs used following transplantation exhibit antiretroviral effects. A close collaboration between infectious disease specialists and transplant professionals is mandatory in order to optimize transplantation outcomes in these patients. Transplantation from HIV(+) donors to HIV(+) recipients has been a subject of intense debate. The HIV Organ Policy Equity act provided a platform to research this area further and to develop guidelines. The first HIV(+) to HIV(+) kidney transplant in the United States and the first HIV(+) to HIV(+) liver transplant in the world were recently performed at the Johns Hopkins University Medical Center. PMID:27458559

  17. Update on kidney transplantation in human immunodeficiency virus infected recipients

    PubMed Central

    Nashar, Khaled; Sureshkumar, Kalathil K

    2016-01-01

    Improved survival of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients with chronic kidney disease following the introduction of antiretroviral therapy resulted in the need to revisit the topic of kidney transplantation in these patients. Large cohort studies have demonstrated favorable outcomes and proved that transplantation is a viable therapeutic option. However, HIV-infected recipients had higher rates of rejection. Immunosuppressive therapy did not negatively impact the course of HIV infection. Some of the immunosuppressive drugs used following transplantation exhibit antiretroviral effects. A close collaboration between infectious disease specialists and transplant professionals is mandatory in order to optimize transplantation outcomes in these patients. Transplantation from HIV+ donors to HIV+ recipients has been a subject of intense debate. The HIV Organ Policy Equity act provided a platform to research this area further and to develop guidelines. The first HIV+ to HIV+ kidney transplant in the United States and the first HIV+ to HIV+ liver transplant in the world were recently performed at the Johns Hopkins University Medical Center. PMID:27458559

  18. Human immunodeficiency virus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Goepfert, Paul; Bansal, Anju

    2014-12-01

    Although some success was achieved in recent years in HIV prevention, an effective vaccine remains the means with the most potential of curtailing HIV-1 infections worldwide. Despite multiple failed attempts, a recent HIV vaccine regimen demonstrated modest protection from infection. Although the protective efficacy in this trial was not sufficient to warrant licensure, it spurred renewed optimism in the field and has provided valuable insights for improving future vaccine designs. This review summarizes the pertinent details of vaccine development and discusses ways the field is moving forward to develop a vaccine to prevent HIV infection and disease progression.

  19. Prevention and treatment of opportunistic infections and other coinfections in HIV-infected patients: May 2015.

    PubMed

    Iribarren, José Antonio; Rubio, Rafael; Aguirrebengoa, Koldo; Arribas, Jose Ramón; Baraia-Etxaburu, Josu; Gutiérrez, Félix; Lopez Bernaldo de Quirós, Juan Carlos; Losa, Juan Emilio; Miró, José Ma; Moreno, Santiago; Pérez Molina, José; Podzamczer, Daniel; Pulido, Federico; Riera, Melchor; Rivero, Antonio; Sanz Moreno, José; Amador, Concha; Antela, Antonio; Arazo, Piedad; Arrizabalaga, Julio; Bachiller, Pablo; Barros, Carlos; Berenguer, Juan; Caylá, Joan; Domingo, Pere; Estrada, Vicente; Knobel, Hernando; Locutura, Jaime; López Aldeguer, José; Llibre, Josep Ma; Lozano, Fernando; Mallolas, Josep; Malmierca, Eduardo; Miralles, Celia; Miralles, Pilar; Muñoz, Agustín; Ocampo, Agustín; Olalla, Julián; Pérez, Inés; Pérez Elías, Ma Jesús; Pérez Arellano, José Luis; Portilla, Joaquín; Ribera, Esteban; Rodríguez, Francisco; Santín, Miguel; Sanz Sanz, Jesús; Téllez, Ma Jesús; Torralba, Miguel; Valencia, Eulalia; Von Wichmann, Miguel Angel

    2016-10-01

    Despite the huge advance that antiretroviral therapy represents for the prognosis of infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), opportunistic infections (OIs) continue to be a cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected patients. OIs often arise because of severe immunosuppression resulting from poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy, failure of antiretroviral therapy, or unawareness of HIV infection by patients whose first clinical manifestation of AIDS is an OI. The present article updates our previous guidelines on the prevention and treatment of various OIs in HIV-infected patients, namely, infections by parasites, fungi, viruses, mycobacteria, and bacteria, as well as imported infections. The article also addresses immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.

  20. Genital ulcers associated with human immunodeficiency virus-related immunosuppression in female sex workers in Abidjan, Ivory Coast.

    PubMed

    Ghys, P D; Diallo, M O; Ettiègne-Traoré, V; Yeboué, K M; Gnaoré, E; Lorougnon, F; Kalé, K; Van Dyck, E; Brettegaard, K; Hoyi, Y M

    1995-11-01

    A cross-sectional study among female sex workers in Abidjan was conducted to study the association between sexually transmitted diseases and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and HIV-related immunosuppression. Among 1209 women tested for HIV, 962 (80%) were seropositive. HIV infection was independently associated with a longer duration of sex work, a lower price for intercourse, being an immigrant, and having a positive Treponema pallidum hemagglutination test (P < .05). Genital ulcers (25% vs. 5%), genital warts (14% vs. 4%), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (32% vs. 16%), Trichomonas vaginalis (27% vs. 17%), and syphilis (27% vs. 17%) were more frequent (P < .05) in HIV-infected than -uninfected women. Among HIV-infected women, the proportions with a genital ulcer were 17%, 25%, and 36% for those with > 28%, 14%-28%, and < 14% CD4 cells, respectively (P < .001). This study suggests that genital ulcers are an opportunistic disease in female sex workers in Abidjan.

  1. Partners in Crime: The Role of CMV in Immune Dysregulation and Clinical Outcome During HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Michael L.; Lederman, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    In the current era of combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals are living longer and healthier lives. Nevertheless, HIV-infected persons are at greater risk for age-related disorders, which have been linked to residual immune dysfunction and inflammation. HIV-infected individuals are almost universally co-infected with cytomegalovirus (CMV) and both viruses are associated with inflammation-related morbidities. Therefore, a detailed investigation of the relationship between CMV and aging-related morbidities emerging during chronic HIV infection is warranted. Here, we review the literature on how CMV co-infection affects HIV infection and host immunity and we discuss the gaps in our knowledge that need elucidation. PMID:26810437

  2. Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Galiatsatos, Panagis; Melia, Michael T.; Silhan, Leann L.

    2016-01-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) results from a hypersensitivity response to airways colonization with Aspergillus fumigatus, and it occurs most often in individuals with asthma or cystic fibrosis. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis is an indolent, but potentially progressive, disease in patients. In patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), ABPA is rare, and its description in the literature is limited to case reports. We describe the occurrence of ABPA in a 37-year-old woman with well controlled HIV infection. This represents the first documented case of ABPA in an HIV-infected patient whose only pulmonary comorbidity included the ramifications of prior acute respiratory distress syndrome due to Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. We also review prior case reports of ABPA in HIV-infected patients and consider risk factors for its development. PMID:27419184

  3. Invasive Aspergillus Sinusitis in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, John M.; Walsh, Thomas J.; Gulick, Roy M.

    2016-01-01

    Invasive Aspergillus (IA) sinusitis is a life-threatening opportunistic infection in immunocompromised individuals, but it is uncommon in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. To gain a better understanding of the characteristics of IA sinusitis in this population, we present a unique case of chronic IA sinusitis in an HIV-infected patient taking antiretroviral therapy and review the literature summarizing published cases of invasive aspergillosis of the paranasal (n = 41) and mastoid (n = 17) sinuses in HIV-infected individuals. Among these cases, only 4 were reported after 1999, and 98% of patients had acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Orbital invasion occurred in 54% of paranasal sinus cases, whereas intracranial invasion was reported in 53% of mastoid sinus cases. The overall mortality was 79%. We also discuss various clinical and immunologic factors that may play a role in the development of IA and consider the changing epidemiology of aspergillosis in the era of effective antiretroviral therapy. PMID:27800523

  4. The human immunodeficiency virus and the cardiometabolic syndrome in the developing world: an African perspective.

    PubMed

    Mutimura, Eugene; Crowther, Nigel J; Stewart, Aimee; Cade, W Todd

    2008-01-01

    The advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has transformed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS into a manageable chronic disorder. Clinical care, however, needs to address the metabolic, anthropometric, and cardiovascular changes associated with HIV infection and HAART. Studies in developing countries suggest an increasing incidence of HIV-associated cardiometabolic syndrome (CMS), especially in urban settings. Predictions indicate that the greatest increase in the prevalence of diabetes will occur in Africa over the next 2 decades due to lifestyle changes. This, coupled with increased access to HAART, may exponentially increase the prevalence of CMS in developing countries, where HIV infection is prevalent. Appropriate evaluation and intervention programs need to be implemented in the developing world, especially sub-Saharan Africa, to curtail HIV-related CMS. This should include routine cardiovascular risk assessments, management of HIV infection with more "metabolically friendly" HAART, and encouragement of lifestyle modifications, particularly smoking cessation, weight management, regular exercise, and adherence to a healthy diet.

  5. Inflammatory joint disease and human immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Forster, S M; Seifert, M H; Keat, A C; Rowe, I F; Thomas, B J; Taylor-Robinson, D; Pinching, A J; Harris, J R W

    1988-01-01

    Nine men positive for antibody to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who developed peripheral, non-erosive arthritis were followed up. The clinical features were compatible with reactive arthritis but were atypical in several respects: the joint symptoms were generally severe, persistent, and unresponsive to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The onset of arthritis was associated with various infections, none of which are known to be associated with the development of reactive arthritis. HLA typing was performed for three patients, all of whom were positive for HLA-B27. HIV was isolated from the synovial fluid of one patient. No patient had AIDS before developing arthritis, but four progressed to having AIDS after a mean of 7·5 months, and two died. Arthritis resolved in only one patient. The possibility of HIV infection should be considered in all patients with conditions suggesting reactive arthritis. Synovitis in patients with severe immunodeficiency has important pathogenetic implications. PMID:3135044

  6. Idiopathic genital ulcers in women infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J; Clark, R A; Watts, D H; Till, M; Arrastia, C; Schuman, P; Cohn, S E; Young, M; Bessen, L; Greenblatt, R; Vogler, M; Swindells, S; Boyer, P

    1996-12-01

    A national survey of investigators caring for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women was undertaken to describe the clinical presentation of idiopathic genital ulcer disease. Patients with negative syphilis and herpes simplex testing and/or negative genital ulcer biopsy were included in this study. Study participants (n = 29) were generally severely immunocompromised (median CD4 cell count was 50/mm3, and 68% had an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome [AIDS]-defining opportunistic process). Thirty-seven percent had coexistent oral ulcers and 19% had their genital ulcer progress to fistula formation (four rectovaginal and one vaginal-perineal). There was generally a favorable response to topical, systemic, and intralesional steroid treatment. This study suggests that idiopathic or probable aphthous genital ulcers in women have similar clinical characteristics to aphthous oroesophageal ulcers. Although infrequent, these genital ulcers can cause severe morbidity. Further research is warranted to better define the pathophysiology and optimal management.

  7. Prevention and treatment of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Daniel R.; Salomon, Joshua A.

    2005-01-01

    Strategies for confronting the epidemic of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) have included a range of different approaches that focus on prevention and treatment. However, debate persists over what levels of emphasis are appropriate for the different components of the global response. This paper presents an overview of this debate and briefly summarizes the evidence on a range of interventions designed to prevent the spread of HIV infection, paying particular attention to voluntary counselling and testing, treatment for sexually transmitted infections and prevention of mother-to-child transmission. We also review the experience with antiretroviral therapy to date in terms of response rates and survival rates, adherence, drug resistance, behavioural change and epidemiological impact. Although various studies have identified strategies with proven effectiveness in reducing the risks of HIV infection and AIDS mortality, considerable uncertainties remain. Successful integration of treatment and prevention of HIV/AIDS will require a balanced approach and rigorous monitoring of the impact of programmes in terms of both individual and population outcomes. PMID:15744406

  8. Practice Bulletin No. 167 Summary: Gynecologic Care for Women and Adolescents With Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    PubMed

    2016-10-01

    In the United States in 2013, there were an estimated 226,000 women and adolescents living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (1). Women with HIV are living longer, healthier lives, so the need for routine and problem-focused gynecologic care has increased. The purpose of this document is to educate clinicians about basic health screening and care, family planning, prepregnancy care, and managing common gynecologic problems for women and adolescents who are infected with HIV. For information on screening guidelines, refer to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' Committee Opinion No. 596, Routine Human Immunodeficiency Virus Screening (2). PMID:27661642

  9. Practice Bulletin No. 167: Gynecologic Care for Women and Adolescents With Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    PubMed

    2016-10-01

    In the United States in 2013, there were an estimated 226,000 women and adolescents living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (1). Women with HIV are living longer, healthier lives, so the need for routine and problem-focused gynecologic care has increased. The purpose of this document is to educate clinicians about basic health screening and care, family planning, prepregnancy care, and managing common gynecologic problems for women and adolescents who are infected with HIV. For information on screening guidelines, refer to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' Committee Opinion No. 596, Routine Human Immunodeficiency Virus Screening (2). PMID:27661659

  10. Strategies for managing hepatitis C virus infection in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Clanon, Kathleen A

    2003-01-01

    Liver disease associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a significant and increasing cause of death for HIV-infected patients, but limited data exist to guide treatment of coinfection. Increased knowledge of HCV disease and its treatment among HIV care practitioners and adoption of routine care procedures can improve management of coinfected patients. This article discusses HCV screening and diagnosis, counseling and health care maintenance, and evaluation for and supervision of treatment in HIV-seropositive patients who are coinfected with HCV. The experiences of the Oakland, California-based Alameda County Medical Center, which treats more than 200 coinfected patients, are detailed and serve as the basis for suggested management strategies. This article summarizes a presentation given by Kathleen A. Clanon, MD at the November 2002 International AIDS Society-USA course in San Diego. PMID:12717042

  11. Isolation of a protozoan parasite genetically related to the insect trypanosomatid Herpetomonas samuelpessoai from a human immunodeficiency virus-positive patient.

    PubMed

    Morio, Florent; Reynes, Jacques; Dollet, Michel; Pratlong, Francine; Dedet, Jean-Pierre; Ravel, Christophe

    2008-11-01

    Severely immunocompromised human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients can develop various opportunistic infections due to bacteria, viruses, fungi, or protozoa. Here we report the first isolation of a flagellated protozoan genetically closely related to Herpetomonas samuelpessoai, which is usually a parasite of insects, from the blood of an HIV-infected patient.

  12. Dimension of chronic hepatitis C virus in HIV-infected patients in the interferon-free era: an overview from south Spain.

    PubMed

    Rivero-Juarez, A; Gutierrez-Valencia, A; Castaño, M; Merino, D; Neukam, K; Ríos-Villegas, M J; Lopez-Ruz, M A; Jiménez-Aguilar, P; Marquez, M; Collado, A; Gomez-Vidal, A; Hernandez-Quero, J; Tellez, F; Fernandez-Fuertes, E; Rivero, A; López-Cortés, L F

    2015-11-01

    The implementation of hepatitis C (HCV) direct-acting antiviral drugs is prioritized in several populations in which its application provides the most immediate and impactful benefit. In this scenario, a precise knowledge of the situation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HCV chronic co-infection is required to adequately address this disease. This cross-sectional study was performed in 21 hospitals in Andalusia (Spain). The study population consisted of HIV-infected patients with an active HCV chronic infection who were not receiving HCV treatment at the time of inclusion. A total of 13,506 HIV-infected patients were included in the study. Of them, 2561 (18.9 %) presented chronic HCV infection. The majority of the patients included were on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART; 96.2 %), showed plasma levels with an undetectable HIV viral load (92.5 %), and had a good immunological status (median CD4+ cell count of 486 cells/mL). The HCV genotype distribution was as follows: 58.1 % were genotype 1, 1.1 % were genotype 2, 16.1 % were genotype 3, and 22.1 % were genotype 4 (2.6 % were missing data). In total, 24.8 % of the patients showed liver fibrosis stage F0-F1, 27.9 % showed stage F2, 16.7 % showed stage F3, and 21 % showed stage F4 (9.6 % were missing data). With regards to previous HCV treatment experiences, 68.05 % of the patients were naïve and 31.95 % had failed to respond to a previous treatment. The burden of HCV/HIV co-infected patients in our population was reported as one in five HIV-infected patients requiring HCV treatment. The implementation of extra resources to face this important health challenge is mandatory.

  13. The temperature arrested intermediate of virus-cell fusion is a functional step in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Hamani I; Hope, Thomas J

    2006-05-25

    HIV entry occurs via membrane-mediated fusion of virus and target cells. Interactions between gp120 and cellular co-receptors lead to both the formation of fusion pores and release of the HIV genome into target cells. Studies using cell-cell fusion assays have demonstrated that a temperature-arrested state (TAS) can generate a stable intermediate in fusion related events. Other studies with MLV pseudotyped with HIV envelope also found that a temperature sensitive intermediate could be generated as revealed by the loss of a fluorescently labeled membrane. However, such an intermediate has never been analyzed in the context of virus infection. Therefore, we used virus-cell infection with replication competent HIV to gain insights into virus-cell fusion. We find that the TAS is an intermediate in the process culminating in the HIV infection of a target cell. In the virion-cell TAS, CD4 has been engaged, the heptad repeats of gp41 are exposed and the complex is kinetically predisposed to interact with coreceptor to complete the fusion event leading to infection.

  14. Epidemic transmission of human immunodeficiency virus in renal dialysis centers in Egypt.

    PubMed

    El Sayed, N M; Gomatos, P J; Beck-Sagué, C M; Dietrich, U; von Briesen, H; Osmanov, S; Esparza, J; Arthur, R R; Wahdan, M H; Jarvis, W R

    2000-01-01

    In 1993 an epidemic of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection occurred among 39 patients at 2 renal dialysis centers in Egypt. The centers, private center A (PCA) and university center A (UCA) were visited, HIV-infected patients were interviewed, seroconversion rates at UCA were calculated, and relatedness of HIV strains was determined by sequence analysis; 34 (62%) of 55 patients from UCA and 5 (42%) of 12 patients from PCA were HIV-infected. The HIV seroconversion risk at UCA varied significantly with day and shift of dialysis session. Practices that resulted in sharing of syringes among patients were observed at both centers. The analyzed V3 loop sequences of the HIV strain of 12 outbreak patients were >96% related to each other. V3 loop sequences from each of 8 HIV-infected Egyptians unrelated to the 1993 epidemic were only 76%-89% related to those from outbreak strains. Dialysis patients may be at risk for HIV infection if infection control guidelines are not followed.

  15. Immunogenicity of the Bivalent Oral Cholera Vaccine Shanchol in Haitian Adults With HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Ivers, Louise C; Charles, Richelle C; Hilaire, Isabelle J; Mayo-Smith, Leslie M; Teng, Jessica E; Jerome, J Gregory; Rychert, Jenna; LaRocque, Regina C; Xu, Peng; Kovácˇ, Pavol; Ryan, Edward T; Qadri, Firdausi; Almazor, Charles P; Franke, Molly F; Harris, Jason B

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated immune responses following bivalent oral cholera vaccination (Shanchol [Shantha Biotechnics]; BivWC) in a cohort of 25 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults in Haiti. Compared with adults without HIV infection, vaccination in HIV-infected individuals resulted in lower vibriocidal responses against Vibrio cholerae O1, and there was a positive relationship between the CD4(+) T-cell count and vibriocidal responses following vaccination. Nevertheless, seroconversion occurred at a rate of 65% against the Ogawa serotype and 74% against the Inaba serotype in adults with HIV infection. These results suggest that the vaccine retains substantial immunogenicity in adults with HIV infection and may benefit this population by protecting against cholera.

  16. Hepatitis B virus infection among HIV-infected pregnant women in Malawi and transmission to infants

    PubMed Central

    Chasela, Charles S.; Kourtis, Athena P.; Wall, Patrick; Drobeniuc, Jan; King, Caroline C.; Thai, Hong; Teshale, Eyasu H.; Hosseinipour, Mina; Ellington, Sascha; Codd, Mary B.; Jamieson, Denise J.; Knight, Rod; Fitzpatrick, Patricia; Kamili, Saleem; Hoffman, Irving; Kayira, Dumbani; Mumba, Noel; Kamwendo, Deborah D.; Martinson, Francis; Powderly, William; Teo, Chong-Gee; van der Horst, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims The extent of HBV infection to infants of HBV/HIV-coinfected pregnant women in sub-Saharan Africa is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess prevalence of HBV infection among antiretroviral-naïve, HIV-infected pregnant women in Malawi and examine HBV transmission to their infants. Methods Plasma from 2048 HIV-infected, Malawian women and their infants were tested for markers of HBV infection. Study participants were provided standard-of-care health services, which included administration of pentavalent vaccine to infants at 6, 10, and 14 weeks of age. Results One-hundred and three women (5%) were HBsAg-positive; 70 of these HBsAg-positive women were also HBV-DNA-positive. Sixteen women (0.8%) were HBV-DNA-positive but HBsAg-negative. Five of 51 infants (9.8%) born to HBsAg-positive and/or HBV-DNA-positive women were HBV-DNA-positive by 48 weeks of age. HBV DNA concentrations of two infants of mothers who received extended lamivudine-containing anti-HIV prophylaxis were <4 log10 IU/ml compared to ≥8 log10 IU/ml in three infants of mothers who did not. Conclusions HBV DNA was detected in nearly 10% of infants born to HBV/HIV-coinfected women. Antenatal testing for HIV and HBV, if instituted, can facilitate implementation of prophylactic measures against infant infection by both viruses. Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of the European Association for the Study of the Liver. PMID:24211737

  17. HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders: The Relationship of HIV Infection with Physical and Social Comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Tedaldi, Ellen M.; Minniti, Nancy L.; Fischer, Tracy

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) will undoubtedly increase with the improved longevity of HIV-infected persons. HIV infection, itself, as well as multiple physiologic and psychosocial factors can contribute to cognitive impairment and neurologic complications. These comorbidities confound the diagnosis, assessment, and interventions for neurocognitive disorders. In this review, we discuss the role of several key comorbid factors that may contribute significantly to the development and progression of HIV-related neurocognitive impairment, as well as the current status of diagnostic strategies aimed at identifying HIV-infected individuals with impaired cognition and future research priorities and challenges. PMID:25815329

  18. Interstitial nephritis caused by HIV infection by itself: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Asako; Iwata, Kentaro; Hara, Shigeo; Imai, Yukihiro; Hasuike, Toshikazu; Nishioka, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial nephritis is a common cause of renal dysfunction. It is primarily caused by drugs, infections, or autoimmune disorders. Patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection can develop interstitial nephritis, although it typically occurs because of the aforementioned etiologies and not as a direct consequence of HIV infection. Interstitial lesions may occur in patients with HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN). However, interstitial nephritis without the glomerular injuries characteristic of HIVAN, and without the risk factors described earlier, is very rare. Here, we describe a rare case of interstitial nephritis that was likely caused directly by HIV infection and not by other etiologies. PMID:27621665

  19. Interstitial nephritis caused by HIV infection by itself: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Asako; Iwata, Kentaro; Hara, Shigeo; Imai, Yukihiro; Hasuike, Toshikazu; Nishioka, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial nephritis is a common cause of renal dysfunction. It is primarily caused by drugs, infections, or autoimmune disorders. Patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection can develop interstitial nephritis, although it typically occurs because of the aforementioned etiologies and not as a direct consequence of HIV infection. Interstitial lesions may occur in patients with HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN). However, interstitial nephritis without the glomerular injuries characteristic of HIVAN, and without the risk factors described earlier, is very rare. Here, we describe a rare case of interstitial nephritis that was likely caused directly by HIV infection and not by other etiologies.

  20. Interstitial nephritis caused by HIV infection by itself: a case report.

    PubMed

    Doi, Asako; Iwata, Kentaro; Hara, Shigeo; Imai, Yukihiro; Hasuike, Toshikazu; Nishioka, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial nephritis is a common cause of renal dysfunction. It is primarily caused by drugs, infections, or autoimmune disorders. Patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection can develop interstitial nephritis, although it typically occurs because of the aforementioned etiologies and not as a direct consequence of HIV infection. Interstitial lesions may occur in patients with HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN). However, interstitial nephritis without the glomerular injuries characteristic of HIVAN, and without the risk factors described earlier, is very rare. Here, we describe a rare case of interstitial nephritis that was likely caused directly by HIV infection and not by other etiologies. PMID:27621665

  1. The First Case of Vestibulocochlear Neuritis in a Patient with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun Joo; Cho, Chin Saeng; Kim, Nak Min; Yun, Su A

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections continue to increase throughout the world. Although neurologic complications are frequent in individuals with HIV infection or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), vestibulocochlear neuritis is still a relatively rare manifestation. We report the first case of vestibulocochlear neuritis occurring in an AIDS patient in Korea. PMID:27433384

  2. The First Case of Vestibulocochlear Neuritis in a Patient with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Joo; Cho, Chin Saeng; Kim, Nak Min; Yun, Su A; Yoon, Hee Jung

    2016-06-01

    The incidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections continue to increase throughout the world. Although neurologic complications are frequent in individuals with HIV infection or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), vestibulocochlear neuritis is still a relatively rare manifestation. We report the first case of vestibulocochlear neuritis occurring in an AIDS patient in Korea.

  3. [Role of human immunodeficiency virus in leukocytes apoptosis from infected patients].

    PubMed

    Salmen, Siham; Guillermo, Carolina; Colmenares, Melisa; Barboza, Luisa; Goncalves, Loredana; Terán, Guillermo; Alfonso, Nacarid; Montes, Henry; Berrueta, Lisbeth

    2005-09-01

    The hallmark of the immunodeficiency virus infection is a progressive detriment of the immune response which has been associated to a gradual loss of its responsible components, in particularly, CD4 positive T cells. Although this cell population is considered the main target of the virus, there is a recent deal of interest in studying other components that may not be targets of the virus, but are important elements to control infectious microorganisms and that have been demonstrated to be altered during HIV infection. Neutrophils (PMN) are innate immune components that play a fundamental role against HIV infection and these cells have been described as functionally altered during AIDS. It has been suggested that such a dysfunction could be attributed to an increased susceptibility of these cells to accelerated spontaneous apoptosis. However, the underlying mechanisms that induce programmed cell death of neutrophils remain unknown. In previous works we have explored some events involved during cell death of neutrophils from HIV infected patients. It is the purpose of this work to review the current knowledge of apoptosis signals in neutrophils and to discuss our own data about some mechanisms involved in spontaneous and Fas mediated apoptosis, which may contribute to understand neutrophils dysfunction during HIV infection.

  4. Herpes simplex virus type 2 and HIV infection among US military personnel: implications for health prevention programmes.

    PubMed

    Bautista, C T; Singer, D E; O'Connell, R J; Crum-Cianflone, N; Agan, B K; Malia, J A; Sanchez, J L; Peel, S A; Michael, N L; Scott, P T

    2009-09-01

    US military personnel are routinely screened for HIV infection. Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is a risk factor for HIV acquisition. To determine the association between HSV-2 and HIV, a matched case-control study was conducted among US Army and Air Force service members with incident HIV infections (cases) randomly matched with two HIV-uninfected service members (controls) between 2000 and 2004. HSV-2 prevalence was significantly higher among cases (30.3%, 138/456) than among controls (9.7%, 88/912, P < 0.001). HSV-2 was strongly associated with HIV in univariate (odds ratio [OR] = 4.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.1-5.8) and multiple analyses (adjusted [OR] = 3.9, 95% CI = 2.8-5.6). The population attributable risk percentage of HIV infection due to HSV-2 was 23%. Identifying HSV-2 infections may afford the opportunity to provide targeted behavioural interventions that could decrease the incidence of HIV infections in the US military population; further studies are needed.

  5. Decreases in human immunodeficiency virus infection rates in Kombolcha, Ethiopia: a 10-year data review

    PubMed Central

    Shiferaw, Melashu Balew; Gebregergs, Gebremedhin Berhe; Sinishaw, Mulusew Alemneh; Yesuf, Yohannes Amede

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome is one of the most serious public health and development challenges in sub-Saharan Africa, including Ethiopia. A particular challenge for prevention strategies has been the emergence of hotspot areas. Therefore, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome programs should not be based on national level statistics, but need to be more focused geographically. Kombolcha is one of the high spot areas with different projects and development corridors. Hence, the aim of this study is to assess the trend of HIV infection rates among patients who visited Africa Service Committee clinic from 2005 to 2014. Methods An institutional-based cross-sectional study was conducted from January 1 to January 30, 2016. All records of new patients enrolled from February 8, 2005 to December 31, 2014 were reviewed. Data on sociodemographic information, risky sexual behavior, and HIV test result were collected from each study participant using data collection format. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to identify risk factors of HIV infection. Results The overall HIV infection was 10.8% (2,233/20,674). The rate of infection varied from 13.3% in 2005 to 4.5% in 2014, and its trend had significantly declined from 2008 to 2014. Urban residence (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 2.53; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.22–5.25), patients who ever had intercourse with penetration (AOR: 5.62; 95% CI: 1.11–28.57), and those who had marriage experience (AOR: 11.65; 95% CI: 4.2–32.3) were more infected with HIV. Conclusion The trend of HIV infection significantly reduced in the last 10 years in Kombolcha area. However, the HIV infection still remains high (4.5%) that needs intervention of those who had marriage experience, risky sexual behavior, and urban dwellers. PMID:27462177

  6. Role of liver transplantation in human immunodeficiency virus positive patients

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Deepak; Agarwal, Kosh

    2015-01-01

    End-stage liver disease (ESLD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality amongst human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals. Chronic hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, drug-induced hepatotoxicity related to combined anti-retro-viral therapy, alcohol related liver disease and non-alcohol related fatty liver disease appear to be the leading causes. It is therefore, anticipated that more HIV-positive patients with ESLD will present as potential transplant candidates. HIV infection is no longer a contraindication to liver transplantation. Key transplantation outcomes such as rejection and infection rates as well as medium term graft and patient survival match those seen in the non-HIV infected patients in the absence of co-existing HCV infection. HIV disease does not seem to be negatively impacted by transplantation. However, HIV-HCV co-infection transplant outcomes remain suboptimal due to recurrence. In this article, we review the key challenges faced by this patient cohort in the pre- and post-transplant period. PMID:26604639

  7. Prevalence and risk factors for oral DNA tumor viruses in HIV-infected youth.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Jessica A; Rudy, Bret J; Xu, Jiahong; Kapogiannis, Bill; Secord, Elizabeth; Gillison, Maura

    2016-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV) may promote oral cancers, especially among immunosuppressed individuals. The aims of this study were to examine whether demographic characteristics, medical history, sexual behaviors, substance use, CD4+ T-cell count, HIV viral load, and HPV vaccination were associated with HPV, EBV, and KSHV infection and viral load. Multivariable modeling using logistic or linear regression examined associations between independent variables and infection or viral load, respectively. Among 272 HIV-infected 12-24-year-old youth, 19.5% were positive for oral HPV, 88.2% for EBV, and 11.8% for KSHV. In multivariable models, recent marijuana use (OR 1.97, 95%CI 1.02-3.82) and lower CD4+ T-cell count (<350 vs. ≥350 cells/mm(3) : OR 1.92, 95%CI 1.003-3.69) were associated with HPV infection; lifetime tobacco use (estimated coefficient [EC] 1.55, standard error [SE] 0.53, P = 0.0052) with HPV viral load; recent tobacco use (OR 2.90, 95%CI 1.06-7.97), and higher HIV viral load (>400 vs. <400 copies/ml: OR 3.98, 95%CI 1.84-8.74) with EBV infection; Black versus White race (EC 1.18, SE 0.37, P = 0.0023), and lower CD4+ T-cell count (EC 0.70, SE 0.28, P = 0.017) with EBV viral load, male versus female gender (OR 10, 95%CI 1.32-100) with KSHV infection, and younger age at HIV diagnosis (1-14 vs. 18-20 years: EC 0.33, SE 0.16, P = 0.049; 15-17 vs. 18-20 years: EC 0.35, SE 0.13, P = 0.0099) with KSHV viral load. In conclusion, substance use and immunosuppression are associated with oral DNA tumor viruses in HIV-infected youth. J. Med. Virol. 88:1944-1952, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27096166

  8. Prevalence and risk factors for oral DNA tumor viruses in HIV-infected youth.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Jessica A; Rudy, Bret J; Xu, Jiahong; Kapogiannis, Bill; Secord, Elizabeth; Gillison, Maura

    2016-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV) may promote oral cancers, especially among immunosuppressed individuals. The aims of this study were to examine whether demographic characteristics, medical history, sexual behaviors, substance use, CD4+ T-cell count, HIV viral load, and HPV vaccination were associated with HPV, EBV, and KSHV infection and viral load. Multivariable modeling using logistic or linear regression examined associations between independent variables and infection or viral load, respectively. Among 272 HIV-infected 12-24-year-old youth, 19.5% were positive for oral HPV, 88.2% for EBV, and 11.8% for KSHV. In multivariable models, recent marijuana use (OR 1.97, 95%CI 1.02-3.82) and lower CD4+ T-cell count (<350 vs. ≥350 cells/mm(3) : OR 1.92, 95%CI 1.003-3.69) were associated with HPV infection; lifetime tobacco use (estimated coefficient [EC] 1.55, standard error [SE] 0.53, P = 0.0052) with HPV viral load; recent tobacco use (OR 2.90, 95%CI 1.06-7.97), and higher HIV viral load (>400 vs. <400 copies/ml: OR 3.98, 95%CI 1.84-8.74) with EBV infection; Black versus White race (EC 1.18, SE 0.37, P = 0.0023), and lower CD4+ T-cell count (EC 0.70, SE 0.28, P = 0.017) with EBV viral load, male versus female gender (OR 10, 95%CI 1.32-100) with KSHV infection, and younger age at HIV diagnosis (1-14 vs. 18-20 years: EC 0.33, SE 0.16, P = 0.049; 15-17 vs. 18-20 years: EC 0.35, SE 0.13, P = 0.0099) with KSHV viral load. In conclusion, substance use and immunosuppression are associated with oral DNA tumor viruses in HIV-infected youth. J. Med. Virol. 88:1944-1952, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Serum creatinine elevation after switch to dolutegravir in a human immunodeficiency virus-positive kidney transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Lee, D H; Malat, G E; Bias, T E; Harhay, M N; Ranganna, K; Doyle, A M

    2016-08-01

    Dolutegravir is a preferred antiretroviral drug for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients following solid organ transplantation. It has potent antiretroviral activity and does not interact with calcineurin inhibitors. We describe a case of an HIV-infected kidney transplant patient, who was noted to have a rising serum creatinine following initiation of dolutegravir. At first, an acute rejection episode was suspected, but this finding was later attributed to inhibition of creatinine secretion by dolutegravir. We suggest that an awareness of this potential effect of dolutegravir is important for providers who take care of HIV-positive kidney transplant recipients, in order to prevent potentially unnecessary testing. PMID:27159656

  10. In vitro evaluation of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors UC-781 and TMC120-R147681 as human immunodeficiency virus microbicides.

    PubMed

    Van Herrewege, Yven; Michiels, Jo; Van Roey, Jens; Fransen, Katrien; Kestens, Luc; Balzarini, Jan; Lewi, Paul; Vanham, Guido; Janssen, Paul

    2004-01-01

    The nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors UC-781 and TMC120-R147681 (Dapivirine) effectively prevented human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in cocultures of monocyte-derived dendritic cells and T cells, representing primary targets in sexual transmission. Both drugs had a favorable therapeutic index. A 24-h treatment with 1,000 nM UC-781 or 100 nM TMC120-R147681 prevented cell-free HIV infection, whereas 10-fold-higher concentrations blocked cell-associated HIV. PMID:14693562

  11. In Vitro Evaluation of Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors UC-781 and TMC120-R147681 as Human Immunodeficiency Virus Microbicides†

    PubMed Central

    Van Herrewege, Yven; Michiels, Jo; Van Roey, Jens; Fransen, Katrien; Kestens, Luc; Balzarini, Jan; Lewi, Paul; Vanham, Guido; Janssen, Paul

    2004-01-01

    The nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors UC-781 and TMC120-R147681 (Dapivirine) effectively prevented human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in cocultures of monocyte-derived dendritic cells and T cells, representing primary targets in sexual transmission. Both drugs had a favorable therapeutic index. A 24-h treatment with 1,000 nM UC-781 or 100 nM TMC120-R147681 prevented cell-free HIV infection, whereas 10-fold-higher concentrations blocked cell-associated HIV. PMID:14693562

  12. Engineered virus targets HIV-infected cells: interview with Garry Nolan, Ph.D. Interview by John S. James.

    PubMed

    Nolan, G

    1997-09-19

    A Yale independent research team and a research team at the Federal Research Center for Virus Diseases of Animals in Tubingen, Germany have engineered viruses that will target and destroy HIV-infected cells while leaving uninfected cells intact. The Yale team has genetically engineered the vesicular stomatitis virus and the German team has engineered the rabies virus to enter human CD4 cells in the same way HIV does, that is, by recognizing the HIV protein gp120 that appears on the surface of infected cells. Garry Nolan, who wrote the review for the research report when it appeared in the journal Cell, discusses the risks, benefits, and the future of using such viruses. It is possible that these viruses could replicate in humans, thus killing more HIV-infected cells. There should always be concern when using any replicating system; HIV-positive individuals and their sexual partners may be infected by the new virus. It is hoped that this virus-based technology can be altered to use liposomes rather than viruses to directly deliver the anti-HIV agents to the infected cells. Viral resistance could be avoided by binding the proteins that HIV needs to mutate. Nolan also discusses using triplex DNA to deactivate the virus and using receptor proteins to deliver treatments to cells. PMID:11364688

  13. CD8+ Lymphocytes Can Control HIV Infection in vitro by Suppressing Virus Replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Christopher M.; Moody, Dewey J.; Stites, Daniel P.; Levy, Jay A.

    1986-12-01

    Lymphocytes bearing the CD8 marker were shown to suppress replication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The effect was dose-dependent and most apparent with autologous lymphocytes; it did not appear to be mediated by a cytotoxic response. This suppression of HIV replication could be demonstrated by the addition of CD8+ cells at the initiation of virus production as well as after several weeks of virus replication by cultured cells. The observations suggest a potential approach to therapy in which autologous CD8 lymphocytes could be administered to individuals to inhibit HIV replication and perhaps progression of disease.

  14. Recursion-based depletion of human immunodeficiency virus-specific naive CD4(+) T cells may facilitate persistent viral replication and chronic viraemia leading to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Tetsuo; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Okada, Seiji; Matano, Tetsuro

    2016-09-01

    Although antiretroviral therapy has made human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection a controllable disease, it is still unclear how viral replication persists in untreated patients and causes CD4(+) T-cell depletion leading to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in several years. Theorists tried to explain it with the diversity threshold theory in which accumulated mutations in the HIV genome make the virus so diverse that the immune system will no longer be able to recognize all the variants and fail to control the viraemia. Although the theory could apply to a number of cases, macaque AIDS models using simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) have shown that failed viral control at the set point is not always associated with T-cell escape mutations. Moreover, even monkeys without a protective major histocompatibility complex (MHC) allele can contain replication of a super infected SIV following immunization with a live-attenuated SIV vaccine, while those animals are not capable of fighting primary SIV infection. Here we propose a recursion-based virus-specific naive CD4(+) T-cell depletion hypothesis through thinking on what may happen in individuals experiencing primary immunodeficiency virus infection. This could explain the mechanism for impairment of virus-specific immune response in the course of HIV infection.

  15. Recursion-based depletion of human immunodeficiency virus-specific naive CD4(+) T cells may facilitate persistent viral replication and chronic viraemia leading to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Tetsuo; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Okada, Seiji; Matano, Tetsuro

    2016-09-01

    Although antiretroviral therapy has made human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection a controllable disease, it is still unclear how viral replication persists in untreated patients and causes CD4(+) T-cell depletion leading to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in several years. Theorists tried to explain it with the diversity threshold theory in which accumulated mutations in the HIV genome make the virus so diverse that the immune system will no longer be able to recognize all the variants and fail to control the viraemia. Although the theory could apply to a number of cases, macaque AIDS models using simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) have shown that failed viral control at the set point is not always associated with T-cell escape mutations. Moreover, even monkeys without a protective major histocompatibility complex (MHC) allele can contain replication of a super infected SIV following immunization with a live-attenuated SIV vaccine, while those animals are not capable of fighting primary SIV infection. Here we propose a recursion-based virus-specific naive CD4(+) T-cell depletion hypothesis through thinking on what may happen in individuals experiencing primary immunodeficiency virus infection. This could explain the mechanism for impairment of virus-specific immune response in the course of HIV infection. PMID:27515208

  16. Motor slowing in asymptomatic HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Fitzgibbon, M L; Cella, D F; Humfleet, G; Griffin, E; Sheridan, K

    1989-06-01

    To examine neuropsychological deficits associated with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), 25 asymptomatic homosexual men and sexual partners of intravenous drug users and 25 seronegative homosexual men and nonhigh-risk heterosexuals were assessed on measures of fine motor control, visual scanning, attention, depression, and global psychological functioning. Analysis suggested that HIV infection is associated with reduced fine motor control. Seropositivity is associated with elevated depression and global psychological maladjustment. When depression and global adjustment were analyzed as covariates, motor slowing was evident in the seropositive group. These findings suggest an association between motor slowing and HIV infection in asymptomatic subjects and point to the necessity of measuring affect at least as a control variable. Further study is needed to determine whether the fine motor deficit evident in this sample is limited to distinct subgrouping of the over-all sample. PMID:2762096

  17. Persistent Peripheral Nervous System Damage in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Macaques Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dorsey, Jamie L; Mangus, Lisa M; Hauer, Peter; Ebenezer, Gigi J; Queen, Suzanne E; Laast, Victoria A; Adams, Robert J; Mankowski, Joseph L

    2015-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-induced peripheral neuropathy is the most common neurologic complication associated with HIV infection. In addition to virus-mediated injury of the peripheral nervous system (PNS), treatment of HIV infection with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) may induce toxic neuropathy as a side effect. Antiretroviral toxic neuropathy is clinically indistinguishable from the sensory neuropathy induced by HIV; in some patients, these 2 processes are likely superimposed. To study these intercurrent PNS disease processes, we first established a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)/pigtailed macaque model in which more than 90% of animals developed PNS changes closely resembling those seen in HIV-infected individuals with distal sensory neuropathy. To determine whether cART alters the progression of SIV-induced PNS damage, dorsal root ganglia and epidermal nerve fibers were evaluated in SIV-infected macaques after long-term suppressive cART. Although cART effectively suppressed SIV replication and reduced macrophage activation in the dorsal root ganglia, PGP 9.5 immunostaining and measurements of epidermal nerve fibers in the plantar surface of the feet of treated SIV-infected macaques clearly showed that cART did not normalize epidermal nerve fiber density. These findings illustrate that significant PNS damage persists in SIV-infected macaques on suppressive cART.

  18. Shedding of Hepatitis C Virus in Semen of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Men

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Samuel S.; Gianella, Sara; Yip, Marcus J-S.; van Seggelen, Wouter O.; Gillies, Robert D.; Foster, Andrew L.; Barbati, Zachary R.; Smith, Davey M.; Fierer, Daniel S.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The epidemic of sexually transmitted hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) has been documented for over a decade. Despite this, there is no consensus as to the risk factors for sexual acquisition of HCV in these men. Methods. We obtained paired semen and blood samples at 2-week intervals from HIV-infected MSM with recent and chronic HCV infection and quantified HCV in semen. Results. Hepatitis C virus was quantified in 59 semen specimens from 33 men. Hepatitis C virus was shed in 16 (27%) of semen specimens from 11 (33%) of the men. Median HCV viral load (VL) in semen was 1.49 log10 IU/mL. Hepatitis C virus VL in blood was significantly higher at the time of HCV shedding in semen than when HCV shedding in semen was not detected (P = .002). Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between the HCV VL in blood and semen overall (rs = 0.41; P = .001), and in the subgroup with recent HCV infection (rs = 0.37; P = .02), but not in the subgroup with chronic HCV infection (rs = 0.34; P = .1). Conclusions. One third of HIV-infected MSM coinfected with HCV shed HCV into their semen. Based on the HCV VL in semen in this study, an average ejaculate would deliver up to 6630 IU of virus into the rectum of the receptive partner. Therefore, our data strongly support that condoms should be used during anal intercourse among MSM to prevent transmission of HCV. PMID:27186582

  19. Shedding of Hepatitis C Virus in Semen of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Men.

    PubMed

    Turner, Samuel S; Gianella, Sara; Yip, Marcus J-S; van Seggelen, Wouter O; Gillies, Robert D; Foster, Andrew L; Barbati, Zachary R; Smith, Davey M; Fierer, Daniel S

    2016-03-01

    Background.  The epidemic of sexually transmitted hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) has been documented for over a decade. Despite this, there is no consensus as to the risk factors for sexual acquisition of HCV in these men. Methods.  We obtained paired semen and blood samples at 2-week intervals from HIV-infected MSM with recent and chronic HCV infection and quantified HCV in semen. Results.  Hepatitis C virus was quantified in 59 semen specimens from 33 men. Hepatitis C virus was shed in 16 (27%) of semen specimens from 11 (33%) of the men. Median HCV viral load (VL) in semen was 1.49 log10 IU/mL. Hepatitis C virus VL in blood was significantly higher at the time of HCV shedding in semen than when HCV shedding in semen was not detected (P = .002). Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between the HCV VL in blood and semen overall (rs = 0.41; P = .001), and in the subgroup with recent HCV infection (rs = 0.37; P = .02), but not in the subgroup with chronic HCV infection (rs = 0.34; P = .1). Conclusions.  One third of HIV-infected MSM coinfected with HCV shed HCV into their semen. Based on the HCV VL in semen in this study, an average ejaculate would deliver up to 6630 IU of virus into the rectum of the receptive partner. Therefore, our data strongly support that condoms should be used during anal intercourse among MSM to prevent transmission of HCV. PMID:27186582

  20. In vitro infection of natural killer cells with different human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Chehimi, J; Bandyopadhyay, S; Prakash, K; Perussia, B; Hassan, N F; Kawashima, H; Campbell, D; Kornbluth, J; Starr, S E

    1991-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are a discrete subset of leukocytes, distinct from T and B lymphocytes. NK cells mediate spontaneous non-MHC-restricted killing of a wide variety of target cells without prior sensitization and appear to be involved in initial protection against certain viral infections. Depressed NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity, one of the many immunological defects observed in AIDS patients, may contribute to secondary virus infections. Here we report that clonal and purified polyclonal populations of NK cells, which expressed neither surface CD4 nor CD4 mRNA, were susceptible to infection with various isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Viral replication was demonstrated by detection of p24 antigen intracellularly and in culture supernatants, by the presence of HIV DNA within infected cells, and by the ability of supernatants derived from HIV-infected NK cells to infect peripheral blood mononuclear cells or CD4+ cell lines. Infection of NK cells was not blocked by anti-CD4 or anti-Fc gamma RIII monoclonal antibodies. NK cells from HIV-infected and uninfected cultures were similar in their ability to lyse three different target cells. Considerable numbers of cells died in HIV-infected NK cell cultures. These results suggest that loss of NK cells in AIDS patients is a direct effect of HIV infection but that reduced NK cell function involves another mechanism. The possibility that NK cells serve as a potential reservoir for HIV-1 must be considered. Images PMID:1672164

  1. Nonpathogenic Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Klatt, Nichole R.; Silvestri, Guido; Hirsch, Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    The simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) are a diverse group of viruses that naturally infect a wide range of African primates, including African green monkeys (AGMs) and sooty mangabey monkeys (SMs). Although natural infection is widespread in feral populations of AGMs and SMs, this infection generally does not result in immunodeficiency. However, experimental inoculation of Asian macaques results in an immunodeficiency syndrome remarkably similar to human AIDS. Thus, natural nonprogressive SIV infections appear to represent an evolutionary adaptation between these animals and their primate lentiviruses. Curiously, these animals maintain robust virus replication but have evolved strategies to avoid disease progression. Adaptations observed in these primates include phenotypic changes to CD4+ T cells, limited chronic immune activation, and altered mucosal immunity. It is probable that these animals have achieved a unique balance between T-cell renewal and proliferation and loss through activation-induced apoptosis, and virus-induced cell death. A clearer understanding of the mechanisms underlying the lack of disease progression in natural hosts for SIV infection should therefore yield insights into the pathogenesis of AIDS and may inform vaccine design. PMID:22315718

  2. Elevated homocysteine levels in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients under antiretroviral therapy: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Deminice, Rafael; Silva, Talita Capoani Vieira; de Oliveira, Vitor Hugo Fernando

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the association between the levels of homocysteine (Hcy), folate, vitamin B12 in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients who were treated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) or not treated with ART. METHODS: The PubMed and Scielo databases were searched. Eligible studies regarding plasma Hcy level in HIV-infected patients were firstly identified. After careful analysis by two independent researches, the identified articles were included in the review according to two outcomes (1) Hcy, folate and vitamin B12 blood concentration in HIV-infected subjects vs health controls and; (2) Hcy blood concentration in HIV-infected subjects under ART vs not treated with ART. RevMan (version 5.2) was employed for data synthesis. RESULTS: A total of 12 studies were included in outcome 1 (1649 participants, 932 cases and 717 controls). Outcome 1 meta-analysis demonstrated higher plasma Hcy (2.05 µmol/L; 95%CI: 0.10 to 4.00, P < 0.01) and decreased plasma folate concentrations (-2.74 ng/mL; 95%CI: -5.18 to -0.29, P < 0.01) in HIV-infected patients compared to healthy controls. No changes in vitamin B12 plasma concentration were observed between groups. All studies included in the outcome 2 meta-analysis (1167 participants; 404 HIV-infected exposed to ART and 757 HIV-infected non-ART patients) demonstrated higher mean Hcy concentration in subjects HIV-infected under ART compared to non-ART HIV subjects (4.13 µmol/L; 95%CI: 1.34 to 6.92, P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: This meta-analysis demonstrated that the levels of Hcy and folate, but not vitamin B12, were associated with HIV infection. In addition, Hcy levels were higher in HIV-infected patients who were under ART compared to HIV-infected patients who were not exposed to ART. Our results suggest that hyperhomocysteinemia should be included among the several important metabolic disturbances that are associated with ART in patients with HIV infection. PMID:25964880

  3. Intermuscular Adipose Tissue and Metabolic Associations in HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Scherzer, Rebecca; Shen, Wei; Heymsfield, Steven B.; Lewis, Cora E.; Kotler, Donald P.; Punyanitya, Mark; Bacchetti, Peter; Shlipak, Michael G.; Grunfeld, Carl

    2013-01-01

    Intermuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) is associated with metabolic abnormalities similar to those associated with visceral adipose tissue (VAT). Increased IMAT has been found in obese human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women. We hypothesized that IMAT, like VAT, would be similar or increased in HIV-infected persons compared with healthy controls, despite decreases in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) found in HIV infection. In the second FRAM (Study of Fat Redistribution and Metabolic Change in HIV infection) exam, we studied 425 HIV-infected subjects and 211 controls (from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study) who had regional AT and skeletal muscle (SM) measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Multivariable linear regression identified factors associated with IMAT and its association with metabolites. Total IMAT was 51% lower in HIV-infected participants compared with controls (P = 0.003). The HIV effect was attenuated after multivariable adjustment (to −28%, P < 0.0001 in men and −3.6%, P = 0.70 in women). Higher quantities of leg SAT, upper-trunk SAT, and VAT were associated with higher IMAT in HIV-infected participants, with weaker associations in controls. Stavudine use was associated with lower IMAT and SAT, but showed little relationship with VAT. In multivariable analyses, regional IMAT was associated with insulin resistance and triglycerides (TGs). Contrary to expectation, IMAT is not increased in HIV infection; after controlling for demographics, lifestyle, VAT, SAT, and SM, HIV+ men have lower IMAT compared with controls, whereas values for women are similar. Stavudine exposure is associated with both decreased IMAT and SAT, suggesting that IMAT shares cellular origins with SAT. PMID:20539305

  4. Follicular dendritic cells and human immunodeficiency virus infectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Sonya L.; Tew, J. Grant; Tew, John G.; Szakal, Andras K.; Burton, Gregory F.

    1995-10-01

    LARGE amounts of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) localize on follicular dendritic cells (FDC) in the follicles of secondary lymphoid tissues following viral infection1,2. During clinical latency, active viral infection occurs primarily at these sites3,4. As HIV on FDC is in the form of immune complexes5, some of which may be formed with neutralizing antibody, we investigated whether HIV on FDC is infectious. We report here that HIV on FDC is highly infectious. Furthermore, FDC can convert neutralized HIV into an infectious form even in the presence of a vast excess of neutralizing antibody. Thus FDC may provide a mechanism whereby HIV infection can continue in the presence of neutralizing antibody.

  5. Renal involvement in feline immunodeficiency virus infection: a clinicopathological study.

    PubMed

    Poli, A; Abramo, F; Taccini, E; Guidi, G; Barsotti, P; Bendinelli, M; Malvaldi, G

    1993-01-01

    Renal tissues from 15 cats naturally infected with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) were examined histologically, immunohistochemically and ultrastructurally. Renal function and urinary proteins were also studied. Kidney abnormalities were found in 12 cats and were characterized by mesangial widening with segmental to diffuse glomerulosclerosis and presence of IgM and C3, and scanty IgG deposits in the mesangium. Tubulointerstitial lesions were also present. In 6 cats the lesions were severe enough to cause marked increase in blood urea nitrogen and creatinine, and heavy glomerular nonselective proteinuria. These findings suggest that a renal involvement is a frequent occurrence in FIV-infected cats. As the histopathological features observed were similar to those described in HIV-infected patients, FIV-infected cats may represent a valuable model for a better understanding of HIV-associated nephropathy in humans. PMID:8321363

  6. Seroprevalence of human immunodeficiency virus among inpatient pretrial detainees.

    PubMed

    Schwartz-Watts, D; Montgomery, L D; Morgan, D W

    1995-01-01

    Medical records of inpatients discharged from a forensic unit in Columbia, South Carolina, from January 1991 to December 1991 were reviewed to determine the incidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositivity. Results were linked to age, gender, ethnicity, history of intravenous drug use, and Axis I diagnoses. HIV status was obtained for 74 percent of patients 18 to 55 years of age. The incidence of HIV seropositivity among patients tested was 5.5 percent, which is greater than 40 times the incidence for the general population in South Carolina. Intravenous drug use was reported for 33 percent of the seropositive males. We conclude that inpatient pretrial detainees are at increased risk for HIV infection. HIV testing should be mandated at all facilities housing detainees. Further studies are needed to determine any factors about these patients that can be linked to seropositivity.

  7. Glanzmann Thrombasthenia Associated with Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Patient

    PubMed Central

    Manne, Rakesh Kumar; Natarajan, Kannan; Patil, Rajendra; Prathi, Venkata Sarath; Beeraka, Swapna Sridevi; Kolaparthi, Venkata Suneel Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Glanzmann's thrombasthenia (GT) is an autosomal recessive inherited platelet function defect characterized by normal platelet count, prolonged bleeding time and abnormal clot retraction. This disease typically presents in infancy or early childhood and has proven to have very good prognosis. In this case study, a 22-year-old GT patient who also developed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection after sometime is reported. The patient showed oral manifestations of gingival hyperplasia and petechial lesions. Unfortunately the detection of both thrombasthenia and HIV were done at considerably late stages which contributed to a poor prognosis. The patient died of cardiopulmonary arrest secondary to HIV, thrombasthenia and thrombocytopenia. The importance of early detection, supportive care and communication between the general and oral physician in management of the GT is also discussed. PMID:24829739

  8. Relative Efficacy of a Pregnancy, Sexually Transmitted Infection, or Human Immunodeficiency Virus Prevention--Focused Intervention on Changing Sexual Risk Behavior among Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Wynne E.; Fisher, Jeffrey D.; Amico, K. Rivet; Dovidio, John F.; Johnson, Blair T.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Despite findings suggesting that young adults are more concerned about experiencing an unplanned pregnancy or contracting a sexually transmitted infection (STI) than becoming human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected, no empirical work has investigated whether the specific focus of an intervention may be more or less efficacious at…

  9. Markers predicting progression of human immunodeficiency virus-related disease.

    PubMed Central

    Tsoukas, C M; Bernard, N F

    1994-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) interacts with the immune system throughout the course of infection. For most of the disease process, HIV activates the immune system, and the degree of activation can be assessed by measuring serum levels of molecules such as beta 2-microglobulin and neopterin, as well as other serum and cell surface phenotype markers. The levels of some of these markers correlate with clinical progression of HIV disease, and these markers may be useful as surrogate markers for development of clinical AIDS. Because the likelihood and timing of development of clinical AIDS following seroconversion, for any particular individual, are not readily predictable, the use of nonclinical disease markers has become critically important to patient management. Surrogate markers of HIV infection are, by definition, measurable traits that correlate with disease progression. An ideal marker should identify patients at highest risk of disease progression, provide information on how long an individual has been infected, help in staging HIV disease, predict development of opportunistic infections associated with AIDS, monitor the therapeutic efficacy of immunomodulating or antiviral treatments, and the easily quantifiable, reliable, clinically available, and affordable. This review examines the current state of knowledge and the role of surrogate markers in the natural history and treatment of HIV infection. The clinical usefulness of each marker is assessed with respect to the criteria outlined for the ideal surrogate marker for HIV disease progression. PMID:8118788

  10. From Wasting to Obesity: The Contribution of Nutritional Status to Immune Activation in HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Koethe, John R; Heimburger, Douglas C; PrayGod, George; Filteau, Suzanne

    2016-10-01

    The impact of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection on innate and adaptive immune activation occurs in the context of host factors, which serve to augment or dampen the physiologic response to the virus. Independent of HIV infection, nutritional status, particularly body composition, affects innate immune activation through a variety of conditions, including reduced mucosal barrier defenses and microbiome dysbiosis in malnutrition and the proinflammatory contribution of adipocytes and stromal vascular cells in obesity. Similarly, T-cell activation, proliferation, and cytokine expression are reduced in the setting of malnutrition and increased in obesity, potentially due to adipokine regulatory mechanisms restraining energy-avid adaptive immunity in times of starvation and exerting a paradoxical effect in overnutrition. The response to HIV infection is situated within these complex interactions between host nutritional health and immunologic function, which contribute to the varied phenotypes of immune activation among HIV-infected patients across a spectrum from malnutrition to obesity.

