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Sample records for immunoglobulin gene regions

  1. Immunoglobulin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Honjo, T. ); Alt, F.W. . Hudson Labs.); Rabbitts, T.H. )

    1989-01-01

    This book reports on the structure, function, and expression of the genes encoding antibodies in normal and neoplastic cells. Topics covered are: B Cells; Organization and rearrangement of immunoglobin genes; Immunoglobin genes in disease; Immunoglobin gene expression; and Immunoglobin-related genes.

  2. The human VK locus. Characterization of a duplicated region encoding 28 different immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Straubinger, B; Huber, E; Lorenz, W; Osterholzer, E; Pargent, W; Pech, M; Pohlenz, H D; Zimmer, F J; Zachau, H G

    1988-01-05

    Two large regions of the human multigene family coding for the variable parts of the immunoglobulin light chains of the K type (VK) have been characterized on cosmid clones. The two germline regions, called Aa and Ab, span together 250,000 base-pairs and comprise 28 different VK gene segments, nine of which have been sequenced. There is a preponderance of VKII genes but genes belonging to subgroups I and III, and genes that cannot be easily assigned to one of the known subgroups, are interspersed within the VKII gene clusters. A number of pseudogenes have been identified. Within the Aa and Ab regions, all gene segments are organized in the same transcriptional orientation. The regions Aa and Ab, whose restriction maps are highly homologous, were shown not to be allelic structures; they must have arisen by a duplication event. Taken together with previous results, one can conclude that the major part of the VK locus exists in duplicated form. One individual has been found who has only one copy of some of the duplicated regions. By chromosomal walking, the A regions could be linked to the O regions, an analysis of which has been reported. The A regions contribute about one-third of the VK genes so far identified.

  3. Stochastic rearrangement of immunoglobulin variable-region genes in chicken B-cell development.

    PubMed

    Benatar, T; Tkalec, L; Ratcliffe, M J

    1992-08-15

    The molecular mechanism by which immunoglobulin (Ig) gene rearrangement occurs is highly conserved between mammalian and avian species. However, in avian species, an equivalent to the mammalian pre-B cell, which has undergone Ig heavy-chain gene rearrangement and expresses mu heavy chains in the absence of Ig light-chain rearrangement, has not been convincingly demonstrated. It is consequently unclear whether an ordered progression of gene rearrangement events leading to functional Ig expression occurs in avian species. To examine the sequence of Ig gene rearrangement events in chicken B-cell development, we transformed day 12 embryo bursal cells with the REV-T(CSV) retrovirus. More than 100 clones were analyzed by Southern blotting and polymerase chain reaction for the presence of Ig gene rearrangements. The majority of these clones contained only germline Ig sequences. Several clones contained complete heavy- and light-chain rearrangements and 13 clones contained only heavy-chain rearrangements analogous to stages of mammalian B-cell development. However, 5 clones contained rearrangements of light-chain genes in the absence of complete heavy-chain rearrangement. Consequently, we conclude that rearrangement of chicken Ig light-chain genes does not require heavy-chain variable-region rearrangement. This observation suggests that chicken Ig gene rearrangement events required for Ig expression occur stochastically rather than sequentially.

  4. Complete structure and organization of immunoglobulin heavy chain constant region genes in a phylogenetically primitive vertebrate.

    PubMed Central

    Kokubu, F; Hinds, K; Litman, R; Shamblott, M J; Litman, G W

    1988-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) gene organization in Heterodontus francisci (horned shark), a phylogenetically primitive vertebrate, is unique. Homologous Ig heavy chain variable (VH) and constant region (CH) specific probes were used to screen a spleen cDNA library constructed in lambda gt11. Both secretory (SEC) and transmembrane (TM) cDNA clones were recovered; the latter were identified by a negative selection strategy. The complete sequence of the CH portion of a Heterodontus genomic DNA-lambda clone also was determined. The sequences of the individual CH genes differ from each other in all exons. When compared to mammalian prototypes, similarities in exon and intron organization as well as conservation of sequences involved with differential splicing of SEC and TM mRNA indicate that Heterodontus heavy chain genes are of the mu type, although intron lengths are uniformly longer in Heterodontus. Heterodontus genes are not associated, however, with the family of DNA sequences that have been implicated in heavy chain class switching in mammals. Spleen cDNA library screening and RNA blot analyses indicate that mRNAs encoding TM Ig are exceedingly rare. The relationship between this quantitative difference and the distribution of polyadenylation signal sequences suggests that regulation of Ig gene expression in Heterodontus may be highly dependent on position effects. Images PMID:3138109

  5. Complete structure and organization of immunoglobulin heavy chain constant region genes in a phylogenetically primitive vertebrate.

    PubMed

    Kokubu, F; Hinds, K; Litman, R; Shamblott, M J; Litman, G W

    1988-07-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) gene organization in Heterodontus francisci (horned shark), a phylogenetically primitive vertebrate, is unique. Homologous Ig heavy chain variable (VH) and constant region (CH) specific probes were used to screen a spleen cDNA library constructed in lambda gt11. Both secretory (SEC) and transmembrane (TM) cDNA clones were recovered; the latter were identified by a negative selection strategy. The complete sequence of the CH portion of a Heterodontus genomic DNA-lambda clone also was determined. The sequences of the individual CH genes differ from each other in all exons. When compared to mammalian prototypes, similarities in exon and intron organization as well as conservation of sequences involved with differential splicing of SEC and TM mRNA indicate that Heterodontus heavy chain genes are of the mu type, although intron lengths are uniformly longer in Heterodontus. Heterodontus genes are not associated, however, with the family of DNA sequences that have been implicated in heavy chain class switching in mammals. Spleen cDNA library screening and RNA blot analyses indicate that mRNAs encoding TM Ig are exceedingly rare. The relationship between this quantitative difference and the distribution of polyadenylation signal sequences suggests that regulation of Ig gene expression in Heterodontus may be highly dependent on position effects.

  6. Evidence for gene conversion among immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region genes.

    PubMed

    Clarke, S H; Rudikoff, S

    1984-03-01

    We have previously reported that the VH region amino acid sequence of a phosphocholine (PC)-binding hybridoma antibody of CBA/J origin, HP101 6G6 (6G6), differs extensively from the VH regions of other PC-binding antibodies. The sequence of 6G6 VH appears to be derived from a gene homologous to the BALB/c V11 gene, a member of the PC VH (T15 VH) gene family not normally used to encode PC-binding antibodies. The 6G6 VH sequence differs from the translated sequence of V11 by six amino acids, four of which occur at the same position in other members of this gene family. This coincidence led to the proposal that the 6G6 VH gene was derived by gene conversion involving three genes of the PC VH gene family. We report here the nucleic acid sequence of the rearranged VH gene of hybridoma 6G6. This sequence supports our previous suggestion of gene conversion by confirming those differences, relative to the BALB/c V11 gene sequence, that are encoded by other members of this gene family, and extends this correlation to include three silent base pair substitutions as well. In addition, 5' noncoding region sequence and Southern blot analysis using probes derived from the coding and 5' noncoding regions confirm that the 6G6 VH gene is likely to be derived from the V11 homologue in CBA/J mice, and suggest that all three genes believed to be involved in the generation of the 6G6 VH gene are present in the CBA/J genome, a prerequisite for their involvement in gene conversion.

  7. Immunoglobulin variable-region gene mutational lineage tree analysis: application to autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Steiman-Shimony, Avital; Edelman, Hanna; Barak, Michal; Shahaf, Gitit; Dunn-Walters, Deborah; Stott, David I; Abraham, Roshini S; Mehr, Ramit

    2006-04-01

    Lineage trees have frequently been drawn to illustrate diversification, via somatic hypermutation (SHM), of immunoglobulin variable-region (IGV) genes. In order to extract more information from IGV sequences, we developed a novel mathematical method for analyzing the graphical properties of IgV gene lineage trees, allowing quantification of the differences between the dynamics of SHM and antigen-driven selection in different lymphoid tissues, species, and disease situations. Here, we investigated trees generated from published IGV sequence data from B cell clones participating in autoimmune responses in patients with Myasthenia Gravis (MG), Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), and Sjögren's Syndrome (SS). At present, as no standards exist for cell sampling and sequence extraction methods, data obtained by different research groups from two studies of the same disease often vary considerably. Nevertheless, based on comparisons of data groups within individual studies, we show here that lineage trees from different individual patients are often similar and can be grouped together, as can trees from two different tissues in the same patient, and even from IgG- and IgA-expressing B cell clones. Additionally, lineage trees from most studies reflect the chronic character of autoimmune diseases.

  8. Equine immunoglobulins and organization of immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Walther, Stefanie; Rusitzka, Tamara V; Diesterbeck, Ulrike S; Czerny, Claus-Peter

    2015-12-01

    Our understanding of how equine immunoglobulin genes are organized has increased significantly in recent years. For equine heavy chains, 52 IGHV, 40 IGHD, 8 IGHJ and 11 IGHC are present. Seven of these IGHCs are gamma chain genes. Sequence diversity is increasing between fetal, neonatal, foal and adult age. The kappa light chain contains 60 IGKV, 5 IGKJ and 1 IGKC, whereas there are 144 IGLV, 7 IGLJ, and 7 IGLC for the lambda light chain, which is expressed predominantly in horses. Significant transcriptional differences for IGLV and IGLC are identified in different breeds. Allotypic and allelic variants are observed for IGLC1, IGLC5, and IGLC6/7, and two IGLV pseudogenes are also transcribed. During age development, a decrease in IGLVs is noted, although nucleotide diversity and significant differences in gene usage increased. The following paper suggests a standardization of the existing nomenclature of immunoglobulin genes.

  9. Extensive families of constant region genes in a phylogenetically primitive vertebrate indicate an additional level of immunoglobulin complexity.

    PubMed Central

    Kokubu, F; Hinds, K; Litman, R; Shamblott, M J; Litman, G W

    1987-01-01

    A homologous probe for the constant region of the Heterodontus francisci (horned shark) immunoglobulin heavy chain was used to screen a genomic DNA library constructed in bacteriophage lambda, and a large number of independent clones were recovered. Their hybridization patterns with segment-specific probes are consistent with the close linkage of heavy-chain constant (CH), joining (JH), and variable (VH) gene segments. Differences in the nucleotide sequences of the first CH exon of five genes primarily are localized to 5' positions; extended regions of sequence identity are noted at 3' positions. The predicted amino acid sequences of each gene are different and are related distantly to the corresponding regions of higher vertebrate immunoglobulins. Gene-specific oligodeoxynucleotide probes were used to establish that at least three of the five genes are transcriptionally active. Quantitative gene titration data are consistent with the large numbers of genes suggested by the library screening analyses. In this representative early vertebrate, it appears that (VH-diversity-JH) segments are associated with individual constant region genes that can differ at the predicted protein level. Images PMID:3475706

  10. Immunoglobulin genes of the turtles.

    PubMed

    Magadán-Mompó, Susana; Sánchez-Espinel, Christian; Gambón-Deza, Francisco

    2013-03-01

    The availability of reptile genomes for the use of the scientific community is an exceptional opportunity to study the evolution of immunoglobulin genes. The genome of Chrysemys picta bellii and Pelodiscus sinensis is the first one that has been reported for turtles. The scanning for immunoglobulin genes resulted in the presence of a complex locus for the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH). This IGH locus in both turtles contains genes for 13 isotypes in C. picta bellii and 17 in P. sinensis. These correspond with one immunoglobulin M, one immunoglobulin D, several immunoglobulins Y (six in C. picta bellii and eight in P. sinensis), and several immunoglobulins that are similar to immunoglobulin D2 (five in C. picta belli and seven in P. sinensis) that was previously described in Eublepharis macularius. It is worthy to note that IGHD2 are placed in an inverted transcriptional orientation and present sequences for two immunoglobulin domains that are similar to bird IgA domains. Furthermore, its phylogenetic analysis allows us to consider about the presence of IGHA gene in a primitive reptile, so we would be dealing with the memory of the gene that originated from the bird IGHA. In summary, we provide a clear picture of the immunoglobulins present in a turtle, whose analysis supports the idea that turtles emerged from the evolutionary line from the differentiation of birds and the presence of the IGHA gene present in a common ancestor.

  11. A large section of the gene locus encoding human immunoglobulin variable regions of the kappa type is duplicated.

    PubMed

    Pech, M; Smola, H; Pohlenz, H D; Straubinger, B; Gerl, R; Zachau, H G

    1985-06-05

    The structure of a new segment of the gene locus encoding the variable regions of human immunoglobulins of the Kappa type (VK) has been elucidated. This segment (cluster B) encompasses six VK sequences, which belong to three different subgroups and which are arranged in the same transcriptional orientation. Part of cluster B was found to be very similar to another region of the VK gene locus, which was cloned previously (cluster A). Sequence differences between the homologous region of clusters A and B range from 0.2% to 3.7% depending on the position of the VK sequences. The divergence is in the same range for genes and pseudogenes. Hybridization experiments with DNAs from different individuals clearly demonstrate that the two segments are located at different positions within the VK locus and do not represent allelic variants. The sequence homology between clusters A and B is higher than the homology of both clusters to an allelic variant, which is represented by a DNA segment that had been isolated from another individual. These results, together with a report in the literature of two other homologous regions in the VK locus, make it very likely that a major part of even the whole locus is duplicated. In this case, VK gene numbers would be higher than previously estimated on the basis of hybridization studies. An inverse orientation of VK gene clusters would explain published data on rearrangement products in B-cells if an inversion-deletion mechanism is assumed.

  12. Recombination events near the immunoglobulin Cmu gene join variable and constant region genes, switch heavy-chain expression, or inactivate the locus.

    PubMed

    Cory, S; Webb, E; Gough, J; Adams, J M

    1981-04-28

    Immunoglobulin heavy-chain expression is initiated by recombination between a variable region (VH) gene and one of several joining region (JH) genes located near the mu constant region (Cmu) gene, and the active VH gene can subsequently switch to another CH gene. That the general mechanism for CH switching involves recombination between sites within the JH-Cmu intervening sequence and the 5' flanking region of another CH gene is supported here by Southern blot hybridization analysis of eight IgG- and IgA-secreting plasmacytomas. An alternative model requiring successive VH linkage to similar JH clusters near each CH gene is shown to be very unlikely since the mouse genome appears to contain only one complement of the JH locus and no JH gene was detectable within large cloned sequences flanking germline C gamma 3 and C gamma 1 genes. Thus, VH-JH joining and CH switching are mediated by separate regions of "the joining-switch" or J-S element. In each plasmacytoma examined, the J-S element had undergone recombination within both the JH locus and the switch region and was shown to be linked to the functional CH gene in an IgG3, and IgG1, and three IgA secretors. Both JH joining and CH switching occurred by deletion of DNA. Switch recombination occurred at more than one site within the J-S element in different lines, even for recombination with the same CH gene. Significantly, although heavy-chain expression is restricted to one allele ("allelic exclusion"), all rearranged in each plasmacytoma. Some rearrangements were aberrant, involving, for example, deletion of all JH genes from the allele. Hence, an error-prone recombination machinery may account for allelic exclusion in many plasmacytomas.

  13. Functional Versatility of AGY Serine Codons in Immunoglobulin Variable Region Genes

    PubMed Central

    Detanico, Thiago; Phillips, Matthew; Wysocki, Lawrence J.

    2016-01-01

    In systemic autoimmunity, autoantibodies directed against nuclear antigens (Ags) often arise by somatic hypermutation (SHM) that converts AGT and AGC (AGY) Ser codons into Arg codons. This can occur by three different single-base changes. Curiously, AGY Ser codons are far more abundant in complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) of IgV-region genes than expected for random codon use or from species-specific codon frequency data. CDR AGY codons are also more abundant than TCN Ser codons. We show that these trends hold even in cartilaginous fishes. Because AGC is a preferred target for SHM by activation-induced cytidine deaminase, we asked whether the AGY abundance was solely due to a selection pressure to conserve high mutability in CDRs regardless of codon context but found that this was not the case. Instead, AGY triplets were selectively enriched in the Ser codon reading frame. Motivated by reports implicating a functional role for poly/autoreactive specificities in antiviral antibodies, we also analyzed mutations at AGY in antibodies directed against a number of different viruses and found that mutations producing Arg codons in antiviral antibodies were indeed frequent. Unexpectedly, however, we also found that AGY codons mutated often to encode nearly all of the amino acids that are reported to provide the most frequent contacts with Ag. In many cases, mutations producing codons for these alternative amino acids in antiviral antibodies were more frequent than those producing Arg codons. Mutations producing each of these key amino acids required only single-base changes in AGY. AGY is the only codon group in which two-thirds of random mutations generate codons for these key residues. Finally, by directly analyzing X-ray structures of immune complexes from the RCSB protein database, we found that Ag-contact residues generated via SHM occurred more often at AGY than at any other codon group. Thus, preservation of AGY codons in antibody genes appears to have been

  14. An experimental approach to enumerate the genes coding for immunoglobulin variable-regions.

    PubMed Central

    Zeelon, E P; Bothwell, A L; Kantor, F; Schechter, I

    1981-01-01

    Critical to our understanding of the immune system diversity is the determination of the number of germ line V genes. The total number of V genes is given by the product: number of subgroups x number of germ line genes per subgroup. Studies of kappa chains and of embryonic DNA indicate 5-10 V genes per subgroup. Statistical analysis of the limited sequence data of mouse kappa chains suggest about 50 V kappa subgroups. We report here a general approach for direct estimation of the number of VL and VH subgroups expressed in normal spleen, and present data for V kappa. The kappa mRNA of the spleen is a heterogeneous population where different V kappa are linked to the same C kappa, i.e. C kappa equals total V kappa. The ratio C kappa/distinct V kappa approximates the number of subgroups since V kappa of the same subgroup cross hybridize while V kappa of different subgroups do not. This ratio was determined by molecular hybridization of cloned C kappa and V kappa DNA probes with spleen mRNA. The results indicate the expression of 280 V kappa subgroups in mouse. Assuming an average of 7 genes per subgroup, we estimate about 2000 V kappa germ line genes. Images PMID:6169011

  15. Interaction between T cell receptor beta chain and immunoglobulin heavy chain region genes in susceptibility to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Field, L L; Stephure, D K; McArthur, R G

    1991-09-01

    Despite some reports of an association between insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and a BglII RFLP in the T cell receptor beta chain (TCRB) constant region, results of several recent studies, including our own, have failed to support such an association. However, we here report evidence for an IDDM-TCRB relationship which is dependent on immunoglobulin heavy-chain-region genes. We analyzed 198 unrelated diabetics and 84 normal siblings (maximum one sibling per diabetic) typed for the BglII TCRB RFLP and Gm immunoglobulin allotypes Glm(1), Glm(2), G2m(23), and G3m(5), which identify the four common Gm haplotypes. The BglIII TCRB genotype frequencies were significantly different between diabetics positive and negative for G2m(23) (P = .017) and G3m(5) (P = .021) but were not different between normal siblings positive and negative for those allotypes (P = .94 and P = .77, respectively). Thus, there were significant interactions between TCRB, Gm, and IDDM for two of the four immunoglobulin allotypes examined. We have previously reported interactions between HLA, Gm (particularly G2m(23)), and IDDM and postulate that the TCRB-Gm-IDDM and HLA-Gm-IDDM interaction effects may be functionally related.

  16. High rate of somatic point mutation in vitro in and near the variable-region segment of an immunoglobulin heavy chain gene.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, J; Jäck, H M; Ellis, N; Wabl, M

    1986-01-01

    The "silent" allele at the immunoglobulin heavy-chain locus in the pre-B-lymphocyte line 18-81 contains a correctly assembled gene. However, an amber termination codon within the variable-region gene segment prematurely terminates translation into complete heavy chain. Revertants that do produce heavy chain are generated at a high rate, which is termed hypermutation. By DNA sequencing of subclones, we have confirmed that whenever mu chain is produced by the usually silent allele, a true reversion is found in the DNA. Mutations are not confined to the position of the amber termination codon but are also found at other sites in and near the variable-region gene segment. Images PMID:3092221

  17. Cloning of a hamster anti-mouse CD79B antibody sequences and identification of a new hamster immunoglobulin lambda constant IGLC gene region

    PubMed Central

    Haggart, Ryan; Perera, Jason; Huang, Haochu

    2013-01-01

    Anti-CD79 antibodies have been effective at targeting B cell lymphoma cells and depleting B cells in animal models. In order to engineer recombinant antibodies with additional effector functions in mice, we cloned and sequenced the full-length cDNAs of the heavy and light chain of a hamster anti-mouse CD79B antibody. Although hamster antibodies represent a unique source of monoclonal antibodies against mouse, rat, and human antigens, sequence information of hamster immunoglobulins (IG) is sparse. Here we report a new hamster (Cricetulus migratorius) IG lambda constant (IGLC) gene region that is most homologous to mouse IGLC2 and IGLC3. PMID:23558558

  18. Recombination events that activate, diversify, and delete immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Leder, P; Max, E E; Seidman, J G; Kwan, S P; Scharff, M; Nau, M; Norman, B

    1981-01-01

    Immunoglobulin kappa light-chain diversity arises, in large part, from an array of germ-line V-region genes that undergo somatic recombination with one of four active J-region segments. The diversity provided by this combinational system is increased by a recombination mechanism that allows variation of crossover points so as to generate additional diversity at a critical region of the light chain. The elaborate mechanism for generating diversity is accompanied not only by considerable waste, in terms of unused V and J regions in a given cell, but also by a range of aberrant recombinants that fail to produce active immunoglobulin genes.

  19. The T suppressor cell alloantigen Tsud maps near immunoglobulin allotype genes and may be an heavy chain constant-region marker on a T cell receptor

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The mouse T cell alloantigen, Tsud, is expressed on a minority of mature, Lyt-2+ cells, and its expression is controlled by a gene linked to the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene cluster, Igh. Tsud can be assayed by immunofluorescence staining with an antiserum made in BALB/c mice against C.AL-20 concanavalin A blasts. This antiserum can also be used to induced T suppressor cells in mice expressing Tsu(d). Both of these assays were used to type several panels of recombinant inbred strains and Igh recombinant strains to accurately map the Tsu(d) locus. The Tsu(d) gene is located very near the heavy chain constant-region genes, Igh-C, on the side toward the prealbumin gene, Pre-1. Tsu(d) is not among the heavy chain variable-region genes, Igh-V, and thus is not a variable-region framework allotype, subgroup determinant, or idiotype. The map position suggest that the Tsu(d) antigen is a constant region allotypic determinant on the as yet uncharacterized T cell receptor. PMID:6454740

  20. Rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) improves the PCR-based isolation of immunoglobulin variable region genes from murine and human lymphoma cells and cell lines.

    PubMed

    Doenecke, A; Winnacker, E L; Hallek, M

    1997-10-01

    The isolation of rearranged immunoglobulin (Ig) variable region (V) genes is usually performed by PCR with consensus primers binding to conserved regions within the V sequences. However, the isolation of Ig genes by this method is hampered in 15-35% by technical difficulties, mostly mismatches of oligonucleotide primers to V sequences. In order to obtain DNA sequences from V heavy chain (VH) genes which could not be amplified with consensus primers, we used a modified PCR technique, the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) PCR in combination with new heavy chain constant region primers for the isolation of human and murine VH genes. In comparison, consensus primer PCR with different sets of previously published oligonucleotide primers was used. Both methods were applied to isolate VH genes from murine B cell lymphoma (A20 and BCL1), myeloma (NS1) and hybridoma (SP6) cell lines and from freshly isolated human chronic lymphocytic leukemia and lymphoma cells. RACE PCR allowed the amplification and subsequent cloning of the complete VH gene in all cases. In contrast, consensus primer PCR failed to isolate the VH sequence of the murine A20 cell line; this was explained by a mismatch of consensus primers with VH sequences. When both PCR methods amplified VH sequences, the DNA sequences obtained were identical. Taken together, RACE PCR represents a reliable and versatile method for the isolation of VH genes from human and murine lymphoma cells, in particular if consensus primer PCR fails.

  1. Mutation Status and Immunoglobulin Gene Rearrangements in Patients from Northwest and Central Region of Spain with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    González-Gascón y Marín, I.; Hernández, J. A.; Martín, A.; Alcoceba, M.; Sarasquete, M. E.; Rodríguez-Vicente, A.; Heras, C.; de las Heras, N.; Fisac, R.; García de Coca, A.; de la Fuente, I.; Hernández-Sánchez, M.; Recio, I.; Galende, J.; Martín-Núñez, G.; Alonso, J. M.; Hernández-Rivas, J. M.; González, M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency and mutation status of the immunoglobulin heavy variable chain (IGHV) in a cohort of 224 patients from northwest and central region of Spain diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), and to correlate it with cytogenetic abnormalities, overall survival (OS) and time to first treatment (TTFT). 125 patients had mutated IGHV, while 99 had unmutated IGHV. The most frequently used IGHV family was IGHV3, followed by IGHV1 and IGHV4. The regions IGHV3-30, IGHV1-69, IGHV3-23, and IGHV4-34 were the most commonly used. Only 3.1% of the patients belonged to the subfamily IGHV3-21 and we failed to demonstrate a worse clinical outcome in this subgroup. The IGHV4 family appeared more frequently with mutated pattern, similar to IGHV3-23 and IGHV3-74. By contrast, IGHV1-69 was expressed at a higher frequency in unmutated CLL patients. All the cases from IGHV3-11 and almost all from IGHV5-51 subfamily belonged to the group of unmutated CLL. PMID:24790994

  2. Mutation status and immunoglobulin gene rearrangements in patients from northwest and central region of Spain with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    González-Gascón Y Marín, I; Hernández, J A; Martín, A; Alcoceba, M; Sarasquete, M E; Rodríguez-Vicente, A; Heras, C; de Las Heras, N; Fisac, R; García de Coca, A; de la Fuente, I; Hernández-Sánchez, M; Recio, I; Galende, J; Martín-Núñez, G; Alonso, J M; Hernández-Rivas, J M; González, M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency and mutation status of the immunoglobulin heavy variable chain (IGHV) in a cohort of 224 patients from northwest and central region of Spain diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), and to correlate it with cytogenetic abnormalities, overall survival (OS) and time to first treatment (TTFT). 125 patients had mutated IGHV, while 99 had unmutated IGHV. The most frequently used IGHV family was IGHV3, followed by IGHV1 and IGHV4. The regions IGHV3-30, IGHV1-69, IGHV3-23, and IGHV4-34 were the most commonly used. Only 3.1% of the patients belonged to the subfamily IGHV3-21 and we failed to demonstrate a worse clinical outcome in this subgroup. The IGHV4 family appeared more frequently with mutated pattern, similar to IGHV3-23 and IGHV3-74. By contrast, IGHV1-69 was expressed at a higher frequency in unmutated CLL patients. All the cases from IGHV3-11 and almost all from IGHV5-51 subfamily belonged to the group of unmutated CLL.

  3. Characterization of a complete immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable region germ-line gene of rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, T; Chen, T; Törmänen, V

    1990-10-01

    A germ-line heavy-chain variable region (VH) gene (RTVH431) has been isolated from a rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) and characterized by complete nucleotide sequencing. It is characteristic of VH, as shown by the conserved octamer and TATA motif in the 5' region, the heptamernonamer recombination signal sequence in the 3' region, and the 18-amino-acid-long hydrophobic leader interrupted by an intron. The 98-amino-acid-long VH coding region has 50-70% nucleotide sequence homology and 40-60% amino acid sequence homology with VHS of various vertebrate species. We have also found unique or species-specific amino acid residues in the VHS of rainbow trout, amphibia (Xenopus), reptile (Caiman), and shark (Heterodontus) in our sequence analyses. The RTVH431 has an unusual amino acid in the conserved 34th position in complementarity-determining region 1 of VH. Southern hybridization results suggest the presence of a large gene family related to RTVH431 in the trout genome. The complex evolution of antibody V genes is discussed.

  4. Characterization of a complete immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable region germ-line gene of rainbow trout.

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, T; Chen, T; Törmänen, V

    1990-01-01

    A germ-line heavy-chain variable region (VH) gene (RTVH431) has been isolated from a rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) and characterized by complete nucleotide sequencing. It is characteristic of VH, as shown by the conserved octamer and TATA motif in the 5' region, the heptamernonamer recombination signal sequence in the 3' region, and the 18-amino-acid-long hydrophobic leader interrupted by an intron. The 98-amino-acid-long VH coding region has 50-70% nucleotide sequence homology and 40-60% amino acid sequence homology with VHS of various vertebrate species. We have also found unique or species-specific amino acid residues in the VHS of rainbow trout, amphibia (Xenopus), reptile (Caiman), and shark (Heterodontus) in our sequence analyses. The RTVH431 has an unusual amino acid in the conserved 34th position in complementarity-determining region 1 of VH. Southern hybridization results suggest the presence of a large gene family related to RTVH431 in the trout genome. The complex evolution of antibody V genes is discussed. Images PMID:2120708

  5. Complete nucleotide sequence of primitive vertebrate immunoglobulin light chain genes.

    PubMed Central

    Shamblott, M J; Litman, G W

    1989-01-01

    Antibody to Heterodontus francisci (horned shark) immunoglobulin light chain was used to screen a spleen cDNA expression library, and recombinant clones encoding light chain genes were isolated. The complete sequences of the mature coding regions of two light chain genes in this phylogenetically distant vertebrate have been determined and are reported here. Comparisons of the sequences are consistent with the presence of mammalian-like framework and complementarity-determining regions. The predicted amino acid sequences of the genes are more related to mammalian lambda than to kappa light chains. The nucleotide sequences of the genes are most related to mammalian T-cell antigen receptor beta chain. Heterodontus light chain genes may reflect characteristics of the common ancestor of immunoglobulin and T-cell antigen receptors before its evolutionary diversification. PMID:2499889

  6. Complete nucleotide sequence of primitive vertebrate immunoglobulin light chain genes.

    PubMed

    Shamblott, M J; Litman, G W

    1989-06-01

    Antibody to Heterodontus francisci (horned shark) immunoglobulin light chain was used to screen a spleen cDNA expression library, and recombinant clones encoding light chain genes were isolated. The complete sequences of the mature coding regions of two light chain genes in this phylogenetically distant vertebrate have been determined and are reported here. Comparisons of the sequences are consistent with the presence of mammalian-like framework and complementarity-determining regions. The predicted amino acid sequences of the genes are more related to mammalian lambda than to kappa light chains. The nucleotide sequences of the genes are most related to mammalian T-cell antigen receptor beta chain. Heterodontus light chain genes may reflect characteristics of the common ancestor of immunoglobulin and T-cell antigen receptors before its evolutionary diversification.

  7. Restricted immunoglobulin variable region gene usage by normal Ly-1 (CD5+) B cells that recognize phosphatidyl choline

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    5-15% of lymphocytes in the peritoneums of normal adult B10.H-2aH- 4bp/Wts (2a4b) mice are CD5+ (Ly-1) B cells that recognize phosphatidyl choline (PtC), a phospholipid component of all mammalian cells. We produced a set of IgM-secreting hybridomas from the peritoneal cells of normal, adult 2a4b mice. We found that this set of hybridomas shows a similarly high frequency of antibodies specific for PtC (21 of 86) that also react with bromelain-treated mouse erythrocytes. Restriction fragment analysis of Ig gene rearrangements and analysis of expressed Ig idiotypes reveal that these cells use a restricted set of variable region genes to generate the PtC-specific antibodies. The Ig genes used by the PtC-specific hybridomas appear to be the same as those found in the PtC-specific Ly-1 B cell lymphomas, CH27 and CH34. PMID:2499651

  8. Molecular analysis of the immunoglobulin genes in goose.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tian; Wu, Kun; Yuan, Xiaoli; Shao, Shuai; Wang, WenYuan; Wei, Si; Cao, Gengsheng

    2016-07-01

    Immunoglobulins play an important role in adaptive immune system as defense molecules against pathogens. However, our knowledge on avian immunoglobulin genes has been limited to a few species. In this study, we analyzed goose (Anser cygnoides orientalis) immunoglobulin genes. Three IgH classes including IgM, IgA, IgY and λ light chain were identified. The IgM and IgA heavy chain constant regions are characteristically similar to their counterparts described in other vertebrates. In addition to the classic Ig isotypes, we also detected a transcript that encoded a truncated form of IgY (IgY(ΔFc)) in goose. Similar to duck, the IgY(ΔFc) in goose was generated by using different transcriptional termination signal of the same υ gene. Limited variability and only one leader peptide were observed in VH and VL domains, which suggested that gene conversion was the primary mechanism involved in goose antibody diversity. Our study provides more insights into the immunoglobulin genes in goose that had not been fully explored before. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Genomic variation in the porcine immunoglobulin lambda variable region

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xi; Schwartz, John C.; Murtaugh, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Production of a vast antibody repertoire is essential for protection against pathogens. Variable region germline complexity contributes to repertoire diversity and is a standard feature of mammalian immunoglobulin loci, but functional V region genes are limited in swine. For example, the porcine lambda light chain locus is composed of 23 variable (V) genes and 4 joining (J) genes, but only 10 or 11 V and 2 J genes are functional. Allelic variation in V and J may increase overall diversity within a population, yet lead to repertoire holes in individuals lacking key alleles. Previous studies focused on heavy chain genetic variation, thus light chain allelic diversity is not known. We characterized allelic variation of the porcine immunoglobulin lambda variable (IGLV) region genes. All intact IGLV genes in 81 pigs were amplified, sequenced, and analyzed to determine their allelic variation and functionality. We observed mutational variation across the entire length of the IGLV genes, in both framework and complementarity determining regions (CDRs). Three recombination hotspots were also identified, suggesting that non-allelic homologous recombination is an evolutionarily alternative mechanism for generating germline antibody diversity. Functional alleles were greatest in the most highly expressed families, IGLV3 and IGLV8. At the population level, allelic variation appears to help maintain the potential for broad antibody repertoire diversity in spite of reduced gene segment choices and limited germline sequence modification. The trade-off may be a reduction in repertoire diversity within individuals that could result in increased variation in immunity to infectious disease and response to vaccination. PMID:26791019

  10. Genomic variation in the porcine immunoglobulin lambda variable region.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xi; Schwartz, John C; Murtaugh, Michael P

    2016-04-01

    Production of a vast antibody repertoire is essential for the protection against pathogens. Variable region germline complexity contributes to repertoire diversity and is a standard feature of mammalian immunoglobulin loci, but functional V region genes are limited in swine. For example, the porcine lambda light chain locus is composed of 23 variable (V) genes and 4 joining (J) genes, but only 10 or 11 V and 2 J genes are functional. Allelic variation in V and J may increase overall diversity within a population, yet lead to repertoire holes in individuals lacking key alleles. Previous studies focused on heavy chain genetic variation, thus light chain allelic diversity is not known. We characterized allelic variation of the porcine immunoglobulin lambda variable (IGLV) region genes. All intact IGLV genes in 81 pigs were amplified, sequenced, and analyzed to determine their allelic variation and functionality. We observed mutational variation across the entire length of the IGLV genes, in both framework and complementarity determining regions (CDRs). Three recombination hotspot motifs were also identified suggesting that non-allelic homologous recombination is an evolutionarily alternative mechanism for generating germline antibody diversity. Functional alleles were greatest in the most highly expressed families, IGLV3 and IGLV8. At the population level, allelic variation appears to help maintain the potential for broad antibody repertoire diversity in spite of reduced gene segment choices and limited germline sequence modification. The trade-off may be a reduction in repertoire diversity within individuals that could result in an increased variation in immunity to infectious disease and response to vaccination.

  11. Characterization of a lymphoblastoid line deleted for lambda immunoglobulin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Hough, C.A., White, B.N., Holden, J.A.

    1995-04-01

    While characterizing the cat eye syndrome (CES) supernumerary chromosome for the presence of {lambda} immunoglobulin gene region sequences, a lymphoblastoid cell line from one CES patient was identified in which there was selection of cells deleted from some IGLC and IGLV genes. Two distinct deletions, one on each chromosome 22, were identified, presumably arising from independent somatic recombination events occurring during B-lymphocyte differentiation. The extent of the deleted regions was determined using probes from the various IGLV subgroups and they each covered at least 82 kilobases. The precise definition of the deletions was not possible because of conservation of some restriction sites in the IGLV region. The cell line was used to map putative IGLV genes within the recombinant phage {lambda}V{lambda}135 to the distal part of the IGLV gene region. 35 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Genomic organization and sequences of immunoglobulin light chain genes in a primitive vertebrate suggest coevolution of immunoglobulin gene organization.

    PubMed Central

    Shamblott, M J; Litman, G W

    1989-01-01

    The genomic organization and sequence of immunoglobulin light chain genes in Heterodontus francisci (horned shark), a phylogenetically primitive vertebrate, have been characterized. Light chain variable (VL) and joining (JI) segments are separated by 380 nucleotides and together with the single constant region exon (CI), occupy less than 2.7 kb, the closest linkage described thus far for a rearranging gene system. The VL segment is flanked by a characteristic recombination signal sequence possessing a 12 nucleotide spacer; the recombination signal sequence flanking the JL segment is 23 nucleotides. The VL genes, unlike heavy chain genes, possess a typical upstream regulatory octamer as well as conserved enhancer core sequences in the intervening sequence separating JL and CL. Restriction mapping and genomic Southern blotting are consistent with the presence of multiple light chain gene clusters. There appear to be considerably fewer light than heavy chain genes. Heavy and light chain clusters show no evidence of genomic linkage using field inversion gel electrophoresis. The findings of major differences in the organization and functional rearrangement properties of immunoglobulin genes in species representing different levels of vertebrate evolution, but consistent similarity in the organization of heavy and light chain genes within a species, suggests that these systems may be coevolving. Images PMID:2511000

  13. A double-strand break can trigger immunoglobulin gene conversion

    PubMed Central

    Bastianello, Giulia; Arakawa, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    All three B cell-specific activities of the immunoglobulin (Ig) gene re-modeling system—gene conversion, somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination—require activation-induced deaminase (AID). AID-induced DNA lesions must be further processed and dissected into different DNA recombination pathways. In order to characterize potential intermediates for Ig gene conversion, we inserted an I-SceI recognition site into the complementarity determining region 1 (CDR1) of the Ig light chain locus of the AID knockout DT40 cell line, and conditionally expressed I-SceI endonuclease. Here, we show that a double-strand break (DSB) in CDR1 is sufficient to trigger Ig gene conversion in the absence of AID. The pattern and pseudogene usage of DSB-induced gene conversion were comparable to those of AID-induced gene conversion; surprisingly, sometimes a single DSB induced multiple gene conversion events. These constitute direct evidence that a DSB in the V region can be an intermediate for gene conversion. The fate of the DNA lesion downstream of a DSB had more flexibility than that of AID, suggesting two alternative models: (i) DSBs during the physiological gene conversion are in the minority compared to single-strand breaks (SSBs), which are frequently generated following DNA deamination, or (ii) the physiological gene conversion is mediated by a tightly regulated DSB that is locally protected from non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or other non-homologous DNA recombination machineries. PMID:27701075

  14. Immunoglobulin variable region structure and B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Kiyoi, H; Naoe, T

    2001-01-01

    The enormous diversity of immunoglobulin (Ig) variable (V) gene sequences encoding the antibody repertoire are formed by the somatic recombination of relatively few genetic elements. In B-lineage malignancies, Ig gene rearrangements have been widely used for determining clonality and cell origin. The recent development of rapid cloning and sequencing techniques has resulted in a substantial accumulation of IgV region sequences at various stages of B-cell development and has revealed stage-specific trends in the use of V, diversity, joining genes, the degree of noncoding nucleotide addition, and the rate of somatic mutations. Furthermore, sequences from B-lineage malignant cells nearly reflect the characteristics of the normal counterpart at each respective stage of development. Alternatively, from the IgV region structure of the malignant cells, it is possible to speculate at which stage of B-cell development the cells were transformed. As the complete nucleotide sequences of the human Ig heavy and Ig light V region loci have now been determined, the study of Ig genetics has entered into the super-information era.

  15. Enhancer Complexes Located Downstream of Both Human ImmunoglobulinGenes

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Frederick C.; Harindranath, Nagaradona; Mitchell, Mary; Max, Edward E.

    1997-01-01

    To investigate regulation of human immunoglobulin heavy chain expression, we have cloned DNA downstream from the two human Cα genes, corresponding to the position in the mouse IgH cluster of a locus control region (LCR) that includes an enhancer which regulates isotype switching. Within 25 kb downstream of both the human immunoglobulin Cα1 and Cα2 genes we identified several segments of DNA which display B lymphoid–specific DNase I hypersensitivity as well as enhancer activity in transient transfections. The corresponding sequences downstream from each of the two human Cα genes are nearly identical to each other. These enhancers are also homologous to three regions which lie in similar positions downstream from the murine Cα gene and form the murine LCR. The strongest enhancers in both mouse and human have been designated HS12. Within a 135-bp core homology region, the human HS12 enhancers are ∼90% identical to the murine homolog and include several motifs previously demonstrated to be important for function of the murine enhancer; additional segments of high sequence conservation suggest the possibility of previously unrecognized functional motifs. On the other hand, certain functional elements in the murine enhancer, including a B cell–specific activator protein site, do not appear to be conserved in human HS12. The human homologs of the murine enhancers designated HS3 and HS4 show lower overall sequence conservation, but for at least two of the functional motifs in the murine HS4 (a κB site and an octamer motif  ) the human HS4 homologs are exactly conserved. An additional hypersensitivity site between human HS3 and HS12 in each human locus displays no enhancer activity on its own, but includes a region of high sequence conservation with mouse, suggesting the possibility of another novel functional element. PMID:9294139

  16. Immunoglobulin V/J recombination is accompanied by deletion of joining site and variable region segments.

    PubMed Central

    Seidman, J G; Nau, M M; Norman, B; Kwan, S P; Scharff, M; Leder, P

    1980-01-01

    A site-specific recombination event is responsible for the somatic activation of immunoglobulin genes and for generating a major share of immunoglobulin gene diversity. Although several possible mechanisms can be proposed to account for this process, recombinatio accompanied by deletion is a particularly attractive mechanism because it might utilize inverted repeat sequences noted on the 3' side of all variable regions and on the 5' side of all joining site segments thus far studied. Testing this model is complicated by the fact that antibody cells are at least diploid and gene segments on the inactive chromosome can obscure deletions occurring within the active gene. Accordingly, we have screened several immunoglobulin-producing plasmacytoma lines to select those in which both chromosomes are rearranged. By using appropriate cell lines and variable and joining region probes in in situ hybridization experiments, we show that recombination is accompanied by the deletion of both variable and joining region genes. These experiments also allow us to map the site of V/J recombination of several active immunoglobulin genes and suggest an order and orientation for variable, joining, and constant region sequences. Images PMID:6777777

  17. Complementarity-determining region 2 is implicated in the binding of staphylococcal protein A to human immunoglobulin VHIII variable regions.

    PubMed

    Randen, I; Potter, K N; Li, Y; Thompson, K M; Pascual, V; Førre, O; Natvig, J B; Capra, J D

    1993-10-01

    Staphylococcal protein A (SPA) has two distinct binding sites on human immunoglobulins. In addition to binding to the Fc region of most IgG molecules, an "alternative" binding site has been localized to the Fab region of human immunoglobulins encoded by heavy chain variable gene segments belonging to the VHIII family. Comparison of amino acid sequences of closely related SPA-binding and -non-binding proteins suggested that VHIII-specific residues in the second complementarity-determining region (CDR2) were likely responsible for SPA binding activity. Site-directed mutagenesis of a single amino acid residue in CDR2 converted an IgM rheumatoid factor which did not bind SPA to an SPA binder. These findings, therefore, locate a critical site involved in SPA binding to the CDR2 of human immunoglobulins encoded by VHIII family gene segments.

  18. Cell-type preference of immunoglobulin kappa and lambda gene promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Picard, D; Schaffner, W

    1985-01-01

    Immunoglobulin gene constant regions are known to be associated with strictly tissue-specific enhancer elements. Until recently the promoter of the variable region, which becomes linked to the constant region by somatic rearrangement, could have been viewed as a passive recipient of the enhancer stimulus. Here we show that the promoters of the immunoglobulin kappa and lambda light chain genes are approximately 20-30 times more active in lymphoid cells than in non-lymphoid cells. To avoid the problem of differential mRNA stability upon transfection of immunoglobulin genes into non-lymphoid cells we have constructed chimeric genes. All kappa mRNA sequences were progressively deleted to fuse the kappa gene promoter to a globin gene coding body. A similar chimeric gene was constructed with the promoter of the lambda gene. The cell-type preference of the promoter may be exploited during B-lymphocyte differentiation to regulate the immunoglobulin gene promoter independently from the enhancer. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:2998757

  19. Immunoglobulin λ Gene Rearrangement Can Precede κ Gene Rearrangement

    DOE PAGES

    Berg, Jörg; Mcdowell, Mindy; Jäck, Hans-Martin; ...

    1990-01-01

    Imore » mmunoglobulin genes are generated during differentiation of B lymphocytes by joining gene segments. A mouse pre-B cell contains a functional immunoglobulin heavy-chain gene, but no light-chain gene. Although there is only one heavy-chain locus, there are two lightchain loci: κ and λ .It has been reported that κ loci in the germ-line configuration are never (in man) or very rarely (in the mouse) present in cells with functionally rearranged λ -chain genes. Two explanations have been proposed to explain this: (a) the ordered rearrangement theory, which postulates that light-chain gene rearrangement in the pre-B cell is first attempted at the κ locus, and that only upon failure to produce a functional κ chain is there an attempt to rearrange the λ locus; and (b) the stochastic theory, which postulates that rearrangement at the λ locus proceeds at a rate that is intrinsically much slower than that at the κ locus. We show here that λ -chain genes are generated whether or not the κ locus has lost its germ-line arrangement, a result that is compatible only with the stochastic theory.« less

  20. Mapping of Heavy Chain Genes for Mouse Immunoglobulins M and D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chih-Ping; Tucker, Philip W.; Mushinski, J. Frederic; Blattner, Frederick R.

    1980-09-01

    A single DNA fragment containing both μ and δ immunoglobulin heavy chain genes has been cloned from normal BALB/c mouse liver DNA with a new λ phage vector Charon 28. The physical distance between the membrane terminal exon of μ and the first domain of δ is 2466 base pairs, with δ on the 3' side of μ . A single transcript could contain a variable region and both μ and δ constant regions. The dual expression of immunoglobulins M and D on spleen B cells may be due to alternate splicing of this transcript.

  1. Immunoglobulin heavy chain gene organization and complexity in the skate, Raja erinacea.

    PubMed Central

    Harding, F A; Cohen, N; Litman, G W

    1990-01-01

    Immunoglobulin heavy chain genes from Raja erinacea have been isolated by cross hybridization with probes derived from the immunoglobulin genes of Heterodontus francisci (horned shark), a representative of a different elasmobranch order. Heavy chain variable (VH), diversity (DH) and joining (JH) segments are linked closely to constant region (CH) exons, as has been described in another elasmobranch. The nucleotide sequence homology of VH gene segments within Raja and between different elasmobranch species is high, suggesting that members of this phylogenetic subclass may share one VH family. The organization of immunoglobulin genes segments is diverse; both VD-J and VD-DJ joined genes have been detected in the genome of non-lymphoid cells. JH segment sequence diversity is high, in contrast to that seen in a related elasmobranch. These data suggest that the clustered V-D-J-C form of immunoglobulin heavy chain organization, including germline joined components, may occur in all subclasses of elasmobranchs. While variation in VH gene structure is limited, gene organization appears to be diverse. Images PMID:2107524

  2. Immunoglobulin heavy chain gene organization and complexity in the skate, Raja erinacea.

    PubMed

    Harding, F A; Cohen, N; Litman, G W

    1990-02-25

    Immunoglobulin heavy chain genes from Raja erinacea have been isolated by cross hybridization with probes derived from the immunoglobulin genes of Heterodontus francisci (horned shark), a representative of a different elasmobranch order. Heavy chain variable (VH), diversity (DH) and joining (JH) segments are linked closely to constant region (CH) exons, as has been described in another elasmobranch. The nucleotide sequence homology of VH gene segments within Raja and between different elasmobranch species is high, suggesting that members of this phylogenetic subclass may share one VH family. The organization of immunoglobulin genes segments is diverse; both VD-J and VD-DJ joined genes have been detected in the genome of non-lymphoid cells. JH segment sequence diversity is high, in contrast to that seen in a related elasmobranch. These data suggest that the clustered V-D-J-C form of immunoglobulin heavy chain organization, including germline joined components, may occur in all subclasses of elasmobranchs. While variation in VH gene structure is limited, gene organization appears to be diverse.

  3. Phylogeny, genomic organization and expression of lambda and kappa immunoglobulin light chain genes in a reptile, Anolis carolinensis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian; Wei, Zhiguo; Yang, Zhi; Wang, Tao; Ren, Liming; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Meng, Qingyong; Guo, Ying; Zhu, Qinghong; Robert, Jacques; Hammarström, Lennart; Li, Ning; Zhao, Yaofeng

    2010-05-01

    The reptiles are the last major taxon of jawed vertebrates in which immunoglobulin light chain isotypes have not been well characterized. Using the recently released genome sequencing data, we show in this study that the reptile Anolis carolinensis expresses both lambda and kappa light chain genes. The genomic organization of both gene loci is structurally similar to their respective counterparts in mammals. The identified lambda locus contains three constant region genes each preceded by a joining gene segment, and a total of 37 variable gene segments. In contrast, the kappa locus contains only a single constant region gene, and two joining gene segments with a single family of 14 variable gene segments located upstream. Analysis of junctions of the recombined VJ transcripts reveals a paucity of N and P nucleotides in both expressed lambda and kappa sequences. These results help us to understand the generation of the immunoglobulin repertoire in reptiles and immunoglobulin evolution in vertebrates.

  4. Rearrangement of immunoglobulin light chain genes in the chicken occurs prior to colonization of the embryonic bursa of Fabricius.

    PubMed Central

    Mansikka, A; Sandberg, M; Lassila, O; Toivanen, P

    1990-01-01

    We have applied polymerase-chain-reaction-directed immunoglobulin gene analysis to study the embryonic differentiation of chicken B cells. Immunoglobulin light chain DNA segments in the rearranged configuration were amplified from cells of the intraembryonic mesenchyme as early as day 7 of incubation. We showed by sequencing that the rearranged variable region genes in these early B-cell progenitors were not different from the germ-line V lambda 1 gene (the single functional light chain variable region gene in chickens). In the bursal B lymphocytes, on the other hand, clear gene conversion events were first observed at day 15 of embryonic development. The present data indicate that rearrangement of light chain genes in the chicken occurs independently of the bursa of Fabricius and that diversification of the variable region begins only later, when the surface immunoglobulin-positive B cells are proliferating in the bursal follicles. Images PMID:2123557

  5. Comparative mapping of DNA probes derived from the V{sub k} immunoglobulin gene regions on human and great ape chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, N.; Wienberg, J.; Ermert, K.

    1995-03-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of cosmid clones of human V{sub K} gene regions to human and primate chromosomes contributed to the dating of chromosome reorganizations in evolution. A clone from the K locus at 2p11-p12 (cos 106) hybridized to the assumed homologous chromosome bands in the chimpanzees Pan troglodytes (PTR) and P. paniscus (PPA), the Gorilla gorilla (GGO), and the orangutan Pongo Pygmaeus (PPY). Human and both chimpanzees differed from gorilla and orangutan by the mapping of cos 170, a clone derived from chromosome 2cen-q11.2; the transposition of this orphon to the other side of the centromere can, therefore, be dated after the human/chimpanzee and gorilla divergence. Hybridization to homologous bands was also found with a cosmid clone containing a V{sub K}I orphon located on chromosome 1 (cos 115, main signal at 1q31-q32), although the probe is not fully unique. Also, a clone derived from the orphon V{sub K} region on chromosome 22q11 (cos 121) hybridized to the homologous bands in the great apes. This indicates that the orphons on human chromosomes 1 and 22 had been translocated early in primate evolution. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Structural and functional mapping of immunoglobulin V-regions.

    PubMed

    Fougereau, M; Schiff, C; Mathieu, C; de Préval, C; Bourgois, A; Moulin, A; Rocca-Serra, J

    1976-01-01

    V-regions of immunoglobulins chains contain 3 types of positions, which are equally represented: invariant and sub-group characteristic, which account for the "framework" and hypervariable positions, responsible for antigen recognition. The 3 types of positions are grouped and fall within a very few discrete stretches. Sub-group characteristic segments containing one of the 2 cysteyl residues of the V-regions may be isolated by high voltage paper electrophoresis and provide a basis to type for sub-groups in the VK and in the VH human systems. This allowed to characterize a large set of human myeloma proteins that were used in a series of competitive hybridizations which indicated that sub-groups had no influence on preferential reassociations, which occurred in 80% of the cases. This preference seems to rely mostly on individual structural differences, which may be linked to heterogeneity at the framework level. Distinction between framework heterogeneity and hypervariable regions heterogeneity may be approached by raising antibodies against a mouse myeloma protein, MOPC 173, of known sequence, by means of syngeneic and allogeneic immunizations, using Balb/c and A/J mice. Junction of distinct portions of immunoglobulin chains such as the V and the C regions raises the possibility that some recognition signals may operate at the DNA level. Since rotational symmetry regions in the DNA are known to act as such signals, it is discussed whether such regions can be expected from the amino acid sequence data, especially in the vicinity of the "switch" peptide.

  7. γδTCR immunoglobulin constant region domain exchange in human αβTCRs improves TCR pairing without altering TCR gene-modified T cell function.

    PubMed

    Tao, Changli; Shao, Hongwei; Zhang, Wenfeng; Bo, Huaben; Wu, Fenglin; Shen, Han; Huang, Shulin

    2017-02-15

    The adoptive genetic transfer of T cell receptors (TCRs) has been shown to be overall feasible and offer clinical potential as a treatment for different types of cancer. However, this promising clinical approach is limited by the serious potential consequence that exogenous TCR mispairing with endogenous TCR chains may lead to the risk of self-reactivity. In the present study, domain‑exchange and three‑dimensional modeling strategies were used to create a set of chimeric TCR variants, which were used to exchange the partial or complete constant region of αβTCR with corresponding γδTCR domains. The expression, assembly and function of the chimeric TCR variants were examined in Jurkat T cells and peripheral mononuclear blood cells (PBMCs). Genetically‑encoded chimeras were fused with a pair of fluorescent proteins (ECFP/EYFP) to monitor expression and the pairing between chimeric TCRα chains and TCRβ chains. The fluorescence energy transfer based on confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that the introduction of γδTCR constant sequences into the αβTCR did not result in a global reduction of mispairing with endogenous TCR. However, the TCR harboring the immunoglobulin‑like domain of the γδTCR constant region (i.e., TCR∆IgC), showed a higher expression and preferential pairing, compared with wild‑type (wt)TCR. The function analysis showed that TCR∆IgC exhibited the same levels of interferon-γ production and cytotoxic activity, compared with wtTCR. Furthermore, these modified TCR-transduced T cells retained the classic human leukocyte antigen restriction of the original TCR. The other two chimeric TCRs, had either exchange of the cp+tm+ic domain or exchange of the whole C domain (Fig. 1). Ultimately, exchange of these domains demonstrated defective function in the transduced T cells. Taken together, these findings may provide further understanding of the γδTCR constant domain with implications for the improvement of TCR gene transfer

  8. Expression of cloned immunoglobulin genes introduced into mouse L cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gilles, S D; Tonegawa, S

    1983-01-01

    Functionally rearranged immunoglobulin heavy-chain (gamma 2b) and light-chain (lambda 1 and kappa) genes were introduced into mouse L tk- cells by co-transformation with the Herpes virus tk gene. Cloned cell lines were selected in HAT medium and tested for the presence of transfected immunoglobulin gene sequences by Southern blotting analysis. It was found that the gamma 2b gene was accurately transcribed at a low level in transfected mouse L cells and cytoplasmic gamma 2b, heavy-chain protein was detected by immunoprecipitation of cell extracts. Light-chain genes, on the other hand, were not accurately transcribed. Instead, lambda 1 or kappa RNA species were detected which were approximately 200 to 300 bases longer than the authentic mRNAs. These results suggest that the expression of rearranged heavy-chain and light-chain genes are controlled differently and that these differences can be seen in transfected, non-lymphoid cells. Images PMID:6316279

  9. Clonal immunoglobulin gene rearrangement in the infarcted lymph node syndrome.

    PubMed

    Laszewski, M J; Belding, P J; Feddersen, R M; Lutz, C T; Goeken, J A; Kemp, J D; Dick, F R

    1991-07-01

    The authors report a case of complete lymph node infarction in which a specific etiology could not be determined by morphologic or immunophenotypic studies; however, clonal rearrangement of the immunoglobulin gene was demonstrated by Southern blot hybridization of DNA extracted from the necrotic tissue. A subsequent lymph node biopsy later was diagnosed as malignant lymphoma, using morphologic, immunophenotypic and genotypic criteria. Identical clonally rearranged bands were present in DNA from both the infarcted nodal and the subsequent tissue biopsies. In the setting of lymph node necrosis, gene rearrangement studies may provide diagnostic information concerning clonality, even if morphologic and immunophenotypic studies are indeterminate for a lymphoproliferative process.

  10. B29 gene products complex with immunoglobulins on B lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Ishihara, K; Wood, W J; Damore, M; Hermanson, G G; Wall, R; Kincade, P W

    1992-01-01

    B29 is a B-lineage-specific gene predicted from sequence information to be a transmembrane member of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily, with a single extracellular Ig-like domain. Its presumptive cytoplasmic region contains a peptide motif present in CD3 and other molecules involved in lymphocyte activation. Affinity-purified goat antibodies were prepared to a TrpE fusion protein of B29 and used to study B29 expression on lymphoid cells. The antiserum precipitated surface-labeled heterodimers from B lymphoma cells. One was 65-88 kDa (unreduced) or 36-47 plus 32-34 kDa (reduced) by SDS/PAGE analysis, regardless of detergent. A smaller heterodimer was detected only with Triton detergent extraction. IgM molecules were coprecipitated by the B29 antiserum when the weak detergent digitonin was used. In addition, cocapping experiments revealed that most B29 molecules codistribute with Ig on the cell surface. Although early B-lineage cells and plasma cells contain B29 mRNA, surface expression was detectable only on B cells that had significant amounts of surface Ig. The surface expression was B-lineage-specific and included cells from mutant xid mice and B-cell lines representing mu, delta, gamma, and alpha heavy-chain isotypes and both kappa and lambda light-chain types. The density of surface B29 protein correlated directly with surface mu heavy-chain density on subclones of a B-cell lymphoma and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated pre-B cells. These findings show that B29 is covalently linked in a heterodimer and are consistent with a recently proposed model of surface Ig complexes. Images PMID:1731334

  11. SRSF1-3 contributes to diversification of the immunoglobulin variable region gene by promoting accumulation of AID in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Yuka; Nariki, Hiroaki; Kawamoto, Naoko; Kanehiro, Yuichi; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Suzuki, Mari; Magari, Masaki; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi; Kanayama, Naoki

    2017-04-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential for diversification of the Ig variable region (IgV). AID is excluded from the nucleus, where it normally functions. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for regulating AID localization remain to be elucidated. The SR-protein splicing factor SRSF1 is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein, a splicing isoform of which called SRSF1-3, has previously been shown to contribute to IgV diversification in chicken DT40 cells. In this study, we examined whether SRSF1-3 functions in IgV diversification by promoting nuclear localization of AID. AID expressed alone was localized predominantly in the cytoplasm. In contrast, co-expression of AID with SRSF1-3 led to the nuclear accumulation of both AID and SRSF1-3 and the formation of a protein complex that contained them both, although SRSF1-3 was dispensable for nuclear import of AID. Expression of either SRSF1-3 or a C-terminally-truncated AID mutant increased IgV diversification in DT40 cells. However, overexpression of exogenous SRSF1-3 was unable to further enhance IgV diversification in DT40 cells expressing the truncated AID mutant, although SRSF1-3 was able to form a protein complex with the AID mutant. These results suggest that SRSF1-3 promotes nuclear localization of AID probably by forming a nuclear protein complex, which might stabilize nuclear AID and induce IgV diversification in an AID C-terminus-dependent manner. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Somatic mutation of immunoglobulin VH6 genes in human infants

    PubMed Central

    Ridings, J; Dinan, L; Williams, R; Roberton, D; Zola, H

    1998-01-01

    Infants respond to antigen by making antibody that is generally of low affinity for antigen. Somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes, and selection of cells expressing mutations with improved affinity for antigen, are the molecular and cellular processes underlying the maturation of antibody affinity. We have reported previously that neonates and infants up to 2 months of age, including individuals undergoing strong immunological challenge, show very few mutated VH6 sequences, with low mutation frequencies in mutated sequences, and little evidence of selection. We have now examined immunoglobulin genes from healthy infants between 2 and 10 months old for mutation and evidence of selection. In this age group, the proportion of VH6 sequences which are mutated and the mutation frequency in mutated sequences increase with age. There is evidence of selection from 6 months old. These results indicate that the process of affinity maturation, which depends on cognate T–B cell interaction and functional germinal centres, is approaching maturity from 6 months old. PMID:9764600

  13. Biased JH usage in plasma cell immunoglobulin gene sequences from colonic mucosa in ulcerative colitis but not in Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Dunn-Walters, D; Boursier, L; Hackett, M; Spencer, J

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Ulcerative colitis is an inflammatory disease of the colonic and rectal mucosa. Autoantibodies have been observed in ulcerative colitis which may have a role in the pathogenesis of the disease. Evidence also suggests that there is an hereditary predisposition towards the disease, although no individual genes have been identified. 
AIMS—This is a pilot study of immunoglobulin heavy chain genes (IgH) in ulcerative colitis to determine whether they have any particular genetic characteristics which may lead to a better understanding of the disease aetiology. 
SUBJECTS—Colonic or rectal tissue was obtained from five children with ulcerative colitis. Tissue was also obtained from five children with Crohn's disease and five children who did not have inflammatory bowel disease as controls. 
METHODS—B cells and IgD+ B cells were identified by immunohistochemistry on frozen sections. Areas of lamina propria containing plasma cells, and areas of IgD+ B cells were microdissected. The immunoglobulin genes were PCR amplified, cloned, and sequenced. Sequences were analysed for content of somatic mutations and composition of heavy chain. 
RESULTS—An increase in the use of JH6 and DXP'1, and a decrease in the use of JH4, gene segments in immunoglobulin genes from lamina propria plasma cells, and from virgin IgD+ B cells, was found in patients with ulcerative colitis. These biases were not present in the control groups. 
CONCLUSIONS—There is a fundamental difference in the immunoglobulin genes from patients with ulcerative colitis. Whether this is caused by a difference in content of immunoglobulin gene segments in the germline or a difference in the recombination mechanism is not known. 

 Keywords: ulcerative colitis; immunoglobulin heavy chain gene; joining region; diversity region; repertoire; Crohn's disease PMID:10026325

  14. Immunoglobulin V gene replacement is caused by the intramolecular DNA deletion mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Usuda, S; Takemori, T; Matsuoka, M; Shirasawa, T; Yoshida, K; Mori, A; Ishizaka, K; Sakano, H

    1992-01-01

    Circular DNA resulting from V gene replacement was studied with an A-MuLV transformed cell line containing ablts. This cell line undergoes V gene replacement at elevated temperatures in the immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy chain (H) gene. Examination of circular DNA revealed that a heptamer-related sequence (TACTGTG) within the coding region of VDJ was joined to the recombination signal sequence (RSS) of a germline VH segment. This provides direct evidence for a intramolecular DNA deletion mechanism for V gene replacement. In the pre-B cell line as well as in in vivo lymphocytes, unusual circular DNAs were found which were structurally similar to the V gene replacement circles. They represented excision products of the deletion type recombination between one complete RSS and a heptamer-like sequence in the Ig H region. PMID:1311252

  15. Allelic exclusion of immunoglobulin genes: models and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Vettermann, Christian; Schlissel, Mark S.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The allelic exclusion of immunoglobulin (Ig) genes is one of the most evolutionarily conserved features of the adaptive immune system and underlies the monospecificity of B cells. While much has been learned about how Ig allelic exclusion is established during B-cell development, the relevance of monospecificity to B-cell function remains enigmatic. Here, we review the theoretical models that have been proposed to explain the establishment of Ig allelic exclusion and focus on the molecular mechanisms utilized by developing B cells to ensure the monoallelic expression of Igκ and Igλ light chain genes. We also discuss the physiological consequences of Ig allelic exclusion and speculate on the importance of monospecificity of B cells for immune recognition. PMID:20727027

  16. Polymorphism of germ-line immunoglobulin VH genes correlates with allotype and idiotype markers.

    PubMed

    Ben-Neriah, Y; Cohen, J B; Rechavi, G; Zakut, R; Givol, D

    1981-12-01

    The polymorphic nature of the immunoglobulin VH genes was investigated by Southern blot analysis of liver DNA of sixteen different mouse strains and hybridization with VH probes. Differences in restriction enzyme pattern (REP) were observed and six different patterns of restriction fragments were found for the sixteen strains analyzed. No equivalent polymorphism was observed in another multigene family, the actins. The six patterns correlate with immunoglobin constant region allotypes (Igh-1). Experiments with Igh-1-congenic strains suggest that the VH REP is linked to immunoglobulin constant region haplotype. Mouse strains which share inherited idiotypes also share identical VH restriction pattern. This provides a structural basis for the genetic linkage between idiotypes and allotypes. It also indicates that different strains carry different VH gene repertoires, which may be the basis for the expression of different inherited idiotypes in various strains. We propose that a VH group in a set of linked genes that are coinherited as a cluster with the constant region genes and that VH and Ch can be regarded as an extended haplotype.

  17. Patterns of Somatic Mutations in Immunoglobulin Variable Genes

    PubMed Central

    Golding, G. Brian; Gearhart, Patricia J.; Glickman, Barry W.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism responsible for somatic mutation in the variable genes of antibodies is unknown and may differ from previously described mechanisms that produce mutation in DNA. We have analyzed 421 somatic mutations from the rearranged immunoglobulin variable genes of mice to determine (1) if the nucleotide substitutions differ from those generated during meiosis and (2) if the presence of nearby direct and inverted repeated sequences could template mutations around the variable gene. The results reveal a difference in the pattern of substitutions obtained from somatic mutations vs. meiotic mutations. An increased frequency of T:A to C:G transitions and a decreased frequency of mutations involving a G in the somatic mutants compared to the meiotic mutants is indicated. This suggests that the mutational processes responsible for somatic mutation in antibody genes differs from that responsible for mutation during meiosis. An analysis of the local DNA sequences revealed many direct repeats and palindromic sequences that were capable of templating some of the known mutations. Although additional factors may be involved in targeting mutations to the variable gene, mistemplating by nearby repeats may provide a mechanism for the enhancement of somatic mutation. PMID:3557109

  18. Biased immunoglobulin light chain gene usage in the shark1

    PubMed Central

    Iacoangeli, Anna; Lui, Anita; Naik, Ushma; Ohta, Yuko; Flajnik, Martin; Hsu, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    This study of a large family of kappa light (L) chain clusters in nurse shark completes the characterization of its classical immunoglobulin (Ig) gene content (two heavy chain classes, mu and omega, and four L chain isotopes, kappa, lambda, sigma, and sigma-2). The shark kappa clusters are minigenes consisting of a simple VL-JL-CL array, where V to J recombination occurs over a ~500 bp interval, and functional clusters are widely separated by at least 100 kb. Six out of ca. 39 kappa clusters are pre-rearranged in the germline (GL-joined). Unlike the complex gene organization and multistep assembly process of Ig in mammals, each shark Ig rearrangement, somatic or in the germline, appears to be an independent event localized to the minigene. This study examined the expression of functional, non-productive, and sterile transcripts of the kappa clusters compared to the other three L chain isotypes. Kappa cluster usage was investigated in young sharks, and a skewed pattern of split gene expression was observed, one similar in functional and non-productive rearrangements. These results show that the individual activation of the spatially distant kappa clusters is non-random. Although both split and GL-joined kappa genes are expressed, the latter are prominent in young animals and wane with age. We speculate that, in the shark, the differential activation of the multiple isotypes can be advantageously used in receptor editing. PMID:26342033

  19. Ornithorhynchus anatinus (platypus) links the evolution of immunoglobulin genes in eutherian mammals and nonmammalian tetrapods.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yaofeng; Cui, Huiting; Whittington, Camilla M; Wei, Zhiguo; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Ziding; Yu, Li; Ren, Liming; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Zhang, Yaping; Hellman, Lars; Belov, Katherine; Li, Ning; Hammarström, Lennart

    2009-09-01

    The evolutionary origins of mammalian immunoglobulin H chain isotypes (IgM, IgD, IgG, IgE, and IgA) are still incompletely understood as these isotypes differ considerably in structure and number from their counterparts in nonmammalian tetrapods. We report in this study that the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) Ig H chain constant region gene locus contains eight Ig encoding genes, which are arranged in an mu-delta-omicron-gamma2-gamma1-alpha1-epsilon-alpha2 order, spanning a total of approximately 200 kb DNA, encoding six distinct isotypes. The omicron (omicron for Ornithorhynchus) gene encodes a novel Ig H chain isotype that consists of four constant region domains and a hinge, and is structurally different from any of the five known mammalian Ig classes. This gene is phylogenetically related to upsilon (epsilon) and gamma, and thus appears to be a structural intermediate between these two genes. The platypus delta gene encodes ten heavy chain constant region domains, lacks a hinge region and is similar to IgD in amphibians and fish, but strikingly different from that in eutherian mammals. The platypus Ig H chain isotype repertoire thus shows a unique combination of genes that share similarity both to those of nonmammalian tetrapods and eutherian animals and demonstrates how phylogenetically informative species can be used to reconstruct the evolutionary history of functionally important genes.

  20. AID-targeting and hypermutation of non-immunoglobulin genes does not correlate with proximity to immunoglobulin genes in germinal center B cells.

    PubMed

    Gramlich, Hillary Selle; Reisbig, Tara; Schatz, David G

    2012-01-01

    Upon activation, B cells divide, form a germinal center, and express the activation induced deaminase (AID), an enzyme that triggers somatic hypermutation of the variable regions of immunoglobulin (Ig) loci. Recent evidence indicates that at least 25% of expressed genes in germinal center B cells are mutated or deaminated by AID. One of the most deaminated genes, c-Myc, frequently appears as a translocation partner with the Ig heavy chain gene (Igh) in mouse plasmacytomas and human Burkitt's lymphomas. This indicates that the two genes or their double-strand break ends come into close proximity at a biologically relevant frequency. However, the proximity of c-Myc and Igh has never been measured in germinal center B cells, where many such translocations are thought to occur. We hypothesized that in germinal center B cells, not only is c-Myc near Igh, but other mutating non-Ig genes are deaminated by AID because they are near Ig genes, the primary targets of AID. We tested this "collateral damage" model using 3D-fluorescence in situ hybridization (3D-FISH) to measure the distance from non-Ig genes to Ig genes in germinal center B cells. We also made mice transgenic for human MYC and measured expression and mutation of the transgenes. We found that there is no correlation between proximity to Ig genes and levels of AID targeting or gene mutation, and that c-Myc was not closer to Igh than were other non-Ig genes. In addition, the human MYC transgenes did not accumulate mutations and were not deaminated by AID. We conclude that proximity to Ig loci is unlikely to be a major determinant of AID targeting or mutation of non-Ig genes, and that the MYC transgenes are either missing important regulatory elements that allow mutation or are unable to mutate because their new nuclear position is not conducive to AID deamination.

  1. SUBGROUPS OF AMINO ACID SEQUENCES IN THE VARIABLE REGIONS OF IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAINS*

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Bruce A.; Pflumm, Mollie N.; User, Urs Rutisha; Edelman, Gerald M.

