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Sample records for immunodeficieny disease scid

  1. Therapeutic Efficacy of Human Hepatocyte Transplantation in a SCID/uPA Mouse Model with Inducible Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Donna N.; Kawahara, Toshiyasu; Sis, Banu; Bond, David; Fischer, Karl P.; Tyrrell, D. Lorne J.; Lewis, Jamie T.; Kneteman, Norman M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Severe Combined Immune Deficient (SCID)/Urokinase-type Plasminogen Activator (uPA) mice undergo liver failure and are useful hosts for the propagation of transplanted human hepatocytes (HH) which must compete with recipient-derived hepatocytes for replacement of the diseased liver parenchyma. While partial replacement by HH has proven useful for studies with Hepatitis C virus, complete replacement of SCID/uPA mouse liver by HH has never been achieved and limits the broader application of these mice for other areas of biomedical research. The herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (HSVtk)/ganciclovir (GCV) system is a powerful tool for cell-specific ablation in transgenic animals. The aim of this study was to selectively eliminate murine-derived parenchymal liver cells from humanized SCID/uPA mouse liver in order to achieve mice with completely humanized liver parenchyma. Thus, we reproduced the HSVtk (vTK)/GCV system of hepatic failure in SCID/uPA mice. Methodology/Principal Findings In vitro experiments demonstrated efficient killing of vTK expressing hepatoma cells after GCV treatment. For in vivo experiments, expression of vTK was targeted to the livers of FVB/N and SCID/uPA mice. Hepatic sensitivity to GCV was first established in FVB/N mice since these mice do not undergo liver failure inherent to SCID/uPA mice. Hepatic vTK expression was found to be an integral component of GCV-induced pathologic and biochemical alterations and caused death due to liver dysfunction in vTK transgenic FVB/N and non-transplanted SCID/uPA mice. In SCID/uPA mice with humanized liver, vTK/GCV caused death despite extensive replacement of the mouse liver parenchyma with HH (ranging from 32–87%). Surprisingly, vTK/GCV-dependent apoptosis and mitochondrial aberrations were also localized to bystander vTK-negative HH. Conclusions/Significance Extensive replacement of mouse liver parenchyma by HH does not provide a secure therapeutic advantage against v

  2. The use of SCID mice in biotechnology and as a model for human disease

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhu, J.S. |; Boynton, E.; Gorczynski, R.; Hozumi, N.

    1996-05-01

    The use of SCID (severe combined immunodeficient) mice in medical research and biotechnology has increased tremendously in recent years. This review outlines the major characteristics of these animals and the impediments that they poise to the engraftment of human cells and tissues. The development of the SCID mice pretreatment protocol (anti-asialo GM 1 antisera and radiation) is described, and the results of xenotransplantation studies of human cells and tissues in these pretreated animals are outlined. Wherever possible, data from transplantation studies (of human tissues and cells) in pretreated and nonpretreated animals are compared. The potential of the pretreated SCID mice for medical research and biotechnology is discussed.

  3. Eliminating SCID row: new approaches to SCID.

    PubMed

    Kohn, Donald B

    2014-12-05

    Treatments for patients with SCID by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) have changed this otherwise lethal primary immune deficiency disorder into one with an increasingly good prognosis. SCID has been the paradigm disorder supporting many key advances in the field of HSCT, with first-in-human successes with matched sibling, haploidentical, and matched unrelated donor allogeneic transplantations. Nevertheless, the optimal approaches for HSCT are still being defined, including determining the optimal stem cell sources, the use and types of pretransplantation conditioning, and applications for SCID subtypes associated with radiosensitivity, for patients with active viral infections and for neonates. Alternatively, autologous transplantation after ex vivo gene correction (gene therapy) has been applied successfully to the treatment of adenosine deaminase-deficient SCID and X-linked SCID by vector-mediated gene addition. Gene therapy holds the prospect of avoiding risks of GVHD and would allow each patient to be their own donor. New approaches to gene therapy by gene correction in autologous HSCs using site-specific endonuclease-mediated homology-driven gene repair are under development. With newborn screening becoming more widely adopted to detect SCID patients before they develop complications, the prognosis for SCID is expected to improve further. This chapter reviews recent advances and ongoing controversies in allogeneic and autologous HSCT for SCID.

  4. [Psoriasis SCID-mouse model].

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, J; Kaufmann, R; Boehncke, W-H

    2006-07-01

    Psoriasis is characterized by a complex phenotype and pathogenesis along with polygenic determination. Several psoriasis animal models have only been able to incompletely reproduce the disease. A xenogeneic transplantation approach, grafting skin from psoriatic patients onto mice with a severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), was the first to meet the criteria for a psoriasis model. During the last 10 years, this psoriasis SCID-mouse model not only allowed telling experiments focusing on pathogenetic aspects, but also proved being a powerful tool for drug discovery with a good predictive value.

  5. Systemic Correction of Storage Disease in MPS I NOD/SCID Mice Using the Sleeping Beauty Transposon System

    PubMed Central

    Aronovich, Elena L; Bell, Jason B; Khan, Shaukat A; Belur, Lalitha R; Gunther, Roland; Koniar, Brenda; Schachern, Patricia A; Parker, Josh B; Carlson, Cathy S; Whitley, Chester B; McIvor, R Scott; Gupta, Pankaj; Hackett, Perry B

    2009-01-01

    The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system is a nonviral vector that directs transgene integration into vertebrate genomes. We hydrodynamically delivered SB transposon plasmids encoding human α-L-iduronidase (hIDUA) at two DNA doses, with and without an SB transposase gene, to NOD.129(B6)-Prkdcscid IDUAtm1Clk/J mice. In transposon-treated, nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice with mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I), plasma IDUA persisted for 18 weeks at levels up to several hundred–fold wild-type (WT) activity, depending on DNA dose and gender. IDUA activity was present in all examined somatic organs, as well as in the brain, and correlated with both glycosaminoglycan (GAG) reduction in these organs and level of expression in the liver, the target of transposon delivery. IDUA activity was higher in the treated males than in females. In females, omission of transposase source resulted in significantly lower IDUA levels and incomplete GAG reduction in some organs, confirming the positive effect of transposition on long-term IDUA expression and correction of the disease. The SB transposon system proved efficacious in correcting several clinical manifestations of MPS I in mice, including thickening of the zygomatic arch, hepatomegaly, and accumulation of foamy macrophages in bone marrow and synovium, implying potential effectiveness of this approach in treatment of human MPS I. PMID:19384290

  6. NOD/SCID-GAMMA Mice Are an Ideal Strain to Assess the Efficacy of Therapeutic Agents Used in the Treatment of Myeloma Bone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Michelle A.; Paton-Hough, Julia M.; Evans, Holly R.; Walker, Rebecca E.; Harris, William; Ratnabalan, Dharshi; Snowden, John A.; Chantry, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    Animal models of multiple myeloma vary in terms of consistency of onset, degree of tumour burden and degree of myeloma bone disease. Here we describe five pre-clinical models of myeloma in NOD/SCID-GAMMA mice to specifically study the effects of therapeutic agents on myeloma bone disease. Groups of 7–8 week old female irradiated NOD/SCID-GAMMA mice were injected intravenously via the tail vein with either 1x106 JJN3, U266, XG-1 or OPM-2 human myeloma cell lines or patient-derived myeloma cells. At the first signs of morbidity in each tumour group all animals were sacrificed. Tumour load was measured by histological analysis, and bone disease was assessed by micro-CT and standard histomorphometric methods. Mice injected with JJN3, U266 or OPM-2 cells showed high tumour bone marrow infiltration of the long bones with low variability, resulting in osteolytic lesions. In contrast, mice injected with XG-1 or patient-derived myeloma cells showed lower tumour bone marrow infiltration and less bone disease with high variability. Injection of JJN3 cells into NOD/SCID-GAMMA mice resulted in an aggressive, short-term model of myeloma with mice exhibiting signs of morbidity 3 weeks later. Treating these mice with zoledronic acid at the time of tumour cell injection or once tumour was established prevented JJN3-induced bone disease but did not reduce tumour burden, whereas, carfilzomib treatment given once tumour was established significantly reduced tumour burden. Injection of U266, XG-1, OPM-2 and patient-derived myeloma cells resulted in less aggressive longer-term models of myeloma with mice exhibiting signs of morbidity 8 weeks later. Treating U266-induced disease with zoledronic acid prevented the formation of osteolytic lesions and trabecular bone loss as well as reducing tumour burden whereas, carfilzomib treatment only reduced tumour burden. In summary, JJN3, U266 or OPM-2 cells injected into NOD/SCID-GAMMA mice provide robust models to study anti-myeloma therapies

  7. Successful treatment of disseminated human Hodgkin's disease in SCID mice with deglycosylated ricin A-chain immunotoxins.

    PubMed

    Winkler, U; Gottstein, C; Schön, G; Kapp, U; Wolf, J; Hansmann, M L; Bohlen, H; Thorpe, P; Diehl, V; Engert, A

    1994-01-15

    To evaluate the effects of deglycosylated ricin A-chain (dgA) immunotoxins against disseminated Hodgkin's lymphoma, we used RFT5.dgA (CD25) and IRac.dgA (70 kD) to treat L540Cy Hodgkin cells in severely immunodeficient SCID mice. In this model, more than 90% of the animals developed multiple lymphomas in various organs such as the lymph nodes, liver, bone marrow, and extranodal sites that killed untreated animals after a mean survival time (MST) of 36.3 days. A single intraperitoneal injection of 8 micrograms of either immunotoxin rendered 95% (RFT5.dgA) and 93% (IRac.dgA), respectively, of mice tumor-free when applied 1 day after tumor challenge. The MST of the RFT5.dgA-treated group was extended by more than 80 days (P < .00001). SCID mice treated 12 days after tumor challenge had lower remission rates (46%), suggesting that the antitumor effect of the immunotoxins depends on the number of tumor cells present. We conclude that ricin A-chain immunotoxins have potent antitumor effects against disseminated Hodgkin's tumors in SCID mice and that this model is ideally suited for the evaluation of different immunotoxin treatment modalities.

  8. Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID)

    MedlinePlus

    ... immune-restoring treatments, such as transplants of blood-forming stem cells, gene therapy, or enzyme therapy. More ... about SCID symptoms and diagnosis Treatment Hematopoietic (blood-forming) stem cell transplantation is the standard treatment for ...

  9. Genetics of SCID.

    PubMed

    Cossu, Fausto

    2010-11-15

    Human SCID (Severe Combined Immunodeficiency) is a prenatal disorder of T lymphocyte development, that depends on the expression of numerous genes. The knowledge of the genetic basis of SCID is essential for diagnosis (e.g., clinical phenotype, lymphocyte profile) and treatment (e.g., use and type of pre-hematopoietic stem cell transplant conditioning).Over the last years novel genetic defects causing SCID have been discovered, and the molecular and immunological mechanisms of SCID have been better characterized. Distinct forms of SCID show both common and peculiar (e.g., absence or presence of nonimmunological features) aspects, and they are currently classified into six groups according to prevalent pathophysiological mechanisms: impaired cytokine-mediated signaling; pre-T cell receptor defects; increased lymphocyte apoptosis; defects in thymus embryogenesis; impaired calcium flux; other mechanisms.This review is the updated, extended and largely modified translation of the article "Cossu F: Le basi genetiche delle SCID", originally published in Italian language in the journal "Prospettive in Pediatria" 2009, 156:228-238.

  10. Inflammatory bowel disease in C.B-17 scid mice reconstituted with the CD45RBhigh subset of CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Leach, M. W.; Bean, A. G.; Mauze, S.; Coffman, R. L.; Powrie, F.

    1996-01-01

    Chronic inflammation developed spontaneously in the large intestine of C.B-17 scid mice restored with the CD45RBhigh subset of CD4+ T cells obtained from normal BALB/c mice. The inflammation, which extended diffusely from the cecum to the rectum, was localized to the lamina propria of mildly affected mice but became transmural in severely affected mice. Immunohistochemical and flow cytometric analyses showed that the inflammatory infiltrate contained numerous macrophages accompanied by moderate numbers of activated CD4+ lymphocytes. Some mice also had scattered multinucleated giant cells. Mucin depletion and epithelial hyperplasia resulting in glandular elongation and mucosal thickening were also consistently seen. Less frequent findings included ulceration with fibrosis, crypt abscesses, crypt loss, and granulomatous inflammation. Immunofluorescent analysis of inflamed large intestinal sections demonstrated increased epithelial expression of major histocompatibility class II antigens. The changes in the large intestine of these mice are similar to those seen in patients with idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis). This murine model may be useful for studying mucosal immunoregulation as it relates to the pathogenesis and treatment of chronic inflammatory bowel diseases in the large intestine of human patients. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:8623920

  11. Generation and Disease Model Relevance of a Manganese Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based NOD/scid-IL-2Rγcnull Mouse Brain Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Sajja, Balasrinivasa R.; Bade, Aditya N.; Zhou, Biyun; Uberti, Mariano G.; Gorantla, Santhi; Gendelman, Howard E.; Boska, Michael D.; Liu, Yutong

    2016-01-01

    Strain specific mouse brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) atlases provide coordinate space linked anatomical registration. This allows longitudinal quantitative analyses of neuroanatomical volumes and imaging metrics for assessing the role played by aging and disease to the central nervous system. As NOD/scid-IL-2Rγcnull (NSG) mice allow human cell transplantation to study human disease, these animals are used to assess brain morphology. Manganese enhanced MRI (MEMRI) improves contrasts amongst brain components and as such can greatly help identifying a broad number of structures on MRI. To this end, NSG adult mouse brains were imaged in vivo on a 7.0 Tesla MR scanner at an isotropic resolution of 100 µm. A population averaged brain of 19 mice was generated using an iterative alignment algorithm. MEMRI provided sufficient contrast permitting 41 brain structures to be manually labeled. Volumes of 7 humanized mice brain structures were measured by atlas-based segmentation and compared against non-humanized controls. The humanized NSG mice brain volumes were smaller than controls (p<0.001). Many brain structures of humanized mice were significantly smaller than controls. We posit that the irradiation and cell grafting involved in the creation of humanized mice were responsible for the morphological differences. Six NSG mice without MnCl2 administration were scanned with high resolution T2-weighted MRI and segmented to test broad utility of the atlas. PMID:26556033

  12. Kv1.3 in Psoriatic Disease: PAP-1, a small molecule inhibitor of Kv1.3 is effective in the SCID mouse psoriasis - xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Kundu-Raychaudhuri, Smriti; Chen, Yi-Je; Wulff, Heike; Raychaudhuri, Siba P

    2015-01-01

    Kv1.3 channels regulate the activation/proliferation of effector memory T cells and thus play a critical role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Using a combination of immunohistochemistry, confocal microscopy, flow cytometry and electrophysiology methods we observed a significant enrichment of activated Kv1.3+ memory T cells in psoriasis plaques and synovial fluid from patients with psoriasis/psoriatic arthritis (PsA) compared to non-lesional psoriatic skin, normal skin or peripheral blood lympho-mononuclear cells. In in vitro studies performed with lesional mononuclear cells or T cells derived from skin and joints of psoriatic disease, the small molecule Kv1.3 blocker PAP-1 dose-dependently inhibited proliferation and suppressed IL-2 and IFN-γ production. To further substantiate the pathologic role of Kv1.3highTEM cells in psoriatic disease we tested whether PAP-1 is able to improve psoriatic disease pathology in the SCID mouse-psoriasis skin xenograft model. Following four weeks of daily treatment with 2% PAP-1 ointment we noticed about 50% reduction in the epidermal thickness (rete peg length) and the number of CD3+ lymphocytes/mm2 of dermis decreased by 85%. Vehicle treated and untreated plaques in contrast remained unchanged and showed no reduction in epidermis thickness and infiltrating CD3+ T cells and HLA-DR+ T cells. Based on these results we propose the development of Kv1.3 targeted topical immunotherapy for psoriasis and possibly for other inflammatory skin conditions, where effector memory T cells are involved in the pathogenesis. PMID:25175978

  13. Role of Natural Killer Cells in Intravenous Immunoglobulin-Induced Graft-versus-Host Disease Inhibition in NOD/LtSz-scidIL2rg(-/-) (NSG) Mice.

    PubMed

    Gregoire-Gauthier, Joëlle; Fontaine, François; Benchimol, Lionel; Nicoletti, Simon; Selleri, Silvia; Dieng, Mame Massar; Haddad, Elie

    2015-05-01

    Although clinical studies have yet to demonstrate clearly the use of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) for prevention of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), their effective use in a xenogeneic mouse model has been demonstrated. We aimed to determine the mechanism of action by which IVIG contributes to GVHD prevention in a xenogeneic mouse model. NOD/LtSz-scidIL2rg(-/-) (NSG) mice were used for our xenogeneic mouse model of GVHD. Sublethally irradiated NSG mice were injected with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (huPBMCs) and treated weekly with PBS or 50 mg IVIG. Incidence of GVHD and survival were noted, along with analysis of cell subsets proliferation in the peripheral blood. Weekly IVIG treatment resulted in a robust and consistent proliferation of human natural killer cells that were activated, as demonstrated by their cytotoxicity against K562 target cells. IVIG treatment did not inhibit GVHD when huPBMCs were depleted in natural killer (NK) cells, strongly suggesting that this NK cell expansion was required for the IVIG-mediated prevention of GVHD in our mouse model. Moreover, inhibition of T cell activation by either cyclosporine A (CsA) or monoclonal antihuman CD3 antibodies abolished the IVIG-induced NK cell expansion. In conclusion, IVIG treatment induces NK cell proliferation, which is essential for IVIG-mediated protection of GVHD in our mouse model. Furthermore, activated T cells are mandatory for effective IVIG-induced NK cell proliferation. These results shed light on a new mechanism of action of IVIG and could explain why the efficacy of IVIG in preventing GVHD in a clinical setting, where patients receive CsA, has never been undoubtedly demonstrated.

  14. Exacerbation of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in immunodeficient (scid) mice by concurrent infection with a pneumovirus.

    PubMed

    Bray, M V; Barthold, S W; Sidman, C L; Roths, J; Smith, A L

    1993-04-01

    scid mice naturally infected with Pneumocystis carinii and inoculated with a normally apathogenic pneumovirus had significantly higher P. carinii cyst counts and developed significantly more severe P. carinii-related disease than did sham-inoculated, P. carinii-infected scid mice. P. carinii-free, virus-infected scid mice survived for 2 months despite high pulmonary virus titers. These results show that a respiratory virus infection can exacerbate P. carinii disease in an immunocompromised-rodent model.

  15. Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID): from molecular basis to clinical management.

    PubMed

    Sponzilli, Ivonne; Notarangelo, Luigi D

    2011-04-01

    Primary immune deficiency diseases (PID) comprise a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders that affect distinct components of the innate and adaptive immune system, such as neutrophils, macrophages, dendritic cells, complement proteins, natural killer cells, as well as T and B lymphocytes. Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is a group of disorders characterized by increased susceptibility to severe infections and early death. The diagnosis of SCID is supported by the demonstration of low absolute lymphocyte count and T cell lymphopenia (variably associated with numerical defects of B and NK cells). In the last two decades, advances in the characterization of the molecular pathophysiology of SCID, have permitted the development of novel diagnostic assays based on analysis of the expression of the disease-associated proteins and mutation analysis. More recently, pilot newborn screening programs for the identification of infants with SCID have been initiated in the United States. Prompt and aggressive treatment of infections, antimicrobial prophylaxis (in particular against Pneumocystis jiroveci) and regular administration of immunoglobulins are essential to reduce the risk of early death. However, survival ultimately depends on reconstitution of immune function, that is usually achieved by means of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Gene therapy and enzyme replacement therapy have also been used successfully is selected forms of SCID. Here we review the molecular and cellular pathophysiology and the mainstay of treatment of SCID.

  16. Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)-associated dyschromia with subsequent repigmentation: a report of two patients.

    PubMed

    Heath, Candrice R; Burk, Cynthia J; Lawley, Leslie P; Mancini, Anthony J; Connelly, Elizabeth Alvarez

    2009-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) often presents with mucosal infections, cutaneous infections and eczematous rashes. We present two patients with history of SCID diagnosed at an early age who experienced diffuse dyschromia associated with their bone marrow and stem cell transplants. Dyschromias may be caused by numerous factors including medications, genetics, environmental contacts, or as a sequela of underlying chronic disease. These case reports describe progressive repigmentation to original skin color after the occurrence of dyschromia in two patients with SCID.

  17. Engraftment of tonsillar mononuclear cells in human skin/SCID mouse chimera--validation of a novel xenogeneic transplantation model for autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, N; Yamamoto, Y; Kuki, K

    2001-01-01

    Pustulosis palmaris et plantaris (PPP) has been considered as one of the typical tonsillar focal infections, based on the marked clinical improvement of the skin lesions after tonsillectomy. Despite the accumulation of data showing the clinical efficacy of tonsillectomy for this skin lesion, fundamental etiological and pathophysiological issues have yet to be addressed. One primary obstacle hindering investigators has been the lack of an appropriate animal model for this human skin disorder. In the early stage of PPP, it has been reported that lymphocytes, predominantly CD4+ T lymphocytes, infiltrate the palmar and plantar skins. However, the origin and mechanism of infiltration by these lymphocytes is not clear and there are very few reports on whether tonsillar mononuclear cells react directly with the skin. We have been intrigued by the ability to engraft human cells onto severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice, together with the opportunity for long-term graft survival and ability to adoptively transfer various human immunocompetent cells. In this review, we addressed the existing deficiencies in our understanding of the relationship between tonsils and PPP by using emerging transplantation technology involving SCID mice.

  18. Cord blood transplants for SCID: better B-cell engraftment?

    PubMed

    Chan, Wan-Yin; Roberts, Robert Lloyd; Moore, Theodore B; Stiehm, E Richard

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation is the treatment of choice for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). Despite successful T-cell engraftment in transplanted patients, B-cell function is not always achieved; up to 58% of patients require immunoglobulin therapy after receiving haploidentical transplants. We report 2 half-sibling males with X-linked γ-chain SCID treated with different sources of stem cells. Sibling 1 was transplanted with T-cell-depleted haploidentical maternal bone marrow and sibling 2 was transplanted with 7/8 human leukocyte antigen-matched unrelated umbilical cord blood. Both patients received pretransplant conditioning and posttransplant graft-versus-host-disease prophylaxis. B-cell engraftment and function was achieved in sibling 1 but not in sibling 2. This disparate result is consistent with a review of 19 other SCID children who received cord blood transplants. B-cell function, as indicated by no need for immunoglobulin therapy, was restored in 42% of patients given haploidentical transplants and in 68% of patients given matched unrelated donor transplants compared with 80% of patients given cord blood transplants. Cord blood is an alternative source of stem cells for transplantation in children with SCID and has a higher likelihood of B-cell reconstitution.

  19. Advances in gene therapy for ADA-deficient SCID.

    PubMed

    Aiuti, Alessandro

    2002-10-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) was the first inherited disease treated with gene therapy. The pilot gene therapy studies demonstrated the safety, therapeutic potential and limitations of ADA gene transfer into hematopoietic cells using retroviral vectors. This review describes the latest progress in ADA-SCID dinical trials using peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). PBL gene therapy was able to restore T-cell functions after discontinuation of ADA enzyme replacement therapy, but only partially corrected the purine metabolic defect. The development of improved HSC gene transfer protocols, combined with low intensity conditioning, allowed full correction of the immunological and metabolic ADA defects, with clinic benefit. These results have important implications for future applications of gene therapy in other disorders involving the hemapoietic system.

  20. [Gene therapy of SCID-X1].

    PubMed

    Baum, C; Schambach, A; Modlich, U; Thrasher, A

    2007-12-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) is an inherited disease caused by inactivating mutations in the gene encoding the interleukin 2 receptor common gamma chain (IL2RG), which is located on the X-chromosome. Affected boys fail to develop two major effector cell types of the immune system (T cells and NK cells) and suffer from a functional B cell defect. Although drugs such as antibiotics can offer partial protection, the boys normally die in the first year of life in the absence of a curative therapy. For a third of the children, bone marrow transplantation from a fully matched donor is available and can cure the disease without major side effects. Mismatched bone marrow transplantation, however, is complicated by severe and potentially lethal side effects. Over the past decade, scientists worldwide have developed new treatments by introducing a correct copy of the IL2RG-cDNA. Gene therapy was highly effective when applied in young children. However, in a few patients the IL2RG-gene vector has unfortunately caused leukaemia. Activation of cellular proto-oncogenes by accidental integration of the gene vector has been identified as the underlying mechanism. In future clinical trials, improved vector technology in combination with other protocol modifications may reduce the risk of this side effect.

  1. Learning about Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID)

    MedlinePlus

    ... immunodeficiency From The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology Learning About Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) What is ... immunodeficiency From The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology Get Email Updates Advancing human health through genomics ...

  2. Guidelines for Screening, Early Diagnosis and Management of Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) in India.

    PubMed

    Madkaikar, Manisha; Aluri, Jahnavi; Gupta, Sudhir

    2016-05-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is one of the most severe and fatal forms of inherited primary immunodeficiency. Early diagnosis of SCID improves the outcome of life before and after hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). SCID fulfills the internationally-established criteria for a condition to be screened for at birth. T cell receptor excision circle (TREC) assay is commonly used in western countries as part of newborn blood spot screening (NBS) program as the assay has high sensitivity and specificity to identify SCID infants, allowing early intervention and curative bone marrow (BM) transplantation. In India, the blood spot based screening programs are yet to mature into a full-fledged national program. Moreover, TREC assay, a PCR based test, is not widely available and may cost USD 5-7 per test; thus limiting its applicability for screening newborns in Indian scenario. Most of the SCID patients have lymphopenia at birth and routine evaluation for absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) on cord blood samples can help in pre-symptomatic detection and early intervention for neonates with SCID. Although ALC count lacks the sensitivity and specificity of TREC assay; its lower cost and widespread availability makes it an attractive option for identifying newborns with lymphopenia during the post-partum hospital stay. BCG vaccine and other live attenuated vaccines (e.g., oral polio vaccine) should be withheld in lymphopenic infants until SCID is excluded by clinical and/or immunological work-up. A diagnosis of SCID warrants immediate care to prevent and treat infections and wherever feasible, early stem cell transplantation for disease free survival.

  3. How We Manage Adenosine Deaminase-Deficient Severe Combined Immune Deficiency (ADA SCID).

    PubMed

    Kohn, Donald B; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2017-02-14

    Adenosine deaminase-deficient severe combined immune deficiency (ADA SCID) accounts for 10-15% of cases of human SCID. From what was once a uniformly fatal disease, the prognosis for infants with ADA SCID has improved greatly based on the development of multiple therapeutic options, coupled with more frequent early diagnosis due to implementation of newborn screening for SCID. We review the various treatment approaches for ADA SCID including allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) from a human leukocyte antigen-matched sibling or family member or from a matched unrelated donor or a haplo-identical donor, autologous HSCT with gene correction of the hematopoietic stem cells (gene therapy-GT), and enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with polyethylene glycol-conjugated adenosine deaminase. Based on growing evidence of safety and efficacy from GT, we propose a treatment algorithm for patients with ADA SCID that recommends HSCT from a matched family donor, when available, as a first choice, followed by GT as the next option, with allogeneic HSCT from an unrelated or haplo-identical donor or long-term ERT as other options.

  4. Atypical radiation response of SCID cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chawapun, Nisa

    Murine SCID (severe combined immune deficiency) cells are well known for their defect in DNA double-strand break repair and in variable(diversity)joining [V(D)J] recombination due to a mutation in a catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs). As a consequence, scid cells are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation. The present study showed that asynchronous populations of scid cells were about two-fold more sensitive than Balb/c with respect to cell killing and the defect in scid cells was corrected by complementation with human chromosome 8. Analysis of the survival of synchronized populations as a function of the cell cycle revealed that while scid cells were hypersensitive in all cell cycle phases compared to wild-type cells, this hypersensitivity is even more pronounced in G1 phase. The hypersensitivity reduced as the cells progressed into S phase suggested that homologous recombination repair plays a role. The results imply that there are at least two pathways for the repair of DSB DNA, consistent with a model previously proposed by others. The scid cells were also more sensitive to UVC light (254 nm) killing as compared to wild type cells by clonogenic survival. Using a host cell reactivation (HCR) assay to study the nucleotide excision repair (NER) which is the major repair pathway for UV-photoproducts, the results showed that NER in scid cells was not as efficient as CB- 17. This suggests that DNA-PK is involved in NER as well as non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) DSB repair which is responsible for ionizing radiation sensitivity in scid cells. Repair in scid cells was not totally absent as shown by low dose rate sparing of cell killing after exposure to 137Cs γ-rays at dose rate of 0.6 cGy/h, 1.36 cGy/h, 6 cGy/h as compared to high dose rate at 171 cGy/min, although this phenomenon could be explained partly by proliferation. However, for radiation induced transformation, no significant dose rate effect was seen. A plot of transformation

  5. SCID patients with ARTEMIS vs RAG deficiencies following HCT: increased risk of late toxicity in ARTEMIS-deficient SCID.

    PubMed

    Schuetz, Catharina; Neven, Benedicte; Dvorak, Christopher C; Leroy, Sandrine; Ege, Markus J; Pannicke, Ulrich; Schwarz, Klaus; Schulz, Ansgar S; Hoenig, Manfred; Sparber-Sauer, Monika; Gatz, Susanne A; Denzer, Christian; Blanche, Stephane; Moshous, Despina; Picard, Capucine; Horn, Biljana N; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Cavazzana, Marina; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Friedrich, Wilhelm; Fischer, Alain; Cowan, Morton J

    2014-01-09

    A subgroup of severe combined immunodeficiencies (SCID) is characterized by lack of T and B cells and is caused by defects in genes required for T- and B-cell receptor gene rearrangement. Several of these genes are also involved in nonhomologous end joining of DNA double-strand break repair, the largest subgroup consisting of patients with T(-)B(-)NK(+)SCID due to DCLRE1C/ARTEMIS defects. We postulated that in patients with ARTEMIS deficiency, early and late complications following hematopoietic cell transplantation might be more prominent compared with patients with T(-)B(-)NK(+)SCID caused by recombination activating gene 1/2 (RAG1/2) deficiencies. We analyzed 69 patients with ARTEMIS and 76 patients with RAG1/2 deficiencies who received transplants from either HLA-identical donors without conditioning or from HLA-nonidentical donors without or with conditioning. There was no difference in survival or in the incidence or severity of acute graft-versus-host disease regardless of exposure to alkylating agents. Secondary malignancies were not observed. Immune reconstitution was comparable in both groups, however, ARTEMIS-deficient patients had a significantly higher occurrence of infections in long-term follow-up. There is a highly significant association between poor growth in ARTEMIS deficiency and use of alkylating agents. Furthermore, abnormalities in dental development and endocrine late effects were associated with alkylation therapy in ARTEMIS deficiency.

  6. SCID Dogs: Similar Transplant Potential but Distinct Intra-Uterine Growth Defects and Premature Replicative Senescence Compared with SCID Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Meek, Katheryn; Jutkowitz, Ari; Allen, Lisa; Glover, Jillian; Convery, Erin; Massa, Alisha; Mullaney, Tom; Stanley, Bryden; Rosenstein, Diana; Bailey, Susan M.; Johnson, Cheri; Georges, George

    2014-01-01

    We have previously described DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) mutations in horses and dogs that result in deficits in V(D)J recombination, DNA repair, and SCID. In this paper, we document substantial developmental growth defects in DNA-PKcs-deficient dogs that are not apparent in SCID mice. Fibroblast cell strains derived from either fetal or adult SCID dogs proliferate poorly in culture and undergo premature replicative senescence, somewhat reminiscent of cells derived from Ku-deficient mice. A limited number of animals have been immune reconstituted (by bone marrow transplantation) so that they can be maintained in a normal environment for long periods. Several of these animals have developed conditions associated with premature ageing at 2–3 years of age, roughly 20% of their expected lifespan. These conditions include intestinal malabsorption and primary neural cell neoplasia. These results suggest that DNA-PKcs deficiency is not tolerated equally in all species, perhaps providing insight into why DNA-PKcs deficiency has not been observed in humans. Finally, this study demonstrates the feasibility of maintaining SCID dogs for extended periods of time and documents their utility for bone marrow transplantation studies and as hosts for the propagation of xenografts. In sum, SCID dogs may present researchers with new possibilities for the development of animal models of human disease. PMID:19635917

  7. New insights and unresolved issues regarding insertional mutagenesis in X-linked SCID gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Pike-Overzet, Karin; van der Burg, Mirjam; Wagemaker, Gerard; van Dongen, Jacques J M; Staal, Frank J T

    2007-11-01

    The oncogenic potential of retrovirus-mediated gene therapy has been re-emphasized because four patients developed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL)-like disease from an otherwise successful gene therapy trial for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (X-linked SCID). X-linked SCID, a disease caused by inactivating mutations in the IL2Rgamma gene, is part of a heterogeneous group of SCIDs characterized by the lack of T cells in conjunction with the absence of B and/or natural killer (NK) cells. Gene therapy approaches are being developed for this group of diseases. In this review we discuss the various forms of SCID in relation to normal T-cell development. In addition, we consider the possible role of LMO2 and other T-ALL oncogenes in the development of adverse effects as seen in the X-linked SCID gene therapy trial. Furthermore, we debate whether the integration near the LMO2 locus is sufficient to result in T-ALL-like proliferations or whether the gamma-retroviral viral expression of the therapeutic IL2RG gene contributes to leukemogenesis. Finally, we review some newly developed murine models that may have added value for gene therapy safety studies.

  8. A Markov Model to Analyze Cost-Effectiveness of Screening for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID)

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kee; APRN, Joie Davis; Pai, Sung-Yun; Bonilla, Francisco A.; Puck, Jennifer M; Apkon, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of universal neonatal screening for T cell lymphocytopenia in enhancing quality of life and life expectancy for children with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). Methods Decision trees were created and analyzed to estimate the cost, life years, and quality adjusted life years (QALYs) across a population when universal screening for lack of T cells is used to detect SCID, as implemented in five states, compared to detection based on recognizing symptoms and signs of disease. Terminal values of each tree limb were derived through Markov models simulating the natural history of three cohorts: unaffected subjects; those-diagnosed with SCID as neonates (early diagnosis); and those diagnosed after becoming symptomatic and arousing clinical suspicion (late diagnosis). Models considered the costs of screening and of care including hematopoietic cell transplantation for affected individuals. Key decision variables were derived from the literature and from a survey of families with children affected by SCID, which was used to describe the clinical history and healthcare utilization for affected subjects. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to explore the influence of these decision variables. Results Over a 70 year time horizon, the average cost per infant was $8.89 without screening and $14.33 with universal screening. The model predicted that universal screening in the U.S. would cost approximately $22.4 million/year with a gain of 880 life years and 802 QALYs. Sensitivity analyses showed that screening test specificity and disease incidence were critical driving forces affecting the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). Assuming a SCID incidence of 1/75,000 births and test specificity and sensitivity each at 0.99, screening remained cost-effective up to a maximum cost of $15 per infant screened. Conclusion At our current estimated screening cost of $4.22/infant, universal screening for SCID would be a cost effective

  9. Gene therapy outpaces haplo for SCID-X1.

    PubMed

    Kohn, Donald B

    2015-06-04

    In this issue of Blood, Touzot et al report that autologous gene therapy/hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for infants with X-linked severe combined immune deficiency (SCID-X1) lacking a matched sibling donor may have better outcomes than haploidentical (haplo) HSCT. Because gene therapy represents an autologous transplant, it obviates immune suppression before and after transplant, eliminates risks of graft versus host disease (GVHD), and, as the authors report, led to faster immunological reconstitution after transplant than did haplo transplant.

  10. Neonatal Screening for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID)

    PubMed Central

    Puck, Jennifer M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review Population-based newborn screening for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and related disorders has been instituted in five states, with several more planning to add this testing to their newborn screening panels. This review summarizes the rationale, development, and implementation of SCID screening programs to date and highlights current and future challenges. Recent findings Early results of T-cell receptor excision circle (TREC) testing newborns in pilot states indicate that this addition to the newborn screening panel can be successfully integrated into state public health programs. The TREC test has clinical validity and TRECs, as predicted, are an excellent biomarker of poor T-cell lymphocyte production in the thymus or increased lymphocyte loss resulting in T-cell lymphopenia. A variety of cases with typical SCID genotypes and other conditions have been detected in a timely manner and referred for appropriate early treatment. Summary Early detection of primary immunodeficiency is recognized as important for avoiding infectious complications that compromise outcomes. Routine screening of all newborns with the TREC test, implemented as part of an integrated public health program, can achieve pre-symptomatic diagnosis of SCID and other disorders with T-cell lymphopenia, allowing prompt and effective treatment and leading to a better understanding of the spectrum of these disorders and how to manage them. PMID:22001765

  11. Greasing the SCIDs for universal flu antibodies.

    PubMed

    Yewdell, Jonathan W; Ince, William L

    2013-07-17

    In this issue, Nakamura et al. (2013) describe a robust SCID mouse-based method for isolating human monoclonal antibodies of desired specificity from adoptively transferred human B cells. As proof of principle, they isolate human mAbs that could potentially be used to treat or prevent human infection with any influenza A virus strain.

  12. Characterization of human ovarian carcinomas in a SCID mouse model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Silver, D F; Yang, N P; Oflazoglu, E; Hempling, R E; Piver, M S; Repasky, E A

    1999-02-01

    This study characterizes a murine model which is promising for the study of the growth and natural history of ovarian cancer and for testing of new therapies for its treatment. Intact portions of 20 different human ovarian cancer surgical specimens were implanted in over 60 severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice using techniques previously developed in our laboratory. Growth of xenografts was evaluated by gross examination and histopathologic analysis. Confirmation of the human origin of the tumor outgrowth was obtained using in situ hybridization analysis. By histological evaluation, all of the patients' tumors showed evidence of invasive growth in at least 1 of the mice implanted with portions of each surgical specimen and these tumors remained morphologically similar to the parent tumors for a long period of time. Furthermore, 65% (13/20) of the xenografts grew rapidly enough (i.e., reached a diameter of 1-2 cm within 2-6 months) to allow passage to subsequent SCID mice. Among the passaged xenografts, 3 eventually developed metastases in a distribution pattern similar to that of naturally occurring ovarian cancer and 2 developed ascites without evidence of further metastatic spread. Upon evaluation of sera from tumor-bearing mice, human antibodies presumably derived from immunoglobulin-secreting cells present in the original tumor specimen were identified. In support of this, human B cells and plasma cells could be seen within the tumor xenograft for more than 6 months following implantation. In summary, transplantation of surgical specimens from ovarian cancer patients into SCID mice results in an attractive model for the study of the natural history of ovarian cancer and may also be useful for analysis or new experimental therapeutic approaches for the treatment of this disease.

  13. Histological and immunocytochemical studies of human psoriatic lesions transplanted onto SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Sugai, J; Iizuka, M; Kawakubo, Y; Ozawa, A; Ohkido, M; Ueyama, Y; Tamaoki, N; Inokuchi, S; Shimamura, K

    1998-06-01

    To investigate the pathology of psoriasis, we developed an animal model for this disease using severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. These mice possess neither B nor T Lymphocytes so that both cellular and humoral immunities are impaired. For the in vivo study of psoriasis, human psoriatic skin was grafted on SCID mice. Long-term morphological and immunohistochemical changes in the grafted skin ware examined for up to 22 weeks after transplantation. The human skin graft were generally well maintained during this period, but the histological and immunohistochemical findings characteristic of psoriasis, except for acanthosis and hyperkeratosis, gradually disappeared as lymphocytic infiltration of the psoriatic lesions declined.

  14. Anti-CD11a ameliorates disease in the human psoriatic skin-SCID mouse transplant model: comparison of antibody to CD11a with Cyclosporin A and clobetasol propionate.

    PubMed

    Zeigler, M; Chi, Y; Tumas, D B; Bodary, S; Tang, H; Varani, J

    2001-09-01

    The present study assesses the applicability of human skin-SCID (severe combined immunodeficiency) mouse chimeras in testing antipsoriatic therapeutics. Three agents were examined: (1) a monoclonal antibody to the alpha subunit of leukocyte function associated antigen-1 integrin (CD11a); (2) Cyclosporin A; and (3) clobetasol propionate (Temovate), a potent topical corticosteroid used clinically in the treatment of psoriasis. Skin transplanted to SCID mice from normal human volunteers or from psoriatic lesional skin was allowed to heal for 3 to 5 weeks before application of test reagents. During this period, psoriatic skin, which was 3.8-fold thicker than the corresponding normal skin before transplantation, maintained its phenotype (ie, increased epidermal thickness, rete ridges with blunted ends, and intralesional presence of T lymphocytes). Transplanted normal human skin, however, underwent a hyperplastic response during this period, resulting in a 2.4-fold increase in epidermal thickness. After the healing period, animals transplanted with normal or psoriatic skin were treated for 14 days by daily intraperitoneal injection of either Cyclosporin A or a monoclonal antibody to human CD11a, or by topical application of clobetasol propionate. At the end of the treatment period, the mice were killed and the tissue evaluated morphometrically for changes in epidermal thickness and immunohistologically for the presence of T lymphocytes. Both Cyclosporin A and anti-CD11a reduced the epidermal thickness of transplanted psoriatic skin, whereas neither reagent significantly reduced the thickness of transplanted normal skin. T lymphocytes were detected in the skin from treated animals; there did not seem to be any reduction in the number of T lymphocytes. Clobetasol propionate reduced the epidermal thickness of both normal and psoriatic skin. These data indicate that, in this model, therapies directed against pathophysiologic mechanisms that contribute to psoriasis can be

  15. Impaired IL-7 signaling may explain a case of atypical JAK3-SCID.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Nara, Hidetoshi; Rahman, Mizanur; Juliana, Farha Matin; Araki, Akemi; Asao, Hironobu

    2010-02-01

    Janus kinase 3-severe combined immunodeficiency (JAK3-SCID) is an autosomal recessive immunodeficiency disease caused by various mutations in the JAK3 gene. Typical JAK3-SCID is characterized by a phenotype in which B cells are present but T and NK cells are not, the T(-)B(+)NK(-) phenotype, and by impaired signaling through cytokine receptors that use the common gamma chain (gammac) subunit. An atypical JAK3-SCID case carrying a single glutamate to glycine substitution mutation (E481G) in the JH3 domain of one JAK3 allele, and a deletion mutation (del482-596) in the JH3 and JH2 domains of the other allele was reported previously. Although this patient had CD4(+) T cells and NK cells unlike typical cases, the CD4(+) T cells were functionally impaired. We report here that the JAK3-E481G mutant transduced IL-2-, IL-4-, IL-15-, and IL-21-induced signals as efficiently as wild-type JAK3. However, this mutant failed to respond to IL-7 by phosphorylating JAK1, JAK3, or STAT5. The other mutant JAK3, JAK3-del482-596, was non-functional. Thus, an impaired IL-7 signal may cause SCID and compromise T-cell differentiation, even if the IL-15 signal is preserved and supports NK-cell development, as in this patient.

  16. Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) Presenting with Neonatal Aplastic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Angela; Glover, Jason; Skoda-Smith, Suzanne; Torgerson, Troy; Xu, Min; Burroughs, Lauri; Woolfrey, Ann; Fleming, Mark; Shimamura, Akiko

    2015-01-01

    Aplastic anemia in the neonate is rare. We report a case of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) presenting with neonatal aplastic anemia. This report highlights the importance of considering SCID early in the evaluation of neonatal aplastic anemia prior to the development of infectious complications. PMID:26011426

  17. SCID: A Competency-Based Curriculum Development Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Robert E.

    To provide structure for developing curriculum for Competency Based Education (CBE), an effective and efficient model, Systematic Curriculum and Instructional Development (SCID), has been devised. SCID has five phases: analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation. Each of 23 components involves several steps, some optional. Phase…

  18. Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) presenting with neonatal aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Scott, Angela; Glover, Jason; Skoda-Smith, Suzanne; Torgerson, Troy R; Xu, Min; Burroughs, Lauri M; Woolfrey, Ann E; Fleming, Mark D; Shimamura, Akiko

    2015-11-01

    Aplastic anemia in the neonate is rare. We report a case of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) presenting with neonatal aplastic anemia. This report highlights the importance of considering SCID early in the evaluation of neonatal aplastic anemia prior to the development of infectious complications.

  19. Infection dynamics and clinical features of cryptosporidiosis in SCID mice.

    PubMed Central

    Mead, J R; Ilksoy, N; You, X; Belenkaya, Y; Arrowood, M J; Fallon, M T; Schinazi, R F

    1994-01-01

    Cryptosporidial infections in severe combined immune deficient (SCID) mice produce a chronic disease state which in the later stages leads to extraintestinal involvement and hepatic dysfunction. To further characterize the infection dynamics in this model and monitor the changes in the hepatic system, a dose titration of the oocyst inoculum was performed and alkaline phosphatase levels in the sera were assayed. Ten SCID mice per dose were inoculated with 10(3), 10(4), 10(5), 10(6), or 10(7) oocysts. Oocyst shedding in the feces was quantified by microscopic enumeration. Mice inoculated with 10(6) oocysts and those inoculated with 10(7) oocysts demonstrated similar oocyst shedding patterns, but the 10(7)-oocyst group exhibited signs of distress (e.g., weight loss and icterus) earlier. The intensity of the infection increased markedly approximately 14 days postinoculation (p.i.) and continued to increase steadily over the next 6 weeks. Inoculation with lower oocyst doses produced a delay in patency (e.g., it occurred 7 days later with the 10(5)-oocyst inoculum and 14 days later with the 10(4)-oocyst inoculum). Mean serum alkaline phosphatase levels in the 10(7)-oocyst group were more than twice control values at 5 weeks p.i. and continued to increase over the next 8 weeks. Oocyst doses and alkaline phosphatase levels were positively correlated with hepatobiliary colonization (r = 0.71) and liver necrosis (r = 0.65) at 13 weeks p.i. A strong positive correlation between hepatobiliary colonization and liver necrosis at 13 weeks p.i. (r = 0.87) was observed. PMID:8168930

  20. Cetacean-reconstituted severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice respond to vaccination with canine distemper vaccine.

    PubMed

    De Guise, Sylvain; Levin, Milton Jay

    2004-02-01

    Morbillivirus infections have been responsible for mass mortalities in several species of marine mammals. Nevertheless, relatively little is known on the pathogenesis of the disease and the immune response to the agent, especially in cetaceans, hindering the treatment of individuals and the development of appropriate vaccines, given the difficulty of performing experimental work in marine mammals. The reconstitution of severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice, which do not have the ability to reject grafts, with lymphocytes from different species has been used with increasing success as a surrogate species model to study the immune system. We injected NOD/SCID mice with lymphocytes from different species of cetaceans and further vaccinated those mice with a commercial canine distemper virus (CDV) vaccine to develop a practical model to study cetacean immune response to a morbillivirus. Reconstitution was detected in 10/20 mice reconstituted with harbor porpoise spleen, 6/10 mice reconstituted with harbor porpoise lymph node cells, 8/10 mice reconstituted with fresh beluga PBMCs and none of the mice reconstituted with neonate bottlenose dolphin spleen or thymus cells when assessed 42-63 days after reconstitution. While a humoral immune response was detected in none of the reconstituted mice, a cell-mediated immune response to the CDV vaccine was detected in 6/15 (40%) and 2/18 (11%) of the SCID mice after reconstitution with cetacean immune cells after a single or booster vaccination, respectively, for a combined total of 8/33 (24%). This represents the first demonstration of successful reconstitution of SCID mice with marine mammal cells, and to the authors' knowledge, the first direct demonstration of a primary antigen-specific cell-mediated immune response in reconstituted SCID mice. This model will be useful for further research on the physiology of the marine mammal immune system and its response to infectious agents and vaccines, with possible important

  1. Pathogenicity of Helicobacter rodentium in A/JCr and SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Myles, Matthew H; Livingston, Robert S; Franklin, Craig L

    2004-10-01

    Helicobacter rodentium was first recognized as a potential pathogen when it was isolated, along with Helicobacter bilis, from a colony of scid/Trp53 knockout mice with diarrhea. Clinical disease in these mice was more severe than that previously reported in mice infected with H. bilis alone, thus suggesting that H. rodentium contributed to the pathogenesis of enteritis. The purpose of the study reported here was to address two questions: is H. rodentium pathogenic in mice, and when co-infection with a pathogenic helicobacter occurs, does H. rodentium augment disease? To this end, A/JCr and C.B-17/IcrCrl-scidBr mice were inoculated with H. rodentium and/or H. hepaticus. Twelve weeks after inoculation, mice were euthanized. The cecum and liver were evaluated microscopically for evidence of disease. Cecal interferon-inducible protein 10 (IP-10), macrophage inflammatory protein 1alpha (MIP-1alpha), interleukin 10 (IL-10), and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) mRNA values were measured as an indicator of mucosal immune response. Hepatic lesions were not identified in mice mono-infected with H. rodentium; likewise, cecal lesion scores were not significantly different from those of uninfected controls. With the exception of an increased IL-10 mRNA value in SCID mice, mean immune-related gene expression in H. rodentium mono-infected and uninfected control mice was not significantly different. In contrast, all mice infected with H. hepaticus developed moderate to severe hepatitis, significant increase in cecal lesion scores, and increased immune-related gene expression. The C.B-17/IcrCrl-scidBr mice co-infected with H. hepaticus and H. rodentium had liquid cecal contents and low terminal body weight. Further, compared with mice infected with H. hepaticus alone, co-infection was associated with significant increases of IL-10, MIP-1alpha, and IP-10 mRNA values in C.B-17/IcrCrl-scidBr and IFN-gamma and MIP-1alpha mRNA values in A/JCr mice. These results suggested that H. rodentium

  2. Differential Secondary Reconstitution of In Vivo-Selected Human SCID-Repopulating Cells in NOD/SCID versus NOD/SCID/γ chain Mice.

    PubMed

    Cai, Shanbao; Wang, Haiyan; Bailey, Barbara; Hartwell, Jennifer R; Silver, Jayne M; Juliar, Beth E; Sinn, Anthony L; Baluyut, Arthur R; Pollok, Karen E

    2011-01-01

    Humanized bone-marrow xenograft models that can monitor the long-term impact of gene-therapy strategies will help facilitate evaluation of clinical utility. The ability of the murine bone-marrow microenvironment in NOD/SCID versus NOD/SCID/γ chain(null) mice to support long-term engraftment of MGMT(P140K)-transduced human-hematopoietic cells following alkylator-mediated in vivo selection was investigated. Mice were transplanted with MGMT(P140K)-transduced CD34(+) cells and transduced cells selected in vivo. At 4 months after transplantation, levels of human-cell engraftment, and MGMT(P140K)-transduced cells in the bone marrow of NOD/SCID versus NSG mice varied slightly in vehicle- and drug-treated mice. In secondary transplants, although equal numbers of MGMT(P140K)-transduced human cells were transplanted, engraftment was significantly higher in NOD/SCID/γ chain(null) mice compared to NOD/SCID mice at 2 months after transplantation. These data indicate that reconstitution of NOD/SCID/γ chain(null) mice with human-hematopoietic cells represents a more promising model in which to test for genotoxicity and efficacy of strategies that focus on manipulation of long-term repopulating cells of human origin.

  3. Towards a rAAV-based gene therapy for ADA-SCID: from ADA deficiency to current and future treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Silver, Jared N; Flotte, Terence R

    2008-07-01

    Adenosine deaminase deficiency fosters a rare, devastating pediatric immune deficiency with concomitant opportunistic infections, metabolic anomalies and multiple organ system pathology. The standard of care for adenosine deaminase deficient severe combined immune deficiency (ADA-SCID) includes enzyme replacement therapy or bone marrow transplantation. Gene therapies for ADA-SCID over nearly two decades have exclusively involved retroviral vectors targeted to lymphocytes and hematopoetic progenitors. These groundbreaking gene therapies represent a revolution in clinical medicine, but come with several challenges, including the risk of insertional mutagenesis. An alternative gene therapy for ADA-SCID may utilize recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors in vivo, with numerous target tissues, to foster ectopic expression and secretion of adenosine deaminase. This review endeavors to describe ADA-SCID, the traditional treatments, previous retroviral gene therapies, and primarily, alternative recombinant adeno-associated virus-based strategies to remedy this potentially fatal genetic disease.

  4. Chemokine receptor CCR5 genotype influences the kinetics of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection in human PBL-SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Picchio, G R; Gulizia, R J; Mosier, D E

    1997-09-01

    Individuals homozygous for a 32-bp deletion (delta 32) in the CCR5 gene encoding the coreceptor for macrophage-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are resistant to virus infection, and heterozygous individuals show some slowing of disease progression. The impact of the CCR5 genotype on HIV-1 infection was assessed in vitro and in the human PBL-SCID (hu-PBL-SCID) model. Cells and hu-PBL-SCID mice from CCR5 delta 32/delta 32 donors were resistant to infection with macrophage-tropic HIV-1 and showed slower replication of dual-tropic HIV-1. hu-PBL-SCID mice derived from CCR5 delta 32/+ heterozygotes showed delayed replication of macrophage-tropic HIV-1 despite a small and variable effect of heterozygosity on viral replication in vitro. The level of CCR5 expression appears to limit replication of macrophage-tropic and dual-tropic HIV-1 strains in vivo.

  5. B-cell reconstitution for SCID: should a conditioning regimen be used in SCID treatment?

    PubMed

    Haddad, Elie; Leroy, Sandrine; Buckley, Rebecca H

    2013-04-01

    Bone marrow transplantation has resulted in life-saving sustained T-cell reconstitution in many infants with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), but correction of B-cell function has been more problematic. At the annual meeting of the Primary Immunodeficiency Treatment Consortium held in Boston, Massachusetts, on April 27, 2012, a debate was held regarding the use of pretransplantation conditioning versus no pretransplantation conditioning in an effort to address this problem. Reviews of the literature were made by both debaters, and there was agreement that there was a higher rate of B-cell chimerism and a lower number of patients who required ongoing immunoglobulin replacement therapy in centers that used pretransplantation conditioning. However, there were still patients who required immunoglobulin replacement in those centers, and therefore pretransplantation conditioning did not guarantee development of B-cell function. Dr Rebecca H. Buckley presented data on B-cell function according to the molecular defect of the patient, and showed that patients with IL-7 receptor α, ADA, and CD3 chain gene mutations can have normal B-cell function after transplantation with only host B cells. Dr Elie Haddad presented a statistical analysis of B-cell function in published reports and showed that only a conditioning regimen that contained busulfan was significantly associated with better B-cell function after transplantation. The question is whether the risk of immediate and long-term toxicity with use of busulfan is justified, particularly in patients with SCID with DNA repair defects and in very young newborns with SCID who will be detected by using newborn screening.

  6. Clinical characteristics and genetic profiles of 44 patients with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID): report from Shanghai, China (2004-2011).

    PubMed

    Yao, Chun-Mei; Han, Xiao-Hua; Zhang, Yi-Dan; Zhang, Hui; Jin, Ying-Ying; Cao, Rui-Ming; Wang, Xi; Liu, Quan-Hua; Zhao, Wei; Chen, Tong-Xin

    2013-04-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), a rare type of genetic associated immune disorder, is poorly characterized in mainland China. We retrospectively reviewed 44 patients with SCID who received treatment from 2004 to 2011 in Shanghai, China, and herein summarize their clinical manifestations and immunological and preliminary genetic features. The male-to-female ratio was 10:1. Twenty five patients presented with X-SCID symptoms. Only one patient was diagnosed before the onset of symptoms due to positive family history. The mean time of delay in the diagnosis of X-SCID was 2.69 months (range, 0.5-8.67). Thirty-seven of the 44 patients died by the end of 2011 with the mean age of death being 7.87 months (range, 1.33-31). Six patients received hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT); only one of them survived, who was transplanted twice. The time between onset and death was shorter in the HSCT-treated group compared with the untreated group (2.87 ± 1.28 and 3.34 ± 0.59 months, respectively), probably due to active infections during transplantation. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) complications occurred in 14 of the 34 patients who received BCG vaccination. Transfusion-induced graft-versus-host disease occurred in 5 patients. Total 20 mutations in interleukin-2 receptor subunit gamma (IL2RG) were identified in 22 patients, including 11 novel mutations. Most patients were misdiagnosed before referred to our SCID Center. Therefore, establishing more diagnostic centers dedicated to the care of PID and accessible by primary immunodeficiency patients will facilitate early, correct diagnosis and better care of SCID in China.

  7. Spontaneous Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in immunodeficient mutant scid mice. Natural history and pathobiology.

    PubMed Central

    Roths, J. B.; Marshall, J. D.; Allen, R. D.; Carlson, G. A.; Sidman, C. L.

    1990-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pneumocystis carinii (Pc) poses a major clinical health problem in individuals with immune deficiency, including those patients with human immunodeficiency (HIV)-associated acquired immune deficiency disease (AIDS). Heretofore, in vivo investigations of the biology of Pc and pathogenesis of pneumocystosis have generally employed steroid-induced immune suppression with antibiotic prophylaxis and protein deprivation. This approach has many drawbacks, chief among them being the widespread, multiple interacting effects caused by the inducing agents. Athymic (nude) mice and rats have been used, but are less than ideal, as the immune defect primarily affects T lymphocytes. This article describes the natural history, pathobiology, and environmental effects on Pc pneumonitis in nonaxenically housed mice homozygous for the autosomal recessive mutation 'severe combined immunodeficiency' (scid), which almost totally lack both cell-mediated and antibody-mediated immune functions. The predictability, unequivocal expression, high morbidity, and well-defined genetic basis make scid/scid mutant mice the model of choice for in vivo studies of spontaneous pneumocystosis. Images Figure 3 Figure 6 PMID:2349968

  8. Using ICR and SCID mice as animal models for smallpox to assess antiviral drug efficacy.

    PubMed

    Titova, Ksenya A; Sergeev, Alexander A; Zamedyanskaya, Alena S; Galahova, Darya O; Kabanov, Alexey S; Morozova, Anastasia A; Bulychev, Leonid E; Sergeev, Artemiy A; Glotova, Tanyana I; Shishkina, Larisa N; Taranov, Oleg S; Omigov, Vladimir V; Zavjalov, Evgenii L; Agafonov, Alexander P; Sergeev, Alexander N

    2015-09-01

    The possibility of using immunocompetent ICR mice and immunodeficient SCID mice as model animals for smallpox to assess antiviral drug efficacy was investigated. Clinical signs of the disease did not appear following intranasal (i.n.) challenge of mice with strain Ind-3a of variola virus (VARV), even when using the highest possible dose of the virus (5.2 log10 p.f.u.). The 50 % infective doses (ID50) of VARV, estimated by the virus presence or absence in the lungs 3 and 4 days post-infection, were 2.7 ± 0.4 log10 p.f.u. for ICR mice and 3.5 ± 0.7 log10 p.f.u. for SCID mice. After i.n. challenge of ICR and SCID mice with VARV 30 and 50 ID50, respectively, steady reproduction of the virus occurred only in the respiratory tract (lungs and nose). Pathological inflammatory destructive changes were revealed in the respiratory tract and the primary target cells for VARV (macrophages and epithelial cells) in mice, similar to those in humans and cynomolgus macaques. The use of mice to assess antiviral efficacies of NIOCH-14 and ST-246 demonstrated the compliance of results with those described in scientific literature, which opens up the prospect of their use as an animal model for smallpox to develop anti-smallpox drugs intended for humans.

  9. Spontaneous Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in immunodeficient mutant scid mice. Natural history and pathobiology.

    PubMed

    Roths, J B; Marshall, J D; Allen, R D; Carlson, G A; Sidman, C L

    1990-05-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pneumocystis carinii (Pc) poses a major clinical health problem in individuals with immune deficiency, including those patients with human immunodeficiency (HIV)-associated acquired immune deficiency disease (AIDS). Heretofore, in vivo investigations of the biology of Pc and pathogenesis of pneumocystosis have generally employed steroid-induced immune suppression with antibiotic prophylaxis and protein deprivation. This approach has many drawbacks, chief among them being the widespread, multiple interacting effects caused by the inducing agents. Athymic (nude) mice and rats have been used, but are less than ideal, as the immune defect primarily affects T lymphocytes. This article describes the natural history, pathobiology, and environmental effects on Pc pneumonitis in nonaxenically housed mice homozygous for the autosomal recessive mutation 'severe combined immunodeficiency' (scid), which almost totally lack both cell-mediated and antibody-mediated immune functions. The predictability, unequivocal expression, high morbidity, and well-defined genetic basis make scid/scid mutant mice the model of choice for in vivo studies of spontaneous pneumocystosis.

  10. Intravenous injection of a foamy virus vector to correct canine SCID-X1.

    PubMed

    Burtner, Christopher R; Beard, Brian C; Kennedy, Douglas R; Wohlfahrt, Martin E; Adair, Jennifer E; Trobridge, Grant D; Scharenberg, Andrew M; Torgerson, Troy R; Rawlings, David J; Felsburg, Peter J; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2014-06-05

    Current approaches to hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy involve the collection and ex vivo manipulation of HSCs, a process associated with loss of stem cell multipotency and engraftment potential. An alternative approach for correcting blood-related diseases is the direct intravenous administration of viral vectors, so-called in vivo gene therapy. In this study, we evaluated the safety and efficacy of in vivo gene therapy using a foamy virus vector for the correction of canine X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1). In newborn SCID-X1 dogs, injection of a foamy virus vector expressing the human IL2RG gene resulted in an expansion of lymphocytes expressing the common γ chain and the development of CD3(+) T lymphocytes. CD3(+) cells expressed CD4 and CD8 coreceptors, underwent antigen receptor gene rearrangement, and demonstrated functional maturity in response to T-cell mitogens. Retroviral integration site analysis in 4 animals revealed a polyclonal pattern of integration in all dogs with evidence for dominant clones. These results demonstrate that a foamy virus vector can be administered with therapeutic benefit in the SCID-X1 dog, a clinically relevant preclinical model for in vivo gene therapy.

  11. Correction of interleukin-2 receptor function in X-SCID lymphoblastoid cells by retrovirally mediated transfer of the gamma-c gene.

    PubMed

    Taylor, N; Uribe, L; Smith, S; Jahn, T; Kohn, D B; Weinberg, K

    1996-04-15

    X-SCID, the most common form of human SCID, is due to mutations in the common gamma chain gene (gamma-c) that encodes an essential component of the cytokine receptors for interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4, IL-7, IL-9, and IL-15. Activation of the Janus family tyrosine kinases Jak1 and Jak3 is necessary for appropriate signalling through the IL-2 receptor (IL-2R). Neither Jak1 nor Jak3 was phosphorylated after IL-2 stimulation of an Epstein-Barr virus-transformed cell line (LCL) from an X-SCID patient with a gamma-c null mutation. However, we now show that appropriate IL-2R function can be restored in an X-SCID LCL by transduction of a wild-type gamma-c gene. A retroviral vector, G1gamma-cSvNa, was constructed and produced in the PG13 packaging line. Transduced X-SCID LCL expressed the G1gamma-cSvNa transcript. IL-2 stimulation of the transduced cell line resulted in appropriate tyrosine phosphorylation of both Jak1 and Jak3. Thus, retroviral-mediated transduction of normal gamma-c can reconstitute downstream signalling through the IL-2R in X-SCID cell lines, suggesting that gene therapy may be a treatment for this disease.

  12. Faster T-cell development following gene therapy compared with haploidentical HSCT in the treatment of SCID-X1.

    PubMed

    Touzot, Fabien; Moshous, Despina; Creidy, Rita; Neven, Bénédicte; Frange, Pierre; Cros, Guilhem; Caccavelli, Laure; Blondeau, Johanna; Magnani, Alessandra; Luby, Jean-Marc; Ternaux, Brigitte; Picard, Capucine; Blanche, Stéphane; Fischer, Alain; Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; Cavazzana, Marina

    2015-06-04

    During the last decade, gene therapy via ex vivo gene transfer into autologous hematopoietic stem cells has emerged as a convincing therapy for severe combined immunodeficiency caused by ILR2G mutation (SCID-X1) despite the occurrence of genotoxicity caused by the integration of first-generation retroviral vectors. However, the place of gene therapy among the therapeutic armamentarium remains to be defined. We retrospectively analyze and compare clinical outcomes and immune reconstitution in 13 consecutive SCID-X1 patients having undergone haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and 14 SCID-X1 patients treated with gene therapy over the same period at a single center level: the Necker Children's Hospital (Paris, France). Our results show a clear advantage in terms of T-cell development of gene therapy over HSCT with a mismatched donor. Patients treated with gene therapy display a faster T-cell reconstitution and a better long-term thymic output. Interestingly, this advantage of gene therapy vs haploidentical HSCT seems to be independent of the existence of clinical graft-versus-host disease in the latter condition. If data of safety are confirmed over the long term, gene therapy for SCID-X1 appears to be an equal, if not superior, alternative to haploidentical HSCT.