  11. From Wasting to Obesity: The Contribution of Nutritional Status to Immune Activation in HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Koethe, John R; Heimburger, Douglas C; PrayGod, George; Filteau, Suzanne

    2016-10-01

    The impact of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection on innate and adaptive immune activation occurs in the context of host factors, which serve to augment or dampen the physiologic response to the virus. Independent of HIV infection, nutritional status, particularly body composition, affects innate immune activation through a variety of conditions, including reduced mucosal barrier defenses and microbiome dysbiosis in malnutrition and the proinflammatory contribution of adipocytes and stromal vascular cells in obesity. Similarly, T-cell activation, proliferation, and cytokine expression are reduced in the setting of malnutrition and increased in obesity, potentially due to adipokine regulatory mechanisms restraining energy-avid adaptive immunity in times of starvation and exerting a paradoxical effect in overnutrition. The response to HIV infection is situated within these complex interactions between host nutritional health and immunologic function, which contribute to the varied phenotypes of immune activation among HIV-infected patients across a spectrum from malnutrition to obesity. PMID:27625434

  12. The prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus infection among TB patients in Port Harcourt Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Erhabor, O; Jeremiah, Z A; Adias, T C; Okere, CE

    2010-01-01

    The joint statement by the American Thoracic Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Infectious Diseases Society of America recommends that all patients with tuberculosis (TB) undergo testing for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection after counseling. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of HIV infection among 120 patients diagnosed with microbiologically proven TB aged 18 to 54 years with a mean age of 39.5 years (standard deviation 6.75). The subjects studied were 36 male (30%) and 84 females (70%). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods were used to screen for HIV infection among the subjects. Of the 120 TB patients tested 30 (25%) were positive for HIV infection. The prevalence of HIV was higher in females 24 (80%) compared to males 6 (20%) and among singles (66.7%) compared to married subjects (33.3%) (χ2 = 83.5 and χ2 = 126.2, respectively P = 0.001). HIV-1 was the predominant viral subtype. HIV prevalence was significantly higher in subjects in the 38–47 year and 28–37 year age groups (both 40%) followed by the 18–28 year age group (20%) (χ2 = 42.6, P = 0.05). The mean CD4 lymphocyte count of the HIV-infected TB subjects was significantly lower (195 ± 40.5 cells/μL) compared to the non-HIV infected (288 ± 35.25 cells/μL P = 0.01). This study has shown a high prevalence of HIV among TB patients. Reactivation of TB among people living with HIV can be reduced by TB preventive therapy and by universal access to antiretroviral therapy. PMID:22096379

  13. Immunization of children at risk of infection with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Moss, William J.; Clements, C. John; Halsey, Neal A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews the English language literature on the safety, immunogenicity and effectiveness in children infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) of vaccines currently recommended by WHO for use in national immunization programmes. Immunization is generally safe and beneficial for children infected with HIV, although HIV-induced immune suppression reduces the benefit compared with that obtained in HIV-uninfected children. However, serious complications can occur following immunization of severely immunocompromised children with bacillus Calmette-Gu rin (BCG) vaccine. The risk of serious complications attributable to yellow fever vaccine in HIV-infected persons has not been determined. WHO guidelines for immunizing children with HIV infection and infants born to HIV-infected women differ only slightly from the general guidelines. BCG and yellow fever vaccines should be withheld from symptomatic HIV-infected children. Only one serious complication (fatal pneumonia) has been attributed to measles vaccine administered to a severely immunocompromised adult. Although two HIV-infected infants have developed vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis, several million infected children have been vaccinated and the evidence does not suggest that there is an increased risk. The benefits of measles and poliovirus vaccines far outweigh the potential risks in HIV-infected children. The policy of administering routine vaccines to all children, regardless of possible HIV exposure, has been very effective in obtaining high immunization coverage and control of preventable diseases. Any changes in this policy would have to be carefully examined for a potential negative impact on disease control programmes in many countries. PMID:12640478

  14. Cost-effective Screening for Acute Hepatitis C Virus Infection in HIV-Infected Men Who Have Sex With Men

    PubMed Central

    Linas, Benjamin P.; Wong, Angela Y.; Schackman, Bruce R.; Kim, Arthur Y.; Freedberg, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Background. We used a Monte Carlo computer simulation to estimate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of screening for acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected men who have sex with men. Methods. One-time screening for prevalent HCV infection was performed at the time of enrollment in care, followed by either symptom-based screening, screening with liver function tests (LFTs), HCV antibody (Ab) screening, or HCV RNA screening in various combinations and intervals. We considered both treatment with pegylated interferon and ribavirin (PEG/RBV) alone and with an HCV protease inhibitor. Outcome measures were life expectancy, quality-adjusted life expectancy, direct medical costs, and cost-effectiveness, assuming a societal willingness to pay $100 000 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained. Results. All strategies increased life expectancy (from 0.49 to 0.94 life-months), quality-adjusted life expectancy (from 0.47 to 1.00 quality-adjusted life-months), and costs (from $1900 to $7600), compared with symptom-based screening. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of screening with 6-month LFTs and a 12-month HCV Ab test, compared with symptom-based screening, was $43 700/QALY (for PEG/RBV alone) and $57 800/QALY (for PEG/RBV plus HCV protease inhibitor). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of screening with 3-month LFTs, compared with 6-month LFTs plus a 12-month HCV Ab test, was $129 700/QALY (for PEG/RBV alone) and $229 900/QALY (for PEG/RBV plus HCV protease inhibitor). With HCV protease inhibitor–based therapy, screening with 6-month LFTs and a 12-month HCV Ab test was the optimal strategy when the HCV infection incidence was ≤1.25 cases/100 person-years. The 3-month LFT strategy was optimal when the incidence was >1.25 cases/100 person-years. Conclusions. Screening for acute HCV infection in HIV-infected MSM prolongs life expectancy and is cost-effective. Depending on incidence

  15. Dilation of the aortic root in children infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1: The Prospective P2C2 HIV Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Wyman W.; Colan, Steven D.; Easley, Kirk A.; Lipshultz, Steven E.; Starc, Thomas J.; Bricker, J. Timothy; Kaplan, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Background Vascular lesions have become more evident in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV)-infected patients as the result of earlier diagnosis, improved treatment, and longer survival. Aortic root dilation in HIV-infected children has not previously been described. This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of aortic root dilation in HIV-infected children and to evaluate some of the potential pathogenic mechanisms. Methods Aortic root measurements were incorporated into the routine echocardiographic surveillance of 280 children of HIV-infected women: an older cohort of 86 HIV-infected children and a neonatal cohort of 50 HIV-infected and 144 HIV-uninfected children. Results By repeated-measures analyses, mean aortic root measurements were significantly increased in HIV-infected children versus HIV-uninfected children (P values of ≤.04 and ≤.005 at 2 and 5 years of age, respectively, for aortic annulus diameter, sinuses of Valsalva, and sinotubular junction). Heart rate, systolic blood pressure, stroke volume, hemoglobin, and hematocrit were not significantly associated with aortic root size. Left ventricular dilation, increased serum HIV RNA levels, and lower CD4 cell count measurements were associated with aortic root dilation at baseline. Conclusions Mild and nonprogressive aortic root dilation was seen in children with vertically transmitted HIV infection from 2 to 9 years of age. Aortic root size was not significantly associated with markers for stress-modulated growth; however, aortic root dilation was associated with left ventricular dilation, increased viral load, and lower CD4 cell count in HIV-infected children. As prolonged survival of HIV-infected patients becomes more prevalent, some patients may require long-term follow-up of aortic root size. PMID:11275935

  16. Successful treatment of spleen tuberculosis in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Maserati, R; Seminari, E; Scudeller, L; Rizzi, L; Benedetti, M; Minoli, L

    1999-04-01

    Tuberculosis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients may act as a cofactor that accelerates the clinical course of HIV infection, and, indeed, HIV-infected patients with tuberculosis have a reduced survival rate compared to those without tuberculosis. Diagnosis of tuberculosis in HIV-positive patients can be difficult because of nonspecific symptoms and the time required for the identification of mycobacteria by means of culture techniques. Recently, antiretroviral combination therapies have improved the outcome of several acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-associated conditions. Unfortunately, the use of antiretroviral therapy for patients coinfected with HIV and Mycobacterium tuberculosis is still to be fully evaluated. The complexity of side-effects due to antituberculosis medication and drug interaction represent important issues and combining an effective anti-HIV treatment with antituberculosis therapy is still a clinical challenge. We discuss here a case of spleen tuberculosis in a human immunodeficiency virus-positive patient who had a successful response after a diagnostic splenectomy and medical treatment that included classical antituberculosis treatment associated with antiretroviral therapy without protease inhibitors.

  17. "Frontal systems" behaviors in comorbid human immunodeficiency virus infection and methamphetamine dependency.

    PubMed

    Marquine, María J; Iudicello, Jennifer E; Morgan, Erin E; Brown, Gregory G; Letendre, Scott L; Ellis, Ronald J; Deutsch, Reena; Woods, Steven Paul; Grant, Igor; Heaton, Robert K

    2014-01-30

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and methamphetamine (MA) dependence are associated with neural injury preferentially involving frontostriatal circuits. Little is known, however, about how these commonly comorbid conditions impact behavioral presentations typically associated with frontal systems dysfunction. Our sample comprised 47 HIV-uninfected/MA-nondependent; 25 HIV-uninfected/MA-dependent; 36 HIV-infected/MA-nondependent; and 28 HIV-infected/MA-dependent subjects. Participants completed self-report measures of "frontal systems" behaviors, including impulsivity/disinhibition, sensation-seeking, and apathy. They also underwent comprehensive neurocognitive and neuropsychiatric assessments that allowed for detailed characterization of neurocognitive deficits and comorbid/premorbid conditions, including lifetime Mood and Substance Use Disorders, Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, and Antisocial Personality Disorder. Multivariable regression models adjusting for potential confounds (i.e., demographics and comorbid/premorbid conditions) showed that MA dependence was independently associated with increased impulsivity/disinhibition, sensation-seeking and apathy, and HIV infection with greater apathy. However, we did not see synergistic/additive effects of HIV and MA on frontal systems behaviors. Global neurocognitive impairment was relatively independent of the frontal systems behaviors, which is consistent with the view that these constructs may have relatively separable biopsychosocial underpinnings. Future research should explore whether both neurocognitive impairment and frontal systems behaviors may independently contribute to everyday functioning outcomes relevant to HIV and MA.

  18. Health care workers infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. The next steps.

    PubMed

    Lo, B; Steinbrook, R

    1992-02-26

    The tragedy of five patients who contracted human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection from a seropositive dentist has alarmed the public. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recently revised its recommendations for preventing the transmission of HIV infection to patients during invasive procedures. The CDC abandoned a previous plan to list exposure-prone invasive procedures that HIV-infected health care workers should not perform. The CDC said "expert review panels" should decide on a case-by-case basis whether seropositive health care workers may perform invasive procedures. As of February 1992, the revised recommendations were under review by the US Department of Health and Human Services. Many issues remain to be clarified, such as how these panels will operate and whether decisions will be consistent in similar cases. Disregarding the CDC guidelines or infection-control precautions may further erode public trust and lead to draconian restrictions on HIV-infected health care workers. Physicians and dentists should respond more effectively to public fears about HIV transmission. The challenge is to protect patients while respecting the privacy and livelihood of health care workers.

  19. Incidence of hepatitis C virus infection among injection drug users during an outbreak of HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, David M.; Tyndall, Mark W.; Cornelisse, Peter G.A.; Li, Kathy; Sherlock, Chris H.; Rekart, Michael L.; Strathdee, Steffanie A.; Currie, Sue L.; Schechter, Martin T.; O'Shaughnessy, Michael V.

    2001-01-01

    Background Beginning in 1994, Vancouver experienced an explosive outbreak of HIV infection among injection drug users (IDUs). The objectives of this study were to measure the prevalence and incidence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in this context and to examine factors associated with HCV seroconversion among IDUs. Methods IDUs recruited through a study site and street outreach completed interviewer-administered questionnaires covering subjects' characteristics, behaviour, health status and service utilization and underwent serologic testing for HIV and HCV at baseline and semiannually thereafter. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to identify independent correlates of HCV seroconversion. Results As of Nov. 30, 1999, 1345 subjects had been recruited into the study cohort. The prevalence of anti-HCV antibodies was 81.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 79.6% to 83.6%) at enrolment. Sixty-two HCV seroconversions occurred among 155 IDUs who were initially HCV negative and who returned for follow-up, for an overall incidence density rate of 29.1 per 100 person-years (95% CI 22.3 to 37.3). The HCV incidence remained above 16 per 100 person-years over 3 years of observation (December 1996 to November 1999), whereas HIV incidence declined from more than 19 to less than 5 per 100 person-years. Independent correlates of HCV seroconversion included female sex, cocaine use, injecting at least daily and frequent attendance at a needle exchange program. Interpretation Because of high transmissibility of HCV among those injecting frequently and using cocaine, the harm reduction initiatives deployed in Vancouver during the study period proved insufficient to eliminate hepatitis C transmission in this population. PMID:11599327

  20. Guidelines for Counselling about HIV Infection and Disease. WHO AIDS Series 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland).

    The present guidelines have been prepared to provide counselors, health care workers, and others with a model for use in counseling people affected directly or indirectly by Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). The guidelines describe the nature, role, and principles of counseling, the…

  1. The Confidentiality Rights of HIV-Infected Individuals within a School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams-Nepote, Sue

    The right of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infected students and staff members to continue in the public school system without disruption has been legally established. However, the question now lies in the legal implications of confidentiality. School districts must implement policies and procedures to ensure medical record confidentiality of…

  2. A Developmental Neuropsychological Model for the Study of Children with HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gioia, Gerard A.; And Others

    A developmental neuropsychological model is presented to address critical factors critical to the functional outcome in children with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. In the model, which is derived from work at the Boston Children's Hospital Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) program, neuropsychological outcomes are determined…

  3. Sexual and Drug Use Behavior in Perinatal HIV-Infected Youth: Mental Health and Family Influences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellins, Claude A.; Elkington, Katherine S.; Brackis-Cott, Elizabeth; Bauermeister, Jose A.; Dolezal, Curtis; McKay, Mary; Wiznia, Andrew; Bamji, Mahrukh; Abrams, Elaine J.

    2009-01-01

    A study found that youth and caregiver mental health problem have greater impact than key environmental factors and family functioning on sex and drug use risk behaviors in perinatally human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected (PHIV+) and PHIV- youths. No differences in the rates of sexual risk behavior and substance use were observed between…

  4. Editorial: The Double Bind in Science Policy and the Protection of Women from HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Zena A.

    1992-01-01

    The double-bind message given women about preventing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection suggests that, if a partner will not use a condom, the woman should use a spermicide. The debate about the protection offered by spermicides is reviewed, and research on prevention effectiveness is urged. (SLD)

  5. Self-Deferral, HIV Infection, and the Blood Supply: Evaluating an AIDS Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Edward H.; Novick, Alvin

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the effectiveness of self-deferral, a social screen implemented to protect the U.S. blood supply from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection prior to the advent of laboratory testing. Mathematical models are developed to estimate the number of infectious transfusions ultimately leading to AIDS prior to self-deferral.…

  6. Family-Centered Comprehensive Care for Children with HIV Infection: A Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Health Service (DHHS), Rockville, MD.

    This document is designed to assist state and local program administrators in responding to the need for comprehensive care for children (specifically children under the age of 13) and child-rearing families affected by Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). The document is based on the premise…

  7. Nasopharyngeal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae in adults infected with human immunodeficiency virus in Jakarta, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Harimurti, Kuntjoro; Saldi, Siti R F; Dewiasty, Esthika; Khoeri, Miftahuddin M; Yunihastuti, Evi; Putri, Tiara; Tafroji, Wisnu; Safari, Dodi

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the distribution of serotype and antimicrobial susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae carried by adults infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in Jakarta, Indonesia. Specimens of nasopharyngeal swab were collected from 200 HIV infected adults aged 21 to 63 years. Identification of S. pneumoniae was done by optochin susceptibility test and PCR for the presence of psaA and lytA genes. Serotyping was performed with sequential multiplex PCR and antibiotic susceptibility with the disk diffusion method. S. pneumoniae strains were carried by 10% adults with serotype 6A/B 20% was common serotype among cultured strains in 20 adults. Most of isolates were susceptible to chloramphenicol (80%) followed by clindamycin (75%), erythromycin (75%), penicillin (55%), and tetracycline (50%). This study found resistance to sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim was most common with only 15% of strains being susceptible. High non-susceptibility to sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim was observed in S. pneumoniae strains carried by HIV infected adults in Jakarta, Indonesia.

  8. Effect of human immunodeficiency virus on blood-brain barrier integrity and function: an update

    PubMed Central

    Atluri, Venkata Subba Rao; Hidalgo, Melissa; Samikkannu, Thangavel; Kurapati, Kesava Rao Venkata; Jayant, Rahul Dev; Sagar, Vidya; Nair, Madhavan P. N.

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a diffusion barrier that has an important role in maintaining a precisely regulated microenvironment protecting the neural tissue from infectious agents and toxins in the circulating system. Compromised BBB integrity plays a major role in the pathogenesis of retroviral associated neurological diseases. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection in the Central Nervous System (CNS) is an early event even before the serodiagnosis for HIV positivity or the initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART), resulting in neurological complications in many of the infected patients. Macrophages, microglia and astrocytes (in low levels) are the most productively/latently infected cell types within the CNS. In this brief review, we have discussed about the effect of HIV infection and viral proteins on the integrity and function of BBB, which may contribute to the progression of HIV associated neurocognitive disorders. PMID:26113810

  9. Expanding human immunodeficiency virus testing and counseling to reach tuberculosis clients' partners and families.

    PubMed

    Courtenay-Quirk, C; Date, A; Bachanas, P; Baggaley, R; Getahun, H; Nelson, L; Granich, R

    2015-12-01

    Recent years have shown important increases in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing and counseling (HTC), diagnosis, and coverage of antiretroviral therapy (ART) among HIV-infected tuberculosis (TB) patients. Expansion of HTC for partners and families are critical next steps to increase earlier HIV diagnoses and access to ART, and to achieve international goals for reduced TB and HIV-related morbidity, mortality, transmission and costs. TB and HIV programs should develop and evaluate feasible and effective strategies to increase access to HTC among the partners and families of TB patients, and ensure that newly diagnosed people living with HIV and HIV-infected TB patients who complete anti-tuberculosis treatment are successfully linked to ongoing HIV clinical care.

  10. A human serum mannose-binding protein inhibits in vitro infection by the human immunodeficiency virus

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    In vitro infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) of CD4+ H9 lymphoblasts is inhibited by a mannose-binding protein (MBP) purified from human serum. In addition, MBP is able to selectively bind to HIV- infected H9 cells and HIV-infected cells from the monocyte cell line U937. These results indicate MBP most likely recognizes high mannose glycans known to be present on gp120 in the domain that is recognized by CD4 and thereby inhibits viral entry to susceptible cells. In support of this contention, recombinant gp120 binds directly to MBP; the binding is saturable, mannan inhibitable, removed by N-glycanase treatment, and dependent on divalent cations. PMID:2909656

  11. Retinal blood flow indices in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Yung, C W; Harris, A; Massicotte, S; Chioran, G; Krombach, G; Danis, R; Wolf, S

    1996-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND: Abnormal blood flow dynamics are believed to contribute to the development of retinal microvascular disease in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In this study, the scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) was used, combined with fluorescein angiography, to measure retinal blood flow indices in HIV seropositive patients. METHODS: Arteriovenous passage time (AVP) and perifoveal capillary blood flow velocity (CFV) were measured in 23 HIV infected patients and 23 control subjects with SLO fluorescein angiography. RESULTS: No significant difference in AVP was found between the two groups. However, CFV was significantly reduced in HIV infected patients (p = 0.013). CONCLUSION: Patients infected with HIV show abnormal haemodynamics at the level of the perifoveal capillaries. PMID:8949717

  12. Adolescents and human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J R

    1992-12-01

    As of March 31, 1992, individuals 13 to 19 years of age had been diagnosed with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome; over one third were diagnosed in the past 2 years alone. Because of the long incubation period from initial infection to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome diagnosis, the majority of young adults with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome were probably initially infected as adolescents. In 1991, 34% of adolescents with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome were female, and their predominant mode of transmission was heterosexual contact. Human immunodeficiency virus seroprevalence studies of adolescents show a male-to-female ratio approaching 1:1, with many human immunodeficiency virus-infected adolescent women identifying none of the standard risk. Factors such as sexual and drug experimentation, risk taking, and sense of invulnerability so characteristic of adolescence put adolescents at special risk for human immunodeficiency virus. There is no published information on if or how clinical manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus disease in adolescents might differ from those seen in adults. Medical care should be broad-based and should include access to clinical trials for new drug treatments. General knowledge levels about acquired immunodeficiency syndrome are high among US adolescents, but behavioral changes have lagged behind. All adolescents should be targeted for intensive education about human immunodeficiency virus along with interventions designed to enhance their general coping, communication, and decision-making skills.

  13. Combined use of an immunotoxin and cyclosporine to prevent both activated and quiescent peripheral blood T cells from producing type 1 human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, K D; Ramilo, O; Vitetta, E S

    1993-01-01

    Two different populations of infected T cells are present in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals: activated cells that produce virions and quiescent cells that harbor the viral genome but are unable to produce virus unless they are activated. Using an in vitro model of acute HIV infection, we have evaluated the effect of depleting activated T cells with an immunotoxin and subsequently inhibiting activation of quiescent T cells with an immunosuppressive agent. CD25 (Tac, p55), the alpha chain of the interleukin 2 receptor, is expressed on activated, but not quiescent, T cells. An anti-CD25-ricin A chain immunotoxin eliminated activated, CD25+ HIV-infected cells and, thereby, inhibited viral production by these cells. Subsequent addition of cyclosporine to the residual CD25- cells prevented their activation and thereby suppressed their ability to produce virus and to propagate the infection to uninfected T cells. Images PMID:8434001

  14. Water, electrolytes, and acid-base alterations in human immunodeficiency virus infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Musso, Carlos G; Belloso, Waldo H; Glassock, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    The clinical spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection associated disease has changed significantly over the past decade, mainly due to the wide availability and improvement of combination antiretroviral therapy regiments. Serious complications associated with profound immunodeficiency are nowadays fortunately rare in patients with adequate access to care and treatment. However, HIV infected patients, and particularly those with acquired immune deficiency syndrome, are predisposed to a host of different water, electrolyte, and acid-base disorders (sometimes with opposite characteristics), since they have a modified renal physiology (reduced free water clearance, and relatively increased fractional excretion of calcium and magnesium) and they are also exposed to infectious, inflammatory, endocrinological, oncological variables which promote clinical conditions (such as fever, tachypnea, vomiting, diarrhea, polyuria, and delirium), and may require a variety of medical interventions (antiviral medication, antibiotics, antineoplastic agents), whose combination predispose them to undermine their homeostatic capability. As many of these disturbances may remain clinically silent until reaching an advanced condition, high awareness is advisable, particularly in patients with late diagnosis, concomitant inflammatory conditions and opportunistic diseases. These disorders contribute to both morbidity and mortality in HIV infected patients. PMID:26788462

  15. Water, electrolytes, and acid-base alterations in human immunodeficiency virus infected patients.

    PubMed

    Musso, Carlos G; Belloso, Waldo H; Glassock, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    The clinical spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection associated disease has changed significantly over the past decade, mainly due to the wide availability and improvement of combination antiretroviral therapy regiments. Serious complications associated with profound immunodeficiency are nowadays fortunately rare in patients with adequate access to care and treatment. However, HIV infected patients, and particularly those with acquired immune deficiency syndrome, are predisposed to a host of different water, electrolyte, and acid-base disorders (sometimes with opposite characteristics), since they have a modified renal physiology (reduced free water clearance, and relatively increased fractional excretion of calcium and magnesium) and they are also exposed to infectious, inflammatory, endocrinological, oncological variables which promote clinical conditions (such as fever, tachypnea, vomiting, diarrhea, polyuria, and delirium), and may require a variety of medical interventions (antiviral medication, antibiotics, antineoplastic agents), whose combination predispose them to undermine their homeostatic capability. As many of these disturbances may remain clinically silent until reaching an advanced condition, high awareness is advisable, particularly in patients with late diagnosis, concomitant inflammatory conditions and opportunistic diseases. These disorders contribute to both morbidity and mortality in HIV infected patients. PMID:26788462

  16. Aberrant and unstable expression of immunoglobulin genes in persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Bessudo, A; Rassenti, L; Havlir, D; Richman, D; Feigal, E; Kipps, T J

    1998-08-15

    We examined the IgM VH gene subgroup use-distribution in serial blood samples of 37 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients and a group of HIV-seronegative healthy adults. The IgM VH gene repertoires of healthy adults were relatively similar to one another and were stable over time. In contrast, individuals infected with HIV had IgM VH gene repertoires that were significantly more heterogeneous and unstable. Persons at early stages of HIV infection generally had abnormal expression levels of Ig VH3 genes and frequently displayed marked fluctuations in the relative expression levels of this VH gene subgroup over time. In contrast, persons with established acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) had a significantly lower incidence of abnormalities in Ig VH3 expression levels, although continued to display abnormalities and instability in the expression levels of the smaller Ig VH gene subgroups. Moreover, the skewing and/or fluctuations in the expressed-IgM VH gene repertoire appeared greatest for persons at earlier stages of HIV infection. These studies show that persons infected with HIV have aberrant and unstable expression of immunoglobulin genes suggestive of a high degree humoral immune dysregulation and ongoing humoral immune responses to HIV-associated antigens and superantigens.

  17. Human papillomavirus in the HIV-infected host: epidemiology and pathogenesis in the antiretroviral era.

    PubMed

    Brickman, Cristina; Palefsky, Joel M

    2015-03-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is associated with essentially all cervical cancers, 80-90 % of anal cancers, and a high proportion of oropharyngeal, vaginal, penile, and vulvar cancers. Malignancy is preceded by the development of precancerous lesions termed high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL). Men and women with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are at high risk of HPV-related malignancies. The incidence of anal cancer in particular has markedly risen during the antiretroviral era due to the increased longevity of patients with HIV and the absence of anal malignancy screening programs. HIV infection may facilitate initial HPV infection by disrupting epithelial cell tight junctions. Once infection is established, HIV may promote HSIL development via the up-regulation of HPV oncogene expression and impairment of the immune response needed to clear the lesion. HIV-infected women should be screened for cervical HSIL and cancer, and HIV-infected men and women should be considered for anal screening programs.

  18. Long-term Bone Mineral Density Changes in Antiretroviral-Treated HIV-Infected Individuals.

    PubMed

    Grant, Philip M; Kitch, Douglas; McComsey, Grace A; Collier, Ann C; Koletar, Susan L; Erlandson, Kristine M; Yin, Michael T; Bartali, Benedetta; Ha, Belinda; Melbourne, Kathy; Brown, Todd T

    2016-08-15

    We compared adjusted bone mineral density (BMD) changes between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals during the first approximately 7.5 years after antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation and HIV-uninfected controls. HIV-infected individuals (n = 97) had significantly greater adjusted BMD decline than controls (n = 614) during the first 96 weeks of ART. Subsequently, the rate of BMD decline slowed in HIV-infected individuals but remained greater than the rate of decline in HIV-uninfected individuals at the lumbar spine but not at the hip. In HIV-infected individuals after 96 weeks, no HIV- or treatment-related characteristic was associated with BMD loss, but lower lean body mass was associated with greater BMD loss at both lumbar spine and hip. PMID:27330053

  19. Effects of Smoking on Non-AIDS-Related Morbidity in HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shirley, Daniel K.; Kaner, Robert J.; Glesby, Marshall J.

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco smoking has many adverse health consequences. Patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection smoke at very high rates, and many of the comorbidities associated with smoking in the general population are more prevalent in this population. It is likely that a combination of higher smoking rates along with an altered response to cigarette smoke throughout the body in persons with HIV infection leads to increased rates of the known conditions related to smoking. Several AIDS-defining conditions associated with smoking have been reviewed elsewhere. This review aims to summarize the data on non-AIDS-related health consequences of smoking in the HIV-infected population and explore evidence for the potential compounding effects on chronic systemic inflammation due to HIV infection and smoking. PMID:23572487

  20. Fecal bacterial microbiome diversity in chronic HIV-infected patients in China

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yang; Ma, Yingfei; Lin, Ping; Tang, Yi-Wei; Yang, Liying; Shen, Yinzhong; Zhang, Renfan; Liu, Li; Cheng, Jun; Shao, Jiashen; Qi, Tangkai; Tang, Yan; Cai, Rentian; Guan, Liqian; Luo, Bin; Sun, Meiyan; Li, Ben; Pei, Zhiheng; Lu, Hongzhou

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify fecal bacterial microbiome changes in patients with chronic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in China. Bacterial 16S rRNA genes were amplified, sequenced (454 pyrosequencing), and clustered into operational taxonomic units using the QIIME software. Relative abundance at the phylum and genus levels were calculated. Alpha diversity was determined by Chao 1 and observed-species indices, and beta diversity was determined by double principal component analysis using the estimated phylogeny-based unweighted Unifrac distance matrices. Fecal samples of the patients with chronic HIV-infection tended to be enriched with bacteria of the phyla Firmicutes (47.20%±0.43 relative abundance) and Proteobacteria (37.21%±0.36) compared with those of the non-HIV infected controls (17.95%±0.06 and 3.81%±0.02, respectively). Members of the genus Bilophila were exclusively detected in samples of the non-HIV infected controls. Bacteroides and arabacteroides were more abundant in the chronic HIV-infected patients. Our study indicated that chronic HIV-infected patients in China have a fecal bacterial microbiome composition that is largely different from that found in non-HIV infected controls, and further study is needed to evaluate whether microbiome changes play a role in disease complications in the distal gut, including opportunistic infections. PMID:27048741

  1. Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Adolescent Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Salas-Humara, Caroline; Wood, Sarah M; D'Angelo, Lawrence J; Dowshen, Nadia

    2015-12-01

    Many adolescents are at high risk for HIV infection, and those who are infected or at-risk commonly present to the ED, often as their only or frequent source of care. It is important to consider routine screening and to have a high index of suspicion for AHI in this setting. If a diagnosis of HIV infection is made, immediate linkage to care with a specialist in adolescent and young adult HIV infection should be prioritized. For the known HIV-infected patient, management must consider unique possibilities of OIs, IRIS, and medication side effects. For any patient on ART, drug-drug interactions must be noted as part of any treatment plan. If a young person presents with a recent sexual or needlestick exposure of concern, every effort to prescribe and ensure follow-up for PEP should be made. It is essential for physicians to understand and comply with local regulations regarding HIV testing and adolescents' rights for associated confidential care. Finally, physicians who see adolescents in acute care settings have a tremendous opportunity to make a difference in ensuring improved health outcomes for youth living with HIV and to prevent new infections.

  2. Sulforaphane Inhibits HIV Infection of Macrophages through Nrf2

    PubMed Central

    Furuya, Andrea Kinga Marias; Sharifi, Hamayun J.; Jellinger, Robert M.; Cristofano, Paul; Shi, Binshan; de Noronha, Carlos M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Marburg virus, the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and Dengue virus all activate, and benefit from, expression of the transcription regulator nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). The impact of Nrf2 activation on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has not been tested. Sulforaphane (SFN), produced in cruciferous vegetables after mechanical damage, mobilizes Nrf2 to potently reprogram cellular gene expression. Here we show for the first time that SFN blocks HIV infection in primary macrophages but not in primary T cells. Similarly SFN blocks infection in PMA-differentiated promonocytic cell lines, but not in other cell lines tested. siRNA-mediated depletion of Nrf2 boosted HIV infectivity in primary macrophages and reduced the anti-viral effects of SFN treatment. This supports a model in which anti-viral activity is mediated through Nrf2 after it is mobilized by SFN. We further found that, like the type I interferon-induced cellular anti-viral proteins SAMHD1 and MX2, SFN treatment blocks infection after entry, but before formation of 2-LTR circles. Interestingly however, neither SAMHD1 nor MX2 were upregulated. This shows for the first time that Nrf2 action can potently block HIV infection and highlights a novel way to trigger this inhibition. PMID:27093399

  3. Sulforaphane Inhibits HIV Infection of Macrophages through Nrf2.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Andrea Kinga Marias; Sharifi, Hamayun J; Jellinger, Robert M; Cristofano, Paul; Shi, Binshan; de Noronha, Carlos M C

    2016-04-01

    Marburg virus, the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and Dengue virus all activate, and benefit from, expression of the transcription regulator nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). The impact of Nrf2 activation on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has not been tested. Sulforaphane (SFN), produced in cruciferous vegetables after mechanical damage, mobilizes Nrf2 to potently reprogram cellular gene expression. Here we show for the first time that SFN blocks HIV infection in primary macrophages but not in primary T cells. Similarly SFN blocks infection in PMA-differentiated promonocytic cell lines, but not in other cell lines tested. siRNA-mediated depletion of Nrf2 boosted HIV infectivity in primary macrophages and reduced the anti-viral effects of SFN treatment. This supports a model in which anti-viral activity is mediated through Nrf2 after it is mobilized by SFN. We further found that, like the type I interferon-induced cellular anti-viral proteins SAMHD1 and MX2, SFN treatment blocks infection after entry, but before formation of 2-LTR circles. Interestingly however, neither SAMHD1 nor MX2 were upregulated. This shows for the first time that Nrf2 action can potently block HIV infection and highlights a novel way to trigger this inhibition. PMID:27093399

  4. BK virus infection in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Ledesma, J; Muñoz, P; Garcia de Viedma, D; Cabrero, I; Loeches, B; Montilla, P; Gijon, P; Rodriguez-Sanchez, B; Bouza, E

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the prevalence of BK virus (BKV) infection in HIV-positive patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in our hospital. The presence of BKV was analysed in urine and plasma samples from 78 non-selected HIV-infected patients. Clinical data were recorded using a pre-established protocol. We used a nested PCR to amplify a specific region of the BKV T-large antigen. Positive samples were quantified using real-time PCR. Mean CD4 count in HIV-infected patients was 472 cells/mm3 and median HIV viral load was <50 copies/mL. BKV viraemia was detected in only 1 HIV-positive patient, but 57.7% (45 out of 78) had BKV viruria, which was more common in patients with CD4 counts>500 cells/mm3 (74.3% vs 25.7%; p=0.007). Viruria was present in 21.7% of healthy controls (5 out of 23 samples, p=0.02). All viral loads were low (<100 copies/mL), and we could not find any association between BKV infection and renal or neurological manifestations. We provide an update on the prevalence of BKV in HIV-infected patients treated with HAART. BKV viruria was more common in HIV-infected patients; however, no role for BKV has been demonstrated in this population.

  5. Reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus during early infection with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, M A; Kingsley, L A; Atchison, R W; Belle, S; Breinig, M C; Ho, M; Rinaldo, C R

    1991-01-01

    Reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in early human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection was investigated in 49 homosexual men who seroconverted to HIV (cases) as compared with 49 matched controls who remained seronegative to HIV during a longitudinal study. EBV infection was reactivated in cases 6 months, but not 12 months, prior to HIV seroconversion as compared with controls and remained reactivated during 18 months of follow-up after HIV seroconversion, as shown by increases in immunoglobulin (Ig) G antibody titers to EBV early antigen. Antibody titers to EBV viral capsid antigen did not differ between cases and controls prior to the time of seroconversion to HIV but were significantly increased among cases by the first seropositive study visit and remained elevated during the 18 months after HIV seroconversion. Total serum IgG levels were increased in cases at the visit of seroconversion, and during 18 months of follow-up, but did not correlate with enhanced IgG production specific for EBV antigens. Significant decreases in numbers of CD4+ cells and increases in numbers of CD8+ cells during this early phase of HIV infection were not associated with changes in patterns of EBV antibody responses. Reactivation of EBV beginning 6 months before HIV seroconversion may have implications regarding the role of this herpesvirus in the pathogenesis of HIV. PMID:1650790

  6. Pulmonary toxoplasmosis in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients in the era of antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Velásquez, Jorge N; Ledesma, Bibiana A; Nigro, Monica G; Vittar, Natalia; Rueda, Nestor; De Carolis, Luis; Figueiras, Olga; Carnevale, Silvana; Corti, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a severe opportunistic infection in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The lung is a major site of infection after the central nervous system. In this report we described two cases of pneumonia due to Toxoplasma gondii infection in HIV patients with antiretroviral therapy. Clinical and radiological abnormalities are not specific. Pulmonary toxoplasmosis should be considered in HIV-infected patients with late stage of HIV, CD4 count less than 100 cells/µl and a poor adherence to HAART. PMID:26933317

  7. Pulmonary toxoplasmosis in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients in the era of antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Velásquez, Jorge N; Ledesma, Bibiana A; Nigro, Monica G; Vittar, Natalia; Rueda, Nestor; De Carolis, Luis; Figueiras, Olga; Carnevale, Silvana; Corti, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a severe opportunistic infection in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The lung is a major site of infection after the central nervous system. In this report we described two cases of pneumonia due to Toxoplasma gondii infection in HIV patients with antiretroviral therapy. Clinical and radiological abnormalities are not specific. Pulmonary toxoplasmosis should be considered in HIV-infected patients with late stage of HIV, CD4 count less than 100 cells/µl and a poor adherence to HAART.

  8. Neurobehavioral Manifestations of Human Immunodeficiency Virus/AIDS: Diagnosis and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Singer, Elyse J; Thames, April D

    2016-02-01

    Behavioral disorders are common in persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The differential includes preexisting psychiatric diseases, substance abuse, direct effects of HIV infection, opportunistic infection, and the adverse effects of medical therapies. Many patients have more than one contributing or comorbid problem to explain these behavioral changes. The differential should always include consideration of psychosocial, genetic, and medical causes of disease. Treatment strategies must take into account the coadministration of antiretroviral therapy and the specific neurologic problems common in patients infected with HIV. PMID:26613994

  9. One approach to care for patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus in an academic medical center.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, J. L.; Damson, L. C.; Rogers, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic poses unprecedented challenges to the health-care system. Caregivers must contend both with the complicated clinical syndromes associated with HIV infection and with issues that are central to the epidemic, such as discrimination, isolation, poverty, and substance abuse. Our HIV treatment program combines and enhances the resources of an academic medical center in a multidisciplinary care model. All patients, regardless of payor class, are offered services from 10 different disciplines. The same team of clinicians follows patients in the clinic and hospital. The program is flexible, non-hierarchical, and open to community participation. This approach may be a useful model for other institutions. PMID:8982523

  10. Nodular Erythema Elevatum Diutinum Mimicking Kaposi's Sarcoma in a Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infected Patient

    PubMed Central

    Rao, G Raghurama; Joshi, Rajiv; Phaneendra Prasad, A Krishna; Amareswar, A; Sandhya, S; Sridevi, M

    2014-01-01

    Erythema elevatum diutinum (EED) has been emerging as a specific Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) associated dermatosis in recent times. It is an extremely rare chronic disease of unknown origin and part of the spectrum of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. We describe a case of EED simulating Kaposi's sarcoma in a 52-year-old HIV infected female patient with no previous opportunistic infections and CD4+ count of 164/mm3. Therapy with oral dapsone (100 mg/day) for two weeks resulted in resolution of some lesions. PMID:25484391

  11. Extensive astrocyte infection is prominent in human immunodeficiency virus-associated dementia.

    PubMed

    Churchill, Melissa J; Wesselingh, Steven L; Cowley, Daniel; Pardo, Carlos A; McArthur, Justin C; Brew, Bruce J; Gorry, Paul R

    2009-08-01

    Astrocyte infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is considered rare, so astrocytes are thought to play a secondary role in HIV neuropathogenesis. By combining double immunohistochemistry, laser capture microdissection, and highly sensitive multiplexed polymerase chain reaction to detect HIV DNA in single astrocytes in vivo, we showed that astrocyte infection is extensive in subjects with HIV-associated dementia, occurring in up to 19% of GFAP+ cells. In addition, astrocyte infection frequency correlated with the severity of neuropathological changes and proximity to perivascular macrophages. Our data indicate that astrocytes can be extensively infected with HIV, and suggest an important role for HIV-infected astrocytes in HIV neuropathogenesis.

  12. Pulmonary toxoplasmosis in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients in the era of antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Velásquez, Jorge N; Ledesma, Bibiana A; Nigro, Monica G; Vittar, Natalia; Rueda, Nestor; De Carolis, Luis; Figueiras, Olga; Carnevale, Silvana; Corti, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a severe opportunistic infection in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The lung is a major site of infection after the central nervous system. In this report we described two cases of pneumonia due to Toxoplasma gondii infection in HIV patients with antiretroviral therapy. Clinical and radiological abnormalities are not specific. Pulmonary toxoplasmosis should be considered in HIV-infected patients with late stage of HIV, CD4 count less than 100 cells/µl and a poor adherence to HAART. PMID:26933317

  13. Human papilloma virus vaccination induces strong human papilloma virus specific cell-mediated immune responses in HIV-infected adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Rainone, Veronica; Giacomet, Vania; Penagini, Francesca; Fabiano, Valentina; Calascibetta, Francesca; Mameli, Chiara; Pisanelli, Stefania; Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo; Clerici, Mario; Trabattoni, Daria

    2015-03-27

    The ability of a quadrivalent human papilloma virus (HPV)-16/18/6/11 virus-like particles vaccine (Gardasil) to elicit HPV-specific cell-mediated immune responses was evaluated in antiretroviral therapy (ART)-treated HIV-infected young adults. Results showed that, after three doses of vaccine, central memory and effector memory CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes, as well as HPV-specific interleukin (IL)2(+)/CD4(+), interferon-gamma (IFN-γ(+))/CD4(+), IFN-γ(+)/CD8(+) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)(+)/CD8(+) T lymphocytes and Perforin and Granzyme B secreting CD8(+) T lymphocytes were significantly increased. Notably, results obtained in HIV-infected patients were comparable to those seen in HIV-uninfected age-matched healthy controls.

  14. Osteolytic lesions and bacillary angiomatosis in HIV infection: radiologic differentiation from AIDS-related Kaposi sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Baron, A L; Steinbach, L S; LeBoit, P E; Mills, C M; Gee, J H; Berger, T G

    1990-10-01

    Bacillary angiomatosis is a newly recognized multisystem bacterial infectious disease seen in the setting of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The disease is marked by cutaneous vascular lesions that contain a bacterium similar to the cat scratch disease bacillus. Antibiotic therapy leads to the resolution of both cutaneous and systemic manifestations. Of 17 HIV-infected patients with cutaneous lesions of bacillary angiomatosis, six (35%) had symptomatic osteolytic bone lesions that improved following antibiotic therapy. The authors describe the appearance of the bone lesions on radiographs, computed tomographic (CT) scans, magnetic resonance (MR) images, and radionuclide studies. Osteolytic lesions are a relatively common feature of bacillary angiomatosis in patients with HIV infection. The presence of bone lesions aids in differentiation of bacillary angiomatosis from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related Kaposi sarcoma, which has similar cutaneous abnormalities but no associated bone lesions.

  15. White matter tract injury and cognitive impairment in human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Gongvatana, Assawin; Schweinsburg, Brian C; Taylor, Michael J; Theilmann, Rebecca J; Letendre, Scott L; Alhassoon, Omar M; Jacobus, Joanna; Woods, Steven P; Jernigan, Terry L; Ellis, Ronald J; Frank, Lawrence R; Grant, Igor

    2009-04-01

    Approximately half of those infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) exhibit cognitive impairment, which has been related to cerebral white matter damage. Despite the effectiveness of antiretroviral treatment, cognitive impairment remains common even in individuals with undetectable viral loads. One explanation for this may be subtherapeutic concentrations of some antiretrovirals in the central nervous system (CNS). We utilized diffusion tensor imaging and a comprehensive neuropsychological evaluation to investigate the relationship of white matter integrity to cognitive impairment and antiretroviral treatment variables. Participants included 39 HIV-infected individuals (49% with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome [AIDS]; mean CD4 = 529) and 25 seronegative subjects. Diffusion tensor imaging indices were mapped onto a common whole-brain white matter tract skeleton, allowing between-subject voxelwise comparisons. The total HIV-infected group exhibited abnormal white matter in the internal capsule, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, and optic radiation; whereas those with AIDS exhibited more widespread damage, including in the internal capsule and the corpus callosum. Cognitive impairment in the HIV-infected group was related to white matter injury in the internal capsule, corpus callosum, and superior longitudinal fasciculus. White matter injury was not found to be associated with HIV viral load or estimated CNS penetration of antiretrovirals. Diffusion tensor imaging was useful in identifying changes in white matter tracts associated with more advanced HIV infection. Relationships between diffusion alterations in specific white matter tracts and cognitive impairment support the potential utility of diffusion tensor imaging in examining the anatomical underpinnings of HIV-related cognitive impairment. The study also confirms that CNS injury is evident in persons infected with HIV despite effective antiretroviral treatment.

  16. Immune Activation Response in Chronic HIV-Infected Patients: Influence of Hepatitis C Virus Coinfection

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, Mercedes; Romero-Cores, Paula; Montes-Oca, Monserrat; Martín-Aspas, Andrés; Soto-Cárdenas, María-José; Guerrero, Francisca; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Clotilde; Girón-González, José-Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We have analyzed the parameters (bacterial translocation, immune activation and regulation, presence of HCV coinfection) which could be implicated in an inappropriate immune response from individuals with chronic HIV infection. The influence of them on the evolution of CD4+ T cell count has been investigated. Patients and methods Seventy HIV-infected patients [monoinfected by HIV (n = 20), HCV-coinfected (with (n = 25) and without (n = 25) liver cirrhosis)] and 25 healthy controls were included. Median duration of HIV infection was 20 years. HIV- and HCV-related parameters, as well as markers relative to bacterial translocation, monocyte and lymphocyte activation and regulation were considered as independent variables. Dependent variables were the increase of CD4+ T cell count during the follow-up (12 months). Results Increased values of bacterial translocation, measured by lipopolysaccharide-binding protein, monocyte and lymphocyte activation markers and T regulatory lymphocytes were detected in HIV-monoinfected and HIV/HCV coinfected patients. Serum sCD14 and IL-6 were increased in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients with liver cirrhosis in comparison with those with chronic hepatitis or HIV-monoinfected individuals. Time with undetectable HIV load was not related with these parameters. The presence of cirrhosis was negatively associated with a CD4+ T cell count increase. Conclusion In patients with a chronic HIV infection, a persistent increase of lipopolysaccharide-binding protein and monocyte and lymphocyte modifications are present. HCV-related cirrhosis is associated with more elevated serum concentrations of monocyte-derived markers. Cirrhosis influences the continued immune reconstitution of these patients. PMID:25775475

  17. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes response dynamics after prime-boost vaccine regimens with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 canarypox and pseudovirions.

    PubMed

    Arp, J; Rovinski, B; Sambhara, S; Tartaglia, J; Dekaban, G

    1999-01-01

    Virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) may represent significant immune mechanisms in the control of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and, therefore, CTL induction may be a fundamental goal in the development of an efficacious acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) vaccine. In the current study, prime-boost protocols were used to investigate the potential of noninfectious human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) pseudovirions (HIV PSV) in enhancing HIV-specific CTL responses in Balb/c mice primed with the recombinant canarypox vector, vCP205, encoding HIV-1 gp120 (MN strain) in addition to Gag/Protease (HIB strain). The prime-boost immunization regimens were administered intramuscularly and involved injections of vCP205 followed by boosts with HIV PSV. Previous vaccination strategies solely involving vCP205 had induced good cellular immune responses in uninfected human volunteers, despite some limitations. The use of genetically engineered HIV PSV was a logical step in the evaluation of whole noninfectious virus or inactivated virus vaccine strategies, particularly as a potential boosting agent for vCP205-primed recipients. Based on this current study, HIV PSV appeared to have the capability to effectively induce and boost cell-mediated HIV-1-specific responses. In order to observe the immune effects of HIV PSV in a prime-boost immunization strategy, both HIV vaccine immunogens required careful titration in vivo. This suggests that careful consideration should be given to the optimization of immunization protocols destined for human use.

  18. REVIEW OF CONTROL OF HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS INFECTION IN NIGERIA.

    PubMed

    Dami, N; Shehu, N Y; Dami, S; Iroezindu, M O

    2015-01-01

    The global scourge of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is inundating, especially in sub-Saharan Africa and in particular Nigeria which is home to 10% of the world's HIV-infected persons. The target of the millennium development goal 6 is to halt and reverse the spread of HIV/AIDS by 2015. HIV control in Nigeria was initially shrouded in denial and apathy. Subsequently, a more pragmatic approach was launched during the tenure of President Olusegun Obasanjo. Several policies were formulated. The national prevalence of HIV witnessed some progressive decline and is currently 4.1%. There is now improvement in both HIV awareness and counselling and testing. Greater access to antiretroviral therapy and other support services have also been witnessed with over 300,000 persons currently on drugs. Notable achievements have been recorded in prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTC). However, with increased access to antiretroviral therapy, antiretroviral drug resistance has become inevitable. Acquired drug resistance is high-82% and transmitted drug resistance ranges between 0.7 and 4.5%. The achievements were largely facilitated by international partnerships which have become more streamlined in recent years. A sustained shift to indigenously sourced financial and manpower resource has become imperative. It is also important to integrate HIV facilities with other existing health care facilities for sustainability and cost-effectiveness. In an attempt to strengthen the national response, President Goodluck Ebele Jonathan launched the President's Comprehensive Response Plan for HIV/AIDS in Nigeria. It is hoped that this well-articulated policy would be well implemented to significantly reverse the epidemic. PMID:27487603

  19. REVIEW OF CONTROL OF HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS INFECTION IN NIGERIA.

    PubMed

    Dami, N; Shehu, N Y; Dami, S; Iroezindu, M O

    2015-01-01

    The global scourge of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is inundating, especially in sub-Saharan Africa and in particular Nigeria which is home to 10% of the world's HIV-infected persons. The target of the millennium development goal 6 is to halt and reverse the spread of HIV/AIDS by 2015. HIV control in Nigeria was initially shrouded in denial and apathy. Subsequently, a more pragmatic approach was launched during the tenure of President Olusegun Obasanjo. Several policies were formulated. The national prevalence of HIV witnessed some progressive decline and is currently 4.1%. There is now improvement in both HIV awareness and counselling and testing. Greater access to antiretroviral therapy and other support services have also been witnessed with over 300,000 persons currently on drugs. Notable achievements have been recorded in prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTC). However, with increased access to antiretroviral therapy, antiretroviral drug resistance has become inevitable. Acquired drug resistance is high-82% and transmitted drug resistance ranges between 0.7 and 4.5%. The achievements were largely facilitated by international partnerships which have become more streamlined in recent years. A sustained shift to indigenously sourced financial and manpower resource has become imperative. It is also important to integrate HIV facilities with other existing health care facilities for sustainability and cost-effectiveness. In an attempt to strengthen the national response, President Goodluck Ebele Jonathan launched the President's Comprehensive Response Plan for HIV/AIDS in Nigeria. It is hoped that this well-articulated policy would be well implemented to significantly reverse the epidemic.

  20. Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Task Force learned about the potential benefits and harms of this screening: (1) Everyone aged 15 to ... the disease to other people. Potential Benefits and Harms of Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) The ...

  1. Preventing opportunistic infections in human immunodeficiency virus-infected persons: implications for the developing world.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, J E; Hu, D J; Holmes, K K; Jaffe, H W; Masur, H; De Cock, K M

    1996-07-01

    More than 18 million persons in the world are estimated to have been infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the cause of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). As immunodeficiency progresses, these persons become susceptible to a wide variety of opportunistic infections (OIs) The spectrum of OIs varies among regions of the world. Tuberculosis is the most common serious OI in sub-Saharan Africa and is also more common in Latin America and in Asia than in the United States. Bacterial and parasitic infections are prevalent in Africa; protozoal infections such as toxoplasmosis, cryptosporidiosis, and isosporiasis are also common in Latin America. Fungal infections, including cryptococcosis and Penicillium marneffei infection, appear to be prevalent in Southeast Asia. Despite limited health resources in these regions, some measures that are recommended to prevent OIs in the United States may be useful for prolonging and improving the quality of life of HIV-infected persons. These include trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole to prevent Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, toxoplasmosis, and bacterial infections; isoniazid to prevent tuberculosis; and 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine to prevent disease due to Streptococcus pneumoniae. Research is needed to determine the spectrum of OIs and the efficacy of various prevention measures in resource-poor nations, and health officials need to determine a minimum standard of care for HIV-infected persons. An increasing problem in the developing world, HIV/AIDS should receive attention comparable to other tropical diseases.

  2. Microbiome in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Salas, January T.; Chang, Theresa L.

    2014-01-01

    HIV primary infection occurs at mucosa tissues, suggesting an intricate interplay between microbiome and HIV infection. Recent advanced technologies of high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics allow researchers to explore nonculturable microbes including bacteria, virus and fungi and their association with diseases. HIV/SIV infection is associated with microbiome shifts and immune activation that may affect the outcome of disease progression. Similarly, altered microbiome and inflammation are associated with increased risks of HIV acquisition, suggesting the role of microbiome in HIV transmission. In this review, we will focus on microbiome in HIV infection at various mucosal compartments. Understanding the relationship between microbiome and HIV may offer insights into development of better strategies for HIV prevention and treatment. PMID:25439273

  3. Improving Medical Residents' Attitudes toward HIV-Infected Persons through Training in an HIV Staging and Triage Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orlander, Jay D.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A study assessed the effectiveness of a weekly outpatient clinic for staging and triage of newly identified human-immunodeficiency-virus (HIV)-infected patients on 21 medical residents' attitudes and knowledge regarding HIV patient care, as compared with 20 control students. Results indicated that the experience positively affected student…

  4. Circadian rhythms of circulating NK cells in healthy and human immunodeficiency virus-infected men.

    PubMed

    Bourin, P; Mansour, I; Doinel, C; Roué, R; Rouger, P; Levi, F

    1993-08-01

    Antiviral immunity involves NK cells, which circulate rhythmically every 24 hours. We have investigated circadian and 12-hour rhythms in the peripheral count of circulating NK cells in 15 men infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and 13 healthy controls. We analyzed three phenotypes using double-labeling with monoclonal antibodies and flow cytometry assessment: CD3- CD16+, CD3-CD57+, and CD2+CD3-. A statistical validation of time-dependent differences was achieved if significance (p < 0.05) was validated both with analysis of variance and cosinor. The circadian rhythm had a similar asymmetric waveform for the three phenotypes and is homogeneous on an individual basis. The circulating NK cell count peaked in the early morning and was low at night. A circadian rhythm and a circahemidian harmonic characterized all phenotypes in healthy subjects. We considered two groups of HIV-infected men: those who were asymptomatic (eight) and those with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) (seven). Circadian changes in NK cell count were similar in both subgroups and in healthy controls. The circadian pattern was also consistent among individual patients. Asymptomatic HIV-infected men (early-stage disease) exhibited more pronounced 12-hour rhythmicity than did patients with AIDS or controls. The circulation of NK cells does not appear to share the same synchronizer(s) as other circulating T- or B-lymphocyte subsets. Thus, HIV infection gradually abolished circadian rhythmicity in circulating T and B cells, whereas it did not disturb that in NK cells.