    1969-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of the first 133 residues of the heavy (γ) chain from a human γG immunoglobulin (He) has been determined. This γ-chain is identical in Gm type to that of protein Eu, the complete sequence of which has been reported. Comparison of the two sequences substantiates the previous suggestion that there are subgroups of variable regions of heavy chains. The variable region of Eu has been assigned to subgroup I and that of He to subgroup II; on the other hand, the constant regions of the two proteins appear to be identical. Comparison of the sequence of the heavy chain of He with the heavy chain sequences determined in other laboratories suggests that the variable region of subgroup II is at least 118 residues long. The nature and distribution of amino acid variations in this heavy chain subgroup resemble those observed in light chain subgroups. These studies provide evidence that the translocation hypothesis applies to heavy as well as to light chains, viz., genes for variable regions (V) are somatically translocated to genes for constant regions (C) to form complete VC structural genes. Images PMID:5264153

  2. Salivary Immunoglobulin Gene Expression in Patients with Caries

    PubMed Central

    Santín, Gema Regina Guadarrama; Salgado, Angel Visoso; Bastida, Norma Margarita Montiel; Gómez, Isaías de la Rosa; Benítez, Jonnathan Guadalupe Santillán; Zerón, Hugo Mendieta

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Immunoglobulins mediate the host’s humoral immune response are expressed in saliva. AIM: To quantify the FcαR, FcγRIIB, and FcαμR gene expression in the saliva of Mexican patients with caries in mixed and permanent dentition. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: This was a comparative cross-sectional study. mRNA was isolated from 200 μL of saliva following the RNA III Tissue Fresh-frozen protocol of the MagNA Pure LC Instrument 2.0 (Roche Diagnostics GmbH, Nederland BV) and the FcαR, FcαμR and FcγRIIB were quantified through TaqMan Assays. RESULTS: One hundred individuals, 50 with mixed dentition and 50 with permanent dentition, were included in the study. Statistically, it was found a significant difference (p = 0.025) in the IgG (FcγRIIB) expression between the studied groups. CONCLUSION: Although we confirmed the existence of FcαR, FcγRIIB and FcαμR gene expression in saliva, only a significant difference in the expression of FcγRIIB between the mixed dentition and permanent dentition was found. PMID:28507635

  3. Mapping of human immunoglobulin heavy chain variable gene segments outside the major IGH locus

    SciTech Connect

    Wintle, R.F.; Cox, D.W. |

    1994-09-01

    Physical mapping of the human immunoglobulin heavy chain gene cluster (IGH) on chromosome 14 has previously shown that the locus includes at least 63 variable region (VH) gene segments. Fifteen VH gene segments are located on six NotI DNA restriction fragments that are not within the mapped region of IGH. We have used human/rodent somatic cell hybrid lines to map these genes segments, as it was previously not proven that they are located in the chromosome 14 IGH locus. Four gene segments map to human chromosome 16 and two to chromosome 15. Apparently, four of the six NotI fragments, representing 11 VH gene segments, are not located within the chromosome 14 IGH locus. In addition, we have demonstrated that a YAC containing a functional human telomere, and mapping to 14qter, is located at the telomeric end of the IGH gene cluster physical map and contains at least four VH gene segments. This YAC is collinear with the existing physical map of genomic DNA. We conclude that our original physical map of IGH represents almost the entire locus on chromosome 14 and that the 11 gene segments newly mapped are not part of the functional IGH locus. 33 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. The ubiquitous octamer-binding protein(s) is sufficient for transcription of immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D G; Carayannopoulos, L; Capra, J D; Tucker, P W; Hanke, J H

    1990-01-01

    All immunoglobulin genes contain a conserved octanucleotide promoter element, ATGCAAAT, which has been shown to be required for their normal B-cell-specific transcription. Proteins that bind this octamer have been purified, and cDNAs encoding octamer-binding proteins have been cloned. Some of these proteins (referred to as OTF-2) are lymphoid specific, whereas at least one other, and possibly more (referred to as OTF-1), is found ubiquitously in all cell types. The exact role of these different proteins in directing the tissue-specific expression of immunoglobulin genes is unclear. We have identified two human pre-B-cell lines that contain extremely low levels of OTF-2 yet still express high levels of steady-state immunoglobulin heavy-chain mRNA in vivo and efficiently transcribe an immunoglobulin gene in vitro. Addition of a highly enriched preparation of OTF-1 made from one of these pre-B cells or from HeLa cells specifically stimulated in vitro transcription of an immunoglobulin gene. Furthermore, OFT-1 appeared to have approximately the same transactivation ability as OTF-2 when normalized for binding activity. These results suggest that OTF-1, without OTF-2, is sufficient for transcription of immunoglobulin genes and that OTF-2 alone is not responsible for the B-cell-specific regulation of immunoglobulin gene expression. Images PMID:2304473

  5. Three transposed elements in the intron of a human VK immunoglobulin gene.

    PubMed

    Straubinger, B; Osterholzer, E; Zachau, H G

    1987-11-25

    Two gene segments coding for the variable region of human immunoglobulin light chains of the kappa type (VK genes, ref. 2) were found to have unusual structures. The two genes which are called A6 and A22 are located in duplicated gene clusters. Their restriction maps are very similar. About 4 kb of the A22 gene region were sequenced. It turned out that the intron contains an insert with the characteristics of a transposed element. The inserted DNA of 1.2 kb length contains imperfect direct and inverted repeats at its ends; at the insertion site a duplication of five nucleotides was found. Within the inserted DNA one copy each of an Alu element and of the simple sequence motif (T-G)17 were identified. Also these two repetitive sequences are themselves flanked by short direct repeats. The major inserted DNA has no significant homology to published human nucleic acid sequences. The whole structure is interpreted best by assuming a sequential insertion of the three elements. The coding region of the VK gene itself has several mutations which by themselves would render it a pseudogene; we assume that the insertion event(s) occurred prior to the mutations. According to mapping and hybridization data A6 is very similar to A22.

  6. A novel monoclonal antibody against the constant region of goose immunoglobulin light chain.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yongli; Gao, Mingchun; Ma, Bo; Sheng, Qiaoling; Wang, Qian; Liu, Dandan; Wang, Junwei

    2014-04-01

    A monoclonal antibody (MAb) against the antigenic determinant of the constant region of goose immunoglobulin light chain (GoIgCL) was produced and characterized for the first time here. Goose immunoglobulin (Ig) in serum was purified by immunoaffinity chromatography and the resulting protein was used as immunogen to immunize BALB/c mice. At the same time, the GoIgCL gene was expressed and purified as the screening antigen for selecting MAb against GoIgCL. One hybridoma that produces antibodies against GoIgCL was selected by indirect ELISA. Then the characterization of the MAb was analyzed by ELISA, Western blot, and flow cytometry. It was found to be IgG1 with κ light chain; the MAB has high specificity to Ig in goose serum, bile, and B lymphocytes from peripheral blood, reacts only with the light chain of goose Ig, and can distinguish Ig from other birds. Therefore, the MAb generated in this study can be used as a specific reagent for detection of goose disease-specific antibodies and as a powerful tool for basic immunology research on geese.

  7. Molecular characterization of the immunoglobulin light chain variable region repertoire of human autoantibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Victor, K.D.

    1992-01-01

    The molecular structures of the light chain variable regions encoding human autoantibodies have been studied in detail. The variable region repertoire among this group of antibodies is diverse. There is no evidence for preferential utilization of specific V[sub L] gene families or over-representation of certain V[sub L] gene segments in autoantibodies. Many autoreactive antibodies utilize direct copies of known germline gene segments with little evidence of somatic mutation, supporting the conclusion that at least some germline gene segments encode autoreactivity. Additionally, the structures of several autoantibodies are clearly the product of somatic mutation. Lastly, affinity maturation has been demonstrated in two clonally related IgM rheumatoid factors suggestive of an antigen driven response. The heterogeneity of the V[sub L] region repertoire in human autoantibodies challenges evidence in the literature suggesting that the majority of human autoantibodies utilize the same or closely related germline gene segments with no evidence of somatic mutation. In addition, this study has documented that variation in the length of the light chain is a common feature in human antibodies. Length variation is confined to the V[sub k]-J[sub k] joint of CDR3 and occurs in all V[sub k] gene families. Analysis of the structures of the V[sub k]-J[sub k] joints suggests that both germline derived and non-germline encoded nucleotides (N-segments), probably the result of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase activity, contribute to the junctional diversity of the immunoglobulin light chain variable region. Thus, length variation at the V[sub L]-J[sub L] joint is a frequent event having the potential to expand the diversity of the antibody molecule.

  8. A Preliminary Analysis of the Immunoglobulin Genes in the African Elephant (Loxodonta africana)

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yongchen; Bao, Yonghua; Wang, Hui; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Zhao, Zhihui; Li, Ning; Zhao, Yaofeng

    2011-01-01

    The genomic organization of the IgH (Immunoglobulin heavy chain), Igκ (Immunoglobulin kappa chain), and Igλ (Immunoglobulin lambda chain) loci in the African elephant (Loxodonta africana) was annotated using available genome data. The elephant IgH locus on scaffold 57 spans over 2,974 kb, and consists of at least 112 VH gene segments, 87 DH gene segments (the largest number in mammals examined so far), six JH gene segments, a single μ, a δ remnant, and eight γ genes (α and ε genes are missing, most likely due to sequence gaps). The Igκ locus, found on three scaffolds (202, 50 and 86), contains a total of 153 Vκ gene segments, three Jκ segments, and a single Cκ gene. Two different transcriptional orientations were determined for these Vκ gene segments. In contrast, the Igλ locus on scaffold 68 includes 15 Vλ gene segments, all with the same transcriptional polarity as the downstream Jλ-Cλ cluster. These data suggest that the elephant immunoglobulin gene repertoire is highly diverse and complex. Our results provide insights into the immunoglobulin genes in a placental mammal that is evolutionarily distant from humans, mice, and domestic animals. PMID:21364892

  9. A preliminary analysis of the immunoglobulin genes in the African elephant (Loxodonta africana).

    PubMed

    Guo, Yongchen; Bao, Yonghua; Wang, Hui; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Zhao, Zhihui; Li, Ning; Zhao, Yaofeng

    2011-02-25

    The genomic organization of the IgH (Immunoglobulin heavy chain), Igκ (Immunoglobulin kappa chain), and Igλ (Immunoglobulin lambda chain) loci in the African elephant (Loxodonta africana) was annotated using available genome data. The elephant IgH locus on scaffold 57 spans over 2,974 kb, and consists of at least 112 V(H) gene segments, 87 D(H) gene segments (the largest number in mammals examined so far), six J(H) gene segments, a single μ, a δ remnant, and eight γ genes (α and ε genes are missing, most likely due to sequence gaps). The Igκ locus, found on three scaffolds (202, 50 and 86), contains a total of 153 V(κ) gene segments, three J(κ) segments, and a single C(κ) gene. Two different transcriptional orientations were determined for these V(κ) gene segments. In contrast, the Igλ locus on scaffold 68 includes 15 V(λ) gene segments, all with the same transcriptional polarity as the downstream J(λ)-C(λ) cluster. These data suggest that the elephant immunoglobulin gene repertoire is highly diverse and complex. Our results provide insights into the immunoglobulin genes in a placental mammal that is evolutionarily distant from humans, mice, and domestic animals.

  10. Cloning of the gene encoding streptococcal immunoglobulin A protease and its expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, J V; Plaut, A G; Fishman, Y; Wright, A

    1988-01-01

    We have identified and cloned a 6-kilobase-pair segment of chromosomal DNA from Streptococcus sanguis ATCC 10556 that encodes immunoglobulin A (IgA) protease activity when cloned into Escherichia coli. The enzyme specified by the iga gene in plasmid pJG1 accumulates in the periplasm of E. coli MM294 cells and has a substrate specificity for human IgA1 identical to that of native S. sanguis protease. Hybridization experiments with probes from within the encoding DNA showed no detectable homology at the nucleotide sequence level with chromosomal DNA of gram-negative bacteria that excrete IgA protease. Moreover, the S. sanguis iga gene probes showed no detectable hybridization with chromosomal DNA of S. pneumoniae, although the IgA proteases of these two streptococcal species cleaved the identical peptide bond in the human IgA1 heavy-chain hinge region. Images PMID:3294181

  11. Nucleotide sequences of immunoglobulin eta genes of chimpanzee and orangutan: DNA molecular clock and hominoid evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Sakoyama, Y.; Hong, K.J.; Byun, S.M.; Hisajima, H.; Ueda, S.; Yaoita, Y.; Hayashida, H.; Miyata, T.; Honjo, T.

    1987-02-01

    To determine the phylogenetic relationships among hominoids and the dates of their divergence, the complete nucleotide sequences of the constant region of the immunoglobulin eta-chain (C/sub eta1/) genes from chimpanzee and orangutan have been determined. These sequences were compared with the human eta-chain constant-region sequence. A molecular clock (silent molecular clock), measured by the degree of sequence divergence at the synonymous (silent) positions of protein-encoding regions, was introduced for the present study. From the comparison of nucleotide sequences of ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin and ..beta..- and delta-globulin genes between humans and Old World monkeys, the silent molecular clock was calibrated: the mean evolutionary rate of silent substitution was determined to be 1.56 x 10/sup -9/ substitutions per site per year. Using the silent molecular clock, the mean divergence dates of chimpanzee and orangutan from the human lineage were estimated as 6.4 +/- 2.6 million years and 17.3 +/- 4.5 million years, respectively. It was also shown that the evolutionary rate of primate genes is considerably slower than those of other mammalian genes.

  12. Diverse organization of immunoglobulin VH gene loci in a primitive vertebrate.

    PubMed Central

    Kokubu, F; Litman, R; Shamblott, M J; Hinds, K; Litman, G W

    1988-01-01

    The immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy chain variable (VH) gene family of Heterodontus francisci (horned shark), a phylogenetically distant vertebrate, is unique in that VH, diversity (DH), joining (JH) and constant region (CH) gene segments are linked closely, in multiple individual clusters. The V regions of 12 genomic (liver and gonad) DNA clones have been sequenced completely and three organization patterns are evident: (i) VH-D1-D2-JH-CH with unique 12/22 and 12/12 spacers in the respective D recombination signal sequences (RSSs); VH and JH segments have 23 nucleotide (nt) spacers, (ii) VHDH-JH-CH, an unusual germline configuration with joined VH and DH segments and (iii) VHDHJH-CH, with all segmental elements being joined. The latter two configurations do not appear to be pseudogenes. Another VH-D1-D2-JH-CH gene possesses a D1 segment that is flanked by RSSs with 12 nt spacers and a D2 segment with 22/12 spacers. Based on the comparison of spleen, VH+ cDNA sequences to a germline consensus, it is evident that both DH segments as well as junctional and N-type diversity account for Ig variability. In this early vertebrate, the Ig genes share unique properties with higher vertebrate T-cell receptor as well as with Ig and may reflect the structure of a common ancestral antigen binding receptor gene. Images PMID:3145194

  13. Complete nucleotide sequence of an immunoglobulin VH gene homologue from Caiman, a phylogenetically ancient reptile.

    PubMed

    Litman, G W; Berger, L; Murphy, K; Litman, R; Hinds, K; Jahn, C L; Erickson, B W

    1983-05-26

    Immunoglobulin variable (V) gene regions typify extensive multigenic families in terms of overall size, chromosomal arrangement and presence of large numbers of apparent pseudogenes. A unique mechanism of somatic reorganization involving recombination of VH, D and JH or VL and JL segments accompanies the differentiation of lymphoid cells and together with somatic mutation and other types of recombination accounts for V-region diversity. Although these processes have been well characterized in higher mammals, little is known concerning their origin and diversification during phylogenetic time. Previously, we described the blot-hybridization characteristics of murine VHIII probes with restriction enzyme-digested genomic DNA isolated from several phylogenetically critical species, including Caiman crocodylus, a modern representative of an ancient reptilian subclass. Here we have used a murine probe, S107V, to select homologous clones from a library of Caiman genomic DNA constructed in a lambda bacteriophage. The complete nucleotide sequence of a Caiman gene homologous to the murine VH gene and its adjacent 5' and 3' region is described. Comparison of the sequence with mammalian prototypes shows evidence of considerable organizational and structural homology extending outside the presumed VH-coding region and including elements believed to be involved in somatic recombination. Inferences about the evolution of this multigenic family can now be extended to the level of phylogenetic class.

  14. Susceptibility to multiple sclerosis is associated with the proximal immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region.

    PubMed Central

    Walter, M A; Gibson, W T; Ebers, G C; Cox, D W

    1991-01-01

    15 immunoglobulin heavy chain constant (CH) and variable region (VH) polymorphisms were selected to span the entire length of the heavy chain cluster. These polymorphisms were examined in 34 sib pairs concordant for multiple sclerosis (MS) and in 23 sporadic MS patients. Allele frequencies were calculated for the 2 MS patient groups and compared with those found in a control population from the same geographical location and of similar ethnic background. No significant association was found between MS and the 7 CH region polymorphisms examined. However, a significant correlation between the MS phenotype and a VH2 family polymorphism was observed in both MS patient populations (familial MS patients chi 2 = 8.16, P less than 0.005; sporadic MS patients chi 2 = 8.90, P less than 0.005). One allele of the VH2-5 gene segment was found to be over-represented in both MS groups. VH2-5 has recently been physically mapped close to the CH region, between 180 and 360 kb away. These results indicate that a locus near or within the CH-proximal VH region is associated with increased susceptibility to MS. Images PMID:1672695

  15. Analysis of the immunoglobulin light chain genes in zebra finch: evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Das, Sabyasachi; Mohamedy, Uzra; Hirano, Masayuki; Nei, Masatoshi; Nikolaidis, Nikolas

    2010-01-01

    All jawed vertebrates produce immunoglobulins (IGs) as a defense mechanism against pathogens. Typically, IGs are composed of two identical heavy chains (IGH) and two identical light chains (IGL). Most tetrapod species encode more than one isotype of light chains. Chicken is the only representative of birds for which genomic information is currently available and is an exception to the above rule because it encodes only a single IGL isotype (i.e., lambda). Here, we show that the genome of zebra finch, another bird species, encodes a single IGL isotype, that is, lambda, like the chicken. These results strongly suggest that the second isotype (i.e., kappa) present in both reptiles and mammals was lost in a very early stage of bird evolution. Furthermore, we show that both chicken and zebra finch contain a single set of functional variable, joining, and constant region genes and multiple variable region pseudogenes. The latter finding suggests that this type of genomic organization was already present in the common ancestor of these bird species and remained unchanged over a long evolutionary time. This conservation is in contrast with the high levels of variation observed in the mammalian IGL loci. The presence of a single functional variable region gene followed by multiple variable pseudogenes in zebra finch suggest that this species may be generating antibody diversity by a gene conversion-like mechanism like the chicken.

  16. Interaction between immunoglobulin allotypes and NK receptor genes in diabetes post-hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Granados-Montiel, Julio; Zúñiga, Joaquin; Azocar, Jose; Feris, Edmond J; Terreros, Daniel; Larsen, Charles E; Clavijo, Olga P; Cruz-Lagunas, Alfredo; Middleton, Derek; Alper, Chester A; Pandey, Janardan P; Yunis, Edmond J

    2011-06-01

    Genetic interactions between natural killer (NK) cells immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genes and immunoglobulin allotypes have been previously reported in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients. Puerto Rican Americans with a history of intravenous drug use who developed DM following HCV infection (n=32) were compared to individuals infected with HCV without diabetes (n=121) and to DM non-infected individuals (n=95). Subjects were genotyped for KIRs and immunoglobulin allotypes. We found interactions of immunoglobulin allotypes KM3/KM3 with NK inhibitory receptors 2DL3/2DL3, 2DL1 in the absence of 2DS4 associated with susceptibility to DM in HCV infected individuals. These data suggest the possibility that a subset of patients with HCV could have an immune-mediated component contributing to the development of DM.

  17. Significant Differences in Physicochemical Properties of Human Immunoglobulin Kappa and Lambda CDR3 Regions

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Catherine L.; Laffy, Julie M. J.; Wu, Yu-Chang Bryan; Silva O’Hare, Joselli; Martin, Victoria; Kipling, David; Fraternali, Franca; Dunn-Walters, Deborah K.

    2016-01-01

    Antibody variable regions are composed of a heavy and a light chain, and in humans, there are two light chain isotypes: kappa and lambda. Despite their importance in receptor editing, the light chain is often overlooked in the antibody literature, with the focus being on the heavy chain complementarity-determining region (CDR)-H3 region. In this paper, we set out to investigate the physicochemical and structural differences between human kappa and lambda light chain CDR regions. We constructed a dataset containing over 29,000 light chain variable region sequences from IgM-transcribing, newly formed B cells isolated from human bone marrow and peripheral blood. We also used a published human naïve dataset to investigate the CDR-H3 properties of heavy chains paired with kappa and lambda light chains and probed the Protein Data Bank to investigate the structural differences between kappa and lambda antibody CDR regions. We found that kappa and lambda light chains have very different CDR physicochemical and structural properties, whereas the heavy chains with which they are paired do not differ significantly. We also observed that the mean CDR3 N nucleotide addition in the kappa, lambda, and heavy chain gene rearrangements are correlated within donors but can differ between donors. This indicates that terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase may work with differing efficiencies between different people but the same efficiency in the different classes of immunoglobulin chain within one person. We have observed large differences in the physicochemical and structural properties of kappa and lambda light chain CDR regions. This may reflect different roles in the humoral immune response. PMID:27729912

  18. Significant Differences in Physicochemical Properties of Human Immunoglobulin Kappa and Lambda CDR3 Regions.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Catherine L; Laffy, Julie M J; Wu, Yu-Chang Bryan; Silva O'Hare, Joselli; Martin, Victoria; Kipling, David; Fraternali, Franca; Dunn-Walters, Deborah K

    2016-01-01

    Antibody variable regions are composed of a heavy and a light chain, and in humans, there are two light chain isotypes: kappa and lambda. Despite their importance in receptor editing, the light chain is often overlooked in the antibody literature, with the focus being on the heavy chain complementarity-determining region (CDR)-H3 region. In this paper, we set out to investigate the physicochemical and structural differences between human kappa and lambda light chain CDR regions. We constructed a dataset containing over 29,000 light chain variable region sequences from IgM-transcribing, newly formed B cells isolated from human bone marrow and peripheral blood. We also used a published human naïve dataset to investigate the CDR-H3 properties of heavy chains paired with kappa and lambda light chains and probed the Protein Data Bank to investigate the structural differences between kappa and lambda antibody CDR regions. We found that kappa and lambda light chains have very different CDR physicochemical and structural properties, whereas the heavy chains with which they are paired do not differ significantly. We also observed that the mean CDR3 N nucleotide addition in the kappa, lambda, and heavy chain gene rearrangements are correlated within donors but can differ between donors. This indicates that terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase may work with differing efficiencies between different people but the same efficiency in the different classes of immunoglobulin chain within one person. We have observed large differences in the physicochemical and structural properties of kappa and lambda light chain CDR regions. This may reflect different roles in the humoral immune response.

  19. Epigenetic silencing of the immunoglobulin heavy-chain gene in classical Hodgkin lymphoma-derived cell lines contributes to the loss of immunoglobulin expression.

    PubMed

    Ushmorov, Alexey; Ritz, Olga; Hummel, Michael; Leithäuser, Frank; Möller, Peter; Stein, Harald; Wirth, Thomas

    2004-11-15

    Immunoglobulin production is impaired in Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells of classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) in spite of functional clonal rearrangements. The presence of "crippling" mutations in coding and regulatory regions, as well as down-regulation of B-cell-specific transcription factors, has been suggested as a potential reason for the lack of immunoglobulin (Ig) chain gene transcription. We have investigated the impact of epigenetic silencing in suppressing Ig heavy (H)-chain expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) was used to analyze transcription factor binding to octamer motifs present in the IgH regulatory regions. Transcription factors were bound to these motifs in control cell lines, however, they were absent in the cHL-derived cell lines KMH2, L1236, and L428. Ectopic expression of octamer-binding transcription factor (Oct2) and/or B-cell Oct binding protein/Oct-binding factor (BOB.1/OBF.1) did not result in any measurable binding to these sites. Increased histone 3 Lysine 9 (H3-K9) methylation was observed in the promoter region of the IgH locus in L428 and L1236 cells. This is a typical feature of heterochromatic, transcriptionally silent regions. Treatment of cHL-derived cell lines with the DNA demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) partially reactivated IgH transcription and affected chromatin modifications. Our results suggest an important role of epigenetic silencing in the inhibition of IgH transcription in HRS cells.

  20. Diversification, not use, of the immunoglobulin VH gene repertoire is restricted in DiGeorge syndrome.

    PubMed

    Haire, R N; Buell, R D; Litman, R T; Ohta, Y; Fu, S M; Honjo, T; Matsuda, F; de la Morena, M; Carro, J; Good, R A

    1993-09-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) genes were isolated from unamplified conventional as well as polymerase chain reaction-generated cDNA libraries constructed from the peripheral blood cells of a patient with complete DiGeorge syndrome. Comparison of the sequences of 36 heavy chain clones to the recently expanded database of human VH genes permitted identification of the germline VH genes that are expressed in this patient as well as placement of 19 of these genes in a partially resolved 0.8-mb region of the human VH locus. The pattern of VH gene use does not resemble the fetal (early) repertoire. However, as in the fetal repertoire, there are a number of cDNAs derived from germline genes that previously have been identified as autoantibodies. Two D mu sequences also were identified, as was another sequence resulting from a unique recombination event linking JH to an unidentified sequence containing a recombination signal sequence-like heptamer. All of the DiGeorge cDNAs are closely related to germline VH genes, showing little or no evidence of somatic mutation. In contrast, comparably selected IgM VH sequences derived from normal adult and age-matched human libraries, and from a second DiGeorge syndrome patient in whom the degree of thymic dysfunction is much less severe, exhibit considerable evidence of somatic mutation. The absence of somatic mutation is consistent with the atypical development of functional antibody responses associated with complete DiGeorge syndrome and implicates a role for T cells in the generation of diversity within the B cell repertoire.

  1. Coding strategy differences between constant and variable segments of immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, P

    1984-01-01

    Vertebrate immunoglobulin (Ig) mRNAs reveal intraspecies variation in codon usage distinct from that seen with yeast or bacterial genes. Comparison of all available Ig gene sequences shows that %(G + C) in codon position III is consistently lower in variable (V) segments than in constant (C) segments. I find an even lower %(G + C) in the hypervariable domains of V segments. This analysis suggests that base substitution in Ig genes correlates positively with local A + T content. PMID:6462913

  2. Structural analysis of substitution patterns in alleles of human immunoglobulin VH genes.

    PubMed

    Romo-González, Tania; Vargas-Madrazo, Enrique

    2005-05-01

    The diversity in repertoires of antibodies (Abs) needed in response to the antigen challenge is produced by evolutionary and somatic processes. The mechanisms operating at a somatic level have been studied in great detail. In contrast, neither the mechanisms nor the strategies of diversification at an evolutionary level have yet been understood in similar detail. Particularly, the substitution patterns in alleles of immunoglobulin genes (Igs) have not been systematically studied. Furthermore, there is a scarcity of studies which link the analysis at a genetic level of the diversification of repertoires with the structural consequences at the protein level of the changes in DNA information. For the purpose of systematically characterizing the strategies of evolutionary diversification through sequence variation at alleles, in this work, we built a database for all the alleles of the IGHV locus in humans reported until now. Based on these data, we performed diverse analyses of substitution patterns and linked these results with studies at the protein level. We found that the sequence diversification in different alleles does not operate with equal intensity for all V genes. Our studies, both of the number of substitutions and of the type of amino acid change per sub-segment of the V-REGION evidenced differences in the selective pressure to which these regions are exposed. The implications of these results for understanding the evolutionary diversification strategies, as well as for the somatic generation of antibody repertoires are discussed.

  3. In situ visualisation of immunoglobulin genes in normal and malignant lymphoid cells

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, C; Telhada, M; do Carmo-Fonseca, M; Parreira, L

    1995-01-01

    Aims—To directly visualise immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy (H) and light chain genes (κ and λ) in metaphase chromosomes and interphase nuclei of normal and malignant lymphocytes using small genomic probes targeted to intragenic sequences. Methods—Cytogenetic preparations from phytohaemagglutinin stimulated lymphocytes, B-chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL) cells, and a B-prolymphocytic leukaemia (B-PLL) cell line, containing a t(11;14), were hybridised in situ using biotin or digoxigenin labelled plasmid probes. The κ genes were visualised with a combination of probes for the Cκ, Jκ, Vκ1, and Vκ2 segments, the λ genes with a probe containing the Jλ2-Cλ2, Jλ3-Cλ3 segments and the H genes with a probe for Cλ2. Hybridisation sites were visualised using appropriate fluorochrome conjugates and images were analysed by digital microscopy. Results—In both normal and malignant lymphoid cells, the κ and λ genes were visualised as a single dot signal, whereas the H λ genes were resolved as either two or three separate signals per chromatid in metaphase chromosomes or per allele in interphase nuclei. In the malignant PLL cells, double hybridisation experiments with a painting library specific for the chromosome 11 showed that the λ region was retained in the translocated chromosome, with an in situ resolution pattern similar to that of the normal allele. Conclusions—This study shows that a high resolution in situ analysis of the three Ig loci can be efficiently performed with small size genomic probes on both normal and malignant lymphoid cells. Such an approach offers a flexible tool for the molecular characterisations of these loci on chromosomes and individual neoplastic cells. Images PMID:16695998

  4. Immunoglobulin heavy chain variable gene usage and (super)-antigen drive in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bühler, Andreas; Zenz, Thorsten; Stilgenbauer, Stephan

    2010-01-15

    Increasing evidence supports the prognostic relevance of specific immunoglobulin heavy chain variable (IGHV) genes or stereotyped B-cell receptors (BCR) in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The clonotypic BCRs differ in their specificity and affinity toward classical antigens and/or superantigens. The BCR-triggered mechanisms are distinct but could explain in part the different clinical behavior among CLL subgroups.

  5. Ubiquitination Events That Regulate Recombination of Immunoglobulin Loci Gene Segments

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Jaime; Rothschild, Gerson; Basu, Uttiya

    2014-01-01

    Programed DNA mutagenesis events in the immunoglobulin (Ig) loci of developing B cells utilize the common and conserved mechanism of protein ubiquitination for subsequent proteasomal degradation to generate the required antigen-receptor diversity. Recombinase proteins RAG1 and RAG2, necessary for V(D)J recombination, and activation-induced cytidine deaminase, an essential mutator protein for catalyzing class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation, are regulated by various ubiquitination events that affect protein stability and activity. Programed DNA breaks in the Ig loci can be identified by various components of DNA repair pathways, also regulated by protein ubiquitination. Errors in the ubiquitination pathways for any of the DNA double-strand break repair proteins can lead to inefficient recombination and repair events, resulting in a compromised adaptive immune system or development of cancer. PMID:24653725

  6. Production of individualized V gene databases reveals high levels of immunoglobulin genetic diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corcoran, Martin M.; Phad, Ganesh E.; Bernat, Néstor Vázquez; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane; Sumida, Noriyuki; Persson, Mats A. A.; Martin, Marcel; Hedestam, Gunilla B. Karlsson

    2016-12-01

    Comprehensive knowledge of immunoglobulin genetics is required to advance our understanding of B cell biology. Validated immunoglobulin variable (V) gene databases are close to completion only for human and mouse. We present a novel computational approach, IgDiscover, that identifies germline V genes from expressed repertoires to a specificity of 100%. IgDiscover uses a cluster identification process to produce candidate sequences that, once filtered, results in individualized germline V gene databases. IgDiscover was tested in multiple species, validated by genomic cloning and cross library comparisons and produces comprehensive gene databases even where limited genomic sequence is available. IgDiscover analysis of the allelic content of the Indian and Chinese-origin rhesus macaques reveals high levels of immunoglobulin gene diversity in this species. Further, we describe a novel human IGHV3-21 allele and confirm significant gene differences between Balb/c and C57BL6 mouse strains, demonstrating the power of IgDiscover as a germline V gene discovery tool.

  7. Production of individualized V gene databases reveals high levels of immunoglobulin genetic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Corcoran, Martin M.; Phad, Ganesh E.; Bernat, Néstor Vázquez; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane; Sumida, Noriyuki; Persson, Mats A.A.; Martin, Marcel; Hedestam, Gunilla B. Karlsson

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge of immunoglobulin genetics is required to advance our understanding of B cell biology. Validated immunoglobulin variable (V) gene databases are close to completion only for human and mouse. We present a novel computational approach, IgDiscover, that identifies germline V genes from expressed repertoires to a specificity of 100%. IgDiscover uses a cluster identification process to produce candidate sequences that, once filtered, results in individualized germline V gene databases. IgDiscover was tested in multiple species, validated by genomic cloning and cross library comparisons and produces comprehensive gene databases even where limited genomic sequence is available. IgDiscover analysis of the allelic content of the Indian and Chinese-origin rhesus macaques reveals high levels of immunoglobulin gene diversity in this species. Further, we describe a novel human IGHV3-21 allele and confirm significant gene differences between Balb/c and C57BL6 mouse strains, demonstrating the power of IgDiscover as a germline V gene discovery tool. PMID:27995928

  8. Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor Gene Associations with Autoimmune and Allergic Diseases, Recurrent Spontaneous Abortion, and Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Kuśnierczyk, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) are a family of cell surface inhibitory or activating receptors expressed on natural killer cells and some subpopulations of T lymphocytes. KIR genes are clustered in the 19q13.4 region and are characterized by both allelic (high numbers of variants) and haplotypic (different numbers of genes for inhibitory and activating receptors on individual chromosomes) polymorphism. This contributes to diverse susceptibility to diseases and other clinical situations. Associations of KIR genes, as well as of genes for their ligands, with selected diseases such as psoriasis vulgaris and atopic dermatitis, rheumatoid arthritis, recurrent spontaneous abortion, and non-small cell lung cancer are discussed in the context of NK and T cell functions. PMID:23372569

  9. Exclusion of polymeric immunoglobulins and selective immunoglobulin Y transport that recognizes its Fc region in avian ovarian follicles.

    PubMed

    Kitaguchi, Kohji; Osada, Kenichi; Horio, Fumihiko; Murai, Atsushi

    2008-02-15

    In avian species, blood immunoglobulin (Ig) Y, the equivalent to mammalian IgG, is selectively incorporated into ovarian follicles, but other classes, IgA and IgM, are much less abundant in the follicles. Several mammalian Igs, including IgG and IgA, are also incorporated into ovarian follicles when administered to birds. To clarify the Ig structure required for incorporation into ovarian follicles, Ig uptakes were determined after the intravenous injection of chicken and human Igs. Three chicken Igs (cIgY, cIgA and cIgM) and two human IgAs (monomeric hIgA and polymeric hIgA) were labeled with digoxigenin, and their uptakes into quail (Coturnix japonica) egg yolks were determined by ELISA and SDS-PAGE. The uptake of cIgY was the highest among the three cIgs (22% of injected cIgY was recovered from egg yolks). Chicken IgA was efficiently incorporated into egg yolk when it formed a monomeric state. Pentameric IgM was untransportable into egg yolk. We also found that the uptake of monomeric hIgA was much more efficient than that of polymeric hIgA. These results suggest that the retention of the monomeric form contributes to the efficient transport of Igs into ovarian follicles. On the other hand, Ig uptakes among monomeric Igs nevertheless differed; for example, a time-course analysis showed that the rate of monomeric cIgY uptake was approximately eight times faster than that of monomeric hIgA. The injection of cIgY fragments Fc, Fab and F(ab')(2) resulted in the largest uptake of Fc fragment, with the same level as that of cIgY. These results suggest the presence of a selective IgY transport system that recognizes its Fc region in avian ovarian follicles.

  10. Genomic structure of PIR-B, the inhibitory member of the paired immunoglobulin-like receptor genes in mice.

    PubMed

    Alley, T L; Cooper, M D; Chen, M; Kubagawa, H

    1998-03-01

    The genes encoding the murine paired immunoglobulin-like receptors PIR-A and PIR-B are members of a novel gene family which encode cell-surface receptors bearing immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) and their non-inhibitory/activatory counterparts. PIR-A and PIR-B have highly homologous extracellular domains but distinct transmembrane and cytoplasmic regions. A charged arginine in the transmembrane region of PIR-A suggests its potential association with other transmembrane proteins to form a signal transducing unit. PIR-B, in contrast, has an uncharged transmembrane region and several ITIMs in its cytoplasmic tail. These characteristics suggest that PIR-A and PIR-B which are coordinately expressed by B cells and myeloid cells, serve counter-regulatory roles in humoral and inflammatory responses. In the present study we have determined the genomic structure of the single copy PIR-B gene. The gene consists of 15 exons and spans approximately 8 kilobases. The first exon contains the 5' untranslated region, the ATG translation start site, and approximately half of the leader peptide sequence. The remainder of the leader peptide sequence is encoded by exon 2. Exons 3-8 encode the six extracellular immunoglobulin-like domains and exons 9 and 10 code for the extracellular membrane proximal and transmembrane regions. The final five exons (exons 11-15) encode for the ITIM-bearing cytoplasmic tail and the 3' untranslated region. The intron/exon boundaries of PIR-B obey the GT-AG rule and are in phase I, with the notable exception of the three boundaries determined for ITIM-containing exons. A microsatellite composed of the trinucleotide repeat AAG in the intron between exons 9 and 10 provides a useful marker for studying population genetics.

  11. The BRCT domain of PARP-1 is required for immunoglobulin gene conversion.

    PubMed

    Paddock, Marcia N; Buelow, Ben D; Takeda, Shunichi; Scharenberg, Andrew M

    2010-07-20

    Genetic variation at immunoglobulin (Ig) gene variable regions in B-cells is created through a multi-step process involving deamination of cytosine bases by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) and their subsequent mutagenic repair. To protect the genome from dangerous, potentially oncogenic effects of off-target mutations, both AID activity and mutagenic repair are targeted specifically to the Ig genes. However, the mechanisms of targeting are unknown and recent data have highlighted the role of regulating mutagenic repair to limit the accumulation of somatic mutations resulting from the more widely distributed AID-induced lesions to the Ig genes. Here we investigated the role of the DNA damage sensor poly-(ADPribose)-polymerase-1 (PARP-1) in the repair of AID-induced DNA lesions. We show through sequencing of the diversifying Ig genes in PARP-1(-/-) DT40 B-cells that PARP-1 deficiency results in a marked reduction in gene conversion events and enhanced high-fidelity repair of AID-induced lesions at both Ig heavy and light chains. To further characterize the role of PARP-1 in the mutagenic repair of AID-induced lesions, we performed functional analyses comparing the role of engineered PARP-1 variants in high-fidelity repair of DNA damage induced by methyl methane sulfonate (MMS) and the mutagenic repair of lesions at the Ig genes induced by AID. This revealed a requirement for the previously uncharacterized BRCT domain of PARP-1 to reconstitute both gene conversion and a normal rate of somatic mutation at Ig genes, while being dispensable for the high-fidelity base excision repair. From these data we conclude that the BRCT domain of PARP-1 is required to initiate a significant proportion of the mutagenic repair specific to diversifying antibody genes. This role is distinct from the known roles of PARP-1 in high-fidelity DNA repair, suggesting that the PARP-1 BRCT domain has a specialized role in assembling mutagenic DNA repair complexes involved in antibody

  12. Cloning of size-selected human immunoglobulin heavy-chain rearrangements from third complementarity-determining region fingerprint profiles.

    PubMed

    Raaphorst, F M; Tami, J; Sanz, I E

    1996-01-01

    Methods have been developed to rapidly visualize the size distribution of third complementarity-determining regions (CDR3) in immunoglobulin (Ig) and T-cell receptor (TCR) molecules. DNA fragments spanning the Ig or TCR CDR3 are generated by PCR using primers at fixed positions in the variable and constant segments. These fragments differ in length due to size variation of the CDR3s. Visualization of the amplification products in polyacrylamide gels as a "CDR3 fingerprint profile" is a rough measure for the complexity of the Ig and TCR antigen-binding specificities. We report an adaptation of this method for the analysis of human Ig heavy-chain genes that incorporates silver staining, which allows for the fine analysis of specific regions of the profiles. This is especially useful for the study of low-abundant transcripts.

  13. Tandem repeats 3{prime} of the IGHA genes in the human immunoglobulin heavy chain gene cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, H.K.; Cox, D.W. |

    1996-07-01

    The human IGH constant region spans 350 kb and includes nine genes and two pseudogenes. All of the constant region gene cluster has been cloned except for sequences between the IGHD and IGHG3 genes, between the IGHA1 and IGHA2 gene. The regions 3{prime} of the IGHA genes, which are not cloned, are of interest since transcriptional control elements were found downstream of the IGHA genes in the rat and the mouse IGH loci. In addition, by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis mapping, CpG islands were identified approximately 30 kb downstream of each IGHA gene, within the uncloned portion of the human IGH. These findings indicate that the regions 3{prime} of the IGHA genes to be unclonable by standard cloning methods. Therefore, we applied the Inverse-PCR technique to amplify the sequences flanking the IGHA1 gene. The new sequence included tandem repeats of 20 bp, which we propose is the cause of the unclonability of this region. 39 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Immunoglobulin gene insertions and deletions in the affinity maturation of HIV-1 broadly reactive neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kepler, Thomas B; Liao, Hua-Xin; Alam, S Munir; Bhaskarabhatla, Rekha; Zhang, Ruijun; Yandava, Chandri; Stewart, Shelley; Anasti, Kara; Kelsoe, Garnett; Parks, Robert; Lloyd, Krissey E; Stolarchuk, Christina; Pritchett, Jamie; Solomon, Erika; Friberg, Emma; Morris, Lynn; Karim, Salim S Abdool; Cohen, Myron S; Walter, Emmanuel; Moody, M Anthony; Wu, Xueling; Altae-Tran, Han R; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Kwong, Peter D; Boyd, Scott D; Fire, Andrew Z; Mascola, John R; Haynes, Barton F

    2014-09-10

    Induction of HIV-1 broad neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) is a goal of HIV-1 vaccine development but has remained challenging partially due to unusual traits of bnAbs, including high somatic hypermutation (SHM) frequencies and in-frame insertions and deletions (indels). Here we examined the propensity and functional requirement for indels within HIV-1 bnAbs. High-throughput sequencing of the immunoglobulin (Ig) VHDJH genes in HIV-1 infected and uninfected individuals revealed that the indel frequency was elevated among HIV-1-infected subjects, with no unique properties attributable to bnAb-producing individuals. This increased indel occurrence depended only on the frequency of SHM point mutations. Indel-encoded regions were generally proximal to antigen binding sites. Additionally, reconstruction of a HIV-1 CD4-binding site bnAb clonal lineage revealed that a large compound VHDJH indel was required for bnAb activity. Thus, vaccine development should focus on designing regimens targeted at sustained activation of bnAb lineages to achieve the required SHM and indel events.

  15. Immunoglobulin Gene Insertions and Deletions in the Affinity Maturation of HIV-1 Broadly Reactive Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Kepler, Thomas B.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Alam, S. Munir; Bhaskarabhatla, Rekha; Zhang, Ruijun; Stewart, Shelley; Anasti, Kara; Kelsoe, Garnett; Parks, Robert; Lloyd, Krissey E.; Stolarchuk, Christina; Pritchett, Jamie; Solomon, Erika; Friberg, Emma; Morris, Lynn; Karim, Salim S. Abdool; Cohen, Myron S.; Walter, Emmanuel; Moody, M. Anthony; Wu, Xueling; Altae-Tran, Han R.; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Kwong, Peter D.; Boyd, Scott D.; Fire, Andrew Z.; Mascola, John R.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Induction of HIV-1 broad neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) is a goal of HIV-1 vaccine development but has remained challenging partially due to unusual traits of bnAbs, including high somatic hypermutation (SHM) frequencies and in-frame insertions and deletions (indels). Here we examined the propensity and functional requirement for indels within HIV-1 bnAbs. High-throughput sequencing of the immunoglobulin (Ig) VHDJH genes in HIV-1 infected and uninfected individuals revealed that the indel frequency was elevated among HIV-1-infected subjects, with no unique properties attributable to bnAb-producing individuals. This increased indel occurrence depended only on the frequency of SHM point-mutations. Indel-encoded regions were generally proximal to antigen binding sites. Additionally, reconstruction of a HIV-1 CD4-binding site bnAb clonal lineage revealed that a large compound VHDJH indel was required for bnAb activity. Thus, vaccine development should focus on designing regimens targeted at sustained activation of bnAb lineages to achieve the required SHM and indel events. PMID:25211073

  16. Biased Immunoglobulin Light Chain Gene Usage in the Shark.

    PubMed

    Iacoangeli, Anna; Lui, Anita; Naik, Ushma; Ohta, Yuko; Flajnik, Martin; Hsu, Ellen

    2015-10-15

    This study of a large family of κ L chain clusters in nurse shark completes the characterization of its classical Ig gene content (two H chain isotypes, μ and ω, and four L chain isotypes, κ, λ, σ, and σ-2). The shark κ clusters are minigenes consisting of a simple VL-JL-CL array, where V to J recombination occurs over an ~500-bp interval, and functional clusters are widely separated by at least 100 kb. Six out of ~39 κ clusters are prerearranged in the germline (germline joined). Unlike the complex gene organization and multistep assembly process of Ig in mammals, each shark Ig rearrangement, somatic or in the germline, appears to be an independent event localized to the minigene. This study examined the expression of functional, nonproductive, and sterile transcripts of the κ clusters compared with the other three L chain isotypes. κ cluster usage was investigated in young sharks, and a skewed pattern of split gene expression was observed, one similar in functional and nonproductive rearrangements. These results show that the individual activation of the spatially distant κ clusters is nonrandom. Although both split and germline-joined κ genes are expressed, the latter are prominent in young animals and wane with age. We speculate that, in the shark, the differential activation of the multiple isotypes can be advantageously used in receptor editing.

  17. Anti-tumor activities of peptides corresponding to conserved complementary determining regions from different immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Carlos R; Matsuo, Alisson L; Massaoka, Mariana H; Polonelli, Luciano; Travassos, Luiz R

    2014-09-01

    Short synthetic peptides corresponding to sequences of complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) from different immunoglobulin families have been shown to induce antimicrobial, antiviral and antitumor activities regardless of the specificity of the original monoclonal antibody (mAb). Presently, we studied the in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity of synthetic peptides derived from conserved CDR sequences of different immunoglobulins against human tumor cell lines and murine B16F10-Nex2 melanoma aiming at the discovery of candidate molecules for cancer therapy. Four light- and heavy-chain CDR peptide sequences from different antibodies (C36-L1, HA9-H2, 1-H2 and Mg16-H2) showed cytotoxic activity against murine melanoma and a panel of human tumor cell lineages in vitro. Importantly, they also exerted anti-metastatic activity using a syngeneic melanoma model in mice. Other peptides (D07-H3, MN20v1, MS2-H3) were also protective against metastatic melanoma, without showing significant cytotoxicity against tumor cells in vitro. In this case, we suggest that these peptides may act as immune adjuvants in vivo. As observed, peptides induced nitric oxide production in bone-marrow macrophages showing that innate immune cells can also be modulated by these CDR peptides. The present screening supports the search in immunoglobulins of rather frequent CDR sequences that are endowed with specific antitumor properties and may be candidates to be developed as anti-cancer drugs.

  18. Analysis of the structural integrity of YACs comprising human immunoglobulin genes in yeast and in embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez, M.J.; Abderrahim, H.; Noguchi, M.

    1995-03-20

    With the goal of creating a strain of mice capable of producing human antibodies, we are cloning and reconstructing the human immunoglobulin germline repertoire in yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs). We describe the identification of YACs containing variable and constant region sequences from the human heavy chain (IgH) and kappa light chain (IgK) loci and the characterization of their integrity in yeast and in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. The IgH locus-derived YAC contains five variable (V{sub H}) genes, the major diversity (D) gene cluster, the joining (J{sub H}) genes, the intronic enhancer (E{sub H}), and the constant region genes, mu (C{mu}) and delta (C{delta}). Two IgK locus-derived YACs each contain three variable (V{kappa}) genes, the joining (J{kappa}) region, the intronic enhancer (E{kappa}), the constant gene (C{kappa}), and the kappa deleting element (kde). The IgH YAC was unstable in yeast, generating a variety of deletion derivatives, whereas both IgK YACs were stable. YACs encoding heavy chain and kappa light chain, retrofitted with the mammalian selectable marker, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT), were each introduced into HPRT-deficient mouse ES cells. Analysis of YAC integrity in ES cell lines revealed that the majority of DNA inserts were integrated in substantially intact form. 78 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Antigen-specific immunoglobulin variable region sequencing measures humoral immune response to vaccination in the equine neonate

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Steven C.; Parry, Stephen A.

    2017-01-01

    The value of prophylactic neonatal vaccination is challenged by the interference of passively transferred maternal antibodies and immune competence at birth. Taken our previous studies on equine B cell ontogeny, we hypothesized that the equine neonate generates a diverse immunoglobulin repertoire in response to vaccination, independently of circulating maternal antibodies. In this study, equine neonates were vaccinated with 3 doses of keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) or equine influenza vaccine, and humoral immune responses were assessed using antigen-specific serum antibodies and B cell Ig variable region sequencing. An increase (p<0.0001) in serum KLH-specific IgG level was measured between days 21 and days 28, 35 and 42 in vaccinated foals from non-vaccinated mares. In vaccinated foals from vaccinated mares, serum KLH-specific IgG levels tended to increase at day 42 (p = 0.07). In contrast, serum influenza-specific IgG levels rapidly decreased (p≤0.05) in vaccinated foals from vaccinated mares within the study period. Nevertheless, IGHM and IGHG sequences were detected in KLH- and influenza- sorted B cells of vaccinated foals, independently of maternal vaccination status. Immunoglobulin nucleotide germline identity, IGHV gene usage and CDR length of antigen-specific IGHG sequences in B cells of vaccinated foals revealed a diverse immunoglobulin repertoire with isotype switching that was comparable between groups and to vaccinated mares. The low expression of CD27 memory marker in antigen-specific B cells, and of cytokines in peripheral blood mononuclear cells upon in vitro immunogen stimulation indicated limited lymphocyte population expansion in response to vaccine during the study period. PMID:28520789

  20. Complex regional pain syndrome treated with intravenous immunoglobulin in a patient with common variable immune deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tachdjian, Raffi

    2013-12-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) represents a large heterogeneous group of antibody-deficiency syndromes associated with a wide range of clinical features and a lack of defined causes in the realm of primary immunodeficiencies. Here, we present a case of CVID in a 62-year-old white male patient with a history of longstanding complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). His medical history included multiple sinus infections per year and several pneumonias requiring antibiotics. He has had various back surgeries, including a laminectomy at the L4 level 1 year prior to his diagnosis. Thereafter, he underwent four sympathetic nerve blocks with minimal pain relief. Blood chemistries showed a normal white blood cell count with a normal differential, but increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein levels. Total Ig (Immunoglobulin)G was 611 mg/dL (normal 700-1,600), IgG1 was 425 mg/dL (341-894), IgG2 was 114 mg/dL (171-632), IgG3 was 14.4 mg/dL (18.4-106), and IgG4 was 7.4 mg/dL (2.4-121). IgA was 47 mg/dL (normal 70-400), IgM was 131 mg/dL (40-230), and IgE was 4.5 kU/L (<4.0). He only had 10 of 23 pneumococcal titers in the protective range post-vaccination. Upon treatment of the CVID with intravenous immunoglobulin, the patient's pain levels were significantly decreased and have been maintained for more than 2 years. Therefore, immunoglobulin therapy appears to have been beneficial in the treatment of the patient's symptoms of CRPS, including pain. Additional studies investigating the mechanism by which immunoglobulin therapy may reduce the inflammation and pain of CRPS are needed.

  1. Activation of prophage eib genes for immunoglobulin-binding proteins by genes from the IbrAB genetic island of Escherichia coli ECOR-9.

    PubMed

    Sandt, Carol H; Hopper, James E; Hill, Charles W

    2002-07-01

    Four distinct Escherichia coli immunoglobulin-binding (eib) genes, each of which encodes a surface-exposed protein that binds immunoglobulins in a nonimmune manner, are carried by separate prophages in E. coli reference (ECOR) strain ECOR-9. Each eib gene was transferred to test E. coli strains, both in the form of multicopy recombinant plasmids and as lysogenized prophage. The derived lysogens express little or no Eib protein, in sharp contrast to the parental lysogen, suggesting that ECOR-9 has an expression-enhancing activity that the derived lysogens lack. Supporting this hypothesis, we cloned from ECOR-9 overlapping genes, ibrA and ibrB (designation is derived from "immunoglobulin-binding regulator"), which together activated eib expression in the derived lysogens. The proteins encoded by ibrA and ibrB are very similar to uncharacterized proteins encoded by genes of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and E. coli O157:H7 (in a prophage-like element of the Sakai strain and in two O islands of strain EDL933). The genomic segment containing ibrA and ibrB has been designated the IbrAB island. It contains regions of homology to the Shiga toxin-converting prophage, Stx2, as well as genes homologous to phage antirepressor genes. The left boundary between the IbrAB island and the chromosomal framework is located near min 35.8 of the E. coli K-12 genome. Homology to IbrAB was found in certain other ECOR strains, including the other five eib-positive strains and most strains of the phylogenetic group B2. Sequencing of a 1.1-kb portion of ibrAB revealed that the other eib-positive strains diverge by

  2. Two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy reveals coupled immunoglobulin regions of differential flexibility that influence stability.

    PubMed

    Kamerzell, Tim J; Middaugh, C Russell

    2007-08-28

    Despite the well-accepted importance of protein flexibility and dynamics in molecular recognition and conformational stability, our understanding of these relationships is incomplete. Immunoglobulin flexibility is essential for antigen binding and adaptation to diverse molecular shapes and sizes. The inherent flexibility of immunoglobulins also renders these molecules suitable for investigating the possible relationships between protein flexibility and stability. To better understand these inter-relationships, we employ generalized perturbation-based two-dimensional correlation FTIR spectroscopy to monitor the time evolution of H-D exchange of an IgG1 as a function of pH. The differential flexibility of various immunoglobulin regions is described in response to an external perturbation and shown to vary widely. The greatest number of regions with differential exchange rates and, thus differential flexibility, is seen at pH 6. Approximately seven, six, five, and four separate states that exchange with different rates were observed at pH 6, 8, 4, and 2, respectively. The overall distribution of exchange rates calculated from the decays of the integrated Amide I and Amide II areas provides further evidence of multiple regions with differential flexibility. The sequence of events at pH 4 determined from the asynchronous vibrational patterns is of significant interest and suggests protonation of Glu and Asp side chains occurs first and initiates changes in the conformation and flexibility of different sheet and turns structure. A complex inter-relationship between differential regional flexibility and conformational coupling (i.e., cooperativity) initiated by changes in pH influences the stability of this IgG.

  3. A Killer Immunoglobulin - Like Receptor Gene - Content Haplotype and A Cognate Human Leukocyte Antigen Ligand are Associated with Autism

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Anthony; Westover, Jonna; Benson, Michael; Johnson, Randall; Dykes, Annelise

    2016-01-01

    The killing activity of natural killer cells is largely regulated by the binding of class I human leukocyte antigen cognate ligands to killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor proteins. The killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor gene - complex contains genes that activate and others that inhibit the killing state of natural killer cells depending on the binding of specific human leukocyte antigen cognate ligands. It has been suggested in previous publications that activating human leukocyte antigen/killer - cell immunoglobulin - like receptor complexes are increased in people with autism. We present data, which suggests that an activating cB01/tA01 killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor gene - content haplotype and the cognate ligand human leukocyte antigen - C1k that activates this haplotype is significantly increased in autism. This is an important observation suggesting that the interaction between two proteins encoded on different chromosomes increases natural killer cell killing in autism. PMID:27853655

  4. A Killer Immunoglobulin - Like Receptor Gene - Content Haplotype and A Cognate Human Leukocyte Antigen Ligand are Associated with Autism.

    PubMed

    Torres, Anthony; Westover, Jonna; Benson, Michael; Johnson, Randall; Dykes, Annelise

    2016-04-01

    The killing activity of natural killer cells is largely regulated by the binding of class I human leukocyte antigen cognate ligands to killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor proteins. The killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor gene - complex contains genes that activate and others that inhibit the killing state of natural killer cells depending on the binding of specific human leukocyte antigen cognate ligands. It has been suggested in previous publications that activating human leukocyte antigen/killer - cell immunoglobulin - like receptor complexes are increased in people with autism. We present data, which suggests that an activating cB01/tA01 killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor gene - content haplotype and the cognate ligand human leukocyte antigen - C1k that activates this haplotype is significantly increased in autism. This is an important observation suggesting that the interaction between two proteins encoded on different chromosomes increases natural killer cell killing in autism.

  5. Characterization of clonal immunoglobulin heavy (IGH) V-D-J gene rearrangements and the complementarity-determining region in South Indian patients with precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumar, Thangarajan; Rajalekshmy, Kamalalayam Raghavan; Nancy, Nirmala Karunakaran

    2017-01-01

    Background This study characterized clonal IG heavy V-D-J (IGH) gene rearrangements in South Indian patients with precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (precursor B-ALL) and identified age-related predominance in VDJ rearrangements. Methods IGH rearrangements were studied in 50 precursor B-ALL cases (common ALL=37, pre-B ALL=10, pro-B ALL=3) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) heteroduplex analysis. Twenty randomly selected clonal IGH rearrangement sequences were analyzed using the IMGT/V-QUEST tool. Results Clonal IGH rearrangements were detected in 41 (82%) precursor B-ALL cases. Among the IGHV1-IGHV7 subgroups, IGHV3 was used in 25 (50%) cases. Among the IGHD1-IGHD7 genes, IGHD2 and IGHD3 were used in 8 (40%) and 5 (25%) clones, respectively. Among the IGHJ1-IGHJ6 genes, IGHJ6 and IGHJ4 were used in 9 (45%) and 6 (30%) clones, respectively. In 6 out of 20 (30%) IGH rearranged sequences, CDR3 was in frame whereas 14 (70%) had rearranged sequences and CDR3 was out of frame. A somatic mutation in Vmut/Dmut/Jmut was detected in 14 of 20 IGH sequences. On average, Vmut/Dmut/Jmut were detected in 0.1 nt, 1.1 nt, and 0.2 nt, respectively. Conclusion The IGHV3 gene was frequently used whereas lower frequencies of IGHV5 and IGHV6 and a higher frequency of IGHV4 were detected in children compared with young adults. The IGHD2 and IGHD3 genes were over-represented, and the IGHJ6 gene was predominantly used in precursor-B-ALL. However, the IGH gene rearrangements in precursor-B-ALL did not show any significant age-associated genotype pattern attributed to our population. PMID:28401103

  6. On immunoglobulin heavy chain gene switching: two gamma 2b genes are rearranged via switch sequences in MPC-11 cells but only one is expressed.

    PubMed

    Lang, R B; Stanton, L W; Marcu, K B

    1982-01-22

    During B lymphocytes differentiation, switches in the expression of heavy chain immunoglobulin constant region (CH) genes occur by a novel DNA recombination mechanism. We have investigated the requirements of the CH gene switch by characterizing two rearranged gamma 2b genes from a gamma 2b producing mouse myeloma (MPC-11). One of the two gamma 2b genes is present in 2-3 copies per cell (gamma 2b strong hybridizer) while the other is present in approximately 1 copy per cell (gamma 2b weak hybridizer). Genomic clones of the gamma 2b strongly hybridizing gene indicate that this is an abortive switch event between the S gamma 3 and S gamma 2b regions. However, clones of the gamma 2b weakly hybridizing gene suggest a functional rearrangement due to the presence of VH, JH and S mu sequences. The switch-recombination sites of these rearranged gamma 2b genes and those of other CH genes show a high degree of preference for the sequence AGGTTG 5' of either the S mu donor site or the appropriate CH S acceptor site. AGGTTG and its analogs are rare in the S mu region, are somewhat prevalent in s alpha and in the case of S mu are found 5' of a tandemly repeated DNA sequence (GAGCT, GGGGT) comprising most of S mu.

  7. Regulation and targeting of recombination in extrachromosomal substrates carrying immunoglobulin switch region sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Leung, H; Maizels, N

    1994-01-01

    We have used extrachromosomal substrates carrying immunoglobulin heavy-chain S mu and S gamma 3 switch region sequences to study activation and targeting of recombination by a transcriptional enhancer element. Substrates are transiently introduced into activated primary murine B cells, in which recombination involving S-region sequences deletes a conditionally lethal marker, and recombination is measured by transformation of Escherichia coli in the second step of the assay. Previously we found that as many as 25% of replicated substrates recombined during 40-h transfection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated primary cells and that efficient recombination was dependent on the presence of S-region sequences as well as a transcriptional activator region in the constructs (H. Leung and N. Maizels, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89:4154-4158, 1992). Here we show that recombination of the switch substrates is threefold more efficient in LPS-cultured primary B cells than in the T-cell line EL4; the activities responsible for switch substrate recombination thus appear to be more abundant or more active in cells which can carry out chromosomal switch recombination. We test the role of the transcriptional activator region and show that the immunoglobulin heavy-chain intron enhancer (E mu) alone stimulates recombination as well as E mu combined with a heavy-chain promoter and that mutations that diminish enhancer-dependent transcription 500-fold diminish recombinational activation less than 2-fold. These observations suggest that the enhancer stimulates recombination by a mechanism that does not depend on transcript production or that is insensitive to the level of transcript production over a very broad range. Furthermore, we find that E mu stimulates recombination when located either upstream or downstream of S mu but that the position of the recombinational activator does affect the targeting of recombination junctions, suggesting that the relatively imprecise targeting of

  8. The structure of immunoglobulin variable regions in the horned shark,Heterodontus francisci.

    PubMed

    Kehoe, J M; Sharon, J; Gerber-Jenson, B; Litman, G W

    1978-12-01

    The heavy and light chains of pooled antibodies of the hybodont shark,Heterodontus francisci (horned shark), were subjected to amino acid sequence analysis. Yield determinations showed that more than 90% of the available polypeptides in the respective pools were sequenced. The heavy chains were homogeneous in the initial framework segment and showed a sequence homology of approximately 70% with the corresponding region of the more recently evolved nurse shark and a 45% homology with a human myeloma heavy chain. The light chains were less homogeneous and not identifiable as either kappa or lambda chains as known in higher species. The first half-cystine characteristics of the variable domain intrachain disulfide bridge of immunoglobulins was present in the same position (22 for heavy chains; 23 for light chains) in the horned shark as in mammalian species. The sequence analysis also suggested the presence of a hypervariable region in the horned shark light chains. The combined data imply that the antigen-binding function of immunoglobulins is mediated in much the same manner in this primitive shark as in more recently evolved species, including mammals.

  9. The coupling between enhancer activity and hypomethylation of kappa immunoglobulin genes is developmentally regulated

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, D.E.; Pollok, B.A.; Atchison, M.L.; Perry, R.P.

    1988-02-01

    Previous studies have indicated that immunoglobulin enhancers are essential for establishing transcriptional competence but not for maintaining the activity of constitutively transcribed genes. To understand the basis for this developmental shift away from dependence on enhancer function, the authors investigated the relationship between transcriptional activity and methylation status of the immunoglobulin kappa-light-chain genes (kappa genes) in mouse cell lines representing different stages of B-cell maturation. Using pre-B-cell lines in which the level of a critical kappa enhancer-binding factor, NF-kappaB, was controlled by the administration of withdrawal of lipopolysaccharide and plasmacytoma lines that either contain or lack this factor, they studied the properties of endogenous kappa genes and of transfected kappa genes which were stably integrated into the genomes of these cells. In the pre-B cells, the exogenous (originally unmethylated) kappa genes, as well as the endogenous kappa genes, were fully methylated and persistently dependent on enhancer function, even after more than 30 generations in a transcriptionally active state. In plasmacytoma cells, the endogenous kappa genes were invariably hypomethylated, whereas exogenous kappa genes were hypomethylated only in cells that contain NF-kappaB and are thus permissive for kappa enhancer function. These results indicate that the linkage of hypomethylation to enhancer-dependent activation of kappa transcription occurs after the pre-B-cell stage of development. The change in methylation status, together with associated changes in chromatin structure, may suffice to eliminate or lessen the importance of the enhancer for the maintenance of the transcriptionally active state.

  10. Expression of immunoglobulin genes in the avian embryo bone marrow revealed by retroviral transformation.

    PubMed

    Benatar, T; Iacampo, S; Tkalec, L; Ratcliffe, M J

    1991-10-01

    Analysis of the early stages of avian B lymphocyte differentiation has been hampered by the low frequency of extra-bursal B lineage cells in sites of hematopoiesis. Consequently, little is known about B lineage precursors prior to their migration into the bursa of Fabricius. Colonization of the bursa typically occurs between about days 8 and 14 of embryonic (e) development, although cells which can colonize the bursa, functionally defined as pre-bursal stem cells, can be demonstrated in embryo bone marrow up until about the time of hatch. As a novel approach to analyzing early stages of avian B lymphocyte development, we show here that transformed B lineage cells can be derived from chick embryo bone marrow after infection in vitro with the replication-defective retrovirus REV-T produced in the context of the non-cytopathic CSV helper virus. Thus, exposure of day 14e-15e chick embryo bone marrow cells to REV-T (CSV) results in the generation of transformed, polyclonal lines of cells. From these lines, cells expressing cell surface immunoglobulin were readily isolated by flow cytometric cell sorting and single cell cloning. Analysis of the phenotype of REV-T(CSV)-transformed clones with a panel of monoclonal antibody reagents demonstrated that transformation by v-rel likely leads to marked changes in cell surface antigen expression. Nonetheless, clones expressing cell surface immunoglobulin expressed apparently normal mRNA for immunoglobulin mu and light chain and contained apparently normal immunoglobulin heavy and light chain gene rearrangements. Furthermore, no evidence for chromosomal deletions or aberrations of the Ig loci was detected among either sIg+ or sIg- REV-T(CSV)-transformed clones.

  11. A Diverse Repertoire of Human Immunoglobulin Variable Genes in a Chicken B Cell Line is Generated by Both Gene Conversion and Somatic Hypermutation

    PubMed Central

    Leighton, Philip A.; Schusser, Benjamin; Yi, Henry; Glanville, Jacob; Harriman, William

    2015-01-01

    Chicken immune responses to human proteins are often more robust than rodent responses because of the phylogenetic relationship between the different species. For discovery of a diverse panel of unique therapeutic antibody candidates, chickens therefore represent an attractive host for human-derived targets. Recent advances in monoclonal antibody technology, specifically new methods for the molecular cloning of antibody genes directly from primary B cells, has ushered in a new era of generating monoclonal antibodies from non-traditional host animals that were previously inaccessible through hybridoma technology. However, such monoclonals still require post-discovery humanization in order to be developed as therapeutics. To obviate the need for humanization, a modified strain of chickens could be engineered to express a human-sequence immunoglobulin variable region repertoire. Here, human variable genes introduced into the chicken immunoglobulin loci through gene targeting were evaluated for their ability to be recognized and diversified by the native chicken recombination machinery that is present in the B-lineage cell line DT40. After expansion in culture the DT40 population accumulated genetic mutants that were detected via deep sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that the human targeted constructs are performing as expected in the cell culture system, and provide a measure of confidence that they will be functional in transgenic animals. PMID:25852694

  12. Diversity of killer cell immunoglobulin like receptor genes in the Mongolian population.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Wang, Aili; Ju, Zhong; Zhang, Yonghong

    2013-06-01

    Killer cell immunoglobulin like receptor (KIR) is highly polymorphic in genotype, haplotype and allele levels. This study was done to investigate KIR genes frequencies, genotypes and inheritance in Mongolian. Gene-specific PCR amplification was used to identify the presence or absence of 16 KIR loci.KIR genotypes were obtained by a KIR genotypes website. The KIR genes frequencies of Mongolian were compared to 24 different populations around the world. The distribution of haplotype B in Mongolian was higher than that in Mongoloid and less than that in Caucasian. Thirty discovered genotypes and five novel genotypes were identified from 1 to 34 individuals. 37.8% of Mongolian carried KIR haplotype AA.Mongolian was exhibited between North Mongoloid and Caucasus by principal component and genetic tree analysis.

  13. Diversity of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor genes in Indonesian populations of Java, Kalimantan, Timor and Irian Jaya.

    PubMed

    Velickovic, M; Velickovic, Z; Panigoro, R; Dunckley, H

    2009-01-01

    Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) regulate the activity of natural killer and T cells through interactions with specific human leucocyte antigen class I molecules on target cells. Population studies performed over the last several years have established that KIR gene frequencies (GFs) and genotype content vary considerably among different ethnic groups, indicating the extent of KIR diversity, some of which have also shown the effect of the presence or absence of specific KIR genes in human disease. We have determined the frequencies of 16 KIR genes and pseudogenes and genotypes in 193 Indonesian individuals from Java, East Timor, Irian Jaya (western half of the island of New Guinea) and Kalimantan provinces of Indonesian Borneo. All 16 KIR genes were observed in all four populations. Variation in GFs between populations was observed, except for KIR2DL4, KIR3DL2, KIR3DL3, KIR2DP1 and KIR3DP1 genes, which were present in every individual tested. When comparing KIR GFs between populations, both principal component analysis and a phylogenetic tree showed close clustering of the Kalimantan and Javanese populations, while Irianese populations were clearly separated from the other three populations. Our results indicate a high level of KIR polymorphism in Indonesian populations that probably reflects the large geographical spread of the Indonesian archipelago and the complex evolutionary history and population migration in this region.

  14. Diagnostic value of immunoglobulin κ light chain gene rearrangement analysis in B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Kokovic, Ira; Jezersek Novakovic, Barbara; Novakovic, Srdjan

    2015-03-01

    Analysis of the immunoglobulin κ light chain (IGK) gene is an alternative method for B-cell clonality assessment in the diagnosis of mature B-cell proliferations in which the detection of clonal immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) gene rearrangements fails. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the added value of standardized BIOMED-2 assay for the detection of clonal IGK gene rearrangements in the diagnostic setting of suspected B-cell lymphomas. With this purpose, 92 specimens from 80 patients with the final diagnosis of mature B-cell lymphoma (37 specimens), mature T-cell lymphoma (26 specimens) and reactive lymphoid proliferation (29 specimens) were analyzed for B-cell clonality. B-cell clonality analysis was performed using the BIOMED-2 IGH and IGK gene clonality assays. The determined sensitivity of the IGK assay was 67.6%, while the determined sensitivity of the IGH assay was 75.7%. The sensitivity of combined IGH+IGK assay was 81.1%. The determined specificity of the IGK assay was 96.2% in the group of T-cell lymphomas and 96.6% in the group of reactive lesions. The determined specificity of the IGH assay was 84.6% in the group of lymphomas and 86.2% in the group of reactive lesions. The comparison of GeneScan (GS) and heteroduplex pretreatment-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (HD-PAGE) methods for the analysis of IGK gene rearrangements showed a higher efficacy of GS analysis in a series of 27 B-cell lymphomas analyzed by both methods. In the present study, we demonstrated that by applying the combined IGH+IGK clonality assay the overall detection rate of B-cell clonality was increased by 5.4%. Thus, we confirmed the added value of the standardized BIOMED-2 IGK assay for assessment of B-cell clonality in suspected B-cell lymphomas with inconclusive clinical and cyto/histological diagnosis.