  13. Genome-wide gene expression profiling of SCID mice with T-cell-mediated Colitis.

    PubMed

    Brudzewsky, D; Pedersen, A E; Claesson, M H; Gad, M; Kristensen, N N; Lage, K; Jensen, T; Tommerup, N; Larsen, L A; Knudsen, S; Tümer, Z

    2009-05-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a multifactorial disorder with an unknown aetiology. The aim of this study is to employ a murine model of IBD to identify pathways and genes, which may play a key role in the pathogenesis of IBD and could be important for discovery of new disease markers in human disease. Here, we have investigated severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice, which upon adoptive transfer with concanavalin A-activated CD4(+) T cells develop inflammation of the colon with predominance in rectum. Mice with increasing level of inflammation was studied. RNA from rectum of transplanted and non-transplanted SCID mice was investigated by a genome-wide gene expression analysis using the Affymetrix mouse expression array 430A (MOE430A) including 22,626 probe sets. A significant change in gene expression (P = 0.00001) is observed in 152 of the genes between the non-transplanted control mice and colitis mice, and among these genes there is an overrepresentation of genes involved in inflammatory processes. Some of the most significant genes showing higher expression encode S100A proteins and chemokines involved in trafficking of leucocytes in inflammatory areas. Classification by gene clustering based on the genes with the significantly altered gene expression corresponds to two different levels of inflammation as established by the histological scoring of the inflamed rectum. These data demonstrate that this SCID T-cell transfer model is a useful animal model for human IBD and can be used for suggesting candidate genes involved in the pathogenesis and for identifying new molecular markers of chronic inflammation in human IBD.

  14. The SCID PTSD module's trauma screen: validity with two samples in detecting trauma history.

    PubMed

    Elhai, Jon D; Franklin, C Laurel; Gray, Matt J

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) module's trauma screen of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID), a single-item traumatic event history query. Compared to the Stressful Life Events Screening Questionnaire (SLESQ), the SCID trauma screen was 76% sensitive in identifying trauma histories in 199 medical patients (correctly ruling out 67%) but only 66% sensitive in 253 college students (ruling out 87%). A modified, more behaviorally specific SCID trauma screen (M-SCID) yielded poorer results in identifying trauma among 245 additional college students. Based on probable PTSD diagnoses (PTSD Symptom Scale), using the SCID screen instead of the SLESQ, 3% (M-SCID screen) to 11-14% (standard SCID) of PTSD cases were missed due to not having a trauma history. Our results lend support to previous research establishing the SCID trauma screen as a useful screening device in settings where a more comprehensive trauma screen is not possible.

  15. Improved engraftment of human cord blood stem cells in NOD/LtSz-scid/scid mice after irradiation or multiple-day injections into unirradiated recipients.

    PubMed

    Lowry, P A; Shultz, L D; Greiner, D L; Hesselton, R M; Kittler, E L; Tiarks, C Y; Rao, S S; Reilly, J; Leif, J H; Ramshaw, H; Stewart, F M; Quesenberry, P J

    1996-02-01

    Human lymphoematopoietic stem cells engraft in irradiated immunodeficient mice that are homozygous for the severe combined immunodeficiency (scid) mutation. Engraftment levels in C.B-17-scid/scid mice, however, have been low and transient, decreasing the utility of this model for investigation of the development potential and function of human stem cells. In the present study, we have used NOD/LtSz-scid/scid mice as recipients and human cord blood as a source of donor stem cells. Our results demonstrate that NOD/LtSz-scid/scid mice support approximately fivefold higher levels of human stem cell marrow engraftment than do C.B-17-scid/scid mice. Human CD34+ cells are present in the marrow of recipient mice, and the engrafted cells readily peripheralize to the circulation of the host. Terminal differentiation of the stem and progenitor cells into mature progeny is limited. Using a multiple-day injection protocol developed in mice, which allows engraftment of stem cells between congenic mice in the absence of irradiation preconditioning, we observed high levels of human cell engraftment in unirradiated NOD/LtSz-scid/scid recipients after three or five consecutive-day injections. These results demonstrate that NOD/LtSz-scid/scid mice support high levels of human stem cell engraftment and that xenogeneic lymphohematopoietic stem cells can engraft in unirradiated hosts without the need for ablative reconditioning. This model will be useful for the in vivo investigation of human stem cells and for the preclinical analysis of human stem cells for transplantation.

  16. Lymphoid regeneration from gene-corrected SCID-X1 subject-derived iPSCs.

    PubMed

    Menon, Tushar; Firth, Amy L; Scripture-Adams, Deirdre D; Galic, Zoran; Qualls, Susan J; Gilmore, William B; Ke, Eugene; Singer, Oded; Anderson, Leif S; Bornzin, Alexander R; Alexander, Ian E; Zack, Jerome A; Verma, Inder M

    2015-04-02

    X-linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) is a genetic disease that leaves newborns at high risk of serious infection and a predicted life span of less than 1 year in the absence of a matched bone marrow donor. The disease pathogenesis is due to mutations in the gene encoding the Interleukin-2 receptor gamma chain (IL-2Rγ), leading to a lack of functional lymphocytes. With the leukemogenic concerns of viral gene therapy there is a need to explore alternative therapeutic options. We have utilized induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology and genome editing mediated by TALENs to generate isogenic subject-specific mutant and gene-corrected iPSC lines. While the subject-derived mutant iPSCs have the capacity to generate hematopoietic precursors and myeloid cells, only wild-type and gene-corrected iPSCs can additionally generate mature NK cells and T cell precursors expressing the correctly spliced IL-2Rγ. This study highlights the potential for the development of autologous cell therapy for SCID-X1 subjects.

  17. Correction of SCID-X1 using an enhancerless Vav promoter.

    PubMed

    Almarza, E; Zhang, F; Santilli, G; Blundell, M P; Howe, S J; Thornhill, S I; Bueren, J A; Thrasher, A J

    2011-03-01

    The efficacy of gene therapy for the treatment of inherited immunodeficiency has been highlighted in recent clinical trials, although in some cases complicated by insertional mutagenesis and silencing of vector genomes through methylation. To minimize these effects, we have evaluated the use of regulatory elements that confer reliability of gene expression, but also lack potent indiscriminate enhancer activity. The Vav1 proximal promoter is particularly attractive in this regard and may be useful in situations where high-level or complex regulation of gene expression is not necessary. X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) is a good candidate for such an approach, particularly as there may be additional disease-related intrinsic risks of leukemogenesis, and where safety is therefore a paramount concern. We have tested whether lentiviral vectors expressing the common cytokine receptor gamma chain under the control of the proximal Vav1 gene promoter are effective for correction of signaling defects and the disease phenotype. Despite low-level gene expression, we observed near-complete restoration of cytokine-mediated STAT5 phosphorylation in a model cell line. Furthermore, at low vector copy number, highly effective T- and B-lymphocyte reconstitution was achieved in vivo in a murine model of SCID-X1, in both primary and secondary graft recipients. This vector configuration deserves further evaluation and consideration for future clinical trials.

  18. Long Term Amperometric Recordings in the Brain Extracellular Fluid of Freely Moving Immunocompromised NOD SCID Mice

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Caroline H.; Finnerty, Niall J.

    2017-01-01

    We describe the in vivo characterization of microamperometric sensors for the real-time monitoring of nitric oxide (NO) and oxygen (O2) in the striatum of immunocompromised NOD SCID mice. The latter strain has been utilized routinely in the establishment of humanized models of disease e.g., Parkinson’s disease. NOD SCID mice were implanted with highly sensitive and selective NO and O2 sensors that have been previously characterized both in vitro and in freely moving rats. Animals were systemically administered compounds that perturbed the amperometric current and confirmed sensor performance. Furthermore, the stability of the amperometric current was investigated and 24 h recordings examined. Saline injections caused transient changes in both currents that were not significant from baseline. l-NAME caused significant decreases in NO (p < 0.05) and O2 (p < 0.001) currents compared to saline. l-Arginine produced a significant increase (p < 0.001) in NO current, and chloral hydrate and Diamox (acetazolamide) caused significant increases in O2 signal (p < 0.01) compared against saline. The stability of both currents were confirmed over an eight-day period and analysis of 24-h recordings identified diurnal variations in both signals. These findings confirm the efficacy of the amperometric sensors to perform continuous and reliable recordings in immunocompromised mice. PMID:28241417

  19. NK cells are intrinsically functional in pigs with Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) caused by spontaneous mutations in the Artemis gene

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Ellis J.; Cunnick, Joan E.; Knetter, Susan M.; Loving, Crystal L.; Waide, Emily H.; Dekkers, Jack C.M.; Tuggle, Christopher K.

    2016-01-01

    We have identified Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) in a line of Yorkshire pigs at Iowa State University. These SCID pigs lack B-cells and T-cells, but possess Natural Killer (NK) cells. This SCID phenotype is caused by recessive mutations in the Artemis gene. Interestingly, two human tumor cell lines, PANC-1 and A375-SM, survived after injection into these SCID pigs, but, as we demonstrate here, these cells, as well as K562 tumor cells, can be lysed in vitro by NK cells from SCID and non-SCID pigs. NK cells from both SCID and non-SCID pigs required activation in vitro with either recombinant human IL-2 or the combination of recombinant porcine IL-12 and IL-18 to kill tumor targets. We also showed that SCID NK cells could be activated to produce perforin, and perforin production was greatly enhanced in NK cells from both SCID and non-SCID pigs after IL-2 cytokine treatment. While CD16+, CD172− NK cells constituted an average of only 4% in non-SCID pigs, NK cells averaged 27% of the peripheral blood mononuclear cell population in SCID pigs. We found no significant differences in killing activity per NK cell between SCID and non-SCID pigs. We conclude that survival of human cancer cells in these SCID pigs is not due to an intrinsic defect in NK cell killing ability. PMID:27269786

  20. NK cells are intrinsically functional in pigs with Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) caused by spontaneous mutations in the Artemis gene.

    PubMed

    Powell, Ellis J; Cunnick, Joan E; Knetter, Susan M; Loving, Crystal L; Waide, Emily H; Dekkers, Jack C M; Tuggle, Christopher K

    2016-07-01

    We have identified Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) in a line of Yorkshire pigs at Iowa State University. These SCID pigs lack B-cells and T-cells, but possess Natural Killer (NK) cells. This SCID phenotype is caused by recessive mutations in the Artemis gene. Interestingly, two human tumor cell lines, PANC-1 and A375-SM, survived after injection into these SCID pigs, but, as we demonstrate here, these cells, as well as K562 tumor cells, can be lysed in vitro by NK cells from SCID and non-SCID pigs. NK cells from both SCID and non-SCID pigs required activation in vitro with either recombinant human IL-2 or the combination of recombinant porcine IL-12 and IL-18 to kill tumor targets. We also showed that SCID NK cells could be activated to produce perforin, and perforin production was greatly enhanced in NK cells from both SCID and non-SCID pigs after IL-2 cytokine treatment. While CD16+, CD172- NK cells constituted an average of only 4% in non-SCID pigs, NK cells averaged 27% of the peripheral blood mononuclear cell population in SCID pigs. We found no significant differences in killing activity per NK cell between SCID and non-SCID pigs. We conclude that survival of human cancer cells in these SCID pigs is not due to an intrinsic defect in NK cell killing ability.

  1. Hyperbilirubinemia and rapid fatal hepatic failure in severe combined immunodeficiency caused by adenosine deaminase deficiency (ADA-SCID).

    PubMed

    Kühl, J S; Schwarz, K; Münch, A; Schmugge, M; Pekrun, A; Meisel, C; Wahn, V; Ebell, W; von Bernuth, H

    2011-03-01

    Adenosin deaminase (ADA) deficiency is the cause for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) in about 15% of patients with SCID, often presenting as T (-)B (-)NK (-)SCID. Treatment options for ADA-SCID are enzyme replacement, bone marrow transplantation or gene therapy. We here describe the first patient with ADA-SCID and fatal hepatic failure despite bone marrow transplantation from a 10/10 HLA identical related donor. As patients with ADA-SCID may be at yet underestimated increased risk for rapid hepatic failure we speculate whether hepatitis in ADA-SCID should lead to the immediate treatment with enzyme replacement by pegylated ADA.

  2. The beneficial effect of blocking Kv1.3 in the psoriasiform SCID mouse model.

    PubMed

    Gilhar, Amos; Bergman, Reuven; Assay, Bedia; Ullmann, Yehuda; Etzioni, Amos

    2011-01-01

    The Kv1.3 channel is important in the activation and function of effector memory T cells. Recently, specific blockers of the Kv1.3 channel have been developed as a potential therapeutic option for diverse autoimmune diseases. In psoriatic lesions, most lymphocytes are memory effector T cells. The aim of the present study was to detect the expression of Kv1.3 channels in these cells in psoriatic lesions as well as in human psoriasiform skin grafts using the severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model. Histological and immunohistochemical staining for Kv1.3 expression and various inflammatory markers was performed in sections obtained from six psoriatic patients and 18 beige-SCID mice with psoriasiform human skin grafts. Six grafted mice were treated with Stichodactyla helianthus neurotoxin (ShK), a known Kv1.3 blocker. The results showed an increased number of Kv1.3+ cells in the psoriatic skin as well as in the psoriasiform skin grafts as compared with normal skin and normal skin grafts. Injections of ShK showed a marked therapeutic effect in three of six psoriasiform skin grafts. A significantly decreased number of Kv1.3+ cells was observed in the responders compared with the control grafts. This pilot study, although performed in a small number of mice, reveals the possible beneficial effect of Kv1.3 blockers in psoriasis patients.

  3. Gene therapy: X-SCID transgene leukaemogenicity.

    PubMed

    Thrasher, Adrian J; Gaspar, H Bobby; Baum, Christopher; Modlich, Ute; Schambach, Axel; Candotti, Fabio; Otsu, Makoto; Sorrentino, Brian; Scobie, Linda; Cameron, Ewan; Blyth, Karen; Neil, Jim; Abina, Salima Hacein-Bey; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Fischer, Alain

    2006-09-21

    Gene therapy has been remarkably effective for the immunological reconstitution of patients with severe combined immune deficiency, but the occurrence of leukaemia in a few patients has stimulated debate about the safety of the procedure and the mechanisms of leukaemogenesis. Woods et al. forced high expression of the corrective therapeutic gene IL2RG, which encodes the gamma-chain of the interleukin-2 receptor, in a mouse model of the disease and found that tumours appeared in a proportion of cases. Here we show that transgenic IL2RG does not necessarily have potent intrinsic oncogenic properties, and argue that the interpretation of this observation with respect to human trials is overstated.

  4. Severe combined immunodeficiency with B-lymphocytes (T-B+SCID): report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Lin, J S; Shyur, S D; Lin, H Y

    1998-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is a rare pediatric medical emergency in Taiwan. The early diagnosis of infants with SCID is very important because it can save the life of these critical infants. The essential clues important for early diagnosis of SCID patients include positive family history of early infant death, paucity of tonsil and lymphoid tissue, cutaneous fungal infection and lymphopenia. Severe combined immunodeficiency is a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders characterized by the failure of both cellular and humoral immunity. It can be categorized into SCID with B-lymphocytes predominant (T-B+SCID) and SCID with paucity of B-lymphocytes (T-B-SCID), according to the number of B-lymphocytes in the patient's peripheral circulation. We report two male infants with T-B+SCID who had been suffering from severe pulmonary distress with persistent O2 desaturation when they were transferred to our pediatric intensive care unit. Tracing back these infant's family histories, it was discovered that both of them had an elder brother who had died to overwhelming infection within the first year of life, and Pneumocystis carinii pneumonitis (PCP) was confirmed in the elder brother of case 2. After hospitalization, the immune condition of these two infants were evaluated which showed a decrease in T-cell and NK cell number, an increase in B-cell number, and decreased serum levels of all the Igs except IgM, which was elevated in case 1. These were the diagnostic immunological findings for T-B+SCID, which included X-linked SCID and Jak-3-deficient SCID. During hospitalization, severe mucocutaneous candidiasis and PCP were noted and confirmed in case 1 and PCP was highly suspected in case 2. Bone marrow transplantation, the only curable treatment for T-B+SCID at present, could not be performed in these two patients because of their grave clinical condition. Both of them expired due to their progressively downhill pulmonary conditions.

  5. Clinical translation of TALENS: Treating SCID-X1 by gene editing in iPSCs.

    PubMed

    Biffi, Alessandra

    2015-04-02

    Mutations causing X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) reduce immune cell populations and function and may be amenable to targeted gene correction strategies. Now in Cell Stem Cell, Menon et al. (2015) correct SCID-X1-related blood differentiation defects by TALEN-mediated genome editing in patient-derived iPSCs, suggesting a possible strategy for autologous cell therapy of SCID-X1.

  6. Dimethylnitrosamine-induced liver fibrosis and recovery in NOD/SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Hyon, Min-Kyong; Kwon, Euna; Choi, Hyung Jun; Kang, Byeong-Cheol

    2011-06-01

    There is a need for a new liver fibrosis model of immunodeficient mice to study the effects of cell therapy on liver disease because there are not many animal models available to study the effects of cell therapy. In this study, we induced liver fibrosis using dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) in NOD/SCID mice to create an animal model for liver disease. DMN (5 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected intraperitoneally for three consecutive days per week for 6 or 8 weeks, and the mice were sacrificed at weeks 0, 4 and 8 after the last DMN injection. The 6-week DMN-treated group gradually recovered from serum biochemical changes, histopathological toxic effects and lesions in the liver at weeks 4 and 8 after the last DMN injection. However, the progression of liver fibrosis and toxic levels were maintained in the 8-week DMN-treated group at week 4 after the last DMN injection. The increases in iron and extracellular matrix (collagen) in the DMN-treated group were confirmed by Prussian blue (PB) and Masson's trichrome (MT) staining, respectively. Additionally, activation of hepatic stellate cells was observed by alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) immunostaining and western blot. In conclusion, treatment of NOD/SCID mice with 5 mg/kg of DMN for 8 weeks can be used to induce an appropriate animal model of disease for liver fibrosis. This model may be useful for evaluation of the efficacy and safety of cell therapies such as human mesenchymal stem cell therapy.

  7. The case for mandatory newborn screening for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID).

    PubMed

    Gaspar, H B; Hammarström, L; Mahlaoui, N; Borte, M; Borte, S

    2014-05-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is the most severe form of inherited primary immunodeficiency and is a paediatric emergency. Delay in recognising and detecting SCID can have fatal consequences and also reduces the chances of a successful haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Screening for SCID at birth would prevent children from dying before HSCT can be attempted and would increase the success of HSCT. There is strong evidence to show that SCID fulfills the internationally-established criteria for a condition to be screened for at birth. There is also a test (the T-cell receptor excision circle (TREC) assay) that is now being successfully used in an increasing number of US states to screen for SCID in routine newborn Guthrie samples. Concerted lobbying efforts have highlighted the need for newborn screening (NBS) for SCID, and its implementation is being discussed in Europe both at EU and individual country level, but as yet there is no global mandate to screen for this rare and frequently lethal condition. This paper summarizes the current evidence for, and the success of SCID NBS, together with a review of the practical aspects of SCID testing and the arguments in favour of adding SCID to the conditions screened for at birth.

  8. The SCID mouse model: novel therapeutic targets - lessons from gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Pierer, Matthias; Müller-Ladner, Ulf; Pap, Thomas; Neidhart, Michel; Gay, Renate E; Gay, Steffen

    2003-08-01

    The hallmark of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is progressive destruction of the joints, preceded and accompanied by synovial hyperplasia and chronic inflammation. Spontaneous and induced animal models of RA reflect predominantly the inflammatory aspects of the disease. To reproduce the destruction of cartilage and bone mediated by an activated synovium, it was desirable to develop models that allow the dissection of cellular and molecular components derived from human tissue. The SCID mouse co-implantation model of human RA focuses on RA synovial fibroblasts (RA-SF) and their role in cartilage destruction. The model has provided the best evidence that RA-SF contribute significantly to matrix degradation, even in the absence of human lymphocytes and macrophages, since highly purified RA-SF invade the co-implanted normal human cartilage. Moreover, it became clear that they maintained their aggressive phenotype over long periods of time, particularly at sites of invasion into the co-implanted human cartilage. Targeting different signaling molecules, cytokines and matrix-degrading enzymes by soluble receptors, antagonists or negative mutants in the SCID mouse model of RA has implicated many of them in the mechanisms leading to cartilage destruction. However, since inhibition of a single molecule or pathway is not sufficient to inhibit the aggressive behavior of RA-SF it appears necessary to co-express in the synoviocytes genes for two or even more antagonists of e.g. cytokines, matrix-degrading enzymes or molecules interfering specifically with signaling pathways involved in the apoptosis of RA-SF. Based on the recent observation that the L1 (line-1) endogenous retroviral element appears responsible for the cytokine- independent activation via the MAPK p38delta, the current understanding of disease pathogenesis suggests that both the cytokine-dependent as well as the cytokine-independent pathways of joint destruction must be inhibited. Modulation of both pathways by gene

  9. Induction of psoriasiform inflammation by a bacterial superantigen in the SCID-hu xenogeneic transplantation model.

    PubMed

    Boehncke, W H; Zollner, T M; Dressel, D; Kaufmann, R

    1997-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic skin disease affecting about 2% of the Caucasian population, characterized by co-existing inflammation and epidermal hyperproliferation. A T-lymphocyte-mediated autoimmune reaction induced by bacterial superantigens might be central in its pathogenesis. To model psoriasiform inflammation, we transplanted clinically uninvolved skin from psoriatic patients onto SCID mice. Repetitive intradermal injections with a bacterial superantigen and simultaneous intraperitoneal injections with the patients superantigen-stimulated peripheral mononuclear blood cells resulted in an inflammatory reaction exhibiting some of the hallmarks of psoriasis, e.g. epidermal hyperproliferation, papillomatosis, focal neo-expression of ICAMI, and an exocytotic T-lymphocytic infiltrate characterized by the expression of the cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen. These observations document the potential of superantigens to trigger psoriasiform dermatitis and provide a model to study lymphocyte homing.

  10. Establishment of xenotransplantation model of human CN-AML with FLT3-ITD (mut) /NPM1 (-) in NOD/SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Shang, Zhen; Wang, Jue; Wang, Di; Xiao, Min; Li, Tong-juan; Wang, Na; Huang, Liang; Zhou, Jian-feng

    2013-06-01

    Patients with FLT3-ITD (mut) /NPM1 (-) cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML), as high-risk molecular group in CN-AML, are associated with a worse prognosis than other CN-AML patients. It is beneficial to generate xenotransplantation model of FLT3-ITD (mut) /NPM1 (-) CN-AML to better understand the pathogenesis and therapeutic strategies of such AML subtype. The purpose of present study was to establish the xenotransplantation model in NOD/SCID mice with FLT3-ITD (mut) /NPM1 (-) CN-AML primary cells. The FLT3-ITD (mut) /NPM1 (-) CN-AML primary cells from 3 of 7 cases were successfully transplanted into NOD/SCID mice, and human CD45 positive cells were detected in the peripheral blood, spleen and bone marrow of mice by using flow cytometry. Infiltration of human leukemia cells in various organs of mice was observed by using immunohistochemistry. Gene analysis confirmed sustained FLT3/ITD mutation without NPM1 mutation in mice. By performing serial transplantation, it was found that characteristics of the leukemia cells in secondary and tertiary generation models remained unchanged. Moreover, in vivo cytarabine administration could extend survival of NOD/SCID mice, which was consistent with clinical observation. In conclusion, we successfully established xenotransplantation model of human FLT3-ITD (mut) /NPM1 (-) CN-AML in NOD/SCID mice. The model was able to present primary disease and suitable to evaluate the curative effects of new drugs or therapy strategies.

  11. Restoration of human B-cell differentiation into NOD-SCID mice engrafted with gene-corrected CD34+ cells isolated from Artemis or RAG1-deficient patients.

    PubMed

    Lagresle-Peyrou, Chantal; Benjelloun, Fatine; Hue, Christophe; Andre-Schmutz, Isabelle; Bonhomme, Delphine; Forveille, Monique; Beldjord, Kheira; Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; De Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Charneau, Pierre; Durandy, Anne; Fischer, Alain; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina

    2008-02-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) caused by mutation of the recombination-activating gene 1 (RAG1) or Artemis gene lead to the absence of B- and T-cell differentiation. The only curative treatment is allogeneic bone marrow (BM) transplantation, which displays a high survival rate when an HLA compatible donor is available but has a poorer prognosis when the donor is partially compatible. Consequently, gene therapy may be a promising alternative strategy for these diseases. Here, we report that lentiviral gene-corrected BM CD34(+) cells (isolated from Artemis- or RAG1-deficient patients) sustain human B-cell differentiation following injection into non-obese diabetic/SCID (NOD-SCID) mice previously infused with anti-interleukin-2 receptor beta chain monoclonal antibody. In most of the mice BM, engrafted with Artemis-transduced cells, human B-cell differentiation occurred until the mature stage. The B cells were functional as human immunoglobulin M (IgM) was present in the serum. Following injection with RAG1-transduced cells, human engraftment occurred in vivo but B-cell differentiation until the mature stage was less frequent. However, when it occurred, it was always associated with human IgM production. This overall approach represents a useful tool for evaluating gene transfer efficiency in human SCID forms affecting B-cell development (such as Artemis deficiency) and for testing new vectors for improving in vivo RAG1 complementation.

  12. Outcome of xenografted fetal porcine pancreatic tissue is superior in inbred scid (C.B-17/Icr-scid/scid) compared to outbred nude (CD-1-nu/nu) mice.

    PubMed

    Tuch, B E; Casamento, F M

    1999-01-01

    Nude mice are used as recipients of foreign tissue because of their inability to reject these grafts. Our experience has been that there is variable rejection of fetal porcine insulin-producing tissue transplanted into CD-1 (athymic) outbred nude mice. To examine the suitability of this line of nude mouse as a recipient of the tissue, fetal porcine pancreas was grafted either into these outbred animals or into an inbred mutant strain of mice, the more immunocompromised severe combined immunodeficient (scid) mouse. Eight weeks after transplantation grafts were recovered from recipients and assayed for insulin content. Mean insulin levels were not significantly different between the two groups of mice, but a wider range of values was obtained from grafts recovered from nude (CD-1-nu/nu) mice. Reversal of diabetes in hyperglycemic recipients was achieved in 4 of 8 nude mice and 8 of 8 scid (C.B-17/lcr-scid/scid) mice. The time taken to achieve this was longer in the nudes than the scid mice, 121 +/- 12 vs. 44 +/- 2 days, the grafts increasing in size at a slower rate in the nude mice. Time taken for the weight of the grafts to double in size was 94 +/- 17 vs. 32 +/- 1 days, respectively. Histologically the grafts in the scid mice contained mostly epithelial cell clusters, a majority of which were insulin containing. In the nude mice that achieved normoglycemia, a similar pattern was observed and, as well, there was a localized lymphoid infiltrate. In those nude mice that remained diabetic fibrous tissue predominated together with a lymphoid infiltrate. In summary, fetal porcine pancreatic tissue grows and develops more efficiently when xenografted into scid rather than outbred nude mice.

  13. Morphological and biochemical characterization of a human liver in a uPA-SCID mouse chimera.

    PubMed

    Meuleman, Philip; Libbrecht, Louis; De Vos, Rita; de Hemptinne, Bernard; Gevaert, Kris; Vandekerckhove, Joël; Roskams, Tania; Leroux-Roels, Geert

    2005-04-01

    A small animal model harboring a functional human liver cell xenograft would be a useful tool to study human liver cell biology, drug metabolism, and infections with hepatotropic viruses. Here we describe the repopulation, organization, and function of human hepatocytes in a mouse recipient and the infections with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) of the transplanted cells. Homozygous urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA)-SCID mice underwent transplantation with primary human hepatocytes, and at different times animals were bled and sacrificed to analyze plasma and liver tissue, respectively. The plasma of mice that were successfully transplanted contained albumin and an additional 21 human proteins. Liver histology showed progressive and massive replacement of diseased mouse tissue by human hepatocytes. These cells were accumulating glycogen but appeared otherwise normal and showed no signs of damage or death. They formed functional bile canaliculi that connected to mouse canaliculi. Besides mature hepatocytes, human hepatic progenitor cells that were differentiating into mature hepatocytes could be identified within liver parenchyma. Infection of chimeric mice with HBV or HCV resulted in an active infection that did not alter the liver function and architecture. Electron microscopy showed the presence of viral and subviral structures in HBV infected hepatocytes. In conclusion, human hepatocytes repopulate the uPA(+/+)-SCID mouse liver in a very organized fashion with preservation of normal cell function. The presence of human hepatic progenitor cells in these chimeric animals necessitates a critical review of the observations and conclusions made in experiments with isolated "mature" hepatocytes. Supplementary material for this article can be found on the HEPATOLOGY website (http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/0270-9139/suppmat/index.html).

  14. Biochemical and genetic defects in the DNA-dependent protein kinase in murine scid lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Danska, J S; Holland, D P; Mariathasan, S; Williams, K M; Guidos, C J

    1996-01-01

    The scid gene product has been identified as the 460-kDa catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs p460), a member of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase family. DNA-PK activity is undetectable in scid cells, but the molecular basis for this defect has not been identified. Here we report that expression of p460 in scid lymphocyte precursors is detectable but is reduced at least 10-fold relative to that in wild-type lymphocytes. In addition, we show that the scid mutation disturbs p460 nuclear association, presumably affecting its role in DNA repair pathways. To examine the molecular basis for our observations, we used a degenerate PCR strategy to clone the C-terminal p460 kinase domain from wild-type and scid thymocytes. Northern (RNA) analysis with these probes revealed normal steady-state p460 mRNA levels in scid cells, suggesting that the reduced abundance of p460 protein is due to a posttranscriptional defect. Sequence comparisons identified a single-base-pair alteration in the scid C-terminal p460 kinase domain, resulting in a premature stop codon. This mutation is predicted to truncate p460 by approximately 8 kDa, but it preserves the conserved motifs required for kinase activity in members of the phosphoinositidyl 3-kinase family. Despite a computed molecular weight alteration of less than 2%, we were able to visualize this difference by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis of wild-type and scid p460. These data demonstrate that the scid DNA-PKes mutation is not a null allele and suggest a molecular rationale for the well-described leakiness of the scid phenotype. PMID:8816463

  15. NK cells are intrinsically functional in pigs with Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) caused by spontaneous mutations in the Artemis gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have identified Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) in a line of Yorkshire pigs at Iowa State University. These SCID pigs lack B-cells and T-cells, but possess Natural Killer (NK) cells. This SCID phenotype is caused by recessive mutations in the Artemis gene. Interestingly, two human tumor c...

  16. Gene Therapy for "Bubble Boy" Disease.

    PubMed

    Hoggatt, Jonathan

    2016-07-14

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency results in the accumulation of toxic metabolites that destroy the immune system, causing severe combined immunodeficiency (ADA-SCID), often referred to as the "bubble boy" disease. Strimvelis is a European Medicines Agency approved gene therapy for ADA-SCID patients without a suitable bone marrow donor.

  17. Differential post-surgical metastasis and survival in SCID, NOD-SCID and NOD-SCID-IL-2Rγ(null) mice with parental and subline variants of human breast cancer: implications for host defense mechanisms regulating metastasis.

    PubMed

    Milsom, Chloe C; Lee, Christina R; Hackl, Christina; Man, Shan; Kerbel, Robert S

    2013-01-01

    We compare for the first time, the metastatic aggressiveness of the parental MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line and two luciferase-tagged in vivo-derived and selected pro-metastatic variants (LM2-4/luc⁺ and 164/8-1B/luc⁺ in SCID, NOD-SCID and NOD-SCID-IL-2Rγ(null) (NSG) mice following orthotopic implantation and primary tumour resection. The variants are known to be more aggressively metastatic in SCID mice, compared to the parental line which has limited spontaneous metastatic competence in these mice. When 2×10⁶ cells were injected into the mammary fat pad, the growth of the resultant primary tumours was identical for the various cell lines in the three strains of mice. However, metastatic spread of all three cell lines, including the MDA-MB-231 parental cell line, was strikingly more aggressive in the highly immunocompromised NSG mice compared to both NOD-SCID and SCID mice, resulting in extensive multi-organ metastases and a significant reduction in overall survival. While these studies were facilitated by monitoring post-surgical spontaneous metastases using whole body bioluminescence imaging, we observed that the luciferase-tagged parental line showed altered growth and diminished metastatic properties compared to its untagged counterpart. Our results are the first to show that host immunity can have a profound impact on the spread of spontaneous visceral metastases and survival following resection of a primary tumour in circumstances where the growth of primary tumours is not similarly affected; as such they highlight the importance of immunity in the metastatic process, and by extension, suggest certain therapeutic strategies that may have a significant impact on reducing metastasis.

  18. Differential Post-Surgical Metastasis and Survival in SCID, NOD-SCID and NOD-SCID-IL-2Rγnull Mice with Parental and Subline Variants of Human Breast Cancer: Implications for Host Defense Mechanisms Regulating Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Milsom, Chloe C.; Lee, Christina R.; Hackl, Christina; Man, Shan; Kerbel, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    We compare for the first time, the metastatic aggressiveness of the parental MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line and two luciferase-tagged in vivo-derived and selected pro-metastatic variants (LM2-4/luc+ and 164/8-1B/luc+) in SCID, NOD-SCID and NOD-SCID-IL-2Rγnull (NSG) mice following orthotopic implantation and primary tumour resection. The variants are known to be more aggressively metastatic in SCID mice, compared to the parental line which has limited spontaneous metastatic competence in these mice. When 2×106 cells were injected into the mammary fat pad, the growth of the resultant primary tumours was identical for the various cell lines in the three strains of mice. However, metastatic spread of all three cell lines, including the MDA-MB-231 parental cell line, was strikingly more aggressive in the highly immunocompromised NSG mice compared to both NOD-SCID and SCID mice, resulting in extensive multi-organ metastases and a significant reduction in overall survival. While these studies were facilitated by monitoring post-surgical spontaneous metastases using whole body bioluminescence imaging, we observed that the luciferase-tagged parental line showed altered growth and diminished metastatic properties compared to its untagged counterpart. Our results are the first to show that host immunity can have a profound impact on the spread of spontaneous visceral metastases and survival following resection of a primary tumour in circumstances where the growth of primary tumours is not similarly affected; as such they highlight the importance of immunity in the metastatic process, and by extension, suggest certain therapeutic strategies that may have a significant impact on reducing metastasis. PMID:23967178

  19. Generation of Pediatric Leukemia Xenograft Models in NSG-B2m Mice: Comparison with NOD/SCID Mice.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnapillai, Anilkumar; Kolb, E Anders; Dhanan, Priyanka; Bojja, Aruna Sri; Mason, Robert W; Corao, Diana; Barwe, Sonali P

    2016-01-01

    Generation of orthotopic xenograft mouse models of leukemia is important to understand the mechanisms of leukemogenesis, cancer progression, its cross talk with the bone marrow microenvironment, and for preclinical evaluation of drugs. In these models, following intravenous injection, leukemic cells home to the bone marrow and proliferate there before infiltrating other organs, such as spleen, liver, and the central nervous system. Moreover, such models have been shown to accurately recapitulate the human disease and correlate with patient response to therapy and prognosis. Thus, various immune-deficient mice strains have been used with or without recipient preconditioning to increase engraftment efficiency. Mice homozygous for the severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) mutation and with non-obese diabetic background (NOD/SCID) have been used in the majority of leukemia xenograft studies. Later, NOD/SCID mice deficient for interleukin 2 receptor gamma chain (IL2Rγ) gene called NSG mice became the model of choice for leukemia xenografts. However, engraftment of leukemia cells without irradiation preconditioning still remained a challenge. In this study, we used NSG mice with null alleles for major histocompatibility complex class I beta2-microglobulin (β2m) called NSG-B2m. This is a first report describing the 100% engraftment efficiency of pediatric leukemia cell lines and primary samples in NSG-B2m mice in the absence of host preconditioning by sublethal irradiation. We also show direct comparison of the engraftment efficiency and growth rate of pediatric acute leukemia cells in NSG-B2m and NOD/SCID mice, which showed 80-90% engraftment efficiency. Secondary and tertiary xenografts in NSG-B2m mice generated by injection of cells isolated from the spleens of leukemia-bearing mice also behaved similar to the primary patient sample. We have successfully engrafted 25 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 5 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patient samples with

  20. Sustaining expression of B domain-deleted human factor VIII mediated by using lentiviral vectors in NOD/SCID mouse.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Jie; Chen, Chong; Zeng, Ling-Yu; Cao, Jiang; Xu, Kai-Lin

    2012-06-01

    Recently, gene therapy has been become a promising approach to cure hemophilia A, a most common recessive bleeding disease. The aim of this study was to determine the perspective of lentiviral vector in hemophilia A gene therapy in vitro and in NOD/SCID mice. Lentivirus transfer vector pXZ9/BDDFVIII containing human B-domain-deleted Factor VIII-IRES-eGFP coding sequence and mock control pXZ9 were constructed. Lentivirus was prepared by co-transfecting 3 plasmids into 293FT cells. 293FT, HLF, human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and Chang-liver cells were transfected with the prepared virus. Coagulant activity of human FVIII, human FVIII antigen, human FVIII mRNA transcription and genomic integration were assayed by ELISA, one-step method, RT-PCR and PCR after infection. Lentiviral particles were concentrated by ultracentrifugation and NOD/SCID mice were transfected via portal vein injection. Human FVIII antigen in mouse blood plasma was analyzed by ELISA. eGFP expression was observed by fluorescent microscopy and human FVIII transcription in mouse liver was analyzed by RT-PCR at one month after transduction. The results showed that the high titer of recombinant virus was prepared and used to efficiently transduce the target cells in vitro. At 72 h after transfection, high levels of FVIII activity and FVIII antigen were detected. Human FVIII gene transcription could be detected in the liver of NOD/SCID mice received lentiviral particles carrying FVIII gene. Mouse hepatocytes were transfected with recombinant lentivirus efficiently in vivo. Human FVIII level in mouse blood plasma reached to (49 ± 6) mU, (54 ± 8) mU and (23 ± 4) mU at 72 h, one week and one month after transfection respectively. It is concluded that the lentiviral particles carrying BDDhFVIII gene can high efficiently transfect the target cells both in vitro and in vivo, and the transfected target cells can secrete hFVIII efficiently. The sustained expression of human FVIII in NOD/SCID mice is

  1. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R (SCID). I: History, rationale, and description.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, R L; Williams, J B; Gibbon, M; First, M B

    1992-08-01

    The history, rationale, and development of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R (SCID) is described. The SCID is a semistructured interview for making the major Axis I DSM-III-R diagnoses. It is administered by a clinician and includes an introductory overview followed by nine modules, seven of which represent the major axis I diagnostic classes. Because of its modular construction, it can be adapted for use in studies in which particular diagnoses are not of interest. Using a decision tree approach, the SCID guides the clinician in testing diagnostic hypotheses as the interview is conducted. The output of the SCID is a record of the presence or absence of each of the disorders being considered, for current episode (past month) and for lifetime occurrence.

  2. A severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model for infection with Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We used severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice to study resistance to invasive infection with Entamoeba histolytica. Seven of seven SCID mice developed liver abscesses when challenged intrahepatically with virulent HM1:IMSS strain E. histolytica trophozoites. Only one of seven similarly challenged immunocompetent congenic C.B-17 mice developed an abscess. Adoptive transfer of polyclonal rabbit anti-E. histolytica antiserum, but not preimmune rabbit serum, completely protected 7 of 12 SCID mice from intrahepatic challenge with ameba. These results demonstrate that lymphocyte-based immunity is important in protection against amebic liver abscess, and that anti-E. histolytica antibody can protect against amebic infection in this system. The SCID mouse may provide a powerful model for studying the components of protective immunity to invasive amebiasis. PMID:1460420

  3. Evaluation of ADA gene expression and transduction efficiency in ADA/SCID patients undergoing gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Carlucci, F; Tabucchi, A; Aiuti, A; Rosi, F; Floccari, F; Pagani, R; Marinello, E

    2004-10-01

    A capillary electrophoresis (CE) method was developed for ADA/SCID diagnosis and monitoring of enzyme replacement therapy, as well as for exploring the transfection efficiency for different retroviral vectors in gene therapy.

  4. From Murine to Human Nude/SCID: The Thymus, T-Cell Development and the Missing Link

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Rosa; Palamaro, Loredana; Fusco, Anna; Iannace, Leucio; Maio, Stefano; Vigliano, Ilaria; Giardino, Giuliana; Pignata, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) are disorders of the immune system, which lead to increased susceptibility to infections. T-cell defects, which may affect T-cell development/function, are approximately 11% of reported PIDs. The pathogenic mechanisms are related to molecular alterations not only of genes selectively expressed in hematopoietic cells but also of the stromal component of the thymus that represents the primary lymphoid organ for T-cell differentiation. With this regard, the prototype of athymic disorders due to abnormal stroma is the Nude/SCID syndrome, first described in mice in 1966. In man, the DiGeorge Syndrome (DGS) has long been considered the human prototype of a severe T-cell differentiation defect. More recently, the human equivalent of the murine Nude/SCID has been described, contributing to unravel important issues of the T-cell ontogeny in humans. Both mice and human diseases are due to alterations of the FOXN1, a developmentally regulated transcription factor selectively expressed in skin and thymic epithelia. PMID:22474479

  5. Generation of Knockout Rats with X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (X-SCID) Using Zinc-Finger Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Mashimo, Tomoji; Takizawa, Akiko; Voigt, Birger; Yoshimi, Kazuto; Hiai, Hiroshi; Kuramoto, Takashi; Serikawa, Tadao

    2010-01-01

    Background Although the rat is extensively used as a laboratory model, the inability to utilize germ line-competent rat embryonic stem (ES) cells has been a major drawback for studies that aim to elucidate gene functions. Recently, zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) were successfully used to create genome-specific double-stranded breaks and thereby induce targeted gene mutations in a wide variety of organisms including plants, drosophila, zebrafish, etc. Methodology/Principal Findings We report here on ZFN-induced gene targeting of the rat interleukin 2 receptor gamma (Il2rg) locus, where orthologous human and mouse mutations cause X-linked severe combined immune deficiency (X-SCID). Co-injection of mRNAs encoding custom-designed ZFNs into the pronucleus of fertilized oocytes yielded genetically modified offspring at rates greater than 20%, which possessed a wide variety of deletion/insertion mutations. ZFN-modified founders faithfully transmitted their genetic changes to the next generation along with the severe combined immune deficiency phenotype. Conclusions and Significance The efficient and rapid generation of gene knockout rats shows that using ZFN technology is a new strategy for creating gene-targeted rat models of human diseases. In addition, the X-SCID rats that were established in this study will be valuable in vivo tools for evaluating drug treatment or gene therapy as well as model systems for examining the treatment of xenotransplanted malignancies. PMID:20111598

  6. Pegademase bovine (PEG-ADA) for the treatment of infants and children with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Claire; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2009-01-01

    Adenosine deaminase deficiency (ADA) is a rare, inherited disorder of purine metabolism characterized by immunodeficiency, failure to thrive and metabolic abnormalities. A lack of the enzyme ADA allows accumulation of toxic metabolites causing defects of both cell mediated and humoral immunity leading to ADA severe combined immune deficiency (SCID), a condition that can be fatal in early infancy if left untreated. Hematopoietic stem cell transplant is curative but is dependent on a good donor match. Other therapeutic options include enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with pegademase bovine (PEG-ADA) and more recently gene therapy. PEG-ADA has been used in over 150 patients worldwide and has allowed stabilization of patients awaiting more definitive treatment with hematopoietic stem cell transplant. It affords both metabolic detoxification and protective immune function with patients remaining clinically well, but immune reconstitution is often suboptimal and may not be long lived. We discuss the pharmacokinetics, immune reconstitution, effects on systemic disease and side effects of treatment with PEG-ADA. We also review the long-term outcome of patients receiving ERT and discuss the role of PEG-ADA in the management of infants and children with ADA-SCID, alongside other therapeutic options. PMID:19707420

  7. NOD/Shi-scid IL2rgamma(null) (NOG) mice more appropriate for humanized mouse models.

    PubMed

    Ito, M; Kobayashi, K; Nakahata, T

    2008-01-01

    "Humanized mice," in which various kinds of human cells and tissues can be engrafted and retain the same functions as in humans, are extremely useful because human diseases can be studied directly. Using the newly combined immunodeficient NOD-scid IL2rgamma(null) mice and Rag2(null) IL2rgamma(null) humanized mice, it has became possible to expand applications because various hematopoietic cells can be differentiated by human hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and the human immune system can be reconstituted to some degree. This work has attracted attention worldwide, but the development and use of immunodeficient mice in Japan are not very well known or understood. This review describes the history and characteristics of the NOD/Shi-scid IL2rgamma(null) (NOG) and BALB/cA-Rag2(null) IL2rgamma(null) mice that were established in Japan, including our unpublished data from researchers who are currently using these mice. In addition, we also describe the potential development of new immunodeficient mice that can be used as humanized mice in the future.

  8. Pegademase bovine (PEG-ADA) for the treatment of infants and children with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID).

    PubMed

    Booth, Claire; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2009-01-01

    Adenosine deaminase deficiency (ADA) is a rare, inherited disorder of purine metabolism characterized by immunodeficiency, failure to thrive and metabolic abnormalities. A lack of the enzyme ADA allows accumulation of toxic metabolites causing defects of both cell mediated and humoral immunity leading to ADA severe combined immune deficiency (SCID), a condition that can be fatal in early infancy if left untreated. Hematopoietic stem cell transplant is curative but is dependent on a good donor match. Other therapeutic options include enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with pegademase bovine (PEG-ADA) and more recently gene therapy. PEG-ADA has been used in over 150 patients worldwide and has allowed stabilization of patients awaiting more definitive treatment with hematopoietic stem cell transplant. It affords both metabolic detoxification and protective immune function with patients remaining clinically well, but immune reconstitution is often suboptimal and may not be long lived. We discuss the pharmacokinetics, immune reconstitution, effects on systemic disease and side effects of treatment with PEG-ADA. We also review the long-term outcome of patients receiving ERT and discuss the role of PEG-ADA in the management of infants and children with ADA-SCID, alongside other therapeutic options.

  9. Successful reconstitution of immunity in ADA-SCID by stem cell gene therapy following cessation of PEG-ADA and use of mild preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, H Bobby; Bjorkegren, Emma; Parsley, Kate; Gilmour, Kimberly C; King, Doug; Sinclair, Joanna; Zhang, Fang; Giannakopoulos, Aris; Adams, Stuart; Fairbanks, Lynette D; Gaspar, Jane; Henderson, Lesley; Xu-Bayford, Jin Hua; Davies, E Graham; Veys, Paul A; Kinnon, Christine; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2006-10-01

    Gene therapy is a promising treatment option for monogenic diseases, but success has been seen in only a handful of studies thus far. We now document successful reconstitution of immune function in a child with the adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient form of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) following hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy. An ADA-SCID child who showed a poor response to PEG-ADA enzyme replacement was enrolled into the clinical study. Following cessation of enzyme replacement therapy, autologous CD34(+) HSCs were transduced with an ADA-expressing gammaretroviral vector. Gene-modified cells were reinfused following one dose of preconditioning chemotherapy. Two years after the procedure, immunological and biochemical correction has been maintained with progressive increase in lymphocyte numbers, reinitiation of thymopoiesis, and systemic detoxification of ADA metabolites. Sustained vector marking with detection of polyclonal vector integration sites in multiple cell lineages and detection of ADA activity in red blood cells suggests transduction of early hematopoietic progenitors. No serious side effects were seen either as a result of the conditioning procedure or due to retroviral insertion. Gene therapy is an effective treatment option for the treatment of ADA-SCID.

  10. Long-term survival and late deaths after hematopoietic cell transplantation for primary immunodeficiency diseases and inborn errors of metabolism.

    PubMed

    Eapen, Mary; Ahn, Kwang Woo; Orchard, Paul J; Cowan, Morton J; Davies, Stella M; Fasth, Anders; Hassebroek, Anna; Ayas, Mouhab; Bonfim, Carmem; O'Brien, Tracey A; Gross, Thomas G; Horwitz, Mitchell; Horwitz, Edwin; Kapoor, Neena; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Majhail, Navneet; Ringden, Olle; Szabolcs, Paul; Veys, Paul; Baker, K Scott

    2012-09-01

    It is uncertain whether late mortality rates after hematopoietic cell transplantation for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), non-SCID primary immunodeficiency diseases (non-SCID PIDD), and inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) return to rates observed in the general population, matched for age, sex, and nationality. We studied patients with SCID (n = 201), non-SCID PIDD (n = 405), and IEM (n = 348) who survived for at least 2 years after transplantation with normal T cell function (SCID) or >95% donor chimerism (non-SCID PIDD and IEM). Importantly, mortality rate was significantly higher in these patients compared with the general population for several years after transplantation. The rate decreased toward the normal rate in patients with SCID and non-SCID PIDD beyond 6 years after transplantation, but not in patients with IEM. Active chronic graft-versus-host disease at 2 years was associated with increased risk of late mortality for all diseases (hazard ratio [HR], 1.87; P = .05). In addition, late mortality was higher in patients with non-SCID PIDD who received T cell-depleted grafts (HR 4.16; P = .007) and in patients with IEM who received unrelated donor grafts (HR, 2.72; P = .03) or mismatched related donor grafts (HR, 3.76; P = .01). The finding of higher mortality rates in these long-term survivors for many years after transplantation confirms the need for long-term surveillance.

  11. SCID mice containing muscle with human mitochondrial DNA mutations. An animal model for mitochondrial DNA defects.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, K M; Watt, D J; Lightowlers, R N; Johnson, M A; Relvas, J B; Taanman, J W; Turnbull, D M

    1998-01-01

    Defects of the mitochondrial genome are important causes of disease. Despite major advances in our investigation of patients, there is no effective therapy. Progress in this area is limited by the absence of any animal models in which we can evaluate treatment. To develop such a model we have injected human myoblasts into the tibialis anterior of SCID mice after inducing necrosis. After injection of normal human myoblasts, regenerating fibers expressed human beta-spectrin, confirming they were derived from fusion of human myoblasts. The stability of the muscle fibers was inferred by demonstrating the formation of motor end plates on the regenerating fibers. In addition, we show the presence of human cytochrome c oxidase subunit II, which is encoded by the mitochondrial genome, in the regenerated fibers. After injection of human myoblasts containing either the A8344G or the T8993C heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA mutations, human beta-spectrin positive fibers were found to contain the mutation at a similar level to the injected myoblasts. These studies highlight the potential value of this model for the study of mitochondrial DNA defects. PMID:9854044

  12. Raman spectroscopy for in situ- evaluation of high-grade malignant gliomas induced in SCID mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clary, Candace E.; Dergachev, Alex Y.; Mirov, Sergey B.; Gillespie, G. Yancey

    1997-05-01

    Each year, more people at younger ages are diagnosed with primary brain tumors. Current histological discrimination between normal and diseased tissue occurs after tissue excision. A reliable optical biopsy for open craniotomy would optimize the amount and types of tissue removal by making an accurate evaluation before excision. The presented work is part of a study investigating the clinical diagnostic potential of Raman spectroscopy for gliomas. It has been shown that the optical properties of in vitro tissue are strongly dependent upon sample preparation. The investigation of the effects of time latency, paraformalin tissue fixation, and tissue perfusion with carbogen-bubbled cortical transport solution on their respective Raman spectra of brain tissue and tumors will be discussed, as well as their implications on the study of neurological tissue. The studies are conducted with in situ tissue samples from scid mice and 785 nm pulsed alexandrite laser excitation. Results illustrating positive qualitative and quantitative variations between Raman spectra of normal and malignant brain tissue will be presented.

  13. Cystic metacestodes of a rat-adapted Taenia taeniaeformis established in the peritoneal cavity of scid and nude mice.

    PubMed

    Ito, A; Ma, L; Sato, Y

    1997-08-01

    In vitro-hatched (but not activated) oncospheres of a rat-adapted strain of Taenia taeniaeformis intraperitoneally inoculated into severe combined immunodeficiency (scid), congenitally athymic (nude) and immunocompetent (normal) female BALB/c mice developed into cystic metacestodes in the peritoneal cavity (but not in the liver) of scid and nude mice exclusively. This suggests that cystic metacestodes of this parasite, usually harboured in the liver only, can establish in scid and nude mice provided that the oncospheres are inoculated into the peritoneal cavity. Immunodeficient mice, especially scid mice, may be a good experimental animal model for the intermediate host of any taeniid species, of human, domestic- or wild-animal origin.

  14. Spectrum of mutations in a cohort of UK patients with ADA deficient SCID: Segregation of genotypes with specific ethnicities.

    PubMed

    Adams, Stuart P; Wilson, Melanie; Harb, Elissar; Fairbanks, Lynette; Xu-Bayford, Jinhua; Brown, Lucie; Kearney, Laura; Madkaikar, Manisha; Bobby Gaspar, H

    2015-12-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) arises from a number of different genetic defects, one of the most common being mutations in the gene encoding adenosine deaminase (ADA). In the UK, ADA deficient SCID compromises approximately 20% of all known cases of SCID. We carried out a retrospective analysis of the ADA gene in 46 known ADA deficient SCID patients on whom DNA had been stored. Here, we report a high frequency of two previously reported mutations and provide a link between the mutations and patient ethnicity within our patient cohort. We also report on 9 novel mutations that have been previously unreported.

  15. Prednisolone reduces experimental arthritis, and inflammatory tissue destruction in SCID mice infected with Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Hurtenbach, U; Böggemeyer, E; Stehle, T; Museteanu, C; Del Pozo, E; Simon, M M

    1996-05-01

    Glucocorticosteroids (GC) are widely used as anti-inflammatory agents. The effects of Prednisolone on the development of Borrelia (B.) burgdorferi-induced clinical arthritis and organ inflammation was studied in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. The drug was administered orally at a dose of 3, 10 and 30 mg/kg, starting shortly before experimental infection of the mice. A dose dependent inhibition of arthritic joint swelling was observed. Full protection was obtained with 30 mg/kg until 21 days after infection, subsequently, mild joint swelling developed but progression and severity of the disease was considerably less than in the other treated as well as in the untreated mice. Inhibition of clinical arthritis coincided with reduction of inflammatory cell infiltration in the joints, liver and muscle. Prednisolone was ineffective when application was initiated after arthritis was fully developed, i.e., 22 days after infection. Since the activated endothelium plays a critical role in development of inflammatory lesions, the expression of the cellular adhesion molecules (CAMs) E-selectin, P-selectin, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 was determined in vitro using the bEnd3 endothelial cell line. Stimulation with a sonicated B. burgdorferi preparation in the presence of the water-soluble compound Prednisolone-21-hemisuccinate considerably reduced expression of ICAM-1, and marginally also of E-selectin, whereas the level of P-selectin and VCAM-1 remained unaltered. Thus, downregulation of ICAM-1 might be a critical factor in Prednisolone-mediated inhibition of B. burgdorferi-induced inflammation; the flare up of the disease after the initial protection indicates that additional therapy, e.g. with antibiotics, is necessary.

  16. Gene Therapy for Diseases and Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... notable advancements are the following: Gene Therapy for Genetic Disorders Severe Combined Immune Deficiency (ADA-SCID) ADA- ... in preclinical animal models of this disease. Other genetic disorders After many years of laboratory and preclinical ...

  17. Pathological features of Cryptosporidium andersoni-induced lesions in SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Masuno, Koichi; Yanai, Tokuma; Sakai, Hiroki; Satoh, Masaaki; Kai, Chieko; Nakai, Yutaka

    2013-07-01

    To assess the infectivity and the istopathological features of Cryptosporidium andersoni (C. andersoni) in laboratory animals, SCID mice were orally inoculated with oocysts of C. andersoni. Starting one week after inoculation, the SCID mice began shedding oocysts, and this continued for ten weeks. Histopathologically, myriads of C. andersoni were observed on the apical surface of the epithelium in the gastric pit of the glandular stomach. There were few lesions in the gastric epithelium except C. andersoni adhesion. In the lamina propria of the affected mucosa, minimum infiltration of inflammatory cells was observed. Immunohistochemically, C. andersoni demonstrated a positive reaction to a number of primary antibodies of Cryptosporidium parvum. In the experiment described here, few increases were seen in apoptotic epithelial cells in the affected mucosas of the SCID mice, and the nuclear augmentation was not enhanced. It was hypothesized that the absence of apoptosis and cell division were due to a lack of inflammatory cell reaction in the lamina propria.

  18. Influence of human myasthenia gravis thymus on the differentiation of human cord blood stem cells in SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian Ru; Liu, Ping Ping; Xuan, Xiao Yan; Guan, Sha Sha; Du, Ying; Gao, Feng; Zhang, Qing Yong

    2014-02-01

    The normal thymus contributes to T lymphocytes differentiation and induction of tolerance to self-antigens. Myasthenia gravis (MG) is characterized by abnormal thymic hyperplasia. To assess the potential influence of MG-thymus on the differentiation of T lymphocytes differentiation, we used the MG-thymus transplanted severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice model to evaluate the human cord blood stem cells differentiation. Thymus fragments from MG patient and human cord blood stem cells were transplanted into SCID mice successively. SCID mice were observed to develop sustained human T lymphocytes and a functional anti-tumor immune. The levels of various T cell subsets in SCID mice with MG-thymus were different from that of control group. Among that, the frequency of CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells was significant lower in SCID mice with MG-thymus. The deficiency of CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells seens to contribute to the pathogenesis of MG.

  19. Highly potent anti-CD20-RLI immunocytokine targeting established human B lymphoma in SCID mouse

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Marie; Teppaz, Géraldine; Lajoie, Laurie; Solé, Véronique; Bessard, Anne; Maillasson, Mike; Loisel, Séverine; Béchard, David; Clémenceau, Béatrice; Thibault, Gilles; Garrigue-Antar, Laure; Jacques, Yannick; Quéméner, Agnès

    2014-01-01

    Rituximab (RTX), a chimeric IgG1 monoclonal antibody directed against the CD20 antigen, has revolutionized the treatment of B-cell malignancies. Nevertheless, the relapsed/refractory rates are still high. One strategy to increase the clinical effectiveness of RTX is based on antibody-cytokine fusion protein (immunocytokine; ICK) vectorizing together at the tumor site the antibody effector activities and the cytokine co-signal required for the generation of cytotoxic cellular immunity. Such ICKs linking various antibody formats to interleukin (IL)-2 are currently being investigated in clinical trials and have shown promising results in cancer therapies. IL-15, a structurally-related cytokine, is now considered as having a better potential than IL-2 in antitumor immunotherapeutic strategies. We have previously engineered the fusion protein RLI, linking a soluble form of human IL-15Rα-sushi+ domain to human IL-15. Compared with IL-15, RLI displayed better biological activities in vitro and higher antitumor effects in vivo in murine and human cancer models. In this study, we investigated the advantages of fusing RLI to RTX. Anti-CD20-RLI kept its binding capacity to CD20, CD16 and IL-15 receptor and therefore fully retained both antibody effector functions (ADCC and CDC), and the cytokine potential of RLI. In a severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse model of disseminated residual lymphoma, anti-CD20-RLI was found to induce long-term survival of 90% of mice up to at least 120 days whereas RLI and RTX, alone or in combination, just delayed the disease onset (100% of death at 28, 40 and 51 days respectively). These findings suggest that such ICK could improve the clinical efficacy of RTX, particularly in patients with refractory B-cell lymphoma. PMID:25072059

  20. Effects of fission neutrons on human thyroid tissues maintained in SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Shigeki; Ryo, Haruko; Hongyo, Tadashi; Nakajima, Hiroo; Tsuboi-Kikuya, Rie; Tokita, Yoriko; Matsuzuka, Fumio; Hiramatsu, Keizo; Fujikawa, Kazuo; Itoh, Tetsuo; Nomura, Taisei

    2010-02-01

    Morphology and function (secretion of thyroid hormone) of human thyroid tissues from Graves' disease patients are well maintained in C57BL/6J-scid mice. Serum level of thyroid hormone was reduced by fission neutrons from the nuclear reactor UTR-KINKI, and changes in thyroid hormone by fission neutrons were bigger than those by low LET radiations, X-rays and (137)Cs gamma-rays, suggesting high relative biological effectiveness (RBE; 6.5) of fission neutrons. Microarray analyses revealed that about 3% of genes showed more than 4-fold change in gene expression in the unexposed thyroid tissues against surgically resected thyroid tissues from the same patient, probably due to the difficult oxygen and nutrient supply shortly after transplantation. Dose-dependent changes in gene expression against unexposed concurrent controls were observed with increasing doses of fission neutrons (0.2-0.6Gy) and (137)Cs gamma-rays (1.0-3.0Gy) and showed high RBE (4.2). Furthermore, there were some specific genes which showed more than 4-fold change in gene expression in all the thyroid tissues exposed to higher doses of radiation, especially neutrons (0.4 and 0.6Gy), but none at lower doses (0.2Gy of neutrons and 1.0 and 2.0Gy of gamma-rays). These genes related to degeneration, regeneration, apoptosis, and transcription, respond specifically and very sensitively to neutron injury in human thyroid tissues. This is the first experimental report that fission neutrons can induce some morphological and functional disorders in human tissues, showing high RBE against gamma-ray exposure. These results are useful to evaluate the risks of fission neutrons and cosmic rays to humans.

  1. Arthritogenic T cells drive the recovery of autoantibody-producing B cell homeostasis and the adoptive transfer of arthritis in SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Kis-Toth, Katalin; Radacs, Marianna; Olasz, Katalin; van Eden, Willem; Mikecz, Katalin; Glant, Tibor T

    2012-08-01

    T cells orchestrate joint inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but B cells/B cell-derived factors are also involved in disease pathogenesis. The goal of this study was to understand the role of antigen-specific T and B cells in the pathological events of arthritis, which is impossible to study in humans due to the small number of antigen-specific cells. To determine the significance of antigen-specific lymphocytes and antibodies in the development of an autoimmune mouse model of RA, we generated TCR transgenic (TCR-Tg) mice specific for the dominant arthritogenic epitope of cartilage proteoglycan (PG) and performed a series of combined transfers of T cells, B cells and autoantibodies into BALB/c.Scid mice. The adoptive transfer of highly purified T cells from naive TCR-Tg, arthritic TCR-Tg or arthritic wild-type mice induced arthritis in SCID recipients, but the onset and severity of the disease were dependent on the sequential events of the T cell-supported reconstitution of PG-specific B cells and autoantibodies. The presence of activated PG-specific T cells was critical for disease induction, establishing a unique milieu for the selective homeostasis of autoantibody-producing B cells. In this permissive environment, anti-PG autoantibodies bound to cartilage and induced activation of the complement cascade, leading to irreversible cartilage destruction in affected joints. These findings may lead to a better understanding of the complex molecular and cellular mechanisms of RA.

  2. A novel SCID mouse model for studying spontaneous metastasis of human lung cancer to human tissue.

    PubMed

    Teraoka, S; Kyoizumi, S; Seyama, T; Yamakido, M; Akiyama, M

    1995-05-01

    We established a novel severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model for the study of human lung cancer metastasis to human lung. Implantation of both human fetal and adult lung tissue into mammary fat pads of SCID mice showed a 100% rate of engraftment, but only fetal lung implants revealed normal morphology of human lung tissue. Using these chimeric mice, we analyzed human lung cancer metastasis to both mouse and human lungs by subcutaneous inoculation of human squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma cell lines into the mice. In 60 to 70% of SCID mice injected with human-lung squamous-cell carcinoma, RERF-LC-AI, cancer cells were found to have metastasized to both mouse lungs and human fetal lung implants but not to human adult lung implants 80 days after cancer inoculation. Furthermore, human-lung adenocarcinoma cells, RERF-LC-KJ, metastasized to the human lung implants within 90 days in about 40% of SCID mice, whereas there were no metastases to the lungs of the mice. These results demonstrate the potential of this model for the in vivo study of human lung cancer metastasis.

  3. The Bo-RBC-SCID mouse model for evaluating the efficacy of anti-theilerial drugs.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, K; Tsuji, M; Ishihara, C; Tajima, M; Kurosawa, T; Iwai, H; Takahashi, K

    1993-02-01

    We have previously developed a mouse model which allowed the proliferation of Theileria sergenti in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice with circulating bovine erythrocytes (Bo-RBC). In the present study, this model was utilized to test the efficacy of anti-theilerial drugs. Bo-RBC-SCID mice were created by giving periodic transfusions of T. sergenti-free Bo-RBC, and subsequently infecting with T. sergenti. Three anti-protozoal compounds, Pamaquine (Yamanouchi Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd), Ganaseg (Japan CIBA-GEIGY Ltd) and Buparvaquone (Coopers Animal Health Ltd), were subcutaneously administered into the mice at doses recommended for cattle therapy. Blood examinations demonstrated that all three drugs significantly reduced the level of parasitemia although Ganaseg was effective only at a dose five times higher than that recommended for cattle therapy. Administration of the drugs neither caused any sign of acute toxicity nor changed the rate of Bo-RBC in the SCID mice's circulating blood cells. The results indicate that the Bo-RBC-SCID mouse model may offer a useful in vivo system for evaluating the efficacy of anti-protozoal drugs against T. sergenti.

  4. The inclusion of ADA-SCID in expanded newborn screening by tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    la Marca, Giancarlo; Giocaliere, Elisa; Malvagia, Sabrina; Funghini, Silvia; Ombrone, Daniela; Della Bona, Maria Luisa; Canessa, Clementina; Lippi, Francesca; Romano, Francesca; Guerrini, Renzo; Resti, Massimo; Azzari, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency due to adenosine-deaminase defect (ADA-SCID) is usually deadly in childhood because of severe recurrent infections. When clinical diagnosis is done, permanent damages due to infections or metabolite accumulation are often present. Gene therapy, bone marrow transplantation or enzyme replacement therapy may be effective if started early. The aim of this study was to set-up a robust method suitable for screening with a minimized preparation process and with inexpensive running costs, for diagnosing ADA-SCID by tandem mass spectrometry. ADA-SCID satisfies all the criteria for inclusion in a newborn screening program. We describe a protocol revised to incorporate adenosine and 2-deoxyadenosine testing into an expanded newborn screening program. We assessed the effectiveness of this approach testing dried blood spots from 4 genetically confirmed early-onset and 5 delayed-onset ADA-SCID patients. Reference values were established on 50,000 healthy newborns (deoxyadenosine <0.09μmol/L, adenosine <1.61μmol/L). We also developed a second tier test to distinguish true positives from false positives and improve the positive predictive value of an initial abnormal result. In the first 18 months, the pilot project has identified a newborn with a genetically confirmed defect in adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene. The results show that the method having great simplicity, low cost and low process preparations can be fully applicable to a mass screening program.