  5. Prevention and treatment of opportunistic infections and other coinfections in HIV-infected patients: May 2015.

    PubMed

    Iribarren, José Antonio; Rubio, Rafael; Aguirrebengoa, Koldo; Arribas, Jose Ramón; Baraia-Etxaburu, Josu; Gutiérrez, Félix; Lopez Bernaldo de Quirós, Juan Carlos; Losa, Juan Emilio; Miró, José Ma; Moreno, Santiago; Pérez Molina, José; Podzamczer, Daniel; Pulido, Federico; Riera, Melchor; Rivero, Antonio; Sanz Moreno, José; Amador, Concha; Antela, Antonio; Arazo, Piedad; Arrizabalaga, Julio; Bachiller, Pablo; Barros, Carlos; Berenguer, Juan; Caylá, Joan; Domingo, Pere; Estrada, Vicente; Knobel, Hernando; Locutura, Jaime; López Aldeguer, José; Llibre, Josep Ma; Lozano, Fernando; Mallolas, Josep; Malmierca, Eduardo; Miralles, Celia; Miralles, Pilar; Muñoz, Agustín; Ocampo, Agustín; Olalla, Julián; Pérez, Inés; Pérez Elías, Ma Jesús; Pérez Arellano, José Luis; Portilla, Joaquín; Ribera, Esteban; Rodríguez, Francisco; Santín, Miguel; Sanz Sanz, Jesús; Téllez, Ma Jesús; Torralba, Miguel; Valencia, Eulalia; Von Wichmann, Miguel Angel

    2016-10-01

    Despite the huge advance that antiretroviral therapy represents for the prognosis of infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), opportunistic infections (OIs) continue to be a cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected patients. OIs often arise because of severe immunosuppression resulting from poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy, failure of antiretroviral therapy, or unawareness of HIV infection by patients whose first clinical manifestation of AIDS is an OI. The present article updates our previous guidelines on the prevention and treatment of various OIs in HIV-infected patients, namely, infections by parasites, fungi, viruses, mycobacteria, and bacteria, as well as imported infections. The article also addresses immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. PMID:26976381

  6. Heat shock protein-based therapeutic strategies against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, B G; Wainberg, M A

    1999-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (hsps) and cyclophilins (CypA) are intracellular chaperone molecules that facilitate protein folding and assembly. These proteins are selectively expressed in cells following exposure to a range of stress stimuli, including viral infection. Hsp species are highly immunogenic, eliciting humoral, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL), and natural killer (NK) cell responses against viruses, tumours, and infectious diseases. This review discusses the roles of stress proteins in immunity and viral life cycles, vis-à-vis the development of Hsp-based therapeutic strategies against human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection. Cumulative findings are cited implicating the requirement of CypA in HIV-1 replication and formation of infectious virions. Studies by our group show the upregulated expression of hsp27 and hsp70 during single-cycle HIV infections. These species redistribute to the cell surface following HIV-infection and heat stress, serving as targets for NK and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Co-immunoprecipitation and Western blot studies show that hsp27, hsp70, and hsp78 complex with HIV-1 viral proteins intracellularly. Hsp70, hsp56, and CypA are assembled into HIV-1 virions. The ability of hsps to interact with HIV-1 viral proteins, combined with their inherent adjuvant and immunogenic properties, indicates that hsps may serve as vehicles for antigen delivery and the design of vaccines against acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. PMID:10231014

  7. Simian immunodeficiency virus disrupts extended lengths of the blood--brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Maclean, A G; Belenchia, G E; Bieniemy, D N; Moroney-Rasmussen, T A; Lackner, A A

    2005-10-01

    It is known that there is disruption of the blood-brain barrier during terminal AIDS encephalitis in both human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected humans and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus macaques. Much, although by no means all, of the neuropathological findings of HIV and SIV infection involves accumulation of monocytes/macrophages that have likely crossed the blood-brain barrier (BBB). There is no convincing, rigorous, demonstration of HIV (or SIV) infecting endothelial cells in vivo. However, this is not to say that HIV infection would not have any effects on the physiology of microvascular brain endothelial cells. Because of the elaborate nature of cerebral microvessels, previous studies of cerebral endothelial cells have been constrained by sectioning artifacts. Examination of freshly isolated cerebral microvessels allows investigation of extended lengths of vessels (>150 mum) without sectioning artifacts. These studies determine the changes in the expression of the tight junction protein zo-1 protein on the endothelial cells of cerebral capillaries at terminal acquired immune deficiency syndrome, demonstrating that there is a decreased expression of zo-1 protein over extended lengths of microvessels.

  8. Endothelial and platelet function alterations in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Gresele, P; Falcinelli, E; Sebastiano, M; Baldelli, F

    2012-03-01

    The HIV epidemic has huge dimensions: in 2009, 33.3million people worldwide, including 2.5million children, were affected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The introduction of Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy (HAART) has significantly modified the course of HIV disease, with longer survival and improved quality of life, but it has simultaneously lead to the appearance of previously unrecognized complications, such as ischemic cardiovascular events. Many studies have shown a higher rate of premature atherosclerosis in patients with HIV infection, leading to coronary, cerebrovascular, or peripheral arterial disease. However, it is still debated whether cardiovascular complications are a consequence of HIV infection itself or of the long-term use of HAART. In particular, myocardial infarction has been suggested to be associated with the use of abacavir. Endothelial dysfunction and platelet activation are markers of atherosclerosis and of increased cardiovascular risk. Here we review the evidence that endothelial dysfunction and platelet alterations are associated with chronic HIV infection, the possible role of different HAARTs, and the possible pathophysiologic mechanisms. Potential therapeutic implications are also discussed.

  9. High viral load in lymph nodes and latent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in peripheral blood cells of HIV-1-infected chimpanzees.

    PubMed Central

    Saksela, K; Muchmore, E; Girard, M; Fultz, P; Baltimore, D

    1993-01-01

    We have examined human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in chimpanzees by analyzing HIV-1 DNA and RNA in lymph nodes and peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Like certain asymptomatic HIV-infected persons, these chimpanzees had no detectable viral replication in their PBMCs. However, viral replication and a high viral load were observed in the lymphatic tissue. Despite the absence of viral replication in PBMCs, 1/1,000 to 1/10,000 of the PBMCs contained HIV-1 proviral DNA, and HIV transcription could be rapidly induced in these cells in vitro. These results provide direct evidence of cellular latency of HIV in vivo and suggest that HIV infection in chimpanzees may be a useful model for clinical latency of HIV infection in humans. Images PMID:8230463

  10. Impact of HIV Infection and Zidovudine Therapy on RBC Parameters and Urine Methylmalonic Acid Levels

    PubMed Central

    Adediran, Adewumi; Osunkalu, Vincent; Wakama, Tamunomieibi; John-Olabode, Sarah; Akinbami, Akinsegun; Uche, Ebele; Akanmu, Sulaimon

    2016-01-01

    Background. Anaemia is a common complication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of HIV infection and zidovudine on red blood cells (RBC) parameters and urine methylmalonic acid (UMMA) levels in patients with HIV infection. Material and Methods. A cross-sectional study involving 114 subjects, 94 of which are HIV-infected nonanaemic and 20 HIV negative subjects (Cg) as control. Full blood count parameters and urine methylmalonic acid (UMMA) level of each subject were determined. Associations were determined by Chi-square test and logistic regression statistics where appropriate. Results. Subjects on zidovudine-based ART had mean MCV (93 fL) higher than that of control group (82.9 fL) and ART-naïve (85.9 fL) subjects and the highest mean RDW. Mean UMMA level, which reflects vitamin B12 level status, was high in all HIV-infected groups but was significantly higher in ART-naïve subjects than in ART-experienced subjects. Conclusion. Although non-zidovudine therapy may be associated with macrocytosis (MCV > 95 fL), zidovudine therapy and ART naivety may not. Suboptimal level of vitamin B12 as measured by high UMMA though highest in ART-naïve subjects was common in all HIV-infected subjects. PMID:26989408

  11. Psychosocial and cultural correlates of depression among Hispanic men with HIV infection: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    De Santis, J P; Gonzalez-Guarda, R M; Vasquez, E P

    2012-12-01

    Depression is a common mental health condition among persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Depression influences quality of life, social relationships and adherence to medication therapy. Little is known about depression among Hispanic men with HIV infection. The purpose of this pilot study was to describe the relationships of depression to other psychosocial factors (self-esteem, Hispanic stress, substance abuse and violence) and cultural factors (familism and Hispanic stress) among a sample of Hispanic men with HIV infection. Using a cross-sectional, descriptive research design a convenience sample of 46 Hispanic men with HIV infection was recruited and surveyed from the South Florida area of the USA. The majority of the participants (65%; n = 30) were depressed. In addition, the majority of participants reported high familism and self-esteem and low Hispanic stress. A history of substance abuse and childhood and adult violence were common. Significant relationships were noted between depression, and self-esteem, Hispanic stress, substance abuse, and adult physical violence. Healthcare providers need to be aware of the high rates of depression, substance abuse and violence that may occur among Hispanic men with HIV infection. More research is needed to further explore the relationship of these factors, as well as to determine the impact that these variables have on adherence to medication therapy among Hispanic men with HIV infection.

  12. Impact of HIV Infection and Zidovudine Therapy on RBC Parameters and Urine Methylmalonic Acid Levels.

    PubMed

    Adediran, Adewumi; Osunkalu, Vincent; Wakama, Tamunomieibi; John-Olabode, Sarah; Akinbami, Akinsegun; Uche, Ebele; Akanmu, Sulaimon

    2016-01-01

    Background. Anaemia is a common complication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of HIV infection and zidovudine on red blood cells (RBC) parameters and urine methylmalonic acid (UMMA) levels in patients with HIV infection. Material and Methods. A cross-sectional study involving 114 subjects, 94 of which are HIV-infected nonanaemic and 20 HIV negative subjects (Cg) as control. Full blood count parameters and urine methylmalonic acid (UMMA) level of each subject were determined. Associations were determined by Chi-square test and logistic regression statistics where appropriate. Results. Subjects on zidovudine-based ART had mean MCV (93 fL) higher than that of control group (82.9 fL) and ART-naïve (85.9 fL) subjects and the highest mean RDW. Mean UMMA level, which reflects vitamin B12 level status, was high in all HIV-infected groups but was significantly higher in ART-naïve subjects than in ART-experienced subjects. Conclusion. Although non-zidovudine therapy may be associated with macrocytosis (MCV > 95 fL), zidovudine therapy and ART naivety may not. Suboptimal level of vitamin B12 as measured by high UMMA though highest in ART-naïve subjects was common in all HIV-infected subjects. PMID:26989408

  13. Epidemiology of contemporary seroincident HIV infection in the Navy and Marine corps.

    PubMed

    Brett-Major, David M; Hakre, Shilpa; Naito, Neal A; Armstrong, Adam; Bower, Eric A; Michael, Nelson L; Scott, Paul T

    2012-11-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection continues at a steady rate among U.S. Sailors and Marines. This study provides the first service-specific description of HIV infection demographics. All Sailors and Marines identified as HIV infected between January 2005 and August 2010 were included. The project compared personnel and epidemiologic data, and tested reposed sera in the Department of Defense Serum Repository. This group comprised 410 Sailors and 86 Marines, predominantly men. HIV infected Marines were more likely to be foreign born than their Navy counterparts, 42% versus 10%, p < 0.001. Approximately half of the patients had deployed including to the wars in Iraq or Afghanistan. Nearly half of each group was infected by the age of 25. Similar to the U.S. epidemic, Black race was over-represented. Unlike national rates, Hispanic Sailors and Marines were not over-represented. Demographics were distinct for those of specific occupational specialties. Certain ship classes carried lower incidences. Clustering of HIV infection risk occurred around deployment. The Navy and Marine Corps have different patterns of HIV infection, which may merit distinct approaches to prevention. The Navy may have unique targets for prevention efforts to include pipeline training and first assignment as well as particular occupational environments.

  14. Selective killing of CD4+ cells harboring a human immunodeficiency virus-inducible suicide gene prevents viral spread in an infected cell population.

    PubMed

    Caruso, M; Klatzmann, D

    1992-01-01

    We have stably expressed in CD4+ lymphoid cells the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) gene under the control of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) promoter and transactivation response element sequences. Upon HIV infection these regulatory sequences were transactivated, switching on high-level expression of HSV1-TK. This in turn caused the death of HIV-infected cells when they were cultured in the presence of acyclovir, a nucleoside analog that becomes toxic after phosphorylation by HSV1-TK. The elimination of HIV-infected cells resulted in the arrest of HIV spreading in the culture. Complete protection of HSV1-TK-expressing cells was obtained using acyclovir concentrations that are commonly detected in the plasma of patients treated for HSV1 infection. Thus, expression of this DNA construct generates a pool of CD4+ booby-trapped cells that, as a population, are resistant to HIV infection. Our data provide a rationale for the use of suicide genes in the design of gene therapy of HIV infection. PMID:1346066

  15. Human Immunodeficiency Virus as a Chronic Disease: Evaluation and Management of Nonacquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome-Defining Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Serrano-Villar, Sergio; Gutiérrez, Félix; Miralles, Celia; Berenguer, Juan; Rivero, Antonio; Martínez, Esteban; Moreno, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    In the modern antiretroviral therapy (ART) era, motivated people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who have access to therapy are expected to maintain viral suppression indefinitely and to receive treatment for decades. Hence, the current clinical scenario has dramatically shifted since the early 1980s, from treatment and prevention of opportunistic infections and palliative care to a new scenario in which most HIV specialists focus on HIV primary care, ie, the follow up of stable patients, surveillance of long-term toxicities, and screening and prevention of age-related conditions. The median age of HIV-infected adults on ART is progressively increasing. By 2030, 3 of every 4 patients are expected to be aged 50 years or older in many countries, more than 80% will have at least 1 age-related disease, and approximately one third will have at least 3 age-related diseases. Contemporary care of HIV-infected patients is evolving, and questions about how we might monitor and perhaps even treat HIV-infected adults have emerged. Through key published works, this review briefly describes the most prevalent comorbidities and age-associated conditions and highlights the differential features in the HIV-infected population. We also discuss the most critical aspects to be considered in the care of patients with HIV for the management and prevention of age-associated disease. PMID:27419169

  16. Suicidal ideation and suicide attempts among human immunodeficiency virus-infected adults: differences in risk factors and their implications.

    PubMed

    Kang, Cho Ryok; Bang, Ji Hwan; Cho, Sung-Il; Kim, Kui Nam; Lee, Hee-Jin; Ryu, Bo Yeong; Cho, Soo Kyung; Lee, Young Hwa; Oh, Myoung-Don; Lee, Jong-Koo

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have investigated risk factors for suicidal ideation and suicide attempt; however, most have failed to show differences in risk factors between suicidal ideation and suicide attempt among the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected population. This study was designed to identify differences in risk factors between suicidal ideation and suicide attempts among HIV-infected adults in Seoul. A face-to-face survey of 457 HIV-infected adults was conducted by the Seoul Metropolitan Government in 2013. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with suicidal ideation and suicide attempt. Among 422 participants, 44% had suicidal ideation, and 11% had suicide attempts. The independent risk factors for suicidal ideation were young and middle age, living with someone, history of AIDS-defining opportunistic disease, history of treatment for depression, lower social support, and psychological status. Beneficiaries of National Medical Aid, economic barriers to treatment, history of treatment for depression, and lower psychological status were independently associated with suicide attempts. Patients with HIV in Korea were treated without cost in some centers. Thus, experiencing an economic barrier to treatment might be due in part to ignorance of HIV care policies. Our findings indicate that suicide attempts are associated with socioeconomic factors and information inequality regarding medical care. In conclusion, suicidal ideation closely associated with the psychosocial factors, whereas suicide attempt demonstrates a stronger association with socioeconomic factors. Suicide prevention measures should be implemented to provide information to help HIV-infected patients.

  17. Human Immunodeficiency Virus as a Chronic Disease: Evaluation and Management of Nonacquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome-Defining Conditions.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Villar, Sergio; Gutiérrez, Félix; Miralles, Celia; Berenguer, Juan; Rivero, Antonio; Martínez, Esteban; Moreno, Santiago

    2016-04-01

    In the modern antiretroviral therapy (ART) era, motivated people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who have access to therapy are expected to maintain viral suppression indefinitely and to receive treatment for decades. Hence, the current clinical scenario has dramatically shifted since the early 1980s, from treatment and prevention of opportunistic infections and palliative care to a new scenario in which most HIV specialists focus on HIV primary care, ie, the follow up of stable patients, surveillance of long-term toxicities, and screening and prevention of age-related conditions. The median age of HIV-infected adults on ART is progressively increasing. By 2030, 3 of every 4 patients are expected to be aged 50 years or older in many countries, more than 80% will have at least 1 age-related disease, and approximately one third will have at least 3 age-related diseases. Contemporary care of HIV-infected patients is evolving, and questions about how we might monitor and perhaps even treat HIV-infected adults have emerged. Through key published works, this review briefly describes the most prevalent comorbidities and age-associated conditions and highlights the differential features in the HIV-infected population. We also discuss the most critical aspects to be considered in the care of patients with HIV for the management and prevention of age-associated disease. PMID:27419169

  18. The effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy on liver function in human immunodeficiency virus-infected pediatric patients with or without hepatitis virus co-infection

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lijuan; Jin, Changzhong; Bai, Shi; Davies, Henry; Rao, Heping; Liang, Yong; Wu, Nanping

    2015-01-01

    Background: Co-infection of hepatitis virus is common in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected adults in China. But little is known about hepatitis virus co-infection in pediatric HIV-infected subjects. The study aimed to investigate the impact of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and/or hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infection and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on liver function of pediatric HIV-infected subjects. Materials and Methods: A cohort study including 101 pediatric HIV-infected subjects with HBV/HCV co-infection and 44 pediatric comparators with HIV mono-infection was carried out in Henan Province of China from September 2011 to September 2012. All patients received HAART for 1-year. HBV and HCV infection was determined by antibody tests. HIV RNA load, CD4+ T-cell counts and liver function were determined before and after HAART. The Student's t-test or a one-way ANOVA was used for normally distributed values and A Mann-Whitney U-test was performed for values without normal distribution using SPSS statistical package 18.0 (SPSS Inc.). Results: After HAART for 1-year, the median levels of viral load were decreased to lower limit of detection in 90.34% pediatric HIV-infected subjects with/without HBV/HCV co-infection (P < 0.001), and CD4+ T-cell counts increased significantly (P < 0.001). Compared with the pre-HAART, mean level of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in each group had a significant increase after HAART (P < 0.01). The mean levels of ALT and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) in nevirapine (NVP) based HAART group increased significantly after HAART (P < 0.01). Mean change values of ALT and AST were significantly higher in the NVP based regimen group than in the efavirenz (EFV) based regimen group (P < 0.01). For HIV/HBV/HCV co-infected patients, mean change values of ALT and AST in NVP-based HAART group was significantly higher than that in EFV-based HAART group (P < 0.01). Conclusion: Highly active antiretroviral therapy can damage liver

  19. A new look at human immunodeficiency virus infection and stroke in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Luchuo, Engelbert Bain; Nkoke, Clovis

    2016-06-01

    Stroke and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are major causes of morbidity and mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), with disease burdens being amongst the highest worldwide. HIV infection has emerged as an important risk factor for stroke. The remarkable development in the treatment of HIV infection which occurred in recent decades has allowed the survival of a large number of patients. This therapeutic success which allows patients to live longer has facilitated the emergence of a new population of adults with increased risk for cardiovascular disease including stroke due to aging, the direct effects of HIV infection and combined anti-retroviral therapy (cART). Preventive strategies to decrease the burden of stroke amongst this specific patient population remain understudied in this region of the world. Lack of early diagnosis (CT scans) and poor record keeping make appreciation of the burden difficult. There is indisputable evidence that early diagnosis and early placement on cART therapy reduce HIV associated morbidity and mortality in this region of the world. However, the emergence of a new population of patients at risk for developing stroke (HIV patients) who fortunately live longer deserves a keener attention. Long term effects of cART regimens on cardiovascular and metabolic profiles remain uncertain, and specific cohort studies to properly ascertain its consequences are needed. The evidence and specific guidelines with regards to anti-platelet therapies and statin use, though potentially beneficial, in this patient sub group remains scarce. African specific cohort studies including HIV positive patients in our opinion should constitute a top research priority, to properly ascertain the potential roles of anti-platelet therapies and statins with regards to primary and secondary prevention of stroke, as well as long term effects of cART on their cardiovascular and metabolic profiles. PMID:27429969

  20. A new look at human immunodeficiency virus infection and stroke in Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Luchuo, Engelbert Bain

    2016-01-01

    Stroke and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are major causes of morbidity and mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), with disease burdens being amongst the highest worldwide. HIV infection has emerged as an important risk factor for stroke. The remarkable development in the treatment of HIV infection which occurred in recent decades has allowed the survival of a large number of patients. This therapeutic success which allows patients to live longer has facilitated the emergence of a new population of adults with increased risk for cardiovascular disease including stroke due to aging, the direct effects of HIV infection and combined anti-retroviral therapy (cART). Preventive strategies to decrease the burden of stroke amongst this specific patient population remain understudied in this region of the world. Lack of early diagnosis (CT scans) and poor record keeping make appreciation of the burden difficult. There is indisputable evidence that early diagnosis and early placement on cART therapy reduce HIV associated morbidity and mortality in this region of the world. However, the emergence of a new population of patients at risk for developing stroke (HIV patients) who fortunately live longer deserves a keener attention. Long term effects of cART regimens on cardiovascular and metabolic profiles remain uncertain, and specific cohort studies to properly ascertain its consequences are needed. The evidence and specific guidelines with regards to anti-platelet therapies and statin use, though potentially beneficial, in this patient sub group remains scarce. African specific cohort studies including HIV positive patients in our opinion should constitute a top research priority, to properly ascertain the potential roles of anti-platelet therapies and statins with regards to primary and secondary prevention of stroke, as well as long term effects of cART on their cardiovascular and metabolic profiles. PMID:27429969

  1. Platelet Activation in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 Patients Is Not Altered with Cocaine Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Kiebala, Michelle; Singh, Meera V.; Piepenbrink, Michael S.; Qiu, Xing; Kobie, James J.; Maggirwar, Sanjay B.

    2015-01-01

    Recent work has indicated that platelets, which are anucleate blood cells, significantly contribute to inflammatory disorders. Importantly, platelets also likely contribute to various inflammatory secondary disorders that are increasingly associated with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 (HIV) infection including neurological impairments and cardiovascular complications. Indeed, HIV infection is often associated with increased levels of platelet activators. Additionally, cocaine, a drug commonly abused by HIV-infected individuals, leads to increased platelet activation in humans. Considering that orchestrated signaling mechanisms are essential for platelet activation, and that nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) inhibitors can alter platelet function, the role of NF-κB signaling in platelet activation during HIV infection warrants further investigation. Here we tested the hypothesis that inhibitory kappa B kinase complex (IKK) activation would be central for platelet activation induced by HIV and cocaine. Whole blood from HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals, with or without cocaine abuse was used to assess platelet activation via flow cytometry whereas IKK activation was analyzed by performing immunoblotting and in vitro kinase assays. We demonstrate that increased platelet activation in HIV patients, as measured by CD62P expression, is not altered with reported cocaine use. Furthermore, cocaine and HIV do not activate platelets in whole blood when treated ex vivo. Finally, HIV-induced platelet activation does not involve the NF-κB signaling intermediate, IKKβ. Platelet activation in HIV patients is not altered with cocaine abuse. These results support the notion that non-IKK targeting approaches will be better suited for the treatment of HIV-associated inflammatory disorders. PMID:26076359

  2. Malignancies in human immunodeficiency virus infected patients in India: Initial experience in the HAART era

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Surendra K.; Soneja, Manish; Ranjan, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Limited data are available on malignancies in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients from India. We undertook this study to assess the frequency and spectrum of malignancies in HIV-infected adult patients during the first eight years of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) rollout under the National ART Programme at a tertiary care centre in New Delhi, India. Methods: Retrospective analysis of records of patients registered at the ART clinic between May 2005 and December 2013 was done. Results: The study included 2598 HIV-infected adult patients with 8315 person-years of follow up. Malignancies were diagnosed in 26 patients with a rate of 3.1 (IQR 2.1-4.5) cases per 1000 person-years. The median age for those diagnosed with malignancy was 45 (IQR 36-54) yr, which was significantly (P<0.01) higher compared with those not developing malignancies 35 (IQR 30-40) yr. The median baseline CD4+ T-cell count in patients with malignancy was 135 (IQR 68-269) cells/µl compared to 164 (IQR 86-243) cells/µl in those without malignancies. AIDS-defining cancers (ADCs) were seen in 19 (73%) patients, while non-AIDS-defining cancers (NADCs) were observed in seven (27%) patients. Malignancies diagnosed included non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (16), carcinoma cervix (3), Hodgkin's lymphoma (2), carcinoma lung (2), hepatocellular carcinoma (1), and urinary bladder carcinoma (1). One patient had primary central nervous system lymphoma. There was no case of Kaposi's sarcoma. Interpretation & conclusions: Malignancies in HIV-infected adult patients were infrequent in patients attending the clinic. Majority of the patients presented with advanced immunosuppression and the ADCs, NHL in particular, were the commonest malignancies. PMID:26658591

  3. Anxiety and depressive symptoms among patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Kee, Mee-Kyung; Lee, Sae-Young; Kim, Na-Young; Lee, Joo-Shil; Kim, June Myung; Choi, Jun Yong; Ku, Nam Su; Kang, Moon Won; Kim, Min Ja; Woo, Jun Hee; Kim, Shin-Woo; Song, Joon Young; Baek, Ji-Hyeon; Choi, Bo Youl; Kim, Sung Soon

    2015-01-01

    Patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) may develop mental health problems such as anxiety and depression, which negatively impact of disease progression. We investigated factors associated with the prevalence of anxiety and depression symptoms among HIV-infected patients in Korea. A total of 840 HIV-infected patients who participated in the Korea HIV/AIDS Cohort Study from 2006 to 2012 were evaluated. Socio-demographic, epidemiologic, and clinical variables were obtained through standardized questionnaires. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Beck Depression Inventory were used to assess the symptoms of anxiety and depression. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to identify factors associated with symptoms of anxiety and depression. The prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms among HIV-infected patients was 32% and 36%, respectively. Ex-smoker and persistent symptoms for more than one week within the past six months and diagnosis of HIV infection within one year were associated with increased anxiety symptoms (odds ratio [OR] 1.71, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09-2.69; OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.09-2.11; OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.02-2.20) and current smoking and persistent symptoms were also associated with increased depressive symptoms (OR 2.10, 95% CI 1.31-3.30; OR 1.87, 95% CI 1.25-2.79). Marital status, current smoking, current drinking, and persistent symptoms were associated with both increased anxiety and depressive symptoms (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.07-2.88; OR 1.66, 95% CI 1.06-2.61; OR 1.88, 95% CI 1.18-2.99). The prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms among HIV-infected patients is higher than those estimated for the general population. This study shows the necessity to evaluate symptoms of anxiety and depression and suggest psychological support for HIV-infected patients who smoke or have persistent symptoms or have sexual partner or drink.

  4. Mortality and Risk Stratification of HIV Infected Individuals.

    PubMed

    Heltemes, Bradley R

    2015-01-01

    For the first decade and a half after the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) was first identified, the prognosis for most people infected with HIV was quite poor. Life insurance companies responded accordingly and insurance laboratories developed new means to test for the infection. However, it is now clear that people with HIV infection are living longer and that the majority of deaths occurring among those on treatment are now no longer due to AIDS-defining illnesses. This review examines the results of selected studies which analyzed mortality outcomes in those with HIV infection, the many factors which influence those outcomes, and the limitations in the data and in their applicability to an insurance population. PMID:27584921

  5. Cytokines and T-Cell Homeostasis in HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Michael L; Shive, Carey L; Nguyen, Thao P; Younes, Souheil-Antoine; Panigrahi, Soumya; Lederman, Michael M

    2016-10-01

    Untreated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is characterized by progressive CD4(+) T-cell depletion and CD8(+) T-cell expansion, and CD4(+) T-cell depletion is linked directly to the risk for opportunistic infections and infection-associated mortality. With suppression of HIV replication by antiretroviral therapy, circulating CD4(+) Tcell numbers typically improve while CD8(+) T-cell expansion persists, and both CD4(+) T-cell cytopenia and CD8(+) T-cell expansion are associated with morbidity and mortality. In this brief review, we report on the role that selected homeostatic and inflammatory cytokines may play both in the failure of CD4(+) T-cell restoration and the CD8(+) T-cell expansion that characterize HIV infection. PMID:27625431

  6. Selective destruction of cells infected with human immunodeficiency virus

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K.; Ward, Thomas E.

    2003-09-30

    Compositions and methods for selectively killing a cell containing a viral protease are disclosed. The composition is a variant of a protein synthesis inactivating toxin wherein a viral protease cleavage site is interposed between the A and B chains. The variant of the type II ribosome-inactivating protein is activated by digestion of the viral protease cleavage site by the specific viral protease. The activated ribosome-inactivating protein then kills the cell by inactivating cellular ribosomes. A preferred embodiment of the invention is specific for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and uses ricin as the ribosome-inactivating protein. In another preferred embodiment of the invention, the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein is modified by attachment of one or more hydrophobic agents. The hydrophobic agent facilitates entry of the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein into cells and can lead to incorporation of the ribosome-inactivating protein into viral particles. Still another preferred embodiment of the invention includes a targeting moiety attached to the variants of the ribosome-inactivating protein to target the agent to HIV infectable cells.

  7. Selective Destruction Of Cells Infected With The Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K.; Ward, Thomas E.

    2006-03-28

    Compositions and methods for selectively killing a cell containing a viral protease are disclosed. The composition is a varient of a protein synthesis inactivating toxin wherein a viral protease cleavage site is interposed between the A and B chains. The variant of the type II ribosome-inactivating protein is activated by digestion of the viral protease cleavage site by the specific viral protease. The activated ribosome-inactivating protein then kills the cell by inactivating cellular ribosomes. A preferred embodiment of the invention is specific for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and uses ricin as the ribosome-inactivating protein. In another preferred embodiment of the invention, the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein is modified by attachment of one or more hydrophobic agents. The hydrophobic agent facilitates entry of the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein into cells and can lead to incorporation of the ribosome-inactivating protein into viral particles. Still another preferred embodiment of the invention includes a targeting moiety attached to the variants of the ribosome-inactivating protein to target the agent to HIV infectable cells.

  8. Recombination increases human immunodeficiency virus fitness, but not necessarily diversity.

    PubMed

    Vijay, N N V; Vasantika; Ajmani, Rahul; Perelson, Alan S; Dixit, Narendra M

    2008-06-01

    Recombination can facilitate the accumulation of mutations and accelerate the emergence of resistance to current antiretroviral therapies for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Yet, since recombination can also dissociate favourable combinations of mutations, the benefit of recombination to HIV remains in question. The confounding effects of mutation, multiple infections of cells, random genetic drift and fitness selection that underlie HIV evolution render the influence of recombination difficult to unravel. We developed computer simulations that mimic the genomic diversification of HIV within an infected individual and elucidate the influence of recombination. We find, interestingly, that when the effective population size of HIV is small, recombination increases both the diversity and the mean fitness of the viral population. When the effective population size is large, recombination increases viral fitness but decreases diversity. In effect, recombination enhances (lowers) the likelihood of the existence of multi-drug resistant strains of HIV in infected individuals prior to the onset of therapy when the effective population size is small (large). Our simulations are consistent with several recent experimental observations, including the evolution of HIV diversity and divergence in vivo. The intriguing dependencies on the effective population size appear due to the subtle interplay of drift, selection and epistasis, which we discuss in the light of modern population genetics theories. Current estimates of the effective population size of HIV have large discrepancies. Our simulations present an avenue for accurate determination of the effective population size of HIV in vivo and facilitate establishment of the benefit of recombination to HIV.

  9. Challenge of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) immunized with human immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein gp120.

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, L O; Bess, J W; Waters, D J; Pyle, S W; Kelliher, J C; Nara, P L; Krohn, K; Robey, W G; Langlois, A J; Gallo, R C

    1989-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the causative agent of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, infects humans and chimpanzees. To determine the efficacy of immunization for preventing infection, chimpanzees were immunized with gp120 purified from human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type IIIB (HTLV-IIIB)-infected cell membranes and challenged with the homologous virus, HTLV-IIIB. A challenge stock of HTLV-IIIB was prepared by using unconcentrated HTLV-IIIB produced in H9 cells. The titer of the virus from this stock on human and chimpanzee peripheral blood mononuclear cells and in human lymphoid cell lines was determined; a cell culture infectivity of 10(4) was assigned. All chimpanzees inoculated intravenously with 40 cell culture infectious units or more became infected, as demonstrated by virus isolation and seroconversion. One of two chimpanzees inoculated with 4 cell culture infectious units became infected. Chimpanzees immunized with gp120 formulated in alum developed antibodies which precipitated gp120 and neutralized HTLV-IIIB. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from gp120-vaccinated and HIV-infected animals showed a significantly greater response in proliferation assays with HIV proteins than did peripheral blood mononuclear cells from nonvaccinated and non-HIV-infected chimpanzees. Two of the gp120-alum-immunized chimpanzees were challenged with virus from the HTLV-IIIB stock. One animal received 400 cell culture infectious units, and one received 40 infectious units. Both animals became infected with HIV, indicating that the immune response elicited by immunization with gp120 formulated in alum was not effective in preventing infection with HIV-1. PMID:2555541

  10. Chronic plasma cell endometritis in hysterectomy specimens of HIV-infected women: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Kerr-Layton, J A; Stamm, C A; Peterson, L S; McGregor, J A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Abnormal uterine bleeding is a common and troublesome problem in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women. We sought to evaluate endometrial pathology among HIV-infected women requiring hysterectomy to explore if endometritis may be common among these patients. METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis of uterine pathology specimens obtained from HIV-infected and control patients requiring hysterectomy in two urban hospitals between 1988 and 1997 matched for age, surgical indication, and history of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) use. Cases were evaluated for the presence of plasma cells and assigned a grade between 0 and 3. RESULTS: Indications included cervical dysplasia (4), carcinoma in situ (2), abnormal uterine bleeding (3), and adnexal mass (3). Some degree of abnormal uterine bleeding occurred in all cases. Plasma cell endometritis was twice as common in HIV-infected women compared to HIV-negative specimens (11/11 versus 11/22) (P < 0.05). Plasma cell endometritis was also of a higher grade in specimens from HIV-infected women than in controls (P = 0.001). CONCLUSION: Chronic endometritis was common and of a higher grade among HIV-infected women requiring hysterectomy in our series. Diagnosis and treatment of endometritis should be considered in HIV-infected women with uterine bleeding and/or tenderness. We speculate that antiretroviral and/or antimicrobial treatment for endometritis may effectively treat endometritis and eliminate the need for surgery in some HIV-infected women. We suggest that consideration and treatment of endometritis in HIV-1 infected women being evaluated for possible hysterectomy has the potential to reduce costs and morbidity for patients and providers who may be exposed during surgical procedures. PMID:9812252

  11. Parasitic infections in HIV infected individuals: Diagnostic & therapeutic challenges

    PubMed Central

    Nissapatorn, Veeranoot; Sawangjaroen, Nongyao

    2011-01-01

    After 30 years of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic, parasites have been one of the most common opportunistic infections (OIs) and one of the most frequent causes of morbidity and mortality associated with HIV-infected patients. Due to severe immunosuppression, enteric parasitic pathogens in general are emerging and are OIs capable of causing diarrhoeal disease associated with HIV. Of these, Cryptosporidium parvum and Isospora belli are the two most common intestinal protozoan parasites and pose a public health problem in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients. These are the only two enteric protozoan parasites that remain in the case definition of AIDS till today. Leismaniasis, strongyloidiasis and toxoplasmosis are the three main opportunistic causes of systemic involvements reported in HIV-infected patients. Of these, toxoplasmosis is the most important parasitic infection associated with the central nervous system. Due to its complexity in nature, toxoplasmosis is the only parasitic disease capable of not only causing focal but also disseminated forms and it has been included in AIDS-defining illnesses (ADI) ever since. With the introduction of highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), cryptosporidiosis, leishmaniasis, schistosomiasis, strongyloidiasis, and toxoplasmosis are among parasitic diseases reported in association with immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). This review addresses various aspects of parasitic infections in term of clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic challenges associated with HIV-infection. PMID:22310820

  12. Real-Time PCR Assay for Clinical Management of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients with Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Bossolasco, Simona; Gaiera, Giovanni; Olchini, Davide; Gulletta, Maurizio; Martello, Leonardo; Bestetti, Arabella; Bossi, Laura; Germagnoli, Luca; Lazzarin, Adriano; Uberti-Foppa, Caterina; Cinque, Paola

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of a real-time PCR for Leishmania DNA in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and Leishmania coinfection, Leishmania DNA levels were measured in whole peripheral blood from 25 HIV-infected patients with clinical features suggestive of visceral leishmaniasis. Leishmania DNA was detected in 10 of 25 patients with microscopically confirmed visceral leishmaniasis and in none of those without this disease. Following treatment with liposomal amphotericin B, a clinical response was observed in 9 of 10 patients, in association with significantly decreased parasite loads. Seven patients relapsed clinically a median of 110 days after the end of treatment, in association with substantial increases in Leishmania DNA levels. Leishmania DNA levels correlated with the clinical course of visceral leishmaniasis, and their measurement at diagnosis and during and after treatment seems to be useful in the clinical management of HIV-infected patients with this disease. PMID:14605142

  13. [HIV infection : Test and treatment].

    PubMed

    Rockstroh, J K; Wasmuth, J-C

    2016-08-01

    In Europe depending on the country 15-80 % of all individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are either not aware of the diagnosis or are diagnosed later. An early HIV diagnosis could, however, considerably improve the prognosis of individuals infected with HIV and decrease the risk of new infections; therefore, in the presence of indicator diseases, such as sexually transmitted diseases, oral thrush, herpes zoster and lymphoma, the performance of a HIV test is of utmost importance. A newly diagnosed HIV infection represents an indication for starting antiretroviral combination therapy independent of the clinical stage or CD4 cell count. A decline of the viral burden to below the limit of detection and subsequent continuous suppression of viral replication can prevent transition from HIV to acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and if started early enough a normal life expectancy can be achieved. Challenges which remain in HIV therapy are the lifelong daily intake of medication and the complex long-term adverse effects. PMID:27368530

  14. [Pneumocystosis during HIV infection].

    PubMed

    El Fane, M; Sodqi, M; Oulad Lahsen, A; Chakib, A; Marih, L; Marhoum El Filali, K

    2016-08-01

    Pneumocystosis is an opportunistic disease caused by invasion of unicellular fungus Pneumocystic jirovecii which is responsible for febrile pneumonia among patients with cellular immunodeficiency especially those HIV infected. Despite the decreasing of its incidence due to the introduction of antiretroviral therapy, as well as anti-Pneumocystis prophylaxis among these patients, Pneumocystis pneumonia remains the first AIDS-defining event and a leading cause of mortality among HIV-infected patients. The usual radiological presentation is that of diffuse interstitial pneumonia. The diagnosis is confirmed by the detection of trophozoides and/or cysts P. jirovecii in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples using several staining techniques. The use of polymerase chain reaction in the BAL samples in conjunction with standard immunofluorescent or colorimetric tests have allowed for more has allowed for more rapid and accurate diagnosis. The standard regimen of treatment is the association of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole which has been utilized as an effective treatment with a favourable recovery. Early HIV diagnosis and antiretroviral therapy should reduce the incidence of this dreaded disease. PMID:27349824

  15. The Interaction between Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Human Papillomaviruses in Heterosexuals in Africa.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2015-04-02

    Sub-Saharan Africa has the highest incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer in the world, which is further aggravated by the burden of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) disease with invasive cervical cancer being an AIDS-defining cancer. The prevalence of HPV infection and associated disease is very high in HIV-infected people and continues to be a problem even after anti-retroviral therapy. In the genital tract, the interaction between HPV and HIV is complex, with infection with multiple HPV types reported to make both women and men more susceptible to HIV infection. Besides the national programmes to vaccinate girls against HPV and screen women for cervical cancer, there should be targeted cervical cancer screening, treatment and prevention programmes introduced into HIV treatment centres. There is evidence that in high HIV prevalence areas, HIV-positive women could cause increases in the prevalence of genital HPV infection in HIV-negative men and so increase the HPV circulating in the community. Condom use and circumcision reduce the acquisition of HIV-1, and also to some extent of HPV. This review will highlight what is known about the interaction of HIV and HPV, with an emphasis on research in Africa.

  16. The Interaction between Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Human Papillomaviruses in Heterosexuals in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2015-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa has the highest incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer in the world, which is further aggravated by the burden of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) disease with invasive cervical cancer being an AIDS-defining cancer. The prevalence of HPV infection and associated disease is very high in HIV-infected people and continues to be a problem even after anti-retroviral therapy. In the genital tract, the interaction between HPV and HIV is complex, with infection with multiple HPV types reported to make both women and men more susceptible to HIV infection. Besides the national programmes to vaccinate girls against HPV and screen women for cervical cancer, there should be targeted cervical cancer screening, treatment and prevention programmes introduced into HIV treatment centres. There is evidence that in high HIV prevalence areas, HIV-positive women could cause increases in the prevalence of genital HPV infection in HIV-negative men and so increase the HPV circulating in the community. Condom use and circumcision reduce the acquisition of HIV-1, and also to some extent of HPV. This review will highlight what is known about the interaction of HIV and HPV, with an emphasis on research in Africa. PMID:26239348

  17. The Interaction between Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Human Papillomaviruses in Heterosexuals in Africa.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2015-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa has the highest incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer in the world, which is further aggravated by the burden of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) disease with invasive cervical cancer being an AIDS-defining cancer. The prevalence of HPV infection and associated disease is very high in HIV-infected people and continues to be a problem even after anti-retroviral therapy. In the genital tract, the interaction between HPV and HIV is complex, with infection with multiple HPV types reported to make both women and men more susceptible to HIV infection. Besides the national programmes to vaccinate girls against HPV and screen women for cervical cancer, there should be targeted cervical cancer screening, treatment and prevention programmes introduced into HIV treatment centres. There is evidence that in high HIV prevalence areas, HIV-positive women could cause increases in the prevalence of genital HPV infection in HIV-negative men and so increase the HPV circulating in the community. Condom use and circumcision reduce the acquisition of HIV-1, and also to some extent of HPV. This review will highlight what is known about the interaction of HIV and HPV, with an emphasis on research in Africa. PMID:26239348

  18. Prevalence of occult hepatitis C virus infection in the Iranian patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Bokharaei-Salim, Farah; Keyvani, Hossein; Esghaei, Maryam; Zare-Karizi, Shohreh; Dermenaki-Farahani, Sahar-Sadat; Hesami-Zadeh, Khashayar; Fakhim, Shahin

    2016-11-01

    Occult hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a new form of chronic HCV infection described by the presence of the genomic HCV-RNA in liver biopsy and/or peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples, and undetectable levels or absence of HCV-RNA and in the absence or presence of anti HCV antibodies in the plasma specimens. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the occurrence of occult HCV infection (OCI) among Iranian subjects infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) using RT-nested PCR. From March 2014 until April 2015, 109 Iranian patients with established HIV infection were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. After extraction of viral RNA from the plasma and PBMC samples, HCV-RNA status was examined by RT-nested PCR using primers from the 5'-NTR. HCV genotyping was conducted using RFLP analysis. For the confirmation of HCV genotyping by RFLP method, the PCR products were sequenced. Of the 109 patients, 50 were positive for antibodies against HCV. The HCV-RNA was detected in PBMC specimens in 6 (10.2%) out of the total 59 patients negative for anti-HCV Abs and undetectable plasma HCV-RNA and also from 4 (8.0%) out of the total 50 patients positive for anti-HCV Abs and undetectable plasma HCV-RNA. HCV genotyping analysis showed that 6 (60.0%) patients were infected with HCV subtype 3a, 3 (30.0%) were infected with HCV subtype 1a and 1 (10.0%) patient was infected with HCV subtype 1b. This study revealed the incidence of OCI (9.2%) in HIV-infected Iranian patients. Hence, designing prospective studies focusing on the detection of OCI in these patients would provide more information. J. Med. Virol. 88:1960-1966, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Prevalence of occult hepatitis C virus infection in the Iranian patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Bokharaei-Salim, Farah; Keyvani, Hossein; Esghaei, Maryam; Zare-Karizi, Shohreh; Dermenaki-Farahani, Sahar-Sadat; Hesami-Zadeh, Khashayar; Fakhim, Shahin

    2016-11-01

    Occult hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a new form of chronic HCV infection described by the presence of the genomic HCV-RNA in liver biopsy and/or peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples, and undetectable levels or absence of HCV-RNA and in the absence or presence of anti HCV antibodies in the plasma specimens. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the occurrence of occult HCV infection (OCI) among Iranian subjects infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) using RT-nested PCR. From March 2014 until April 2015, 109 Iranian patients with established HIV infection were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. After extraction of viral RNA from the plasma and PBMC samples, HCV-RNA status was examined by RT-nested PCR using primers from the 5'-NTR. HCV genotyping was conducted using RFLP analysis. For the confirmation of HCV genotyping by RFLP method, the PCR products were sequenced. Of the 109 patients, 50 were positive for antibodies against HCV. The HCV-RNA was detected in PBMC specimens in 6 (10.2%) out of the total 59 patients negative for anti-HCV Abs and undetectable plasma HCV-RNA and also from 4 (8.0%) out of the total 50 patients positive for anti-HCV Abs and undetectable plasma HCV-RNA. HCV genotyping analysis showed that 6 (60.0%) patients were infected with HCV subtype 3a, 3 (30.0%) were infected with HCV subtype 1a and 1 (10.0%) patient was infected with HCV subtype 1b. This study revealed the incidence of OCI (9.2%) in HIV-infected Iranian patients. Hence, designing prospective studies focusing on the detection of OCI in these patients would provide more information. J. Med. Virol. 88:1960-1966, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27463051

  20. Nucleoside inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prem L; Nurpeisov, Viktoria; Hernandez-Santiago, Brenda; Beltran, Thierry; Schinazi, Raymond F

    2004-01-01

    The development of novel compounds that can effectively inhibit both wild type and the most consensus resistant strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is the primary focus in HIV disease management. Combination therapy, comprising at least three classes of drugs, has become the standard of care for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or HIV-infected individuals. The drug cocktail can comprise all three classes of HIV inhibitors, including nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI), non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) and protease inhibitors (PI). Due to their competitive mode of inhibition and requirement for metabolic activation, almost all NRTI drugs lack the virological potency of NNRTI or PI drugs. However, data from clinical trials indicate that sustained viral suppression could not be achieved with NRTI, NNRTI or PIs alone. Therefore, the NRTIs will remain essential components of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for the foreseeable future, because they enhance the virological potency of the regimen, they do not bind excessively to protein and most regimens are small pills/tablets given once a day. It has become apparent in recent years that the prolonged use of certain NRTIs exhibits adverse events as a class, limiting the length of time for which they can be safely used. Of major clinical concern is their association with the potentially fatal lactic acidaemia and hepatic steatosis. These class events, as well as individual drug effects, such as peripheral neuropathy, are linked to delayed mitochondrial destruction. In addition to toxicity, the development of resistance-conferring mutations against exposure to nucleoside analogs currently in use influences long-term therapeutic benefits. Of critical importance for the evaluation of new NRTIs are recent studies showing that the efficiency of discrimination or excision by pyrophosphorolysis in the presence of nucleotides of a given NRTI is a key

  1. Detachment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 from germinal centers by blocking complement receptor type 2.

    PubMed

    Kacani, L; Prodinger, W M; Sprinzl, G M; Schwendinger, M G; Spruth, M; Stoiber, H; Döpper, S; Steinhuber, S; Steindl, F; Dierich, M P

    2000-09-01

    After the transition from the acute to the chronic phase of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, complement mediates long-term storage of virions in germinal centers (GC) of lymphoid tissue. The contribution of particular complement receptors (CRs) to virus trapping in GC was studied on tonsillar specimens from HIV-infected individuals. CR2 (CD21) was identified as the main binding site for HIV in GC. Monoclonal antibodies (MAb) blocking the CR2-C3d interaction were shown to detach 62 to 77% of HIV type 1 from tonsillar cells of an individual in the presymptomatic stage. Although they did so at a lower efficiency, these antibodies were able to remove HIV from tonsillar cells of patients under highly active antiretroviral therapy, suggesting that the C3d-CR2 interaction remains a primary entrapment mechanism in treated patients as well. In contrast, removal of HIV was not observed with MAb blocking CR1 or CR3. Thus, targeting CR2 may facilitate new approaches toward a reduction of residual virus in GC.

  2. Detachment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 from germinal centers by blocking complement receptor type 2.

    PubMed

    Kacani, L; Prodinger, W M; Sprinzl, G M; Schwendinger, M G; Spruth, M; Stoiber, H; Döpper, S; Steinhuber, S; Steindl, F; Dierich, M P

    2000-09-01

    After the transition from the acute to the chronic phase of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, complement mediates long-term storage of virions in germinal centers (GC) of lymphoid tissue. The contribution of particular complement receptors (CRs) to virus trapping in GC was studied on tonsillar specimens from HIV-infected individuals. CR2 (CD21) was identified as the main binding site for HIV in GC. Monoclonal antibodies (MAb) blocking the CR2-C3d interaction were shown to detach 62 to 77% of HIV type 1 from tonsillar cells of an individual in the presymptomatic stage. Although they did so at a lower efficiency, these antibodies were able to remove HIV from tonsillar cells of patients under highly active antiretroviral therapy, suggesting that the C3d-CR2 interaction remains a primary entrapment mechanism in treated patients as well. In contrast, removal of HIV was not observed with MAb blocking CR1 or CR3. Thus, targeting CR2 may facilitate new approaches toward a reduction of residual virus in GC. PMID:10933708

  3. Targeted interventions required against genital ulcers in African countries worst affected by HIV infection.

    PubMed Central

    O'Farrell, N.

    2001-01-01

    It remains unclear why there is such marked variation in the severity of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic between African countries. The prevalence of HIV infection has reached high levels in many parts of southern Africa but in most countries of West Africa the levels are much lower. Although there is good evidence that sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and genital ulcers in particular facilitate heterosexual transmission of HIV, there is little comparative STI data from the African countries worst affected by HIV infection. A MEDLINE search covering the period 1966 to August 2000 using the keywords "sexually transmitted diseases", "genital ulcers" and "Africa" was performed to identify factors that might be relevant to the spread of HIV infection in countries with the highest prevalences of the virus. In the countries worst affected by HIV infection, the proportions of men and women with STI who had genital ulcers lay in the ranges 45-68% and 13-68%, respectively. The proportions were much lower in countries of West Africa than in those of southern Africa. The African countries worst affected by HIV infection should adopt a more specialized approach to STI control than hitherto and specifically target the high incidence of genital ulceration. Locally, technical STI committees should draw up country-specific guidelines taking into account the prevalence of the various causes of genital ulceration. In these countries, national AIDS control programmes and donor agencies should develop a specific focus for decreasing the incidence of genital ulcer disease. PMID:11436480

  4. Targeted interventions required against genital ulcers in African countries worst affected by HIV infection.

    PubMed

    O'Farrell, N

    2001-01-01

    It remains unclear why there is such marked variation in the severity of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic between African countries. The prevalence of HIV infection has reached high levels in many parts of southern Africa but in most countries of West Africa the levels are much lower. Although there is good evidence that sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and genital ulcers in particular facilitate heterosexual transmission of HIV, there is little comparative STI data from the African countries worst affected by HIV infection. A MEDLINE search covering the period 1966 to August 2000 using the keywords "sexually transmitted diseases", "genital ulcers" and "Africa" was performed to identify factors that might be relevant to the spread of HIV infection in countries with the highest prevalences of the virus. In the countries worst affected by HIV infection, the proportions of men and women with STI who had genital ulcers lay in the ranges 45-68% and 13-68%, respectively. The proportions were much lower in countries of West Africa than in those of southern Africa. The African countries worst affected by HIV infection should adopt a more specialized approach to STI control than hitherto and specifically target the high incidence of genital ulceration. Locally, technical STI committees should draw up country-specific guidelines taking into account the prevalence of the various causes of genital ulceration. In these countries, national AIDS control programmes and donor agencies should develop a specific focus for decreasing the incidence of genital ulcer disease.

  5. Human immunodeficiency virus receptor and coreceptor expression on human uterine epithelial cells: regulation of expression during the menstrual cycle and implications for human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Yeaman, Grant R; Howell, Alexandra L; Weldon, Sally; Demian, Douglas J; Collins, Jane E; O'Connell, Denise M; Asin, Susana N; Wira, Charles R; Fanger, Michael W

    2003-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) is primarily a sexually transmitted disease. Identification of cell populations within the female reproductive tract that are initially infected, and the events involved in transmission of infection to other cells, remain to be established. In this report, we evaluated expression of HIV receptors and coreceptors on epithelial cells in the uterus and found they express several receptors critical for HIV infection including CD4, CXCR4, CCR5 and galactosylceramide (GalC). Moreover, expression of these receptors varied during the menstrual cycle. Expression of CD4 and CCR5 on uterine epithelial cells is high throughout the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle when blood levels of oestradiol are high. In contrast, CXCR4 expression increased gradually throughout the proliferative phase. During the secretory phase of the cycle when both oestradiol and progesterone are elevated, CD4 and CCR5 expression decreased whereas CXCR4 expression remained elevated. Expression of GalC on endometrial glands is higher during the secretory phase than during the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle. Because epithelial cells line the female reproductive tract and express HIV receptors and coreceptors, it is likely that they are one of the first cell types to become infected. The hormonal regulation of HIV receptor expression may affect a woman's susceptibility to HIV infection during her menstrual cycle. Moreover, selective coreceptor expression could account for the preferential transmission of R5-HIV-1 strains to women. In addition, these studies provide evidence that the uterus, and potentially the entire upper reproductive tract, are important sites for the initial events involved in HIV infection.

  6. Human immunodeficiency virus receptor and coreceptor expression on human uterine epithelial cells: regulation of expression during the menstrual cycle and implications for human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Yeaman, Grant R; Howell, Alexandra L; Weldon, Sally; Demian, Douglas J; Collins, Jane E; O'Connell, Denise M; Asin, Susana N; Wira, Charles R; Fanger, Michael W

    2003-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) is primarily a sexually transmitted disease. Identification of cell populations within the female reproductive tract that are initially infected, and the events involved in transmission of infection to other cells, remain to be established. In this report, we evaluated expression of HIV receptors and coreceptors on epithelial cells in the uterus and found they express several receptors critical for HIV infection including CD4, CXCR4, CCR5 and galactosylceramide (GalC). Moreover, expression of these receptors varied during the menstrual cycle. Expression of CD4 and CCR5 on uterine epithelial cells is high throughout the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle when blood levels of oestradiol are high. In contrast, CXCR4 expression increased gradually throughout the proliferative phase. During the secretory phase of the cycle when both oestradiol and progesterone are elevated, CD4 and CCR5 expression decreased whereas CXCR4 expression remained elevated. Expression of GalC on endometrial glands is higher during the secretory phase than during the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle. Because epithelial cells line the female reproductive tract and express HIV receptors and coreceptors, it is likely that they are one of the first cell types to become infected. The hormonal regulation of HIV receptor expression may affect a woman's susceptibility to HIV infection during her menstrual cycle. Moreover, selective coreceptor expression could account for the preferential transmission of R5-HIV-1 strains to women. In addition, these studies provide evidence that the uterus, and potentially the entire upper reproductive tract, are important sites for the initial events involved in HIV infection. PMID:12709027

  7. Inhibition of Acute in vivo Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection by Human Interleukin 10 Treatment of SCID Mice Implanted with Human Fetal Thymus and Liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollmann, Tobias R.; Pettoello-Mantovani, Massimo; Katopodis, Nikos F.; Hachamovitch, Moshe; Rubinstein, Arye; Kim, Ana; Goldstein, Harris

    1996-04-01

    To improve the usefulness of in vivo models for the investigation of the pathophysiology of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, we modified the construction of SCID mice implanted with human fetal thymus and liver (thy/liv-SCID-hu mice) so that the peripheral blood of the mice contained significant numbers of human monocytes and T cells. After inoculation with HIV-159, a primary patient isolate capable of infecting monocytes and T cells, the modified thy/liv-SCID-hu mice developed disseminated HIV infection that was associated with plasma viremia. The development of plasma viremia and HIV infection in thy/liv-SCID-hu mice inoculated with HIV-159 was inhibited by acute treatment with human interleukin (IL) 10 but not with human IL-12. The human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in these modified thy/liv-SCID-hu mice were responsive in vivo to treatment with exogenous cytokines. Human interferon γ expression in the circulating human peripheral blood mononuclear cells was induced by treatment with IL-12 and inhibited by treatment with IL-10. Thus, these modified thy/liv-SCID-hu mice should prove to be a valuable in vivo model for examining the role of immunomodulatory therapy in modifying HIV infection. Furthermore, our demonstration of the in vivo inhibitory effect of IL-10 on acute HIV infection suggests that further studies may be warranted to evaluate whether there is a role for IL-10 therapy in preventing HIV infection in individuals soon after exposure to HIV such as for children born to HIV-infected mothers.

  8. Inhibition of acute in vivo human immunodeficiency virus infection by human interleukin 10 treatment of SCID mice implanted with human fetal thymus and liver.