  15. Cerebrospinal-fluid-derived immunoglobulin G of different multiple sclerosis patients shares mutated sequences in complementarity determining regions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vaibhav; Stoop, Marcel P; Stingl, Christoph; Luitwieler, Ronald L; Dekker, Lennard J; van Duijn, Martijn M; Kreft, Karim L; Luider, Theo M; Hintzen, Rogier Q

    2013-12-01

    B lymphocytes play a pivotal role in multiple sclerosis pathology, possibly via both antibody-dependent and -independent pathways. Intrathecal immunoglobulin G in multiple sclerosis is produced by clonally expanded B-cell populations. Recent studies indicate that the complementarity determining regions of immunoglobulins specific for certain antigens are frequently shared between different individuals. In this study, our main objective was to identify specific proteomic profiles of mutated complementarity determining regions of immunoglobulin G present in multiple sclerosis patients but absent in healthy controls. To achieve this objective, we purified immunoglobulin G from the cerebrospinal fluid of 29 multiple sclerosis patients and 30 healthy controls and separated the corresponding heavy and light chains via SDS-PAGE. Subsequently, bands were excised, trypsinized, and measured with high-resolution mass spectrometry. We sequenced 841 heavy and 771 light chain variable region peptides. We observed 24 heavy and 26 light chain complementarity determining regions that were solely present in a number of multiple sclerosis patients. Using stringent criteria for the identification of common peptides, we found five complementarity determining regions shared in three or more patients and not in controls. Interestingly, one complementarity determining region with a single mutation was found in six patients. Additionally, one other patient carrying a similar complementarity determining region with another mutation was observed. In addition, we found a skew in the κ-to-λ ratio and in the usage of certain variable heavy regions that was previously observed at the transcriptome level. At the protein level, cerebrospinal fluid immunoglobulin G shares common characteristics in the antigen binding region among different multiple sclerosis patients. The indication of a shared fingerprint may indicate common antigens for B-cell activation.

  16. Fish Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Mashoof, Sara; Criscitiello, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    The B cell receptor and secreted antibody are at the nexus of humoral adaptive immunity. In this review, we summarize what is known of the immunoglobulin genes of jawed cartilaginous and bony fishes. We focus on what has been learned from genomic or cDNA sequence data, but where appropriate draw upon protein, immunization, affinity and structural studies. Work from major aquatic model organisms and less studied comparative species are both included to define what is the rule for an immunoglobulin isotype or taxonomic group and what exemplifies an exception. PMID:27879632

  17. Diversity of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor genes in Indonesian populations of Sumatra, Sulawesi and Moluccas Islands.

    PubMed

    Velickovic, M; Velickovic, Z; Panigoro, R; Dunckley, H

    2010-10-01

    Killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) regulate the activity of natural killer and T cells through interaction with specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules on target cells. Like HLA class I genes that are characterised by extreme allelic polymorphism, KIR genes are diverse and vary in both gene content and allelic polymorphism. Population studies conducted over the last several years have showed that KIR gene frequencies (GF) and genotype content vary among different ethnic groups, indicating the extent of KIR diversity. Some studies have also shown the effect of the presence or absence of specific KIR genes in human disease. We have recently reported the distribution of KIR genes in populations from Java (Central Javanese and the Sundanese of West Java), East Timor (Timorese), Kalimantan provinces of Indonesian Borneo (Dayaks) and Irian Jaya (Western half of the island of New Guinea; Melanese). We here extend analysis of the KIR genes in populations from North Sulawesi (Minahasans), West Sumatra (Minangs) and Moluccas Islands. All 16 KIR genes were observed in all three populations. Variation in GF between populations was observed, except for the KIR2DL4, KIR3DL2, KIR3DL3 and KIR3DP1 genes, which were present in every individual tested. When comparing KIR GF between populations, both principal component analysis and phylogenetic tree analyses showed a close relationship between Minahasan and Moluccan populations that are clustered with Timorese in the same clade. The Minang tribe lies between the Javanese/Kalimantan and the Timorese/Minahasan/Moluccan clades, whereas Irianese show the greatest genetic distances from other Indonesian populations. The results correspond well with the history of migration in Indonesia and will contribute to the understanding of the genetic as well as the geographic history of the region.

  18. Somatic mutation of immunoglobulin V(H)6 genes in human infants.

    PubMed

    Ridings, J; Dinan, L; Williams, R; Roberton, D; Zola, H

    1998-10-01

    Infants respond to antigen by making antibody that is generally of low affinity for antigen. Somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes, and selection of cells expressing mutations with improved affinity for antigen, are the molecular and cellular processes underlying the maturation of antibody affinity. We have reported previously that neonates and infants up to 2 months of age, including individuals undergoing strong immunological challenge, show very few mutated V(H)6 sequences, with low mutation frequencies in mutated sequences, and little evidence of selection. We have now examined immunoglobulin genes from healthy infants between 2 and 10 months old for mutation and evidence of selection. In this age group, the proportion of V(H)6 sequences which are mutated and the mutation frequency in mutated sequences increase with age. There is evidence of selection from 6 months old. These results indicate that the process of affinity maturation, which depends on cognate T-B cell interaction and functional germinal centres, is approaching maturity from 6 months old.

  19. Pulsed-field electrophoresis screening for immunoglobulin heavy-chain constant-region (IGHC) multigene deletions and duplications.

    PubMed Central

    Bottaro, A; Cariota, U; DeMarchi, M; Carbonara, A O

    1991-01-01

    Genome regions containing multiple copies of homologous genes, such as the immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy-chain constant-region (IGHC) locus, are often unstable and give rise to duplicated and deleted haplotypes. Analysis of such processes is fundamental to understanding the mechanisms of evolution of multigene families. In the IGHC region, a number of single and multiple gene deletions, derived from either unequal crossing-over or looping-out excision, have been described. To study these haplotypes at the population level, a simple and efficient method for preparing large numbers of DNA samples suitable for pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis was set up, and a sample of 110 blood donors was screened. Deletions were found to be frequent, as expected on the basis of previous serological surveys for homozygotes. Furthermore, a number of multigene duplications, never identified before, were detected. The total frequency of individuals bearing rearranged IGHC haplotypes was 10%. The genes involved in these deletions and duplications were assessed by densitometric analysis of standard Southern blots hybridized with several IGHC probes; two types of deletion and two types of duplication could thus be characterized. These data provide further evidence of the instability of the IGHC locus and demonstrate that unequal crossing-over is the most likely origin of rearranged IGHC haplotypes; they also suggest that such recombination events may be relatively frequent. Moreover, the simplicity and effectiveness of the large-scale PFGE screening approach will be of great help in the study of multigene families and of other loci involved in aberrant recombinations. Images p[750]-a Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1901690

  20. Diversity of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor genes in the Bengali population of northern West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Guha, P; Bhattacharjee, S; Chaudhuri, T K

    2014-12-01

    The Indian Subcontinent exhibits extensive diversity in its culture, religion, ethnicity and linguistic heritage, which symbolizes extensive genetic variations within the populations. The highly polymorphic Killer cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptor (KIR) family plays an important role in tracing genetic differentiation in human population. In this study, we aimed to analyse the KIR gene polymorphism in the Bengali population of northern West Bengal, India. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the KIR gene polymorphism in the Bengalis of West Bengal, India. Herein, we have studied the distribution of 14 KIR genes (KIR3DL1-3DL3, KIR2DL1-2DL5, KIR2DS1-2DS5 AND KIR3DS1) and two pseudogenes (KIR3DP1 and 2DP1) in the Bengalis. Apart from the framework genes (KIR2DL4, 3DL2, 3DL3 and 3DP1), which are present in all the individuals, the gene frequencies of other KIR genes varied between 0.34 and 0.88. Moreover, upon comparing the KIR polymorphism of the Bengalis with the available published data of other world populations, it has been found that the Indo-European-speaking Bengalis from the region share both Dravidian and Indo-Aryan gene pool with considerable influences of mongoloid and European descents. Furthermore, evidences from previously published data on human leucocyte antigen and Y-chromosome haplogroup diversity support the view. Our results will help to understand the genetic background of the Bengali population, in illustrating the population migration events in the eastern and north-eastern part of India, in explaining the extensive genetic admixture amongst the different linguistic groups of the region and also in KIR-related disease researches.

  1. Boundaries of somatic mutation in rearranged immunoglobulin genes: 5' boundary is near the promoter, and 3' boundary is approximately 1 kb from V(D)J gene

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    To investigate why somatic mutations are spatially restricted to a region around the rearranged V(D)J immunoglobulin gene, we compared the distribution of mutations flanking murine V gene segments that had rearranged next to either proximal or distal J gene segments. 124 nucleotide substitutions, nine deletions, and two insertions were identified in 32,481 bp of DNA flanking the coding regions from 17 heavy and kappa light chain genes. Most of the mutations occurred within a 2-kb region centered around the V(D)J gene, regardless of which J gene segment was used, suggesting that the structural information for mutation is located in sequences around and within the V(D)J gene, and not in sequences downstream of the J gene segments. The majority of mutations were found within 300 bp of DNA flanking the 5' side of the V(D)J gene and 850 bp flanking the 3' side at a frequency of 0.8%, which was similar to the frequency in the coding region. The frequency of flanking mutations decreased as a function of distance from the gene. There was no evidence for hot spots in that every mutation was unique and occurred at a different position. No mutations were found upstream of the promoter region, suggesting that the promoter delimits a 5' boundary, which provides strong evidence that transcription is necessary to generate mutation. The 3' boundary was approximately 1 kb from the V(D)J gene and was not associated with a DNA sequence motif. Occasional mutations were located in the nuclear matrix association and enhancer regions. The pattern of substitutions suggests that there is discrimination between the two DNA strands during mutation, in that the four bases were mutated with different frequencies on each strand. The high frequency of mutations in the 3' flanking region and the uniqueness of each mutation argues against templated gene conversion as a mechanism for generating somatic diversity in murine V(D)J genes. Rather, the data support a model for random point mutations

  2. Fine mapping of T-cell immunoglobulin mucin domain gene 1 failed to detect a significant association with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Grabmer, C; Nachbauer, W; Schanda, K; Feurle, P; Loacker, K; Scholz, E; Schennach, H; Berger, T; Reindl, M; Gassner, C

    2010-03-01

    The T-cell immunoglobulin mucin (TIM) gene family encodes receptors on T-cells that regulate Th1- and Th2-cell-mediated immunity. Recently published data implied differential expression of human TIM molecules by mononuclear cells in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and might therefore be involved in different phases of the pathogenesis of MS. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of TIM1 gene polymorphism with susceptibility to and clinical progression in MS. In total, 272 patients with MS and 272 sex- and age-matched healthy blood donors from Western Austria were genotyped for 10 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Five SNPs were located in the promoter region of TIM1 (rs7702920, rs41297577, rs41297579, rs9313422 and rs34333511). Another five SNPs were selected in exon 4 (rs1553316 and rs12522248) and in the intronic regions 4 and 7 of TIM1 (rs1553318, rs2279804 and rs2277025), respectively. None of these SNPs showed a significant association with MS after correction for multiple comparisons. Haplotype analysis of our data resulted in 11 haplotypes and showed no significant differences between MS patients and controls. Our findings suggest that even fine mapping of TIM1 shows no significant association of this gene with multiple sclerosis.

  3. Immunoglobulin light chain (IgL) genes in zebrafish: Genomic configurations and inversional rearrangements between (VL–JL–CL) gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Anastasia M.; Yeo, Gene; Howe, Kerstin; Maddox, Benjamin J.; Steiner, Lisa A.

    2008-01-01

    In mammals, Immunoglobulin light chain (IgL) are localized to two chromosomal regions (designated κ and λ). Here we report a genome-wide survey of IgL genes in the zebrafish revealing (VL–JL–CL) clusters spanning 5 separate chromosomes. To elucidate IgL loci present in the zebrafish genome assembly (Zv6), conventional sequence similarity searches and a novel scanning approach based on recombination signal sequence (RSS) motifs were applied. RT-PCR with zebrafish cDNA was used to confirm annotations, evaluate VJ-rearrangement possibilities and show that each chromosomal locus is expressed. In contrast to other vertebrates in which IgL exon usage has been studied, inversional rearrangement between (VL–JL–CL) clusters were found. Inter-cluster rearrangements may convey a selective advantage for editing self-reactive receptors and poise zebrafish by virtue of their extensive numbers of VL, JL and CL to have greater potential for immunoglobulin gene shuffling than traditionally studied mice and human models. PMID:18022691

  4. DNA breaks in hypermutating immunoglobulin genes: evidence for a break-and-repair pathway of somatic hypermutation.

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Q; Maizels, N

    2001-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that immunoglobulin gene hypermutation in vivo employs a pathway in which DNA breaks are introduced and subsequently repaired to produce mutations, we have used a PCR-based assay to detect and identify single-strand DNA breaks in lambda1 genes of actively hypermutating primary murine germinal center B cells. We find that there is a two- to threefold excess of breaks in lambda1 genes of hypermutating B cells, relative to nonhypermutating B cells, and that 1.3% of germinal center B cells contain breaks in the lambda1 gene that are associated with hypermutation. Breaks were found in both top and bottom DNA strands and were localized to the region of lambda1 that actively hypermutates, but duplex breaks accounted for only a subset of breaks identified. Almost half of the breaks in hypermutating B cells occurred at hotspots, sites at which two or more independent breaks were identified. Breaksite hotspots were associated with characteristic sequence motifs: a pyrimidine-rich motif, either RCTYT or CCYC; and RGYW, a sequence motif associated with hypermutation hotspots. The sequence motifs identified at breaksite hotspots should inform the design of substrates for characterization of activities that participate in the hypermutation pathway. PMID:11333245

  5. Lectins from opportunistic bacteria interact with acquired variable-region glycans of surface immunoglobulin in follicular lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Dunja; Dühren-von Minden, Marcus; Alkhatib, Alabbas; Setz, Corinna; van Bergen, Cornelis A. M.; Benkißer-Petersen, Marco; Wilhelm, Isabel; Villringer, Sarah; Krysov, Sergey; Packham, Graham; Zirlik, Katja; Römer, Winfried; Buske, Christian; Stevenson, Freda K.; Veelken, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) expression is a key feature of most B-cell lymphomas, but the mechanisms of BCR signal induction and the involvement of autoantigen recognition remain unclear. In follicular lymphoma (FL) B cells, BCR expression is retained despite a chromosomal translocation that links the antiapoptotic gene BCL2 to the regulatory elements of immunoglobulin genes, thereby disrupting 1 heavy-chain allele. A remarkable feature of FL-BCRs is the acquisition of potential N-glycosylation sites during somatic hypermutation. The introduced glycans carry mannose termini, which create potential novel binding sites for mannose-specific lectins. Here, we investigated the effect of N-linked variable-region glycosylation for BCR interaction with cognate antigen and with lectins of different origins. N-glycans were found to severely impair BCR specificity and affinity to the initial cognate antigen. In addition, we found that lectins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cenocepacia bind and stimulate FL cells. Human exposure to these bacteria can occur by contact with soil and water. In addition, they represent opportunistic pathogens in susceptible hosts. Understanding the role of bacterial lectins might elucidate the pathogenesis of FL and establish novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:25784678

  6. Lectins from opportunistic bacteria interact with acquired variable-region glycans of surface immunoglobulin in follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Dunja; Dühren-von Minden, Marcus; Alkhatib, Alabbas; Setz, Corinna; van Bergen, Cornelis A M; Benkißer-Petersen, Marco; Wilhelm, Isabel; Villringer, Sarah; Krysov, Sergey; Packham, Graham; Zirlik, Katja; Römer, Winfried; Buske, Christian; Stevenson, Freda K; Veelken, Hendrik; Jumaa, Hassan

    2015-05-21

    B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) expression is a key feature of most B-cell lymphomas, but the mechanisms of BCR signal induction and the involvement of autoantigen recognition remain unclear. In follicular lymphoma (FL) B cells, BCR expression is retained despite a chromosomal translocation that links the antiapoptotic gene BCL2 to the regulatory elements of immunoglobulin genes, thereby disrupting 1 heavy-chain allele. A remarkable feature of FL-BCRs is the acquisition of potential N-glycosylation sites during somatic hypermutation. The introduced glycans carry mannose termini, which create potential novel binding sites for mannose-specific lectins. Here, we investigated the effect of N-linked variable-region glycosylation for BCR interaction with cognate antigen and with lectins of different origins. N-glycans were found to severely impair BCR specificity and affinity to the initial cognate antigen. In addition, we found that lectins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cenocepacia bind and stimulate FL cells. Human exposure to these bacteria can occur by contact with soil and water. In addition, they represent opportunistic pathogens in susceptible hosts. Understanding the role of bacterial lectins might elucidate the pathogenesis of FL and establish novel therapeutic approaches.

  7. Efficient immunoglobulin gene disruption and targeted replacement in rabbit using zinc finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Flisikowska, Tatiana; Thorey, Irmgard S; Offner, Sonja; Ros, Francesca; Lifke, Valeria; Zeitler, Bryan; Rottmann, Oswald; Vincent, Anna; Zhang, Lei; Jenkins, Shirin; Niersbach, Helmut; Kind, Alexander J; Gregory, Philip D; Schnieke, Angelika E; Platzer, Josef

    2011-01-01

    Rabbits are widely used in biomedical research, yet techniques for their precise genetic modification are lacking. We demonstrate that zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) introduced into fertilized oocytes can inactivate a chosen gene by mutagenesis and also mediate precise homologous recombination with a DNA gene-targeting vector to achieve the first gene knockout and targeted sequence replacement in rabbits. Two ZFN pairs were designed that target the rabbit immunoglobulin M (IgM) locus within exons 1 and 2. ZFN mRNAs were microinjected into pronuclear stage fertilized oocytes. Founder animals carrying distinct mutated IgM alleles were identified and bred to produce offspring. Functional knockout of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus was confirmed by serum IgM and IgG deficiency and lack of IgM(+) and IgG(+) B lymphocytes. We then tested whether ZFN expression would enable efficient targeted sequence replacement in rabbit oocytes. ZFN mRNA was co-injected with a linear DNA vector designed to replace exon 1 of the IgM locus with ∼1.9 kb of novel sequence. Double strand break induced targeted replacement occurred in up to 17% of embryos and in 18% of fetuses analyzed. Two major goals have been achieved. First, inactivation of the endogenous IgM locus, which is an essential step for the production of therapeutic human polyclonal antibodies in the rabbit. Second, establishing efficient targeted gene manipulation and homologous recombination in a refractory animal species. ZFN mediated genetic engineering in the rabbit and other mammals opens new avenues of experimentation in immunology and many other research fields.

  8. Linking of the human immunoglobulin VK and JKCK regions by chromosomal walking.

    PubMed

    Klobeck, H G; Zimmer, F J; Combriato, G; Zachau, H G

    1987-12-10

    The linking of the human VK and JKCK gene regions (abbreviations in ref. 1) by chromosomal walking is reported. Hybridization experiments with the DNA of a somatic cell hybrid containing the region between JKCK and the telomer show that none of the major VK gene clusters is located downstream of CK. The distance between the VK and JK genes was found to be 23 kb. The JK proximal VK gene is the B3 gene which is the only representative of subgroup IV in the genome. This gene and the neighbouring B2 gene (accompanying paper) are arranged in opposite orientation to JKCK and can therefore rearrange only by an inversion mechanism. This finding is used, together with previous data, to delineate the rearrangement processes in the Burkitt lymphoma derived cell line BL21 as comprising an inversion in the first and a deletion in the second step.

  9. Extensive variation in gene copy number at the killer immunoglobulin-like receptor locus in humans.

    PubMed

    Vendelbosch, Sanne; de Boer, Martin; Gouw, Remko A T W; Ho, Cynthia K Y; Geissler, Judy; Swelsen, Wendy T N; Moorhouse, Michael J; Lardy, Neubury M; Roos, Dirk; van den Berg, Timo K; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2013-01-01

    Killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) are involved in the regulation of natural killer cell cytotoxicity. Within the human genome seventeen KIR genes are present, which all contain a large number of allelic variants. The high level of homology among KIR genes has hampered KIR genotyping in larger cohorts, and determination of gene copy number variation (CNV) has been difficult. We have designed a multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique for genotyping and CNV determination in one single assay and validated the results by next-generation sequencing and with a KIR gene-specific short tandem repeat assay. In this way, we demonstrate in a cohort of 120 individuals a high level of CNV for all KIR genes except for the framework genes KIR3DL3 and KIR3DL2. Application of our MLPA assay in segregation analyses of families from the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humaine, previously KIR-genotyped by classical techniques, confirmed an earlier reported duplication and resulted in the identification of a novel duplication event in one of these families. In summary, our KIR MLPA assay allows rapid and accurate KIR genotyping and CNV detection, thus rendering improved transplantation programs and oncology treatment feasible, and enables more detailed studies on the role of KIRs in human (auto)immunity and infectious disease.

  10. The role of G-density in switch region repeats for immunoglobulin class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zheng Z; Pannunzio, Nicholas R; Hsieh, Chih-Lin; Yu, Kefei; Lieber, Michael R

    2014-12-01

    The boundaries of R-loops are well-documented at immunoglobulin heavy chain loci in mammalian B cells. Within primary B cells or B cell lines, the upstream boundaries of R-loops typically begin early in the repetitive portion of the switch regions. Most R-loops terminate within the switch repetitive zone, but the remainder can extend a few hundred base pairs further, where G-density on the non-template DNA strand gradually drops to the genome average. Whether the G-density determines how far the R-loops extend is an important question. We previously studied the role of G-clusters in initiating R-loop formation, but we did not examine the role of G-density in permitting the elongation of the R-loop, after it had initiated. Here, we vary the G-density of different portions of the switch region in a murine B cell line. We find that both class switch recombination (CSR) and R-loop formation decrease significantly when the overall G-density is reduced from 46% to 29%. Short 50 bp insertions with low G-density within switch regions do not appear to affect either CSR or R-loop elongation, whereas a longer (150 bp) insertion impairs both. These results demonstrate that G-density is an important determinant of the length over which mammalian genomic R-loops extend.

  11. Langerhans cell sarcoma in a patient with hairy cell leukemia: common clonal origin indicated by identical immunoglobulin gene rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Furmanczyk, Paul S; Lisle, Allison E; Caldwell, Russell B; Kraemer, Kenneth G; Mercer, Stephen E; George, Evan; Argenyi, Zsolt B

    2012-06-01

    Histiocytic/dendritic cell sarcomas are rare tumors, a few of which have been reported in association with B-cell lymphoma/leukemia. Isolated reports have documented identical immunoglobulin gene rearrangements suggesting a common clonal origin for both the sarcoma and the B-cell neoplasm from individual patients. We report a case of a 75-year-old male with hairy cell leukemia who subsequently developed Langerhans cell sarcoma 1 year after his primary diagnosis of leukemia. The bone marrow biopsy containing hairy cell leukemia and skin biopsies of Langerhans cell sarcoma were evaluated by routine histology, immunohistochemistry, flow cytometric immunophenotyping and PCR-based gene rearrangement studies of the immunoglobulin heavy chain and kappa genes. The hairy cell leukemia showed characteristic morphologic, immunohistochemical and flow cytometric features. The Langerhans cell sarcoma showed pleomorphic cytology, a high mitotic rate and characteristic immunohistochemical staining for Langerin, S100 and CD1a. There was no evidence of B-cell differentiation or a background B-cell infiltrate based on the absence of immunoreactivity with antibodies to multiple B-cell markers. Identical immunoglobulin gene rearrangements were identified in both the hairy cell leukemia and Langerhans cell sarcoma specimens. Despite the phenotypic dissimilarity of the two neoplasms, identical immunoglobulin gene rearrangements indicate a common origin. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. B cell development in mice that lack one or both immunoglobulin kappa light chain genes.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J; Trounstine, M; Kurahara, C; Young, F; Kuo, C C; Xu, Y; Loring, J F; Alt, F W; Huszar, D

    1993-01-01

    We have generated mice that lack the ability to produce immunoglobulin (Ig) kappa light chains by targeted deletion of J kappa and C kappa gene segments and the intervening sequences in mouse embryonic stem cells. In wild type mice, approximately 95% of B cells express kappa light chains and only approximately 5% express lambda light chains. Mice heterozygous for the J kappa C kappa deletion have approximately 2-fold more lambda+ B cells than wild-type littermates. Compared with normal mice, homozygous mutants for the J kappa C kappa deletion have about half the number of B cells in both the newly generated and the peripheral B cell compartments, and all of these B cells express lambda light chains in their Ig. Therefore, homozygous mutant mice appear to produce lambda-expressing cells at nearly 10 times the rate observed in normal mice. These findings demonstrate that kappa gene assembly and/or expression is not a prerequisite for lambda gene assembly and expression. Furthermore, there is no detectable rearrangement of 3' kappa RS sequences in lambda+ B cells of the homozygous mutant mice, thus rearrangements of these sequences, per se, is not required for lambda light chain gene assembly. We discuss these findings in the context of their implications for the control of Ig light chain gene rearrangement and potential applications of the mutant animals. Images PMID:8458340

  13. Immunoglobulin light chain (IGL) genes in torafugu: Genomic organization and identification of a third teleost IGL isotype

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xi; Zhang, Fengjun; Watabe, Shugo; Asakawa, Shuichi

    2017-01-01

    Here, we report a genome-wide survey of immunoglobulin light chain (IGL) genes of torafugu (Takifugu rubripes) revealing multi-clusters spanning three separate chromosomes (v5 assembly) and 45 scaffolds (v4 assembly). Conventional sequence similarity searches and motif scanning approaches based on recombination signal sequence (RSS) motifs were used. We found that three IGL isotypes (L1, L2, and L3) exist in torafugu and that several loci for each isotype are present. The transcriptional orientations of the variable IGL (VL) segments were found to be either the same (in the L2 isotype) or opposite (in the L1 and L3 isotypes) to the IGL joining (JL) and constant (CL) segments, suggesting they can undergo rearrangement by deletion or inversion when expressed. Alignments of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) to corresponding germline gene segments revealed expression of the three IGL isotypes in torafugu. Taken together, our findings provide a genomic framework for torafugu IGL genes and show that the IG diversity of this species could be attributed to at least three distinct chromosomal regions. PMID:28098239

  14. Sequences of human immunoglobulin switch regions: implications for recombination and transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, F C; Brooker, J S; Camerini-Otero, R D

    1990-01-01

    We have sequenced the entire human S mu and S gamma 4 immunoglobulin heavy chain class switch regions, and have also completed the sequence of human S epsilon. S mu is composed predominantly of GAGCT and GGGCT pentameric repeats, with these units also being found in S epsilon at a much lower density. S mu-S gamma 4 matches are infrequent, but S gamma 4 contains a cluster of repeated sequences similar to units in mouse gamma switch sites and unrelated to the S mu repeats, suggesting that S mu-S gamma homology is not important in mu-gamma switching. We examined our epsilon and gamma 4 sequences for features that could regulate production of 'sterile' transcripts preceding switch recombination. There is an Evolutionarily Conserved Sequence (ECS) upstream from the human and mouse S epsilon regions that overlaps and extends 5' to the start sites for human and mouse epsilon sterile transcripts. Similarly, an ECS upstream from S gamma 4 is homologous to a mouse sequence that overlaps and extends 5' to the start sites for mouse gamma 2b sterile transcripts. The epsilon and gamma 4 conserved segments contain potential Interferon Stimulable Response Elements (ISRE's) that are identical between human epsilon and gamma 4. PMID:2124350

  15. Global gene regulation during activation of immunoglobulin class switching in human B cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Youming; Fear, David J.; Willis-Owen, Saffron A. G.; Cookson, William O.; Moffatt, Miriam F.

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin class switch recombination (CSR) to IgE is a tightly regulated process central to atopic disease. To profile the B-cell transcriptional responses underlying the activation of the germinal centre activities leading to the generation of IgE, naïve human B-cells were stimulated with IL-4 and anti-CD40. Gene expression and alternative splicing were profiled over 12 days using the Affymetrix Human Exon 1.0 ST Array. A total of 1,399 genes, forming 13 temporal profiles were differentially expressed. CCL22 and CCL17 were dramatically induced but followed a temporal trajectory distinct from classical mediators of isotype switching. AICDA, NFIL3, IRF4, XBP1 and BATF3 shared a profile with several genes involved in innate immunity, but with no recognised role in CSR. A transcription factor BHLHE40 was identified at the core of this profile. B-cell activation was also accompanied by variation in exon retention affecting >200 genes including CCL17. The data indicate a circadian component and central roles for the Th2 chemokines CCL22 and CCL17 in the activation of CSR. PMID:27897229

  16. Necessity of the stalk region for immunoglobulin E interaction with CD23.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bing-Hung; Ma, Check; Caven, Timothy H; Chan-Li, Yee; Beavil, Andrew; Beavil, Rebecca; Gould, Hannah; Conrad, Daniel H

    2002-11-01

    Previously, a soluble mouse CD23 chimera, composed of an N-terminal trimeric isoleucine zipper motif (lz) followed by the entire extracellular region (amino acids 48-331) of CD23 (lz-CD2348-331), was prepared and exhibited strong binding to rodent immunoglobulin E (IgE). In the current study, we report the construction of a similar human chimeric protein (lz-huCD2345-321), as well as a series of murine chimeric lz-CD23 mutants with incremental portions of stalk deleted, to further investigate the role of the stalk region in mediating the CD23-IgE interaction. All chimeric proteins were designed such that the predicted heptad structure of the stalk was retained. IgE binding, as determined by the capacity to inhibit 125I-IgE from binding to FcepsilonRI-bearing RBL-2H3 cells, and by surface plasmon-resonance analysis using an IgE-coated sensor chip, was unchanged from the original lz chimera and the binding parameters were similar to those of cell-surface CD23. The minimal murine chimera that retained IgE-binding activity was lz-CD23139-331, which still contains 35 amino acids of the stalk region. When the lz motif was linked to CD23 amino acid 157 (or higher), significant IgE-binding capacity was lost. With human lz-CD23, as with mouse, deletion of the stalk greatly reduced IgE-binding ability. In summary, the data support the concept that at least a portion of the stalk region of CD23 plays a crucial role in maintaining high-affinity/avidity interaction with IgE. The lz-CD23 constructs represent a possible alternative for both blocking the IgE/FcepsilonRI interaction and inhibiting IgE production by B lymphocytes.

  17. Necessity of the stalk region for immunoglobulin E interaction with CD23

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bing-Hung; Ma, Check; Caven, Timothy H; Chan-Li, Yee; Beavil, Andrew; Beavil, Rebecca; Gould, Hannah; Conrad, Daniel H

    2002-01-01

    Previously, a soluble mouse CD23 chimera, composed of an N-terminal trimeric isoleucine zipper motif (lz) followed by the entire extracellular region (amino acids 48–331) of CD23 (lz-CD2348–331), was prepared and exhibited strong binding to rodent immunoglobulin E (IgE). In the current study, we report the construction of a similar human chimeric protein (lz-huCD2345–321), as well as a series of murine chimeric lz-CD23 mutants with incremental portions of stalk deleted, to further investigate the role of the stalk region in mediating the CD23–IgE interaction. All chimeric proteins were designed such that the predicted heptad structure of the stalk was retained. IgE binding, as determined by the capacity to inhibit 125I-IgE from binding to Fc∈RI-bearing RBL-2H3 cells, and by surface plasmon-resonance analysis using an IgE-coated sensor chip, was unchanged from the original lz chimera and the binding parameters were similar to those of cell-surface CD23. The minimal murine chimera that retained IgE-binding activity was lz-CD23139–331, which still contains 35 amino acids of the stalk region. When the lz motif was linked to CD23 amino acid 157 (or higher), significant IgE-binding capacity was lost. With human lz-CD23, as with mouse, deletion of the stalk greatly reduced IgE-binding ability. In summary, the data support the concept that at least a portion of the stalk region of CD23 plays a crucial role in maintaining high-affinity/avidity interaction with IgE. The lz-CD23 constructs represent a possible alternative for both blocking the IgE/Fc∈RI interaction and inhibiting IgE production by B lymphocytes. PMID:12423314

  18. Parallel antibody germline gene and haplotype analyses support the validity of immunoglobulin germline gene inference and discovery.

    PubMed

    Kirik, Ufuk; Greiff, Lennart; Levander, Fredrik; Ohlin, Mats

    2017-04-04

    Analysis of antibody repertoire development and specific antibody responses important for e.g. autoimmune conditions, allergy, and protection against disease is supported by high throughput sequencing and associated bioinformatics pipelines that describe the diversity of the encoded antibody variable domains. Proper assignment of sequences to germline genes are important for many such processes, for instance in the analysis of somatic hypermutation. Germline gene inference from antibody-encoding transcriptomes, by using tools such as TIgGER or IgDiscover, has a potential to enhance the quality of such analyses. These tools may also be used to identify germline genes not previously known. In this study, we exploited such software for germline gene inference and define aspects of analysis settings and pre-existing knowledge of germline genes that affect the outcome of gene inference. Furthermore, we demonstrate the capacity of IGHJ and IGHD haplotype inference, whenever subjects are heterozygous with respect to such genes, to lend support to IGHV gene inference in general, and to the identification of novel alleles presently not recognized by germline gene reference directories. We propose that such haplotype analysis shall, whenever possible, be used in future best practice to support the outcome of germline gene inference. IGHJ-directed haplotype inference was also used to identify haplotypes not expressing some IGHV germline genes. In particular, we identified a haplotype that did not express several major germline genes such as IGHV1-8, IGHV3-9, IGHV3-15, IGHV1-18, IGHV3-21, and IGHV3-23. We envisage that haplotype analysis will provide an efficient approach to identify subjects for further studies of the link between the available immunoglobulin repertoire and outcomes of immune responses.

  19. AID-induced remodeling of immunoglobulin genes and B cell fate.

    PubMed

    Laffleur, Brice; Denis-Lagache, Nicolas; Péron, Sophie; Sirac, Christophe; Moreau, Jeanne; Cogné, Michel

    2014-03-15

    Survival and phenotype of normal and malignant B lymphocytes are critically dependent on constitutive signals by the B cell receptor (BCR) for antigen. In addition, either antigen ligation of the BCR or various mitogenic stimuli result in B cell activation and induction of activation-induced deaminase (AID). AID activity can in turn mediate somatic hypermutation (SHM) of immunoglobulin (Ig) V regions and also deeply remodel the Ig heavy chain locus through class switch recombination (CSR) or locus suicide recombination (LSR). In addition to changes linked to affinity for antigen, modifying the class/isotype (i.e. the structure and function) of the BCR or suddenly deleting BCR expression also modulates the fate of antigen-experienced B cells.

  20. Hinge-Region O-Glycosylation of Human Immunoglobulin G3 (IgG3)*

    PubMed Central

    Plomp, Rosina; Dekkers, Gillian; Rombouts, Yoann; Visser, Remco; Koeleman, Carolien A.M.; Kammeijer, Guinevere S.M.; Jansen, Bas C.; Rispens, Theo; Hensbergen, Paul J.; Vidarsson, Gestur; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) is one of the most abundant proteins present in human serum and a fundamental component of the immune system. IgG3 represents ∼8% of the total amount of IgG in human serum and stands out from the other IgG subclasses because of its elongated hinge region and enhanced effector functions. This study reports partial O-glycosylation of the IgG3 hinge region, observed with nanoLC-ESI-IT-MS(/MS) analysis after proteolytic digestion. The repeat regions within the IgG3 hinge were found to be in part O-glycosylated at the threonine in the triple repeat motif. Non-, mono- and disialylated core 1-type O-glycans were detected in various IgG3 samples, both poly- and monoclonal. NanoLC-ESI-IT-MS/MS with electron transfer dissociation fragmentation and CE-MS/MS with CID fragmentation were used to determine the site of IgG3 O-glycosylation. The O-glycosylation site was further confirmed by the recombinant production of mutant IgG3 in which potential O-glycosylation sites had been knocked out. For IgG3 samples from six donors we found similar O-glycan structures and site occupancies, whereas for the same samples the conserved N-glycosylation of the Fc CH2 domain showed considerable interindividual variation. The occupancy of each of the three O-glycosylation sites was found to be ∼10% in six serum-derived IgG3 samples and ∼13% in two monoclonal IgG3 allotypes. PMID:25759508

  1. Editing of mouse and human immunoglobulin genes by CRISPR-Cas9 system.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Taek-Chin; Compagno, Mara; Chiarle, Roberto

    2016-03-09

    Applications of the CRISPR-Cas9 system to edit the genome have widely expanded to include DNA gene knock-out, deletions, chromosomal rearrangements, RNA editing and genome-wide screenings. Here we show the application of CRISPR-Cas9 technology to edit the mouse and human immunoglobulin (Ig) genes. By delivering Cas9 and guide-RNA (gRNA) with retro- or lenti-virus to IgM(+) mouse B cells and hybridomas, we induce class-switch recombination (CSR) of the IgH chain to the desired subclass. Similarly, we induce CSR in all human B cell lines tested with high efficiency to targeted IgH subclass. Finally, we engineer mouse hybridomas to secrete Fab' fragments instead of the whole Ig. Our results indicate that Ig genes in mouse and human cells can be edited to obtain any desired IgH switching helpful to study the biology of normal and lymphoma B cells. We also propose applications that could transform the technology of antibody production.

  2. Editing of mouse and human immunoglobulin genes by CRISPR-Cas9 system

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Taek-Chin; Compagno, Mara; Chiarle, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Applications of the CRISPR-Cas9 system to edit the genome have widely expanded to include DNA gene knock-out, deletions, chromosomal rearrangements, RNA editing and genome-wide screenings. Here we show the application of CRISPR-Cas9 technology to edit the mouse and human immunoglobulin (Ig) genes. By delivering Cas9 and guide-RNA (gRNA) with retro- or lenti-virus to IgM+ mouse B cells and hybridomas, we induce class-switch recombination (CSR) of the IgH chain to the desired subclass. Similarly, we induce CSR in all human B cell lines tested with high efficiency to targeted IgH subclass. Finally, we engineer mouse hybridomas to secrete Fab′ fragments instead of the whole Ig. Our results indicate that Ig genes in mouse and human cells can be edited to obtain any desired IgH switching helpful to study the biology of normal and lymphoma B cells. We also propose applications that could transform the technology of antibody production. PMID:26956543

  3. Automated cleaning and pre-processing of immunoglobulin gene sequences from high-throughput sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Michaeli, Miri; Noga, Hila; Tabibian-Keissar, Hilla; Barshack, Iris; Mehr, Ramit

    2012-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing (HTS) yields tens of thousands to millions of sequences that require a large amount of pre-processing work to clean various artifacts. Such cleaning cannot be performed manually. Existing programs are not suitable for immunoglobulin (Ig) genes, which are variable and often highly mutated. This paper describes Ig High-Throughput Sequencing Cleaner (Ig-HTS-Cleaner), a program containing a simple cleaning procedure that successfully deals with pre-processing of Ig sequences derived from HTS, and Ig Insertion—Deletion Identifier (Ig-Indel-Identifier), a program for identifying legitimate and artifact insertions and/or deletions (indels). Our programs were designed for analyzing Ig gene sequences obtained by 454 sequencing, but they are applicable to all types of sequences and sequencing platforms. Ig-HTS-Cleaner and Ig-Indel-Identifier have been implemented in Java and saved as executable JAR files, supported on Linux and MS Windows. No special requirements are needed in order to run the programs, except for correctly constructing the input files as explained in the text. The programs' performance has been tested and validated on real and simulated data sets. PMID:23293637

  4. Incomplete penetrance of susceptibility genes for MHC-determined immunoglobulin deficiencies in monozygotic twins discordant for type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Alper, Chester A.; Husain, Zaheed; Larsen, Charles E.; Dubey, Devendra P.; Stein, Rosanne; Day, Caitlin; Baker, Alissa; Beyan, Huriya; Hawa, Mohammed; Ola, Thomas O.; Leslie, R. David

    2006-01-01

    Incomplete intrinsic penetrance is the failure of some genetically susceptible individuals (e.g., monozygotic twins of those who have a trait) to exhibit that trait. For the first time, we examine penetrance of susceptibility genes for multiple MHC gene-determined traits in the same subjects. Serum levels of IgA, IgD, IgG3, but not IgG4, in 50 pairs of monozygotic twins discordant for type 1 diabetes (T1D) correlated more closely in the twins than in random paired controls. The frequencies of subjects deficient in IgA (6%), IgD (33%) and IgG4 (12%), but not in IgG3, were higher in the twins than in controls. We postulate that this was because the MHC haplotypes (and possible non-MHC genes) that predispose to T1D also carry susceptibility genes for certain immunoglobulin deficiencies. Immunoglobulin deficiencies were not associated with T1D. Pairwise concordance for the deficiencies in the twins was 50% for IgA, 57% for IgD and 50% for IgG4. There were no significant associations among the specific immunoglobulin deficiencies except that all IgA-deficient subjects had IgD deficiency. Thus, intrinsic penetrance is a random process independently affecting different MHC susceptibility genes. Because multiple different external triggers would be required to explain the results, differential environmental determinants appear unlikely. PMID:17029885

  5. Rearrangement and expression of the immunoglobulin μ-chain gene in human myeloid cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jing; Sun, Xiaoping; Gong, Xiaoting; He, Zhiqiao; Chen, Lei; Qiu, Xiaoyan; Yin, C Cameron

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig), a characteristic marker of B cells, has been reported to be expressed in epithelial cells, with a suggested role in their growth and survival. We have previously reported that IgG heavy chain is expressed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but not in the monocytes or neutrophils from patients with non-hematopoietic neoplasms or healthy controls. In the present study, we assessed IgM heavy chain expression and repertoire in human myeloid cells. We detected VHμDJHμ rearrangement and expression in 7/7 AML cell lines, 7/14 primary myeloblasts from AML patients, and interestingly, 8/20 monocytes and 3/20 neutrophils from patients with non-hematopoietic neoplasms and healthy individuals. We also found evidence of somatic hypermutation of the variable (V) gene segments in AML-derived IgM gene rearrangements but not in IgM from monocytes or neutrophils from patients with non-hematopoietic neoplasms and healthy individuals. Furthermore, IgM VHμDJHμ gene rearrangements in AML cell lines, primary myeloblasts, and monocytes and neutrophils from patients with non-hematopoietic neoplasms showed a restricted V usage and repertoire, whereas the VHμDJHμ gene rearrangements in monocytes and neutrophils from healthy individuals displayed more diversity. Anti-human IgM inhibited cell proliferation, but did not induce apoptosis in AML cell lines. Our findings suggest that AML-derived IgM might be a novel AML-related molecule that is involved in leukemogenesis and AML progression and might serve as a useful molecular marker for designing targeted therapy and monitoring minimal residual disease. PMID:24141767

  6. Atherosclerosis Susceptibility in Mice Is Independent of the V1 Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Gene

    PubMed Central

    Centa, Monica; Gruber, Sabrina; Nilsson, Daniel; Polyzos, Konstantinos A.; Johansson, Daniel K.; Hansson, Göran K.; Ketelhuth, Daniel F.J.; Binder, Christoph J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective— The V1 (VHS107.1.42) immunoglobulin heavy chain gene is thought to be critical in producing IgM natural antibodies of the T15-idiotype that protect against both atherosclerosis and infection from Streptococcus pneumoniae. Our aim was to determine whether genetic loss of the V1 gene increased atherosclerotic plaque burden in vivo because of a reduction in the T15-idiotype or other atheroprotective antibodies. Approach and Results— We crossed VHS107.1.42-deficient mice with the atherosclerosis-prone Apoe−/− and Ldlr−/− strains. Although these double knockout strains manifested no defects in B-cell development, we did observe a substantial reduction in early immune responses against phosphocholine after immunization. However, the titers of plasma antibodies reacting against defined atherosclerotic antigens such as oxidized low-density lipoprotein, as well as the T15-idiotype, were unaffected by loss of the VHS107.1.42 gene in hypercholesterolemic mice. Furthermore, we observed no increase in atherosclerotic lesion formation, either within the aortic arch or aortic root. Robust deposition of IgM within atherosclerotic plaques could also be readily observed in both control and experimental mice. Conclusions— Our data indicate that IgM-dependent protection against atherosclerosis is unlikely to be dependent on antibodies that use the VHS107.1.42 gene, in contrast to the acute immune response conferred by this heavy chain in the response to phosphocholine and in providing resistance against lethal S pneumoniae infection. PMID:26564818

  7. The Immunoglobulin-like Gene spe-45 Acts during Fertilization in Caenorhabditis elegans like the Mouse Izumo1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Hitoshi; Tajima, Tatsuya; Comstra, Heather Skye; Gleason, Elizabeth J.; L'Hernault, Steven W.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The Caenorhabditis elegans spe-9 class genes, which show specific or predominant expression in the male germline, are indispensable for fertilization [1, 2]. However, due to the rapid evolution of genes involved in reproduction, we do not currently know if there are spe-9 class genes in mammals that play similar roles during fertilization to those found in C. elegans. In mice, the Izumo1 gene encodes a sperm-specific transmembrane (TM) protein with a single immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domain that is absolutely required for gamete fusion [3, 4]. In this study, we hypothesized that C. elegans has a new member of the spe-9 class genes coding for an IZUMO1-like protein. We screened C. elegans microarray data [5, 6] to identify male germline-enriched genes that encode membrane proteins with Ig-like domains. A deletion (tm3715) in one such gene (F28D1.8) caused hermaphrodites to show a male germline-dependent self-sterility, so we have named it spe-45. Mutant spe-45 worms seemed to normally undergo spermatogenesis (spermatid production by meiosis) and spermiogenesis (spermatid activation into actively motile spermatozoa). spe-45 mutant spermatozoa, however, could not complete gamete fusion, which is a characteristic of all spe-9 class mutants [1, 2]. Moreover, spe-45 self-sterile worms were rescued by a transgene expressing chimeric SPE-45 protein where its Ig-like domain was replaced by the Ig-like domain from mouse IZUMO1. Hence, C. elegans SPE-45 and mouse IZUMO1 appear to have retained a common function(s) that is required during fertilization. PMID:26671669

  8. Endonuclease G plays a role in immunoglobulin class switch DNA recombination by introducing double-strand breaks in switch regions.

    PubMed

    Zan, Hong; Zhang, Jinsong; Al-Qahtani, Ahmed; Pone, Egest J; White, Clayton A; Lee, Derrik; Yel, Leman; Mai, Thach; Casali, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) class switch DNA recombination (CSR) is the crucial mechanism diversifying the biological effector functions of antibodies. Generation of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs), particularly staggered DSBs, in switch (S) regions of the upstream and downstream CH genes involved in the specific recombination process is an absolute requirement for CSR. Staggered DSBs would be generated through deamination of dCs on opposite DNA strands by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), subsequent dU deglycosylation by uracil DNA glycosylase (Ung) and abasic site nicking by apurinic/apyrimidic endonuclease. However, consistent with the findings that significant amounts of DSBs can be detected in the IgH locus in the absence of AID or Ung, we have shown in human and mouse B cells that AID generates staggered DSBs not only by cleaving intact double-strand DNA, but also by processing blunt DSB ends generated in an AID-independent fashion. How these AID-independent DSBs are generated is still unclear. It is possible that S region DNA may undergo AID-independent cleavage by structure-specific nucleases, such as endonuclease G (EndoG). EndoG is an abundant nuclease in eukaryotic cells. It cleaves single and double-strand DNA, primarily at dG/dC residues, the preferential sites of DSBs in S region DNA. We show here that EndoG can localize to the nucleus of B cells undergoing CSR and binds to S region DNA, as shown by specific chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Using knockout EndoG(-/-) mice and EndoG(-/-) B cells, we found that EndoG deficiency resulted in a two-fold reduction in CSR in vivo and in vitro, as demonstrated by reduced cell surface IgG1, IgG2a, IgG3 and IgA, reduced secreted IgG1, reduced circle Iγ1-Cμ, Iγ3-Cμ, Iɛ-Cμ, Iα-Cμ transcripts, post-recombination Iμ-Cγ1, Iμ-Cγ3, Iμ-Cɛ and Iμ-Cα transcripts. In addition to reduced CSR, EndoG(-/-) mice showed a significantly altered spectrum of mutations in IgH J(H)-iEμ DNA. Impaired CSR in

  9. Endonuclease G plays a role in immunoglobulin class switch DNA recombination by introducing double-strand breaks in switch regions

    PubMed Central

    Zan, Hong; Zhang, Jinsong; Al-Qahtani, Ahmed; Pone, Egest J.; White, Clayton A.; Lee, Derrik; Yel, Leman; Mai, Thach; Casali, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) class switch DNA recombination (CSR) is the crucial mechanism diversifying the biological effector functions of antibodies. Generation of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs), particularly staggered DSBs, in switch (S) regions of the upstream and downstream CH genes involved in the specific recombination process is an absolute requirement for CSR. Staggered DSBs would be generated through deamination of dCs on opposite DNA strands by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), subsequent dU deglycosylation by uracil DNA glycosylase (Ung) and abasic site nicking by apurinic/apyrimidic endonuclease. However, consistent with the findings that significant amounts of DSBs can be detected in the IgH locus in the absence of AID or Ung, we have shown in human and mouse B cells that AID generates staggered DSBs not only by cleaving intact double-strand DNA, but also by processing blunt DSB ends generated in an AID-independent fashion. How these AID-independent DSBs are generated is still unclear. It is possible that S region DNA may undergo AID-independent cleavage by structure-specific nucleases, such as endonuclease G (EndoG). EndoG is an abundant nuclease in eukaryotic cells. It cleaves single- and double-strand DNA, primarily at dG/dC residues, the preferential sites of DSBs in S region DNA. We show here that EndoG can localize to the nucleus of B cells undergoing CSR and binds to S region DNA, as shown by specific chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Using knockout EndoG−/− mice and EndoG−/− B cells, we found that EndoG deficiency resulted in defective CSR in vivo and in vitro, as demonstrated by reduced cell surface IgG1, IgG2a, IgG3 and IgA, reduced secreted IgG1, reduced circle Iγ1-Cμ, Iγ3-Cμ, Iε-Cμ, Iα-Cμ transcripts, post-recombination Iμ-Cγ1, Iμ-Cγ3, Iμ-Cε and Iμ-Cα transcripts. In addition to reduced CSR, EndoG−/− mice showed a significantly altered spectrum of mutations in IgH JH-iEμ DNA. Impaired CSR in Endo

  10. cDNA cloning of the immunoglobulin heavy chain genes in banded houndshark Triakis scyllium.

    PubMed

    Honda, Yuka; Kondo, Hidehiro; Caipang, Christopher Marlowe A; Hirono, Ikuo; Aoki, Takashi

    2010-11-01

    In this study, cDNAs encoding the secreted forms of the immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy chains of IgM, IgNAR, and IgW were cloned from the banded houndshark Triakis scyllium. Two clones for the IgM heavy chains encoded 569 and 570 amino acids, whose conserved (C) region showed 47-70% amino acid identities to those reported in other cartilaginous fish. Four clones for the IgNAR encoded 673-670 amino acids with conserved Ig-superfamily domains. The IgNAR C region showed 56-69% amino acid identities to those so far reported. High-throughput sequencing revealed that in most of the IgNAR sequences, the two variable regions (CDR1 and CDR3) each possess a cysteine residue. Three types of IgW were identified; one contained Ig-superfamily domains that are in other cartilaginous fish, one lacks the 3rd domain in the constant region, and one lacks the 3rd to 5th domains. Despite these differences, the IgW isoforms clustered with IgWs of other cartilaginous fishes and the C regions showed 47-89% amino acid identities. mRNAs for IgM and IgNAR were detected in various tissues, while IgW mRNA was mainly detected in pancreas. The banded hounded shark also has IgM, IgW and IgNAR as well as the other cartilaginous fish with unique IgW isoform.

  11. Immunoglobulin gene translocations in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: A report of 35 patients and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    DE BRAEKELEER, MARC; TOUS, CORINE; GUÉGANIC, NADIA; LE BRIS, MARIE-JOSÉE; BASINKO, AUDREY; MOREL, FRÉDÉRIC; DOUET-GUILBERT, NATHALIE

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) represents the most common hematological malignancy in Western countries, with a highly heterogeneous clinical course and prognosis. Translocations involving the immunoglobulin (IG) genes are regularly identified. From 2000 to 2014, we identified an IG gene translocation in 18 of the 396 patients investigated at diagnosis (4.6%) and in 17 of the 275 analyzed during follow-up (6.2%). A total of 4 patients in whom the IG translocation was identified at follow-up did not carry the translocation at diagnosis. The IG heavy locus (IGH) was involved in 27 translocations (77.1%), the IG κ locus (IGK) in 1 (2.9%) and the IG λ locus (IGL) in 7 (20.0%). The chromosome band partners of the IG translocations were 18q21 in 16 cases (45.7%), 11q13 and 19q13 in 4 cases each (11.4% each), 8q24 in 3 cases (8.6%), 7q21 in 2 cases (5.7%), whereas 6 other bands were involved once (2.9% each). At present, 35 partner chromosomal bands have been described, but the partner gene has solely been identified in 10 translocations. CLL associated with IG gene translocations is characterized by atypical cell morphology, including plasmacytoid characteristics, and the propensity of being enriched in prolymphocytes. The IG heavy chain variable region (IGHV) mutational status varies between translocations, those with unmutated IGHV presumably involving cells at an earlier stage of B-cell lineage. All the partner genes thus far identified are involved in the control of cell proliferation and/or apoptosis. The translocated partner gene becomes transcriptionally deregulated as a consequence of its transposition into the IG locus. With the exception of t(14;18)(q32;q21) and its variants, prognosis appears to be poor for the other translocations. Therefore, searching for translocations involving not only IGH, but also IGL and IGK, by banding and molecular cytogenetics is required. Furthermore, it is important to identify the partner gene to ensure the patients receive

  12. Intraclass diversification of immunoglobulin heavy chain genes in the African lungfish

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tianyi; Tacchi, Luca; Wei, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    Lungfish (Dipnoi) are the closest living relatives to tetrapods, and they represent the transition from water to land during vertebrate evolution. Lungfish are armed with immunoglobulins (Igs), one of the hallmarks of the adaptive immune system of jawed vertebrates, but only three Ig forms have been characterized in Dipnoi to date. We report here a new diversity of Ig molecules in two African lungfish species (Protopterus dolloi and Protopterus annectens). The African lungfish Igs consist of three IgMs, two IgWs, three IgNs, and an IgQ, where both IgN and IgQ originated evidently from the IgW lineage. Our data also suggest that the IgH genes in the lungfish are organized in a transiting form from clusters (IgH loci in cartilaginous fish) to a translocon configuration (IgH locus in tetrapods). We propose that the intraclass diversification of the two primordial gnathostome Ig classes (IgM and IgW) as well as acquisition of new isotypes (IgN and IgQ) has allowed lungfish to acquire a complex and functionally diverse Ig repertoire to fight a variety of microorganisms. Furthermore, our results support the idea that “tetrapod-specific” Ig classes did not evolve until the vertebrate adaptation to land was completed ∼360 million years ago. PMID:24676685

  13. Intraclass diversification of immunoglobulin heavy chain genes in the African lungfish.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianyi; Tacchi, Luca; Wei, Zhiguo; Zhao, Yaofeng; Salinas, Irene

    2014-05-01

    Lungfish (Dipnoi) are the closest living relatives to tetrapods, and they represent the transition from water to land during vertebrate evolution. Lungfish are armed with immunoglobulins (Igs), one of the hallmarks of the adaptive immune system of jawed vertebrates, but only three Ig forms have been characterized in Dipnoi to date. We report here a new diversity of Ig molecules in two African lungfish species (Protopterus dolloi and Protopterus annectens). The African lungfish Igs consist of three IgMs, two IgWs, three IgNs, and an IgQ, where both IgN and IgQ originated evidently from the IgW lineage. Our data also suggest that the IgH genes in the lungfish are organized in a transiting form from clusters (IgH loci in cartilaginous fish) to a translocon configuration (IgH locus in tetrapods). We propose that the intraclass diversification of the two primordial gnathostome Ig classes (IgM and IgW) as well as acquisition of new isotypes (IgN and IgQ) has allowed lungfish to acquire a complex and functionally diverse Ig repertoire to fight a variety of microorganisms. Furthermore, our results support the idea that "tetrapod-specific" Ig classes did not evolve until the vertebrate adaptation to land was completed ~360 million years ago.

  14. Immunoglobulin variable region hypermutation is associated with a DNA repair deficit

    SciTech Connect

    Valles-Ayoub, Y.; Govan, H.L. III; Braun, J. )

    1991-03-11

    The molecular mechanism of Ig variable region hypermutation is unknown, but has been hypothesized to involve an error-prone DNA repair process. In this study, the authors used a novel PCR-based assay to compare repair of UV-induced DNA damage in mantle zone versus germinal center B lymphocytes. They observed that DNA repair activity within rearranged VDJ loci was sluggish in germinal center B lymphocytes compared to repair activity monitored in mantle zone B lymphocytes. In contrast, DNA repair times within the germline V{sub H}5 gene family, the variable region J{sub H}{endash}C{sub H} intron, and the N-ras gene was rapid and similar in both germinal center and mantle zone B cells. These results reflect a DNA repair deficit which, as expected for hypermutation, is selective for rearranged Ig VDG in germinal center cells. To directly measure the fidelity of DNA repair, the repaired PCR-amplified gene segments were analyzed for sequence changes by restriction enzyme digestion. In experiments thus far, repair of germline V{sub H}5 was error-free in both germinal center and mantle zone B cells. However, while rearranged V{sub H}5 segments were also error-free in mantle zone cells, they were highly mutated in germinal center cells. These findings provide direct biochemical evidence for the role of a sequence- and stage-specific error-prone DNA repair pathway in Ig V gene hypermutation.

  15. Association of Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor Genes with Hodgkin's Lymphoma in a Familial Study

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Fionnuala; Orsi, Laurent; Amiel, Corinne; Lependeven, Catherine; Antoni, Guillemette; Hermine, Olivier; Brice, Pauline; Ferme, Christophe; Carde, Patrice; Canioni, Danielle; Brière, Josette; Raphael, Martine; Nicolas, Jean-Claude; Clavel, Jacqueline; Middleton, Derek; Vivier, Eric; Abel, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    Background Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is the major environmental factor associated with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL), a common lymphoma in young adults. Natural killer (NK) cells are key actors of the innate immune response against viruses. The regulation of NK cell function involves activating and inhibitory Killer cell Immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs), which are expressed in variable numbers on NK cells. Various viral and virus-related malignant disorders have been associated with the presence/absence of certain KIR genes in case/control studies. We investigated the role of the KIR cluster in HL in a family-based association study. Methodology We included 90 families with 90 HL index cases (age 16–35 years) and 255 first-degree relatives (parents and siblings). We developed a procedure for reconstructing full genotypic information (number of gene copies) at each KIR locus from the standard KIR gene content. Out of the 90 collected families, 84 were informative and suitable for further analysis. An association study was then carried out with specific family-based analysis methods on these 84 families. Principal Findings Five KIR genes in strong linkage disequilibrium were found significantly associated with HL. Refined haplotype analysis showed that the association was supported by a dominant protective effect of KIR3DS1 and/or KIR2DS1, both of which are activating receptors. The odds ratios for developing HL in subjects with at least one copy of KIR3DS1 or KIR2DS1 with respect to subjects with neither of these genes were 0.44[95% confidence interval 0.23–0.85] and 0.42[0.21–0.85], respectively. No significant association was found in a tentative replication case/control study of 68 HL cases (age 18–71 years). In the familial study, the protective effect of KIR3DS1/KIR2DS1 tended to be stronger in HL patients with detectable EBV in blood or tumour cells. Conclusions This work defines a template for family-based association studies based on full genotypic

  16. Immunoglobulin and T Cell Receptor Genes: IMGT® and the Birth and Rise of Immunoinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Lefranc, Marie-Paule

    2014-01-01

    IMGT®, the international ImMunoGeneTics information system®1, (CNRS and Université Montpellier 2) is the global reference in immunogenetics and immunoinformatics. By its creation in 1989, IMGT® marked the advent of immunoinformatics, which emerged at the interface between immunogenetics and bioinformatics. IMGT® is specialized in the immunoglobulins (IG) or antibodies, T cell receptors (TR), major histocompatibility (MH), and proteins of the IgSF and MhSF superfamilies. IMGT® has been built on the IMGT-ONTOLOGY axioms and concepts, which bridged the gap between genes, sequences, and three-dimensional (3D) structures. The concepts include the IMGT® standardized keywords (concepts of identification), IMGT® standardized labels (concepts of description), IMGT® standardized nomenclature (concepts of classification), IMGT unique numbering, and IMGT Colliers de Perles (concepts of numerotation). IMGT® comprises seven databases, 15,000 pages of web resources, and 17 tools, and provides a high-quality and integrated system for the analysis of the genomic and expressed IG and TR repertoire of the adaptive immune responses. Tools and databases are used in basic, veterinary, and medical research, in clinical applications (mutation analysis in leukemia and lymphoma) and in antibody engineering and humanization. They include, for example IMGT/V-QUEST and IMGT/JunctionAnalysis for nucleotide sequence analysis and their high-throughput version IMGT/HighV-QUEST for next-generation sequencing (500,000 sequences per batch), IMGT/DomainGapAlign for amino acid sequence analysis of IG and TR variable and constant domains and of MH groove domains, IMGT/3Dstructure-DB for 3D structures, contact analysis and paratope/epitope interactions of IG/antigen and TR/peptide-MH complexes and IMGT/mAb-DB interface for therapeutic antibodies and fusion proteins for immune applications (FPIA). PMID:24600447

  17. Immunoglobulin and T Cell Receptor Genes: IMGT(®) and the Birth and Rise of Immunoinformatics.

    PubMed

    Lefranc, Marie-Paule

    2014-01-01

    IMGT(®), the international ImMunoGeneTics information system(®) (1), (CNRS and Université Montpellier 2) is the global reference in immunogenetics and immunoinformatics. By its creation in 1989, IMGT(®) marked the advent of immunoinformatics, which emerged at the interface between immunogenetics and bioinformatics. IMGT(®) is specialized in the immunoglobulins (IG) or antibodies, T cell receptors (TR), major histocompatibility (MH), and proteins of the IgSF and MhSF superfamilies. IMGT(®) has been built on the IMGT-ONTOLOGY axioms and concepts, which bridged the gap between genes, sequences, and three-dimensional (3D) structures. The concepts include the IMGT(®) standardized keywords (concepts of identification), IMGT(®) standardized labels (concepts of description), IMGT(®) standardized nomenclature (concepts of classification), IMGT unique numbering, and IMGT Colliers de Perles (concepts of numerotation). IMGT(®) comprises seven databases, 15,000 pages of web resources, and 17 tools, and provides a high-quality and integrated system for the analysis of the genomic and expressed IG and TR repertoire of the adaptive immune responses. Tools and databases are used in basic, veterinary, and medical research, in clinical applications (mutation analysis in leukemia and lymphoma) and in antibody engineering and humanization. They include, for example IMGT/V-QUEST and IMGT/JunctionAnalysis for nucleotide sequence analysis and their high-throughput version IMGT/HighV-QUEST for next-generation sequencing (500,000 sequences per batch), IMGT/DomainGapAlign for amino acid sequence analysis of IG and TR variable and constant domains and of MH groove domains, IMGT/3Dstructure-DB for 3D structures, contact analysis and paratope/epitope interactions of IG/antigen and TR/peptide-MH complexes and IMGT/mAb-DB interface for therapeutic antibodies and fusion proteins for immune applications (FPIA).

  18. Immunoglobulin VH gene structure and diversity in Heterodontus, a phylogenetically primitive shark.

    PubMed

    Litman, G W; Berger, L; Murphy, K; Litman, R; Hinds, K; Erickson, B W

    1985-04-01

    A mouse VH probe has been used to identify and isolate VH homologs in a DNA library of Heterodontus francisci (horned shark). The complete nucleotide sequence of one VH gene, HXIA, has been determined and found to exhibit striking organizational homology and nucleotide identity with mammalian prototype VH genes. Metric analysis of the complete sequence is consistent with the early phylogenetic diversification of framework and complementarity-determining regions (CDR). Both the predicted amino acid sequence and the specific hybridization of the CDR2-specific, synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide probe in spleen mRNA suggest that HXIA is functionally expressed. A probe consisting of the entire coding region of this gene hybridizes with multiple components in Southern blot analysis of Heterodontus genomic DNA and together with the identification of additional unique VH+-lambda clones indicates that considerable complexity is associated with the germline VH gene family in a contemporary species that represents an early stage in the phylogenetic development of the vertebrates.

  19. Repeat organization and epigenetic regulation of the DH-Cmu domain of the immunoglobulin heavy-chain gene locus.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Tirtha; Chowdhury, Dipanjan; Keyes, Amanda; Jani, Anant; Subrahmanyam, Ramesh; Ivanova, Irina; Sen, Ranjan

    2007-09-07

    The first steps of murine immunoglobulin heavy-chain (IgH) gene recombination take place within a chromosomal domain that contains diversity (D(H)) and joining (J(H)) gene segments, but not variable (V(H)) gene segments. Here we show that the chromatin state of this domain is markedly heterogeneous. Specifically, only 5'- and 3'-most D(H) gene segments carry active chromatin modifications, whereas intervening D(H)s are associated with heterochromatic marks that are maintained by ongoing histone deacetylation. The intervening D(H)s form part of a tandemly repeated sequence that expresses tissue-specific, antisense oriented transcripts. We propose that the intervening D(H) genes are actively suppressed by repeat-induced epigenetic silencing, which is reflected in their infrequent representation in DJ(H) junctions compared to the flanking D(H) genes.

  20. Structural organization of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus in the channel catfish: the IgH locus represents a composite of two gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Ventura-Holman, Tereza; Lobb, Craig J

    2002-01-01

    Two structurally-related genomic clusters of catfish immunoglobulin heavy chain gene segments are known. The first gene cluster contains DH and JH segments, as well as the C region exons encoding the functional Cmu. The second gene cluster contains multiple VH gene segments representing different VH families, a germline-joined VDJ, a single JH segment, and at least two pseudogene Cmu exons. It was not known whether these gene clusters were linked, nor was the organization or the location of VH segments associated within the first gene cluster known. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis studies have been used to determine the structural organization of these gene clusters. Restriction mapping studies show that the two gene clusters are closely linked; the second gene cluster is located upstream from the first with the Cmu regions within the clusters separated by about 725kb. The clusters are in the same relative transcriptional orientation, and the results indicate that the complete IgH locus spans no more than 1000kb and may be as small as 750-800kb. VH gene segments are located both upstream and downstream of the pseudo-Cmu exons; however, no VH gene segments that hybridized with the VH specific probes were detected downstream of the functional Cmu. These studies coupled with earlier sequence analyses indicate that the catfish IgH locus arose from a massive internal duplication event. Subsequent gene rearrangement within the duplicated cluster likely resulted in the presence of the germline VDJ and the deletion of intervening V, D and J segments. Transposition by a member of the Tc1/mariner family of transposable elements appears to have led to the disruption of the duplicated Cmu.

  1. Immunoglobulin Gene Polymorphisms are Susceptibility Factors for Clinical and Autoantibody Subgroups of the Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    O’Hanlon, Terrance P.; Rider, Lisa G.; Schiffenbauer, Adam; Targoff, Ira N.; Malley, Karen; Pandey, Janardan P.; Miller, Frederick W.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate possible associations of GM and KM markers in European Americans (EA) and African Americans (AA) with adult and juvenile forms of the idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM). Methods We performed serologic analyses of polymorphic determinants associated with immunoglobulin gamma heavy (GM) and kappa light chains (KM) in large populations of EA (n=514: 297 adults and 217 juveniles) and AA IIM patients (n=109: 73 adults and 50 juveniles) representing the major clinicopathologic and autoantibody groups. Results For EA dermatomyositis (DM) patients, the GM 3 23 5,13 phenotype was a risk factor for both adults (OR=2.2; Pc=0.020) and juveniles (OR=2.2; Pc=0.0013). Of interest, the GM 13 allotype was a risk factor for juvenile DM (JDM) for both EA (OR=3.9; Pc<0.0001) and AA (OR=4.8; Pc=0.033). However, the GM 1,3,17 5,13,21 phenotype was a risk factor for JDM in EA but not in AA. Among the IIM autoantibody groups, GM 3 23 5,13 was a risk factor for EA adults with anti-Jo-1 autoantibodies (OR=3.4; Pc=0.0031), while the GM 3 allotype was protective for adults with anti-threonyl tRNA synthetase or anti-RNP autoantibodies (OR=0.1; Pc=0.047 and OR=0.2; Pc=0.034, respectively). In contrast, GM 6 was a risk factor for AA adults with anti-SRP autoantibodies (OR=7.5; Pc=0.041). Conclusions These data suggest that polymorphic alleles of GM and KM loci are differentially associated with IIM subgroups defined by age, ethnicity, clinical features and autoantibodies, and expand the list of immune response genes possibly important in the pathogenesis of myositis. PMID:18821675

  2. Potential role of killer immunoglobulin receptor genes among individuals vaccinated against hepatitis B virus in Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    Melhem, Nada M; Mahfouz, Rami A; Kreidieh, Khalil; Abdul-Khalik, Rabab; El-Khatib, Rolla; Talhouk, Reem; Musharrafieh, Umayya; Hamadeh, Ghassan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To explore the role of killer immunoglobulin receptor (KIR) genes in responsiveness or non-responsiveness to vaccination against hepatitis B virus. METHODS We recruited 101 voluntary participants between March 2010 and December 2011. Sera samples from vaccinated and non-vaccinated participants were tested for the presence of anti-HBs antibodies as a measure of protection against hepatitis B, hepatitis B surface antigen and hepatitis B core antibody as indicators of infection by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. KIR gene frequencies were determined by polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS Sera samples from 99 participants were tested for the levels of anti-HBs as an indicator of protection (≥ 10 mIU/mL) following vaccination as defined by the World Health Organization international reference standard. Among the vaccinated participants, 47% (35/74) had anti-HBs titers above 100 mIU/mL, 22% (16/74) had anti-HBs ranging between 10-100 mIU/mL, and 20% (15/74) had values of less than 10 mIU/mL. We report the lack of significant association between the number of vaccine dosages and the titer of antibodies among our vaccinated participants. The inhibitory KIR2DL1, KIR2DL4, KIR3DL1, KIR3DL2, and KIR3DL were detected in more than 95%, whereas KIR2DL2, KIR2DL3, KIR2DL5 (KR2DL5A and KIR2DL5B) were expressed in 56%, 84% and 42% (25% and 29%) of participants, respectively. The observed frequency of the activating KIR genes ranged between 35% and 55% except for KIR2DS4, detected in 95% of the study participants (40.6% 2DS4*001/002; 82.2% 2DS4*003/007). KIR2DP1 pseudogene was detected in 99% of our participants, whereas KIR3DP*001/02/04 and KIR3DP1*003 had frequencies of 17% and 100%, respectively. No association between the frequency of KIR genes and anti-HBs antibodies was detected. When we compared the frequency of KIR genes between vaccinated individuals with protective antibodies titers and those who lost their protective antibody levels, we did not detect a significant

  3. Immunoglobulin heavy-chain enhancer is required to maintain transfected gamma 2A gene expression in a pre-B-cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Porton, B; Zaller, D M; Lieberson, R; Eckhardt, L A

    1990-01-01

    The immunoglobulin heavy-chain (IgH) enhancer serves to activate efficient and accurate transcription of cloned IgH genes when introduced into B lymphomas or myelomas. The role of this enhancer after gene activation, however, is unclear. The endogenous IgH genes in several cell lines, for example, have lost the IgH enhancer by deletion and yet continue to be expressed. This might be explained if the role of the enhancer were to establish high-level gene transcription but not to maintain it. Alternatively, other enhancers might lie adjacent to endogenous IgH genes, substituting their activity for that of the lost IgH enhancer. To address both of these alternatives, we searched for enhancer activity within the flanking regions of one of these IgH enhancer-independent genes and designed an experiment that allowed us to consider separately the establishment and maintenance of expression of a transfected gene. For the latter experiment we generated numerous pre-B cell lines stably transformed with a gamma 2a gene. In this gene, the IgH enhancer lay at a site outside the heavy-chain transcription unit, between DH and JH gene segments. After expression of the transfected gene was established, selective conditions were chosen for the outgrowth of subclones that had undergone D-J joining and thus IgH enhancer deletion. Measurements of gamma 2a expression before and after enhancer deletion revealed that the enhancer was required for maintenance of expression of the transfected gene. The implication of this finding for models of enhancer function in endogenous genes is discussed. Images PMID:2106067

  4. Mice with megabase humanization of their immunoglobulin genes generate antibodies as efficiently as normal mice.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Andrew J; Macdonald, Lynn E; Stevens, Sean; Karow, Margaret; Dore, Anthony T; Pobursky, Kevin; Huang, Tammy T; Poueymirou, William T; Esau, Lakeisha; Meola, Melissa; Mikulka, Warren; Krueger, Pamela; Fairhurst, Jeanette; Valenzuela, David M; Papadopoulos, Nicholas; Yancopoulos, George D

    2014-04-08

    Mice genetically engineered to be humanized for their Ig genes allow for human antibody responses within a mouse background (HumAb mice), providing a valuable platform for the generation of fully human therapeutic antibodies. Unfortunately, existing HumAb mice do not have fully functional immune systems, perhaps because of the manner in which their genetic humanization was carried out. Heretofore, HumAb mice have been generated by disrupting the endogenous mouse Ig genes and simultaneously introducing human Ig transgenes at a different and random location; KO-plus-transgenic humanization. As we describe in the companion paper, we attempted to make mice that more efficiently use human variable region segments in their humoral responses by precisely replacing 6 Mb of mouse Ig heavy and kappa light variable region germ-line gene segments with their human counterparts while leaving the mouse constant regions intact, using a unique in situ humanization approach. We reasoned the introduced human variable region gene segments would function indistinguishably in their new genetic location, whereas the retained mouse constant regions would allow for optimal interactions and selection of the resulting antibodies within the mouse environment. We show that these mice, termed VelocImmune mice because they were generated using VelociGene technology, efficiently produce human:mouse hybrid antibodies (that are rapidly convertible to fully human antibodies) and have fully functional humoral immune systems indistinguishable from those of WT mice. The efficiency of the VelocImmune approach is confirmed by the rapid progression of 10 different fully human antibodies into human clinical trials.