  5. Novel metastasis model of human lung cancer in SCID mice depleted of NK cells.

    PubMed

    Yano, S; Nishioka, Y; Izumi, K; Tsuruo, T; Tanaka, T; Miyasaka, M; Sone, S

    1996-07-17

    Metastasis is a critical problem in the treatment of human lung cancer. Thus, a suitable animal model of metastasis of human lung cancer is required for in vivo biological and preclinical studies. In this study, we tried to establish a suitable model for this, using SCID mice. Neither human SCLC H69/VP cells (5 x 10(6)) nor squamous-cell carcinoma RERF-LC-AI cells (1 x 10(6)), injected through a tail vein, formed metastases in untreated SCID mice. Pre-treatment of SCID mice with anti-asialo GM1 serum resulted in only a few metastases of H69/VP cells, but pre-treatment with anti-mouse IL-2 receptor beta chain Ab (TM-beta 1) resulted in numerous lymph-node metastases 56 days after tumor inoculation. H69/VP-M cells, an in vivo-selected variant line, formed significant numbers of lymph-node metastases even in SCID mice pre-treated with anti-asialo GM1 serum. SCID mice depleted of NK cells by treatment with TM-beta 1 showed different patterns of metastasis when inoculated intravenously with the 2 different human lung cancer cell lines (H69/VP and RERF-LC-AI cells): H69/VP cells formed metastases mainly in systemic lymph nodes and the liver, whereas RERF-LC-AI cells formed metastases mainly in the liver and kidneys, with only a few in lymph nodes. A histopathological study showed that the metastatic colonies consisted of cancer cells. The numbers of metastatic colonies formed by the 2 cell lines increased with the number of cells inoculated. TM-beta 1 treatment of SCID mice efficiently removed NK cells from peripheral blood for at least 6 weeks, whereas, after treatment of the mice with anti-asialo GM1 serum, NK cells were recovered within 9 days. These findings suggest that NK-cell-depleted SCID mice may be useful as a model in biological and pre-clinical studies on metastasis of human lung cancer.

  6. Generation of Novel Chimeric Mice with Humanized Livers by Using Hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID Mice.

    PubMed

    Tateno, Chise; Kawase, Yosuke; Tobita, Yoshimi; Hamamura, Satoko; Ohshita, Hiroki; Yokomichi, Hiroshi; Sanada, Harumi; Kakuni, Masakazu; Shiota, Akira; Kojima, Yuha; Ishida, Yuji; Shitara, Hiroshi; Wada, Naoko A; Tateishi, Hiromi; Sudoh, Masayuki; Nagatsuka, Shin-Ichiro; Jishage, Kou-Ichi; Kohara, Michinori

    2015-01-01

    We have used homozygous albumin enhancer/promoter-driven urokinase-type plasminogen activator/severe combined immunodeficient (uPA/SCID) mice as hosts for chimeric mice with humanized livers. However, uPA/SCID mice show four disadvantages: the human hepatocytes (h-heps) replacement index in mouse liver is decreased due to deletion of uPA transgene by homologous recombination, kidney disorders are likely to develop, body size is small, and hemizygotes cannot be used as hosts as more frequent homologous recombination than homozygotes. To solve these disadvantages, we have established a novel host strain that has a transgene containing albumin promoter/enhancer and urokinase-type plasminogen activator cDNA and has a SCID background (cDNA-uPA/SCID). We applied the embryonic stem cell technique to simultaneously generate a number of transgenic lines, and found the line with the most appropriate levels of uPA expression-not detrimental but with a sufficiently damaged liver. We transplanted h-heps into homozygous and hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID mice via the spleen, and monitored their human albumin (h-alb) levels and body weight. Blood h-alb levels and body weight gradually increased in the hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID mice and were maintained until they were approximately 30 weeks old. By contrast, blood h-alb levels and body weight in uPA/SCID chimeric mice decreased from 16 weeks of age onwards. A similar decrease in body weight was observed in the homozygous cDNA-uPA/SCID genotype, but h-alb levels were maintained until they were approximately 30 weeks old. Microarray analyses revealed identical h-heps gene expression profiles in homozygous and hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID mice were identical to that observed in the uPA/SCID mice. Furthermore, like uPA/SCID chimeric mice, homozygous and hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID chimeric mice were successfully infected with hepatitis B virus and C virus. These results indicate that hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID mice may be novel and useful hosts for

  7. Responses to larval Taenia taeniaeformis in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency (scid).

    PubMed

    Ishiwata, K; Oku, Y; Ito, M; Kamiya, M

    1992-04-01

    Responses to Taenia taeniaeformis infection were studied in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency (scid), which lack functional T and B lymphocytes. In the early phase of infection, accumulation of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PML) occurred around the larvae in the liver of scid mice and their immunocompetent counterparts, C.B-17, (a BALB/c strain, genetically resistant to this parasite). PML accumulation continued until encapsulation of developing larvae by fibroblasts (14 days p.i.), and subsequent fibrosis resulted in granuloma formation. No infiltration of eosinophils or macrophages around larvae was observed in scid mice prior to granuloma formation, while in C.B-17 mice infiltration was observed as early as 5 days p.i., when specific antibodies could not be detected in the circulation. Most larvae were destroyed by 14 days p.i. in C.B-17 mice. In scid mice the larvae survived but the host capsules (cysts) were thin and most contained blood at 42 days p.i. In these cysts, inflammatory cells were observed on the larval surface and in invaded parasite tissue. Hepatocyte coagulation necrosis adjacent to larvae was commonly found in C.B-17 mice by 5 days p.i., while it did not occur in scid mice throughout these experiments. These results suggest that in host responses to larval T. taeniaeformis, PML accumulation and encapsulation by fibrosis are T and B cell independent, while eosinophil and macrophage infiltration, as well as resistance to infection, are T and/or B cell dependent. Additionally, there may be an association between host cell necrosis around larvae and T and/or B cell responses.

  8. Radiation-induced apoptosis in SCID Mousespleen after a low-dose irration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, T.; Takahashi, A.; Ohnishi, K.

    Purpose: To estimate the effects of space radiation on health of space crews, we aimed to clarify whether pre-irradiation at a low-dose interferes in a p53-centered signal transduction pathway induced by radiation. By using a severe combined immunodeficiency (Scid) mouse defective DNA-PK activity, we examined the role of DNA-PK activity in radioadaptation induced by low-dose irradiation. Methodology: Specific pathogen free 5-week-old fe male mice of Scid and the parental mice (CB-17 Icr+/+) were irradiated with X-rays at 3.0 Gy 1, 2, 3 or 4 weeks after conditioning irradiation at 0.15, 0.30, 0.45 or 0.60 Gy. The mice spleens were fixed for immunohistochemistry 12 h after irradiation. Bax on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections were stained by the avidin-biotin peroxidase complex method using HISTOFINE SAB-PO(R) kit (Nichirei Co., Tokyo, Japan). Apoptosis incidence in the sections was measured by staining with HE staining. Results: The frequency of Bax- and apoptosis -positive cells increased up to 12 h after irradiation at 3.0 Gy in the spleen of CB-17 Icr+/+ and Scid mice. However, they were not observed by irradiation with low dose at 0.15-0.60 Gy. When pre-irradiation at 0.45 Gy 2 weeks before challenging acute irradiation at 3.0 Gy was performed, Bax accumulation and apoptosis induced by irradiation at 3.0 Gy was depressed in the spleen of CB-17 Icr+/+ mice, but not Scid mice. Conclusions: These data suggest that DNA-PKcs (expressed in CB-17 Icr+/+, not Scid mice) might play a major role on radioadaptation induced by pre-irradiation at low dose in mice spleen. We expect that the present findings will provide useful information for the care of space crews' health.

  9. Evaluation of the NOD/SCID xenograft model for glucocorticoid-regulated gene expression in childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Glucocorticoids such as prednisolone and dexamethasone are critical drugs used in multi-agent chemotherapy protocols used to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and response to glucocorticoids is highly predictive of outcome. The NOD/SCID xenograft mouse model of ALL is a clinically relevant model in which the mice develop a systemic leukemia which retains the fundamental biological characteristics of the original disease. Here we report a study evaluating the NOD/SCID xenograft mouse model to investigate glucocorticoid-induced gene expression. Cells from a glucocorticoid-sensitive xenograft derived from a child with B-cell precursor ALL were inoculated into NOD/SCID mice. When highly engrafted the mice were randomized into groups of 4 to receive dexamethasone 15 mg/kg by intraperitoneal injection or vehicle control. Leukemia cells were harvested from mice spleens at 0, 8, 24 or 48 hours thereafter, and gene expression analyzed on Illumina WG-6_V3 chips, comparing all groups to time 0 hours. Results The 8 hour dexamethasone-treated timepoint had the highest number of significantly differentially expressed genes, with fewer observed at the 24 and 48 hour timepoints, and with minimal changes seen across the time-matched controls. When compared to publicly available datasets of glucocorticoid-induced gene expression from an in vitro cell line study and from an in vivo study of patients with ALL, at the level of pathways, expression changes in the 8 hour xenograft samples showed a similar response to patients treated with glucocorticoids. Replicate analysis revealed that at the 8 hour timepoint, a dataset with high signal and differential expression, using data from 3 replicates instead of 4 resulted in excellent recovery scores of > 0.9. However at other timepoints with less signal very poor recovery scores were obtained with 3 replicates. Conclusions The NOD/SCID xenograft mouse model provides a reproducible experimental system in which to

  10. The long and the short of telomeres in bone marrow recipient SCID patients.

    PubMed

    Sarzotti-Kelsoe, Marcella; Daniell, Xiaoju G; Whitesides, John F; Buckley, Rebecca H

    2011-04-01

    Telomeres are noncoding DNA regions at the end of the chromosomes that are crucial for genome stability. Since telomere length decreases with cell division, they can be used as a signature of cell proliferation history. T-cell reconstitution in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) subjects, recipients of T-cell-depleted, allogeneic-related bone marrow cells, is due to the development and maturation of donor T-cell precursors in the infant's vestigial thymus and to homeostatic proliferation of mature T cells in the peripheral organs. Since T-cell function, thymic output, and T-cell clonal diversity are maintained long term in these patients, we investigated whether donor T-cell engraftment resulted in increased telomere shortening. Our study of seven SCID patients, following successful bone marrow transplantation, demonstrates that the patients' peripheral T cells did not exhibit greater than normal telomere shortening.

  11. Hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy for adenosine deaminase deficient-SCID.

    PubMed

    Aiuti, Alessandro; Brigida, Immacolata; Ferrua, Francesca; Cappelli, Barbara; Chiesa, Robert; Marktel, Sarah; Roncarolo, Maria-Grazia

    2009-01-01

    Gene therapy is a highly attractive strategy for many types of inherited disorders of the immune system. Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficient-severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) has been the target of several clinical trials based on the use of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells engineered with retroviral vectors. The introduction of a low intensity conditioning regimen has been a crucial factor in achieving stable engrafment of hematopoietic stem cells and therapeutic levels of ADA-expressing cells. Recent studies have demonstrated that gene therapy for ADA-SCID has favorable safety profile and is effective in restoring normal purine metabolism and immune functions. Stem cell gene therapy combined with appropriate conditioning regimens might be extended to other genetic disorders of the hematopoietic system.

  12. Correction of ADA-SCID by stem cell gene therapy combined with nonmyeloablative conditioning.

    PubMed

    Aiuti, Alessandro; Slavin, Shimon; Aker, Memet; Ficara, Francesca; Deola, Sara; Mortellaro, Alessandra; Morecki, Shoshana; Andolfi, Grazia; Tabucchi, Antonella; Carlucci, Filippo; Marinello, Enrico; Cattaneo, Federica; Vai, Sergio; Servida, Paolo; Miniero, Roberto; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Bordignon, Claudio

    2002-06-28

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy for adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) has shown limited clinical efficacy because of the small proportion of engrafted genetically corrected HSCs. We describe an improved protocol for gene transfer into HSCs associated with nonmyeloablative conditioning. This protocol was used in two patients for whom enzyme replacement therapy was not available, which allowed the effect of gene therapy alone to be evaluated. Sustained engraftment of engineered HSCs with differentiation into multiple lineages resulted in increased lymphocyte counts, improved immune functions (including antigen-specific responses), and lower toxic metabolites. Both patients are currently at home and clinically well, with normal growth and development. These results indicate the safety and efficacy of HSC gene therapy combined with nonmyeloablative conditioning for the treatment of SCID.

  13. Application of HSVtk suicide gene to X-SCID gene therapy: ganciclovir treatment offsets gene corrected X-SCID B cells.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Toru; Kumaki, Satoru; Ishikawa, Yoshinori; Onodera, Masafumi; Sato, Miki; Du, Wei; Sasahara, Yoji; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Sugamura, Kazuo; Tsuchiya, Shigeru

    2006-03-10

    Recently, a serious adverse effect of uncontrolled clonal T cell proliferation due to insertional mutagenesis of retroviral vector was reported in X-SCID gene therapy clinical trial. To offset the side effect, we have incorporated a suicide gene into therapeutic retroviral vector for selective elimination of transduced cells. In this study, B-cell lines from two X-SCID patients were transduced with bicistronic retroviral vector carrying human gamma c chain cDNA and Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene. After confirmation of functional reconstitution of the gamma c chain, the cells were treated with ganciclovir (GCV). The gamma c chain positive cells were eliminated under low concentration without cytotoxicity on untransduced cells and have not reappeared at least for 5 months. Furthermore, the gamma c chain transduced cells were still sensitive to GCV after five months. These results demonstrated the efficacy of the suicide gene therapy although further in vivo studies are required to assess feasibility of this approach in clinical trial.

  14. Application of HSVtk suicide gene to X-SCID gene therapy: Ganciclovir treatment offsets gene corrected X-SCID B cells

    SciTech Connect

    Uchiyama, Toru; Kumaki, Satoru . E-mail: kumakis@idac.tohoku.ac.jp; Ishikawa, Yoshinori; Onodera, Masafumi; Sato, Miki; Du, Wei; Sasahara, Yoji; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Sugamura, Kazuo; Tsuchiya, Shigeru

    2006-03-10

    Recently, a serious adverse effect of uncontrolled clonal T cell proliferation due to insertional mutagenesis of retroviral vector was reported in X-SCID gene therapy clinical trial. To offset the side effect, we have incorporated a suicide gene into therapeutic retroviral vector for selective elimination of transduced cells. In this study, B-cell lines from two X-SCID patients were transduced with bicistronic retroviral vector carrying human {gamma}c chain cDNA and Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene. After confirmation of functional reconstitution of the {gamma}c chain, the cells were treated with ganciclovir (GCV). The {gamma}c chain positive cells were eliminated under low concentration without cytotoxicity on untransduced cells and have not reappeared at least for 5 months. Furthermore, the {gamma}c chain transduced cells were still sensitive to GCV after five months. These results demonstrated the efficacy of the suicide gene therapy although further in vivo studies are required to assess feasibility of this approach in clinical trial.

  15. Investor Outlook: Rising from the Ashes; GSK's European Approval of Strimvelis for ADA-SCID.

    PubMed

    Schimmer, Joshua; Breazzano, Steven

    2016-06-01

    GlaxoSmithKline's (GSK) and partner San Raffaele Telethon Institute for Gene Therapy's recent positive European approval for Strimvelis for treatment of severe combined immunodeficiency due to adenosine deaminase deficiency (ADA-SCID) represents the second EU-approved gene therapy and the first γ-retrovirus and first ex vivo gene therapy. In this article we discuss the significance and implications of this historic approval for the broader gene therapy field.

  16. Bobel-24 Activity against Cryptosporidium parvum in Cell Culture and in a SCID Mouse Model▿

    PubMed Central

    Rueda, Cristina; Fenoy, Soledad; Simón, Fernando; del Aguila, Carmen

    2008-01-01

    The anticryptosporidial activity of Bobel-24 (2,4,6-triiodophenol) was studied for the first time, resulting in a reduction of the in vitro growth of Cryptosporidium of up to 99.6%. In a SCID mouse model of chronic cryptosporidiosis, significant differences (P < 0.05) in oocyst shedding were observed in animals treated with 125 mg/kg/day. These results merit further investigation of Bobel-24 as a chemotherapeutic option for cryptosporidiosis. PMID:18160525

  17. FR255734, a humanized, Fc-Silent, Anti-CD28 antibody, improves psoriasis in the SCID mouse-psoriasis xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Raychaudhuri, Siba P; Kundu-Raychaudhuri, Smriti; Tamura, Kouichi; Masunaga, Taro; Kubo, Kaori; Hanaoka, Kaori; Jiang, Wen-Yue; Herzenberg, Leonore A; Herzenberg, Leonard A

    2008-08-01

    In psoriasis, CD28/B7 costimulatory molecules are well characterized. Here, using the severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse-psoriasis xenograft model, we report therapeutic efficacy of a humanized anti-CD28 monoclonal antibody (FR255734; Astellas Pharmaceuticals Inc., Tokyo, Japan). Transplanted psoriasis plaques on the SCID mouse were treated weekly for 4 weeks with intraperitoneal injections of FR255734 at 10, 3, and 1-mg kg(-1) doses. Groups treated with doses of 10 and 3 mg kg(-1) had significant thinning of the epidermis and reduced HLA-DR-positive lymphocytic infiltrates. The length of the rete pegs changed from 415.2+/-59.6 to 231.4+/-40.4 microm (P<0.005) in the 10-mg kg(-1) group, and from 323.4+/-69.6 to 237.5+/-73.6 microm in the 3-mg kg(-1) group (P=0.002). Positive controls treated with CTLA4-Ig and cyclosporine had significant histological improvement, whereas plaques treated with saline and isotype controls (human and mouse IgG2) remained unchanged. In vitro studies have shown that FR255734 effectively blocked T-cell proliferation and proinflammatory cytokine production. These observations warrant studies to evaluate the efficacy of FR255734 in human autoimmune diseases.

  18. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for severe combined immunodeficiency diseases.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Morton J; Neven, Benedicte; Cavazanna-Calvo, M; Fischer, A; Puck, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the only curative option for most children with severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID). Survival for SCID following HSCT has significantly improved over the past several decades, and ranges from 70% to 95% depending on the clinical condition of the child at the time of transplant, the availability of an HLA-matched sibling donor, and the SCID genotype/phenotype. In this article we will review the types of SCID and discuss the critical HSCT issues that confront us today, including the optimal source of donor cells when an HLA-matched sibling is not available, as well as the pros and cons of using conditioning therapy pretransplant. As SCID children have been followed for several decades, it is becoming apparent that long-term outcome and durable T and B cell immune reconstitution are quite variable depending on the initial treatment and source of donor cells. Finally, the development of methods to improve the early diagnosis of SCID along with designing prospective trials to evaluate the best approaches to curing these diseases with minimal toxicity are critical to improving outcomes for children with SCID.

  19. Validation of the Wisconsin Personality Disorders Inventory-IV with the SCID-II.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tracey L; Klein, Marjorie H; Benjamin, Lorna S

    2003-06-01

    The Wisconsin Personality Disorders Inventory (WISPI-IV; Klein & Benjamin, 1996) is the latest version of a self-report measure of DSM-IV personality disorders (PDs) derived from an interpersonal perspective. When categorical diagnoses derived from the WISPI-IV were compared with independent SCID-II diagnoses, the majority of the kappas were poor (>.40). However, all but one of the effect sizes for the differences in WISPI-IV means between groups with and without SCID-II diagnoses were large (>.80). When SCID-II and WISPI-IV dimensional scores were considered, the average r between profiles was .61 (median = .58) and correlations between corresponding PD scales (mean diagonal r = .48; mean off-diagonal r = .18) indicated good convergent and discriminant validity for five of the WISPI-IV scales. These results add to the cumulating evidence suggesting greater reliability and validity of dimensional over categorical scores for PDs. Researchers and clinicians interested in having an efficient method of assessing PDs may consider using a dimensional approach such as the WISPI-IV as an alternative to diagnostic interview.

  20. Growth suppressive efficacy of human lak cells against human lung-cancer implanted into scid mice.

    PubMed

    Teraoka, S; Kyoizumi, S; Suzuki, T; Yamakido, M; Akiyama, M

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine the efficacy of immunotherapy using human lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cells against a human-lung squamous-cell carcinoma cell line (RERF-LC-AI) implanted into severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. A statistically significant growth suppressive effect on RERF-LC-AI implanted into SCID mice was observed when human LAK cells were administered into the caudal vein of the mice treated with a continuous supply (initiated prior to LAK cells injection) of rIL-2. The human LAK cells stained with PKH 2, a fluorescent dye, for later detection using flow cytometry were administered into the caudal vein of RERF-LC-AI bearing SCID mice; the cells persisted for 7 days in the implanted lung cancer tissue and in the mouse peripheral blood, but for 5 days in the mouse spleen. The number of infiltrated human LAK cells in each tissue increased dose-dependently with the number of injected cells. The results indicate that the antitumor effect most likely occurred during the early implantation period of the human LAK cells. These results demonstrate the applicability of this model to the in vivo study of human lung cancer therapy.

  1. Dynamic Tracking Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Tropism following Smoke Inhalation Injury in NOD/SCID Mice

    PubMed Central

    Song, MeiJuan; Zhang, XiuWei; Sun, ShuLi; Xiao, PeiXin; Hou, ShiKe; Ding, Hui; Liu, ZiQuan; Dong, WenLong; Wang, JinQiang; Wang, Xue; Sun, ZhiGuang

    2016-01-01

    Multiple preclinical evidences have supported the potential value of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for treatment of acute lung injury (ALI). However, few studies focus on the dynamic tropism of MSCs in animals with acute lung injury. In this study, we track systemically transplanted human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) in NOD/SCID mice with smoke inhalation injury (SII) through bioluminescence imaging (BLI). The results showed that hBMSCs systemically delivered into healthy NOD/SCID mouse initially reside in the lungs and then partially translocate to the abdomen after 24 h. Compared with the uninjured control group treated with hBMSCs, higher numbers of hBMSCs were found in the lungs of the SII NOD/SCID mice. In both the uninjured and SII mice, the BLI signals in the lungs steadily decreased over time and disappeared by 5 days after treatment. hBMSCs significantly attenuated lung injury, elevated the levels of KGF, decreased the levels of TNF-α in BALF, and inhibited inflammatory cell infiltration in the mice with SII. In conclusion, our findings demonstrated that more systemically infused hBMSCs localized to the lungs in mice with SII. hBMSC xenografts repaired smoke inhalation-induced lung injury in mice. This repair was maybe due to the effect of anti-inflammatory and secreting KGF of hMSCs but not associated with the differentiation of the hBMSCs into alveolar epithelial cells. PMID:27725837

  2. Family dynamics and psychosocial functioning in children with SCI/D from Colombia, South America

    PubMed Central

    Nicolais, Christina J.; Perrin, Paul B.; Panyavin, Ivan; Nicholls, Elizabeth G.; Olivera Plaza, Silvia Leonor; Quintero, Lorena Medina; Arango-Lasprilla, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the connections between family dynamics and the psychosocial functioning of children with spinal cord injuries and disorders (SCI/D). Design Cross-sectional. Setting Participants were recruited from communities in Neiva, Colombia. Participants Thirty children with SCI/D and their primary caregiver participated. Children were between 8 and 17 years of age, and had sustained their injury at least six months prior to data collection. Interventions NA. Outcome measures Participating children completed measures assessing their own psychosocial functioning (Children's Depression Inventory, Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale-2, Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory), and their primary caregiver completed measures of family dynamics (Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scale- Fourth Edition, Family Communication Scale, Family Assessment Device- General Functioning, Family Satisfaction Scale, Relationship-Focused Coping Scale). Results A correlation matrix showed a number of significant bivariate correlations between child and family variables, and three multiple regressions showed that family satisfaction, empathy, and flexibility significantly explained 27% of the variance in child worry; family satisfaction and communication explained 18% of the variance in child social anxiety; and family cohesion and communication explained 23% of the variance in child emotional functioning. Conclusions These findings highlight the importance of rehabilitation professionals considering the association between family dynamics and the psychosocial functioning of children with SCI/D when working with this population. PMID:25582185

  3. Single and combined humoral and cell-mediated immunotherapy of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in immunodeficient scid mice.

    PubMed

    Roths, J B; Sidman, C L

    1993-05-01

    Homozygous mutant scid/scid (severe combined immunodeficiency) mice (referred to as scid mice) lack both specific humoral and cell-mediated immune functions and are exemplary in vivo models for analysis of host-parasite relationships. In our colony, scid mice routinely and predictably develop spontaneous Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) with high morbidity. Previous studies have identified both T cells (specifically, CD4+ cells) and antibody as independent mechanisms of effective anti-P. carinii resistance; however, CD4+ T cells also cause an often fatal hyperinflammatory reaction. The current study has explored the optimal application of these immune components for conferring protection against P. carinii. Anti-P. carinii hyperimmune serum was highly effective at reducing the number of P. carinii organisms in early, intermediate, and advanced stages of PCP and was capable of increasing the mean life expectancy of P. carinii-infected scid mice by more than threefold if provided on a continuing basis. When a short course of hyperimmune-serum therapy was provided prior to transfer of P. carinii-sensitized normal lymphocytes, scid mice were rendered permanently free of P. carinii without the pathological sequelae of the hyperinflammatory reaction. These findings are discussed in the contexts of mechanism and clinical relevance.

  4. Single and combined humoral and cell-mediated immunotherapy of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in immunodeficient scid mice.

    PubMed Central

    Roths, J B; Sidman, C L

    1993-01-01

    Homozygous mutant scid/scid (severe combined immunodeficiency) mice (referred to as scid mice) lack both specific humoral and cell-mediated immune functions and are exemplary in vivo models for analysis of host-parasite relationships. In our colony, scid mice routinely and predictably develop spontaneous Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) with high morbidity. Previous studies have identified both T cells (specifically, CD4+ cells) and antibody as independent mechanisms of effective anti-P. carinii resistance; however, CD4+ T cells also cause an often fatal hyperinflammatory reaction. The current study has explored the optimal application of these immune components for conferring protection against P. carinii. Anti-P. carinii hyperimmune serum was highly effective at reducing the number of P. carinii organisms in early, intermediate, and advanced stages of PCP and was capable of increasing the mean life expectancy of P. carinii-infected scid mice by more than threefold if provided on a continuing basis. When a short course of hyperimmune-serum therapy was provided prior to transfer of P. carinii-sensitized normal lymphocytes, scid mice were rendered permanently free of P. carinii without the pathological sequelae of the hyperinflammatory reaction. These findings are discussed in the contexts of mechanism and clinical relevance. PMID:8478052

  5. The Presence and Preferential Activation of Regulatory T Cells Diminish Adoptive Transfer of Autoimmune Diabetes by Polyclonal Nonobese Diabetic (NOD) T Cell Effectors into NSG versus NOD-scid Mice.

    PubMed

    Presa, Maximiliano; Chen, Yi-Guang; Grier, Alexandra E; Leiter, Edward H; Brehm, Michael A; Greiner, Dale L; Shultz, Leonard D; Serreze, David V

    2015-10-01

    NOD-scid.Il2rg(null) (NSG) mice are currently being used as recipients to screen for pathogenic autoreactive T cells in type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients. We questioned whether the restriction of IL-2R γ-chain (Il-2rγ)-dependent cytokine signaling only to donor cells in NSG recipients differently influenced the activities of transferred diabetogenic T cells when they were introduced as a monoclonal/oligoclonal population versus being part of a polyclonal repertoire. Unexpectedly, a significantly decreased T1D transfer by splenocytes from prediabetic NOD donors was observed in Il-2rγ(null)-NSG versus Il-2rγ-intact standard NOD-scid recipients. In contrast, NOD-derived monoclonal/oligoclonal TCR transgenic β cell-autoreactive T cells in either the CD8 (AI4, NY8.3) or CD4 (BDC2.5) compartments transferred disease significantly more rapidly to NSG than to NOD-scid recipients. The reduced diabetes transfer efficiency by polyclonal T cells in NSG recipients was associated with enhanced activation of regulatory T cells (Tregs) mediated by NSG myeloid APC. This enhanced suppressor activity was associated with higher levels of Treg GITR expression in the presence of NSG than NOD-scid APC. These collective results indicate NSG recipients might be efficiently employed to test the activity of T1D patient-derived β cell-autoreactive T cell clones and lines, but, when screening for pathogenic effectors within polyclonal populations, Tregs should be removed from the transfer inoculum to avoid false-negative results.

  6. Human intestinal epithelial cells produce proinflammatory cytokines in response to infection in a SCID mouse-human intestinal xenograft model of amebiasis.

    PubMed Central

    Seydel, K B; Li, E; Swanson, P E; Stanley, S L

    1997-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica causes amebic dysentery and amebic liver abscess, diseases associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. E. histolytica infection appears to involve the initial attachment of amebic trophozoites to intestinal epithelial cells, followed by lysis of these cells and subsequent invasion into the submucosa. A recent in vitro study (L. Eckmann, S. L. Reed, J. R. Smith, and M. F. Kagnoff, J. Clin. Invest. 96:1269-1279, 1995) demonstrated that incubation of E. histolytica trophozoites with epithelial cell lines results in epithelial cell production of inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1 (IL-1) and IL-8, suggesting that intestinal epithelial cell production of cytokines might play a role in the inflammatory response and tissue damage seen in intestinal amebiasis. To determine whether intestinal epithelial cell production of IL-1 and IL-8 occurs in response to E. histolytica infection in vivo and as an approach to studying the specific interactions between amebic trophozoites and human intestine, we used a SCID mouse-human intestinal xenograft (SCID-HU-INT) model of disease, where human intestinal xenografts were infected with virulent E. histolytica trophozoites. Infection of xenografts with E. histolytica trophozoites resulted in extensive tissue damage, which was associated with the development of an early inflammatory response composed primarily of neutrophils. Using oligonucleotide primers that specifically amplify human IL-1beta and IL-8, we could demonstrate by reverse transcription PCR that mRNA for both IL-1beta and IL-8 is produced by human intestinal xenografts in response to amebic infection. The increase in human intestinal IL-1beta and IL-8 in response to invasive amebiasis was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays specific for human IL-1beta and IL-8. Using immunohistochemistry, we confirmed that human intestinal epithelial cells were the source of IL-8 in infected xenografts

  7. Transient restoration of gene rearrangement at multiple T cell receptor loci in gamma-irradiated scid mice

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The developmental arrest of thymocytes from scid mice, deficient in variable, (diversity), and joining, or V(D)J recombination, can be overcome by sublethal gamma-irradiation. Since previous studies focused on restoration of rearrangement of the T cell receptor (TCR) beta locus, productive rearrangement of which is selected for, we sought to examine to what extent locus specificity and cellular selection contributed to the observed effects. We report here that irradiation of newborn scid mice induces normal V-D-J rearrangements of the TCR delta locus, which like TCR beta, is also actively rearranged in CD(4-)CD(8-) (double negative) thymocytes. In contrast, no complete V-J alpha rearrangements were detected. Instead, we detected substantial levels of hairpin-terminated coding ends at the 5' end of the J alpha locus, demonstrating that TCR alpha rearrangements manifest the effects of the scid mutation. Irradiation, therefore, transiently compensates for the effects of the scid mutation in a locus-nonspecific manner in thymocytes, resulting in a burst of normal TCR beta and delta rearrangements. Irradiation also allows the development of cells that can initiate but fail to complete V(D)J recombination events at the TCR alpha locus, which is normally inaccessible in scid thymocytes. PMID:8760795

  8. Validity of a self-reported diagnosis of depression among participants in a cohort study using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-I)

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Villegas, Almudena; Schlatter, Javier; Ortuno, Felipe; Lahortiga, Francisca; Pla, Jorge; Benito, Silvia; Martinez-Gonzalez, Miguel A

    2008-01-01

    Background Depression assessment in population studies is usually based on depressive symptoms scales. However, the use of scales could lead to the choice of an arbitrary cut-off point depending on the sample characteristics and on the patient diagnosis. Thus, the use of a medical diagnosis of depression could be a more appropriate approach. Objective To validate a self-reported physician diagnosis of depression using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-I) as Gold Standard and to assess the factors associated to a valid self-reported diagnosis. Methods The SUN Project is a cohort study based on university graduates followed-up through postal questionnaires. The response to the question included in the questionnaire: Have you ever been diagnosed of depression by a physician? was compared to that obtained through the SCID-I applied by a psychiatrist or a clinical psychologist. The percentages of confirmed depression and non-depression were assessed for the overall sample and according to several characteristics. Logistic regression models were fitted to ascertain the association between different factors and a correct classification regarding depression status. Results The percentage of confirmed depression was 74.2%; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 63.3–85.1. Out of 42 participants who did not report a depression diagnosis in the questionnaire, 34 were free of the disease (%confirmed non-depression = 81.1%; 95% CI = 69.1–92.9). The probability of being a true positive was higher among ex-smokers and non-smokers and among those overweight or obese but the differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion The validity of a self-reported diagnosis of depression in the SUN cohort is adequate. Thus, this question about depression diagnosis could be used in further investigations regarding this disease in this graduate cohort study. PMID:18558014

  9. HLA-A2–Matched Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells From Type 1 Diabetic Patients, but Not Nondiabetic Donors, Transfer Insulitis to NOD-scid/γcnull/HLA-A2 Transgenic Mice Concurrent With the Expansion of Islet-Specific CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Whitfield-Larry, Fatima; Young, Ellen F.; Talmage, Garrick; Fudge, Elizabeth; Azam, Anita; Patel, Shipra; Largay, Joseph; Byrd, Warren; Buse, John; Calikoglu, Ali S.; Shultz, Leonard D.; Frelinger, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease characterized by the destruction of insulin-producing β-cells. NOD mice provide a useful tool for understanding disease pathogenesis and progression. Although much has been learned from studies with NOD mice, increased understanding of human type 1 diabetes can be gained by evaluating the pathogenic potential of human diabetogenic effector cells in vivo. Therefore, our objective in this study was to develop a small-animal model using human effector cells to study type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We adoptively transferred HLA-A2–matched peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from type 1 diabetic patients and nondiabetic control subjects into transgenic NOD-scid/γcnull/HLA-A*0201 (NOD-scid/γcnull/A2) mice. At various times after adoptive transfer, we determined the ability of these mice to support the survival and proliferation of the human lymphoid cells. Human lymphocytes were isolated and assessed from the blood, spleen, pancreatic lymph node and islets of NOD-scid/γcnull/A2 mice after transfer. RESULTS Human T and B cells proliferate and survive for at least 6 weeks and were recovered from the blood, spleen, draining pancreatic lymph node, and most importantly, islets of NOD-scid/γcnull/A2 mice. Lymphocytes from type 1 diabetic patients preferentially infiltrate the islets of NOD-scid/γcnull/A2 mice. In contrast, PBMCs from nondiabetic HLA-A2–matched donors showed significantly less islet infiltration. Moreover, in mice that received PBMCs from type 1 diabetic patients, we identified epitope-specific CD8+ T cells among the islet infiltrates. CONCLUSIONS We show that insulitis is transferred to NOD-scid/γcnull/A2 mice that received HLA-A2–matched PBMCs from type 1 diabetic patients. In addition, many of the infiltrating CD8+ T cells are epitope-specific and produce interferon-γ after in vitro peptide stimulation. This indicates that NOD-scid/γcnull/A2 mice transferred with HLA-A2

  10. Radiosensitive Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dvorak, Christopher C.; Cowan, Morton J.

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Inherited defects in components of the non-homologous end joining DNA repair mechanism produce a T-B-NK+ severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) characterized by heightened sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Patients with the radiosensitive form of SCID may also have increased short- and long-term sensitivity to the alkylator-based chemotherapy regimens traditionally utilized for conditioning prior to allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Known etiologies of radiosensitive SCID include deficiencies of Artemis, DNA Ligase IV, DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), and Cernunnos-XLF, all of which have been treated with HCT. Because of their sensitivity to certain forms of chemotherapy, the approach to donor selection and type of conditioning regimen utilized for a radiosensitive SCID patient requires careful consideration. Significantly more research needs to be done in order to determine the long-term outcomes of radiosensitive SCID patients following HCT, as well as to discover novel non-toxic approaches to HCT that might benefit those with intrinsic radio- and chemo-sensitivity, as well as potentially all patients undergoing an HCT. PMID:20113890

  11. Disseminated Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) disease in an infant with severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Sohail, Shagufta; Afzal, Muhammad; Anwar, Vaqas; Shama, Quratulain

    2014-11-01

    Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine is administered to all newborns in countries where tuberculosis is still endemic. It is a live attenuated vaccine and considered quite safe in immunocompetent children. Disseminated BCG disease is the most serious complication seen only in individuals with underlying primary or secondary immunodeficiencies. We report a case of disseminated BCG disease in an infant with Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) who received BCG administration prior to diagnosis of SCID.

  12. Effect of clarythromycin on the distant metastases of human lung cancer cells in SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Parajuli, P; Yano, S; Hanibuchi, M; Nokihara, H; Shinohara, T; Sone, S

    1998-02-01

    Recently, the use of macrolides is suggested to be therapeutically effective in prolonging the survival of patients with inoperable non-small cell lung cancer. The purpose of this study was to examine therapeutic effects of a macrolide, clarythromycin (CAM) on the metastastic developments of two different human non-small cell lung cancers (squamous cell lung carcinoma RERF-LC-AI, and adenocarcinoma PC-14) in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice depleted or undepleted of natural killer (NK) cells, respectively. CAM, injected subcutaneously at doses of 5 and 10 mg/kg body weight/day from day 7 to 41 after i.v. inoculation of human lung cancer cells, was not effective in inhibiting their distant organ metastases in SCID mice. CAM at concentrations of less than 10 micrograms/ml did not have a direct influence on the proliferation of these tumor cells in vitro. Although CAM alone was not effective in augmenting NK activity, it augmented the IL-2-induced killer (LAK) activity against Daudi cells in vitro. These results suggest that CAM alone may not be enough to control the spread of non-small cell lung cancer in the patient with T cell dysfunction.

  13. Insertional oncogenesis in 4 patients after retrovirus-mediated gene therapy of SCID-X1.

    PubMed

    Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; Garrigue, Alexandrine; Wang, Gary P; Soulier, Jean; Lim, Annick; Morillon, Estelle; Clappier, Emmanuelle; Caccavelli, Laure; Delabesse, Eric; Beldjord, Kheira; Asnafi, Vahid; MacIntyre, Elizabeth; Dal Cortivo, Liliane; Radford, Isabelle; Brousse, Nicole; Sigaux, François; Moshous, Despina; Hauer, Julia; Borkhardt, Arndt; Belohradsky, Bernd H; Wintergerst, Uwe; Velez, Maria C; Leiva, Lily; Sorensen, Ricardo; Wulffraat, Nicolas; Blanche, Stéphane; Bushman, Frederic D; Fischer, Alain; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina

    2008-09-01

    Previously, several individuals with X-linked SCID (SCID-X1) were treated by gene therapy to restore the missing IL-2 receptor gamma (IL2RG) gene to CD34+ BM precursor cells using gammaretroviral vectors. While 9 of 10 patients were successfully treated, 4 of the 9 developed T cell leukemia 31-68 months after gene therapy. In 2 of these cases, blast cells contained activating vector insertions near the LIM domain-only 2 (LMO2) proto-oncogene. Here, we report data on the 2 most recent adverse events, which occurred in patients 7 and 10. In patient 10, blast cells contained an integrated vector near LMO2 and a second integrated vector near the proto-oncogene BMI1. In patient 7, blast cells contained an integrated vector near a third proto-oncogene,CCND2. Additional genetic abnormalities in the patients' blast cells included chromosomal translocations, gain-of-function mutations activating NOTCH1, and copy number changes, including deletion of tumor suppressor gene CDKN2A, 6q interstitial losses, and SIL-TAL1 rearrangement. These findings functionally specify a genetic network that controls growth in T cell progenitors. Chemotherapy led to sustained remission in 3 of the 4 cases of T cell leukemia, but failed in the fourth. Successful chemotherapy was associated with restoration of polyclonal transduced T cell populations. As a result, the treated patients continued to benefit from therapeutic gene transfer.

  14. Psoriasiform architecture of murine epidermis overlying human psoriatic dermis transplanted onto SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Boehncke, W H; Sterry, W; Hainzl, A; Scheffold, W; Kaufmann, R

    1994-01-01

    Preliminary observations in a xenogeneic SCID mouse transplantation model indicated that murine epidermis overgrows human dermis from psoriatic skin but not that form normal skin. To investigate the effect of peripheral blood mononuclear cells on the differentiation of murine keratinocytes, we transplanted involved and uninvolved full-thickness skin from patients with psoriasis onto SCID mice and followed this with repeated subcutaneous injections of cells suspended in patient serum. After 6 weeks grafts were analysed morphologically and immunohistochemically. The epidermis in grafts from clinically uninvolved skin appeared normal. The persistence of a psoriasiform epidermis was noted in all grafts from affected sites despite a lack of lymphocytic infiltration. Staining for human and mouse MHC class I antigens revealed the murine origin of keratinocytes forming the psoriasiform epidermis, while the human dermis was retained. Our observations indicate that the defect underlying the pathogenesis of psoriasis is most likely located in the dermal rather than the epidermal compartment. This xenogeneic transplantation model may be useful for future studies of the pathogenesis and treatment of psoriasis.

  15. Curing genetic disease with gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Williams, David A

    2014-01-01

    Development of viral vectors that allow high efficiency gene transfer into mammalian cells in the early 1980s foresaw the treatment of severe monogenic diseases in humans. The application of gene transfer using viral vectors has been successful in diseases of the blood and immune systems, albeit with several curative studies also showing serious adverse events (SAEs). In children with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), chronic granulomatous disease, and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, these SAEs were caused by inappropriate activation of oncogenes. Subsequent studies have defined the vector sequences responsible for these transforming events. Members of the Transatlantic Gene Therapy Consortium [TAGTC] have collaboratively developed new vectors that have proven safer in preclinical studies and used these vectors in new clinical trials in SCID-X1. These trials have shown evidence of early efficacy and preliminary integration analysis data from the SCID-X1 trial suggest an improved safety profile.

  16. OSI-211, a novel liposomal topoisomerase I inhibitor, is active in SCID mouse models of human AML and ALL.

    PubMed

    Tomkinson, Blake; Bendele, Ray; Giles, Francis J; Brown, Eric; Gray, Atherton; Hart, Karen; LeRay, Jeremy D; Meyer, Denny; Pelanne, Michelle; Emerson, David L

    2003-11-01

    OSI-211 (liposomal lurtotecan), was evaluated using several different dose schedules (1mg/kg, d1-5, 1.75 mg/kg d1, 3, 5 and 6 mg/kg d1, 8) in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse models of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) with early treatment (ET, days 6-8) or late treatment (LT, days 15-19), examining early and advanced disease, respectively. Due to the aggressive nature of the Molt-4 model, the ET and LT were accelerated to day 3 or 4 and day 8 post-implant, respectively. For each model, 2 x 10(7) (KBM-3B) or 1 x 10(7) (Molt-4, HL-60 and CEM) leukemia cells were injected intravenously into the tail vein. Each control and test group consisted of eight animals. All three schedules (1mg/kg qd1-5, 1.75 mg/kg d1, 3, 5 and 6 mg/kg d1, 8) increased the life span of OSI-211 treated animals in each model, with a tendency toward improved efficacy with the 6 mg/kg d1, 8 schedule. As a result, the activity of the 6 mg/kg d1, 8 schedule is detailed for each model. ET significantly (P<0.005) increased survival in the KBM-3B model with 86% long-term survivors (LTS). Using PRC analysis, human beta-globin gene sequences in one or several tissues were amplified in all but 3 LTS, suggesting minimal residual disease in 26 of the 29 LTS. LT also significantly (P<0.005) improved average life span in the KBM-3B model, with an average ILS=196+/-11% and one LTS. Treatment of HL-60 leukemia animals significantly (P<0.005) increased life span, with an ILS=213+/-9% and two LTS for ET, and with an ILS=219+/-4% and no LTS for LT. Treatment of Molt-4 animals, the most aggressive leukemia model tested, significantly (P<0.005) increased life span, with an average ILS=181+/-3% and no LTS for ET and an average ILS=172+/-1% with no LTS for LT. In the CEM model, ET resulted in a significantly (P<0.005) improved ILS=244+/-24% with one LTS. In comparison to OSI-211, treatment with DaunoXome, the liposomal formulation of daunorubicin, a drug with clinical

  17. NOD-scid IL2R γnull mice engrafted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells as a model to test therapeutics targeting human signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Animal models of human inflammatory diseases have limited predictive quality for human clinical trials for various reasons including species specific activation mechanisms and the immunological background of the animals which markedly differs from the genetically heterogeneous and often aged patient population. Objective Development of an animal model allowing for testing therapeutics targeting pathways involved in the development of Atopic Dermatitis (AD) with better translatability to the patient. Methods NOD-scid IL2R γnull mice engrafted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMC) derived from patients suffering from AD and healthy volunteers were treated with IL-4 and the antagonistic IL-4 variant R121/Y124D (Pitrakinra). Levels of human (h)IgE, amount of B-, T- and plasma- cells and ratio of CD4 : CD8 positive cells served as read out for induction and inhibition of cell proliferation and hIgE secretion. Results were compared to in vitro analysis. Results hIgE secretion was induced by IL-4 and inhibited by the IL-4 antagonist Pitrakinra in vivo when formulated with methylcellulose. B-cells proliferated in response to IL-4 in vivo; the effect was abrogated by Pitrakinra. IL-4 shifted CD4 : CD8 ratios in vitro and in vivo when hPBMC derived from healthy volunteers were used. Pitrakinra reversed the effect. Human PBMC derived from patients with AD remained inert and engrafted mice reflected the individual responses observed in vitro. Conclusion NOD-scid IL2R γnull mice engrafted with human PBMC reflect the immunological history of the donors and provide a complementary tool to in vitro studies. Thus, studies in this model might provide data with better translatability from bench to bedside. PMID:23294516

  18. Poliomyelitis in MuLV-infected ICR-SCID mice after injection of basement membrane matrix contaminated with lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus.

    PubMed

    Carlson Scholz, Jodi A; Garg, Rohit; Compton, Susan R; Allore, Heather G; Zeiss, Caroline J; Uchio, Edward M

    2011-10-01

    The arterivirus lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus (LDV) causes life-long viremia in mice. Although LDV infection generally does not cause disease, infected mice that are homozygous for the Fv1(n) allele are prone to develop poliomyelitis when immunosuppressed, a condition known as age-dependent poliomyelitis. The development of age-dependent poliomyelitis requires coinfection with endogenous murine leukemia virus. Even though LDV is a common contaminant of transplantable tumors, clinical signs of poliomyelitis after inadvertent exposure to LDV have not been described in recent literature. In addition, LDV-induced poliomyelitis has not been reported in SCID or ICR mice. Here we describe the occurrence of poliomyelitis in ICR-SCID mice resulting from injection of LDV-contaminated basement membrane matrix. After exposure to LDV, a subset of mice presented with clinical signs including paresis, which was associated with atrophy of the hindlimb musculature, and tachypnea; in addition, some mice died suddenly with or without premonitory signs. Mice presenting within the first 6 mo after infection had regions of spongiosis, neuronal necrosis and astrocytosis of the ventral spinal cord, and less commonly, brainstem. Axonal degeneration of ventral roots prevailed in more chronically infected mice. LDV was identified by RT-PCR in 12 of 15 mice with typical neuropathology; positive antiLDV immunolabeling was identified in all PCR-positive animals (n = 7) tested. Three of 8 mice with neuropathology but no clinical signs were LDV negative by RT-PCR. RT-PCR yielded murine leukemia virus in spinal cords of all mice tested, regardless of clinical presentation or neuropathology.

  19. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for primary immune deficiency diseases: current status and critical needs.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Linda M; Cowan, Morton J; Kohn, Donald B; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Puck, Jennifer M; Schultz, Kirk R; Buckley, Rebecca H; Eapen, Mary; Kamani, Naynesh R; O'Reilly, Richard J; Parkman, Robertson; Roifman, Chaim M; Sullivan, Kathleen E; Filipovich, Alexandra H; Fleisher, Thomas A; Shearer, William T

    2008-12-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has been used for 40 years to ameliorate or cure primary immune deficiency (PID) diseases, including severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and non-SCID PID. There is a critical need for evaluation of the North American experience of different HCT approaches for these diseases to identify best practices and plan future investigative clinical trials. Our survey of incidence and prevalence of PID in North American practice sites indicates that such studies are feasible. A conference of experts in HCT treatment of PID has recommended (1) a comprehensive cross-sectional and retrospective analysis of HCT survivors with SCID; (2) a prospective study of patients with SCID receiving HCT, with comparable baseline and follow-up testing across participating centers; (3) a pilot study of newborn screening for SCID to identify affected infants before compromise by infection; and (4) studies of the natural history of disease in patients who do or do not receive HCT for the non-SCID diseases of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome and chronic granulomatous disease. To accomplish these goals, collaboration by a consortium of institutions in North America is proposed. Participation of immunologists and HCT physicians having interest in PID and experts in laboratory methods, clinical outcomes assessment, databases, and analysis will be required for the success of these studies.

  20. Genetic correction of β-thalassemia patient-specific iPS cells and its use in improving hemoglobin production in irradiated SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yixuan; Zheng, Chen-Guang; Jiang, Yonghua; Zhang, Jiqin; Chen, Jiayu; Yao, Chao; Zhao, Qingguo; Liu, Sheng; Chen, Ke; Du, Juan; Yang, Ze; Gao, Shaorong

    2012-04-01

    The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from differentiated somatic cells by over-expression of several transcription factors has the potential to cure many genetic and degenerative diseases currently recalcitrant to traditional clinical approaches. One such genetic disease is β-thalassemia major (Cooley's anemia). This disease is caused by either a point mutation or the deletion of several nucleotides in the β-globin gene, and it threatens the lives of millions of people in China. In the present study, we successfully generated iPSCs from fibroblasts collected from a 2-year-old patient who was diagnosed with a homozygous 41/42 deletion in his β-globin gene. More importantly, we successfully corrected this genetic mutation in the β-thalassemia iPSCs by homologous recombination. Furthermore, transplantation of the genetically corrected iPSCs-derived hematopoietic progenitors into sub-lethally irradiated immune deficient SCID mice showed improved hemoglobin production compared with the uncorrected iPSCs. Moreover, the generation of human β-globin could be detected in the mice transplanted with corrected iPSCs-derived hematopietic progenitors. Our study provides strong evidence that iPSCs generated from a patient with a genetic disease can be corrected by homologous recombination and that the corrected iPSCs have potential clinical uses.

  1. High efficiency of muscle regeneration after human myoblast clone transplantation in SCID mice.

    PubMed Central

    Huard, J; Verreault, S; Roy, R; Tremblay, M; Tremblay, J P

    1994-01-01

    SCID mouse tibialis anterior muscles were first irradiated to prevent regeneration by host myoblasts and injected with notexin to damage the muscle fibers and trigger regeneration. The muscles were then injected with roughly 5 million human myoblasts. 1 mo later, 16-33% of the normal number of muscle fibers were present in the injected muscle, because of incomplete regeneration. However, > 90% of these muscle fibers contained human dystrophin. Some newly formed muscle fibers had an accumulation of human dystrophin and desmin on a part of their membrane. Such accumulations have been demonstrated at neuromuscular junctions before suggesting that the new muscle fibers are innervated and functional. The same pool of clones of human myoblasts produced only < or = 4% of muscle fibers containing human dystrophin when injected in nude mice muscles. Several of the human myoblasts did not fuse and remained in interstitial space or tightly associated with muscle fibers suggesting that some of them have formed satellite cells. Moreover, cultures of 98% pure human myoblasts were obtained from transplanted SCID muscles. In some mice where the muscle regeneration was not complete, the muscle fibers containing human dystrophin also expressed uniformly HLA class 1, confirming that the fibers are of human origin. The presence of hybrid muscle fibers containing human dystrophin and mouse MHC was also demonstrated following transplantation. These results establish that in absence of an immune reaction, transplanted human myoblasts participate to the muscle regeneration with a high degree of efficacy even if the animals were killed only 1 mo after the transplantation. Images PMID:8113396

  2. Frequency of the severe combined immunodeficiency disease gene among horses in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Piro, M; Benjouad, A; Tligui, N S; El Allali, K; El Kohen, M; Nabich, A; Ouragh, L

    2008-09-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) of horses is an autosomal, recessive hereditary disease occurring among Arabian or crossbred Arabian horses. The genetic defect responsible was previously identified as a 5-base pair deletion in the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of the DNA dependant protein kinase (DNA-PKcs). This study was carried out to determine the frequency of SCID and identify horses carrying the gene for SCID among Arabian and Arabian crossbred stallions and mares in Morocco using a DNA-based test. Twenty-one horses were SCID carriers: 14 (7%) Arabians, 6 (4%) Arab-Barbs and one (33%) Anglo-Arab. After analysing their genealogy, 3 imported stallions were identified that disseminated the mutant gene of DNA-PKcs in Morocco.

  3. IL-3 or IL-7 increases ex vivo gene transfer efficiency in ADA-SCID BM CD34+ cells while maintaining in vivo lymphoid potential.

    PubMed

    Ficara, Francesca; Superchi, Daniela B; Hernández, Raisa Jofra; Mocchetti, Cristina; Carballido-Perrig, Nicole; Andolfi, Grazia; Deola, Sara; Colombo, Augusto; Bordignon, Claudio; Carballido, José M; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2004-12-01

    To improve maintenance and gene transfer of human lymphoid progenitors for clinical use in gene therapy of adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient SCID we investigated several gene transfer protocols using various stem cell-enriched sources. The lymphoid differentiation potential was measured by an in vitro clonal assay for B/NK cells and in the in vivo SCID-hu mouse model. Ex vivo culture with the cytokines TPO, FLT3-ligand, and SCF (T/F/S) plus IL-3 or IL-7 substantially increased the yield of transduced bone marrow (BM) CD34(+) cells purified from ADA-SCID patients or healthy donors, compared to T/F/S alone. Moreover, the use of IL-3 or IL-7 significantly improved the maintenance of in vitro B cell progenitors from ADA-SCID BM cells and allowed the efficient transduction of B and NK cell progenitors. Under these optimized conditions transduced CD34(+) cells were efficiently engrafted into SCID-hu mice and gave rise to B and T cell progeny, demonstrating the maintenance of in vivo lymphoid reconstitution capacity. The protocol based on the T/F/S + IL-3 combination was included in a gene therapy clinical trial for ADA-SCID, resulting in long-term engraftment of stem/progenitor cells. Remarkably, gene-corrected BM CD34(+) cells obtained from one patient 4 and 11 months after gene therapy were capable of repopulating the lymphoid compartment of SCID-hu hosts.

  4. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Childhood Diagnoses (Kid-SCID): first psychometric evaluation in a Dutch sample of clinically referred youths.

    PubMed

    Roelofs, Jeffrey; Muris, Peter; Braet, Caroline; Arntz, Arnoud; Beelen, Imke

    2015-06-01

    The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Childhood Disorders (Kid-SCID) is a semi-structured interview for the classification of psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents. This study presents a first evaluation of the psychometric properties of the Kid-SCID in a Dutch sample of children and adolescents who had been referred to an outpatient treatment centre for mental health problems. Results indicated that the inter-rater reliability of the Kid-SCID classifications and the internal consistency of various (dimensional) criteria of the diagnoses were moderate to good. Further, for most Kid-SCID diagnoses, reasonable agreement between children and parents was found. Finally, the correspondence between the Kid-SCID and the final clinical diagnosis as established after the full intake procedure, which included the information as provided by the Kid-SCID, ranged from poor to good. Results are discussed in the light of methodological issues pertaining to the assessment of psychiatric disorders in youths. The Kid-SCID can generally be seen as a reliable and useful tool that can assist clinicians in carrying out clinical evaluations of children and adolescents.

  5. Infection of immunodeficient horses with Sarcocystis neurona does not result in neurologic disease.

    PubMed

    Sellon, Debra C; Knowles, Donald P; Greiner, Ellis C; Long, Maureen T; Hines, Melissa T; Hochstatter, Tressa; Tibary, Ahmed; Dame, John B

    2004-11-01

    Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis is a progressive neurologic disease of horses most commonly caused by infection with the apicomplexan parasite Sarcocystis neurona. Factors affecting neuroinvasion and neurovirulence have not been determined. We investigated the pathogenesis of infection with S. neurona in horses with severe combined immune deficiency (SCID). Two immunocompetent (IC) Arabian horses and two Arabian horses with SCID were infected orally with 5 x 10(5) sporocysts of S. neurona. Four IC horses and one SCID horse were infected intravenously (i.v.) with 5 x 10(8) merozoites of the WSU-1 isolate of S. neurona. Despite prolonged parasitemia and persistent infection of visceral tissues (skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle, lung, liver, and spleen) as demonstrated by PCR and culture, SCID horses did not develop neurologic signs after oral or i.v. infection. S. neurona was undetectable in the neuronal tissues of SCID horses by either PCR, immunohistochemistry, or culture. In contrast, although parasitemia was undetectable in orally infected IC horses and of only short duration in i.v. infected IC horses, four of six IC horses developed neurologic signs. S. neurona was detectable by PCR and/or culture of neural tissue but not visceral tissue of IC horses with neurologic disease. Infected SCID horses are unable to clear S. neurona from visceral tissues, but the infection does not result in neurologic signs; in contrast, IC horses rapidly control parasitemia and infection of visceral tissues but frequently experience neuroinvasion and exhibit clinical signs of neurologic disease.

  6. The gene for severe combined immunodeficiency disease in Athabascan-speaking Native Americans is located on chromosome 10p.

    PubMed Central

    Li, L; Drayna, D; Hu, D; Hayward, A; Gahagan, S; Pabst, H; Cowan, M J

    1998-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) consists of a group of heterogeneous genetic disorders. The most severe phenotype, T-B- SCID, is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait and is characterized by a profound deficiency of both T cell and B cell immunity. There is a uniquely high frequency of T-B- SCID among Athabascan-speaking Native Americans (A-SCID). To localize the A-SCID gene, we conducted a genomewide search, using linkage analysis of approximately 300 microsatellite markers in 14 affected Athabascan-speaking Native American families. We obtained conclusive evidence for linkage of the A-SCID locus to markers on chromosome 10p. The maximum pairwise LOD scores 4.53 and 4.60 were obtained from two adjacent markers, D10S191 and D10S1653, respectively, at a recombination fraction of straight theta=.00. Recombination events placed the gene in an interval of approximately 6.5 cM flanked by D10S1664 and D10S674. Multipoint analysis positioned the gene for the A-SCID phenotype between D10S191 and D10S1653, with a peak LOD score of 5.10 at D10S191. Strong linkage disequilibrium was found in five linked markers spanning approximately 6.5 cM in the candidate region, suggesting a founder effect with an ancestral mutation that occurred sometime before 1300 A.D. PMID:9443881

  7. Non-infectious lung disease in patients with adenosine deaminase deficient severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Booth, C; Algar, V E; Xu-Bayford, J; Fairbanks, L; Owens, C; Gaspar, H B

    2012-06-01

    Adenosine deaminase deficiency is a disorder of purine metabolism manifesting severe combined immunodeficiency (ADA-SCID) and systemic abnormalities. Increased levels of the substrate deoxyadenosine triphosphate (dATP) lead to immunodeficiency and are associated in a murine model with pulmonary insufficiency. We compared a cohort of patients with ADA-SCID and X-linked SCID and found that despite similar radiological and respiratory findings, positive microbiology is significantly less frequent in ADA-SCID patients (p < 0.0005), suggesting a metabolic pathogenesis for the lung disease. Clinicians should be aware of this possibility and correct metabolic abnormalities either through enzyme replacement or haematopoietic stem cell transplant, in addition to treating infectious complications.

  8. Induction of hepatic pathology in SCID-Hu mice engrafted with peripheral blood lymphocytes of patients with Schistosomiasis japonica.

    PubMed

    Kresina, T F; Wisnewski, A; Love-Homan, L; Ramirez, B; Neil, G A

    1994-09-01

    SCID mice were engrafted with peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) derived from persons currently or previously infected with Schistosoma japonicum. After immunization with soluble worm antigenic preparation, the SCID-Hu mice were analyzed for a human immune response. ELISA revealed a low titer of human antibody recognizing soluble egg antigens in 2 of 10 mice. One mouse had detectable levels of interleukin (IL)-2 and gamma-interferon, TH1 phenotype cytokines. All mice had elevated levels of IL-4, a TH2 phenotype cytokine. The human cytokine profile of the mice paralleled the patient's serum profile at clinical examination. In addition, all mice had substantial hepatic pathology, including inflammatory cell infiltrates and macrovesicular fat deposition. The data indicate that activation of PBL from patients with a history of schistosomiasis japonica infection can result in focal hepatic pathology, which may be driven by specific cytokines.

  9. Carnosic Acid-combined Arsenic Trioxide Antileukaemia Cells in the Establishment of NB4/SCID Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Hao, Li; Ran, Wang; Xiang-Xin, Li; Lu-Qun, Wang; Xiao-Ning, Yu

    2016-09-01

    Despite great improvement in the treatment outcome of APL, treatment failure still sometimes occurs due to the toxicity of arsenic trioxide (ATO). Damage to the heart and liver often occurs even when the dose is lower than the therapeutic dose. Based on the results of cell experiments in vitro in this study, we investigated the synergistic activity of carnosic acid (CA) combined with ATO in the SCID mouse model of human promyelocytic leukaemia in vivo. A NB4/SCID mouse model was established in this study. The NB4/SCID mice were randomly divided into three treatment groups (CA alone, ATO alone and CA combined with ATO) and a control group based on factorial design. The evaluation indicators of the curative effect of the drugs included expressions of cleaved caspase-3, PTEN, p27 gene mRNA and proteins by immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry and Western blot analysis. The survival time was compared between the four groups. The results indicated that verification of the NB4/SCID mouse model was confirmed by histopathological examination. Compared with mice treated by CA or ATO alone, the mice in the combination of CA and ATO group had a higher rate of apoptosis, which was linked with expressions of cleaved caspase-3, PTEN, p27 gene mRNA and proteins. Also, the mice with the longest survival time were those treated with the combination of CA and ATO. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that CA and ATO in combination have strong synergistic antileukaemic effects on cell activity.

  10. Resistance against Friend leukemia virus-induced leukemogenesis in DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK)-deficient scid mice associated with defective viral integration at the Spi-1 and Fli-1 site.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Maki; Yamaguchi, Shuichi; Aizawa, Shiro; Ikeda, Hidetoshi; Tatsumi, Kouichi; Noda, Yuko; Hirokawa, Katsuiku; Kitagawa, Masanobu

    2005-08-01

    Retroviral DNA integration is mediated by the viral protein integrase. However, elements of the host DNA repair machinery such as the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI-3K)-related protein kinase family system would play a role in the integration of viral DNA into the host DNA. Here, we show that a host PI-3K-related protein kinase, DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), plays a role in the specific integration of retroviral DNA and induction of retroviral diseases in vivo. DNA-PK-deficient scid mice inoculated with Friend leukemia virus (FLV) exhibited a random integration into their genomic DNA and expressed the viral envelope protein gp70. However, the specific integration of FLV at Spi-1 or Fli-1 sites did not occur in association with the significant resistance of scid mice to FLV-induced leukemogenesis. In contrast, the knockout of another member of the PI-3K-related protein kinase family, encoded by the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene, resulted in mice as sensitive to FLV-induced leukemogenesis as the wild type mice. FLV was specifically integrated into the DNA at Spi-1 and Fli-1 sites with significant expression of these transcription factors. These findings indicated that DNA-PK would be essential for controlling the in vivo integration of FLV at specific sites as well as the susceptibility to FLV-induced leukemogenesis.

  11. Passive transfer of interferon-γ over-expressing macrophages enhances resistance of SCID mice to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Pasula, Rajamouli; Martin, William J; Kesavalu, Banu Rekha; Abdalla, Maher Y; Britigan, Bradley E

    2017-02-23

    Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) is associated with increased deaths worldwide. Alveolar macrophages (AMs) play a critical role in host defense against infection with this pathogen. In this work we tested the hypothesis that passive transfer of normal AMs, IFN-γ activated AMs, or macrophages transduced to over-express IFN-γ into the lungs of immunosuppressed SCID mice, where resident macrophages are present but not functional, would enhance alveolar immunity and increase clearance of pulmonary M.tb infection. Accordingly, SCID mice were infected with M.tb intratracheally (I.T.), following which they received either control macrophages or macrophages overexpressing IFN-γ (J774A.1). The extent of M.tb infection was assessed at 30days post-M.tb infection. SCID mice administered macrophages over-expressing IFN-γ showed a significant decrease in M.tb burden and increased survival compared to J774A.1 control macrophages or untreated mice. This was further associated with a significant increase in IFN-γ and TNF-α mRNA and protein expression, as well as NF-κB (p65) mRNA, in the lungs. The increase in IFN-γ and TNF-α lung levels was inversely proportional to the number of M.tb organisms recovered. These results provide evidence that administration of macrophages overexpressing IFN-γ inhibit M.tb growth in vivo and may enhance host defense against M.tb infection.

  12. Insertional mutagenesis combined with acquired somatic mutations causes leukemogenesis following gene therapy of SCID-X1 patients.