    PubMed Central

    Kollmann, T R; Pettoello-Mantovani, M; Katopodis, N F; Hachamovitch, M; Rubinstein, A; Kim, A; Goldstein, H

    1996-01-01

    To improve the usefulness of in vivo mode for the investigation of the pathophysiology of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, we modified the construction of SCID mice implanted with human fetal thymus and liver (thy/liv-SCID-hu mice) so that the peripheral blood of the mice contained significant numbers of human monocytes and T cells. After inoculation with HIV-1(59), a primary patient isolate capable of infecting monocytes and T cells, the modified thy/liv-SCID-hu mice developed disseminated HIV infection that was associated with plasma viremia. The development of plasma viremia and HIV infection in thy/liv-SCID-hu mice inoculated with HIV-1(59) was inhibited by acute treatment with human interleukin (IL) 10 but not with human IL-12. The human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in these modified thy/liv-SCID-hu mice were responsive to in vivo treatment with exogenous cytokines. Human interferon gamma expression in the circulating human peripheral blood mononuclear cells was induced by treatment with IL-12 and inhibited by treatment with IL-10. Thus, these modified thy/liv-SCID-hu mice should prove to be a valuable in vivo model for examining the role of immunomodulatory therapy in modifying HIV infection. Furthermore, our demonstration of the vivo inhibitory effect of IL-10 on acute HIV infection suggests that further studies may be warranted to evaluate whether there is a role for IL-10 therapy in preventing HIV infection in individuals soon after exposure to HIV such as for children born to HIV-infected mothers. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8610180

  9. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and human immunodeficiency virus infection in Nevada.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, J Q; Semiatin, S L

    1991-01-01

    We summarize information from three sets of epidemiologic data: the Nevada AIDS [acquired immunodeficiency syndrome] Surveillance System, which contains information about every case identified within the state boundaries through September 1989; the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seroprevalence reporting systems, which currently include data on all HIV-positive reports submitted statewide to public health authorities; and surveys on the knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of Nevadans concerning HIV-related disease. The Nevada State AIDS Task Force outlined major policy recommendations, nearly half of which concerned testing; only 2 dealt with preventing HIV transmission. Greater efforts should go into education, particularly directed toward groups at greatest risk of exposure to HIV, and to improve community-based care of infected persons.

  10. Troubled Adolescents and HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff, John O., Ed.; And Others

    This report on adolescents, Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), and Human Immune Virus (HIV) infection had its beginning in the Knowledge Development Workshop "Issues in the Prevention and Treatment of AIDS Among Adolescents with Serious Emotional Disturbance," held June 9-10, 1988 in the District of Columbia. These papers are included:…

  11. Both human immunodeficiency virus-infected and human immunodeficiency virus-exposed, uninfected children living in Brazil, Argentina, and Mexico have similar rates of low concentrations of retinol, beta-carotene, and vitamin E.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Jacqueline P; Freimanis-Hance, Laura; Faria, Lidiane B; Mussi-Pinhata, Marisa M; Korelitz, James; Vannucchi, Hélio; Queiroz, Wladimir; Succi, Regina C M; Hazra, Rohan

    2009-10-01

    Our objective was to describe the prevalence of low concentrations of retinol, beta-carotene, and vitamin E in a group of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected Latin American children and a comparison group of HIV-exposed, uninfected children. Our hypothesis was that the rates of low concentrations of these micronutrients would be higher in the HIV-infected group than those in the HIV-exposed, uninfected group. This was a cross-sectional substudy of a larger cohort study at clinical pediatric HIV centers in Latin America. Serum levels of micronutrients were measured in the first stored sample obtained after each child's first birthday by high-performance liquid chromatography. Low concentrations of retinol, beta-carotene, and vitamin E were defined as serum levels below 0.70, 0.35, and 18.0 micromol/L, respectively. The population for this analysis was 336 children (124 HIV-infected, 212 HIV-exposed, uninfected) aged 1 year or older to younger than 4 years. Rates of low concentrations were 74% for retinol, 27% for beta-carotene, and 89% for vitamin E. These rates were not affected by HIV status. Among the HIV-infected children, those treated with antiretrovirals were less likely to have retinol deficiency, but no other HIV-related factors correlated with micronutrient low serum levels. Low concentrations of retinol, beta-carotene, and vitamin E are very common in children exposed to HIV living in Brazil, Argentina, and Mexico, regardless of HIV-infection status.

  12. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Vaccine Trials

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Robert J.; Kim, Jerome H.; Corey, Lawrence; Michael, Nelson L.

    2012-01-01

    More than 2 million AIDS-related deaths occurred globally in 2008, and more than 33 million people are living with HIV/AIDS. Despite promising advances in prevention, an estimated 2.7 million new HIV infections occurred in that year, so that for every two patients placed on combination antiretroviral treatment, five people became infected. The pandemic poses a formidable challenge to the development, progress, and stability of global society 30 years after it was recognized. Experimental preventive HIV-1 vaccines have been administered to more than 44,000 human volunteers in more than 187 separate trials since 1987. Only five candidate vaccine strategies have been advanced to efficacy testing. The recombinant glycoprotein (rgp)120 subunit vaccines, AIDSVAX B/B and AIDSVAX B/E, and the Merck Adenovirus serotype (Ad)5 viral-vector expressing HIV-1 Gag, Pol, and Nef failed to show a reduction in infection rate or lowering of postinfection viral set point. Most recently, a phase III trial that tested a heterologous prime-boost vaccine combination of ALVAC-HIV vCP1521 and bivalent rgp120 (AIDSVAX B/E) showed 31% efficacy in protection from infection among community-risk Thai participants. A fifth efficacy trial testing a DNA/recombinant(r) Ad5 prime-boost combination is currently under way. We review the clinical trials of HIV vaccines that have provided insight into human immunogenicity or efficacy in preventing HIV-1 infection. PMID:23209178

  13. A New Multidisciplinary Home Care Telemedicine System to Monitor Stable Chronic Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients: A Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    León, Agathe; Cáceres, César; Fernández, Emma; Chausa, Paloma; Martin, Maite; Codina, Carles; Rousaud, Araceli; Blanch, Jordi; Mallolas, Josep; Martinez, Esteban; Blanco, Jose L.; Laguno, Montserrat; Larrousse, Maria; Milinkovic, Ana; Zamora, Laura; Canal, Neus; Miró, Josep M.; Gatell, Josep M.; Gómez, Enrique J.; García, Felipe

    2011-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral therapy has changed the natural history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in developed countries, where it has become a chronic disease. This clinical scenario requires a new approach to simplify follow-up appointments and facilitate access to healthcare professionals. Methodology We developed a new internet-based home care model covering the entire management of chronic HIV-infected patients. This was called Virtual Hospital. We report the results of a prospective randomised study performed over two years, comparing standard care received by HIV-infected patients with Virtual Hospital care. HIV-infected patients with access to a computer and broadband were randomised to be monitored either through Virtual Hospital (Arm I) or through standard care at the day hospital (Arm II). After one year of follow up, patients switched their care to the other arm. Virtual Hospital offered four main services: Virtual Consultations, Telepharmacy, Virtual Library and Virtual Community. A technical and clinical evaluation of Virtual Hospital was carried out. Findings Of the 83 randomised patients, 42 were monitored during the first year through Virtual Hospital (Arm I) and 41 through standard care (Arm II). Baseline characteristics of patients were similar in the two arms. The level of technical satisfaction with the virtual system was high: 85% of patients considered that Virtual Hospital improved their access to clinical data and they felt comfortable with the videoconference system. Neither clinical parameters [level of CD4+ T lymphocytes, proportion of patients with an undetectable level of viral load (p = 0.21) and compliance levels >90% (p = 0.58)] nor the evaluation of quality of life or psychological questionnaires changed significantly between the two types of care. Conclusions Virtual Hospital is a feasible and safe tool for the multidisciplinary home care of chronic HIV patients. Telemedicine should be considered as an

  14. Smart nanoparticles as targeting platforms for HIV infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikary, Rishi Rajat; More, Prachi; Banerjee, Rinti

    2015-04-01

    While Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infections are reducing in incidence with the advent of Highly Active Anti-retroviral Therapy (HAART), there remain a number of challenges including the existence of reservoirs, drug resistance and anatomical barriers to antiretroviral therapy. To overcome these, smart nanoparticles with stimuli responsive release are proposed for delivery of anti-retroviral agents. The paper highlights the strategic similarities between the design of smart antiretroviral nanocarriers and those optimized for cancer chemotherapy. This includes the development of nanoparticles capable of passive and active targeting as well as those that are responsive to various internal and external triggers. For antiretroviral therapy, the relevant triggers for stimuli responsive release of drugs include semen, enzymes, endosomal escape, temperature and magnetic field. Deriving from the experience of cancer chemotherapy, additional potential triggers are light and ultrasound which remain hitherto unexplored in HIV therapy. In addition, the roles of nanomicrobicides (nanogels) and virus mimetic nanoparticles are discussed from the point of view of prevention of HIV transmission. The challenges associated with translation of smart nanoparticles for HIV infections to realize the Millennium Development Goal of combating HIV infections are discussed.

  15. HIV Infection--Guangdong Province, China, 1997-2007.

    PubMed

    2009-04-24

    In 2007, an estimated 700,000 persons in China were living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. An estimated 50,000 new HIV infections and 20,000 deaths related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) occurred in 2007, and an estimated 71% of persons with HIV infection were unaware of their HIV status. In 2007, 40.6% of those living with HIV had been infected through heterosexual transmission and 38.1% through injection-drug use. Guangdong Province in southeastern China is the country's most populous province, with an estimated 75.6 million permanent residents and 16.5 million migrants; the province has undergone rapid economic development. Since 1986, a case-based surveillance system (CBSS) in China has collected data on persons infected with HIV, including demographic characteristics and transmission categories. To assess recent trends in HIV infection in the province, the Guangdong Center for Disease Control, with technical assistance from CDC, analyzed CBSS data for the period 1997--2007. The results of that analysis indicated that the number of HIV cases increased from 102 in 1997 to 4,593 in 2007, although this increase resulted, in part, from expanded testing and surveillance. Among males classified by HIV transmission category, 82.1% of newly diagnosed infections were attributed to injection-drug use. Among females classified by HIV transmission category, 53.7% engaged in high-risk heterosexual conduct. Despite substantial methodologic limitations, these results can be useful to Guangdong public health agencies in targeting and evaluating HIV prevention, care, and treatment programs. PMID:19390507

  16. Women at Risk for Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quadagno, David; And Others

    This article reports results from a survey among women at risk for contracting Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) as well as transmitting it in a vertical (to offspring) and horizontal (sexual partner or intravenous [IV] drug usage) mode. Little is known about the extent of HIV knowledge, sexual behaviors, and IV drug usage for women at risk for…

  17. Importance and detection of virus reservoirs and compartments of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Nickle, David C; Shriner, Daniel; Mittler, John E; Frenkel, Lisa M; Mullins, James I

    2003-08-01

    Current therapies for treating HIV-1 infection are capable of suppressing virus load in blood to undetectable levels, and result in marked clinical improvement. Despite this suppression, HIV-1 infection persists and virus load quickly rebounds when therapy is interrupted. The origin of the rebounding virus is unknown, but is thought to result from continuing viral replication in anatomic or cellular compartments, and the release of virus from latent infection in reservoirs.

  18. Pharmacologic management of human immunodeficiency virus wasting syndrome.

    PubMed

    Badowski, Melissa; Pandit, Neha Sheth

    2014-08-01

    Pharmacologic interventions for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) wasting have been studied since the 1990s, but the results of these interventions have been difficult to compare because the studies used different HIV wasting definitions and assessed various patient outcomes. Thus, we performed a systematic review of the current literature to identify studies that evaluated pharmacologic management of HIV wasting and to compare and contrast treatment options. Further, we provide a comprehensive review of these treatment options and describe the definition of HIV wasting used in each study, the outcomes assessed, and whether antiretroviral therapy was used during the HIV wasting treatment. Literature searches of the PubMed/Medline (1946-2014) and Google Scholar databases were performed, and a review of the bibliographies of retrieved articles was performed to identify additional references. Only English-language articles pertaining to humans and HIV-infected individuals were evaluated. Thirty-six studies were identified that assessed pharmacologic interventions to treat HIV wasting. Appetite stimulants, such as megestrol acetate, have been shown to increase total body weight (TBW) and body mass index in HIV-infected patients with wasting. Studies evaluating dronabinol showed conflicting data on TBW increases, but the drug may have minimal benefit on body composition compared with other appetite stimulants. Testosterone has been shown to be effective in HIV wasting for those who suffer from hypogonadism. Recombinant human growth hormone has been evaluated for HIV wasting and has shown promising results for TBW and lean body mass increases. Thalidomide has been studied; however, its use is limited due to its toxicities. Although megestrol acetate and dronabinol are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of HIV wasting, it is important to recognize other comorbidities such as depression or hypogonadism that may contribute to the

  19. CXCR4 expression during lymphopoiesis: implications for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of the thymus.

    PubMed Central

    Kitchen, S G; Zack, J A

    1997-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of the human thymus results in depletion of CD4-bearing thymocytes. This depletion is initially manifested in the immature CD4+/CD8+ thymocyte subset. To determine cellular factors involved in HIV infection in the thymus, we examined the expression of the recently identified viral coreceptor, CXCR4, on fresh human thymocytes and on human cells from SCID-hu (Thy/Liv) mice. CXCR4 is a member of the chemokine receptor family which is required along with CD4 for entry into the cell of syncytium-inducing (SI) HIV-1 strains. Our analyses show that CXCR4 expression is modulated during T-lymphoid differentiation such that immature thymocytes display an increased frequency and higher surface density of the coreceptor than do more mature cells. In addition, using an SI strain of HIV-1 which directs expression of a reporter protein on the surface of infected cells, we have found that the immature CD4+/CD8+ thymocytes that express the highest levels of both CD4 and CXCR4 are the cells that are preferentially infected and depleted by the virus in vitro. Thus, high levels of both primary receptor and coreceptor may allow efficient infection of the thymus by certain HIV-1 strains. This in part may explain the rapid disease progression seen in some HIV-infected children, where the thymus is actively involved in the production of new T lymphocytes. PMID:9261420

  20. Genital ulcers: etiology, clinical diagnosis, and associated human immunodeficiency virus infection in Kingston, Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Behets, F M; Brathwaite, A R; Hylton-Kong, T; Chen, C Y; Hoffman, I; Weiss, J B; Morse, S A; Dallabetta, G; Cohen, M S; Figueroa, J P

    1999-05-01

    Individuals presenting consecutively with genital ulcers in Kingston, Jamaica, underwent serological testing for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, chlamydial infection, and syphilis. Ulcer material was analyzed by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (M-PCR) analysis. DNA from herpes simplex virus (HSV), Haemophilus ducreyi, and Treponema pallidum was detected in 158 (52.0%), 72 (23.7%), and 31 (10.2%) of 304 ulcer specimens. Of the 304 subjects, 67 (22%) were HIV-seropositive and 64 (21%) were T. pallidum-seroreactive. Granuloma inguinale was clinically diagnosed in nine (13.4%) of 67 ulcers negative by M-PCR analysis and in 12 (5.1%) of 237 ulcers positive by M-PCR analysis (P = .03). Lymphogranuloma venereum was clinically diagnosed in eight patients. Compared with M-PCR analysis, the sensitivity and specificity of a clinical diagnosis of syphilis, herpes, and chancroid were 67.7%, 53.8%, and 75% and 91.2%, 83.6%, and 75.4%, respectively. Reactive syphilis serology was 74% sensitive and 85% specific compared with M-PCR analysis. Reported contact with a prostitute in the preceding 3 months was associated with chancroid (P = .009), reactive syphilis serology (P = .011), and HIV infection (P = .007). The relatively poor accuracy of clinical and locally available laboratory diagnoses pleads for syndromic management of genital ulcers in Jamaica. Prevention efforts should be intensified.

  1. Selective Loss of Innate CD4+ Vα24 Natural Killer T Cells in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Johan K.; Fast, Noam M.; Palacios, Emil H.; Fennelly, Glenn; Dobroszycki, Joanna; Palumbo, Paul; Wiznia, Andrew; Grant, Robert M.; Bhardwaj, Nina; Rosenberg, Michael G.; Nixon, Douglas F.

    2002-01-01

    Vα24 natural killer T (NKT) cells are innate immune cells involved in regulation of immune tolerance, autoimmunity, and tumor immunity. However, the effect of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection on these cells is unknown. Here, we report that the Vα24 NKT cells can be subdivided into CD4+ or CD4− subsets that differ in their expression of the homing receptors CD62L and CD11a. Furthermore, both CD4+ and CD4− NKT cells frequently express both CXCR4 and CCR5 HIV coreceptors. We find that the numbers of NKT cells are reduced in HIV-infected subjects with uncontrolled viremia and marked CD4+ T-cell depletion. The number of CD4+ NKT cells is inversely correlated with HIV load, indicating depletion of this subset. In contrast, CD4− NKT-cell numbers are unaffected in subjects with high viral loads. HIV infection experiments in vitro show preferential depletion of CD4+ NKT cells relative to regular CD4+ T cells, in particular with virus that uses the CCR5 coreceptor. Thus, HIV infection causes a selective loss of CD4+ lymph node homing (CD62L+) NKT cells, with consequent skewing of the NKT-cell compartment to a predominantly CD4− CD62L− phenotype. These data indicate that the key immunoregulatory NKT-cell compartment is compromised in HIV-1-infected patients. PMID:12097565

  2. The epidemiology of hepatitis B virus infection in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected pregnant women in the Western Cape, South Africa☆

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, M.I.; Maponga, T.G.; Ijaz, S.; Barnes, J.; Theron, G.B.; Meredith, S.A.; Preiser, W.; Tedder, R.S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Persistent hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. The HIV epidemic has the potential to affect its biology. Immunisation protocols established in the pre-HIV era are based upon data showing predominantly horizontal infant transmission. This study aimed to determine whether HIV co-infection will change the epidemiology of HBV both by increasing infectivity and by favouring the escape of viruses bearing phenotypically altered HBsAg. Methods This retrospective cross-sectional study used antenatal samples from the 2008 Antenatal Sentinel HIV and Syphilis Prevalence Survey in the Western Cape, South Africa. All HIV-infected women were age and race-matched to HIV-uninfected women. Samples were tested for serological markers of HBV and HDV infection. HBV viral load, consensus sequencing and genotyping were performed. Luminex technology was used to determine HBsAg phenotype. All samples from HIV-infected women were tested for traces of antiretroviral drugs by mass spectrometry. Results This study showed a trend toward loss of immune control of HBV in HIV-infected women with 3.4% of samples containing HBsAg, 18.9% contained HBeAg. In contrast, 2.9% of samples from HIV-uninfected women contained HBsAg and 17.1% of these HBeAg. The median HBV load in the HIV-infected group was 9.72 × 107 IU/ml and in the HIV-uninfected group 1.19 × 106 IU/ml. Genotyping showed 63/68 samples belonged to genotype A and the remainder genotype D. Mutations in the precore region were found in 35% and 33% of samples from HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected respectively. Although no major epitope ablation was found, marked variation in HBsAg profiles in HIV-infected group was demonstrated. No HDV infection was detected. Conclusion HIV-HBV co-infected women exhibit a degree of immune escape. One in six HBV-infected pregnant women, irrespective of HIV status is HBeAg seropositive. HBV immunization of newborns in sub

  3. Substance Use Patterns of HIV-Infected Russian Women with and Without Hepatitis C Virus Co-infection.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jennifer L; DiClemente, Ralph J; Sales, Jessica M; Rose, Eve S; Safonova, Polina; Levina, Olga S; Belyakov, Nikolay; Rassokhin, Vadim V

    2016-10-01

    Individuals with HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infection may experience substance use related health complications. This study characterized substance use patterns between HIV/HCV co-infected and HIV mono-infected Russian women. HIV-infected women (N = 247; M age = 30.0) in St. Petersburg, Russia, completed a survey assessing substance use, problematic substance use, and the co-occurrence of substance use and sexual behaviors. Covariate adjusted logistic and linear regression analyses indicated that HIV/HCV co-infected participants (57.1 %) reported more lifetime drug use (e.g., heroin: AOR: 13.2, 95 % CI 4.9, 35.3, p < .001), problem drinking (β = 1.2, p = .05), substance use problems (β = 1.3, p = .009), and increased likelihood of past injection drug use (AOR: 26.4, 95 % CI 8.5, 81.9, p < .001) relative to HIV mono-infected individuals. HIV/HCV co-infection was prevalent and associated with increased substance use and problematic drug use. Findings highlight the need for ongoing substance use and HIV/HCV risk behavior assessment and treatment among HIV/HCV co-infected Russian women.

  4. Guidelines for Communicable Disease Control Policies in Montana Schools: A Guide and Model Policy for Communicable Diseases Including HIV Infected Students and Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana State Dept. of Public Instruction, Helena.

    This guide was developed to help local school districts review existing policies or establish new policies to address communicable diseases. Based on current scientific and medical information about the safety in allowing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected students and staff to remain at school, it contains a suggested policy for local…

  5. The Importance of Quality of Care: Effects of Perinatal HIV Infection and Early Institutional Rearing on Preschoolers' Attachment and Indiscriminate Friendliness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobrova-Krol, Natasha A.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; Van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Juffer, Femmie

    2010-01-01

    Background: The rearing environment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children is often compromised, putting these children at additional risks. Positive caregiving may ameliorate the impact of adverse circumstances and promote attachment security. The goal of the present study was to examine the attachment relationships of…

  6. The neuropathology of adult HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Bell, J E

    1998-12-01

    Since the onset of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic fifteen years ago, much has been learned about the effects of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the nervous system. This review summarizes the pathology findings in the central nervous system (CNS). There is now abundant evidence that HIV can infect the CNS directly, leading to a characteristic HIV encephalitis (HIVE) which occurs in 10-50 p. 100 of AIDS autopsy series. Multinucleated giant cells are the pathognomonic feature of HIVE and are found predominantly in the central white matter and deep grey matter. Evidence of productive HIV infection in the CNS is confined to cells of the microglial/macrophage lineage, from which the giant cells are almost certainly derived. These cells are known to express both CD4 and beta-chemokine receptors, which act in conjunction to permit HIV entry. Restricted infection of astrocytes has also been identified by a variety of methods. HIVE is frequently associated with white matter damage ranging from inflammatory (microglia, macrophages and sparse lymphocytes) to degenerative (myelin loss and axonal damage) pathology. Although giant cells are seen less frequently in neocortical grey matter, significant neuronal loss has been established in a number of studies. Recent investigations using markers of apoptosis, (including TUNEL, Bcl-2 and BAX), have established the presence of DNA damage in some neurons and in other cell types. Axonal damage has also been confirmed by evidence of amyloid precursor protein expression. The CNS is also vulnerable to opportunistic infections and high grade B-cell lymphomas as a result of the immune suppression of advanced HIV infection. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is reported in 10-30 p. 100 of AIDS cases at autopsy, toxoplasma in 10-25 p. 100, progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy in about 5 p. 100 and lymphomas, usually primary, in up to 10 p. 100. A wide variety of other infections has also been reported

  7. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus in South America

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Bruno M.; Hagiwara, Mitika K.; Cruz, Juliano C. M.; Hosie, Margaret J.

    2012-01-01

    The rapid emergence of AIDS in humans during the period between 1980 and 2000 has led to extensive efforts to understand more fully similar etiologic agents of chronic and progressive acquired immunodeficiency disease in several mammalian species. Lentiviruses that have gene sequence homology with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have been found in different species (including sheep, goats, horses, cattle, cats, and several Old World monkey species). Lentiviruses, comprising a genus of the Retroviridae family, cause persistent infection that can lead to varying degrees of morbidity and mortality depending on the virus and the host species involved. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) causes an immune system disease in domestic cats (Felis catus) involving depletion of the CD4+ population of T lymphocytes, increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections, and sometimes death. Viruses related to domestic cat FIV occur also in a variety of nondomestic felids. This is a brief overview of the current state of knowledge of this large and ancient group of viruses (FIVs) in South America. PMID:22590677

  8. Humanized Mouse Models of HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Denton, Paul W.; Garcia, J. Victor

    2013-01-01

    Because of the limited tropism of HIV, in vivo modeling of this virus has been almost exclusively limited to other lentiviruses such as SIV that reproduce many important characteristics of HIV infection. However, there are significant genetic and biological differences among lentiviruses and some HIV-specific interventions are not effective against other lentiviruses in non-human hosts. For these reasons much emphasis has recently been placed on developing alternative animal models that support HIV replication and recapitulate key aspects of HIV infection and pathogenesis in humans. Humanized mice, CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cell transplanted immunodeficient mice and in particular mice also implanted with human thymic/liver tissue (BLT mice) that develop a functional human immune system, have been the focus of a great deal of attention as possible models to study virtually all aspects of HIV biology and pathogenesis. Humanized mice are systemically reconstituted with human lymphoid cells offering rapid, reliable and reproducible experimental systems for HIV research. Peripheral blood of humanized mice can be readily sampled longitudinally to assess reconstitution with human cells and to monitor HIV replication permitting the evaluation of multiple parameters of HIV infection such as viral load levels, CD4+ T cell depletion, immune activation, as well as the effects of therapeutic interventions. Of high relevance to HIV transmission is the extensive characterization and validation of the reconstitution with human lymphoid cells of the female reproductive tract and of the gastrointestinal tract of humanized BLT mice that renders them susceptible to both vaginal and rectal HIV infection. Other important attributes of all types of humanized mice include: 1) their small size and cost that make them broadly accessible; 2) multiple cohorts of humanized mice can be made from multiple human donors and each cohort has identical human cells, permitting control of

  9. A national surveillance system for newly acquired HIV infection in Australia. National HIV Surveillance Committee.

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, A M; Gertig, D M; Crofts, N; Kaldor, J M

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The purpose of this study was to describe the establishment of a national surveillance system for newly acquired human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and present the first 3 years' results. METHODS. All new cases of diagnosed HIV infection were reported to the national HIV surveillance center through state and territory health authorities. Information sought on each case included evidence of whether the infection had been newly acquired, defined by the diagnosis of HIV seroconversion illness or by the report of a negative or indeterminate HIV antibody test result occurring within the 12 months prior to diagnosis of infection. RESULTS. Of 3602 reported cases of HIV infection in adults and adolescents newly diagnosed in Australia between 1991 and 1993, 11.4% were identified as newly acquired. The majority (85%) of cases of newly diagnosed HIV infection occurred among men who reported homosexual contact, and 15% of these cases were identified as newly acquired. Average age at diagnosis was 31 years for cases of newly acquired infection and 34 years for other cases. CONCLUSIONS. Surveillance for newly acquired HIV infection has been established at a national level in Australia and provides valuable information for planning primary HIV prevention programs. PMID:7998631

  10. HIV Infection and Antiretroviral Therapy Have Divergent Effects on Mitochondria in Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Caryn G.; Voss, Joachim G.; Rakocevic, Goran; McLaughlin, Mary; Vinton, Carol L.; Huber, Charles; Hu, Xiaojun; Yang, Jun; Huang, Da Wei; Logun, Carolea; Danner, Robert L.; Rangel, Zoila G.; Munson, Peter J.; Orenstein, Jan M.; Rushing, Elisabeth J.; Lempicki, Richard A.; Dalakas, Marinos C.; Kovacs, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Although human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART) affect mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content and function, comprehensive evaluations of their effects on mitochondria in muscle, adipose tissue, and blood cells are limited. Methods. Mitochondrial DNA quantification, mitochondrial genome sequencing, and gene expression analysis were performed on muscle, adipose tissue, and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples from untreated HIV-positive patients, HIV-positive patients receiving nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)–based ART, and HIV-negative controls. Results. The adipose tissue mtDNA/nuclear DNA (nDNA) ratio was increased in untreated HIV-infected patients (ratio, 353) and decreased in those receiving ART (ratio, 162) compared with controls (ratio, 255; P < .05 for both comparisons); the difference between the 2 HIV-infected groups was also significant (P = .002). In HIV-infected participants, mtDNA/nDNA in adipose tissue correlated with the level of activation (CD38+/HLA-DR+) for CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes. No significant differences in mtDNA content were noted in muscle or PMBCs among groups. Exploratory DNA microarray analysis identified differential gene expression between patient groups, including a subset of adipose tissue genes. Conclusions. HIV infection and ART have opposing effects on mtDNA content in adipose tissue; immune activation may mediate the effects of HIV, whereas NRTIs likely mediate the effects of ART. PMID:22476717

  11. Renal alterations in feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-infected cats: a natural model of lentivirus-induced renal disease changes.

    PubMed

    Poli, Alessandro; Tozon, Natasa; Guidi, Grazia; Pistello, Mauro

    2012-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with several renal syndromes including acute and chronic renal failures, but the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. HIV and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) share numerous biological and pathological features, including renal alterations. We investigated and compared the morphological changes of renal tissue of 51 experimentally and 21 naturally infected cats. Compared to the latter, the experimentally infected cats exhibited some mesangial widening and glomerulonephritis, milder proteinuria, and lower tubular and interstitial alterations. The numbers of giant protein tubular casts and tubular microcysts were also lower. In contrast, diffuse interstitial infiltrates and glomerular and interstitial amyloidosis were detected only in naturally infected cats. Similar alterations are found in HIV infected patients, thus supporting the idea of a causative role of FIV infection in renal disease, and underlining the relevance of the FIV and its natural host as an animal model for investigating lentivirus-associated nephropathy. PMID:23170163

  12. Simultaneous detection of seven sexually transmitted agents in human immunodeficiency virus-infected Brazilian women by multiplex polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Souza, Raquel P; de Abreu, André L P; Ferreira, Érika C; Rocha-Brischiliari, Sheila C; de B Carvalho, Maria D; Pelloso, Sandra M; Bonini, Marcelo G; Gimenes, Fabrícia; Consolaro, Marcia E L

    2013-12-01

    We determined the prevalence of seven clinically important pathogens that cause sexually transmitted infections (STIs) (Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma genitalium, Trichomonas vaginalis, herpes simplex virus 1 [HSV-1], HSV-2, and Treponema pallidum), by using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (M-PCR) in samples from Brazilian woman infected with human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) and uninfected Brazilian women (controls). The M-PCR assay identified all STIs tested for and surprisingly, occurred association between the control and STIs. This association was probably caused by excellent HIV infection control and regular monitoring in these women established by public health strategies in Brazil to combat HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Studies using this M-PCR in different populations may help to better elucidate the roles of STIs in several conditions.

  13. Renal Alterations in Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV)-Infected Cats: A Natural Model of Lentivirus-Induced Renal Disease Changes

    PubMed Central

    Poli, Alessandro; Tozon, Natasa; Guidi, Grazia; Pistello, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with several renal syndromes including acute and chronic renal failures, but the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. HIV and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) share numerous biological and pathological features, including renal alterations. We investigated and compared the morphological changes of renal tissue of 51 experimentally and 21 naturally infected cats. Compared to the latter, the experimentally infected cats exhibited some mesangial widening and glomerulonephritis, milder proteinuria, and lower tubular and interstitial alterations. The numbers of giant protein tubular casts and tubular microcysts were also lower. In contrast, diffuse interstitial infiltrates and glomerular and interstitial amyloidosis were detected only in naturally infected cats. Similar alterations are found in HIV infected patients, thus supporting the idea of a causative role of FIV infection in renal disease, and underlining the relevance of the FIV and its natural host as an animal model for investigating lentivirus-associated nephropathy. PMID:23170163

  14. Simultaneous detection of seven sexually transmitted agents in human immunodeficiency virus-infected Brazilian women by multiplex polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Souza, Raquel P; de Abreu, André L P; Ferreira, Érika C; Rocha-Brischiliari, Sheila C; de B Carvalho, Maria D; Pelloso, Sandra M; Bonini, Marcelo G; Gimenes, Fabrícia; Consolaro, Marcia E L

    2013-12-01

    We determined the prevalence of seven clinically important pathogens that cause sexually transmitted infections (STIs) (Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma genitalium, Trichomonas vaginalis, herpes simplex virus 1 [HSV-1], HSV-2, and Treponema pallidum), by using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (M-PCR) in samples from Brazilian woman infected with human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) and uninfected Brazilian women (controls). The M-PCR assay identified all STIs tested for and surprisingly, occurred association between the control and STIs. This association was probably caused by excellent HIV infection control and regular monitoring in these women established by public health strategies in Brazil to combat HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Studies using this M-PCR in different populations may help to better elucidate the roles of STIs in several conditions. PMID:24080632

  15. A case of human immunodeficiency virus infection with cerebellar ataxia that suggested by an association with autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Shigeto; Kondo, Takayuki; Nakamura, Takashi; Nakagawa, Tomokazu; Matsumoto, Sadayuki

    2016-04-28

    We report a case of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection that showed subacute progressive cerebellar ataxia without HIV encephalopathy or other encephalopathies, including progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy or encephalitis of other human herpes virus (HHV) infections. A 43-year-old man exhibited unsteady gait. Neurological examination disclosed ataxia of the trunk and lower extremities. Personality change and dementia were absent. Magnetic resonance imaging did not reveal any abnormal finding, including of the cerebellum. The serum HIV-1-RNA was 1.2 × 10(5) copies/ml, and the absolute CD4 lymphocyte count was 141 cells/ml. Remarkably, the serum anti-Yo antibody, as an anti-cerebellar antibody of paraneoplastic syndrome, and anti-gliadin antibody, associated with celiac disease or gluten ataxia, were positive. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) immunoglobulin G index was 1.2 (< 0.8), and oligoclonal bands were present. PCR of the CSF was negative for HIV, JC virus, other HHVs, and mycosis. Previous reports presented HIV-infected patients with concurrent autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus, anti-phospholipid syndrome, autoimmune thrombocytopenia, vasculitis, polymyositis and dermatomyositis, sarcoidosis, Graves' disease, and hepatic diseases. These might have been present in patients with a CD4 T lymphocyte count of more than 200 cells/ml. On the other hand, paraneoplastic syndrome, gluten ataxia, cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody, and Hashimoto's encephalopathy might manifest as autoimmune cerebellar ataxia. As regards the association of HIV infection and autoimmune cerebellar ataxia, a previous report suggested that anti-gliadin antibody was detected in about 30% of HIV-infected children, though there is no reference to an association with cerebellar ataxia. Moreover, to our knowledge, detection of anti-Yo antibody in an HIV-infected patient with cerebellar ataxia has not been reported

  16. Longitudinal assessment of fractional anisotropy alterations caused by simian immunodeficiency virus infection: a preliminary diffusion tensor imaging study.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhenchao; Dong, Enqing; Liu, Jiaojiao; Liu, Zhenyu; Wei, Wenjuan; Wang, Bo; Li, Hongjun; Tian, Jie

    2016-04-01

    Previous diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies found that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection led to white matter (WM) microstructure degeneration. Most of the DTI studies were cross-sectional and thus merely investigated only one specific point in the disease. In order to systematically study the WM impairments caused by HIV infection, more longitudinal studies are needed. However, longitudinal studies on HIV patients are very difficult to conduct. To address this question, we employed the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus monkeys model to carry out a longitudinal DTI study. We aimed to longitudinally access the WM abnormalities of SIV-infected rhesus monkeys by studying the fractional anisotropy (FA) alterations with Tract Based Spatial Statistic (TBSS) analysis. Four rhesus monkeys inoculated intravenously with SIVmac239 were utilized in the study. DTI scans and peripheral blood CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell counts were acquired prior to virus inoculation (as the baseline) and in the 12th and 24th week postvirus inoculation. Significant FA alterations were found in the two areas of the inferotemporal regions (iTE), respectively located in the ventral subregion of posterior iTE (iTEpv) and the dorsal subregion of iTE (iTEpd). The decreased FA values in iTEpd were found significantly negatively correlated with the elevated peripheral blood CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratios. It might suggest that WM in iTEpd was still impaired even though the immune dysfunction alleviated temporally. PMID:26438160

  17. Longitudinal assessment of fractional anisotropy alterations caused by simian immunodeficiency virus infection: a preliminary diffusion tensor imaging study.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhenchao; Dong, Enqing; Liu, Jiaojiao; Liu, Zhenyu; Wei, Wenjuan; Wang, Bo; Li, Hongjun; Tian, Jie

    2016-04-01

    Previous diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies found that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection led to white matter (WM) microstructure degeneration. Most of the DTI studies were cross-sectional and thus merely investigated only one specific point in the disease. In order to systematically study the WM impairments caused by HIV infection, more longitudinal studies are needed. However, longitudinal studies on HIV patients are very difficult to conduct. To address this question, we employed the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus monkeys model to carry out a longitudinal DTI study. We aimed to longitudinally access the WM abnormalities of SIV-infected rhesus monkeys by studying the fractional anisotropy (FA) alterations with Tract Based Spatial Statistic (TBSS) analysis. Four rhesus monkeys inoculated intravenously with SIVmac239 were utilized in the study. DTI scans and peripheral blood CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell counts were acquired prior to virus inoculation (as the baseline) and in the 12th and 24th week postvirus inoculation. Significant FA alterations were found in the two areas of the inferotemporal regions (iTE), respectively located in the ventral subregion of posterior iTE (iTEpv) and the dorsal subregion of iTE (iTEpd). The decreased FA values in iTEpd were found significantly negatively correlated with the elevated peripheral blood CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratios. It might suggest that WM in iTEpd was still impaired even though the immune dysfunction alleviated temporally.

  18. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infections in alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Om; Mason, Andrew; Luftig, Ronald B; Bautista, Abraham P

    2002-07-01

    Approximately 400,000 individuals in the United States are co-infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and it is likely that almost one in two of these subjects consumes alcohol. The majority of these patients suffer an accelerated course of liver disease as manifested by the onset of cirrhosis within 5 to 10 years of developing HCV infection, as well as an increased risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It is thought that chronic alcohol abuse mediates liver damage as a result of increased production of free radicals and proinflammatory cytokines. In the setting of chronic HCV infection, alcohol ingestion has an additional effect of diminishing immune clearance and increasing viral burden to hasten the onset of cirrhosis and HCC. Likewise, chronic HCV and HIV-1 co-infection results in a net increase in HCV burden; higher prevalence rates of HCV transmission to sexual partners and offspring, as well as an accelerated progression to end stage liver disease as compared to individuals with HCV infection alone. Thus, the synergistic effects of alcohol abuse and HIV-1 greatly impact on the morbidity and mortality for patients with HCV coinfection. Ultimately, this cumulative disease process will require far more aggressive management with abstinence and counseling for alcohol abuse; highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for HIV infection and combination anti-viral therapy for HCV infection to stem the rapid progression to end stage liver disease. PMID:12086918

  19. Insights into human immunodeficiency virus-hepatitis B virus co-infection in India

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Runu; Pal, Ananya

    2015-01-01

    Shared routes of transmission lead to frequent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-hepatitis B virus (HBV) co-infection in a host which results in about 10% of HIV positive individuals to have chronic hepatitis B infection worldwide. In post-antiretroviral therapy era, liver diseases have emerged as the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected individuals and HBV co-infection have become the major health issue among this population particularly from the regions with endemic HBV infection. In setting of HIV-HBV co-infection, HIV significantly impacts the natural history of HBV infection, its disease profile and the treatment outcome in negative manner. Moreover, the epidemiological pattern of HBV infection and the diversity in HBV genome (genotypic and phenotypic) are also varied in HIV co-infected subjects as compared to HBV mono-infected individuals. Several reports on the abovementioned issues are available from developed parts of the world as well as from sub-Saharan African countries. In contrast, most of these research areas remained unexplored in India despite having considerable burden of HIV and HBV infections. This review discusses present knowledge from the studies on HIV-HBV co-infection in India and relevant reports from different parts of the world. Issues needed for the future research relevant to HIV-HBV co-infection in India are also highlighted here, including a call for further investigations on this field of study. PMID:26279986

  20. Increased numbers of granzyme-B-expressing cytotoxic T-lymphocytes in the small intestine of HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Snijders, F; Wever, P C; Danner, S A; Hack, C E; ten Kate, F J; ten Berge, I J

    1996-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether granzyme B-expressing cells, which identify activated cytotoxic lymphocytes, are present in the small intestinal mucosa of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with and without diarrhea. Therefore, duodenal biopsy specimens from 29 HIV-infected patients (11 with diarrhea and 18 without diarrhea) and 15 control patients were stained for the presence of granzyme B expressing cells. In HIV-infected patients, a significantly increased expression of granzyme B in the lamina propria was observed (p = 0.00001): In 22 of 29 patients, at least 5-10 cells per high-power field were counted. In contrast, in 13 of 15 control patients, granzyme B was not expressed or minimally so, and in two others a maximum of five granzyme-B-expressing cells could be detected per high-power field. No significant difference was found between the HIV-infected patients with and without diarrhea. Double staining revealed that the granzyme-B-expressing cells were mainly CD3 positive. These data show that activated cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are present in the duodenal mucosa of HIV-infected patients. No relation between the number of CTLs and the presence of diarrhea was demonstrated. CTLs are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of HIV infection and in the production of tissue injury, but their functional role in intestinal HIV-related pathology has yet to be elucidated.

  1. HIV infection and intervention: the first decade.

    PubMed

    Beck, E J

    1991-01-01

    Integrated intervention strategies, appropriate to the specific socioeconomic context, are required to address the needs of the 18 million adults projected to be infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) by the year 2000. Such interventions must operate on two levels. The first is aimed at minimizing the devastating effects of HIV and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) on individuals, while the second is geared toward halting HIV transmission in populations. The median two-year survival time for people with AIDS had doubled from 10 months before 1987 to 20 months in 1990, primarily because of treatments such as zidovudine that slow down the rate of virus replication, but AIDS patients who survive longer develop more intractable opportunistic infections than in the past. Viral transmission throughout populations can be halted only through a comprehensive strategy that addresses agent, host, and environmental factors in a complementary manner. For example, whether or not high-risk individuals will be willing and able to adopt safer sex practices depends, in large part, on the social, economic, and psychological forces acting on and within those individuals. Finally, public attitudes toward sexuality, drug use, and racial discrimination comprise the moral context in which AIDS prevention strategies must be implemented. The mass media, which have already created public awareness of the problem and corrected many misconceptions, must continue to motivate individuals to adopt behavioral changes that reduce the risk of HIV infection.

  2. 78 FR 46969 - Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient-Focused Drug Development and Human Immunodeficiency Virus...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ... Development and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Cure Research; Reopening of Comment Period AGENCY: Food and Drug... Virus (HIV) Patient-Focused Drug Development and HIV Cure Research,'' published in the Federal Register of May 21, 2013 (78 FR 29755). In that notice, FDA requested public comment regarding...

  3. Multiple Origins of Virus Persistence during Natural Control of HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Boritz, Eli A; Darko, Samuel; Swaszek, Luke; Wolf, Gideon; Wells, David; Wu, Xiaolin; Henry, Amy R; Laboune, Farida; Hu, Jianfei; Ambrozak, David; Hughes, Marybeth S; Hoh, Rebecca; Casazza, Joseph P; Vostal, Alexander; Bunis, Daniel; Nganou-Makamdop, Krystelle; Lee, James S; Migueles, Stephen A; Koup, Richard A; Connors, Mark; Moir, Susan; Schacker, Timothy; Maldarelli, Frank; Hughes, Stephen H; Deeks, Steven G; Douek, Daniel C

    2016-08-11

    Targeted HIV cure strategies require definition of the mechanisms that maintain the virus. Here, we tracked HIV replication and the persistence of infected CD4 T cells in individuals with natural virologic control by sequencing viruses, T cell receptor genes, HIV integration sites, and cellular transcriptomes. Our results revealed three mechanisms of HIV persistence operating within distinct anatomic and functional compartments. In lymph node, we detected viruses with genetic and transcriptional attributes of active replication in both T follicular helper (TFH) cells and non-TFH memory cells. In blood, we detected inducible proviruses of archival origin among highly differentiated, clonally expanded cells. Linking the lymph node and blood was a small population of circulating cells harboring inducible proviruses of recent origin. Thus, HIV replication in lymphoid tissue, clonal expansion of infected cells, and recirculation of recently infected cells act together to maintain the virus in HIV controllers despite effective antiviral immunity. PMID:27453467

  4. The Fc and not CD4 Receptor Mediates Antibody Enhancement of HIV Infection in Human Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homsy, Jacques; Meyer, Mia; Tateno, Masatoshi; Clarkson, Sarah; Levy, Jay A.

    1989-06-01

    Antibodies that enhance human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infectivity have been found in the blood of infected individuals and in infected or immunized animals. These findings raise serious concern for the development of a safe vaccine against acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. To address the in vivo relevance and mechanism of this phenomenon, antibody-dependent enhancement of HIV infectivity in peripheral blood macrophages, lymphocytes, and human fibroblastoid cells was studied. Neither Leu3a, a monoclonal antibody directed against the CD4 receptor, nor soluble recombinant CD4 even at high concentrations prevented this enhancement. The addition of monoclonal antibody to the Fc receptor III (anti-FcRIII), but not of antibodies that react with FcRI or FcRII, inhibited HIV type 1 and HIV type 2 enhancement in peripheral blood macrophages. Although enhancement of HIV infection in CD4+ lymphocytes could not be blocked by anti-FcRIII, it was inhibited by the addition of human immunoglobulin G aggregates. The results indicate that the FcRIII receptor on human macrophages and possibly another Fc receptor on human CD4+ lymphocytes mediate antibody-dependent enhancement of HIV infectivity and that this phenomenon proceeds through a mechanism independent of the CD4 protein.

  5. Drugs of abuse and HIV infection/replication: implications for mother-fetus transmission

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2011-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and progression of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) can be modulated by a number of cofactors, including drugs of abuse. Opioids, cocaine, cannabinoids, methamphetamine (METH), alcohol, and other substances of abuse have been implicated as risk factors for HIV infection, as they all have the potential to compromise host immunity and facilitate viral replication. Although epidemiologic evidence regarding the impact of drugs of abuse on HIV disease progression is mixed, in vitro studies as well as studies using in vivo animal models have indicated that drugs of abuse have the ability to enhance HIV infection/replication. Drugs of abuse may also be a risk factor for perinatal transmission of HIV. Because high levels of viral load in maternal blood are associated with increased risk of HIV vertical transmission, it is likely that drugs of abuse play an important role in promoting mother-fetus transmission. Furthermore, because the neonatal immune system differs qualitatively from the adult system, it is possible that maternal exposure to drugs of abuse would exacerbate neonatal immunity defects, facilitating HIV infection of neonate immune cells and promoting HIV vertical transmission. The availability and use of antiretroviral therapy for women infected with HIV increase, there is an increasing interest in determining the impact of drug abuse on efficacy of AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) -standardized treatment regimens for woman infected with HIV in the context of HIV vertical transmission. PMID:21056582

  6. The Surprising Role of Amyloid Fibrils in HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Castellano, Laura M; Shorter, James

    2012-01-01

    Despite its discovery over 30 years ago, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) continues to threaten public health worldwide. Semen is the principal vehicle for the transmission of this retrovirus and several endogenous peptides in semen, including fragments of prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP248-286 and PAP85-120) and semenogelins (SEM1 and SEM2), assemble into amyloid fibrils that promote HIV infection. For example, PAP248-286 fibrils, termed SEVI (Semen derived Enhancer of Viral Infection), potentiate HIV infection by up to 105-fold. Fibrils enhance infectivity by facilitating virion attachment and fusion to target cells, whereas soluble peptides have no effect. Importantly, the stimulatory effect is greatest at low viral titers, which mimics mucosal transmission of HIV, where relatively few virions traverse the mucosal barrier. Devising a method to rapidly reverse fibril formation (rather than simply inhibit it) would provide an innovative and urgently needed preventative strategy for reducing HIV infection via the sexual route. Targeting a host-encoded protein conformer represents a departure from traditional microbicidal approaches that target the viral machinery, and could synergize with direct antiviral approaches. Here, we review the identification of these amyloidogenic peptides, their mechanism of action, and various strategies for inhibiting their HIV-enhancing effects.

  7. Estimation of HIV infection and incubation via state space models.

    PubMed

    Tan, W Y; Ye, Z

    2000-09-01

    By using the state space model (Kalman filter model) of the HIV epidemic, in this paper we have developed a general Bayesian procedure to estimate simultaneously the HIV infection distribution, the HIV incubation distribution, the numbers of susceptible people, infective people and AIDS cases. The basic approach is to use the Gibbs sampling method combined with the weighted bootstrap method. We have applied this method to the San Francisco AIDS incidence data from January 1981 to December 1992. The results show clearly that both the probability density function of the HIV infection and the probability density function of the HIV incubation are curves with two peaks. The results of the HIV infection distribution are clearly consistent with the finding by Tan et al. [W.Y. Tan, S.C. Tang, S.R. Lee, Estimation of HIV seroconversion and effects of age in San Francisco homosexual populations, J. Appl. Stat. 25 (1998) 85]. The results of HIV incubation distribution seem to confirm the staged model used by Satten and Longini [G. Satten, I. Longini, Markov chain with measurement error: estimating the 'true' course of marker of the progression of human immunodeficiency virus disease, Appl. Stat. 45 (1996) 275]. PMID:10942785

  8. Clinical management considerations for dyslipidemia in HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, Jeffrey T

    2012-01-01

    Dyslipidemia is common in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and may result in significant morbidity, including coronary heart disease (CHD). Treatment of dyslipidemia in these patients is generally based on the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III goals for individuals without HIV. For individuals with ≥ 2 cardiovascular risk factors, the risk of CHD should be evaluated using the Framingham risk calculator and managed accordingly. Switching to an antiretroviral regimen with a favorable lipid profile should be considered before pharmacologic management if virologic suppression can be maintained. Statins are the first-choice therapy for elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, but in HIV-infected individuals, special consideration must be given to drug-drug interactions, specifically those between protease inhibitors and statins. Management of dyslipidemia in HIV-infected individuals is a challenging but important aspect of chronic disease management. Additional research, specifically related to the role of chronic inflammation, is needed to better define the relationship between HIV infection and cardiovascular disease.

  9. Intra-Blood-Brain Barrier Synthesis of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Antigen and Antibody in Humans and Chimpanzees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudsmit, Jaap; Epstein, Leon G.; Paul, Deborah A.; van der Helm, Hayo J.; Dawson, George J.; Asher, David M.; Yanagihara, Richard; Wolff, Axel V.; Gibbs, Clarence J.; Carleton Gajdusek, D.

    1987-06-01

    The presence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antigens in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was associated with progressive encephalopathy in adult and pediatric patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). HIV antigen was detected in CSF from 6 of 7 AIDS patients with progressive encephalopathy. By contrast, HIV antigen, whether free or complexed, was detected in CSF from only 1 of 18 HIV antibody seropositive patients without progressive encephalopathy and from 0 of 8 experimentally infected chimpanzees without clinical signs. Intra-blood-brain barrier synthesis of HIV-specific antibody was demonstrated in the majority of patients with AIDS (9/12) or at risk for AIDS (8/13) as well as in the experimentally infected chimpanzees, indicating HIV-specific B-cell reactivity in the brain without apparent neurological signs. In 6 of 11 patients with HIV infection, antibodies synthesized in the central nervous system were directed against HIV envelope proteins. Active viral expression appears to be necessary for both the immunodeficiency and progressive encephalopathy associated with HIV infection.

  10. Immediate-early gene region of human cytomegalovirus trans-activates the promoter of human immunodeficiency virus

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.G.; Kenney, S.C.; Kamine, J.; Pagano, J.S.; Huang, E.S.

    1987-12-01

    Almost all homosexual patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome are also actively infected with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). The authors have hypothesized that an interaction between HCMV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the agent that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, may exist at a molecular level and contribute to the manifestations of HIV infection. In this report, they demonstrate that the immediate-early gene region of HCMV, in particular immediate-early region 2, trans-activates the expression of the bacterial gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase that is fused to the HIV long terminal repeat and carried by plasmid pHIV-CAT. The HCMV immediate-early trans-activator increases the level of mRNA from the plamid pHIV-CAT. The sequences of HIV that are responsive to trans-activation by the HDMV immediate-early region are distinct from HIV sequences that are required for response to the HIV tat. The stimulation of HIV gene expression by HDMV gene functions could enhance the consequences of HIV infection in persons with previous or concurrent HCMV infection.

  11. Declined Neural Efficiency in Cognitively Stable Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Thomas; Yakupov, Renat; Nakama, Helenna; Crocket, Grace; Cole, Michael; Watters, Michael; Ricardo-Dukelow, Mary Lynn; Chang, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine whether brain activation changes in clinically and neurocognitively normal human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected and in HIV-seronegative control (SN) participants over a 1-year period. Methods Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was performed in 32 SN and 31 HIV patients (all with stable combination antiretroviral treatment) at baseline and after 1 year. Each participant performed a set of visual attention tasks with increasing attentional load (from tracking two, three, or four balls). All HIV and SN participants had normal neuropsychological function at both examinations. Results Over 1 year, HIV patients showed no change in their neurocognitive status or in task performance during fMRI. However, HIV patients showed significant 1-year increases in fMRI signals in the prefrontal and posterior parietal cortices for the more difficult tasks, whereas SN control participants showed only decreases in brain activation in these regions. This resulted in significant interactions between HIV status and time of study in left insula, left parietal, left temporal, and several frontal regions (left and right middle frontal gyrus, and anterior cingulate). Interpretation Because fMRI task performance remained unchanged in both groups, the HIV patients appeared to maintain performance by increasing usage of the attention network, whereas the control participants reduced usage of the attention network after 1 year. These findings suggest improved efficiency or a practice effect in the SN participants but declined efficiency of the neural substrate in HIV patients, possibly because of ongoing brain injury associated with the HIV infection, despite their apparent stable clinical course. PMID:19334060

  12. Measuring domestic violence in human immunodeficiency virus-positive women

    PubMed Central

    Patrikar, Seema; Verma, AK; Bhatti, VK; Shatabdi, S

    2012-01-01

    Background Violence affects the lives of millions of women worldwide, in all socioeconomic classes. Violence and the fear of violence are emerging as important risk factor contributing to the vulnerability to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection for women. The objective of the present cross sectional study is to compare the experiences of domestic violence between HIV-positive and HIV-negative married women seeking treatment in a tertiary care hospital. Methods The study is conducted in a tertiary care hospital in Pune on a randomly selected 150 married women (75 HIV-positive and 75 HIV-negative). Informed consent was obtained from all the women and also a trained counsellor was present during the process of data collection. The data was collected by interview method by taking precautions as laid down in the World Health Organization's ethical and safety recommendations for research on domestic violence and using modified conflict tactics scale (CTS). The definition of violence followed is as per the Declaration on the Elimination of Violence against Women, adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in 1993. Results The percentage of women reporting domestic violence is 44.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 36.84–52.68). The proportion of physical, emotional and sexual violence reported is 38% (95% CI = 30.49–45.96), 24% (95% CI = 17.67–31.31), and 14.7% (95% CI = 9.66–21.02), respectively. The odds of reporting violence of all forms is significantly higher among HIV-positive women than among HIV-negative women (P<0.05). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression is carried out to examine the possible predictors of domestic violence. Conclusion The findings suggest high proportion of HIV-positive women report violence then HIV-negative women which must be addressed through multilevel prevention approaches. PMID:24669053

  13. Leishmania and human immunodeficiency virus coinfection: the first 10 years.

    PubMed Central

    Alvar, J; Cañavate, C; Gutiérrez-Solar, B; Jiménez, M; Laguna, F; López-Vélez, R; Molina, R; Moreno, J

    1997-01-01

    Over 850 Leishmania-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection cases have been recorded, the majority in Europe, where 7 to 17% of HIV-positive individuals with fever have amastigotes, suggesting that Leishmania-infected individuals without symptoms will express symptoms of leishmaniasis if they become immunosuppressed. However, there are indirect reasons and statistical data demonstrating that intravenous drug addiction plays a specific role in Leishmania infantum transmission: an anthroponotic cycle complementary to the zoonotic one has been suggested. Due to anergy in patients with coinfection, L. infantum dermotropic zymodemes are isolated from patient viscera and a higher L. infantum phenotypic variability is seen. Moreover, insect trypanosomatids that are currently considered nonpathogenic have been isolated from coinfected patients. HIV infection and Leishmania infection each induce important analogous immunological changes whose effects are multiplied if they occur concomitantly, such as a Th1-to-Th2 response switch; however, the consequences of the viral infection predominate. In fact, a large proportion of coinfected patients have no detectable anti-Leishmania antibodies. The microorganisms share target cells, and it has been demonstrated in vitro how L. infantum induces the expression of latent HIV-1. Bone marrow culture is the most useful diagnostic technique, but it is invasive. Blood smears and culture are good alternatives. PCR, xenodiagnosis, and circulating-antigen detection are available only in specialized laboratories. The relationship with low levels of CD4+ cells conditions the clinical presentation and evolution of disease. Most patients have visceral leishmaniasis, but asymptomatic, cutaneous, mucocutaneous, diffuse cutaneous, and post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis can be produced by L. infantum. The digestive and respiratory tracts are frequently parasitized. The course of coinfection is marked by a high relapse rate. There is a lack

  14. Mechanism of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 localization in CD4-negative thymocytes: differentiation from a CD4-positive precursor allows productive infection.