  5. Mice with megabase humanization of their immunoglobulin genes generate antibodies as efficiently as normal mice

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Andrew J.; Macdonald, Lynn E.; Stevens, Sean; Karow, Margaret; Dore, Anthony T.; Pobursky, Kevin; Huang, Tammy T.; Poueymirou, William T.; Esau, Lakeisha; Meola, Melissa; Mikulka, Warren; Krueger, Pamela; Fairhurst, Jeanette; Valenzuela, David M.; Papadopoulos, Nicholas; Yancopoulos, George D.

    2014-01-01

    Mice genetically engineered to be humanized for their Ig genes allow for human antibody responses within a mouse background (HumAb mice), providing a valuable platform for the generation of fully human therapeutic antibodies. Unfortunately, existing HumAb mice do not have fully functional immune systems, perhaps because of the manner in which their genetic humanization was carried out. Heretofore, HumAb mice have been generated by disrupting the endogenous mouse Ig genes and simultaneously introducing human Ig transgenes at a different and random location; KO-plus-transgenic humanization. As we describe in the companion paper, we attempted to make mice that more efficiently use human variable region segments in their humoral responses by precisely replacing 6 Mb of mouse Ig heavy and kappa light variable region germ-line gene segments with their human counterparts while leaving the mouse constant regions intact, using a unique in situ humanization approach. We reasoned the introduced human variable region gene segments would function indistinguishably in their new genetic location, whereas the retained mouse constant regions would allow for optimal interactions and selection of the resulting antibodies within the mouse environment. We show that these mice, termed VelocImmune mice because they were generated using VelociGene technology, efficiently produce human:mouse hybrid antibodies (that are rapidly convertible to fully human antibodies) and have fully functional humoral immune systems indistinguishable from those of WT mice. The efficiency of the VelocImmune approach is confirmed by the rapid progression of 10 different fully human antibodies into human clinical trials. PMID:24706856

  6. Phylogenetic conservation of immunoglobulin heavy chains: direct comparison of hamster and mouse Cmu genes.

    PubMed

    McGuire, K L; Duncan, W R; Tucker, P W

    1985-08-12

    We have analyzed the JH-Cmu locus of the Syrian hamster by DNA cloning and sequencing. The single Cmu gene is highly homologous to that of the mouse. The hamster equivalents of the JH and switch (S) recombination regions are arranged as in the mouse, but surprisingly are not highly conserved. Also unlike its close murine relative, the Smu regions among inbred hamster strains are not polymorphic. The complete nucleotide sequence of hamster and mouse Cmu genes have been compared to partial Cmu sequences of other species. Conservation within a portion of the 3' untranslated region may signify functional requirements for 3' end processing. Mutational frequencies within exons and introns of hamster and mouse do not support the theory that the rate of DNA transitions to transversions decreases with evolutionary distance.

  7. Immunoglobulin and IgG subclass levels in a regional pediatric cystic fibrosis clinic.

    PubMed

    Garside, J P; Kerrin, D P; Brownlee, K G; Gooi, H C; Taylor, J M; Conway, S P

    2005-02-01

    The aim of this study was to report serum immunoglobulin (Ig) and IgG subclass levels in a large pediatric population with cystic fibrosis, and relate these to measures of disease severity. Total immunoglobulin levels were measured in 154 patients, and IgG subclass levels were measured in 136 patients and compared to age-related normal population data and to levels reported in previously published studies of children with cystic fibrosis. Clinical data were also collected: genotype; height, weight, and BMI standard deviation scores; FEV(1) (as percent predicted); Shwachmann-Kulczycki (S-K) and Northern chest X-ray scores; and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection status. The clinical well-being of patients with hypo- or hyper-gammaglobulinemia was compared with age- and sex-matched control patients who had normal levels of gammaglobulin. IgG subclass levels were measured, and the results were compared with previous studies. Eleven patients had hypergammaglobulinemia (7.8% compared with 0-69% in the published literature). Patients with hypergammaglobulinemia had lower FEV(1) percent-predicted values, and worse S-K and Northern chest X-ray scores than controls. Three patients had hypogammaglobulinemia (1.9% compared with 0-10.8% in the published literature). There was no difference in any clinical parameter between controls and those with hypogammaglobulinemia. Nineteen patients (14%) had low levels of IgG1, and 40 patients (29%) had low levels of IgG2. The low percentage of patients with abnormally high immunoglobulin levels probably reflects the improved respiratory status of today's children with CF. The low percentage of those with low IgG probably reflects better nutritional status. The finding of worse lung function and clinical scores in patients with hypergammaglobulinemia agrees with the published literature. The high percentage of patients with low IgG2 was unexpected and was not previously reported. The clinical significance of this in patients with CF is

  8. Distribution of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor genes in Roma from Republic of Macedonia.

    PubMed

    Petlichkovski, A; Djulejic, E; Trajkov, D; Efinska-Mladenovska, O; Hristomanova, S; Kirijas, M; Senev, A; Spiroski, M

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze Killer Ig-Like Receptor (KIR) gene polymorphisms in Roma people from Republic of Macedonia. The studied sample consists of 103 healthy unrelated individuals, aged 20-45 years. All individuals are of Roma origin, residents of different geographical regions (Gostivar, Skopje, and Kochani). The population genetics analysis package, Arlequin, was used for analysis of the data. We found that all 16 KIR genes were observed in the Roma individuals and framework genes (KIR3DL3, KIR3DP1, KIR- 2DL4, and KIR3DL2) were present in all individuals. The frequencies of other KIR genes were: KIR2DP1 (1), KIR2DL1 (0.961), KIR2DL2 (0.544), KIR2DL3 (0.874), KIR2DL5 (0.311), KIR3DL1 (0.990), KIR- 2DS1 (0.330), KIR2DS2 (0.553), KIR2DS3 (0.359), KIR2DS4 (0.981), KIR2DS5 (0.291), and KIR3DS1 (0.379). The results of tested linkage disequilibrium (LD) among KIR genes demonstrated that KIR genes present a wide range of linkage disequilibrium. The obtained results for KIR genes and genotype frequencies in Macedonian Roma individuals can be used for anthropological comparisons.

  9. Membrane immunoglobulin expressed by retroviral vector gene transfer mimics partial function of the B-cell receptor in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Chen, Feng; Xu, Zhen; Zhang, Lingling; Xu, Peng; Liu, Depei; Liang, Chihchuan

    2016-01-01

    Activation of B-cells is initiated by the ligation of B-cell receptors by its cognate antigen, inducing a series of signal cascades. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of these important events is a crucial goal for immunologists. Chimeric B cell receptors provide a powerful tool for analysis of B-cell signal function. However, this method can only be used in tool cells, but cannot be used for in vivo study. Here, we constructed a retroviral vector to encode both heavy chains and light chains of a membrane immunoglobulin, and expressed them in primary B-cells using retroviral gene transfer. Our results demonstrate that the membrane immunoglobulin expressed by retroviral vectors transfer can initiate B-cell receptor-mediated signaling, resulting in the phosphorylation of Syk and Erk1/2 proteins. The results showed that B-cells expressing membrane immunoglobulin can make proliferative responses to cognate antigen both in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, we provide a methodology for rapidly analyzing the downstream signals of B-cell receptors both in vitro and in vivo, which could expedite the identification of proteins involved in B-cell function.

  10. Mouse Cmu heavy chain immunoglobulin gene segment contains three intervening sequences separating domains.

    PubMed

    Calame, K; Rogers, J; Early, P; Davis, M; Livant, D; Wall, R; Hood, L

    1980-04-03

    The IgM molecule is composed of subunits made up of two light chain and two heavy chain (mu) polypeptides. The mu chain is encoded by several gene segments--variable (V), joining (J) and constant (Cmu). The Cmu gene segment is of particular interest for several reasons. First, the mu chain must exist in two very different environments--as an integral membrane protein in receptor IgM molecules (micrometer) and as soluble serum protein in IgM molecules into the blood (mus). Second, the Cmu region in mus is composed of four homology units or domains (Cmu1, Cmu2, Cmu3 and Cmu4) of approximately 110 amino acid residues plus a C-terminal tail of 19 residues. We asked two questions concerning the organisation of the Cmu gene segment. (1) Are the homology units separated by intervening DNA sequences as has been reported for alpha (ref. 5), gamma 1 (ref. 6) and gamma 2b (ref. 7) heavy chain genes? (2) Is the C-terminal tail separated from the Cmu4 domain by an intervening DNA sequence? If so, DNA rearrangements or RNA splicing could generate hydrophilic and hydrophobic C-terminal tails for the mus and micrometer polypeptides, respectively. We demonstrate here that intervening DNA sequences separate each of the four coding regions for Cmu domains, and that the coding regions for the Cmu4 domains and the C-terminal tail are directly contiguous.

  11. Evidence for a quadruplex structure in the polymorphic hs1.2 enhancer of the immunoglobulin heavy chain 3’ regulatory regions and its conservation in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Geoffrey; Cicconi, Alessandro; Micheli, Emanuela; Cacchione, Stefano; Poma, Anna; Gargioli, Cesare; Giambra, Vincenzo; Frezza, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Regulatory regions in the genome can act through a variety of mechanisms that range from the occurrence of histone modifications to the presence of protein‐binding loci for self‐annealing sequences. The final result is often the induction of a conformational change of the DNA double helix, which alters the accessibility of a region to transcription factors and consequently gene expression. A ∼300 kb regulatory region on chromosome 14 at the 3' end (3'RR) of immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy‐chain genes shows very peculiar features, conserved in mammals, including enhancers and transcription factor binding sites. In primates, the 3'RR is present in two copies, both having a central enhancer named hs1.2. We previously demonstrated the association between different hs1.2 alleles and Ig plasma levels in immunopathology. Here, we present the analysis of a putative G‐quadruplex structure (tetraplex) consensus site embedded in a variable number tandem repeat (one to four copies) of hs1.2 that is a distinctive element among the enhancer alleles, and an investigation of its three‐dimensional structure using bioinformatics and spectroscopic approaches. We suggest that both the role of the enhancer and the alternative effect of the hs1.2 alleles may be achieved through their peculiar three‐dimensional‐conformational rearrangement. © 2017 The Authors Biopolymers Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 768–778, 2016. PMID:27287611

  12. Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) gene content variation in the HGDP-CEPH populations.

    PubMed

    Hollenbach, Jill A; Nocedal, Isobel; Ladner, Martha B; Single, Richard M; Trachtenberg, Elizabeth A

    2012-10-01

    In the present study, we investigate patterns of variation in the KIR cluster in a large and well-characterized sample of worldwide human populations in the Human Genome Diversity Project-Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (HGDP-CEPH) panel in order to better understand the patterns of diversity in the region. Comparison of KIR data with that from other genomic regions allows control for strictly demographic factors; over 500,000 additional genomic markers have been typed in this panel by other investigators and the data made publicly available. Presence/absence frequencies and haplotypic associations for the KIR region are analyzed in the 52 populations comprising the panel and in accordance with major world regions (Africa, Middle East, Central Asia, East Asia, Europe, Americas, and Oceania). These data represent the first overview of KIR population genetics in the well-documented HGDP-CEPH panel and suggest different evolutionary histories and recent selection in the KIR gene cluster.

  13. Proteomic analysis of influenza haemagglutinin-specific antibodies following vaccination reveals convergent immunoglobulin variable region signatures.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Penelope J; Al Kindi, Mahmood A; Wang, Jing J; Colella, Alex D; Chataway, Timothy K; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Gordon, Tom P; Gordon, David L

    2017-10-09

    Analysis of the anti-haemagglutinin serum antibody proteome from six H1N1pdm09 influenza A vaccinated subjects demonstrated restricted IgG1 heavy chain species encoded by IGHV5-51 and IGHV3-7 gene families in 2 subjects and either IGHV5-51 or IGHV3-7 in 4 individuals. All subjects exhibited a dominant IGKV3-20 light chain, however 5 subjects also exhibited IGKV3-11 and IGKV4-1 families. Sequences were closely aligned with the matched germline sequence, with few shared mutations. This study illustrates the feasibility of using a proteomic approach to determine the expressed V region signatures of serum antibodies induced by vaccination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Human immunoglobulin repertoires against tetanus toxoid contain a large and diverse fraction of high-affinity promiscuous V(H) genes.

    PubMed

    de Kruif, John; Kramer, Arjen; Visser, Therèse; Clements, Carina; Nijhuis, Roy; Cox, Freek; van der Zande, Vanessa; Smit, Renate; Pinto, Daniel; Throsby, Mark; Logtenberg, Ton

    2009-04-03

    To study the contribution of antibody light (L) chains to the diversity and binding properties of immune repertoires, a phage display repertoire was constructed from a single human antibody L chain and a large collection of antibody heavy (H) chains harvested from the blood of two human donors immunized with tetanus toxoid (TT) vaccine. After selection for binding to TT, 129 unique antibodies representing 53 variable immunoglobulin H chain (V(H)) gene rearrangements were isolated. This panel of anti-TT antibodies restricted to a single variable immunoglobulin L chain (V(L)) could be organized into 17 groups binding non-competing epitopes on the TT molecule. Comparison of the V(H) regions in this V(L)-restricted panel with a previously published repertoire of anti-TT V(H) regions with cognate V(H)-V(L) pairing showed a very similar distribution of V(H), D(H) and J(H) gene segment utilization and length of the complementarity-determining region 3 of the H chain. Surface plasmon resonance analysis of the single-V(L) anti-TT repertoire unveiled a range of affinities, with a median monovalent affinity of 2 nM. When the single-V(L) anti-TT V(H) repertoire was combined with a collection of naïve V(L) regions and again selected for binding to TT, many of the V(H) genes were recovered in combination with a diversity of V(L) regions. The affinities of a panel of antibodies consisting of a single promiscuous anti-TT V(H) combined with 15 diverse V(L) chains were determined and found to be identical to each other and to the original isolate restricted to a single-V(L) chain. Based on previous estimates of the clonal size of the human anti-TT repertoire, we conclude that up to 25% of human anti-TT-encoding V(H) regions from an immunized repertoire have promiscuous features. These V(H) regions readily combine with a single antibody L chain to result in a large panel of anti-TT antibodies that conserve the expected epitope diversity, V(H) region diversity and affinity of a

  15. Immunoglobulin VH gene structure and diversity in Heterodontus, a phylogenetically primitive shark.

    PubMed Central

    Litman, G W; Berger, L; Murphy, K; Litman, R; Hinds, K; Erickson, B W

    1985-01-01

    A mouse VH probe has been used to identify and isolate VH homologs in a DNA library of Heterodontus francisci (horned shark). The complete nucleotide sequence of one VH gene, HXIA, has been determined and found to exhibit striking organizational homology and nucleotide identity with mammalian prototype VH genes. Metric analysis of the complete sequence is consistent with the early phylogenetic diversification of framework and complementarity-determining regions (CDR). Both the predicted amino acid sequence and the specific hybridization of the CDR2-specific, synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide probe in spleen mRNA suggest that HXIA is functionally expressed. A probe consisting of the entire coding region of this gene hybridizes with multiple components in Southern blot analysis of Heterodontus genomic DNA and together with the identification of additional unique VH+-lambda clones indicates that considerable complexity is associated with the germline VH gene family in a contemporary species that represents an early stage in the phylogenetic development of the vertebrates. Images PMID:3920659

  16. DNA Replication Origins in Immunoglobulin Switch Regions Regulate Class Switch Recombination in an R-Loop-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Eva-Maria; Peycheva, Mihaela; Pavri, Rushad

    2016-12-13

    Class switch recombination (CSR) at the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) locus generates antibody isotypes. CSR depends on double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). Although DSB formation and repair machineries are active in G1 phase, efficient CSR is dependent on cell proliferation and S phase entry; however, the underlying mechanisms are obscure. Here, we show that efficient CSR requires the replicative helicase, the Mcm complex. Mcm proteins are enriched at IgH switch regions during CSR, leading to assembly of facultative replication origins that require Mcm helicase function for productive CSR. Assembly of CSR-associated origins is facilitated by R loops and promotes the physical proximity (synapsis) of recombining switch regions, which is reduced by R loop inhibition or Mcm complex depletion. Thus, R loops contribute to replication origin specification that promotes DSB resolution in CSR. This suggests a mechanism for the dependence of CSR on S phase and cell division.

  17. Effects of anti-IgM suppression on polyclonally activated murine B cells: analysis of immunoglobulin mRNA, gene specific nuclear factors and cell cycle distribution.

    PubMed Central

    Marcuzzi, A; Van Ness, B; Rouse, T; Lafrenz, D

    1989-01-01

    Polyclonal activation of murine B cells with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and dextran sulfate (DxS) results in cell proliferation as well as increased immunoglobulin gene transcription and antibody secretion. When added to B cell cultures during mitogen activation, anti-mu antibody suppresses the rate of proliferation and immunoglobulin gene expression. Using this model system we show that co-cultures of B cells with LPS/DxS and anti-mu resulted in a decrease of both mu and kappa chain mRNA. Suppression did not prevent B cell entry into cycle nor a significant alteration in the distribution of cells in phases of cell cycle, although it did prolong the cycle transit time in a dose dependent fashion as determined by bromodeoxyuridine pulse labelling. Analysis of B cell specific nuclear binding factors, which previously have been shown to be important in regulating immunoglobulin gene transcription were examined. Results show that the kappa-specific enhancer binding activity of NF-kappa B was induced in activated as well as suppressed cultures. The lymphoid specific factor NF-A2, which recognizes the octamer sequence motif in the promoters of immunoglobulin genes, was induced by the polyclonal activation but was selectively lost in extracts from suppressed cells. Thus, specific regulation of the nuclear factor which plays a critical role in both heavy and light chain immunoglobulin gene expression may contribute to the transcriptional suppression observed in anti-mu treated B cells. Images PMID:2481271

  18. [A case of lambda-expressing pulmonary MALT lymphoma with dual clonal rearrangements of kappa and lambda immunoglobulin light chain gene].

    PubMed

    Oh, Hye Ryong; Lee, Mi Ja; Park, Geon; Moon, Dae Soo; Park, Young Jin; Jang, Sook Jin

    2009-06-01

    A 70-yr-old woman was hospitalized with a history of dry cough. Bronchial endoscopy and transbronchial lung biopsy were performed. However, the findings of histopathology and immunohistochemistry were not sufficient to decide whether the lesion was benign or malignant, because of the presence of crush artifacts in the biopsy specimens. We performed B-cell clonality studies using BIOMED-2 multiplex PCR (InVivoScribe Technologies, USA) to detect clonal rearrangements in the immunoglobulin gene. The results of multiplex PCR showed clonal rearrangements of both kappa and lambda immunoglobulin light chain genes. The findings of immunochemistry revealed that the lesion expressed lambda light chain, but not kappa light chain. Based on the clinical, pathologic, and molecular findings, this case was diagnosed as pulmonary MALT lymphoma. We report the first case in Korea of lambda-expressing MALT lymphoma that is shown to have dual clonal rearrangements of kappa and lambda immunoglobulin light chain gene by multiplex PCR.

  19. Switch Transcripts in Immunoglobulin Class Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Matthias; Jung, Steffen; Radbruch, Andreas

    1995-03-01

    B cells can exchange gene segments for the constant region of the immunoglobulin heavy chain, altering the class and effector function of the antibodies that they produce. Class switching is directed to distinct classes by cytokines, which induce transcription of the targeted DNA sequences. These transcripts are processed, resulting in spliced "switch" transcripts. Switch recombination can be directed to immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) by the heterologous human metallothionein II_A promoter in mutant mice. Induction of the structurally conserved, spliced switch transcripts is sufficient to target switch recombination to IgG1, whereas transcription alone is not.

  20. Transposition of two different intracisternal A particle elements into an immunoglobulin kappa-chain gene.

    PubMed Central

    Hawley, R G; Shulman, M J; Hozumi, N

    1984-01-01

    Each of two severely defective mouse kappa-chain genes has acquired a different intracisternal A particle (IAP) element within one of its introns. One IAP element generated 6-base-pair direct repeats upon insertion. In contrast, the other IAP element was not flanked by direct repeats and was missing a single nucleotide from its 3' terminus. Sequence analysis of the latter IAP element demonstrated that its long terminal repeats were not identical. Nevertheless, the long terminal repeats were organized like proviral long terminal repeats, and this IAP element did contain two regions that were analogous to retroviral priming sites for RNA-directed DNA synthesis. The region that corresponded to a retroviral tRNA primer binding site was complementary to the 3' ends of all mammalian phenylalanine tRNAs. These findings are discussed in the context of the presumed mode of transposition of IAP elements involving the reverse transcription of IAP RNA. Images PMID:6098810

  1. Non-HLA region genes in insulin dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Field, L L

    1991-09-01

    The focus of this chapter is on the contribution of genes outside the HLA region to insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) susceptibility. We review laboratory evidence for such genes from published studies and also present unpublished data from our recent research. The existence of genes predisposing to IDDM in the region of the insulin (INS) gene now appears established. Association analysis has demonstrated an increased frequency of class 1 alleles of the 5' INS polymorphism in diabetics compared with controls, and a new method of analysis (AFBAC) has shown that this association is not an artefact of population stratification. Interestingly, the effect of INS region susceptibility on IDDM cannot be detected by linkage analysis, suggesting that if a genetic marker locus is close to a disease susceptibility locus, association analysis may be a more sensitive method than linkage analysis for detecting the susceptibility locus. There is no convincing evidence that genes in the T cell receptor beta chain (TCRB) or alpha chain (TCRA) regions influence predisposition to IDDM, either directly, or indirectly through interaction with HLA region genes. However, we present new evidence for interaction between TCRB and immunoglobulin heavy chain (Gm) region genes in IDDM: diabetics who are positive for the IgG2 allotype G2m(23) have significantly different frequencies of a TCRB restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) than those who are negative for the allotype. Gm region genes also appear to have indirect effects on IDDM susceptibility through interaction with HLA and INS region genes: DR3/4 and non-DR3/4 diabetics have significantly different frequencies of G2m(23), and INS1/1 and non-INS1/1 diabetics also have significantly different frequencies of this allotype. To our knowledge, there are no other studies of Gm-TCRB or Gm-INS interaction in IDDM susceptibility. Evidence for Gm-HLA interaction in IDDM has been published by several other groups of

  2. [Treatment of immune thrombocytopenic purpura in Pediatrics. Therapeutic efficacy of a regional intravenous immunoglobulin G].

    PubMed

    Buteler, C; Colombo, H; Gabosi, G; Manfredi, M J; Montero, S; Pasquali, M A; Rougier, C; Sisti, A M

    2001-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a bleeding disorder characterized by accelerated splenic removal of platelets opsonized with autoantibodies. Several different treatments have been tried in acute ITP patients, including intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. The aim of this paper was to assess the therapeutic efficacy, clinical tolerance and viral safety of Inmunoglobulina G Endovenosa-UNC, manufactured by Laboratorio de Hemoderivados, Cordoba National University, in the treatment of acute ITP patients. A prospective longitudinal study was carried out on 8 children, who were admitted to the Hospital de Niños de Córdoba, from July 1998 to June 1999. A dose of 1 g/Kg/day of Inmunoglobulina G Endovenosa-UNC was administered to those children whose platelet values remained < or = 20,000/mm3, 21 days after the first IVIG cycle. The observed results led us to conclude that Inmunoglobulina G Endovenosa-UNC is well tolerated and therapeutically effective in the treatment of acute ITP in children, with platelet values recovery, similar to those obtained with other IVIG. Moreover, it proved to be virally safe since the 8 patients were non reactive for viral markers of hepatitis B, hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency, 12 months after ending the treatment.

  3. Complete sequence of a cDNA clone specifying sandbar shark immunoglobulin light chain: gene organization and implications for the evolution of light chains.

    PubMed Central

    Hohman, V S; Schluter, S F; Marchalonis, J J

    1992-01-01

    A full-length cDNA clone specifying sandbar shark (Carcharhinus plumbeus) immunoglobulin light chain has been isolated and sequenced. By alignment with human lambda chains, the leader, framework, complementarity-determining, joining, and constant regions are clearly identified in the shark light chain. Approximately 40-50% identity is shared between the human and shark sequences in the variable and constant regions. We have performed sequence comparisons of the individual segments and constructed phylogenetic trees for the variable region. These studies identify the shark protein as a lambda chain. In addition, the sandbar shark light chain is only distantly related to that of horned shark (Heterodontus francisci) [Shamblott, M. J. & Litman, G. W. (1989) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 86, 4684-4688], demonstrating that the long evolutionary time of divergence among shark species has led to the generation of substantial differences in sequence. The positions of the variable, joining, and constant gene segments in 14 genomic clones have been mapped. The segments are linked in individual clusters (variable, joining, constant) occupying 3-7 kilobases. Cluster arrangement can be grouped into two patterns based upon spacing between the genes in the individual clones. This arrangement is fundamentally different from that observed in higher vertebrates. Images PMID:1729697

  4. Complete sequence of a cDNA clone specifying sandbar shark immunoglobulin light chain: gene organization and implications for the evolution of light chains.

    PubMed

    Hohman, V S; Schluter, S F; Marchalonis, J J

    1992-01-01

    A full-length cDNA clone specifying sandbar shark (Carcharhinus plumbeus) immunoglobulin light chain has been isolated and sequenced. By alignment with human lambda chains, the leader, framework, complementarity-determining, joining, and constant regions are clearly identified in the shark light chain. Approximately 40-50% identity is shared between the human and shark sequences in the variable and constant regions. We have performed sequence comparisons of the individual segments and constructed phylogenetic trees for the variable region. These studies identify the shark protein as a lambda chain. In addition, the sandbar shark light chain is only distantly related to that of horned shark (Heterodontus francisci) [Shamblott, M. J. & Litman, G. W. (1989) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 86, 4684-4688], demonstrating that the long evolutionary time of divergence among shark species has led to the generation of substantial differences in sequence. The positions of the variable, joining, and constant gene segments in 14 genomic clones have been mapped. The segments are linked in individual clusters (variable, joining, constant) occupying 3-7 kilobases. Cluster arrangement can be grouped into two patterns based upon spacing between the genes in the individual clones. This arrangement is fundamentally different from that observed in higher vertebrates.

  5. Time-dependent transition of the immunoglobulin G subclass and immunoglobulin E response in cancer patients vaccinated with cholesteryl pullulan-melanoma antigen gene-A4 nanogel

    PubMed Central

    Kyogoku, Noriaki; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Tsuchikawa, Takahiro; Abiko, Takehiro; Fujiwara, Aki; Maki, Takehiro; Yamamura, Yoshiyuki; Ichinokawa, Masaomi; Tanaka, Kimitaka; Imai, Naoko; Miyahara, Yoshihiro; Kageyama, Shinichi; Shiku, Hiroshi; Hirano, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    A phase I+II clinical trial of vaccination with MAGE-A4 protein complexed with cholesteryl pullulan melanoma antigen gene-A4 nanogel (CHP-MAGE-A4) is currently underway in patients with MAGE-A4-expressing cancer. In the present study, the primary phase I endpoint was to test the safety of the administration of 300 µg CHP-MAGE-A4 with and without OK-432. Another aim of the study was to clarify the details of the specific humoral immune response to vaccination. The 9 patients enrolled for phase I were vaccinated 6 times, once every 2 weeks: 3 patients with 100 µg and 3 patients with 300 µg CHP-MAGE-A4, and 3 patients with 300 µg CHP-MAGE-A4 plus 0.5 clinical units of OK-432. Toxicities were assessed using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0. Clinical response was evaluated by modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours. Immunological monitoring of anti-MAGE-A4-specific antibodies was performed by ELISA of pre- and post-vaccination patient sera. The 6 vaccinations produced no severe adverse events. Stable disease was assessed in 4/9 patients. Anti-MAGE-A4 total immunoglobulin (Ig)G titers increased in 7/9 patients. Efficacious anti-MAGE-A4 IgG1, 2 and 3 antibody responses were observed in 7/9 patients. Among them, positive conversions to T helper 2 (Th2)-type antibody responses (IgG4 and IgE) were observed after frequent vaccination in 4/7 patients. The Th2 conversion was possibly associated with undesirable clinical observations, including progressive disease and the appearance of a new relapse lesion. The present study suggested that frequent vaccinations activated a Th2-dominant status in the cancer patients. The identification of a time-dependent IgG subclass and IgE antibody production during vaccination protocols may be a useful surrogate marker indicating a potentially undesirable change of the immunological environment for an effective antitumor immune response in cancer patients. PMID:28105158

  6. Restriction fragment length polymorphism and evolution of the mouse immunoglobulin constant region gamma loci.

    PubMed

    Morgado, M G; Jouvin-Marche, E; Gris-Liebe, C; Bonhomme, F; Anand, R; Talwar, G P; Cazenave, P A

    1993-01-01

    Genomic DNA from twelve laboratory mouse strains, in addition to 21 wild-derived strains belonging to different taxa (Mus musculus domesticus, Mus musculus musculus, Mus spretus, Mus macedonicus, and Mus spicilegus) and four mouse strains that are evolutionarily more distant, were analyzed by Southern blot for polymorphism of the Ig heavy chain constant region gamma isotype (Igh-C gamma) and for the distribution of the duplicated Igh-1 (C gamma 2 alpha) haplotype. Distinct allelic forms of each Igh-C locus could be defined by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). In laboratory mouse strains RFLP proved to be more sensitive in the detection of Igh-4 (C gamma 1) alleles than serological methods. Taq I digestion allowed the definition of two alleles in the Igh-8 (C gamma 3) locus, which is absolutely conserved at the protein levels. More extensive RFLP could be found in wild strains belonging to the subgenus Mus and in the evolutionarily more distant Mus species belonging to other subgenera. In previous studies we have shown that the Igh-1 locus is duplicated in M. m. musculus subspecies. We now extend this observations to the wild mouse strains belonging to M. spicilegus and M. macedonicus species and to the evolutionarily more distant wild mouse strain Mus pahari (subgenus coelomys), which is thought to have diverged from domestic mice about 5 million years ago. In addition, we found a similar RFLP pattern in ten of 18 wild mice trapped in India, suggesting that the haplotype containing the two Igh-1-like genes, organized in tandem as distinct isotypes, is widely spread in natural populations. The evolution of murine Igh-C gamma-encoded isotypes is also discussed.

  7. Successful treatment of highly advanced immunoglobulin G4-related kidney disease presenting renal mass-like regions with end-stage kidney failure: a case study.

    PubMed

    Ono, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Taichi; Mima, Akira; Shibata, Eriko; Tamaki, Masanori; Yoshimoto, Sakiya; Ueda, Sayo; Kishi, Fumi; Kishi, Seiji; Kawanaka, Takashi; Matsuura, Motokazu; Nagai, Kojiro; Abe, Hideharu; Harada, Masashi; Doi, Toshio

    2017-08-03

    Immunoglobulin G4-related kidney disease characterized by immunoglobulin G4-positive plasma cell-rich tubulointerstitial nephritis has distinctive serological and radiological findings. Renal prognosis is good because of a good response to glucocorticoids. Here we report a case of successful treatment of highly advanced immunoglobulin G4-related kidney disease presenting renal mass-like regions with end-stage kidney failure. A 59-year-old Japanese man was referred to our hospital because of uremia with a creatinine level of 12.36 mg/dL. Urinalysis revealed mild proteinuria and hyperβ2microglobulinuria, and blood tests showed hyperglobulinemia with an IgG level of 3243 mg/dL and an IgG4 level of 621 mg/dL. Non-contrast computed tomography revealed renal mass-like regions. Based on the findings, immunoglobulin G4-related kidney disease was suspected, however, further radiological examination showed unexpected results. Ga-67 scintigraphy showed no kidney uptake. T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging revealed high-intensity signals which corresponded to mass-like regions and multiple patchy low-intensity signals in kidney cortex. Finally, the patient was diagnosed with immunoglobulin G4-related kidney disease by renal pathology of severe immunoglobulin G4-positive plasma cell-rich tubulointerstitial nephritis and characteristic fibrosis. He received 50 mg oral prednisolone, which was tapered with a subsequent decrease of serum creatinine and IgG4 levels. One year after initiation of treatment, he achieved normalization of serum IgG4 level and proteinuria, and remained off dialysis with a creatinine level of 3.50 mg/dL. After treatment with steroids, repeat imaging suggested bilateral severe focal atrophy. However, mass-like regions did not show atrophic change although renal atrophy was evident in patchy low-intensity lesions on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. These findings suggest that multiple patchy low-intensity signals and high-intensity mass

  8. Regulatory elements necessary for termination of transcription within the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene locus

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, B.B.

    1992-01-01

    Previous experimentation demonstrated that regulation of the IgM only phenotype in both pre-B and immature B cells was primarily at the transcriptional level. Expression of IgD mRNA involves transcription of the entire 29 kilobase rearranged [mu]-[delta] locus. Mature B cells transcribe the [beta] exons at approximately half the level that they transcribe the [delta] gene. Early B cells however, transcribe the [mu] gene with approximately 90% more efficiency than they do the [delta] gene. Specifically, early B cells show a transcription termination event occurring within a 1 kilobase region of the [mu]-[delta] intron. This dissertation analyzes the sequence elements necessary to encode the transcription termination event within the [mu]-[delta] intron. This work shows that the termination motif consists of specific sequences within the [mu]m poly(A) site as well as a region of the [mu]-[delta] intron contained within a 1200 base pair fragment. The 1200 base pair fragment extends from the Pst I site within the intron and ends just prior to the C[delta]1 exon. This fragment contains a 162 base pair unique sequence inverted repeat (USIR). Furthermore, the [mu]m site is specifically required because the [mu]s site was unable to substitute, despite extensive usage. In addition, the USIR-containing intron functions in an orientation-dependent manner. Analysis of this termination motif in a variety of lymphoid and non-lymphoid cells suggests that this motif is an intrinsic polymerase II termination motif. This implies that transcription termination in early B cells is by a default model and that active regulation of this motif involves an anti-termination event in mature B cells.

  9. Integrity of immunoglobulin variable region is supported by GANP during AID-induced somatic hypermutation in germinal center B cells.

    PubMed

    Eid, Mohammed Mansour Abbas; Shimoda, Mayuko; Singh, Shailendra Kumar; Almofty, Sarah Ameen; Pham, Phuong; Goodman, Myron F; Maeda, Kazuhiko; Sakaguchi, Nobuo

    2017-05-24

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) affinity maturation depends on somatic hypermutation (SHM) in variable (V) regions initiated by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). AID induces transition mutations by C→U deamination on both strands, causing C:G→T:A. Error-prone repairs of U by base excision and mismatch repairs create transversion mutations at C/G and mutations at A/T sites. In Neuberger's model, it remained to clarify how transition/transversion repair is regulated. We investigate role of AID-interacting GANP (germinal-center associated nuclear protein) in IgV SHM profile. GANP enhances transition mutation of nontranscribed-strand G and reduces mutation at A, restricted to GYW of AID hotspot motif. It reduces DNA polymerase η hotspot mutations associated with mismatch repairs followed by uracil-DNA glycosylase. Mutation comparison between IgV complementary and framework regions by Statistical Bayesian estimation demonstrates GANP supports to preserve IgV framework region genomic sequences. GANP works to maintain antibody structure by reducing drastic changes in IgV framework region in affinity maturation. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society for Immunology.

  10. Effect of CpG dinucleotides within IgH switch region repeats on immunoglobulin class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zheng Z; Hsieh, Chih-Lin; Okitsu, Cindy Yen; Han, Li; Yu, Kefei; Lieber, Michael R

    2015-08-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy chains undergo class switch recombination (CSR) to change the heavy chain isotype from IgM to IgG, A or E. The switch regions are several kilobases long, repetitive, and G-rich on the nontemplate strand. They are also relatively depleted of CpG (also called CG) sites for unknown reasons. Here we use synthetic switch regions at the IgH switch alpha (Sα) locus to test the effect of CpG sites and to try to understand why the IgH switch sequences evolved to be relatively depleted of CpG. We find that even just two CpG sites within an 80 bp synthetic switch repeat iterated 15 times (total switch region length of 1200 bp containing 30 CpG sites) are sufficient to dramatically reduce both Ig CSR and transcription through the switch region from the upstream Iα sterile transcript promoter, which is the promoter that directs transcripts through the Sα region. De novo DNA methylation occurs at the four CpG sites in and around the Iα promoter when each 80 bp Iα switch repeat contains the two CpG sites. Thus, a relatively low density of CpG sites within the switch repeats can induce upstream CpG methylation at the IgH alpha locus, and cause a substantial decrease in transcription from the sterile transcript promoter. This effect is likely the reason that switch regions evolved to contain very few CpG sites. We discuss these findings as they relate to DNA methylation and to Ig CSR.

  11. Evolution of lymphocytes. Immunoglobulin T of the teleost sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax): Quantitation of gene expressing and immunoreactive cells.

    PubMed

    Picchietti, S; Nuñez-Ortiz, N; Stocchi, V; Randelli, E; Buonocore, F; Guerra, L; Scapigliati, G

    2017-04-01

    Immunoglobulin T (IgT) is one of the key effector molecules of jawed vertebrate's adaptive immune system, and in this work we describe the quantitative distribution of IgT-expressing and IgT-producing cells in tissues of the European seabass Dicentrarchus labrax by using mRNA riboprobes and a specific anti-IgT antibody. A polyclonal antiserum (pAb) was prepared by immunizing rabbits with three synthetic peptides deduced from the full length IgT cDNA sequence and located in a surface-exposed CH3 domain of IgT constant region. The obtained antiserum, named RAIgT1, was able to recognize by ELISA immunization antigens and IgT from intestinal mucus and serum. In western blots of head kidney leukocytes lysates the antiserum recognized a 180 kDa polypeptide in non-reducing, and a 75 kDa peptide in reducing conditions. Interestingly, the RAIgT1 pAb crossreacted intensely in western blots with rainbow trout IgT purified from mucus and serum. Antisense mRNA IgT oligonucleotide sequences were employed in in situ hybridization to detect IgT-expressing cells in sections from lymphoid tissues, and positive cells were observed in head kidney, spleen, intestine and gills. By employing RAIgT1 in quantitative immunohistochemistry, the highest number of IgT-producing cells was observed in the gills (9.5 ± 0.7%), followed by intestine (8.4 ± 1.2%), head kidney (6.2 ± 1.4%), and spleen (4.1 ± 0.7%). Interestingly, the number of IgT-B cells showed a regionalization in the intestine, increasing from the proximal to the terminal part. By immunofluorescence and flow cytometry of live leukocytes, the percentages of RAIgT1 stained cells were 34 ± 11% in the intestine, 22 ± 5% in head kidney, 16 ± 7% in spleen, and 9 ± 5% in gills. At the fluorescence microscope, live cells from these tissues showed a typical membrane-associated positivity and a lymphocytic morphology, and no IgT/IgM double positive cells were detected. Immunoreactive cells have been purified from

  12. Antisense transcripts from immunoglobulin heavy-chain locus V(D)J and switch regions

    PubMed Central

    Perlot, Thomas; Li, Gang; Alt, Frederick W.

    2008-01-01

    Activation-induced cytosine deaminase (AID) is essential for both somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR), two processes involved in antibody diversification. Previously, various groups showed both in vitro and in vivo that AID initiates SHM and CSR by deaminating cytosines in DNA in a transcription-dependent manner. Although in vivo both DNA strands are equally targeted by AID, many in vitro and bacterial experiments found that AID almost exclusively targets the nontemplate strand of a transcribed substrate. Here, we report the detection of antisense transcripts in assembled Ig heavy chain (IgH) variable region exons and their immediate downstream region, as well as in switch regions, sequences that, respectively, are targets for SHM and CSR in vivo. In contrast, we did not detect antisense transcripts from the Cμ constant region exons, which lie between the IgH variable region exons and downstream S regions and which are not normally an AID target. Expression of the antisense variable region/flanking region and the S-region transcripts were found in all lymphocytes that transcribe these sequences in the sense direction. Steady-state levels of antisense transcripts appeared very low, and start sites potentially appeared heterogeneous. We discuss the potential implications of antisense IgH locus transcription for AID targeting or other processes. PMID:18292225

  13. Development of a Bioinformatics Framework for the Detection of Gene Conversion and the Analysis of Combinatorial Diversity in Immunoglobulin Heavy Chains in Four Cattle Breeds

    PubMed Central

    Czerny, Claus-Peter; König, Sven; Diesterbeck, Ulrike S.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a new bioinformatics framework for the analysis of rearranged bovine heavy chain immunoglobulin (Ig) variable regions by combining and refining widely used alignment algorithms. This bioinformatics framework allowed us to investigate alignments of heavy chain framework regions (FRHs) and the separate alignments of FRHs and heavy chain complementarity determining regions (CDRHs) to determine their germline origin in the four cattle breeds Aubrac, German Black Pied, German Simmental, and Holstein Friesian. Now it is also possible to specifically analyze Ig heavy chains possessing exceptionally long CDR3Hs. In order to gain more insight into breed specific differences in Ig combinatorial diversity, somatic hypermutations and putative gene conversions of IgG, we compared the dominantly transcribed variable (IGHV), diversity (IGHD), and joining (IGHJ) segments and their recombination in the four cattle breeds. The analysis revealed the use of 15 different IGHV segments, 21 IGHD segments, and two IGHJ segments with significant different transcription levels within the breeds. Furthermore, there are preferred rearrangements within the three groups of CDR3H lengths. In the sequences of group 2 (CDR3H lengths (L) of 11–47 amino acid residues (aa)) a higher number of recombination was observed than in sequences of group 1 (L≤10 aa) and 3 (L≥48 aa). The combinatorial diversity of germline IGHV, IGHD, and IGHJ-segments revealed 162 rearrangements that were significantly different. The few preferably rearranged gene segments within group 3 CDR3H regions may indicate specialized antibodies because this length is unique in cattle. The most important finding of this study, which was enabled by using the bioinformatics framework, is the discovery of strong evidence for gene conversion as a rare event using pseudogenes fulfilling all definitions for this particular diversification mechanism. PMID:27828971

  14. Clonal rearrangement for immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor genes in systemic Castleman's disease. Association with Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, C. A.; Frizzera, G.; Patton, D. F.; Peterson, B. A.; McClain, K. L.; Gajl-Peczalska, K. J.; Kersey, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    Castleman's disease is a morphologically and clinically heterogeneous lymphoproliferative disorder. Both a localized benign variant and an aggressive form with systemic manifestations have been described. To investigate the differences between these variants of Castleman's disease, the authors analyzed lymph node DNA from 4 patients with the localized type and 4 with the systemic type of Castleman's disease for immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor gene rearrangements. The role of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) was also studied by viral genomic DNA probes. They detected clonal rearrangements in 3 of the 4 patients with the systemic variant of Castleman's; no patients with localized disease had rearrangements. Copies of EBV genome were also detected in 2 of the 3 patients with clonal rearrangements. These results suggest that systemic Castleman's disease is a disorder distinct from the classical localized variant in that it may evolve into a clonal lymphoproliferation. Images Figure 1 PMID:2833104

  15. High-throughput sequencing of human immunoglobulin variable regions with subtype identification.

    PubMed

    Schanz, Merle; Liechti, Thomas; Zagordi, Osvaldo; Miho, Enkelejda; Reddy, Sai T; Günthard, Huldrych F; Trkola, Alexandra; Huber, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The humoral immune response plays a critical role in controlling infection, and the rapid adaptation to a broad range of pathogens depends on a highly diverse antibody repertoire. The advent of high-throughput sequencing technologies in the past decade has enabled insights into this immense diversity. However, not only the variable, but also the constant region of antibodies determines their in vivo activity. Antibody isotypes differ in effector functions and are thought to play a defining role in elicitation of immune responses, both in natural infection and in vaccination. We have developed an Illumina MiSeq high-throughput sequencing protocol that allows determination of the human IgG subtype alongside sequencing full-length antibody variable heavy chain regions. We thereby took advantage of the Illumina procedure containing two additional short reads as identifiers. By performing paired-end sequencing of the variable regions and customizing one of the identifier sequences to distinguish IgG subtypes, IgG transcripts with linked information of variable regions and IgG subtype can be retrieved. We applied our new method to the analysis of the IgG variable region repertoire from PBMC of an HIV-1 infected individual confirmed to have serum antibody reactivity to the Membrane Proximal External Region (MPER) of gp41. We found that IgG3 subtype frequencies in the memory B cell compartment increased after halted treatment and coincided with increased plasma antibody reactivity against the MPER domain. The sequencing strategy we developed is not restricted to analysis of IgG. It can be adopted for any Ig subtyping and beyond that for any research question where phasing of distant regions on the same amplicon is needed.

  16. Clues to pathogenesis of Waldenström macroglobulinemia and immunoglobulin M monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance provided by analysis of immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangement and clustering of B-cell receptors.

    PubMed

    Varettoni, Marzia; Zibellini, Silvia; Capello, Daniela; Arcaini, Luca; Rossi, Davide; Pascutto, Cristiana; Rattotti, Sara; Mangiacavalli, Silvia; Pochintesta, Lara; Gotti, Manuel; Gaidano, Gianluca; Cazzola, Mario

    2013-11-01

    We characterized immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) gene rearrangements and searched for clusters of stereotyped B-cell receptors in 123 patients with Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM; n = 59) or immunoglobulin M monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (IgM-MGUS) (n = 64). A productive monoclonal IGHV-D-J rearrangement was obtained in 99/123 patients (80%). Immunoglobulin heavy chain variable (IGHV) genes were mutated in 94/99 patients (95%) with a median somatic hypermutation rate of 6.7% (2.1-14.5). Compared with the normal B-cell repertoire, patients with WM/IgM-MGUS showed an over-representation of the IGHV3 subgroup (83% vs. 55%, p < 0.0001) and an under-representation of IGHV1 (7% vs. 14%, p = 0.04) and IGHV4 (7% vs. 23%, p = 0.0001) subgroups. At the gene level, in WM/IgM-MGUS there was an over-representation of IGHV3-23 (24% vs. 12%, p = 0.0003), IGHV3-64 (3% vs. < 1%, p = 0.003), IGHV3-7 (12% vs. 4%, p = 0.0001) and IGHV3-74 (9% vs. 2%, p < 0.0001), while IGHV4-39 was never used (0 vs. 5%, p = 0.03). Intra-WM/IgM-MGUS search for HCDR3 similarity showed no association fulfilling criteria for stereotyped receptors. WM/IgM-MGUS sequences were unrelated to known chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) or mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) subsets. In conclusion, the IGHV gene usage in WM and IgM-MGUS is remarkably biased as compared to the normal B-cell repertoire. WM and IgM-MGUS-specific HCDR3 clusters do not occur with a frequency detectable with currently available databases, not supporting a B-cell receptor-driven pathogenesis in WM and IgM-MGUS.

  17. Associations between genes for killer immunoglobulin-like receptors and their ligands in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Giebel, Sebastian; Boratyn-Nowicka, Agnieszka; Karabon, Lidia; Jedynak, Anna; Pamula-Pilat, Jolanta; Tecza, Karolina; Kula, Dorota; Kowal, Monika; Frydecka, Irena; Grzybowska, Ewa

    2014-06-01

    Killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) regulate function of NK cells and subsets of T cells. HLA class I molecules are ligands for inhibitory KIRs while specificity of activating KIRs is mainly unknown. Both KIR and HLA genotypes are highly polymorphic. In this study we analyzed associations of KIR and KIR ligand genes with the incidence and clinical course of epithelial ovarian cancer. DNA of 142 patients was analyzed for KIR genes and 103 samples were typed for HLA class I. Control group consisted of 200 healthy individuals, including 83 women, analyzed separately. The frequency of KIR genes in patients and controls were comparable. HLA-C group 1 (ligand for KIR2DL2/3) was more frequent in patients than in controls (86.4% vs. 67.5%, p=0.002). The frequency of KIR2DS4fl was higher in patients with endometrioid cancer (72.3%) compared with other histological subtypes (36.5%, p=0.004) and controls (29.5%, p=0.0001). KIR and KIR ligand genotype did not influence significantly the clinical course of the disease. We conclude that the genotype of KIR ligands is strongly associated with the incidence of epithelial ovarian cancer while KIR2DS4fl confers susceptibility to endometrioid subtype of the disease.

  18. Killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor and human leukocyte antigen-C genes in common variable immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Kartal, Ozgur; Musabak, Ugur; Yesillik, Sait; Sagkan, Rahsan I; Pekel, Aysel; Demirel, Fevzi; Baysan, Abdullah; Selçuk, Ali; Güleç, Mustafa; Şener, Osman

    2016-11-01

    We aimed herein to investigate the killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genes and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-C alleles in patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), and to reveal their differences from those in healthy population. In all, 18 patients who have been diagnosed with CVID and 15 living donors of kidney transplant recipients were enrolled in the study. Polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific primer (PCR-SSP) typing method was used in molecular genetic analysis. The frequencies of the genes in the study groups were statistically compared with each other using chi-square or Fisher exact tests, whichever were appropriate. Although there was no significant difference between both study groups with respect to distribution of KIR and HLA-C2 group genes, HLA-Cw7 allele frequency in patients with CVID was significantly lower than that in healthy population (P = 0.008). This present study results support that HLA-Cw7 allele, an inhibitor of KIR ligand, may play a role in the pathogenesis of CVID.

  19. Triple Immunoglobulin Gene Knockout Transchromosomic Cattle: Bovine Lambda Cluster Deletion and Its Effect on Fully Human Polyclonal Antibody Production

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Hiroaki; Sano, Akiko; Wu, Hua; Jiao, Jin-an; Kasinathan, Poothappillai; Sullivan, Eddie J.; Wang, Zhongde; Kuroiwa, Yoshimi

    2014-01-01

    Towards the goal of producing fully human polyclonal antibodies (hpAbs or hIgGs) in transchromosomic (Tc) cattle, we previously reported that Tc cattle carrying a human artificial chromosome (HAC) comprising the entire unrearranged human immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy-chain (hIGH), kappa-chain (hIGK), and lambda-chain (hIGL) germline loci produced physiological levels of hIgGs when both of the bovine immunoglobulin mu heavy-chains, bIGHM and bIGHML1, were homozygously inactivated (bIGHM−/−, bIGHML1−/−; double knockouts or DKO). However, because endogenous bovine immunoglobulin light chain loci are still intact, the light chains are produced both from the hIGK and hIGL genomic loci on the HAC and from the endogenous bovine kappa-chain (bIGK) and lambda-chain (bIGL) genomic loci, resulting in the production of fully hIgGs (both Ig heavy-chains and light-chains are of human origin: hIgG/hIgκ or hIgG/hIgλ) and chimeric hIgGs (Ig heavy-chains are of human origin while the Ig light-chains are of bovine origin: hIgG/bIgκ or hIgG/bIgλ). To improve fully hIgG production in Tc cattle, we here report the deletion of the entire bIGL joining (J) and constant (C) gene cluster (bIGLJ1-IGLC1 to bIGLJ5-IGLC5) by employing Cre/loxP mediated site-specific chromosome recombination and the production of triple knockout (bIGHM−/−, bIGHML1−/− and bIGL−/−; TKO) Tc cattle. We further demonstrate that bIGL cluster deletion greatly improves fully hIgGs production in the sera of TKO Tc cattle, with 51.3% fully hIgGs (hIgG/hIgκ plus hIgG/hIgλ). PMID:24603704

  20. Triple immunoglobulin gene knockout transchromosomic cattle: bovine lambda cluster deletion and its effect on fully human polyclonal antibody production.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Hiroaki; Sano, Akiko; Wu, Hua; Jiao, Jin-An; Kasinathan, Poothappillai; Sullivan, Eddie J; Wang, Zhongde; Kuroiwa, Yoshimi

    2014-01-01

    Towards the goal of producing fully human polyclonal antibodies (hpAbs or hIgGs) in transchromosomic (Tc) cattle, we previously reported that Tc cattle carrying a human artificial chromosome (HAC) comprising the entire unrearranged human immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy-chain (hIGH), kappa-chain (hIGK), and lambda-chain (hIGL) germline loci produced physiological levels of hIgGs when both of the bovine immunoglobulin mu heavy-chains, bIGHM and bIGHML1, were homozygously inactivated (bIGHM-/-, bIGHML1-/-; double knockouts or DKO). However, because endogenous bovine immunoglobulin light chain loci are still intact, the light chains are produced both from the hIGK and hIGL genomic loci on the HAC and from the endogenous bovine kappa-chain (bIGK) and lambda-chain (bIGL) genomic loci, resulting in the production of fully hIgGs (both Ig heavy-chains and light-chains are of human origin: hIgG/hIgκ or hIgG/hIgλ) and chimeric hIgGs (Ig heavy-chains are of human origin while the Ig light-chains are of bovine origin: hIgG/bIgκ or hIgG/bIgλ). To improve fully hIgG production in Tc cattle, we here report the deletion of the entire bIGL joining (J) and constant (C) gene cluster (bIGLJ1-IGLC1 to bIGLJ5-IGLC5) by employing Cre/loxP mediated site-specific chromosome recombination and the production of triple knockout (bIGHM-/-, bIGHML1-/- and bIGL-/-; TKO) Tc cattle. We further demonstrate that bIGL cluster deletion greatly improves fully hIgGs production in the sera of TKO Tc cattle, with 51.3% fully hIgGs (hIgG/hIgκ plus hIgG/hIgλ).

  1. Gene Expression Profiling in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of Patients with Common Variable Immunodeficiency: Modulation of Adaptive Immune Response following Intravenous Immunoglobulin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Alessandro; Tinazzi, Elisa; Rizzi, Monica; Beri, Ruggero; Argentino, Giuseppe; Ottria, Andrea; Lunardi, Claudio; Puccetti, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Background Regular intravenous immunoglobulin treatment is used to replace antibody deficiency in primary immunodeficiency diseases; however the therapeutic effect seems to be related not only to antibody replacement but also to an active role in the modulation of the immune response. Common variable immunodeficiency is the most frequent primary immunodeficiency seen in clinical practice. Methods We have studied the effect of intravenous immunoglobulin replacement in patients with common variable immunodeficiency by evaluating the gene-expression profiles from Affimetrix HG-U133A. Some of the gene array results were validated by real time RT-PCR and by the measurement of circulating cytokines and chemokines by ELISA. Moreover we performed FACS analysis of blood mononuclear cells from the patients enrolled in the study. Results A series of genes involved in innate and acquired immune responses were markedly up- or down-modulated before therapy. Such genes included CD14, CD36, LEPR, IRF-5, RGS-1, CD38, TNFRSF25, IL-4, CXCR4, CCR3, IL-8. Most of these modulated genes showed an expression similar to that of normal controls after immunoglobulin replacement. Real time RT-PCR of selected genes and serum levels of IL-4, CXCR4 before and after therapy changed accordingly to gene array results. Interestingly, serum levels of IL-8 remained unchanged, as the corresponding gene, before and after treatment. FACS analysis showed a marked decrease of CD8+T cells and an increase of CD4+T cells following treatment. Moreover we observed a marked increase of CD23−CD27−IgM−IgG− B cells (centrocytes). Conclusions Our results are in accordance with previous reports and provide further support to the hypothesis that the benefits of intravenous immunoglobulin therapy are not only related to antibody replacement but also to its ability to modulate the immune response in common variable immunodeficiency. PMID:24831519

  2. Detection and characterization of R-loops at the murine immunoglobulinregion.

    PubMed

    Kao, Yu-Pu; Hsieh, Wen-Chuan; Hung, Shu-Ting; Huang, Chiun-Wei; Lieber, Michael R; Huang, Feng-Ting

    2013-06-01

    IgA is the most abundant antibody in mammals. However, the mechanism of its class switching is still not clear. The formation of the R-loops, as the target for AID, has been proposed to play a crucial role during mammalian class switch recombination. Here, we provide a systematic evaluation of R-loops at Sα (IgA) in CH12F3-2A cells, which is a unique cell model system for class switch recombination because of its consistent switching to IgA upon stimulation. The results of R-loop analysis demonstrate distinct features specific to Sα. Some R-loops may initiate from the end of Iα, but all terminate exclusively within Sα. Time-course analysis also indicates that the percentage of R-loops peaks prior to the occurrence of class switch recombination. This is the first demonstration that R-loops form at Sαin vitro and in situ, despite variable G density and relatively few GGGG clusters in Sα. The short distance from the promoter to Sα may compensate for the less robust R-loop-forming factors at Sα relative to other switch regions. In conclusion, R-loops at the Sα region further support R-loop formation as a general feature of all stimulated switch regions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The translesion DNA polymerase θ plays a dominant role in immunoglobulin gene somatic hypermutation

    PubMed Central

    Zan, Hong; Shima, Naoko; Xu, Zhenming; Al-Qahtani, Ahmed; Evinger III, Albert J; Zhong, Yuan; Schimenti, John C; Casali, Paolo

    2005-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) somatic hypermutation (SHM) critically underlies the generation of high-affinity antibodies. Mutations can be introduced by error-prone polymerases such as polymerase ζ (Rev3), a mispair extender, and polymerase η, a mispair inserter with a preference for dA/dT, while repairing DNA lesions initiated by AID-mediated deamination of dC to yield dU:dG mismatches. The partial impairment of SHM observed in the absence of these polymerases led us to hypothesize a main role for another translesion DNA polymerase. Here, we show that deletion in C57BL/6J mice of the translesion polymerase θ, which possesses a dual nucleotide mispair inserter–extender function, results in greater than 60% decrease of mutations in antigen-selected V186.2DJH transcripts and greater than 80% decrease in mutations in the Ig H chain intronic JH4-iEμ sequence, together with significant alterations in the spectrum of the residual mutations. Thus, polymerase θ plays a dominant role in SHM, possibly by introducing mismatches while bypassing abasic sites generated by UDG-mediated deglycosylation of AID-effected dU, by extending DNA past such abasic sites and by synthesizing DNA during dU:dG mismatch repair. PMID:16222339

  4. Immunoglobulin gene repertoire in ocular adnexal lymphomas: hints on the nature of the antigenic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Dagklis, A; Ponzoni, M; Govi, S; Cangi, M G; Pasini, E; Charlotte, F; Vino, A; Doglioni, C; Davì, F; Lossos, I S; Ntountas, I; Papadaki, T; Dolcetti, R; Ferreri, A J M; Stamatopoulos, K; Ghia, P

    2012-04-01

    Evidence from certain geographical areas links lymphomas of the ocular adnexa marginal zone B-cell lymphomas (OAMZL) with Chlamydophila psittaci (Cp) infection, suggesting that lymphoma development is dependent upon chronic stimulation by persistent infections. Notwithstanding that, the actual immunopathogenetical mechanisms have not yet been elucidated. As in other B-cell lymphomas, insight into this issue, especially with regard to potential selecting ligands, could be provided by analysis of the immunoglobulin (IG) receptors of the malignant clones. To this end, we studied the molecular features of IGs in 44 patients with OAMZL (40% Cp-positive), identifying features suggestive of a pathogenic mechanism of autoreactivity. Herein, we show that lymphoma cells express a distinctive IG repertoire, with electropositive antigen (Ag)-binding sites, reminiscent of autoantibodies (auto-Abs) recognizing DNA. Additionally, five (11%) cases of OAMZL expressed IGs homologous with autoreactive Abs or IGs of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, a disease known for the expression of autoreactive IGs by neoplastic cells. In contrast, no similarity with known anti-Chlamydophila Abs was found. Taken together, these results strongly indicate that OAMZL may originate from B cells selected for their capability to bind Ags and, in particular, auto-Ags. In OAMZL associated with Cp infection, the pathogen likely acts indirectly on the malignant B cells, promoting the development of an inflammatory milieu, where auto-Ags could be exposed and presented, driving proliferation and expansion of self-reactive B cells.

  5. Immunoglobulin VH and VK genes of the BALB/c anti-foot-and-mouth disease virus (O1) VP1 response: cloning, characterization and transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Conrad, U; Becker, K; Ziegner, M; Walter, G

    1991-11-01

    Hybridomas producing monoclonal antibodies of different isotypes were isolated from BALB/c antibody responses to the capsid protein VP1 of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) strain O1. According to antigen binding measured by ELISA a weak-binding (81D10, IgM) and a strong-binding antibody (113C12, IgG2a) were selected. As RNA sequencing of productive immunoglobulin VH and VK genes turned out, both chains of the weak-binding antibody (81D10) are encoded by germline (i.e. not mutated) genes whereas the gene encoding the strong-binding antibody (113C12) k chain is mutated at several sites. Therefore, rearranged VH and VK genes of 81D10 were cloned, expressed in immunoglobulin non-producing plasmacytoma cells, and mice transgenic for the 81D10 k gene were produced. These mice provide a first step in the development of a transgenic mouse model for genetical investigations in the affinity maturation of anti-viral immunoglobulin variable genes.

  6. Transfection of Murine and Human Hematopoietic Progenitors with Rearranged Immunoglobulin Genes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    idiotopes should occur in approximately 0.1% (1/800) of the p*+-B cells. This estimate is based on the assumption that the 100 to 200 endogenous K -genes...expression of endogenous K -genes. To determine why M167-id+ B cells were amplified 100 to 500 fold while Tl5-id+ B cells were not detected, we...electroporated the M167-H-chain gene into the non secreting SP2/0 myeloma line along with either the K 2 2 or K 2 4 light chain genes. The antibodies produced by

  7. Contribution of genes for killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) to the susceptibility to chronic hepatitis C virus infection and to viremia.

    PubMed

    Kuśnierczyk, Piotr; Mozer-Lisewska, Iwona; Zwolińska, Katarzyna; Kowala-Piaskowska, Arleta Elżbieta; Bura, Maciej; Bereszyńska, Iwona; Pauli, Anna; Żeromski, Jan

    2015-03-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are an important element of innate immunity against viruses, although their numbers decrease in the liver during chronic HCV infection. NK cells express a large panel of inhibitory and activating receptors. The most polymorphic of these are killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) which are encoded by multiple genes that may be present or absent in given individuals depending on their genotype. This variability results in differential susceptibility to viral infections and diseases, including HCV infection and its consequences. The aim of this study was to test whether chronical infection with HCV and the viremia levels are associated with any KIR gene in the Polish population. We typed 301 chronically HCV-infected patients and 425 non-infected healthy individuals for the presence or absence of KIR genes and their ligands, HLA-C C1 and C2 groups as well as HLA-B and HLA-A Bw4-positive alleles. We found that males, but not females, possessing KIR2DS2 and KIR2DL2 genes had a 1.7 higher probability to become chronically HCV-infected than males negative for these genes (p=0.0213). In accord with this, centromeric B region, containing KIR2DS2 and KIR2DL2 genes, was also associated with chronic HCV infection in males. In addition, patients of both genders possessing KIR2DS3 but not KIR2DS5 gene exhibited, on average, 2.6 lower level of viremia than HCV-infected individuals with other genotypes (p=0.00282). This was evident in those infected at a young age. KIR2DS3-positive patients also had lower mean levels of bilirubin than KIR2DS3-negative ones (p=0.02862). Our results suggest a contribution of the KIR2DS2 and KIR2DL2 genes (cenB haplotype) to the susceptibility to chronic HCV infection, and an association of the KIR2DS3 gene in the absence of KIR2DS5 with low viremia levels. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Dietary linseed oil in the maternal diet affects immunoglobulins, tissue fatty acid composition and expression of lipid metabolism-related genes in piglets.

    PubMed

    Chen, X L; Wang, N; Tian, M L; Wang, L; Liu, T; Zhang, X W; Shi, B M; Shan, A S

    2016-11-21

    This experiment investigated the effects of supplementing the maternal diet with linseed oil (LSO) and soya bean oil (SBO) on immunoglobulins, the fatty acid composition and hepatic expression of lipid metabolism-related genes in piglets. Multiparous sows (twenty-four per diet) were fed on diets containing a supplement of either SBO or LSO during last week of gestation and lactation. The results indicated that supplementation of maternal diet with LSO could improve the weaning weight of piglets and average daily gain (ADG) (p < 0.05). The concentration of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immunoglobulin A (IgA) was enhanced in sow plasma, colostrum and milk by the addition of LSO (p < 0.05). In addition, the concentration of 18: 3n-3 fatty acids was higher in the milk of LSO sows. Meanwhile, maternal supplementation with LSO increased the levels of plasma IgG, IgA and the tissues n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) in piglets (p < 0.05). Correspondingly, the mRNA expression levels of hepatic ∆5-desaturase (D5D) and ∆6-desaturase (D6D) were higher, and fatty acid synthase (FAS) was lower in piglets from LSO-fed sows when compared with that in the SBO group. In conclusion, LSO supplementation of the maternal diet increases immunoglobulins, modifies the fatty acid composition and affects the gene of D5D and D6D expression of piglets.

  9. Strand-biased defect in C/G transversions in hypermutating immunoglobulin genes in Rev1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Jacob G; Langerak, Petra; Tsaalbi-Shtylik, Anastasia; van den Berk, Paul; Jacobs, Heinz; de Wind, Niels

    2006-02-20

    Somatic hypermutation of Ig genes enables B cells of the germinal center to generate high-affinity immunoglobulin variants. Key intermediates in somatic hypermutation are deoxyuridine lesions, introduced by activation-induced cytidine deaminase. These lesions can be processed further to abasic sites by uracil DNA glycosylase. Mutagenic replication of deoxyuridine, or of its abasic derivative, by translesion synthesis polymerases is hypothesized to underlie somatic hypermutation. Rev1 is a translesion synthesis polymerase that in vitro incorporates uniquely deoxycytidine opposite deoxyuridine and abasic residues. To investigate a role of Rev1 in mammalian somatic hypermutation we have generated mice deficient for Rev1. Although Rev1-/- mice display transient growth retardation, proliferation of Rev1-/- LPS-stimulated B cells is indistinguishable from wild-type cells. In mutated Ig genes from Rev1-/- mice, C to G transversions were virtually absent in the nontranscribed (coding) strand and reduced in the transcribed strand. This defect is associated with an increase of A to T, C to A, and T to C substitutions. These results indicate that Rev1 incorporates deoxycytidine residues, most likely opposite abasic nucleotides, during somatic hypermutation. In addition, loss of Rev1 causes compensatory increase in mutagenesis by other translesion synthesis polymerases.

  10. Construction of a multicolor GeneScan analytical system to detect clonal rearrangements of immunoglobulin and T cell receptor genes in canine lymphoid tumors.

    PubMed

    Goto-Koshino, Yuko; Mochizuki, Hiroyuki; Sato, Masahiko; Nakashima, Ko; Hiyoshi, Saaya; Fujiwara-Igarashi, Aki; Maeda, Shingo; Nakamura, Kenji; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Fujino, Yasuhito; Ohno, Koichi; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2015-05-15

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification to detect immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) and T cell receptor γ-chain (TCRγ) gene rearrangements has recently become widely used as part of the diagnostic strategy for lymphoid tumors in dogs. In this study, we constructed a multicolor GeneScan analytical system to improve the sensitivity and resolution of the clonality analysis of antigen receptor gene rearrangements in dogs. We used 7 reactions per sample, with 2 PCR conditions, to amplify IgH/TCRγ and control genes. By using multicolor-labeled primers, these 7 PCR products could be combined into 3 tubes before capillary electrophoresis. Clonal rearrangement of the IgH/TCRγ genes was detected in 93.3% of dogs with multicentric lymphoma and 84.6% of dogs with gastrointestinal lymphoma. Detection sensitivity of the clonally expanded cells in the background of normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells was 1-10%. The multicolor GeneScan analytical system developed here may prove to be helpful for the diagnosis of lymphoid tumors in dogs.

  11. Deciphering the importance of the palindromic architecture of the immunoglobulin heavy-chain 3' regulatory region

    PubMed Central

    Saintamand, Alexis; Vincent-Fabert, Christelle; Garot, Armand; Rouaud, Pauline; Oruc, Zeliha; Magnone, Virginie; Cogné, Michel; Denizot, Yves

    2016-01-01

    The IgH 3' regulatory region (3'RR) controls class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) in B cells. The mouse 3'RR contains four enhancer elements with hs1,2 flanked by inverted repeated sequences and the centre of a 25-kb palindrome bounded by two hs3 enhancer inverted copies (hs3a and hs3b). hs4 lies downstream of the palindrome. In mammals, evolution maintained this unique palindromic arrangement, suggesting that it is functionally significant. Here we report that deconstructing the palindromic IgH 3'RR strongly affects its function even when enhancers are preserved. CSR and IgH transcription appear to be poorly dependent on the 3'RR architecture and it is more or less preserved, provided 3'RR enhancers are present. By contrast, a ‘palindromic effect' significantly lowers VH germline transcription, AID recruitment and SHM. In conclusion, this work indicates that the IgH 3'RR does not simply pile up enhancer units but also optimally exposes them into a functional architecture of crucial importance. PMID:26883548

  12. AID induces double-strand breaks at immunoglobulin switch regions and c-MYC causing chromosomal translocations in yeast THO mutants.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, José F; Gómez-González, Belén; Aguilera, Andrés

    2011-02-01

    Transcription of the switch (S) regions of immunoglobulin genes in B cells generates stable R-loops that are targeted by Activation Induced Cytidine Deaminase (AID), triggering class switch recombination (CSR), as well as translocations with c-MYC responsible for Burkitt's lymphomas. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, stable R-loops are formed co-transcriptionally in mutants of THO, a conserved nuclear complex involved in mRNP biogenesis. Such R-loops trigger genome instability and facilitate deamination by human AID. To understand the mechanisms that generate genome instability mediated by mRNP biogenesis impairment and by AID, we devised a yeast chromosomal system based on different segments of mammalian S regions and c-MYC for the analysis of chromosomal rearrangements in both wild-type and THO mutants. We demonstrate that AID acts in yeast at heterologous S and c-MYC transcribed sequences leading to double-strand breaks (DSBs) which in turn cause chromosomal translocations via Non-Homologous End Joining (NHEJ). AID-induced translocations were strongly enhanced in yeast THO null mutants, consistent with the idea that AID-mediated DSBs depend on R-loop formation. Our study not only provides new clues to understand the role of mRNP biogenesis in preventing genome rearrangements and the mechanism of AID-mediated genome instability, but also shows that, once uracil residues are produced by AID-mediated deamination, these are processed into DSBs and chromosomal rearrangements by the general and conserved DNA repair functions present from yeast to human cells.