    PubMed

    Howe, Steven J; Mansour, Marc R; Schwarzwaelder, Kerstin; Bartholomae, Cynthia; Hubank, Michael; Kempski, Helena; Brugman, Martijn H; Pike-Overzet, Karin; Chatters, Stephen J; de Ridder, Dick; Gilmour, Kimberly C; Adams, Stuart; Thornhill, Susannah I; Parsley, Kathryn L; Staal, Frank J T; Gale, Rosemary E; Linch, David C; Bayford, Jinhua; Brown, Lucie; Quaye, Michelle; Kinnon, Christine; Ancliff, Philip; Webb, David K; Schmidt, Manfred; von Kalle, Christof; Gaspar, H Bobby; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2008-09-01

    X-linked SCID (SCID-X1) is amenable to correction by gene therapy using conventional gammaretroviral vectors. Here, we describe the occurrence of clonal T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) promoted by insertional mutagenesis in a completed gene therapy trial of 10 SCID-X1 patients. Integration of the vector in an antisense orientation 35 kb upstream of the protooncogene LIM domain only 2 (LMO2) caused overexpression of LMO2 in the leukemic clone. However, leukemogenesis was likely precipitated by the acquisition of other genetic abnormalities unrelated to vector insertion, including a gain-of-function mutation in NOTCH1, deletion of the tumor suppressor gene locus cyclin-dependent kinase 2A (CDKN2A), and translocation of the TCR-beta region to the STIL-TAL1 locus. These findings highlight a general toxicity of endogenous gammaretroviral enhancer elements and also identify a combinatorial process during leukemic evolution that will be important for risk stratification and for future protocol design.

  13. Vector integration is nonrandom and clustered and influences the fate of lymphopoiesis in SCID-X1 gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Deichmann, Annette; Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; Schmidt, Manfred; Garrigue, Alexandrine; Brugman, Martijn H; Hu, Jingqiong; Glimm, Hanno; Gyapay, Gabor; Prum, Bernard; Fraser, Christopher C; Fischer, Nicolas; Schwarzwaelder, Kerstin; Siegler, Maria-Luise; de Ridder, Dick; Pike-Overzet, Karin; Howe, Steven J; Thrasher, Adrian J; Wagemaker, Gerard; Abel, Ulrich; Staal, Frank J T; Delabesse, Eric; Villeval, Jean-Luc; Aronow, Bruce; Hue, Christophe; Prinz, Claudia; Wissler, Manuela; Klanke, Chuck; Weissenbach, Jean; Alexander, Ian; Fischer, Alain; von Kalle, Christof; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina

    2007-08-01

    Recent reports have challenged the notion that retroviruses and retroviral vectors integrate randomly into the host genome. These reports pointed to a strong bias toward integration in and near gene coding regions and, for gammaretroviral vectors, around transcription start sites. Here, we report the results obtained from a large-scale mapping of 572 retroviral integration sites (RISs) isolated from cells of 9 patients with X-linked SCID (SCID-X1) treated with a retrovirus-based gene therapy protocol. Our data showed that two-thirds of insertions occurred in or very near to genes, of which more than half were highly expressed in CD34(+) progenitor cells. Strikingly, one-fourth of all integrations were clustered as common integration sites (CISs). The highly significant incidence of CISs in circulating T cells and the nature of their locations indicate that insertion in many gene loci has an influence on cell engraftment, survival, and proliferation. Beyond the observed cases of insertional mutagenesis in 3 patients, these data help to elucidate the relationship between vector insertion and long-term in vivo selection of transduced cells in human patients with SCID-X1.

  14. Altered intracellular and extracellular signaling leads to impaired T-cell functions in ADA-SCID patients

    PubMed Central

    Cassani, Barbara; Mirolo, Massimiliano; Cattaneo, Federica; Benninghoff, Ulrike; Hershfield, Michael; Carlucci, Filippo; Tabucchi, Antonella; Bordignon, Claudio; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene are responsible for a form of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) caused by the lymphotoxic accumulation of ADA substrates, adenosine and 2′-deoxy-adenosine. The molecular mechanisms underlying T-cell dysfunction in humans remain to be elucidated. Here, we show that CD4+ T cells from ADA-SCID patients have severely compromised TCR/CD28-driven proliferation and cytokine production, both at the transcriptional and protein levels. Such an impairment is associated with an intrinsically reduced ZAP-70 phosphorylation, Ca2+ flux, and ERK1/2 signaling and to defective transcriptional events linked to CREB and NF-κB. Moreover, exposure to 2′-deoxy-adenosine results in a stronger inhibition of T-cell activation, mediated by the aberrant A2A adenosine receptor signaling engagement and PKA hyperactivation, or in a direct apoptotic effect at higher doses. Conversely, in T cells isolated from patients after gene therapy with retrovirally transduced hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, the biochemical events after TCR triggering occur properly, leading to restored effector functions and normal sensitivity to apoptosis. Overall, our findings provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of the immune defects associated with an altered purine metabolism and confirm that ADA gene transfer is an efficacious treatment for ADA-SCID. The trials in this study are enrolled at www.ClinicalTrials.gov as #NCT00598481 and #NCT0059978. PMID:18218852

  15. Altered intracellular and extracellular signaling leads to impaired T-cell functions in ADA-SCID patients.

    PubMed

    Cassani, Barbara; Mirolo, Massimiliano; Cattaneo, Federica; Benninghoff, Ulrike; Hershfield, Michael; Carlucci, Filippo; Tabucchi, Antonella; Bordignon, Claudio; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2008-04-15

    Mutations in the adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene are responsible for a form of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) caused by the lymphotoxic accumulation of ADA substrates, adenosine and 2'-deoxy-adenosine. The molecular mechanisms underlying T-cell dysfunction in humans remain to be elucidated. Here, we show that CD4(+) T cells from ADA-SCID patients have severely compromised TCR/CD28-driven proliferation and cytokine production, both at the transcriptional and protein levels. Such an impairment is associated with an intrinsically reduced ZAP-70 phosphorylation, Ca(2+) flux, and ERK1/2 signaling and to defective transcriptional events linked to CREB and NF-kappaB. Moreover, exposure to 2'-deoxy-adenosine results in a stronger inhibition of T-cell activation, mediated by the aberrant A(2A) adenosine receptor signaling engagement and PKA hyperactivation, or in a direct apoptotic effect at higher doses. Conversely, in T cells isolated from patients after gene therapy with retrovirally transduced hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, the biochemical events after TCR triggering occur properly, leading to restored effector functions and normal sensitivity to apoptosis. Overall, our findings provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of the immune defects associated with an altered purine metabolism and confirm that ADA gene transfer is an efficacious treatment for ADA-SCID. The trials in this study are enrolled at www.ClinicalTrials.gov as #NCT00598481 and #NCT0059978.

  16. An analysis and decision tool to measure cost benefit of newborn screening for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and related T-cell lymphopenia.

    PubMed

    Modell, Vicki; Knaus, Megan; Modell, Fred

    2014-10-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is a group of syndromes resulting from genetic defects causing absence in T-cell and B-cell function, leading to serious and life-threatening infections. SCID is often fatal in the first 2 years of life if not identified and properly treated. While additional laboratory methods are being developed, the current T-cell receptor excision circle assay has proven to have outstanding specificity and sensitivity to accurately identify infants with SCID and other T-cell lymphopenia. The Jeffrey Modell Foundation (JMF) has a long history of advocacy and continues to promote newborn screening for SCID to be implemented in the United States and worldwide. Based on reports provided by California, New York, Texas, and Wisconsin on the results of their population based newborn screening programs, the overall incidence of SCID averaged 1:33,000 and T-cell lymphopenia averaged 1:6,600. JMF has developed a working algorithm or "decision tree", validated by peer-reviewed scientific literature, to be used by Public Health Departments and Health Ministries in states, countries, and regions throughout the world. This decision tool allows for local or regional data to be applied to measure the threshold and economic impact of implementing newborn screening for SCID and T-cell lymphopenia.

  17. Novel mutations in RAG1/2 and ADA genes in Israeli patients presenting with T-B-SCID or Omenn syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Ilan; Tasher, Diana; Somech, Raz; Etzioni, Amos; Garti, Ben-Zion; Lev, Dorit; Cohen, Sarit; Somekh, Eli; Leshinsky-Silver, Esther

    2011-09-01

    The relative frequency of the different forms of SCID may vary in different countries. The most frequent form in Israel is the autosomal-recessive T-B- SCID or Omenn syndrome while X-linked SCID is rare. We report our immunological and genetic analyses in multicentre study of patients presenting with either T-B- SCID or Omenn syndrome. Among 16 patients, we identified 7 novel mutations in 6 patients. In the RAG1 gene we detected two novel mutations: L454Q and 469 fs-4bpdel. In the RAG 2 gene: 3 novel mutations: D65Y, G157V, and E480X. One T-B- SCID patient was found to be a compound heterozygote for new mutations in the ADA gene: W264X and R235W. Prenatal diagnosis was performed in 8 families while others refused due to religious reasons. Identification of the new mutations expands our knowledge regarding the unique features of SCID phenotype in Israel and may help the families seeking for genetic counseling.

  18. Taenia taeniaeformis larval product induces gastric mucosal hyperplasia in SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Lagapa, Jose Trinipil G; Oku, Yuzaburo; Nonaka, Nariaki; Kamiya, Masao

    2002-02-01

    The effects of intraperitoneal implantation of Taenia taeniaeformis larvae and inoculation of in vitro larval products on gastric mucosa of SCID mice were investigated in this study. Mice surgically implanted with T. taeniaeformis larvae developed slight and moderate gastric hyperplasia. When in vitro cultured T. taeniaeformis larval excretory-secretory (TtLES) products containing 1 mg of protein were injected daily into mice, they caused gastropathy after 5-7 days. Mice injected daily with 0.5 mg of TtLES products also showed slight gastric hyperplasia after day 14 and 28. The gastropathy was characterized by reduction of both parietal and zymogenic cell number and increased number of alcian blue-periodic acid Schiff (AB-PAS)-positive cells and by two-fold extension of proliferative zone of gastric units. Larval implantation demonstrated a more potent effect in inducing gastropathy than did in vitro larval culture products. Significant decrease in number of parietal cells with concomitant increase of proliferative zone and AB-PAS-positive cell number indicated their important roles in inducing the hyperplastic lesion. Similarities with other gastropathies indicated that there is a common fundamental regulatory mechanism involved, and that the host response may not be specific to parasites. Present study validated the induction of gastric mucosal hyperplasia by larval ES products of T. taeniaeformis. This proved the hypothesis of previous studies suggesting the role of larvae-derived products in inducing gastric mucosal hyperplasia in T. taeniaeformis-infected rats.

  19. Efficient targeting of a SCID gene by an engineered single-chain homing endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Grizot, Sylvestre; Smith, Julianne; Daboussi, Fayza; Prieto, Jesús; Redondo, Pilar; Merino, Nekane; Villate, Maider; Thomas, Séverine; Lemaire, Laetitia; Montoya, Guillermo; Blanco, Francisco J.; Pâques, Frédéric; Duchateau, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Sequence-specific endonucleases recognizing long target sequences are emerging as powerful tools for genome engineering. These endonucleases could be used to correct deleterious mutations or to inactivate viruses, in a new approach to molecular medicine. However, such applications are highly demanding in terms of safety. Mutations in the human RAG1 gene cause severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). Using the I-CreI dimeric LAGLIDADG meganuclease as a scaffold, we describe here the engineering of a series of endonucleases cleaving the human RAG1 gene, including obligate heterodimers and single-chain molecules. We show that a novel single-chain design, in which two different monomers are linked to form a single molecule, can induce high levels of recombination while safeguarding more effectively against potential genotoxicity. We provide here the first demonstration that an engineered meganuclease can induce targeted recombination at an endogenous locus in up to 6% of transfected human cells. These properties rank this new generation of endonucleases among the best molecular scissors available for genome surgery strategies, potentially avoiding the deleterious effects of previous gene therapy approaches. PMID:19584299

  20. Efficient targeting of a SCID gene by an engineered single-chain homing endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Grizot, Sylvestre; Smith, Julianne; Daboussi, Fayza; Prieto, Jesús; Redondo, Pilar; Merino, Nekane; Villate, Maider; Thomas, Séverine; Lemaire, Laetitia; Montoya, Guillermo; Blanco, Francisco J; Pâques, Frédéric; Duchateau, Philippe

    2009-09-01

    Sequence-specific endonucleases recognizing long target sequences are emerging as powerful tools for genome engineering. These endonucleases could be used to correct deleterious mutations or to inactivate viruses, in a new approach to molecular medicine. However, such applications are highly demanding in terms of safety. Mutations in the human RAG1 gene cause severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). Using the I-CreI dimeric LAGLIDADG meganuclease as a scaffold, we describe here the engineering of a series of endonucleases cleaving the human RAG1 gene, including obligate heterodimers and single-chain molecules. We show that a novel single-chain design, in which two different monomers are linked to form a single molecule, can induce high levels of recombination while safeguarding more effectively against potential genotoxicity. We provide here the first demonstration that an engineered meganuclease can induce targeted recombination at an endogenous locus in up to 6% of transfected human cells. These properties rank this new generation of endonucleases among the best molecular scissors available for genome surgery strategies, potentially avoiding the deleterious effects of previous gene therapy approaches.

  1. Stable isotope resolved metabolomics of lung cancer in a SCID mouse model.

    PubMed

    Fan, Teresa W-M; Lane, Andrew N; Higashi, Richard M; Yan, Jun

    2011-06-01

    We have determined the time course of [U-(13)C]-glucose utilization and transformations in SCID mice via bolus injection of the tracer in the tail vein. Incorporation of (13)C into metabolites extracted from mouse blood plasma and several tissues (lung, heart, brain, liver, kidney, and skeletal muscle) were profiled by NMR and GC-MS, which helped ascertain optimal sampling times for different target tissues. We found that the time for overall optimal (13)C incorporation into tissue was 15-20 min but with substantial differences in (13)C labeling patterns of various organs that reflected their specific metabolism. Using this stable isotope resolved metabolomics (SIRM) approach, we have compared the (13)C metabolite profile of the lungs in the same mouse with or without an orthotopic lung tumor xenograft established from human PC14PE6 lung adenocarcinoma cells. The (13)C metabolite profile shows considerable differences in [U-(13)C]-glucose transformations between the two lung tissues, demonstrating the feasibility of applying SIRM to investigate metabolic networks of human cancer xenograft in the mouse model.

  2. IL-2R{gamma} gene microdeletion demonstrates that canine X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency is a homologue of the human disease

    SciTech Connect

    Henthorn, P.S.; Fimiani, V.M.; Patterson, D.F.

    1994-09-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is characterized by profound defects in cellular and humoral immunity and, in humans, is associated with mutations in the gene for the {gamma} chain of the IL-2 receptor (IL-2R{gamma}). We have examined this gene in a colony of dogs established from a single X-linked SCID carrier female. Affected dogs have a 4-bp deletion in the first exon of the IL-2R{gamma} gene, which precludes the production of a functional protein, demonstrating that the canine disease is a true homologue of human X-linked SCID. 37 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Noninvasive Optical Imaging and In Vivo Cell Tracking of Indocyanine Green Labeled Human Stem Cells Transplanted at Superficial or In-Depth Tissue of SCID Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sabapathy, Vikram; Mentam, Jyothsna; Jacob, Paul Mazhuvanchary; Kumar, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell based therapies hold great promise for the treatment of human diseases; however results from several recent clinical studies have not shown a level of efficacy required for their use as a first-line therapy, because more often in these studies fate of the transplanted cells is unknown. Thus monitoring the real-time fate of in vivo transplanted cells is essential to validate the full potential of stem cells based therapy. Recent studies have shown how real-time in vivo molecular imaging has helped in identifying hurdles towards clinical translation and designing potential strategies that may contribute to successful transplantation of stem cells and improved outcomes. At present, there are no cost effective and efficient labeling techniques for tracking the cells under in vivo conditions. Indocyanine green (ICG) is a safer, economical, and superior labelling technique for in vivo optical imaging. ICG is a FDA-approved agent and decades of usage have clearly established the effectiveness of ICG for human clinical applications. In this study, we have optimized the ICG labelling conditions that is optimal for noninvasive optical imaging and demonstrated that ICG labelled cells can be successfully used for in vivo cell tracking applications in SCID mice injury models. PMID:26240573

  4. Noninvasive and real-time assessment of reconstructed functional human endometrium in NOD/SCID/gamma c(null) immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Hirotaka; Maruyama, Tetsuo; Hiratsu, Emi; Yamane, Junichi; Iwanami, Akio; Nagashima, Takashi; Ono, Masanori; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Okano, Hirotaka James; Ito, Mamoru; Tamaoki, Norikazu; Nomura, Tatsuji; Okano, Hideyuki; Matsuzaki, Yumi; Yoshimura, Yasunori

    2007-02-06

    Human uterine endometrium exhibits unique properties of cyclical regeneration and remodeling throughout reproductive life and also is subject to endometriosis through ectopic implantation of retrogradely shed endometrial fragments during menstruation. Here we show that functional endometrium can be regenerated from singly dispersed human endometrial cells transplanted beneath the kidney capsule of NOD/SCID/gamma(c)(null) immunodeficient mice. In addition to the endometrium-like structure, hormone-dependent changes, including proliferation, differentiation, and tissue breakdown and shedding (menstruation), can be reproduced in the reconstructed endometrium, the blood to which is supplied predominantly by human vessels invading into the mouse kidney parenchyma. Furthermore, the hormone-dependent behavior of the endometrium regenerated from lentivirally engineered endometrial cells expressing a variant luciferase can be assessed noninvasively and quantitatively by in vivo bioluminescence imaging. These results indicate that singly dispersed endometrial cells have potential applications for tissue reconstitution, angiogenesis, and human-mouse chimeric vessel formation, providing implications for mechanisms underlying the physiological endometrial regeneration during the menstrual cycle and the establishment of endometriotic lesions. This animal system can be applied as the unique model of endometriosis or for other various types of neoplastic diseases with the capacity of noninvasive and real-time evaluation of the effect of therapeutic agents and gene targeting when the relevant cells are transplanted beneath the kidney capsule.

  5. Measures of kidney function by minimally invasive techniques correlate with histological glomerular damage in SCID mice with adriamycin-induced nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Scarfe, Lauren; Rak-Raszewska, Aleksandra; Geraci, Stefania; Darssan, Darsy; Sharkey, Jack; Huang, Jiaguo; Burton, Neal C; Mason, David; Ranjzad, Parisa; Kenny, Simon; Gretz, Norbert; Lévy, Raphaël; Kevin Park, B; García-Fiñana, Marta; Woolf, Adrian S; Murray, Patricia; Wilm, Bettina

    2015-09-02

    Maximising the use of preclinical murine models of progressive kidney disease as test beds for therapies ideally requires kidney function to be measured repeatedly in a safe, minimally invasive manner. To date, most studies of murine nephropathy depend on unreliable markers of renal physiological function, exemplified by measuring blood levels of creatinine and urea, and on various end points necessitating sacrifice of experimental animals to assess histological damage, thus counteracting the principles of Replacement, Refinement and Reduction. Here, we applied two novel minimally invasive techniques to measure kidney function in SCID mice with adriamycin-induced nephropathy. We employed i) a transcutaneous device that measures the half-life of intravenously administered FITC-sinistrin, a molecule cleared by glomerular filtration; and ii) multispectral optoacoustic tomography, a photoacoustic imaging device that directly visualises the clearance of the near infrared dye, IRDye 800CW carboxylate. Measurements with either technique showed a significant impairment of renal function in experimental animals versus controls, with significant correlations with the proportion of scarred glomeruli five weeks after induction of injury. These technologies provide clinically relevant functional data and should be widely adopted for testing the efficacies of novel therapies. Moreover, their use will also lead to a reduction in experimental animal numbers.

  6. Novel RAG2 mutation in a patient with T- B- severe combined immunodeficiency and disseminated BCG disease.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi-Shabestari, M; Vesal, S; Jabbarpour-Bonyadi, M; de Villatay, J P; Fischer, A; Rezaei, N

    2009-01-01

    T-B-NK+ severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is an autosomal recessive disease that is caused mainly by a defect in the recombination activating genes (RAG). Patients with SCID usually experience life-threatening opportunistic infections in early infancy and complications after vaccination with bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG). We report a patient of consanguineous parents who was referred to our center with subaxillary lymphadenitis and respiratory distress. Laboratory studies confirmed the diagnosis of T-B-NK+ SCID and molecular studies revealed homozygous mutations in the RAG2 gene. The patient died despite administration of antituberculosis drugs, antibiotics, and intravenous immunoglobulin. Inoculation of live vaccines such as BCG should be postponed in families with a positive history of SCID until screening tests rule out this condition.

  7. Efficacy of Recombinant Gamma Interferon for Treatment of Systemic Cryptococcosis in SCID Mice

    PubMed Central

    Clemons, Karl V.; Lutz, Jon E.; Stevens, David A.

    2001-01-01

    We have previously shown that gamma interferon (IFN-γ) is a useful adjunct to therapy of experimental systemic cryptococcosis in normal mice. To better emulate AIDS patients, SCID mice were infected intravenously with Cryptococcus neoformans. Mice received no therapy, 3 mg of amphotericin B (AmB) per kg of body weight, or 105 U of IFN-γ alone (prophylactically and therapeutically or only therapeutically) or with AmB. In the first experiment, >75% of the mice survived. Therapy with AmB alone was efficacious compared to no therapy in all organs. Both regimens of IFN-γ alone were efficacious in the brain and lungs, and the combination of AmB and IFN-γ showed significant synergy in the kidneys. AmB alone cured 40% of mice of infection, whereas the combination regimens cured >50% of the mice and 90% of the brain infections. In a second study, IFN-γ again proved efficacious alone, and when given with AmB its efficacy was improved. Therapeutic IFN-γ alone was effective only in the liver compared to no therapy, and the combination regimen, although highly effective, showed no significant synergy. In a third experiment, AmB alone or in combination with IFN-γ prolonged survival compared to no therapy or IFN-γ alone. The combination regimen showed significant synergy over AmB alone in the brain, liver, kidneys, and lungs. AmB alone cured no mice of infections in more than two organs, whereas AmB in combination with IFN-γ cured 55% of infections in three or more organs. These results indicate that IFN-γ has therapeutic efficacy in severely immunodeficient animals, especially in combination with AmB. Significant synergistic activity was noted in all organs except the spleen. Overall, IFN-γ has utility as an adjunctive therapy against systemic cryptococcosis in the severely immunocompromised host. PMID:11181343

  8. The SCID Mouse Model for Identifying Virulence Determinants in Coxiella burnetii

    PubMed Central

    van Schaik, Erin J.; Case, Elizabeth D.; Martinez, Eric; Bonazzi, Matteo; Samuel, James E.

    2017-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular, zoonotic pathogen that is the causative agent of Q fever. Infection most frequently occurs after inhalation of contaminated aerosols, which can lead to acute, self-limiting febrile illness or more serve chronic infections such as hepatitis or endocarditis. Macrophages are the principal target cells during infection where C. burnetii resides and replicates within a unique phagolysosome-like compartment, the Coxiella-containing vacuole (CCV). The first virulence determinant described as necessary for infection was full-length lipopolysaccarride (LPS); spontaneous rough mutants (phase II) arise after passage in immuno-incompetent hosts. Phase II C. burnetii are attenuated in immuno-competent animals, but are fully capable of infecting a variety of host cells in vitro. A clonal strain of the Nine Mile isolate (RSA439, clone 4), has a 26 KDa chromosomal deletion that includes LPS biosynthetic genes and is uniquely approved for use in BL2/ABL2 conditions. With the advances of axenic media and genetic tools for C. burnetii research, the characterization of novel virulence determinants is ongoing and almost exclusively performed using this attenuated clone. A major problem with predicting essential virulence loci with RSA439 is that, although some cell-autonomous phenotypes can be assessed in tissue culture, no animal model for assessing pathogenesis has been defined. Here we describe the use of SCID mice for predicting virulence factors of C. burnetii, in either independent or competitive infections. We propose that this model allows for the identification of mutations that are competent for intracellular replication in vitro, but attenuated for growth in vivo and predict essential innate immune responses modulated by the pathogen during infection as a central pathogenic strategy. PMID:28217558

  9. Identification and Characterization of Novel Rat Polyomavirus 2 in a Colony of X-SCID Rats by P-PIT assay

    PubMed Central

    Rigatti, Lora H.; Toptan, Tuna; Newsome, Joseph T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Polyomaviruses (PyVs) are known to infect a wide range of vertebrates and invertebrates and are associated with a broad spectrum of diseases, including cancers, particularly in immune-suppressed hosts. A novel polyomavirus, designated rat polyomavirus 2 (RatPyV2), was identified from a breeding colony of rats having X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency. Using a human panpolyomavirus immunohistochemistry test (P-PIT), RatPyV2 was initially detected in the parotid salivary gland of a colony member. Rolling circle amplification using DNA from harderian and parotid glands identified a novel 5.1-kb polyomavirus genome closely related to human Washington University (WU) and Karolinska Institute (KI) and vole polyomaviruses but notably divergent from Rattus norvegicus PyV1 (RnorPyV1; also designated RatPyV1). Further screening showed RatPyV2 inclusion body infection in the lung epithelium and variably in other respiratory, reproductive, and glandular tissues of 12/12 (100%) rats. IMPORTANCE Although P-PIT was developed to detect diseases associated with known human polyomaviruses, the identification of a new polyomavirus in rats suggests that it may have utility as a broad-based screen for new, as well as known polyomaviruses. Our findings suggest that RatPyV2 may be a commensal infection of laboratory rats that can lead to disseminated disease in T cell immune-deficient rats. Infection of the X-SCID rats with RatPyV2 and Pneumocystis carinii is a potential model for coinfection pathogenesis and treatment options during transplant preclinical studies. PMID:28028546

  10. Antiviral Activity of Bay 41-4109 on Hepatitis B Virus in Humanized Alb-uPA/SCID Mice

    PubMed Central

    Brezillon, Nicolas; Brunelle, Marie-Noëlle; Massinet, Hélène; Giang, Eric; Lamant, Céline; DaSilva, Lucie; Berissi, Sophie; Belghiti, Jacques; Hannoun, Laurent; Puerstinger, Gherard; Wimmer, Eva; Neyts, Johan; Hantz, Olivier; Soussan, Patrick; Morosan, Serban; Kremsdorf, Dina

    2011-01-01

    Current treatments for HBV chronic carriers using interferon alpha or nucleoside analogues are not effective in all patients and may induce the emergence of HBV resistant strains. Bay 41-4109, a member of the heteroaryldihydropyrimidine family, inhibits HBV replication by destabilizing capsid assembly. The aim of this study was to determine the antiviral effect of Bay 41-4109 in a mouse model with humanized liver and the spread of active HBV. Antiviral assays of Bay 41-4109 on HepG2.2.15 cells constitutively expressing HBV, displayed an IC50 of about 202 nM with no cell toxicity. Alb-uPA/SCID mice were transplanted with human hepatocytes and infected with HBV. Ten days post-infection, the mice were treated with Bay 41-4109 for five days. During the 30 days of follow-up, the HBV load was evaluated by quantitative PCR. At the end of treatment, decreased HBV viremia of about 1 log(10) copies/ml was observed. By contrast, increased HBV viremia of about 0.5 log(10) copies/ml was measured in the control group. Five days after the end of treatment, a rebound of HBV viremia occurred in the treated group. Furthermore, 15 days after treatment discontinuation, a similar expression of the viral capsid was evidenced in liver biopsies. Our findings demonstrate that Bay 41-4109 displayed antiviral properties against HBV in humanized Alb-uPA/SCID mice and confirm the usefulness of Alb-uPA/SCID mice for the evaluation of pharmaceutical compounds. The administration of Bay 41-4109 may constitute a new strategy for the treatment of patients in escape from standard antiviral therapy. PMID:22162746

  11. Long-term outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for IL2RG/JAK3 SCID-: a cohort report.

    PubMed

    Abd Hamid, Intan Juliana; Slatter, Mary A; McKendrick, Fiona; Pearce, Mark S; Gennery, Andrew R

    2017-02-16

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) cures the T-lymphocyte, B-lymphocyte and Natural Killer (NK) cell differentiation defect in IL2RG/JAK3 SCID. We evaluated long-term clinical features, longitudinal immunoreconstitution, donor chimerism and quality of life (QoL) of IL2RG/JAK3 SCID patients >2 years post-HSCT at our center. Clinical data were collated and patients/families answered PedsQL Generic Core Scale v4.0 questionnaires. We performed longitudinal analyses of CD3+, CD4+ naïve T-lymphocyte, CD19+ and NK cell numbers from pre-transplant until 15 years post-transplant. 31/43 (72%) patients survived. Median age at last follow-up was 10 years (range, 2-25). 21 (68%) had persistent medical issues, mainly on-going immunoglobulin replacement (14, 45%), cutaneous viral warts (7, 24%), short stature (4, 14%), limb lymphoedema (3, 10%) and bronchiectasis (2, 7%). Lung function was available and normal for 6 patients. Longitudinal analysis demonstrated sustained CD3+, CD19+ and NK cell output 15 years post-HSCT. CD4+ naïve lymphocyte numbers were better in conditioned versus unconditioned recipients (p 0.06). B-lymphocyte and myeloid chimerism were highly correlated, (rho 0.98, p < 0.001). Low toxicity MAC recipients have better B-lymphocyte/myeloid chimerism and are free from immunoglobulin replacement therapy. IL2RG/JAK3 SCID survivors free from immunoglobulin replacement have normal QoL.

  12. Clinical-scale expansion of CD34(+) cord blood cells amplifies committed progenitors and rapid scid repopulation cells.

    PubMed

    Casamayor-Genescà, Alba; Pla, Arnau; Oliver-Vila, Irene; Pujals-Fonts, Noèlia; Marín-Gallén, Sílvia; Caminal, Marta; Pujol-Autonell, Irma; Carrascal, Jorge; Vives-Pi, Marta; Garcia, Joan; Vives, Joaquim

    2017-03-25

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation is associated with long periods of aplastic anaemia. This undesirable situation is due to the low cell dose available per unit of UCB and the immaturity of its progenitors. To overcome this, we present a cell culture strategy aimed at the expansion of the CD34(+) population and the generation of granulocyte lineage-committed progenitors. Two culture products were produced after either 6 or 14days of in vitro expansion, and their characteristics compared to non-expanded UCB CD34(+) controls in terms of phenotype, colony-forming activity and multilineage repopulation potential in NOD-scid IL2Rγ(null) mice. Both expanded cell products maintained rapid SCID repopulation activity similar to the non-expanded control, but 14-day cultured cells showed impaired long term SCID repopulation activity. The process was successfully scaled up to clinically relevant doses of 89×10(6) CD34(+) cells committed to the granulocytic lineage and 3.9×10(9) neutrophil precursors in different maturation stages. Cell yields and biological properties presented by the cell product obtained after 14days in culture were superior and therefore this is proposed as the preferred production setup in a new type of dual transplant strategy to reduce aplastic periods, producing a transient repopulation before the definitive engraftment of the non-cultured UCB unit. Importantly, human telomerase reverse transcriptase activity was undetectable, c-myc expression levels were low and no genetic abnormalities were found, as determined by G-banding karyotype, further confirming the safety of the expanded product.

  13. Experimental Support for the Ecoimmunity Theory: Distinct Phenotypes of Nonlymphocytic Cells in SCID and Wild-Type Mice.

    PubMed

    Ochayon, David E; Baranovski, Boris M; Malkin, Peter; Schuster, Ronen; Kalay, Noa; Ben-Hamo, Rotem; Sloma, Ido; Levinson, Justin; Brazg, Jared; Efroni, Sol; Lewis, Eli C; Nevo, Uri

    2016-01-01

    Immune tolerance toward "self" is critical in multiple immune disorders. While there are several mechanisms to describe the involvement of immune cells in the process, the role of peripheral tissue cells in that context is not yet clear. The theory of ecoimmunity postulates that interactions between immune and tissue cells represent a predator-prey relationship. A lifelong interaction, shaped mainly during early ontogeny, leads to selection of nonimmune cell phenotypes. Normally, therefore, nonimmune cells that evolve alongside an intact immune system would be phenotypically capable of evading immune responses, and cells whose phenotype falls short of satisfying this steady state would expire under hostile immune responses. This view was supported until recently by experimental evidence showing an inferior endurance of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)-derived pancreatic islets when engrafted into syngeneic immune-intact wild-type (WT) mice, relative to islets from WT. Here we extend the experimental exploration of ecoimmunity by searching for the presence of the phenotypic changes suggested by the theory. Immune-related phenotypes of islets, spleen, and bone marrow immune cells were determined, as well as SCID and WT nonlymphocytic cells. Islet submass grafting was performed to depict syngeneic graft functionality. Islet cultures were examined under both resting and inflamed conditions for expression of CD40 and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I/II and release of interleukin-1α (IL-1α), IL-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), IL-10, and insulin. Results depict multiple pathways that appear to be related to the sculpting of nonimmune cells by immune cells; 59 SCID islet genes displayed relative expression changes compared with WT islets. SCID cells expressed lower tolerability to inflammation and higher levels of immune-related molecules, including MHC class I. Accordingly, islets exhibited a marked increase in insulin release upon

  14. Positive Family History, Infection, Low Absolute Lymphocyte Count (ALC) and Absent Thymic Shadow: Diagnostic Clues for all Molecular Forms of Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID)

    PubMed Central

    McWilliams, Laurie M; Railey, Mary Dell; Buckley, Rebecca H

    2015-01-01

    Background Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) is a syndrome uniformly fatal during infancy unless recognized and treated successfully by bone marrow transplantation or gene therapy. Because SCID infants have no abnormal physical appearance, diagnosis is usually delayed unless newborn screening is performed. Objective In this study, we sought to evaluate the presenting features of all 172 SCID patients transplanted at this institution over the past 31 years. Methods We reviewed original charts from 172 consecutive classic SCID patients who received either T cell-depleted HLA-haploidentical (N=154) or HLA-identical (N=18) non-ablative related marrow transplants at Duke University Medical Center from 1982–2013. Results The mean age at presentation was 4.87 months. When there was a family history of early infant death or known SCID (63/172 or 37%), the mean presentation age was much earlier, 2.0 months compared to 6.6 months. Failure to thrive was common, with 84 patients (50%) having a weight less than the 5th percentile. The leading infections included oral moniliasis (43%), viral infections (61/172 35.5%) and Pneumocystis jiroveci (26%) pneumonia. The group mean ALC was 1454/cmm; 88% of the infants had an ALC less than 3000/cmm. Absent thymic shadow was seen in 92% of infants with electronic radiographic data available. An absence of T cell function was found in all patients. Conclusions SCID infants appear normal at birth but later present with failure to thrive and/or recurrent fungal, viral and bacterial infections. Low ALCs and absent thymic shadow on chest x-ray are key diagnostic clues. The absence of T cell function confirms the diagnosis. PMID:25824440

  15. Inhibition of Acute in vivo Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection by Human Interleukin 10 Treatment of SCID Mice Implanted with Human Fetal Thymus and Liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollmann, Tobias R.; Pettoello-Mantovani, Massimo; Katopodis, Nikos F.; Hachamovitch, Moshe; Rubinstein, Arye; Kim, Ana; Goldstein, Harris

    1996-04-01

    To improve the usefulness of in vivo models for the investigation of the pathophysiology of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, we modified the construction of SCID mice implanted with human fetal thymus and liver (thy/liv-SCID-hu mice) so that the peripheral blood of the mice contained significant numbers of human monocytes and T cells. After inoculation with HIV-159, a primary patient isolate capable of infecting monocytes and T cells, the modified thy/liv-SCID-hu mice developed disseminated HIV infection that was associated with plasma viremia. The development of plasma viremia and HIV infection in thy/liv-SCID-hu mice inoculated with HIV-159 was inhibited by acute treatment with human interleukin (IL) 10 but not with human IL-12. The human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in these modified thy/liv-SCID-hu mice were responsive in vivo to treatment with exogenous cytokines. Human interferon γ expression in the circulating human peripheral blood mononuclear cells was induced by treatment with IL-12 and inhibited by treatment with IL-10. Thus, these modified thy/liv-SCID-hu mice should prove to be a valuable in vivo model for examining the role of immunomodulatory therapy in modifying HIV infection. Furthermore, our demonstration of the in vivo inhibitory effect of IL-10 on acute HIV infection suggests that further studies may be warranted to evaluate whether there is a role for IL-10 therapy in preventing HIV infection in individuals soon after exposure to HIV such as for children born to HIV-infected mothers.

  16. Neutral metoclopramide sensitizes cytotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation in SCID mice xenografted with a human brain astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Hua, J; Olsson, A R; Pero, R W

    1997-12-10

    A formulation of metoclopramide (MCA) conformationally altered by neutralization of pH (nMCA, Neu-Sensamide) has been shown to have the same efficacy of enhancing the cytotoxicity of a single dose of 1 Gy radiation as acidic formulations (e.g., Primperan, Sensamide) in a human lung adenocarcinoma (H2981) xenografted into SCID mice. In the present study, 2 x 1 Gy radiation was combined with 2 x 2 mg nMCA/kg body weight injected 2 hr before radiation treatment for evaluation of radiosensitization in SCID mice xenografted with a human brain astrocytoma (T24). Given in this treatment schedule, nMCA alone at 2 mg/kg showed no cytotoxic effect on tumor growth in vivo. When combined with 2 x 1 Gy of radiation, however, the cytotoxicity was significantly increased as measured by tumor growth delay over the radiation-only-treated group. Furthermore, nMCA was absorbed into brains of mice and rats as efficiently as acidic MCA (aMCA) when analyzed 45 min after i.m. injection by high-performance liquid chromatography.

  17. Multilineage hematopoietic reconstitution without clonal selection in ADA-SCID patients treated with stem cell gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Aiuti, Alessandro; Cassani, Barbara; Andolfi, Grazia; Mirolo, Massimiliano; Biasco, Luca; Recchia, Alessandra; Urbinati, Fabrizia; Valacca, Cristina; Scaramuzza, Samantha; Aker, Memet; Slavin, Shimon; Cazzola, Matteo; Sartori, Daniela; Ambrosi, Alessandro; Di Serio, Clelia; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Mavilio, Fulvio; Bordignon, Claudio

    2007-08-01

    Gene transfer into HSCs is an effective treatment for SCID, although potentially limited by the risk of insertional mutagenesis. We performed a genome-wide analysis of retroviral vector integrations in genetically corrected HSCs and their multilineage progeny before and up to 47 months after transplantation into 5 patients with adenosine deaminase-deficient SCID. Gene-dense regions, promoters, and transcriptionally active genes were preferred retroviral integrations sites (RISs) both in preinfusion transduced CD34(+) cells and in vivo after gene therapy. The occurrence of insertion sites proximal to protooncogenes or genes controlling cell growth and self renewal, including LMO2, was not associated with clonal selection or expansion in vivo. Clonal analysis of long-term repopulating cell progeny in vivo revealed highly polyclonal T cell populations and shared RISs among multiple lineages, demonstrating the engraftment of multipotent HSCs. These data have important implications for the biology of retroviral vectors, the dynamics of genetically modified HSCs, and the safety of gene therapy.

  18. Effect of Agaricus blazei Murrill extract on HT-29 human colon cancer cells in SCID mice in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Fang; Chen, Yung-Liang; Lee, Mei-Hui; Shih, Yung-Luen; Hsu, Yu-Ming; Tang, Ming-Chu; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Tang, Nou-Ying; Yang, Su-Tso; Chueh, Fu-Shin; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2011-01-01

    Agaricus blazei Murrill (ABM) popularly known as 'Cogumelo do Sol' in Brazil, or 'Himematsutake' in Japan, is a mushroom native to Brazil and widely cultivated in Japan for its medicinal uses and is now considered one of the most important edible and culinary-medicinal biotechnological species. This study is the first tumor growth model to evaluate the amelioratory effect of ABM extract using HT-29 human colon cancer cells in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. Forty SCID mice were inoculated with HT-29 cells to induce tumor formation and were then divided into four groups. All the four groups (control, low, medium and high concentration treatment) of mice were separately orally administered 0 mg, 1.125 mg, 4.5 mg or 45 mg ABM extract daily. After six weeks of treatment, 8 out of the 40 mice had not survived including one mouse which scored +++ (tumor up to 15 mm diameter) and four mice which scored ++++ (tumor over 15 mm diameter) in the control group and three mice which scored ++++ on the low-dose ABM treatment. After high- or medium-dose treatment, all ten mice in each group survived. The oral administration of ABM does not prevent tumor growth, as shown by increased tumor mass, but compared with the control group, the tumor mass seems to grow more slowly depending on the ABM dose.

  19. Attempts to protect severe combined immunodeficient (scid) mice with antibody enriched for reactivity to Cryptosporidium parvum surface antigen-1.

    PubMed

    Tatalick, L M; Perryman, L E

    1995-07-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a protozoal pathogen which infects the gastrointestinal epithelium of mammals causing diarrhoea, the duration and severity of which is determined by the immunocompetency of the host. Currently, there is no effective treatment or prevention. We evaluated the ability of surface antigen-1 (SA-1), defined as those antigens recognized by neutralizing mAb 17.41, to elicit a protective antibody response when used as an immunogen. A SA-1 enriched fraction was obtained by immunoaffinity chromatography and was used to immunize a naive Holstein calf. SA-1 immune serum from this calf detected C. parvum epitopes to a 1:10,000 dilution in a dot blot assay, and sporozoite surface epitopes at a 1:10,000 dilution in a live immunofluorescence assay. Western blot analysis showed that SA-1 immune bovine serum recognized a similar pattern of C. parvum antigens as the defining mAb 17.41. Oral passive transfer of SA-1 immune bovine serum did not protect severe combined immunodeficient (scid) mice or suckling BALB/c mice from initial infection with C. parvum, or terminate a persistent infection in scid mice.

  20. Histopathological and expression profiling studies of early tumor responses to near-infrared PDT treatment in SCID mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starkey, Jean R.; Rebane, Aleksander; Drobizhev, Mikhail A.; Meng, Fanqin; Gong, Aijun; Elliott, Aleisha; McInnerney, Kate; Pascucci, Elizabeth; Spangler, Charles W.

    2008-02-01

    A novel class of porphyrin-based near-infrared photodynamic therapy (PDT) sensitizers is studied. We achieve regressions of human small cell lung cancer (NCI-H69), non-small cell lung cancer (A 459) and breast cancer (MDAMB- 231) xenografts in SCID mice at significant tissue depth by irradiation with an amplified femtosecond pulsed laser at 800 nm wavelength. Significant tumor regressions were observed during the first 10-14 days post treatment. Tumor histopathology was consistent with known PDT effects, while no significant changes were noted in irradiated normal tissues. In vivo imaging studies using intravenous injections of fluorescent dextran demonstrated an early loss of tumor blood flow. RNA was isolated from NCI-H69 PDT treated SCID mouse xenografts and paired untreated xenografts at 4 hours post laser irradiation. Similarly RNA was isolated from PDT treated and untreated Lewis lung carcinomas growing in C57/Bl6 mice. Expression profiling was carried out using Affymetrix TM human and mouse GeneChips®. Cluster analysis of microarray expression profiling results demonstrated reproducible increases in transcripts associated with apoptosis, stress, oxygen transport and gene regulation in the PDT treated NCI-H69 samples. In addition, PDT treated Lewis lung carcinomas showed reproducible increases in transcripts associated with immune response and lipid biosynthesis. PDT treated C57/Bl6 mice developed cytotoxic T cell activity towards this tumor, while untreated tumor bearing mice failed to do so.

  1. Comparison of a treatment strategy combining CCI-779 plus DTIC versus DTIC monotreatment in human melanoma in SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Thallinger, Christiane; Werzowa, Johannes; Poeppl, Wolfgang; Kovar, Florian M; Pratscher, Barbara; Valent, Peter; Quehenberger, Peter; Joukhadar, Christian

    2007-10-01

    This study compares the antineoplastic potential of a novel treatment strategy combining cell cycle inhibitor-779 (CCI-779) plus dacarbazine (DTIC) versus DTIC monotreatment, the current chemotherapeutic mainstay in combating metastatic melanoma. A controlled four-group parallel study design comprising 24-40 mice per tumor cell line was used in a severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)-mouse xenotransplantation model. SCID mice were injected with 518A2, Mel-JUSO, or 607B human melanoma cells. After they developed tumors, mice received daily CCI-779 or solvent over 14 days. From treatment day 4-8 mice were additionally injected with DTIC or saline. Treatment with CCI-779 plus DTIC was superior to single agent DTIC in two out of three cell lines (P<0.05). The tumor weight reduction was 44+/-17 and 61+/-6% compared with DTIC monotreatment in Mel-JUSO and 607B melanomas, respectively (P<0.05). In contrast, in 518A2 xenotransplants, CCI-779 plus DTIC treatment was as effective as DTIC monotreatment. CCI-779 monotherapy exerted no statistically significant antitumor effect. Collectively, these data indicate that CCI-779 has the potential to increase the chemotherapeutic efficacy, as the combination of CCI-779 plus DTIC proved to be more efficacious compared to DTIC monotherapy in two out of three melanoma cell lines in vivo.

  2. Suppression subtractive hybridization method for the identification of a new strain of murine hepatitis virus from xenografted SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammed M; Toohey, Brendan; Purcell, Damian F J; Kannourakis, George

    2015-12-01

    During attempts to clone retroviral determinants associated with a mouse model of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was used to identify unique viruses in the liver of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice transplanted with LCH tissues. A partial genomic sequence of a murine coronavirus was identified, and the whole genome (31428 bp) of the coronavirus was subsequently sequenced using PCR cloning techniques. Nucleotide sequence comparisons revealed that the genome sequence of the new virus was 91-93% identical to those of known murine hepatitis viruses (MHVs). The predicted open reading frame from the nucleotide sequence encoded all known proteins of MHVs. Analysis at the protein level showed that the virus was closely related to the highly virulent MHV-JHM strain. The virus strain was named MHV-MI. No type D retroviruses were found. Degenerate PCR targeting of type D retrovirus and 5'-RACE targeting of other types of retroviruses confirmed the absence of any retroviral association with the LCH xenografted SCID mice.

  3. Appearance of Human Plasma Cells Following Differentiation of Human B Cells in NOD/SCID Mouse Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Kentaro; Lian, Zhe-Xiong; He, Xiao-Song; Ansari, Aftab A.; Ishibashi, Miyuki; Miyakawa, Hiroshi; Shultz, Leonard D.; Ikehara, Susumu; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2003-01-01

    Relatively little is known for the differentiation and maturation process of human B cells to plasma cells. This is particularly important in reconstitution work involving transfer of autoantibodies. To address this issue, we transplanted human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) directly into the spleen of irradiated NOD/SCID mice depleted of natural killer cell activity. Within 6 weeks, naïve B cells differentiated into memory B cells and, importantly, the numbers of human CD138+ plasma cells in spleen increased by 100 fold after transplantation. Plasma cell numbers correlated with the detection of human IgM and IgG in serum, indicating that human B cells had differentiated into mature plasma cells in the murine spleen. In addition to CD19+ plasma cells, a distinct CD19- plasma cell population was detected, suggesting that downregulation of CD19 associated with maturation of plasma cells occurred. When purified human B cells were transplanted, those findings were not observed. Our results indicate that differentiation and maturation of human B cells and plasma cells can be investigated by transplantation of human PBMC into the spleen of NOD/SCID mice. The model will be useful for studying the differentiation of human B cells and generation of plasma cells. PMID:14768952

  4. Multilineage hematopoietic reconstitution without clonal selection in ADA-SCID patients treated with stem cell gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Aiuti, Alessandro; Cassani, Barbara; Andolfi, Grazia; Mirolo, Massimiliano; Biasco, Luca; Recchia, Alessandra; Urbinati, Fabrizia; Valacca, Cristina; Scaramuzza, Samantha; Aker, Memet; Slavin, Shimon; Cazzola, Matteo; Sartori, Daniela; Ambrosi, Alessandro; Di Serio, Clelia; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Mavilio, Fulvio; Bordignon, Claudio

    2007-01-01

    Gene transfer into HSCs is an effective treatment for SCID, although potentially limited by the risk of insertional mutagenesis. We performed a genome-wide analysis of retroviral vector integrations in genetically corrected HSCs and their multilineage progeny before and up to 47 months after transplantation into 5 patients with adenosine deaminase–deficient SCID. Gene-dense regions, promoters, and transcriptionally active genes were preferred retroviral integrations sites (RISs) both in preinfusion transduced CD34+ cells and in vivo after gene therapy. The occurrence of insertion sites proximal to protooncogenes or genes controlling cell growth and self renewal, including LMO2, was not associated with clonal selection or expansion in vivo. Clonal analysis of long-term repopulating cell progeny in vivo revealed highly polyclonal T cell populations and shared RISs among multiple lineages, demonstrating the engraftment of multipotent HSCs. These data have important implications for the biology of retroviral vectors, the dynamics of genetically modified HSCs, and the safety of gene therapy. PMID:17671653

  5. Evaluation of TCR Vbeta subfamily T cell expansion in NOD/SCID mice transplanted with human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chen; Chen, Shaohua; Yang, Lijian; Tan, Yubo; Bai, Xue; Li, Yangqiu

    2007-08-01

    Examination of the T cell receptor (TCR) gene repertoire is important in the analysis of the immune status of models, because clonal expansion of T cells permits the identification of specific antigen responses of T cells. Little is known about T-cell immunity in the humanized NOD/SCID mouse model. TCR Vbeta repertoire usage and clonality were analyzed to investigate the distribution and clonal expansion of TCR Vbeta subfamily T cells in NOD/SCID mice transplanted with human cord blood (CB) hematopoietic stem cells. The NOD/SCID mice were sublethally irradiated ((60)Co, 300cGy) to eliminate residual innate immunity in the host. The experimental mice were transplanted intravenously with CB CD34(+) cells sorted by MACS. After 6 weeks, RNA was obtained from peripheral blood, bone marrow and thymus of the study animals. The gene expression and clonality of the TCR Vbeta repertoire were determined by RT-PCR and GeneScan techniques. A restricted range of TCR Vbeta usage was exhibited in the bone marrow of mice, which included TCR Vbeta 1, 2, 9, 13 and 19. Further, oligoclonal expression of some TCR Vbeta subfamilies (Vbeta9, 13, 19) was identified by GeneScan technique. To investigate the reason for oligoclonal expansion of the TCR Vbeta subfamily T cells from CB in mouse models, the T-cell culture with tissue-antigen of NOD/SCID mouse was performed in vitro. The cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and bone marrow, spleen, thymus in NOD/SCID mice were frozen and thawed, and used as tissue-antigen. CB mononuclear cells were separately cultured with the component from those murine cells for 15-20 days. Oligoclonal expression or oligoclonal trend of some TCR Vbeta subfamilies (Vbeta10, 11 and Vbeta2, 15, 16, 19) was detected in T cells after stimulation with tissue-antigen of NOD/SCID mouse. Interestingly, a similar clonal expansion of the TCR Vbeta11 subfamily was found in T cells cultured with peripheral blood, bone marrow and spleen respectively. The TCR Vbeta

  6. Ex vivo expanded human regulatory T cells delay islet allograft rejection via inhibiting islet-derived monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production in CD34+ stem cells-reconstituted NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fang; Ma, Liang; Zhao, Min; Huang, Guocai; Mirenda, Vincenzo; Dorling, Anthony; Lechler, Robert; Lombardi, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is an autoimmune disease caused by immune-mediated destruction of insulin-secreting β cells of the pancreas. Near complete dependence on exogenous insulin makes T1DM very difficult to control, with the result that patients are exposed to high blood glucose and risk of diabetic complications and/or intermittent low blood glucose that can cause unconsciousness, fits and even death. Allograft transplantation of pancreatic islets restores normoglycemia with a low risk of surgical complications. However, although successful immediately after transplantation, islets are progressively lost, with most of the patients requiring exogenous insulin within 2 years post-transplant. Therefore, there is an urgent requirement for the development of new strategies to prevent islet rejection. In this study, we explored the importance of human regulatory T cells in the control of islets allograft rejection. We developed a pre-clinical model of human islet transplantation by reconstituting NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice with cord blood-derived human CD34+ stem cells and demonstrated that although the engrafted human immune system mediated the rejection of human islets, their survival was significantly prolonged following adoptive transfer of ex vivo expanded human Tregs. Mechanistically, Tregs inhibited the infiltration of innate immune cells and CD4+ T cells into the graft by down-regulating the islet graft-derived monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Our findings might contribute to the development of clinical strategies for Treg therapy to control human islet rejection. We also show for the first time that CD34+ cells-reconstituted NOD-scid IL2rγnull mouse model could be beneficial for investigating human innate immunity in vivo.

  7. Accumulation of xenotransplanted canine bone marrow cells in NOD/SCID/γc(null) mice with acute hepatitis induced by CCl4.

    PubMed

    Kato, Takashi; Hisasue, Masaharu; Segawa, Kazuhito; Fujimoto, Ayumi; Makiishi, Eri; Neo, Sakurako; Yasuno, Kyohei; Kobayashi, Ryosuke; Tsuchiya, Ryo

    2013-07-31

    Bone marrow cell infusion (BMI) has recently been suggested as an effective therapy for refractory liver disease; however, the efficiency of BMI using canine bone marrow cells (cBMCs) has not been reported. We evaluated the accumulation potential of cBMCs in a mouse model of acute liver failure. Acute hepatitis was induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) treatment in NOD/SCID/γc(null)(NOG) mice and wild-type (WT) C57BL mice, and the characteristics of liver dysfunction and the degree of hepatic injury and regeneration were compared between the two mouse models. Next, female CCl4-treated NOG mice were xenotransplanted with male PKH26-labeled cBMCs, and the potential of cBMCs to accumulate in injured liver tissue compartments was examined. Fluorescence microscopy was performed to histologically detect the infused cBMCs, and DNA polymerase chain reaction was performed for detection of the male Y chromosome (SRY gene) in the recipient female NOG mice. The number of PKH26-positive cBMCs transplanted in the liver tissue gradually increased in the NOG mice. The infused cBMCs were located in the necrotic area of the liver at an early stage after transplantation, and most had accumulated a week after transplantation. However, the therapeutic efficacy of the xenotransplantation remained unclear, because no significant differences were observed concerning the extent liver injury and regeneration between the cBMC-transplanted and saline control mice. These results suggest that cBMCs will specifically accumulate in injured liver tissue and that BMC transplantation may have the potential to repair liver deficiency.

  8. Sequential Cadaveric Lung and Bone Marrow Transplant for Immune Deficiency Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-16

    Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID); Immunodeficiency With Predominant T-cell Defect, Unspecified; Severe Chronic Neutropenia; Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD); Hyper IgE Syndromes; Hyper IgM Deficiencies; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Mendelian Susceptibility to Mycobacterial Disease; Common Variable Immune Deficiency (CVID)

  9. A Novel Model of SCID-X1 Reconstitution Reveals Predisposition to Retrovirus-induced Lymphoma but No Evidence of γC Gene Oncogenicity.

    PubMed

    Scobie, Linda; Hector, Ralph D; Grant, Louise; Bell, Margaret; Nielsen, Anne A; Meikle, Sharon; Philbey, Adrain; Thrasher, Adrain J; Cameron, Ewan R; Blyth, Karen; Neil, James C

    2009-06-01

    The emergence of leukemia following gene transfer to restore common cytokine receptor γ chain (γC) function in X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) has raised important questions with respect to gene therapy safety. To explore the risk factors involved, we tested the oncogenic potential of human γC in new strains of transgenic mice expressing the gene under the control of the CD2 promoter and locus control region (LCR). These mice demonstrated mildly perturbed T-cell development, with an increased proportion of thymic CD8 cells, but showed no predisposition to tumor development even on highly tumor prone backgrounds or after γ-retrovirus infection. The human CD2-γC transgene rescued T and B-cell development in γC(-/-) mice but with an age-related delay, mimicking postnatal reconstitution in SCID-X1 gene therapy subjects. However, we noted that γC(-/-) mice are acutely susceptible to murine leukemia virus (MLV) leukemogenesis, and that this trait was not corrected by the γC transgene. We conclude that the SCID-X1 phenotype can be corrected safely by stable ectopic expression of γC and that the transgene is not significantly oncogenic when expressed in this context. However, an underlying predisposition conferred by the SCID-X1 background appears to collaborate with insertional mutagenesis to increase the risk of tumor development.

  10. A novel model of SCID-X1 reconstitution reveals predisposition to retrovirus-induced lymphoma but no evidence of gammaC gene oncogenicity.

    PubMed

    Scobie, Linda; Hector, Ralph D; Grant, Louise; Bell, Margaret; Nielsen, Anne A; Meikle, Sharon; Philbey, Adrian; Philbey, Adrain; Thrasher, Adrian J; Thrasher, Adrain J; Cameron, Ewan R; Blyth, Karen; Neil, James C

    2009-06-01

    The emergence of leukemia following gene transfer to restore common cytokine receptor gamma chain (gammaC) function in X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) has raised important questions with respect to gene therapy safety. To explore the risk factors involved, we tested the oncogenic potential of human gammaC in new strains of transgenic mice expressing the gene under the control of the CD2 promoter and locus control region (LCR). These mice demonstrated mildly perturbed T-cell development, with an increased proportion of thymic CD8 cells, but showed no predisposition to tumor development even on highly tumor prone backgrounds or after gamma-retrovirus infection. The human CD2-gammaC transgene rescued T and B-cell development in gammaC(-/-) mice but with an age-related delay, mimicking postnatal reconstitution in SCID-X1 gene therapy subjects. However, we noted that gammaC(-/-) mice are acutely susceptible to murine leukemia virus (MLV) leukemogenesis, and that this trait was not corrected by the gammaC transgene. We conclude that the SCID-X1 phenotype can be corrected safely by stable ectopic expression of gammaC and that the transgene is not significantly oncogenic when expressed in this context. However, an underlying predisposition conferred by the SCID-X1 background appears to collaborate with insertional mutagenesis to increase the risk of tumor development.

  11. Reliability and validity of the Turkish version of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders (SCID-D): a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Kundakçi, Turgut; Sar, Vedat; Kiziltan, Emre; Yargiç, Ilhan L; Tutkun, Hamdi

    2014-01-01

    A total of 34 consecutive patients with dissociative identity disorder or dissociative disorder not otherwise specified were evaluated using the Turkish version of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders (SCID-D). They were compared with a matched control group composed of 34 patients who had a nondissociative psychiatric disorder. Interrater reliability was evaluated by 3 clinicians who assessed videotaped interviews conducted with 5 dissociative and 5 nondissociative patients. All subjects who were previously diagnosed by clinicians as having a dissociative disorder were identified as positive, and all subjects who were previously diagnosed as not having a dissociative disorder were identified as negative. The scores of the main symptom clusters and the total score of the SCID-D differentiated dissociative patients from the nondissociative group. There were strong correlations between the SCID-D and the Dissociative Experiences Scale total and subscale scores. These results are promising for the validity and reliability of the Turkish version of the SCID-D. However, as the present study was conducted on a predominantly female sample with very severe dissociation, these findings should not be generalized to male patients, to dissociative disorders other than dissociative identity disorder, or to broader clinical or nonclinical populations.

  12. Angiopoietin-like 5 and IGFBP2 stimulate ex vivo expansion of human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells as assayed by NOD/SCID transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng Cheng; Kaba, Megan; Iizuka, Satoru; Huynh, HoangDinh; Lodish, Harvey F

    2008-04-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are the basis of bone marrow transplantation and are attractive target cells for hematopoietic gene therapy, but these important clinical applications have been severely hampered by difficulties in ex vivo expansion of HSCs. In particular, the use of cord blood for adult transplantation is greatly limited by the number of HSCs. Previously we identified angiopoietin-like proteins and IGF-binding protein 2 (IGFBP2) as new hormones that, together with other factors, can expand mouse bone marrow HSCs in culture. Here, we measure the activity of multipotent human severe combined immunodeficient (SCID)-repopulating cells (SRCs) by transplantation into the nonobese diabetic SCID (NOD/SCID) mice; secondary transplantation was performed to evaluate the self-renewal potential of SRCs. A serum-free medium containing SCF, TPO, and FGF-1 or Flt3-L cannot significantly support expansion of the SRCs present in human cord blood CD133+ cells. Addition of either angiopoietin-like 5 or IGF-binding protein 2 to the cultures led to a sizable expansion of HSC numbers, as assayed by NOD/SCID transplantation. A serum-free culture containing SCF, TPO, FGF-1, angiopoietin-like 5, and IGFBP2 supports an approximately 20-fold net expansion of repopulating human cord blood HSCs, a number potentially applicable to several clinical processes including HSC transplantation.

  13. Foamy viral vector integration sites in SCID-repopulating cells after MGMTP140K-mediated in vivo selection

    PubMed Central

    Olszko, Miles E.; Adair, Jennifer E.; Linde, Ian; Rae, Dustin T.; Trobridge, Patty; Hocum, Jonah D.; Rawlings, David J.; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Trobridge, Grant D.

    2015-01-01

    Foamy virus (FV) vectors are promising for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy but preclinical data on the clonal composition of FV vector transduced human repopulating cells is needed. Human CD34+ human cord blood cells were transduced with an FV vector encoding a methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT)P140K transgene, transplanted into immunodeficient NOD/SCID IL2Rγnull (NSG) mice, and selected in vivo for gene-modified cells. The retroviral insertion site (RIS) profile of repopulating clones was examined using modified genomic sequencing PCR (MGS-PCR). We observed polyclonal repopulation with no evidence of clonal dominance even with the use of a strong internal spleen focus forming virus (SFFV) promoter known to be genotoxic. Our data supports the use of FV vectors with MGMTP140K for HSC gene therapy, but also suggests additional safety features should be developed and evaluated. PMID:25786870

  14. Foamy viral vector integration sites in SCID-repopulating cells after MGMTP140K-mediated in vivo selection.

    PubMed

    Olszko, M E; Adair, J E; Linde, I; Rae, D T; Trobridge, P; Hocum, J D; Rawlings, D J; Kiem, H-P; Trobridge, G D

    2015-07-01

    Foamy virus (FV) vectors are promising for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy but preclinical data on the clonal composition of FV vector-transduced human repopulating cells is needed. Human CD34(+) human cord blood cells were transduced with an FV vector encoding a methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT)P140K transgene, transplanted into immunodeficient NOD/SCID IL2Rγ(null) mice, and selected in vivo for gene-modified cells. The retroviral insertion site profile of repopulating clones was examined using modified genomic sequencing PCR. We observed polyclonal repopulation with no evidence of clonal dominance even with the use of a strong internal spleen focus forming virus promoter known to be genotoxic. Our data supports the use of FV vectors with MGMTP140K for HSC gene therapy but also suggests additional safety features should be developed and evaluated.

  15. Eradication of Human Hepatic and Pulmonary Melanoma Metastases in SCID Mice by Antibody--Interleukin 2 Fusion Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Jurgen C.; Pancook, James D.; Gillies, Stephen D.; Mendelsohn, John; Reisfeld, Ralph A.

    1996-04-01

    Antibody--cytokine fusion proteins combine the unique targeting ability of antibodies with the multifunctional activity of cytokines. Here, we demonstrate the therapeutic efficacy of such constructs for the treatment of hepatic and pulmonary metastases of different melanoma cell lines. Two antibody--interleukin 2 (IL-2) fusion proteins, ch225-IL2 and ch14.18-IL2, constructed by fusion of a synthetic sequence coding for human IL-2 to the carboxyl end of the Cγ 1 gene of the corresponding antibodies, were tested for their therapeutic efficacy against xenografted human melanoma in vivo. Tumorspecific fusion proteins completely inhibited the growth of hepatic and pulmonary metastases in C.B-17 scid/scid mice previously reconstituted with human lymphokine-activated killer cells, whereas treatment with combinations of the corresponding antibodies plus recombinant IL-2 only reduced the tumor load. Even when treatment with fusion proteins was delayed up to 8 days after inoculation of tumor cells, it still resulted in complete eradication of micrometastases that were established at that time point. Selection of tumor cell lines expressing or lacking the targeted antigen of the administered fusion protein proved the specificity of the observed antitumor effect. Biodistribution analysis demonstrated that the tumorspecific fusion protein accumulated not only in subcutaneous tumors but also in lungs and livers affected with micrometastases. Survival times of animals treated with the fusion protein were more than doubled as compared to those treated with the combination of the corresponding antibody plus IL-2. Our data demonstrate that an immunotherapeutic approach using cytokines targeted by antibodies to tumor sites has potent effects against disseminated human melanoma.

  16. Establishment of a retinoic acid-resistant human acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) model in human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) transgenic severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice.

    PubMed Central

    Fukuchi, Y.; Kizaki, M.; Kinjo, K.; Awaya, N.; Muto, A.; Ito, M.; Kawai, Y.; Umezawa, A.; Hata, J.; Ueyama, Y.; Ikeda, Y.