    PubMed Central

    Kitchen, S G; Uittenbogaart, C H; Zack, J A

    1997-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection of the thymus could have profound effects on development of the immune response, particularly in children. We and others have established that in addition to infecting and depleting CD4-bearing thymocytes, functional HIV proviruses are found in thymocytes lacking surface CD4 expression. Using in vitro thymocyte cultures, we show that neither HIV-mediated down regulation of CD4 nor CD4-independent infection contributes to the localization of HIV in cells lacking the primary virus receptor. Rather, infection of a CD4-positive precursor cell (CD4 positive/CD8 positive) with subsequent differentiation into a mature CD4-negative phenotype results in productively infected CD4-negative cells. This novel mechanism may contribute to pathogenesis by distributing viral sequences into functional subsets of T cells typically refractory to HIV infection and could account for the presence of viral DNA in CD8-positive lymphocytes recently observed in patients. PMID:9223457

  15. Bispecific Antibodies that Mediate Killing of Cells Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus of Any Strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Jorg; Lotscher, Erika; Steimer, Kathelyn S.; Capon, Daniel J.; Baenziger, Jurg; Jack, Hans-Martin; Wabl, Matthias

    1991-06-01

    Although AIDS patients lose human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific cytotoxic T cells, their remaining CD8-positive T lymphocytes maintain cytotoxic function. To exploit this fact we have constructed bispecific antibodies that direct cytotoxic T lymphocytes of any specificity to cells that express gp120 of HIV. These bispecific antibodies comprise one heavy/light chain pair from an antibody to CD3, linked to a heavy chain whose variable region has been replaced with sequences from CD4 plus a second light chain. CD3 is part of the antigen receptor on T cells and is responsible for signal transduction. In the presence of these bispecific antibodies, T cells of irrelevant specificity effectively lyse HIV-infected cells in vitro.

  16. Association of infections with human immunodeficiency virus and human papillomavirus in Honduras.

    PubMed

    Ferrera, A; Melchers, W J; Velema, J P; Figueroa, M

    1997-08-01

    The etiologic role of the oncogenic types of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the development of cervical cancer has been widely proven. Since this cancer occurs more frequently in immunosuppressed individuals, we sought to evaluate the prevalence of HPV infection among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected and HIV-noninfected prostitutes in Tegucigalpa, Honduras. Cervical scrapes were collected from 23 HIV-seropositive and 28 HIV-seronegative prostitutes for HPV DNA detection by the polymerase chain reaction. Fifty-six percent of the HIV-seropositive women and only 18% of the seronegative women were HPV DNA positive (odds ratio = 6.0). In addition, there was a significant association between seropositivity for HIV with a history of sexually transmitted diseases (P < 0.01). Our data confirm the association between infections with HIV and HPV.

  17. Antibody responses to defined epitopes in the Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1-encoded transactivator protein among human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

    PubMed Central

    Tedeschi, R; Dillner, J; De Paoli, P

    1996-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1-encoded replication activator (ZEBRA) is a key mediator of reactivation from latency to the viral productive cycle. In the present study, the serum antibody responses against three defined ZEBRA epitopes (designated ZEBRA-1, -19, and -22) were determined for 50 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-seropositive patients and 100 matched healthy control subjects. The anti-ZEBRA responses were more commonly found among HIV-seropositive patients than among healthy controls for all the three ZEBRA epitopes tested (P < 0.0003, P < 0.003, and P < 0.001, respectively). Comparison of ZEBRA antibody levels with the degree of immunodeficiency (CD4 cell counts), CDC grouping, and HIV p24 antigen positivity showed little association, suggesting that induction of ZEBRA antibodies is an early event after HIV infection. PMID:8705686

  18. Prenatal Transmission of Syphilis and Human Immunodeficiency Virus in Brazil: Achieving Regional Targets for Elimination

    PubMed Central

    Cerda, Rodrigo; Perez, Freddy; Domingues, Rosa Maria S.M.; Luz, Paula M.; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Veloso, Valdilea G.; Caffe, Sonja; Francke, Jordan A.; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Ciaranello, Andrea L.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The Pan-American Health Organization has called for reducing (1) human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) to ≤0.30 infections/1000 live births (LB), (2) HIV MTCT risk to ≤2.0%, and (3) congenital syphilis (CS) incidence to ≤0.50/1000 LB in the Americas by 2015. Methods. Using published Brazilian data in a mathematical model, we simulated a cohort of pregnant women from antenatal care (ANC) through birth. We investigated 2 scenarios: “current access” (89.1% receive one ANC syphilis test and 41.1% receive 2; 81.7% receive one ANC HIV test and 18.9% receive birth testing; if diagnosed, 81.0% are treated for syphilis and 87.5% are treated for HIV) and “ideal access” (95% of women undergo 2 HIV and syphilis screenings; 95% receive appropriate treatment). We conducted univariate and multivariate sensitivity analyses on key inputs. Results. With current access, we projected 2.95 CS cases/1000 LB, 0.29 HIV infections/1000 LB, 7.1% HIV MTCT risk, and 11.11 intrauterine fetal demises (IUFD)/1000 pregnancies, with significant regional variation. With ideal access, we projected improved outcomes: 1.00 CS cases/1000 LB, 0.10 HIV infections/1000 LB, HIV MTCT risk of 2.4%, and 10.65 IUFD/1000 pregnancies. Increased testing drove the greatest improvements. Even with ideal access, only HIV infections/1000 LB met elimination goals. Achieving all targets required testing and treatment >95% and reductions in prevalence and incidence of HIV and syphilis. Conclusions. Increasing access to care and HIV and syphilis antenatal testing will substantially reduce HIV and syphilis MTCT in Brazil. In addition, regionally tailored interventions reducing syphilis incidence and prevalence and supporting HIV treatment adherence are necessary to completely meet elimination goals. PMID:26180825

  19. Circadian rhythms of circulating NK cells in healthy and human immunodeficiency virus-infected men.

    PubMed

    Bourin, P; Mansour, I; Doinel, C; Roué, R; Rouger, P; Levi, F

    1993-08-01

    Antiviral immunity involves NK cells, which circulate rhythmically every 24 hours. We have investigated circadian and 12-hour rhythms in the peripheral count of circulating NK cells in 15 men infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and 13 healthy controls. We analyzed three phenotypes using double-labeling with monoclonal antibodies and flow cytometry assessment: CD3- CD16+, CD3-CD57+, and CD2+CD3-. A statistical validation of time-dependent differences was achieved if significance (p < 0.05) was validated both with analysis of variance and cosinor. The circadian rhythm had a similar asymmetric waveform for the three phenotypes and is homogeneous on an individual basis. The circulating NK cell count peaked in the early morning and was low at night. A circadian rhythm and a circahemidian harmonic characterized all phenotypes in healthy subjects. We considered two groups of HIV-infected men: those who were asymptomatic (eight) and those with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) (seven). Circadian changes in NK cell count were similar in both subgroups and in healthy controls. The circadian pattern was also consistent among individual patients. Asymptomatic HIV-infected men (early-stage disease) exhibited more pronounced 12-hour rhythmicity than did patients with AIDS or controls. The circulation of NK cells does not appear to share the same synchronizer(s) as other circulating T- or B-lymphocyte subsets. Thus, HIV infection gradually abolished circadian rhythmicity in circulating T and B cells, whereas it did not disturb that in NK cells. PMID:8403073

  20. Prenatal Transmission of Syphilis and Human Immunodeficiency Virus in Brazil: Achieving Regional Targets for Elimination.

    PubMed

    Cerda, Rodrigo; Perez, Freddy; Domingues, Rosa Maria S M; Luz, Paula M; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Veloso, Valdilea G; Caffe, Sonja; Francke, Jordan A; Freedberg, Kenneth A; Ciaranello, Andrea L

    2015-04-01

    Background.  The Pan-American Health Organization has called for reducing (1) human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) to ≤0.30 infections/1000 live births (LB), (2) HIV MTCT risk to ≤2.0%, and (3) congenital syphilis (CS) incidence to ≤0.50/1000 LB in the Americas by 2015. Methods.  Using published Brazilian data in a mathematical model, we simulated a cohort of pregnant women from antenatal care (ANC) through birth. We investigated 2 scenarios: "current access" (89.1% receive one ANC syphilis test and 41.1% receive 2; 81.7% receive one ANC HIV test and 18.9% receive birth testing; if diagnosed, 81.0% are treated for syphilis and 87.5% are treated for HIV) and "ideal access" (95% of women undergo 2 HIV and syphilis screenings; 95% receive appropriate treatment). We conducted univariate and multivariate sensitivity analyses on key inputs. Results.  With current access, we projected 2.95 CS cases/1000 LB, 0.29 HIV infections/1000 LB, 7.1% HIV MTCT risk, and 11.11 intrauterine fetal demises (IUFD)/1000 pregnancies, with significant regional variation. With ideal access, we projected improved outcomes: 1.00 CS cases/1000 LB, 0.10 HIV infections/1000 LB, HIV MTCT risk of 2.4%, and 10.65 IUFD/1000 pregnancies. Increased testing drove the greatest improvements. Even with ideal access, only HIV infections/1000 LB met elimination goals. Achieving all targets required testing and treatment >95% and reductions in prevalence and incidence of HIV and syphilis. Conclusions.  Increasing access to care and HIV and syphilis antenatal testing will substantially reduce HIV and syphilis MTCT in Brazil. In addition, regionally tailored interventions reducing syphilis incidence and prevalence and supporting HIV treatment adherence are necessary to completely meet elimination goals. PMID:26180825

  1. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Newly Diagnosed at Autopsy in New York City, 2008-2012.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Chitra; Ellman, Tanya M; Myers, Julie; Madsen, Ann; Sepkowitz, Kent; Shepard, Colin

    2015-12-01

    Background.  Studying the most extreme example of late diagnosis, new HIV diagnoses after death, may be instructive to HIV testing efforts. Using the results of routine HIV testing of autopsies performed by the Office of Chief Medical Examiner (OCME), we identified new HIV diagnoses after death in New York City (NYC) from 2008 to 2012. Methods.  Population-based registries for HIV and deaths were linked to identify decedents not known to be HIV-infected before death. Multivariable logistic regression models were constructed to determine correlates of a new HIV diagnosis after death among all persons newly diagnosed with HIV and among all HIV-infected decedents receiving an OCME autopsy. Results.  Of 264 893 deaths, 24 426 (9.2%) were autopsied by the NYC OCME. Of these, 1623 (6.6%) were infected with HIV, including 142 (8.8%) with a new HIV diagnosis at autopsy. This represents 0.8% (142 of 18 542) of all new HIV diagnoses during the 5-year period. Decedents newly diagnosed with HIV at OCME autopsy were predominantly male (73.9%), aged 13-64 years (85.9%), non-white (85.2%), unmarried (81.7%), less than college educated (83.8%), and residents of an impoverished neighborhood (62.0%). Of all HIV-infected OCME decedents aged ≥65 years (n = 71), 22.0% were diagnosed at autopsy. The strongest independent correlate of new HIV diagnosis at autopsy in both multivariable models was age ≥65 years. Conclusions.  Human immunodeficiency virus diagnoses first made after death are rare, but, when observed, these diagnoses are more commonly found among persons ≥65 years, suggesting that despite highly visible efforts to promote HIV testing community-wide, timely diagnosis among older adults living in impoverished, high-prevalence neighborhoods may require additional strategies. PMID:26566538

  2. Cellular automata approach for the dynamics of HIV infection under antiretroviral therapies: The role of the virus diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Ramón E. R.; de Figueirêdo, Pedro Hugo; Coutinho, Sérgio

    2013-10-01

    We study a cellular automata model to test the timing of antiretroviral therapy strategies for the dynamics of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We focus on the role of virus diffusion when its population is included in previous cellular automata model that describes the dynamics of the lymphocytes cells population during infection. This inclusion allows us to consider the spread of infection by the virus-cell interaction, beyond that which occurs by cell-cell contagion. The results show an acceleration of the infectious process in the absence of treatment, but show better efficiency in reducing the risk of the onset of AIDS when combined antiretroviral therapies are used even with drugs of low effectiveness. Comparison of results with clinical data supports the conclusions of this study.

  3. HIV Infection: The Clinical Picture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redfield, Robert R.; Burke, Donald S.

    1988-01-01

    Reports on the human immunodeficiency virus which causes disease that culminates in the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). States that the key to prolonging life and health is early detection of the infection which usually occurs years before symptoms emerge. (RT)

  4. Infectious and Non-infectious Etiologies of Cardiovascular Disease in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chastain, Daniel B.; King, Travis S.; Stover, Kayla R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Increasing rates of HIV have been observed in women, African Americans, and Hispanics, particularly those residing in rural areas of the United States. Although cardiovascular (CV) complications in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have significantly decreased following the introduction of antiretroviral therapy on a global scale, in many rural areas, residents face geographic, social, and cultural barriers that result in decreased access to care. Despite the advancements to combat the disease, many patients in these medically underserved areas are not linked to care, and fewer than half achieve viral suppression. Methods: Databases were systematically searched for peer-reviewed publications reporting infectious and non-infectious etiologies of cardiovascular disease in HIV-infected patients. Relevant articles cited in the retrieved publications were also reviewed for inclusion. Results: A variety of outcomes studies and literature reviews were included in the analysis. Relevant literature discussed the manifestations, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes of infectious and non-infectious etiologies of cardiovascular disease in HIV-infected patients. Conclusion: In these medically underserved areas, it is vital that clinicians are knowledgeable in the manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of CV complications in patients with untreated HIV. This review summarizes the epidemiology and causes of CV complications associated with untreated HIV and provide recommendations for management of these complications. PMID:27583063

  5. [Challenges of lopinavir/ritonavir in the chronicity of human immunodeficiency virus infection].

    PubMed

    Aguirrebengoa, Koldo

    2014-11-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) has increased patient survival, which is currently similar to that of the general population in western countries. However, ART is unable to completely restore normal health, given the persistence of chronic immune activation. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has become a chronic disease and 50% of patients will soon be older than 50 years. Currently, there is a debate on the possibility of accelerated aging in the HIV-infected population. An overlap has been observed between chronic inflammation, age-related comorbidities, lifestyle, and the long-term toxicity of ART. ART-related toxicity can encourage the development of comorbidities, especially cardiovascular and renal complications, while toxicity-especially that of thymidine analogs-can also contribute to inflammation and aging. Evidence is available on simplification strategies with boosted protease inhibitor monotherapy aiming to avoid or reduce potential or demonstrated toxicity. Currently, studies are underway of dual therapy strategies with lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r) with distinct antiretroviral agents. The studies with the largest samples are those with raltegravir and lamivudine. The GARDEL trial has demonstrated that dual therapy with LPV/r plus a generic drug such as lamivudine is non-inferior to triple therapy in treatment- naïve patients. All of the above indicates the response to the challenge posed to LPV/r by the chronic phase of the disease and by the need to reduce costs.

  6. Dried blood spots, valid screening for viral hepatitis and human immunodeficiency virus in real-life

    PubMed Central

    Mössner, Belinda K; Staugaard, Benjamin; Jensen, Janne; Lillevang, Søren Thue; Christensen, Peer B; Holm, Dorte Kinggaard

    2016-01-01

    AIM To detect chronic hepatitis B (CHB), chronic hepatitis C (CHC) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections in dried blood spot (DBS) and compare these samples to venous blood sampling in real-life. METHODS We included prospective patients with known viral infections from drug treatment centers, a prison and outpatient clinics and included blood donors as negative controls. Five drops of finger capillary blood were spotted on filter paper, and a venous blood sample was obtained. The samples were analyzed for HBsAg, anti-HBc, anti-HBs, anti-HCV, and anti-HIV levels as well as subjected to a combined nucleic acid test (NAT) for HBV DNA, HCV RNA and HIV RNA. RESULTS Samples from 404 subjects were screened (85 CHB, 116 CHC, 114 HIV and 99 blood donors). DBS had a sensitivity of > 96% and a specificity of > 98% for the detection of all three infections. NAT testing did not improve sensitivity, but correctly classified 95% of the anti-HCV-positive patients with chronic and past infections. Anti-HBc and anti-HBS showed low sensitivity in DBS (68% and 42%). CONCLUSION DBS sampling, combined with an automated analysis system, is a feasible screening method to diagnose chronic viral hepatitis and HIV infections outside of the health care system. PMID:27672281

  7. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1-related lipoatrophy and lipohypertrophy are associated with serum concentrations of leptin.

    PubMed

    Nagy, G Sonia; Tsiodras, Sotirios; Martin, Lizabeth D; Avihingsanon, Anchalee; Gavrila, Alina; Hsu, William C; Karchmer, Adolf W; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2003-03-15

    The relationship between the adipocyte-derived hormone leptin, insulin resistance, and fat redistribution in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has not been established. We classified a cohort of HIV type 1 (HIV-1)-infected patients with >or=6 months of antiretroviral exposure as having no lipodystrophy (51 patients [43% of the cohort]), lipoatrophy (23 patients [19% of the cohort]), mixed lipodystrophy (29 patients [24% of the cohort]), or lipohypertrophy (17 patients [14% of the cohort]), on the basis of physical examination, anthropometric measurements, and the findings of dual-emission x-ray absorptiometry and computed tomography. Measurements of insulin resistance were higher for patients with each category of lipodystrophy, compared with those observed for patients with no lipodystrophy (P<.001). Mean leptin levels (+/- standard deviation) were lowest in patients with lipoatrophy (1.76+/-1.20 ng/mL), highest in patients with lipohypertrophy (9.10+/-6.86 ng/mL), and significantly different from those in patients without lipodystrophy (3.14+/-2.30 ng/mL; both P<.01). In this cohort of antiretroviral-experienced HIV-infected patients, a low serum level of leptin was independently associated with insulin resistance in patients with lipoatrophy, after controlling for total and regional body fat.

  8. Committee opinion no: 635: Prenatal and perinatal human immunodeficiency virus testing: expanded recommendations.

    PubMed

    2015-06-01

    Given the enormous advances in the prevention of perinatal transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), it is clear that early identification and treatment of all pregnant women with HIV is the best way to prevent neonatal infection and also improve women's health. Furthermore, new evidence suggests that early initiation of antiretroviral therapy in the course of infection is beneficial for individuals infected with HIV and reduces the rate of sexual transmission to partners who are not infected. Screening should be performed after women have been notified that HIV screening is recommended for all pregnant patients and that they will receive an HIV test as part of the routine panel of prenatal tests unless they decline (opt-out screening). Obstetrician-gynecologists or other obstetric providers should follow opt-out prenatal HIV screening where legally possible. Repeat HIV testing in the third trimester is recommended for women in areas with high HIV incidence or prevalence and women known to be at risk of acquiring HIV infection. Women who were not tested earlier in pregnancy or whose HIV status is otherwise undocumented should be offered rapid screening on labor and delivery using the opt-out approach where allowed. If a rapid HIV test result in labor is reactive, antiretroviral prophylaxis should be immediately initiated while waiting for supplemental test results. If the diagnosis of HIV infection is established, the woman should be linked into ongoing care with a specialist in HIV care for comanagement.

  9. Can antiretroviral therapy be tailored to each human immunodeficiency virus-infected individual? Role of pharmacogenomics

    PubMed Central

    Asensi, Victor; Collazos, Julio; Valle-Garay, Eulalia

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics refers to the effect of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within human genes on drug therapy outcome. Its study might help clinicians to increase the efficacy of antiretroviral drugs by improving their pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and by decreasing their side effects. HLAB*5701 genotyping to avoid the abacavir-associated hypersensitivity reaction (HSR) is a cost-effective diagnostic tool, with a 100% of negative predictive value, and, therefore, it has been included in the guidelines for treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. HALDRB*0101 associates with nevirapine-induced HSR. CYP2B6 SNPs modify efavirenz plasma levels and their genotyping help decreasing its central nervous system, hepatic and HSR toxicities. Cytokines SNPs might influence the development of drug-associated lipodystrophy. APOA5, APOB, APOC3 and APOE SNPs modify lipids plasma levels and might influence the coronary artery disease risk of HIV-infected individuals receiving antiretroviral therapy. UGT1A1*28 and ABCB1 (MDR1) 3435C > T SNPs modify atazanavir plasma levels and enhance hyperbilirubinemia. Much more effort needs to be still devoted to complete large prospective studies with multiple SNPs genotyping in order to reveal more clues about the role played by host genetics in antiretroviral drug efficacy and toxicity. PMID:26279978

  10. Can antiretroviral therapy be tailored to each human immunodeficiency virus-infected individual? Role of pharmacogenomics.

    PubMed

    Asensi, Victor; Collazos, Julio; Valle-Garay, Eulalia

    2015-08-12

    Pharmacogenetics refers to the effect of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within human genes on drug therapy outcome. Its study might help clinicians to increase the efficacy of antiretroviral drugs by improving their pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and by decreasing their side effects. HLAB*5701 genotyping to avoid the abacavir-associated hypersensitivity reaction (HSR) is a cost-effective diagnostic tool, with a 100% of negative predictive value, and, therefore, it has been included in the guidelines for treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. HALDRB*0101 associates with nevirapine-induced HSR. CYP2B6 SNPs modify efavirenz plasma levels and their genotyping help decreasing its central nervous system, hepatic and HSR toxicities. Cytokines SNPs might influence the development of drug-associated lipodystrophy. APOA5, APOB, APOC3 and APOE SNPs modify lipids plasma levels and might influence the coronary artery disease risk of HIV-infected individuals receiving antiretroviral therapy. UGT1A1*28 and ABCB1 (MDR1) 3435C > T SNPs modify atazanavir plasma levels and enhance hyperbilirubinemia. Much more effort needs to be still devoted to complete large prospective studies with multiple SNPs genotyping in order to reveal more clues about the role played by host genetics in antiretroviral drug efficacy and toxicity. PMID:26279978

  11. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection and Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic is clearly one of the most serious health-care crises in the professional lives of contemporary physicians. It cannot be regarded as a curiosity to be dealt with by inner-city infectious-disease experts, but rather must be considered a problem for all health-care providers and a problem in which the obstetrician-gynecologist has a special role to play. PMID:18475370

  12. Plasmoblastic lymphoma associated with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Emoke; Krenács, L; Bagdi, Eniko; Pávai, Z; Macarie, I; Nagy, Elod-Erno; Demian, Smaranda

    2008-01-01

    Plasmoblastic lymphoma (PBL) is a subtype of the diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, typically present as extranodal disease associated with human immune deficiency virus (HIV) infection. PBLs are often the initial manifestation of AIDS. Here we present a case of PBL concerning the oral cavity. A 34-year-old woman presented a tumor in the oral cavity that involved the maxilla and gingiva (confirmed by CT-scan). The gingival biopsy showed a massive infiltration by large lymphoid cells with round, vesicular nuclei, prominent nucleoli, fine chromatin and an significant amount of basophilic cytoplasm which express CD79a, CD138, cytoplasmic lambda light chain and LCA, without staining for CD20, CD38, CD3 and CTK. Serological analysis confirmed HIV positivity. PBLs lack most B-lineage markers, but many express CD79a in at least some of the cells, therefore generate difficulties in differential diagnosis. Overall assessment and correlation of the histopathological and immunohistochemical features with the clinical findings and serology investigation are the most helpful diagnostic tools and can lead to the final diagnosis.

  13. Plasmoblastic lymphoma associated with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Emoke; Krenács, L; Bagdi, Eniko; Pávai, Z; Macarie, I; Nagy, Elod-Erno; Demian, Smaranda

    2008-01-01

    Plasmoblastic lymphoma (PBL) is a subtype of the diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, typically present as extranodal disease associated with human immune deficiency virus (HIV) infection. PBLs are often the initial manifestation of AIDS. Here we present a case of PBL concerning the oral cavity. A 34-year-old woman presented a tumor in the oral cavity that involved the maxilla and gingiva (confirmed by CT-scan). The gingival biopsy showed a massive infiltration by large lymphoid cells with round, vesicular nuclei, prominent nucleoli, fine chromatin and an significant amount of basophilic cytoplasm which express CD79a, CD138, cytoplasmic lambda light chain and LCA, without staining for CD20, CD38, CD3 and CTK. Serological analysis confirmed HIV positivity. PBLs lack most B-lineage markers, but many express CD79a in at least some of the cells, therefore generate difficulties in differential diagnosis. Overall assessment and correlation of the histopathological and immunohistochemical features with the clinical findings and serology investigation are the most helpful diagnostic tools and can lead to the final diagnosis. PMID:18758634

  14. The Influence of Mining and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Among Patients Admitted for Retreatment of Tuberculosis in Northern Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Mpagama, Stellah G; Lekule, Isaack A; Mbuya, Alexander W; Kisonga, Riziki M; Heysell, Scott K

    2015-08-01

    In tuberculosis (TB)-prevalent settings, patients admitted for retreatment of TB may account for a high burden of poor treatment outcome. We performed a retrospective cohort study to characterize retreatment patients and outcomes at a TB referral hospital in northern Tanzania. From 2009 to 2013, 185 patients began a retreatment regimen, the majority for relapse after prior treatment completion. Men accounted for an unexpected majority (88%), 36 (20%) were human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected and for 45 (24%) mining was their primary occupation. A poor outcome (death, default, or persistent smear positivity after 7 months of treatment) was found in 37 (23%). HIV infection was the only significant predictor of poor outcome (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 2.50, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.07-5.83, P = 0.034). Interventions to minimize need for retreatment or improve retreatment success may be regionally specific. In our setting, community-based diagnosis and management among at-risk subpopulations such as miners and those HIV infected appear of highest yield.

  15. Risk factors for perceived unmet medical needs in human immunodeficiency virus-infected adults in Seoul, Korea.

    PubMed

    Kang, Cho Ryok; Bang, Ji Hwan; Cho, Sung-Il; Kim, Kui Nam; Lee, Hee-Jin; Lee, Young Hwa; Ryu, Bo Yeong; Cho, Soo Kyung; Oh, Myoung-Don; Lee, Jong-Koo

    2016-09-01

    To identify the factors associated with perceived unmet medical needs in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults, we analyzed the results from a series of city-wide cross-sectional surveys of HIV-infected adults living in Seoul, Korea. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors related to unmet medical needs. Among the 775 subjects included in the study, 15.4% had perceived unmet medical needs. Significant factors included age group (35-49 years; adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.80; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06-3.06), lower monthly income (aOR, 3.75 for the <$900/mo group and 2.44 for the $900-$1800/mo group; 95% CI, 1.68-8.35 and 1.18-5.04, respectively), beneficiaries of the National Medical Aid Program (aOR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.01-3.17), recent CD4 cell counts <500/µL (aOR, 1.53; 95% CI, 1.01-2.33). Taken together, these data reveal strong associations of middle age and low socioeconomic status with perceived unmet medical needs among HIV-infected adults.

  16. Determinants of Anemia Among Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Adults at Care and Treatment Clinics in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Petraro, Paul; Duggan, Christopher; Spiegelman, Donna; Hertzmark, Ellen; Makubi, Abel; Chalamilla, Guerino; Siril, Helen; Sando, David; Aboud, Said; Fawzi, Wafaie W

    2016-02-01

    Anemia is often a comorbidity of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Many cross-sectional studies have been conducted on anemia and HIV, but few, if any, have addressed incidence of anemia prospectively. A longitudinal analysis was conducted in 48,068 nonpregnant HIV-infected adults in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, seen at Management and Development for Health-U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief HIV care and treatment programs between 2004 and 2011. Almost 56% (N = 27,184) of study participants had anemia (hemoglobin < 11 g/dL) at the time of enrollment at the clinic. Female gender, low body mass index (BMI), low CD4 T-cell count, high levels of liver enzyme alanine aminotransferase, antiretroviral treatment (ART) regimens, and concurrent tuberculosis treatment were all independently significantly associated with an increased risk of anemia. Low BMI and low CD4 T-cell count were independently significantly associated with an increased risk for iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Higher BMI status and ART use were associated with recovery from anemia. Anemia, including IDA, is a comorbidity that is associated with other adverse consequences (e.g., low BMI and CD4 T-cell count) among individuals with HIV infection, including those on ART. Interventions to prevent anemia and its complications need to be examined in the context of future studies. PMID:26666698

  17. Correlates of Delayed Diagnosis among Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Pulmonary Tuberculosis Suspects in a Rural HIV Clinic, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Boniface, Respicious; Moshabela, Mosa; Zulliger, Rose; Macpherson, Peter; Nyasulu, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background. Delay in pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) diagnosis is one of the major factors that affect outcome and threatens continued spread of tuberculosis. This study aimed at determining factors associated with delayed PTB diagnosis among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected individuals. Methods. A retrospective observational study was done using clinic records of HIV-infected PTB suspects attending an HIV/AIDS clinic at Tintswalo rural hospital in South Africa (SA) between January 2006 and December 2007. Using routine clinic registers, 480 records were identified. Results. PTB diagnosis delay was found among 77/176 (43.8%) of the patients diagnosed with PTB. The mean delay of PTB diagnosis was 170.6 days; diagnosis delay ranged 1-30 days in 27 (35.1%) patients, 31-180 days in 24 (33.8%) patients; 24 (31.2%) patients remained undiagnosed for ≥180 days. Independent factors associated with delayed diagnosis were: older age >40 years (Odds Ratio (OR) 3.43, 95% CI 1.45-8.08) and virological failure (OR 2.72, 95% CI 1.09-6.74). Conclusion. There is a considerable delayed PTB diagnosis among HIV-infected patients in rural SA. Older patients as well as patients with high viral load are at a higher risk of PTB diagnosis delay. Therefore efforts to reduce PTB diagnosis delay need to emphasised.

  18. Utility of fine-needle aspiration in the diagnosis of salivary gland lesions in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Chhieng, D C; Argosino, R; McKenna, B J; Cangiarella, J F; Cohen, J M

    1999-10-01

    Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) has been increasingly utilized as a diagnostic tool in evaluating salivary gland masses, primarily to differentiate nonneoplastic from neoplastic lesions. Patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) frequently present with salivary gland lesions. In this study, we reviewed the cytology of salivary gland lesions in HIV-infected patients and assessed the value of FNA in the diagnosis of salivary gland lesions in HIV-infected patients. One hundred and three FNAs of salivary gland lesions from 78 HIV-infected patients (63 males and 15 females) were included in our study. The patients' ages ranged from 7-65 yr, with a mean age of 40.9 yr. FNAs were classified into three categories: benign lymphoepithelial lesions (BLL) (77 cases or 74.8%), inflammatory processes (14 cases or 13.6%), including 3 reactive lymphoid hyperplasia, and neoplastic lesions (6 cases or 5.8%). The latter included three malignant lymphomas, a multiple myeloma, a metastatic adenocarcinoma from a lung primary, and a direct extension of basal-cell carcinoma. Six (5.8%) aspirates were nondiagnostic. No false-positive or false-negative cases were noted during follow-up of these patients. In conclusion, FNA is a simple and cost-effective procedure for the diagnosis of HIV-related salivary gland lesions. The majority of these lesions are cystic BLL and can be managed conservatively. Malignant lesions are rarely encountered and are readily recognized by FNA. Diagn. Cytopathol. 1999;21:260-264.

  19. The Influence of Mining and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection among Patients Admitted for Retreatment of Tuberculosis in Northern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Mpagama, Stellah G.; Lekule, Isaack A.; Mbuya, Alexander W.; Kisonga, Riziki M.; Heysell, Scott K.

    2015-01-01

    In tuberculosis (TB)–prevalent settings, patients admitted for retreatment of TB may account for a high burden of poor treatment outcome. We performed a retrospective cohort study to characterize retreatment patients and outcomes at a TB referral hospital in northern Tanzania. From 2009 to 2013, 185 patients began a retreatment regimen, the majority for relapse after prior treatment completion. Men accounted for an unexpected majority (88%), 36 (20%) were human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected and for 45 (24%) mining was their primary occupation. A poor outcome (death, default, or persistent smear positivity after 7 months of treatment) was found in 37 (23%). HIV infection was the only significant predictor of poor outcome (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 2.50, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.07–5.83, P = 0.034). Interventions to minimize need for retreatment or improve retreatment success may be regionally specific. In our setting, community-based diagnosis and management among at-risk subpopulations such as miners and those HIV infected appear of highest yield. PMID:26013368

  20. A relationship between CD4 count and oral manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy in urban population

    PubMed Central

    Satyakiran, Gadavalli Vera Venkata; Bavle, Radhika Manoj; Alexander, Glory; Rao, Saritha; Venugopal, Reshma; Hosthor, Sreelatha S

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection gradually destroys the body's immune system, which makes it harder for the body to fight infections. HIV infection causes a quantitative and qualitative depletion of CD4 lymphocyte count, which increases the risk of opportunistic infections. Thus, CD4 count is one of the key factors in determining both the urgency of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) initiation and the need of prophylaxis for opportunistic infections. Aim: This study aims to evaluate the prevalence and variations in the oral manifestations of HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome patients on HAART therapy in urban population and their association with CD4 count. Materials and Methods: A study was conducted by screening eighty patients who were HIV positive in an urban location. Both adult and pediatric patients were screened for oral manifestations and simultaneously CD4 count was also evaluated. Patients with HIV infection for variable time period who are under HAART were considered. Statistical Analysis: Measures of central tendency were used to analyse the data. Results: HIV infection destroys the immune system of an individual, making the patient susceptible to various infections and malignancies. With the advent of antiretroviral therapy, the scenario has changed drastically. We have observed that patients with CD4 counts between 164 and 1286 show relatively few oral manifestations. Long-term HAART therapy causes pigmentation, xerostomia and angular cheilitis but is taken up quite well by the patients. Conclusion: In this study, eighty patients with HAART from urban population showed very minimal oral findings because of good accessibility for treatment and awareness about HIV infections. The patients who were on long-standing HAART treatment also showed minimal oral manifestation such as pigmentation and xerostomia. Hence, we conclude that recognition, significance and treatment of these lesions in patients with HIV

  1. Antimicrobial peptides from amphibian skin potently inhibit human immunodeficiency virus infection and transfer of virus from dendritic cells to T cells.

    PubMed

    VanCompernolle, Scott E; Taylor, R Jeffery; Oswald-Richter, Kyra; Jiang, Jiyang; Youree, Bryan E; Bowie, John H; Tyler, Michael J; Conlon, J Michael; Wade, David; Aiken, Christopher; Dermody, Terence S; KewalRamani, Vineet N; Rollins-Smith, Louise A; Unutmaz, Derya

    2005-09-01

    Topical antimicrobicides hold great promise in reducing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission. Amphibian skin provides a rich source of broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptides including some that have antiviral activity. We tested 14 peptides derived from diverse amphibian species for the capacity to inhibit HIV infection. Three peptides (caerin 1.1, caerin 1.9, and maculatin 1.1) completely inhibited HIV infection of T cells within minutes of exposure to virus at concentrations that were not toxic to target cells. These peptides also suppressed infection by murine leukemia virus but not by reovirus, a structurally unrelated nonenveloped virus. Preincubation with peptides prevented viral fusion to target cells and disrupted the HIV envelope. Remarkably, these amphibian peptides also were highly effective in inhibiting the transfer of HIV by dendritic cells (DCs) to T cells, even when DCs were transiently exposed to peptides 8 h after virus capture. These data suggest that amphibian-derived peptides can access DC-sequestered HIV and destroy the virus before it can be transferred to T cells. Thus, amphibian-derived antimicrobial peptides show promise as topical inhibitors of mucosal HIV transmission and provide novel tools to understand the complex biology of HIV capture by DCs.

  2. Genotyping and Molecular Characterization of Hepatitis B Virus from Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Individuals in Southern Africa

    PubMed Central

    Makondo, Euphodia; Bell, Trevor G.; Kramvis, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are hyperendemic in sub-Saharan Africa. The HBV genotypes prevailing in HIV-infected Africans are unknown. Our aim was to determine the HBV genotypes in HIV-infected participants and to identify clinically significant HBV mutations. From 71 HBV DNA+ve HIV-infected participants, 49 basic core promoter/precore (BCP/PC) and 29 complete S regions were successfully sequenced. Following phylogenetic analysis of 29 specimens in the complete S region, 28 belonged to subgenotype A1 and one to D3. Mutations affecting HBeAg expression at the transcriptional (1762T1764A), translational (Kozak 1809–1812, initiation 1814–1816, G1896A with C1858T), or post translational levels (G1862T), were responsible for the high HBeAg-negativity observed. The G1862T mutation occurred only in subgenotype A1 isolates, which were found in one third (7/21) of HBsAg−ve participants, but in none of the 18 HBsAg+ve participants (p<0.05). Pre-S deletion mutants were detected in four HBsAg+ve and one HBsAg−ve participant/s. The following mutations occurred significantly more frequently in HBV isolated in this study than in strains of the same cluster of the phylogenetic tree: ps1F25L, ps1V88L/A; ps2Q10R, ps2 R48K/T, ps2A53V and sQ129R/H, sQ164A/V/G/D, sV168A and sS174N (p<0.05). ps1I48V/T occurred more frequently in females than males (p<0.05). Isolates with sV168A occurred more frequently in participants with viral loads >200 IU per ml (p<0.05) and only sS174N occurred more frequently in HBsAg−ve than in HBsAg+ve individuals (p<0.05). Prior to initiation of ART, ten percent, 3 of 29 isolates sequenced, had drug resistance mutations rtV173L, rtL180M+rtM204V and rtV214A, respectively. This study has provided important information on the molecular characteristics of HBV in HIV-infected southern Africans prior to ART initiation, which has important clinical relevance in the management of HBV/HIV co-infection in our unique setting

  3. End-Stage Renal Disease Among HIV-Infected Adults in North America

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Alison G.; Althoff, Keri N.; Jing, Yuezhou; Estrella, Michelle M.; Kitahata, Mari M.; Wester, C. William; Bosch, Ronald J.; Crane, Heidi; Eron, Joseph; Gill, M. John; Horberg, Michael A.; Justice, Amy C.; Klein, Marina; Mayor, Angel M.; Moore, Richard D.; Palella, Frank J.; Parikh, Chirag R.; Silverberg, Michael J.; Golub, Elizabeth T.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Napravnik, Sonia; Lucas, Gregory M.; Kirk, Gregory D.; Benson, Constance A.; Bosch, Ronald J.; Collier, Ann C.; Boswell, Stephen; Grasso, Chris; Mayer, Ken; Hogg, Robert S.; Harrigan, Richard; Montaner, Julio; Cescon, Angela; Brooks, John T.; Buchacz, Kate; Gebo, Kelly A.; Moore, Richard D.; Moore, Richard D.; Carey, John T.; Rodriguez, Benigno; Horberg, Michael A.; Silverberg, Michael J.; Thorne, Jennifer E.; Goedert, James J.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Klein, Marina B.; Rourke, Sean B.; Burchell, Ann; Rachlis, Anita R.; Hunter-Mellado, Robert F.; Mayor, Angel M.; Gill, M. John; Deeks, Steven G.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Saag, Michael S.; Mugavero, Michael J.; Willig, James; Eron, Joseph J.; Napravnik, Sonia; Kitahata, Mari M.; Crane, Heidi M.; Justice, Amy C.; Dubrow, Robert; Fiellin, David; Sterling, Timothy R.; Haas, David; Bebawy, Sally; Turner, Megan; Gange, Stephen J.; Anastos, Kathryn; Moore, Richard D.; Saag, Michael S.; Gange, Stephen J.; Althoff, Keri N.; Kitahata, Mari M.; McKaig, Rosemary G.; Justice, Amy C.; Freeman, Aimee M.; Moore, Richard D.; Freeman, Aimee M.; Lent, Carol; Kitahata, Mari M.; Van Rompaey, Stephen E.; Crane, Heidi M.; Webster, Eric; Morton, Liz; Simon, Brenda; Gange, Stephen J.; Althoff, Keri N.; Abraham, Alison G.; Lau, Bryan; Zhang, Jinbing; Jing, Jerry; Golub, Elizabeth; Modur, Shari; Hanna, David B.; Rebeiro, Peter; Wong, Cherise; Mendes, Adell

    2015-01-01

    Background. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults, particularly those of black race, are at high-risk for end-stage renal disease (ESRD), but contributing factors are evolving. We hypothesized that improvements in HIV treatment have led to declines in risk of ESRD, particularly among HIV-infected blacks. Methods. Using data from the North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration for Research and Design from January 2000 to December 2009, we validated 286 incident ESRD cases using abstracted medical evidence of dialysis (lasting >6 months) or renal transplant. A total of 38 354 HIV-infected adults aged 18–80 years contributed 159 825 person-years (PYs). Age- and sex-standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were estimated by race. Poisson regression was used to identify predictors of ESRD. Results. HIV-infected ESRD cases were more likely to be of black race, have diabetes mellitus or hypertension, inject drugs, and/or have a prior AIDS-defining illness. The overall SIR was 3.2 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.8–3.6) but was significantly higher among black patients (4.5 [95% CI, 3.9–5.2]). ESRD incidence declined from 532 to 303 per 100 000 PYs and 138 to 34 per 100 000 PYs over the time period for blacks and nonblacks, respectively, coincident with notable increases in both the prevalence of viral suppression and the prevalence of ESRD risk factors including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and hepatitis C virus coinfection. Conclusions. The risk of ESRD remains high among HIV-infected individuals in care but is declining with improvements in virologic suppression. HIV-infected black persons continue to comprise the majority of cases, as a result of higher viral loads, comorbidities, and genetic susceptibility. PMID:25409471

  4. Socio-demographic Characteristics of Adults Screened for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Ahoada–East Local Government Area in the Niger Delta of Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Obi, Azuonwu; Osaro, Erhabor; Nnenna, Frank-Peterside

    2011-01-01

    Background: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the pathogen responsible for the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and the most significant emerging infectious disease is causing health, social, and developmental problems to mankind. Aims, Setting and Design: This is a cross-sectional study to evaluate the socio-demographic characteristics of adults screened for HIV infection in Ahoada Community in Rivers State in the Niger Delta of Nigeria. Materials and Methods: HIV antibodies were detected using “Determine” (Abbott Laboratories, Japan), Start–Pak (Chembio Diagnostics, USA) and SD Bioline HIV-1/2 kits (Standard Diagnostics, Korea). All test procedures were carried out according to the manufacturers’ instructions. Subjects included 152) consecutively recruited adults consisting of 955 females and 566 males aged 18-54 years with a mean age of 36.25±7.02 years. Statistical Analysis: Data were entered and analyzed using statistical package SPSS version 9. A P-value ≤0.05 were considered statistically significant in all statistical comparisms. Results and Conclusion: Out of a total of 1521 persons screened for HIV infection, 162 persons tested positive for HIV (10.6%). HIV infection was higher among females (10.9%) compared to males (10.1%) and in the 25-34 and 45-60 years age groups (11.1%) (P= 0.08). HIV-1 was the predominant subtype (74%) compared to 26% for dual HIV-1 and 2. This study indicates the urgent need for both government and non-governmental organizations to intensify awareness campaign programme to reduce the spread of the HIV infection in the area with emphasis on behavioral change and economic empowerment of the people as well as provision of universal access to antiretroviral therapy for those with HIV infection. PMID:22223994

  5. High Prevalence of Multiple Human Herpesviruses in Saliva from Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Persons in the Era of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Craig S.; Berger, Joseph R.; Mootoor, Yunanan; Avdiushko, Sergei A.; Zhu, Hua; Kryscio, Richard J.

    2006-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with an increased risk for human herpesviruses (HHVs) and their related diseases. Methods for limiting the transmission of HHVs require a better understanding of the prevalence and infectiousness of oral HHVs in HIV-infected patients. We performed quantitative PCR to investigate the prevalence, quantity, risk, and correlates of salivary HHVs from 58 HIV-seropositive individuals in a case control study. HHVs were significantly more prevalent in the salivas of HIV-seropositive persons than in those of the controls (odds ratios [ORs], 4.2 to 26.2; P ≤ 0.008). In HIV-infected patients, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) were detected in 90%, 57%, 31% and 16% of samples, respectively, compared with 48%, 24%, 2%, and 2%, respectively, of samples from controls. Multiple HHVs were observed in 71% of HIV-seropositive persons and only 16% of controls (OR, 13.0; 95% confidence interval, 5.29 to 32.56). HIV-positive patients had significantly higher EBV loads than HIV-negative persons (P < 0.0001). HIV-infected patients with CD4 counts above 200 cells/μl had increased probability for having HHV-8 in saliva (P = 0.009) compared with patients whose counts were less than 200. In contrast, HSV-1, EBV, and CMV were detected more often when CD4 counts were low. High salivary HHV loads were detected for those (n = 7) with oral lesions. These findings suggest that saliva is a potential risk factor for the acquisition of multiple HHVs, and several host factors may function to accelerate HHV reactivation or replication in patients with HIV infection. PMID:16825357

  6. Detection of GB virus C genomic sequence in the cerebrospinal fluid of a HIV-infected patient in China: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Zhang, Y; Wei, F; Xu, M; Mou, D; Zhang, T; Li, W; Chen, D; Wu, H

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis G virus or GB virus C (GBV-C) is a human virus of the Flaviviridae family that is structurally and epidemiologically closest to hepatitis C virus, but replicates primarily in lymphocytes. Co-infection with GBV-C has been reported to confer beneficial outcomes in some HIV-positive patients. Up to now, however, studies on GBV-C infection in the central nervous system (CNS) of HIV-infected patient have rarely been reported. Herein, we report on a 32-year-old HIV-1-infected patient with cerebral toxoplasmosis and fungal encephalitis. GBV-C viral loads were detected in CSF by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and the results showed that GBV-C viral load was 6·5 log copies/ml. We amplified and sequenced the E2 and 5'-untranslated regions from the purified viral RNA from CSF by RT-PCR. Both sequences belong to genotype 3 and there were some minor nucleotide divergence among the E2 sequences from the CSF of the patient. These data suggest that GBV-C may be able to penetrate the blood-brain barrier and colonize the CNS of HIV-infected patients. However, the exact mechanisms and potential effect of the infected GBV-C in CNS on HIV-associated neuropathy needs to be further explored. PMID:26081197

  7. Favorable Socioeconomic Status and Recreational Polydrug Use Are Linked With Sexual Hepatitis C Virus Transmission Among Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Men Who Have Sex With Men

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun-Chi; Wiberg, Kjell J.; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Bansal, Arun; Bolzan, Philipe; Guy, Janelle A.; Maina, Erastus N.; Cox, Andrea L.; Thio, Chloe L.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Sexual transmission of hepatitis C virus (HCV) among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) is an emerging issue. Studies addressing the temporal trends and risk factors associated with incident HCV in HIV-infected MSM in the community-based primary care settings in the United States are scarce. Methods. Using a retrospective cohort study design, HCV incidence, defined as HCV antibody seroconversion, was determined in 1147 HIV-infected men receiving care at Chase Brexton Health Care clinics in Baltimore, Maryland between 2004 and 2014. Multivariate regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with incident HCV. Results. There were 42 incident HCV infections during 5242 person-years (PY) of follow up (incidence rate [IR], 8.01/1000 PY). Thirty-seven (88%) of the incident infections were in MSM, of whom 31 (84%) reported no injection-drug use (IDU). The annual IRs for MSM were 13.1–15.8/1000 PY between 2004 and 2007, decreased to 2.7–6.2/1000 PY between 2008 and 2011, and increased to 10.4/1000 PY and 13.3/1000 PY in 2013 and 2014, respectively. Injection-drug use was strongly associated with incident HCV among all MSM (IR ratio [IRR], 14.15; P = .003); however, among MSM without IDU, entering care between 2010 and 2013 (IRR, 3.32; P = .01), being employed (IRR, 3.14; P = .03), and having a history of ulcerative sexually transmitted infections (IRR, 3.70; P = .009) or of polydrug use (IRR, 5.54; P = .01) independently predicted incident HCV. Conclusions. In this cohort of HIV-infected men, a re-emerging HCV epidemic was observed from 2011 to 2014 among MSM. In addition to IDU, high-risk sexual behaviors, favorable socioeconomic status, and polydrug use fueled this increase in HCV infections. PMID:27703998

  8. Obesity Among HIV-Infected Adults Receiving Medical Care in the United States: Data From the Cross-Sectional Medical Monitoring Project and National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    PubMed

    Thompson-Paul, Angela M; Wei, Stanley C; Mattson, Christine L; Robertson, McKaylee; Hernandez-Romieu, Alfonso C; Bell, Tanvir K; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2015-07-01

    Our objective was to compare obesity prevalence among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults receiving care and the U.S. general population and identify obesity correlates among HIV-infected men and women.Cross-sectional data was collected in 2009 to 2010 from 2 nationally representative surveys: Medical Monitoring Project (MMP) and National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES).Weighted prevalence estimates of obesity, defined as body mass index ≥30.0 kg/m, were compared using prevalence ratios (PR, 95% confidence interval [CI]). Correlates of obesity in HIV-infected adults were examined using multivariable logistic regression.Demographic characteristics of the 4006 HIV-infected adults in MMP differed from the 5657 adults from the general U.S. population in NHANES, including more men (73.2% in MMP versus 49.4% in NHANES, respectively), black or African Americans (41.5% versus 11.6%), persons with annual incomes <$20,000 (64.5% versus 21.9%), and homosexuals or bisexuals (50.9% versus 3.9%). HIV-infected men were less likely to be obese (PR 0.5, CI 0.5-0.6) and HIV-infected women were more likely to be obese (PR1.2, CI 1.1-1.3) compared with men and women in the general population, respectively. Among HIV-infected women, younger age was associated with obesity (<40 versus >60 years). Among HIV-infected men, correlates of obesity included black or African American race/ethnicity, annual income >$20,000 and <$50,000, heterosexual orientation, and geometric mean CD4+ T-lymphocyte cell count >200 cells/μL.Obesity is common, affecting 2 in 5 HIV-infected women and 1 in 5 HIV-infected men. Correlates of obesity differ for HIV-infected men and women; therefore, different strategies may be needed for the prevention and treatment. PMID:26166086

  9. Cerebral infarction in an HIV-infected patient with combined protein S and C deficiency and a patent foramen ovale.

    PubMed

    Tomomasa, Ran; Yamashiro, Kazuo; Tanaka, Ryota; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2013-11-01

    A 41-year-old male with a history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection developed motor aphasia, dysarthria, and right hemiparesis. A magnetic resonance imaging scan of the brain revealed a cerebral infarction in the territory of the left middle cerebral artery. The laboratory data showed decreased levels of protein S and protein C. Transesophageal contrast-enhanced echocardiography revealed a patent foramen ovale (PFO). Prothrombotic states, such as protein S and C deficiency, have been reported in HIV-infected patients. In addition, previous studies have reported prothrombotic states to be risk factors for PFO-related cerebral infarction. An association between combined protein S and C deficiency caused by HIV infection and PFO-related cerebral infarction was suggested in our patient.

  10. Correlation between CD4 T cell Counts and Virus Compartmentalization in Genital and Systemic Compartments of HIV-infected Females

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Suman; Noel, Richard J.; Rodríguez, Nayra; Collado, Santiago; Munoz, Jhoanne; Kumar, Anil; Yamamura, Yashuhiro

    2011-01-01

    The majority of infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) across the world occurs by heterosexual transmission and is likely mediated by virus present in genital secretions. In spite of this, infection is followed by clinical markers of the virus present in blood, which may not be representative of the virus involved in transmission. In fact, several studies have demonstrated that the genital tract represents a unique compartment for the virus. We assessed the relationship between immune system integrity, represented by CD4+ T cell counts, and the maintenance of viral compartmentalization between plasma and vaginal fluid virus in treatment naïve women from the Dominican Republic infected by the heterosexual transmission route. We cloned and sequenced cell free virus from plasma and genital fluid samples from six women to assess viral evolution, phylogenetic relatedness, and calculated co-receptor use for the C2V3 region of the envelope. Our analyses demonstrated plasma and vaginal fluid virus compartments remained intact only in samples from women with CD4+ T cell counts over 350 cells/μ1 majority of viral forms were predicted to use the CCR5 co-receptor, although several dual tropic forms were also identified. None of the clones were found to use the CXCR4 co-receptor even though many of the patients showed severe disease. Our findings lend further support to the role of an intact immune system in maintaining compartmentalization across blood and genital quasispecies and provide a compelling rationale to specifically consider genital tract viral forms in therapeutic and vaccine research. PMID:21745672

  11. Effect of traditional Chinese medicine for treating human immunodeficiency virus infections and acquired immune deficiency syndrome: Boosting immune and alleviating symptoms.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wen; Wang, Jian; Liu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    To respond to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic in China, the integration of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has important implications in health outcomes, especially in China where the use of TCM is widespread. The National Free TCM Pilot Program for HIV Infected People began in 5 provinces (Henan, Hebei, Anhui, Hubei, and Guangdong) in 2004, and quickly scaled up to 19 provinces, autonomous regions, and municipalities in China including some places with high prevalence, 26,276 adults have been treated thus far. Usually, people with HIV infection seek TCM for four main reasons: to enhance immune function, to treat symptoms, to improve quality of life, and to reduce side effects related to medications. Evidences from randomized controlled clinical trials suggested some beneficial effects of use of traditional Chinese herbal medicine for HIV infections and AIDS. More proofs from large, well-designed, rigorous trials is needed to give firm support. Challenges include interaction between herbs and antiretroviral drugs, stigma and discrimination. The Free TCM Program has made considerable progress in providing the necessary alternative care and treatment for HIV-infected people in China, and has strong government support for continued improvement and expansion, establishing and improving a work mechanism integrating Chinese and Western medicines.

  12. Effect of traditional Chinese medicine for treating human immunodeficiency virus infections and acquired immune deficiency syndrome: Boosting immune and alleviating symptoms.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wen; Wang, Jian; Liu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    To respond to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic in China, the integration of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has important implications in health outcomes, especially in China where the use of TCM is widespread. The National Free TCM Pilot Program for HIV Infected People began in 5 provinces (Henan, Hebei, Anhui, Hubei, and Guangdong) in 2004, and quickly scaled up to 19 provinces, autonomous regions, and municipalities in China including some places with high prevalence, 26,276 adults have been treated thus far. Usually, people with HIV infection seek TCM for four main reasons: to enhance immune function, to treat symptoms, to improve quality of life, and to reduce side effects related to medications. Evidences from randomized controlled clinical trials suggested some beneficial effects of use of traditional Chinese herbal medicine for HIV infections and AIDS. More proofs from large, well-designed, rigorous trials is needed to give firm support. Challenges include interaction between herbs and antiretroviral drugs, stigma and discrimination. The Free TCM Program has made considerable progress in providing the necessary alternative care and treatment for HIV-infected people in China, and has strong government support for continued improvement and expansion, establishing and improving a work mechanism integrating Chinese and Western medicines. PMID:26577109

  13. Biomedical Consequences of Alcohol Use Disorders in the HIV-Infected Host Invited Review

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Patricia E.; Bagby, Gregory J.; Nelson, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is the most common and costly form of drug abuse in the United States. It is well known that alcohol abuse contributes to risky behaviors associated with greater incidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections. As HIV has become a more chronic disease since the introduction of antiretroviral therapy, it is expected that alcohol use disorders will have an adverse effect on the health of HIV-infected patients. The biomedical consequences of acute and chronic alcohol abuse are multisystemic. Based on what is currently known of the comorbid and pathophysiological conditions resulting from HIV infection in people with alcohol use disorders, chronic alcohol abuse appears to alter the virus infectivity, the immune response of the host, and the progression of disease and tissue injury, with specific impact on disease progression. The combined insult of alcohol abuse and HIV affects organ systems, including the central nervous system, the immune system, the liver, heart, and lungs, and the musculoskeletal system. Here we outline the major pathological consequences of alcohol abuse in the HIV-infected individual, emphasizing its impact on immunomodulation, erosion of lean body mass associated with AIDS wasting, and lipodystrophy. We conclude that interventions focused on reducing or avoiding alcohol abuse are likely to be important in decreasing morbidity and improving outcomes in people living with HIV/AIDS. PMID:25053365

  14. Incident Hepatitis B Virus Infection in HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Men Who Have Sex With Men From Pre-HAART to HAART Periods

    PubMed Central

    Falade-Nwulia, Oluwaseun; Seaberg, Eric C.; Snider, Anna E.; Rinaldo, Charles R.; Phair, John; Witt, Mallory D.; Thio, Chloe L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Men who have sex with men (MSM) are at high risk for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Data on the effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on incident HBV infection in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected MSM are limited. Objective To determine predictors of incident HBV infection in MSM during pre-HAART and HAART periods. Design Observational cohort study. Setting Cohort of MSM who have, or are at risk for, HIV infection. Patients 2375 HBV-uninfected MSM in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study. Measurements Poisson regression was used to compare incidence rates of HBV infection in the pre-HAART and HAART eras and to identify factors associated with incidence of HBV infection. Results In 25 322 person-years of follow-up, 244 incident HBV infections occurred. The unadjusted incidence rate was higher in HIV-infected MSM than in HIV-uninfected MSM (IRR, 1.9 [95% CI, 1.5 to 2.4]) and was significantly lower in the HAART era than in the pre-HAART era among HIV-infected (IRR, 0.2 [CI, 0.1 to 0.4]) and HIV-uninfected (IRR, 0.3 [CI, 0.2 to 0.4]) MSM. Age younger than 40 years (IRR, 2.3 [CI, 1.7 to 3.0]), more than 1 recent sexual partner (IRR, 3.1 [CI, 2.3 to 4.2]), and HIV infection (IRR, 2.4 [CI, 1.8 to 3.1]) were independently associated with higher incidence of HBV infection, whereas HBV vaccination was protective (IRR, 0.3 [CI, 0.2 to 0.4]). Highly active antiretroviral therapy with HIV RNA levels less than 400 copies/mL was associated with protection (IRR, 0.2 [CI, 0.1 to 0.5]), but HAART in those with HIV RNA levels of 400 copies/mL or greater was not. Limitation The observational nature limits inferences about causality. Conclusion Effective HAART is associated with lower incidence of HBV infection; however, even in the HAART era, incidence of HBV infection remains high among MSM. Primary Funding Source National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. PMID:26457744

  15. Current Advances in Virus-Like Particles as a Vaccination Approach against HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chongbo; Ao, Zhujun; Yao, Xiaojian

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 virus-like particles (VLPs) are promising vaccine candidates against HIV-1 infection. They are capable of preserving the native conformation of HIV-1 antigens and priming CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses efficiently via cross presentation by both major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II molecules. Progress has been achieved in the preclinical research of HIV-1 VLPs as prophylactic vaccines that induce broadly neutralizing antibodies and potent T cell responses. Moreover, the progress in HIV-1 dendritic cells (DC)-based immunotherapy provides us with a new vision for HIV-1 vaccine development. In this review, we describe updates from the past 5 years on the development of HIV-1 VLPs as a vaccine candidate and on the combined use of HIV particles with HIV-1 DC-based immunotherapy as efficient prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination strategies. PMID:26805898

  16. Effects of co-infection with hepatitis C virus and GB virus C on CD4 cell count and HIV-RNA level among HIV-infected patients treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Voirin, Nicolas; Trépo, Christian; Estève, Jacques; Chevallier, Philippe; Ritter, Jacques; Fabry, Jacques; Vanhems, Philippe

    2002-07-26

    The effects of co-infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and GB virus C (GBV-C) on CD4 cell counts and plasma HIV-RNA levels has been investigated in HIV-infected patients treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Patients co-infected with HCV and GBV-C experienced a CD4 cell increase during 4 years of HAART, whereas the increase stopped after 2 years in the other groups.