  13. Configuration of immunoglobulin and T cell receptor beta and gamma genes in acute myeloid leukaemia: pitfalls in the analysis of 40 cases.

    PubMed Central

    Parreira, L.; Carvalho, C.; Moura, H.; Melo, A.; Santos, P.; Guimarães, J. E.; Parreira, A.

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the overall incidence of immunoglobulin (Ig) and T cell receptor (TCR) beta and gamma gene rearrangements in a series of 40 cases of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and to determine whether structural modifications of these genes could be correlated with the abnormal expression of lymphoid markers in malignant cells. METHODS: All cases were classified according to the criteria of the FAB group and immunophenotyped with a panel of monoclonal antibodies reactive with myeloid and lymphoid differentiation antigens. DNA analysis was performed by the method of Southern using probes for the Ig JH, TCR-C beta 1, and TCR-J tau 1 regions. RESULTS: Phenotypic analysis showed that in addition to myeloid markers, 10 cases expressed lymphoid antigens: CD7 in seven (of which three were TdT positive, one CD2 positive, and one CD19 positive) and CD19 in three. Southern blot analysis showed that bands with sizes different from the germ line control were present in the TCR beta genes in 11 cases: in six of 30 with pure myeloid phenotype and in five of 10 of those expressing lymphoid markers. A close observation of the size and patterns of those bands, however, showed that they could be artefactual. Indeed, further analysis showed that they were either due to resistant Eco RI/Hind III sites at the beta locus or to plasmid contamination. Rearranged genes were eventually found in only two of the 40 cases: at the Ig JH region in one of the 30 with pure myeloid phenotype (3.3%) and at the TCR gamma genes in one of 10 with lymphoid markers (10%). CONCLUSIONS: These observations showed that Ig/TCR gene rearrangements were rare in this AML series (overall incidence of 5%) and that they were not significantly more common in cases with aberrant expression of lymphoid markers. The size and pattern of the potential non-germline bands that can be found in these loci must be carefully evaluated. Images PMID:1372916

  14. Mutations in two regions upstream of the A gamma globin gene canonical promoter affect gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, J A; Lee, R F; Lingrel, J B

    1989-01-01

    Two regions upstream of the human fetal (A gamma) globin gene, which interact with protein factors from K562 and HeLa nuclear extracts, have functional significance in gene expression. One binding site (site I) is at a position -290 to -267 bp upstream of the transcription initiation site, the other (site II) is at -182 to -168 bp. Site II includes the octamer sequence (ATGCAAAT) found in an immunoglobulin enhancer and the histone H2b gene promoter. A point mutation (T----C) at -175, within the octamer sequence, is characteristic of a naturally occurring HPFH (hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin), and decreases factor binding to an oligonucleotide containing the octamer motif. Expression assays using a A gamma globin promoter-CAT (chloramphenicol acetyl transferase) fusion gene show that the point mutation at -175 increases expression in erythroid, but not non-erythroid cells when compared to a wild-type construct. This correlates with the actual effect of the HPFH mutation in humans. This higher expression may result from a mechanism more complex than reduced binding of a negative regulator. A site I clustered-base substitution gives gamma-CAT activity well below wild-type, suggesting that this factor is a positive regulator. Images PMID:2472607

  15. Minimal residual disease detection in Tunisian B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia based on immunoglobulin gene rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Besbes, S.; Hamadou, W.S.; Boulland, M.L.; Youssef, Y.B.; Achour, B.; Regaieg, H.; Khelif, A.; Fest, T.; Soua, Z.

    2017-01-01

    IGH gene rearrangement and IGK-Kde gene deletion can be used as molecular markers for the assessment of B lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). Minimal residual disease detected based on those markers is currently the most reliable prognosis factor in B-ALL. The aim of this study was to use clonal IGH/IGK-Kde gene rearrangements to confirm B-ALL diagnosis and to evaluate the treatment outcome of Tunisian leukemic patients by monitoring the minimal residual disease (MRD) after induction chemotherapy. Seventeen consecutive newly diagnosed B-ALL patients were investigated by multiplex PCR assay and real time quantitative PCR according to BIOMED 2 conditions. The vast majority of clonal VH-JH rearrangements included VH3 gene. For IGK deletion, clonal VK1f/6-Kde recombinations were mainly identified. These rearrangements were quantified to follow-up seven B-ALL after induction using patient-specific ASO. Four patients had an undetectable level of MRD with a sensitivity of up to 10-5. This molecular approach allowed identification of prognosis risk group and adequate therapeutic decision. The IGK-Kde and IGH gene rearrangements might be used for diagnosis and MRD monitoring of B-ALL, introduced for the first time in Tunisian laboratories. PMID:28099581

  16. Innate Functions of Immunoglobulin M Lessen Liver Gene Transfer with Helper-Dependent Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Unzu, Carmen; Morales-Kastresana, Aizea; Sampedro, Ana; Serrano-Mendioroz, Irantzu; Azpilikueta, Arantza; Ochoa, María Carmen; Dubrot, Juan; Martínez-Ansó, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The immune system poses obstacles to viral vectors, even in the first administration to preimmunized hosts. We have observed that the livers of B cell-deficient mice were more effectively transduced by a helper-dependent adenovirus serotype-5 (HDA) vector than those of WT mice. This effect was T-cell independent as shown in athymic mice. Passive transfer of the serum from adenovirus-naïve WT to Rag1KO mice resulted in a reduction in gene transfer that was traced to IgM purified from serum of adenovirus-naïve mice. To ascribe the gene transfer inhibition activity to either adenoviral antigen-specific or antigen-unspecific functions of IgM, we used a monoclonal IgM antibody of unrelated specificity. Both the polyclonal and the irrelevant monoclonal IgM inhibited gene transfer by the HDA vector to either cultured hepatocellular carcinoma cells or to the liver of mice in vivo. Adsorption of polyclonal or monoclonal IgMs to viral capsids was revealed by ELISAs on adenovirus-coated plates. These observations indicate the existence of an inborn IgM mechanism deployed against a prevalent virus to reduce early post-infection viremia. In conclusion, innate IgM binding to adenovirus serotype-5 capsids restrains gene-transfer and offers a mechanism to be targeted for optimization of vector dosage in gene therapy with HDA vectors. PMID:24465560

  17. Precise and in situ genetic humanization of 6 Mb of mouse immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Lynn E; Karow, Margaret; Stevens, Sean; Auerbach, Wojtek; Poueymirou, William T; Yasenchak, Jason; Frendewey, David; Valenzuela, David M; Giallourakis, Cosmas C; Alt, Frederick W; Yancopoulos, George D; Murphy, Andrew J

    2014-04-08

    Genetic humanization, which involves replacing mouse genes with their human counterparts, can create powerful animal models for the study of human genes and diseases. One important example of genetic humanization involves mice humanized for their Ig genes, allowing for human antibody responses within a mouse background (HumAb mice) and also providing a valuable platform for the generation of fully human antibodies as therapeutics. However, existing HumAb mice do not have fully functional immune systems, perhaps because of the manner in which they were genetically humanized. Heretofore, most genetic humanizations have involved disruption of the endogenous mouse gene with simultaneous introduction of a human transgene at a new and random location (so-called KO-plus-transgenic humanization). More recent efforts have attempted to replace mouse genes with their human counterparts at the same genetic location (in situ humanization), but such efforts involved laborious procedures and were limited in size and precision. We describe a general and efficient method for very large, in situ, and precise genetic humanization using large compound bacterial artificial chromosome-based targeting vectors introduced into mouse ES cells. We applied this method to genetically humanize 3-Mb segments of both the mouse heavy and κ light chain Ig loci, by far the largest genetic humanizations ever described. This paper provides a detailed description of our genetic humanization approach, and the companion paper reports that the humoral immune systems of mice bearing these genetically humanized loci function as efficiently as those of WT mice.

  18. Innate functions of immunoglobulin M lessen liver gene transfer with helper-dependent adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Unzu, Carmen; Melero, Ignacio; Morales-Kastresana, Aizea; Sampedro, Ana; Serrano-Mendioroz, Irantzu; Azpilikueta, Arantza; Ochoa, María Carmen; Dubrot, Juan; Martínez-Ansó, Eduardo; Fontanellas, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The immune system poses obstacles to viral vectors, even in the first administration to preimmunized hosts. We have observed that the livers of B cell-deficient mice were more effectively transduced by a helper-dependent adenovirus serotype-5 (HDA) vector than those of WT mice. This effect was T-cell independent as shown in athymic mice. Passive transfer of the serum from adenovirus-naïve WT to Rag1KO mice resulted in a reduction in gene transfer that was traced to IgM purified from serum of adenovirus-naïve mice. To ascribe the gene transfer inhibition activity to either adenoviral antigen-specific or antigen-unspecific functions of IgM, we used a monoclonal IgM antibody of unrelated specificity. Both the polyclonal and the irrelevant monoclonal IgM inhibited gene transfer by the HDA vector to either cultured hepatocellular carcinoma cells or to the liver of mice in vivo. Adsorption of polyclonal or monoclonal IgMs to viral capsids was revealed by ELISAs on adenovirus-coated plates. These observations indicate the existence of an inborn IgM mechanism deployed against a prevalent virus to reduce early post-infection viremia. In conclusion, innate IgM binding to adenovirus serotype-5 capsids restrains gene-transfer and offers a mechanism to be targeted for optimization of vector dosage in gene therapy with HDA vectors.

  19. Minimal Residual Disease (MRD) Detection with Translocations and T-Cell Receptor and Immunoglobulin Gene Rearrangements in Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia Patients: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Sayitoğlu, Müge; Ar, M Cem; Hatırnaz, Özden; Öngören, Şeniz; Üre, Ümit; Başlar, Zafer; Sırma, Sema; Aydın, Yıldız; Özbek, Uğur; Ferhanoğlu, Burhan

    2008-09-05

    Monitoring minimal residual disease has become increasingly important in clinical practice of ALL management. Break-point fusion regions of leukaemia related chromosomal aberrations and rearranged immunoglobulin (Ig) and T cell-receptor (TCR) genes, which can be detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), are used as leukaemia specific markers in genetic studies of MRD. A total of 31 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed ALL were screened for eligibility criteria. Of those 26 were included in the study. One patient with partial response following induction therapy and four patients who were lost to follow-up after induction were excluded from the study; thus 21 patients were evaluated for MRD. Chromosomal aberrations were detected in 5 (24%) of the patients and were used for MRD monitoring. Three patients had t(9;22) translocation, the other 2 had t(4;11) and t(1;19). MRD-based risk stratification of the 16 patients analysed for Ig/TCR rearrangements revealed 3 low-risk, 11 intermediate-risk and 2 high-risk patients. MRD monitoring is progressively getting to be a more important predictive factor in adult ALL patients. As reported by others confirmed by our limited data there is a good correlation between MRD status and clinical outcome in patients receiving chemotherapy. The pilot-study presented here is the first that systematically and consecutively performs a molecular MRD monitoring of ALL patients in Turkey.

  20. Forward genetics identifies a requirement for the Izumo-like immunoglobulin superfamily spe-45 gene in Caenorhabditis elegans fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Singaravelu, Gunasekaran; Rahimi, Sina; Krauchunas, Amber; Rizvi, Anam; Dharia, Sunny; Shakes, Diane; Smith, Harold; Golden, Andy; Singson, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Fertilization is a conserved process in all sexually reproducing organisms whereby sperm bind and fuse with oocytes. Despite the importance of sperm-oocyte interactions in fertilization, the molecular underpinnings of this process are still not well understood. The only cognate ligand-receptor pair identified in the context of fertilization is sperm-surface Izumo and egg-surface Juno in mouse [1]. Here we describe a genetic screening strategy to isolate fertilization mutants in Caenorhabditis elegans in order to generate a more complete inventory of molecules required for gamete interactions. From this screening strategy, we identified, cloned, and characterized spe-45, a gene that encodes an Izumo-like immunoglobulin superfamily protein. Mammalian Izumo is required for male fertility and has the same basic mutant phenotype as spe-45. Worms lacking spe-45 function produce morphologically normal and motile sperm that cannot fuse with oocytes despite direct contact in the reproductive tract. The power of this screen to identify proteins with ancient sperm functions suggests that characterization of additional mutants from our screen may reveal other deeply conserved components in fertility pathways and complement studies in other organisms. PMID:26671668

  1. ETS-Mediated Cooperation between Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Motifs of the Immunoglobulin μ Heavy-Chain Gene Enhancer

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Wei; Sun, Xiao-hong; Sen, Ranjan

    1998-01-01

    The μE motifs of the immunoglobulin μ heavy-chain gene enhancer bind ubiquitously expressed proteins of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family. These elements work together with other, more tissue-restricted elements to produce B-cell-specific enhancer activity by presently undefined combinatorial mechanisms. We found that μE2 contributed to transcription activation in B cells only when the μE3 site was intact, providing the first evidence for functional interactions between bHLH proteins. In vitro assays showed that bHLH zipper proteins binding to μE3 enhanced Ets-1 binding to μA. One of the consequences of this protein-protein interaction was to facilitate binding of a second bHLH protein, E47, to the μE2 site, thereby generating a three-protein–DNA complex. Furthermore, transcriptional synergy between bHLH and bHLH zipper factors also required an intermediate ETS protein, which may bridge the transcription activation domains of the bHLH factors. Our observations define an unusual form of cooperation between bHLH and ETS proteins and suggest mechanisms by which tissue-restricted and ubiquitous factors combine to generate tissue-specific enhancer activity. PMID:9488464

  2. The immunoglobulin heavy chain locus in the reptile Anolis carolinensis.

    PubMed

    Gambón Deza, Francisco; Sánchez Espinel, Christian; Magadán Mompó, Susana

    2009-05-01

    We describe the entire immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) locus from the reptile Anolis carolinensis. The heavy chain constant (C(H)) region includes C mu, C delta and C upsilon genes. This is the first description of a C upsilon gene in the reptilian class. Variable (V(H)), diversity (D(H)) and joining (J(H)) genes are located 5' from the constant (C(H)) chain complex locus. The C mu and C upsilon genes encode antibodies with four immunoglobulin domains. The C delta gene encoded an 11 domain delta heavy chain as in Eublepharis macularius. Seventy V(H) genes, belonging to 28 families, were identified, and they can be sorted into five broader groups. The similarity of the organization of the reptilian genes with those of amphibians and mammals suggests the existence of a process of heavy chain genomic reorganization before the radiation of tetrapod vertebrates.

  3. Immunoglobulin K light chain deficiency: A rare, but probably underestimated, humoral immune defect.

    PubMed

    Sala, Pierguido; Colatutto, Antonio; Fabbro, Dora; Mariuzzi, Laura; Marzinotto, Stefania; Toffoletto, Barbara; Perosa, Anna R; Damante, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Human immunoglobulin molecules are generated by a pair of identical heavy chains, which identify the immunoglobulin class, and a pair of identical light chains, Kappa or Lambda alternatively, which characterize the immunoglobulin type. In normal conditions, Kappa light chains represent approximately 2/3 of the light chains of total immunoglobulins, both circulating and lymphocyte surface bound. Very few cases of immunoglobulin Kappa or Lambda light chain defects have been reported. Furthermore, the genetic basis of this defect has been extensively explored only in a single case. We report a case of a patient suffering of serious recurrent bacterial infections, which was caused by a very rare form of immunoglobulin disorder, consisting of a pure defect of Kappa light chain. We evaluated major serum immunoglobulin concentrations, as well as total and free Kappa and Lambda light chain concentrations. Lymphocyte phenotyping was also performed and finally we tested the Kappa chain VJ rearrangement as well as the constant Kappa region sequence. Studies performed on VJ rearrangement showed a polyclonal genetic arrangement, whereas the gene sequencing for the constant region of Kappa chain showed a homozygous T to G substitution at the position 1288 (rs200765148). This mutation causes a substitution from Cys to Gly in the protein sequence and, therefore, determines the abnormal folding of the constant region of Kappa chain. We suggest that this defect could lead to an effective reduction of the variability of total antibody repertoire and a consequent defect of an apparently normal immunoglobulin response to common antigens.

  4. Iodine supplementation of the pregnant dam alters intestinal gene expression and immunoglobulin uptake in the newborn lamb.

    PubMed

    McGovern, F M; Magee, D A; Browne, J A; MacHugh, D E; Boland, T M

    2016-04-01

    Excess iodine intake by the pregnant dam reduces lamb serum antibody concentration, specifically immunoglobulin G (IgG). An experiment was conducted to investigate the mechanisms under pinning the reduced serum IgG concentration at 24 h postpartum in the progeny of iodine supplemented dams. Forty-five mature twin bearing ewes (n=15/treatment) were allocated to one of three dietary treatments as follows: basal diet (Control); basal diet plus 26.6 mg of iodine per ewe per day as calcium iodate (CaIO3); or potassium iodide (KI). Ewes were individually housed and fed from d 119 of gestation until parturition. All lambs received colostrum at 1, 10 and 18 h postpartum via stomach tube. At 1 h postpartum lambs from the control and an iodine supplemented treatment (n=10 per treatment from control and CaIO3) were euthanised before colostrum consumption and ileal segments isolated to determine the gene expression profile of a panel of genes identified as having a role in antibody transfer. Preceding euthanasia, lambs were blood sampled for determination of serum IgG, total thyroxine and free tri-iodothyronine concentrations. Progeny of CaIO3 supplemented dams had lower tri-iodothyronine concentrations (P<0.01) at 1 h postpartum and lower serum IgG concentrations (P<0.001) at 24 h postpartum when compared with the progeny of control dams. Iodine (CaIO3) supplementation of the dam increased the relative expression (P<0.05) of the B2M, PIGR and MYC genes in the ileum of the lamb, before colostrum consumption; while the expression of THRB declined when compared with the progeny of C dams (P<0.01). In conclusion, the results of this study show that it is the actual inclusion of excess iodine in the diet of the ewe, regardless of the carrier element, that negatively affects passive transfer in the newborn lamb. This study presents novel data describing the relationship between maternal iodine nutrition and its effect on the thyroid hormone status and subsequent gene expression in

  5. CIG-DB: the database for human or mouse immunoglobulin and T cell receptor genes available for cancer studies.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yoji; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi; Furue, Motoki; Gojobori, Takashi; Akiyama, Yasuto

    2010-07-27

    Immunoglobulin (IG or antibody) and the T-cell receptor (TR) are pivotal proteins in the immune system of higher organisms. In cancer immunotherapy, the immune responses mediated by tumor-epitope-binding IG or TR play important roles in anticancer effects. Although there are public databases specific for immunological genes, their contents have not been associated with clinical studies. Therefore, we developed an integrated database of IG/TR data reported in cancer studies (the Cancer-related Immunological Gene Database [CIG-DB]). This database is designed as a platform to explore public human and murine IG/TR genes sequenced in cancer studies. A total of 38,308 annotation entries for IG/TR proteins were collected from GenBank/DDBJ/EMBL and the Protein Data Bank, and 2,740 non-redundant corresponding MEDLINE references were appended. Next, we filtered the MEDLINE texts by MeSH terms, titles, and abstracts containing keywords related to cancer. After we performed a manual check, we classified the protein entries into two groups: 611 on cancer therapy (Group I) and 1,470 on hematological tumors (Group II). Thus, a total of 2,081 cancer-related IG and TR entries were tabularized. To effectively classify future entries, we developed a computational method based on text mining and canonical discriminant analysis by parsing MeSH/title/abstract words. We performed a leave-one-out cross validation for the method, which showed high accuracy rates: 94.6% for IG references and 94.7% for TR references. We also collected 920 epitope sequences bound with IG/TR. The CIG-DB is equipped with search engines for amino acid sequences and MEDLINE references, sequence analysis tools, and a 3D viewer. This database is accessible without charge or registration at http://www.scchr-cigdb.jp/, and the search results are freely downloadable. The CIG-DB serves as a bridge between immunological gene data and cancer studies, presenting annotation on IG, TR, and their epitopes. This database

  6. CIG-DB: the database for human or mouse immunoglobulin and T cell receptor genes available for cancer studies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Immunoglobulin (IG or antibody) and the T-cell receptor (TR) are pivotal proteins in the immune system of higher organisms. In cancer immunotherapy, the immune responses mediated by tumor-epitope-binding IG or TR play important roles in anticancer effects. Although there are public databases specific for immunological genes, their contents have not been associated with clinical studies. Therefore, we developed an integrated database of IG/TR data reported in cancer studies (the Cancer-related Immunological Gene Database [CIG-DB]). Description This database is designed as a platform to explore public human and murine IG/TR genes sequenced in cancer studies. A total of 38,308 annotation entries for IG/TR proteins were collected from GenBank/DDBJ/EMBL and the Protein Data Bank, and 2,740 non-redundant corresponding MEDLINE references were appended. Next, we filtered the MEDLINE texts by MeSH terms, titles, and abstracts containing keywords related to cancer. After we performed a manual check, we classified the protein entries into two groups: 611 on cancer therapy (Group I) and 1,470 on hematological tumors (Group II). Thus, a total of 2,081 cancer-related IG and TR entries were tabularized. To effectively classify future entries, we developed a computational method based on text mining and canonical discriminant analysis by parsing MeSH/title/abstract words. We performed a leave-one-out cross validation for the method, which showed high accuracy rates: 94.6% for IG references and 94.7% for TR references. We also collected 920 epitope sequences bound with IG/TR. The CIG-DB is equipped with search engines for amino acid sequences and MEDLINE references, sequence analysis tools, and a 3D viewer. This database is accessible without charge or registration at http://www.scchr-cigdb.jp/, and the search results are freely downloadable. Conclusions The CIG-DB serves as a bridge between immunological gene data and cancer studies, presenting annotation on IG, TR, and

  7. Promoter region of mouse Tcrg genes

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimi, Y.; Huang, Y.Y.; Ohta, S.

    1996-06-01

    The mouse T-cell receptor (Tcr){gamma} chain is characterized by a specific expression of V gene segments in the thymus corresponding to consecutive developmental stages; i.e., the Vg5 in fetal, Vg6 in neonatal, and Vg4 and Vg7 in adult. The order of the Vg gene usage correlates with the localization of the Vg gene segment on the chromosome; i.e., the Vg5 gene, being most proximal to the Jg1, is used first, followed by the Vg segments away from the Jg1 in a sequential manner. Since they all rearrange to the same Jg1 gene segment, the sequences in the coding region and/or in the 5{prime} upstream region are responsible for the stage-specific transcription. Also, Goldman and co-workers reported the germline transcription of Vg genes preceding their rearrangement. Therefore, the stage-specific transcription may be involved in the regulation of the stage-specific rearrangement; we sequenced and analyzed the 5{prime} flanking regions of the Vg5, Vg6, Vg4, and Vg7 genes to study the transcriptional relation. 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Ancient Genetic Signatures of Orang Asli Revealed by Killer Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor Gene Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    NurWaliyuddin, Hanis Z. A.; Norazmi, Mohd N.; Edinur, Hisham A.; Chambers, Geoffrey K.; Panneerchelvam, Sundararajulu; Zafarina, Zainuddin

    2015-01-01

    The aboriginal populations of Peninsular Malaysia, also known as Orang Asli (OA), comprise three major groups; Semang, Senoi and Proto-Malays. Here, we analyzed for the first time KIR gene polymorphisms for 167 OA individuals, including those from four smallest OA subgroups (Che Wong, Orang Kanaq, Lanoh and Kensiu) using polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific primer (PCR-SSP) analyses. The observed distribution of KIR profiles of OA is heterogenous; Haplotype B is the most frequent in the Semang subgroups (especially Batek) while Haplotype A is the most common type in the Senoi. The Semang subgroups were clustered together with the Africans, Indians, Papuans and Australian Aborigines in a principal component analysis (PCA) plot and shared many common genotypes (AB6, BB71, BB73 and BB159) observed in these other populations. Given that these populations also display high frequencies of Haplotype B, it is interesting to speculate that Haplotype B may be generally more frequent in ancient populations. In contrast, the two Senoi subgroups, Che Wong and Semai are displaced toward Southeast Asian and African populations in the PCA scatter plot, respectively. Orang Kanaq, the smallest and the most endangered of all OA subgroups, has lost some degree of genetic variation, as shown by their relatively high frequency of the AB2 genotype (0.73) and a total absence of KIR2DL2 and KIR2DS2 genes. Orang Kanaq tradition that strictly prohibits intermarriage with outsiders seems to have posed a serious threat to their survival. This present survey is a demonstration of the value of KIR polymorphisms in elucidating genetic relationships among human populations. PMID:26565719

  9. IMGT/HighV-QUEST Statistical Significance of IMGT Clonotype (AA) Diversity per Gene for Standardized Comparisons of Next Generation Sequencing Immunoprofiles of Immunoglobulins and T Cell Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Aouinti, Safa; Malouche, Dhafer; Giudicelli, Véronique; Kossida, Sofia; Lefranc, Marie-Paule

    2015-01-01

    The adaptive immune responses of humans and of other jawed vertebrate species (gnasthostomata) are characterized by the B and T cells and their specific antigen receptors, the immunoglobulins (IG) or antibodies and the T cell receptors (TR) (up to 2.1012 different IG and TR per individual). IMGT, the international ImMunoGeneTics information system (http://www.imgt.org), was created in 1989 by Marie-Paule Lefranc (Montpellier University and CNRS) to manage the huge and complex diversity of these antigen receptors. IMGT built on IMGT-ONTOLOGY concepts of identification (keywords), description (labels), classification (gene and allele nomenclature) and numerotation (IMGT unique numbering), is at the origin of immunoinformatics, a science at the interface between immunogenetics and bioinformatics. IMGT/HighV-QUEST, the first web portal, and so far the only one, for the next generation sequencing (NGS) analysis of IG and TR, is the paradigm for immune repertoire standardized outputs and immunoprofiles of the adaptive immune responses. It provides the identification of the variable (V), diversity (D) and joining (J) genes and alleles, analysis of the V-(D)-J junction and complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) and the characterization of the ‘IMGT clonotype (AA)’ (AA for amino acid) diversity and expression. IMGT/HighV-QUEST compares outputs of different batches, up to one million nucleotide sequencesfor the statistical module. These high throughput IG and TR repertoire immunoprofiles are of prime importance in vaccination, cancer, infectious diseases, autoimmunity and lymphoproliferative disorders, however their comparative statistical analysis still remains a challenge. We present a standardized statistical procedure to analyze IMGT/HighV-QUEST outputs for the evaluation of the significance of the IMGT clonotype (AA) diversity differences in proportions, per gene of a given group, between NGS IG and TR repertoire immunoprofiles. The procedure is generic and

  10. Analysis of S gene mutation of the hepatitis B virus in adult liver transplant recipients showing resistance to hepatitis B immunoglobulin therapy.

    PubMed

    Park, G-C; Hwang, S; Ahn, C-S; Kim, K-H; Moon, D-B; Ha, T-Y; Song, G-W; Jung, D-H; Shin, Y W; Kim, S-H; Chang, K-H; Namgoong, J-M; Park, C-S; Park, H-W; Park, Y-H; Kang, S-H; Jung, B-H; Lee, S-G

    2013-10-01

    A considerable proportion of recipients of liver transplantations who are presented hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) monotherapy for hepatitis B virus (HBV) prophylaxis develop HBIG resistance. In this study, we investigated the mutation patterns in the major hydrophilic region (MHR) of amino acid sequences 100 to 160. Using the gene sequence analyzer for amino acid sequences 0 to 226 in the S/pre-S region we analyzed blood samples of 15 patients showing HBIG resistance after high-dose HBIG prophylaxis. Various mutations in the MHR were observed in 14/15 samples: Gly145Arg mutation in 8/13 Adr subtype and 1/2 Ayw subtype samples (60%). The next most common mutation was Gly165Trp in 8/13 Adr subtype but neither of 2 Ayw subtype samples (53.3%). Concurrent antiviral resistance was noted in 5 patients: lamivudine (n = 5), or entecavir (n = 3), but not adefovir, suggesting the occurrence of simultaneous, antiviral cross-resistances. Two patients underwent retransplantation due to the progression of HBV infection despite vigorous antiviral therapy. At diagnosis of HBV recurrence, the mean HBV DNA load was 6.5 × 10(6) copies/mL; 4 patients showed paradoxical coexistence of anti-HBs and HBsAg. Currently, 2 subjects show low-level HBV DNA replication in peripheral blood, although the other 12 had no DNA replication after prolonged antiviral therapy. This study suggested that various mutations in the "a" determinant were associated with HBIG resistance. Since treatment failure to rescue antiviral therapy was often associated with delayed detection of HBV recurrence rather than concurrent antiviral resistance, frequent HBV surveillance using more sensitive screening tests, such as HBeAg and HBV DNA polymerase chain reaction assay, seems to be mandatory. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparison of two real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction strategies for minimal residual disease evaluation in lymphoproliferative disorders: correlation between immunoglobulin gene mutation load and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction performance.

    PubMed

    Della Starza, Irene; Cavalli, Marzia; Del Giudice, Ilaria; Barbero, Daniela; Mantoan, Barbara; Genuardi, Elisa; Urbano, Marina; Mannu, Claudia; Gazzola, Anna; Ciabatti, Elena; Guarini, Anna; Foà, Robin; Galimberti, Sara; Piccaluga, Pierpaolo; Gaidano, Gianluca; Ladetto, Marco; Monitillo, Luigia

    2014-09-01

    We compared two strategies for minimal residual disease evaluation of B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders characterized by a variable immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) genes mutation load. Twenty-five samples from chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (n = 18) or mantle cell lymphoma (n = 7) patients were analyzed. Based on IGH variable region genes, 22/25 samples carried > 2% mutations, 20/25 > 5%. In the IGH joining region genes, 23/25 samples carried > 2% mutations, 18/25 > 5%. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed on IGH genes using two strategies: method A utilizes two patient-specific primers, whereas method B employs one patient-specific and one germline primer, with different positions on the variable, diversity and joining regions. Twenty-three samples (92%) resulted evaluable using method A, only six (24%) by method B. Method B poor performance was specifically evident among mutated IGH variable/joining region cases, although no specific mutation load above, which the real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction failed was found. The molecular strategies for minimal residual disease evaluation should be adapted to the B-cell receptor features of the disease investigated.

  12. Characterization of antibodies directed against the immunoglobulin light kappa chain variable chain region (VK) of hepatitis C virus-related type-II mixed cryoglobulinemia and B-cell proliferations.

    PubMed

    de Re, Valli; Simula, Maria Paola; Pavan, Alessandro; Garziera, Marica; Marin, Dolores; Dolcetti, Riccardo; de Vita, Salvatore; Sansonno, Domenico; Geremia, Silvano; Toffoli, Giuseppe

    2009-09-01

    Autoimmune type-II cryoglobulinemia (II-MC) is sustained by hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and B-cell (oligo)clones. This is the reason why the disease may be considered an "indolent B-cell lymphoma (NHL)." B clones show a restricted use of immunoglobulin variable genes (BCR), in particular in the use of the variable kappa (VK)3-20/15 light chain, and show a homology between their BCR functional regions and those of autoimmune rheumatoid factors. We underlined the BCR unique repertoire with frequent rheumatoid factor activity also observed in other autoimmune disorders associated with NHL. The immunoglobulin idiotype is a clonal B-cell marker and an ideal target for immunotherapy. Five monoclonal antibodies were produced in our laboratory toward the VK3-20 of a subject with HCV infection and a II-MC-associated NHL. Epitope determination was performed using the epitope excision approach. Monoclonal antibody reactivity was tested in vitro in ELISA, Western blot, and cytofluorimetry. Data confirmed that a panel of antibodies, reactive against shared idiotypes, can be produced from patients with HCV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative diseases, thus obviating the need to produce an anti-idiotype antibody for each patient.

  13. The ribosomal gene spacer region in archaebacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achenbach-Richter, L.; Woese, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    Sequences for the spacer regions that separate the 16S and 23S ribosomal RNA genes have been determined for four more (strategically placed) archaebacteria. These confirm the general rule that methanogens and extreme halophiles have spacers that contain a single tRNAala gene, while tRNA genes are not found in the spacer region of the true extreme thermophiles. The present study also shows that the spacer regions from the sulfate reducing Archaeglobus and the extreme thermophile Thermococcus (both of which cluster phylogenetically with the methanogens and extreme halophiles) contain each a tRNAala gene. Thus, not only all methanogens and extreme halophiles show this characteristic, but all organisms on the "methanogen branch" of the archaebacterial tree appear to do so. The finding of a tRNA gene in the spacer region of the extreme thermophile Thermococcus celer is the first known phenotypic property that links this organism with its phylogenetic counterparts, the methanogens, rather than with its phenotypic counterparts, the sulfur-dependent extreme thermophiles.

  14. Quantification of Peptides from Immunoglobulin Constant and Variable Regions by Liquid Chromatography-Multiple Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry for Assessment of Multiple Myeloma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Remily-Wood, Elizabeth R.; Benson, Kaaron; Baz, Rachid C.; Chen, Y. Ann; Hussein, Mohamad; Hartley-Brown, Monique A.; Sprung, Robert W.; Perez, Brianna; Liu, Richard Z.; Yoder, Sean; Teer, Jamie; Eschrich, Steven A.; Koomen, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Quantitative mass spectrometry assays for immunoglobulins (Igs) are compared with existing clinical methods in samples from patients with plasma cell dyscrasias, e.g. multiple myeloma. Experimental design Using LC-MS/MS data, Ig constant region peptides and transitions were selected for liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (LC-MRM). Quantitative assays were used to assess Igs in serum from 83 patients. Results LC-MRM assays quantify serum levels of Igs and their isoforms (IgG1–4, IgA1–2, IgM, IgD, and IgE, as well as kappa(κ) and lambda(λ) light chains). LC-MRM quantification has been applied to single samples from a patient cohort and a longitudinal study of an IgE patient undergoing treatment, to enable comparison with existing clinical methods. Proof-of-concept data for defining and monitoring variable region peptides are provided using the H929 multiple myeloma cell line and two MM patients. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance LC-MRM assays targeting constant region peptides determine the type and isoform of the involved immunoglobulin and quantify its expression; the LC-MRM approach has improved sensitivity compared with the current clinical method, but slightly higher interassay variability. Detection of variable region peptides is a promising way to improve Ig quantification, which could produce a dramatic increase in sensitivity over existing methods, and could further complement current clinical techniques. PMID:24723328

  15. Catalytic immunoglobulin gene delivery in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease: prophylactic and therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Kou, Jinghong; Yang, Junling; Lim, Jeong-Eun; Pattanayak, Abhinandan; Song, Min; Planque, Stephanie; Paul, Sudhir; Fukuchi, Ken-Ichiro

    2015-02-01

    Accumulation of amyloid beta-peptide (Aβ) in the brain is hypothesized to be a causal event leading to dementia in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aβ vaccination removes Aβ deposits from the brain. Aβ immunotherapy, however, may cause T cell- and/or Fc-receptor-mediated brain inflammation and relocate parenchymal Aβ deposits to blood vessels leading to cerebral hemorrhages. Because catalytic antibodies do not form stable immune complexes and Aβ fragments produced by catalytic antibodies are less likely to form aggregates, Aβ-specific catalytic antibodies may have safer therapeutic profiles than reversibly-binding anti-Aβ antibodies. Additionally, catalytic antibodies may remove Aβ more efficiently than binding antibodies because a single catalytic antibody can hydrolyze thousands of Aβ molecules. We previously isolated Aβ-specific catalytic antibody, IgVL5D3, with strong Aβ-hydrolyzing activity. Here, we evaluated the prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy of brain-targeted IgVL5D3 gene delivery via recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (rAAV9) in an AD mouse model. One single injection of rAAV9-IgVL5D3 into the right ventricle of AD model mice yielded widespread, high expression of IgVL5D3 in the unilateral hemisphere. IgVL5D3 expression was readily detectable in the contralateral hemisphere but to a much lesser extent. IgVL5D3 expression was also confirmed in the cerebrospinal fluid. Prophylactic and therapeutic injection of rAAV9-IgVL5D3 reduced Aβ load in the ipsilateral hippocampus of AD model mice. No evidence of hemorrhages, increased vascular amyloid deposits, increased proinflammatory cytokines, or infiltrating T-cells in the brains was found in the experimental animals. AAV9-mediated anti-Aβ catalytic antibody brain delivery can be prophylactic and therapeutic options for AD.

  16. Modifying the sequence of an immunoglobulin V-gene alters the resulting pattern of hypermutation

    PubMed Central

    Goyenechea, Beatriz; Milstein, César

    1996-01-01

    Affinity maturation of antibodies requires localized hypermutation and antigen selection. Hypermutation is particularly active in certain regions (notably the CDRs of light and heavy chains) due to the local accumulation of hot spots. We have now analyzed the role of individual nucleotides in the origin of hot spots and show that mutability is largely defined by the nucleotide sequence. We compared the mutability profile of wild-type and modified κ transgenes that contain silent mutations in the CDR1 segment. We found a new hot spot created at the third base of Ser-31 when its wild-type AGT codon was substituted by AGC. Two major hot spots associated with this AGC vanished when Ser-31 was encoded by the synonymous TCA. In addition to these, which were the most prominent changes, there were compensatory alterations in mutability of residues not directly related to the introduced silent mutations, so that the average hypermutation remained constant. Thus, mutations arising early in the immune response, even silent ones, could affect the mutability of critical residues and alter the pattern of affinity maturation. When analyzing hybridomas, we detected such alterations, but they seemed to better correlate with changes in average rather than local mutation rates. Overall, this paper shows how evolution could have optimized the mutability of individual residues to minimize deleterious mutations. Thus, the optimal strategy for affinity maturation may involve the incorporation of multiple point mutations before antigen selection of the relevant cells. PMID:8943046

  17. Clonal Progression during the T Cell-Dependent B Cell Antibody Response Depends on the Immunoglobulin DH Gene Segment Repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Trad, Ahmad; Tanasa, Radu Iulian; Lange, Hans; Zemlin, Michael; Schroeder, Harry W.; Lemke, Hilmar

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of the third complementarity determining region of the IgH chain is constrained by natural selection of immunoglobulin diversity (DH) sequence. To test the functional significance of this constraint in the context of thymus-dependent (TD) immune responses, we immunized BALB/c mice with WT or altered DH sequence with 2-phenyloxazolone-coupled chicken serum albumin (phOx-CSA). We chose this antigen because studies of the humoral immune response to the hapten phOx were instrumental in the development of the current theoretical framework on which our understanding of the forces driving TD responses is based. To allow direct comparison, we used the classic approach of generating monoclonal Ab (mAb) from various stages of the immune response to phOx to assess the effect of changing the sequence of the DH on clonal expansion, class switching, and affinity maturation, which are hallmarks of TD responses. Compared to WT, TD-induced humoral IgM as well as IgG antibody production in the D-altered ΔD-DμFS and ΔD-iD strains were significantly reduced. An increased prevalence of IgM-producing hybridomas from late primary, secondary, and tertiary memory responses suggested either impaired class switch recombination (CSR) or impaired clonal expansion of class switched B cells with phOx reactivity. Neither of the D-altered strains demonstrated the restriction in the VH/VL repertoire, the elimination of VH1 family-encoded antibodies, the focusing of the distribution of CDR-H3 lengths, or the selection for the normally dominant Ox1 clonotype, which all are hallmarks of the anti-phOx response in WT mice. These changes in clonal selection and expansion, as well as CSR indicate that the genetic constitution of the DH locus, which has been selected by evolution, can strongly influence the functional outcome of a TD humoral response. PMID:25157256

  18. Homologous recombination can restore normal immunoglobulin production in a mutant hybridoma cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, M D; Pennell, N; Bosnoyan, L; Shulman, M J

    1988-01-01

    We report here the occurrence of homologous recombination between transferred and chromosomal immunoglobulin genes. Specifically, we have corrected a chromosomal immunoglobulin gene mutation by transferring pSV2neo vectors encoding the constant region of the immunoglobulin mu heavy chain to mutant hybridoma cells that bear a 2-base-pair deletion in the third constant region exon of their chromosomal mu gene. After DNA transfer, we detected G418-resistant transformants that produce normal IgM. Analysis of the DNA structure of the mu gene in these transformants indicates that in four of five cases the mu gene has been restored as a result of the integration of a single copy of the transfer vector by a reciprocal homologous recombination event; the fifth case seems to have resulted from gene conversion or double crossover. These results suggest that this technology might be adapted for mapping immunoglobulin gene mutations by marker rescue and for more convenient engineering of specifically altered immunoglobulin. Images PMID:2842771

  19. Two distinct immunoglobulin heavy chain isotypes in a primitive, cartilaginous fish, Raja erinacea.

    PubMed

    Harding, F A; Amemiya, C T; Litman, R T; Cohen, N; Litman, G W

    1990-11-11

    Immunoglobulin heavy chain genes in Raja erinacea (little skate) are organized in clusters consisting of VH, DH, JH segments and CH exons (1). An immunoglobulin heavy chain mu-like isotype that exhibits 61-91% nucleotide sequence identity in coding segments to the Heterodontus francisci (horned shark) mu-type immunoglobulin is described. The overall length of the mu-type clusters is approximately 16 kb; transmembrane exons (TM1 and TM2) are located 3 to CH exon 4 (CH4). In three of four TM-containing genomic clones, a significant deletion is present in TM1. A second isotype of Raja immunoglobulin heavy chain genes has been detected by screening a spleen cDNA library with homologous Raja VH- and CH1-specific probes complementing the respective regions of the mu-like isotype. Weak hybridization with VH-specific probes and no discernable hybridization with C mu-specific probes were considered presumptive evidence for a second immunoglobulin isotype that nominally is designated as X-type. The Vx region of the X-type cDNA is approximately 60% identical at the nucleotide (nt) level to other Raja VH segments and thus represents a second VH family. Putative Dx and Jx sequences also have been identified. The constant region of the X-type immunoglobulin heavy chain gene consists of two characteristic immunoglobulin domains and a cysteine-rich carboxy terminal segment that are only partially homologous with the mu-like isotype. Genomic Southern blotting indicates that the V and C segments of both immunoglobulin heavy chain isotypes are encoded by complex multigene families. Vx- and different Cx-specific probes hybridize to different length transcripts in northern blot analyses of Raja spleen RNA suggesting that the regulation of expression of the X-type genes may involve differential RNA processing.

  20. Two distinct immunoglobulin heavy chain isotypes in a primitive, cartilaginous fish, Raja erinacea.

    PubMed Central

    Harding, F A; Amemiya, C T; Litman, R T; Cohen, N; Litman, G W

    1990-01-01

    Immunoglobulin heavy chain genes in Raja erinacea (little skate) are organized in clusters consisting of VH, DH, JH segments and CH exons (1). An immunoglobulin heavy chain mu-like isotype that exhibits 61-91% nucleotide sequence identity in coding segments to the Heterodontus francisci (horned shark) mu-type immunoglobulin is described. The overall length of the mu-type clusters is approximately 16 kb; transmembrane exons (TM1 and TM2) are located 3 to CH exon 4 (CH4). In three of four TM-containing genomic clones, a significant deletion is present in TM1. A second isotype of Raja immunoglobulin heavy chain genes has been detected by screening a spleen cDNA library with homologous Raja VH- and CH1-specific probes complementing the respective regions of the mu-like isotype. Weak hybridization with VH-specific probes and no discernable hybridization with C mu-specific probes were considered presumptive evidence for a second immunoglobulin isotype that nominally is designated as X-type. The Vx region of the X-type cDNA is approximately 60% identical at the nucleotide (nt) level to other Raja VH segments and thus represents a second VH family. Putative Dx and Jx sequences also have been identified. The constant region of the X-type immunoglobulin heavy chain gene consists of two characteristic immunoglobulin domains and a cysteine-rich carboxy terminal segment that are only partially homologous with the mu-like isotype. Genomic Southern blotting indicates that the V and C segments of both immunoglobulin heavy chain isotypes are encoded by complex multigene families. Vx- and different Cx-specific probes hybridize to different length transcripts in northern blot analyses of Raja spleen RNA suggesting that the regulation of expression of the X-type genes may involve differential RNA processing. Images PMID:2123029

  1. Gene Regions Responding to Skeletal Muscle Atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Frank W.

    1997-01-01

    Our stated specific aims for this project were: 1) Identify the region(s) of the mouse IIb myosin heavy chain (MHC) promoter necessary for in vivo expression in mouse fast-twitch muscle, and 2) Identify the region(s) of the mouse IIb MHC promoter responsive to immobilization in mouse slow-twitch muscle in vivo. We sought to address these specific aims by introducing various MHC IIb promoter/reporter gene constructs directly into the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscles of living mice. Although the method of somatic gene transfer into skeletal muscle by direct injection has been successfully used in our laboratory to study the regulation of the skeletal alpha actin gene in chicken skeletal muscle, we had many difficulties utilizing this procedure in the mouse. Because of the small size of the mouse soleus and the difficulty in obtaining consistent results, we elected not to study this muscle as first proposed. Rather, our MHC IIb promoter deletion experiments were performed in the gastrocnemius. Further, we decided to use hindlimb unloading via tail suspension to induce an upregulation of the MHC IIb gene, rather than immobilization of the hindlimbs via plaster casts. This change was made because tail suspension more closely mimics spaceflight, and this procedure in our lab results in a smaller loss of overall body mass than the mouse hindlimb immobilization procedure. This suggests that the stress level during tail suspension is less than during immobilization. This research has provided an important beginning point towards understanding the molecular regulation of the MHC lIb gene in response to unweighting of skeletal muscle Future work will focus on the regulation of MHC IIb mRNA stability in response to altered loading of skeletal muscle

  2. The immunoglobulin heavy chain locus in the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus).

    PubMed

    Gambón-Deza, F; Sánchez-Espinel, C; Magadán-Mompó, S

    2009-08-01

    Immunoglobulins loci in mammals are well known to be organized within a translocon, however their origin remains unresolved. Four of the five classes of immunoglobulins described in humans and rodents (immunoglobulins M, G, E and A-IgM, IgG, IgE and IgA) were found in marsupials and monotremes (immunoglobulin D-IgD was not found) thus showing that the genomic structure of antibodies in mammals has remained constant since its origin. We have recently described the genomic organization of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus in reptiles (IGHM, IGHD and IGHY). These data and the characterization of the IGH locus in platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus), allow us to elucidate the changes that took place in this genomic region during evolution from reptile to mammal. Thus, by using available genome data, we were able to detect that platypus IGH locus contains reptilian and mammalian genes. Besides having an IGHD that is very similar to the one in reptiles and an IGHY, they also present the mammal specific antibody genes IGHG and IGHE, in addition to IGHA. We also detected a pseudogene that originated by recombination between the IGHD and the IGHM (similar to the IGHD2 found in Eublepharis macularius). The analysis of the IGH locus in platypus shows that IGHY was duplicated, firstly by evolving into IGHE and then into IGHG. The IGHA of the platypus has a complex origin, and probably arose by a process of recombination between the IGHM and the IGHY. We detected about 44 VH genes (25 were already described), most of which comprise a single group. When we compared these VH genes with those described in Anolis carolinensis, we find that there is an evolutionary relationship between the VH genes of platypus and the reptilian Group III genes. These results suggest that a fast VH turnover took place in platypus and this gave rise to a family with a high VH gene number and the disappearance of the earlier VH families.

  3. Structure and diversification of the bovine immunoglobulin repertoire.

    PubMed

    Aitken, R; Hosseini, A; MacDuff, R

    1999-12-15

    Our understanding of the basis to immunoglobulin formation in cattle has benefited substantially from the application of molecular biology over the past decade. It is now established that both the lambda light chain and heavy chain repertoires are founded upon the frequent expression of single gene families and subgroups of segments which are of conserved sequence. It is likely that a functional kappa locus exists in the bovine genome but this isotype comprises as few as 5% of bovine light chains. Similarly, alternative but non-expressed V(H) gene families are present posing intriguing but unresolved questions about the regulation of immunoglobulin synthesis. The heavy chain frequently bears a third complementarity-determining region which is atypically long but the processes which expand this region of the reading frame and its contribution to the interaction with antigen remain matters of speculation. Opportunities exist to map the major immunoglobulin loci and to define the membership and sequence diversity of the gene families which dominate each repertoire. However, it is already evident that cattle cannot generate significant diversity from rearrangement and junctional imprecision alone. Elucidation of the mechanism(s), dynamics and tissue distribution of immunoglobulin diversification in cattle, thus, remain key challenges in this branch of veterinary immunology.

  4. Secretion of a chimeric T-cell receptor-immunoglobulin protein.

    PubMed Central

    Gascoigne, N R; Goodnow, C C; Dudzik, K I; Oi, V T; Davis, M M

    1987-01-01

    To produce sufficient quantities of soluble T-cell receptor protein for detailed biochemical and biophysical analyses we have explored the use of immunoglobulin--T-cell receptor gene fusions. In this report we describe a chimeric gene construct containing a T-cell receptor alpha-chain variable (V) domain and the constant (C) region coding sequences of an immunoglobulin gamma 2a molecule. Cells transfected with the chimeric gene synthesize a stable protein product that expresses immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor antigenic determinants as well as protein A binding sites. We show that the determinant recognized by the anticlonotypic antibody A2B4.2 resides on the V alpha domain of the T-cell receptor. The chimeric protein associates with a normal lambda light chain to form an apparently normal tetrameric (H2L2, where H = heavy and L = light) immunoglobulin molecule that is secreted. Also of potential significance is the fact that a T-cell receptor V beta gene in the same construct is neither assembled nor secreted with the lambda light chain, and when expressed with a C kappa region it does not assemble with the chimeric V alpha C gamma 2a protein mentioned above. This indicates that not all T-cell receptor V regions are similar enough to immunoglobulin V regions for them to be completely interchangeable. Images PMID:3472243

  5. Accuracy and coverage assessment of Oryctolagus cuniculus (rabbit) genes encoding immunoglobulins in the whole genome sequence assembly (OryCun2.0) and localization of the IGH locus to chromosome 20.

    PubMed

    Gertz, E Michael; Schäffer, Alejandro A; Agarwala, Richa; Bonnet-Garnier, Amélie; Rogel-Gaillard, Claire; Hayes, Hélène; Mage, Rose G

    2013-10-01

    We report on the analyses of genes encoding immunoglobulin heavy and light chains in the rabbit 6.51× whole genome assembly. This OryCun2.0 assembly confirms previous mapping of the duplicated IGK1 and IGK2 loci to chromosome 2 and the IGL lambda light chain locus to chromosome 21. The most frequently rearranged and expressed IGHV1 that is closest to IG DH and IGHJ genes encodes rabbit VHa allotypes. The partially inbred Thorbecke strain rabbit used for whole-genome sequencing was homozygous at the IGK but heterozygous with the IGHV1a1 allele in one of 79 IGHV-containing unplaced scaffolds and IGHV1a2, IGHM, IGHG, and IGHE sequences in another. Some IGKV, IGLV, and IGHA genes are also in other unplaced scaffolds. By fluorescence in situ hybridization, we assigned the previously unmapped IGH locus to the q-telomeric region of rabbit chromosome 20. An approximately 3-Mb segment of human chromosome 14 including IGH genes predicted to map to this telomeric region based on synteny analysis could not be located on assembled chromosome 20. Unplaced scaffold chrUn0053 contains some of the genes that comparative mapping predicts to be missing. We identified discrepancies between previous targeted studies and the OryCun2.0 assembly and some new BAC clones with IGH sequences that can guide other studies to further sequence and improve the OryCun2.0 assembly. Complete knowledge of gene sequences encoding variable regions of rabbit heavy, kappa, and lambda chains will lead to better understanding of how and why rabbits produce antibodies of high specificity and affinity through gene conversion and somatic hypermutation.

  6. Accuracy and coverage assessment of Oryctolagus cuniculus (Rabbit) Genes Encoding Immunoglobulins in the Whole Genome Sequence Assembly (OryCun2.0) and Localization of the IGH Locus to Chromosome 20

    PubMed Central

    Gertz, E. Michael; Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Agarwala, Richa; Bonnet-Garnier, Amélie; Rogel-Gaillard, Claire; Hayes, Hélène; Mage, Rose G.

    2013-01-01

    We report analyses of genes encoding immunoglobulin heavy and light chains in the rabbit 6.51x whole genome assembly. This OryCun2.0 assembly confirms previous mapping of the duplicated IGK1 and IGK2 loci to chromosome 2 and the IGL lambda light chain locus to chromosome 21. The most frequently rearranged and expressed IGHV1 that is closest to IG DH and IGHJ genes encodes rabbit VHa allotypes. The partially inbred Thorbecke strain rabbit used for whole-genome sequencing was homozygous at the IGK but heterozygous with the IGHV1a1 allele in one of 79 IGHV-containing unplaced scaffolds and IGHV1a2, IGHM, IGHG and IGHE sequences in another. Some IGKV, IGLV and IGHA genes are also in other unplaced scaffolds. By fluorescence in situ hybridization, we assigned the previously unmapped IGH locus to the q-telomeric region of rabbit chromosome 20. An approximately 3 Mb segment of human chromosome 14 including IGH genes predicted to map to this telomeric region based on synteny analysis could not be located on assembled chromosome 20. Unplaced scaffold chrUn0053 contains some of the genes that comparative mapping predicts to be missing. We identified discrepancies between previous targeted studies and the OryCun2.0 assembly and some new BAC clones with IGH sequences that can guide other studies to further sequence and improve the OryCun2.0 assembly. Complete knowledge of gene sequences encoding variable regions of rabbit heavy, kappa and lambda chains will lead to better understanding of how and why rabbits produce antibodies of high specificity and affinity through gene conversion and somatic hypermutation. PMID:23925440

  7. Immunoglobulin production by human-mouse somatic cell hybrids.

    PubMed

    Smith, M; Hirschhorn, K

    1977-01-01

    Studies on immunoglobulin production in human-mouse somatic cell hybrids suggest: 1. The structural genes for heavy chain immunoglobulins are carried on chromsome 6, probably on the short arm or the proximal half of the long arm of the chromosome. 2. The structural gene for kappa light chain immunoglobulin may be carried on chromsome 11. 3. The occurrence of immunoglobulin molecules on the cell surface requires the presence of chromosome 2.

  8. [Selective immunoglobulin A deficiency].

    PubMed

    Binek, Alicja; Jarosz-Chobot, Przemysława

    2012-01-01

    Immunoglobulin class A is the main protein of the mucosal immune system. Selective immunoglobulin A deficiency (sIgAD) is the most common primary immunodeficiency in Caucasians. sIGAD is strongly associated with the certain major histocompatibility complex region. Most individuals with sIgAD are asymptomatic and identified coincidentally. However, some patients may present with recurrent infections, allergic disorders and autoimmune manifestations. Several autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, diabetes mellitus type 1, Graves disease and celiac disease, are associated with an increased prevalence of sIgAD. Screening for sIgAD in coeliac disease is essential. Patients need treatment of associated diseases. It is also known that IgA deficiency may progress into a common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). Pathogenesis and molecular mechanism involved in sIgAD should be elucidated in the future.

  9. Feline immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Schultz, R D; Scott, F W; Duncan, J R; Gillespie, J H

    1974-02-01

    Immunoglobulins (Ig) in feline sera and secretions were identified by immuno-electrophoresis and immunodiffusion with rabbit antisera prepared to feline IgG, IgA, IgM, and whole serum. Adult cat sera, colostral whey, postcolostral sera, tears, and nasal secretions contained IgG, IgA, and IgM. IgG was the only Ig identified in precolostral sera and cerebrospinal fluid. Milk, intestinal contents, pooled allantoic and amniotic fluids, and saliva from adult cats and urine from suckling kittens contained IgG and IgA. Ig were not detected in urine from adult cats. Bile was unique in that IgA and IgM were the predominant Ig.

  10. Burkitt's lymphoma is a malignancy of mature B cells expressing somatically mutated V region genes.

    PubMed Central

    Klein, U.; Klein, G.; Ehlin-Henriksson, B.; Rajewsky, K.; Küppers, R.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The developmental stage from which stems the malignant B cell population in Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) is unclear. An approach to answering this question is provided by the sequence analysis of rear-ranged immunoglobulin (Ig) variable region (V) genes from BL for evidence of somatic mutations, together with a phenotypic characterization. As somatic hypermutation of Ig V region genes occurs in germinal center B cells, somatically mutated Ig genes are found in germinal center B cells and their descendents. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Rearranged V kappa region genes from 10 kappa-expressing sporadic and endemic BL-derived cell lines (9 IgM and 1 IgG positive) and three kappa-expressing endemic BL biopsy specimens were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. In addition, VH region gene sequences from these cell lines were determined. RESULTS: All BL cell lines and the three biopsy specimens carried somatically mutated V region genes. The average mutation frequency of rearranged V kappa genes from eight BL cell lines established from sporadic BL was 1.8%. A higher frequency (6%) was found in five endemic cases (three biopsy specimens and two BL cell lines). CONCLUSIONS: The detection of somatic mutations in the rearranged V region genes suggests that both sporadic and endemic BL represent a B-cell malignancy originating from germinal center B cells or their descendants. Interestingly, the mutation frequency detected in sporadic BL is in a range similar to that characteristic for IgM-expressing B cells in the human peripheral blood and for mu chain-expressing germinal center B cells, whereas the mutation frequency found in endemic BL is significantly higher. PMID:8529116

  11. Fixed nuclei as alternative template of BIOMED-2 multiplex polymerase chain reaction for immunoglobulin gene clonality testing in B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yuan; Chen, Jie; Wang, Jianchao; Zheng, Ke; Liao, Dianying; Liao, Xiaomei; Liu, Weiping; Wang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of immunoglobulin (Ig) gene rearrangements with BIOMED-2 multiplex PCR has become a standard detection of clonality in mature B cell malignancies. Conventionally, this method is relatively labor-intensive and time-consuming, as it requires DNA isolation from bone marrow aspirates (BM) or peripheral blood (PB) in patients with BM or PB involvement. On the other hand, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is routinely used as genetic screening in B cell malignancies, but the surplus fixed nuclei initially prepared for FISH usually turn useless afterwards. We sought to use these surplus nuclei after FISH as a template to perform PCR-based Ig gene clonality testing. Templates of 12 patients with mature B cell malignancies, which consisted of both DNA isolated with commercial DNA isolation kit from fresh BM or PB (DNA group) and the fixed nuclei initially prepared for FISH (nuclei group) from the same individuals, were subjected to PCR with BIOMED-2 primer sets for immunoglobulin heavy chain and kappa light chain under recommended conditions. Our result, for the first time, showed a high consistency between the two groups in detecting B cell clonality, which indicates that nuclei for FISH can function as a reliable template comparable to fresh tissue-isolated DNA in PCR based Ig clonality testing. This offers a simple, rapid and more economical alternative to standard Ig testing based on regular DNA.

  12. Detection of two distinct malignant B cell clones in a single patient using anti-idiotype monoclonal antibodies and immunoglobulin gene rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Giardina, S L; Schroff, R W; Woodhouse, C S; Golde, D W; Oldham, R K; Cleary, M L; Sklar, J; Pritikin, N; Foon, K A

    1985-11-01

    Immunoglobulin gene rearrangement analysis and somatic cell hybridization techniques were used to examine the malignant cell population in an unusual patient with hairy cell leukemia and macroglobulinemia (N Engl J Med 296:92, 1977). Although previous investigations suggested that the IgM macroglobulin was secreted by the circulating leukemia cells, anti-idiotype monoclonal antibodies raised to the IgM macroglobulin failed to react with the malignant cells in the circulation and bone marrow. In contrast, approximately 50% of the mononuclear cells from an enlarged inguinal lymph node reacted strongly with the anti-idiotype antibodies. Subsequent reanalysis of all cell populations demonstrated that whereas the circulating and bone marrow cells were IgM kappa-bearing, the macroglobulin was IgM gamma-bearing and the lymph node cells were evenly divided among IgM kappa-bearing and IgM gamma-bearing. Immunofluorescence flow cytometry indicated that those lymph node cells that reacted strictly with the anti-idiotype antibody were IgM gamma-bearing, demonstrating that they were the source of macroglobulin. An analysis of immunoglobulin gene DNA confirmed the coexistence of two distinct malignant B cell populations in the lymph node and indicated that the IgM kappa-bearing lymph node cells were identical to the circulating and bone marrow leukemic cells.

  13. The flow cytometry-defined light chain cytoplasmic immunoglobulin index and an associated 12-gene expression signature are independent prognostic factors in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Papanikolaou, X; Alapat, D; Rosenthal, A; Stein, C; Epstein, J; Owens, R; Yaccoby, S; Johnson, S; Bailey, C; Heuck, C; Tian, E; Joiner, A; van Rhee, F; Khan, R; Zangari, M; Jethava, Y; Waheed, S; Davies, F; Morgan, G; Barlogie, B

    2015-08-01

    As part of Total Therapy (TT) 3b, baseline marrow aspirates were subjected to two-color flow cytometry of nuclear DNA content and cytoplasmic immunoglobulin (DNA/CIG) as well as plasma cell gene expression profiling (GEP). DNA/CIG-derived parameters, GEP and standard clinical variables were examined for their effects on overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Among DNA/CIG parameters, the percentage of the light chain-restricted (LCR) cells and their cytoplasmic immunoglobulin index (CIg) were linked to poor outcome. In the absence of GEP data, low CIg <2.8, albumin <3.5 g/dl and age ⩾65 years were significantly associated with inferior OS and PFS. When GEP information was included, low CIg survived the model along with GEP70-defined high risk and low albumin. Low CIg was linked to beta-2-microglobulin >5.5 mg/l, a percentage of LCR cells exceeding 50%, C-reactive protein ⩾8 mg/l and GEP-derived high centrosome index. Further analysis revealed an association of low CIg with 12 gene probes implicated in cell cycle regulation, differentiation and drug transportation from which a risk score was developed in TT3b that held prognostic significance also in TT3a, TT2 and HOVON trials, thus validating its general applicability. Low CIg is a powerful new prognostic variable and has identified potentially drug-able targets.

  14. The flow cytometry-defined light chain cytoplasmic immunoglobulin index and an associated 12-gene expression signature are independent prognostic factors in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Papanikolaou, X; Alapat, D; Rosenthal, A; Stein, C; Epstein, J; Owens, R; Yaccoby, S; Johnson, S; Bailey, C; Heuck, C; Tian, E; Joiner, A; van Rhee, F; Khan, R; Zangari, M; Jethava, Y; Waheed, S; Davies, F; Morgan, G; Barlogie, B

    2015-01-01

    As part of Total Therapy (TT) 3b, baseline marrow aspirates were subjected to two-color flow cytometry of nuclear DNA content and cytoplasmic immunoglobulin (DNA/CIG) as well as plasma cell gene expression profiling (GEP). DNA/CIG-derived parameters, GEP and standard clinical variables were examined for their effects on overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Among DNA/CIG parameters, the percentage of the light chain-restricted (LCR) cells and their cytoplasmic immunoglobulin index (CIg) were linked to poor outcome. In the absence of GEP data, low CIg <2.8, albumin <3.5 g/dl and age ⩾65 years were significantly associated with inferior OS and PFS. When GEP information was included, low CIg survived the model along with GEP70-defined high risk and low albumin. Low CIg was linked to beta-2-microglobulin >5.5 mg/l, a percentage of LCR cells exceeding 50%, C-reactive protein ⩾8 mg/l and GEP-derived high centrosome index. Further analysis revealed an association of low CIg with 12 gene probes implicated in cell cycle regulation, differentiation and drug transportation from which a risk score was developed in TT3b that held prognostic significance also in TT3a, TT2 and HOVON trials, thus validating its general applicability. Low CIg is a powerful new prognostic variable and has identified potentially drug-able targets. PMID:25753926

  15. Structure and Function of Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Harry W; Cavacini, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Immunoglobulins are heterodimeric proteins composed of two heavy (H) and two light (L) chains. They can be separated functionally into variable (V) domains that binds antigens and constant (C) domains that specify effector functions such as activation of complement or binding to Fc receptors. The variable domains are created by means of a complex series of gene rearrangement events, and can then be subjected to somatic hypermutation after exposure to antigen to allow affinity maturation. Each V domain can be split into three regions of sequence variability, termed the complementarity determining regions, or CDRs, and four regions of relatively constant sequence termed the framework regions, or FRs. The three CDRs of the H chain are paired with the three CDRs of the L chain to form the antigen binding site, as classically defined. There are five main classes of heavy chain C domains. Each class defines the IgM, IgG, IgA, IgD, and IgE isotypes. IgG can be split into four subclasses, IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, and IgG4, each with its own biologic properties; and IgA can similarly be split into IgA1 and IgA2. The constant domains of the H chain can be switched to allow altered effector function while maintaining antigen specificity. PMID:20176268

  16. Structure and function of immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Harry W; Cavacini, Lisa

    2010-02-01

    Immunoglobulins are heterodimeric proteins composed of 2 heavy and 2 light chains. They can be separated functionally into variable domains that bind antigens and constant domains that specify effector functions, such as activation of complement or binding to Fc receptors. The variable domains are created by means of a complex series of gene rearrangement events and can then be subjected to somatic hypermutation after exposure to antigen to allow affinity maturation. Each variable domain can be split into 3 regions of sequence variability termed the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) and 4 regions of relatively constant sequence termed the framework regions. The 3 CDRs of the heavy chain are paired with the 3 CDRs of the light chain to form the antigen-binding site, as classically defined. The constant domains of the heavy chain can be switched to allow altered effector function while maintaining antigen specificity. There are 5 main classes of heavy chain constant domains. Each class defines the IgM, IgG, IgA, IgD, and IgE isotypes. IgG can be split into 4 subclasses, IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, and IgG4, each with its own biologic properties, and IgA can similarly be split into IgA1 and IgA2.

  17. Homologous Elements hs3a and hs3b in the 3′ Regulatory Region of the Murine Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain (Igh) Locus Are Both Dispensable for Class-switch Recombination*

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yi; Pieretti, Joyce; Ju, Zhongliang; Wei, Shiniu; Christin, John R.; Bah, Fatmata; Birshtein, Barbara K.; Eckhardt, Laurel A.

    2011-01-01

    Immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) genes are formed, tested, and modified to yield diverse, specific, and high affinity antibody responses to antigen. The processes involved must be regulated, however, to avoid unintended damage to chromosomes. The 3′ regulatory region of the Igh locus plays a major role in regulating class-switch recombination (CSR), the process by which antibody effector functions are modified during an immune response. Loss of all known enhancer-like elements in this region dramatically impairs CSR, but individual element deletions have no effect on this process. In the present study, we explored the hypothesis that an underlying functional redundancy in the homologous elements hs3a and hs3b was masking the importance of either element to CSR. Several transgenic mouse lines were generated, each carrying a bacterial artificial chromosome transgene that mimicked Igh locus structure but in which hs3a was missing and hs3b was flanked by loxP sites. Matings to Cyclization Recombination Enzyme-expressing mice established “pairs” of lines that differed only in the presence or absence of hs3b. Remarkably, CSR remained robust in the absence of both hs3a and hs3b, suggesting that the remaining two elements of the 3′ regulatory region, hs1.2 and hs4, although individually dispensable for CSR, are, together, sufficient to support CSR. PMID:21673112

  18. Role of genetic polymorphisms in factor H and MBL genes in Tunisian patients with immunoglobulin A nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Gorgi, Yousr; Hbibi, Imen; Sfar, Imen; Gargueh, Tahar; Cherif, Majda; Goucha Louzir, Rim; Daghbouj, Raoudha; Aouadi, Houda; Makhlouf, Mouna; Ben Romdhane, Thouraya; Jendoubi-Ayed, Salwa; Amri, Mohamed; Kheder, Adel; Lakhoua, Mohaled R; Ben Abdallah, Taïeb; Ayed, Khaled

    2010-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of IgA nephropathy (IgAN) remain poorly understood. Several different polymorphic genes have been investigated in order to demonstrate their possible association with this disease. It is evident that mainly alternative and lectin pathways complement activation and play an important role in renal injury of IgAN. This study was conducted to determine eventual deficiencies of factor H in the SCR20 gene region and to look for a possible association between the polymorphism (+54) exon 1 of the MBL gene and the predisposition in Tunisian patients with IgAN. We then evaluated the effects of these FH mutations and/or this MBL polymorphism on nephropathy susceptibility and progression. Polymorphism A/B (+54) in the exon1 of the MBL gene and analysis within the C-terminal domain of the protein SCR20 in the exon 22 of the factor H (FH) gene were conducted in 36 sporadic IgAN Tunisian patients and 117 age and gender matched healthy subjects recruited from blood donors, by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and direct sequencing respectively. The analysis of the Gly54Asp (+54) mutation of the MBL gene according to the criteria of gravity of the IgAN reveals that the patients with genotype AB present more frequently with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) compared with those of genotype AA [OR: 8, CI (1.74–54.49), P = 0.019]. Moreover, the variant allele B was statistically more frequent than the allele A in patients with an association with initial arterial high blood pressure, ESRD and class V of the Haas classification compared to those without this association (P = 0.009). The direct sequencing of exon 22 (SCR 20) of FH gene did not reveal any abnormal mutational deficiency for this factor in all patients and controls. The data did not support the hypothesis that FH is a susceptibility factor for the IgAN. However the data did show there was an association between AB (+54) exon1 MBL genotype and severe

  19. Interaction of Platelet Membrane Receptors with von Willebrand Factor, Ristocetin, and the Fc Region of Immunoglobulin G

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Anne; Ross, Gordon D.; Nachman, Ralph L.

    1978-01-01

    The agglutination of human platelets by ristocetin and von Willebrand factor was inhibited by aggregated immunoglobulin (Ig)G and by Fc fragments of IgG, but not by Fab, F(ab′)2 or pFc fragments of IgG. Because this inhibition occurred with formalin-fixed platelets as well as with normal platelets, a generalized aggregation of fluid membrane components by Fc fragments was not responsible for this inhibition of ristocetin and von Willebrand factor-induced agglutination. Reciprocal inhibition of platelet Fc receptors was produced by prior incubation of platelets with von Willebrand factor and ristocetin. Sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation studies demonstrated that aggregated IgG did not form fluid-phase complexes with von Willebrand factor and ristocetin. Furthermore, passage of von Willebrand factor and ristocetin through a column of immobilized heat-aggregated IgG did not alter platelet agglutinating activity which indicates that aggregated IgG did not inactivate von Willebrand factor or ristocetin. Thus, it was likely that the IgG-mediated interference with platelet agglutination by ristocetin and von Willebrand factor did not occur in the fluid phase but at the platelet surface. These studies suggest that the platelet membrane Fc receptor may be either a part of, or sterically related to, the membrane glycoprotein I complex that interacts with von Willebrand factor, and that occupation of one of these surface components blocks the availability of the other. PMID:309473

  20. Short hairpin RNA targeted to dihydrofolate reductase enhances the immunoglobulin G expression in gene-amplified stable Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Suh-Chin; Hong, Willy W L; Liu, Jin-Hwang

    2008-09-08

    The dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr)/methotrexate (MTX) selection is a common method to conduct gene amplification in stable clones of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. We previously reported the use of a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) vector targeted to the dhfr gene resulted in improving the intracellular antigen expression in gene-amplified stable CHO cells [Hong, W.W., Wu, S.C., 2007. A novel RNA silencing vector to improve antigen expression and stability in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Vaccine 25 (20), 4103-4111]. Here we investigated the use of the dhfr-targeted shRNA vector for immunoglobulin G (IgG) expression in gene-amplified stable CHO cells. With the use of the dhfr-targeted shRNA vector, the gene-amplified CHO/dhFr(-) cells were found to increase IgG expression at 1.0 microM MTX by more than 100% and to improve the genomic stability of IgG expression in MTX-free cultures by approximately 30%. The use of the dhfr-targeted shRNA vector can enhance the IgG expression in the gene-amplified stable CHO cells and uphold the IgG expression in MTX-free cultures. Utilizing the dhfr-targeted shRNA vector may provide an alternative way to maneuver CHO cell factories for IgG production in cultures.