    1998-01-01

    To understand the mechanisms and identify novel approaches to overcoming retinoic acid (RA) resistance in acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL), we established the first human RA-resistant APL model in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. UF-1 cells, an RA-resistant APL cell line established in our laboratory, were transplanted into human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-producing SCID (hGMTg SCID) mice and inoculated cells formed subcutaneous tumours in all hGMTg SCID mice, but not in the non-transgenic control SCID mice. Single-cell suspensions (UF-1/GMTg SCID cells) were similar in morphological, immunological, cytogenetic and molecular genetic features to parental UF-1 cells. All-trans RA did not change the morphological features of cells or their expression of CD11b. RA did not alter the growth curve of cells as determined by MTT assay, suggesting that UF-1/GMTg SCID cells are resistant to RA. These results demonstrate that this is the first RA-resistant APL animal model that may be useful for investigating the biology of this myeloid leukaemia in vivo, as well as for evaluating novel therapeutic approaches including patients with RA-resistant APL. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9764578

  17. Transplantation of T cell-mediated, lymphoreticular disease from the scurfy (sf) mouse.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, V L; Rouse, B T; Wilkinson, J E

    1994-08-01

    The X-linked mutation, scurfy (sf), causes a fatal lymphoreticular disease characterized by runting, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, hypergammaglobulinemia, exfoliative dermatitis, Coombs'-positive anemia, and death by 24 days of age. T lymphocytes are required to mediate this syndrome as shown by a total absence of disease in mice bred to be scurfy and nude (sf/Y; nu/nu). The scurfy phenotype is not transmitted by sf/Y bone marrow transplants, though cells of scurfy origin do reconstitute all lymphoid organs in the recipient mouse. These data suggest that scurfy disease results from an abnormal T cell development process and not from an intrinsic stem cell defect. We therefore tested the ability of transplanted scurfy thymuses to transmit scurfy disease to congenic euthymic mice, to athymic (nude) mice, and to severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. Euthymic recipients of sf/Y thymic grafts remained clinically normal as did all SCID and nude recipients of normal thymus transplants. Morphological lesions similar to those found in scurfy mice occurred in all H-2-compatible nude and SCID recipients of sf/Y thymic grafts. Intraperitoneal injections of scurfy thymocytes, splenocytes, and lymph node cells also transmitted the scurfy phenotype to H-2-compatible nude mice and SCID mice. Our findings indicate that scurfy disease can be transmitted to T cell-deficient mice by engraftment of scurfy T cells, but that pathogenic scurfy T cell activities can be inhibited (or prevented) in immunocompetent recipient mice.

  18. [Effect of combined administration of Angelica polysaccharide and cytarabine on liver of human leukemia NOD/SCID mouse model].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jia-Hong; Xu, Chun-Yan; Mu, Xin-Yi; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Meng-Si; Jia, Dao-Yong; Zhang, Yan-Yan; Huang, Guo-Ning; Wang, Ya-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Leukemia is a type of malignant tumors of hematopoietic system with the abnormal increased immature leukemia cells showing metastasis and invasion ability. Liver is one of the main targets of the leukemia cells spread to, where they may continue to proliferate and differentiate and cause liver function damage, even liver failure. Our previous studies showed that Angelica polysscharides (APS), the main effective components in Angelica sinensis of Chinese traditional medicine, was able to inhibit the proliferation and induced differentiation of the leukemia cells, however, its effect on the liver during the treatment remains elucidated. In the present study, the human leukemia NOD/SCID mouse model were established by implantation human leukemia K562 cells line, then the leukemia mouse were treated with APS, Ara-c or APS + Ara-c respectively by peritoneal injection for 14 days, to explore the effect and mechanism of the chemicals on the mouse liver. Compared to the human leukemia NOD/SCID mouse model group with the treatments of APS, Ara-c and APS + Ara-c, We found that severe liver damage and pathological changes of the liver were able to alleviate: First, the number of white blood cells in the peripheral blood was significantly lower and with less transplanted K562 leukemia cells; Second, liver function damage was alleviated as liver function tests showed that alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and total bilirubin (TBiL) were significantly reduced, while the albumin (Alb) was notably increased; Third, liver antioxidant ability was improved as the activities of the antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were significantly increased, and the contents of GSH and malonaldehyde (MDA) were decreased significantly in the liver; Fourth, the inflammation of the liver was relieved as the level of IL-1beta and IL-6, the inflammatory cytokines, were decreased significantly in the liver. Fifth, liver index

  19. A Case of IL-7R Deficiency Caused by a Novel Synonymous Mutation and Implications for Mutation Screening in SCID Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Gallego-Bustos, Fernando; Gotea, Valer; Ramos-Amador, José T.; Rodríguez-Pena, Rebeca; Gil-Herrera, Juana; Sastre, Ana; Delmiro, Aitor; Rai, Ghadi; Elnitski, Laura; González-Granado, Luis I.; Allende, Luis M.

    2016-01-01

    Reported synonymous substitutions are generally non-pathogenic, and rare pathogenic synonymous variants may be disregarded unless there is a high index of suspicion. In a case of IL7 receptor deficiency severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), the relevance of a non-reported synonymous variant was only suspected through the use of additional in silico computational tools, which focused on the impact of mutations on gene splicing. The pathogenic nature of the variant was confirmed using experimental validation of the effect on mRNA splicing and IL7 pathway function. This case reinforces the need to use additional experimental methods to establish the functional impact of specific mutations, in particular for cases such as SCID where prompt diagnosis can greatly impact on diagnosis, treatment, and survival. PMID:27833609

  20. Human platelet antigen (HPA)-1a peptides do not reliably suppress anti-HPA-1a responses using a humanized severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse model.

    PubMed

    Jackson, D J; Eastlake, J L; Kumpel, B M

    2014-04-01

    Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) occurs most frequently when human platelet antigen (HPA)-1a-positive fetal platelets are destroyed by maternal HPA-1a immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibodies. Pregnancies at risk are treated by administration of high-dose intravenous Ig (IVIG) to women, but this is expensive and often not well tolerated. Peptide immunotherapy may be effective for ameliorating some allergic and autoimmune diseases. The HPA-1a/1b polymorphism is Leu/Pro33 on β3 integrin (CD61), and the anti-HPA-1a response is restricted to HPA-1b1b and HLA-DRB3*0101-positive pregnant women with an HPA-1a-positive fetus. We investigated whether or not HPA-1a antigen-specific peptides that formed the T cell epitope could reduce IgG anti-HPA-1a responses, using a mouse model we had developed previously. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in blood donations from HPA-1a-immunized women were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) into severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice with peptides and HPA-1a-positive platelets. Human anti-HPA-1a in murine plasma was quantitated at intervals up to 15 weeks. HPA-1a-specific T cells in PBMC were identified by proliferation assays. Using PBMC of three donors who had little T cell reactivity to HPA-1a peptides in vitro, stimulation of anti-HPA-1a responses by these peptides occurred in vivo. However, with a second donation from one of these women which, uniquely, had high HPA-1a-specific T cell proliferation in vitro, marked suppression of the anti-HPA-1a response by HPA-1a peptides occurred in vivo. HPA-1a peptide immunotherapy in this model depended upon reactivation of HPA-1a T cell responses in the donor. For FNAIT, we suggest that administration of antigen-specific peptides to pregnant women might cause either enhancement or reduction of pathogenic antibodies.

  1. Human platelet antigen (HPA)-1a peptides do not reliably suppress anti-HPA-1a responses using a humanized severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, D J; Eastlake, J L; Kumpel, B M

    2014-01-01

    Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) occurs most frequently when human platelet antigen (HPA)-1a-positive fetal platelets are destroyed by maternal HPA-1a immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibodies. Pregnancies at risk are treated by administration of high-dose intravenous Ig (IVIG) to women, but this is expensive and often not well tolerated. Peptide immunotherapy may be effective for ameliorating some allergic and autoimmune diseases. The HPA-1a/1b polymorphism is Leu/Pro33 on β3 integrin (CD61), and the anti-HPA-1a response is restricted to HPA-1b1b and HLA-DRB3*0101-positive pregnant women with an HPA-1a-positive fetus. We investigated whether or not HPA-1a antigen-specific peptides that formed the T cell epitope could reduce IgG anti-HPA-1a responses, using a mouse model we had developed previously. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in blood donations from HPA-1a-immunized women were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) into severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice with peptides and HPA-1a-positive platelets. Human anti-HPA-1a in murine plasma was quantitated at intervals up to 15 weeks. HPA-1a-specific T cells in PBMC were identified by proliferation assays. Using PBMC of three donors who had little T cell reactivity to HPA-1a peptides in vitro, stimulation of anti-HPA-1a responses by these peptides occurred in vivo. However, with a second donation from one of these women which, uniquely, had high HPA-1a-specific T cell proliferation in vitro, marked suppression of the anti-HPA-1a response by HPA-1a peptides occurred in vivo. HPA-1a peptide immunotherapy in this model depended upon reactivation of HPA-1a T cell responses in the donor. For FNAIT, we suggest that administration of antigen-specific peptides to pregnant women might cause either enhancement or reduction of pathogenic antibodies. PMID:24261689

  2. Role of CD4+, CD8+ and double negative T-cells in the protection of SCID/beige mice against respiratory challenge with Rhodococcus equi.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, T L; Balson, G A; Miners, J S; Smith, G D; Shewen, P E; Prescott, J F; Yager, J A

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the contributions of T-lymphocyte subsets in pulmonary immunity against Rhodococcus equi, C.B-17 SCID/beige mice were adoptively transferred with splenic lymphocytes from congenic BALB/c mice previously infected with R. equi. Spleen cells were enriched for either CD4+ or CD8+ populations before inoculation, Flow cytometry showed that each enriched population contained less than 0.5% cross contamination. Groups of adoptively transferred SCID/beige mice were sacrificed 6 and 13 d after intranasal infection with R. equi. Bacterial clearance was measured in the lungs, liver and spleen. Lesion development was assessed by gross and histopathological score and the fate of transferred cells assessed by flow cytometry and by immunohistochemistry. SCID/beige mice receiving either CD4+ or CD8+ T-cells were able to clear the infection better than control mice. On d 6 post-infection, bacterial numbers were significantly lower in the lungs of CD4+ transferred mice as compared to CD8+ mice. By d 13, both groups had cleared R. equi from all organs. CD4+ cells were however identified in the lung and spleen of CD8+ recipients at d 13 making conclusions about the role of CD8+ cells in R. equi clearance impossible. By contrast, no significant increases in CD8+ lymphocytes were observed in the organs of CD4+ recipients. All mice developed suppurative bronchopneumonia but lesions were most severe in the CD4+ group. Immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry confirmed that CD4+ and CD8+ cells had migrated to the lungs of adoptively transferred mice. Serum antibody against R, equi was not detected by ELISA in the recipients. SCID/beige mice receiving CD4-CD8- cells were unable to clear R. equi. The study supports the suggestion that CD4+ cells have a central role in R. equi clearance in mice. Images Figure 2. Figure 5. PMID:8809381

  3. Development of Cryptosporidium parvum-Induced Gastrointestinal Neoplasia in Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) Mice: Severity of Lesions Is Correlated with Infection Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Certad, Gabriela; Creusy, Colette; Ngouanesavanh, Tramy; Guyot, Karine; Gantois, Nausicaa; Mouray, Anthony; Chassat, Thierry; Flament, Nicolas; Fleurisse, Laurence; Pinon, Anthony; Delhaes, Laurence; Dei-Cas, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    We reported previously that Cryptosporidium parvum was able to induce intestinal tumors in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice treated with corticoids. To further characterize this Cryptosporidium-induced cell transformation, SCID mice treated with dexamethasone were challenged with C. parvum oocysts, and euthanatized sequentially after infection for histologic examination. Ki-67 was used as a marker of cellular proliferation. Our previous results were confirmed, and it was also found that mice receiving higher inocula (106–107) experienced more severe neoplastic development. Additionally, neoplastic changes were observed not only in the caecum but also in the stomach and duodenum of some animals. Interestingly, SCID mice (6/6) inoculated with 105–107 oocysts showed high grade intraepithelial neoplasia or adenomas with high grade dysplasia in the caecum after Day 46 post-infection (PI). Immunohistochemistry for Ki-67 staining indicated the neoplastic process associated to cryptosporidiosis, and evidenced the first immunohistochemical alterations at early stages of the process, even at 3 weeks PI. PMID:20134002

  4. A New IL-2RG Gene Mutation in an X-linked SCID Identified through TREC/KREC Screening: a Case Report.

    PubMed

    Nourizadeh, Maryam; Borte, Stephan; Fazlollahi, Mohammad Reza; Hammarström, Lennart; Pourpak, Zahra

    2015-08-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) represents a rare group of primary immunodeficiency disorders (PIDs), with known or unknown genetic alterations. Here, we report a new interleukin 2 receptor, gamma chain (IL-2RG) mutation in an Iranian SCID newborn. The patient was a 6-day old boy with a family history of PID. The child was screened using a molecular-based analysis for the assessment of T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) and kappa-deleting recombination excision circles (KRECs). Moreover, a complete immunological evaluation and gene sequencing was performed. Results showed undetectable TREC but a high level of KREC copy numbers. Flow cytometric data indicated low numbers of T and NK cells, but elevated number of B cells. A novel substitution in IL2RG: c.675 C>A, leading to p.225 Ser>Arg was found. Based on the functional analysis, the mutation is predicted to be damaging. The patient was diagnosed as a T B+ NK X-linked SCID.

  5. Pretransplant mobilization with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor improves B-cell reconstitution by lentiviral vector gene therapy in SCID-X1 mice.

    PubMed

    Huston, Marshall W; Riegman, Adriaan R A; Yadak, Rana; van Helsdingen, Yvette; de Boer, Helen; van Til, Niek P; Wagemaker, Gerard

    2014-10-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy is a demonstrated effective treatment for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), but B-cell reconstitution and function has been deficient in many of the gene therapy treated patients. Cytoreductive preconditioning is known to improve HSC engraftment, but in general it is not considered for SCID-X1 since the poor health of most of these patients at diagnosis and the risk of toxicity preclude the conditioning used in standard bone marrow stem cell transplantation. We hypothesized that mobilization of HSC by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) should create temporary space in bone marrow niches to improve engraftment and thereby B-cell reconstitution. In the present pilot study supplementing our earlier preclinical evaluation (Huston et al., 2011), Il2rg(-/-) mice pretreated with G-CSF were transplanted with wild-type lineage negative (Lin(-)) cells or Il2rg(-/-) Lin(-) cells transduced with therapeutic IL2RG lentiviral vectors. Mice were monitored for reconstitution of lymphocyte populations, level of donor cell chimerism, and antibody responses as compared to 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI), previously found effective in promoting B-cell reconstitution. The results demonstrate that G-CSF promotes B-cell reconstitution similar to low-dose TBI and provides proof of principle for an alternative approach to improve efficacy of gene therapy in SCID patients without adverse effects associated with cytoreductive conditioning.

  6. Neonatal bone marrow transplantation of ADA-deficient SCID mice results in immunologic reconstitution despite low levels of engraftment and an absence of selective donor T lymphoid expansion.

    PubMed

    Carbonaro, Denise A; Jin, Xiangyang; Cotoi, Daniel; Mi, Tiejuan; Yu, Xiao-Jin; Skelton, Dianne C; Dorey, Frederick; Kellems, Rodney E; Blackburn, Michael R; Kohn, Donald B

    2008-06-15

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) may be treated by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation without prior cytoreductive conditioning, although the mechanism of immune reconstitution is unclear. We studied this process in a murine gene knockout model of ADA-deficient SCID. Newborn ADA-deficient pups received transplants of intravenous infusion of normal congenic bone marrow, without prior cytoreductive conditioning, which resulted in long-term survival, multisystem correction, and nearly normal lymphocyte numbers and mitogenic proliferative responses. Only 1% to 3% of lymphocytes and myeloid cells were of donor origin without a selective expansion of donor-derived lymphocytes; immune reconstitution was by endogenous, host-derived ADA-deficient lymphocytes. Preconditioning of neonates with 100 to 400 cGy of total body irradiation before normal donor marrow transplant increased the levels of engrafted donor cells in a radiation dose-dependent manner, but the chimerism levels were similar for lymphoid and myeloid cells. The absence of selective reconstitution by donor T lymphocytes in the ADA-deficient mice indicates that restoration of immune function occurred by rescue of endogenous ADA-deficient lymphocytes through cross-correction from the engrafted ADA-replete donor cells. Thus, ADA-deficient SCID is unique in its responses to nonmyeloablative bone marrow transplantation, which has implications for clinical bone marrow transplantation or gene therapy.

  7. The antitumor activity of an anti-CD54 antibody in SCID mice xenografted with human breast, prostate, non-small cell lung, and pancreatic tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Kimberly J; Coleman, Elaine J; Vitetta, Ellen S

    2008-11-15

    We have previously described the development and testing of a monoclonal anti-human CD54 antibody (UV3) in SCID mice xenografted with human multiple myeloma, lymphoma, and melanoma cell lines. In all 3 cases, UV3 was highly effective at slowing the growth of tumors and/or prolonging survival. Since CD54 (ICAM-1) is up-regulated on many different types of cancer cells, we have now investigated the anti-tumor activity of UV3 in several other CD54(+) epithelial tumors. A panel of 16 human breast, prostate, non-small cell (NSC) lung, and pancreatic tumor cell lines was examined for reactivity with UV3, and 13 were positive. A representative CD54(+) cell line from each cancer was grown subcutaneously in SCID mice. Once the tumors were established, UV3 was administered using different dose regimens. UV3 slowed the growth of all 4 tumors, although it was not curative. When UV3 or gemcitabine were administered to SCID mice xenografted with a NSC lung tumor cell line or a pancreatic tumor cell line, UV3 was as effective as the chemotherapy alone. When gemcitabine and UV3 were administered together, the best anti-tumor responses were observed. UV3 has been chimerized (cUV3) and both toxicology studies and clinical trials are planned to assess the safety and activity of cUV3 in patients with one or more of these tumors.

  8. Pretransplant Mobilization with Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Improves B-Cell Reconstitution by Lentiviral Vector Gene Therapy in SCID-X1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huston, Marshall W.; Riegman, Adriaan R.A.; Yadak, Rana; van Helsdingen, Yvette; de Boer, Helen; van Til, Niek P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy is a demonstrated effective treatment for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), but B-cell reconstitution and function has been deficient in many of the gene therapy treated patients. Cytoreductive preconditioning is known to improve HSC engraftment, but in general it is not considered for SCID-X1 since the poor health of most of these patients at diagnosis and the risk of toxicity preclude the conditioning used in standard bone marrow stem cell transplantation. We hypothesized that mobilization of HSC by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) should create temporary space in bone marrow niches to improve engraftment and thereby B-cell reconstitution. In the present pilot study supplementing our earlier preclinical evaluation (Huston et al., 2011), Il2rg−/− mice pretreated with G-CSF were transplanted with wild-type lineage negative (Lin−) cells or Il2rg−/− Lin− cells transduced with therapeutic IL2RG lentiviral vectors. Mice were monitored for reconstitution of lymphocyte populations, level of donor cell chimerism, and antibody responses as compared to 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI), previously found effective in promoting B-cell reconstitution. The results demonstrate that G-CSF promotes B-cell reconstitution similar to low-dose TBI and provides proof of principle for an alternative approach to improve efficacy of gene therapy in SCID patients without adverse effects associated with cytoreductive conditioning. PMID:25222508

  9. IgE basement membrane zone antibodies induce eosinophil infiltration and histological blisters in engrafted human skin on SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Zone, John J; Taylor, Ted; Hull, Christopher; Schmidt, Linda; Meyer, Laurence

    2007-05-01

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is characterized by the deposition of IgG in the basement membrane zone, infiltration of eosinophils, and blister formation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a potential role of IgE basement membrane antibodies in the histological findings of BP. LABD97 is a component of the shed ectodomain of bullous pemphigoid antigen 2. We have developed an IgE hybridoma to LABD97 antigen. This hybridoma was injected subcutaneously in SCID mice with engrafted human skin. A subcutaneous hybridoma secreting IgE antibodies developed. An IgE mouse hybridoma to trinitrophenyl was used as a control. Human grafts and mouse skin were examined grossly over 21 days, histologically, and immunopathologically at day 21 after injection of the hybridoma. A visible subcutaneous tumor developed in 10-14 days. Erythema and intense scratching developed 2-3 days before the tumor in test mice, but not in controls. At day 21, 16/16 test mice developed intense eosinophil infiltration and degranulation of the human mast cells within the grafts and 13/16 developed histological, but not clinically visible, basement membrane blisters. Human skin grafts of control mice and normal mouse skin on the test mice and control mice did not develop any histological abnormalities. IgE antibodies to LABD97 recapitulate the histological inflammatory process seen in BP.

  10. Biaxial mechanical properties of the inferior vena cava in C57BL/6 and CB-17 SCID/bg mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y U; Naito, Y; Kurobe, H; Breuer, C K; Humphrey, J D

    2013-09-03

    Multiple murine models have proven useful in studying the natural history of neovessel development in the tissue engineering of vascular grafts. Nevertheless, to better understand longitudinal changes in the biomechanics of such neovessels, we must first quantify native tissue structure and properties. In this paper, we present the first biaxial mechanical data for, and nonlinear constitutive modeling of, &QJ;the inferior vena cava from two models used in tissue engineering: wild-type C57BL/6 and immunodeficient CB-17 SCID/bg mice. Results show that inferior vena cava from the latter are significantly stiffer in the circumferential direction, both materially (as assessed by a stored energy function) and structurally (as assessed by the compliance), despite a lower intramural content of fibrillar collagen and similar wall thickness. Quantifying the natural history of neovessel development in different hosts could lead to increased insight into the mechanisms by which cells fashion and maintain extracellular matrix in order to match best the host stiffness while ensuring sufficient vascular integrity.

  11. Prolonged pancytopenia in a gene therapy patient with ADA-deficient SCID and trisomy 8 mosaicism: a case report.

    PubMed

    Engel, Barbara C; Podsakoff, Greg M; Ireland, Joanna L; Smogorzewska, E Monika; Carbonaro, Denise A; Wilson, Kathy; Shah, Ami; Kapoor, Neena; Sweeney, Mirna; Borchert, Mark; Crooks, Gay M; Weinberg, Kenneth I; Parkman, Robertson; Rosenblatt, Howard M; Wu, Shi-Qi; Hershfield, Michael S; Candotti, Fabio; Kohn, Donald B

    2007-01-15

    A patient with adenosine deaminase-deficient severe combined immune deficiency (ADA-SCID) was enrolled in a study of retroviral-mediated ADA gene transfer to bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells. After the discontinuation of ADA enzyme replacement, busulfan (75 mg/m2) was administered for bone marrow cytoreduction, followed by infusion of autologous, gene-modified CD34+ cells. The expected myelosuppression developed after busulfan but then persisted, necessitating the administration of untransduced autologous bone marrow back-up at day 40. Because of sustained pancytopenia and negligible gene marking, diagnostic bone marrow biopsy and aspirate were performed at day 88. Analyses revealed hypocellular marrow and, unexpectedly, evidence of trisomy 8 in 21.6% of cells. Trisomy 8 mosaicism (T8M) was subsequently diagnosed by retrospective analysis of a pretreatment marrow sample that might have caused the lack of hematopoietic reconstitution. The confounding effects of this preexisting marrow cytogenetic abnormality on the response to gene transfer highlights another challenge of gene therapy with the use of autologous hematopoietic stem cells.

  12. Lack of Genomic Instability in Bone Marrow Cells of SCID Mice Exposed Whole-Body to Low-Dose Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Rithidech, Kanokporn Noy; Udomtanakunchai, Chatchanok; Honikel, Louise; Whorton, Elbert

    2013-01-01

    It is clear that high-dose radiation is harmful. However, despite extensive research, assessment of potential health-risks associated with exposure to low-dose radiation (at doses below or equal to 0.1 Gy) is still challenging. Recently, we reported that 0.05 Gy of 137Cs gamma rays (the existing limit for radiation-exposure in the workplace) was incapable of inducing significant in vivo genomic instability (measured by the presence of late-occurring chromosomal damage at 6 months post-irradiation) in bone marrow (BM) cells of two mouse strains, one with constitutively high and one with intermediate levels of the repair enzyme DNA-dependent protein-kinase catalytic-subunit (DNA-PKcs). In this study, we present evidence for a lack of genomic instability in BM cells of the severely combined-immunodeficiency (SCID/J) mouse (which has an extremely low-level of DNA-PKcs activity) exposed whole-body to low-dose radiation (0.05 Gy). Together with our previous report, the data indicate that low-dose radiation (0.05 Gy) is incapable of inducing genomic instability in vivo (regardless of the levels of DNA-PKcs activity of the exposed mice), yet higher doses of radiation (0.1 and 1 Gy) do induce genomic instability in mice with intermediate and extremely low-levels of DNA-PKcs activity (indicating an important role of DNA-PKcs in DNA repair). PMID:23549227

  13. Proteasome inhibition reduces superantigen-mediated T cell activation and the severity of psoriasis in a SCID-hu model.

    PubMed

    Zollner, Thomas M; Podda, Maurizio; Pien, Christine; Elliott, Peter J; Kaufmann, Roland; Boehncke, Wolf-Henning

    2002-03-01

    There is increasing evidence that bacterial superantigens contribute to inflammation and T cell responses in psoriasis. Psoriatic inflammation entails a complex series of inductive and effector processes that require the regulated expression of various proinflammatory genes, many of which require NF-kappa B for maximal trans-activation. PS-519 is a potent and selective proteasome inhibitor based upon the naturally occurring compound lactacystin, which inhibits NF-kappa B activation by blocking the degradation of its inhibitory protein I kappa B. We report that proteasome inhibition by PS-519 reduces superantigen-mediated T cell-activation in vitro and in vivo. Proliferation was inhibited along with the expression of very early (CD69), early (CD25), and late T cell (HLA-DR) activation molecules. Moreover, expression of E-selectin ligands relevant to dermal T cell homing was reduced, as was E-selectin binding in vitro. Finally, PS-519 proved to be therapeutically effective in a SCID-hu xenogeneic psoriasis transplantation model. We conclude that inhibition of the proteasome, e.g., by PS-519, is a promising means to treat T cell-mediated disorders such as psoriasis.

  14. Mobilization Characteristics and Strategies to Improve Hematopoietic Progenitor Cell Mobilization and Collection in Patients with Chronic Granulomatous Disease and Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Panch, Sandhya R.; Yau, Yu Ying; Kang, Elizabeth M.; De Ravin, Suk See; Malech, Harry L.; Leitman, Susan F.

    2014-01-01

    Background G-CSF mobilized autologous hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) may be collected by apheresis of patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) and severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) for use in gene therapy trials. CD34+ cell mobilization has not been well characterized in such patients. Study Design and Methods We retrospectively evaluated CD34+ cell mobilization and collection in 73 consecutive CGD and SCID patients and in 99 age, weight and G-CSF dose-matched healthy allogeneic controls. Results In subjects aged ≤20 years, day 5 pre-apheresis circulating CD34+ counts were significantly lower in CGD and SCID than in controls; mean peak CD34+ cells 58, 64, and 87/uL, respectively, p=0.01. The SCIDs had lower CD34+ collection efficiency than CGDs and controls; mean efficiency 40%, 63% and 57%, respectively, p=0.003. In subjects >20 years, the CGDs had significantly lower CD34+ cell mobilization than controls; mean peak CD34+ cells 41 and 113/uL, respectively, p<0.0001. In a multivariate analysis, lower sedimentation rate (ESR) at mobilization was significantly correlated with better CD34+ cell mobilization, p=0.007. In SCIDs, CD34 collection efficiency was positively correlated with higher red cell indices (MCV: R2=0.77; MCH: R2=0.94; MCHC: R2=0.7, p<0.007) but not hemoglobin. Conclusions CGD and SCID populations are characterized by significantly less robust CD34+ HPC mobilization than healthy controls. The presence of active inflammation/infection as suggested by an elevated ESR may negatively impact mobilization. Among SCIDs, markedly reduced CD34 collection efficiencies were related to iron deficiency, wherein decreased red cell size and density may impair apheresis cell separation mechanics. PMID:25143186

  15. Effects of chitosan on xenograft models of melanoma in C57BL/6 mice and hepatoma formation in SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Ming-Yang; Wu, Ming-Fang; Shang, Hung-Sheng; Chang, Jin-Biou; Shih, Yung-Luen; Chen, Yung-Liang; Hung, Hsiao-Fang; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Yeh, Chun; Wood, W Gibson; Hung, Fang-Ming; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2013-11-01

    According to the World Health Organization, Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is a comprehensive term referring to traditional medical treatments and various forms of indigenous medicines, also known as indigenous or folk medicine. Cancer patients often use CAM in the form of nutritional supplements, psychological techniques and natural medical approaches in the place of or in parallel to conventional medicine. The present study aimed to determine if Chitosan can inhibit lung metastasis and hepatoma formation, by studying xenograft of B16F10 melanoma cells in C57BL/6 mice and of Smmu 7721 cells in SCID mice, respectively. For the lung metastasis model, after a five-week treatment, the survival rates of B6 mice were 15% for the control group and 35%, 20%, 45% and 40% for the 320,000 kDa, 173,000 kDa, 86,000 kDa and 8,000 kDa molecular-weight treatment groups, respectively. Chitosan treatment dramatically increased lifespan and inhibited tumor metastasis especially in treatment groups of the low-molecular weight compound. For the hepatoma growth model, the size of the liver tumor mass was approximately >14 mm in the control group. In comparison to the control group, the tumor mass grew slowly with Chitosan treatment, especially at the low-molecular weight treatment group. Chitosan slowed-down the rate of tumor growth but did not inhibit tumor formation. Data presented herein demonstrate that Chitosan has anticancer effects and thus further study of the substance is warranted to examine for mechanisms of action and optimal dosage.

  16. Anti-HCV therapies in chimeric scid-Alb/uPA mice parallel outcomes in human clinical application.

    PubMed

    Kneteman, Norman M; Weiner, Amy J; O'Connell, John; Collett, Marc; Gao, Tiejun; Aukerman, Lea; Kovelsky, Rosemary; Ni, Zhi-Jie; Zhu, Qing; Hashash, Ahmad; Kline, Janine; Hsi, Belinda; Schiller, Daniel; Douglas, Donna; Tyrrell, D Lorne J; Mercer, David F

    2006-06-01

    Compounds with in vitro anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) activity are often advanced directly into clinical trials with limited or no in vivo efficacy data. This limits prediction of clinical efficacy of compounds in the HCV drug pipeline, and may expose human subjects to unnecessary treatment effects. The scid-Alb-uPA mouse supports proliferation of transplanted human hepatocytes and subsequent HCV infection. Cohorts of genotype 1a HCV-infected mice were treated with interferon alpha-2b(IFN-alpha), BILN-2061 (anti-NS3 protease), or HCV371 (anti-NS5B polymerase). Mice treated with 1350 IU/g/day IFN-alpha intramuscularly for 10 to 28 days demonstrated reduced viral titers compared with controls in all five experiments (P < .05, t test); viral titers rebounded after treatment withdrawal. A more pronounced antiviral effect with IFN-alpha was seen in genotype 3a-infected mice. Pilot studies with BILN2061 confirmed exposure to 10X replicon EC50 at trough and reduced viral titer over 2 log at 4 days. In a second 7-day study, mean HCV RNA titers dropped 1.1 log in BILN2061-treated animals, 0.6 log in IFN-treated mice, and rose 0.2 log in controls (P = .013, ANOVA). Pre-existing mutants with partial resistance to BILN2061 were identified by sequencing both the human inoculum and sera from treated mice. The polymerase inhibitor HCV371 yielded a decline in HCV titers of 0.3 log relative to vehicle-treated controls (P = NS). Performance of all three antiviral regimens in the chimeric mouse model paralleled responses in humans. In conclusion, this system may help selection of lead compounds for advancement into human trials with an increased likelihood of clinical success while broadening the tools available for study of the biology of HCV infection.

  17. A review of current murine models of multiple myeloma used to assess the efficacy of therapeutic agents on tumour growth and bone disease.

    PubMed

    Paton-Hough, J; Chantry, A D; Lawson, M A

    2015-08-01

    Pre-clinical in vivo models of multiple myeloma are essential tools for investigating the pathophysiology of multiple myeloma and for testing new therapeutic agents and strategies prior to their potential use in clinical trials. Over the last five decades, several different types of murine models of multiple myeloma have been developed ranging from immunocompetent syngeneic models, e.g. the 5 T series of myeloma cells, to immunocompromised models including the SCID xenograft models, which use human myeloma cell lines or patient-derived cells. Other models include hybrid models featuring the implantation of SCID mice with bone chips (SCID-hu or SCID-rab) or 3-D bone scaffolds (SCID-synth-hu), and mice that have been genetically engineered to develop myeloma. Bearing in mind the differences in these models, it is not surprising that they reflect to varying degrees different aspects of myeloma. Here we review the past and present murine models of myeloma, with particular emphasis on their advantages and limitations, characteristics, and their use in testing therapeutic agents to treat myeloma tumour burden and bone disease.

  18. Improving cellular therapy for primary immune deficiency diseases: Recognition, diagnosis, and management

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Linda M.; Cowan, Morton J.; Notarangelo, Luigi D.; Puck, Jennifer M.; Buckley, Rebecca H.; Candotti, Fabio; Conley, Mary Ellen; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Gaspar, H. Bobby; Kohn, Donald B.; Ochs, Hans D.; O'Reilly, Richard J.; Rizzo, J. Douglas; Roifman, Chaim M.; Small, Trudy N.; Shearer, William T.

    2010-01-01

    More than 20 North American academic centers account for the majority of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) procedures for primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs), with smaller numbers performed at additional sites. Given the importance of a timely diagnosis of these rare diseases and the diversity of practice sites, there is a need for guidance as to best practices in management of patients with PIDs before, during, and in follow-up for definitive treatment. In this conference report of immune deficiency experts and HCT physicians who care for patients with PIDs, we present expert guidance for (1) PID diagnoses that are indications for HCT, including severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID), combined immunodeficiency disease, and other non-SCID diseases; (2) the critical importance of a high degree of suspicion of the primary care physician and timeliness of diagnosis for PIDs; (3) the need for rapid referral to an immune deficiency expert, center with experience in HCT, or both for patients with PIDs; (4) medical management of a child with suspicion of SCID/combined immunodeficiency disease while confirming the diagnosis, including infectious disease management and workup; (5) the posttransplantation follow-up visit schedule; (6) antimicrobial prophylaxis after transplantation, including gamma globulin administration; and (7) important indications for return to the transplantation center after discharge. Finally, we discuss the role of high-quality databases in treatment of PIDs and HCTas an element of the infrastructure that will be needed for productive multicenter clinical trials in these rare diseases. PMID:20004776

  19. Improving cellular therapy for primary immune deficiency diseases: recognition, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Linda M; Cowan, Morton J; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Puck, Jennifer M; Buckley, Rebecca H; Candotti, Fabio; Conley, Mary Ellen; Fleisher, Thomas A; Gaspar, H Bobby; Kohn, Donald B; Ochs, Hans D; O'Reilly, Richard J; Rizzo, J Douglas; Roifman, Chaim M; Small, Trudy N; Shearer, William T

    2009-12-01

    More than 20 North American academic centers account for the majority of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) procedures for primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs), with smaller numbers performed at additional sites. Given the importance of a timely diagnosis of these rare diseases and the diversity of practice sites, there is a need for guidance as to best practices in management of patients with PIDs before, during, and in follow-up for definitive treatment. In this conference report of immune deficiency experts and HCT physicians who care for patients with PIDs, we present expert guidance for (1) PID diagnoses that are indications for HCT, including severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID), combined immunodeficiency disease, and other non-SCID diseases; (2) the critical importance of a high degree of suspicion of the primary care physician and timeliness of diagnosis for PIDs; (3) the need for rapid referral to an immune deficiency expert, center with experience in HCT, or both for patients with PIDs; (4) medical management of a child with suspicion of SCID/combined immunodeficiency disease while confirming the diagnosis, including infectious disease management and workup; (5) the posttransplantation follow-up visit schedule; (6) antimicrobial prophylaxis after transplantation, including gamma globulin administration; and (7) important indications for return to the transplantation center after discharge. Finally, we discuss the role of high-quality databases in treatment of PIDs and HCT as an element of the infrastructure that will be needed for productive multicenter clinical trials in these rare diseases.

  20. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor gene transduction into human lung cancer cells differentially regulates metastasis formations in various organ microenvironments of natural killer cell-depleted SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Yano, S; Nishioka, Y; Nokihara, H; Sone, S

    1997-02-15

    We investigated whether local production of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), responsible for migration and activation of monocytes/macrophages at a tumor growth site, affected the metastatic pattern of lung cancer. For this, highly metastatic human squamous (RERF-LC-AI) or small (H69/VP) cell lung carcinoma cells were transduced with the human M-CSF gene inserted into pRc/CMV-MCSF to establish M-CSF-producing clones (MCSF-AI-9-18, MCSF-AI-9-24, and MCSF-VP-5). M-CSF gene transduction had no effect on the expression of surface antigen or on in vitro proliferation. After s.c. injection into SCID mice, the growth rates of M-CSF-producing cells were slower than those of parent or mock-transduced cells. In the metastatic model in SCID mice depleted of natural killer cells, RERF-LC-AI cells formed metastases mainly in the liver and kidneys, whereas H69/VP cells metastasized mainly to the liver and systemic lymph nodes. The numbers of metastatic colonies of MCSF-AI-9-18 and MCSF-AI-9-24 cells in the liver but not the kidneys were significantly reduced. The development of lymph node metastases of MCSF-VP-5 cells was also less than that of parent or mock-transduced cells. Treatment of SCID mice with anti-human M-CSF antibody resulted in a significant increase in liver metastases of their M-CSF gene transfectants. No significant differences were observed in the distributions in mice or in the in vitro invasive potentials of MCSF-AI-9-18 cells and Neo-AI-3 cells. These findings indicate that the antimetastatic effect of M-CSF may be specific to particular organs, suggesting the influence of heterogeneity of organ microenvironments on the metastasis of lung cancer.

  1. A self-inactivating lentiviral vector for SCID-X1 gene therapy that does not activate LMO2 expression in human T cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Sheng; Mody, Disha; DeRavin, Suk See; Hauer, Julia; Lu, Taihe; Ma, Zhijun; Hacein-Bey Abina, Salima; Gray, John T; Greene, Michael R; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Malech, Harry L; Sorrentino, Brian P

    2010-08-12

    To develop safer and more effective vectors for gene therapy of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), we have evaluated new self-inactivating lentiviral vectors based on the HIV virus. The CL20i4-hgamma(c)-Revgen vector contains the entire human common gamma chain (gamma(c)) genomic sequence driven by the gamma(c) promoter. The CL20i4-EF1alpha-hgamma(c)OPT vector uses a promoter fragment from the eukaryotic elongation factor alpha (EF1alpha) gene to express a codon-optimized human gamma(c) cDNA. Both vectors contain a 400-bp insulator fragment from the chicken beta-globin locus within the self-inactivating long-terminal repeat. Transduction of bone marrow cells using either of these vectors restored T, B, and natural killer lymphocyte development and function in a mouse SCID-X1 transplantation model. Transduction of human CD34(+) bone marrow cells from SCID-X1 patients with either vector restored T-cell development in an in vitro assay. In safety studies using a Jurkat LMO2 activation assay, only the CL20i4-EF1alpha-hgamma(c)OPT vector lacked the ability to transactivate LMO2 protein expression, whereas the CL20i4-hgamma(c)-Revgen vector significantly activated LMO2 protein expression. In addition, the CL20i4-EF1alpha-hgamma(c)OPT vector has not caused any tumors in transplanted mice. We conclude that the CL20i4-EF1alpha-hgamma(c)OPT vector may be suitable for testing in a clinical trial based on these preclinical demonstrations of efficacy and safety.

  2. Transduction of Human CD34+ Repopulating Cells with a Self-Inactivating Lentiviral Vector for SCID-X1 Produced at Clinical Scale by a Stable Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Lockey, Timothy; Mehta, Perdeep K.; Kim, Yoon-Sang; Eldridge, Paul W.; Gray, John T.; Sorrentino, Brian P.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Self-inactivating (SIN)-lentiviral vectors have safety and efficacy features that are well suited for transduction of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), but generation of vector at clinical scale has been challenging. Approximately 280 liters of an X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Disorder (SCID-X1) SIN-lentiviral vector in two productions from a stable cell line were concentrated to final titers of 4.5 and 7.2×108 tu/ml. These two clinical preparations and three additional development-scale preparations were evaluated in human CD34+ hematopoietic cells in vitro using colony forming cell (CFU-C) assay and in vivo using the NOD/Lt-scid/IL2Rγnull (NSG) mouse xenotransplant model. A 40-hour transduction protocol using a single vector exposure conferred a mean NSG repopulating cell transduction of 0.23 vector genomes/human genome with a mean myeloid vector copy number of 3.2 vector genomes/human genome. No adverse effects on engraftment were observed from vector treatment. Direct comparison between our SIN-lentiviral vector using a 40-hour protocol and an MFGγc γ-retroviral vector using a five-day protocol demonstrated equivalent NSG repopulating cell transduction efficiency. Clonality survey by linear amplification-mediated polymerase chain reaction (LAM-PCR) with Illumina sequencing revealed common clones in sorted myeloid and lymphoid populations from engrafted mice demonstrating multipotent cell transduction. These vector preparations will be used in two clinical trials for SCID-X1. PMID:23075105

  3. Demonstration of human papillomavirus (HPV) genomic amplification and viral-like particles from CaSki cell line in SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, T C; Hsieh, S T; Purow, B W; Kurman, R J

    1997-05-01

    We demonstrate that from the CaSki cervical cancer cell line, integrated HPV-16 genome was amplified and viral-like particles were generated in an in vivo SCID mouse model. The in vivo tumor growth of several HPV-containing cell lines and 2 HPV-negative cell lines was examined in SCID mice. Tumor growth was noted with the HeLa, CaSki, ME-180, and MS751 cell lines within 2 months after subcutaneous injection. Squamous differentiation was appreciated in focal areas of tumors derived from CaSki and ME-180. In the CaSki tumors, DNA in situ hybridization revealed homogeneous staining of nuclei in some cells in the differentiated areas, suggesting HPV genomic amplification. In contrast, punctate or speckled patterns of hybridization were identified in the less differentiated areas, suggesting continued integration of the HPV genome. Immunocytochemical staining for HPV-16 L1 capsid protein showed it to be concentrated in cells from the differentiated areas, correlating with the results of hybridization. Electron microscopic studies revealed 50 nm uniform particles, consistent with HPV viral-like particles, in the nuclei of some cells in well-differentiated areas. Furthermore, Southern transfer and hybridization of the Hirt's extract from the CaSki tumors was positive for HPV-16 DNA, indicating non-integrated, low molecular weight HPV-16 DNA. Our results show HPV genomic amplification of integrated viral DNA and generation of HPV viral-like particles in CaSki cancer cells in SCID mice and that viral DNA amplification and the formation of viral-like particles are coupled to cellular differentiation. This experimental model provides a potential system for studying the molecular pathogenesis of HPV infections.

  4. AML1/ETO promotes the maintenance of early hematopoietic progenitors in NOD/SCID mice but does not abrogate their lineage specific differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bäsecke, Jörg; Schwieger, Maike; Griesinger, Frank; Schiedlmeier, Bernd; Wulf, Gerald; Trümper, Lorenz; Stocking, Carol

    2005-02-01

    AML1-ETO is generated by the t(8;21) translocation found in approximately 12% of acute myelogenous leukemia. Studies to delineate the mechanism by which AML1-ETO induces leukemia have primarily relied on transformed human cell lines or murine model systems. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of AML1-ETO expression on primary human hematopoietic cells in vitro and in a xenograft model. We used a FMEV retroviral vector for the transfer of AML1/ETO into human CD34 + cells. The repopulation, self-renewal, and differentiation potential of infected cells were assessed in serum-free liquid culture, colony assays, and in transplanted NOD-SCID mice. High transcription levels were confirmed by real-time PCR. AML1-ETO expressing cells were expandable for up to 12 weeks and retained an immature morphology. The capacity for prolonged survival, however, did not abrogate maturation, as AML1-ETO cells gave rise to normal colonies in a CFU-assay. AML1/ETO-expressing cells also contributed to myeloid (CD15, CD33), B-lymphoid (CD20), NK-cell (CD56) and erythroid (GPA) lineages in xenografted NOD/SCID mice. Although able to engraft all major lineages, AML1/ETO transplanted cells were primarily found in less differentiated fractions as measured by cell surface markers CD34 and CD38. In spite of a good engraftment and prolonged observation period none of the NOD/SCID-mice developed an acute myelogenous leukemia. Our findings demonstrate that AML1/ETO promotes the maintenance of early human hematopoietic progenitors, but does not abrogate their physiologic differentiation. Furthermore, the leukemogenic potential of AML1/ETO expressed in human progenitors is low, despite transcription levels equivalent to those found in AMLs.

  5. Use of a SCID mouse/human lymphoma model to evaluate cytokine-induced killer cells with potent antitumor cell activity

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    C.B-17 severe combined immune deficient (SCID) mice, which lack functional B and T lymphocytes, allow xenografts and, therefore, can be used to study the biology of human malignancies. Two different human B cell lymphoma cell lines, SU-DHL-4 and OCI-Ly8, which both harbor the t(14;18) chromosomal translocation, were injected into C.B-17 SCID mice. Mice injected intravenously or intraperitoneally developed tumors and died in a dose-dependent manner. The presence of tumor cells in various murine tissues could be demonstrated by a clonogenic tumor assay, staining of frozen sections with a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against a human B cell antigen (CD19), and with the polymerase chain reaction technique. A protocol using cytotoxic effector cells was developed and used to selectively deplete the tumor cells from bone marrow. These cells were developed by growing peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the presence of interferon gamma (IFN-gamma), anti- CD3 mAb, and interleukin 2 (IL-2). The timing of IFN-gamma treatment was critical and optimal if IFN-gamma was added before IL-2 treatment. The cells that were stimulated by IFN-gamma, followed by IL-2, could be expanded by treatment with a mAb directed against CD3. These cells could be further activated by IL-1, but not by tumor necrosis factor alpha. With this protocol, a tumor cell kill of 3 logs was obtained as measured by a clonogenic assay. Interestingly, despite their high cytotoxic activity against lymphoma cells, these cells had little toxicity against a subset of normal human hematopoietic precursor cells (granulocyte/macrophage colony-forming units). These cells were further tested by treating murine bone marrow contaminated with the human lymphoma cell line SU-DHL-4, and injecting these cells into SCID mice to assay for tumor growth in vivo. The animals injected with bone marrow contaminated with SU-DHL-4 cells had enhanced survival if the bone marrow was treated with the cytokine-induced killer cells before

  6. Disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Park, In-Hyun; Arora, Natasha; Huo, Hongguang; Maherali, Nimet; Ahfeldt, Tim; Shimamura, Akiko; Lensch, M William; Cowan, Chad; Hochedlinger, Konrad; Daley, George Q

    2008-09-05

    Tissue culture of immortal cell strains from diseased patients is an invaluable resource for medical research but is largely limited to tumor cell lines or transformed derivatives of native tissues. Here we describe the generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from patients with a variety of genetic diseases with either Mendelian or complex inheritance; these diseases include adenosine deaminase deficiency-related severe combined immunodeficiency (ADA-SCID), Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome (SBDS), Gaucher disease (GD) type III, Duchenne (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), Parkinson disease (PD), Huntington disease (HD), juvenile-onset, type 1 diabetes mellitus (JDM), Down syndrome (DS)/trisomy 21, and the carrier state of Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. Such disease-specific stem cells offer an unprecedented opportunity to recapitulate both normal and pathologic human tissue formation in vitro, thereby enabling disease investigation and drug development.

  7. Arrested rearrangement of TCR V[beta] genes in thymocytes from children with x-linked severe combined immunodeficiency disease

    SciTech Connect

    Sleasman, J.W.; Harville, T.O.; White, G.B.; Barrett, D.J. ); George, J.F. ); Goodenow, M.M. Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL )

    1994-07-01

    Human X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) is an immunodeficiency disorder in which T cell development is arrested in the thymic cortex. B lymphocytes in children with X-linked SCID seem to differentiate normally. X-linked SCID is associated with a mutation in the gene that encodes the IL-2R [gamma]-chain. Because TCR-[beta] gene recombination is a pivotal initial event in T lymphocyte onteogeny within the thymus, the authors hypothesized that a failure to express normal IL-2R[gamma] could lead to impaired TCR-[beta] gene recombination in early thymic development. PCR was used to determine the status of TCR-[beta] gene-segment rearrangements in thymic DNA that had been obtained from children with X-linked SCID. The initial step in TCR-[beta] gene rearrangement, that of D[beta] to J[beta] recombination, was readily detected in all thymus samples from children with X-linked SCID; in contrast, V[beta] to DJ[beta] gene rearrangements were undetectable in the same samples. Both D[beta] to J[beta] and V[beta] to DJ[beta] TCR genes were rearranged in the thymic tissues obtained from immunologically normal children. The authors conclude that TCR[beta]-chain gene rearrangement is arrested in children with X-linked SCID. The results suggest a causative relationship between the failure of TCR [beta]-chain gene arrangements to proceed beyond DJ[beta] rearrangements and the production of a nonfunctional IL-2R [gamma]-chain. 45 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Homozygosity for a novel adenosine deaminase (ADA) nonsense mutation (Q3>X) in a child with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)

    SciTech Connect

    Santisteban, I.; Arrendondo-Vega, F.X.; Kelly, S. |

    1994-09-01

    A Somali girl was diagnosed with ADA-deficient SCID at 7 mo; she responded well to PEG-ADA replacement and is now 3.3 yr old. ADA mRNA was undetectable (Northern) in her cultured T cells, but was present in T cells of her parents and two sibs. All PCR-amplified exon 1 genomic clones from the patient had a C>T transition at bp 7 relative to the start of translation, replacing Gln at codon 3 (AGA) with a termination codon (TGA, Q3>X). Patient cDNA (prepared by RT-PCR with a 5{prime} primer that covered codons 1-7) had a previously described polymorphism, K80>R, but was otherwise normal, indicating that no other coding mutations were present. A predicted new genomic BfaI restriction site was used to establish her homozygosity for Q3>X and to analyze genotypes of family members. We also analyzed the segregation of a variable Alu polyA-associated TAAA repeat (AluVpA) situated 5{prime} of the ADA gene. Three different AluVpA alleles were found, one of which was only present in the father and was not associated with his Q3>X allele. Because the father`s RBCs had only {approximately}15% of normal ADA activity, we analyzed his ADA cDNA. We found a G>A transition at bp 425 that substitutes Gln for Arg142, a solvent-accessible residue, and eliminates a BsmAI site in exon 5. ADA activity of the R142>Q in vitro translation product was 20-25% of wild type ADA translation product, suggesting that R142>Q is a new {open_quote}partial{close_quote} ADA deficiency mutation. As expected, Q3>X mRNA did not yield a detectable in vitro translation product. We conclude that the patient`s father is a compound heterozygote carrying the ADA Q3>X/R142>Q genotype. {open_quote}Partial{close_quote} ADA deficiency unassociated with immunodeficiency is relatively common in individuals of African descent. The present findings and previous observations suggest that {open_quote}partial{close_quote} ADA deficiency may have had an evolutionary advantage.

  9. Hereditary multiple intestinal atresia (HMIA) with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID): a case report of two siblings and review of the literature on MIA, HMIA and HMIA with immunodeficiency over the last 50 years

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Yasser Ali Hussein; Rahman, Sajjad; Bhat, Venkatraman; Thani, Sheikha Al; Ismail, Adel; Bassiouny, Ibrahim

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary multiple intestinal atresia (HMIA), a presumed autosomal recessive disorder, is an unusual and rare form of recurrent intestinal atresia which can be associated with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). The combination of HMIA and SCID is invariably lethal. The authors describe this fatal association in two siblings. The parents are consanguineous and have three other normal healthy children. Both index cases had abnormal antenatal ultrasounds and were symptomatic after birth. The final diagnosis of HMIA with SCID was confirmed in both siblings. They were never able to receive enteral feeds, remained totally dependent on parenteral nutrition, had repeated episodes of sepsis and died after a very difficult neonatal intensive care course. In this article we have reviewed the clinical course and outcome of both cases. The existing literature on multiple intestinal atresia, HMIA and HMIA with immunodeficiency is also reviewed. PMID:22715199

  10. Successful Handling of Disseminated BCG Disease in a Child with Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bacalhau, Sílvia; Freitas, Cristina; Valente, Rosalina; Barata, Deolinda; Neves, Conceição; Schäfer, Katrin; Lubatschofski, Annelie; Schulz, Ansgar; Neves, João Farela

    2011-01-01

    In high-burden countries, Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine is administered in newborn to prevent severe Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Because life-threatening disseminated BCG disease may occur in children with primary immunodeficiency, vaccination strategy against tuberculosis should be redefined in non-high-burden countries. We report the case of a patient with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) who developed disseminated BCG disease, highlighting the specific strategies adopted. PMID:22110512

  11. Murine leukemias with retroviral insertions at Lmo2 are predictive of the leukemias induced in SCID-X1 patients following retroviral gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Davé, Utpal P; Akagi, Keiko; Tripathi, Rati; Cleveland, Susan M; Thompson, Mary A; Yi, Ming; Stephens, Robert; Downing, James R; Jenkins, Nancy A; Copeland, Neal G

    2009-05-01

    Five X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency patients (SCID-X1) successfully treated with autologous bone marrow stem cells infected ex vivo with an IL2RG-containing retrovirus subsequently developed T-cell leukemia and four contained insertional mutations at LMO2. Genetic evidence also suggests a role for IL2RG in tumor formation, although this remains controversial. Here, we show that the genes and signaling pathways deregulated in murine leukemias with retroviral insertions at Lmo2 are similar to those deregulated in human leukemias with high LMO2 expression and are highly predictive of the leukemias induced in SCID-X1 patients. We also provide additional evidence supporting the notion that IL2RG and LMO2 cooperate in leukemia induction but are not sufficient and require additional cooperating mutations. The highly concordant nature of the genetic events giving rise to mouse and human leukemias with mutations at Lmo2 are an encouraging sign to those wanting to use mice to model human cancer and may help in designing safer methods for retroviral gene therapy.

  12. Correction of murine SCID-X1 by lentiviral gene therapy using a codon-optimized IL2RG gene and minimal pretransplant conditioning.

    PubMed

    Huston, Marshall W; van Til, Niek P; Visser, Trudi P; Arshad, Shazia; Brugman, Martijn H; Cattoglio, Claudia; Nowrouzi, Ali; Li, Yuedan; Schambach, Axel; Schmidt, Manfred; Baum, Christopher; von Kalle, Christof; Mavilio, Fulvio; Zhang, Fang; Blundell, Mike P; Thrasher, Adrian J; Verstegen, Monique M A; Wagemaker, Gerard

    2011-10-01

    Clinical trials have demonstrated the potential of ex vivo hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy to treat X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) using γ-retroviral vectors, leading to immune system functionality in the majority of treated patients without pretransplant conditioning. The success was tempered by insertional oncogenesis in a proportion of the patients. To reduce the genotoxicity risk, a self-inactivating (SIN) lentiviral vector (LV) with improved expression of a codon optimized human interleukin-2 receptor γ gene (IL2RG) cDNA (coγc), regulated by its 1.1 kb promoter region (γcPr), was compared in efficacy to the viral spleen focus forming virus (SF) and the cellular phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) promoters. Pretransplant conditioning of Il2rg(-/-) mice resulted in long-term reconstitution of T and B lymphocytes, normalized natural antibody titers, humoral immune responses, ConA/IL-2 stimulated spleen cell proliferation, and polyclonal T-cell receptor gene rearrangements with a clear integration preference of the SF vector for proto-oncogenes, contrary to the PGK and γcPr vectors. We conclude that SIN lentiviral gene therapy using coγc driven by the γcPr or PGK promoter corrects the SCID phenotype, potentially with an improved safety profile, and that low-dose conditioning proved essential for immune competence, allowing for a reduced threshold of cell numbers required.

  13. Passive serum therapy with polyclonal antibodies against Mycobacterium tuberculosis protects against post-chemotherapy relapse of tuberculosis infection in SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Guirado, Evelyn; Amat, Isabel; Gil, Olga; Díaz, Jorge; Arcos, Virginia; Caceres, Neus; Ausina, Vicenç; Cardona, Pere-Joan

    2006-04-01

    We investigated the protective role of immune-sera against reactivation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in SCID mice and found that passive immunization with sera obtained from mice treated with detoxified M. tuberculosis extracts (delivered in liposomes in a composition known as RUTI) exerted significant protection. Our SCID mouse model consisted of aerosol infection by M. tuberculosis, followed by 3 to 8weeks of chemotherapy with isoniazid+rifampicin (INH+RIF) (25 and 10mg/kg, respectively). After infection and antibiotic administration, two groups of mice were treated for up to 10weeks with intraperitoneal passive immunization using hyperimmune serum (HS) obtained from mice infected with M. tuberculosis, treated with chemotherapy (INH+RIF) for 8weeks and inoculated with RUTI (HS group) or with normal serum (CT group). Significant differences were found between HS and CT groups in the number of bacilli in the lungs (3.68+/-2.02 vs. 5.72+/-1.41log(10) c.f.u.), extent of pulmonary granulomatomous infiltration (10.33+/-0.67 vs. 31.2+/-1.77%), and percentage of animals without pulmonary abscesses (16.7% vs. 45.5%). These data strongly suggest a protective role of specific antibodies against lung dissemination of M. tuberculosis infection.

  14. Alterations in the adenosine metabolism and CD39/CD73 adenosinergic machinery cause loss of Treg cell function and autoimmunity in ADA-deficient SCID.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Aisha V; Brigida, Immacolata; Carriglio, Nicola; Hernandez, Raisa Jofra; Scaramuzza, Samantha; Clavenna, Daniela; Sanvito, Francesca; Poliani, Pietro L; Gagliani, Nicola; Carlucci, Filippo; Tabucchi, Antonella; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Traggiai, Elisabetta; Villa, Anna; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2012-02-09

    Adenosine acts as anti-inflammatory mediator on the immune system and has been described in regulatory T cell (Treg)-mediated suppression. In the absence of adenosine deaminase (ADA), adenosine and other purine metabolites accumulate, leading to severe immunodeficiency with recurrent infections (ADA-SCID). Particularly ADA-deficient patients with late-onset forms and after enzyme replacement therapy (PEG-ADA) are known to manifest immune dysregulation. Herein we provide evidence that alterations in the purine metabolism interfere with Treg function, thereby contributing to autoimmune manifestations in ADA deficiency. Tregs isolated from PEG-ADA-treated patients are reduced in number and show decreased suppressive activity, whereas they are corrected after gene therapy. Untreated murine ADA(-/-) Tregs show alterations in the plasma membrane CD39/CD73 ectonucleotidase machinery and limited suppressive activity via extracellular adenosine. PEG-ADA-treated mice developed multiple autoantibodies and hypothyroidism in contrast to mice treated with bone marrow transplantation or gene therapy. Tregs isolated from PEG-ADA-treated mice lacked suppressive activity, suggesting that this treatment interferes with Treg functionality. The alterations in the CD39/CD73 adenosinergic machinery and loss of function in ADA-deficient Tregs provide new insights into a predisposition to autoimmunity and the underlying mechanisms causing defective peripheral tolerance in ADA-SCID.

  15. Tissue distribution of mucosal antibody-producing cells specific for respiratory syncytial virus in severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) mice engrafted with human tonsils.

    PubMed Central

    Nadal, D; Albini, B; Schläpfer, E; Chen, C; Brodsky, L; Ogra, P L

    1991-01-01

    Groups of C.B-17 SCID mice were reconstituted intraperitoneally with human tonsillar mononuclear cells (hu-TMC) from children seropositive for antibody to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and subsequently challenged intraperitoneally with inactivated RSV or sham-immunized. The synthesis and the distribution characteristics of human antibody to RSV in various murine tissues were studied using an enzyme-linked immunospot assay (ELISPOT). No specific antibody was observed in sham-immunized animals. In contrast, mice engrafted with hu-TMC exhibited the appearance of specific human antibody secreting cells (hu-ASC) after i.p. immunization with inactivated RSV. RSV-specific hu-ASC were detected only in animals engrafted with cells from donors seropositive for antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus. Hu-TMC engrafted mice showed RSV-specific IgM and, in lower numbers, IgG hu-ASC in several tissues including the lungs. Numbers of RSV-specific IgA hu-ASC were low, however, and detected only in the lung. No RSV-specific hu-ASC were detected in the intestine. These data demonstrate for the first time that hu-TMC-SCID chimeras respond to immunization with viral antigen. Furthermore, the results suggest that hu-TMC engraft in lungs but not in the intestinal tissue. PMID:1893614

  16. Long-Term Quantitative Biodistribution and Side Effects of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hMSCs) Engraftment in NOD/SCID Mice following Irradiation.

    PubMed

    François, Sabine; Usunier, Benoit; Douay, Luc; Benderitter, Marc; Chapel, Alain

    2014-01-01

    There is little information on the fate of infused mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and long-term side effects after irradiation exposure. We addressed these questions using human MSCs (hMSCs) intravenously infused to nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mice submitted to total body irradiation (TBI) or local irradiation (abdominal or leg irradiation). The animals were sacrificed 3 to 120 days after irradiation and the quantitative and spatial distribution of hMSCs were studied by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Following their infusion into nonirradiated animals, hMSCs homed to various tissues. Engraftment depended on the dose of irradiation and the area exposed. Total body irradiation induced an increased hMSC engraftment level compared to nonirradiated mice, while local irradiations increased hMSC engraftment locally in the area of irradiation. Long-term engraftment of systemically administered hMSCs in NOD/SCID mice increased significantly in response to tissue injuries produced by local or total body irradiation until 2 weeks then slowly decreased depending on organs and the configuration of irradiation. In all cases, no tissue abnormality or abnormal hMSCs proliferation was observed at 120 days after irradiation. This work supports the safe and efficient use of MSCs by injection as an alternative approach in the short- and long-term treatment of severe complications after radiotherapy for patients refractory to conventional treatments.

  17. Transplantation of marrow cells from children with standard risk-acute lymphoblastic leukemia at the end of therapy into NOD/SCID mice for detecting residual leukemic cells with in vivo growth potential.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Manuel; Díaz, Miguel A; Madero, Luis; Bueren, Juan A

    2003-12-01

    In the present work, we developed a strategy for detecting residual leukemia in the marrow of children with standard risk-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (sr-ALL) at the end of therapy, based on the capacity of human leukemic cells for growing in the NOD/SCID mice marrow microenvironment. Mononuclear (MN) marrow cells from 62 patients were injected into sublethally irradiated NOD/SCID mice and the engraftment kinetics and composition of the human grafts were determined periodically. The presence of human leukemic cells with immunophenotypes and clonal DNA markers similar to those of the original leukemic clone was studied.

  18. Combination treatment of human umbilical cord matrix stem cell-based interferon-beta gene therapy and 5-fluorouracil significantly reduces growth of metastatic human breast cancer in SCID mouse lungs.

    PubMed

    Rachakatla, Raja Shekar; Pyle, Marla M; Ayuzawa, Rie; Edwards, Sarah M; Marini, Frank C; Weiss, Mark L; Tamura, Masaaki; Troyer, Deryl

    2008-08-01

    Umbilical cord matrix stem (UCMS) cells that were engineered to express interferon-beta (IFN-beta) were transplanted weekly for three weeks into MDA 231 breast cancer xenografts bearing SCID mice in combination with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The UCMS cells were found within lung tumors but not in other tissues. Although both treatments significantly reduced MDA 231 tumor area in the SCID mouse lungs, the combined treatment resulted in a greater reduction in tumor area than by either treatment used alone. These results indicate that a combination treatment of UCMS-IFN-beta cells and 5-FU is a potentially effective therapeutic procedure for breast cancer.

  19. [Anti-mouse CD122 antibody promotes the hematopoietic repopulating capacity of cord blood CD34⁺ cells in NOD/SCID mice].

    PubMed

    Sheng, Men-Yao; Shi, Hui; Xing, Wen; Wang, Wen-Jun; Si, Xiao-Hui; Bai, Jie; Yuan, Wei-Ping; Zhou, Yuan; Yang, Feng-Chun

    2014-12-01

    The study was aimed to investigate the effect of anti-mouse CD122 antibody on the hematopoietic repopulating capacity of cord blood CD34⁺ cells in a humanized murine model-non obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice. After sublethal irradiation with γ-ray, NOD/SCID mice were intraperitoneally injected with 200 µg mouse isotype control antibody or anti-mouse CD122 antibody. Human cord blood CD34⁺ cells or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) were injected via the tail vein at 6-8 hours later. Cohort of the mice injected with anti-mice CD122 antibody or control antibody alone were sacrificed at different time point (at week 2, 3, and 4 weeks) after the injection, and the percentage of NK cells in the peripheral blood was analyzed by flow cytometry. To evaluate the effect of anti-mouse CD122 antibody on the repopulating capacity of cord blood CD34⁺ cells in the recipient mice, phenotype analysis was performed in the bone marrow at 6 and 8 weeks after the transplantation. The results showed that the proportion of NK cells in the peripheral blood were (4.6 ± 0.6)% and (5.7 ± 1.7)% at week 2 and 3 after anti-CD122 antibody injection respectively,which decreased by 60%, compared with the mice injected with isotype control antibody. After 6 and 8 weeks of cord blood CD34⁺ cell transplantation,the percentage of human CD45⁺ in the bone marrow of the recipient mice treated with anti-mice CD122 antibody was (63.0 ± 12.2)% and (53.2 ± 16.3)%,respectively,which were dramatically higher than that in the mice treated with isotype control antibody (7.7 ± 3.6)% and (6.1 ± 2.4)%. Moreover,at 8 weeks after transplantation,human CD34⁺ cells appeared significantly in the recipients treated with anti-CD122 antibody. It is concluded that the anti-mouse CD122 antibody enhances the hematopoietic repopulating capacity of cord blood CD34⁺ cells in the NOD/SCID mice through decreasing the proportion of NK cells.

  20. Multifunctional interleukin-1beta promotes metastasis of human lung cancer cells in SCID mice via enhanced expression of adhesion-, invasion- and angiogenesis-related molecules.