  17. Complementary Antiviral Efficacy of Hydroxyurea and Protease Inhibitors in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Dendritic Cells and Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Piccinini, Giampiero; Foli, Andrea; Comolli, Giuditta; Lisziewicz, Julianna; Lori, Franco

    2002-01-01

    Dendritic cells are susceptible to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and may transmit the virus to T cells in vivo. Scarce information is available about drug efficacy in dendritic cells because preclinical testing of antiretroviral drugs has been limited predominantly to T cells and macrophages. We compared the antiviral activities of hydroxyurea and two protease inhibitors (indinavir and ritonavir) in monocyte-derived dendritic cells and in lymphocytes. At therapeutic concentrations (50 to 100 μM), hydroxyurea inhibited supernatant virus production from monocyte-derived dendritic cells in vitro but the drug was ineffective in activated lymphocytes. Concentrations of hydroxyurea insufficient to be effective in activated lymphocytes cultured alone strongly inhibited supernatant virus production from cocultures of uninfected, activated lymphocytes with previously infected monocyte-derived dendritic cells in vitro. In contrast, protease inhibitors were up to 30-fold less efficient in dendritic cells than in activated lymphocytes. Our data support the rationale for testing of the combination of hydroxyurea and protease inhibitors, since these drugs may have complementary antiviral efficacies in different cell compartments. A new criterion for combining drugs for the treatment of HIV infection could be to include at least one drug that selectively targets HIV in viral reservoirs. PMID:11836405

  18. HIV behind Bars: Human Immunodeficiency Virus Cluster Analysis and Drug Resistance in a Reference Correctional Unit from Southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Maria Letícia R.; Kuhleis, Daniele; Picon, Pedro D.; Jarczewski, Carla A.; Osório, Marta R.; Sánchez, Alexandra; Seuánez, Héctor N.; Larouzé, Bernard; Soares, Marcelo A.; Soares, Esmeralda A.

    2013-01-01

    People deprived of liberty in prisons are at higher risk of infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) due to their increased exposure through intravenous drug use, unprotected sexual activity, tattooing in prison and blood exposure in fights and rebellions. Yet, the contribution of intramural HIV transmission to the epidemic is scarcely known, especially in low- and middle-income settings. In this study, we surveyed 1,667 inmates incarcerated at Presídio Central de Porto Alegre, located in southern Brazil, for HIV infection and molecular characterization. The HIV seroprevalence was 6.6% (110/1,667). Further analyses were carried out on 40 HIV-seropositive inmates to assess HIV transmission clusters and drug resistance within the facility with the use of molecular and phylogenetic techniques. The molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 subtypes observed was similar to the one reported for the general population in southern Brazil, with the predominance of HIV-1 subtypes C, B, CRF31_BC and unique BC recombinants. In particular, the high rate (24%) of URF_BC found here may reflect multiple exposures of the population investigated to HIV infection. We failed to find HIV-infected inmates sharing transmission clusters with each other. Importantly, the analysis of HIV-1 pol genomic fragments evidenced high rates of HIV primary and secondary (acquired) drug resistance and an alarming proportion of virologic failure among patients under treatment, unveiling suboptimal access to antiretroviral therapy (ARV), low ARV adherence and dissemination of drug resistant HIV strains in primary infections. Our results call for immediate actions of public authority to implement preventive measures, serological screening and, for HIV-seropositive subjects, clinical and treatment follow-up in order to control HIV infection and limit the spread of drug resistance strains in Brazilian prisons. PMID:23874857

  19. Relative dominance of Gag p24-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes is associated with human immunodeficiency virus control.

    PubMed

    Zuñiga, Rosario; Lucchetti, Aldo; Galvan, Patricia; Sanchez, Shyla; Sanchez, Carmen; Hernandez, Ana; Sanchez, Hugo; Frahm, Nicole; Linde, Caitlyn H; Hewitt, Hannah S; Hildebrand, William; Altfeld, Marcus; Allen, Todd M; Walker, Bruce D; Korber, Bette T; Leitner, Thomas; Sanchez, Jorge; Brander, Christian

    2006-03-01

    Conflicting data on the role of total virus- and protein-specific cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses in the control of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease progression exist. We present data generated from a Peruvian cohort of untreated, clade B-infected subjects, demonstrating that the proportion of Gag-specific, and in particular p24-reactive, CTL responses among the total virus-specific CTL activity is associated with individuals' CD4 counts and viral loads. Analyses in a second cohort in the United States confirm these findings and point towards a dominant role of Gag-specific immunity in effective control of HIV infection, providing important guidance for HIV vaccine development. PMID:16501126

  20. Risk of Anal Cancer in HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Individuals in North America

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Bryan; Justice, Amy C.; Engels, Eric; Gill, M. John; Goedert, James J.; Kirk, Gregory D.; D’Souza, Gypsyamber; Bosch, Ronald J.; Brooks, John T.; Napravnik, Sonia; Hessol, Nancy A.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Kitahata, Mari M.; Klein, Marina B.; Moore, Richard D.; Rodriguez, Benigno; Rourke, Sean B.; Saag, Michael S.; Sterling, Timothy R.; Gebo, Kelly A.; Press, Natasha; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Dubrow, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Background. Anal cancer is one of the most common cancers affecting individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), although few have evaluated rates separately for men who have sex with men (MSM), other men, and women. There are also conflicting data regarding calendar trends. Methods. In a study involving 13 cohorts from North America with follow-up between 1996 and 2007, we compared anal cancer incidence rates among 34 189 HIV-infected (55% MSM, 19% other men, 26% women) and 114 260 HIV-uninfected individuals (90% men). Results. Among men, the unadjusted anal cancer incidence rates per 100 000 person-years were 131 for HIV-infected MSM, 46 for other HIV-infected men, and 2 for HIV-uninfected men, corresponding to demographically adjusted rate ratios (RRs) of 80.3 (95% confidence interval [CI], 42.7–151.1) for HIV-infected MSM and 26.7 (95% CI, 11.5–61.7) for other HIV-infected men compared with HIV-uninfected men. HIV-infected women had an anal cancer rate of 30/100 000 person-years, and no cases were observed for HIV-uninfected women. In a multivariable Poisson regression model, among HIV-infected individuals, the risk was higher for MSM compared with other men (RR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.8–6.0), but no difference was observed comparing women with other men (RR, 1.0; 95% CI, 0.5–2.2). In comparison with the period 2000–2003, HIV-infected individuals had an adjusted RR of 0.5 (95% CI, .3–.9) in 1996–1999 and 0.9 (95% CI, .6–1.2) in 2004–2007. Conclusions. Anal cancer rates were substantially higher for HIV-infected MSM, other men, and women compared with HIV-uninfected individuals, suggesting a need for universal prevention efforts. Rates increased after the early antiretroviral therapy era and then plateaued. PMID:22291097

  1. Low Prevalence of Varicella Zoster Virus and Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 in Saliva from Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Persons in the Era of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunmei C.; Yepes, Luis C.; Danaher, Robert J.; Berger, Joseph R.; Mootoor, Yunanan; Kryscio, Richard J.; Miller, Craig S.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Human herpesviruses (HHVs), e.g. herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1, Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus, appear in saliva at greater frequency in persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) than healthy individuals. However, it is not known if varicella zoster virus (VZV) and HSV-2 appear simultaneously during HIV infection at greater frequency in saliva during this era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and amounts of VZV and HSV-2 in the saliva of HIV-infected, orally asymptomatic patients. Study Design Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to investigate the prevalence, quantity, risk, and correlates of salivary VZV and HSV-2 from 59 HIV-seropositive individuals and 53 healthy controls in a case-control, cross-sectional study. Seventy-eight percent of the HIV-seropositive patients (46/59) were taking HAART. Results VZV DNA was detected in the saliva of 5.1% (3/59) of the HIV-positive group and in only one healthy control 1.9% (1/53; P = 0.62). The amount of VZV DNA in the expressors was low, generally less than 1,100 copies/mL with no observed difference between the HIV-positive group and the controls (P= 1.0). HSV-2 DNA was not detected in either group. In the HIV-infected group, VZV shedding occurred in those on HAART, but was not associated with oral lesions, specific CD4+ or CD8+ T-cell levels, or demographic factors. Conclusions VZV was detected at low prevalence in the saliva of HIV-infected persons whereas HSV-2 was not detected in the saliva of this cohort. HAART does not appear to diminish the risk for asymptomatic VZV shedding. PMID:20123407

  2. 78 FR 29755 - Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient-Focused Drug Development and Human Immunodeficiency Virus...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-21

    ... (78 FR 21613), FDA published a document that announced the disease ] areas for meetings in fiscal... immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Patient-Focused Drug Development and HIV Cure Research. Patient-Focused Drug... Fee Act (PDUFA V). FDA is interested in obtaining patient input on the impact of HIV on daily...

  3. Effects of dimethyl prostaglandin A1 on herpes simplex virus and human immunodeficiency virus replication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; McGrath, M. S.; Hanks, D.; Erickson, S.; Pulliam, L.

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the direct effect of dimethyl prostaglandin A1 (dmPGA1) on the replication of herpes simplex virus (HSV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). dmPGA1 significantly inhibited viral replication in both HSV and HIV infection systems at concentrations of dmPGA1 that did not adversely alter cellular DNA synthesis. The 50% inhibitory concentration (ID50) for several HSV type 1 (HSV-1) strains ranged from 3.8 to 5.6 micrograms/ml for Vero cells and from 4.6 to 7.3 micrograms/ml for human foreskin fibroblasts. The ID50s for two HSV-2 strains varied from 3.8 to 4.5 micrograms/ml for Vero cells; the ID50 was 5.7 micrograms/ml for human foreskin fibroblasts. We found that closely related prostaglandins did not have the same effect on the replication of HSV; dmPGE2 and dmPGA2 caused up to a 60% increase in HSV replication compared with that in untreated virus-infected cells. HIV-1 replication in acutely infected T cells (VB line) and chronically infected macrophages was assessed by quantitative decreases in p24 concentration. The effective ID50s were 2.5 micrograms/ml for VB cells acutely infected with HIV-1 and 5.2 micrograms/m for chronically infected macrophages. dmPGA1 has an unusual broad-spectrum antiviral activity against both HSV and HIV-1 in vitro and offers a new class of potential therapeutic agents for in vivo use.

  4. Symptom Screening Among HIV-Infected Pregnant Women Is Acceptable and Has High Negative Predictive Value for Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekhar, Aditya; Gupte, Nikhil; Patil, Sandesh; Bhosale, Ramesh; Sambarey, Pradeep; Ghorpade, Shivahari; Nayak, Uma; Garda, Laila; Sastry, Jayagowri; Bharadwaj, Renu; Bollinger, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated tuberculosis (TB) screening among 799 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected pregnant women in India. Eleven (1.4%) had active TB. The negative predictive value of screening using cough, fever, night sweats, or weight loss was 99.3%. Tuberculin skin test and targeted chest radiography provided no substantial benefit. TB symptom screening, as recommended by the World Health Organization, is effective for ruling out TB in HIV-infected pregnant women. PMID:21940417

  5. The CD8+ cell non-cytotoxic antiviral response affects RNA polymerase II-mediated human immunodeficiency virus transcription in infected CD4+ cells.

    PubMed

    Blazek, Dalibor; Teque, Fernando; Mackewicz, Carl; Peterlin, Matija; Levy, Jay A

    2016-01-01

    A CD8+ cell non-cytotoxic antiviral response (CNAR), mediated by a CD8+ cell antiviral factor (CAF), is associated with a long-term healthy state in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. CNAR/CAF reduces viral transcription without a known effect on specific viral sequences in the HIV genome. In studies to define the mechanism involved in the block in viral transcription, we now report that transcription from the HIV-LTR reporter is reduced in infected CD4+ cells upon treatment with CAF. In agreement with this observation, the amount of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) on the HIV promoter and other viral regions was strongly diminished in HIV-infected CD4+ cells co-cultivated with CNAR-expressing CD8+ cells. These results demonstrate further that CNAR/CAF has a specific role in regulating HIV transcription and a step during the preinitiation complex assembly appears to be sensitive to CNAR/CAF. PMID:26499373

  6. Absence of Pneumocystis jirovecii Colonization in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Individuals With and Without Airway Obstruction and With Undetectable Viral Load.

    PubMed

    Ronit, Andreas; Klitbo, Ditte Marie; Kildemoes, Anna Overgaard; Benfield, Thomas; Gerstoft, Jan; Vestbo, Jørgen; Jensen, Jørgen Skov; Kurtzhals, Jørgen; Nielsen, Susanne Dam

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii colonization has been associated with non-acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) pulmonary comorbidity. We used spirometry to measure pulmonary function and analyzed oral wash specimens by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), targeting the large mitochondrial ribosomal subunit. For sensitivity control, a blinded subsample was subjected to touch-down PCRs, targeting both large and small ribosomal subunits and the major surface glycoprotein. Pneumocystis jirovecii deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was detected in 1 of 156 (95% confidence interval, .1%-3.5%) virologically suppressed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals confirmed by all PCR methods. Thus, prevalence of P jirovecii colonization was low and unlikely to be a major cause of pulmonary comorbidity in this group of well treated HIV-infected individuals. PMID:27006967

  7. Human Papillomavirus Prevalence and Genotype Distribution among HIV-Infected Women in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun Kyoung; Cho, Heerim; Lee, Seung Geun; Lee, Sang Yeup; Kim, Ki Hyung; Lee, Chang Hun; Chung, Joo Seop; Kwak, Ihm Soo

    2014-01-01

    The epidemiology on human papillomavirus (HPV) among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women in Korea is not well established. A retrospective study was conducted to determine the prevalence and genotype distribution of HPV infection among HIV-infected women in Korea. HPV DNA genotype and cervical cytology were examined in 60 HIV-positive women and 1,938 HIV-negative women. HPV genotypes were analyzed by using a HPV DNA chip. HIV-infected women had higher prevalence of high-risk HPV (hr-HPV) infection (30% vs 4.9%, adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 6.96; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.63-13.34, P<0.001) and abnormal cervical cytology (18.3% vs 1.8%, AOR, 10.94; 95% CI, 5.18-23.1, P<0.001) compared with controls. The most common hr-HPV genotype detected in HIV-infected women was HPV 16 (10%), followed by 18 (6.7%) and 52 (5%). Prevalence of quadrivalent vaccine-preventable types (HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18) was 21.7% and 2.3% in HIV-positive women and HIV-negative women, respectively. Age was a significant risk factor for hr-HPV infection in HIV-infected women (P=0.039). The presence of hr-HPV was significantly associated with abnormal cervical cytology (P<0.001). These findings suggest that HPV testing for cervical cancer screening in HIV-infected women would be necessary, particularly among young age group. PMID:24431902

  8. Diagnosis of paediatric HIV infection in a primary health care setting with a clinical algorithm.

    PubMed Central

    Horwood, C.; Liebeschuetz, S.; Blaauw, D.; Cassol, S.; Qazi, S.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the validity of an algorithm used by primary care health workers to identify children with symptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. This HIV algorithm is being implemented in South Africa as part of the Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI), a strategy that aims to improve childhood morbidity and mortality by improving care at the primary care level. As AIDS is a leading cause of death in children in southern Africa, diagnosis and management of symptomatic HIV infection was added to the existing IMCI algorithm. METHODS: In total, 690 children who attended the outpatients department in a district hospital in South Africa were assessed with the HIV algorithm and by a paediatrician. All children were then tested for HIV viral load. The validity of the algorithm in detecting symptomatic HIV was compared with clinical diagnosis by a paediatrician and the result of an HIV test. Detailed clinical data were used to improve the algorithm. FINDINGS: Overall, 198 (28.7%) enrolled children were infected with HIV. The paediatrician correctly identified 142 (71.7%) children infected with HIV, whereas the IMCI/HIV algorithm identified 111 (56.1%). Odds ratios were calculated to identify predictors of HIV infection and used to develop an improved HIV algorithm that is 67.2% sensitive and 81.5% specific in clinically detecting HIV infection. CONCLUSIONS: Children with symptomatic HIV infection can be identified effectively by primary level health workers through the use of an algorithm. The improved HIV algorithm developed in this study could be used by countries with high prevalences of HIV to enable IMCI practitioners to identify and care for HIV-infected children. PMID:14997238

  9. Analysis of Michigan Medicaid costs to treat HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Solomon, D J; Hogan, A J; Bouknight, R R; Solomon, C T

    1989-01-01

    To obtain better understanding of the nature and cost of health care related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, medical payment records were analyzed for 204 men, women, and children older than 60 months who had indications of HIV infection. The records were those of Michigan Medicaid, the General Assistance Medical Program, and the Resident County Hospitalization Program, with service dates on or after January 1, 1984, and which were processed by November 30, 1987. Patient payment records were coded according to whether the patient's condition was considered to be pre-HIV, HIV unrelated, possibly HIV related, or HIV related. Average monthly payments were found to be $150 for pre-HIV patient payment records, $114 for those HIV unrelated, $57 for those possibly related, and $1,213 for those related to HIV infection. HIV-related monthly payments rose from about $1,500 per month in the period 3 months prior to the patient's death to more than $8,000 in the last month of life. Men were found to have twice as many claims as women, and men's claims cost about three times as much. A higher percentage of women than men (91 percent versus 37 percent) received pre-HIV paid services, indicating a higher percentage of women were at least initially receiving Medicaid for reasons other than an HIV-related disability. Diagnostic categories that accounted for the bulk of the HIV-related health care utilization included infectious and parasitic diseases, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, diseases of the respiratory system, and non-HIV-specific immunity disorders. Inpatient hospitalization accounted for more than 75 percent of the payments, followed by physician costs (11 percent), pharmacy costs (5 percent), and outpatient costs (3 percent). A total of 45, or about 22 percent of the recipients, received zidovudine (AZT) prescriptions at an average monthly cost of $404. PMID:2508170

  10. Salivary gland lymph nodes. The site of lymphadenopathies and lymphomas associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Ioachim, H L; Ryan, J R; Blaugrund, S M

    1988-12-01

    Normally, lymph nodes are intimately associated with the salivary glands, particularly the parotid gland. Several lymph nodes are embedded in the parotid gland, other lymph nodes are adjacent to the submaxillary gland, and ectopic salivary gland acini and ducts are commonly present in cervical lymph nodes. These salivary gland lymph nodes may become the primary site of the benign lymphadenopathy and the malignant lymphomas characteristically associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. This report of a series of HIV-associated lymphatic lesions originating in salivary gland lymph nodes comprises nine cases of salivary gland masses that were surgically excised, it includes six cases of lymphadenitides and three cases of lymphoma--all originating in salivary gland lymph nodes and showing the histologic lesions known to occur in association with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The HIV-related infections and neoplasias located in the salivary gland lymph nodes raise interesting questions about the possible etiologic role of an oral portal of entry and of the virus-infected saliva. The recognition of their clinical and pathologic features is indispensable to enable correct diagnosis and treatment.

  11. Endemic mycosis complicating human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Sarosi, G A; DAvies, S F

    1996-01-01

    Persons infected with the human immunodeficiency virus are prone to the development of many fungal diseases. Normal hosts with intact immunity usually recover from infection by these less-invasive fungi. In persons with compromised T-cell-mediated immunity, however, widespread dissemination from a pulmonary focus occurs. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of the three major North American mycoses, histoplasmosis, blastomycosis, and coccidioidomycosis. In most cases, amphotericin B is the initial drug of choice, followed by one of the azoles for lifelong maintenance therapy. PMID:8732733

  12. Lipid management in human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Myerson, Merle

    2015-05-01

    The development and use of antiretroviral medications to treat patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has dramatically changed the course of this disease from one that was fatal to a chronic and more manageable condition. Recommendations and guidelines for the general population are presented in this review with suggestions as to how they may be applied to this patient population. Issues for which there is little or no information available are noted to highlight the many gaps in our knowledge regarding diagnosis and management of dyslipidemia for patients living with HIV.

  13. Gut epithelial barrier dysfunction in human immunodeficiency virus-hepatitis C virus coinfected patients: Influence on innate and acquired immunity

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, Mercedes; Fernández Gutiérrez del Álamo, Clotilde; Girón-González, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Even in cases where viral replication has been controlled by antiretroviral therapy for long periods of time, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients have several non-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) related co-morbidities, including liver disease, cardiovascular disease and neurocognitive decline, which have a clear impact on survival. It has been considered that persistent innate and acquired immune activation contributes to the pathogenesis of these non-AIDS related diseases. Immune activation has been related with several conditions, remarkably with the bacterial translocation related with the intestinal barrier damage by the HIV or by hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related liver cirrhosis. Consequently, increased morbidity and mortality must be expected in HIV-HCV coinfected patients. Disrupted gut barrier lead to an increased passage of microbial products and to an activation of the mucosal immune system and secretion of inflammatory mediators, which in turn might increase barrier dysfunction. In the present review, the intestinal barrier structure, measures of intestinal barrier dysfunction and the modifications of them in HIV monoinfection and in HIV-HCV coinfection will be considered. Both pathogenesis and the consequences for the progression of liver disease secondary to gut microbial fragment leakage and immune activation will be assessed. PMID:26819512

  14. Revised surveillance case definition for HIV infection--United States, 2014.

    PubMed

    2014-04-11

    Following extensive consultation and peer review, CDC and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists have revised and combined the surveillance case definitions for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection into a single case definition for persons of all ages (i.e., adults and adolescents aged ≥13 years and children aged <13 years). The revisions were made to address multiple issues, the most important of which was the need to adapt to recent changes in diagnostic criteria. Laboratory criteria for defining a confirmed case now accommodate new multitest algorithms, including criteria for differentiating between HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection and for recognizing early HIV infection. A confirmed case can be classified in one of five HIV infection stages (0, 1, 2, 3, or unknown); early infection, recognized by a negative HIV test within 6 months of HIV diagnosis, is classified as stage 0, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is classified as stage 3. Criteria for stage 3 have been simplified by eliminating the need to differentiate between definitive and presumptive diagnoses of opportunistic illnesses. Clinical (nonlaboratory) criteria for defining a case for surveillance purposes have been made more practical by eliminating the requirement for information about laboratory tests. The surveillance case definition is intended primarily for monitoring the HIV infection burden and planning for prevention and care on a population level, not as a basis for clinical decisions for individual patients. CDC and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists recommend that all states and territories conduct case surveillance of HIV infection using this revised surveillance case definition.

  15. Determinants of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 escape from the primary CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte response.

    PubMed

    Jones, Nicola A; Wei, Xiping; Flower, Darren R; Wong, Mailee; Michor, Franziska; Saag, Michael S; Hahn, Beatrice H; Nowak, Martin A; Shaw, George M; Borrow, Persephone

    2004-11-15

    CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play an important role in containment of virus replication in primary human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. HIV's ability to mutate to escape from CTL pressure is increasingly recognized; but comprehensive studies of escape from the CD8 T cell response in primary HIV infection are currently lacking. Here, we have fully characterized the primary CTL response to autologous virus Env, Gag, and Tat proteins in three patients, and investigated the extent, kinetics, and mechanisms of viral escape from epitope-specific components of the response. In all three individuals, we observed variation beginning within weeks of infection at epitope-containing sites in the viral quasispecies, which conferred escape by mechanisms including altered peptide presentation/recognition and altered antigen processing. The number of epitope-containing regions exhibiting evidence of early CTL escape ranged from 1 out of 21 in a subject who controlled viral replication effectively to 5 out of 7 in a subject who did not. Evaluation of the extent and kinetics of HIV-1 escape from >40 different epitope-specific CD8 T cell responses enabled analysis of factors determining escape and suggested that escape is restricted by costs to intrinsic viral fitness and by broad, codominant distribution of CTL-mediated pressure on viral replication.

  16. Determinants of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 escape from the primary CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte response.

    PubMed

    Jones, Nicola A; Wei, Xiping; Flower, Darren R; Wong, Mailee; Michor, Franziska; Saag, Michael S; Hahn, Beatrice H; Nowak, Martin A; Shaw, George M; Borrow, Persephone

    2004-11-15

    CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play an important role in containment of virus replication in primary human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. HIV's ability to mutate to escape from CTL pressure is increasingly recognized; but comprehensive studies of escape from the CD8 T cell response in primary HIV infection are currently lacking. Here, we have fully characterized the primary CTL response to autologous virus Env, Gag, and Tat proteins in three patients, and investigated the extent, kinetics, and mechanisms of viral escape from epitope-specific components of the response. In all three individuals, we observed variation beginning within weeks of infection at epitope-containing sites in the viral quasispecies, which conferred escape by mechanisms including altered peptide presentation/recognition and altered antigen processing. The number of epitope-containing regions exhibiting evidence of early CTL escape ranged from 1 out of 21 in a subject who controlled viral replication effectively to 5 out of 7 in a subject who did not. Evaluation of the extent and kinetics of HIV-1 escape from >40 different epitope-specific CD8 T cell responses enabled analysis of factors determining escape and suggested that escape is restricted by costs to intrinsic viral fitness and by broad, codominant distribution of CTL-mediated pressure on viral replication. PMID:15545352

  17. Anatomic Fat Depots and Coronary Plaque Among Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected and Uninfected Men in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Palella, Frank J.; McKibben, Rebeccah; Post, Wendy S.; Li, Xiuhong; Budoff, Matthew; Kingsley, Lawrence; Witt, Mallory D.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Brown, Todd T.

    2016-01-01

    Methods. In a cross-sectional substudy of the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study, noncontrast cardiac computed tomography (CT) scanning for coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring was performed on all men, and, for men with normal renal function, coronary CT angiography (CTA) was performed. Associations between fat depots (visceral adipose tissue [VAT], abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue [aSAT], and thigh subcutaneous adipose tissue [tSAT]) with coronary plaque presence and extent were assessed with logistic and linear regression adjusted for age, race, cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, body mass index (BMI), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) parameters. Results. Among HIV-infected men (n = 597) but not HIV-uninfected men (n = 343), having greater VAT was positively associated with noncalcified plaque presence (odds ratio [OR] = 1.04, P < .05), with a significant interaction (P < .05) by HIV serostatus. Human immunodeficiency virus-infected men had lower median aSAT and tSAT and greater median VAT among men with BMI <25 and 25–29.9 kg/m2. Among HIV-infected men, VAT was positively associated with presence of coronary plaque on CTA after adjustment for CVD risk factors (OR = 1.04, P < .05), but not after additional adjustment for BMI. There was an inverse association between aSAT and extent of total plaque among HIV-infected men, but not among HIV-uninfected men. Lower tSAT was associated with greater CAC and total plaque score extent regardless of HIV serostatus. Conclusions. The presence of greater amounts of VAT and lower SAT may contribute to increased risk for coronary artery disease among HIV-infected persons. PMID:27419170

  18. Anatomic Fat Depots and Coronary Plaque Among Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected and Uninfected Men in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Palella, Frank J; McKibben, Rebeccah; Post, Wendy S; Li, Xiuhong; Budoff, Matthew; Kingsley, Lawrence; Witt, Mallory D; Jacobson, Lisa P; Brown, Todd T

    2016-04-01

    Methods.  In a cross-sectional substudy of the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study, noncontrast cardiac computed tomography (CT) scanning for coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring was performed on all men, and, for men with normal renal function, coronary CT angiography (CTA) was performed. Associations between fat depots (visceral adipose tissue [VAT], abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue [aSAT], and thigh subcutaneous adipose tissue [tSAT]) with coronary plaque presence and extent were assessed with logistic and linear regression adjusted for age, race, cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, body mass index (BMI), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) parameters. Results.  Among HIV-infected men (n = 597) but not HIV-uninfected men (n = 343), having greater VAT was positively associated with noncalcified plaque presence (odds ratio [OR] = 1.04, P < .05), with a significant interaction (P < .05) by HIV serostatus. Human immunodeficiency virus-infected men had lower median aSAT and tSAT and greater median VAT among men with BMI <25 and 25-29.9 kg/m(2). Among HIV-infected men, VAT was positively associated with presence of coronary plaque on CTA after adjustment for CVD risk factors (OR = 1.04, P < .05), but not after additional adjustment for BMI. There was an inverse association between aSAT and extent of total plaque among HIV-infected men, but not among HIV-uninfected men. Lower tSAT was associated with greater CAC and total plaque score extent regardless of HIV serostatus. Conclusions.  The presence of greater amounts of VAT and lower SAT may contribute to increased risk for coronary artery disease among HIV-infected persons. PMID:27419170

  19. Improbability of Effective Vaccination Against Human Immunodeficiency Virus Because of Its Intracellular Transmission and Rectal Portal of Entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabin, Albert B.

    1992-09-01

    The worldwide effort to produce a vaccine against AIDS continues to disregard the fact that even human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific neutralizing antibodies and cell-mediated immunity are ineffective against virus within cells without viral antigens on the cell membrane-and that much of HIV infection is transmitted in this manner. According to a recent report, a simian immunodeficiency virus vaccine that protected monkeys against an intravenous challenge with cell-free virus was, as predicted, ineffective against an intravenous challenge with the same amount of virus in infected cells. Moreover, antibody and HIV have been found to coexist in cell-free plasma from asymptomatic and symptomatic patients. Excluding direct introduction of HIV into the bloodstream, the most common and efficient form of transmission of HIV infection is by receptive anal intercourse, and semen contains large numbers of infected cells per milliliter. Recent reports showing that colorectal cells can be persistently infected by HIV and that HIV RNA and cDNA are present in the cells of the colon of dead AIDS patients indicate that either cell-free or intracellular HIV has the capacity to multiply at the portal of entry in the colorectal area without interference from neutralizing antibodies. The available data provide no basis for testing any HIV vaccine in human beings either before or after infection. The main challenge is to find a way to kill cells with chromosomally integrated HIV cDNA without harming normal cells, perhaps by identifying repressor proteins that might be produced by the cells with integrated HIV cDNA and thus could become specific targets for cell-killing drugs.

  20. A Pilot Study of Raltegravir Plus Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in Early Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection: Challenges and Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Collier, Ann C; Chun, Tae-Wook; Maenza, Janine; Coombs, Robert W; Tapia, Kenneth; Chang, Ming; Stevens, Claire E; Justement, J Shawn; Murray, Danielle; Stekler, Joanne D; Mullins, James I; Holte, Sarah E

    2016-01-01

    Availability of integrase strand transfer inhibitors created interest in determining whether their use would decrease persistently infected cell numbers. This study hypothesized that adding raltegravir (RAL) to standard antiretroviral therapy (ART) would decrease human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected CD4(+) T cells more than standard combination ART. This was a pilot, randomized study comparing open-label standard triple ART to standard triple ART plus RAL over 96 weeks in ART-naive adults with early HIV infection. The primary objective was to compare quantity and trajectory of HIV DNA. Eighty-two persons were referred. A diverse set of reasons precluded the enrollment of all but 10. Those who enrolled and completed the study had an estimated median duration of HIV infection of 74 days at ART start. The groups had similar baseline characteristics. The RAL group had more rapid first phase plasma HIV RNA decay (0.67 log10 copies/mL/day) than with combination ART (0.34 log10copies/mL/day), p = 0.037. Second phase HIV RNA decay, residual viremia, cell-associated RNA, HIV DNA, CD4(+) T-cells with replication-competent virus, and 2LTR circle levels did not differ between groups. Among those with entry plasma HIV RNA levels above the median, 2LTR circles were significantly lower over time than in those with lower entry HIV RNA levels (p = 0.02). Our results suggest homogeneity of responses in cell-associated RNA, HIV DNA, CD4(+) T-cells with replication-competent virus, and 2LTR circles with early HIV in both ART groups. The kinetics of 2LTR DNA did not reflect the kinetics of plasma HIV RNA decline following ART initiation.

  1. A Pilot Study of Raltegravir Plus Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in Early Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection: Challenges and Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Collier, Ann C; Chun, Tae-Wook; Maenza, Janine; Coombs, Robert W; Tapia, Kenneth; Chang, Ming; Stevens, Claire E; Justement, J Shawn; Murray, Danielle; Stekler, Joanne D; Mullins, James I; Holte, Sarah E

    2016-01-01

    Availability of integrase strand transfer inhibitors created interest in determining whether their use would decrease persistently infected cell numbers. This study hypothesized that adding raltegravir (RAL) to standard antiretroviral therapy (ART) would decrease human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected CD4(+) T cells more than standard combination ART. This was a pilot, randomized study comparing open-label standard triple ART to standard triple ART plus RAL over 96 weeks in ART-naive adults with early HIV infection. The primary objective was to compare quantity and trajectory of HIV DNA. Eighty-two persons were referred. A diverse set of reasons precluded the enrollment of all but 10. Those who enrolled and completed the study had an estimated median duration of HIV infection of 74 days at ART start. The groups had similar baseline characteristics. The RAL group had more rapid first phase plasma HIV RNA decay (0.67 log10 copies/mL/day) than with combination ART (0.34 log10copies/mL/day), p = 0.037. Second phase HIV RNA decay, residual viremia, cell-associated RNA, HIV DNA, CD4(+) T-cells with replication-competent virus, and 2LTR circle levels did not differ between groups. Among those with entry plasma HIV RNA levels above the median, 2LTR circles were significantly lower over time than in those with lower entry HIV RNA levels (p = 0.02). Our results suggest homogeneity of responses in cell-associated RNA, HIV DNA, CD4(+) T-cells with replication-competent virus, and 2LTR circles with early HIV in both ART groups. The kinetics of 2LTR DNA did not reflect the kinetics of plasma HIV RNA decline following ART initiation. PMID:26862469

  2. Quantitation of Productively Infected Monocytes and Macrophages of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Avalos, Claudia R.; Price, Sarah L.; Forsyth, Ellen R.; Pin, Julia N.; Shirk, Erin N.; Bullock, Brandon T.; Queen, Suzanne E.; Li, Ming; Gellerup, Dane; O'Connor, Shelby L.; Zink, M. Christine; Mankowski, Joseph L.; Gama, Lucio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite the success of combined antiretroviral therapy (ART), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection remains a lifelong infection because of latent viral reservoirs in infected patients. The contribution of CD4+ T cells to infection and disease progression has been extensively studied. However, during early HIV infection, macrophages in brain and other tissues are infected and contribute to tissue-specific diseases, such as encephalitis and dementia in brain and pneumonia in lung. The extent of infection of monocytes and macrophages has not been rigorously assessed with assays comparable to those used to study infection of CD4+ T cells and to evaluate the number of CD4+ T cells that harbor infectious viral genomes. To assess the contribution of productively infected monocytes and macrophages to HIV- and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected cells in vivo, we developed a quantitative virus outgrowth assay (QVOA) based on similar assays used to quantitate CD4+ T cell latent reservoirs in HIV- and SIV-infected individuals in whom the infection is suppressed by ART. Myeloid cells expressing CD11b were serially diluted and cocultured with susceptible cells to amplify virus. T cell receptor β RNA was measured as a control to assess the potential contribution of CD4+ T cells in the assay. Virus production in the supernatant was quantitated by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. Productively infected myeloid cells were detected in blood, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, lungs, spleen, and brain, demonstrating that these cells persist throughout SIV infection and have the potential to contribute to the viral reservoir during ART. IMPORTANCE Infection of CD4+ T cells and their role as latent reservoirs have been rigorously assessed; however, the frequency of productively infected monocytes and macrophages in vivo has not been similarly studied. Myeloid cells, unlike lymphocytes, are resistant to the cytopathic effects of HIV. Moreover, tissue

  3. Functional Mechanisms of Treg in the Context of HIV Infection and the Janus Face of Immune Suppression

    PubMed Central

    López-Abente, Jacobo; Correa-Rocha, Rafael; Pion, Marjorie

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an important role in infections, by modulating host immune responses and avoiding the overreactive immunity that in the case of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection leads to a marked erosion and deregulation of the entire immune system. Therefore, the suppressive function of Treg in HIV-infected patients is critical because of their implication on preventing the immune hyperactivation, even though it could also have a detrimental effect by suppressing HIV-specific immune responses. In recent years, several studies have shown that HIV-1 can directly infect Treg, disturbing their phenotype and suppressive capacity via different mechanisms. These effects include Foxp3 and CD25 downregulation, and the impairment of suppressive capacity. This review describes the functional mechanisms of Treg to modulate immune activation during HIV infection, and how such control is no longer fine-tune orchestrated once Treg itself get infected. We will review the current knowledge about the HIV effects on the Treg cytokine expression, on pathways implying the participation of different ectoenzymes (i.e., CD39/CD73 axis), transcription factors (ICER), and lastly on cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), one of the keystones in Treg-suppressive function. To define which are the HIV effects upon these regulatory mechanisms is crucial not only for the comprehension of immune deregulation in HIV-infected patients but also for the correct understanding of the role of Tregs in HIV infection. PMID:27242797

  4. Suppression of human immunodeficiency virus replication by ascorbate in chronically and acutely infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Harakeh, S; Jariwalla, R J; Pauling, L

    1990-01-01

    We have studied the action of ascorbate (vitamin C) on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the etiological agent clinically associated with AIDS. We report the suppression of virus production and cell fusion in HIV-infected T-lymphocytic cell lines grown in the presence of nontoxic concentrations of ascorbate. In chronically infected cells expressing HIV at peak levels, ascorbate reduced the levels of extracellular reverse transcriptase (RT) activity (by greater than 99%) and of p24 antigen (by 90%) in the culture supernatant. Under similar conditions, no detectable inhibitory effects on cell viability, host metabolic activity, and protein synthesis were observed. In freshly infected CD4+ cells, ascorbate inhibited the formation of giant-cell syncytia (by approximately 93%). Exposure of cell-free virus to ascorbate at 37 degrees C for 1 day had no effect on its RT activity or syncytium-forming ability. Prolonged exposure of virus (37 degrees C for 4 days) in the presence of ascorbate (100-150 micrograms/ml) resulted in the drop by a factor of 3-14 in RT activity as compared to a reduction by a factor of 25-172 in extracellular RT released from chronically infected cells. These results indicate that ascorbate mediates an anti-HIV effect by diminishing viral protein production in infected cells and RT stability in extracellular virions. Images PMID:1698293

  5. Human immunodeficiency virus-induced pathology favored by cellular transmission and activation

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, D.E.; Yoffe, B.; Bosworth, C.G.; Hollinger, F.B.; Rich, R.R.

    1988-03-01

    Epidemiological data suggest that transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) occurs primarily by transference of virally infected cells. However, the efficiency of lytic productive infection induced by HIV after transmission of cell-associated virus vs. free virus is difficult to assess. The present studies compare the extent of depletion of CD4+ (helper/inducer) T cells after mixing uninfected cells with either free HIV or irradiated HIV-infected allogeneic or autologous cells in vitro. Rapid CD4+ cellular depletion occurred only in cultures containing allogeneic infected cells or after addition of a nonspecific T cell activation signal to cultures with autologous infected cells. These in vitro observations strongly support the epidemiological implication that interactions between infected and uninfected cells are the most efficient means of transmission and HIV-induced cytopathology in vivo. They also provide direct support for the concept that immunological stimulation by foreign cells infected with HIV dramatically increases the likelihood of transmission. These in vitro observations suggest a model for the acquisition of HIV in vivo and the role of cellular activation in dissemination of the virus to uninfected cells in an infected individual.

  6. Involvement of claudin-7 in HIV infection of CD4(-) cells

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Junying; Xie, Yiming; Campbell, Richard; Song, Jun; Massachi, Samira; Razi, Miriam; Chiu, Robert; Berenson, James; Yang, Otto O; Chen, Irvin SY; Pang, Shen

    2005-01-01

    Background Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection of CD4(-) cells has been demonstrated, and this may be an important mechanism for HIV transmission. Results We demonstrated that a membrane protein, claudin-7 (CLDN-7), is involved in HIV infection of CD4(-) cells. A significant increase in HIV susceptibility (2- to 100-fold) was demonstrated when CLDN-7 was transfected into a CD4(-) cell line, 293T. In addition, antibodies against CLDN-7 significantly decreased HIV infection of CD4(-) cells. Furthermore, HIV virions expressing CLDN-7 on their envelopes had a much higher infectivity for 293T CD4(-) cells than the parental HIV with no CLDN-7. RT-PCR results demonstrated that CLDN-7 is expressed in both macrophages and stimulated peripheral blood leukocytes, suggesting that most HIV virions generated in infected individuals have CLDN-7 on their envelopes. We also found that CLDN-7 is highly expressed in urogenital and gastrointestinal tissues. Conclusion Together these results suggest that CLDN-7 may play an important role in HIV infection of CD4(-) cells. PMID:16368003

  7. How does sex trafficking increase the risk of HIV Infection? An observational study from Southern India.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Kathleen E; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric J; Silverman, Jay G; Murray, Megan B

    2013-02-01

    Studies have documented the substantial risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection endured by sex-trafficked women, but it remains unclear how exposure to trafficking puts its victims at risk. We assessed whether the association between sex trafficking and HIV could be explained by self-reported forced prostitution or young age at entry into prostitution using cross-sectional data collected from 1,814 adult female sex workers in Karnataka, India, between August 2005 and August 2006. Marginal structural logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios for HIV infection. Overall, 372 (21%) women met 1 or both criteria used to define sex trafficking: 278 (16%) began sex work before age 18 years, and 107 (5%) reported being forcibly prostituted. Thirteen (0.7%) met both criteria. Forcibly prostituted women were more likely to be HIV-infected than were women who joined the industry voluntarily, independent of age at entering prostitution (odds ratio = 2.30, 95% confidence interval: 1.08, 4.90). Conversely, after adjustment for forced prostitution and other confounders, no association between age at entry into prostitution and HIV was observed. The association between forced prostitution and HIV infection became stronger in the presence of sexual violence (odds ratio = 11.13, 95% confidence interval: 2.41, 51.40). These findings indicate that forced prostitution coupled with sexual violence probably explains the association between sex trafficking and HIV. PMID:23324332

  8. Global prevention of HIV infection for neglected populations: men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Beyrer, Chris

    2010-05-15

    The global epidemiology of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among men who have sex with men (MSM) suggests both reemergent spread among men in resource-sufficient countries since 2000 and emerging epidemics among MSM in resource-limited countries. Both epidemic contexts are evidence of the current limits of prevention of HIV infection in MSM. A range of evidence-based preventive interventions exist, but few new interventions have shown efficacy among MSM. Circumcision has not been investigated for MSM. New interventions are needed. Trials of preexposure prophylaxis are pending and may markedly alter the prevention landscape. For MSM in developing countries, basic services for prevention of HIV infection have yet to reach the large majority of men. Homophobia and discrimination limit access of MSM to prevention services and markedly increase vulnerability, as does criminalization of same-sex behavior. Decriminalization of same-sex behavior is a structural intervention for prevention of HIV infection and has recently been embraced by a nonbinding statement from the United Nations.

  9. Stimulation of Liver X Receptor Has Potent Anti-HIV Effects in a Humanized Mouse Model of HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Ramezani, Ali; Dubrovsky, Larisa; Pushkarsky, Tatiana; Sviridov, Dmitri; Karandish, Sara; Raj, Dominic S; Fitzgerald, Michael L; Bukrinsky, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that liver X receptor (LXR) agonists inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication by upregulating cholesterol transporter ATP-binding cassette A1 (ABCA1), suppressing HIV production, and reducing infectivity of produced virions. In this study, we extended these observations by analyzing the effect of the LXR agonist T0901317 [N-[4-(1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-hydroxypropan-2-yl)phenyl]-N-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)benzenesulfonamide] on the ongoing HIV infection and investigating the possibility of using LXR agonist for pre-exposure prophylaxis of HIV infection in a humanized mouse model. Pre-exposure of monocyte-derived macrophages to T0901317 reduced susceptibility of these cells to HIV infection in vitro. This protective effect lasted for up to 4 days after treatment termination and correlated with upregulated expression of ABCA1, reduced abundance of lipid rafts, and reduced fusion of the cells with HIV. Pre-exposure of peripheral blood leukocytes to T0901317 provided only a short-term protection against HIV infection. Treatment of HIV-exposed humanized mice with LXR agonist starting 2 weeks postinfection substantially reduced viral load. When eight humanized mice were pretreated with LXR agonist prior to HIV infection, five animals were protected from infection, two had viral load at the limit of detection, and one had viral load significantly reduced relative to mock-treated controls. T0901317 pretreatment also reduced HIV-induced dyslipidemia in infected mice. In conclusion, these results reveal a novel link between LXR stimulation and cell resistance to HIV infection and suggest that LXR agonists may be good candidates for development as anti-HIV agents, in particular for pre-exposure prophylaxis of HIV infection.

  10. Complete genome analysis of hepatitis B virus in human immunodeficiency virus infected and uninfected South Africans.

    PubMed

    Gededzha, Maemu P; Muzeze, Muxe; Burnett, Rosemary J; Amponsah-Dacosta, Edina; Mphahlele, M Jeffrey; Selabe, Selokela G

    2016-09-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections are highly endemic in South Africa. Data on the complete genome sequences of HBV in HIV-positive patients in South Africa are scanty. This study characterized the complete HBV genome isolated from both HIV-positive and negative patients at the Dr George Mukhari Academic Hospital (DGMAH), Pretoria. Serum samples from nine (five HIV-positive and four HIV-negative) patients attending the DGMAH from 2007 to 2011 were serologically tested, amplified, and sequenced for complete genome. Phylogenetic tree was constructed using MEGA6.0. Mutations were analyzed by comparing the sequences with genotype-matched GenBank references. Eight patients were HBsAg positive, with only one from the HIV positive group being negative. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete genome sequences classified them into five genotypes; A1 (n = 4), A2 (n = 1), C1 (n = 2), D1 (n = 1), and D3 (n = 1). Deletions up to 35 nucleotides in length were identified in this study. No drug resistance mutations were identified in the P ORF, while the L217R mutation was identified in one subgenotype A2 sequence. The double (A1762T/G1764A) and triple (T1753C/A1762T/G1764A) mutations in the Basal core promoter were identified in four and two sequences, respectively. In the core region, mutation G1888A was identified in four of the subgenotype A1 sequences. In conclusion, this study has added to the limited South African data on HBV genotypes and mutations in HBV/HIV co-infected and HBV mono-infected patients, based on complete HBV genome analysis. Subgenotype A1 was predominant, and no drug-resistant mutants were detected in the study. J. Med. Virol. 88:1560-1566, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Enhancing Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Specific CD8+ T Cell Responses with Heteroclitic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Adegoke, Adeolu Oyemade; Grant, Michael David

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific CD8+ T cells play a critical role in containing HIV replication and delaying disease progression. However, HIV-specific CD8+ T cells become progressively more “exhausted” as chronic HIV infection proceeds. Symptoms of T cell exhaustion range from expression of inhibitory receptors and selective loss of cytokine production capacity through reduced proliferative potential, impaired differentiation into effector cells and increased susceptibility to apoptosis. While effective combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) durably reduces HIV viremia to undetectable levels, this alone does not restore the full pluripotency of HIV-specific CD8+ T cells. In a number of studies, a subset of peptide epitope variants categorized as heteroclitic, restimulated more potent cellular immune responses in vitro than did the native, immunizing peptides themselves. This property of heteroclitic peptides has been exploited in experimental cancer and chronic viral infection models to promote clearance of transformed cells and persistent viruses. In this review, we consider the possibility that heteroclitic peptides could improve the efficacy of therapeutic vaccines as part of HIV immunotherapy or eradication strategies. We review literature on heteroclitic peptides and illustrate their potential to beneficially modulate the nature of HIV-specific T cell responses toward those found in the small minority of HIV-infected, aviremic cART-naïve persons termed elite controllers or long-term non-progressors. Our review suggests that the efficacy of HIV vaccines could be improved by identification, testing, and incorporation of heteroclitic variants of native HIV peptide epitopes. PMID:26257743

  12. De Novo intracerebral aneurysm in a child with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bakhaidar, Mohamad G; Ahamed, Naushad A; Almekhlafi, Mohammed A; Baeesa, Saleh S

    2015-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection associated aneurysmal vasculopathy is a rare complication of HIV infection affecting the pediatric and adult population. We present a case of a 7-year-old male child known to have a congenitally acquired HIV infection presenting with a ruptured left distal internal carotid artery fusiform aneurysm that was diagnosed on MRI scans 6 months prior to his presentation. He underwent craniotomy and successful aneurysm reconstruction. He had uncomplicated postoperative course and experienced a good recovery. This case is among the few reported pediatric cases of HIV-associated cerebral arteriopathy to undergo surgery. We also reviewed the relevant literature of this rare condition.

  13. Disruption of Type I Interferon Induction by HIV Infection of T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, David Jesse; Miranda, Daniel; Marsden, Matthew D.; Dizon, Thomas Michael A.; Bontemps, Johnny R.; Davila, Sergio J.; Del Mundo, Lara E.; Ha, Thai; Senaati, Ashkon; Zack, Jerome A.; Cheng, Genhong

    2015-01-01

    Our main objective of this study was to determine how Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) avoids induction of the antiviral Type I Interferon (IFN) system. To limit viral infection, the innate immune system produces important antiviral cytokines such as the IFN. IFN set up a critical roadblock to virus infection by limiting further replication of a virus. Usually, IFN production is induced by the recognition of viral nucleic acids by innate immune receptors and subsequent downstream signaling. However, the importance of IFN in the defense against viruses has lead most pathogenic viruses to evolve strategies to inhibit host IFN induction or responses allowing for increased pathogenicity and persistence of the virus. While the adaptive immune responses to HIV infection have been extensively studied, less is known about the balance between induction and inhibition of innate immune defenses, including the antiviral IFN response, by HIV infection. Here we show that HIV infection of T cells does not induce significant IFN production even IFN I Interferon production. To explain this paradox, we screened HIV proteins and found that two HIV encoded proteins, Vpu and Nef, strongly antagonize IFN induction, with expression of these proteins leading to loss of expression of the innate immune viral RNA sensing adaptor protein, IPS-1 (IFN-β promoter stimulator-1). We hypothesize that with lower levels of IPS-1 present, infected cells are defective in mounting antiviral responses allowing HIV to replicate without the normal antiviral actions of the host IFN response. Using cell lines as well as primary human derived cells, we show that HIV targeting of IPS-1 is key to limiting IFN induction. These findings describe how HIV infection modulates IFN induction providing insight into the mechanisms by which HIV establishes infection and persistence in a host. PMID:26375588

  14. Epidemiology of Meningitis in an HIV-Infected Ugandan Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Rajasingham, Radha; Rhein, Joshua; Klammer, Kate; Musubire, Abdu; Nabeta, Henry; Akampurira, Andrew; Mossel, Eric C.; Williams, Darlisha A.; Boxrud, Dave J.; Crabtree, Mary B.; Miller, Barry R.; Rolfes, Melissa A.; Tengsupakul, Supatida; Andama, Alfred O.; Meya, David B.; Boulware, David R.

    2015-01-01

    There is limited understanding of the epidemiology of meningitis among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected populations in sub-Saharan Africa. We conducted a prospective cohort study of HIV-infected adults with suspected meningitis in Uganda, to comprehensively evaluate the etiologies of meningitis. Intensive cerebrospiral fluid (CSF) testing was performed to evaluate for bacterial, viral, fungal, and mycobacterial etiologies, including neurosyphilis,16s ribosomal DNA (rDNA) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for bacteria, Plex-ID broad viral assay, quantitative-PCR for HSV-1/2, cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein–Barr virus (EBV), and Toxoplasma gondii; reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) for Enteroviruses and arboviruses, and Xpert MTB/RIF assay. Cryptococcal meningitis accounted for 60% (188 of 314) of all causes of meningitis. Of 117 samples sent for viral PCR, 36% were EBV positive. Among cryptococcal antigen negative patients, the yield of Xpert MTB/RIF assay was 22% (8 of 36). After exclusion of cryptococcosis and bacterial meningitis, 61% (43 of 71) with an abnormal CSF profile had no definitive diagnosis. Exploration of new TB diagnostics and diagnostic algorithms for evaluation of meningitis in resource-limited settings remains needed, and implementation of cryptococcal diagnostics is critical. PMID:25385864

  15. [Control of HCV, HBV and HIV Infections in Hemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Fabrizi, Fabrizio; Martin, Paul; Messa, Piergiorgio

    2013-01-01

    Infections with blood-borne pathogens are still common among patients on maintenance dialysis all over the world. The control of infection due to blood-borne viruses (particularly HBV) within dialysis units has been a major goal in the management of patients with chronic kidney disease in the industrialized world. Standard precautions and specific procedures have been recommended to prevent infections with HBV, HCV and HIV within dialysis units. Isolation of HBsAg positive patients by dialysis rooms, staff and machines continues to be an important step to control HBV infection within dialysis units, according to the CDC and other regulatory agencies. Some prospective observational studies have reported the complete prevention of HCV transmission to hemodialysis patients in the absence of any isolation policy, and the use of dedicated dialysis machines for HCV-infected patients is not recommended by clinical guidelines. Isolation of HCV-infected patients should be considered in special circumstances only. Vaccination is an important tool against transmission of HBV among patients on long-term dialysis even if the immune response towards the hepatitis B vaccine remains unsatisfactory. Hemodialysis is considered a low risk setting for the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, providing that standard and specific procedures are carefully observed. HIV-infected patients do not have to be isolated from other patients or dialyzed separately on dedicated machines.

  16. Simulation of HIV infection in artificial immune systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieburg, Hans B.; McCutchan, J. Allen; Clay, Oliver K.; Cabalerro, Lisa; Ostlund, James J.

    1990-09-01

    Infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) causes a multi-faceted disease process which ultimately leads to severe degenerative conditions in the immune and nervous systems. The complexity of the virus/host-system interaction has brought into sharp focus the need for alternative efforts by which to overcome the limitations of available animal models. This article reports on the dynamics of HIV infection in an artificial immune system (AIS), a novel in silico tool for bio-medical research. Using a method of graphical programming, the HIV/AIS interactions are described at the cellular level and then transferred into the setting of an asynchronous cellular automaton simulation. A specific problem in HIV pathogenesis is addressed: To determine the extent by which the physiological connectivity of a normal B-cell, T-cell, macrophage immune system supports persistence of infection and disease progression to AIDS. Several observations are discussed which will be presented in four categories: (a) the major known manifestations of HIV infection and AIDS; (b) the predictability of latency and sudden progression to disease; (c) the predictability of HIV-dependent alterations of cytokine secretion patterns, and (d) secondary infections, which are found to be a critical element in establishing and maintaining a progressive disease dynamics. The effects of exogenously applied cytokine Interleukin 2 are considered. All results are summarized in a phase-graph model of the global HIV/AIS dynamical system.