  1. An inherited immunoglobulin class-switch recombination deficiency associated with a defect in the INO80 chromatin remodeling complex

    PubMed Central

    Kracker, Sven; Di Virgilio, Michela; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Cuenin, Cyrille; Forveille, Monique; Deau, Marie-Céline; McBride, Kevin M.; Majewski, Jacek; Gazumyan, Anna; Seneviratne, Suranjith; Grimbacher, Bodo; Kutukculer, Necil; Herceg, Zdenko; Cavazzana, Marina; Jabado, Nada; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Fischer, Alain; Durandy, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Background Immunoglobulin class-switch recombination defects (CSR-D) are rare primary immunodeficiencies characterized by impaired production of switched immunoglobulin isotypes and normal or elevated IgM levels. They are caused by impaired T:B cooperation or intrinsic B cell defects. However, many immunoglobulin CSR-Ds are still undefined at the molecular level. Objective This study's objective was to delineate new causes of immunoglobulin CSR-Ds and thus gain further insights into the process of immunoglobulin class-switch recombination (CSR). Methods Exome sequencing in 2 immunoglobulin CSR-D patients identified variations in the INO80 gene. Functional experiments were performed to assess the function of INO80 on immunoglobulin CSR. Results We identified recessive, nonsynonymous coding variations in the INO80 gene in 2 patients affected by defective immunoglobulin CSR. Expression of wild-type INO80 in patients' fibroblastic cells corrected their hypersensitivity to high doses of γ-irradiation. In murine CH12-F3 cells, the INO80 complex accumulates at Sα and Eμ regions of the IgH locus, and downregulation of INO80 as well as its partners Reptin and Pontin impaired CSR. In addition, Reptin and Pontin were shown to interact with activation-induced cytidine deaminase. Finally, an abnormal separation of sister chromatids was observed upon INO80 downregulation in CH12-F3 cells, pinpointing its role in cohesin activity. Conclusion INO80 deficiency appears to be associated with defective immunoglobulin CSR. We propose that the INO80 complex modulates cohesin function that may be required during immunoglobulin switch region synapsis. PMID:25312759

  2. An inherited immunoglobulin class-switch recombination deficiency associated with a defect in the INO80 chromatin remodeling complex.

    PubMed

    Kracker, Sven; Di Virgilio, Michela; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Cuenin, Cyrille; Forveille, Monique; Deau, Marie-Céline; McBride, Kevin M; Majewski, Jacek; Gazumyan, Anna; Seneviratne, Suranjith; Grimbacher, Bodo; Kutukculer, Necil; Herceg, Zdenko; Cavazzana, Marina; Jabado, Nada; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Fischer, Alain; Durandy, Anne

    2015-04-01

    Immunoglobulin class-switch recombination defects (CSR-D) are rare primary immunodeficiencies characterized by impaired production of switched immunoglobulin isotypes and normal or elevated IgM levels. They are caused by impaired T:B cooperation or intrinsic B cell defects. However, many immunoglobulin CSR-Ds are still undefined at the molecular level. This study's objective was to delineate new causes of immunoglobulin CSR-Ds and thus gain further insights into the process of immunoglobulin class-switch recombination (CSR). Exome sequencing in 2 immunoglobulin CSR-D patients identified variations in the INO80 gene. Functional experiments were performed to assess the function of INO80 on immunoglobulin CSR. We identified recessive, nonsynonymous coding variations in the INO80 gene in 2 patients affected by defective immunoglobulin CSR. Expression of wild-type INO80 in patients' fibroblastic cells corrected their hypersensitivity to high doses of γ-irradiation. In murine CH12-F3 cells, the INO80 complex accumulates at Sα and Eμ regions of the IgH locus, and downregulation of INO80 as well as its partners Reptin and Pontin impaired CSR. In addition, Reptin and Pontin were shown to interact with activation-induced cytidine deaminase. Finally, an abnormal separation of sister chromatids was observed upon INO80 downregulation in CH12-F3 cells, pinpointing its role in cohesin activity. INO80 deficiency appears to be associated with defective immunoglobulin CSR. We propose that the INO80 complex modulates cohesin function that may be required during immunoglobulin switch region synapsis. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A Comprehensive Analysis of the Phylogeny, Genomic Organization and Expression of Immunoglobulin Light Chain Genes in Alligator sinensis, an Endangered Reptile Species

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yan; Zhang, Chenglin; Wu, Xiaobing; Han, Haitang; Zhao, Yaofeng; Ren, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Crocodilians are evolutionarily distinct reptiles that are distantly related to lizards and are thought to be the closest relatives of birds. Compared with birds and mammals, few studies have investigated the Ig light chain of crocodilians. Here, employing an Alligator sinensis genomic bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library and available genome data, we characterized the genomic organization of the Alligator sinensis IgL gene loci. The Alligator sinensis has two IgL isotypes, λ and κ, the same as Anolis carolinensis. The Igλ locus contains 6 Cλ genes, each preceded by a Jλ gene, and 86 potentially functional Vλ genes upstream of (Jλ-Cλ)n. The Igκ locus contains a single Cκ gene, 6 Jκs and 62 functional Vκs. All VL genes are classified into a total of 31 families: 19 Vλ families and 12 Vκ families. Based on an analysis of the chromosomal location of the light chain genes among mammals, birds, lizards and frogs, the data further confirm that there are two IgL isotypes in the Alligator sinensis: Igλ and Igκ. By analyzing the cloned Igλ/κ cDNA, we identified a biased usage pattern of V families in the expressed Vλ and Vκ. An analysis of the junctions of the recombined VJ revealed the presence of N and P nucleotides in both expressed λ and κ sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of the V genes revealed V families shared by mammals, birds, reptiles and Xenopus, suggesting that these conserved V families are orthologous and have been retained during the evolution of IgL. Our data suggest that the Alligator sinensis IgL gene repertoire is highly diverse and complex and provide insight into immunoglobulin gene evolution in vertebrates. PMID:26901135

  4. A Comprehensive Analysis of the Phylogeny, Genomic Organization and Expression of Immunoglobulin Light Chain Genes in Alligator sinensis, an Endangered Reptile Species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xifeng; Cheng, Gang; Lu, Yan; Zhang, Chenglin; Wu, Xiaobing; Han, Haitang; Zhao, Yaofeng; Ren, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Crocodilians are evolutionarily distinct reptiles that are distantly related to lizards and are thought to be the closest relatives of birds. Compared with birds and mammals, few studies have investigated the Ig light chain of crocodilians. Here, employing an Alligator sinensis genomic bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library and available genome data, we characterized the genomic organization of the Alligator sinensis IgL gene loci. The Alligator sinensis has two IgL isotypes, λ and κ, the same as Anolis carolinensis. The Igλ locus contains 6 Cλ genes, each preceded by a Jλ gene, and 86 potentially functional Vλ genes upstream of (Jλ-Cλ)n. The Igκ locus contains a single Cκ gene, 6 Jκs and 62 functional Vκs. All VL genes are classified into a total of 31 families: 19 Vλ families and 12 Vκ families. Based on an analysis of the chromosomal location of the light chain genes among mammals, birds, lizards and frogs, the data further confirm that there are two IgL isotypes in the Alligator sinensis: Igλ and Igκ. By analyzing the cloned Igλ/κ cDNA, we identified a biased usage pattern of V families in the expressed Vλ and Vκ. An analysis of the junctions of the recombined VJ revealed the presence of N and P nucleotides in both expressed λ and κ sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of the V genes revealed V families shared by mammals, birds, reptiles and Xenopus, suggesting that these conserved V families are orthologous and have been retained during the evolution of IgL. Our data suggest that the Alligator sinensis IgL gene repertoire is highly diverse and complex and provide insight into immunoglobulin gene evolution in vertebrates.

  5. Biased distribution of recombination sites within S regions upon immunoglobulin class switch recombination induced by transforming growth factor beta and lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We have characterized extrachromosomal circular DNAs from adult mouse spleen cells that were induced to switch to immunoglobulin A (IgA) with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta), and identified breakpoints of S mu/S gamma 3, S mu/S gamma 2, S mu/S alpha, S gamma 3/S alpha, and S gamma 2/S alpha recombinants. The S mu recombination donor sites clustered in the 3' half of the S mu region, while the S alpha recombination acceptor sites clustered in the 5' half of the S alpha region. In addition, donor and acceptor sites of S gamma regions also clustered in the 3' and 5' parts, respectively. These site preferences are in sharp contrast to the dispersed distribution of S mu/S gamma 1 breakpoints within both S mu and S gamma 1 regions upon IgG1 switch induced by LPS and interleukin 4. Our results support the hypotheses that TGF-beta increases the frequency of switch recombination events to IgA and that the switch recombination to IgA often proceeds by successive recombination of S mu/S gamma and S gamma/S alpha. PMID:1588279

  6. The mouse Igh-1a and Igh-1b H chain constant regions are derived from two distinct isotypic genes.

    PubMed

    Jouvin-Marche, E; Morgado, M G; Leguern, C; Voegtle, D; Bonhomme, F; Cazenave, P A

    1989-01-01

    Genetic and structural analyses of the mouse genes encoding constant region of immunoglobulin subclass (Igh-C) have shown that recombination is rare within this cluster which is inherited as a set designated the Igh haplotype. Recent molecular analyses have demonstrated that either DNA exchanges or gene duplications have probably occurred during the evolution of this set of genes. In order to assess the generality of the duplication processes, the presence and expression of two allelic forms of the Igh-1 (gamma 2a) gene (Igh-1a and Igh-1b) were examined in a large panel of wild mice belonging to Mus musculus domesticus and Mus musculus musculus species. Our data indicate that certain M. m. domesticus animals and most animals in the M. m. musculus group coexpress the two allelic forms of Igh-1. Moreover, genetic studies show that these two immunoglobulin types are encoded by tandemly arranged genes. We propose that wild mice, from which laboratory mice are derived, carry three isotypic gamma 2 genes (Igh-1a, Igh-1b, Igh-3), and these have given rise to the two isotypes seen in laboratory strains by a deletion/insertion mechanism.

  7. The subunit and polypeptide-chain structure of rabbit secretory immunoglobulin A. Isolation of a proteolytic fragment suitable for sequence studies on the variable region of alpha-chain.

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, A P; Mole, L E

    1977-01-01

    A method was developed for the preparation of a proteolytic fragment of rabbit secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) which contains the variable region of the alpha-chain; this fragment is suitable for primary-sequence studies. The serologically defined subclasses of sIgA are shown to correlate partially with the nature of the binding of a constituent chain of sIgA, called secretory piece. Data are also presented on the relative resistance of sIgA to enzymic and reductive cleavage, compared with immunoglobulin G. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. PMID:412497

  8. Molecular characterization of T-cell immunoglobulin mucin domain-3 and Galectin-9 genes of swamp- and riverine-type water buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Duran, P L H; Padiernos, R B C; Abella, E A; Konnai, S; Mingala, C N

    2015-12-01

    Molecular characterization of T-cell immunoglobulin mucin domain-3 (TIM-3) and Galectin-9 (GAL-9) genes of swamp- and riverine-type water buffaloes was conducted to compare these genes with other species; determine the unique characteristic specific in water buffalo; and provide baseline information for the assessment of disease progression in buffalo species. TIM-3 and GAL-9 genes were amplified, purified, sequenced and characterized. The sequence result of TIM-3 in both types of water buffaloes contained 843 nucleotides encoding to 280 amino acids while GAL-9 of swamp-type and riverine-type water buffaloes contained 1023 and 972 nucleotides encoding to 340 and 323 amino acids, respectively. Meanwhile, the nucleotide and amino sequence of TIM-3 in water buffalo were 83-98% and 94-97% identical with other artiodactyl species, respectively. On the other hand, GAL-9 nucleotide and amino acid sequence in water buffalo were 85-98% and 76-96% identical with other artiodactyl species. The tyrosine-kinase phosphorylation motif and potential glycosylation sites were conserved within the tribe Bovinae. It is imperative to have further studies in the assessment of the role of these genes in disease progression in water buffalo during chronic infection. The study is the first report that describes the genetic characteristic of TIM-3 and GAL-9 genes in water buffalo. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Human heavy-chain variable region gene family nonrandomly rearranged in familial chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, A.; Humphries, C.; Tucker, P.; Blattner, F.

    1987-12-01

    The authors have identified a family of human immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable-region (V/sub H/) genes, one member of which is rearranged in two affected members of a family in which the father and four of five siblings developed chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Cloning and sequencing of the rearranged V/sub H/ genes from leukemic lymphocytes of three affected siblings showed that two siblings had rearranged V/sub H/ genes (V/sub H/TS1 and V/sub H/WS1) that were 90% homologous. The corresponding germ-line gene, V/sub H/251, was found to part of a small (four gene) V/sub H/ gene family, which they term V/sub H/V. The DNA sequence homology to V/sub H/WS1 (95%) and V/sub H/TS1 (88%) and identical restriction sites on the 5' side of V/sub H/ confirm that rearrangement of V/sub H/251 followed by somatic mutation produced the identical V/sub H/ gene rearrangements in the two siblings. V/sub H/TS1 is not a functional V/sub H/ gene; a functional V/sub H/ rearrangement was found on the other chromosome of this patient. The other two siblings had different V/sub H/ gene rearrangements. All used different diversity genes. Mechanisms proposed for nonrandom selection of a single V/sub H/ gene include developmental regulation of this V/sub H/ gene rearrangement or selection of a subpopulation of B cells in which this V/sub H/ has been rearranged.

  10. Utility of Doppler Myocardial Imaging, Cardiac Biomarkers and Clonal Immunoglobulin Genes to Assess Left Ventricular Performance and Stratify Risk Following Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients with Systemic Light Chain Amyloidosis (AL)

    PubMed Central

    Bellavia, Diego; Abraham, Roshini S.; Pellikka, Patricia A.; Dispenzieri, Angela; Burnett, John C.; Al-Zahrani, Ghormallah B.; Green, Tammy D.; Manske, Michelle K.; Gertz, Morie A.; Miller, Fletcher A.; Abraham, Theodore P.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac dysfunction is a well-recognized complication of light chain amyloidosis (AL). Autologous stem cell transplant (auto-SCT) has emerged as a successful treatment modality for AL patients. In this study, we examined the effect of clonal immunoglobulin light chain genes (VL), which encodes the immunoglobulin light chain protein that ultimately forms amyloid, on cardiac function, in the context of auto-SCT and its impact on overall survival. Longitudinal Doppler myocardial imaging parameters along with cardiac biomarkers were used to assess for cardiac function pre and post auto-SCT. VL gene analysis revealed that Vλ genes, in particular VλVI, were associated with worse cardiac function parameters than Vκ genes. Clonal VL genes appeared to have an impact on left ventricular (LV) function post-transplant and also influenced mortality, with specific VL gene families associated with lower survival. Another key predictor of mortality in this report was change in tricuspid regurgitant flow velocity following auto-SCT. Correlations were also observed between systolic strain rate, systolic strain and VL genes associated with amyloid formation. In summary, clonal VL gene usage influences global cardiac function in AL, with patients having VλVI and VλII-III-associated amyloid more severely affected than those having Vκ or VλI amyloid. Pulsed wave tissue Doppler imaging along with immunoglobulin gene analysis offers novel insights into prediction of mortality and cardiac dysfunction in AL after auto-SCT. PMID:21315556

  11. Analysis of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) and their HLA ligand genes polymorphisms in Iranian patients with systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, Mahdi; Fallahian, Faranak; Sobhani, Soheila; Ghoroghi, Shima; Jamshidi, Ahmadreza; Poursani, Shiva; Dolati, Masoumeh; Hosseinpour, Zahra; Gharibdoost, Farhad

    2017-04-01

    Genetic factors have a great role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases by cooperating with environmental stimuli. Killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) are cell surface proteins on NK cells whose association with major histocompatibility complex-I regulates their killing function. The aim of this study was to provide information on the possible association between KIR and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes with systemic sclerosis disease in Iranian population. A total of 279 systemic sclerosis patients and 451 healthy controls were enrolled in this case-control study in order to determine the presence or absence of 19 KIR genes and 6 specific HLA class I ligands. DNA was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction using the specific sequence primer method (PCR-SSP). Among 11 discovered KIR genotypes, 6 genotypes showed a considerable role and 4 genotypes could preclude the risk of systemic sclerosis (SSc) disease. The gene-gene interactions were also analyzed, and significant confounding effects were seen between involved genes in these two combinations: "KIR3DL1; HLA-BW4-Thr80" and "KIR3DL1 -HLA-BW4-A1." None of single KIR genes showed significant effect on the risk of SSc. We conclude that there is an important relationship between KIR genes and their HLA ligands with incidence rate of systemic sclerosis in Iranian population. The powerful role of a number of discovered KIR/HLA compounds such as activating KIR genotype 3 and HLA-BW4-A1 confirmed the provocative hypothesis of the interplay between activating or inhibitory KIR genes with HLA ligands as a critical index of systemic sclerosis predisposition.

  12. Characterization of cDNAs of the human pregnancy-specific beta1-glycoprotein family, a new subfamily of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Q.X.; Tease, L.A.; Shupert, W.L.; Chan, W.Y. )

    1990-03-20

    Three highly homologous cDNAs encoding human pregnancy-specific {beta}1-glycoprotein (SP1) were isolated from a human placental cDNA library. These cDNAs share >90% nucleotide homology in their coding sequences, and >79% of the encoded amino acids are homologous. Proteins encoded by these cDNAs are very similar to members of the carcinoembryonic antigen family and contain repeating domains, conserved disulfided bridges, and {beta}-sheet structure typical of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily. However, the high degree of sequence homology and relatively lesser degree of glycosylation among the SP1 proteins suggest that they exist as a unique family instead of being members of the CEA family. Both soluble and potentially membrane-bound forms of SP1 proteins were present in the placenta. Northern blot analysis using specific probes confirmed the expression of multiple mRNA species in human term placenta.

  13. The protease inhibitor chagasin of Trypanosoma cruzi adopts an immunoglobulin-type fold and may have arisen by horizontal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Rigden, D J; Monteiro, A C; Grossi de Sá, M F

    2001-08-24

    Chagasin, a protein from Trypanosoma cruzi, is the first member of a new family of tight binding cysteine protease inhibitors [Monteiro, A.C.S., Abrahamson, M., Lima, A.P.C., Vannier-Santos, M.A. and Scharfstein, J. (2001) J. Cell Sci., in press] [corrected]. Despite its lack of significant sequence identity with known proteins, convincing structural models, using variable light chain templates, could be constructed on the basis of threading results. Experimental support for the final structure came from inhibition data for overlapping oligopeptides spanning the chagasin sequence. Chagasin therefore exemplifies a new protease inhibitor structural class and a new natural use for an immunoglobulin-like domain. Limited sequence resemblance suggests that chagasin may represent the result of a rare horizontal gene transfer from host to parasite.

  14. A reappraisal of immunoglobulin variable gene primers and its impact on assessing clonal relationships between PB B cells and BM plasma cells in AL amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Nagaaki; Poshusta, Tanya L; Manske, Michelle K; Dispenzieri, Angela; Gertz, Morie A; Abraham, Roshini S; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina

    2011-12-01

    Monoclonal tumor plasma cells as well as non-terminally differentiated B cells having a clonal relationship to the tumor cells have been detected in the peripheral blood (PB) of some multiple myeloma (MM) patients but rarely in light chain (primary systemic) amyloidosis (AL) patients. Previously, our group found these peripheral clonotypic B cells in three AL patients. Here, we report detailed analysis of a larger cohort of AL patients to validate the prior findings and to investigate the effect of this cell population on clinical outcome. Fourteen AL patients were selected from a clinical prospective trial, and the relationship between immunoglobulin light chain variable gene (V(L)) representation in PB B cells and the clonal population in the bone marrow (BM) was investigated. A clonal relationship was not detected, and the present study provides important insights into the disparity with the earlier data, including clinical history of the patients and methodological analysis.

  15. HCV Proteins and Immunoglobulin Variable Gene (IgV) Subfamilies in HCV-Induced Type II Mixed Cryoglobulinemia: A Concurrent Pathogenetic Role

    PubMed Central

    Sautto, Giuseppe; Mancini, Nicasio; Solforosi, Laura; Diotti, Roberta A.; Clementi, Massimo; Burioni, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    The association between hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and type II mixed cryoglobulinemia (MCII) is well established, but the role played by distinct HCV proteins and by specific components of the anti-HCV humoral immune response remains to be clearly defined. It is widely accepted that HCV drives the expansion of few B-cell clones expressing a restricted pool of selected immunoglobulin variable (IgV) gene subfamilies frequently endowed with rheumatoid factor (RF) activity. Moreover, the same IgV subfamilies are frequently observed in HCV-transformed malignant B-cell clones occasionally complicating MCII. In this paper, we analyze both the humoral and viral counterparts at the basis of cryoglobulins production in HCV-induced MCII, with particular attention reserved to the single IgV subfamilies most frequently involved. PMID:22690241

  16. A comparison of human and macaque (Macaca mulatta) immunoglobulin germline V regions and its implications for antibody engineering

    PubMed Central

    Chahboun, Siham; Pelat, Thibaut

    2010-01-01

    Seventy-five V regions encoded by the sequenced genome of one Macaca mulatta specimen have been identified by homology and paired with similar human counterparts. When the human V region of each pair presented no allelic polymorphism, it was directly compared with its homolog. This was the case for 37 pairs and percents of identity ranged between 84–97%. When the human V region presented allelic polymorphism, this polymorphism was found to be significantly smaller (p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001, p = 0.03 for IGHV, IGLV, IGKV regions respectively), 4.2-fold on average, than the differences observed between human and macaque V regions. Similar results were obtained when analyzing framework regions (FRs) only. These results, in agreement with others, demonstrate the existence of differences between human and macaque V regions, confirm the need for the humanization of macaque V regions intended for therapeutic use and call into question the validity of patents relying on the “undistinguishable” character of human and macaque V regions or FRs. PMID:20562531

  17. A comparison of human and macaque (Macaca mulatta) immunoglobulin germline V regions and its implications for antibody engineering.

    PubMed

    Thullier, Philippe; Chahboun, Siham; Pelat, Thibaut

    2010-01-01

    Seventy-five V regions encoded by the sequenced genome of one Macaca mulatta specimen have been identified by homology, and paired with similar human counterparts. When the human V region of each pair presented no allelic polymorphism, it was directly compared with its homolog. This was the case for 37 pairs, and percents of identity ranged between 84 to 97%. When the human V region presented allelic polymorphism, this polymorphism was found to be significantly smaller (p<0.0001, p<0.0001, p = 0.03 for IGHV, IGLV, IGKV regions respectively), 4.2-fold on average, than the differences observed between human and macaque V regions. Similar results were obtained when analysing framework regions (FRs) only. These results, in agreement with others, demonstrate the existence of differences between human and macaque V regions, confirm the need for the humanization of macaque V regions intended for therapeutic use and call into question the validity of patents relying on the "undistinguishable" character of human and macaque V regions or FRs.

  18. Introduction of a CD40L genomic fragment via a human artificial chromosome vector permits cell-type-specific gene expression and induces immunoglobulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hidetoshi; Li, Yanze C; Nishikawa, Mitsuo; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Inoue, Toshiaki

    2008-01-01

    Gene therapy using cDNA driven by an exogenous promoter is not suited for genetic disorders that require intrinsic expression of a transgene, such as hyperimmunoglobulin (Ig)M syndrome (HIGM), which is caused by mutations in the CD40L gene. The human artificial chromosome (HAC) vector has the potential to solve this problem, because it can be used to transfer large genomic fragments containing their own regulatory elements. In this study, we examined whether introduction of a genomic fragment of CD40L via the HAC vector permits intrinsic expression of the transgene and has an effect on immunoglobulin secretion. We constructed an HAC vector carrying the mouse CD40L genomic fragment (mCD40L-HAC) in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and transferred the mCD40L-HAC vector into a human CD4-positive active T-cell line (Jurkat) and a human myeloid cell line (U937) via microcell-mediated chromosome transfer (MMCT). The mCD40L-HAC vector permits mCD40L expression in human active T cells but not in human myeloid cells. The mCD40L-HAC also functions to stimulate mouse B cells derived from CD40L(-/-) mice, inducing secretion of IgG. This study may be an initial step toward the therapeutic application of HAC vectors for intrinsic expression of genes, a potential new direction for genome-based gene therapy.

  19. Regional Variation in the Density of Essential Genes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hentges, Kathryn E; Pollock, David D; Liu, Bin; Justice, Monica J

    2007-01-01

    In most species, and particularly in vertebrates, the percentage of genes absolutely required for survival, the essential genes, has not been estimated. To obtain this estimation, we used the mouse as an experimental model to carry out high-efficiency N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis screens in two balancer chromosome regions, and compared our results to a third previously published screen. The number of essential genes in each region was predicted based on allele frequencies. We determined that the density of essential genes differs by up to an order of magnitude among genomic regions. This indicates that extrapolating from regional estimates to genome-wide estimates of essential genes has a huge variance. A particularly high density of essential genes on mouse Chromosome 11 coincides with a high degree of regional linkage conservation, providing a possible causal explanation for the density variation. This is the first demonstration of regional variation in essential gene density in the mouse genome. PMID:17480122

  20. Analysis of antigen receptor genes in Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Angel, C A; Pringle, J H; Naylor, J; West, K P; Lauder, I

    1993-01-01

    AIM--To analyse the configuration of the antigen receptor genes in Hodgkin's disease. METHODS--DNA extracted from 45 samples of Hodgkin's disease was analysed using Southern blotting and DNA hybridisation, using probes to the joining region of the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene, the constant region of kappa immunoglobulin light chain gene, and the constant region of the beta chain of the T cell receptor gene. RESULTS--A single case of nodular sclerosing disease showed clonal rearrangement of the immunoglobulin heavy and light chain genes, all other samples having germline immunoglobulin genes. The nature of the clonal population in the diseased tissue is uncertain, because the intensity of the rearranged bands did not correlate with the percentage of Reed-Sternberg cells present. The T cell receptor genes were in germline configuration in all the samples. CONCLUSIONS--Antigen receptor gene rearrangement is a rare finding in unselected cases of Hodgkin's disease. Images PMID:8388407

  1. Increased activating killer immunoglobulin-like receptor genes and decreased specific HLA-C alleles in couples with recurrent spontaneous abortion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shan; Zhao, Yue-Ran; Jiao, Yu-Lian; Wang, Lai-Cheng; Li, Jian-Feng; Cui, Bin; Xu, Cheng-Yan; Shi, Yu-Hua; Chen, Zi-Jiang

    2007-08-31

    Accumulating evidence indicates natural killer (NK) cells play crucial roles in successful pregnancy. To investigate whether the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) gene polymorphism and the corresponding specific HLA ligands in parent couples possessing a susceptibility to unexplained recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA), we searched 73 pairs of childless couples with three or more abortions characterized as unexplained RSA and 68 pairs of healthy control couples. Peripheral blood was drawn to obtain genomic DNA which was used for a polymerase chain reaction using sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) in order to determine whether 15 selected KIR genes and two groups of HLA-C alleles were present. Our result showed that gene frequency of KIR2DS1 was higher in patients with RSA compared to that of control subjects (P =0.029). Increased numbers of activating KIR genes was observed in patients (P =0.041). Women who possessed more than two activating KIR genes were found more frequently in patients than those in control subjects (P =0.018). From a cohort of husband and wife couples, the women with a KIR2DS1 gene, and with a decreased group 2 HLA-C allele for the homologous inhibitory receptor KIR2DL1, had a tendency to fall into the RSA group (P =0.004). The results suggest that a genetic variation at the KIR locus influences the susceptibility to unexplained RSA in the Chinese Han population. Moreover, decreased ligands for inhibitory KIRs could potentially lower the threshold for NK cell activation, mediated through activating receptors, thereby contributing to pathogenesis of RSA.

  2. The human fibroblast growth factor receptor genes: a common structural arrangement underlies the mechanisms for generating receptor forms that differ in their third immunoglobulin domain.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D E; Lu, J; Chen, H; Werner, S; Williams, L T

    1991-01-01

    To determine the mechanisms by which multiple forms of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptors are generated, we have mapped the arrangement of exons and introns in the human FGF receptor 1 (FGFR 1) gene (flg). We found three alternative exons encoding a portion of the third immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domain of the receptor. One of these alternatives encodes a sequence that is part of a secreted form of FGFR 1. The other two encode sequences that are likely part of transmembrane forms of FGFR 1. One of these forms has not been previously reported in published cDNAs. Also, we have determined the structural organization of a portion of the human FGFR 2 gene (bek) and found a similar arrangement of alternative exons for the third Ig-like domain. The arrangement of these genes suggests that there are conserved mechanisms governing the expression of secreted FGF receptors as well as the expression of at least two distinct membrane-spanning forms of the FGF receptors. The diverse forms appear to be generated by alternative splicing of mRNA and selective use of polyadenylation signals. Images PMID:1652059

  3. Specificity repertoire of lymphocytes from multiple myeloma patients. I. High frequency of B cells specific for idiotypic and F(ab')2-region determinants on immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Pilarski, L M; Piotrowska-Krezolak, M; Gibney, D J; Winger, L; Winger, C; Mant, M J; Ruether, B A

    1985-07-01

    The specificity repertoire of B lymphocytes from 14 multiple myeloma patients has been studied using the technique of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) transformation of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) coupled with clonal analysis by limiting dilution. We find that up to 100% of the B cells from myeloma patients undergoing EBV transformation secrete IgM specific for determinants on the F(ab')2 region of autologous and/or heterologous monoclonal immunoglobulin. In normal individuals 0.02-0.73% of the transformed B cells secrete IgM specific for F(ab')2 determinants. Two patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance had only a weak reactivity to F(ab')2 fragments. The number of anti-F(ab')2 B cells was up to 145-fold greater in patients than in normal donors. The majority of antibodies from patient clones recognized determinants shared among 3-12 different F(ab')2 fragments, whereas those originating from normal donor B cells saw determinants expressed on only one or two of the panel of test F(ab')2 fragments. There was a preference for autologous M components and a high proportion of antiidiotypic reactivity in five of eight patients so analyzed. We speculate that these findings indicate the existence of an anti-F(ab')2 immunoregulatory network mediating patient immunodeficiency network mediating patient immunodeficiency, thereby creating an abnormality that may enable the progression of multiple myeloma.

  4. Phage-Displayed T-Cell Epitope Grafted into Immunoglobulin Heavy-Chain Complementarity-Determining Regions: an Effective Vaccine Design Tested in Murine Cysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Manoutcharian, Karen; Terrazas, Luis Ignacio; Gevorkian, Goar; Acero, Gonzalo; Petrossian, Pavel; Rodriguez, Miriam; Govezensky, Tzipe

    1999-01-01

    A new type of immunogenic molecule was engineered by replacing all three complementarity-determining-region (CDR) loops of the human immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy-chain variable (VH) domain with the Taenia crassiceps epitope PT1 (PPPVDYLYQT) and by displaying this construct on the surfaces of M13 bacteriophage. When BALB/c mice were immunized with such phage particles (PIgphage), a strong protection against challenge infection in very susceptible female hosts was obtained. When specifically stimulated, the in vivo-primed CD4+ and CD8+ T cells isolated from mice immunized with PT1, both as a free peptide and as the PIgphage construct, proliferated in vitro, indicating efficient epitope presentation by both major histocompatibility complex class II and class I molecules in the specifically antigen-pulsed macrophages used as antigen-presenting cells. These data demonstrate the immunogenic potential of recombinant phage particles displaying CDR epitope-grafted Ig VH domains and establish an alternative approach to the design of an effective subunit vaccine for prevention of cysticercosis. The key advantage of this type of immunogen is that no adjuvant is required for its application. The proposed strategy for immunogen construction is potentially suitable for use in any host-pathogen interaction. PMID:10456929

  5. Asian population frequencies and haplotype distribution of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genes among Chinese, Malay, and Indian in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yi Chuan; Chan, Soh Ha; Ren, Ee Chee

    2008-11-01

    Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) gene frequencies have been shown to be distinctly different between populations and contribute to functional variation in the immune response. We have investigated KIR gene frequencies in 370 individuals representing three Asian populations in Singapore and report here the distribution of 14 KIR genes (2DL1, 2DL2, 2DL3, 2DL4, 2DL5, 2DS1, 2DS2, 2DS3, 2DS4, 2DS5, 3DL1, 3DL2, 3DL3, 3DS1) with two pseudogenes (2DP1, 3DP1) among Singapore Chinese (n = 210); Singapore Malay (n = 80), and Singapore Indian (n = 80). Four framework genes (KIR3DL3, 3DP1, 2DL4, 3DL2) and a nonframework pseudogene 2DP1 were detected in all samples while KIR2DS2, 2DL2, 2DL5, and 2DS5 had the greatest significant variation across the three populations. Fifteen significant linkage patterns, consistent with associations between genes of A and B haplotypes, were observed. Eighty-four distinct KIR profiles were determined in our populations, 38 of which had not been described in other populations. KIR haplotype studies were performed using nine Singapore Chinese families comprising 34 individuals. All genotypes could be resolved into corresponding pairs of existing haplotypes with eight distinct KIR genotypes and eight different haplotypes. The haplotype A2 with frequency of 63.9% was dominant in Singapore Chinese, comparable to that reported in Korean and Chinese Han. The A haplotypes predominate in Singapore Chinese, with ratio of A to B haplotypes of approximately 3:1. Comparison with KIR frequencies in other populations showed that Singapore Chinese shared similar distributions with Chinese Han, Japanese, and Korean; Singapore Indian was found to be comparable with North Indian Hindus while Singapore Malay resembled the Thai.

  6. Association between total immunoglobulin E and antibody responses to naturally acquired Ascaris lumbricoides infection and polymorphisms of immune system-related LIG4, TNFSF13B and IRS2 genes.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, N; Mercado, D; Vergara, C; Sánchez, J; Kennedy, M W; Jiménez, S; Fernández, A M; Gutiérrez, M; Puerta, L; Caraballo, L

    2009-08-01

    The 13q33-34 region harbours a susceptibility locus to Ascaris lumbricoides, although the underlying genes are unknown. Immunoglobulin (Ig)E and IgG confer protective immunity and here we sought to investigate in an endemic population whether LIG4, TNFSF13B and IRS2 genes influence IgE and IgG levels against Ascaris and the ABA-1 allergen as a putative resistance marker. Mite-allergic asthmatic patients were analysed for potential relationships between Ascaris predisposition and allergy. One thousand and sixty-four subjects from Cartagena, Colombia, were included. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped using TaqMan assays. Antibody levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Linear and logistic regressions were used to model effects of genotypes on antibody levels. The GG genotype of LIG4 (rs1805388) was associated with higher IgE levels to Ascaris compared with other genotypes. TNFSF13B (rs10508198) was associated positively with IgG levels against Ascaris extract and IgE levels against ABA-1. In asthmatics, IRS2 (rs2289046) was associated with high total IgE levels. Associations held up after correction by population stratification using a set of 52 ancestry markers, age, sex and disease status. There was no association with asthma or mite sensitization. In a tropical population, LIG4 and TNFSF13B polymorphisms are associated with specific IgE and IgG to Ascaris, supporting previous linkage studies implicating the 13q33 region. Our results suggest that genes protecting against parasite infections can be different to those predisposing to asthma and atopy.

  7. Association between total immunoglobulin E and antibody responses to naturally acquired Ascaris lumbricoides infection and polymorphisms of immune system-related LIG4, TNFSF13B and IRS2 genes

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, N; Mercado, D; Vergara, C; Sánchez, J; Kennedy, M W; Jiménez, S; Fernández, A M; Gutiérrez, M; Puerta, L; Caraballo, L

    2009-01-01

    The 13q33–34 region harbours a susceptibility locus to Ascaris lumbricoides, although the underlying genes are unknown. Immunoglobulin (Ig)E and IgG confer protective immunity and here we sought to investigate in an endemic population whether LIG4, TNFSF13B and IRS2 genes influence IgE and IgG levels against Ascaris and the ABA-1 allergen as a putative resistance marker. Mite-allergic asthmatic patients were analysed for potential relationships between Ascaris predisposition and allergy. One thousand and sixty-four subjects from Cartagena, Colombia, were included. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped using TaqMan assays. Antibody levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Linear and logistic regressions were used to model effects of genotypes on antibody levels. The GG genotype of LIG4 (rs1805388) was associated with higher IgE levels to Ascaris compared with other genotypes. TNFSF13B (rs10508198) was associated positively with IgG levels against Ascaris extract and IgE levels against ABA-1. In asthmatics, IRS2 (rs2289046) was associated with high total IgE levels. Associations held up after correction by population stratification using a set of 52 ancestry markers, age, sex and disease status. There was no association with asthma or mite sensitization. In a tropical population, LIG4 and TNFSF13B polymorphisms are associated with specific IgE and IgG to Ascaris, supporting previous linkage studies implicating the 13q33 region. Our results suggest that genes protecting against parasite infections can be different to those predisposing to asthma and atopy. PMID:19604268

  8. Widespread transcription of a Qa region gene in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    The mouse MHC class I family includes genes encoded in four regions: H- 2K, H-2D, Qa and Tla. While K/D genes are well characterized, relatively little is known about Qa or Tla genes. We have studied the transcription of a B10.P Qa region gene. DNA sequence comparisons of the transmembrane region, supported by Southern blot analysis of cosmid and genomic DNAs from BALB/c and C57BL/10, demonstrate the lambda 3a gene corresponds to Q4p. In both Northern blots and RNA protection experiments using probes derived from the 3' noncoding region, we found that Q4, like the H-2K and H-2D genes, is widely transcribed in B10.P tissues. These data demonstrate for the first time widespread transcription of a Qa gene. PMID:2439640

  9. Dissecting the Structure-Function Relationship of a Fungicidal Peptide Derived from the Constant Region of Human Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Ciociola, Tecla; Pertinhez, Thelma A.; Giovati, Laura; Sperindè, Martina; Magliani, Walter; Ferrari, Elena; Gatti, Rita; D'Adda, Tiziana; Spisni, Alberto; Polonelli, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic peptides encompassing sequences related to the complementarity-determining regions of antibodies or derived from their constant region (Fc peptides) were proven to exert differential antimicrobial, antiviral, antitumor, and/or immunomodulatory activities in vitro and/or in vivo, regardless of the specificity and isotype of the parental antibody. Alanine substitution derivatives of these peptides exhibited unaltered, increased, or decreased candidacidal activities in vitro. The bioactive IgG-derived Fc N10K peptide (NQVSLTCLVK) spontaneously self-assembles, a feature previously recognized as relevant for the therapeutic activity of another antibody-derived peptide. We evaluated the contribution of each residue to the peptide self-assembling capability by circular-dichroism spectroscopy. The interaction of the N10K peptide and its derivatives with Candida albicans cells was studied by confocal, transmission, and scanning electron microscopy. The apoptosis and autophagy induction profiles in yeast cells treated with the peptides were evaluated by flow cytometry, and the therapeutic efficacy against candidal infection was studied in a Galleria mellonella model. Overall, the results indicate a critical role for some residues in the self-assembly process and a correlation of that capability with the candidacidal activities of the peptides in vitro and their therapeutic effects in vivo. PMID:26856836

  10. Dissecting the Structure-Function Relationship of a Fungicidal Peptide Derived from the Constant Region of Human Immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Ciociola, Tecla; Pertinhez, Thelma A; Giovati, Laura; Sperindè, Martina; Magliani, Walter; Ferrari, Elena; Gatti, Rita; D'Adda, Tiziana; Spisni, Alberto; Conti, Stefania; Polonelli, Luciano

    2016-04-01

    Synthetic peptides encompassing sequences related to the complementarity-determining regions of antibodies or derived from their constant region (Fc peptides) were proven to exert differential antimicrobial, antiviral, antitumor, and/or immunomodulatory activitiesin vitroand/orin vivo, regardless of the specificity and isotype of the parental antibody. Alanine substitution derivatives of these peptides exhibited unaltered, increased, or decreased candidacidal activitiesin vitro The bioactive IgG-derived Fc N10K peptide (NQVSLTCLVK) spontaneously self-assembles, a feature previously recognized as relevant for the therapeutic activity of another antibody-derived peptide. We evaluated the contribution of each residue to the peptide self-assembling capability by circular-dichroism spectroscopy. The interaction of the N10K peptide and its derivatives withCandida albicanscells was studied by confocal, transmission, and scanning electron microscopy. The apoptosis and autophagy induction profiles in yeast cells treated with the peptides were evaluated by flow cytometry, and the therapeutic efficacy against candidal infection was studied in aGalleria mellonellamodel. Overall, the results indicate a critical role for some residues in the self-assembly process and a correlation of that capability with the candidacidal activities of the peptidesin vitroand their therapeutic effectsin vivo.

  11. Clonality Analysis of Immunoglobulin Gene Rearrangement by Next-Generation Sequencing in Endemic Burkitt Lymphoma Suggests Antigen Drive Activation of BCR as Opposed to Sporadic Burkitt Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Amato, Teresa; Abate, Francesco; Piccaluga, Pierpaolo; Iacono, Michele; Fallerini, Chiara; Renieri, Alessandra; De Falco, Giulia; Ambrosio, Maria Raffaella; Mourmouras, Vaselious; Ogwang, Martin; Calbi, Valeria; Rabadan, Roul; Hummel, Michael; Pileri, Stefano; Bellan, Cristiana

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Recent studies using next-generation sequencing (NGS) analysis disclosed the importance of the intrinsic activation of the B-cell receptor (BCR) pathway in the pathogenesis of sporadic Burkitt lymphoma (sBL) due to mutations of TCF3/ID3 genes. Since no definitive data are available on the genetic landscape of endemic Burkitt (eBL), we first assessed the mutation frequency of TCF3/ID3 in eBL compared with sBL and subsequently the somatic hypermutation status of the BCR to answer whether an extrinsic activation of BCR signaling could also be demonstrated in Burkitt lymphoma. Methods: We assessed the mutations of TCF3/ID3 by RNAseq and the BCR status by NGS analysis of the immunoglobulin genes (IGs). Results: We detected mutations of TCF3/ID3 in about 30% of the eBL cases. This rate is significantly lower than that detected in sBL (64%). The NGS analysis of IGs revealed intraclonal diversity, suggesting an active targeted somatic hypermutation process in eBL compared with sBL. Conclusions: These findings support the view that the antigenic pressure plays a key role in the pathogenetic pathways of eBL, which may be partially distinct from those driving sBL development. PMID:26712879

  12. A study of Gm allotypes and immunoglobulin heavy gamma IGHG genes in Berbers, Arabs and sub-Saharan Africans from Jerba Island, Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Loveslati, B Y; Sanchez-Mazas, A; Ennafaa, H; Marrakchi, R; Dugoujon, J M; Lefranc, J M; Elgaaied, A B

    2001-10-01

    The Gm polymorphism of human IgG immunoglobulins was investigated in three different ethnic groups--Arabs, Berbers and 'dark-skinned people'--on Jerba Island, Tunisia. The genetic relationships among these groups and several populations from North Africa, sub-Saharan Africa, west Asia and Europe were analysed by principal coordinate analysis, Fst significance testing, and analysis of molecular variance based on haplotype frequencies. The results revealed a non-significant genetic differentiation between Arabs and Berbers from Jerba. However, the Jerbian population of sub-Saharan African origin was close to Ethiopians. Gene flow among the three Jerbian populations, as well as an East African origin of the dark-skinned individuals, is proposed to account for the observed genetic pattern. However, the genetic diversity observed among the different Tunisian populations did not show any significant correlation with either geographic or linguistic differentiation. A preliminary analysis of the restriction fragment length polymorphism of the IGHG genes in Arabs and Berbers from Jerba confirmed the close genetic relationship between the two populations. However, it also indicated a lower level of genetic diversity in the Berbers, which may be explained by more rapid genetic drift due to longer isolation on the island.

  13. Allelic inclusion in a pre-B-cell line that generates immunoglobulin heavy chain genes in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Beck-Engeser, G; Jäck, H M; Wabl, M

    1987-01-01

    In a pre-B-cell line that rearranges its heavy chain gene segments in vitro, we found that the rate of productive rearrangement on one allele was not influenced by the presence of heavy chain protein encoded by the other allele. This shows that allelic exclusion of heavy chain genes is not regulated at the genetic level. Images PMID:3103122

  14. Demarcating the gene-rich regions of the wheat genome

    PubMed Central

    Erayman, Mustafa; Sandhu, Devinder; Sidhu, Deepak; Dilbirligi, Muharrem; Baenziger, P. S.; Gill, Kulvinder S.

    2004-01-01

    By physically mapping 3025 loci including 252 phenotypically characterized genes and 17 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) relative to 334 deletion breakpoints, we localized the gene-containing fraction to 29% of the wheat genome present as 18 major and 30 minor gene-rich regions (GRRs). The GRRs varied both in gene number and density. The five largest GRRs physically spanning <3% of the genome contained 26% of the wheat genes. Approximate size of the GRRs ranged from 3 to 71 Mb. Recombination mainly occurred in the GRRs. Various GRRs varied as much as 128-fold for gene density and 140-fold for recombination rates. Except for a general suppression in 25–40% of the chromosomal region around centromeres, no correlation of recombination was observed with the gene density, the size, or chromosomal location of GRRs. More than 30% of the wheat genes are in recombination-poor regions thus are inaccessible to map-based cloning. PMID:15240829

  15. Diffusion of Immunoglobulin G in Shed Vaginal Epithelial Cells and in Cell-Free Regions of Human Cervicovaginal Mucus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying-Ying; Schroeder, Holly A.; Nunn, Kenetta L.; Woods, Karen; Anderson, Deborah J.; Cone, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Human cervicovaginal mucus (CVM) is a viscoelastic gel containing a complex mixture of mucins, shed epithelial cells, microbes and macromolecules, such as antibodies, that together serve as the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Here, to investigate the affinity between IgG and different mucus constituents, we used Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) to measure the diffusion of IgG in fresh, minimally modified CVM. We found that CVM exhibits substantial spatial variations that necessitate careful selection of the regions in which to perform FRAP. In portions of CVM devoid of cells, FRAP measurements using different IgG antibodies and labeling methods consistently demonstrate that both exogenous and endogenous IgG undergo rapid diffusion, almost as fast as in saline, in good agreement with the rapid diffusion of IgG in mid-cycle endocervical mucus that is largely devoid of cells. This rapid diffusion indicates the interactions between secreted mucins and IgG must be very weak and transient. IgG also accumulated in cellular debris and shed epithelial cells that had become permeable to IgG, which may allow shed epithelial cells to serve as reservoirs of secreted IgG. Interestingly, in contrast to cell-free regions of CVM, the diffusion of cell-associated IgG was markedly slowed, suggesting greater affinity between IgG and cellular constituents. Our findings contribute to an improved understanding of the role of IgG in mucosal protection against infectious diseases, and may also provide a framework for using FRAP to study molecular interactions in mucus and other complex biological environments. PMID:27362256

  16. Increased frequencies of the killer immunoglobulin-like receptor genes KIR2DL2 and KIR2DS2 are associated with neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Keating, S E; Ní Chorcora, C; Dring, M M; Stallings, R L; O'Meara, A; Gardiner, C M

    2015-09-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extra-cranial solid tumour in children. Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphocytes that are known to mediate the direct cytotoxicity of neuroblastoma tumour cells. Natural variation in the highly polymorphic killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) and their cognate human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I ligands results in considerable diversity in NK cell function. As the early onset of neuroblastoma suggests the contribution of genetic factors, we investigated if individual KIR genes, combined KIR gene haplotypes or compound KIR-HLA ligand genotypes could influence susceptibility to neuroblastoma. Genotype analysis of the KIR genes as well as their three major HLA class I ligand groups, HLA-C1, HLA-C2 and HLA-Bw4, was carried out in a cohort of 201 neuroblastoma patients compared with 240 healthy control subjects using polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers. We found a significant increase in the frequency of KIR2DL2 (P = 0.019) as well as KIR2DS2 (P = 0.008) in patients with neuroblastoma compared with the healthy control group. While the incidence of the least inhibitory compound KIR-HLA-C genotype, KIR2DL3 in the presence of HLA-C1 was slightly reduced in neuroblastoma patients, this did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.069). In summary, while KIR-HLA compound genotypes have previously been implicated in predicting treatment outcomes in neuroblastoma, here we show that the presence of the individual KIR genes, KIR2DL2 and KIR2DS2, irrespective of HLA-C genotype is associated with the onset of this embryonal malignancy.

  17. Proteolysis of lymphocytic surface immunoglobulin.

    PubMed Central

    Hough, D W; McIlroy, B M; Stevenson, G T

    1977-01-01

    Limited proteolysis of lymphocytic surface immunoglobulins in guinea-pig, rabbit and man was investigated by immunofluorescence using conjugated antisera specific for immunoglobulin fragments. The cell surface IgM of guinea pig L2C leukaemic lymphocytes and rabbit blood lymphocytes was cleaved in situ at its hinge region by papain. The Fcmicron fragment remained attached to the membrane and could be stained with the appropriate anti-Fc conjugate. The surface IgD and IgM of human chronic lymphocytic leukaemia cells was cleared from the cell surface by papain, as shown by reagents directed against both Fab and Fc region determinants. This could be due either to proteolytic degradation of membrane bound Fc or to initial cleavage of Ig from the membrane at some point other than the hinge region. PMID:321347

  18. Differential association of gene content polymorphisms of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors with placental malaria in HIV- and HIV+ mothers.

    PubMed

    Omosun, Yusuf O; Blackstock, Anna J; Gatei, Wangeci; Hightower, Allen; van Eijk, Anne Maria; Ayisi, John; Otieno, Juliana; Lal, Renu B; Steketee, Richard; Nahlen, Bernard; ter Kuile, Feiko O; Slutsker, Laurence; Shi, Ya Ping

    2012-01-01

    Pregnant women have abundant natural killer (NK) cells in their placenta, and NK cell function is regulated by polymorphisms of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs). Previous studies report different roles of NK cells in the immune responses to placental malaria (PM) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infections. Given these references, the aim of this study was to determine the association between KIR gene content polymorphism and PM infection in pregnant women of known HIV-1 status. Sixteen genes in the KIR family were analyzed in 688 pregnant Kenyan women. Gene content polymorphisms were assessed in relation to PM in HIV-1 negative and HIV-1 positive women, respectively. Results showed that in HIV-1 negative women, the presence of the individual genes KIR2DL1 and KIR2DL3 increased the odds of having PM, and the KIR2DL2/KIR2DL2 homozygotes were associated with protection from PM. However, the reverse relationship was observed in HIV-1 positive women, where the presence of individual KIR2DL3 was associated with protection from PM, and KIR2DL2/KIR2DL2 homozygotes increased the odds for susceptibility to PM. Further analysis of the HIV-1 positive women stratified by CD4 counts showed that this reverse association between KIR genes and PM remained only in the individuals with high CD4 cell counts but not in those with low CD4 cell counts. Collectively, these results suggest that inhibitory KIR2DL2 and KIR2DL3, which are alleles of the same locus, play a role in the inverse effects on PM and PM/HIV co-infection and the effect of KIR genes on PM in HIV positive women is dependent on high CD4 cell counts. In addition, analysis of linkage disequilibrium (LD) of the PM relevant KIR genes showed strong LD in women without PM regardless of their HIV status while LD was broken in those with PM, indicating possible selection pressure by malaria infection on the KIR genes.

  19. Analysis of API2-MALT1 fusion, trisomies, and immunoglobulin VH genes in pulmonary mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Xia, Hongjing; Nakayama, Takahisa; Sakuma, Hidenori; Yamada, Seiji; Sato, Fumihiko; Takino, Hisashi; Okabe, Mitsukuni; Fujiyoshi, Yukio; Hattori, Hideo; Inagaki, Hiroshi

    2011-09-01

    Pulmonary mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma is unique in that chronic inflammation is rare and that API2-MALT1 fusion, resulting from t(11;18)(q21;q21), occurs frequently. In this study, we examined 20 cases for API2-MALT1 fusion using the multiplex reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and looked for trisomy 3, trisomy 18, and abnormalities of MALT1 and IGH genes using fluorescence in situ hybridization. In addition, we analyzed VH genes by subcloning of the monoclonal polymerase chain reaction products. Of 20 cases studied, we detected gene abnormalities in 16: API2-MALT1 fusion in 9, trisomy 3 in 5, trisomy 18 in 4, MALT1 abnormality in 13, and IGH abnormality in 1. MALT1 gene abnormalities were concordant with API2-MALT1 fusion or trisomy 18. One case showed API2-MALT1 fusion and trisomy 3. On detection of API2-MALT1 fusion and trisomies, we were able to divide our cases into 3 groups, API2-MALT1 positive, trisomy positive, and no detectable gene abnormality, suggesting that tumor development had processed along different genetic pathways. All 20 cases were analyzed for VH genes. Most of the VH genes selected by the lymphomas belonged to the VH3 family, but there was no restriction to any particular VH fragment. Of interest, VH genes were unmutated in 7 cases, suggesting that T-cell-independent extrafollicular B-cell maturation may be important in the development of this lymphoma. In addition, both mutated and unmutated tumor cases were found to carry the API2-MALT1 fusion and trisomy 3. This observation suggests that these gene abnormalities may occur in microenvironments found before or outside of follicular germinal centers.

  20. Analysis of Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptor Genes and Their HLA Ligands in Iranian Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, Mehdi; Jamshidi, Ahmad Reza; Karami, Jafar; Mohseni, Alireza; Amirzargar, Ali Akbar; Farhadi, Elham; Ahmadzadeh, Nooshin; Nicknam, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-02-01

    Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) is a chronic rheumatic disease which mainly involves the axial skeleton. It seems that non-HLA genes, as well as HLA-B27 gene, are linked to the etiology of the disease. Recently, it has been documented that KIRs and their HLA ligands are contributed to the Ankylosing Spondylitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the KIR genes and their HLA ligands in Iranian AS patients and healthy individuals. The present study includes 200 AS patient samples and 200 healthy control samples. KIR genotyping was performed using the polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific primer (PCR-SSP) method to type the presence or absence of the 16 KIR genes, 6 known specific HLA class I ligands and also, two pseudogenes. Two KIR genes (KIR-2DL3 and KIR2DL5), and among the HLA ligands, two HLA ligands (HLA-C2Lys80 and HLA-B27) genes were significantly different between case and control groups. In addition, we found some interesting KIR/HLA compound genotypes, which were associated with AS susceptibility. Our results suggest that the AS patients present more activating and less inhibitory KIR genes with combination of their HLA ligands than healthy controls. Once the balance of signal transduction between activating and inhibitory receptors is disturbed, the ability of NK cells to identify and lyse the targets in immune responses will be compromised. Accordingly, imbalance of activating and inhibitory KIR genes by up-regulating the activation and losing the inhibition of KIRs signaling or combination of both might be one of the important factors which underlying the pathogenesis of AS.

  1. Impact of serum immunoglobulins level and IL-18 promoter gene polymorphism among Egyptian patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Aref, Salah; El-Ghonemy, Mohamed Sabry; El-Aziz, Sherin Abd; Abouzeid, Tarek; Talaab, Mona; El-Sabbagh, Amr

    2017-03-01

    Based on the concept of immune dysregulation in immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) and that Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is an inflammatory cytokine that plays an important role in autoimmune disease by inducing interferon-γ secretion; this study aimed to assess a possible association between the IL-18 promoter polymorphisms (-607 C/A site) and genetic susceptibility to ITP and the impact of the immunoglobulins (Igs) concentrations level on disease severity and response to therapy. A cross-section study was done on 105 patients' age range from 10 to 28 years, with newly diagnosed ITP at the Oncology Center Mansoura University over the past 2 years and 100 healthy subjects as a control group. For all patients and controls, the IL-18 promoter polymorphism (-607 C/A site) as well as serum Ig (IgG, IgM, IgA) concentration was determined. The IL-18 promoter polymorphism (-607 C/A site) was not significantly different between ITP patients and normal controls. The number of patients respond to standard line of therapy was significantly higher in those with low IgA levels as compared to those with high IgA levels (P = 0.02). On the other hand, the number of patients respond to standard therapy was significantly higher in those patients with high IgM levels as compared to those with low IgM levels (54.7 vs. 36.5%) (P < 0.05). The number of patients with bleeding manifestation was significantly higher among those with high IgA as compared to those with low IgA (43 of 79, 54.4%; vs. 36 of 79, 45.6%; P = 0.04). A change in IgG levels was not associated with response to treatment, bleeding tendency, or platelet counts. There is no association between IL-18 promoter polymorphisms (-607 C/A site) and genetic susceptibility to ITP. High IgA and low IgM levels are a bad index for treatment response to standard therapy.

  2. The Importance of an In-depth Study of Immunoglobulin Gene Rearrangements When Ascertaining the Clonal Relationship between Concomitant Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia and Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Trudel, Stéphanie; Ghamlouch, Hussein; Dremaux, Julie; Delette, Caroline; Harrivel, Véronique; Marolleau, Jean-Pierre; Gubler, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and multiple myeloma (MM) are hematological disorders that occur at different stages of B-cell development. It has been shown that CLL B-cells can differentiate into plasma cells in vitro and in vivo. CLL is the most frequent adult leukemia in the western world. It is a heterogeneous disease, characterized by clonal proliferation and the accumulation of mature CD5+ B lymphocytes (1). MM is a clonal plasma cell malignancy that accounts for more than 10% of all hematologic cancers (2). Although secondary cancers [particularly solid tumors (3–5)] can occur with CLL and MM, the concomitant occurrence of these two disorders in the same patient is rare [for a review of the few reported cases, see Ref. (6)]. The clonal relationship between these diseases has not always been clarified but is important in terms of understanding the pathogenesis and optimizing treatment. The clonal relationship between CLL and MM can be evaluated by (i) analyzing immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy chain and light chain (Ig kappa light chain and Ig lambda light chain) gene rearrangement, (ii) identifying and comparing somatic mutations, and (iii) studying chromosomic aberrations. Nevertheless, Ig rearrangements must always be interpreted in the light of specific phenomena such as allelic exclusion, B-cell receptor (BCR) revision (VH and DH gene replacement), BCR editing, and somatic mutations—events that were not considered in previous studies. These issues can be addressed by sequencing the rearranged Ig genes from sorted populations and interpreting the generated data. In the present study, we evaluated the putative clonal relationship between the two diseases by combining DNA copy number analysis with an assessment of Ig gene rearrangements [clonality assessment, V(D)J sequencing, and somatic hypermutation analysis] in highly enriched CD19+ CD5+ (CLL) and CD38+ CD138+ (MM) cell populations. Array comparative genomic hybridization data suggested a possible

  3. Quantitative immunoglobulins in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Crisp, Howard C; Quinn, James M

    2009-01-01

    Although age-related changes in serum immunoglobulins are well described in childhood, alterations in immunoglobulins in the elderly are less well described and published. This study was designed to better define expected immunoglobulin ranges and differences in adults of differing decades of life. Sera from 404 patients, aged 20-89 years old were analyzed for quantitative immunoglobulin G (IgG), immunoglobulin M (IgM), and immunoglobulin A (IgA). The patients with diagnoses or medications known to affect immunoglobulin levels were identified while blinded to their immunoglobulin levels. A two-factor ANOVA was performed using decade of life and gender on both the entire sample population as well as the subset without any disease or medication expected to alter immunoglobulin levels. A literature review was also performed on all English language articles evaluating quantitative immunoglobulin levels in adults >60 years old. For the entire population, IgM was found to be higher in women when compared with men (p < 0.001) and lower in the oldest sample population compared with the youngest population (p < 0.001). For the population without diseases known to affect immunoglobulin levels, the differences in IgM with gender and age were maintained (p < or = 0.001) and IgA levels were generally higher in the older population when compared with the younger population (p = 0.009). Elderly patients without disease known to affect immunoglobulin levels have higher serum IgA levels and lower serum IgM levels. Women have higher IgM levels than men throughout life. IgG levels are not significantly altered in an older population.

  4. Production and Characterization of a Set of Mouse-Human Chimeric Immunoglobulin G (IgG) Subclass and IgA Monoclonal Antibodies with Identical Variable Regions Specific for Pseudomonas aeruginosa Serogroup O6 Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Michael J.; Gerçeker, A. Alev; Reff, Mitchell E.; Pier, Gerald B.

    1998-01-01

    The heavy- and light-chain variable regions from a murine monoclonal antibody that recognize Pseudomonas aeruginosa serogroup O6 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were used to generate a series of chimeric mouse-human monoclonal antibodies with identical variable regions. The murine variable-region gene segments were cloned into an immunoglobulin (Ig) cDNA expression vector that contained the human kappa light-chain and IgG1 constant regions. The IgG1 heavy-chain constant region was then replaced with the human IgG2, IgG3, IgG4, or IgA1 heavy-chain constant region. The five different expression vectors were transfected into Chinese hamster ovary cells for antibody production. The chimeric antibodies exhibited immunoreactivity and affinity similar to that of the parental murine IgG antibody toward whole cells of a serogroup O6 strain. In vitro complement deposition assays demonstrated that the chimeric IgG4 and IgA antibodies did not mediate the deposition of complement component C3 onto the surface of either purified LPS or whole bacteria. The chimeric IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies were similar in their ability to deposit C3 onto the surface of both bacteria and LPS, while IgG2 antibody was more effective at depositing C3 onto the surface of bacteria than onto purified LPS. The pattern of opsonophagocytic activity of the chimeric monoclonal antibodies was similar to that of complement deposition onto bacterial cells in that the chimeric IgG1 and IgG3 had the highest opsonic activity. Although IgG2 deposited more C3 onto the bacterial surface than did IgG4 or IgA, all three of these isotypes had low opsonic activity against the serogroup O6 target strain. This series of related antibodies will help reveal functional differences in efficacy among protective antibodies to P. aeruginosa and will be critical for defining the optimal formulation of either a vaccine for active immunization or a polyclonal intravenous IgG or monoclonal antibody cocktail for passive immunotherapy. PMID

  5. Immunoglobulin E in histoplasmosis.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, R A; Arnold, D R

    1980-01-01

    Immunoglobulin M, G, A, and E serum levels were quantitated in 20 patients with active histoplasmosis (group I), 24 healthy subjects who were skin test positive to histoplasmin (group II), and 47 healthy persons who were skin test negative to histoplasmin (group III). The results established that patients with this disease have increased immunoglobulin G (P less than 0.05), immunoglobulin A (P less than 0.001), and immunoglobulin E (P less than 0.01) serum levels when compared with the 71 healthy subjects in groups II and III. PMID:7399706

  6. Thermodynamic stability contributes to immunoglobulin specificity.

    PubMed

    Dimitrov, Jordan D; Kaveri, Srinivas V; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien

    2014-05-01

    Antigen-binding specificity of immunoglobulins is important for their function in immune defense. However, immune repertoires contain a considerable fraction of immunoglobulins with promiscuous binding behavior, the physicochemical basis of which is not well understood. Evolution of immunoglobulin specificity occurs through iterative processes of mutation and selection, referred to as affinity maturation. Recent studies reveal that some somatic mutations could compromise the thermodynamic stability of the variable regions of immunoglobulins. By integrating this observation with the wealth of data on the evolution of novel enzyme activities, we propose that antibody specificity is linked to the thermodynamic stability of the antigen-binding regions, which provides a quantitative distinction between highly specific and promiscuous antibodies.

  7. A second gene for the African green monkey poliovirus receptor that has no putative N-glycosylation site in the functional N-terminal immunoglobulin-like domain.

    PubMed Central

    Koike, S; Ise, I; Sato, Y; Yonekawa, H; Gotoh, O; Nomoto, A

    1992-01-01

    Using cDNA of the human poliovirus receptor (PVR) as a probe, two types of cDNA clones of the monkey homologs were isolated from a cDNA library prepared from an African green monkey kidney cell line. Either type of cDNA clone rendered mouse L cells permissive for poliovirus infection. Homologies of the amino acid sequences deduced from these cDNA sequences with that of human PVR were 90.2 and 86.4%, respectively. These two monkey PVRs were found to be encoded in two different loci of the genome. Evolutionary analysis suggested that duplication of the PVR gene in the monkey genome had occurred after the species differentiation between humans and monkeys. The NH2-terminal immunoglobulin-like domain, domain 1, of the second monkey PVR, which lacks a putative N-glycosylation site, mediated poliovirus infection. In addition, a human PVR mutant without N-glycosylation sites in domain 1 also promoted viral infection. These results suggest that domain 1 of the monkey receptor also harbors the binding site for poliovirus and that sugar moieties possibly attached to this domain of human PVR are dispensable for the virus-receptor interaction. Images PMID:1331508

  8. Association analysis of -416 G>C polymorphism of T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain-1 gene with asthma in Iran.

    PubMed

    Shirzade, H; Meshkat, R; Ganjalikhani-Hakemi, M; Mosayebian, A; Ghasemi, R; Deress, F; Parchami Barjui, S; Sadri, M; Salehi, R

    2015-08-01

    TIM (T-cell immunoglobulin (Ig) and mucin domain)-1, one of the members of TIM family, expresses on Th2 cells and promotes the production of Th2 signature cytokines. This can increase a series of responses in these cells which could be one of the causes of asthma or asthma-related phenotypes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a TIM-1 promoter single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), -416 G>C, is associated with asthma in Iranian population. In this case-control study, existence of the -416 G>C polymorphism was assessed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) in 300 patients with asthma (97 atopic, 203 nonatopic) and 309 healthy volunteers. Additionally, the relationship between these polymorphism genotypes and total serum IgE levels in this Iranian population was evaluated. We discovered a significant association between the -416 G>C polymorphism and atopic asthma susceptibility in the population, but this SNP showed no connection with nonatopic asthma (P < 0.05). However, our results showed significant relation between this polymorphism and serum IgE level (P < 0.05). Our results suggest that -416 G>C polymorphism in TIM-1 gene could be a predisposing factor for atopic asthma in Iranian population, and CC genotype of this SNP can be associated with increased level of IgE in patients with asthma in the same population. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. A large protein containing zinc finger domains binds to related sequence elements in the enhancers of the class I major histocompatibility complex and kappa immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, A S; LeClair, K P; Singh, H; Sharp, P A

    1990-01-01

    A cDNA from a B-cell library was previously isolated that encodes a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein with affinities for related sites in a class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and kappa immunoglobulin gene enhancers. We report here approximately 6.5 kilobases of sequence of the MBP-1 (MHC enhancer binding protein 1) cDNA. MBP-1 protein has a molecular weight predicted to be greater than 200,000. A DNA-binding domain with high affinity for the MHC enhancer sequence TGGGGATTCCCCA was localized to an 118-amino-acid protein fragment containing two zinc fingers of the class Cys2-X12-His2. Analysis of expression of MBP-1 mRNA revealed relatively high expression in HeLa cells and in a human retinal cell line, with lower levels in Jurkat T cells and in two B-cell lines. Interestingly, expression of MBP-1 mRNA was inducible by mitogen and phorbol ester treatment of Jurkat T cells and by serum treatment of confluent serum-deprived human fibroblasts. Images PMID:2108316

  10. Minimal residual disease (MRD) monitoring using rearrangement of T-cell receptor and immunoglobulin H gene in the treatment of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Toubai, Tomomi; Tanaka, Junji; Ota, Shuichi; Fukuhara, Takashi; Hashino, Satoshi; Kondo, Takeshi; Kasai, Masaharu; Kakinoki, Yasutaka; Masauzi, Nobuo; Morioka, Masanobu; Kawamura, Tsugumichi; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Asaka, Masahiro; Imamura, Masahiro

    2005-11-01

    We evaluate whether molecular monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD) using TCR delta (TCRD), TCR gamma (TCRG), and immunoglobulin H (IgH) gene rearrangements in the bone marrow (BM) is correlated with clinical events in ALL patients. The 14 patients enrolled in this study included 6 males and 8 females with a median age of 53 years (range, 25-79 years), and the median duration of follow-up was 417 days (range, 57-617 days). The median WBC count was 11.3 x 10(9)/L at diagnosis. All patients had L2 type ALL. Eleven patients had a monoclonal pattern of IgH (7), TCRD (3) and TCRG (1), and 3 patients had two clonal patterns. Eleven of the 14 patients achieved the first complete remission (CR) after the first induction chemotherapy. We analyzed 9 of 11 CR patients who could be examined immediately after induction chemotherapy (including re-induction therapy). Event-free survival (EFS, 0%) and disease-free survival (DFS, 0%) at 1 year in CR patients with MRD level >or=10(-3) (n = 3) were significantly lower than those in CR patients with MRD level <10(-3) (n = 6) (log-rank test, P = 0.013, 0.013). A lower MRD in BM value after induction chemotherapy was associated significantly with longer survival in the log-rank test. Our data provide evidence that molecular MRD status of BM is a strong predictor of outcome in adult ALL.

  11. High frequency of clonal immunoglobulin or T cell receptor gene rearrangements in acute myelogenous leukemia expressing terminal deoxyribonucleotidyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Ig and T cell receptor rearrangements have been used as irreversible markers of lineage and clonality in the study of B- and T-lymphoid populations. We have addressed the issue of lymphoid lineage specificity of these rearrangements by analyzing a panel of 25 TdT- acute myelogenous leukemias, 13 TdT+ AMLs, and 4 TdT+ undifferentiated leukemias. We report that while gene rearrangements represent extremely rare events in classical TdT- AML (less than 8%), rearrangements of either the Ig or T beta locus or both were detectable in the majority of the TdT+ AMLs (greater than 60%), and rearrangements of both loci were detectable in all of the TdT+ undifferentiated leukemias. These data demonstrate a significant association between TdT expression and Ig or T beta gene rearrangements even outside the lymphoid lineage, further supporting a role for TdT in Ig and T cell receptor gene assembly. These data also indicate that a coordinated program of lymphoid gene expression involving TdT-CD7-expression and Ig/T beta rearrangements can be activated before myeloid commitment. Whether the activation of this program represents a normal, albeit rare, event in early myelopoiesis or a transformation-related event present only in leukemic cells remains to be determined. PMID:3473183

  12. Structural repertoire in human V{sub L} pseudogenes of immunoglobulins: Comparison with functional germline genes and amino acid sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Almagro, J.C.; Lara-Ochoa, F.; Dominguez-Martinez, V.