    PubMed

    Yano, Seiji; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Akihiko; Goto, Hisatsugu; Ogawa, Hirohisa; Kanematsu, Takanori; Miki, Toyokazu; Uehara, Hisanori; Saijo, Yasuo; Nukiwa, Toshihiro; Sone, Saburo

    2003-03-01

    We examined whether interleukin-1 (IL-1), a multifunctional proinflammatory cytokine, progresses or regresses metastasis of lung cancer. Exogenous IL-1beta enhanced expression of various cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)) and intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) by A549, PC14, RERF-LC-AI, and SBC-3 cells expressing IL-1 receptors. A549 cells transduced with human IL-1beta-gene with the growth-hormone signaling-peptide sequence (A549/IL-1beta) secreted a large amount of IL-1beta protein. Overexpression of IL-1beta resulted in augmentation of expression of the cytokines, ICAM-1, and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). A549/IL-1beta cells intravenously inoculated into severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice distributed to the lung more efficiently and developed lung metastasis much more rapidly than did control A549 cells. Treatment of SCID mice with anti-IL-1beta antibody inhibited formation of lung metastasis by A549/IL-1beta cells. Moreover, A549/IL-1beta cells inoculated in the subcutis grew more rapidly, without necrosis, than did control A549 cells, which produced smaller tumors with central necrosis, suggesting involvement of angiogenesis in addition to enhanced binding in the high metastatic potential of A549/IL-1beta cells. Histological analyses showed that more host-cell infiltration, fewer apoptotic cells, more vascularization, and higher MMP activity were observed in tumors derived from A549/IL-1beta cells, compared with tumors derived from control A549 cells. These findings suggest that IL-1beta facilitates metastasis of lung cancer via promoting multiple events, including adhesion, invasion and angiogenesis.

  1. Integration of retroviral vectors induces minor changes in the transcriptional activity of T cells from ADA-SCID patients treated with gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Cassani, Barbara; Montini, Eugenio; Maruggi, Giulietta; Ambrosi, Alessandro; Mirolo, Massimiliano; Selleri, Silvia; Biral, Erika; Frugnoli, Ilaria; Hernandez-Trujillo, Vivian; Di Serio, Clelia; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Naldini, Luigi; Mavilio, Fulvio; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2009-10-22

    Gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells by gamma-retroviral vectors (RVs) is an effective treatment for inherited blood disorders, although potentially limited by the risk of insertional mutagenesis. We evaluated the genomic impact of RV integration in T lymphocytes from adenosine deaminase-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency (ADA-SCID) patients 10 to 30 months after infusion of autologous, genetically corrected CD34(+) cells. Expression profiling on ex vivo T-cell bulk population revealed no difference with respect to healthy controls. To assess the effect of vector integration on gene expression at the single-cell level, primary T-cell clones were isolated from 2 patients. T-cell clones harbored either 1 (89.8%) or 2 (10.2%) vector copies per cell and displayed partial to full correction of ADA expression, purine metabolism, and T-cell receptor-driven functions. Analysis of RV integration sites indicated a high diversity in T-cell origin, consistently with the polyclonal T-cell receptor-Vbeta repertoire. Quantitative transcript analysis of 120 genes within a 200-kb window around RV integration sites showed modest (2.8- to 5.2-fold) dysregulation of 5.8% genes in 18.6% of the T-cell clones compared with controls. Nonetheless, affected clones maintained a stable phenotype and normal in vitro functions. These results confirm that RV-mediated gene transfer for ADA-SCID is safe, and provide crucial information for the development of future gene therapy protocols. The trials described herein have been registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00598481 and #NCT00599781.

  2. Harnessing Autopsied DIPG Tumor Tissues for Orthotopic Xenograft Model Development in the Brain Stems of SCID Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    virtually all children with this disease within 1-2 years of diagnosis1. Because DIPGs are not amenable for surgery due to its location and...10. Hurt EM, Kawasaki BT, Klarmann GJ, Thomas SB, Farrar WL. CD44+ CD24(-) prostate cells are early cancer progenitor/stem cells that provide a model...co-expression of CD117 (c-kit) and osteocalcin in activated bone marrow stem cells in different diseases . Br J Haematol. 2002;118:305-312. 18

  3. Targeting Interleukin-13 with Tralokinumab Attenuates Lung Fibrosis and Epithelial Damage in a Humanized SCID Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huilan; Oak, Sameer R.; Coelho, Ana Lucia; Herath, Athula; Flaherty, Kevin R.; Lee, Joyce; Bell, Matt; Knight, Darryl A.; Martinez, Fernando J.; Sleeman, Matthew A.; Herzog, Erica L.; Hogaboam, Cory M.

    2014-01-01

    The aberrant fibrotic and repair responses in the lung are major hallmarks of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Numerous antifibrotic strategies have been used in the clinic with limited success, raising the possibility that an effective therapeutic strategy in this disease must inhibit fibrosis and promote appropriate lung repair mechanisms. IL-13 represents an attractive target in IPF, but its disease association and mechanism of action remains unknown. In the present study, an overexpression of IL-13 and IL-13 pathway markers was associated with IPF, particularly a rapidly progressive form of this disease. Targeting IL-13 in a humanized experimental model of pulmonary fibrosis using tralokinumab (CAT354) was found to therapeutically block aberrant lung remodeling in this model. However, targeting IL-13 was also found to promote lung repair and to restore epithelial integrity. Thus, targeting IL-13 inhibits fibrotic processes and enhances repair processes in the lung. PMID:24325475

  4. Recent advances in transplantation for primary immune deficiency diseases: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    de la Morena, M Teresa; Nelson, Robert P

    2014-04-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a curative therapeutic option for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), a group of diseases which otherwise carry life expectancies that are of limited duration and quality. Survival following HCT for SCID has improved from approximately 23 to 91 % over the last 40 years. Success with SCID prompted efforts to apply HCT to the therapeutic challenge of well over 20 molecularly defined primary immune deficiency diseases (PID). Such success is due to both early recognition of PIDs and advances in the field of transplantation. Such advances include high-resolution HLA DNA donor-recipient matching, expansion of donor sources, better tolerated conditioning, new antibiotics, and wider availability. International collaborative efforts have provided patients and caregivers information that permit better treatment decisions now, and direct clinicians and investigators to ensure progress in the future. Pioneers in screening for SCID have taken steps to correct the fundamental challenge to successful treatment, which is the rapid discovery and characterization of cases and offering the transplant option to an affected child early in life; blood spot testing for T and B cell receptor quantification is now available to a growing fraction of newborns. Organizations including the Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium in the USA, The European Society for Primary Immunodeficiency, the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, the Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Consortium, the United States Immunodeficiency Network, the Immune Deficiency Foundation, and the Jeffrey Modell Foundation are contributing mightily to increase awareness and standardize optimal utilization to the benefit of patients. This review will update the allergist-immunologist concerning disease presentations, indications for transplantation, methodologies, conditioning regimens, and clinical outcomes for patients with PID for which timely HCT is

  5. Acute serum amyloid A induces migration, angiogenesis, and inflammation in synovial cells in vitro and in a human rheumatoid arthritis/SCID mouse chimera model.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Mary; Marrelli, Alessandra; Blades, Mark; McCormick, Jennifer; Maderna, Paola; Godson, Catherine; Mullan, Ronan; FitzGerald, Oliver; Bresnihan, Barry; Pitzalis, Costantino; Veale, Douglas J; Fearon, Ursula

    2010-06-01

    Serum amyloid A (A-SAA), an acute-phase protein with cytokine-like properties, is expressed at sites of inflammation. This study investigated the effects of A-SAA on chemokine-regulated migration and angiogenesis using rheumatoid arthritis (RA) cells and whole-tissue explants in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo. A-SAA levels were measured by real-time PCR and ELISA. IL-8 and MCP-1 expression was examined in RA synovial fibroblasts, human microvascular endothelial cells, and RA synovial explants by ELISA. Neutrophil transendothelial cell migration, cell adhesion, invasion, and migration were examined using transwell leukocyte/monocyte migration assays, invasion assays, and adhesion assays with or without anti-MCP-1/anti-IL-8. NF-kappaB was examined using a specific inhibitor and Western blotting. An RA synovial/SCID mouse chimera model was used to examine the effects of A-SAA on cell migration, proliferation, and angiogenesis in vivo. High expression of A-SAA was demonstrated in RA patients (p < 0.05). A-SAA induced chemokine expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner (p < 0.05). Blockade with anti-scavenger receptor class B member 1 and lipoxin A4 (A-SAA receptors) significantly reduced chemokine expression in RA synovial tissue explants (p < 0.05). A-SAA induced cell invasion, neutrophil-transendothelial cell migration, monocyte migration, and adhesion (all p < 0.05), effects that were blocked by anti-IL-8 or anti-MCP-1. A-SAA-induced chemokine expression was mediated through NF-kappaB in RA explants (p < 0.05). Finally, in the RA synovial/SCID mouse chimera model, we demonstrated for the first time in vivo that A-SAA directly induces monocyte migration from the murine circulation into RA synovial grafts, synovial cell proliferation, and angiogenesis (p < 0.05). A-SAA promotes cell migrational mechanisms and angiogenesis critical to RA pathogenesis.

  6. Variability of a bacterial surface protein and disease expression in a possible mouse model of systemic Lyme borreliosis

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    During persistent infection of scid mice with Borrelia turicatae, an agent of relapsing fever and neuroborreliosis, there was variation in the surface proteins the bacteria expressed and in disease manifestations over time. Two serotypes, A and B, were isolated from the mice, cloned by limiting dilution, and further characterized. The only discernible difference between the two variants was in the size of the major surface protein they expressed: serotype A had a variable major protein (Vmp) of 23,000, and serotype B had a Vmp of 20,000. When other scid mice were inoculated with clonal populations of A and B, the infections were similar with respect to onset and degree of spirochetemia, involvement of the eye and heart, and occurrence of a peripheral vestibular disorder. However, there were differences between the serotypes in other respects: (a) serotype B but not A caused reddened and significantly enlarged joints, markedly impaired performance on a walking bar, and severe arthritis by histologic examination; (b) serotype A but not B invaded the central nervous system during early infection; and (c) serotype A penetrated monolayers of human umbilical vein endothelial cells more readily than did serotype B. The combination of arthritis, myocarditis, and neurologic disease resembled human Lyme borreliosis. The findings indicate that differences in disease expression are determined by variable surface proteins of the bacterium and that scid mouse infections with B. turicatae provide a model for the study of the pathogenesis of Lyme borreliosis and other persistent spirochetal diseases. PMID:8294872

  7. DT388-GM-CSF, a novel fusion toxin consisting of a truncated diphtheria toxin fused to human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, prolongs host survival in a SCID mouse model of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hall, P D; Willingham, M C; Kreitman, R J; Frankel, A E

    1999-04-01

    Despite significant advances in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the majority of patients will succumb to drug-resistant AML. To overcome this resistance, we have developed a novel fusion toxin consisting of the catalytic and translocation subunits of diphtheria toxin (DT388) linked to human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). In vitro, DT388-GM-CSF demonstrated significant activity against numerous AML cell lines and fresh AML blasts. To determine its in vivo efficacy, we developed an in vivo model of human AML in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice injected intravenously with 1 x 10(7) HL-60 cells (AML-M2 cell line). The SCID mice developed abdominal masses, infiltration of the liver and bone marrow, and peripheral blasts with a median survival of 42.5 days. We tested DT388-GM-CSF, ara-C, human GM-CSF, and DAB389IL-2, which were injected intraperitoneally on days 2-6 in this model. DT3-GM-CSF significantly improved survival of the SCID mice over Ara-C, DAB389IL-2, or control (P < 0.001). DT388-GM-CSF-treated mice who developed leukemia exhibited no difference in the number of GM-CSF receptors (P = 0.39), ligand affinity (P = 0.77), or sensitivity (P = 0.56) to DT388-GM-CSF as compared to the controls. Frank leukemia in DT388-GM-CSF-treated mice may be due to incomplete penetration of drug into tissues rather than cellular resistance. DT388-GM-CSF is an active therapeutic agent in our SCID mouse model of AML with a unique mechanism of action and differing toxicities than current cytotoxic agents.

  8. Engraftment of human HSCs in nonirradiated newborn NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice is enhanced by transgenic expression of membrane-bound human SCF

    PubMed Central

    Racki, Waldemar J.; Leif, Jean; Burzenski, Lisa; Hosur, Vishnu; Wetmore, Amber; Gott, Bruce; Herlihy, Mary; Ignotz, Ronald; Dunn, Raymond; Shultz, Leonard D.; Greiner, Dale L.

    2012-01-01

    Immunodeficient mice engrafted with human HSCs support multidisciplinary translational experimentation, including the study of human hematopoiesis. Heightened levels of human HSC engraftment are observed in immunodeficient mice expressing mutations in the IL2-receptor common γ chain (IL2rg) gene, including NOD-scid IL2rγnull (NSG) mice. Engraftment of human HSC requires preconditioning of immunodeficient recipients, usually with irradiation. Such preconditioning increases the expression of stem cell factor (SCF), which is critical for HSC engraftment, proliferation, and survival. We hypothesized that transgenic expression of human membrane-bound stem cell factor Tg(hu-mSCF)] would increase levels of human HSC engraftment in nonirradiated NSG mice and eliminate complications associated with irradiation. Surprisingly, detectable levels of human CD45+ cell chimerism were observed after transplantation of cord blood–derived human HSCs into nonirradiated adult as well as newborn NSG mice. However, transgenic expression of human mSCF enabled heightened levels of human hematopoietic cell chimerism in the absence of irradiation. Moreover, nonirradiated NSG-Tg(hu-mSCF) mice engrafted as newborns with human HSCs rejected human skin grafts from a histoincompatible donor, indicating the development of a functional human immune system. These data provide a new immunodeficient mouse model that does not require irradiation preconditioning for human HSC engraftment and immune system development. PMID:22246028

  9. Dynamics of gene-modified progenitor cells analyzed by tracking retroviral integration sites in a human SCID-X1 gene therapy trial.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gary P; Berry, Charles C; Malani, Nirav; Leboulch, Philippe; Fischer, Alain; Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Bushman, Frederic D

    2010-06-03

    X-linked severe-combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) has been treated by therapeutic gene transfer using gammaretroviral vectors, but insertional activation of proto-oncogenes contributed to leukemia in some patients. Here we report a longitudinal study of gene-corrected progenitor cell populations from 8 patients using 454 pyrosequencing to map vector integration sites, and extensive resampling to allow quantification of clonal abundance. The number of transduced cells infused into patients initially predicted the subsequent diversity of circulating cells. A capture-recapture analysis was used to estimate the size of the gene-corrected cell pool, revealing that less than 1/100th of the infused cells had long-term repopulating activity. Integration sites were clustered even at early time points, often near genes involved in growth control, and several patients harbored expanded cell clones with vectors integrated near the cancer-implicated genes CCND2 and HMGA2, but remain healthy. Integration site tracking also documented that chemotherapy for adverse events resulted in successful control. The longitudinal analysis emphasizes that key features of transduced cell populations--including diversity, integration site clustering, and expansion of some clones--were established early after transplantation. The approaches to sequencing and bioinformatics analysis reported here should be widely useful in assessing the outcome of gene therapy trials.

  10. Efficient construction of producer cell lines for a SIN lentiviral vector for SCID-X1 gene therapy by concatemeric array transfection.

    PubMed

    Throm, Robert E; Ouma, Annastasia A; Zhou, Sheng; Chandrasekaran, Anantharaman; Lockey, Timothy; Greene, Michael; De Ravin, Suk See; Moayeri, Morvarid; Malech, Harry L; Sorrentino, Brian P; Gray, John T

    2009-05-21

    Retroviral vectors containing internal promoters, chromatin insulators, and self-inactivating (SIN) long terminal repeats (LTRs) may have significantly reduced genotoxicity relative to the conventional retroviral vectors used in recent, otherwise successful clinical trials. Large-scale production of such vectors is problematic, however, as the introduction of SIN vectors into packaging cells cannot be accomplished with the traditional method of viral transduction. We have derived a set of packaging cell lines for HIV-based lentiviral vectors and developed a novel concatemeric array transfection technique for the introduction of SIN vector genomes devoid of enhancer and promoter sequences in the LTR. We used this method to derive a producer cell clone for a SIN lentiviral vector expressing green fluorescent protein, which when grown in a bioreactor generated more than 20 L of supernatant with titers above 10(7) transducing units (TU) per milliliter. Further refinement of our technique enabled the rapid generation of whole populations of stably transformed cells that produced similar titers. Finally, we describe the construction of an insulated, SIN lentiviral vector encoding the human interleukin 2 receptor common gamma chain (IL2RG) gene and the efficient derivation of cloned producer cells that generate supernatants with titers greater than 5 x 10(7) TU/mL and that are suitable for use in a clinical trial for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1).

  11. T-cell receptor gene therapy targeting melanoma-associated antigen-A4 inhibits human tumor growth in non-obese diabetic/SCID/γcnull mice.

    PubMed

    Shirakura, Yoshitaka; Mizuno, Yukari; Wang, Linan; Imai, Naoko; Amaike, Chisaki; Sato, Eiichi; Ito, Mamoru; Nukaya, Ikuei; Mineno, Junichi; Takesako, Kazutoh; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Shiku, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy with lymphocytes that have been genetically engineered to express tumor-reactive T-cell receptors (TCR) is a promising approach for cancer immunotherapy. We have been exploring the development of TCR gene therapy targeting cancer/testis antigens, including melanoma-associated antigen (MAGE) family antigens, that are ideal targets for adoptive T-cell therapy. The efficacy of TCR gene therapy targeting MAGE family antigens, however, has not yet been evaluated in vivo. Here, we demonstrate the in vivo antitumor activity in immunodeficient non-obese diabetic/SCID/γc(null) (NOG) mice of human lymphocytes genetically engineered to express TCR specific for the MAGE-A4 antigen. Polyclonal T cells derived from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were transduced with the αβ TCR genes specific for MAGE-A4, then adoptively transferred into NOG mice inoculated with MAGE-A4 expressing human tumor cell lines. The transferred T cells maintained their effector function in vivo, infiltrated into tumors, and inhibited tumor growth in an antigen-specific manner. The combination of adoptive cell therapy with antigen peptide vaccination enhanced antitumor activity, with improved multifunctionality of the transferred cells. These data suggest that TCR gene therapy with MAGE-A4-specific TCR is a promising strategy to treat patients with MAGE-A4-expressing tumors; in addition, the acquisition of multifunctionality in vivo is an important factor to predict the quality of the T-cell response during adoptive therapy with human lymphocytes.

  12. Clonality analysis after retroviral-mediated gene transfer to CD34+ cells from the cord blood of ADA-deficient SCID neonates.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Manfred; Carbonaro, Denise A; Speckmann, Carsten; Wissler, Manuela; Bohnsack, John; Elder, Melissa; Aronow, Bruce J; Nolta, Jan A; Kohn, Donald B; von Kalle, Christof

    2003-04-01

    A clinical trial of retroviral-mediated transfer of the adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene into umbilical cord blood CD34(+) cells was started in 1993. ADA-containing peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) have persisted in patients from this trial, with T lymphocytes showing the highest prevalence of gene marking. To gain a greater understanding of the nature and number of the transduced cells that were engrafted, we used linear amplification-mediated PCR (LAM-PCR) to identify clonal vector proviral integrants. In one patient, a single vector integrant was predominant in T lymphocytes at a stable level over most of the eight-year time span analyzed and was also detected in some myeloid samples. T-cell clones with the predominant integrant, isolated after eight years, showed multiple patterns of T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement, indicating that a single pre-thymic stem or progenitor cell served as the source of the majority of the gene-marked cells over an extended period of time. It is important to distinguish the stable pattern of monoclonal gene marking that we observed here from the progressive increase of a T-cell clone with monoclonal gene marking that results from leukemic transformation, as observed in two subjects in a clinical trial of gene therapy for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID).

  13. Characterization of an early passage Merkel cell polyomavirus-positive Merkel cell carcinoma cell line, MS-1, and its growth in NOD scid gamma mice

    PubMed Central

    Guastafierro, Anna; Feng, Huichen; Thant, Mamie; Kirkwood, John M.; Chang, Yuan; Moore, Patrick S.; Shuda, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive skin cancer with a high mortality rate. The majority of MCC (70–80%) harbor clonally integrated Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) in the tumor genome and express viral T antigen oncoproteins. The characterization of an early passage MCV-positive MCC cell line MS-1 is described, and its cellular, immunohistochemical, and virological features to MCV-negative (UISO, MCC13, and MCC26) and MCV-positive cell lines (MKL-1 and MKL-2) were compared. The MS-1 cellular genome harbors integrated MCV, which preserves an identical viral sequence from its parental tumor. Neither VP2 gene transcripts nor VP1 protein are detectable in MS-1 or other MCV-positive MCC cell lines tested. Mapping of viral and cellular integration sites in MS-1 and MCC tumor samples demonstrates no consistent viral or cellular gene integration locus. All MCV-positive cell lines show cytokeratin 20 positivity and grow in suspension. When injected subcutaneously into NOD scid gamma (NSG) mice, MS-1 forms a discrete macroscopic tumor. Immunophenotypic analysis of the MS-1 cell line and xenografts in mice show identical profiles to the parental tumor biopsy. Hence, MS-1 is an early passage cell line that provides a useful in vitro model to characterize MCV-positive MCC. PMID:23085629

  14. Antagonistic effects of the staphylococcal enterotoxin a mutant, SEA(F47A/D227A), on psoriasis in the SCID-hu xenogeneic transplantation model.

    PubMed

    Boehncke, W H; Hardt-Weinelt, K; Nilsson, H; Wolter, M; Dohlsten, M; Ochsendorf, F R; Kaufmann, R; Antonsson, P

    2001-04-01

    Psoriasis is a T-cell-mediated immune dermatosis probably triggered by bacterial superantigens. This pathomechanism has been experimentally reproduced in a SCID-hu xenogeneic transplantation model. We analyzed the effects of different bacterial superantigens on the induction of psoriasis in this model. Staphylococcal enterotoxin B and exfoliative toxin triggered the onset of psoriasis when administered repetitively intracutaneously over a period of 2 wk, whereas staphylococcal enterotoxin A representing a distinct subfamily of staphylococcal enterotoxins only mimicked certain aspects of psoriasis. The biologic effects of staphylococcal enterotoxin A were more pronounced when a mutated form, SEA(H187A), of this superantigen with reduced affinity to major histocompatibility complex class II was coinjected. Another mutated variant, SEA(F47A/D227A), exhibiting no measurable major histocompatibility complex class II affinity blocked the effects triggered by wild-type staphylococcal enterotoxin A when injected in a 10-fold higher dose. Inhibition was specific as induction of psoriasiform epidermal changes by staphylococcal enterotoxin B could not be blocked. As staphylococcal enterotoxin A, in contrast to the other superantigens tested, is capable of inducing epidermal thickening but not the typical appearance of psoriasis, we conclude that bacterial superantigens may differ with regard to their effects on human nonlesional psoriatic skin. Staphylococcal-enterotoxin-A-mediated effects were blocked by a genetically engineered superantigen highlighting the potential therapeutic use of mutated superantigens.

  15. A pulmonary influenza virus infection in SCID mice can be cured by treatment with hemagglutinin-specific antibodies that display very low virus-neutralizing activity in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Mozdzanowska, K; Furchner, M; Washko, G; Mozdzanowski, J; Gerhard, W

    1997-01-01

    We have previously shown that a pulmonary influenza virus infection in SCID mice can be cured by treatment with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for the viral transmembrane protein hemagglutinin (HA) but not for matrix 2. Since both types of MAbs react with infected cells but only the former neutralizes the virus, it appeared that passive MAbs cured by neutralization of progeny virus rather than reaction with infected host cells. To prove this, we selected a set of four HA-specific MAbs, all of the immunoglobulin G2a isotype, which reacted well with native HA expressed on infected cells yet differed greatly (>10,000-fold) in virus neutralization (VN) activity in vitro, apparently because of differences in antibody avidity and accessibility of the respective determinants on the HA of mature virions. Since the VN activities of these MAbs in vitro were differentially enhanced by serum components, we determined their prophylactic activities in vivo and used them as measures of their actual VN activities in vivo. The comparison of therapeutic and prophylactic activities indicated that these MAbs cured the infection to a greater extent by VN activity (which was greatly enhanced in vivo) and to a lesser extent by reaction with infected host cells. Neither complement- nor NK cell-dependent mechanisms were involved in the MAb-mediated virus clearance. PMID:9151823

  16. Novel lentiviral vectors displaying "early-acting cytokines" selectively promote survival and transduction of NOD/SCID repopulating human hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Verhoeyen, Els; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Olivier, Delphine; Izac, Brigitte; Trono, Didier; Dubart-Kupperschmitt, Anne; Cosset, François-Loïc

    2005-11-15

    A major limitation of current lentiviral vectors (LVs) is their inability to govern efficient gene transfer into quiescent cells, such as human CD34(+) cells, that reside in the G(0) phase of the cell cycle and that are highly enriched in hematopoietic stem cells. This hampers their application for gene therapy of hematopoietic cells. Here, we designed novel LVs that overcome this restriction by displaying "early-acting cytokines" on their surface. Display of thrombopoietin, stem cell factor, or both cytokines on the LV surface allowed efficient gene delivery into quiescent cord blood CD34(+) cells. Moreover, these surface-engineered LVs preferentially transduced and promoted survival of resting CD34(+) cells rather than cycling cells. Finally, and most importantly, these novel LVs allowed superior gene transfer in the most immature CD34(+) cells as compared to conventional LVs, even when the latter vectors were used to transduce cells in the presence of recombinant cytokines. This was demonstrated by their capacity to promote selective transduction of CD34(+) cell in in vitro derived long-term culture-initiating cell (LTC-IC) colonies and of long-term NOD/SCID repopulating cells (SRCs) in vivo.

  17. Role of CD8+ and WC-1+ gamma/delta T cells in resistance to Mycobacterium bovis infection in the SCID-bo mouse.

    PubMed

    Smith, R A; Kreeger, J M; Alvarez, A J; Goin, J C; Davis, W C; Whipple, D L; Estes, D M

    1999-01-01

    The role of various effector T cell populations in the bovine immune response to Mycobacterium bovis infection is poorly understood. This is largely due to the difficulties associated with performing in vivo challenge studies in the natural host species. In this report, we utilized a fetal bovine-severe combined immunodeficient (SCID-bo) xenochimeric mouse model to study the protective role of two putative effector cell types, CD8+ T cells and a subpopulation of gamma/delta T cells that express WC-1, a member of the cysteine-rich scavenger receptor superfamily (CRSR). We demonstrate that CD8+ T cells play a key role in protection and contribute substantially to bovine IFN-gamma mRNA levels at 30 days post-infection. The role of WC-1 bearing cells to protection was less definitive but our results suggest that this population may play a pivotal role early in infection. Granuloma architecture was altered in anti-WC-1 (ILA29) but not anti-CD8 (ILA51) -treated animals, suggesting that this population may be involved in recruitment of various cell types to sites of infection.

  18. Severe papillomavirus infection progressing to metastatic squamous cell carcinoma in bone marrow-transplanted X-linked SCID dogs.

    PubMed

    Goldschmidt, Michael H; Kennedy, Jeffrey S; Kennedy, Douglas R; Yuan, Hang; Holt, David E; Casal, Margret L; Traas, Anne M; Mauldin, Elizabeth A; Moore, Peter F; Henthorn, Paula S; Hartnett, Brian J; Weinberg, Kenneth I; Schlegel, Richard; Felsburg, Peter J

    2006-07-01

    Canine X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) is due to mutations in the common gamma chain (gammac) gene and is identical clinically and immunologically to human XSCID, making it a true homologue of the human disease. Bone marrow-transplanted (BMT) XSCID dogs not only engraft donor T cells and reconstitute normal T-cell function but, in contrast to the majority of transplanted human XSCID patients, also engraft donor B cells and reconstitute normal humoral immune function. Shortly after our initial report of successful BMT of XSCID dogs, it soon became evident that transplanted XSCID dogs developed late-onset severe chronic cutaneous infections containing a newly described canine papillomavirus. This is analogous to the late-onset cutaneous papillomavirus infection recently described for human XSCID patients following BMT. Of 24 transplanted XSCID dogs followed for at least 1 year post-BMT, 71% developed chronic canine papillomavirus infection. Six of the transplanted dogs that developed cutaneous papillomas were maintained for >3 1/2 years post-BMT for use as breeders. Four of these six dogs (67%) developed invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), with three of the dogs (75%) eventually developing metastatic SCC, an extremely rare consequence of SCC in the dog. This finding raises the question of whether SCC will develop in transplanted human XSCID patients later in life. Canine XSCID therefore provides an ideal animal model with which to study the role of the gammac-dependent signaling pathway in the response to papillomavirus infections and the progression of these viral infections to metastatic SCC.

  19. Virus and Autoantigen-Specific CD4+ T Cells Are Key Effectors in a SCID Mouse Model of EBV-Associated Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Linnerbauer, Stefanie; Behrends, Uta; Adhikary, Dinesh; Witter, Klaus; Bornkamm, Georg W.; Mautner, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Polyclonal Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected B cell line (lymphoblastoid cell lines; LCL)-stimulated T-cell preparations have been successfully used to treat EBV-positive post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) in transplant recipients, but function and specificity of the CD4+ component are still poorly defined. Here, we assessed the tumor-protective potential of different CD4+ T-cell specificities in a PTLD-SCID mouse model. Injection of different virus-specific CD4+ T-cell clones showed that single specificities were capable of prolonging mouse survival and that the degree of tumor protection directly correlated with recognition of target cells in vitro. Surprisingly, some CD4+ T-cell clones promoted tumor development, suggesting that besides antigen recognition, still elusive functional differences exist among virus-specific T cells. Of several EBV-specific CD4+ T-cell clones tested, those directed against virion antigens proved most tumor-protective. However, enriching these specificities in LCL-stimulated preparations conferred no additional survival benefit. Instead, CD4+ T cells specific for unknown, probably self-antigens were identified as principal antitumoral effectors in LCL-stimulated T-cell lines. These results indicate that virion and still unidentified cellular antigens are crucial targets of the CD4+ T-cell response in this preclinical PTLD-model and that enriching the corresponding T-cell specificities in therapeutic preparations may enhance their clinical efficacy. Moreover, the expression in several EBV-negative B-cell lymphoma cell lines implies that these putative autoantigen(s) might also qualify as targets for T-cell-based immunotherapy of virus-negative B cell malignancies. PMID:24853673

  20. Beneficial effects of growth hormone-releasing hormone agonists on rat INS-1 cells and on streptozotocin-induced NOD/SCID mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xianyang; Cui, Tengjiao; He, Jinlin; Wang, Haibo; Cai, Renzhi; Popovics, Petra; Vidaurre, Irving; Sha, Wei; Schmid, Janine; Ludwig, Barbara; Block, Norman L.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Schally, Andrew V.

    2015-01-01

    Agonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) have been previously reported to promote growth, function, and engraftment of islet cells following transplantation. Here we evaluated recently synthesized GHRH agonists on the proliferation and biological functions of rat pancreatic β-cell line (INS-1) and islets. In vitro treatment of INS-1 cells with GHRH agonists increased cell proliferation, the expression of cellular insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1), and GHRH receptor, and also stimulated insulin secretion in response to glucose challenge. Exposure of INS-1 cells to GHRH agonists, MR-356 and MR-409, induced activation of ERK and AKT pathways. Agonist MR-409 also significantly increased the levels of cellular cAMP and the phosphorylation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in INS-1 cells. Treatment of rat islets with agonist, MR-409 significantly increased cell proliferation, islet size, and the expression of insulin. In vivo daily s.c. administration of 10 μg MR-409 for 3 wk dramatically reduced the severity of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in nonobese diabetic severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice. The maximal therapeutic benefits with respect to the efficiency of engraftment, ability to reach normoglycemia, gain in body weight, response to high glucose challenge, and induction of higher levels of serum insulin and IGF1 were observed when diabetic mice were transplanted with rat islets preconditioned with GHRH agonist, MR-409, and received additional treatment with MR-409 posttransplantation. This study provides an improved approach to the therapeutic use of GHRH agonists in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. PMID:26474831

  1. The course of infections and pathology in immunomodulated NOD/LtSz-SCID mice inoculated with Plasmodium falciparum laboratory lines and clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Alicia; Ferrer, Elizabeth; Arahuetes, Susana; Eguiluz, Cesar; Van Rooijen, Nico; Benito, Agustin

    2006-03-01

    Human chimeras are potentially invaluable models for hemoprotozoan parasites such as Plasmodium falciparum. The work presented assesses the susceptibility of immunomodulated NOD/LtSz-SCID mice to genetically distinct P. falciparum parasites. To this end, mice grafted with human erythrocytes were inoculated with two P. falciparum laboratory lines, 3D7 and Dd2 and four clinical isolates, ISCIII-230, ISCIII-231, ISCIII-381 and ISCIII-399. The results showed that, without a previous period of parasite adaptation, 100% of the inoculated mice developed an infection, generally self-limited, though some mice died. The parasitemias ranged from 0.05 to 8% and lasted an average of 19 days (15-26 days) depending on the line or isolate studied. Sexual forms of different maturity, stage II-IV and mature gametocytes were observed in the peripheral blood of mice in 22, 50, 25, 72 and 80% of the mice infected with Dd2, ISCIII-399, ISCIII-230, ISCIII-231 and ISCIII-381 isolates, respectively. The study of the clinical symptoms, the haematological parameters and the histopathological changes in the infected mice showed that most of the malaria features were present in the infected mice except that the sequestration of infected erythrocytes was absent or at most a minor phenomenon, as also indicated by the presence of mature forms of the parasites in the peripheral blood. This study shows that the human chimeras allow the complete asexual and sexual erythrocytic cycle of different P. falciparum lines and clinical isolates to be observed in vivo. It opens a new way to investigate any parasite population in terms of infectivity, transmission, and drug resistance.

  2. Improved function and proliferation of adult human beta cells engrafted in diabetic immunodeficient NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice treated with alogliptin

    PubMed Central

    Jurczyk, Agata; diIorio, Philip; Brostowin, Dean; Leehy, Linda; Yang, Chaoxing; Urano, Fumihiko; Harlan, David M; Shultz, Leonard D; Greiner, Dale L; Bortell, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Dipeptidyl-peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are known to increase insulin secretion and beta cell proliferation in rodents. To investigate the effects on human beta cells in vivo, we utilize immunodeficient mice transplanted with human islets. The study goal was to determine the efficacy of alogliptin, a DPP-4 inhibitor, to enhance human beta cell function and proliferation in an in vivo context using diabetic immunodeficient mice engrafted with human pancreatic islets. Methods Streptozotocin-induced diabetic NOD-scid IL2rγnull (NSG) mice were transplanted with adult human islets in three separate trials. Transplanted mice were treated daily by gavage with alogliptin (30 mg/kg/day) or vehicle control. Islet graft function was compared using glucose tolerance tests and non-fasting plasma levels of human insulin and C-peptide; beta cell proliferation was determined by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation. Results Glucose tolerance tests were significantly improved by alogliptin treatment for mice transplanted with islets from two of the three human islet donors. Islet-engrafted mice treated with alogliptin also had significantly higher plasma levels of human insulin and C-peptide compared to vehicle controls. The percentage of insulin+BrdU+ cells in human islet grafts from alogliptin-treated mice was approximately 10-fold more than from vehicle control mice, consistent with a significant increase in human beta cell proliferation. Conclusion Human islet-engrafted immunodeficient mice treated with alogliptin show improved human insulin secretion and beta cell proliferation compared to control mice engrafted with the same donor islets. Immunodeficient mice transplanted with human islets provide a useful model to interrogate potential therapies to improve human islet function and survival in vivo. PMID:24376359

  3. Hepatitis C virus dynamics and cellular gene expression in uPA-SCID chimeric mice with humanized livers during intravenous silibinin monotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    DebRoy, Swati; Hiraga, Nobuhiko; Imamura, Michio; Hayes, C. Nelson; Akamatsu, Sakura; Canini, Laetitia; Perelson, Alan S.; Pohl, Ralf T.; Persiani, Stefano; Uprichard, Susan L.; Tateno, Chise; Dahari, Harel; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2016-06-08

    Legalon SIL (SIL) is a chemically hydrophilized version of silibinin, an extract of milk thistle (Silybum marianum) seeds that has exhibited hepatoprotective and antiviral effectiveness against hepatitis C virus (HCV) in patients leading to viral clearance in combination with ribavirin. In this paper, to elucidate the incompletely understood mode of action of SIL against HCV, mathematical modelling of HCV kinetics and human hepatocyte gene expression studies were performed in uPA-SCID-chimeric mice with humanized livers. Chronically HCV-infected mice (n = 15) were treated for 14 days with daily intravenous SIL at 469, 265 or 61.5 mg/kg. Serum HCV and human albumin (hAlb) were measured frequently, and liver HCV RNA was analysed at days 3 and 14. Microarray analysis of human hepatocyte gene expression was performed at days 0, 3 and 14 of treatment. While hAlb remained constant, a biphasic viral decline in serum was observed consisting of a rapid 1st phase followed by a second slower phase (or plateau with the two lower SIL dosings). SIL effectiveness in blocking viral production was similar among dosing groups (median ε = 77%). However, the rate of HCV-infected hepatocyte decline, δ, was dose-dependent. Intracellular HCV RNA levels correlated (r = 0.66, P = 0.01) with serum HCV RNA. Pathway analysis revealed increased anti-inflammatory and antiproliferative gene expression in human hepatocytes in SIL-treated mice. Finally, the results suggest that SIL could lead to a continuous second-phase viral decline, that is potentially viral clearance, in the absence of adaptive immune response along with increased anti-inflammatory and antiproliferative gene expression in human hepatocytes.

  4. Hepatitis C virus dynamics and cellular gene expression in uPA-SCID chimeric mice with humanized livers during intravenous silibinin monotherapy

    DOE PAGES

    DebRoy, Swati; Hiraga, Nobuhiko; Imamura, Michio; ...

    2016-06-08

    Legalon SIL (SIL) is a chemically hydrophilized version of silibinin, an extract of milk thistle (Silybum marianum) seeds that has exhibited hepatoprotective and antiviral effectiveness against hepatitis C virus (HCV) in patients leading to viral clearance in combination with ribavirin. In this paper, to elucidate the incompletely understood mode of action of SIL against HCV, mathematical modelling of HCV kinetics and human hepatocyte gene expression studies were performed in uPA-SCID-chimeric mice with humanized livers. Chronically HCV-infected mice (n = 15) were treated for 14 days with daily intravenous SIL at 469, 265 or 61.5 mg/kg. Serum HCV and human albuminmore » (hAlb) were measured frequently, and liver HCV RNA was analysed at days 3 and 14. Microarray analysis of human hepatocyte gene expression was performed at days 0, 3 and 14 of treatment. While hAlb remained constant, a biphasic viral decline in serum was observed consisting of a rapid 1st phase followed by a second slower phase (or plateau with the two lower SIL dosings). SIL effectiveness in blocking viral production was similar among dosing groups (median ε = 77%). However, the rate of HCV-infected hepatocyte decline, δ, was dose-dependent. Intracellular HCV RNA levels correlated (r = 0.66, P = 0.01) with serum HCV RNA. Pathway analysis revealed increased anti-inflammatory and antiproliferative gene expression in human hepatocytes in SIL-treated mice. Finally, the results suggest that SIL could lead to a continuous second-phase viral decline, that is potentially viral clearance, in the absence of adaptive immune response along with increased anti-inflammatory and antiproliferative gene expression in human hepatocytes.« less

  5. Inhibitory effects of retinoic acid metabolism blocking agents (RAMBAs) on the growth of human prostate cancer cells and LNCaP prostate tumour xenografts in SCID mice

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, C K; Brodie, A M H; Njar, V C O

    2006-01-01

    In recent studies, we have identified several highly potent all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) metabolism blocking agents (RAMBAs). On the basis of previous effects of liarozole (a first-generation RAMBA) on the catabolism of ATRA and on growth of rat Dunning R3227G prostate tumours, we assessed the effects of our novel RAMBAs on human prostate tumour (PCA) cell lines. We examined three different PCA cell lines to determine their capacity to induce P450-mediated oxidation of ATRA. Among the three different cell lines, enhanced catabolism was detected in LNCaP, whereas it was not found in PC-3 and DU-145. This catabolism was strongly inhibited by our RAMBAs, the most potent being VN/14-1, VN/50-1, VN/66-1, and VN/69-1 with IC50 values of 6.5, 90.0, 62.5, and 90.0 nM, respectively. The RAMBAs inhibited the growth of LNCaP cells with IC50 values in the μM-range. In LNCaP cell proliferation assays, VN/14-1, VN/50-1, VN/66-1, and VN/69-1 also enhanced by 47-, 60-, 70-, and 65-fold, respectively, the ATRA-mediated antiproliferative activity. We then examined the molecular mechanism underlying the growth inhibitory properties of ATRA alone and in combination with RAMBAs. The mechanism appeared to involve the induction of differentiation, cell-cycle arrest, and induction of apoptosis (TUNEL), involving increase in Bad expression and decrease in Bcl-2 expression. Treatment of LNCaP tumours growing in SCID mice with VN/66-1 and VN/69-1 resulted in modest but statistically significant tumour growth inhibition of 44 and 47%, respectively, while treatment with VN/14-1 was unexpectedly ineffective. These results suggest that some of our novel RAMBAs may be useful agents for the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:16449997

  6. Erythropoietin and its Carbamylated Derivative Prevent the Development of Experimental Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy in STZ-Induced Diabetic NOD-SCID Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Robert E.; Green, Karen G.; Feng, Dongyan; Dorsey, Denise A.; Parvin, Curtis A.; Lee, Jin-Moo; Xiao, Qinlgi; Brines, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Autonomic neuropathy is a significant diabetic complication resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. Studies of autopsied diabetic patients and several rodent models demonstrate that the neuropathologic hallmark of diabetic sympathetic autonomic neuropathy in prevertebral ganglia is the occurrence of synaptic pathology resulting in distinctive dystrophic neurites (“neuritic dystrophy”). Our prior studies show that neuritic dystrophy is reversed by exogenous IGF-I administration without altering the metabolic severity of diabetes, i.e. functioning as a neurotrophic substance. The description of erythropoietin (EPO) synergy with IGF-I function and the recent discovery of EPO’s multifaceted neuroprotective role suggested it might substitute for IGF-I in treatment of diabetic autonomic neuropathy. Our current studies demonstrate EPO receptor (EPO-R) mRNA in a cDNA set prepared from NGF-maintained rat sympathetic neuron cultures which decreased with NGF deprivation, a result which demonstrates clearly that sympathetic neurons express EPO-R, a result confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Treatment of STZ-diabetic NOD-SCID mice have demonstrated a dramatic preventative effect of EPO and carbamylated EPO (CEPO, which is neuroprotective but not hematopoietic) on the development of neuritic dystrophy. Neither EPO nor CEPO had a demonstrable effect on the metabolic severity of diabetes. Our results coupled with reported salutary effects of EPO on postural hypotension in a few clinical studies of EPO-treated anemic diabetic and non-diabetic patients may reflect a primary neurotrophic effect of EPO on the sympathetic autonomic nervous system, rather than a primary hematopoietic effect. These findings may represent a major clinical advance since EPO has been widely and safely used in anemic patients due to a variety of clinical conditions. PMID:17967455

  7. Impaired synthesis of erythropoietin, glutamine synthetase and metallothionein in the skin of NOD/SCID/gamma(c)(null) and Foxn1 nu/nu mice with misbalanced production of MHC class II complex.

    PubMed

    Danielyan, L; Verleysdonk, S; Buadze, M; Gleiter, C H; Buniatian, G H

    2010-06-01

    Most skin pathologies are characterized by unbalanced synthesis of major histocompatability complex II (MHC-II) proteins. Healthy skin keratinocytes simultaneously produce large amounts of MHC-II and regeneration-supporting proteins, e.g. erythropoietin (EPO), EPO receptor (EPOR), glutamine synthetase (GS) and metallothionein (MT). To investigate the level of regeneration-supporting proteins in the skin during misbalanced production of MHC-II, skin sections from nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID)/gamma (c) (null) and or Foxn1 nu/nu mice which are a priory known to under- and over-express MHC II, respectively, were used. Double immunofluorescence analysis of NOD/SCID/gamma (c) (null) skin sections showed striking decrease in expression of MHC-II, EPO, GS and MT. In Foxn1 nu/nu mouse skin, GS was strongly expressed in epidermis and in hair follicles (HF), which lacked EPO. In nude mouse skin EPO and MHC-II were over-expressed in dermal fibroblasts and they were completely absent from cortex, channel, medulla and keratinocytes surrounding the HF, suggest a role for EPO in health and pathology of hair follicle. The level of expression of EPO and GS in both mutant mice was confirmed by results of Western blot analyses. Strong immunoresponsiveness of EPOR in the hair channels of NOD/SCID/gamma (c) (null) mouse skin suggests increased requirements of skin cells for EPO and possible benefits of exogenous EPO application during disorders of immune system accompanied by loss MHC-II in skin cells.

  8. Carrier frequency of a nonsense mutation in the adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene implies a high incidence of ADA-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) in Somalia and a single, common haplotype indicates common ancestry.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Juan J; Monaghan, Gemma; Børsting, Claus; Norbury, Gail; Morling, Niels; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2007-05-01

    Inherited adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency is a rare metabolic disorder that causes immunodeficiency, varying from severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) in the majority of cases to a less severe form in a small minority of patients. Five patients of Somali origin from four unrelated families, with severe ADA-SCID, were registered in the Greater London area. Patients and their parents were investigated for the nonsense mutation Q3X (ADA c7C>T), two missense mutations K80R (ADA c239A>G) and R142Q (ADA c425G>A), and a TAAA repeat located at the 3' end of an Alu element (AluVpA) positioned 1.1 kb upstream of the ADA transcription start site. All patients were homozygous for the haplotype ADA-7T/ADA-239G/ADA-425G/AluVpA7. Among 207 Somali immigrants to Denmark, the frequency of ADA c7C>T and the maximum likelihood estimate of the frequency of the haplotype ADA-7T/ADA-239G/ADA-425G/AluVpA7 were both 0.012 (carrier frequency 2.4%). Based on the analysis of AluVpA alleles, the ADA c7C/T mutation was estimated to be approximately 7,100 years old. Approximately 1 out of 5 - 10000 Somali children will be born with ADA deficiency due to an ADA c7C/T mutation, although within certain clans the frequency may be significantly higher. ADA-SCID may be a frequent immunodeficiency disorder in Somalia, but will be underdiagnosed due to the prevailing socioeconomic and nutritional deprivation.

  9. The hematopoietic stem cell compartment of JAK2V617F-positive myeloproliferative disorders is a reflection of disease heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    James, Chloe; Mazurier, Frederic; Dupont, Sabrina; Chaligne, Ronan; Lamrissi-Garcia, Isabelle; Tulliez, Micheline; Lippert, Eric; Mahon, François-Xavier; Pasquet, Jean-Max; Etienne, Gabriel; Delhommeau, François; Giraudier, Stephane; Vainchenker, William; de Verneuil, Hubert

    2008-09-15

    The JAK2V617F somatic point mutation has been described in patients with myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs). Despite this progress, it remains unknown how a single JAK2 mutation causes 3 different MPD phenotypes, polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia, and primitive myelofibrosis (PMF). Using an in vivo xenotransplantation assay in nonobese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mice, we tested whether disease heterogeneity was associated with quantitative or qualitative differences in the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment. We show that the HSC compartment of PV and PMF patients contains JAK2V617F-positive long-term, multipotent, and self-renewing cells. However, the proportion of JAK2V617F and JAK2 wild-type SCID repopulating cells was dramatically different in these diseases, without major modifications of the self-renewal and proliferation capacities for JAK2V617F SCID repopulating cells. These experiments provide new insights into the pathogenesis of JAK2V617F MPD and demonstrate that a JAK2 inhibitor needs to target the HSC compartment for optimal disease control in classical MPD.

  10. Immune defects in active mycobacterial diseases in patients with primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs).

    PubMed

    Lee, Wen-I; Huang, Jing-Long; Yeh, Kuo-Wei; Jaing, Tang-Her; Lin, Tzou-Yien; Huang, Yhu-Chering; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun

    2011-12-01

    Natural human immunity to the mycobacteria group, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) or nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), and/or Salmonella species, relies on the functional IL-12/23-IFN-γ integrity of macrophages (monocyte/dendritic cell) connecting to T lymphocyte/NK cells. Patients with severe forms of primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs) have more profound immune defects involving this impaired circuit in patients with severe combined immunodeficiencies (SCID) including complete DiGeorge syndrome, X-linked hyper IgM syndrome (HIGM) (CD40L mutation), CD40 deficiency, immunodeficiency with or without anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (NEMO and IKBA mutations), chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) and hyper IgE recurrent infection syndromes (HIES). The patients with severe PIDs have broader diverse infections rather than mycobacterial infections. In contrast, patients with an isolated inborn error of the IL-12/23-IFN-γ pathway are exclusively prone to low-virulence mycobacterial infections and nontyphoid salmonella infections, known as Mendelian susceptibility to the mycobacterial disease (MSMD) phenotype. Restricted defective molecules in the circuit, including IFN-γR1, IFN-γR2, IL-12p40, IL-12R-β1, STAT-1, NEMO, IKBA and the recently discovered CYBB responsible for autophagocytic vacuole and proteolysis, and interferon regulatory factor 8 (IRF8) for dendritic cell immunodeficiency, have been identified in around 60% of patients with the MSMD phenotype. Among all of the patients with PIDs referred for investigation since 1985, we have identified four cases with the specific defect (IFNRG1 for three and IL12RB for one), presenting as both BCG-induced diseases and NTM infections, in addition to some patients with SCID, HIGM, CGD and HIES. Furthermore, manifestations in patients with autoantibodies to IFN-γ (autoAbs-IFN-γ), which is categorized as an anticytokine autoantibody syndrome, can resemble the relatively persistent

  11. Bone metastasis model with multiorgan dissemination of human small-cell lung cancer (SBC-5) cells in natural killer cell-depleted SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Miki, T; Yano, S; Hanibuchi, M; Sone, S

    2000-01-01

    Lung cancer is commonly associated with multiorgan metastasis, and bone is a frequent metastatic site for lung cancer. Nevertheless, no bone metastasis model of lung cancer with multiorgan dissemination is available, which could provide opportunity to study the molecular pathogenesis. We examined the abilities of eight human lung cancer cell lines injected intravenously into natural killer (NK) cell-depleted SCID mice to generate metastatic nodules in bone and multiple organs, and explored the correlation of the parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) with the bone metastasis. Although all the small-cell carcinoma cell lines (SBC-5, SBC-3, SBC-3/ADM, H69, H69/VP) formed metastatic nodules in multiple organs (liver, kidney, and lymph nodes), only SBC-5 cells reproducibly developed bone metastases. Squamous cell carcinoma (RERF-LC-AI) cells metastasized mainly into the liver and kidneys, whereas adenocarcinoma (PC-14, A549) mainly produced colonies in the lungs. As assessed by X-ray photography, the osteolytic bone metastases produced by SBC-5 cells were detected as early as on day 28, and all recipient mice developed bone metastasis by day 35. The expression of PTHrP in eight cell lines was directly correlated with the formation of bone metastasis. No correlation was observed between the formation of bone metastasis and the expression of other metastasis-related cytokines (IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-11, TNF-alpha, VEGF, M-CSF). Consistent with the formation of bone metastasis by SBC-5 cells, the levels of PTHrP and calcium in the mouse serum were increased in a time-dependent manner, suggesting that PTHrP produced by human lung cancer may play a crucial role in the formation of bone metastasis and hypercalcemia. These findings indicate that a bone metastasis model of SBC-5 cells may be useful for clarifying the molecular aspects of the metastatic processes in different organ microenvironments and the development of therapeutic modalities for lung cancer

  12. Infusion of Trx-1-overexpressing hucMSC prolongs the survival of acutely irradiated NOD/SCID mice by decreasing excessive inflammatory injury.

    PubMed

    Hu, JiangWei; Yang, ZaiLiang; Wang, Jun; Tang, YongYong; Liu, Hao; Zhang, Bin; Chen, Hu

    2013-01-01

    A protective reagent for ARI should have the ability to repair injured tissue caused by radiation and prevent continuous damage from secondary risk factors. Trx-1 was explored as a candidate therapy for ARI, as it scavenges reactive oxygen species, regulates cell growth and differentiation, participates in immune reactions, and inhibits apoptosis by acting inside and/or outside cells. Trx-1 can also decrease excessive inflammation in ARI by regulating the creation of inflamed media, by inhibiting the activation of complement, and by reducing the chemotaxis, adhesion, and migration of inflammatory cells. As effectively and stably expressing exogenous genes in the long term and regulating immune inflammation and tissue repair, MSC are a good choice for Trx-1 gene therapy. In this study, Trx-1-overexpressing hucMSC-Trx-1 were obtained by adenoviral vector-mediated infection. We first measured the redox capacity of hucMSC-Trx-1 with an antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) assay, a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) content determination assay in vivo, a H2O2-induced oxidation hemolysis assay, and a lipid peroxidation assay in vitro. Then, we measured survival time, the protection of the hematopoietic system, and the regulation of inflammation in important organs in three treatment groups of NOD/SCID mice (treated with hucMSC-Trx-1, with hucMSC, and with saline) that were exposed to 4.5 Gy (60)Co-γ-ray radiation. The hucMSC-Trx-1 group achieved superior antioxidation results, protecting bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (Lin(-)CD117(+): hucMSC-Trx-1 vs. hucMSC, P<0.05; hucMSC-Trx-1 vs. NS, P<0.01), promoting the formation of red blood cells and hemoglobin (hucMSC-Trx-1 vs. hucMSC or NS, P<0.05), reducing inflammation and damage in important organs (Bone marrow and lung: hucMSC-Trx-1 vs. NS, P<0.01; hucMSC-Trx-1 vs. hucMSC, P<0.05. Liver and intestine: hucMSC-Trx-1 vs. NS, P<0.05; hucMSC-Trx-1 vs. hucMSC, P<0.05), and prolonging survival (hucMSC-Trx-1 vs. hucMSC or NS, P<0

  13. Infusion of Trx-1-Overexpressing hucMSC Prolongs the Survival of Acutely Irradiated NOD/SCID Mice by Decreasing Excessive Inflammatory Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Tang, YongYong; Liu, Hao; Zhang, Bin; Chen, Hu

    2013-01-01

    A protective reagent for ARI should have the ability to repair injured tissue caused by radiation and prevent continuous damage from secondary risk factors. Trx-1 was explored as a candidate therapy for ARI, as it scavenges reactive oxygen species, regulates cell growth and differentiation, participates in immune reactions, and inhibits apoptosis by acting inside and/or outside cells. Trx-1 can also decrease excessive inflammation in ARI by regulating the creation of inflamed media, by inhibiting the activation of complement, and by reducing the chemotaxis, adhesion, and migration of inflammatory cells. As effectively and stably expressing exogenous genes in the long term and regulating immune inflammation and tissue repair, MSC are a good choice for Trx-1 gene therapy. In this study, Trx-1-overexpressing hucMSC-Trx-1 were obtained by adenoviral vector-mediated infection. We first measured the redox capacity of hucMSC-Trx-1 with an antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) assay, a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) content determination assay in vivo, a H2O2-induced oxidation hemolysis assay, and a lipid peroxidation assay in vitro. Then, we measured survival time, the protection of the hematopoietic system, and the regulation of inflammation in important organs in three treatment groups of NOD/SCID mice (treated with hucMSC-Trx-1, with hucMSC, and with saline) that were exposed to 4.5 Gy 60Co-γ-ray radiation. The hucMSC-Trx-1 group achieved superior antioxidation results, protecting bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (Lin−CD117+: hucMSC-Trx-1 vs. hucMSC, P<0.05; hucMSC-Trx-1 vs. NS, P<0.01), promoting the formation of red blood cells and hemoglobin (hucMSC-Trx-1 vs. hucMSC or NS, P<0.05), reducing inflammation and damage in important organs (Bone marrow and lung: hucMSC-Trx-1 vs. NS, P<0.01; hucMSC-Trx-1 vs. hucMSC, P<0.05. Liver and intestine: hucMSC-Trx-1 vs. NS, P<0.05; hucMSC-Trx-1 vs. hucMSC, P<0.05), and prolonging survival (hucMSC-Trx-1 vs. hucMSC or NS, P<0.01). Therefore

  14. Selective Regulation of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected CD4+ Lymphocytes by a Synthetic Immunomodulator Leads to Potent Virus Suppression In Vitro and in hu-PBL-SCID Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bahr, George M.; Darcissac, Edith C. A.; Castéran, Nathalie; Amiel, Corinne; Cocude, Cécile; Truong, Marie-José; Dewulf, Joëlle; Capron, André; Mouton, Yves

    2001-01-01

    We have previously observed that the synthetic immunomodulator Murabutide inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication at multiple levels in macrophages and dendritic cells. The present study was designed to profile the activity of Murabutide on CD8-depleted phytohemagglutinin-activated lymphocytes from HIV-1-infected subjects and on the outcome of HIV-1 infection in severe combined immunodeficiency mice reconstituted with human peripheral blood leukocytes (hu-PBL-SCID mice). Maintaining cultures of CD8-depleted blasts from 36 patients in the presence of Murabutide produced dramatically reduced levels of viral p24 protein in the supernatants. This activity correlated with reduced viral transcripts and proviral DNA, was evident in cultures harboring R5, X4-R5, or X4 HIV-1 isolates, was not linked to inhibition of cellular DNA synthesis, and did not correlate with β-chemokine release. Moreover, c-myc mRNA expression was down-regulated in Murabutide-treated cells, suggesting potential interference of the immunomodulator with the nuclear transport of viral preintegration complexes. On the other hand, daily treatment of HIV-1-infected hu-PBL-SCID mice with Murabutide significantly reduced the viral loads in plasma and the proviral DNA content in human peritoneal cells. These results are the first to demonstrate that a clinically acceptable synthetic immunomodulator with an ability to enhance the host's nonspecific immune defense mechanisms against infections can directly regulate cellular factors in infected lymphocytes, leading to controlled HIV-1 replication. PMID:11435574

  15. Long-term immunological reconstitution by peripheral blood leucocytes in severe combined immune deficiency disease: implications for the role of mature lymphocytes in histocompatible bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Polmar, S H; Schacter, B Z; Sorensen, R U

    1986-01-01

    A 7 month old girl with severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) received a single transfusion of peripheral blood leucocytes from her histocompatible grandfather in an attempt to achieve immunological reconstitution. There was rapid restoration of humoral and cellular immunity which has persisted undiminished over a 54 month follow-up period and the patient has remained free of any significant infections. Lymphocytes of donor karyotype were repeatedly demonstrated in the patient's peripheral blood. In contrast, no evidence of donor cell engraftment in her bone marrow could be obtained by karyotypic, antigenic or enzyme phenotypic analyses. These observations suggest that long term immunological reconstitution may be achieved solely by peripheral engraftment of mature lymphocytes. A review of the literature reveals that this mechanism of immunological reconstitution may not be uncommon following histocompatible bone marrow transplantation for treatment of SCID. PMID:3539420

  16. Somatic cell genetics of adenosine deaminase expression and severe combined immunodeficiency disease in humans.

    PubMed

    Koch, G; Shows, T B

    1980-07-01

    The somatic cell hybrid method has been used to study the number and different types of human genes involved in the expression of adenosine deaminase (ADA; adenosine aminohydrolase, EC 3.5.4.4) in normal cells and cells from a patient with ADA-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID). Genetic and biochemical characterization of ADA in SCID and the ADA tissue-specific isozymes in normal human cells indicates that additional genes, besides the ADA structural gene on chromosome 20, are involved in ADA expression. Human chromosome 6 encodes a gene, ADCP-1, whose presence is necessary for the expression of an ADA-complexing protein in human-mouse somatic cell hybrids [Koch, G. & Shows, T. B. (1978) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 75, 3876-3880]. We report the identification of a second gene, ADCP-2, on human chromosome 2, that is also involved in the expression of the ADA-complexing protein. The data indicate that these two ADCP genes must be present in the same cell for that cell to express the complexing protein. Human-mouse somatic cell hybrids, in which the human parental cells were fibroblastss from an individual with ADA-deficient SCID, also required human chromosomes 2 and 6 to express the ADA-complexing protein, indicating that neither ADCP-1 nor ADCP-2 is involved in the ADA deficiency in SCID. The SCID-mouse hybrid cells expressed no human ADA even when human chromosome 20 had been retained. The deficiency of human ADA in these hybrids maps to human chromosome 20, and therefore is not due to the repression or inhibiton of ADA or its product by unlinked genes or gene products. We propose that the expression of the polymeric ADA tissue isozymes in human cells requires at least three genes: ADA on chromosome 20, ADCP-1 on chromosome 6, and ADCP-2 on chromosome 2. A genetic scheme is presented and the different genes involved in ADA expression and their possible functions are discussed.

  17. Late-onset adenosine deaminase deficiency presenting with Heck's disease.

    PubMed

    Artac, Hasibe; Göktürk, Bahar; Bozdemir, Sefika Elmas; Toy, Hatice; van der Burg, Mirjam; Santisteban, Ines; Hershfield, Michael; Reisli, Ismail

    2010-08-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia, also known as Heck's disease, is a rare but distinctive entity of viral etiology with characteristic clinical and histopathological features. It is a benign, asymptomatic disease of the oral mucosa caused by human papilloma viruses (HPV). Previous studies postulated an association between these lesions and immunodeficiency. Genetic deficiency of adenosine deaminase (ADA) results in varying degrees of immunodeficiency, including neonatal onset severe combined immunodeficiency (ADA-SCID), and milder, later onset immunodeficiency. We report a 12-year-old girl with the late onset-ADA deficiency presenting with Heck's disease. Our case report should draw attention to the possibility of immunodeficiency in patients with HPV-induced focal epithelial hyperplasia.

  18. In vivo depletion of lymphotoxin-alpha expressing lymphocytes inhibits xenogeneic graft-versus-host-disease.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Eugene Y; Kolumam, Ganesh; McCutcheon, Krista M; Young, Judy; Lin, Zhonghua; Balazs, Mercedesz; Grogan, Jane L

    2012-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major barrier to successful allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation and is largely mediated by activated donor lymphocytes. Lymphotoxin (LT)-α is expressed by subsets of activated T and B cells, and studies in preclinical models demonstrated that targeted depletion of these cells with a mouse anti-LT-α monoclonal antibody (mAb) was efficacious in inhibiting inflammation and autoimmune disease. Here we demonstrate that LT-α is also upregulated on activated human donor lymphocytes in a xenogeneic model of GVHD and targeted depletion of these donor cells ameliorated GVHD. A depleting humanized anti-LT-α mAb, designated MLTA3698A, was generated that specifically binds to LT-α in both the soluble and membrane-bound forms, and elicits antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity in vitro. Using a human peripheral blood mononuclear cell transplanted SCID (Hu-SCID) mouse model of GVHD, the anti-human LT-α mAb specifically depleted activated LT-expressing human donor T and B cells, resulting in prolonged survival of the mice. A mutation in the Fc region, rendering the mAb incapable of mediating ADCC, abolished all in vitro and in vivo effects. These data support a role for using a depleting anti-LT-α antibody in treating immune diseases such as GVHD and autoimmune diseases.

  19. Experimental treatment of human Hodgkin's disease with ricin A-chain immunotoxins.

    PubMed

    Engert, A; Gottstein, C; Winkler, U; Amlot, P; Pileri, S; Diehl, V; Thorpe, P

    1994-05-01

    In the present paper we describe the evaluation of ricin A-chain immunotoxins for clinical application in Hodgkin's disease. The immunotoxins were constructed by chemically linking deglycosylated ricin-A to monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) recognising lymphocyte activation markers CD25, CD30, or IRac, which are expressed by Hodgkin's and Reed-Sternberg (H-RS) cells. The cytotoxic effects of the immunotoxins were investigated in vitro against L540Cy Hodgkin cells and in vivo against Hodgkin's tumors in nude mice and disseminated Hodgkin's tumors in SCID mice. MoAbs were evaluated for crossreactivity with normal human tissues and staining of sections from Hodgkin's disease tissue. Of 32 MoAbs, eight showed little crossreactivity with vital human organs and produced highly active immunotoxins. The most effective immunotoxin, RFT5 gamma l.dgA (CD25), inhibits the growth of H-RS cells at concentrations of 7 x 10(-12) M. RFT5 gamma l.dgA destroys about 60% of solid Hodgkin's tumors of 0.5 cm diameter in nude mice and induces complete remissions in 95% of SCID mice with disseminated Hodgkin's tumors when administered one day after tumor challenge. This immunotoxin binds to all H-RS cells in more than 90% of patients with Hodgkin's disease. Patients with refractory Hodgkin's disease are currently being treated in a phase-I/II clinical trial.

  20. No Synergistic Effect of Cotransplantation of MSC and Ex Vivo TPO-Expanded CD34(+) Cord Blood Cells on Platelet Recovery and Bone Marrow Engraftment in NOD SCID Mice.