  17. New ways of preventing HIV infection: thinking simply, simply thinking

    PubMed Central

    Short, R.V

    2006-01-01

    HIV infection is the greatest health crisis in human history. It continues to spread unchecked among the poor in the developing world because we have failed to design simple preventative methods that are available and affordable to those living on under $2 a day. Five new methods are discussed. (i) A natural microbicide. Intravaginal lime or lemon juice has been used for centuries as a traditional contraceptive. The juice can also kill HIV in the laboratory, but clinical trials are needed to see if vaginal application is acceptable, safe and effective. (ii) Intravaginal oestrogen. Monkeys can be protected from Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection by keratinizing the vagina with topical oestrogen. If women take the oral contraceptive pill vaginally it retains its contraceptive efficacy, and the oestrogen it contains should thicken the vagina and protect against HIV infection. Clinical trials are needed. (iii) Male circumcision. Removal of the inner foreskin removes the main site of HIV entry into the penis, resulting in a sevenfold reduction in susceptibility to infection. The practice needs to be promoted. (iv) Post-coital penile hygiene. Wiping the penis immediately after intercourse with lime or lemon juice or vinegar should kill the virus before it has had a chance to infect. A clinical trial of efficacy is needed. (v) PhotoVoice. Asking schoolchildren in developing countries to photograph their impressions of HIV/AIDS is a powerful way of getting them to discuss the subject openly, and develop their own preventative strategies. PMID:16627296

  18. Epidemiology of meningitis in an HIV-infected Ugandan cohort.

    PubMed

    Rajasingham, Radha; Rhein, Joshua; Klammer, Kate; Musubire, Abdu; Nabeta, Henry; Akampurira, Andrew; Mossel, Eric C; Williams, Darlisha A; Boxrud, Dave J; Crabtree, Mary B; Miller, Barry R; Rolfes, Melissa A; Tengsupakul, Supatida; Andama, Alfred O; Meya, David B; Boulware, David R

    2015-02-01

    There is limited understanding of the epidemiology of meningitis among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected populations in sub-Saharan Africa. We conducted a prospective cohort study of HIV-infected adults with suspected meningitis in Uganda, to comprehensively evaluate the etiologies of meningitis. Intensive cerebrospiral fluid (CSF) testing was performed to evaluate for bacterial, viral, fungal, and mycobacterial etiologies, including neurosyphilis,16s ribosomal DNA (rDNA) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for bacteria, Plex-ID broad viral assay, quantitative-PCR for HSV-1/2, cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and Toxoplasma gondii; reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) for Enteroviruses and arboviruses, and Xpert MTB/RIF assay. Cryptococcal meningitis accounted for 60% (188 of 314) of all causes of meningitis. Of 117 samples sent for viral PCR, 36% were EBV positive. Among cryptococcal antigen negative patients, the yield of Xpert MTB/RIF assay was 22% (8 of 36). After exclusion of cryptococcosis and bacterial meningitis, 61% (43 of 71) with an abnormal CSF profile had no definitive diagnosis. Exploration of new TB diagnostics and diagnostic algorithms for evaluation of meningitis in resource-limited settings remains needed, and implementation of cryptococcal diagnostics is critical.

  19. Is Emtricitabine-Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate Pre-exposure Prophylaxis for the Prevention of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Safer Than Aspirin?

    PubMed

    Kojima, Noah; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2016-01-01

    Background.  The safety and effectiveness studies of emtricitabine-tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (FTC-TDF) for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in men and women showed that daily use reduced the risk of HIV acquisition, but there still may concerns about safety. Methods.  A narrative review was done in September 2015 comparing the 5 major studies on PrEP for HIV infection-Preexposure Prophylaxis Initiative (N = 2499; 3324 person-years), Partners Preexposure Prophylaxis (N = 4747; 7830 person-years), TDF2 (N = 1219; 1563 person-years), Preexposure Prophylaxis Trial for HIV Prevention among African Women (N = 2056; 1407 person-years), and Vaginal and Oral Interventions to Control the Epidemic (N = 4969; 5509 person-years)-and the 2 major studies on aspirin safety-Physicians' Health Study (N = 22 071; over 110 000 person-years) and the Women's Health Study (N = 39 876; approximately 400 000 person-years). The numbers needed to harm (NNH) were calculated for FTC-TDF for HIV infection PrEP and aspirin. Results.  The NNH for FTC-TDF in men who have sex with men and transgender women was 114 for nausea and 96 for unintentional weight loss; in heterosexual couples, the NNH was 68 for moderate decreased absolute neutrophil count. For aspirin, the NNH was 909 for major gastrointestinal bleeding, 123 for any gastrointestinal bleeding, and 15 for any bleeding problems in men. In women, the NNH for easy bruising was 10. Conclusions.  We conclude that FTC-TDF for PrEP for HIV infection favorably compares with aspirin in terms of user safety. Although long-term studies are needed, providers should feel reassured about the safety of short- and medium-term PrEP for HIV infection with FTC-TDF. PMID:26949714

  20. Patterns of Healthcare Utilization Among Veterans Infected With Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Coinfected With HIV/HCV: Unique Burdens of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Katrak, Shereen; Park, Lawrence P.; Woods, Christopher; Muir, Andrew; Hicks, Charles; Naggie, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Background. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a leading cause of cirrhosis and the primary cause of liver transplantation in the United States, and coinfection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) increases the risk of comorbidities. However, healthcare utilization (HCU) patterns among HIV/HCV-coinfected patients are poorly understood. This study compared the rates of HCU and reasons for hospital admission among HCV-infected, HIV-infected, and HIV/HCV-coinfected veterans. Methods. Hepatitis C virus- and HIV-infected and HIV/HCV-coinfected veterans in care with the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) from 1998 to 2009 (n = 335 371, n = 28 179, n = 13 471, respectively) were identified by HIV- and HCV-associated International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes from the clinical case registry. We assessed rates of HCU using emergency department (ED) visits, outpatient visits, and hospitalization and primary diagnoses associated with hospitalization. Independent risk factors associated with hospitalization were also examined. Results. Rates of outpatient and ED visits increased over the 11-year study period for all groups, with inpatient admission rates remaining stable. The HCU rates were consistently higher for the coinfected than other cohorts. The primary reason for hospital admission for all groups was psychiatric disease/substance use, accounting for 44% of all admissions. Nadir CD4 <350 cells/mm3 was associated with higher rates of hospitalization versus nadir CD4 >500 cells/mm3. Conclusions. As the current population of HCV-infected, HIV-infected, and HIV/HCV-coinfected veterans age, they will continue to place a substantial and increasing demand on the US healthcare system, particularly in their utilization of ED and outpatient services. These data suggest the need for an ongoing investment in mental health and primary care within the VA healthcare system. PMID:27704025

  1. Resolution of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection-related severe pulmonary hypertension in a very low-birth-weight infant.

    PubMed

    Feiterna-Sperling, Cornelia; Hüseman, Dieter; Timme, Jens; Bührer, Christoph; Obladen, Michael

    2008-06-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) affects approximately 0.5% of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults with poor prognosis. The effectiveness of highly active antiretroviral therapy for treatment of HIV-related PAH (HIV-PAH) remains controversial. Little is known about the incidence, clinical course, and therapy options for PAH in HIV-1-infected pediatric patients. Here, we report the case of a preterm infant with HIV-related life-threatening PAH, which resolved after initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy.

  2. Current laboratory diagnosis of opportunistic enteric parasites in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

    PubMed

    De, Anuradha

    2013-01-01

    Diarrhea is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. Opportunistic enteric parasitic infections are encountered in 30-60% of HIV seropositive patients in developed countries and in 90% of patients in developing countries. Once the CD4(+) cell count drops below 200 cells/μl, patients are considered to have developed acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), with the risk of an AIDS-defining illness or opportunistic infection significantly increasing. Opportunistic enteric parasites encountered in these patients are Cryptosporidium, Isospora, Cyclospora, and microsporidia; as well as those more commonly associated with gastrointestinal disease, for example, Giardia intestinalis, Entamoeba histolytica, Strongyloides stercoralis, and also rarely Balantidium coli. In view of AIDS explosion in India, opportunistic enteric parasites are becoming increasingly important and it has to be identified properly. Apart from wet mounts, concentration methods for stool samples and special staining techniques for identification of these parasites, commercially available fecal immunoassays are widely available for the majority of enteric protozoa. Molecular methods such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism, flow cytometry, and sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), have also come in the pipeline for early diagnosis of these infections. Proper disposal of the feces to prevent contamination of the soil and water, boiling/filtering drinking water along with improved personal hygiene might go a long way in preventing these enteric parasitic infections.

  3. Current laboratory diagnosis of opportunistic enteric parasites in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

    PubMed

    De, Anuradha

    2013-01-01

    Diarrhea is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. Opportunistic enteric parasitic infections are encountered in 30-60% of HIV seropositive patients in developed countries and in 90% of patients in developing countries. Once the CD4(+) cell count drops below 200 cells/μl, patients are considered to have developed acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), with the risk of an AIDS-defining illness or opportunistic infection significantly increasing. Opportunistic enteric parasites encountered in these patients are Cryptosporidium, Isospora, Cyclospora, and microsporidia; as well as those more commonly associated with gastrointestinal disease, for example, Giardia intestinalis, Entamoeba histolytica, Strongyloides stercoralis, and also rarely Balantidium coli. In view of AIDS explosion in India, opportunistic enteric parasites are becoming increasingly important and it has to be identified properly. Apart from wet mounts, concentration methods for stool samples and special staining techniques for identification of these parasites, commercially available fecal immunoassays are widely available for the majority of enteric protozoa. Molecular methods such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism, flow cytometry, and sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), have also come in the pipeline for early diagnosis of these infections. Proper disposal of the feces to prevent contamination of the soil and water, boiling/filtering drinking water along with improved personal hygiene might go a long way in preventing these enteric parasitic infections. PMID:23961436

  4. Current laboratory diagnosis of opportunistic enteric parasites in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    De, Anuradha

    2013-01-01

    Diarrhea is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. Opportunistic enteric parasitic infections are encountered in 30-60% of HIV seropositive patients in developed countries and in 90% of patients in developing countries. Once the CD4+ cell count drops below 200 cells/μl, patients are considered to have developed acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), with the risk of an AIDS-defining illness or opportunistic infection significantly increasing. Opportunistic enteric parasites encountered in these patients are Cryptosporidium, Isospora, Cyclospora, and microsporidia; as well as those more commonly associated with gastrointestinal disease, for example, Giardia intestinalis, Entamoeba histolytica, Strongyloides stercoralis, and also rarely Balantidium coli. In view of AIDS explosion in India, opportunistic enteric parasites are becoming increasingly important and it has to be identified properly. Apart from wet mounts, concentration methods for stool samples and special staining techniques for identification of these parasites, commercially available fecal immunoassays are widely available for the majority of enteric protozoa. Molecular methods such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism, flow cytometry, and sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), have also come in the pipeline for early diagnosis of these infections. Proper disposal of the feces to prevent contamination of the soil and water, boiling/filtering drinking water along with improved personal hygiene might go a long way in preventing these enteric parasitic infections. PMID:23961436

  5. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of enterobacteriaceae isolated from HIV-infected patients in Kinshasa

    PubMed Central

    Iyamba, Jean-Marie Liesse; Wambale, José Mulwahali; Takaisi-Kikuni, Ntondo za Balega

    2014-01-01

    Introduction People infected by Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) are susceptible to develop severe bacterial infections. We set out to determine the frequency and the sensitivity to antibiotics of enterobaceriaceae isolated from urine and feces of HIV-infected persons. Methods Urine and feces samples were collected from HIV-infected patients of the Centre de Traitement Ambulatoire de Kabinda (CTA/Kabinda, Kinshasa) and analyzed at the Reference National Laboratory for HIV/AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Infections. The isolated enterobacteriaceae strains were identified by conventional microbiological methods. Antibiotic sensitivity pattern was carried out by disc diffusion method. Results The following bacteria pathogens were isolated: Escherichia coli, Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Proteus, and Providencia. Most species were sensitive to cefotaxim, ceftriaxon, and gentamicin and resistant to chloramphenicol, cotrimoxazole, tetracycline, and norfloxacin. Conclusion The results of the present study show that the most frequently bacteria isolated were Esherichia coli and cefotaxim, ceftriaxon, and gentamicin were the most active antibiotics. PMID:25392725

  6. Optimizing treatment outcomes in HIV-infected patients with substance abuse issues.

    PubMed

    Celentano, David D; Lucas, Greg

    2007-12-15

    Drug abuse is associated with poorer virologic and clinical outcomes for patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Limited evidence, primarily from in vitro and animal studies, shows that some abused drugs (e.g., opioids) may have direct effects on HIV pathology and the immune response to infection, but the clinical effects are not known. Clinical data indicate that the primary effect of drug abuse on HIV disease progression is mediated via factors that may limit access and/or adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Drug abuse is associated with reduced adherence to HAART, which is strongly correlated with poorer virologic and clinical outcomes. However, the virologic and clinical effects of HAART are generally equivalent among drug abusers and non-drug abusers who adhere to therapy. These results underscore the importance of integrating medical and substance abuse interventions for HIV-positive drug abusers, to improve adherence to HAART and optimize outcomes of treatment for HIV infection.

  7. Role of the dental surgeon in the early detection of adults with underlying HIV infection / AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Cano, Jorge; del Romero, Jorge; Hernando, Victoria; del Amo, Julia; Moreno, Santiago

    2012-01-01

    A review is made of the late diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, a subject of growing interest in public health. It has been estimated that in Europe 30% of all HIV-infected people are unaware of their seropositive condition, and this in turn is associated with a poorer long-term disease prognosis and an increased risk of transmission to other individuals. The role of the dental surgeon in this context could be of great importance, since there are many oral lesions that can suggest the existence of underlying infection. The study also addresses the controversial subject of rapid HIV testing, and whether these tests should be performed on a routine basis in the dental clinic, or whether it is preferable to refer the patient to a specialized center. Key words:HIV in Spain, HIV screening, early diagnosis. PMID:22143719

  8. Antiviral Drugs for Viruses Other Than Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Razonable, Raymund R.

    2011-01-01

    Most viral diseases, with the exception of those caused by human immunodeficiency virus, are self-limited illnesses that do not require specific antiviral therapy. The currently available antiviral drugs target 3 main groups of viruses: herpes, hepatitis, and influenza viruses. With the exception of the antisense molecule fomivirsen, all antiherpes drugs inhibit viral replication by serving as competitive substrates for viral DNA polymerase. Drugs for the treatment of influenza inhibit the ion channel M2 protein or the enzyme neuraminidase. Combination therapy with Interferon-α and ribavirin remains the backbone treatment for chronic hepatitis C; the addition of serine protease inhibitors improves the treatment outcome of patients infected with hepatitis C virus genotype 1. Chronic hepatitis B can be treated with interferon or a combination of nucleos(t)ide analogues. Notably, almost all the nucleos(t) ide analogues for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B possess anti–human immunodeficiency virus properties, and they inhibit replication of hepatitis B virus by serving as competitive substrates for its DNA polymerase. Some antiviral drugs possess multiple potential clinical applications, such as ribavirin for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C and respiratory syncytial virus and cidofovir for the treatment of cytomegalovirus and other DNA viruses. Drug resistance is an emerging threat to the clinical utility of antiviral drugs. The major mechanisms for drug resistance are mutations in the viral DNA polymerase gene or in genes that encode for the viral kinases required for the activation of certain drugs such as acyclovir and ganciclovir. Widespread antiviral resistance has limited the clinical utility of M2 inhibitors for the prevention and treatment of influenza infections. This article provides an overview of clinically available antiviral drugs for the primary care physician, with a special focus on pharmacology, clinical uses, and adverse effects. PMID

  9. The physical and psychological effects of HIV infection and its treatment on perinatally HIV-infected children

    PubMed Central

    Vreeman, Rachel C; Scanlon, Michael L; McHenry, Megan S; Nyandiko, Winstone M

    2015-01-01

    Introduction As highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) transforms human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) into a manageable chronic disease, new challenges are emerging in treating children born with HIV, including a number of risks to their physical and psychological health due to HIV infection and its lifelong treatment. Methods We conducted a literature review to evaluate the evidence on the physical and psychological effects of perinatal HIV (PHIV+) infection and its treatment in the era of HAART, including major chronic comorbidities. Results and discussion Perinatally infected children face concerning levels of treatment failure and drug resistance, which may hamper their long-term treatment and result in more significant comorbidities. Physical complications from PHIV+ infection and treatment potentially affect all major organ systems. Although treatment with antiretroviral (ARV) therapy has reduced incidence of severe neurocognitive diseases like HIV encephalopathy, perinatally infected children may experience less severe neurocognitive complications related to HIV disease and ARV neurotoxicity. Major metabolic complications include dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance, complications that are associated with both HIV infection and several ARV agents and may significantly affect cardiovascular disease risk with age. Bone abnormalities, particularly amongst children treated with tenofovir, are a concern for perinatally infected children who may be at higher risk for bone fractures and osteoporosis. In many studies, rates of anaemia are significantly higher for HIV-infected children. Renal failure is a significant complication and cause of death amongst perinatally infected children, while new data on sexual and reproductive health suggest that sexually transmitted infections and birth complications may be additional concerns for perinatally infected children in adolescence. Finally, perinatally infected children may face psychological challenges, including

  10. Antibody screening tests variably overestimate the prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection among HIV-infected adults in Ghana.

    PubMed

    King, S; Adjei-Asante, K; Appiah, L; Adinku, D; Beloukas, A; Atkins, M; Sarfo, S F; Chadwick, D; Phillips, R O; Geretti, A M

    2015-05-01

    HIV coinfection with HCV has been poorly studied in sub-Saharan Africa, and the reliability of available seroprevalence estimates remains uncertain. The study aim was to determine HCV RNA prevalence in HIV-infected subjects receiving care in Kumasi, Ghana, and relate the findings to HCV antibody detection. From a population of 1520 HIV-infected adults, all HBsAg-positive subjects (n = 236) and a random subset of HBsAg-negative subject (n = 172) were screened for HCV RNA using pooled plasma; positive samples were genotyped by core and NS5B sequencing. HCV antibodies were detected by three commercial screening assays and confirmed by the line immunoassay. HCV RNA was detected in 4/408 subjects (1.0%, 95% confidence interval 0.0-1.9%), comprising 3/236 (1.3%; 0.0-2.8%) HBsAg-positive and 1/172 (0.6%; 0.0-1.8%) HBsAg-negative subjects. HCV RNA-positive subjects showed reactivity in all three antibody screening assays. Among HCV RNA-negative subjects, 5/67 (7.5%), 5/67 (7.5%) and 19/67 (28.4%) showed antibody reactivity by each screening assay, respectively, including two (3.0%) with reactivity by all three assays. Only one sample (1.5%) had confirmed antibody reactivity by line immunoassay indicating past HCV infection. HCV-positive subjects (three males, two females) were aged 30-46 years, by questionnaire-based interview reported surgical procedures and blood transfusion as risk factors for infection. HCV genotypes were 2 (subtypes 2j, 2l, 2k/unassigned) and 1 (subtype unassigned). Without further testing, HCV antibody screening assays variably overestimated HCV prevalence among HIV-infected subjects in Ghana. These findings inform the interpretation of previous seroprevalence estimates based upon screening assays alone.

  11. Pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Levy, J A

    1993-01-01

    The lentivirus human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) causes AIDS by interacting with a large number of different cells in the body and escaping the host immune response against it. HIV is transmitted primarily through blood and genital fluids and to newborn infants from infected mothers. The steps occurring in infection involve an interaction of HIV not only with the CD4 molecule on cells but also with other cellular receptors recently identified. Virus-cell fusion and HIV entry subsequently take place. Following virus infection, a variety of intracellular mechanisms determine the relative expression of viral regulatory and accessory genes leading to productive or latent infection. With CD4+ lymphocytes, HIV replication can cause syncytium formation and cell death; with other cells, such as macrophages, persistent infection can occur, creating reservoirs for the virus in many cells and tissues. HIV strains are highly heterogeneous, and certain biologic and serologic properties determined by specific genetic sequences can be linked to pathogenic pathways and resistance to the immune response. The host reaction against HIV, through neutralizing antibodies and particularly through strong cellular immune responses, can keep the virus suppressed for many years. Long-term survival appears to involve infection with a relatively low-virulence strain that remains sensitive to the immune response, particularly to control by CD8+ cell antiviral activity. Several therapeutic approaches have been attempted, and others are under investigation. Vaccine development has provided some encouraging results, but the observations indicate the major challenge of preventing infection by HIV. Ongoing research is necessary to find a solution to this devastating worldwide epidemic. Images PMID:8464405

  12. Feline immunodeficiency virus: an interesting model for AIDS studies and an important cat pathogen.

    PubMed Central

    Bendinelli, M; Pistello, M; Lombardi, S; Poli, A; Garzelli, C; Matteucci, D; Ceccherini-Nelli, L; Malvaldi, G; Tozzini, F

    1995-01-01

    The lentivirus feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a widespread pathogen of the domestic cat that is mainly transmitted through bites, although other means of transmission are also possible. Its prevalence ranges from 1 to 10% in different cat populations throughout the world, thus representing a large reservoir of naturally infected animals. FIV resembles the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in many respects. Similarities include the structural features of the virion, the general organization and great variability of the genome, the life cycle in the infected host, and most importantly, the pathogenic potential. Infection is associated with laboratory signs of immunosuppression as well as with a large variety of superinfections, tumors, and neurological manifestations. Our understanding of FIV is steadily improving and is providing important clues to the pathogenesis of immunodeficiency-inducing lentiviruses. The cellular receptor for FIV is different from the feline equivalent of the human CD4 molecule used by HIV; nevertheless, the major hallmark of infection is a progressive loss of CD4+ T lymphocytes as in HIV infection. The mechanisms by which FIV escapes the host's immune responses are being actively investigated. FIV causes lysis of infected T cells and also appears to predispose these cells to apoptosis. Infection of macrophages and other cell types has also been documented. For reasons yet to be understood, antibody-mediated neutralization of fresh FIV isolates is very inefficient both in vitro and in vivo. Vaccination studies have provided some encouraging results, but the difficulties encountered appear to match those met in HIV vaccine development. FIV susceptibility to antiviral agents is similar to that of HIV, thus providing a valuable system for in vivo preclinical evaluation of therapies. It is concluded that in many respects FIV is an ideal model for AIDS studies. PMID:7704896

  13. A Patient Presenting with Tuberculous Encephalopathy and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jason; Afroz, Suraiya; French, Eric; Mehta, Anuj

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 33 Final Diagnosis: Tuberculous meningitis, human immunodeficiency virus infection Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Lumbar puncture Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Rare disease Background: In the USA, Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is more likely to be found in foreign-born individuals, and those co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are more likely to have tuberculous meningitis. The literature is lacking in details about the clinical workup of patients presenting with tuberculous meningitis with encephalopathic features who are co-infected with HIV. This report demonstrates a clinical approach to diagnosis and management of tuberculous meningitis. Case Report: A 33-year-old Ecuadorean man presented with altered consciousness and constitutional symptoms. During the workup he was found to have tuberculous meningitis with encephalopathic features and concurrent HIV infection. Early evidence for tuberculosis meningitis included lymphocytic pleocytosis and a positive interferon gamma release assay. A confirmatory diagnosis of systemic infection was made based on lymph node biopsy. Imaging studies of the neck showed scrofula and adenopathy, and brain imaging showed infarctions, exudates, and communicating hydrocephalus. Treatment was started for tuberculous meningitis, while antiretroviral therapy for HIV was started 5 days later in combination with prednisone, given the risk of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). Conclusions: A clinical picture consistent with tuberculous meningitis includes constitutional symptoms, foreign birth, lymphocytic pleocytosis, specific radiographic findings, and immunodeficiency. Workup for tuberculous meningitis should include MRI, HIV screening, and cerebral spinal fluid analysis. It is essential to treat co-infection with HIV and to assess for IRIS. PMID:27302013

  14. Molecular characteristics of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in human immunodeficiency virus-infected and -uninfected patients in the pre-highly active antiretroviral therapy and pre-rituximab era.

    PubMed

    Morton, Lindsay M; Kim, Clara J; Weiss, Lawrence M; Bhatia, Kishor; Cockburn, Myles; Hawes, Debra; Wang, Sophia S; Chang, Cindy; Altekruse, Sean F; Engels, Eric A; Cozen, Wendy

    2014-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection substantially elevates diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) risk, but its impact on the distinct DLBCL subtypes defined by cell of origin is unclear. We compared DLBCL molecular characteristics and prognosis in 51 HIV-infected and 116 HIV-uninfected cases diagnosed during 1977-2003. Using immunohistochemistry to classify cell of origin based on the Tally algorithm, activated B-cell (ABC)-DLBCL was substantially more common in HIV-infected (83%) than in HIV-uninfected (54%) cases (p < 0.001). Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was detected in 63% of DLBCLs in HIV-infected cases, occurring almost exclusively in ABC-DLBCL (74% vs. 13% of germinal center B-cell [GCB]-DLBCL, p = 0.002), but was rarely detected in DLBCLs among HIV-uninfected cases (3%). Among HIV-uninfected cases, MYC/IgH [t(8;14)(q24;q32)] and IgH/BCL2 [t(14;18)(q32;q21)] translocations were significantly more common and BCL6/IgH [t(3;14)(q27;q32)] significantly less common in GCB-DLBCL than in ABC-DLBCL (p = 0.010, < 0.001 and = 0.039, respectively). Among HIV-infected cases, translocations other than MYC/IgH [t(8;14)(q24;q32)] (21%) were rare (≤ 6%) and unrelated to cell of origin. ABC-DLBCL was associated with adverse overall survival compared with GCB-DLBCL regardless of HIV status (pHIV-infected = 0.066; pHIV-uninfected = 0.038). Our data demonstrate key differences in the molecular characteristics, cell of origin and prognosis of DLBCL by HIV status in the pre-highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and pre-rituximab era, supporting biologic differences in lymphomagenesis in the presence of HIV. PMID:23772639

  15. AIDS, HIV infection, and illicit drug use within inner-city families and social networks.

    PubMed Central

    Pivnick, A; Jacobson, A; Eric, K; Doll, L; Drucker, E

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Drug use is commonly depicted and treated as an individual problem. This study describes the extent of drug use, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) among drug users' sexual partners and family and household members in order to broaden considerations of risk. METHODS. Social network charts and structured interviews were administered to 126 women (predominantly African American and Latino) enrolled in methadone treatment. The charts elicited the prevalence of drug use and HIV infection among subjects' family and household members. RESULTS. Drug use and HIV/AIDS permeated subjects' sexual, familial, and household relationships. More than half of the women who resided with a sexual partner reported that their partners currently used drugs. Almost one third of the subjects' siblings were drug users. Of the 715 total siblings (all subjects plus their siblings), 69 (9.7%) were known to be HIV positive or to have an AIDS diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS. The sexual, familial, and household expressions of drug use underscore the notion that drug use and attendant risks, including but not limited to HIV infection, might be usefully viewed and treated as an inter- and intracommunity problem rather than as an exclusively individual one. PMID:8296952

  16. Making the health care system 'safe' for persons with HIV infection or AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Kimball, A M; Lafferty, B; Shields, A; Smyser, M

    1995-01-01

    If health care reform is implemented in states and nationally, the safety of this process needs to be examined for persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection or the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Reform should assure ongoing prevention and transmission control of HIV and continuous coverage of medical costs for persons ill with HIV or AIDS. These persons currently benefit from various state and federal categoric programs designed to assure access to preventive and personal care services. Washington State has passed health care reform legislation that envisions integrating these programs to provide a system of population-based and personal health care. This legislation was analyzed using existing epidemiologic and entitlement information about persons with HIV infection or AIDS in the state to assess its effect. The relationship between public health and personal care services will be a central concern for those with HIV infection or AIDS, and complete coverage of this group may be achieved relatively late in the process of implementing health care reform. Health personnel planning under health care reform will affect the delivery of HIV- and AIDS-related services. Including treatment of AIDS in the basic benefit package merits particular attention. These issues parallel those being faced by the nation as a whole as it seeks to ensure epidemic disease control and compassionate care for long-term disabling illness if health care reform is implemented. Images PMID:7725706

  17. The disclosure of celebrity HIV infection: its effects on public attitudes.

    PubMed Central

    Kalichman, S C; Hunter, T L

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Despite the magnitude of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic, studies have shown low levels of public concern about human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS. We investigated the effects of celebrity disclosure of HIV infection on the AIDS-related perceptions of urban men. METHODS. Measures of AIDS-related perceptions were collected from 361 men waiting for mass transportation in downtown Chicago; 252 were assessed at three time points prior to and 109 were assessed at two time points after professional basketball star Earvin "Magic" Johnson's disclosure of his HIV infection. RESULTS. Significant increases in concern about AIDS, interest in AIDS information, and talking with friends about AIDS occurred after celebrity disclosure of HIV infection. CONCLUSIONS. Celebrity disclosure of HIV seropositivity demonstrated a marked change in AIDS-related perceptions among the men surveyed. Changes in awareness due to celebrity disclosure may lead to increased readiness to reduce risk and could be viewed as a window of opportunity for HIV prevention efforts. PMID:1415863

  18. Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Hepatitis C Virus Coinfection in Spain: Prevalence and Patient Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Berenguer, Juan; Rivero, Antonio; Jarrín, Inmaculada; Núñez, María J.; Vivancos, María J.; Crespo, Manel; Téllez, María J.; Domingo, Pere; Iribarren, José A.; Artero, Arturo; Márquez, Manuel; Santos, Ignacio; Moreno, Javier; Montero, Marta; González-García, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibodies (Abs) and active HCV infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected (HIV+) patients in Spain in 2015. This was a cross-sectional study. Methods. The study was performed in 41 centers in 2015. Sample size was estimated for an accuracy of 2%, the number of patients from each hospital was determined by proportional allocation, and patients were selected using simple random sampling. Results. The reference population was 35 791 patients, and the sample size was 1867 patients. Hepatitis C virus serostatus was known in 1843 patients (98.7%). Hepatitis C virus-Abs were detected in 695 patients (37.7%), in whom the main route of HIV acquisition was injection drug use (75.4%). Of these 695 patients, 402 had HCV RNA, 170 had had a sustained viral response (SVR) after anti-HCV therapy, and 102 cleared HCV spontaneously. Hepatitis C virus-ribonucleic acid results were unknown in 21 cases. Genotype distribution (known in 367 patients) was 1a in 143 patients (39.0%), 4 in 90 (24.5%) patients, 1b in 69 (18.8%) patients, 3 in 57 (15.5%) patients, 2 in 5 (1.4%) patients, and mixed in 3 (0.8%) patients. Liver cirrhosis was present in 93 patients (23.1%) with active HCV infection and in 39 (22.9%) patients with SVR after anti-HCV therapy. Conclusions. The prevalence of HCV-Abs and active HCV infection in HIV+ patients in Spain is 37.7% and 22.1%, respectively; these figures are significantly lower than those recorded in 2002 and 2009. The predominant genotypes in patients with active HCV infection were 1a and 4. A high percentage of patients had cirrhosis. Cirrhosis is also common in patients with SVR after anti-HCV therapy. PMID:27186584

  19. Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Hepatitis C Virus Coinfection in Spain: Prevalence and Patient Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Berenguer, Juan; Rivero, Antonio; Jarrín, Inmaculada; Núñez, María J; Vivancos, María J; Crespo, Manel; Téllez, María J; Domingo, Pere; Iribarren, José A; Artero, Arturo; Márquez, Manuel; Santos, Ignacio; Moreno, Javier; Montero, Marta; González-García, Juan

    2016-03-01

    Background.  The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibodies (Abs) and active HCV infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected (HIV+) patients in Spain in 2015. This was a cross-sectional study. Methods.  The study was performed in 41 centers in 2015. Sample size was estimated for an accuracy of 2%, the number of patients from each hospital was determined by proportional allocation, and patients were selected using simple random sampling. Results.  The reference population was 35 791 patients, and the sample size was 1867 patients. Hepatitis C virus serostatus was known in 1843 patients (98.7%). Hepatitis C virus-Abs were detected in 695 patients (37.7%), in whom the main route of HIV acquisition was injection drug use (75.4%). Of these 695 patients, 402 had HCV RNA, 170 had had a sustained viral response (SVR) after anti-HCV therapy, and 102 cleared HCV spontaneously. Hepatitis C virus-ribonucleic acid results were unknown in 21 cases. Genotype distribution (known in 367 patients) was 1a in 143 patients (39.0%), 4 in 90 (24.5%) patients, 1b in 69 (18.8%) patients, 3 in 57 (15.5%) patients, 2 in 5 (1.4%) patients, and mixed in 3 (0.8%) patients. Liver cirrhosis was present in 93 patients (23.1%) with active HCV infection and in 39 (22.9%) patients with SVR after anti-HCV therapy. Conclusions.  The prevalence of HCV-Abs and active HCV infection in HIV+ patients in Spain is 37.7% and 22.1%, respectively; these figures are significantly lower than those recorded in 2002 and 2009. The predominant genotypes in patients with active HCV infection were 1a and 4. A high percentage of patients had cirrhosis. Cirrhosis is also common in patients with SVR after anti-HCV therapy. PMID:27186584

  20. Platelet activation and platelet-monocyte aggregate formation contribute to decreased platelet count during acute simian immunodeficiency virus infection in pig-tailed macaques.

    PubMed

    Metcalf Pate, Kelly A; Lyons, Claire E; Dorsey, Jamie L; Shirk, Erin N; Queen, Suzanne E; Adams, Robert J; Gama, Lucio; Morrell, Craig N; Mankowski, Joseph L

    2013-09-01

    Platelets are key participants in innate immune responses to pathogens. As a decrease in circulating platelet count is one of the initial hematologic indicators of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, we sought to determine whether decline in platelet number during acute infection results from decreased production, increased antibody-mediated destruction, or increased platelet activation in a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)/macaque model. During acute SIV infection, circulating platelets were activated with increased surface expression of P-selection, CD40L and major histocompatibility complex class I. Platelet production was maintained and platelet autoantibodies were not detected during acute infection. Concurrent with a decrease in platelet numbers and an increase in circulating monocytes, platelets were found sequestered in platelet-monocyte aggregates, thereby contributing to the decline in platelet counts. Because the majority of circulating CD16(+) monocytes formed complexes with platelets during acute SIV infection, a decreased platelet count may represent platelet participation in the innate immune response to HIV.

  1. Epidemiology of human immunodeficiency virus infection in blood donations in Europe and Italy

    PubMed Central

    Suligoi, Barbara; Raimondo, Mariangela; Regine, Vincenza; Salfa, Maria Cristina; Camoni, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Background The safety of blood with regards to transmission of infectious diseases is guaranteed by European laws that regulate both the selection of donors through pre-donation questionnaires and serological screening. However, variability in the epidemiology of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in different countries and some differences in the selection of donors can influence the efficacy (with regards to the safety of blood) of these processes. In this study we compared the prevalence of HIV in blood donations in the three macro-areas of Europe and in various western European countries, analysed the criteria of selection and rewarding of donors in western European countries, and studied the trend in the prevalence of HIV in Italy from to 1995 and 2006. Methods European data were derived from the European Centre for the Surveillance of HIV; Italian data were obtained from the Transfusion-Transmitted Infections Surveillance System and National and Regional Register of blood and plasma. The information on eligibility criteria and rewarding offered to donors was derived from international sources. Results The prevalence of HIV in blood donations was highest in eastern Europe, followed by central Europe and western Europe. Among the western European countries, Spain, Italy and Israel had the highest prevalences; the prevalence was noted to be higher in countries which did not offer any rewarding to the donor. In Italy the prevalence of HIV was 3.8 cases per 100,000 donations in 2006 and increased between 1995 and 2006, both among donations from repeat donors and first time donors. Conclusions The data highlight the need to continue improving the selection of donors and the coverage of the surveillance systems for HIV infection in transfusion services. PMID:20671878

  2. Human immunodeficiency virus-1 protein Tat induces excitotoxic loss of presynaptic terminals in hippocampal cultures

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Angela H.; Thayer, Stanley A.

    2013-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection of the CNS produces dendritic damage that correlates with cognitive decline in patients with HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). HIV-induced neurotoxicity results in part from viral proteins shed from infected cells, including the HIV transactivator of transcription (Tat). We previously showed that Tat binds to the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP), resulting in overactivation of NMDA receptors, activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, and subsequent loss of postsynaptic densities. Here, we show that Tat also induces a loss of presynaptic terminals. The number of presynaptic terminals was quantified using confocal imaging of synaptophysin fused to green fluorescent protein (Syn-GFP). Tat-induced loss of presynaptic terminals was secondary to excitatory postsynaptic mechanisms because treatment with an LRP antagonist or an NMDA receptor antagonist inhibited this loss. Treatment with nutlin-3, an E3 ligase inhibitor, prevented Tat-induced loss of presynaptic terminals. These data suggest that Tat-induced loss of presynaptic terminals is a consequence of excitotoxic postsynaptic activity. We previously found that ifenprodil, an NR2B subunit-selective NMDA receptor antagonist, induced recovery of postsynaptic densities. Here we show that Tat-induced loss of presynaptic terminals was reversed by ifenprodil treatment. Thus, Tat-induced loss of presynaptic terminals is reversible, and this recovery can be initiated by inhibiting a subset of postsynaptic NMDA receptors. Understanding the dynamics of synaptic changes in response to HIV infection of the CNS may lead to the design of improved pharmacotherapies for HAND patients. PMID:23267846

  3. Hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus and human immunodeficiency virus infection in undocumented migrants and refugees in southern Italy, January 2012 to June 2013.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Nicola; Alessio, Loredana; Gualdieri, Luciano; Pisaturo, Mariantonietta; Sagnelli, Caterina; Caprio, Nunzio; Maffei, Rita; Starace, Mario; Angelillo, Italo Francesco; Pasquale, Giuseppe; Sagnelli, Evangelista

    2015-01-01

    Screening of undocumented migrants or refugees for hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections has been offered free of charge and free from bureaucratic procedures since 2012 at four primary-level clinical centres in Naples and Caserta, Italy. Of 926 undocumented migrants and refugees visiting one of the primary-level clinical centres from January 2012 to June 2013, 882 (95%) were screened for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), total hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc) and antibodies against HCV and HIV. Of the 882 individuals enrolled, 78 (9%) were HBsAg positive, 35 (4%) anti-HCV positive and 11 (1%) anti-HIV positive (single infections); seven (1%) had more than one infection (three were HBsAg positive). Of the 801 HBsAg-negative patients, 373 (47%) were anti-HBc positive. The HBsAg-positivity rate was high (14%; 62/444) in individuals from sub-Saharan Africa and intermediate in those from eastern Europe (6%; 12/198), northern Africa (2%; 2/80) and Bangladesh, India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka (the 'India-Pakistan area') (3%; 4/126). Anti-HCV was detected in 9/126 (7%) individuals originating from the India-Pakistan area, in 12/198 (6%) from eastern Europe, in 17/444 (4%) from sub-Saharan and in 2/80 (2%) from northern Africa. The HBV, HCV and HIV infections in the undocumented migrants and refugees screened serve as a reminder to the Italian healthcare authorities to carry out extensive screening and educational programmes for these populations. PMID:26530499

  4. Hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus and human immunodeficiency virus infection in undocumented migrants and refugees in southern Italy, January 2012 to June 2013.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Nicola; Alessio, Loredana; Gualdieri, Luciano; Pisaturo, Mariantonietta; Sagnelli, Caterina; Caprio, Nunzio; Maffei, Rita; Starace, Mario; Angelillo, Italo Francesco; Pasquale, Giuseppe; Sagnelli, Evangelista

    2015-01-01

    Screening of undocumented migrants or refugees for hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections has been offered free of charge and free from bureaucratic procedures since 2012 at four primary-level clinical centres in Naples and Caserta, Italy. Of 926 undocumented migrants and refugees visiting one of the primary-level clinical centres from January 2012 to June 2013, 882 (95%) were screened for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), total hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc) and antibodies against HCV and HIV. Of the 882 individuals enrolled, 78 (9%) were HBsAg positive, 35 (4%) anti-HCV positive and 11 (1%) anti-HIV positive (single infections); seven (1%) had more than one infection (three were HBsAg positive). Of the 801 HBsAg-negative patients, 373 (47%) were anti-HBc positive. The HBsAg-positivity rate was high (14%; 62/444) in individuals from sub-Saharan Africa and intermediate in those from eastern Europe (6%; 12/198), northern Africa (2%; 2/80) and Bangladesh, India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka (the 'India-Pakistan area') (3%; 4/126). Anti-HCV was detected in 9/126 (7%) individuals originating from the India-Pakistan area, in 12/198 (6%) from eastern Europe, in 17/444 (4%) from sub-Saharan and in 2/80 (2%) from northern Africa. The HBV, HCV and HIV infections in the undocumented migrants and refugees screened serve as a reminder to the Italian healthcare authorities to carry out extensive screening and educational programmes for these populations.

  5. Autologous and heterologous neutralizing antibody responses following initial seroconversion in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Moog, C; Fleury, H J; Pellegrin, I; Kirn, A; Aubertin, A M

    1997-01-01

    In the course of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, patients develop a strong and persistent immune response characterized by the production of HIV-specific antibodies. The aim of our study was to analyze the appearance of autologous and heterologous neutralizing antibodies in the sera of HIV-infected individuals. For this purpose, primary strains have been isolated from 18 HIV-1-infected subjects prior to seroconversion (in one case) or within 1 to 8 months after seroconversion. Sera, collected at the same time as the virus was isolated and at various times after isolation, have been analyzed for their ability to neutralize the autologous primary strains isolated early after infection, heterologous primary isolates, and cell-line adapted strains. Our neutralization assay, which combines serial dilutions of virus and serial dilutions of sera, is based on the determination of the serum dilution at which a fixed reduction in virus titer (90%) occurs. We have shown that (i) we could not detect autologous neutralizing antibodies in sera collected at the same time as we isolated viruses; (ii) we detected neutralizing antibodies against the autologous strains about 1 year after seroconversion, occasionally after 8 months, but sera were not always available to exclude the presence of neutralizing antibodies at earlier times; (iii) after 1 year, the neutralization response was highly specific to virus present during the early phase of HIV infection; and (iv) heterologous neutralization of primary isolates was detected later (after about 2 years). These results reveal the enormous diversity of neutralization determinants on primary isolates as well as a temporal evolution of the humoral response generating cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies. PMID:9094648

  6. Circadian variations in plasma levels of hypophyseal, adrenocortical and testicular hormones in men infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Villette, J M; Bourin, P; Doinel, C; Mansour, I; Fiet, J; Boudou, P; Dreux, C; Roue, R; Debord, M; Levi, F

    1990-03-01

    Alterations in the circadian time structure of the secretion of several hormones were investigated in 13 male patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Seven were asymptomatic (classified CDC II, according to the criteria of the Atlanta Centers for Disease Control), and 6 had acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (CDC IV). Ten healthy males volunteered as controls. Plasma levels of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfate (DHEA-S), cortisol, testosterone, ACTH, and beta-endorphin were determined by RIA in blood samples obtained every 4 h from 0830-0830 h the next morning. Data were analyzed both by two-way analysis of variance and the cosinor method. Circadian rhythms were statistically validated for each of the six hormones in each of the three groups of subjects. Compared with the control subjects, mesors (24-h adjusted means) were significantly higher for cortisol and lower for DHEA, DHEA-S, and ACTH (P less than 0.001 for all four hormones) in all HIV-infected patients. Plasma testosterone mesors were similar in controls and CDC II patients, but decreased significantly in the CDC IV patient group (P less than 0.05). Analysis of the circadian rhythms of plasma hormone levels clearly indicated an altered adrenal hormonal state in HIV-infected male patients, even during the asymptomatic period of the infection. For instance, plasma cortisol at 0430 h was more than twice as high in HIV-infected patients as it was in time-qualified controls. Although patients already had elevated plasma cortisol and lowered adrenal androgen levels at this stage, hypogonadism was not observed, as gauged by plasma testosterone concentrations. We speculate that the primary hormonal defect in HIV-infected patients is increased cortisol secretion resulting from circadian-varying stimulation of the adrenal cortex by a factor other than pituitary ACTH. This factor might be a stimulating substance secreted primarily by infected immune cells. Excess cortisol would lower

  7. Review of testing for human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Bylund, D J; Ziegner, U H; Hooper, D G

    1992-06-01

    The performance of HIV testing requires meticulous attention to preanalytic, analytic, and postanalytic variables, especially matters of patient confidentiality. Laboratory directors must pay strict attention to quality control and quality assurance practices. Careful attention to these considerations can produce a screening program in low-prevalence populations that has an extremely low false-positive rate, with a positive predictive value of greater than 99%. Issuing a clear and concise laboratory report to the clinician is important. The Fifth Consensus Conference on Testing for Human Retroviruses of the Association of State and Territorial Public Health Laboratory Directors, March 1990, has recommended that ELISA be reported as reactive or nonreactive; IFA as reactive, nonreactive, or nonspecific, and WB as reactive, nonreactive, or indeterminate. It is recommended that the terms positive and negative be reserved for the summary interpretation given at the conclusion of the HIV-1 antibody testing algorithm. The testing algorithm used for HIV antibody screening at Scripps Clinic is shown in Figure 3. Other algorithms for complete testing on a single sample only or on two separate samples are reported. We agree with others that the patient should not be counseled for infection with HIV until a reactive confirmatory test(s) establishes a positive diagnosis. Certain special situations in diagnostic testing deserve comment. Establishing the diagnosis of HIV infection can be difficult in seronegative persons with acute infection. Polymerase chain reaction, viral culture or antigen detection may be useful tests in this situation. However, careful interpretation of test results and close correlation with patient risk factors are important to establish the proper diagnosis. Reports of seronegative persons, some remaining seronegative over a protracted time, have raised concerns over the transfusional risk of HIV infection. Blood donor screening programs are using

  8. Anal carcinoma and HIV infection: is it time for screening?

    PubMed

    Herranz-Pinto, P; Sendagorta-Cudós, E; Bernardino-de la Serna, J I; Peña-Sánchez de Rivera, J M

    2014-03-01

    A 38-year-old white man had a 10-year history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (A3), with no episodes of opportunistic diseases and in good immunologic recovery (CD4 cell count: 450 and indetectable HIV viral load) while on HAART. He presented with a two-month history of mild anal symptoms, including pruritus and episodic bleeding. He referred past episodes of anal warts, self-treated with several topical compounds, all proven unsuccessful. Perianal examination showed erythema and scratching. A 0.5cm sized tumor, with infiltration at the base was detected on digital exam, located at 15mm from the anal margin. Local biopsy driven by high-resolution anuscopy (AAR) yielded a final diagnosis of infiltrative epidermoid carcinoma. Might that neoplasia have been prevented?

  9. Immunologic Biomarkers, Morbidity, and Mortality in Treated HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Peter W; Lee, Sulggi A; Siedner, Mark J

    2016-10-01

    Despite marked improvements in the modern treatment era, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals, particularly those who initiated antiretroviral therapy (ART) at advanced disease stages, continue to have increased age-related morbidity and mortality, compared with the general population. Immune activation and inflammation persist despite suppressive ART and predict many of these morbidities. The goal of this review is to examine the evidence suggesting a link between the persistent inflammatory state and morbidity and mortality in this setting, to describe the impact of early ART initiation on these factors, and to highlight important unanswered questions for the field. We also advance a hypothesis to explain why some morbidities-and their root inflammatory drivers-may be prevented more than others by early ART initiation. PMID:27625430

  10. Immunologic Biomarkers, Morbidity, and Mortality in Treated HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Peter W; Lee, Sulggi A; Siedner, Mark J

    2016-10-01

    Despite marked improvements in the modern treatment era, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals, particularly those who initiated antiretroviral therapy (ART) at advanced disease stages, continue to have increased age-related morbidity and mortality, compared with the general population. Immune activation and inflammation persist despite suppressive ART and predict many of these morbidities. The goal of this review is to examine the evidence suggesting a link between the persistent inflammatory state and morbidity and mortality in this setting, to describe the impact of early ART initiation on these factors, and to highlight important unanswered questions for the field. We also advance a hypothesis to explain why some morbidities-and their root inflammatory drivers-may be prevented more than others by early ART initiation.

  11. HIV infection among Quebec women giving birth to live infants.

    PubMed Central

    Hankins, C A; Laberge, C; Lapointe, N; Lai Tung, M T; Racine, L; O'Shaughnessy, M

    1990-01-01

    This is the first anonymous unlinked seroprevalence study in Canada to use serum samples from newborns to determine the seroprevalence rate of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among childbearing women. Of the 68,808 samples tested 42 were confirmed as positive, for an overall crude seroprevalence rate of 6.1 per 10,000 live births (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.4 to 8.3), or 1 woman in 1638. Women who lived on Montreal island had an overall rate of 17.9 per 10,000 live births (95% CI 12.2 to 25.4), or 1 woman in 559. We observed a significant association between revenue index and seroprevalence; the rates were as high as 46.4 per 10,000 live births (95% CI 18.7 to 95.3), or 1 woman in 216, for Montreal island postal code areas with revenue indexes 20% or more below the provincial median. Extrapolation of the data suggested that 56 women with HIV infection gave birth to a live infant during 1989 in Quebec. Even though attempts to generalize the data from childbearing women to women of childbearing age have an inherent conservative bias, the results of our study suggest that 988 women (95% CI 713 to 1336) aged 15 to 44 years in Quebec had HIV infection in 1989. The actual number is likely substantially higher. The need for well-designed, creative interventions to prevent further HIV transmission to women is evident. Planning for the provision of medical and psychosocial services sensitive to specific needs of women who are already infected should start immediately. PMID:2224716

  12. Urban legends series: oral manifestations of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Patton, L L; Ramirez-Amador, V; Anaya-Saavedra, G; Nittayananta, W; Carrozzo, M; Ranganathan, K

    2013-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-related oral lesions (HIV-OLs), such as oral candidiasis (OC) and oral hairy leukoplakia (OHL), have been recognized as indicators of immune suppression since the beginning of the global HIV epidemic. The diagnosis and management of HIV disease and spectrum of opportunistic infection has changed over the past 30 years as our understanding of the infection has evolved. We investigated the following controversial topics: (i) Are oral manifestations of HIV still relevant after the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)? (ii) Can we nowadays still diagnose HIV infection through oral lesions? (iii) Is the actual classification of oral manifestations of HIV adequate or does it need to be reviewed and updated? (iv) Is there any novelty in the treatment of oral manifestations of HIV infection? Results from extensive literature review suggested the following: (i) While HAART has resulted in significant reductions in HIV-OLs, many are still seen in patients with HIV infection, with OC remaining the most common lesion. While the relationship between oral warts and the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome is less clear, the malignant potential of oral human papillomavirus infection is gaining increasing attention. (ii) Effective antiretroviral therapy has transformed HIV from a fatal illness to a chronic manageable condition and as a result expanded screening policies for HIV are being advocated both in developed and in developing countries. Affordable, reliable, and easy-to-use diagnostic techniques have been recently introduced likely restricting the importance of HIV-OLs in diagnosis. (iii) The 1993 EC-Clearinghouse classification of HIV-OLs is still globally used despite controversy on the relevance of periodontal diseases today. HIV-OL case definitions were updated in 2009 to facilitate the accuracy of HIV-OL diagnoses by non-dental healthcare workers in large-scale epidemiologic studies and clinical trials. (iv

  13. Antiviral therapy for human immunodeficiency virus infections.

    PubMed Central

    De Clercq, E

    1995-01-01

    Depending on the stage of their intervention with the viral replicative cycle, human immunodeficiency virus inhibitors could be divided into the following groups: (i) adsorption inhibitors (i.e., CD4 constructs, polysulfates, polysulfonates, polycarboxylates, and polyoxometalates), (ii) fusion inhibitors (i.e., plant lectins, succinylated or aconitylated albumins, and betulinic acid derivatives), (iii) uncoating inhibitors (i.e., bicyclams), (iv) reverse transcription inhibitors acting either competitively with the substrate binding site (i.e., dideoxynucleoside analogs and acyclic nucleoside phosphonates) or allosterically with a nonsubstrate binding site (i.e., non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors), (v) integration inhibitors, (vi) DNA replication inhibitors, (vii) transcription inhibitors (i.e., antisense oligodeoxynucleotides and Tat antagonists), (viii) translation inhibitors (i.e., antisense oligodeoxynucleotides and ribozymes), (ix) maturation inhibitors (i.e., protease inhibitors, myristoylation inhibitors, and glycosylation inhibitors), and finally, (x) budding (assembly/release) inhibitors. Current knowledge, including the therapeutic potential, of these various inhibitors is discussed. In view of their potential clinical the utility, the problem of virus-drug resistance and possible strategies to circumvent this problem are also addressed. PMID:7542558

  14. Evolution of feline immunodeficiency virus Gag proteins.

    PubMed

    Burkala, Evan; Poss, Mary

    2007-10-01

    We evaluated the predicted biochemical properties of Gag proteins from a diverse group of feline immunodeficiency viruses (FIV) to determine how different evolutionary histories of virus and host have changed or constrained these important structural proteins. Our data are based on FIV sequences derived from domestic cat (FIVfca), cougar (FIVpco), and lions (FIVple). Analyses consisted of determining the selective forces acting at each position in the protein and the comparing predictions for secondary structure, charge, hydrophobicity and flexibility for matrix, capsid and nucleocapsid, and the C-terminal peptide, which comprise the Gag proteins. We demonstrate that differences among the FIV Gag proteins have largely arisen by neutral evolution, although many neutrally evolving regions have maintained biochemical features. Regions with predicted differences in biochemical features appear to involve intramolecular interactions and structural elements that undergo conformational changes during particle maturation. In contrast, the majority of sites involved in intermolecular contacts on the protein surface are constrained by purifying selection. There is also conservation of sites that interact with host proteins associated with cellular trafficking and particle budding. NC is the only protein with evidence of positive selection, two of which occur in the N-terminal region responsible for RNA binding and interaction with host proteins.

  15. Localized or Systemic {italic In Vivo} Heat-Inactivation of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV): A Mathematical Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pennypacker, Carl R.; Perelson, A.S.; Nys, N.; Nelson, G.; Sessler, D.I.

    1993-12-15

    Temperatures as low as 42 C, maintained for a little as 25 minutes, inactivate {approx}25% of HIV. Furthermore, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected T-cells are more sensitive to heat than healthy lymphocytes and susceptibility increases when the cells are pre-sensitized by exposure to tumor necrosis factor. Thus, induction of a whole-body hyperthermia, or hyperthermia specifically limited to tissues having a high viral load, are potential antiviral therapies for acquired immunodeficiency disease (AIDS). Accordingly, we incorporated therapeutic hyperthermia into an existing mathematical model which evaluates the interaction between HIV and CD4{sup +} T cells. Given the assumptions and limitations of this model, the results indicate that a daily therapy, reducing the population of actively infected cells by 40% or infectious virus by 50%, would effectively reverse the depletion of T cells. In contrast, a daily reduction of 20% of either actively infected cells or infectious virus would have a marginal effect. However, reduction by 20% of both actively infected cells and infectious virus could restore T cell numbers, assuming that permanent damage had not been inflicted on the thymus. Whole-body hyperthermia seems unlikely to be clinically useful, unless it can be induced non-invasively without general anesthesia. In contrast, heating directed specifically to areas of viral concentration may be effective and have a suitable risk/benefit ratio.

  16. Hodgkin lymphoma in the elderly, pregnant, and HIV-infected.

    PubMed

    Bachanova, Veronika; Connors, Joseph M

    2016-07-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) presenting in patients with co-incidental advanced age, pregnancy, or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is uniquely challenging to manage. In this article we integrate recent evidence and clinical expertise to present recommendations for diagnosis and therapeutic management. Older patients with HL need to be carefully evaluated for comorbidies after which judicious choice of chemotherapy should minimize functional compromise. A pregnant patient with concurrent HL should be staged with minimal use of imaging requiring ionizing radiation and treated in an individualized manner optimally combining the strategies of treatment deferral when appropriate, use of single-agent vinblastine for symptomatic disease and reservation of multi-agent chemotherapy for the small minority of patients with aggressive clinical presentation. Treatment of HL coincident with HIV infection requires a combination of highly active anti-retroviral agents (HAART), standard multi-agent chemotherapy with meticulous attention to drug-drug interactions, and vigorous supportive care to ensure the best chance of cure. PMID:27496312

  17. Coronary artery disease risk reduction in HIV-infected persons: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Okeke, Nwora Lance; Chin, Tammy; Clement, Meredith; Chow, Shein-Chung; Hicks, Charles B

    2016-01-01

    Despite an increased risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) in persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), few data are available on primary prevention of CAD in this population. In this retrospective cohort study, HIV-infected patients treated in an academic medical center HIV Specialty Clinic between 1996 and 2010 were matched by age, gender, and ethnicity to a cohort of presumed uninfected persons followed in an academic medical center Internal Medicine primary care clinic. We compared CAD primary prevention care practices between the two clinics, including use of aspirin, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors ("statins"), and anti-hypertensive drugs. CAD risk between the two groups was assessed with 10-year Framingham CAD risk scores. In the comparative analysis, 890 HIV-infected persons were compared to 807 controls. Ten-year Framingham CAD Risk Scores were similar in the two groups (median, 3; interquartile range [IQR], 0-5). After adjusting for relevant risk factors, HIV-infected persons were less likely to be prescribed aspirin (odds ratio [OR] 0.53; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.40-0.71), statins (OR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.53-0.92), and anti-hypertensive drugs (OR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.50-0.79) than persons in the control group. In summary, when compared to demographically similar uninfected persons, HIV-infected persons treated in an HIV specialty clinic were less likely to be prescribed medications appropriate for CAD risk reduction. Improving primary preventative CAD care in HIV specialty clinic populations is an important step toward diminishing risk of heart disease in HIV-infected persons.