    1996-06-01

    Antibody molecules are highly antigen-specific receptors of the immune system. Antigen-antibody interaction involves the antibody V{sub L} and V{sub H} domains, each composed of a framework whose structure is well conserved. The antigen-binding site is composed of six hypervariable loops, three from the V{sub L} domain and three from the V{sub H} domain: L1, L2, L3, and H1, H2, H3, respectively. Genetically, L1 and L2 are encoded by the V{sub L} gene, while L3 is produced by the recombination of an additional gene segment, A. In a similar way, H1 and H2 are encoded by the V{sub H} gene, and H3 is a result of the recombination of two additional gene segments, D and J{sub H}. Analysis of antibodies of known atomic structure has revealed a small number of main-chain conformations or canonical structures for L1, L2, and L3, as well as for H1 and H2. Canonical structures in five of six hypervariable loops imply that only a few main-chain conformations are present in a large set of antibody molecules with different loop sequences. Examination of the known human IGHV, IGKV, and IGLV functional germline genes indicates that most of these sequences have canonical structures. This finding provides evidence concerning structural restrictions at work in the process of antigen recognition. 28 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  13. VH Replacement Footprint Analyzer-I, a Java-Based Computer Program for Analyses of Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Genes and Potential VH Replacement Products in Human and Mouse.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lin; Lange, Miles D; Zhang, Zhixin

    2014-01-01

    VH replacement occurs through RAG-mediated secondary recombination between a rearranged VH gene and an upstream unrearranged VH gene. Due to the location of the cryptic recombination signal sequence (cRSS, TACTGTG) at the 3' end of VH gene coding region, a short stretch of nucleotides from the previous rearranged VH gene can be retained in the newly formed VH-DH junction as a "footprint" of VH replacement. Such footprints can be used as markers to identify Ig heavy chain (IgH) genes potentially generated through VH replacement. To explore the contribution of VH replacement products to the antibody repertoire, we developed a Java-based computer program, VH replacement footprint analyzer-I (VHRFA-I), to analyze published or newly obtained IgH genes from human or mouse. The VHRFA-1 program has multiple functional modules: it first uses service provided by the IMGT/V-QUEST program to assign potential VH, DH, and JH germline genes; then, it searches for VH replacement footprint motifs within the VH-DH junction (N1) regions of IgH gene sequences to identify potential VH replacement products; it can also analyze the frequencies of VH replacement products in correlation with publications, keywords, or VH, DH, and JH gene usages, and mutation status; it can further analyze the amino acid usages encoded by the identified VH replacement footprints. In summary, this program provides a useful computation tool for exploring the biological significance of VH replacement products in human and mouse.

  14. Immunoglobulin variable gene segment V{sub H}81X of the mouse is embedded in L1 transposon sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Bachl, J.; Defranoux, N.; Wabl, M.

    1995-01-11

    L1 elements are widely distributed over the mammalian genome, but the question of their biological significance is still open. The mouse heavy (H) chain variable region V{sub H}81X is overrepresented in the pre-B-cell repertoire; the significance of this is controversial, and V{sub H}81X has been the subject of much research. Here we present data showing that the mouse H chain variable region X{sub H}81X is embedded in the remnants of a LINE-1 element.

  15. Autoreactivity of primary human immunoglobulins ancestral to hypermutated human antibodies that neutralize HCMV.

    PubMed

    McLean, Gary R; Cho, Chin-wen; Schrader, John W

    2006-05-01

    The human antibody response to the AD-2S1 epitope of glycoprotein B (gB) of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is dominated by a family of closely related somatically mutated antibodies. These antibodies neutralize viral infectivity and the genes encoding them are derived from two commonly used germ-line variable (V) region genes, IGHV3-30 and IGKV3-11. Recombination of these V genes with the appropriate junctional diversity generates genes that encode primary immunoglobulins that bind to AD-2S1. To further understand the initial primary immunoglobulin response to AD-2S1 we synthesized the germ-line-based ancestor of one such family of antibodies and showed that it bound gB at the AD-2S1 epitope. Here we show that the germ-line ancestor of a second family of antibodies likewise binds to gB. We further show that one of the ancestral primary immunoglobulins, but not the other, also recognized autoantigens. In contrast, the hypermutated derivatives did not demonstrate autoreactivity and minor structural changes in the primary immunoglobulin were sufficient to generate or abolish autoreactivity or to change specificity. Thus, our demonstration that the ancestor of a highly mutated, non-autoreactive antiviral IgG antibody binds nuclear and cell-surface autoantigens indicates for the first time that self-reactivity is not necessarily a barrier to development into a follicular B lymphocyte that undergoes antigen-initiated affinity maturation.

  16. Looping out and deletion mechanism for the immunoglobulin heavy-chain class switch.

    PubMed Central

    Jäck, H M; McDowell, M; Steinberg, C M; Wabl, M

    1988-01-01

    In the mouse pre-B-cell line 18-81, cells can switch production in vitro from immunoglobulin mu chain to gamma 2b chain. The gene encoding the gamma 2b chain is created by a rearrangement of the mu gene. This rearrangement always takes place within a homolog. In cells with a gamma 2b gene, most of the time the gene segment encoding the constant region of the mu chain is deleted, but often the rearrangement leads to cells that produce no immunoglobulin, and all DNA sequences are retained. The latter result is due to an inversion. Inversions exclude the unequal sister chromatid exchange model of the heavy-chain class switch. Looping out is an intermediate step in the process of generating an inversion. Our findings demonstrate that the switch rearrangement occurs by looping out and deletion. Images PMID:2830623

  17. Genes in one megabase of the HLA class I region

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, H.; Fan, Wu-Fang; Xu, Hongxia; Shukla, H.; Weissman, S.M. ); Parimoo, S. R.W. Johnson Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Raritan, NJ ); Chaplin, D.D. )

    1993-11-15

    To define the gene content of the HLA class I region, cDNA selection was applied to three overlapping yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) that spanned 1 megabase (Mb) of this region of the human major histocompatibility complex. These YACs extended from the region centromeric to HLA-E to the region telomeric to HLA-F. In additions to the recognized class I genes and pseudogenes and the anonymous non-class-I genes described recently by the authors and others, 20 additional anonymous cDNA clones were identified from this 1-Mb region. They also identified a long repetitive DNA element in the region between HLA-B and HLA-E. Homologues of this outside of the HLA complex. The portion of the HLA class I region represented by these YACs shows an average gene density as high as the class II and class III regions. Thus, the high gene density portion of the HLA complex is extended to more than 3 Mb.

  18. Assembly and analysis of cosmid contigs in the CEA-gene family region of human chromosome 19.

    PubMed Central

    Tynan, K; Olsen, A; Trask, B; de Jong, P; Thompson, J; Zimmermann, W; Carrano, A; Mohrenweiser, H

    1992-01-01

    The carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-like genes are members of a large gene family which is part of the immunoglobulin superfamily. The CEA family is divided into two major subgroups, the CEA-subgroup and the pregnancy-specific glycoprotein (PSG)-subgroup. In the course of an effort to develop a set of overlapping cosmids spanning human chromosome 19, we identified 245 cosmids in a human chromosome 19 cosmid library (6-7X redundant) by hybridization with an IgC-like domain fragment of the CEA gene. A fluorescence-based restriction enzyme digest fingerprinting strategy was used to assemble 212 probe-positive cosmids, along with 115 additional cosmids from a collection of approximately 8,000 randomly selected cosmids, into five contigs. Two of the contigs contain CEA-subgroup genes while the remaining three contigs contain PSG-subgroup genes. These five contigs range in size from 100 kb to over 300 kb and span an estimated 1 Mb. The CEA-like gene family was determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization to map in the q13.1-q13.2 region of human chromosome 19. Analysis of the two CEA-subgroup contigs provided verification of the contig assembly strategy and insight into the organization of 9 CEA-subgroup genes. PMID:1579453

  19. The effects of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genes on susceptibility to HIV-1 infection in the Polish population.

    PubMed

    Zwolińska, Katarzyna; Błachowicz, Olga; Tomczyk, Tomasz; Knysz, Brygida; Gąsiorowski, Jacek; Zalewska, Małgorzata; Orzechowska, Beata U; Sochocka, Marta; Piasecki, Egbert

    2016-05-01

    Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) are the most polymorphic receptors of natural killer (NK) cells. Their activity diversifies the functions of NK cells in the antiviral immune response, so the presence of certain KIR may affect transmission of HIV-1. The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of KIR genes on the susceptibility to HIV-1 infection in the Polish population depending on the route of exposure. We determined the frequencies of activating (2DS1, 2DS2, 2DS3, 2DS4f, 2DS4del, 2DS5, 3DS1) and inhibitory (2DL1, 2DL2, 2DL3, 2DL5, 3DL1) KIRs in HIV-1-positive patients (n = 459), individuals exposed to HIV-1 but uninfected (EU, n = 118) and in uninfected, healthy blood donors (BD, n = 98). Analysis was performed using stepwise logistic regression. Apart from KIRs, CCR5-∆32, and CCR2-64I, alleles were also analyzed, as we knew or suspected that these features could affect susceptibility to HIV infection. The regression confirmed the protective effect of CCR5-∆32 (OR = 0.25, p = 0.006) and CCR2-64I (OR = 0.59, p = 0.032) against HIV infection. Among KIR genes, 2DL3 was found to be a protective factor (OR = 0.30, p = 0.015). A similar effect was seen for 3DS1 but only in intravenous drug users (IDUs) (OR = 0.30, p = 0.019), not in sexually exposed people. 2DL5 was found to be a factor facilitating HIV infection (OR = 2.13, p = 0.013). A similar effect was observed for 2DL2 but only in females (OR = 2.15, p = 0.040), and 2DS1 in IDUs (OR = 3.03, p = 0.022). Our results suggest a beneficial role of KIR3DS1 and 2DL3 supporting resistance to HIV infection and a harmful effect of 2DS1, 2DL5, and 2DL2 genes promoting HIV acquisition.

  20. Roles of T-cell Immunoglobulin and Mucin Domain Genes and Toll-like Receptors in Wheezy Children with Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qing; Gu, Tingting; Li, Peijie; Yan, Ping; Chen, Dehong; Han, Bingchao

    2016-12-01

    The study aimed to explore possible factors influencing wheezing in children with Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia (MPP). The study included 84 children with MPP, who were divided into two groups: wheezy group (n=40) and non-wheezy group (n=44), along with 30 age-matched healthy controls. T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain gene (Tim) 1, 3 and Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2, 4 were evaluated using RT-PCR. Serum IL-10, TNF-α, IFN-γ and IgE were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Peripheral blood eosinophil (EOS) was measured by an automated haematology. Children with MPP had markedly increased TLR2, TLR4, Tim1, IL-10, TNF-α, IgE and EOS, and decreased IFN-γ than the healthy controls. In the presence of MPP, wheezy children had significantly elevated TLR2, Tim1, Tim3, TNF-α, IgE and EOS than non-wheezy children. In wheezy children with MPP, MP-specific antibody titre was positively correlated with TLR2 and TIM1, and negatively correlated with IFN-γ. IgE was positively correlated with TLR2, TLR4 and Tim1, while EOS was positively correlated with Tim1 and Tim3. TLR2, Tim1, Tim3, TNF-α, IgE and EOS play a role in MPP-related wheezing in children. The role of IgE might be associated with TLR2 and Tim1, and the role of EOS might be associated with Tim1 and Tim3. Copyright © 2016 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical use of immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    McClelland, D B; Yap, P L

    1984-02-01

    The use of immunoglobulins for prophylaxis and therapy are reviewed. Normal and hyperimmune immunoglobulins have well established clinical applications. These are summarized in Table 14. This form of therapy has now entered a period of rapid change due to the availability of human immunoglobulins which are safe for intravenous use, permitting large doses to be given rapidly. This will permit reappraisal of many conventional applications and exploration of new possibilities for the use of these products. The approaching wide availability of monoclonal antibodies for clinical use will open up a further wide range of new therapeutic applications, providing that concerns over the products' safety are allayed .

  2. VH Replacement Footprint Analyzer-I, a Java-Based Computer Program for Analyses of Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Genes and Potential VH Replacement Products in Human and Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lin; Lange, Miles D.; Zhang, Zhixin

    2014-01-01

    VH replacement occurs through RAG-mediated secondary recombination between a rearranged VH gene and an upstream unrearranged VH gene. Due to the location of the cryptic recombination signal sequence (cRSS, TACTGTG) at the 3′ end of VH gene coding region, a short stretch of nucleotides from the previous rearranged VH gene can be retained in the newly formed VH–DH junction as a “footprint” of VH replacement. Such footprints can be used as markers to identify Ig heavy chain (IgH) genes potentially generated through VH replacement. To explore the contribution of VH replacement products to the antibody repertoire, we developed a Java-based computer program, VH replacement footprint analyzer-I (VHRFA-I), to analyze published or newly obtained IgH genes from human or mouse. The VHRFA-1 program has multiple functional modules: it first uses service provided by the IMGT/V-QUEST program to assign potential VH, DH, and JH germline genes; then, it searches for VH replacement footprint motifs within the VH–DH junction (N1) regions of IgH gene sequences to identify potential VH replacement products; it can also analyze the frequencies of VH replacement products in correlation with publications, keywords, or VH, DH, and JH gene usages, and mutation status; it can further analyze the amino acid usages encoded by the identified VH replacement footprints. In summary, this program provides a useful computation tool for exploring the biological significance of VH replacement products in human and mouse. PMID:24575092

  3. A novel IgA-like immunoglobulin in the reptile Eublepharis macularius.

    PubMed

    Deza, Francisco Gambón; Espinel, Christian Sánchez; Beneitez, Julio Valdueza

    2007-01-01

    The appearance of antibody genes over evolution coincided with the origin of the vertebrates. Reptiles are of great interest in evolution since they are the link between the amphibians, birds, and mammals. This work describes the presence of a gene in the reptile leopard gecko (Eublepharis macularius) where phylogenetic studies suggest that it is the gene orthologue of immunoglobulin A (IgA) and immunoglobulin X (IgX) in Xenopus. Messenger RNA samples taken from different tissues showed expression of this antibody in intestinal tissue. Data on the structure deduced from the sequence of nucleotides showed an antibody with four domains in the constant region. There is a sequence of 20 amino acids in the C terminus similar to the secretory tail of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgA. A detailed analysis of the sequence of amino acids displayed a paradox, i.e., domains CH1 and CH2 showed a clear homology with domains CH1 and CH2 of immunoglobulin Y (IgY) while domains CH3 and CH4 were homologous with domains CH3 and CH4 of IgM. This homology pattern is also seen in Xenopus IgX and bird IgA. The most logical explanation for this phenomenon is that a recombination between the IgM and IgY gave rise to the IgA.

  4. Identification of wheat chromosomal regions containing expressed resistance genes.

    PubMed Central

    Dilbirligi, Muharrem; Erayman, Mustafa; Sandhu, Devinder; Sidhu, Deepak; Gill, Kulvinder S

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to isolate and physically localize expressed resistance (R) genes on wheat chromosomes. Irrespective of the host or pest type, most of the 46 cloned R genes from 12 plant species share a strong sequence similarity, especially for protein domains and motifs. By utilizing this structural similarity to perform modified RNA fingerprinting and data mining, we identified 184 putative expressed R genes of wheat. These include 87 NB/LRR types, 16 receptor-like kinases, and 13 Pto-like kinases. The remaining were seven Hm1 and two Hs1(pro-1) homologs, 17 pathogenicity related, and 42 unique NB/kinases. About 76% of the expressed R-gene candidates were rare transcripts, including 42 novel sequences. Physical mapping of 121 candidate R-gene sequences using 339 deletion lines localized 310 loci to 26 chromosomal regions encompassing approximately 16% of the wheat genome. Five major R-gene clusters that spanned only approximately 3% of the wheat genome but contained approximately 47% of the candidate R genes were observed. Comparative mapping localized 91% (82 of 90) of the phenotypically characterized R genes to 18 regions where 118 of the R-gene sequences mapped. PMID:15020436

  5. The regions of sequence variation in caulimovirus gene VI.

    PubMed

    Sanger, M; Daubert, S; Goodman, R M

    1991-06-01

    The sequence of gene VI from figwort mosaic virus (FMV) clone x4 was determined and compared with that previously published for FMV clone DxS. Both clones originated from the same virus isolation, but the virus used to clone DxS was propagated extensively in a host of a different family prior to cloning whereas that used to clone x4 was not. Differences in the amino acid sequence inferred from the DNA sequences occurred in two clusters. An N-terminal conserved region preceded two regions of variation separated by a central conserved region. Variation in cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) gene VI sequences, all of which were derived from virus isolates from hosts from one host family, was similar to that seen in the FMV comparison, though the extent of variation was less. Alignment of gene VI domains from FMV and CaMV revealed regions of amino acid sequence identical in both viruses within the conserved regions. The similarity in the pattern of conserved and variable domains of these two viruses suggests common host-interactive functions in caulimovirus gene VI homologues, and possibly an analogy between caulimoviruses and certain animal viruses in the influence of the host on sequence variability of viral genes.

  6. Immunoglobulin genetics of Ornithorhynchus anatinus (platypus) and Tachyglossus aculeatus (short-beaked echidna).

    PubMed

    Belov, Katherine; Hellman, Lars

    2003-12-01

    In this paper, we review data on the monotreme immune system focusing on the characterisation of lymphoid tissue and of antibody responses, as well the recent cloning of immunoglobulin genes. It is now known that monotremes utilise immunoglobulin isotypes that are structurally identical to those found in marsupials and eutherians, but which differ to those found in birds and reptiles. Monotremes utilise IgM, IgG, IgA and IgE. They do not use IgY. Their IgG and IgA constant regions contain three domains plus a hinge region. Preliminary analysis of monotreme heavy chain variable region diversity suggests that the platypus primarily uses a single VH clan, while the short-beaked echidna utilises at least 4 distinct VH families which segregate into all three mammalian VH clans. Phylogenetic analysis of the immunoglobulin heavy chain constant region gene sequences provides strong support for the Theria hypothesis. The constant region of IgM has proven to be a useful marker for estimating the time of divergence of mammalian lineages.

  7. Identification of genes from the Treacher Collins candidate region

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, M.; Dixon, J.; Edwards, S. |

    1994-09-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCOF1) is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development. The TCOF1 locus has previously been mapped to chromosome 5q32-33. The candidate gene region has been defined as being between two flanking markers, ribosomal protein S14 (RPS14) and Annexin 6 (ANX6), by analyzing recombination events in affected individuals. It is estimated that the distance between these flanking markers is 500 kb by three separate analysis methods: (1) radiation hybrid mapping; (2) genetic linkage; and (3) YAC contig analysis. A cosmid contig which spans the candidate gene region for TCOF1 has been constructed by screening the Los Alamos National Laboratory flow-sorted chromosome 5 cosmid library. Cosmids were obtained by using a combination of probes generated from YAC end clones, Alu-PCR fragments from YACs, and asymmetric PCR fragments from both T7 and T3 cosmid ends. Exon amplifications, the selection of genomic coding sequences based upon the presence of functional splice acceptor and donor sites, was used to identify potential exon sequences. Sequences found to be conserved between species were then used to screen cDNA libraries in order to identify candidate genes. To date, four different cDNAs have been isolated from this region and are being analyzed as potential candidate genes for TCOF1. These include the genes encoding plasma glutathione peroxidase (GPX3), heparin sulfate sulfotransferase (HSST), a gene with homology to the ETS family of proteins and one which shows no homology to any known genes. Work is also in progress to identify and characterize additional cDNAs from the candidate gene region.

  8. Genomic structure and expression of immunoglobulins in Squamata.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, David N; Garet, Elina; Estevez, Olivia; Sánchez-Espinel, Christian; Gambón-Deza, Francisco

    2016-04-01

    The Squamata order represents a major evolutionary reptile lineage, yet the structure and expression of immunoglobulins in this order has been scarcely studied in detail. From the genome sequences of four Squamata species (Gekko japonicus, Ophisaurus gracilis, Pogona vitticeps and Ophiophagus hannah) and RNA-seq datasets from 18 other Squamata species, we identified the immunoglobulins present in these animals as well as the tissues in which they are found. All Squamata have at least three immunoglobulin classes; namely, the immunoglobulins M, D, and Y. Unlike mammals, however, we provide evidence that some Squamata lineages possess more than one Cμ gene which is located downstream from the Cδ gene. The existence of two evolutionary lineages of immunoglobulin Y is shown. Additionally, it is demonstrated that while all Squamata species possess the λ light chain, only Iguanidae species possess the κ light chain.

  9. Identification of candidate genes in the spinal muscular atrophy gene region

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, T.A.; Wang, C.H.; Vitale, E.

    1994-09-01

    The SMA disease gene region on chromosome 5q13 has been characterized by the presence of low copy repeat element DNA and concomitant genomic instability. The identification of candidate genes has been complicated by the low-copy repeat sequences which include coding and non-coding DNA. To circumvent this problem, we have focused on the identification and characterization of exonic DNA sequence isolated from YAC-derived bacteriophage subclones. Contrary to hybridization-based protocols which identify all closely homologous genes, exons isolated in this manner are known to map the disease gene region. Exon trapping was limited to an approximately 400 kb {open_quotes}minimum genetic region{close_quotes} defined by recombination mapping. Approximately six new genes have been identified by this method. One of the candidate genes is expressed predominantly in muscle and demonstrates sequence homology with known translational regulatory proteins. Physical mapping places the gene within the minimal genetic region and adjacent to a region characterized with genomic instability. We will report our progress in the identification of disease-specific mutations in this gene based upon comparison of normal and SMA cDNA sequence, amplification and sequencing of SMA DNA samples, and RT-PCR sequencing studies.

  10. Two distinct allotypic determinants on the antigen-specific suppressor and enhancing T cell factors that are encoded by genes linked to the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The alloantiserum was raised in BALB/c (H-2d, Igh-1a) mice hyperimmunized with spleen cells of Igh allotype congenic mice, CB-20 (H-2d, Igh-1b). It was found to define the new allotypic determinants (distinct from B cell Igh constant region determinants: Igh allotype) expressed only on a small population of T cells belonging to the Thy-1 dull-stained Lyt-2- or Lyt-2+ population of Igh-1b mice. Genes coding for the determinants were shown to be accommodated somewhere in the right side of the Igh variable region gene (Igh-V) cluster, as the antibody activity was completely absorbed with BAB-14 thymocytes. It was also demonstrated that the products detected by the antiserum represent the allotypic determinants (probably constant region determinants) on the antigen-binding moiety of the antigen-specific augmenting (TaF) and suppressor (TsF) T cell factors. Moreover, determinants on TsF were found to be distinct from those on TaF. Therefore, it can be suggested that the two genes coding for the T cell allodeterminants (distinct from those of the B cell Igh) are located in the right side of the B cell Igh-V on the 12th chromosome, and that both encode the antigen-recognition units of the functionally distinct T cell factors. PMID:6172538

  11. On the genomics of immunoglobulins in the gray, short-tailed opossum Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinxin; Olp, Jonathan J; Miller, Robert D

    2009-08-01

    Annotated maps of the IGH, IGK, and IGL loci in the gray, short-tailed opossum Monodelphis domestica were generated from analyses of the available whole genome sequence for this species. Analyses of their content and organization confirmed a number of previous conclusions based on characterization of complementary DNAs encoding opossum immunoglobulin heavy and light chains and limited genomic analysis, including (a) the predominance of a single immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region (IGHV) subgroup and clan, (b) the presence of a single immunoglobulin (Ig)G subclass, (c) the apparent absence of an IgD, and (d) the general organization and V gene complexity of the IGK and IGL light chain loci. In addition, several unexpected discoveries were made including the presence of a partial V to D, germline-joined IGHV segment, the first germline-joined Ig V gene to be found in a mammal. In addition was the presence of a larger number of IGKV subgroups than had been previously identified. With this report, annotated maps of the major histocompatibility complex, T-cell receptor, and immunoglobulin loci have been completed for M. domestica, the only non-eutherian mammalian species for which this has been accomplished, strengthening the utility of this species as a model organism.

  12. Gene search in the FSHD region on 4q35

    SciTech Connect

    Deutekom, J.C.T. van; Romberg, S.; Geel, M. van

    1994-09-01

    In the search for the FSHD gene on 4q35, four overlapping cosmids spanning a region of 95 kb including the deletion-prone repeated units were subcloned as well as subjected to cDNA selection and exon trap strategies. A total of 300 selected clones with an average length of 500 bp were mapped back to the cosmids. None of the clones appeared to be single copy. Sequence data of most clones and the related genomic regions were compared. cDNA clones with a high homolgy (>90%) and a low repetitive hybridization pattern were further analyzed by Zoo- and Northern blotting and by sequence analysis programs like GRAIL. Excellent and good exons could be identified and some clones showed evolutionary conservation. With the best cDNA, genomic and exon trap clones, several cDNA libraries were screened. The obtained cDNAs identified different genes, none of which originated from 4q35. 3{prime} RACE experiments were performed using primers derived of predicted exons especially in a 2.2 kb EcoRI fragment about 20 kb centromeric of the repeats. So far, only non-4q35 genes could be identified. Altogether, our results support other recent studies indicating that the FSHD gene is most likely not encoded by the 3.3 kb repeated units. Moreover, the region centromeric of these repeats appeared to contain abundant repetitive sequences and homologies to several other chromosomes, complicating the identification of the FSHD gene.

  13. Gene recovery microdissection (GRM) a process for producing chromosome region-specific libraries of expressed genes

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, A T; Coleman, M A; Tucker, J D

    2001-02-08

    Gene Recovery Microdissection (GRM) is a unique and cost-effective process for producing chromosome region-specific libraries of expressed genes. It accelerates the pace, reduces the cost, and extends the capabilities of functional genomic research, the means by which scientists will put to life-saving, life-enhancing use their knowledge of any plant or animal genome.

  14. Immunoglobulin in intestinal secretions.

    PubMed

    Cutropia de Guirao, C

    1977-12-01

    The objective of the present investigation is the study and interpretation of the role played by the immunoglobulins, especially IgA, during acute diarrhea in children. IgA, IGG and IgM values in serum and IgA in intestinal secretions were studied in a group of children (between 3 months and 5 years of age) during diarrhea, convalescence and in normals. The method of simple radial immunodiffusion according to Mancini was employed. IgA is the immunoglobulin which suffers the greastest alteration in acute diarrhea. The precipitation halos (the average values), were lower during the diarrhea than in convalescence and in normals.

  15. Isolation and characterization of genes from the SMA candidate region

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, T.G.; Ta, D.; Wasmuth, J.J.

    1994-09-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder affecting alpha motor neutrons. SMA has been mapped to 5q12-13, between the genetic markers D5S435 and 38.3. The distance between these markers, which are closest on the opposite sides of the SMA locus, is {approximately}750 kb. An extensive physical map of this region has been constructed by radiation hybrid (RH) mapping and YAC contig assembly. Further analysis of the YAC contig of the SMA region revealed many deletions and duplications within the YACs. The extensive rearrangements in these YACs makes it very difficult to use them to construct a cosmid contig. The YACs and cosmids isolated thus far have been used to isolate expressed sequences using the method of exon amplification. Putative exons were then used to screen various cDNA libraries to isolate the corresponding cDNAs. Genomic sequences that cross-hybridize very strongly to many of the cDNAs are present in two different regions of chromosome 5, in the SMA region and in 5p13-14. These duplications appear to represent genes and partially processed psuedogenes in one or both of the regions and it has been difficult to determine which of the two loci is the functional gene. Other cDNAs located exclusively in the SMA region have also been found. From the two classes of cDNAs (duplicated or single copy), there are four that are good candidates for the disease gene. These include a cDNA that shows homology to a chicken neuronal specific myosin heavy chain gene, an expressed variant of promelanin concentrating hormone, k-cadherin and a glutathion-S-transferase Mu class protein. We are isolating the full length transcripts for each of these and will use them in DGGE and SSCP gel analysis of SMA patients.

  16. Hotspots for Vitamin-Steroid-Thyroid Hormone Response Elements Within Switch Regions of Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Loci Predict a Direct Influence of Vitamins and Hormones on B Cell Class Switch Recombination.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, Julia L; Penkert, Rhiannon R; Xu, Beisi; Fan, Yiping; Partridge, Janet F; Maul, Robert W; Gearhart, Patricia J

    2016-03-01

    Vitamin A deficiencies are common throughout the world and have a significant negative influence on immune protection against viral infections. Mouse models demonstrate that the production of IgA, a first line of defense against viruses at mucosal sites, is inhibited in the context of vitamin A deficiency. In vitro, the addition of vitamin A to activated B cells can enhance IgA expression, but downregulate IgE. Previous reports have demonstrated that vitamin A modifies cytokine patterns, and in so doing may influence antibody isotype expression by an indirect mechanism. However, we have now discovered hundreds of potential response elements among Sμ, Sɛ, and Sα switch sites within immunoglobulin heavy chain loci. These hotspots appear in both mouse and human loci and include targets for vitamin receptors and related proteins (e.g., estrogen receptors) in the nuclear receptor superfamily. Full response elements with direct repeats are relatively infrequent or absent in Sγ regions although half-sites are present. Based on these results, we pose a hypothesis that nuclear receptors have a direct effect on the immunoglobulin heavy chain class switch recombination event. We propose that vitamin A may alter S site accessibility to activation-induced deaminase and nonhomologous end-joining machinery, thereby influencing the isotype switch, antibody production, and protection against viral infections at mucosal sites.

  17. [Reactivity of the physiological system of the connective tissue and immunoglobulin levels in divers of the Arctic Pri-Elbrus regions].

    PubMed

    Pavlovich, S I

    1991-01-01

    The functional state of the conjunctive tissue system in deep-divers has been evaluated by the Kavetsky-Leshchinsky method. The content of different classes of immunoglobulins in the mucosa of upper respiratory tracts has been studied by the fluorescent antibody method under conditions of the Arctic and highland. The long-term divings cause a decrease in the reactivity of a physiological system of conjunctive tissue and a shift in the parameters of the immunological organism status. These changes are found to be more pronounced in the deep divers with underwater work experience of more than 2,000 hours. The general immunological reactivity of the organism rises significantly after 2.5 months stay under conditions of the Elbrus (height--2100 m). These facts confirm an idea that favourable climatic factors of the highland are expedient to be used in the complex of rehabilitation measures for deep-divers.

  18. The TL region gene 37 encodes a Qa-1 antigen

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Of all the biochemically defined mouse MHC class I molecules, the Qa-1 antigens are the only ones for which a gene has not been identified. Recent evidence has suggested that Qa-1 antigens are functional class I molecules and can function as restriction elements for gamma/delta T cells. We have examined the relationship between Qa-1 and the product of gene 37, a presumed novel class I antigen encoded within the TL region. Immunoprecipitation and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of the molecules reactive with anti-Qa-1 and anti-37 sera show that the Qa-1 molecule of Qa-1b (Qa-1.2) mouse strains is identical to the product of gene 37 on the basis of molecular weight, pI, and strain distribution. Immunodepletion, biosynthetic labeling, and tunicamycin treatment confirm that the protein encoded by gene 37 in Qa-1b mice is Qa-1.2. In contrast, the anti-37 serum was unable to recognize the Qa-1 molecule in Qa-1a strains. Given the fact that the only allele to gene 37 thus far identified in a Qa-1a strain (A/J) has a termination codon in the alpha 3 domain, our data lead us to conclude that the Qa-1 molecule expressed in Qa-1a mice is not a true allelic product of the gene 37 encoded antigen of Qa-1b mouse strains. PMID:2258708

  19. Immunoglobulin G Expression in Human Sperm and Possible Functional Significance

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Meiling; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Pu, Qinxue; Huang, Tao; Xie, Qingdong; Wang, Yan; Li, Jing; Wang, Yun; Gu, Huan; Huang, Tianhua; Li, Zhiling; Gu, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG), the major molecule of the immune system, which was traditionally thought to be produced by differentiated B-lymphocytes, had recently been found in non-immune cells including spermatozoa of rabbit testis. To study if human sperms could produce IgG that might play a role in fertilization, we employed immunofluorescent staining, Western blot, in situ hybridization, RT-PCR (reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction) and immunoelectron microscope and found that human sperms were capable of synthesizing IgG. IgG protein and mRNA were detected in the cytoplasm, mainly the neck region of the sperm and IgG immunoreactivity was found to cover the entire sperm cell. The essential enzymes necessary for IgG synthesis and class switching, RAG1 (recombination activating gene 1), RAG2 (recombination activating gene 2) and AID (activation-induced cytidine deaminase), were also detected in the sperm cells. Furthermore, we found that anti-IgG antibody could inhibit sperm from penetrating Zona-free hamster egg with statistical significance. These discoveries suggested that immunoglobulin G could be produced by human sperms and it might play a role during fertilization. PMID:26833114

  20. Shared epitopes of avian immunoglobulin light chains.

    PubMed

    Benčina, Mateja; Cizelj, Ivanka; Berčič, Rebeka Lucijana; Narat, Mojca; Benčina, Dušan; Dovč, Peter

    2014-04-15

    Like all jawed vertebrates, birds (Aves) also produce antibodies i.e. immunoglobulins (Igs) as a defence mechanism against pathogens. Their Igs are composed of two identical heavy (H) and light (L) chains which are of lambda isotype. The L chain consists of variable (VL), joining (JL) and constant (CL) region. Using enzyme immunoassays (EIA) and two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) (3C10 and CH31) to chicken L chain, we analysed their cross-reactivity with sera from 33 avian species belonging to nine different orders. Among Galliformes tested, mAbs 3C10 and CH31 reacted with L chains of chicken, turkey, four genera of pheasants, tragopan and peafowl, but not with sera of grey partridge, quail and Japanese quail. Immunoglobulins of guinea-fowl reacted only with mAb 3C10. Both mAbs reacted also with the L chain of Eurasian griffon (order Falconiformes) and domestic sparrow (order Passeriformes). Sera from six other orders of Aves did not react with either of the two mAbs. EIA using mAbs 3C10 and CH31 enabled detection of antibodies to major avian pathogens in sera of chickens, turkeys, pheasants, peafowl, Eurasian griffon and guinea-fowl (only with mAb 3C10). The N-terminal amino acid sequence of pheasant L chain (19 residues) was identical to that of chicken. Sequences of genes encoding the L chain constant regions of pheasants, turkey and partridge were determined and deposited in the public database (GenBank accession numbers: FJ 649651, FJ 649652 and FJ 649653, respectively). Among them, amino acid sequence of pheasants is the most similar to that of chicken (97% similarity), whereas those of turkey and partridge have greater similarity to each other (89%) than to any other avian L chain sequence. The characteristic deletion of two amino acids which is present in the L chain constant region in Galliformes has been most likely introduced to their L chain after their divergence from Anseriformes.

  1. Linkage analyses of murine immunoglobulin heavy chain and serum prealbumin genes establish their location on chromosome 12 proximal to the T (5;12) 31H breakpoint in band 12F1.

    PubMed Central

    Meo, T; Johnson, J; Beechey, C V; Andrews, S J; Peters, J; Searle, A G

    1980-01-01

    Analysis of backcross mice carrying the Harwell translocation T(5;12)31H has led to the definitive localization of the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene cluster. Both Igh-1 and Pre-1 loci were found to segregate in tight linkage with the chromosomal markers 5(12) and 12(5), which define the balanced translocation T(5;12)31H. Additional data establish the location of these genes at the telomeric end of chromosome 12. That both loci are proximal to the chromosomal breakpoint in band 12F1 is shown by the phenotypes of segregants aneuploid for the presence or absence of the small marker 5(12). The order of loci inferred from a single recovered recombinant is: centromere-Igh-1-Pre-1-T(5;12)31H. PMID:6767238

  2. Linkage analyses of murine immunoglobulin heavy chain and serum prealbumin genes establish their location on chromosome 12 proximal to the T (5;12) 31H breakpoint in band 12F1.

    PubMed

    Meo, T; Johnson, J; Beechey, C V; Andrews, S J; Peters, J; Searle, A G

    1980-01-01

    Analysis of backcross mice carrying the Harwell translocation T(5;12)31H has led to the definitive localization of the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene cluster. Both Igh-1 and Pre-1 loci were found to segregate in tight linkage with the chromosomal markers 5(12) and 12(5), which define the balanced translocation T(5;12)31H. Additional data establish the location of these genes at the telomeric end of chromosome 12. That both loci are proximal to the chromosomal breakpoint in band 12F1 is shown by the phenotypes of segregants aneuploid for the presence or absence of the small marker 5(12). The order of loci inferred from a single recovered recombinant is: centromere-Igh-1-Pre-1-T(5;12)31H.

  3. Human immunoglobulin constant heavy G chain (IGHG) (Fcγ) (GM) genes, defining innate variants of IgG molecules and B cells, have impact on disease and therapy.

    PubMed

    Oxelius, Vivi-Anne; Pandey, Janardan P

    2013-12-01

    The distinguished alternative GM allotypes localized in immunoglobulin constant heavy G chain IGHG (Fcγ) (GM) genes on chromosome 14q32.3 define two unique variants of respectively IgG3, IgG1 and IgG2 subclasses, with different structures and functions. The IGHG allele (allotypes), expressed in homozygous or heterozygous forms, are assessed by new serological methods. Fixed combinations of γ3, γ1 and γ2 allotypes constitute the haplotypes, which are indirect markers of B cells. We highlight the role of homozygous IGHG genes with restricted qualities of IgG subclass molecules and B cells. These common Mendelian IGHG genes respond differently to allergens and infections, both bacterial and viral, and to active and passive immunotherapies. IGHG genes have an impact on diseases such as allergy, immunodeficiency, autoimmunity and malignancy. Association/linkage of different IGHG genes gives information about risk/protection, good or bad prognosis, for improvement of clinical care. The IGHG gene map of healthy Caucasians is registered. © 2013.

  4. Serum immunoglobulin G Fc region N-glycosylation profiling by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry can distinguish breast cancer patients from cancer-free controls.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi-Sakita, Nobuko; Kaneshiro-Nakagawa, Kaoru; Kawashima, Masahiro; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Tokiwa, Mariko; Suzuki, Eiji; Kajihara, Shigeki; Fujita, Yuichiro; Iwamoto, Shinichi; Tanaka, Koichi; Toi, Masakazu

    2016-01-22

    Herein, we report that breast cancer (BC) patients can be distinguished from cancer-free (NC) controls by serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) crystallizable fragment (Fc) region N-glycosylation profiling using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). Recently, there has been much progress in the field of tumor immunology. However, to date, the role and biomarker potential of IgG Fc region N-glycosylation, which affects the function of antibodies, have not been examined in BC. In the present study, we profiled serum IgG Fc region N-glycans in BC patients (N = 90) and NC controls (N = 54) using MALDI-MS. An IgG Fc region N-glycan-based multiple logistic regression model was produced which could distinguish BC patients from NC controls (area under the receiver operative characteristic curve = 0.874). Furthermore, stage 0 patients could also be distinguished using this model. These results suggest that an unknown humoral factor or soluble mediator affects IgGs from the earliest stage of breast cancer, and also suggests that IgG Fc region N-glycosylation may play a role in tumor biology. Although further investigation is required, our findings are the evidence that IgG N-glycan profiling has the potential to be used as a breast cancer biomarker and may provide the insights into tumor immunology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Tumor cells of hairy cell leukemia express multiple clonally related immunoglobulin isotypes via RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Forconi, F; Sahota, S S; Raspadori, D; Mockridge, C I; Lauria, F; Stevenson, F K

    2001-08-15

    Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) derives from a mature B cell and expresses markers associated with activation. Analysis of immunoglobulin variable region genes has revealed somatic mutation in most cases, consistent with an origin from a cell that has encountered the germinal center. One unusual feature of hairy cells (HCs) is the frequent expression of multiple immunoglobulin heavy chain isotypes, with dominance of immunoglobulin (Ig)--G3, but only a single light chain type. The origin and clonal relationship of these isotype variants have been unclear. In order to probe the isotype switching status of HCL, RNA transcripts of V(H)DJ(H)--constant region sequences from 5 cases of typical HCL, all expressing multiple surface immunoglobulin isotypes, were analyzed. Tumor V(H)DJ(H)--C(mu) sequences were identified and found to be somatically mutated (range, 1.4% to 6.5%), with a low level of intraclonal heterogeneity. Additional immunoglobulin isotypes of identical V(H)DJ(H) sequence were also identified, including IgD (5 of 5), IgG3 (5 of 5), IgG1 (3 of 5), IgG2 (2 of 5), IgA1 (4 of 5), and IgA2 (1 of 5). Derivation of multiple isotypes from individual cells was demonstrated by analyzing transcripts in single sorted cells from one patient, with evidence for coexistence of isotype variants in 10 of 10 cells. These findings indicate that clonally related multiple isotypes coexist in single HCs, with individual isotypes presumably generated via RNA splicing. Production of IgG3 appears common, but IgG1, IgG2, IgA1, and IgA2 also arise, indicating a continuing influence of a directed process on the tumor clone. These HCs appear to be arrested at the point of isotype switch, where RNA processing may precede deletional recombination. (Blood. 2001;98:1174-1181)

  6. THE IMMUNOGLOBULINS OF MICE

    PubMed Central

    Fahey, John L.; Wunderlich, John; Mishell, Robert

    1964-01-01

    Two classes of 7S γ-globulins are identified in normal mouse serum and are designated 7S γ2-globulins and 7S γ1-globulins. These two immunoglobulin classes are similar in size. They differ in range of electrophoretic mobility, in specific antigenic determinants, and in genetically determined isoantigens. Four classes of immunoglobulins in mouse serum, i.e. 7S γ2-, 7S γ1-, γ1A (β2A), and γM-globulins, were shown to have antibody activity. Each class was characterized and shown to have distinctive immunochemical and physicochemical properties. The genetically determined isoantigens, Iga-1 and Iga-2, were shown to be present only on 7S γ2-globulin molecules. PMID:14208249

  7. [Avidity of polyreactive immunoglobulins].

    PubMed

    Bobrovnik, S A

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of the mechanism of interaction between polyreactive immunoglobulins (PRIG) and antigen was conducted and it was shown that most of the traditional methods of antibody affinity evaluation are not applicable for PRIG affinity. The comparative assessment of the mouse and human PRIG avidity against ovalbumin and horse myoglobin and the avidity of specific monoclonal antibodies against ovalbumin have shown that the avidity of PRIG not only is much less than the avidity of monoclonal antibodies but even exceeds it.

  8. Genetic recombination is targeted towards gene promoter regions in dogs.

    PubMed

    Auton, Adam; Rui Li, Ying; Kidd, Jeffrey; Oliveira, Kyle; Nadel, Julie; Holloway, J Kim; Hayward, Jessica J; Cohen, Paula E; Greally, John M; Wang, Jun; Bustamante, Carlos D; Boyko, Adam R

    2013-01-01

    The identification of the H3K4 trimethylase, PRDM9, as the gene responsible for recombination hotspot localization has provided considerable insight into the mechanisms by which recombination is initiated in mammals. However, uniquely amongst mammals, canids appear to lack a functional version of PRDM9 and may therefore provide a model for understanding recombination that occurs in the absence of PRDM9, and thus how PRDM9 functions to shape the recombination landscape. We have constructed a fine-scale genetic map from patterns of linkage disequilibrium assessed using high-throughput sequence data from 51 free-ranging dogs, Canis lupus familiaris. While broad-scale properties of recombination appear similar to other mammalian species, our fine-scale estimates indicate that canine highly elevated recombination rates are observed in the vicinity of CpG rich regions including gene promoter regions, but show little association with H3K4 trimethylation marks identified in spermatocytes. By comparison to genomic data from the Andean fox, Lycalopex culpaeus, we show that biased gene conversion is a plausible mechanism by which the high CpG content of the dog genome could have occurred.

  9. Genetic Recombination Is Targeted towards Gene Promoter Regions in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Auton, Adam; Rui Li, Ying; Kidd, Jeffrey; Oliveira, Kyle; Nadel, Julie; Holloway, J. Kim; Hayward, Jessica J.; Cohen, Paula E.; Greally, John M.; Wang, Jun; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Boyko, Adam R.

    2013-01-01

    The identification of the H3K4 trimethylase, PRDM9, as the gene responsible for recombination hotspot localization has provided considerable insight into the mechanisms by which recombination is initiated in mammals. However, uniquely amongst mammals, canids appear to lack a functional version of PRDM9 and may therefore provide a model for understanding recombination that occurs in the absence of PRDM9, and thus how PRDM9 functions to shape the recombination landscape. We have constructed a fine-scale genetic map from patterns of linkage disequilibrium assessed using high-throughput sequence data from 51 free-ranging dogs, Canis lupus familiaris. While broad-scale properties of recombination appear similar to other mammalian species, our fine-scale estimates indicate that canine highly elevated recombination rates are observed in the vicinity of CpG rich regions including gene promoter regions, but show little association with H3K4 trimethylation marks identified in spermatocytes. By comparison to genomic data from the Andean fox, Lycalopex culpaeus, we show that biased gene conversion is a plausible mechanism by which the high CpG content of the dog genome could have occurred. PMID:24348265

  10. Recombinant immunoglobulin variable domains generated from synthetic genes provide a system for in vitro characterization of light-chain amyloid proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, P. W.; Raffen, R.; Hanson, D. K.; Deng, Y. L.; Berrios-Hammond, M.; Westholm, F. A.; Murphy, C.; Eulitz, M.; Wetzel, R.; Solomon, A.

    1995-01-01

    The primary structural features that render human monoclonal light chains amyloidogenic are presently unknown. To gain further insight into the physical and biochemical factors that result in the pathologic deposition of these proteins as amyloid fibrils, we have selected for detailed study three closely homologous protein products of the light-chain variable-region single-gene family VkIV. Two of these proteins, REC and SMA, formed amyloid fibrils in vivo. The third protein, LEN, was excreted by the patient at levels of 50 g/day with no indication of amyloid deposits. Sequences of amyloidogenic proteins REC and SMA differed from the sequence of the nonpathogenic protein LEN at 14 and 8 amino acid positions, respectively, and these amino acid differences have been analyzed in terms of the three-dimensional structure of the LEN dimer. To provide a replenishable source of these human proteins, we constructed synthetic genes coding for the REC, SMA, and LEN variable domains and expressed these genes in Escherichia coli. Immunochemical and biophysical comparisons demonstrated that the recombinant VkIV products have tertiary structural features comparable to those of the patient-derived proteins. This well-defined set of three clinically characterized human kIV light chains, together with the capability to produce these kIV proteins recombinantly, provide a system for biophysical and structural comparisons of two different amyloidogenic light-chain proteins and a nonamyloidogenic protein of the same subgroup. This work lays the foundation for future investigations of the structural basis of light-chain amyloidogenicity. PMID:7795526

  11. Defining the autism minimum candidate gene region on chromosome 7.

    PubMed

    Hutcheson, Holli B; Bradford, Y; Folstein, S E; Gardiner, M B; Santangelo, S L; Sutcliffe, J S; Haines, J L

    2003-02-01

    Previous genetic and cytogenetic studies provide evidence that points to one or more autism susceptibility genes residing on chromosome 7q (AUTS1, 115-149 cM on the Marshfield map). However, further localization using linkage analysis has proven difficult. To overcome this problem, we examined the Collaborative Linkage Study of Autism (CLSA) data-set to identify only the families potentially linked to chromosome 7. Out of 94, 47 families were identified and 17 markers were used to generate chromosomal haplotypes. We performed recombination breakpoint analysis to determine if any portion of the chromosome was predominately shared across families. The most commonly shared region spanned a 6 cM interval between D7S501 and D7S2847. Additional markers at 1 cM intervals within this region were genotyped and association and recombination breakpoint analysis was again performed. Although no significant allelic association was found, the recombination breakpoint data points to a shared region between D7S496-D7S2418 (120-123 cM) encompassing about 4.5 Mb of genomic DNA containing over 50 genes. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Molecular characterization of immunoglobulin gene rearrangements in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: antigen-driven origin and IGHV4-34 as a particular subgroup of the non-GCB subtype.

    PubMed

    Sebastián, Elena; Alcoceba, Miguel; Balanzategui, Ana; Marín, Luis; Montes-Moreno, Santiago; Flores, Teresa; González, David; Sarasquete, M Eugenia; Chillón, M Carmen; Puig, Noemí; Corral, Rocío; Pardal, Emilia; Martín, Alejandro; González-Barca, Eva; Caballero, M Dolores; San Miguel, Jesús F; García-Sanz, Ramón; González, Marcos

    2012-11-01

    The pathogenesis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) remains partially unknown. The analysis of the B-cell receptor of the malignant cells could contribute to a better understanding of the DLBCL biology. We studied the molecular features of the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) rearrangements in 165 patients diagnosed with DLBCL not otherwise specified. Clonal IGH rearrangements were amplified according to the BIOMED-2 protocol and PCR products were sequenced directly. We also analyzed the criteria for stereotyped patterns in all complete IGHV-IGHD-IGHJ (V-D-J) sequences. Complete V-D-J rearrangements were identified in 130 of 165 patients. Most cases (89%) were highly mutated, but 12 sequences were truly unmutated or minimally mutated. Three genes, IGHV4-34, IGHV3-23, and IGHV4-39, accounted for one third of the whole cohort, including an overrepresentation of IGHV4-34 (15.5% overall). Interestingly, all IGHV4-34 rearrangements and all unmutated sequences belonged to the nongerminal center B-cell-like (non-GCB) subtype. Overall, we found three cases following the current criteria for stereotyped heavy chain VH CDR3 sequences, two of them belonging to subsets previously described in CLL. IGHV gene repertoire is remarkably biased, implying an antigen-driven origin in DLBCL. The particular features in the sequence of the immunoglobulins suggest the existence of particular subgroups within the non-GCB subtype. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The discovery of immunoglobulin E.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, Domenico

    2016-03-01

    The discovery of immunoglobulin E (IgE) was a breakthrough in the field of allergy and immunology. Our understanding of mechanisms of allergic reactions and the role of IgE in these disorders has paralleled to the discovery of treatment modalities for patients with allergy. The first clue to the existence of a substance responsible for hypersensitivity reactions was demonstrated in 1921 by Prausnitz and Kustner, and after four decades it was identified as an immunoglobulin subclass by Ishizakas and co-workers. In 1968, the WHO International Reference Centre for Immunoglobulins announced the presence of a fifth immunoglobulin isotype, IgE.

  14. The mechanism of mammalian gene replacement is consistent with the formation of long regions of heteroduplex DNA associated with two crossing-over events.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Read, L R; Baker, M D

    2001-01-01

    In this study, the mechanism of mammalian gene replacement was investigated. The system is based on detecting homologous recombination between transferred vector DNA and the haploid, chromosomal immunoglobulin mu-delta region in a murine hybridoma cell line. The backbone of the gene replacement vector (pCmuCdeltapal) consists of pSV2neo sequences bounded on one side by homology to the mu gene constant (Cmu) region and on the other side by homology to the delta gene constant (Cdelta) region. The Cmu and Cdelta flanking arms of homology were marked by insertions of an identical 30-bp palindrome which frequently escapes mismatch repair when in heteroduplex DNA (hDNA). As a result, intermediates bearing unrepaired hDNA generate mixed (sectored) recombinants following DNA replication and cell division. To monitor the presence and position of sectored sites and, hence, hDNA formation during the recombination process, the palindrome contained a unique NotI site that replaced an endogenous restriction enzyme site at each marker position in the vector-borne Cmu and Cdelta regions. Gene replacement was studied under conditions which permitted the efficient recovery of the product(s) of individual recombination events. Analysis of marker segregation patterns in independent recombinants revealed that extensive hDNA was formed within the Cmu and Cdelta regions. In several recombinants, palindrome markers in the Cmu and Cdelta regions resided on opposite DNA strands (trans configuration). These results are consistent with the mammalian gene replacement reaction involving two crossing-over events in homologous flanking DNA.

  15. Parallel evolution of genes and languages in the Caucasus region.

    PubMed

    Balanovsky, Oleg; Dibirova, Khadizhat; Dybo, Anna; Mudrak, Oleg; Frolova, Svetlana; Pocheshkhova, Elvira; Haber, Marc; Platt, Daniel; Schurr, Theodore; Haak, Wolfgang; Kuznetsova, Marina; Radzhabov, Magomed; Balaganskaya, Olga; Romanov, Alexey; Zakharova, Tatiana; Soria Hernanz, David F; Zalloua, Pierre; Koshel, Sergey; Ruhlen, Merritt; Renfrew, Colin; Wells, R Spencer; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Balanovska, Elena

    2011-10-01

    We analyzed 40 single nucleotide polymorphism and 19 short tandem repeat Y-chromosomal markers in a large sample of 1,525 indigenous individuals from 14 populations in the Caucasus and 254 additional individuals representing potential source populations. We also employed a lexicostatistical approach to reconstruct the history of the languages of the North Caucasian family spoken by the Caucasus populations. We found a different major haplogroup to be prevalent in each of four sets of populations that occupy distinct geographic regions and belong to different linguistic branches. The haplogroup frequencies correlated with geography and, even more strongly, with language. Within haplogroups, a number of haplotype clusters were shown to be specific to individual populations and languages. The data suggested a direct origin of Caucasus male lineages from the Near East, followed by high levels of isolation, differentiation, and genetic drift in situ. Comparison of genetic and linguistic reconstructions covering the last few millennia showed striking correspondences between the topology and dates of the respective gene and language trees and with documented historical events. Overall, in the Caucasus region, unmatched levels of gene-language coevolution occurred within geographically isolated populations, probably due to its mountainous terrain.

  16. Meiotic genes are enriched in regions of reduced archaic ancestry.

    PubMed

    Jégou, B; Sankararaman, S; Rolland, A D; Reich, D; Chalmel, F

    2017-04-21

    About 1-6% of the genetic ancestry of modern humans today originates from admixture with archaic humans. It has recently been shown that autosomal genomic regions with a reduced proportion of Neanderthal and Denisovan ancestries are significantly enriched in genes that are more expressed in testis than in other tissues. To determine whether a cellular segregation pattern would exist, we combined maps of archaic introgression with a cross-analysis of three transcriptomic datasets deciphering the transcriptional landscape of human gonadal cell types. We reveal that the regions deficient in both Neanderthal and Denisovan ancestries contain a significant enrichment of genes transcribed in meiotic germ cells. The interbreeding of anatomically modern humans with archaic humans may have introduced archaic-derived alleles that contributed to genetic incompatibilities affecting meiosis that were subsequently purged by natural selection. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Parallel Evolution of Genes and Languages in the Caucasus Region

    PubMed Central

    Balanovsky, Oleg; Dibirova, Khadizhat; Dybo, Anna; Mudrak, Oleg; Frolova, Svetlana; Pocheshkhova, Elvira; Haber, Marc; Platt, Daniel; Schurr, Theodore; Haak, Wolfgang; Kuznetsova, Marina; Radzhabov, Magomed; Balaganskaya, Olga; Romanov, Alexey; Zakharova, Tatiana; Soria Hernanz, David F.; Zalloua, Pierre; Koshel, Sergey; Ruhlen, Merritt; Renfrew, Colin; Wells, R. Spencer; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Balanovska, Elena

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed 40 SNP and 19 STR Y-chromosomal markers in a large sample of 1,525 indigenous individuals from 14 populations in the Caucasus and 254 additional individuals representing potential source populations. We also employed a lexicostatistical approach to reconstruct the history of the languages of the North Caucasian family spoken by the Caucasus populations. We found a different major haplogroup to be prevalent in each of four sets of populations that occupy distinct geographic regions and belong to different linguistic branches. The haplogroup frequencies correlated with geography and, even more strongly, with language. Within haplogroups, a number of haplotype clusters were shown to be specific to individual populations and languages. The data suggested a direct origin of Caucasus male lineages from the Near East, followed by high levels of isolation, differentiation and genetic drift in situ. Comparison of genetic and linguistic reconstructions covering the last few millennia showed striking correspondences between the topology and dates of the respective gene and language trees, and with documented historical events. Overall, in the Caucasus region, unmatched levels of gene-language co-evolution occurred within geographically isolated populations, probably due to its mountainous terrain. PMID:21571925

  18. Anthropogenic antibiotic resistance genes mobilization to the polar regions.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Jorge; González-Acuña, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic influences in the southern polar region have been rare, but lately microorganisms associated with humans have reached Antarctica, possibly from military bases, fishing boats, scientific expeditions, and/or ship-borne tourism. Studies of seawater in areas of human intervention and proximal to fresh penguin feces revealed the presence of Escherichia coli strains least resistant to antibiotics in penguins, whereas E. coli from seawater elsewhere showed resistance to one or more of the following antibiotics: ampicillin, tetracycline, streptomycin, and trim-sulfa. In seawater samples, bacteria were found carrying extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-type CTX-M genes in which multilocus sequencing typing (MLST) showed different sequence types (STs), previously reported in humans. In the Arctic, on the contrary, people have been present for a long time, and the presence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) appears to be much more wide-spread than was previously reported. Studies of E coli from Arctic birds (Bering Strait) revealed reduced susceptibility to antibiotics, but one globally spreading clone of E. coli genotype O25b-ST131, carrying genes of ESBL-type CTX-M, was identified. In the few years between sample collections in the same area, differences in resistance pattern were observed, with E. coli from birds showing resistance to a maximum of five different antibiotics. Presence of resistance-type ESBLs (TEM, SHV, and CTX-M) in E. coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae was also confirmed by specified PCR methods. MLST revealed that those bacteria carried STs that connect them to previously described strains in humans. In conclusion, bacteria previously related to humans could be found in relatively pristine environments, and presently human-associated, antibiotic-resistant bacteria have reached a high global level of distribution that they are now found even in the polar regions.

  19. Anthropogenic antibiotic resistance genes mobilization to the polar regions

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Jorge; González-Acuña, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic influences in the southern polar region have been rare, but lately microorganisms associated with humans have reached Antarctica, possibly from military bases, fishing boats, scientific expeditions, and/or ship-borne tourism. Studies of seawater in areas of human intervention and proximal to fresh penguin feces revealed the presence of Escherichia coli strains least resistant to antibiotics in penguins, whereas E. coli from seawater elsewhere showed resistance to one or more of the following antibiotics: ampicillin, tetracycline, streptomycin, and trim-sulfa. In seawater samples, bacteria were found carrying extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-type CTX-M genes in which multilocus sequencing typing (MLST) showed different sequence types (STs), previously reported in humans. In the Arctic, on the contrary, people have been present for a long time, and the presence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) appears to be much more wide-spread than was previously reported. Studies of E coli from Arctic birds (Bering Strait) revealed reduced susceptibility to antibiotics, but one globally spreading clone of E. coli genotype O25b-ST131, carrying genes of ESBL-type CTX-M, was identified. In the few years between sample collections in the same area, differences in resistance pattern were observed, with E. coli from birds showing resistance to a maximum of five different antibiotics. Presence of resistance-type ESBLs (TEM, SHV, and CTX-M) in E. coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae was also confirmed by specified PCR methods. MLST revealed that those bacteria carried STs that connect them to previously described strains in humans. In conclusion, bacteria previously related to humans could be found in relatively pristine environments, and presently human-associated, antibiotic-resistant bacteria have reached a high global level of distribution that they are now found even in the polar regions. PMID:27938628

  20. Regional genomic instability predisposes to complex dystrophin gene rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Junko; Magner, Daniel B; Lee, Jennifer A; Breman, Amy M; Schmitt, Eric S; White, Lisa D; Crowe, Carol A; Merrill, Michelle; Jayakar, Parul; Rajadhyaksha, Aparna; Eng, Christine M; del Gaudio, Daniela

    2009-09-01

    Mutations in the dystrophin gene (DMD) cause Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies and the majority of cases are due to DMD gene rearrangements. Despite the high incidence of these aberrations, little is known about their causative molecular mechanism(s). We examined 792 DMD/BMD clinical samples by oligonucleotide array-CGH and report on the junction sequence analysis of 15 unique deletion cases and three complex intragenic rearrangements to elucidate potential underlying mechanism(s). Furthermore, we present three cases with intergenic rearrangements involving DMD and neighboring loci. The cases with intragenic rearrangements include an inversion with flanking deleted sequences; a duplicated segment inserted in direct orientation into a deleted region; and a splicing mutation adjacent to a deletion. Bioinformatic analysis demonstrated that 7 of 12 breakpoints combined among 3 complex cases aligned with repetitive sequences, as compared to 4 of 30 breakpoints for the 15 deletion cases. Moreover, the inversion/deletion case may involve a stem-loop structure that has contributed to the initiation of this rearrangement. For the duplication/deletion and splicing mutation/deletion cases, the presence of the first mutation, either a duplication or point mutation, may have elicited the deletion events in an attempt to correct preexisting mutations. While NHEJ is one potential mechanism for these complex rearrangements, the highly complex junction sequence of the inversion/deletion case suggests the involvement of a replication-based mechanism. Our results support the notion that regional genomic instability, aided by the presence of repetitive elements, a stem-loop structure, and possibly preexisting mutations, may elicit complex rearrangements of the DMD gene.

  1. Surface immunoglobulin of guinea-pig leukaemic lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, G T; Eady, R P; Hough, D W; Jurd, R D; Stevenson, F K

    1975-01-01

    The surface immunoglobulin of the transplantable L2C leukaemia of strain 2 guinea-pigs has been investigated. The immunoglobulin is seen to be synthesized when the cells are maintained in culture, indicating its intrinsic origin. Immunolabelling of the cell surface and immunochemical study of the Fab released by limited surface proteolysis indicate the presence of immunoglobulin of class IgM. IgG and free light chains were not detected, and there is unlikely to be an appreciable amount of immunoglobulin of any other class. The amount of immunoglobulin present, in terms of 4-chain monomers, is approximately 100,000 molecules per cell. Its half-life, calculated from the rate of reappearance in vitro of surface Fab after proteolytic clearing, is approximately 5 hours. Immunoglobulin secreted into the environment appears to arise predominantly or entirely from the cell surface: there is no evidence of an appreciable export of immunoglobulin which does not have a surface phase. Papain at 0.06 mg/ml rapidly removes the surface Fab. Residual Fcmu can then be detected by immunofluorescence, suggesting that papain cleaves surface IgM at a hinge region with the molecule in situ on the membrane. The released Fab is only moderately susceptible to degradation by papain at the enzyme: substrate ratio prevailing. It has been possible to isolate it from the papain digest by immuno-adsorption, with a notional yield of 75 mug per 10-10 cells, and then to prepare antisera against it. PMID:48498

  2. Antarctic teleost immunoglobulins: more extreme, more interesting.

    PubMed

    Coscia, Maria Rosaria; Varriale, Sonia; Giacomelli, Stefano; Oreste, Umberto

    2011-11-01

    We have investigated the immunoglobulin molecule and the genes encoding it in teleosts living in the Antarctic seas at the constant temperature of -1.86 °C. The majority of Antarctic teleosts belong to the suborder Notothenioidei (Perciformes), which includes only a few non-Antarctic species. Twenty-one Antarctic and two non-Antarctic Notothenioid species were included in our studies. We sequenced immunoglobulin light chains in two species and μ heavy chains, partially or totally, in twenty species. In the case of heavy chain, genomic DNA and the cDNA encoding the secreted and the membrane form were analyzed. From one species, Trematomus bernacchii, a spleen cDNA library was constructed to evaluate the diversity of VH gene segments. T. bernacchii IgM, purified from the serum and bile, was characterized. Homology Modelling and Molecular Dynamics were used to determine the molecular structure of T. bernacchii and Chionodraco hamatus immunoglobulin domains. This paper sums up the previous results and broadens them with the addition of unpublished data.

  3. Nested polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing analysis of the light-chain and heavy-chain variable regions in the influenza A H1N1 virus hemagglutinin monoclonal antibody gene.

    PubMed

    Li, H J; Guo, C Y; Sun, J Y; Sun, L J; Zhao, P H; Hu, L; Li, Y; Hu, J

    2014-06-11

    The nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was used for the amplification of the influenza A H1N1 virus hemagglutinin monoclonal antibody light-chain and heavy-chain genes. Sequence analysis of the obtained genes was then used to identify common cloning methods of the mouse immunoglobulin-kappa (Igκ) light-chain and heavy-chain variable gene regions. Twenty-two pairs of amplification primers for the mouse Igκ light-chain and heavy-chain variable gene regions were designed, and 6 mouse anti-human H1N1 influenza virus hemagglutinin monoclonal antibody light-chain and heavy-chain variable gene regions were cloned and sequenced. Comparative analysis was conducted between our results and the mouse Ig sequences published in the National Center of Biotechnology Information (NCBI). The nested PCR method effectively avoided cloning the pseudogenes of the monoclonal antibody, and the amino acid sequence obtained was consistent with the characteristics of the mouse Ig variable region. A general method of cloning the mouse Ig light-chain and heavy-chain variable gene regions was established, which provides a basis for further cloning of mouse monoclonal antibody variable gene regions. This study also provides data for further studies of H1N1 influenza virus hemagglutinin antibody binding sites.

  4. Analysis and comparison of the mouse and human immunoglobulin heavy chain JH-Cmu-Cdelta locus.

    PubMed

    Koop, B F; Richards, J E; Durfee, T D; Bansberg, J; Wells, J; Gilliam, A C; Chen, H L; Clausell, A; Tucker, P W; Blattner, F R

    1996-02-01

    We report here 23,686 bases of contiguous DNA sequences from the mouse germline immunoglobulin heavy chain (H) constant (C) mu delta region. The sequence spans the joining (JH) regions, the mu constant region (C mu), the delta constant region (C delta) coding regions, a domain relic, the mu switch region (S mu), seven blocks of simple sequence repeats, a large unique sequence inverted repeat, a large unique sequence forward repeat, and all of the intervening material. A comparison of this 23.7-kb region with the corresponding human C mu/C delta region reveals clear homology in the coding and introns of C mu but not in the 5' flanking J gene segments nor in the intergenic and C delta regions. This mixed pattern of similarity between the human and the mouse sequences contrasts with high levels of similarity found in the T-cell receptor C alpha/C delta region and alpha and beta myosin genes and the very low levels found in the gamma-crystallin, XRCC1, and beta-globin gene clusters. The human and mouse comparison further suggests the incorporation of novel sequences into expressed genes of IgD.

  5. [Blood serum immunoglobulins in thyrotoxicosis].

    PubMed

    Epishin, A V

    1978-01-01

    Serum immunoglobulin content was determined in 85 patients with thyrotoxicosis and in 80 healthy persons by radial immunodiffusion in agar after Mancini by means of monospecific antisera (made at the N. F. Gamaleya Institute of Epidemiology immunoglobulins of classes G and M. The most pronounced increase was noted in patients with severe and moderate thyrotoxicosis.

  6. A new high molecular weight immunoglobulin class from the carcharhine shark: implications for the properties of the primordial immunoglobulin.

    PubMed Central

    Berstein, R M; Schluter, S F; Shen, S; Marchalonis, J J

    1996-01-01

    All immunoglobulins and T-cell receptors throughout phylogeny share regions of highly conserved amino acid sequence. To identify possible primitive immunoglobulins and immunoglobulin-like molecules, we utilized 3' RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) and a highly conserved constant region consensus amino acid sequence to isolate a new immunoglobulin class from the sandbar shark Carcharhinus plumbeus. The immunoglobulin, termed IgW, in its secreted form consists of 782 amino acids and is expressed in both the thymus and the spleen. The molecule overall most closely resembles mu chains of the skate and human and a new putative antigen binding molecule isolated from the nurse shark (NAR). The full-length IgW chain has a variable region resembling human and shark heavy-chain (VH) sequences and a novel joining segment containing the WGXGT motif characteristic of H chains. However, unlike any other H-chain-type molecule, it contains six constant (C) domains. The first C domain contains the cysteine residue characteristic of C mu1 that would allow dimerization with a light (L) chain. The fourth and sixth domains also contain comparable cysteines that would enable dimerization with other H chains or homodimerization. Comparison of the sequences of IgW V and C domains shows homology greater than that found in comparisons among VH and C mu or VL, or CL thereby suggesting that IgW may retain features of the primordial immunoglobulin in evolution. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8622930

  7. Human immunoglobulin allotypes

    PubMed Central

    Lefranc, Marie-Paule

    2009-01-01

    More than twenty recombinant monoclonal antibodies are approved as therapeutics. Almost all of these are based on the whole IgG isotype format, but vary in the origin of the variable regions between mouse (chimeric), humanized mouse and fully human sequences; all of those with whole IgG format employ human constant region sequences. Currently, the opposing merits of the four IgG subclasses are considered with respect to the in vivo biological activities considered to be appropriate to the disease indication being treated. Human heavy chain genes also exhibit extensive structural polymorphism(s) and, being closely linked, are inherited as a haplotype. Polymorphisms (allotypes) within the IgG isotype were originally discovered and described using serological reagents derived from humans; demonstrating that allotypic variants can be immunogenic and provoke antibody responses as a result of allo-immunization. The serologically defined allotypes differ widely within and between population groups; therefore, a mAb of a given allotype will, inevitably, be delivered to a cohort of patients homozygous for the alternative allotype. This publication reviews the serologically defined human IgG allotypes and considers the potential for allotype differences to contribute to or potentiate immunogenicity. PMID:20073133

  8. Mutations in BTD gene causing biotinidase deficiency: a regional report.

    PubMed

    Kasapkara, Çiğdem Seher; Akar, Melek; Özbek, Mehmet Nuri; Tüzün, Heybet; Aldudak, Bedri; Baran, Rıza Taner; Tanyalçın, Tijen

    2015-03-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is an autosomal recessive inborn error of biotin metabolism. Children with biotinidase deficiency cannot cleave biocytin and, therefore, cannot recycle biotin. Untreated individuals become secondarily biotin deficient, which in turn results in decreased activities of the biotin-dependent carboxylases and the subsequent accumulation of toxic metabolites causing clinical symptoms. Biotinidase deficiency is characterized by neurological, cutaneous manifestations and metabolic abnormalities. The worldwide incidence of profound biotinidase deficiency has been estimated at 1:112,271. The human biotinidase gene is located on chromosome 3p25 and consists of four exons with a total length of 1629 base pairs. To date, more than 100 mutations in the biotinidase gene known to cause biotinidase deficiency have been reported. The vast majority of mutations are homozygous or compound heterozygous. Finding known mutations can be correlated with the biochemical enzymatic results. This report summarizes the demographic features of patients identified as biotinidase deficient from August of 2012 through August of 2013 and mutation analysis results for 20 cases in the southeast region of Turkey.

  9. Serum Leukocyte Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor A3 (LILRA3) Is Increased in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis and Is a Strong Independent Indicator of Disease Severity; 6.7kbp LILRA3 Gene Deletion Is Not Associated with Diseases Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    An, Hongyan; Lim, Chai; Guillemin, Gilles J; Vollmer-Conna, Ute; Rawlinson, William; Bryant, Katherine; Tedla, Nicodemus

    2016-01-01

    Leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor A3 (LILRA3) is a soluble immune regulatory molecule primarily expressed by monocytes and macrophages. A homozygous 6.7kbp LILRA3 gene deletion that removes the first seven of its eight exons is predicted to lead to lack of LILRA3 protein, although this has not been experimentally confirmed. Moreover, there are conflicting results with regards to the link between the LILRA3 homozygous genetic deletion and susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS) in different European populations. The aim of this study was to investigate whether LILRA3 gene deletion is associated with MS susceptibility in a North American cohort of European ancestry and assess if serum LILRA3 protein level is a marker of clinical subtype and/or disease severity in MS. A total of 456 patients with MS and 99 unrelated healthy controls were genotyped for the 6.7kbp LILRA3 gene deletion and levels of LILRA3 protein in sera determined by in-house sandwich ELISA. We showed that LILRA3 gene deletion was not associated with MS susceptibility and did not affect the age of disease onset, clinical subtype or disease severity. However, we discovered for the first time that homozygous LILRA3 gene deletion results in lack of production of LILRA3 protein. Importantly, LILRA3 protein level was significantly increased in sera of patients with MS when compared with control subjects, particularly in more severe type primary progressive MS. Multiple regression analysis showed that LILRA3 level in serum was one of the strongest independent markers of disease severity in MS, which potentially can be used as a diagnostic marker.