    PubMed

    van der Garde, Mark; Brand, Anneke; Slot, Manon C; de Graaf-Dijkstra, Alice; Zwaginga, Jaap Jan; van Hensbergen, Yvette

    2015-06-15

    After cord blood (CB) transplantation, early platelet recovery in immune-deficient mice is obtained by expansion of CB CD34(+) cells with thrombopoietin (TPO) as single growth factor. Moreover, improvement of hematopoietic engraftment has been shown by cotransplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). We investigated whether a combination of both approaches would further enhance the outcome of CB transplantation in NOD SCID mice. NOD SCID mice were transplanted with either CB CD34(+) cells, CD34(+) cells with MSC, TPO-expanded CD34(+) cells or TPO-expanded CD34(+) cells with MSC. We analyzed human platelet recovery in the peripheral blood (PB) from day 4 after transplantation onward and human bone marrow (BM) engraftment at week 6. The different transplants were assessed in vitro for their migration capacity and expression of CXCR4. TPO expansion improved the early platelet recovery in the PB of the mice. Cotransplantation of MSC with CD34(+) cells improved BM engraftment and platelet levels in the PB 6 weeks after transplantation. Combining TPO expansion and MSC cotransplantation, however, neither resulted in a more efficient early platelet recovery, nor in a better BM engraftment, nor even very low or absent BM engraftment occurred. In vitro, MSC boosted the migration of CD34(+) cells, suggesting a possible mechanism for the increase in engraftment. Our results show that cotransplantation of MSC with TPO-expanded CD34(+) cells at most combines, but does not increase the separate advantages of these different strategies. A combination of both strategies even adds a risk of non engraftment.

  1. Efficient Engraftment of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Hepatocyte-Like Cells in uPA/SCID Mice by Overexpression of FNK, a Bcl-xL Mutant Gene.

    PubMed

    Nagamoto, Yasuhito; Takayama, Kazuo; Tashiro, Katsuhisa; Tateno, Chise; Sakurai, Fuminori; Tachibana, Masashi; Kawabata, Kenji; Ikeda, Kazuo; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Human liver chimeric mice are expected to be applied for drug toxicity tests and human hepatitis virus research. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells (iPSC-HLCs) are a highly attractive donor source for the generation of human liver chimeric mice because they can be produced on a large scale and established from an individual. Although these cells have been successfully used to generate human liver chimeric mice, there is still room for improvement in the repopulation efficiency. To enhance the repopulation efficacy, the human iPSC-HLCs were transduced with an adenovirus vector (Ad-FNK) expressing FNK, a hyperactive mutant gene from Bcl-xL, which was expected to inhibit apoptosis in the process of integration into liver parenchyma. We then transplanted Ad-FNK-transduced human iPSC-HLCs into urokinase-type plasminogen activator-transgenic severe combined immunodeficiency (uPA/SCID) mice (FNK mice) and evaluated the repopulation efficacy. The antiapoptotic effects of the human iPSC-HLCs were enhanced by FNK overexpression in vitro. Human albumin levels in the transplanted mice were significantly increased by transplantation of Ad-FNK-transduced human iPSC-HLCs (about 24,000 ng/ml). Immunohistochemical analysis with an anti-human αAT antibody revealed greater repopulation efficacy in the livers of FNK mice than control mice. Interestingly, the expression levels of human hepatocyte-related genes in the human iPSC-HLCs of FNK mice were much higher than those in the human iPSC-HLCs before transplantation. We succeeded in improving the repopulation efficacy of human liver chimeric mice generated by transplanting the Ad-FNK-transduced human iPSC-HLCs into uPA/SCID mice. Our method using ectopic expression of FNK was useful for generating human chimeric mice with high chimerism.

  2. Chronic granulomatous disease: lessons from a rare disorder.

    PubMed

    Segal, Brahm H; Veys, Paul; Malech, Harry; Cowan, Morton J

    2011-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a rare primary immunodeficiency with X-linked or autosomal recessive inheritance involving defects in genes encoding phox proteins, which are the subunits of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase. This results in failure to produce superoxide anion and downstream antimicrobial oxidant metabolites and to activate antimicrobial proteases. Affected patients are susceptible to severe, life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections and excessive inflammation characterized by granulomatous enteritis resembling Crohn's disease and genitourinary obstruction. Early diagnosis of CGD and rapid treatment of infections are critical. Prophylaxis with antibacterial and mold-active antifungal agents and the administration of interferon-γ has significantly improved the natural history of CGD. Currently, the only cure is allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT), although there remains controversy as to which patients with CGD should get a transplant. Allele-based HLA typing of alternative donors, improved supportive care measures, and use of reduced toxicity conditioning have resulted in event-free survival (EFS) of at least 80% even with an unrelated donor and even better when the patient has no active infections/inflammation. Gene correction of CGD would eliminate the risks of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and the immunoablative chemotherapy required for allogeneic HCT. Based on gene therapy trials in patients with SCID-X1, ADA-SCID, and the early experience with CGD, it is clear that at least some degree of myeloablation will be necessary for CGD as there is no inherent selective growth advantage for gene-corrected cells. Current efforts for gene therapy focus on use of lentivector constructs, which are thought to be safer from the standpoint of insertional mutagenesis and more efficient in transducing hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs).

  3. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a CD3 gamma-deficient infant with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Ozgür, Tuba Turul; Asal, Gülten Türkkani; Cetinkaya, D; Orhan, D; Kiliç, S S; Usta, Y; Ozen, H; Tezcan, Ilhan

    2008-12-01

    Partial or total CD3 chain expression defects including CD3 gamma, epsilon, delta, and zeta chain are among the autosomally inherited SCID presenting with T-B+NK+ phenotype with lymphopenia. The clinical findings are generally severe in all except for CD3 gamma deficiency. Here we present a 10-month-old CD3 gamma deficient boy with IBD. The patient had suffered from intractable diarrhea, recurrent pulmonary infections and oral moniliasis since two months of age. Following the first allogeneic HSCT from his HLA-identical (6/6) sister after a reduced intensity regimen, a second transplantation was performed five months later. On day +19 after second transplantation, the CD3 TCR alpha/beta chain expression increased to 66% with development of full donor chimerism (98.6%). A significant improvement in diarrhea, perianal lesions, and rectal fistula was observed suggesting an improvement in inflammatory bowel disease. The patient died at home on day +50 with a sudden respiratory failure secondary to an undetermined infection. The case was interesting being the first reported case with SCID and inflammatory bowel disease who responded very well to HSCT by full recovery of intractable diarrhea, failure to thrive, laboratory findings, and improvement of fistula formation.

  4. Gene therapy for childhood immunological diseases.

    PubMed

    Kohn, D B

    2008-01-01

    Gene therapy using autologous hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) that are corrected with the normal gene may have a beneficial effect on blood cell production or function, without the immunologic complications of allogeneic HSC transplantation. Childhood immunological diseases are highly favorable candidates for responses to gene therapy using HSC. Hemoglobinopathies, lysosomal and metabolic disorders and defects of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells should also be ameliorated by gene therapy using autologous HSC. At present, gene therapy has been beneficial for patients with XSCID, ADA-deficient SCID and chronic granulomatous disease. The principle that partial marrow conditioning increases engraftment of gene-corrected HSC has been demonstrated. Clinical trials are being developed in Europe and the United States to treat several other genetic blood cell disorders. This progress is tempered by the serious complication observed in XSCID patients developing T lymphoproliferative disease. New methods for gene transfer (lentiviral and foamy viral vectors, semi-viral systems and gene correction) may retain or further increase the efficacy and decrease the risks from gene therapy using HSC. Ultimately, the relative benefits and risks of autologous gene therapy will be weighed against other available options (for example, allogeneic HSCT) to determine the treatment of choice.

  5. Chronic Granulomatous Disease: Lessons from a Rare Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Segal, B H; Veys, P; Malech, H; Cowan, M J

    2010-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a rare primary immunodeficiency with x-linked or autosomal recessive inheritance involving defects in genes encoding phox proteins which are the subunits of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase. This results in failure to produce superoxide anion and downstream antimicrobial oxidant metabolites and to activate antimicrobial proteases. Affected patients are susceptible to severe, life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections and excessive inflammation characterized by granulomatous enteritis resembling Crohn's disease and genitourinary obstruction. Early diagnosis of CGD and rapid treatment of infections are critical. Prophylaxis with antibacterial and mould-active antifungal agents and the administration of interferon-γ has significantly improved the natural history of CGD. Currently, the only cure is allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) although there remains controversy as to which patients with CGD should get a transplant. Allele-based HLA typing of alternative donors, improved supportive care measures and use of reduced toxicity conditioning have resulted in EFS of at least 80% even with an unrelated donor and even better when the patient has no active infections/inflammation. Gene correction of CGD would eliminate the risks of GVHD and the immunoablative chemotherapy required for allogeneic HCT. Based on gene therapy trials in patients with SCID-X1, ADA-SCID and the early experience with CGD, it is clear that at least some degree of myeloablation will be necessary for CGD as there is no inherent selective growth advantage for gene-corrected cells. Current efforts for gene therapy focus on use of lentivector constructs which are thought to be safer from the standpoint of insertional mutagenesis and more efficient in transducing hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:21195301

  6. Endocrine Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... History Research Resources Research at NIDDK Meetings & Events Technology Advancement & Transfer Health Information Diabetes Digestive Diseases Kidney Disease Weight Management Liver Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition ...

  7. Crohn's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... History Research Resources Research at NIDDK Meetings & Events Technology Advancement & Transfer Health Information Diabetes Digestive Diseases Kidney Disease Weight Management Liver Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition ...

  8. Hodgkin's lymphoma cells are efficiently engrafted and tumor marker CD30 is expressed with constitutive nuclear factor-kappaB activity in unconditioned NOD/SCID/gammac(null) mice.

    PubMed

    Dewan, Md Zahidunnabi; Watanabe, Mariko; Ahmed, Sunjida; Terashima, Kazuo; Horiuchi, Sankichi; Sata, Tetsutaro; Honda, Mitsuo; Ito, Mamoru; Watanabe, Toshiki; Horie, Ryouichi; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2005-08-01

    As there are very few reproducible animal models without conditioning available for the study of human B-cell-type Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL), we investigated the ability of HL cells to induce tumors using novel NOD/SCID/gammac(null) (NOG) mice. Four human Epstein-Barr virus-negative cell lines (KM-H2 and L428 originated from B cells, L540 and HDLM2 originated from T cells) were inoculated either subcutaneously in the postauricular region or intravenously in the tail of unmanipulated NOG mice. All cell lines successfully engrafted and produced tumors with infiltration of cells in various organs of all mice. Tumor cells had classical histomorphology as well as expression patterns of the tumor marker CD30, which is a cell surface antigen expressed on HL. Tumor progression in mice inoculated with B-cell-type, but not T-cell-type, HL cells correlated with an elevation in serum human interleukin-6 levels. Tumor cells from the mice also retained strong nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB DNA binding activity, and the induced NF-kappaB components were indistinguishable from those cultured in vitro. The reproducible growth behavior and preservation of characteristic features of both B-cell-type and T-cell-type HL in the mice suggest that this new xenotransplant model can provide a unique opportunity to understand and investigate the mechanism of pathogenesis and malignant cell growth, and to develop novel anticancer therapies.

  9. Possible reduction of hepatoma formation by Smmu 7721 cells in SCID mice and metastasis formation by B16F10 melanoma cells in C57BL/6 mice by Agaricus blazei murill extract.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Fang; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Hsu, Yu-Ming; Tang, Ming-Chu; Chen, Hsueh-Chin; Lee, Ching-Sung; Yang, Yi-Yuan; Yeh, Ming-Yang; Chung, Hsiung-Kwang; Huang, Yi-Ping; Wu, Chih-Chung; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2011-01-01

    Agaricus blazei Murill extract (ABM) has been reported to possess antitumor effects. In this study, the role of ABM in tumor growth and metastasis in vivo was evaluated in experimental Smmu 7721 hepatoma cells in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice and B16F10 melanoma cells lung metastasis in C57BL/6 mice. For the tumor growth model, the size of the liver tumor mass was about 10 mm to 20 mm in the control group. In comparison with the control group, the tumor mass seem to grow slowly with ABM treatment, especially at the high dose. For the tumor metastasis model, after a six-week treatment, the survival rates of B6 mice were 0%, 30%, 10% and 50% for control group, low, median and high concentration ABM treatment groups, respectively. The survival rate showed that pretreatment of C57BL/6 (B6) mice with ABM lengthened their lifespan after tumor cell inoculation, which supports the notion that ABM successfully reduced lung metastasis formation by B16F10 melanoma cells. The treatment effect was dependent on the concentration of ABM for tumor growth and metastasis in these models.

  10. Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is responsible for production of bone metastasis, but not visceral metastasis, by human small cell lung cancer SBC-5 cells in natural killer cell-depleted SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Miki, Toyokazu; Yano, Seiji; Hanibuchi, Masaki; Kanematsu, Takanori; Muguruma, Hiroaki; Sone, Saburo

    2004-02-10

    We previously established an osteolytic bone metastasis model with multiorgan dissemination in natural killer (NK) cell-depleted severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice using human small cell lung cancer cells (SBC-5), which highly express the parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP). In our present study, we evaluated the role of PTHrP on bone metastasis by SBC-5 cells using anti-PTHrP neutralizing antibody (Ab). Anti-PTHrP Ab did not affect the proliferation or cytokine production of SBC-5 cells in vitro. Repeated intravenous injection with anti-PTHrP Ab inhibited the formation of bone metastasis in a dose-dependent manner, while the same treatment had no significant effect on the metastasis to visceral organs (lung, liver, kidney and lymph node). In addition, treatment with anti-PTHrP Ab improved the elevated serum calcium level, associated with inhibition of osteolytic bone metastasis, suggesting that anti-PTHrP Ab inhibited bone metastasis via suppression of bone resorption probably by neutralizing PTHrP. These findings suggest that PTHrP is essential for bone metastasis, but not visceral metastasis, by small cell lung cancer SBC-5 cells.

  11. Interleukin 15 is produced by endothelial cells and increases the transendothelial migration of T cells In vitro and in the SCID mouse-human rheumatoid arthritis model In vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheimer-Marks, N; Brezinschek, R I; Mohamadzadeh, M; Vita, R; Lipsky, P E

    1998-01-01

    The capacity of endothelial cells (EC) to produce IL-15 and the capacity of IL-15 to influence transendothelial migration of T cells was examined. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells expressed both IL-15 mRNA and protein. Moreover, endothelial-derived IL-15 enhanced transendothelial migration of T cells as evidenced by the inhibition of this process by blocking monoclonal antibodies to IL-15. IL-15 enhanced transendothelial migration of T cells by activating the binding capacity of the integrin adhesion molecule LFA-1 (CD11a/CD18) and also increased T cell motility. In addition, IL-15 induced expression of the early activation molecule CD69. The importance of IL-15 in regulating migration of T cells in vivo was documented by its capacity to enhance accumulation of adoptively transferred human T cells in rheumatoid arthritis synovial tissue engrafted into immune deficient SCID mice. These results demonstrate that EC produce IL-15 and imply that endothelial IL-15 plays a critical role in stimulation of T cells to extravasate into inflammatory tissue. PMID:9502767

  12. Identification of Lymphomyeloid Primitive Progenitor Cells in Fresh Human Cord Blood and in the Marrow of Nonobese Diabetic–Severe Combined Immunodeficient (NOD-SCID) Mice Transplanted with Human CD34+ Cord Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Robin, Catherine; Pflumio, Françoise; Vainchenker, William; Coulombel, Laure

    1999-01-01

    Transplantation of genetically marked donor cells in mice have unambiguously identified individual clones with full differentiative potential in all lymphoid and myeloid pathways. Such evidence has been lacking in humans because of limitations inherent to clonal stem cell assays. In this work, we used single cell cultures to show that human cord blood (CB) contains totipotent CD34+ cells capable of T, B, natural killer, and granulocytic cell differentiation. Single CD34+ CD19−Thy1+ (or CD38−) cells from fresh CB were first induced to proliferate and their progeny separately studied in mouse fetal thymic organotypic cultures (FTOCs) and cocultures on murine stromal feeder layers. 10% of the clones individually analyzed produced CD19+, CD56+, and CD15+ cells in stromal cocultures and CD4+CD8+ T cells in FTOCs, identifying totipotent progenitor cells. Furthermore, we showed that totipotent clones with similar lymphomyeloid potential are detected in the bone marrow of nonobese diabetic severe combined immunodeficient (NOD-SCID) mice transplanted 4 mo earlier with human CB CD34+ cells. These results provide the first direct demonstration that human CB contains totipotent lymphomyeloid progenitors and transplantable CD34+ cells with the ability to reconstitute, in the marrow of recipient mice, the hierarchy of hematopoietic compartments, including a compartment of functional totipotent cells. These experimental approaches can now be exploited to analyze mechanisms controlling the decisions of such primitive human progenitors and to design conditions for their ampification that can be helpful for therapeutic purposes. PMID:10330439

  13. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells protect against injury in an innate murine model of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Deepika; Wang, Yiping; Qin, Xiahong; Wang, Ying; Zheng, Guoping; Wang, Yuan Min; Alexander, Stephen I; Harris, David C H

    2006-10-01

    Studies of mechanisms of disease regulation by CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Treg) have been focused on their interaction with effector T cells; however, the possibility that regulation might involve noncognate cells has not been explored in detail. This study investigated the effect of CD4+CD25+ Treg on macrophage proinflammatory properties and phenotype in vitro and found that they modulate macrophages by inhibiting their activation, leading to reduced proinflammatory cytokine production and a downregulated effector phenotype. For testing the in vivo significance of this effect, CD4+CD25+ T cells that expressed high levels of Foxp3 were reconstituted into SCID mice after induction of Adriamycin nephropathy, a noncognate model of chronic renal disease. CD4+CD25+ T cells significantly reduced glomerular and interstitial injury. In addition, there was a significant fall in the number of macrophages in both the glomeruli and interstitium of SCID mice that were reconstituted with Treg as compared with the Adriamycin alone group. Blockade of TGF-beta using neutralizing antibodies significantly impaired the protective effect of Treg. These findings delineate a TGF-beta-dependent Treg-macrophage inhibitory interaction that can explain cognate-independent protection by Treg.

  14. Dopamine induces IL-6-dependent IL-17 production via D1-like receptor on CD4 naive T cells and D1-like receptor antagonist SCH-23390 inhibits cartilage destruction in a human rheumatoid arthritis/SCID mouse chimera model.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Kazuhisa; Yamaoka, Kunihiro; Hanami, Kentaro; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Sasaguri, Yasuyuki; Yanagihara, Nobuyuki; Tanaka, Shinya; Katsuki, Ichiro; Matsushita, Sho; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2011-03-15

    A major neurotransmitter dopamine transmits signals via five different seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors termed D1-D5. Several studies have shown that dopamine not only mediates interactions into the nervous system, but can contribute to the modulation of immunity via receptors expressed on immune cells. We have previously shown an autocrine/paracrine release of dopamine by dendritic cells (DCs) during Ag presentation to naive CD4(+) T cells and found efficacious results of a D1-like receptor antagonist SCH-23390 in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mouse model of multiple sclerosis and in the NOD mouse model of type I diabetes, with inhibition of Th17 response. This study aimed to assess the role of dopaminergic signaling in Th17-mediated immune responses and in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In human naive CD4(+) T cells, dopamine increased IL-6-dependent IL-17 production via D1-like receptors, in response to anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28 mAb. Furthermore, dopamine was localized with DCs in the synovial tissue of RA patients and significantly increased in RA synovial fluid. In the RA synovial/SCID mouse chimera model, although a selective D2-like receptor antagonist haloperidol significantly induced accumulation of IL-6(+) and IL-17(+) T cells with exacerbated cartilage destruction, SCH-23390 strongly suppressed these responses. Taken together, these findings indicate that dopamine released by DCs induces IL-6-Th17 axis and causes aggravation of synovial inflammation of RA, which is the first time, to our knowledge, that actual evidence has shown the pathological relevance of dopaminergic signaling with RA.

  15. Somatic mosaicism caused by monoallelic reversion of a mutation in T cells of a patient with ADA-SCID and the effects of enzyme replacement therapy on the revertant phenotype.

    PubMed

    Moncada-Vélez, M; Vélez-Ortega, A; Orrego, J; Santisteban, I; Jagadeesh, J; Olivares, M; Olaya, N; Hershfield, M; Candotti, F; Franco, J

    2011-11-01

    Patients with adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency exhibit spontaneous and partial clinical remission associated with somatic reversion of inherited mutations. We report a child with severe combined immunodeficiency (T-B- SCID) due to ADA deficiency diagnosed at the age of 1 month, whose lymphocyte counts including CD4+ and CD8+ T and NK cells began to improve after several months with normalization of ADA activity in Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), as a result of somatic mosaicism caused by monoallelic reversion of the causative mutation in the ADA gene. He was not eligible for haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) or gene therapy (GT); therefore he was placed on enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with bovine PEG-ADA. The follow-up of metabolic and immunologic responses to ERT included gradual improvement in ADA activity in erythrocytes and transient expansion of most lymphocyte subsets, followed by gradual stabilization of CD4+ and CD8+ T (with naïve phenotype) and NK cells, and sustained expansion of TCRγδ+ T cells. This was accompanied by the disappearance of the revertant T cells as shown by DNA sequencing from PBL. Although the patient's clinical condition improved marginally, he later developed a germinal cell tumour and eventually died at the age of 67 months from sepsis. This case adds to our current knowledge of spontaneous reversion of mutations in ADA deficiency and shows that the effects of the ERT may vary among these patients, suggesting that it could depend on the cell and type in which the somatic mosaicism is established upon reversion.

  16. Expansion of Cord Blood CD34+ Cells in Presence of zVADfmk and zLLYfmk Improved Their In Vitro Functionality and In Vivo Engraftment in NOD/SCID Mouse

    PubMed Central

    M, Sangeetha V.; Kale, Vaijayanti P.; Limaye, Lalita S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Cord blood (CB) is a promising source for hematopoietic stem cell transplantations. The limitation of cell dose associated with this source has prompted the ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). However, the expansion procedure is known to exhaust the stem cell pool causing cellular defects that promote apoptosis and disrupt homing to the bone marrow. The role of apoptotic machinery in the regulation of stem cell compartment has been speculated in mouse hematopoietic and embryonic systems. We have consistently observed an increase in apoptosis in the cord blood derived CD34+ cells cultured with cytokines compared to their freshly isolated counterpart. The present study was undertaken to assess whether pharmacological inhibition of apoptosis could improve the outcome of expansion. Methodology/Principal Findings CB CD34+ cells were expanded with cytokines in the presence or absence of cell permeable inhibitors of caspases and calpains; zVADfmk and zLLYfmk respectively. A novel role of apoptotic protease inhibitors was observed in increasing the CD34+ cell content of the graft during ex vivo expansion. This was further reflected in improved in vitro functional aspects of the HSPCs; a higher clonogenicity and long term culture initiating potential. These cells sustained superior long term engraftment and an efficient regeneration of major lympho-myeloid lineages in the bone marrow of NOD/SCID mouse compared to the cells expanded with growth factors alone. Conclusion/Significance Our data show that, use of either zVADfmk or zLLYfmk in the culture medium improves expansion of CD34+ cells. The strategy protects stem cell pool and committed progenitors, and improves their in vitro functionality and in vivo engraftment. This observation may complement the existing protocols used in the manipulation of hematopoietic cells for therapeutic purposes. These findings may have an impact in the CB transplant procedures involving a combined

  17. In vivo kinetics of transduced cells in peripheral T cell-directed gene therapy: role of CD8+ cells in improved immunological function in an adenosine deaminase (ADA)-SCID patient.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, N; Ariga, T; Ohtsu, M; Kobayashi, I; Yamada, M; Tame, A; Furuta, H; Okano, M; Egashira, M; Niikawa, N; Kobayashi, K; Sakiyama, Y

    1999-08-15

    We previously reported successful peripheral T cell-directed gene therapy in a boy with adenosine deaminase (ADA)-SCID. In the present study, to better understand the reconstitutive effect of this gene therapy on his immunological system, we investigated the in vivo kinetics and functional subsets of T cells in PBL. Apparent immunological improvements were obtained after infusion of transduced cells at more than 4 x 108 cells/kg/therapy/3 mo. Frequency of ADAcDNA-integrated cells in PBL, ADA activity in PBL and clinical improvement showed good correlation, even though CD8+ cells gradually became predominant in PBL. On the basis that polyethylene glycol (PEG)-ADA was maintained at the same dosage as before gene therapy, we consider that his immunological improvement resulted from the gene therapy itself. Most CD3+ cells in PBL after gene therapy expressed TCRalphabeta. Analysis of TCR repertoire based on TCR V region usage revealed no expansion of limited clones in his PBL. The T cell subset cells CD8+CDw60+ and CD8+CD27+CD45RA-, which are reported to provide substantial help to B cells, were maintained throughout the gene therapy. Furthermore, his reconstituted peripheral T cells helped normal B cells to produce substantial IgG in vitro. Expression of both Th1- and Th2-type cytokine genes was induced in his reconstituted T cells at the same comparably high level as in normal subjects. Collectively, these results provide evidence of persistent and distinct functions of transduced cells in this patient's PBL after gene therapy.

  18. Graves' Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... sheet Hashimoto's disease fact sheet Illnesses and disabilities Lupus fact sheet What is Graves' disease? What are the symptoms of Graves' disease? Who gets Graves' disease? What causes Graves' disease? How do I find out if ...

  19. Genetic correction of stem cells in the treatment of inherited diseases and focus on xeroderma pigmentosum.

    PubMed

    Rouanet, Sophie; Warrick, Emilie; Gache, Yannick; Scarzello, Sabine; Avril, Marie-Françoise; Bernerd, Françoise; Magnaldo, Thierry

    2013-10-09

    Somatic stem cells ensure tissue renewal along life and healing of injuries. Their safe isolation, genetic manipulation ex vivo and reinfusion in patients suffering from life threatening immune deficiencies (for example, severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)) have demonstrated the efficacy of ex vivo gene therapy. Similarly, adult epidermal stem cells have the capacity to renew epidermis, the fully differentiated, protective envelope of our body. Stable skin replacement of severely burned patients have proven life saving. Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a devastating disease due to severe defects in the repair of mutagenic DNA lesions introduced upon exposure to solar radiations. Most patients die from the consequences of budding hundreds of skin cancers in the absence of photoprotection. We have developed a safe procedure of genetic correction of epidermal stem cells isolated from XP patients. Preclinical and safety assessments indicate successful correction of XP epidermal stem cells in the long term and their capacity to regenerate a normal skin with full capacities of DNA repair.

  20. Periodontal Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diseases Small Text Medium Text Large Text Periodontal Diseases Periodontal diseases are disorders of the gums, or gingiva, and other tissues around the teeth. Periodontal diseases vary in severity, from the reversible, recurring mild ...

  1. Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Parkinson's Disease KidsHealth > For Kids > Parkinson's Disease A A ... symptoms of something called Parkinson's disease. What Is Parkinson's Disease? You may have seen the actor Michael ...

  2. Lyme Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Lyme Disease KidsHealth > For Teens > Lyme Disease A A A ... Northwest, and the northern midwestern states. What Is Lyme Disease? People get Lyme disease through tick bites. The ...

  3. Sandhoff Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease and improve diagnosis) to effectively evaluate brain biochemistry and disease progression, and expanding the use of ... disease and improve diagnosis) to effectively evaluate brain biochemistry and disease progression, and expanding the use of ...

  4. Human peripheral blood leucocyte non-obese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficiency interleukin-2 receptor gamma chain gene mouse model of xenogeneic graft-versus-host-like disease and the role of host major histocompatibility complex

    PubMed Central

    King, M A; Covassin, L; Brehm, M A; Racki, W; Pearson, T; Leif, J; Laning, J; Fodor, W; Foreman, O; Burzenski, L; Chase, T H; Gott, B; Rossini, A A; Bortell, R; Shultz, L D; Greiner, D L

    2009-01-01

    Immunodeficient non-obese diabetic (NOD)-severe combined immune-deficient (scid) mice bearing a targeted mutation in the gene encoding the interleukin (IL)-2 receptor gamma chain gene (IL2rγnull) engraft readily with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Here, we report a robust model of xenogeneic graft-versus-host-like disease (GVHD) based on intravenous injection of human PBMC into 2 Gy conditioned NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice. These mice develop xenogeneic GVHD consistently (100%) following injection of as few as 5 × 106 PBMC, regardless of the PBMC donor used. As in human disease, the development of xenogeneic GVHD is highly dependent on expression of host major histocompatibility complex class I and class II molecules and is associated with severely depressed haematopoiesis. Interrupting the tumour necrosis factor-α signalling cascade with etanercept, a therapeutic drug in clinical trials for the treatment of human GVHD, delays the onset and progression of disease. This model now provides the opportunity to investigate in vivo mechanisms of xenogeneic GVHD as well as to assess the efficacy of therapeutic agents rapidly. PMID:19659776

  5. Gum Disease and Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gum Disease Risk Factors Gum Disease Symptoms Gum Disease Prevention Gum Disease and Other Diseases Gum Disease and ... Gum Disease Risk Factors Gum Disease Symptoms Gum Disease Prevention Gum Disease and Other Diseases Gum Disease and ...

  6. Peri-Implant Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gum Disease Risk Factors Gum Disease Symptoms Gum Disease Prevention Gum Disease and Other Diseases Gum Disease and ... Gum Disease Risk Factors Gum Disease Symptoms Gum Disease Prevention Gum Disease and Other Diseases Gum Disease and ...

  7. Lentiviral-Transduced Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Persistently Express Therapeutic Levels of Enzyme in a Xenotransplantation Model of Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Meyerrose, Todd E.; Roberts, Marie; Ohlemiller, Kevin K.; Vogler, Carole A.; Wirthlin, Louisa; Nolta, Jan A.; Sands, Mark S.

    2009-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a promising platform for cell- and gene-based treatment of inherited and acquired disorders. We recently showed that human MSCs distribute widely in a murine xenotransplantation model. In the current study, we have determined the distribution, persistence, and ability of lentivirally transduced human MSCs to express therapeutic levels of enzyme in a xenotransplantation model of human disease (nonobese diabetic severe combined immunodeficient mucopolysaccharidosis type VII [NOD-SCID MPSVII]). Primary human bone marrow-derived MSCs were transduced ex vivo with a lentiviral vector expressing either enhanced green fluorescent protein or the lysosomal enzyme β-glucuronidase (MSCs-GUSB). Lentiviral transduction did not affect any in vitro parameters of MSC function or potency. One million cells from each population were transplanted intraperitoneally into separate groups of neonatal NOD-SCID MPSVII mice. Transduced MSCs persisted in the animals that underwent transplantation, and comparable numbers of donor MSCs were detected at 2 and 4 months after transplantation in multiple organs. MSCs-GUSB expressed therapeutic levels of protein in the recipients, raising circulating serum levels of GUSB to nearly 40% of normal. This level of circulating enzyme was sufficient to normalize the secondary elevation of other lysosomal enzymes and reduce lysosomal distention in several tissues. In addition, at least one physiologic marker of disease, retinal function, was normalized following transplantation of MSCs-GUSB. These data provide evidence that transduced human MSCs retain their normal trafficking ability in vivo and persist for at least 4 months, delivering therapeutic levels of protein in an authentic xenotransplantation model of human disease. PMID:18436861

  8. Crohn's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Crohn's disease causes inflammation of the digestive system. It is one of a group of diseases called inflammatory ... small intestine called the ileum. The cause of Crohn's disease is unknown. It may be due to an ...

  9. Pneumococcal Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Newsroom Blogs Image Library News Conferences Press Releases Radio Public Service Announcements Real Stories, Real People Share ... National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID) Pneumococcal Disease Radio Public Service Announcement National Foundation for Infectious Diseases ( ...

  10. Alzheimer disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000760.htm Alzheimer disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... of brain function that occurs with certain diseases. Alzheimer disease is one form of dementia. It affects memory, ...

  11. Lung disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... they can't breathe deeply. Pulmonary fibrosis and sarcoidosis are examples of lung tissue disease. Lung circulation ... tuberculosis Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease Rheumatoid lung disease Sarcoidosis Simple pulmonary eosinophilia Patient Instructions Chronic obstructive pulmonary ...

  12. Huntington's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited disease that causes certain nerve cells in the brain to waste away. ... express emotions. If one of your parents has Huntington's disease, you have a 50 percent chance of getting ...

  13. Kawasaki Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Kawasaki Disease? Kawasaki (KAH-wah-SAH-ke) disease is a ... condition involves inflammation of the blood vessels. In Kawasaki disease, the walls of the blood vessels throughout the ...

  14. Bladder Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... frequent, urgent urination Bladder cancer Doctors diagnose bladder diseases using different tests. These include urine tests, x- ... National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  15. Role of Bruton’s tyrosine kinase in myeloma cell migration and induction of bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Bam, Rakesh; Ling, Wen; Khan, Sharmin; Pennisi, Angela; Venkateshaiah, Sathisha Upparahalli; Li, Xin; van Rhee, Frits; Usmani, Saad; Barlogie, Bart; Shaughnessy, John; Epstein, Joshua; Yaccoby, Shmuel

    2014-01-01

    Myeloma cells typically grow in bone, recruit osteoclast precursors and induce their differentiation and activity in areas adjacent to tumor foci. Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK), of the TEC family, is expressed in hematopoietic cells and is particularly involved in B-lymphocyte function and osteoclastogenesis. We demonstrated BTK expression in clinical myeloma plasma cells, interleukin (IL) –6– or stroma–dependent cell lines and osteoclasts. SDF-1 induced BTK activation in myeloma cells and BTK inhibition by small hairpin RNA or the small molecule inhibitor, LFM-A13, reduced their migration toward stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1). Pretreatment with LFM-A13 also reduced in vivo homing of myeloma cells to bone using bioluminescence imaging in the SCID-rab model. Enforced expression of BTK in myeloma cell line enhanced cell migration toward SDF-1 but had no effect on short-term growth. BTK expression was correlated with cell-surface CXCR4 expression in myeloma cells (n = 33, r = 0.81, P < 0.0001), and BTK gene and protein expression was more profound in cell-surface CXCR4-expressing myeloma cells. BTK was not upregulated by IL-6 while its inhibition had no effect on IL-6 signaling in myeloma cells. Human osteoclast precursors also expressed BTK and cell-surface CXCR4 and migrated toward SDF-1. LFM-A13 suppressed migration and differentiation of osteoclast precursors as well as bone-resorbing activity of mature osteoclasts. In primary myeloma-bearing SCID-rab mice, LFM-A13 inhibited osteoclast activity, prevented myeloma-induced bone resorption and moderately suppressed myeloma growth. These data demonstrate BTK and cell-surface CXCR4 association in myeloma cells and that BTK plays a role in myeloma cell homing to bone and myeloma-induced bone disease. PMID:23456977

  16. Heart Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the ... of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease ...

  17. Columnaris Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Columnaris disease is caused by the Gram-negative bacterium, Flavobacterium columnare. The disease was first described in 1917-1919 in the United States and the bacterium was not successfully isolated and grown in the laboratory until 1944. Columnaris disease continues to be a prevalent disease of...

  18. Diseases caused by mutations in ORAI1 and STIM1

    PubMed Central

    Lacruz, Rodrigo S.; Feske, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels mediate a specific form of Ca2+ influx called store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) that contributes to the function of many cell types. CRAC channels are formed by ORAI1 proteins located in the plasma membrane, which form its ion-conducting pore. ORAI1 channels are activated by stromal interaction molecule (STIM) 1 and STIM2 located in the endoplasmic reticulum. Loss- and gain-of-function gene mutations in ORAI1 and STIM1 in human patients cause distinct disease syndromes. CRAC channelopathy is caused by loss-of-function mutations in ORAI1 and STIM1 that abolish CRAC channel function and SOCE; it is characterized by severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)-like disease, autoimmunity, muscular hypotonia, and ectodermal dysplasia, with defects in dental enamel. The latter defect emphasizes an important role of CRAC channels in tooth development. By contrast, autosomal dominant gain-of-function mutations in these genes result in constitutive CRAC channel activation, SOCE, and increased intracellular Ca2+ levels that are associated with an overlapping spectrum of diseases, including non-syndromic tubular aggregate myopathy (TAM) and York platelet and Stormorken syndromes, two syndromes defined, besides myopathy, by thrombocytopenia, thrombopathy, and bleeding diathesis. The fact that myopathy results from loss- and gain-of-function mutations in ORAI1 and STIM1 highlights the importance of CRAC channels for Ca2+ homeostasis in skeletal muscle function. The cellular dysfunction and clinical disease spectrum observed in mutant patients provide important information about the molecular regulation of ORAI1 and STIM1 proteins and the role of CRAC channels in human physiology. PMID:26469693

  19. Kimura disease

    PubMed Central

    AlGhamdi, Fares E.; Al-Khatib, Talal A.; Marzouki, Hani Z.; AlGarni, Mohammed A

    2016-01-01

    Kimura disease is a chronic inflammatory disease that mainly manifests as a lump in the cervical region. Although the underlying pathophysiology is not clear yet, the diagnosis can be established based on specific histopathological characteristics. The first case of this disease was described in China, as well as the majority of subsequent cases that were also described in the Far East countries made Kimura disease traditionally a disease of adult patients of Asian descent. This report describes the occurrence of Kimura disease in pediatric non-Asian patient with a similar clinicopathologic presentation. PMID:26905356

  20. Wilson Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Wilson disease is a rare inherited disorder that prevents your body from getting rid of extra copper. You need ... copper into bile, a digestive fluid. With Wilson disease, the copper builds up in your liver, and ...

  1. Raynaud's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Raynaud's disease is a rare disorder of the blood vessels, usually in the fingers and toes. It causes the ... secondary Raynaud's, which is caused by injuries, other diseases, or certain medicines. People in colder climates are ...

  2. Fifth Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Fifth disease is a viral infection caused by parvovirus B19. The virus only infects humans; it's not the same parvovirus that dogs and cats can get. Fifth disease mostly affects children. Symptoms can include a low ...

  3. Addison Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood pressure and water and salt balance. Addison disease happens if the adrenal glands don't make ... problem with your immune system usually causes Addison disease. The immune system mistakenly attacks your own tissues, ...

  4. Chagas Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Chagas disease is caused by a parasite. It is common in Latin America but not in the United States. ... nose, the bite wound or a cut. The disease can also spread through contaminated food, a blood ...

  5. Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a type of movement disorder. It happens when nerve cells in the brain don't ... coordination As symptoms get worse, people with the disease may have trouble walking, talking, or doing simple ...

  6. Legionnaires' Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Legionnaires' disease is a type of pneumonia caused by bacteria. You usually get it by breathing in mist from ... spread from person to person. Symptoms of Legionnaires' disease include high fever, chills, a cough, and sometimes ...

  7. Endocrine Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... low, you may have a hormone disorder. Hormone diseases also occur if your body does not respond ... In the United States, the most common endocrine disease is diabetes. There are many others. They are ...

  8. Eye Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... the back of the eye Macular degeneration - a disease that destroys sharp, central vision Diabetic eye problems ... defense is to have regular checkups, because eye diseases do not always have symptoms. Early detection and ...

  9. Kidney Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infections Your doctor can do blood and urine tests to check if you have kidney disease. If your kidneys fail, you will need dialysis or a kidney transplant. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  10. Celiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... small intestine. People with celiac disease cannot eat gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye. ... Treatment Doctors treat celiac disease by prescribing a gluten-free diet. Symptoms significantly improve for most people ...

  11. Celiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... immune disease in which people can't eat gluten because it will damage their small intestine. If you have celiac disease and eat foods with gluten, your immune system responds by damaging the small ...

  12. Graves' Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Versions PDF Version (198 KB) Additional Links Hyperthyroidism Pregnancy and Thyroid Disease Thyroid Tests This content is provided as a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of the National Institutes of Health. ...

  13. Hashimoto's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease often leads to reduced thyroid function, or hypothyroidism. Hypothyroidism is a disorder that occurs when the thyroid ... Hashimoto’s disease is the most common cause of hypothyroidism in the United States. 1 Read more in ...

  14. Menkes Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... examining the genetic origins of Menkes disease and studying the effectiveness of early copper injections and gene-replacement therapies for treating the disease. Research also includes work on a universal newborn screening test for newborns. ​​​ ...

  15. Tickborne Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... for tickborne diseases ranges from studying the basic biology of the microbes that cause these diseases to ... Nucleotide Polymorphism Phylogenetics & Ontology Proteomics & Protein Analysis Systems Biology Data Portals Software Applications BCBB Mobyle Interface Designer ( ...

  16. Gaucher's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... interfere with your blood's ability to clot. An enzyme that breaks down these fatty substances doesn't ... people who have Gaucher's disease. Treatment often includes enzyme replacement therapy. An inherited disorder, Gaucher's disease is ...

  17. Fifth disease

    MedlinePlus

    Parvovirus B19; Erythema infectiosum; Slapped cheek rash ... Fifth disease is caused by human parvovirus B19. It often affects preschoolers or school-age children during the spring. The disease spreads through the fluids in the nose and ...

  18. Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Kidney Disease KidsHealth > For Teens > Kidney Disease Print A ... Syndrome Coping With Kidney Conditions What Do the Kidneys Do? You might never think much about some ...

  19. Lyme disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... up the bacteria when they bite mice or deer that are infected with B burgdorferi . You can ... syndrome Images Lyme disease organism, Borrelia burgdorferi Tick, deer engorged on the skin Lyme disease - Borrelia burgdorferi ...

  20. Refsum Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... night blindness due to degeneration of the retina (retinitis pigmentosa). If the disease progresses, other symptoms may include ... night blindness due to degeneration of the retina (retinitis pigmentosa). If the disease progresses, other symptoms may include ...

  1. Behcet's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... neurological disorders such as Behcet's disease. The National Human Genome Research Institute, another Institute of the National ... neurological disorders such as Behcet's disease. The National Human Genome Research Institute, another Institute of the National ...

  2. Hirschsprung Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... approximately one in 5,000 newborns. Children with Down syndrome and other medical problems, such as congenital heart ... For example, about one in 100 children with Down syndrome also has Hirschsprung disease. Hirschsprung disease is congenital, ...

  3. Farber's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... The disease occurs when both parents carry and pass on the defective gene that regulates the protein ... The disease occurs when both parents carry and pass on the defective gene that regulates the protein ...

  4. Canavan disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... if your child has any symptoms of Canavan disease. Prevention Genetic counseling is recommended for people who want to have children and have a family history of Canavan disease. Counseling should be considered if both parents are ...

  5. Kawasaki disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000989.htm Kawasaki disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Kawasaki disease is a rare condition that involves inflammation of ...

  6. Liver disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000205.htm Liver disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The term "liver disease" applies to many conditions that stop the ...

  7. Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Kidney Disease KidsHealth > For Teens > Kidney Disease A A ... Syndrome Coping With Kidney Conditions What Do the Kidneys Do? You might never think much about some ...

  8. Addison disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... amounts of some or all of its hormones ( hypopituitarism ) Autoimmune disorder that affects the nerves and the ... disease) Dermatitis herpetiformis Diabetes Graves disease Hyperthyroidism Hypoparathyroidism Hypopituitarism Immune response Myasthenia gravis Ovarian hypofunction Pernicious anemia ...

  9. Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Teri; Terzakis, Kristina

    2016-06-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects one million people in the United States. This article reviews the etiology and pathophysiology of PD, risk factors, clinical manifestations, diagnostic criteria, and treatment of this common disease. Implications for home care clinicians are included.

  10. Meniere's Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schessel, David A.

    1997-01-01

    Meniere's disease is characterized by unpredictable spells of severe vertigo and fluctuations in hearing and tinnitus. This article discusses the incidence of Meniere's disease, the present status of our understanding of this disease, controversies in its diagnosis, and the multiple therapeutic modalities recruited in its treatment. (Contains…

  11. Kawasaki disease

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Tomisaku

    2006-01-01

    Short history of Kawasaki disease, clinical features (principal symptoms and other significant symptoms or findings), diagnosis, cardiovascular involvement, epidemiology. Pathological features (lesion of vessels and lesion of organs exclusive of vessels), comparison between infantile periarteritis nodosa (IPN)/Kawasaki disease and classic periarteritis nodosa (CPN), etiology, treatment and management of Kawasaki disease are described. PMID:25792773

  12. Legionnaires' Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease is caused by a bacterium known as legionella. You can't catch legionnaires' disease from person-to-person contact. Instead, most people ... with weakened immune systems are particularly susceptible to legionnaires' disease. The legionella bacterium also causes Pontiac fever, a milder illness ...

  13. Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Tomisaku

    2006-04-01

    Short history of Kawasaki disease, clinical features (principal symptoms and other significant symptoms or findings), diagnosis, cardiovascular involvement, epidemiology. Pathological features (lesion of vessels and lesion of organs exclusive of vessels), comparison between infantile periarteritis nodosa (IPN)/Kawasaki disease and classic periarteritis nodosa (CPN), etiology, treatment and management of Kawasaki disease are described.

  14. Lyme Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, George C.

    1991-01-01

    This overview of the public health significance of Lyme disease includes the microbiological specifics of the infectious spirochete, the entomology and ecology of the ticks which are the primary disease carrier, the clinical aspects and treatment stages, the known epidemiological patterns, and strategies for disease control and for expanded public…

  15. Prion Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Geschwind, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of Review This article presents an update on the clinical aspects of human prion disease, including the wide spectrum of their presentations. Recent Findings Prion diseases, a group of disorders caused by abnormally shaped proteins called prions, occur in sporadic (Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease), genetic (genetic Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease, Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome, and fatal familial insomnia), and acquired (kuru, variant Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease, and iatrogenic Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease) forms. This article presents updated information on the clinical features and diagnostic methods for human prion diseases. New antemortem potential diagnostic tests based on amplifying prions in order to detect them are showing very high specificity. Understanding of the diversity of possible presentations of human prion diseases continues to evolve, with some genetic forms progressing slowly over decades, beginning with dysautonomia and neuropathy and progressing to a frontal-executive dementia with pathology of combined prionopathy and tauopathy. Unfortunately, to date, all human prion disease clinical trials have failed to show survival benefit. A very rare polymorphism in the prion protein gene recently has been identified that appears to protect against prion disease; this finding, in addition to providing greater understanding of the prionlike mechanisms of neurodegenerative disorders, might lead to potential treatments. Summary Sporadic Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease is the most common form of human prion disease. Genetic prion diseases, resulting from mutations in the prion-related protein gene (PRNP), are classified based on the mutation, clinical phenotype, and neuropathologic features and can be difficult to diagnose because of their varied presentations. Perhaps most relevant to this Continuum issue on neuroinfectious diseases, acquired prion diseases are caused by accidental transmission to humans, but fortunately, they are the least common form and

  16. Human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) and human diseases.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, T

    1997-01-01

    HTLV-I infection is causally associated with a variety of human diseases including leukemia/lymphoma, myelopathy, uveitis, and arthropathy. Tax protein of HTLV-I, which is considered oncogenic, binds to transcription factors or other cytoplasmic cellular molecules involved in the fundamental cell function and thereby induces cellular changes. The interaction between HTLV-I-infected cells with dysregulated function and different kinds of cells in the host, such as lymphocytes and vascular endothelial cells through viral peptides, antigen receptors cell adhesion molecules, and cytokines, appears to be one of the basic mechanisms underlying the development of HTLV-I-associated diseases. This interaction may play a major role in determining tumorigenicity and in forming clinical features of the diseases. The in vivo cell proliferation model of HTLV-I-infected cells using severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice can differentiate tumorigenicity from cell immortalization in vitro. The OX40 and its ligand gp34, which are induced by HTLV-I infection and directly mediate the adhesion between HTLV-I-infected T cells and vascular endothelial cells, may be critically involved in the localization and proliferation of HTLV-I-infected cells in vivo.

  17. Evaluating Human T-Cell Therapy of Cytomegalovirus Organ Disease in HLA-Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Simone; Klobuch, Sebastian; Podlech, Jürgen; Plachter, Bodo; Hoffmann, Petra; Renzaho, Angelique; Theobald, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Reactivation of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) can cause severe disease in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Although preclinical research in murine models as well as clinical trials have provided 'proof of concept' for infection control by pre-emptive CD8 T-cell immunotherapy, there exists no predictive model to experimentally evaluate parameters that determine antiviral efficacy of human T cells in terms of virus control in functional organs, prevention of organ disease, and host survival benefit. We here introduce a novel mouse model for testing HCMV epitope-specific human T cells. The HCMV UL83/pp65-derived NLV-peptide was presented by transgenic HLA-A2.1 in the context of a lethal infection of NOD/SCID/IL-2rg-/- mice with a chimeric murine CMV, mCMV-NLV. Scenarios of HCMV-seropositive and -seronegative human T-cell donors were modeled by testing peptide-restimulated and T-cell receptor-transduced human T cells, respectively. Upon transfer, the T cells infiltrated host tissues in an epitope-specific manner, confining the infection to nodular inflammatory foci. This resulted in a significant reduction of viral load, diminished organ pathology, and prolonged survival. The model has thus proven its potential for a preclinical testing of the protective antiviral efficacy of HCMV epitope-specific human T cells in the evaluation of new approaches to an immunotherapy of CMV disease. PMID:26181057

  18. Gaucher Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nagral, Aabha

    2014-01-01

    Gaucher disease is the commonest lysosomal storage disease seen in India and worldwide. It should be considered in any child or adult with an unexplained splenohepatomegaly and cytopenia which are seen in the three types of Gaucher disease. Type 1 is the non-neuronopathic form and type 2 and 3 are the neuronopathic forms. Type 2 is a more severe neuronopathic form leading to mortality by 2 years of age. Definitive diagnosis is made by a blood test–the glucocerebrosidase assay. There is no role for histological examination of the bone marrow, liver or spleen for diagnosis of the disease. Molecular studies for mutations are useful for confirming diagnosis, screening family members and prognosticating the disease. A splenectomy should not be performed except for palliation or when there is no response to enzyme replacement treatment or no possibility of getting any definitive treatment. Splenectomy may worsen skeletal and lung manifestations in Gaucher disease. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has completely revolutionized the prognosis and is now the standard of care for patients with this disease. Best results are seen in type 1 disease with good resolution of splenohepatomegaly, cytopenia and bone symptoms. Neurological symptoms in type 3 disease need supportive care. ERT is of no benefit in type 2 disease. Monitoring of patients on ERT involves evaluation of growth, blood counts, liver and spleen size and biomarkers such as chitotriosidase which reflect the disease burden. Therapy with ERT is very expensive and though patients in India have so far got the drug through a charitable access programme, there is a need for the government to facilitate access to treatment for this potentially curable disease. Bone marrow transplantation is an inferior option but may be considered when access to expensive ERT is not possible. PMID:25755533

  19. Infectious disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.

    1990-01-01

    This is a collection of viewgraphs on the Johnson Space Center's work on infectious disease. It addresses their major concern over outbreaks of infectious disease that could jeopardize the health, safety and/or performance of crew members engaged in long duration space missions. The Antarctic environment is seen as an analogous location on Earth and a good place to carry out such infectious disease studies and methods for proposed studies as suggested.

  20. Legionnaire disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... have any type of breathing problem. Alternative Names Legionella pneumonia; Pontiac fever; Legionellosis Images Legionnaires' disease organism, legionella References Edelstein PH, Roy CR. Legionnaires' ...

  1. Periodontal Disease and Systemic Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gum Disease Risk Factors Gum Disease Symptoms Gum Disease Prevention Gum Disease and Other Diseases Gum Disease and ... Gum Disease Risk Factors Gum Disease Symptoms Gum Disease Prevention Gum Disease and Other Diseases Gum Disease and ...

  2. What Is Vascular Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us Vascular Disease What is Vascular Disease? Education and Awareness Vascular Diseases Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Aortic Dissection Arteriovenous Malformation Atherosclerosis Buerger's Disease Carotid Artery Disease ...

  3. Vascular Disease Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us Vascular Disease What is Vascular Disease? Education and Awareness Vascular Diseases Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Aortic Dissection Arteriovenous Malformation Atherosclerosis Buerger's Disease Carotid Artery Disease ...

  4. Autoimmune Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Women - particularly African-American, Hispanic-American, and Native-American women - have a higher risk for some autoimmune diseases. There are more than 80 types of autoimmune diseases, and some have similar symptoms. This makes it hard for your health care provider to know if ...

  5. Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Kidney Disease What is Kidney Disease? What the Kidneys Do Click for more information You have two ... damaged, wastes can build up in the body. Kidney Function and Aging Kidney function may be reduced ...

  6. Cardiovascular Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD), particularly CHD (coronary heart disease) and stroke, remain the leading causes of death of women in America and most developed countries. In recent years the rate of CVD has declined in men but not in women. This is contributed to by an under-recognition of women’s C...

  7. "Aspiration disease".

    PubMed

    Pradhan, D J; Ikins, P M

    1976-03-01

    Aspiration disease, a term used to define both an acute and chronic form of a disease entity, is described. Etiological factors, pathophysiology and therapy are discussed with emphasis on aspiration of gastric juice. A brief mention of a small clinical experience is included.

  8. Prion Diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prion diseases comprise a set of rare fatal neurological diseases found in humans and other mammals. A prion is a protein capable of converting a normal cellular protein (PrPC) into a prion and thereby propagating an infection. A prion and PrPC differ solely in their conformation. There are differen...

  9. [Fabry disease].

    PubMed

    Stephan, F; Haber, R

    2017-02-01

    Fabry disease, also known as Anderson-Fabry disease or angiokeratoma corporis diffusum universale, is an X-linked recessive form of sphingolipidosis caused by total or partial deficiency of the lysosomal hydrolase, alpha-galactosidase A. From the youngest age, it results in a gradual ubiquitous build-up of glycosphingolipids that are not degraded by the missing enzyme. Cutaneous, neurological, nephrologic, cardiac, gastrointestinal, ophthalmological, respiratory, cochleovestibular and haematological involvement are responsible for increased mortality and significant impairment of quality of life in subjects affected by the disease. Angiokeratomas are the most common cutaneous sign of this disease, although they are not specific to it and must be distinguished from angiokeratomas either occurring in isolation or associated with systemic diseases. Other cutaneous signs encountered in this disease include hyperhidrosis, oral lesions, lower limb oedemas, etc. The diagnosis is mainly clinical and should be considered in the presence of a personal and/or familial history; it is confirmed by assay of enzyme activity within leucocytes or by molecular studies. Management is multidisciplinary and involves symptomatic treatment as well as specific treatment, resulting in improved survival and enhanced quality of life for patients presenting the disease. Enzyme replacement therapy with alpha-galactosidase A forms the cornerstone of specific treatment and may be associated with other types of treatments such as galactose and molecular chaperones. Gene therapy is now also used extensively. At present, these marked therapeutic advances, which closely involve dermatologists, could help transform the prognosis for patients presenting Fabry disease.

  10. Chagas disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider if you think you may have Chagas disease. Prevention Insect control with insecticides and houses that are less likely to have high insect populations will help control the spread of the disease. Blood banks in Central and South America screen ...

  11. Krabbe disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Genetic testing MRI of the head Nerve conduction velocity Testing for the GALC gene defect Treatment There is no specific treatment for Krabbe disease. Some people have had a bone marrow transplant in the early stages of the disease, but ...

  12. Gaucher disease

    PubMed Central

    Rizk, Tamer M.; Ariganjoye, Rafiu O.; Alsaeed, Gihad I.

    2015-01-01

    We aim to describe an 8-year-old boy with an unusual clinical presentation of Gaucher disease (GD). Gaucher disease is a progressive lysosomal storage disorder due to deficiency of the specific enzyme glucocerebrosidase with varying clinical features, but often involving the monocytes-macrophages systems. This child ran a progressive course with a devastating outcome. Three distinct GD subtypes have been described with varying clinical features based on the presence or absence of neurologic involvement. Gaucher disease diagnosis is obtained via: enzyme activity assay, gene mutation study, bone marrow aspiration in addition to multiple other tests that have been successfully used in diagnosis of cases of GD. Treatment modalities include enzyme replacement treatment, substrate reduction therapy, bone marrow transplantation, blood transfusion, and surgery are available management modalities for GD. Gaucher disease is a chronic disease requiring a multidisciplinary team approach with regular follow up with multiple subspecialties. PMID:26166597

  13. Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Scheltens, Philip; Blennow, Kaj; Breteler, Monique M B; de Strooper, Bart; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Salloway, Stephen; Van der Flier, Wiesje Maria

    2016-07-30

    Although the prevalence of dementia continues to increase worldwide, incidence in the western world might have decreased as a result of better vascular care and improved brain health. Alzheimer's disease, the most prevalent cause of dementia, is still defined by the combined presence of amyloid and tau, but researchers are gradually moving away from the simple assumption of linear causality as proposed in the original amyloid hypothesis. Age-related, protective, and disease-promoting factors probably interact with the core mechanisms of the disease. Amyloid β42, and tau proteins are established core cerebrospinal biomarkers; novel candidate biomarkers include amyloid β oligomers and synaptic markers. MRI and fluorodeoxyglucose PET are established imaging techniques for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid PET is gaining traction in the clinical arena, but validity and cost-effectiveness remain to be established. Tau PET might offer new insights and be of great help in differential diagnosis and selection of patients for trials. In the search for understanding the disease mechanism and keys to treatment, research is moving increasingly into the earliest phase of disease. Preclinical Alzheimer's disease is defined as biomarker evidence of Alzheimer's pathological changes in cognitively healthy individuals. Patients with subjective cognitive decline have been identified as a useful population in whom to look for preclinical Alzheimer's disease. Moderately positive results for interventions targeting several lifestyle factors in non-demented elderly patients and moderately positive interim results for lowering amyloid in pre-dementia Alzheimer's disease suggest that, ultimately, there will be a future in which specific anti-Alzheimer's therapy will be combined with lifestyle interventions targeting general brain health to jointly combat the disease. In this Seminar, we discuss the main developments in Alzheimer's research.

  14. Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Playfer, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a common disabling disease of old age. The diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease is based on clinical signs and has poor sensitivity, with about 25% of patients confidently diagnosed as having the disease actually having other conditions such as multi-system atrophy and other parkinsonism-plus syndromes. Benign essential tremor and arteriosclerotic pseudo-parkinsonism can easily be confused with Parkinson's disease. The cause of Parkinson's disease remains unknown. Speculative research highlights the role of oxidative stress and free radical mediated damage to dopaminergic cells. Parkinson's disease is the one neurodegenerative disorder in which drugs have been demonstrated to be of value. There is now a wide variety of drugs and formulations available, including anticholinergics, amantidine, L-dopa, dopamine agonists including apomorphine, selegiline and soon to be available catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitors. Disabling side-effects of treatment, fluctuations, dyskinesias and psychiatric problems require strategic use of the drugs available. There is an increasing potential for neurosurgical intervention. PMID:9196696

  15. Morgellons Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ohn, Jungyoon; Park, Seon Yong; Moon, Jungyoon; Choe, Yun Seon

    2017-01-01

    Morgellons disease is a rare disease with unknown etiology. Herein, we report the first case of Morgellons disease in Korea. A 30-year-old woman presented with a 2-month history of pruritic erythematous patches and erosions on the arms, hands, and chin. She insisted that she had fiber-like materials under her skin, which she had observed through a magnifying device. We performed skin biopsy, and observed a fiber extruding from the dermal side of the specimen. Histopathological examination showed only mild lymphocytic infiltration, and failed to reveal evidence of any microorganism. The polymerase chain reaction for Borrelia burgdorferi was negative in her serum. PMID:28392653

  16. Nekam's disease

    PubMed Central

    Aruna, Chintaginjala; Ramamurthy, D. V. S. B.; Neelima, T.; Bandaru, Haritha

    2016-01-01

    Keratosis lichenoides chronica also known as Nekam's disease is a rare mucocutaneous disorder, characterized clinically by asymptomatic violaceous keratotic papules arranged in linear, reticular, or plaque form usually on the trunk and extremities and histologically by interface dermatitis. The disease is considered rare with only 128 cases being reported in the literature till date and very few from India. We report a case of a 40-year-old man who presented with constellation of features of lichen planus, seborrheic dermatitis, and apthous ulcers, which upon workup was found to be Nekam's disease. PMID:27990390

  17. Kummell disease

    PubMed Central

    Schucany, William G.; Opatowsky, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Kummell disease, or avascular necrosis of a vertebral body, presents as vertebral osteonecrosis typically affecting a thoracic vertebra with compression deformity, intravertebral vacuum cleft, and exaggerated kyphosis weeks to months after a minor traumatic injury. This rare disease is increasing in prevalence secondary to an aging population and the associated rise in osteoporosis. Treatment with vertebroplasty or surgical decompression and fusion is often required. We present a classic case of Kummell disease to illustrate the salient features of the condition, with associated imaging findings on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:23814399

  18. Depression and functioning in relation to health care use in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Grant, M M; Gil, K M; Floyd, M Y; Abrams, M

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate depression and health care use in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). Forty-four adults with SCD were interviewed and data from 43 participants, both with (n = 11) and without (n = 32) depression, were used for further analyses. Data from one potential subject were excluded on the basis of diagnosis. The full evaluation included the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R Disorders (SCID) and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies--Depression Scale (CES-D), as well as measures of psychosocial and behavioral functioning. Good between-instrument agreement was found between the self-report and interview-based measures of depression. However, the functioning data did not entirely support the use of a more stringent cutoff score on the CES-D. Findings suggest that the purpose of the evaluation should be factored into the decision-making process when determining which cutoff score should be utilized (i.e. what is the cost-benefit ratio for false-positives vs. false-negatives). A series of hierarchical regression analyses supported the finding that disease severity alone does not explain the level of functioning displayed by patients. More importantly, the patient's perceived functioning was the best indicator of health care use within a 1-year period. Furthermore, specific interventions that target negative thinking and distorted cognitions, as well as provide psychoeducation, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy, need to be further explored within this population.

  19. DEPRESSION AND FUNCTIONING IN RELATION TO HEALTH CARE USE IN SICKLE CELL DISEASE1,2

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Merida M.; Gil, Karen M.; Floyd, Marnita Y.; Abrams, Mary

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate depression and health care use in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). Forty-four adults with SCD were interviewed and data from 43 participants, both with (n = 11) and without (n = 32) depression, were used for further analyses. Data from one potential subject were excluded on the basis of diagnosis. The full evaluation included the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R Disorders (SCID) and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies–Depression Scale (CES-D), as well as measures of psychosocial and behavioral functioning. Good between-instrument agreement was found between the self-report and interview-based measures of depression. However, the functioning data did not entirely support the use of a more stringent cutoff score on the CES-D. Findings suggest that the purpose of the evaluation should be factored into the decision-making process when determining which cutoff score should be utilized (i.e. what is the cost–benefit ratio for false-positives vs. false-negatives). A series of hierarchical regression analyses supported the finding that disease severity alone does not explain the level of functioning displayed by patients. More importantly, the patient’s perceived functioning was the best indicator of health care use within a 1-year period. Furthermore, specific interventions that target negative thinking and distorted cognitions, as well as provide psychoeducation, such as cognitive–behavioral therapy, need to be further explored within this population. PMID:10962708

  20. Meningococcal Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blogs Image Library News Conferences Press Releases Radio Public Service Announcements Real Stories, Real People Share Your Story Additional ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) #NoRegrets Public service announcement on the importance of getting vaccinated against both ...

  1. Hashimoto's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... autoimmune thyroid disease. This includes radiation from the atomic bomb in Japan, the nuclear accident at Chernobyl, ... symptoms as normal pregnancy , such as fatigue and weight gain. Yet untreated underactive thyroid during pregnancy may ...

  2. Sever's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... good flexibility while your child is growing. The stretching exercises pictured in the treatment section can lower ... your child has already recovered from Sever's disease, stretching and putting ice on the heel after activity ...

  3. Kawasaki Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... measles, mumps, rubella) and the Varicella (chicken pox) vaccines . Children over 6 months of age should receive the inactivated influenza (flu) vaccine injection. Long-term follow-up: Children treated for Kawasaki Disease who do not develop ...

  4. Digestive Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Digestive Diseases in the United States Healthy Moments Radio Listen to health tips from Dr. Rodgers in ... la salud en español Health Statistics Healthy Moments Radio Broadcast Clinical Trials For Health Care Professionals Community ...

  5. Stargardt Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... retina provide vision by conveying information from the visual field to the brain. The macula is responsible ... progression of symptoms in Stargardt disease is variable. Visual acuity (the ability to distinguish details and shape) ...

  6. Graves disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... is called hyperthyroidism . (An underactive thyroid leads to hypothyroidism .) Graves disease is the most common cause of ... radioactive iodine often will cause an underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism). Without getting the correct dosage of thyroid hormone ...

  7. Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells make and use a brain chemical called dopamine (say: DOH-puh-meen) to send messages to ... coordinate body movements. When someone has Parkinson's disease, dopamine levels are low. So, the body doesn't ...

  8. Vaginal Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal problems are some of the most common reasons women go to the doctor. They may have ... that affect the vagina include sexually transmitted diseases, vaginal cancer, and vulvar cancer. Treatment of vaginal problems ...

  9. Blount Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... or gained weight very quickly. It's also more common in people of African heritage, kids who started ... worse and can't be traced to an injury — your doctor may consider Blount disease as a ...

  10. Prion Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... nerve cells use for communicating with adjacent cells. Biology & Genetics Scientists are examining how abnormal prion protein ... the abnormal form. Read more about prion diseases biology and genetics Therapeutic Approaches Although there are no ...

  11. Gum Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... away from the teeth. This is known as periodontitis (pronounced: pair-ee-oh-don-TY-tus), a more advanced form of gum disease. With periodontitis, gums become weakened and form pockets around the ...

  12. Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia among older people. Dementia is a brain disorder that seriously affects a person's ability to carry out daily activities. AD begins slowly. It first involves the parts of ...

  13. Hirschsprung Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... have surgery are fully cured and able to pass bowel movements normally. About Hirschsprung Disease Hirschsprung (HERSH- ... The condition — which prevents bowel movements (stool) to pass through the intestines due to missing nerve cells ...