  18. Multimodal neuroimaging evidence of alterations in cortical structure and function in HIV-infected older adults.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Tony W; Heinrichs-Graham, Elizabeth; Becker, Katherine M; Aloi, Joseph; Robertson, Kevin R; Sandkovsky, Uriel; White, Matthew L; O'Neill, Jennifer; Knott, Nichole L; Fox, Howard S; Swindells, Susan

    2015-03-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy transformed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infection from a terminal illness to a manageable condition, but these patients remain at a significantly elevated risk of developing cognitive impairments and the mechanisms are not understood. Some previous neuroimaging studies have found hyperactivation in frontoparietal networks of HIV-infected patients, whereas others reported aberrations restricted to sensory cortices. In this study, we utilize high-resolution structural and neurophysiological imaging to determine whether alterations in brain structure, function, or both contribute to HIV-related cognitive impairments. HIV-infected adults and individually matched controls completed 3-Tesla structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) and a mechanoreception task during magnetoencephalography (MEG). MEG data were examined using advanced beamforming methods, and sMRI data were analyzed using the latest voxel-based morphometry methods with DARTEL. We found significantly reduced theta responses in the postcentral gyrus and increased alpha activity in the prefrontal cortices of HIV-infected patients compared with controls. Patients also had reduced gray matter volume in the postcentral gyrus, parahippocampal gyrus, and other regions. Importantly, reduced gray matter volume in the left postcentral gyrus was spatially coincident with abnormal MEG responses in HIV-infected patients. Finally, left prefrontal and postcentral gyrus activity was correlated with neuropsychological performance and, when used in conjunction, these two MEG findings had a sensitivity and specificity of over 87.5% for HIV-associated cognitive impairment. This study is the first to demonstrate abnormally increased activity in association cortices with simultaneously decreased activity in sensory areas. These MEG findings had excellent sensitivity and specificity for HIV-associated cognitive impairment, and may hold promise as a potential disease marker.

  19. Levamisole-Contaminated Cocaine Use in HIV-Infected and Uninfected Unstably Housed Women.

    PubMed

    Riley, Elise D; Kral, Alex H; Cohen, Jennifer; Dilworth, Samantha E; Shumway, Martha; Lynch, Kara L

    2016-09-01

    A growing number of case reports cite serious health complications linked to the cocaine adulterant, levamisole and women are disproportionately affected; however, the clinical effects are not well established. Between April and October of 2010, we conducted a cross-sectional study among 222 homeless and unstably housed women (116 human immunodeficiency virus [HIV]-infected and 106 HIV-uninfected). Immune markers and behavioral factors were compared in separate models by cocaine and levamisole exposure. Overall, 63% of participants were toxicology positive for cocaine/benzoylecgonine, 85% of whom also tested positive for levamisole. Differences in immune markers did not reach levels of significance among HIV-uninfected persons. Compared to HIV-infected persons who were negative for both cocaine and levamisole, the adjusted odds of low white blood cell count were significantly higher among HIV-infected persons positive for both (p = 0.03), but not for those positive for cocaine only. Neutrophil count and HIV viral load did not differ by cocaine and levamisole status among HIV-infected persons. In a separate model, the adjusted odds of testing positive for levamisole were higher among African American women compared to Caucasian and Asian women (p = 0.02). In the context of high levamisole prevalence, results suggest that decreased immune function as a result of levamisole exposure occurs mainly in individuals who are already immune compromised (e.g., HIV-positive), and race/ethnicity appears to be an important factor in understanding levamisole exposure among cocaine-using women. While larger and geographically diverse studies are needed to elucidate these initial findings, results suggest that levamisole may be one mechanism of immune dysfunction in HIV-infected cocaine-using women. PMID:27203838

  20. Dual Simian Foamy Virus/Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infections in Persons from Côte d’Ivoire

    PubMed Central

    Switzer, William M.; Tang, Shaohua; Zheng, HaoQiang; Shankar, Anupama; Sprinkle, Patrick S.; Sullivan, Vickie; Granade, Timothy C.; Heneine, Walid

    2016-01-01

    Zoonotic transmission of simian retroviruses in West-Central Africa occurring in primate hunters has resulted in pandemic spread of human immunodeficiency viruses (HIVs) and human T-lymphotropic viruses (HTLVs). While simian foamy virus (SFV) and simian T- lymphotropic virus (STLV)-like infection were reported in healthy persons exposed to nonhuman primates (NHPs) in West-Central Africa, less is known about the distribution of these viruses in Western Africa and in hospitalized populations. We serologically screened for SFV and STLV infection using 1,529 specimens collected between 1985 and 1997 from Côte d’Ivoire patients with high HIV prevalence. PCR amplification and analysis of SFV, STLV, and HIV/SIV sequences from PBMCs was used to investigate possible simian origin of infection. We confirmed SFV antibodies in three persons (0.2%), two of whom were HIV-1-infected. SFV polymerase (pol) and LTR sequences were detected in PBMC DNA available for one HIV-infected person. Phylogenetic comparisons with new SFV sequences from African guenons showed infection likely originated from a Chlorocebus sabaeus monkey endemic to Côte d’Ivoire. 4.6% of persons were HTLV seropositive and PCR testing of PBMCs from 15 HTLV seroreactive persons identified nine with HTLV-1 and one with HTLV-2 LTR sequences. Phylogenetic analysis showed that two persons had STLV-1-like infections, seven were HTLV-1, and one was an HTLV-2 infection. 310/858 (53%), 8/858 (0.93%), and 18/858 (2.1%) were HIV-1, HIV-2, and HIV-positive but undifferentiated by serology, respectively. No SIV sequences were found in persons with HIV-2 antibodies (n = 1) or with undifferentiated HIV results (n = 7). We document SFV, STLV-1-like, and dual SFV/HIV infection in Côte d’Ivoire expanding the geographic range for zoonotic simian retrovirus transmission to West Africa. These findings highlight the need to define the public health consequences of these infections. Studying dual HIV-1/SFV infections in

  1. Dual Simian Foamy Virus/Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infections in Persons from Côte d'Ivoire.

    PubMed

    Switzer, William M; Tang, Shaohua; Zheng, HaoQiang; Shankar, Anupama; Sprinkle, Patrick S; Sullivan, Vickie; Granade, Timothy C; Heneine, Walid

    2016-01-01

    Zoonotic transmission of simian retroviruses in West-Central Africa occurring in primate hunters has resulted in pandemic spread of human immunodeficiency viruses (HIVs) and human T-lymphotropic viruses (HTLVs). While simian foamy virus (SFV) and simian T- lymphotropic virus (STLV)-like infection were reported in healthy persons exposed to nonhuman primates (NHPs) in West-Central Africa, less is known about the distribution of these viruses in Western Africa and in hospitalized populations. We serologically screened for SFV and STLV infection using 1,529 specimens collected between 1985 and 1997 from Côte d'Ivoire patients with high HIV prevalence. PCR amplification and analysis of SFV, STLV, and HIV/SIV sequences from PBMCs was used to investigate possible simian origin of infection. We confirmed SFV antibodies in three persons (0.2%), two of whom were HIV-1-infected. SFV polymerase (pol) and LTR sequences were detected in PBMC DNA available for one HIV-infected person. Phylogenetic comparisons with new SFV sequences from African guenons showed infection likely originated from a Chlorocebus sabaeus monkey endemic to Côte d'Ivoire. 4.6% of persons were HTLV seropositive and PCR testing of PBMCs from 15 HTLV seroreactive persons identified nine with HTLV-1 and one with HTLV-2 LTR sequences. Phylogenetic analysis showed that two persons had STLV-1-like infections, seven were HTLV-1, and one was an HTLV-2 infection. 310/858 (53%), 8/858 (0.93%), and 18/858 (2.1%) were HIV-1, HIV-2, and HIV-positive but undifferentiated by serology, respectively. No SIV sequences were found in persons with HIV-2 antibodies (n = 1) or with undifferentiated HIV results (n = 7). We document SFV, STLV-1-like, and dual SFV/HIV infection in Côte d'Ivoire expanding the geographic range for zoonotic simian retrovirus transmission to West Africa. These findings highlight the need to define the public health consequences of these infections. Studying dual HIV-1/SFV infections in

  2. [Social determinants of health associated to the human immunodeficiency virus of indigenous women in north Oaxaca, México].

    PubMed

    Juan-Martínez, Berenice; Castillo-Arcos, Lubia Del Carmen

    2016-01-01

    The vulnerability to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection may increase based on specific social determinants of health, which can also affect the lack of adherence to a safe sexual behavior and access to antiretroviral treatment in indigenous women. Consequently, it is necessary to review, through a documentary study, what are those determinants in the case of a group of indigenous women from the North of Oaxaca and how these aspects affect those women, as well as the important role of nursing for the best approach. Social determinants are classified into 3 levels: macro (socioeconomic status, income, migration and education), meso (culture, gender and access to health services) and micro (lifestyles and adoption of safe sex). Indigenous women with limited resources become easy targets of HIV by engaging in risky sexual behaviors inadvertently. The nurse is a key professional who can influence behaviors of women through effective interventions that help foster self-confidence and empowerment, using the resources that the person possesses.

  3. Impact of antiretroviral therapy on lipid metabolism of human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: Old and new drugs

    PubMed Central

    da Cunha, Joel; Maselli, Luciana Morganti Ferreira; Stern, Ana Carolina Bassi; Spada, Celso; Bydlowski, Sérgio Paulo

    2015-01-01

    For human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, the 1990s were marked by the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) representing a new perspective of life for these patients. The use of HAART was shown to effectively suppress the replication of HIV-1 and dramatically reduce mortality and morbidity, which led to a better and longer quality of life for HIV-1-infected patients. Apart from the substantial benefits that result from the use of various HAART regimens, laboratory and clinical experience has shown that HAART can induce severe and considerable adverse effects related to metabolic complications of lipid metabolism, characterized by signs of lipodystrophy, insulin resistance, central adiposity, dyslipidemia, increased risk of cardiovascular disease and even an increased risk of atherosclerosis. New drugs are being studied, new therapeutic strategies are being implemented, and the use of statins, fibrates, and inhibitors of intestinal cholesterol absorption have been effective alternatives. Changes in diet and lifestyle have also shown satisfactory results. PMID:25964872

  4. FAT10: a Novel Mediator of Vpr-Induced Apoptosis in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Nephropathy▿

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Alexandra; Alsauskas, Zygimantas; Gong, Pengfei; Rosenstiel, Paul E.; Klotman, Mary E.; Klotman, Paul E.; Ross, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated nephropathy is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected persons. Vpr-induced cell cycle dysregulation and apoptosis of renal tubular epithelial cells are important components of the pathogenesis of HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN). FAT10 is a ubiquitin-like protein that is upregulated in renal tubular epithelial cells in HIVAN. In these studies, we report that Vpr induces increased expression of FAT10 in tubular cells and that inhibition of FAT10 expression prevents Vpr-induced apoptosis in human and murine tubular cells. Moreover, we found that Vpr interacts with FAT10 and that these proteins colocalize at mitochondria. These studies establish FAT10 as a novel mediator of Vpr-induced cell death. PMID:19726511

  5. Identification of three feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) env gene subtypes and comparison of the FIV and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 evolutionary patterns.

    PubMed Central

    Sodora, D L; Shpaer, E G; Kitchell, B E; Dow, S W; Hoover, E A; Mullins, J I

    1994-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a lentivirus associated with AIDS-like illnesses in cats. As such, FIV appears to be a feline analog of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). A hallmark of HIV infection is the large degree of viral genetic diversity that can develop within an infected individual and the even greater and continually increasing level of diversity among virus isolates from different individuals. Our goal in this study was to determine patterns of FIV genetic diversity by focusing on a 684-nucleotide region encompassing variable regions V3, V4, and V5 of the FIV env gene in order to establish parallels and distinctions between FIV and HIV type 1 (HIV-1). Our data demonstrate that, like HIV-1, FIV can be separated into distinct envelope sequence subtypes (three are described here). Similar to that found for HIV-1, the pairwise sequence divergence within an FIV subtype ranged from 2.5 to 15.0%, whereas that between subtypes ranged from 17.8 to 26.2%. However, the high number of synonymous nucleotide changes among FIV V3 to V5 env sequences may also include a significant number of back mutations and suggests that the evolutionary distances among FIV subtypes are underestimated. Although only a few subtype B viruses were available for examination, the pattern of diversity between the FIV A and B subtypes was found to be significantly distinct; subtype B sequences had proportionally fewer mutations that changed amino acids, compared with silent changes, suggesting a more advanced state of adaptation to the host. No similar distinction was evident for HIV-1 subtypes. The diversity of FIV genomes within individual infected cats was found to be as high as 3.7% yet twofold lower than that within HIV-1-infected people over a comparable region of the env gene. Despite these differences, significant parallels between patterns of FIV evolution and HIV-1 evolution exist, indicating that a wide array of potentially divergent virus challenges need to be considered

  6. Serological responses in chimpanzees inoculated with human immunodeficiency virus glycoprotein (gp120) subunit vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, L.O.; Pyle, S.W.; Nara, P.L.; Bess, J.W. Jr.; Gonda, M.A.; Kelliher, J.C.; Gilden, R.V.; Robey, W.G.; Bolognesi, D.P.; Gallo, R.C.

    1987-12-01

    The major envelope glycoprotein of a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been purified and was utilized as a prototype vaccine in chimpanzees. The 120,000-dalton glycoprotein (gp120) was purified from membranes of human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV)-IIIB-infected cells and the final preparation contained low levels to no detectable HTLV-IIIB core antigen (p24) and low levels of endotoxin. Chimpanzees inoculated with gp120 responded by developing antibodies that precipitated radiolabeled gp120 and neutralized in vitro infection of HTLV-IIIB. Antibodies to HTLV-IIIB p24 were not detected in the gp120-immunized chimpanzees. Peripheral blood leukocytes from the vaccinated animals were examined for T4/sup +/ and T8/sup +/ cells, and no decrease in the T4/T8 ratio was found, indicating that immunization with a ligand (gp120) that binds to T4 has not detectable adverse effect on the population of T4/sup +/ cells. The only current animal model that can be reproducibly infected with HIV is the chimpanzee. Immunization of chimpanzees with HIV proteins will provide an experimental system for testing the effectiveness of prototype vaccines for preventing HIV infection in vivo.

  7. A case of plasmablastic lymphoma of the liver without human immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Joji; Miyoshi, Hisaaki; Nomura, Takako; Yoneyama, Hirohito; Kobara, Hideki; Mori, Hirohito; Morishita, Asahiro; Himoto, Takashi; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    Plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL) is a very rare B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder was with an aggressive clinical behavior that recently characterized by the World Health Organization. Although PBL is most commonly observed in the oral cavity of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients, it can also be observed at extra-oral sites in HIV-negative patients. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) may be closely related the pathogenesis of PBL. PBL shows different clinicopathological characteristics between HIV-positive and -negative patients. Here, we report a case of PBL of the liver in a 79-year-old HIV-negative male. The patient died approximately 1.5 mo after examination and autopsy showed that the main lesion was a very large liver mass. Histopathological examination of the excised lesion showed large-cell lymphoma with plasmacytic differentiation diffusely infiltrating the liver and involving the surrounding organs. The neoplastic cells were diffusely positive for CD30, EBV, Bob-1, and CD38. The autopsy findings suggested a diagnosis of PBL. To our knowledge, the present case appears to be the first report of PBL with initial presentation of the liver in a patient without HIV infection. PMID:24115831

  8. Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Diarrhea: Still an Issue in the Era of Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dikman, Andrew E; Schonfeld, Emily; Srisarajivakul, Nalinee C; Poles, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Over half of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) experience diarrhea that contributes negatively to quality of life and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Opportunistic infectious agents that cause diarrhea in patients with HIV span the array of protozoa, fungi, viruses, and bacteria. With global use of ART, the incidence of diarrhea because of opportunistic infections has decreased; however, the incidence of noninfectious diarrhea has increased. The etiology of noninfectious diarrhea in patients with HIV is multifactorial and includes ART-associated diarrhea and gastrointestinal damage related to HIV infection (i.e., HIV enteropathy). A basic algorithm for the diagnosis of diarrhea in patients with HIV includes physical examination, a review of medical history, assessment of HIV viral load and CD4+ T cell count, stool microbiologic assessment, and endoscopic evaluation, if needed. For patients with negative diagnostic results, the diagnosis of noninfectious diarrhea may be considered. Pharmacologic options for the treatment of noninfectious diarrhea are primarily supportive; however, the use of many unapproved agents is based on unstudied and anecdotal information. In addition, these agents can be associated with treatment-limiting adverse events (AEs), such as drug-drug interactions with ART regimens, abuse liability, and additional gastrointestinal AEs. Currently, crofelemer, an antisecretory agent, is the only therapy approved in the USA for the symptomatic relief of noninfectious diarrhea in patients with HIV on ART. PMID:25772777

  9. Association of Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-B Chain with Simian Human Immunodeficiency Virus Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Potula, Raghava; Dhillion, Navneet; Sui, Yongjun; Zien, Christopher A.; Funa, Keiko; Pinson, David; Mayo, Matthew S.; Singh, Dinesh K.; Narayan, Opendra; Buch, Shilpa

    2004-01-01

    Chemokines and cytokines play a critical role in HIV infection, serving both to modulate virus replication and to recruit target cells to the site of infection. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), a mitogen and chemoattractant for a wide variety of cells, is secreted by macrophages. Since macrophages are the target cells for lentiviral infection in the brain and PDGF is a known inducer of macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP)-1, a potent chemokine closely associated with HIV encephalitis, we investigated the association of PDGF-B chain (PDGF-B) with encephalitis in macaques caused by simian human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV), a chimera of HIV and SIV. Northern blot analysis confirmed elevated expression of PDGF-B chain mRNA in the brains from encephalitic macaques. Validation of these in vivo studies was confirmed in rhesus macrophage cultures infected with SHIVKU2 in which we demonstrated heightened expression of PDGF-B chain mRNA. Nuclear run-off analysis established transcriptional up-regulation of PDGF-B chain in virus-inoculated macrophage cultures. Reciprocally, addition of exogenous PDGF enhanced virus replication and MCP-1 expression in these cells. Inhibition of virus replication by tyrosine kinase inhibitor, STI-571, and by PDGF-B antisense oligonucleotides confirmed the specificity of the PDGF effect. Relevance of these findings was confirmed by analysis of archival brain tissue from SHIV encephalitic and non-encephalitic macaques for PDGF-B chain expression. PDGF-B chain protein expression was observed in the virus-infected cells in microglial nodules in the brains of SHIV-encephalitic macaques. PMID:15331406

  10. Use of polymerase chain reaction and quantitative antibody tests in children born to human immunodeficiency virus-1-infected mothers.

    PubMed

    Newell, M L; Loveday, C; Dunn, D; Kaye, S; Tedder, R; Peckham, C; De Maria, A; Giaquinto, C; Omeñaca, F; Canosa, C

    1995-12-01

    The diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in children born to HIV-infected mothers is complicated by the presence of passively acquired maternal antibodies, and exclusion of infection in these infants remains problematic. The use of genome detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and the quantification of anti-HIV-1 antibodies were examined as methods for early diagnosis. Blood samples were taken from 84 non-breast-fed infants of HIV-infected mothers in five Italian and Spanish centres, a subgroup of children enrolled in the European Collaborative Study (ECS) for whom clinical and immunological information has been documented from birth. Whole blood was added to glycigel cryopreservative, stored, and tested in the United Kingdom by a nested PCR method. Antibody to HIV-1 was detected and quantified by titration using a gelatin particle agglutination test. PCR sensitivity and specificity were assessed. Twenty-one of the 84 children tested were infected. The estimated PCR sensitivity ranged from 0% (95% CI 0-26%) on day 1, 57% (19-85) on day 7, to 63% (33-92) on day 30. The negative predictive value of PCR ranged from 85% (83-88) on day 0 to 98% (94-100) at 3 months of age. On average, the level of maternal antibody halved every 33 days (31-36.5) in uninfected children. Between 6 and 9 months of age, increases in antibody titres in infected children were not more informative than absolute levels. These findings suggest that antibody measurement may supplement genomic diagnosis and that this collection method provides an alternative to the use of dried blood spots.

  11. Cardiac mechanics in patients with human immunodeficiency virus: a study of systolic myocardial deformation in children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Al-Naami, Ghassan; Kiblawi, Fuad; Kest, Helen; Hamdan, Ayman; Myridakis, Dorothy

    2014-08-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection causes dysfunction of different organ systems. Myocardial diastolic dysfunction has been reported previously in an adult HIV population. Our aim was to study myocardial strain in children and young adults infected by HIV who have apparently normal ejection fraction. Forty HIV-infected patients (mean age 20.6 ± 1.5 years) with normal ejection fraction and 55 matched normal controls (mean age 17 ± 1.5 years) were studied by two-dimensional echocardiogram. The images were stored then exported to velocity vector imaging software for analysis. Measures considered were left-ventricular peak global systolic strain (LV S) and strain rate (LV SR) as well as right-ventricular peak global systolic strain (RV S) and strain rate (RV SR). Circumferential measures of the left ventricle included the following: LV circumferential peak global systolic strain (LV circ S), strain rate (LV circ SR), radial velocity (LV rad vel), and rotational velocity (LV rot vel) at the level of the mitral valve. Statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. The means of all longitudinal deformation parameters were significantly lower in HIV patients compared with normal controls: LV S (-14.15 vs. -19.31), LV SR (-0.88 vs. -1.30), RV S (-19.58 vs. -25.09), and RV SR (-1.34 vs. -2.13), respectively (p < 0.05). LV rot vel was lower in patients compared with controls (43.23 vs. 51.71, p = 0.025). LV circ S, LV circ SR, and LV rad vel showed no significant difference between the two groups (p ≥ 0.05). HIV infection affects longitudinal systolic cardiac strain and strain rate in children and young adults. Normal ejection fraction might be attributed to preserved circumferential myocardial deformation. Strain and strain rate may help identify HIV patients at high risk for cardiac dysfunction and allow early detection of silent myocardial depression.

  12. Mannose-specific plant lectins from the Amaryllidaceae family qualify as efficient microbicides for prevention of human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Balzarini, Jan; Hatse, Sigrid; Vermeire, Kurt; Princen, Katrien; Aquaro, Stefano; Perno, Carlo-Federico; De Clercq, Erik; Egberink, Herman; Vanden Mooter, Guy; Peumans, Willy; Van Damme, Els; Schols, Dominique

    2004-10-01

    The plant lectins derived from Galanthus nivalis (Snowdrop) (GNA) and Hippeastrum hybrid (Amaryllis) (HHA) selectively inhibited a wide variety of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2 strains and clinical (CXCR4- and CCR5-using) isolates in different cell types. They also efficiently inhibited infection of T lymphocytes by a variety of mutant virus strains. GNA and HHA markedly prevented syncytium formation between persistently infected HUT-78/HIV cells and uninfected T lymphocytes. The plant lectins did not measurably affect the antiviral activity of other clinically approved anti-HIV drugs used in the clinic when combined with these drugs. Short exposure of the lectins to cell-free virus particles or persistently HIV-infected HUT-78 cells markedly decreased HIV infectivity and increased the protective (microbicidal) activity of the plant lectins. Flow cytometric analysis and monoclonal antibody binding studies and a PCR-based assay revealed that GNA and HHA do not interfere with CD4, CXCR4, CCR5, and DC-SIGN and do not specifically bind with the membrane of uninfected cells. Instead, GNA and HHA likely interrupt the virus entry process by interfering with the virus envelope glycoprotein. HHA and GNA are odorless, colorless, and tasteless, and they are not cytotoxic, antimetabolically active, or mitogenic to human primary T lymphocytes at concentrations that exceed their antivirally active concentrations by 2 to 3 orders of magnitude. GNA and HHA proved stable at high temperature (50 degrees C) and low pH (5.0) for prolonged time periods and can be easily formulated in gel preparations for microbicidal use; they did not agglutinate human erythrocytes and were not toxic to mice when administered intravenously.

  13. Acyclovir Prophylaxis Reduces the Incidence of Herpes Zoster Among HIV-Infected Individuals: Results of a Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Barnabas, Ruanne V; Baeten, Jared M; Lingappa, Jairam R; Thomas, Katherine K; Hughes, James P; Mugo, Nelly R; Delany-Moretlwe, Sinead; Gray, Glenda; Rees, Helen; Mujugira, Andrew; Ronald, Allan; Stevens, Wendy; Kapiga, Saidi; Wald, Anna; Celum, Connie

    2016-02-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons have higher rates of herpes zoster than HIV-uninfected individuals. We assessed whether twice daily treatment with 400 mg of oral acyclovir reduces the incidence of herpes zoster in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial among 3408 persons coinfected with HIV and herpes simplex virus type 2. During 5175 person-years of follow-up, 26 cases of herpes zoster occurred among those assigned acyclovir, compared with 69 cases among those assigned placebo (rates, 1.00 and 2.68/100 person-years, respectively), a relative decrease of 62% (hazard ratio, 0.38; 95% confidence interval, .24-.67; P < .001). Daily acyclovir prophylaxis significantly reduced herpes zoster incidence among HIV-infected persons.

  14. Mental health of patients with human immunodeficiency virus in Japan: a comparative analysis of employed and unemployed patients.

    PubMed

    Omiya, Tomoko; Yamazaki, Yoshihiko; Shimada, Megumi; Ikeda, Kazuko; Ishiuchi-Ishitani, Seiko; Tsuno, Yoko Sumikawa; Ohira, Katsumi

    2014-01-01

    In developed countries, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has become a chronic disease. The aims of this study were to clarify the physical, social, and psychological factors affecting Japanese HIV patients in a stable condition and to identify factors related to mental health of employed and unemployed HIV patients. The target subjects were people with HIV infection who were treated as outpatients at core hospitals for acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) treatment in Japan. A questionnaire including items from the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) was sent to each medical facility with a request for participation from the HIV-infected outpatients. Responses from 1199 patients were analyzed. Mental health was reportedly better in the employed patients than in the unemployed patients. The unemployed patients were more likely to have resigned from their jobs because of poor health, to have resigned voluntarily, or to have been unfairly dismissed. Once the patients stopped working because of HIV, returning to work became difficult. In the employed patients, a good workplace environment was strongly related to lower scores on HADS. Higher HADS scores were recorded for employed patients infected with HIV for six years or more. For the unemployed patients, a relationship was observed between strong feelings of stigmatization and HADS scores. Quitting a job because of an experience related to HIV status may be related to feelings of stigmatization.

  15. [Executive summary of the recommendations on the evaluation and management of renal disease in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients].

    PubMed

    Gorriz, José L; Gutiérrez, Félix; Trullàs, Joan C; Arazo, Piedad; Arribas, Jose R; Barril, Guillermina; Cervero, Miguel; Cofán, Frederic; Domingo, Pere; Estrada, Vicente; Fulladosa, Xavier; Galindo, María J; Gràcia, Sílvia; Iribarren, José A; Knobel, Hernando; López-Aldeguer, José; Lozano, Fernando; Martínez-Castelao, Alberto; Martínez, Esteban; Mazuecos, Maria A; Miralles, Celia; Montañés, Rosario; Negredo, Eugenia; Palacios, Rosario; Pérez-Elías, María J; Portilla, Joaquín; Praga, Manuel; Quereda, Carlos; Rivero, Antonio; Santamaría, Juan M; Sanz, José; Sanz, Jesús; Miró, José M

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this article is to update the 2010 recommendations on the evaluation and management of renal disease in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. Renal function should be monitored in all HIV-infected patients. The basic renal work-up should include measurements of serum creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate by CKD-EPI, urine protein-to-creatinine ratio, and urinary sediment. Tubular function tests should include determination of serum phosphate levels and urine dipstick for glycosuria. In the absence of abnormal values, renal screening should be performed annually. In patients treated with tenofovir, or with risk factors for chronic kidney disease (CKD), more frequent renal screening is recommended. In order to prevent disease progression, potentially nephrotoxic antiretroviral drugs are not recommended in patients with CKD or risk factors for CKD. The document provides indications for renal biopsy and advises on the optimal time for referral of a patient to the nephrologist. The indications for and evaluation and management of dialysis and renal transplantation are also addressed.

  16. Global stability of infection-free state and endemic infection state of a modified human immunodeficiency virus infection model.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qilin; Min, Lequan; Kuang, Yang

    2015-06-01

    This study proposes a modified human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection differential equation model with a saturated infection rate. This model has an infection-free equilibrium point and an endemic infection equilibrium point. Using Lyapunov functions and LaSalle's invariance principle shows that if the model's basic reproductive number R0 < 1, the infection-free equilibrium point is globally asymptotically stable, otherwise the endemic infection equilibrium point is globally asymptotically stable. It is shown that a forward bifurcation will occur when R0 = 1. The basic reproductive number R0 of the modified model is independent of plasma total CD4⁺ T cell counts and thus the modified model is more reasonable than the original model proposed by Buonomo and Vargas-De-León. Based on the clinical data from HIV drug resistance database of Stanford University, using the proposed model simulates the dynamics of two group patients' anti-HIV infection treatments. The simulation results have shown that the first 4 weeks' treatments made the two group patients' R'0 < 1, respectively. After the period, drug resistance made the two group patients' R'0 > 1. The results explain why the two group patients' mean CD4⁺ T cell counts raised and mean HIV RNA levels declined in the first period, but contrary in the following weeks.

  17. Envelope-specific B-cell populations in African green monkeys chronically infected with simian immunodeficiency virus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ruijun; Martinez, David R.; Nguyen, Quang N.; Pollara, Justin; Arifin, Trina; Stolarchuk, Christina; Foulger, Andrew; Amos, Josh D.; Parks, Robert; Himes, Jonathon E.; Wang, Minyue; Edwards, Regina W.; Trama, Ashley M.; Vandergrift, Nathan; Colvin, Lisa; Dewar, Ken; Juretic, Nikoleta; Wasserscheid, Jessica; Ferrari, Guido; Liao, Hua-Xin; Permar, Sallie R.

    2016-01-01

    African green monkeys (AGMs) are natural primate hosts of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). Interestingly, features of the envelope-specific antibody responses in SIV-infected AGMs are distinct from that of HIV-infected humans and SIV-infected rhesus monkeys, including gp120-focused responses and rapid development of autologous neutralization. Yet, the lack of genetic tools to evaluate B-cell lineages hinders potential use of this unique non-human primate model for HIV vaccine development. Here we define features of the AGM Ig loci and compare the proportion of Env-specific memory B-cell populations to that of HIV-infected humans and SIV-infected rhesus monkeys. AGMs appear to have a higher proportion of Env-specific memory B cells that are mainly gp120 directed. Furthermore, AGM gp120-specific monoclonal antibodies display robust antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and CD4-dependent virion capture activity. Our results support the use of AGMs to model induction of functional gp120-specific antibodies by HIV vaccine strategies. PMID:27381634

  18. Smoothened Agonist Reduces Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Breakdown in Humanized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vir B.; Singh, Meera V.; Gorantla, Santhi; Poluektova, Larisa Y.; Maggirwar, Sanjay B.

    2016-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV)-associated neurocognitive disorder is characterized by recruitment of activated/infected leukocytes into the CNS via disrupted Blood Brain Barrier (BBB) that contributes to persistent neuro-inflammation. In this report, humanized NOD/scid-IL2Rγcnull mice were used to establish that impaired Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling is associated with loss of BBB function and neurological damage, and that modulating Shh signaling can rescue these detrimental effects. Plasma viral load, p24 levels and CD4+ T cells were measured as markers of productive HIV infection. These mice also showed impaired exclusion of Evans blue dye from the brain, increased plasma levels of S100B, an astrocytic protein, and down-regulation of tight junction proteins Occludin and Claudin5, collectively indicating BBB dysfunction. Further, brain tissue from HIV+ mice indicated reduced synaptic density, neuronal atrophy, microglial activation, and astrocytosis. Importantly, reduced expression of Shh and Gli1 was also observed in these mice, demonstrating diminished Shh signaling. Administration of Shh mimetic, smoothened agonist (SAG) restored BBB integrity and also abated the neuropathology in infected mice. Together, our results suggest a neuroprotective role for Shh signaling in the context of HIV infection, underscoring the therapeutic potential of SAG in controlling HAND pathogenesis. PMID:27241024

  19. Bacillary angiomatosis and bacillary peliosis in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus: clinical characteristics in a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Mohle-Boetani, J C; Koehler, J E; Berger, T G; LeBoit, P E; Kemper, C A; Reingold, A L; Plikaytis, B D; Wenger, J D; Tappero, J W

    1996-05-01

    Clinical characteristics associated with bacillary angiomatosis and bacillary peliosis (BAP) in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection were evaluated in a case-control study; 42 case-patients and 84 controls were matched by clinical care institution. Case-patients presented with fever (temperature, > 37.8 degrees C; 93%), a median CD4 lymphocyte count of 21/mm3, cutaneous or subcutaneous vascular lesions (55%), lymphadenopathy (21%), and/or abdominal symptoms (24%). Many case-patients experienced long delays between medical evaluation and diagnosis of BAP (median, 4 weeks; range, 1 day to 24 months). Case-patients were more likely than controls to have fever, lymphadenopathy, hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, a low CD4 lymphocyte count, anemia, or an elevated serum level of alkaline phosphatase (AP) (P < .001). In multivariate analysis, a CD4 lymphocyte count of < 200/mm3 (matched odds ratio [OR], 9.9; P < .09), anemia reflected by a hematocrit value of < 0.36 (OR, 19.7; P < .04), and an elevated AP level of > or = 2.6 mukat/L (OR, 23.9; P < .05) remained associated with disease after therapy with zidovudine was controlled for. BAP should be considered an AIDS-defining opportunistic infection and should be included in the differential diagnosis for febrile, HIV-infected patients with cutaneous or osteolytic lesions, lymphadenopathy, abdominal symptoms, anemia, or an elevated serum level of AP.

  20. [Seroprevalence and factors associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and syphilis in inmates in the state of Pernambuco, Brazil].

    PubMed

    de Albuquerque, Ana Cecília Cavalcanti; da Silva, Débora Maria; Rabelo, Deyse Caroline Cabral; de Lucena, Waldenia Agny Torres; de Lima, Paloma Cássia Silva; Coelho, Maria Rosângela Cunha Duarte; Tiago, Guilherme Gustavo de Brito

    2014-07-01

    Prison inmates are more vulnerable to HIV and other Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) due to risk factors such as needle sharing and unprotected sex with homosexuals. The aim of this work was to determine the seroprevalence and risk factors associated with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1/2) and syphilis among male inmates in Caruaru, State of Pernambuco, Brazil. A cross-sectional study was performed between May and July 2011, when 1,097 inmates at a prison in Caruaru were assessed by means of interviews and blood sample collection for performing the respective tests. The prevalence was 1.19% for HIV infection and 3.92% for syphilis. HIV infection showed a statistically significant association (p <0.05), with injected drug use, homosexuality and blood transfusions. With respect to HIV status and syphilis, factors related to sex life were statistically significant (p <0.05). The prison population is a high risk group for the diseases investigated. The prevalence rates identified indicate the need to implement prevention programs, helping to contain such diseases in this particular population group. PMID:25014292

  1. Integrating Antiretroviral Strategies for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Prevention: Post- and Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis and Early Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Robert M.; Smith, Dawn K.

    2015-01-01

    Best practices for integrating human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing and antiretroviral interventions for prevention and treatment are suggested based on research evidence and existing normative guidance. The goal is to provide high-impact prevention services during periods of substantial risk. Antiretroviral medications are recommended for postexposure prophylaxis (PEP), pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), and treatment of HIV infection. We reviewed research evidence and current normative guidelines to identify best practices for integrating these high-impact prevention strategies. More sensitive HIV tests used for screening enable earlier diagnosis and treatment of HIV infection, more appropriate counseling, and help limit drug resistance. A fully suppressive PEP regimen should be initiated based on exposure history or physical findings when sensitive diagnostic testing is delayed or not available and antibody tests are negative. Transitions from PEP to PrEP are often warranted because HIV exposure events may continue to occur. This algorithmic approach to integrating PEP, PrEP, and early treatment decisions may increase the uptake of these interventions by a greater number and diversity of knowledgeable healthcare providers. PMID:26512356

  2. Smoothened Agonist Reduces Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Breakdown in Humanized Mice.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vir B; Singh, Meera V; Gorantla, Santhi; Poluektova, Larisa Y; Maggirwar, Sanjay B

    2016-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV)-associated neurocognitive disorder is characterized by recruitment of activated/infected leukocytes into the CNS via disrupted Blood Brain Barrier (BBB) that contributes to persistent neuro-inflammation. In this report, humanized NOD/scid-IL2Rγc(null) mice were used to establish that impaired Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling is associated with loss of BBB function and neurological damage, and that modulating Shh signaling can rescue these detrimental effects. Plasma viral load, p24 levels and CD4(+) T cells were measured as markers of productive HIV infection. These mice also showed impaired exclusion of Evans blue dye from the brain, increased plasma levels of S100B, an astrocytic protein, and down-regulation of tight junction proteins Occludin and Claudin5, collectively indicating BBB dysfunction. Further, brain tissue from HIV(+) mice indicated reduced synaptic density, neuronal atrophy, microglial activation, and astrocytosis. Importantly, reduced expression of Shh and Gli1 was also observed in these mice, demonstrating diminished Shh signaling. Administration of Shh mimetic, smoothened agonist (SAG) restored BBB integrity and also abated the neuropathology in infected mice. Together, our results suggest a neuroprotective role for Shh signaling in the context of HIV infection, underscoring the therapeutic potential of SAG in controlling HAND pathogenesis. PMID:27241024

  3. Impact of HIV infection on sustained virological response to treatment against hepatitis C virus with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Monje-Agudo, P; Castro-Iglesias, A; Rivero-Juárez, A; Martínez-Marcos, F; Ortega-González, E; Real, L M; Pernas, B; Merchante, N; Cid, P; Macías, J; Merino, M D; Rivero, A; Mena, A; Neukam, K; Pineda, J A

    2015-10-01

    It is commonly accepted that human immunodeficiency (HIV) coinfection negatively impacts on the rates of sustained virological response (SVR) to therapy with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin (PR). However, this hypothesis is derived from comparing different studies. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of HIV coinfection on SVR to PR in one single population. In a multicentric, prospective study conducted between 2000 and 2013, all previously naïve hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients who started PR in five Spanish hospitals were analyzed. SVR was evaluated 24 weeks after the scheduled end of therapy. Of the 1046 patients included in this study, 413 (39%) were coinfected with HIV. Three hundred and forty-one (54%) HCV-monoinfected versus 174 (42%) HIV/HCV-coinfected patients achieved SVR (p < 0.001). The corresponding figures for undetectable HCV RNA at treatment week 4 were 86/181 (47%) versus 59/197 (30%), p < 0.001. SVR was observed in 149 (69%) HCV genotype 2/3-monoinfected subjects versus 91 (68%) HIV/HCV genotype 2/3-coinfected subjects (p = 0.785). In the HCV genotype 1/4-infected population, 188 (46%) monoinfected patients versus 82 (30%) with HIV coinfection (p < 0.001) achieved SVR. In this subgroup, absence of HIV coinfection was independently associated with higher SVR [adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval): 2.127 (1.135-3.988); p = 0.019] in a multivariate analysis adjusted for age, sex, baseline HCV RNA load, IL28B genotype, fibrosis stage, and type of pegylated interferon. HIV coinfection impacts on the rates of SVR to PR only in HCV genotype 1/4-infected patients, while it has no effect on SVR in the HCV genotype 2/3-infected subpopulation.

  4. Medication adherence and sexual risk behavior among HIV-infected adults: implications for transmission of resistant virus.

    PubMed

    Remien, Robert H; Exner, Theresa M; Morin, Stephen F; Ehrhardt, Anke A; Johnson, Mallory O; Correale, Jackie; Marhefka, Stephanie; Kirshenbaum, Sheri B; Weinhardt, Lance S; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Catz, Sheryl L; Gore-Felton, Cheryl; Chesney, Margaret A; Kelly, Jeffrey

    2007-09-01

    As more people are living long-term with HIV there are growing concerns about specific behaviors that can affect both personal and the public health. This study examined the relationship between antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and sexual risk behavior and their association with psychosocial and health factors among a diverse sample of 2,849 HIV-infected adults. Only 8.5% of the sample reported both non-adherence and sexual risk. Individuals were 46% more likely to report one of these risk outcomes when the other one was present and the presence of both outcomes was associated with an increased likelihood of having a detectable viral load. A simultaneous polytomous regression analysis revealed complex relationships among a range of psychosocial variables and the two primary behavioral risk outcomes. There is a need for targeted interventions and integration of mental health and substance use services into primary HIV care settings.

  5. Serum Sclerostin Levels in Patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection and Their Association with Bone Turnover Markers and Bone Mineral Densitometry

    PubMed Central

    Abdulfatah, Mohammed E.; Baaqil, Omar H.; Bakheet, Alaa A.; Turki, Sarah A.; Kotb, Mamdouh M.; Althubaiti, Alaa; Almaghrabi, Majed M.; Althubaiti, Abdulrahman M.; Madani, Badr M.; Jawad, Ali S. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to compare serum sclerostin levels in human im-munodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients and healthy controls, and to evaluate their relationship with bone turnover markers (BTM) and bone mineral density (BMD). Methods We prospectively studied 33 HIV treatment-naive patients and 63 healthy individuals; matched for age and sex. Serum sclerostin levels, BTM, BMD were measured. Viral load and cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4) levels were also assessed in HIV-infected patients. Results The mean±standard deviation (SD) age of sample was 37.6±10.3 years (range, 19 to 59 years). Of the 96 subjects, 58 (60.4%) were male and 38 (39.6%) were female. Infection with HIV is associated with significant reduction in serum sclerostin levels (HIV-infected: 39.4±28.3 vs. non HIV: 76.6±15.7 pmol/L; P<0.001) and a decrease in BMD at femoral neck and lumbar spine compared to healthy controls. Sclerostin however was not correlated with BMD and was not related to age, generally a strong correlation. There were no significant correlations between sclerostin and BTM (P>0.05). Conclusions These findings suggest that untreated HIV and the resulting immune deficiency and/or systemic inflammation could be an important regulator of serum sclerostin in this population. PMID:26981516

  6. Chimeric gag-V3 virus-like particles of human immunodeficiency virus induce virus-neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Luo, L; Li, Y; Cannon, P M; Kim, S; Kang, C Y

    1992-01-01

    A 41-kDa unprocessed human immunodeficiency virus 2 (HIV-2) gag precursor protein that has a deletion of a portion of the viral protease assembles as virus-like particles by budding through the cytoplasmic membrane of recombinant baculovirus-infected insect cells. We have constructed six different combinations of chimeric genes by coupling the truncated HIV-2 gag gene to the neutralizing domain (V3) or the neutralizing and the CD4 binding domains (V3+CD4BD) of gp120 env gene sequences from HIV-1 or HIV-2. The env gene sequences were inserted either into the middle of the gag gene or at the 3' terminus of the gag gene. Virus-like particles were formed by chimeric gene products only when the env gene sequences were linked to the 3' terminus of the gag gene. Insertion of env gene sequence in the middle of the gag gene resulted in high-level chimeric gene expression but without the formation of virus-like particles. Three different chimeric genes [gag gene with HIV-1 V3 (1V3), gag gene with HIV-2 V3 (2V3), and gag gene with HIV-2 V3+CD4BD (2V3+CD4BD)] formed virus-like particles that were secreted into the cell culture medium. In contrast, the HIV-1 V3+CD4BD/HIV-2 gag construct did not form virus-like particles. The chimeric gag-env particles had spherical morphology and the size was slightly larger than that of the gag particles, but the chimeric particles were similar to the mature HIV particles. Western blot analysis showed that the gag-env chimeric proteins were recognized by antibodies in HIV-positive human serum and rabbit anti-gp120 serum. Rabbit anti-gag 1V3 and anti-gag 2V3 sera reacted with authentic gp120 of HIV-1 and HIV-2, respectively, and neutralized homologous HIV infectivity. Our results show that precursor gag protein has potential as a carrier for the presentation of foreign epitopes in good immunological context. The gag protein is highly immunogenic and has the ability to carry large foreign inserts; as such, it offers an attractive approach for

  7. Nonprogressing HIV-infected children share fundamental immunological features of nonpathogenic SIV infection.

    PubMed

    Muenchhoff, Maximilian; Adland, Emily; Karimanzira, Owen; Crowther, Carol; Pace, Matthew; Csala, Anna; Leitman, Ellen; Moonsamy, Angeline; McGregor, Callum; Hurst, Jacob; Groll, Andreas; Mori, Masahiko; Sinmyee, Smruti; Thobakgale, Christina; Tudor-Williams, Gareth; Prendergast, Andrew J; Kloverpris, Henrik; Roider, Julia; Leslie, Alasdair; Shingadia, Delane; Brits, Thea; Daniels, Samantha; Frater, John; Willberg, Christian B; Walker, Bruce D; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Jooste, Pieter; Moore, Penny L; Morris, Lynn; Goulder, Philip

    2016-09-28

    Disease-free infection in HIV-infected adults is associated with human leukocyte antigen-mediated suppression of viremia, whereas in the sooty mangabey and other healthy natural hosts of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), viral replication continues unabated. To better understand factors preventing HIV disease, we investigated pediatric infection, where AIDS typically develops more rapidly than in adults. Among 170 nonprogressing antiretroviral therapy-naïve children aged >5 years maintaining normal-for-age CD4 T cell counts, immune activation levels were low despite high viremia (median, 26,000 copies/ml). Potent, broadly neutralizing antibody responses in most of the subjects and strong virus-specific T cell activity were present but did not drive pediatric nonprogression. However, reduced CCR5 expression and low HIV infection in long-lived central memory CD4 T cells were observed in pediatric nonprogressors. These children therefore express two cardinal immunological features of nonpathogenic SIV infection in sooty mangabeys-low immune activation despite high viremia and low CCR5 expression on long-lived central memory CD4 T cells-suggesting closer similarities with nonpathogenetic mechanisms evolved over thousands of years in natural SIV hosts than those operating in HIV-infected adults.

  8. Nonprogressing HIV-infected children share fundamental immunological features of nonpathogenic SIV infection.

    PubMed

    Muenchhoff, Maximilian; Adland, Emily; Karimanzira, Owen; Crowther, Carol; Pace, Matthew; Csala, Anna; Leitman, Ellen; Moonsamy, Angeline; McGregor, Callum; Hurst, Jacob; Groll, Andreas; Mori, Masahiko; Sinmyee, Smruti; Thobakgale, Christina; Tudor-Williams, Gareth; Prendergast, Andrew J; Kloverpris, Henrik; Roider, Julia; Leslie, Alasdair; Shingadia, Delane; Brits, Thea; Daniels, Samantha; Frater, John; Willberg, Christian B; Walker, Bruce D; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Jooste, Pieter; Moore, Penny L; Morris, Lynn; Goulder, Philip

    2016-09-28

    Disease-free infection in HIV-infected adults is associated with human leukocyte antigen-mediated suppression of viremia, whereas in the sooty mangabey and other healthy natural hosts of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), viral replication continues unabated. To better understand factors preventing HIV disease, we investigated pediatric infection, where AIDS typically develops more rapidly than in adults. Among 170 nonprogressing antiretroviral therapy-naïve children aged >5 years maintaining normal-for-age CD4 T cell counts, immune activation levels were low despite high viremia (median, 26,000 copies/ml). Potent, broadly neutralizing antibody responses in most of the subjects and strong virus-specific T cell activity were present but did not drive pediatric nonprogression. However, reduced CCR5 expression and low HIV infection in long-lived central memory CD4 T cells were observed in pediatric nonprogressors. These children therefore express two cardinal immunological features of nonpathogenic SIV infection in sooty mangabeys-low immune activation despite high viremia and low CCR5 expression on long-lived central memory CD4 T cells-suggesting closer similarities with nonpathogenetic mechanisms evolved over thousands of years in natural SIV hosts than those operating in HIV-infected adults. PMID:27683550

  9. Nondisclosure of HIV Status in a Clinical Trial Setting: Antiretroviral Drug Screening Can Help Distinguish Between Newly Diagnosed and Previously Diagnosed HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Marzinke, Mark A.; Clarke, William; Wang, Lei; Cummings, Vanessa; Liu, Ting-Yuan; Piwowar-Manning, Estelle; Breaud, Autumn; Griffith, Sam; Buchbinder, Susan; Shoptaw, Steven; del Rio, Carlos; Magnus, Manya; Mannheimer, Sharon; Fields, Sheldon D.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Wheeler, Darrell P.; Koblin, Beryl A.; Eshleman, Susan H.; Fogel, Jessica M.

    2014-01-01

    In The HIV Prevention Trials Network 061 study, 155 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected men reported no prior HIV diagnosis; 83 of those men had HIV RNA levels of <1000 copies/mL at enrollment. Antiretroviral drug testing revealed that 65 of the 83 (78.3%) men were on antiretroviral treatment. Antiretroviral drug testing can help distinguish between newly diagnosed and previously diagnosed HIV infection. PMID:24092804

  10. Occult hepatitis B virus infection and S gene escape mutants in HIV-infected patients after hepatitis B virus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Aghakhani, Arezoo; Mohraz, Minoo; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Banifazl, Mohammad; Vahabpour, Rouhollah; Karami, Afsaneh; Foroughi, Maryam; Ramezani, Amitis

    2016-10-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination is recommended for HIV patients. Despite the relative success of HBV vaccination, breakthrough infections can occur infrequently in patients, and it can be due to occult HBV infection, vaccine unresponsiveness and/or emergence of escape mutants. This study assessed the presence of occult HBV infection and S gene escape mutants in HIV-positive patients after HBV vaccination. Ninety-two HIV-positive patients were enrolled in this study, including 52 responders to HBV vaccine and 40 non-responders. All of the cases received HBV vaccine according to routine HBV vaccination protocols. The presence of HBV-DNA was determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In HBV-DNA positive samples, the most conserved regions of S gene sequences were amplified by nested PCR and PCR products were sequenced. Occult HBV infection was detected in two cases. Glycine to arginine mutation at residue 145 (G145R) within the 'a' region of the S gene was detected in one of the occult HBV infection cases who was in the non-responder group. This study showed that the prevalence of occult HBV infection and vaccine escape mutants was low in our HBV-vaccinated HIV-positive patients in both responder and non-responder groups, so there was no alarming evidence indicating breakthrough HBV infection in our vaccinated HIV-positive cases.

  11. Peptidomimetic therapeutic agents targeting the protease enzyme of the human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Tsantrizos, Youla S

    2008-10-01

    During the past two decades, great strides have been made in the design of peptidomimetic drugs for the treatment of viral infections, despite the stigma of poor drug-like properties, low oral absorption, and high clearance associated with such compounds. This Account summarizes the progress made toward overcoming such liabilities and highlights the drug discovery efforts that have focused specifically on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease inhibitors. The arsenal against the incurable disease AIDS, which is caused by HIV infection, includes peptidomimetic compounds that target the virally encoded aspartic protease enzyme. This enzyme is essential to the production of mature HIV particles and plays a key role in maintaining infectivity. However, because of the rapid genomic evolution of viruses, an inevitable consequence in the treatment of all viral infections is the emergence of resistance to the drugs. Therefore, the incomplete suppression of HIV in treatment-experienced AIDS patients will continue to drive the search for more effective therapeutic agents that exhibit efficacy against the mutants raised by the earlier generation of protease inhibitors. Currently, a number of substrate-based peptidomimetic agents that target the virally encoded HCV NS3/4A protease are in clinical development. Mechanistically, these inhibitors can be generally divided into activated carbonyls that are transition-state mimics or compounds that tap into the feedback mode of enzyme-product inhibition. In the HCV field, there is justified optimism that a number of these compounds will soon reach commercialization as therapeutic agents for the treatment of HCV infections. Structural research has guided the successful design of both HIV and HCV protease inhibitors. X-ray crystallography, NMR, and computational studies have provided valuable insight in to the free-state preorganization of peptidomimetic ligands and their enzyme-bound conformation

  12. Ocular manifestations of HIV infection.

    PubMed Central

    Jabs, D A

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the frequency of ocular complications and the clinical outcomes of these complications in patients with various stages of HIV infection. METHODS: Retrospective review of all HIV-infected patients seen in an AIDS ophthalmology clinic from November 1983 through December 31, 1992. RESULTS: Eleven-hundred sixty-three patients were seen for ophthalmologic evaluation. Of these, 781 had the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), 226 had symptomatic HIV infection (AIDs-related complex [ARC]), and 156 had asymptomatic HIV infection. Non-infectious HIV retinopathy was the most common ocular complication, affecting 50% of the patients with AIDS, 34% of the patients with ARC, and 3% of the patients with asymptomatic HIV infection. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis was the most common opportunistic ocular infection, affecting 37% of the patients with AIDS. Other opportunistic ocular infections, including ocular toxoplasmosis, varicella zoster virus retinitis, and Pneumocystis choroidopathy were all much less common, each occurring in < or = 1% of the patients with AIDS. Treatment of CMV retinitis with either foscarnet or ganciclovir was successful in initially controlling the retinitis. However, relapse represented a significant problem and required frequent re-inductions. As a consequence of the retinal damage associated with relapse, loss of visual acuity occurred. The median time to a visual acuity of 20/200 or worse for all eyes with CMV retinitis was 13.4 months, and the median time to a visual acuity of 20/200 or worse in the better eye was 21.1 months. At last follow-up, 75% of the patients had a final visual acuity of 20/40 or better in at least one eye. Retinal detachments were a frequent ophthalmologic complication of CMV retinitis with a cumulative probability of a retinal detachment in at least one eye of 57% at 12 months after the diagnosis of CMV retinitis. Herpes zoster ophthalmicus developed in 3% of the overall series and was seen in

  13. Insulin signaling in skeletal muscle of HIV-infected patients in response to endurance and strength training.

    PubMed

    Broholm, Christa; Mathur, Neha; Hvid, Thine; Grøndahl, Thomas Sahl; Frøsig, Christian; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund; Lindegaard, Birgitte

    2013-08-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with lipodystrophy have decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Both endurance and resistance training improve insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle of HIV-infected patients, but the mechanisms are unknown. This study aims to identify the molecular pathways involved in the beneficial effects of training on insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle of HIV-infected patients. Eighteen sedentary male HIV-infected patients underwent a 16 week supervised training intervention, either resistance or strength training. Euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamps with muscle biopsies were performed before and after the training interventions. Fifteen age- and body mass index (BMI)-matched HIV-negative men served as a sedentary baseline group. Phosphorylation and total protein expression of insulin signaling molecules as well as glycogen synthase (GS) activity were analyzed in skeletal muscle biopsies in relation to insulin stimulation before and after training. HIV-infected patients had reduced basal and insulin-stimulated GS activity (%fractional velocity, [FV]) as well as impaired insulin-stimulated Akt(thr308) phosphorylation. Despite improving insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, neither endurance nor strength training changed the phosphorylation status of insulin signaling proteins or affected GS activity. However; endurance training markedly increased the total Akt protein expression, and both training modalities increased hexokinase II (HKII) protein. HIV-infected patients with lipodystrophy have decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle and defects in insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt(thr308). Endurance and strength training increase insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in these patients, and the muscular training adaptation is associated with improved capacity for phosphorylation of glucose by HKII, rather than changes in markers of insulin signaling to glucose uptake

  14. Loss of CD4 T lymphocytes in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 is more pronounced in the duodenal mucosa than in the peripheral blood. Berlin Diarrhea/Wasting Syndrome Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, T; Jahn, H U; Schmidt, W; Riecken, E O; Zeitz, M; Ullrich, R

    1995-01-01

    Although changes in T lymphocyte subset distribution in the peripheral blood of patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are well defined it is not known whether these changes reflect changes in lymphoid compartments clearly involved in HIV related disease like the intestinal mucosa. This study analysed lymphocytes isolated simultaneously from the peripheral blood and duodenal biopsy specimens by three colour flow cytometry in eight asymptomatic HIV infected patients, 26 AIDS patients, and 23 controls. The proportion of CD4, CD8, CD4-CD8-, or gamma delta T cells did not correlate between circulating and duodenal T cells. CD4 T cells were reduced in the peripheral blood (7.5% (25th-75th percentile, 2-16%) v 52% (41-63%), p < 0.0005) and even more reduced in the duodenum (1% (1-2%) v 36% (23-57%), p < 0.0005) of AIDS patients compared with controls. Patients with asymptomatic HIV infection had intermediate CD4 T cells in the peripheral blood (24% (22-35%); p < 0.002 v controls; p < 0.01 v AIDS) but like AIDS patients very low CD4 T cells in the duodenum (3% (1-6%); p < 0.002 v controls). The ratio of duodenal to circulating CD4+ T cells was significantly reduced to 0.2 (0-1) in AIDS patients (p < 0.001) and even to 0.1 (0.04-0.5) in asymptomatic HIV infected patients (p < 0.002) compared with 0.72 (0.44-0.95) in controls. These findings show an early and preferential loss of duodenal CD4 T cells in HIV infection. Immunological abnormalities in HIV <