  14. Huntington disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... that may be associated with this disease: Anxiety, stress, and tension Difficulty swallowing Speech impairment Symptoms in children: Rigidity Slow movements Tremor Exams and Tests The doctor will perform a physical ...

  15. Gaucher disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... with this type may live into adulthood. Symptoms Bleeding because of low platelet count is the most common symptom seen in Gaucher disease. Other symptoms may include: Bone pain and fractures Cognitive impairment (decreased thinking ability) Easy bruising Enlarged ...

  16. Alpers' Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rigor & Reproducibility Scientific Resources Animal Models Cell/Tissue/DNA Clinical and Translational Resources Gene Expression Research Reagents ... Definition Alpers' disease is a progressive, neurodevelopmental, mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome characterized by three co-occurring clinical ...

  17. [Lyme disease].

    PubMed

    Portillo, Aránzazu; Santibáñez, Sonia; Oteo, José A

    2014-02-01

    Lyme disease (LD) is a worldwide-distributed multisystemic process caused by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.) and transmitted by hard ticks. In fact, it is the most common tick-borne infectious disease in the northern hemisphere. In Spain it is transmitted by Ixodes ricinus ticks and Borrelia garinii is the genoespecies of B. burgdorferi s.l. mostly involved in our area. LD is known as "the last great imitator" due to the broad clinical spectrum that may cause. Except in the case of erythema migrans (pathognomonic feature of the disease), the remaining clinical manifestations should be confirmed using microbiological tests. This review is intended to provide readers a current vision of the etiology, epidemiology, clinical manifestations, laboratory diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease in our environment. Controversial aspects arising from the use of non-validated microbiological tests that are being used without scientific rigor are highlighted.

  18. Crohn's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... large bowel ( colon ). Crohn's disease may lead to deep ulcers in the intestinal tract, giving a "cobblestone" ... understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed ...

  19. Liver Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Your liver is the largest organ inside your body. It helps your body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. There are many kinds of liver diseases. Viruses cause some of them, like hepatitis ...

  20. Thyroid Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... your menstrual period. Your thyroid helps control your menstrual cycle. Too much or too little thyroid hormone can ... Problems getting pregnant. When thyroid disease affects the menstrual cycle, it also affects ovulation. This can make it ...

  1. Autoimmune Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... of CAM are herbal products, chiropractic , acupuncture , and hypnosis . If you have an autoimmune disease, you might ... help you to feel your best. Meditation, self-hypnosis, and guided imagery, are simple relaxation techniques that ...

  2. Behcet's disease.

    PubMed

    Nair, Jagdish R; Moots, Robert J

    2017-02-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a chronic relapsing and remitting vasculitis of unknown aetiology. It has the capacity to affect almost all organ systems because of its potential to involve both arteries and veins of all sizes, resulting in significant organ-threatening morbidity and mortality. Traditionally known as the 'silk road' disease, it has a worldwide occurrence. The aetiopathological mechanisms of disease development in BD remain poorly understood, but genome wide studies show human leukocyte antigen and non-human leukocyte antigen associations. Environmental influences and genetic factors may have a role in the aetiopathogenetic mechanisms that lead to development of the disease, indicating the autoimmune and auto-inflammatory nature of BD. The evidence base for treatment is limited but new knowledge is emerging and current treatment options range from symptomatic treatment, through to non-biological and biological immunosuppressive drugs, to cover the spectrum of clinical manifestations.

  3. Gilbert disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... passed down through families. It affects the way bilirubin is processed by the liver, and causes the ... eat. Exams and Tests A blood test for bilirubin shows changes that occur with Gilbert disease. The ...

  4. [Wilson disease].

    PubMed

    Huster, D; Kühn, H-J; Mössner, J; Caca, K

    2005-07-01

    Wilson disease is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder of human copper metabolism that leads to neurological symptoms and hepatic damage of variable degree. The affected gene ATP7B encodes a hepatic copper transport protein, which plays a key role in human copper metabolism. Clinical symptoms are complex with neurologic symptoms such as tremor, dysarthria, psychiatric disorders etc., predominant hepatic disease or mixed forms. Copper deposition in the liver results in acute liver failure, chronic hepatitis or liver cirrhosis. Early recognition by means of clinical, biochemical or genetic examination and early initiation of therapy with chelators or zinc-salts are essential for outcome and prognosis. Liver transplantation is an alternative in cases with acute and chronic liver failure and cures the hepatic disease. Frequent monitoring of drug therapy, adverse effects, and compliance is critical for the prognosis of the disease.

  5. Huntington's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... relatively simple tests in the office to judge: Motor symptoms Reflexes Muscle strength Muscle tone Coordination Balance ... drinking utensils adapted for people with limited fine motor skills Managing Huntington's disease is demanding on the ...

  6. Lyme Disease

    PubMed Central

    Burdge, David R.; O'Hanlon, David

    1992-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis is an infectious disease caused by the tick-transmitted spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. To date, the only known endemic focus of Lyme disease in Canada is Long Point, Ont. A national case definition for surveillance purposes, consensus statement regarding laboratory diagnosis, and treatment guidelines have recently been developed in an attempt to standardize the approach to surveillance, diagnosis, and management of Lyme borreliosis in Canada. PMID:21221399

  7. [Ledderhose's disease].

    PubMed

    Bardelli, M; D'Arienzo, M; Veneziani, C

    1991-01-01

    The authors describe the clinical appearance of Ledderhose disease and emphasize the association with Dupuytren disease. They report on a series of patients treated at the 2nd Orthopedic Unit of University of Florence and describe the operating technique used. They believe that the procedure of removal of nodules must always be performed in association with careful exeresis of normal tissue, employing total aponeurectomy only in revision surgery.

  8. Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Schiffmann, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    Fabry disease, an X-linked disorder of glycosphingolipids that is caused by mutations of the GLA gene that codes for α-galactosidase A, leads to dysfunction of many cell types and includes a systemic vasculopathy. As a result, patients have a markedly increased risk of developing ischemic stroke, small-fiber peripheral neuropathy, cardiac dysfunction and chronic kidney disease. Virtually all complications of Fabry disease are non-specific in nature and clinically indistinguishable from similar abnormalities that occur in the context of more common disorders in the general population. Recent studies suggested a much higher incidence of mutations of the GLA gene, suggesting that this disorder is under-diagnosed. However, some of the gene variants may be benign. Although the etiology of Fabry disease has been known for many years, the mechanism by which the accumulating α-D-galactosyl moieties cause this multi organ disorder has only recently been studied and is yet to be completely elucidated. Specific therapy for Fabry disease has been developed in the last few years but its role in the management of the disorder is still being investigated. Fortunately, standard 'non-specific' medical and surgical therapy is effective in slowing deterioration or compensating for organ failure in patients with Fabry disease.

  9. Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Bates, Gillian P; Dorsey, Ray; Gusella, James F; Hayden, Michael R; Kay, Chris; Leavitt, Blair R; Nance, Martha; Ross, Christopher A; Scahill, Rachael I; Wetzel, Ronald; Wild, Edward J; Tabrizi, Sarah J

    2015-04-23

    Huntington disease is devastating to patients and their families - with autosomal dominant inheritance, onset typically in the prime of adult life, progressive course, and a combination of motor, cognitive and behavioural features. The disease is caused by an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat (of variable length) in HTT, the gene that encodes the protein huntingtin. In mutation carriers, huntingtin is produced with abnormally long polyglutamine sequences that confer toxic gains of function and predispose the protein to fragmentation, resulting in neuronal dysfunction and death. In this Primer, we review the epidemiology of Huntington disease, noting that prevalence is higher than previously thought, geographically variable and increasing. We describe the relationship between CAG repeat length and clinical phenotype, as well as the concept of genetic modifiers of the disease. We discuss normal huntingtin protein function, evidence for differential toxicity of mutant huntingtin variants, theories of huntingtin aggregation and the many different mechanisms of Huntington disease pathogenesis. We describe the genetic and clinical diagnosis of the condition, its clinical assessment and the multidisciplinary management of symptoms, given the absence of effective disease-modifying therapies. We review past and present clinical trials and therapeutic strategies under investigation, including impending trials of targeted huntingtin-lowering drugs and the progress in development of biomarkers that will support the next generation of trials. For an illustrated summary of this Primer, visit: http://go.nature.com/hPMENh.

  10. Legionnaires' disease.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Burke A; Burillo, Almudena; Bouza, Emilio

    2016-01-23

    Since first identified in early 1977, bacteria of the genus Legionella are recognised as a common cause of community-acquired pneumonia and a rare cause of hospital-acquired pneumonia. Legionella bacteria multisystem manifestations mainly affect susceptible patients as a result of age, underlying debilitating conditions, or immunosuppression. Water is the major natural reservoir for Legionella, and the pathogen is found in many different natural and artificial aquatic environments such as cooling towers or water systems in buildings, including hospitals. The term given to the severe pneumonia and systemic infection caused by Legionella bacteria is Legionnaires' disease. Over time, the prevalence of legionellosis or Legionnaires' disease has risen, which might indicate a greater awareness and reporting of the disease. Advances in microbiology have led to a better understanding of the ecological niches and pathogenesis of the condition. Legionnaires' disease is not always suspected because of its non-specific symptoms, and the diagnostic tests routinely available do not offer the desired sensitivity. However, effective antibiotics are available. Disease notification systems provide the basis for initiating investigations and limiting the scale and recurrence of outbreaks. This report reviews our current understanding of this disease.

  11. Screening for and treatments of congenital immunodeficiency diseases.

    PubMed

    Verbsky, James; Routes, John

    2014-12-01

    Although newborn screening (NBS) for inborn errors of metabolism has been successfully utilized in the US for decades, only recently has this screening program expanded to include disorders of immunity. Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) became the first disorder of immunity to be screened on a population wide basis in 2008. While NBS for SCID has been successful, the implementation of population-based screening programs is not without controversy, and there remain barriers to the nationwide implementation of this test. In addition, as the program has progressed we have learned of new challenges in the management of newborns that fail this screen.

  12. Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... immune deficiency. Parents who have a child with SCID or a family history of immunodeficiency might want to consider genetic counseling ... screening for newborns. Children without a known family history of the disease are often not diagnosed until 6 months of age or ... Treating SCID SCID is a pediatric emergency. When a child ...

  13. Infection and Cardiovascular Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-17

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Coronary Disease; Cerebrovascular Accident; Heart Diseases; Myocardial Infarction; Infection; Chlamydia Infections; Cytomegalovirus Infections; Helicobacter Infections; Atherosclerosis

  14. Correction of glycogen storage disease type II by an adeno-associated virus vector containing a muscle-specific promoter.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baodong; Zhang, Haoyue; Franco, Luis M; Brown, Talmage; Bird, Andrew; Schneider, Ayn; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2005-06-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (Pompe disease) causes death in infancy from cardiorespiratory failure due to acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA; acid maltase) deficiency. An AAV2 vector pseudotyped as AAV6 (AAV2/6 vector) transiently expressed high-level human GAA in GAA-knockout (GAA-KO) mice without reducing glycogen storage; however, in immunodeficient GAA-KO/SCID mice the AAV2/6 vector expressed high-level GAA and reduced the glycogen content of the injected muscle for 24 weeks. A CD4+/CD8+ lymphocytic infiltrate was observed in response to the AAV2/6 vector in immunocompetent GAA-KO mice. When a muscle-specific creatine kinase promoter was substituted for the CB promoter (AAV-MCKhGAApA), that AAV2/6 vector expressed high-level GAA and reduced glycogen content in immunocompetent GAA-KO mice. Muscle-restricted expression of hGAA provoked only a humoral (not cellular) immune response. Intravenous administration of a high number of particles of AAV-MCKhGAApA as AAV2/7 reduced the glycogen content of the heart and skeletal muscle and corrected individual myofibers in immunocompetent GAA-KO mice 24 weeks postinjection. In summary, persistent correction of muscle glycogen content was achieved with an AAV vector containing a muscle-specific promoter in GAA-KO mice, and this approach should be considered for muscle-targeted gene therapy in Pompe disease.

  15. [New perspectives in oncology: is selective destruction of tumor cells with immunotoxins in Hodgkin's disease an additional therapeutic alternative?].

    PubMed

    Engert, A; Gottstein, C; Winkler, U; Schön, G; Amlot, P; Thorpe, P; Diehl, V

    1992-10-15

    In the present paper, the authors describe the production and testing of immunotoxins for clinical application in Hodgkin's disease. The immunotoxins were constructed by chemical coupling of deglycolysated ricin-A to monoclonal antibodies against antigens on Hodgkin's and Reed-Sternberg cells (CD25, CD30, IRac). The cytotoxic effect of the immunotoxins was investigated in vitro against Hodgkin's and Reed-Sternberg cells (H-RS) and in vivo against solid Hodgkin's tumors in nude mice and disseminated Hodgkin's tumors in SCID mice. Cross-reactivity with normal tissue and the staining behaviour observed in sections of Hodgkin's tissue of various subtypes proved important parameters for the assessment of clinical applicability. Of more than 30 evaluated MoAb's, eight immunotoxins were produced, of which six showed both, cytotoxic effects of considerable potency against Hodgkin's tumor cells and low cross-reactivity with vital human organs. The most effective immunotoxin, RFT5 gamma 1.dgA, (CD25) inhibits the growth of H-RS cells at concentrations of 7 pMol and destroys about 60% of solid Hodgkin's tumors of 0.5 cm in diameter in nude mice. This immunotoxin binds to virtually all tumor cells in more than 90% of patients with Hodgkin's disease. Sufficient quantities of RFT5 gamma 1.dgA were produced for the treatment of patients with refractory Hodgkin's disease. These patients are currently being treated in a phase I clinical trial.

  16. Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Wolters, E C; Calne, D B

    1989-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease there is degeneration of neurons in the substantia nigra, with consequent depletion of the neurotransmitter dopamine. The triad of tremor, rigidity and bradykinesia is the clinical hallmark. Drugs currently used for palliative therapy fall into three categories: anticholinergic agents, dopamine precursors (levodopa combined with extracerebral decarboxylase inhibitors) and artificial dopamine agonists. It has been argued, on theoretical grounds, that some drugs slow the progress of Parkinson's disease, although no firm evidence has supported this. Treatment must be individualized, and more than one type of drug can be given concurrently after a careful build-up in dosage. We review the adverse effects of various drugs and consider new developments such as slow-release preparations, selective D-1 and D-2 agonists and transplants of dopaminergic cells into the brain. The treatment of Parkinson's disease can be demanding, rewarding and sometimes frustrating, but it remains a most challenging exercise in pharmacotherapy. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:2563667

  17. Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Crohn's disease is a chronic condition of the gastrointestinal tract. It is characterised by transmural, granulomatous inflammation that occurs in a discontinuous pattern, with a tendency to form fistulae. The cause is unknown but may depend on interactions between genetic predisposition, environmental triggers, and mucosal immunity. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of medical treatments to induce remission in adults with Crohn's disease? What are the effects of surgical interventions to induce and maintain remission in adults with small-bowel Crohn's disease? What are the effects of surgical interventions to induce remission in adults with colonic Crohn's disease? What are the effects of medical interventions to maintain remission in adults with Crohn's disease; and to maintain remission following surgery? What are the effects of lifestyle interventions to maintain remission in adults with Crohn's disease? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to December 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 93 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: aminosalicylates, antibiotics, azathioprine/mercaptopurine, ciclosporin, corticosteroids (oral), enteral nutrition, fish oil, infliximab, methotrexate, probiotics, resection, segmental colectomy, smoking cessation, and strictureplasty. PMID:21524318

  18. Celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Guandalini, Stefano

    2003-03-01

    Celiac disease is a genetically determined, permanent intolerance to gluten, a protein complex found in wheat, rye and barley. As many as 1:163 people are affected by it, but only a small percentage are aware of the condition, which begins either in infancy, with gastrointestinal symptoms, or in childhood and later years with non-Gl signs and symptoms, such as fatigue, depression, anxiety, anemia, stunted growth, and delayed puberty. A strong association with Type 1 diabetes and Down syndrome is also found, thus making screening mandatory for these subjects. Celiac disease is often entirely clinically silent, yet it must be detected in order to prevent long-term complications.

  19. [Whipple's disease].

    PubMed

    Marth, T

    2007-01-10

    Whipple's disease is a rare infectious disorder affecting mostly middle aged men. The causative organism, Tropheryma whipplei, recently has been cultivated and phylogenetically identified as an actinomycete. The rareness of the disease despite the ubiquitous occurence of T. whipplei presumably is related to a predisposing defect in cellular immunity. The diagnosis usually can be established by small bowel biopsy, but is frequently delayed due to protean clinical manifestations. The initiation of antibiotic treatment in most cases results in clinical remission, however, a significant number of patients is refractory to antimicrobial therapy or has a relapsing course.

  20. Behcet's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... and inflammation in the central nervous system and digestive organs. Vascular System Some people with Behçet’s disease have blood clots ... colon that causes diarrhea, cramps, and weight loss. Digestive tract. The body system that breaks down food. The digestive tract includes ...

  1. Celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Green, Peter H R; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Greywoode, Ruby

    2015-05-01

    This review will focus on the pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of celiac disease (CD). Given an increasing awareness of gluten-related disorders, medical professionals of all varieties are encountering patients with a diagnosis of CD or who are thought to have food intolerance to gluten. The prevalence of CD among the general population is estimated to be 1% in Western nations, and there is growing evidence for underdiagnosis of the disease, especially in non-Western nations that were traditionally believed to be unaffected. The development of serologic markers specific to CD has revolutionized the ability both to diagnose and monitor patients with the disease. Additionally, understanding of the clinical presentations of CD has undergone a major shift over the past half century. Although it is well understood that CD develops in genetically predisposed subjects exposed to gluten, the extent of other environmental factors in the pathogenesis of the disease is an area of continued research. Currently, the main therapeutic intervention for CD is a gluten-free diet; however, novel nondietary agents are under active investigation. Future areas of research should also help us understand the relationship of CD to other gluten-related disorders.

  2. Prostate Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Making Your Wishes Known Home & Community Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Prostate Diseases Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic Facts & Information Causes & Symptoms Diagnosis & Tests Care & Treatment Lifestyle & Management Other Resources Tools & Tips ...

  3. Quincke's disease

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Ladan; Miller, Anthony; Ashurst, John V.

    2016-01-01

    Marijuana smoke can cause thermal injury, and since legalization and increased use of marijuana in our society, differentiating, diagnosing, and managing this condition have become mandatory. A case of a 28-year-old male with Quincke's disease secondary to marijuana inhalation is presented. PMID:28217604

  4. Raynaud's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, E C; Dunger, D B; Dillon, M J

    1985-01-01

    We report five children who presented with Raynaud's disease in whom we could find no clinical, haematological, or immunological evidence of a collagen disorder. Oral phenoxybenzamine proved useful for maintenance treatment in most, with infusions of prostacyclin, nitroprusside, and ketanserin during acute attacks. PMID:3160308

  5. Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Toyooka, Keiko

    2013-01-01

    Fabry disease results from deficient activity of the enzyme α-galactosidase A and progressive lysosomal deposition of globotriaosylceramide (GL-3) in cells throughout the body. The main neurological presentations of Fabry disease patients are painful neuropathy, hypohidrosis, and stroke. Fabry neuropathy is characterized as a length-dependent peripheral neuropathy affecting mainly the small myelinated (Aδ) fibers and unmyelinated (C) fibers. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has been shown to have some positive effects on the reduction of neuropathic pain, the improvement of detection threshold for thermal sensation, and sweat function. On the contrary, the effect of ERT on the central nervous system has not been established. Early initiation of ERT before irreversible organ failure is extremely important, and alternative therapeutic approaches are currently being explored. Heterozygotes suffer from peripheral neuropathy at a higher rate than previously shown, significant multisystemic disease, and severely decreased quality of life. As well as being carriers, heterozygotes also display symptoms of Fabry disease, and should be carefully monitored and given adequate therapy.

  6. Graves' Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... after radioiodine therapy as a supplemental treatment. Side effects of both drugs include rash, joint pain, liver failure or a decrease in disease-fighting white blood cells. Methimazole isn't used to treat pregnant women in the first trimester because of the slight ...

  7. Infectious Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... that contain genetic material, and use your own cells to multiply Fungi - primitive plants, like mushrooms or mildew Protozoa - one-celled animals that use other living things for food and a place to live NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  8. Autoinflammatory Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Behçet’s Disease Progress and Promise Key Words The Immune System When your body is attacked – perhaps by a virus or other germs – your immune system defends you. It “sees” and kills the germs ...

  9. Infectious Diseases,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-29

    was of importance in arresting the disease. On the other hand, tuberculous patients may develop a sarcoidosis -like hypersensitivity to vitamin D; if...action of vitamin D and become hypercalcemic, as in sarcoidosis . Normal quantities of vitamins and other nutrients help to maintain host resistance at

  10. Mitochondrial Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... are defective, the cells do not have enough energy. The unused oxygen and fuel molecules build up in the cells and cause damage. The symptoms of mitochondrial disease can vary. It depends on how ... high energy needs, so muscular and neurological problems are common. ...

  11. Sunflower diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sunflower disease chapter is part of the Sunflower Oilseeds Monograph, which will be a new publication in the AOCS Oilseeds Monograph series. The monograph contains an overview and history of sunflower crop development, how the oilseed is cultivated, how the oilseed is produced, how the seed is...

  12. Parasitic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... You can get them from contaminated food or water, a bug bite, or sexual contact. Some parasitic diseases are easily treated and some are not. Parasites range in size from tiny, ... Contaminated water supplies can lead to Giardia infections. Cats can ...

  13. Lung Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    When you breathe, your lungs take in oxygen from the air and deliver it to the bloodstream. The cells in your body need oxygen to ... you breathe nearly 25,000 times. People with lung disease have difficulty breathing. Millions of people in ...

  14. Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Chomel, B

    2015-08-01

    Lyme disease is among the most frequently diagnosed zoonotic tick-borne diseases worldwide. The number of human cases has been on the increase since the first recognition of its aetiological agent. Lyme disease is caused by spirochete bacteria belonging to the genus Borrelia, with B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.) found in the Americas, and B. afzelii and B. garinii, in addition to B. burgdorferi s.s., in Europe and Asia. Environmental factors, such as human encroachment onto habitats favourable to ticks and their hosts, reduced deforestation, increased human outdoor activities, and climatic factors favouring a wider distribution of tick vectors, have enhanced the impact of the disease on both humans and animals. Clinical manifestations in humans include, in the early phases, erythema migrans, followed several weeks later by neuro-borreliosis (meningo-radiculitis, meningitis or meningo-encephalitis), Lyme arthritis and/or Borrelia lymphocytoma. In dogs, acute signs include fever, general malaise, lameness, lymph node enlargement and polyarthritis, as well as neuro-borreliosis in the chronic form. Diagnosis is mainly serological in both humans and animals, based on either a two-tier approach (an immunoenzymatic test followed by a Western blot confirmatory test) in humans or C(6) peptide, only in dogs. Early treatment with antibiotics, such as doxycycline or amoxicillin, for three weeks usually reduces the risk of chronic disease. Tick control, including the use of tick repellents for both humans and animals, particularly dogs, is highly reliable in preventing transmission. Vaccines are not available to prevent human infection, whereas several vaccines are available to reduce transmission and the clinical manifestations of infection in dogs.

  15. Celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, Luis

    2006-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a common autoimmune disorder, induced by the intake of gluten proteins present in wheat, barley and rye. Contrary to common belief, this disorder is a protean systemic disease, rather than merely a pure digestive alteration. CD is closely associated with genes that code HLA-II antigens, mainly of DQ2 and DQ8 classes. Previously, it was considered to be a rare childhood disorder, but is actually considered a frequent condition, present at any age, which may have multiple complications. Tissue transglutaminase-2 (tTG), appears to be an important component of this disease, both, in its pathogenesis and diagnosis. Active CD is characterized by intestinal and/or extra-intestinal symptoms, villous atrophy and crypt hyperplasia, and strongly positive tTG auto-antibodies. The duodenal biopsy is considered to be the “gold standard” for diagnosis, but its practice has significant limitations in its interpretation, especially in adults. Occasionally, it results in a false-negative because of patchy mucosal changes and the presence of mucosal villous atrophy is often more severe in the proximal jejunum, usually not reached by endoscopic biopsies. CD is associated with increased rates of several diseases, such as iron deficiency anemia, osteoporosis, dermatitis herpetiformis, several neurologic and endocrine diseases, persistent chronic hypertransami-nasemia of unknown origin, various types of cancer and other autoimmune disorders. Treatment of CD dictates a strict, life-long gluten-free diet, which results in remission for most individuals, although its effect on some associated extraintestinal manifestations remains to be established.

  16. Refractory disease in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Carlos; Kallenberg, Cees; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2011-09-01

    Refractory disease (RD) definition has different meanings but it is dynamic, according to knowledge and the availability of new drugs. It should be differentiated from severe disease and damage definitions and it must take into account duration of adequate therapy and compliance of the patient. It can be related to inadequate or inefficacious treatment or to pathogenesis. RD definition has multiple implications to clinical guidelines and to the use of off-label drugs. It should not be regarded as lost cases and prospective studies, registries and clinical trials should be planned.

  17. Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a progressive, X-linked inherited disorder of glycosphingolipid metabolism due to deficient or absent lysosomal α-galactosidase A activity. FD is pan-ethnic and the reported annual incidence of 1 in 100,000 may underestimate the true prevalence of the disease. Classically affected hemizygous males, with no residual α-galactosidase A activity may display all the characteristic neurological (pain), cutaneous (angiokeratoma), renal (proteinuria, kidney failure), cardiovascular (cardiomyopathy, arrhythmia), cochleo-vestibular and cerebrovascular (transient ischemic attacks, strokes) signs of the disease while heterozygous females have symptoms ranging from very mild to severe. Deficient activity of lysosomal α-galactosidase A results in progressive accumulation of globotriaosylceramide within lysosomes, believed to trigger a cascade of cellular events. Demonstration of marked α-galactosidase A deficiency is the definitive method for the diagnosis of hemizygous males. Enzyme analysis may occasionnally help to detect heterozygotes but is often inconclusive due to random X-chromosomal inactivation so that molecular testing (genotyping) of females is mandatory. In childhood, other possible causes of pain such as rheumatoid arthritis and 'growing pains' must be ruled out. In adulthood, multiple sclerosis is sometimes considered. Prenatal diagnosis, available by determination of enzyme activity or DNA testing in chorionic villi or cultured amniotic cells is, for ethical reasons, only considered in male fetuses. Pre-implantation diagnosis is possible. The existence of atypical variants and the availability of a specific therapy singularly complicate genetic counseling. A disease-specific therapeutic option - enzyme replacement therapy using recombinant human α-galactosidase A - has been recently introduced and its long term outcome is currently still being investigated. Conventional management consists of pain relief with analgesic drugs

  18. Human Gingiva-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Inhibit Xeno-Graft-versus-Host Disease via CD39–CD73–Adenosine and IDO Signals

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Feng; Chen, Maogen; Chen, Weiqian; Gu, Jian; Yuan, Jia; Xue, Yaoqiu; Dang, Junlong; Su, Wenru; Wang, Julie; Zadeh, Homayoun H.; He, Xiaoshun; Rong, Limin; Olsen, Nancy; Zheng, Song Guo

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells have the capacity to maintain immune homeostasis and prevent autoimmunity. We recently reported that human-derived gingival mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs) have strong capacity to suppress immune responses and T cell-mediated collagen-induced arthritis in animals. However, it is unclear whether these cells can suppress human T cell-mediated diseases. Here, we used a xenogenic GVHD model in the NOD/SCID mouse, which is a useful preclinical construct for evaluating the therapeutic and translational potential of this approach for applications in human disease. We found that GMSCs potently suppressed the proliferation of PBMC and T cells in vitro. Co-transfer of GMSC with human PBMC significantly suppressed human cell engraftment and markedly prolonged the mouse survival. Moreover, we demonstrated that GMSCs inhibited human PBMC-initiated xenogenic responses via CD39/CD73/adenosine and IDO signals. These findings suggest the potential for GMSCs to suppress human immune responses in immune system-mediated diseases, offering a potential clinical option to be used for modulating GVHD and autoimmune diseases. PMID:28210258

  19. Menkes disease.

    PubMed

    Tümer, Zeynep; Møller, Lisbeth B

    2010-05-01

    Menkes disease (MD) is a lethal multisystemic disorder of copper metabolism. Progressive neurodegeneration and connective tissue disturbances, together with the peculiar 'kinky' hair are the main manifestations. MD is inherited as an X-linked recessive trait, and as expected the vast majority of patients are males. MD occurs due to mutations in the ATP7A gene and the vast majority of ATP7A mutations are intragenic mutations or partial gene deletions. ATP7A is an energy dependent transmembrane protein, which is involved in the delivery of copper to the secreted copper enzymes and in the export of surplus copper from cells. Severely affected MD patients die usually before the third year of life. A cure for the disease does not exist, but very early copper-histidine treatment may correct some of the neurological symptoms.

  20. Minamata disease.

    PubMed

    Eto, K

    2000-09-01

    Minamata disease (methylmercury poisoning) was first discovered in 1956 around Minamata Bay, Kumamoto Prefecture, Japan. A second epidemic in Japan occurred in 1965 along the Agano River, Niigata Prefecture. This paper presents a brief review of Minamata disease with an emphasis on the cases found in Kumamoto Prefecture. At autopsy, the most conspicuous destructive lesion in the cerebrum was found in the anterior portions of the calcarine cortex. Less severe but similar lesions may be found in the post-central, pre-central and temporal transverse cortices. Secondary degeneration from primary lesions may be seen in cases with long survival. In the cerebellum, pathological changes occur deep in the hemisphere. The granule cell population was more affected, compared with Purkinje cells. Among peripheral nerves, sensory nerves were more affected than motor nerves. Our recent experimental studies that reveal knowledge of the pathogenesis of methylmercury poisoning will be discussed.

  1. Menkes disease

    PubMed Central

    Tümer, Zeynep; Møller, Lisbeth B

    2010-01-01

    Menkes disease (MD) is a lethal multisystemic disorder of copper metabolism. Progressive neurodegeneration and connective tissue disturbances, together with the peculiar ‘kinky' hair are the main manifestations. MD is inherited as an X-linked recessive trait, and as expected the vast majority of patients are males. MD occurs due to mutations in the ATP7A gene and the vast majority of ATP7A mutations are intragenic mutations or partial gene deletions. ATP7A is an energy dependent transmembrane protein, which is involved in the delivery of copper to the secreted copper enzymes and in the export of surplus copper from cells. Severely affected MD patients die usually before the third year of life. A cure for the disease does not exist, but very early copper-histidine treatment may correct some of the neurological symptoms. PMID:19888294

  2. Morgellons disease?

    PubMed

    Accordino, Robert E; Engler, Danielle; Ginsburg, Iona H; Koo, John

    2008-01-01

    Morgellons disease, a pattern of dermatologic symptoms very similar, if not identical, to those of delusions of parasitosis, was first described many centuries ago, but has recently been given much attention on the internet and in the mass media. The present authors present a history of Morgellons disease, in addition to which they discuss the potential benefit of using this diagnostic term as a means of building trust and rapport with patients to maximize treatment benefit. The present authors also suggest "meeting the patient halfway" and creating a therapeutic alliance when providing dermatologic treatment by taking their cutaneous symptoms seriously enough to provide both topical ointments as well as antipsychotic medications, which can be therapeutic in these patients.

  3. Peripheral Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) Peripheral artery disease (PAD) refers to ... is peripheral artery disease treated? What is peripheral artery disease (PAD)? Peripheral artery disease, or PAD, refers ...

  4. Ledderhose Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fausto de Souza, Dominique; Micaelo, Lilian; Cuzzi, Tullia

    2010-01-01

    Plantar fibromatosis, or Ledderhose disease, is a rare hyperproliferative disorder of the plantar aponeurosis. It may occur at any age with the greatest prevalence at middle age and beyond. This disorder is more common in men than woman and it is sometimes associated with other forms of fibromatosis. A 28-year-old Brazilian woman with a six-year history of painless bilateral plantar nodules is described in this article. PMID:20877526

  5. Lyme Disease.

    PubMed

    Hu, Linden T

    2016-05-03

    This issue provides a clinical overview of Lyme disease, focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  6. Whipple's disease.

    PubMed

    Marth, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, it has become apparent that Tropheryma whipplei not only causes a chronic multisystemic infection which is often preceded by arthropathies for many years, well known as 'classical' Whipple's disease, but also clinically becomes manifest with localized organ affections and acute (transient) infections in children. T. whipplei is found ubiquitously in the environment and colonizes in some healthy carriers. In this review, we highlight new aspects of this enigmatic infectious disorder.

  7. Beryllium disease

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-20

    After two workers at the nuclear weapons plant at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee were diagnosed earlier this year with chronic beryllium disease (CBD), a rare and sometimes fatal scarring of the lungs, the Department of Energy ordered up a 4-year probe. Now, part of that probe has begun - tests conducted by the Oak Ridge Associated Universities' Center for Epidemiological Research measuring beryllium sensitivity in 3,000 people who've been exposed to the metal's dust since Manhattan Project managers opened the Y-12 plant at Oak Ridge in 1943. Currently, 119 Y-12 employees process beryllium, which has a number of industrial uses, including rocket heat shields and nuclear weapon and electrical components. The disease often takes 20 to 25 years to develop, and the stricken employees haven't worked with beryllium for years. There is no cure for CBD, estimated to strike 2% of people exposed to the metal. Anti-inflammatory steroids alleviate such symptoms as a dry cough, weight loss, and fatigue. Like other lung-fibrosis diseases that are linked to lung cancer, some people suspect CBD might cause some lung cancer. While difficult to diagnose, about 900 cases of CBD have been reported since a Beryllium Case Registry was established in 1952. The Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that about 10,000 DOE employees and 800,000 people in private industry have worked with beryllium.

  8. Celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Scherer, John R

    2008-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder caused by the continued ingestion of gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley and rye, by predisposed individuals. With the development of highly sensitive serologic tests, this has become an increasingly recognized disease with prevalence as high as 1% in certain patient populations, such as Caucasian females. Almost all celiac patients carry the human leukocyte antigen DQ2/DQ8 gene. Much has recently been discovered about the role of the innate immune system in exposing genetically vulnerable patients to the pathogenic gliadin fraction of gluten. The "classical" presentation of chronic diarrhea and malabsorption is now a rarity. Due to earlier detection and increased awareness, celiac disease now presents with a myriad of "atypical" signs and symptoms such as iron-deficiency anemia and osteoporosis. Associated conditions include T-cell lymphoma, dermatitis herpetiformis, autoimmune thyroiditis and type 1 diabetes. Diagnosis requires serologic confirmation with either antiendomysial or antitransglutaminase antibodies as well as histologic confirmation from endoscopic small bowel biopsy. The only effective treatment necessitates a lifelong, continual adherence to a gluten-free diet.

  9. TFDP3 confers chemoresistance in minimal residual disease within childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Ming; Yin, Kailin; Dong, Yujun; Wang, Pingzhang; Xue, Yun; Zhou, Peng; Wang, Yuqi; Wang, Yuedan

    2017-01-01

    Acquired drug resistance in childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) remains a significant clinical problem. In this study, a novel gene therapy target for childhood T-ALL to overcome chemoresistance was discovered: TFDP3 increased in the minimal residual disease (MRD) positive childhood T-ALL patients. Then, we established a preclinical model of resistance to induction therapy to examine the functional relevance of TFDP3 to chemoresistance in MRD derived from Jurkat/E6-1. Jurkat xenografts in NOD/SCID mice were exposed to a four drug combination (VXLD) of vincristine (VCR), dexamethasone (DEX), L-asparaginase (L-asp) and daunorubicin (DNR). During the 4-week VXLD treatment, the level of TFDP3 increased 4-fold. High expression of TFDP3 was identified in the re-emerging lines (Jurkat/MRD) with increased chemoresistance, which is correlated with partially promoter demethylation of TFDP3. Downregulation of TFDP3 by RNA interference reversed chemoresistance in Jurkat/MRD accompanied by reinstated E2F1 activity that coincided with increased levels of p53, p73, and associated proapoptotic target genes. Importantly, TFDP3 silencing in vivo induced apparent benefit to overcome chemoresistance in combination with VXLD treatment. Collectively, TFDP3 confers chemoresistance in MRD within childhood T-ALL, indicating that TFDP3 is a potential gene therapy target for residual cancer. PMID:27902457

  10. Herpes simplex type 2 virus deleted in glycoprotein D protects against vaginal, skin and neural disease

    PubMed Central

    Petro, Christopher; González, Pablo A; Cheshenko, Natalia; Jandl, Thomas; Khajoueinejad, Nazanin; Bénard, Angèle; Sengupta, Mayami; Herold, Betsy C; Jacobs, William R

    2015-01-01

    Subunit vaccines comprised of glycoprotein D (gD-2) failed to prevent HSV-2 highlighting need for novel strategies. To test the hypothesis that deletion of gD-2 unmasks protective antigens, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of an HSV-2 virus deleted in gD-2 and complemented allowing a single round of replication on cells expressing HSV-1 gD (ΔgD−/+gD−1). Subcutaneous immunization of C57BL/6 or BALB/c mice with ΔgD−/+gD1 provided 100% protection against lethal intravaginal or skin challenges and prevented latency. ΔgD−/+gD1 elicited no disease in SCID mice, whereas 1000-fold lower doses of wild-type virus were lethal. HSV-specific antibodies were detected in serum (titer 1:800,000) following immunization and in vaginal washes after intravaginal challenge. The antibodies elicited cell-mediated cytotoxicity, but little neutralizing activity. Passive transfer of immune serum completely protected wild-type, but not Fcγ-receptor or neonatal Fc-receptor knock-out mice. These studies demonstrate that non-neutralizing Fc-mediated humoral responses confer protection and support advancement of this attenuated vaccine. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06054.001 PMID:25756612

  11. The Jeremiah Metzger Lecture: gene therapy for inherited disorders: from Christmas disease to Leber's amaurosis.

    PubMed

    High, Katherine A

    2009-01-01

    This paper will focus on recent developments in the field of gene therapy for inherited disorders. From a historical perspective, this Metzger lecture is a follow-on to one presented by Dr. William Kelley in 1987, entitled "Current Status of Human Gene Therapy" (Transactions Am Clin. Climatol. Assoc. 99:152-169) (1). In 1987, gene transfer studies in human subjects were yet to be undertaken; the first clinical studies, infusion of genetically modified autologous T cells into two young girls with ADA-SCID, would not take place until 1990 (2). Today's lecture will summarize progress since that time in one area, that of in vivo gene transfer for genetic disease. I will describe progress in two areas, gene therapy for the bleeding disorder hemophilia B, and for a subset of retinal degenerative disorders termed Leber's congenital amaurosis, due to mutations in the gene encoding retinal pigment epithelium-specific 65 kilodalton protein (RPE65). This lecture will demonstrate the interconnected nature of progress in these two areas, as careful delineation of the obstacles in hemophilia led to the realization that success could be achieved in Leber's.

  12. Correction of the sickle cell disease mutation in human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Hoban, Megan D; Cost, Gregory J; Mendel, Matthew C; Romero, Zulema; Kaufman, Michael L; Joglekar, Alok V; Ho, Michelle; Lumaquin, Dianne; Gray, David; Lill, Georgia R; Cooper, Aaron R; Urbinati, Fabrizia; Senadheera, Shantha; Zhu, Allen; Liu, Pei-Qi; Paschon, David E; Zhang, Lei; Rebar, Edward J; Wilber, Andrew; Wang, Xiaoyan; Gregory, Philip D; Holmes, Michael C; Reik, Andreas; Hollis, Roger P; Kohn, Donald B

    2015-04-23

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by a single point mutation in the seventh codon of the β-globin gene. Site-specific correction of the sickle mutation in hematopoietic stem cells would allow for permanent production of normal red blood cells. Using zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) designed to flank the sickle mutation, we demonstrate efficient targeted cleavage at the β-globin locus with minimal off-target modification. By co-delivering a homologous donor template (either an integrase-defective lentiviral vector or a DNA oligonucleotide), high levels of gene modification were achieved in CD34(+) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Modified cells maintained their ability to engraft NOD/SCID/IL2rγ(null) mice and to produce cells from multiple lineages, although with a reduction in the modification levels relative to the in vitro samples. Importantly, ZFN-driven gene correction in CD34(+) cells from the bone marrow of patients with SCD resulted in the production of wild-type hemoglobin tetramers.

  13. Inhibitor of DASH proteases affects expression of adhesion molecules in osteoclasts and reduces myeloma growth and bone disease.

    PubMed

    Pennisi, Angela; Li, Xin; Ling, Wen; Khan, Sharmin; Gaddy, Dana; Suva, Larry J; Barlogie, Bart; Shaughnessy, John D; Aziz, Nazneen; Yaccoby, Shmuel

    2009-06-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) IV activity and/or structure homologues (DASH) are serine proteases implicated in tumourigenesis. We previously found that a DASH protease, fibroblast activation protein (FAP), was involved in osteoclast-induced myeloma growth. Here we further demonstrated expression of various adhesion molecules in osteoclasts cultured alone or cocultured with myeloma cells, and tested the effects of DASH inhibitor, PT-100, on myeloma cell growth, bone disease, osteoclast differentiation and activity, and expression of adhesion molecules in osteoclasts. PT-100 had no direct effects on viability of myeloma cells or mature osteoclasts, but significantly reduced survival of myeloma cells cocultured with osteoclasts. Real-time PCR array for 85 adhesion molecules revealed upregulation of 17 genes in osteoclasts after coculture with myeloma cells. Treatment of myeloma/osteoclast cocultures with PT-100 significantly downregulated 18 of 85 tested genes in osteoclasts, some of which are known to play roles in tumourigenesis and osteoclastogenesis. PT-100 also inhibited osteoclast differentiation and subsequent pit formation. Resorption activity of mature osteoclasts and differentiation of osteoblasts were not affected by PT-100. In primary myelomatous severe combined immunodeficient (SCID)-hu mice PT-100 reduced osteoclast activity, bone resorption and tumour burden. These data demonstrated that DASH proteases are involved in myeloma bone disease and tumour growth.

  14. Ehrlichial diseases.

    PubMed

    Madigan, J E; Pusterla, N

    2000-12-01

    Equine granulocytic and monocytic ehrlichiosis caused by Ehrlichia equi and E. risticii, respectively, are seasonal diseases in horses that occur throughout the United States E. equi is transmitted by lxodes ticks and causes high fever, depression, anorexia, limb edema, petechiation, icterus, ataxia, and stiffness in gait. E. risticii, also known as the agent of Potomac horse fever, causes a febrile illness with a colitis of variable severity. Its occurrence is associated with aquatic habitats. The natural route of transmission is oral, through the ingestion of E. risticii infected trematode stages either free in water or in an intermediate host, such as aquatic animals.

  15. [Bone diseases].

    PubMed

    Uebelhart, Brigitte; Rizzoli, René

    2016-01-13

    Calcium intake shows a small impact on bone mineral density and fracture risk. Denosumab is a more potent inhibitor of bone resorption than zoledronate. Abaloparatide, PTHrP analog, increases bone mineral density and decreases fracture incidence. Teriparatide could be delivered via a transdermic device. Romosozumab and odanacatib improve calculated bone strength. Sequential or combined treatments with denosumab and teriparatide could be of interest, but not denosumab followed by teriparatide. Fibrous dysplasia, Paget disease and hypophosphatasia are updated, as well as atypical femoral fracture and osteonecrosis of the jaw.

  16. Celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Isabel

    2008-08-01

    Celiac disease is an immunologically mediated enteropathy of the small intestine, characterized by lifelong intolerance to the gliadin and related prolamines from wheat and other cereals, that occurs in genetically predisposed individuals. Symptoms result from structural damage to the mucosa of the small intestine, which may cause malabsorption with positive autoantibodies in the sera. Normal mucosal architecture is restored after the use of a gluten-free diet and the normalization of the autoantibodies. Villous atrophy and high levels of autoantibodies reappear when gluten is reintroduced into the diet (gluten challenge).

  17. Disease modification in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Henchcliffe, Claire; Severt, W Lawrence

    2011-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age-related, progressive, multisystem neurodegenerative disorder resulting in significant morbidity and mortality, as well as a growing social and financial burden in an aging population. The hallmark of PD is loss of dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta, leading to bradykinesia, rigidity and tremor. Current pharmacological treatment is therefore centred upon dopamine replacement to alleviate symptoms. However, two major problems complicate this approach: (i) motor symptoms continue to progress, requiring increasing doses of medication, which result in both short-term adverse effects and intermediate- to long-term motor complications; (ii) dopamine replacement does little to treat non-dopaminergic motor and non-motor symptoms, which are an important source of morbidity, including dementia, sleep disturbances, depression, orthostatic hypotension, and postural instability leading to falls. It is critical, therefore, to develop a broader and more fundamental therapeutic approach to PD, and major research efforts have focused upon developing neuroprotective interventions. Despite many encouraging preclinical data suggesting the possibility of addressing the underlying pathophysiology by slowing cell loss, efforts to translate this into the clinical realm have largely proved disappointing in the past. Barriers to finding neuroprotective or disease-modifying drugs in PD include a lack of validated biomarkers of progression, which hampers clinical trial design and interpretation; difficulties separating symptomatic and neuroprotective effects of candidate neuroprotective therapies; and possibly fundamental flaws in some of the basic preclinical models and testing. However, three recent clinical trials have used a novel delayed-start design in an attempt to overcome some of these roadblocks. While not examining markers of cell loss and function, which would determine neuroprotective effects, this trial design

  18. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Disease Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Disease Risk Factors Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... or habits may raise your risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). These conditions are known as risk ...

  19. Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Tanowitz, H B; Kirchhoff, L V; Simon, D; Morris, S A; Weiss, L M; Wittner, M

    1992-01-01

    Chagas' disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, is an important cause of morbidity in many countries in Latin America. The important modes of transmission are by the bite of the reduviid bug and blood transfusion. The organism exists in three morphological forms: trypomastigotes, amastigotes, and epimastigotes. The mechanism of transformation and differentiation is currently being explored, and signal transduction pathways of the parasites may be involved in this process. Parasite adherence to and invasion of host cells is a complex process involving complement, phospholipase, penetrin, neuraminidase, and hemolysin. Two clinical forms of the disease are recognized, acute and chronic. During the acute stage pathological damage is related to the presence of the parasite, whereas in the chronic stage few parasites are found. In recent years the roles of tumor necrosis factor, gamma interferon, and the interleukins in the pathogenesis of this infection have been reported. The common manifestations of chronic cardiomyopathy are arrhythmias and thromboembolic events. Autoimmune, neurogenic, and microvascular factors may be important in the pathogenesis of the cardiomyopathy. The gastrointestinal tract is another important target, and "mega syndromes" are common manifestations. The diagnosis and treatment of this infection are active areas of investigation. New serological and molecular biological techniques have improved the diagnosis of chronic infection. Exacerbations of T. cruzi infection have been reported for patients receiving immuno-suppressive therapy and for those with AIDS. Images PMID:1423218

  20. Crohn disease - children - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Inflammatory bowel disease in children - Crohn disease; IBD in children - Crohn disease; Regional enteritis - children; Ileitis - children; Granulomatous ileocolitis - children; Colitis in children; CD - children

  1. In vivo delivery of human acid ceramidase via cord blood transplantation and direct injection of lentivirus as novel treatment approaches for Farber disease

    PubMed Central

    Ramsubir, Shobha; Nonaka, Takahiro; Girbés, Carmen Bedia; Carpentier, Stéphane; Levade, Thierry; Medin, Jeffrey A.

    2008-01-01

    Farber disease is a rare lysosomal storage disorder (LSD) caused by a deficiency of acid ceramidase (AC) activity and subsequent accumulation of ceramide. Currently, there is no treatment for Farber disease beyond palliative care and most patients succumb to the disorder at a very young age. Previously, our group showed that gene therapy using oncoretroviral vectors (RV) could restore enzyme activity in Farber patient cells. The studies described here employ novel RV and lentiviral (LV) vectors that engineer co-expression of AC and a cell surface marking transgene product, human CD25 (huCD25). Transduction of Farber patient fibroblasts and B cells with these vectors resulted in overexpression of AC and led to a 90% and 50% reduction in the accumulation of ceramide, respectively. Vectors were also evaluated in human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) and by direct in vivo delivery in mouse models. In a xenotransplantation model using NOD/SCID mice, we found that transduced CD34+ cells could repopulate irradiated recipient animals, as measured by CD25 expression. When virus was injected intravenously into mice, soluble CD25 was detected in the plasma and increased AC activity was present in the liver up to 14 weeks post-injection. These findings suggest that vector and transgene expression can persist long-term and offer the potential of a lasting cure. To our knowledge, this is the first report of in vivo testing of direct gene therapy strategies for Farber disease. PMID:18805722

  2. [Bone disease in Gaucher's disease].

    PubMed

    Roca Espiau, Mercedes

    2011-09-01

    The exposition aims, is to review the pathophysiological mechanisms of bone marrow involvement and the patterns of marrow infiltration by Gaucher cells. We have reviewed the different methods of assessment of bone marrow infiltration and its temporal development. Qualitative methods include simple radiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) and radioisotope. The simple radiography is the basic element, but its sensitivity is limited and only allows for assessing changes and trabecular bone remodeling MRI allows us to appreciate the bone marrow infiltration, detection of complications and response to therapy. Radioisotopes can contribute to the differential diagnosis of osteomyelitis and bone crises. Among the quantitative methods are the QCSI (quantitative chemical shift imaging) and the dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), as well as new quantitative techniques of CT, MRI and ultrasound densitometry. The QCSI performed an assessment of fat content of bone marrow in the spine. DEXA quantifies bone density by measuring the attenuation coefficient. The semiquantitative methods have various "scores" to establish criteria for generalized bone disease endpoints of disease progression and response to therapy.

  3. Inflammation and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Inflammation and Heart Disease Updated:Oct 12,2016 Understand the risks of ... inflammation causes cardiovascular disease, inflammation is common for heart disease and stroke patients and is thought to be ...

  4. Heart disease and diet

    MedlinePlus

    Diet - heart disease; CAD - diet; Coronary artery disease - diet; Coronary heart disease - diet ... diet and lifestyle can reduce your risk of: Heart disease, heart attacks, and stroke Conditions that lead ...

  5. Coronary heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... buildup of plaque in the arteries to your heart. This may also be called hardening of the ...

  6. Heart disease - risk factors

    MedlinePlus

    Heart disease - prevention; CVD - risk factors; Cardiovascular disease - risk factors; Coronary artery disease - risk factors; CAD - risk ... a certain health condition. Some risk factors for heart disease you cannot change, but some you can. ...

  7. Lyme Disease (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Lyme Disease KidsHealth > For Parents > Lyme Disease A A A ... Pacific Northwest, and the northern Midwest states. About Lyme Disease Lyme disease is caused by the bacterium Borrelia ...

  8. Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Conditions Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease (UCTD) Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease (UCTD) Make an Appointment Find a Doctor ... L. Goldstein, MD, MMSc (February 01, 2016) Undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD) is a systemic autoimmune disease. This ...

  9. Genetics and Rheumatic Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Well with Rheumatic Disease Genetics and Rheumatic Disease Genetics and Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts Studying twins has ... 70%, and for non-identical pairs, even lower. Genetics and ankylosing spondylitis Each rheumatic disease has its ...

  10. Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... They Work Kidney Disease A-Z Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease What is acquired cystic kidney disease? Acquired cystic kidney disease happens when a ... cysts. What are the differences between acquired cystic kidney disease and polycystic kidney disease? Acquired cystic kidney ...

  11. [Castleman disease].

    PubMed

    Belletti, Gerardo A; Savio, Verónica; Minoldo, Daniel; Caminos, Susana; Yorio, Marcelo A

    2004-01-01

    A 66 years female, who was since last year under astenia, arthralgias, pimply lesions in spread plates and tests showing eritrosedimentation over 100 mm, anemi, leucocitosis with neutrofilia, policlonal hypergammaglobulinemia, slight proteinuria and IgE on 900. This patient was sporadically treated with corticoids. When made the medical consult had lost 34lb., was under anorexy, as well as dyspepsia. Hemoglobyn 6.9 gr/dl, leucocytes 20000/mm3, neutrofils at 90%, proteinogram the same as former, with hypoalbuminemia. She was taking prednisona, 16 mg/day. When examined showed depress of conscience, astenia, and dermic lesions already quoted. 4 cm nonpainful right axillary adenopaty adhered to deep planes. Medulogram with increased iron, hyperegenerative. Ganglionar biopsia: linfoid hyperplasic process linked to inmune response. Toracoabdominal tomography with adenomegalia in torax and retroperitoneo. Skin biopsia: neutrofilic vasculitis. The patient suspends the 16 mg of prednisona and fever as well as generalized adenopatias come up. After laying aside other ethiologies, and understanding as Castleman Multicentric disease, it is started to supply prednisona 1 mg/kg of weight with a clinical and biochemical fast and outstanding response. After 7 months it was progressively suspended the esteroids and 60 days later, the process fall back; for that, corticoids are restarted, with a good evolution. The illness of Castleman although it is not very frequent, it should be considered as differential diagnosis in those clinical cases that are accompanied with important general commitment, linphadenopaties and respons to steroid therapy.

  12. Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Benninger, David H

    2013-01-01

    In advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), the emergence of symptoms refractory to conventional therapy poses therapeutic challenges. The success of deep brain stimulation (DBS) and advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of PD have raised interest in noninvasive brain stimulation as an alternative therapeutic tool. The rationale for its use draws from the concept that reversing abnormalities in brain activity and physiology thought to cause the clinical deficits may restore normal functioning. Currently the best evidence in support of this concept comes from DBS, which improves motor deficits, and modulates brain activity and motor cortex physiology, although whether a causal interaction exists remains largely undetermined. Most trials of noninvasive brain stimulation in PD have applied repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), targeting the motor cortex. Current studies suggest a possible therapeutic potential for rTMS and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), but clinical effects so far have been small and negligible with regard to functional independence and quality of life. Approaches to potentiate the efficacy of rTMS include increasing stimulation intensity and novel stimulation parameters that derive their rationale from studies on brain physiology. These novel parameters are intended to simulate normal firing patterns or to act on the hypothesized role of oscillatory activity in the motor cortex and basal ganglia with regard to motor control and its contribution to the pathogenesis of motor disorders. Noninvasive brain stimulation studies will enhance our understanding of PD pathophysiology and might provide further evidence for potential therapeutic applications.

  13. Fatty Liver Disease (Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... History Research Resources Research at NIDDK Meetings & Events Technology Advancement & Transfer Health Information Diabetes Digestive Diseases Kidney Disease Weight Management Liver Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition ...

  14. Treatment for Peptic Ulcer Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... History Research Resources Research at NIDDK Meetings & Events Technology Advancement & Transfer Health Information Diabetes Digestive Diseases Kidney Disease Weight Management Liver Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition ...

  15. Glomerulocystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Siroky, Brian J.; Yin, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Glomerulocystic disease is a rare renal cystic disease with a long descriptive history. Findings from recent studies have significantly advanced the pathophysiological understanding of the disease processes leading to this peculiar phenotype. Many genetic syndromes associated with glomerulocystic disease have had their respective proteins localized to primary cilia or centrosomes. Transcriptional control of renal developmental pathways is dysregulated in obstructive diseases that also lead to glomerulocystic disease, emphasizing the importance of transcriptional choreography between renal development and renal cystic disease. PMID:20091054

  16. Synthesis and evaluation of 18F-fluoroethylated benzothiazole derivatives for in vivo imaging of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Neumaier, B; Deisenhofer, S; Sommer, C; Solbach, C; Reske, S N; Mottaghy, F

    2010-06-01

    Amyloid aggregates play a major role in the development of Alzheimer's disease. Targeting these aggregates by PET probes enables non-invasively the detection and quantification of amyloid deposit distribution in human brains. Based on benzothiazole core structure a series of amyloid imaging agents were developed. Currently [(11)C]2-(4'-(methylamino)phenyl)-6-hydroxybenzothiazole (Pittsburgh Compound-B (PIB) is the most specific and widely used amyloid imaging ligand. But due to the short half life of (11)C, longer lived (18)F-labeled derivatives offer logistic advantages and higher contrast images. In this work, three different [(18)F]fluoroethoxy-substituted benzothiazole derivatives ([(18)F]2-(4'-(methylamino)phenyl)-6-(2-fluoroethoxy)benzothiazole, [(18)F]2-((2'-(2-fluoroethoxy)-4'-amino)phenyl)benzothiazole and [(18)F]2-(3'-((2-fluoroethoxy)-4'-amino)phenyl)benzothiazole) were synthesized via [(18)F]fluoroethylation. The latter two derivatives with fluoroethoxy-substitution on the aromatic amino group showed very low binding affinity for amyloid aggregates. In contrast [(18)F]2-(4'-(methylamino)phenyl)-6-(2-fluoroethoxy)benzothiazole with [(18)F]fluoroethoxy-substitution in 6-position showed excellent amyloid imaging properties with respect to lipophilicity, brain entry and brain clearance in normal SCID mice, amyloid plaque binding affinity and specificity.

  17. Natural cytotoxicity in immunodeficiency diseases: preservation of natural killer activity and the in vivo appearance of radioresistant killing

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, G.F.; Polmar, S.H.; Schacter, B.Z.; Brovall, C.; Hornick, D.L.; Sorensen, R.U.

    1986-01-01

    We studied spontaneous natural killer (NK) cell activity and radiation-resistant NK mediated cytotoxicity in four patients with clinically documented severe combined immune deficiency disease (SCID), and in one subject each with intestinal lymphangiectasia and cartilage-hair hypoplasia. We observed the preservation of spontaneous NK activity in all patients despite the presence of profound B- and T-lymphocytopenia and clinical immunodeficiency. NK activity was associated with relatively normal circulating numbers of OKM1+ lymphocytes, a population known to contain NK effectors. Spontaneous NK activity resistant to 3000 rad was increased in all patients, indicating the presence of activated natural killer cells in vivo. The concept of a chronically activated immune system in these patients was further supported by the presence of increased Ia positive T cells in all subjects tested, suggesting that radioresistant NK activity may be a useful parameter to measure when assessing in vivo immune activation. Our data, as well as that of others, supports the hypothesis that at least one population of NK cells is a distinct lineage arising at the differentiation level of myeloid and lymphoid stem cells in the bone marrow.

  18. Previous hospital admissions and disease severity predict the use of antipsychotic combination treatment in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although not recommended in treatment guidelines, previous studies have shown a frequent use of more than one antipsychotic agent among patients with schizophrenia. The main aims of the present study were to explore the antipsychotic treatment regimen among patients with schizophrenia in a catchment area-based sample and to investigate clinical characteristics associated with antipsychotic combination treatment. Methods The study included 329 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia using antipsychotic medication. Patients were recruited from all psychiatric hospitals in Oslo. Diagnoses were obtained by use of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I disorders (SCID-I). Additionally, Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF), Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and number of hospitalisations and pharmacological treatment were assessed. Results Multiple hospital admissions, low GAF scores and high PANSS scores, were significantly associated with the prescription of combination treatment with two or more antipsychotics. The use of combination treatment increased significantly from the second hospital admission. Combination therapy was not significantly associated with age or gender. Regression models confirmed that an increasing number of hospital admission was the strongest predictor of the use of two or more antipsychotics. Conclusions Previous hospital admissions and disease severity measured by high PANSS scores and low GAF scores, predict the use of antipsychotic combination treatment in patients with schizophrenia. Future studies should further explore the use of antipsychotic drug treatment in clinical practice and partly based on such data establish more robust treatment guidelines for patients with persistently high symptom load. PMID:21812996

  19. Newborn Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Activities Importance of Newborn Screening Newborn Screening and Molecular Biology Branch Pulse Oximetry Screening for CCHDs Sickle Cell Disease Laboratory SCID Quality Assurance Training and Resources ...

  20. Skin Diseases: Skin Health and Skin Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Skin Health and Skin Diseases Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents ... acne to wrinkles Did you know that your skin is the largest organ of your body? It ...

  1. Species-Specific Metastasis of Human Tumor Cells in the Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Mouse Engrafted with Human Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtivelman, Emma; Namikawa, Reiko

    1995-05-01

    We have attempted to model human metastatic disease by implanting human target organs into the immunodeficient C.B-17 scid/scid (severe combined immunodeficiency; SCID) mouse, creating SCID-hu mice. Preferential metastasis to implants of human fetal lung and human fetal bone marrow occurred after i.v. injection of human small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cells into SCID-hu mice; the homologous mouse organs were spared. Clinically more aggressive variant SCLC cells metastasized more efficiently to human fetal lung implants than did cells from classic SCLC. Metastasis of variant SCLC to human fetal bone marrow was enhanced in SCID-hu mice exposed to γ-irradiation or to interleukin 1α. These data indicate that the SCID-hu mice may provide a model in which to study species- and tissue-specific steps of the human metastatic process.

  2. Occurrence of Crohn's disease with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Shinsuke; Curry, Sadie E; Kennelly, Kathleen D; Tacik, Pawel; Heckman, Michael G; Tsuboi, Yoshio; Strongosky, Audrey J; van Gerpen, Jay A; Uitti, Ryan J; Ross, Owen A; Ikezu, Tsuneya; Wszolek, Zbigniew K

    2017-02-10

    We retrospectively investigated the co-occurrence of Crohn's disease in a cohort of 876 patients with Parkinson's disease, based on the observation that LRRK2 is a shared genetic risk factor. We identified 2 patients with Crohn's disease; this number was consistent with the number of cases expected in the general population.

  3. Alzheimer's Disease: The Death of the Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBroom, Lynn W.

    1987-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease, a form of dementia in middle-age and older adults is becoming more evident because of growing numbers of older people and better diagnosis and detection methods. Describes the behavioral and physical symptoms of the disease as well as specific suggestions for care of patients with Alzheimer's disease, including dealing with…

  4. Tay-Sachs Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Tay-Sachs disease is a rare, inherited disease. It is a type of lipid metabolism disorder. It causes too ... cells, causing mental and physical problems. . Infants with Tay-Sachs disease appear to develop normally for the first few ...

  5. Anemia of chronic disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease Long-term infections, such as bacterial endocarditis, osteomyelitis (bone infection), HIV/AIDS , hepatitis B or hepatitis ... disease Crohn disease Erythropoietin test Juvenile idiopathic arthritis Osteomyelitis Rheumatic fever Ulcerative colitis Review Date 2/1/ ...

  6. Mitochondrial Disease: Possible Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Instagram Email Menu Understanding Mitochondrial Disease What is Mito? What is Mitochondrial Disease? Types of Mitochondrial Disease ... Program Frequently Asked Questions Newly Diagnosed Treatments & Therapies Mito 101 MitoFIRST Handbook Current Clinical Trials & Studies Community ...

  7. Understanding cardiovascular disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... system. Some people are born with an arrhythmia. Heart valve diseases occur when one of the four valves in ... heart attack, heart disease, or infection, can cause heart valve diseases. Some people are born with heart valve problems. ...

  8. Pediatric Celiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition Nurses Print Share Celiac Disease Many kids have sensitivities to certain foods, ... protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. Pediatric Celiac Disease If your child has celiac disease, consuming ...

  9. Gum (Periodontal) Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Gum (Periodontal) Disease What Is Gum (Periodontal) Disease? An Infection of the Gums and Surrounding Tissues Gum (periodontal) disease is an infection of the gums and surrounding ...

  10. Paget's Disease of Bone

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Paget's Disease of Bone What is Paget's Disease of Bone? Click for more information Enlarged and Misshapen Bones Paget's disease of bone causes affected bones to ...

  11. Tay-Sachs disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001417.htm Tay-Sachs disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Tay-Sachs disease is a life-threatening disease of the nervous ...

  12. Treatment for Celiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease How do doctors treat celiac disease? A gluten-free diet Doctors treat celiac disease with a ... absorb nutrients from food into the bloodstream normally. Gluten-free diet and dermatitis herpetiformis If you have ...

  13. Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... work? How does inflammatory bowel disease interfere with digestion? Who gets inflammatory bowel disease? How is inflammatory ... top How does inflammatory bowel disease interfere with digestion? When the small intestine becomes inflamed, as in ...

  14. Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes Updated:Nov 4,2016 The following statistics speak ... disease. This content was last reviewed August 2015. Diabetes • Home • About Diabetes • Why Diabetes Matters Introduction Cardiovascular ...

  15. Parkinson disease - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Your doctor has told you that you have Parkinson disease . This disease affects the brain and leads ... have you take different medicines to treat your Parkinson disease and many of the problems that may ...

  16. What's Mad Cow Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Happens in the Operating Room? What's Mad Cow Disease? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's Mad Cow Disease? A A A You might have heard news reports about mad cow disease and wondered: What the heck is that? ...

  17. Ebola Virus Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fact files Questions & answers Features Multimedia Contacts Ebola virus disease Fact sheet Updated January 2016 Key facts ... survivors of Ebola virus disease Symptoms of Ebola virus disease The incubation period, that is, the time ...

  18. Penile Curvature (Peyronie's Disease)

    MedlinePlus

    ... autoimmune diseases associated with Peyronie’s disease affect connective tissues. Connective tissue is specialized tissue that supports, joins, or ... penis are more likely to develop Peyronie’s disease. Connective Tissue and Autoimmune Disorders Men who have certain connective ...

  19. Lyme disease (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Lyme disease is an acute inflammatory disease characterized by skin changes, joint inflammation and symptoms similar to the ... that is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi . Lyme disease is transmitted by the bite of a deer ...

  20. What Is Crohn's Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What are Crohn's & Colitis? > What is Crohn’s Disease? Crohn’s Disease is a Chronic Condition By understanding your ... live a full and rewarding life What is Crohn’s Disease? Email Print + Share Named after Dr. Burrill ...