  10. Serum Leukocyte Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor A3 (LILRA3) Is Increased in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis and Is a Strong Independent Indicator of Disease Severity; 6.7kbp LILRA3 Gene Deletion Is Not Associated with Diseases Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    An, Hongyan; Lim, Chai; Guillemin, Gilles J.; Vollmer-Conna, Ute; Rawlinson, William; Bryant, Katherine; Tedla, Nicodemus

    2016-01-01

    Leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor A3 (LILRA3) is a soluble immune regulatory molecule primarily expressed by monocytes and macrophages. A homozygous 6.7kbp LILRA3 gene deletion that removes the first seven of its eight exons is predicted to lead to lack of LILRA3 protein, although this has not been experimentally confirmed. Moreover, there are conflicting results with regards to the link between the LILRA3 homozygous genetic deletion and susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS) in different European populations. The aim of this study was to investigate whether LILRA3 gene deletion is associated with MS susceptibility in a North American cohort of European ancestry and assess if serum LILRA3 protein level is a marker of clinical subtype and/or disease severity in MS. A total of 456 patients with MS and 99 unrelated healthy controls were genotyped for the 6.7kbp LILRA3 gene deletion and levels of LILRA3 protein in sera determined by in-house sandwich ELISA. We showed that LILRA3 gene deletion was not associated with MS susceptibility and did not affect the age of disease onset, clinical subtype or disease severity. However, we discovered for the first time that homozygous LILRA3 gene deletion results in lack of production of LILRA3 protein. Importantly, LILRA3 protein level was significantly increased in sera of patients with MS when compared with control subjects, particularly in more severe type primary progressive MS. Multiple regression analysis showed that LILRA3 level in serum was one of the strongest independent markers of disease severity in MS, which potentially can be used as a diagnostic marker. PMID:26871720

  11. The low-recombining pericentromeric region of barley restricts gene diversity and evolution but not gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Katie; Bayer, Micha; Cook, Nicola; Dreißig, Steven; Dhillon, Taniya; Russell, Joanne; Hedley, Pete E; Morris, Jenny; Ramsay, Luke; Colas, Isabelle; Waugh, Robbie; Steffenson, Brian; Milne, Iain; Stephen, Gordon; Marshall, David; Flavell, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    The low-recombining pericentromeric region of the barley genome contains roughly a quarter of the genes of the species, embedded in low-recombining DNA that is rich in repeats and repressive chromatin signatures. We have investigated the effects of pericentromeric region residency upon the expression, diversity and evolution of these genes. We observe no significant difference in average transcript level or developmental RNA specificity between the barley pericentromeric region and the rest of the genome. In contrast, all of the evolutionary parameters studied here show evidence of compromised gene evolution in this region. First, genes within the pericentromeric region of wild barley show reduced diversity and significantly weakened purifying selection compared with the rest of the genome. Second, gene duplicates (ohnolog pairs) derived from the cereal whole-genome duplication event ca. 60MYa have been completely eliminated from the barley pericentromeric region. Third, local gene duplication in the pericentromeric region is reduced by 29% relative to the rest of the genome. Thus, the pericentromeric region of barley is a permissive environment for gene expression but has restricted gene evolution in a sizeable fraction of barley's genes. PMID:24947331

  12. THE IMMUNOGLOBULINS OF MICE

    PubMed Central

    Fahey, John L.; Wunderlich, John; Mishell, Robert

    1964-01-01

    Two subclasses of mouse 7S γ2-globulins are identified, and are designated γ2a- and γ2b-globulins. They are distinguished from 7S γ1-globulins, γ1A (β2A)-globulins, and γ1M-globulins of mouse serum. Antibody activity was detected among the γ2a-globulins and γ2b-globulins of hyperimmune mouse serum. γ2a- and γ2b-myeloma proteins were identified. The genetically determined isoantigen, Iga-1, was present on γ2a-myeloma proteins, but not on γ2b-myeloma proteins. These findings indicate a complexity among the 7S γ2-globulins which must be taken into account in structural, functional, and genetic studies of immunoglobulins. PMID:14206439

  13. PKHD1, the Polycystic Kidney and Hepatic Disease 1 Gene, Encodes a Novel Large Protein Containing Multiple Immunoglobulin-Like Plexin-Transcription–Factor Domains and Parallel Beta-Helix 1 Repeats

    PubMed Central

    Onuchic, Luiz F.; Furu, Laszlo; Nagasawa, Yasuyuki; Hou, Xiaoying; Eggermann, Thomas; Ren, Zhiyong; Bergmann, Carsten; Senderek, Jan; Esquivel, Ernie; Zeltner, Raoul; Rudnik-Schöneborn, Sabine; Mrug, Michael; Sweeney, William; Avner, Ellis D.; Zerres, Klaus; Guay-Woodford, Lisa M.; Somlo, Stefan; Germino, Gregory G.

    2002-01-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) is a severe form of polycystic kidney disease that presents primarily in infancy and childhood and that is characterized by enlarged kidneys and congenital hepatic fibrosis. We have identified PKHD1, the gene mutated in ARPKD. PKHD1 extends over ⩾469 kb, is primarily expressed in human fetal and adult kidney, and includes a minimum of 86 exons that are variably assembled into a number of alternatively spliced transcripts. The longest continuous open reading frame encodes a 4,074-amino-acid protein, polyductin, that is predicted to have a single transmembrane (TM)-spanning domain near its carboxyl terminus, immunoglobulin-like plexin-transcription–factor domains, and parallel beta-helix 1 repeats in its amino terminus. Several transcripts encode truncated products that lack the TM and that may be secreted if translated. The PKHD1-gene products are members of a novel class of proteins that share structural features with hepatocyte growth-factor receptor and plexins and that belong to a superfamily of proteins involved in regulation of cell proliferation and of cellular adhesion and repulsion. PMID:11898128

  14. Immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor gene high-throughput sequencing quantifies minimal residual disease in acute lymphoblastic leukemia and predicts post-transplant relapse and survival

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Aaron C.; Vashi, Nikita; Faham, Malek; Carlton, Victoria; Kong, Katherine; Buno, Ismael; Zheng, Jianbiao; Moorhead, Martin; Klinger, Mark; Zhang, Bing; Waqar, Amna; Zehnder, James L.; Miklos, David B.

    2017-01-01

    Minimal residual disease (MRD) quantification is an important predictor of outcome after treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Bone marrow ALL burden ≥ 10−4 after induction predicts subsequent relapse. Likewise, MRD ≥ 10−4 in bone marrow prior to the initiation of conditioning for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) predicts transplant failure. Current methods for MRD quantification in ALL are not sufficiently sensitive for use with peripheral blood specimens and have not been broadly implemented in the management of adults with ALL. Consensus primed immunoglobulin (Ig) and T-cell receptor (TCR) amplification and high-throughput sequencing (HTS) permits use of a standardized algorithm for all patients and can detect leukemia at 10−6 or lower. We applied the Sequenta LymphoSIGHT™ HTS platform to quantification of MRD in 237 samples from 29 adult B-ALL patients before and after allo-HCT. Using primers for the IGH-VDJ, IGH-DJ, IGK, TCRB, TCRD, and TCRG loci, MRD could be quantified in 93% of patients. Leukemia-associated clonotypes at these loci were identified in 52%, 28%, 10%, 35%, 28%, and 41% of patients, respectively. MRD ≥ 10−4 before HCT conditioning predicted post-HCT relapse (HR 7.7, 95% CI 2.0–30, p=0.003). In post-HCT blood samples, MRD ≥ 10−6 had 100% positive predictive value for relapse with median lead-time of 89 days (HR 14; 95% CI 4.7–44, p<0.0001). The use of HTS-based MRD quantification in adults with ALL offers a standardized approach with sufficient sensitivity to quantify leukemia MRD in peripheral blood. Use of this approach may identify a window for clinical intervention prior to overt relapse. PMID:24769317

  15. Immunoglobulin and T cell receptor gene high-throughput sequencing quantifies minimal residual disease in acute lymphoblastic leukemia and predicts post-transplantation relapse and survival.

    PubMed

    Logan, Aaron C; Vashi, Nikita; Faham, Malek; Carlton, Victoria; Kong, Katherine; Buño, Ismael; Zheng, Jianbiao; Moorhead, Martin; Klinger, Mark; Zhang, Bing; Waqar, Amna; Zehnder, James L; Miklos, David B

    2014-09-01

    Minimal residual disease (MRD) quantification is an important predictor of outcome after treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Bone marrow ALL burden ≥ 10(-4) after induction predicts subsequent relapse. Likewise, MRD ≥ 10(-4) in bone marrow before initiation of conditioning for allogeneic (allo) hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) predicts transplantation failure. Current methods for MRD quantification in ALL are not sufficiently sensitive for use with peripheral blood specimens and have not been broadly implemented in the management of adults with ALL. Consensus-primed immunoglobulin (Ig), T cell receptor (TCR) amplification and high-throughput sequencing (HTS) permit use of a standardized algorithm for all patients and can detect leukemia at 10(-6) or lower. We applied the LymphoSIGHT HTS platform (Sequenta Inc., South San Francisco, CA) to quantification of MRD in 237 samples from 29 adult B cell ALL patients before and after allo-HCT. Using primers for the IGH-VDJ, IGH-DJ, IGK, TCRB, TCRD, and TCRG loci, MRD could be quantified in 93% of patients. Leukemia-associated clonotypes at these loci were identified in 52%, 28%, 10%, 35%, 28%, and 41% of patients, respectively. MRD ≥ 10(-4) before HCT conditioning predicted post-HCT relapse (hazard ratio [HR], 7.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.0 to 30; P = .003). In post-HCT blood samples, MRD ≥10(-6) had 100% positive predictive value for relapse with median lead time of 89 days (HR, 14; 95% CI, 4.7 to 44, P < .0001). The use of HTS-based MRD quantification in adults with ALL offers a standardized approach with sufficient sensitivity to quantify leukemia MRD in peripheral blood. Use of this approach may identify a window for clinical intervention before overt relapse. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Milk immunoglobulins and complement factors.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, H; Marnila, P; Gill, H S

    2000-11-01

    The importance of colostrum for the growth and health of newborn offspring is well known. In bovine colostrum, the antibody (immunoglobulin) complement system provides a major antimicrobial effect against a wide range of microbes and confers passive immunity until the calf's own immune system has matured. Bovine serum and lacteal secretions contain three major classes of immunoglobulins: IgG, IgM and IgA. The immunoglobulins are selectively transported from the serum into the mammary gland, as a result of which the first colostrum contains very high concentrations of immunoglobulins (40-200 mg/ml). IgG1 accounts for over 75 % of the immunoglobulins in colostral whey, followed by IgM, IgA and IgG2. All these immunoglobulins decrease within a few days to a total immunoglobulin concentration of 0.7-1.0 mg/ml, with IgG1 representing the major Ig class in milk throughout the lactation period. Together with the antibodies absorbed from colostrum after birth, the complement system plays a crucial role in the passive immunisation of the newborn calf. The occurrence of haemolytic or bactericidal complement activity in bovine colostrum and milk has been demonstrated in several studies. This review deals with the characteristics of bovine Igs and the complement system to be exploited as potential ingredients for health-promoting functional foods.

  17. T-box genes coordinate regional rates of proliferation and regional specification during cardiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chen-Leng; Zhou, Wenlai; Yang, Lei; Bu, Lei; Qyang, Yibing; Zhang, Xiaoxue; Li, Xiaodong; Rosenfeld, Michael G; Chen, Ju; Evans, Sylvia

    2005-05-01

    Mutations in T-box genes are the cause of several congenital diseases and are implicated in cancer. Tbx20-null mice exhibit severely hypoplastic hearts and express Tbx2, which is normally restricted to outflow tract and atrioventricular canal, throughout the heart. Tbx20 mutant hearts closely resemble those seen in mice overexpressing Tbx2 in myocardium, suggesting that upregulation of Tbx2 can largely account for the cardiac phenotype in Tbx20-null mice. We provide evidence that Tbx2 is a direct target for repression by Tbx20 in developing heart. We have also found that Tbx2 directly binds to the Nmyc1 promoter in developing heart, and can repress expression of the Nmyc1 promoter in transient transfection studies. Repression of Nmyc1 (N-myc) by aberrantly regulated Tbx2 can account in part for the observed cardiac hypoplasia in Tbx20 mutants. Nmyc1 is required for growth and development of multiple organs, including the heart, and overexpression of Nmyc1 is associated with childhood tumors. Despite its clinical relevance, the factors that regulate Nmyc1 expression during development are unknown. Our data present a paradigm by which T-box proteins regulate regional differences in Nmyc1 expression and proliferation to effect organ morphogenesis. We present a model whereby Tbx2 directly represses Nmyc1 in outflow tract and atrioventricular canal of the developing heart, resulting in relatively low proliferation. In chamber myocardium, Tbx20 represses Tbx2, preventing repression of Nmyc1 and resulting in relatively high proliferation. In addition to its role in regulating regional proliferation, we have found that Tbx20 regulates expression of a number of genes that specify regional identity within the heart, thereby coordinating these two important aspects of organ development.

  18. Absence of lambda immunoglobulin sequences on the supernumerary chromosome of the "cat eye" syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hough, C A; White, B N; Holden, J J

    1995-09-11

    The supernumerary bisatellited chromosome causing the "cat eye" syndrome (CES) is of chromosome 22 origin and consists of an inverted duplication of the 22pter-->22q11.2 region. To determine the extent of involvement of band q11.2 on the bisatellited chromosome, copy number assessment of sequences homologous to cloned lambda immunoglobulin (lambda Ig) gene region probes was carried out on DNA from individuals with CES using densitometric analysis of Southern blots. None of the 10 lambda Ig sequences studied was found in increased copy number in DNA from any of the 10 CES individuals tested, indicating that these sequences are not present on the supernumerary chromosome. The breakpoints involved in the generation of the bisatellited supernumerary chromosome associated with CES are therefore proximal to the lambda Ig gene region.

  19. The Fab Conformations in the Solution Structure of Human Immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4) Restrict Access to Its Fc Region

    PubMed Central

    Rayner, Lucy E.; Hui, Gar Kay; Gor, Jayesh; Heenan, Richard K.; Dalby, Paul A.; Perkins, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Human IgG4 antibody shows therapeutically useful properties compared with the IgG1, IgG2, and IgG3 subclasses. Thus IgG4 does not activate complement and shows conformational variability. These properties are attributable to its hinge region, which is the shortest of the four IgG subclasses. Using high throughput scattering methods, we studied the solution structure of wild-type IgG4(Ser222) and a hinge mutant IgG4(Pro222) in different buffers and temperatures where the proline substitution suppresses the formation of half-antibody. Analytical ultracentrifugation showed that both IgG4 forms were principally monomeric with sedimentation coefficients s20,w0 of 6.6–6.8 S. A monomer-dimer equilibrium was observed in heavy water buffer at low temperature. Scattering showed that the x-ray radius of gyration Rg was unchanged with concentration in 50–250 mm NaCl buffers, whereas the neutron Rg values showed a concentration-dependent increase as the temperature decreased in heavy water buffers. The distance distribution curves (P(r)) revealed two peaks, M1 and M2, that shifted below 2 mg/ml to indicate concentration-dependent IgG4 structures in addition to IgG4 dimer formation at high concentration in heavy water. Constrained x-ray and neutron scattering modeling revealed asymmetric solution structures for IgG4(Ser222) with extended hinge structures. The IgG4(Pro222) structure was similar. Both IgG4 structures showed that their Fab regions were positioned close enough to the Fc region to restrict C1q binding. Our new molecular models for IgG4 explain its inability to activate complement and clarify aspects of its stability and function for therapeutic applications. PMID:24876381

  20. The Fab conformations in the solution structure of human immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4) restrict access to its Fc region: implications for functional activity.

    PubMed

    Rayner, Lucy E; Hui, Gar Kay; Gor, Jayesh; Heenan, Richard K; Dalby, Paul A; Perkins, Stephen J

    2014-07-25

    Human IgG4 antibody shows therapeutically useful properties compared with the IgG1, IgG2, and IgG3 subclasses. Thus IgG4 does not activate complement and shows conformational variability. These properties are attributable to its hinge region, which is the shortest of the four IgG subclasses. Using high throughput scattering methods, we studied the solution structure of wild-type IgG4(Ser(222)) and a hinge mutant IgG4(Pro(222)) in different buffers and temperatures where the proline substitution suppresses the formation of half-antibody. Analytical ultracentrifugation showed that both IgG4 forms were principally monomeric with sedimentation coefficients s20,w(0) of 6.6-6.8 S. A monomer-dimer equilibrium was observed in heavy water buffer at low temperature. Scattering showed that the x-ray radius of gyration Rg was unchanged with concentration in 50-250 mm NaCl buffers, whereas the neutron Rg values showed a concentration-dependent increase as the temperature decreased in heavy water buffers. The distance distribution curves (P(r)) revealed two peaks, M1 and M2, that shifted below 2 mg/ml to indicate concentration-dependent IgG4 structures in addition to IgG4 dimer formation at high concentration in heavy water. Constrained x-ray and neutron scattering modeling revealed asymmetric solution structures for IgG4(Ser(222)) with extended hinge structures. The IgG4(Pro(222)) structure was similar. Both IgG4 structures showed that their Fab regions were positioned close enough to the Fc region to restrict C1q binding. Our new molecular models for IgG4 explain its inability to activate complement and clarify aspects of its stability and function for therapeutic applications. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Map position of Igh-Oxa gene within the Igh region of the DBA/2 mouse strain.

    PubMed

    Pelkonen, J; Karjalainen, K; Mäkelä, O; Taylor, B A

    1982-07-01

    Mice of 23 BXD recombinant inbred strains derived from the cross of C57BL/6J and DBA/2J were typed for the presence of a public idiotype found in the antibodies against the hapten phenyloxazolone (phOx) produced by DBA/2 mice. The marker is under the control of an immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable region gene, Igh-Ox. Eleven out of the 23 BXK strains shared the public idiotype with the DBA/2 progenitor, while 12 other BXD strains were negative, like the C57BL/6 progenitor. The Igh-Ox marker was inherited concordantly with allotype in all BXD strains except BXD-27, which carries the Igh-1c allotype of DBA/2 but lacks the Igh-Ox idiotype. The Igh-Ox marker was inherited concordantly with 4 other Igh-V markers (Igh-Np, Igh-Nb, Igh-Bgl, and Igh-Gte) in all BXD strains except BXD-20, which has the DBA/2 alleles at Igh-1 and Igh-Ox but resembles C57BL/6 at the other 4 markers. On the basis of these results the Igh-Ox marker is tentatively placed between Igh-C and the rest of the Igh-V markers.

  2. Flexible long-range loops in the VH gene region of the Igh locus facilitate the generation of a diverse antibody repertoire.

    PubMed

    Medvedovic, Jasna; Ebert, Anja; Tagoh, Hiromi; Tamir, Ido M; Schwickert, Tanja A; Novatchkova, Maria; Sun, Qiong; Huis In 't Veld, Pim J; Guo, Chunguang; Yoon, Hye Suk; Denizot, Yves; Holwerda, Sjoerd J B; de Laat, Wouter; Cogné, Michel; Shi, Yang; Alt, Frederick W; Busslinger, Meinrad

    2013-08-22

    The immunoglobulin heavy-chain (Igh) locus undergoes large-scale contraction in pro-B cells, which facilitates VH-DJH recombination by juxtaposing distal VH genes next to the DJH-rearranged gene segment in the 3' proximal Igh domain. By using high-resolution mapping of long-range interactions, we demonstrate that local interaction domains established the three-dimensional structure of the extended Igh locus in lymphoid progenitors. In pro-B cells, these local domains engaged in long-range interactions across the Igh locus, which depend on the regulators Pax5, YY1, and CTCF. The large VH gene cluster underwent flexible long-range interactions with the more rigidly structured proximal domain, which probably ensures similar participation of all VH genes in VH-DJH recombination to generate a diverse antibody repertoire. These long-range interactions appear to be an intrinsic feature of the VH gene cluster, because they are still generated upon mutation of the Eμ enhancer, IGCR1 insulator, or 3' regulatory region in the proximal Igh domain. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Immunoglobulin (Ig)G purified from human sera mirrors intravenous Ig human leucocyte antigen (HLA) reactivity and recognizes one's own HLA types, but may be masked by Fab complementarity-determining region peptide in the native sera.

    PubMed

    Ravindranath, M H; Terasaki, P I; Maehara, C Y; Jucaud, V; Kawakita, S; Pham, T; Yamashita, W

    2015-02-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) reacted with a wide array of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) alleles, in contrast to normal sera, due possibly to the purification of IgG from the pooled plasma. The reactivity of IgG purified from normal sera was compared with that of native sera to determine whether any serum factors mask the HLA reactivity of anti-HLA IgG and whether IgG purified from sera can recognize the HLA types of the corresponding donors. The purified IgG, unlike native sera, mirrored IVIg reactivity to a wide array of HLA-I/-II alleles, indicating that anti-HLA IgG may be masked in normal sera - either by peptides derived from soluble HLA or by those from antibodies. A < 3 kDa peptide from the complementarity-determining region (CDR) of the Fab region of IgG (but not the HLA peptides) masked HLA recognition by the purified IgG. Most importantly, some of the anti-HLA IgG purified from normal sera - and serum IgG from a few donors - indeed recognized the HLA types of the corresponding donors, confirming the presence of auto-HLA antibodies. Comparison of HLA types with the profile of HLA antibodies showed auto-HLA IgG to the donors' HLA antigens in this order of frequency: DPA (80%), DQA (71%), DRB345 (67%), DQB (57%), Cw (50%), DBP (43%), DRB1 (21%), A (14%) and B (7%). The auto-HLA antibodies, when unmasked in vivo, may perform immunoregulatory functions similar to those of therapeutic preparations of IVIg.

  4. Immunoglobulin (Ig)G purified from human sera mirrors intravenous Ig human leucocyte antigen (HLA) reactivity and recognizes one's own HLA types, but may be masked by Fab complementarity-determining region peptide in the native sera

    PubMed Central

    Ravindranath, M H; Terasaki, P I; Maehara, C Y; Jucaud, V; Kawakita, S; Pham, T; Yamashita, W

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) reacted with a wide array of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) alleles, in contrast to normal sera, due possibly to the purification of IgG from the pooled plasma. The reactivity of IgG purified from normal sera was compared with that of native sera to determine whether any serum factors mask the HLA reactivity of anti-HLA IgG and whether IgG purified from sera can recognize the HLA types of the corresponding donors. The purified IgG, unlike native sera, mirrored IVIg reactivity to a wide array of HLA-I/-II alleles, indicating that anti-HLA IgG may be masked in normal sera – either by peptides derived from soluble HLA or by those from antibodies. A < 3 kDa peptide from the complementarity-determining region (CDR) of the Fab region of IgG (but not the HLA peptides) masked HLA recognition by the purified IgG. Most importantly, some of the anti-HLA IgG purified from normal sera – and serum IgG from a few donors – indeed recognized the HLA types of the corresponding donors, confirming the presence of auto-HLA antibodies. Comparison of HLA types with the profile of HLA antibodies showed auto-HLA IgG to the donors' HLA antigens in this order of frequency: DPA (80%), DQA (71%), DRB345 (67%), DQB (57%), Cw (50%), DBP (43%), DRB1 (21%), A (14%) and B (7%). The auto-HLA antibodies, when unmasked in vivo, may perform immunoregulatory functions similar to those of therapeutic preparations of IVIg. PMID:25196542

  5. Two critical genes (HLA-DRB1 and ABCF1)in the HLA region are associated with the susceptibility to autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Ota, Masao; Katsuyama, Yoshihiko; Hamano, Hideaki; Umemura, Takeji; Kimura, Akinori; Yoshizawa, Kaname; Kiyosawa, Kendo; Fukushima, Hirofumi; Bahram, Seiamak; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2007-01-01

    We have previously reported that autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a bioclinical entity characterized by high serum immunoglobulin G4 concentrations and association with the HLA-DRB1*0405-DQB1*0401 haplotype. However, the precise identity of gene(s) within this haplotype directly responsible for AIP pathogenesis is yet to be established. To dissect the genetic contribution of the incriminated haplotype, we have now performed an association analysis within the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region using various types of polymorphic markers. Genomic DNAs from 43 AIP patients and 213 unrelated Japanese controls were used in this analysis. In each DNA sample, we established the genotype of 25 microsatellite markers distributed throughout the HLA region, that of single nucleotide polymorphism within the 5'-flanking regions of the TNFA and IkBLI (also known as NFKBIL1) as well as HLA class I and II genes. The HLA-linked susceptibility regions for AIP were localized to two segments: HLA-DRB1 (*0405; OR = 3.20, P = 0.00063, Pc = 0.0016) -DQB1 (*0401; OR = 3.29, P = 0.00046, Pc = 0.0069) in the HLA class II and C3-2-11 microsatellite (allele 219; OR = 2.96, P = 0.0076, Pc = 0.099) in the HLA class I regions. Upon stratification analysis in search for a synergistic effect given the extensive linkage disequilibrium within the major histocompatibility complex, it was established that each segment contributed to disease pathogenesis. The two critical HLA regions for susceptibility to AIP are limited to the HLA-DRB1*0405-DQB1*0401 in the class II and the ABCF1 proximal to C3-2-11, telomeric of HLA-E, in the class I regions.

  6. Sequence and structure of VH domain from naturally occurring camel heavy chain immunoglobulins lacking light chains.

    PubMed

    Muyldermans, S; Atarhouch, T; Saldanha, J; Barbosa, J A; Hamers, R

    1994-09-01

    We cloned 17 different PCR fragments encoding VH genes of camel (Camelus dromedarius). These clones were derived from the camel heavy chain immunoglobulins lacking the light chain counterpart of normal immunoglobulins. Insight into the camel VH sequences and structure may help the development of single domain antibodies. The most remarkable difference in the camel VH, consistent with the absence of the VL interaction, is the substitution of the conserved Leu45 by an Arg or Cys. Another noteworthy substitution is the Leu11 to Ser. This amino acid normally interacts with the CH1 domain, a domain missing in the camel heavy chain immunoglobulins. The nature of these substitutions agrees with the increased solubility behavior of an isolated camel VH domain. The VH domains of the camels are also characterized by a long CDR3, possibly compensating for the absence of the VL contacts with the antigen. The CDR3 lacks the salt bridge between Arg94 and Asp101. However, the frequent occurrence of additional Cys residues in both the CDR1 and CDR3 might lead to the formation of a second internal disulfide bridge, thereby stabilizing the CDR structure as in the DAW antibody. Within CDRs of the camel VH domains we observe a broad size distribution and a different amino acid pattern compared with the mouse or human VH. Therefore the camel hypervariable regions might adopt structures which differ substantially from the known canonical structures, thereby increasing the repertoire of the camel antigen binding sites within a VH.

  7. Seroepidemiology of Toxoplasma in a coastal region of Haiti: multiplex bead assay detection of immunoglobulin G antibodies that recognize the SAG2A antigen.

    PubMed

    Priest, J W; Moss, D M; Arnold, B F; Hamlin, K; Jones, C C; Lammie, P J

    2015-02-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a globally distributed parasitic protozoan that infects most warm-blooded animals. We incorporated a bead coupled with recombinant SAG2A protein into our Neglected Tropical Disease (NTD) multiplex bead assay (MBA) panel and used it to determine Toxoplasma infection rates in two studies in Haiti. In a longitudinal cohort study of children aged 0-11 years, the infection rate varied with age reaching a maximum of 0·131 infections/year in children aged 3 years [95% confidence interval (CI) 0·065-0·204]. The median time to seroconversion was estimated to be 9·7 years (95% CI 7·6-∞). In a cross-sectional, community-wide survey of residents of all ages, we determined an overall seroprevalence of 28·2%. The seroprevalence age curve from the cross-sectional study also suggested that the force of infection varied with age and peaked at 0·057 infections/year (95% CI 0·033-0·080) at age 2·6 years. Integration of the Toxoplasma MBA into NTD surveys may allow for better estimates of the potential burden of congenital toxoplasmosis in underserved regions.

  8. Structural Heterogeneity and Functional Domains of Murine Immunoglobulin G Fc Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravetch, Jeffrey V.; Luster, Andrew D.; Weinshank, Richard; Kochan, Jarema; Pavlovec, Amalia; Portnoy, Daniel A.; Hulmes, Jeffrey; Pan, Yu-Ching E.; Unkeless, Jay C.

    1986-11-01

    Binding of antibodies to effector cells by way of receptors to their constant regions (Fc receptors) is central to the pathway that leads to clearance of antigens by the immune system. The structure and function of this important class of receptors on immune cells is addressed through the molecular characterization of Fc receptors (FcR) specific for the murine immunoglobulin G isotype. Structural diversity is encoded by two genes that by alternative splicing result in expression of molecules with highly conserved extracellular domains and different transmembrane and intracytoplasmic domains. The proteins encoded by these genes are members of the immunoglobulin supergene family, most homologous to the major histocompatibility complex molecule Eβ. Functional reconstitution of ligand binding by transfection of individual FcR genes demonstrates that the requirements for ligand binding are encoded in a single gene. These studies demonstrate the molecular basis for the functional heterogeneity of FcR's, accounting for the possible transduction of different signals in response to a single ligand.

  9. Immunoglobulin Gene Mutations and Frequent Use of VH1-69 and VH4-34 Segments in Hepatitis C Virus-Positive and Hepatitis C Virus-Negative Nodal Marginal Zone B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Marasca, Roberto; Vaccari, Paola; Luppi, Mario; Zucchini, Patrizia; Castelli, Ilaria; Barozzi, Patrizia; Cuoghi, Angela; Torelli, Giuseppe

    2001-01-01

    Nodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma (NMZL) is actually considered as a distinct entity that must be distinguished from extra-nodal and splenic marginal zone lymphomas. To define the cell origin and the role of antigen stimulation we determined the nucleotide sequence of the tumor-related immunoglobulin heavy chain variable genes in 10 cases of NMZL. The results were also evaluated on the basis of the presence of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. All 10 cases harbored VH somatic mutations with a sequence homology compared to the closest germline gene, ranging from 83.33 to 98.28%. Interestingly, different VH segments were preferentially used in HCV-positive and HCV-negative patients: three of five HCV-negative NMZLs used a VH4-34 segment joined with different D and JH segments whereas three of five HCV-positive NMZLs used a VH1-69 gene joined with a D3-22 and a JH4 segment, with very strong similarities in the CDR3s among the three different cases. These data indicate: 1) NMZL is derived from B cells that have experienced the germinal center reaction; 2) the preferential usage of a VH1-69 segment in the majority of the HCV-positive NMZL cases with similar CDR3s suggests the presence of a common antigen, probably a HCV antigen epitope, involved in the B-cell selection; and 3) the use of a VH4-34 segment suggests a role of yet unknown B-cell superantigen(s) in the selection of tumor B-cell precursors in HCV-negative NMZL. PMID:11438472

  10. A novel immunoglobulin-like transcript from rainbow trout with two Ig-like domains and two isoforms.

    PubMed

    Kock, Holger; Fischer, Uwe

    2008-03-01

    Within the innate immune response in primates the nonrearranging killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) enable natural killer cells to discern target cells exposing "missing self" signals. Recently the novel immune-type receptor (NITR) and the novel immunoglobulin-like transcript (NILT) gene families have been discovered in fish encoding nonrearranging receptors with a similar molecular structure to that of KIRs. Besides the structural similarity the high degree of haplotypic and allelic variation suggests these genes to be functional KIR homologs and involved in recognizing self-determinants in lower vertebrates. Whereas numerous NITR sequences have been detected in several fish species only two NILT genes have been published for carp yet. Here we report a first rainbow trout NILT sequence, Onmy-NILT2D, alternatively spliced into a long membrane-bound and a short, putatively secreted form, both with the same two immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains. The second Ig-like domain comprises a consensus pattern present both in NILTs and NITRs. The cytoplasmic region of the long form simultaneously contains immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIM) and an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activating motif (ITAM).

  11. Immunoglobulin levels of vitiligo patients.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rubaiya; Ahsan, Mohammad Shamsul; Azad, Mohammad Abul Kalam; Ullah, Md Ashik; Bari, Wasimul; Islam, Sheikh Nazrul; Yeasmin, Sabina; Hasnat, Abul

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, the serum immunoglobulin profiles of vitiligo patients were compared with that of cohort control and evaluated the correlation between immunoglobulin level with their socioeconomic factors and nutritional status. Thirty vitiligo patients were recruited randomly from the Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh for this study. Thirty healthy individuals as control group matched by age, sex, education and socioeconomic factors to the patient group were selected. Serum immunoglobulin concentrations were determined by turbidimetry method using immunoglobulin kit. The concentration of IgG and IgA decreased significantly (P<0.05), but the change of IgM was not significant. Socioeconomic data revealed that most of the patients were young and female. Moreover statistical analysis revealed that there was significant correlation between immunoglobulin (IgG and IgA only) concentrations and BMI and number of depigmented patches with IgG concentrations. Finally it can be concluded that the change of serum immunoglobulin concentration in vitiligo patients could be due to the disease condition as pathomechanism suggested the aberrations in cellular immunity. But study with larger number of population is required for further evaluation of the relationship between the immune response and disease state to confirm these findings.

  12. Evolutionary Genomics of Immunoglobulin-Encoding Loci in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sabyasachi; Hirano, Masayuki; Tako, Rea; McCallister, Chelsea; Nikolaidis, Nikolas

    2012-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (or antibodies) are an essential element of the jawed vertebrate adaptive immune response system. These molecules have evolved over the past 500 million years and generated highly specialized proteins that recognize an extraordinarily large number of diverse substances, collectively known as antigens. During vertebrate evolution the diversification of the immunoglobulin-encoding loci resulted in differences in the genomic organization, gene content, and ratio of functional genes and pseudogenes. The tinkering process in the immunoglobulin-encoding loci often gave rise to lineage-specific characteristics that were formed by selection to increase species adaptation and fitness. Immunoglobulin loci and their encoded antibodies have been shaped repeatedly by contrasting evolutionary forces, either to conserve the prototypic structure and mechanism of action or to generate alternative and diversified structures and modes of function. Moreover, evolution favored the development of multiple mechanisms of primary and secondary antibody diversification, which are used by different species to effectively generate an almost infinite collection of diverse antibody types. This review summarizes our current knowledge on the genomics and evolution of the immunoglobulin-encoding loci and their protein products in jawed vertebrates. PMID:23024601

  13. Genetic control of rheumatoid factor production in the mouse. Role of genes linked to the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus and to the major histocompatibility complex.

    PubMed

    Van Snick, J L; Coulie, P G; Stevens, M

    1983-09-01

    The influence of Igh-1 and H-2 linked genes on the production of IgG2a-specific rheumatoid factors (RF) by 129/Sv mice was examined. Heterozygous animals carrying the 129 alleles, H-2b and Igh-1a, and either H-2k, H-2a, or Igh-1b (but not Igh-1d or Igh-1e) had considerably reduced RF levels. In contrast, Igh-1b linked genes failed to suppress RF production by MRL/MpJ-lpr mice. This lack of suppression was linked to the lymphoproliferation trait characteristic of these animals.

  14. Functions of milk protein gene 5' flanking regions on human growth hormone gene.

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, T; Hirabayashi, M; Sagara, J; Yuki, A

    1994-03-01

    Fragments containing 5' flanking regions of four bovine milk protein genes--alpha lactalbumin (b alpha LA), alpha S1 casein (b alpha S1CN), beta casein (b beta CN), kappa casein (b kappa CN)--and mouse whey acidic protein (mWAP) gene were prepared by PCR and ligated to human growth hormone (hGH) gene. These recombinant DNAs were microinjected into rat embryos to produce transgenic rats, and the functions of the 5' regions to direct secretion of hGH in the milk were tested. Although milk was obtained only in 5 of 19 mWAP/hGH rat lines, more than two-thirds of the rats carrying the other four DNAs produced milk. More than 80% of the lactated rats carrying b alpha LA/, b beta CN/, and mWAP/hGH, and 33% of the lactated b alpha S1CN/hGH rats secreted detectable amounts of hGH (> 0.05 microgram/ml) in the milk. In some rats, the hGH concentrations in the milk were comparable to or more than that of the corresponding milk protein in bovine milk. The ranges of hGH concentrations in the milk of b alpha LA/, b beta CN/, b alpha S1CN/, and mWAP/hGH rats were 1.13-4,360 micrograms/ml, 0.11-10,900 micrograms/ml, 86.8-6,480 micrograms/ml, and 6.87-151 micrograms/ml, respectively. HGH was also detected in the sera of these rats, and some abnormalities of growth and reproduction were observed. All but one virgin mWAP/hGH rat secreted up to 0.0722 microgram/ml of hGH in the serum, and more than half of them showed abnormal fat accumulations at their abdomen.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Comparison of prophylactic and therapeutic immunisation with an ErbB-2 (HER2) fusion protein and immunoglobulin V-gene repertoire analysis in a transgenic mouse model of spontaneous breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Arunima; Dyring, Charlotte; Stott, David I

    2014-02-12

    ErbB-2 is associated with several solid tumours of which breast cancer is the commonest cancer in women worldwide. Though anti-ErbB-2 antibody appears to play a significant role in prevention and therapy, naturally occurring anti-ErbB-2 antibody associated with the cleaved ectodomain of overexpressed ErbB-2 self antigen is detectable in patients. It is therefore essential to understand the course of antibody mediated protection during disease progression. 100% of FVB/N(neu) mice expressing mutated, constitutively active ErbB-2 develop mammary carcinoma. It has been shown that vaccination with ErbB-2 associated with a T helper cell epitope P30 can offer protection against transplantable tumour but it is unclear whether the same vaccine protects against naturally developing tumour. We have analysed the course of the disease following prophylactic, and therapeutic vaccination in this spontaneous, eutopic mammary carcinoma model that more closely resembles the human disease. 100% protection against tumour development was observed subsequent to prophylactic immunisation but disease progression was unaffected by therapeutic vaccination. The antibody response exhibited restricted expansion of the Immunoglobulin (Ig) variable (V)-gene repertoire by ErbB-2 specific B cells compared with the non-antigen specific B cell pool and control mice. The serum antibody profile was similar in therapeutically injected mice without any effect on tumour burden.

  16. The matrix attachment region-binding protein SATB1 participates in negative regulation of tissue-specific gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, J; Bramblett, D; Zhu, Q; Lozano, M; Kobayashi, R; Ross, S R; Dudley, J P

    1997-01-01

    The nuclear matrix has been implicated in several cellular processes, including DNA replication, transcription, and RNA processing. In particular, transcriptional regulation is believed to be accomplished by binding of chromatin loops to the nuclear matrix and by the concentration of specific transcription factors near these matrix attachment regions (MARs). A number of MAR-binding proteins have been identified, but few have been directly linked to tissue-specific transcription. Recently, we have identified two cellular protein complexes (NBP and UBP) that bind to a region of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) long terminal repeat (LTR) previously shown to contain at least two negative regulatory elements (NREs) termed the promoter-proximal and promoter-distal NREs. These NREs are absent from MMTV strains that cause T-cell lymphomas instead of mammary carcinomas. We show here that NBP binds to a 22-bp sequence containing an imperfect inverted repeat in the promoter-proximal NRE. Previous data showed that a mutation (p924) within the inverted repeat elevated basal transcription from the MMTV promoter and destabilized the binding of NBP, but not UBP, to the proximal NRE. By using conventional and affinity methods to purify NBP from rat thymic nuclear extracts, we obtained a single major protein of 115 kDa that was identified by protease digestion and partial sequencing analysis as the nuclear matrix-binding protein special AT-rich sequence-binding protein 1 (SATB1). Antibody ablation, distamycin inhibition of binding, renaturation and competition experiments, and tissue distribution data all confirmed that the NBP complex contained SATB1. Similar types of experiments were used to show that the UBP complex contained the homeodomain protein Cux/CDP that binds the MAR of the intronic heavy-chain immunoglobulin enhancer. By using the p924 mutation within the MMTV LTR upstream of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene, we generated two strains of transgenic mice

  17. Formation of plant metabolic gene clusters within dynamic chromosomal regions

    PubMed Central

    Field, Ben; Fiston-Lavier, Anna-Sophie; Kemen, Ariane; Geisler, Katrin; Quesneville, Hadi; Osbourn, Anne E.

    2011-01-01

    In bacteria, genes with related functions often are grouped together in operons and are cotranscribed as a single polycistronic mRNA. In eukaryotes, functionally related genes generally are scattered across the genome. Notable exceptions include gene clusters for catabolic pathways in yeast, synthesis of secondary metabolites in filamentous fungi, and the major histocompatibility complex in animals. Until quite recently it was thought that gene clusters in plants were restricted to tandem duplicates (for example, arrays of leucine-rich repeat disease-resistance genes). However, operon-like clusters of coregulated nonhomologous genes are an emerging theme in plant biology, where they may be involved in the synthesis of certain defense compounds. These clusters are unlikely to have arisen by horizontal gene transfer, and the mechanisms behind their formation are poorly understood. Previously in thale cress (Arabidopsis thaliana) we identified an operon-like gene cluster that is required for the synthesis and modification of the triterpene thalianol. Here we characterize a second operon-like triterpene cluster (the marneral cluster) from A. thaliana, compare the features of these two clusters, and investigate the evolutionary events that have led to cluster formation. We conclude that common mechanisms are likely to underlie the assembly and control of operon-like gene clusters in plants. PMID:21876149

  18. A member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, orange-spotted grouper novel immune gene EcVig, is induced by immune stimulants and type I interferon.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Ying-Chun; Wang, Ting-Yu; Chou, Hsin-Yiu; Lin, Han-You; Chen, Tzong-Yueh; Aoki, Takashi; Wang, Han-Ching

    2016-11-01

    A novel grouper immune gene, EcVig was identified in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides). We recently determined that EcVig expression can be induced by infection with nervous necrosis virus (NNV, an RNA virus), whereas NNV replication may be suppressed when EcVig was overexpressed. Although EcVig appeared to be involved in grouper antiviral activity, its immune effects have not been well characterized. In the present study, two PAMPs (pathogen-associated molecular patterns; lipopolysaccharides [LPS] and synthetic double-stranded RNA polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid [poly(I:C)]), as well as fish DNA virus (red sea bream iridovirus, RSIV; grouper iridovirus, GIV), were used to study EcVig responses in orange-spotted grouper. In addition, groupers were given recombinant type I interferon to determine whether EcVig expression was induced. Poly(I:C) rapidly induced substantial expression of EcVig, whereas LPS stimulation did not appear to have any effect in grouper intestine. Expression levels of total EcVig and other IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) were all significantly increased after RSIV and GIV infection. Furthermore, stimulation of recombinant type I IFN also increased EcVig expression. We conclude that EcVig may be a novel IFN-stimulated gene that demonstrates an antiviral immune response.

  19. Human B cells accumulate immunoglobulin V gene somatic mutations in a cell contact-dependent manner in cultures supported by activated T cells but not in cultures supported by CD40 ligand

    PubMed Central

    Huang, S-C; Glas, A M; Pinchuk, G V; Van Montfort, E H N; Rao, S P; Jiang, R; Milner, E C B

    1999-01-01

    The acquisition of somatic mutations in the rearranged immunoglobulin V regions in B cells occurs within the tightly regulated microenvironment of a germinal centre. The precise mechanism responsible for turning on the mutational process is unknown. To dissect the role of different components of the germinal centre in this mechanism, we have used in vitro cultures of normal human IgD+ peripheral blood B lymphocytes co-cultured with activated CD4+ T cells, or with resting CD4+ T cells, or with CD40 ligand and IL-4. We observed that if the cultures included activated CD4+ T cells, then up to 100% of VH transcripts on day 14 were somatically mutated. Transcripts were found to carry from one to 36 substitutions (median five). In contrast, in the absence of activated T cells, transcripts contained only background levels of somatic mutation irrespective of the presence of resting T cells or CD40 ligand and IL-4. Cell–cell contact was required for mutation because mutations were not detected when B cells were separated from activated T cells by a membrane. PMID:10361232

  20. Estimating Copy Number and Allelic Variation at the Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Locus Using Short Reads.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shishi; Yu, Jane A; Song, Yun S

    2016-09-01

    The study of genomic regions that contain gene copies and structural variation is a major challenge in modern genomics. Unlike variation involving single nucleotide changes, data on the variation of copy number is difficult to collect and few tools exist for analyzing the variation between individuals. The immunoglobulin heavy variable (IGHV) locus, which plays an integral role in the adaptive immune response, is an example of a complex genomic region that varies in gene copy number. Lack of standard methods to genotype this region prevents it from being included in association studies and is holding back the growing field of antibody repertoire analysis. Here we develop a method that takes short reads from high-throughput sequencing and outputs a genetic profile of the IGHV locus with the read coverage depth and a putative nucleotide sequence for each operationally defined gene cluster. Our operationally defined gene clusters aim to address a major challenge in studying the IGHV locus: the high sequence similarity between gene segments in different genomic locations. Tests on simulated data demonstrate that our approach can accurately determine the presence or absence of a gene cluster from reads as short as 70 bp. More detailed resolution on the copy number of gene clusters can be obtained from read coverage depth using longer reads (e.g., ≥ 100 bp). Detail at the nucleotide resolution of single copy genes (genes present in one copy per haplotype) can be determined with 250 bp reads. For IGHV genes with more than one copy, accurate nucleotide-resolution reconstruction is currently beyond the means of our approach. When applied to a family of European ancestry, our pipeline outputs genotypes that are consistent with the family pedigree, confirms existing multigene variants and suggests new copy number variants. This study paves the way for analyzing population-level patterns of variation in IGHV gene clusters in larger diverse datasets and for quantitatively

  1. Tumor suppressor genes are larger than apoptosis-effector genes and have more regions of active chromatin: Connection to a stochastic paradigm for sequential gene expression programs.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Marlene; Mauro, James A; Ramsamooj, Michael; Blanck, George

    2015-08-03

    Apoptosis- and proliferation-effector genes are substantially regulated by the same transactivators, with E2F-1 and Oct-1 being notable examples. The larger proliferation-effector genes have more binding sites for the transactivators that regulate both sets of genes, and proliferation-effector genes have more regions of active chromatin, i.e, DNase I hypersensitive and histone 3, lysine-4 trimethylation sites. Thus, the size differences between the 2 classes of genes suggest a transcriptional regulation paradigm whereby the accumulation of transcription factors that regulate both sets of genes, merely as an aspect of stochastic behavior, accumulate first on the larger proliferation-effector gene "traps," and then accumulate on the apoptosis effector genes, thereby effecting sequential activation of the 2 different gene sets. As IRF-1 and p53 levels increase, tumor suppressor proteins are first activated, followed by the activation of apoptosis-effector genes, for example during S-phase pausing for DNA repair. Tumor suppressor genes are larger than apoptosis-effector genes and have more IRF-1 and p53 binding sites, thereby likewise suggesting a paradigm for transcription sequencing based on stochastic interactions of transcription factors with different gene classes. In this report, using the ENCODE database, we determined that tumor suppressor genes have a greater number of open chromatin regions and histone 3 lysine-4 trimethylation sites, consistent with the idea that a larger gene size can facilitate earlier transcriptional activation via the inclusion of more transactivator binding sites.

  2. Gene-Based Analysis of Regionally Enriched Cortical Genes in GWAS Data Sets of Cognitive Traits and Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ersland, Kari M.; Christoforou, Andrea; Stansberg, Christine; Espeseth, Thomas; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mattingsdal, Morten; Hardarson, Gudmundur A.; Hansen, Thomas; Fernandes, Carla P. D.; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Breuer, René; Strohmaier, Jana; Djurovic, Srdjan; Nöthen, Markus M.; Rietschel, Marcella; Lundervold, Astri J.; Werge, Thomas; Cichon, Sven; Andreassen, Ole A.; Reinvang, Ivar; Steen, Vidar M.; Le Hellard, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite its estimated high heritability, the genetic architecture leading to differences in cognitive performance remains poorly understood. Different cortical regions play important roles in normal cognitive functioning and impairment. Recently, we reported on sets of regionally enriched genes in three different cortical areas (frontomedial, temporal and occipital cortices) of the adult rat brain. It has been suggested that genes preferentially, or specifically, expressed in one region or organ reflect functional specialisation. Employing a gene-based approach to the analysis, we used the regionally enriched cortical genes to mine a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of the Norwegian Cognitive NeuroGenetics (NCNG) sample of healthy adults for association to nine psychometric tests measures. In addition, we explored GWAS data sets for the serious psychiatric disorders schizophrenia (SCZ) (n = 3 samples) and bipolar affective disorder (BP) (n = 3 samples), to which cognitive impairment is linked. Principal Findings At the single gene level, the temporal cortex enriched gene RAR-related orphan receptor B (RORB) showed the strongest overall association, namely to a test of verbal intelligence (Vocabulary, P = 7.7E-04). We also applied gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) to test the candidate genes, as gene sets, for enrichment of association signal in the NCNG GWAS and in GWASs of BP and of SCZ. We found that genes differentially expressed in the temporal cortex showed a significant enrichment of association signal in a test measure of non-verbal intelligence (Reasoning) in the NCNG sample. Conclusion Our gene-based approach suggests that RORB could be involved in verbal intelligence differences, while the genes enriched in the temporal cortex might be important to intellectual functions as measured by a test of reasoning in the healthy population. These findings warrant further replication in independent samples on cognitive traits. PMID

  3. Polymorphism in transmembrane region of MICA gene and cholelithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Shou-Chuan; Lee, Yann-Jinn; Liu, Hsin-Fu; Dang, Ching-Wen; Chang, Shih-Chuan; Lin, Shee-Chan; Kao, Chin-Roa

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the significance of polymorphism of MHC class I chain-related gene A (MICA) gene in patients with cholelithiasis. METHODS: Subjects included 170 unrelated adults (83 males) with cholelithiasis and 245 randomly selected unrelated adults (130 males) as controls. DNA was extracted from peripheral leukocytes and analyzed for polymorphism of 5 alleles (A4, A5, A5.1, A6 and A9) of the MICA gene. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in phenotype, allele, and genotype frequencies of any of the 5 alleles between cholelithiasis patients and controls. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that MICA alleles studied bear no relation to cholelithiasis. PMID:12854159

  4. Indirect Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Detection of Immunoglobulin G Reactive with a Recombinant Protein Expressed from the Gene Encoding the 116-Kilodalton Protein of Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Michael F.; Whithear, Kevin G.; Noormohammadi, Amir H.; Markham, Philip F.; Catton, Michael; Leydon, Jennie; Browning, Glenn F.

    1999-01-01

    Serology remains the method of choice for laboratory diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. Currently available serological tests employ complex cellular fractions of M. pneumoniae as antigen. To improve the specificity of M. pneumoniae diagnosis, a recombinant protein was assessed as a serodiagnostic reagent. A panel of recombinant proteins were expressed from a cloned M. pneumoniae gene that encodes a 116-kDa surface protein antigen. The recombinant proteins were assessed for reactivity with patient sera and the most antigenic was further assessed for its serodiagnostic potential by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The ELISA based on the recombinant protein was equivalent in sensitivity to the commercial test (Serodia Myco II; Fujirebio Inc.) to which it was compared. Southern and Western blotting data suggested that the recombinant protein derived from the 116-kDa protein of M. pneumoniae could provide a species-specific diagnostic tool, although further assessment is required. PMID:10074521

  5. Analysis of the expression of immunoglobulins throughout lactation suggests two periods of immune transfer in the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii).

    PubMed

    Daly, Kerry A; Digby, Matthew; Lefèvre, Christophe; Mailer, Sonia; Thomson, Peter; Nicholas, Kevin; Williamson, Peter

    2007-12-15

    Marsupial young are born in an under-developed state without mature immune responses. Prior to the maturation of an immune system, marsupial young are heavily reliant upon immune factors secreted in the milk to defend them against potential microbial pathogens in the environment. In this study, we identified and characterized the immunoglobulin heavy chain constant regions, light chains, polymeric Ig receptor (pIgR), J chain, neonatal Fc receptor (alpha chain) (FcRn) and the chemokine CCL28 from the model marsupial species, the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii). Low levels of conservation were seen in motifs in C alpha and C gamma associated with receptor binding and or transcytosis, and this may have potential implications for functionality. We evaluated the expression of immunoglobulin genes in the tammar mammary gland throughout lactation and found that two periods of increased expression of immunoglobulin genes occur. These two periods coincide with the birth of the young, and with its first emergence from the pouch. This increased expression may represent a strategy for maternal immunological protection of the pouch young.

  6. Serum immunoglobulins in Nigerian neonates.

    PubMed

    Akinwolere, O A; Akinkugbe, F M; Oyewole, A I; Salimonu, L S

    1989-01-01

    Serum immunoglobulins G, M and A levels were studied in 187 Nigerian neonates. Estimations were done by the radial immunodifusion method of Mancini. Immunoglobulin G shows a fall in value in the first few days of life to about 62% of the value in the last days of the neonatal period. There is however a gradual increase in the level of IgM to about double at the end of the neonatal period. IgA level remained relatively constantly low throughout this period. The effect of maternal education on the levels of immunoglobulins of their neonates was also investigated. This had a positive influence at the secondary educational level, affecting only the IgG and IgA.

  7. [Subcutaneous immunoglobulin substitution and therapy].

    PubMed

    Gulácsy, Vera; Maródi, László

    2011-01-09

    Patients with combined primary immunodeficiency or B-cell deficiency with low serum concentration of immunoglobulin G can be efficiently treated with immunoglobulin G concentrates. From the 1950s IgG was used intramuscularly, and from the 1980s intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) replacement has become widely available for replacement therapy. Among the potential side effects of IVIG (including anaphylaxis), further disadvantages of IVIG are hospitalization during treatment and varying concentrations of IgG. Over the past ten years, subcutaneous IgG (SCIG) preparations have become reasonable alternatives to IVIG. SCIG given weekly assures a more balanced serum IgG level, side affects are mostly local and temporary; systemic, severe adverse events have not been observed. In addition, SCIG can be used for home treatment of patients which improves their quality of life remarkably.

  8. Integrative Gene Regulatory Network Analysis Reveals Light-Induced Regional Gene Expression Phase Shift Programs in the Mouse Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Haisun; Vadigepalli, Rajanikanth; Rafferty, Rachel; Gonye, Gregory E.; Weaver, David R.; Schwaber, James S.

    2012-01-01

    We use the multigenic pattern of gene expression across suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) regions and time to understand the dynamics within the SCN in response to a circadian phase-resetting light pulse. Global gene expression studies of the SCN indicate that circadian functions like phase resetting are complex multigenic processes. While the molecular dynamics of phase resetting are not well understood, it is clear they involve a “functional gene expression program”, e.g., the coordinated behavior of functionally related genes in space and time. In the present study we selected a set of 89 of these functionally related genes in order to further understand this multigenic program. By use of high-throughput qPCR we studied 52 small samples taken by anatomically precise laser capture from within the core and shell SCN regions, and taken at time points with and without phase resetting light exposure. The results show striking regional differences in light response to be present in the mouse SCN. By using network-based analyses, we are able to establish a highly specific multigenic correlation between genes expressed in response to light at night and genes normally activated during the day. The light pulse triggers a complex and highly coordinated network of gene regulation. The largest differences marking neuroanatomical location are in transmitter receptors, and the largest time-dependent differences occur in clock-related genes. Nighttime phase resetting appears to recruit transcriptional regulatory processes normally active in the day. This program, or mechanism, causes the pattern of core region gene expression to transiently shift to become more like that of the shell region. PMID:22662235

  9. Identification of a set of genes showing regionally enriched expression in the mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    D'Souza, Cletus A; Chopra, Vikramjit; Varhol, Richard; Xie, Yuan-Yun; Bohacec, Slavita; Zhao, Yongjun; Lee, Lisa LC; Bilenky, Mikhail; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; He, An; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Goldowitz, Daniel; Marra, Marco A; Holt, Robert A; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Jones, Steven JM

    2008-01-01

    Background The Pleiades Promoter Project aims to improve gene therapy by designing human mini-promoters (< 4 kb) that drive gene expression in specific brain regions or cell-types of therapeutic interest. Our goal was to first identify genes displaying regionally enriched expression in the mouse brain so that promoters designed from orthologous human genes can then be tested to drive reporter expression in a similar pattern in the mouse brain. Results We have utilized LongSAGE to identify regionally enriched transcripts in the adult mouse brain. As supplemental strategies, we also performed a meta-analysis of published literature and inspected the Allen Brain Atlas in situ hybridization data. From a set of approximately 30,000 mouse genes, 237 were identified as showing specific or enriched expression in 30 target regions of the mouse brain. GO term over-representation among these genes revealed co-involvement in various aspects of central nervous system development and physiology. Conclusion Using a multi-faceted expression validation approach, we have identified mouse genes whose human orthologs are good candidates for design of mini-promoters. These mouse genes represent molecular markers in several discrete brain regions/cell-types, which could potentially provide a mechanistic explanation of unique functions performed by each region. This set of markers may also serve as a resource for further studies of gene regulatory elements influencing brain expression. PMID:18625066

  10. RGmatch: matching genomic regions to proximal genes in omics data integration.

    PubMed

    Furió-Tarí, Pedro; Conesa, Ana; Tarazona, Sonia

    2016-11-22

    The integrative analysis of multiple genomics data often requires that genome coordinates-based signals have to be associated with proximal genes. The relative location of a genomic region with respect to the gene (gene area) is important for functional data interpretation; hence algorithms that match regions to genes should be able to deliver insight into this information. In this work we review the tools that are publicly available for making region-to-gene associations. We also present a novel method, RGmatch, a flexible and easy-to-use Python tool that computes associations either at the gene, transcript, or exon level, applying a set of rules to annotate each region-gene association with the region location within the gene. RGmatch can be applied to any organism as long as genome annotation is available. Furthermore, we qualitatively and quantitatively compare RGmatch to other tools. RGmatch simplifies the association of a genomic region with its closest gene. At the same time, it is a powerful tool because the rules used to annotate these associations are very easy to modify according to the researcher's specific interests. Some important differences between RGmatch and other similar tools already in existence are RGmatch's flexibility, its wide range of user options, compatibility with any annotatable organism, and its comprehensive and user-friendly output.

  11. Analysis of the regions flanking the human insulin gene and sequence of an Alu family member.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, G I; Pictet, R; Rutter, W J

    1980-01-01

    The regions around the human insulin gene have been studied by heteroduplex, hybridization and sequence analysis. These studies indicated that there is a region of heterogeneous length located approximately 700 bp before the 5' end of the gene; and that the 19 kb of cloned DNA which includes the 1430 bp insulin gene as well as 5650 bp before and 11,500 bp after the gene is single copy sequence except for 500 bp located 6000 bp from the 3' end of the gene. This 500 bp segment contains a member of the Alu family of dispersed middle repetitive sequences as well as another less highly repeated homopolymeric segment. The sequence of this region was determined. This Alu repeat is bordered by 19 bp direct repeats and also contains an 83 bp sequence which is present twice. The regions flanking the human and rat I insulin genes were compared by heteroduplex analysis to localize homologous sequences in the flanking regions which could be involved in the regulation of insulin biosynthesis. The homology between the two genes is restricted to the region encoding preproinsulin and a short region of approximately 60 bp flanking the 5' side of the genes. Images PMID:6253909

  12. A monoclonal autoantibody that promotes central nervous system remyelination in a model of multiple sclerosis is a natural autoantibody encoded by germline immunoglobulin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.J.; Rodriguez, M.

    1995-03-01

    Antibodies directed against self-Ags are frequently considered detrimental, and have been shown to play a pathogenic role in certain autoimmune diseases. However, the presence of autoreactive Abs in normal individuals suggests that some autoantibodies could participate in normal physiology. Our previous studies demonstrated that monoclonal autoantibodies SCH94.03 and SCH94.32, generated from the splenocytes of uninfected SJL/J mice injected with normal homogenized spinal cord, promote central nervous system remyelination when passively transferred into syngeneic mice chronically infected with Theiler`s murine encephalomyelitis virus, an established experimental model of multiple sclerosis. In this study we show that these two monoclonal autoantibodies are identical, and have phenotypic characteristics of natural autoantibodies. By using a solid phase assay system, SCH94.03 and SCH94.32 showed reactivity toward several protein Ags and chemical haptens, with prominent reactivity toward spectrin, (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl) acetyl, and fluorescein. Sequence analysis showed that both SCH94.03 and SCH94.32 were encoded by identical germline Ig light chain V{sub K}10/J{sub K}l and heavy chain V23/DFL16.1/J{sub H}2 genes, with no definitive somatic mutations. These results indicate that a natural autoantibody participates in a beneficial physiologic response to central nervous system injury. 60 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Sequence analysis of the ERCC2 gene regions in human, mouse, and hamster reveals three linked genes.

    PubMed

    Lamerdin, J E; Stilwagen, S A; Ramirez, M H; Stubbs, L; Carrano, A V

    1996-06-15

    The ERCC2 (excision repair cross-complementing rodent repair group 2) gene product is involved in transcription-coupled repair as an integral member of the basal transcription factor BTF2/TFIIH complex. Defects in this gene can result in three distinct human disorders, namely the cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D, trichothiodystrophy, and Cockayne syndrome. We report the comparative analysis of 91.6 kb of new sequence including 54.3 kb encompassing the human ERCC2 locus, the syntenic region in the mouse (32.6 kb), and a further 4.7 kb of sequence 3' of the previously reported ERCC2 region in the hamster. In addition to ERCC2, our analysis revealed the presence of two previously undescribed genes in all three species. The first is centromeric (in the human) to ERCC2 and is most similar to the kinesin light chain gene in sea urchin. The second gene is telomeric (in the human) to ERCC2 and contains a motif found in ankyrins, some cell cycle proteins, and transcription factors. Multiple EST matches to this putative new gene indicate that it is expressed in several human tissues, including breast. The identification and description of two new genes provides potential candidate genes for disorders mapping to this region of 19q13.2.

  14. Sequence analysis of the ERCC2 gene regions in human, mouse, and hamster reveals three linked genes

    SciTech Connect

    Lamerdin, J.E.; Stilwagen, S.A.; Ramirez, M.H.

    1996-06-15

    The ERCC2 (excision repair cross-complementing rodent repair group 2) gene product is involved in transcription-coupled repair as an integral member of the basal transcription factor BTF2/TFIIH complex. Defects in this gene can result in three distinct human disorders, namely the cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D, trichothiodystrophy, and Cockayne syndrome. We report the comparative analysis of 91.6 kb of new sequence including 54.3 kb encompassing the human ERCC2 locus, the syntenic region in the mouse (32.6 kb), and a further 4.7 kb of sequence 3{prime} of the previously reported ERCC2 region in the hamster. In addition to ERCC2, our analysis revealed the presence of two previously undescribed genes in all three species. The first is centromeric (in the human) to ERCC2 and is most similar to the kinesin light chain gene in sea urchin. The second gene is telomeric (in the human) to ERCC2 and contains a motif found in ankyrins, some cell proteins, and transcription factors. Multiple EST matches to this putative new gene indicate that it is expressed in several human tissues, including breast. The identification and description of two new genes provides potential candidate genes for disorders mapping to this region of 19q13.2. 42 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Minimal residual disease detection using real-time quantitative PCR analysis of immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor gene rearrangements in the non-MRD-based ALL IC-BFM 2002 protocol for childhood ALL: Slovak experience.

    PubMed

    Kolenova, A; Hikkel, I; Ilencikova, D; Hikkelova, M; Sejnova, D; Kaiserova, E; Cizmar, A; Puskacova, J; Bubanska, E; Oravkinova, I; Gencik, M

    2010-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common form of cancer in children. The 10-year event-free survival ranged from 77 to 85% after having achieved complete remission rates of 93% or higher. The main cause of treatment failure is relapse arising from outgrowth of residual leukemic cells that are refractory to therapy. An intense effort has been made to develop methods to determine the degree of minimal residual leukemia cells present in patients considered to be in morphological remission. Because of the strong correlation between minimal residual disease (MRD) levels and risk of relapse, monitoring of MRD provides unique information regarding treatment response. The MRD monitoring based on real-time quantitative PCR detection of patient-specific immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor (Ig/TCR) gene rearrangements is currently considered to be the most reliable tool for MRD-based diagnosis in ALL. Because the significance of MRD monitoring has been strongly supported by several studies and because it has been implemented in the latest protocols, there has been a significant effort to develop MRD monitoring in the Slovak Republic since 2005. Between October 2006 and December 2009, 50 children with ALL who were treated at three Slovak centers were included in the RQ PCR MRD pilot project. A total of 40 patients with BCP-ALL ( B cell precursor ALL) and 4 patients with T ALL were analyzed for Ig/TCR rearrangement. We identified 106 different rearrangements in the 44 ALL patients analyzed. Based on MRD stratification, we identified 26 patients who were stratified into the HRG ( high risk group) (n = 3; 11.5%), IRG ( intermediate risk group) (n = 14; 54%) and SRG ) standard risk group) (n = 9; 34.5%). Morphology-based risk stratification allows the identification of most HRG patients identified also by MRD-based stratification, but fails to discriminate the IRG assigned to therapy reduction. Patients in the SRG and the IRG could profit from MRD-based risk assignment

  16. New immunoglobulin IgG allotypes and haplotypes found in wild mice with monoclonal anti-allotope antibodies.

    PubMed

    Huang, C M; Parsons, M; Wakeland, E K; Moriwaki, K; Herzenberg, L A

    1982-02-01

    Sera from 156 wild mice (Mus musculus L.) collected from parts of Eurasia, Northern Africa, and the Americas were tested in solid-phase radioimmunoassays for reactivity with 20 monoclonal anti-allotope antibodies directed against gene products of the Igh-1, Igh-3, and Igh-4 loci. Most of the wild mice have Igh phenotypes similar to those of inbred strains or heterozygotes thereof, but frequently the wild mice showed unique combinations of allotypes on a given chromosome (haplotypes) not seen in inbred strains. We found new allotypes of the Igh-1 and Igh-4 loci. Mice from three regions (Poland, Taiwan, and Japan) possess combinations of allotypes indicating that recombination, gene conversion, or other gene duplication events have occurred in portions of the Igh constant region gene complex. Most interestingly, sera of three mice from Egypt possess immunoglobulin molecules appearing to result from an intragenic recombination event involving either Igh-1d or Igh-3d with Igh-1b. Two mice from Pakistan and one from Seychelles Island in the Indian Ocean also showed similar unusual phenotypes. These mice possess two CH2 IgH-1b and two CH2 Igh-1a/CH2 Igh-1d determinants, suggesting that these variant immunoglobulin arose from recombinations within the CH2 domain.

  17. The involucrin genes of the white-fronted capuchin and cottontop tamarin: the platyrrhine middle region.

    PubMed

    Phillips, M; Rice, R H; Djian, P; Green, H

    1991-09-01

    In all anthropoid species, the coding region of the involucrin gene contains a segment of short tandem repeats that were added sequentially, beginning in a common anthropoid ancestor. The involucrin coding region of each of two platyrrhine species, the white-fronted capuchin (Cebus albifrons) and the cottontop tamarin (Saguinus oedipus), has now been cloned and sequenced. These genes share with the genes of the catarrhines the repeats added in the common anthropoid lineage (the early region). After their divergence, the platyrrhines, like the catarrhines, continued to add repeats vectorially 5' of the early region, to form a middle region. The mechanism that was established in the common anthropoid lineage for the addition of repeats at a definite site in the coding region was transmitted to both platyrrhines and catarrhines, enabling each to generate its middle region independently. The process of vectorial repeat addition continued in two platyrrhine sublineages after their divergence from each other.

  18. Levels of plasma immunoglobulin G with specificity against the cysteine-rich interdomain regions of a semiconserved Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1, VAR4, predict protection against malarial anemia and febrile episodes.

    PubMed

    Lusingu, John P A; Jensen, Anja T R; Vestergaard, Lasse S; Minja, Daniel T; Dalgaard, Michael B; Gesase, Samwel; Mmbando, Bruno P; Kitua, Andrew Y; Lemnge, Martha M; Cavanagh, David; Hviid, Lars; Theander, Thor G

    2006-05-01

    Antibodies to variant surface antigen have been implicated as mediators of malaria immunity in studies measuring immunoglobulin G (IgG) binding to infected erythrocytes. Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) is an important target for these antibodies, but no study has directly linked the presence of PfEMP1 antibodies in children to protection. We measured plasma IgG levels to the cysteine-rich interdomain region 1alpha (CIDR1alpha) of VAR4 (VAR4-CIDR1alpha), a member of a semiconserved PfEMP1 subfamily, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 561 Tanzanian individuals, who were monitored clinically for 7 months. The participants resided in Mkokola (a high-transmission village where malaria is holoendemic) or Kwamasimba (a moderate-transmission village). For comparison, plasma IgG levels to two merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1) constructs, MSP1-19 and MSP1 block 2, and a control CIDR1 domain were measured. VAR4-CIDR1alpha antibodies were acquired at an earlier age in Mkokola than in Kwamasimba, but after the age of 10 years the levels were comparable in the two villages. After controlling for age and other covariates, the risk of having anemia at enrollment was reduced in VAR4-CIDR1alpha responders for Mkokola (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 0.49; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.29 to 0.88; P = 0.016) and Kwamasimba (AOR, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.16 to 0.68; P = 0.003) villages. The risk of developing malaria fever was reduced among individuals with a measurable VAR4-CIDR1alpha response from Mkokola village (AOR, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.29 to 0.89; P = 0.018) but not in Kwamasimba. Antibody levels to the MSP1 constructs and the control CIDR1alpha domain were not associated with morbidity protection. These data strengthen the concept of developing vaccines based on PfEMP1.

  19. The binding of immunoglobulin Fc to cationic proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Pambakian, S; Poston, R N

    1987-01-01

    The interaction of cationic proteins with IgG, IgA and IgM were investigated by solid phase radioimmunoassay. All these immunoglobulins showed avid binding, IgM giving the strongest reaction, followed by IgA and then IgG. Fc fragments of IgG gave binding, but F(ab')2 fragments from the three main Ig classes did not, showing that the Fc region is the active part of the molecule. The effects of changes of ionic strength and pH are compatible with the interaction being ionic, and are similar to those seen between immunoglobulins and both Clq and cationic ion exchange gels. The addition of other serum proteins resulted in marked inhibition of the interaction. These phenomena are likely to have fundamental significance for the understanding of interactions of immunoglobulins in vivo and in vitro. Images Fig. 6 PMID:3652520

  20. DNA regions that regulate the ovarian transcriptional specificity of Drosophila yolk protein genes.

    PubMed

    Logan, S K; Garabedian, M J; Wensink, P C

    1989-09-01

    Yolk protein genes 1 and 2 (yp1 and yp2) of Drosophila melanogaster are divergently transcribed neighboring genes. Both are transcribed in only two tissues, the ovarian follicle cells and the fat bodies of adult females. Previous work has identified a yolk protein enhancer between the genes that is sufficient to direct transcription in one of the tissues, female fat bodies. Using germ-line transformation methods, we identify two cis-acting regions with positive effects on transcription in ovaries. One, a 301-bp region located between the genes, influences both genes and is an enhancer determining the stage and cell type specificity of ovarian transcription. The other, a 105-bp region located in the first exon of yp2, acts across the yp2 promoter region to stimulate yp1 transcription in ovaries. Additional observations suggest how a single enhancer influences both promoters.

  1. Regional and strain-specific gene expression mapping in the adult mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Rickard; Yasuda, Rie; Pankratz, Daniel G.; Carter, Todd A.; Del Rio, Jo A.; Wodicka, Lisa; Mayford, Mark; Lockhart, David J.; Barlow, Carrolee

    2000-01-01

    To determine the genetic causes and molecular mechanisms responsible for neurobehavioral differences in mice, we used highly parallel gene expression profiling to detect genes that are differentially expressed between the 129SvEv and C57BL/6 mouse strains at baseline and in response to seizure. In addition, we identified genes that are differentially expressed in specific brain regions. We found that approximately 1% of expressed genes are differentially expressed between strains in at least one region of the brain and that the gene expression response to seizure is significantly different between the two inbred strains. The results lead to the identification of differences in gene expression that may account for distinct phenotypes in inbred strains and the unique functions of specific brain regions. PMID:11005875

  2. Thyroid hormone receptors bind to defined regions of the growth hormone and placental lactogen genes.

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, J W; Voz, M L; Eliard, P H; Mathy-Harter, M; De Nayer, P; Economidis, I V; Belayew, A; Martial, J A; Rousseau, G G

    1986-01-01

    The intracellular receptor for thyroid hormone is a protein found in chromatin. Since thyroid hormone stimulates transcription of the growth hormone gene through an unknown mechanism, the hypothesis that the thyroid hormone-receptor complex interacts with defined regions of this gene has been investigated in a cell-free system. Nuclear extracts from human lymphoblastoid IM-9 cells containing thyroid hormone receptors were incubated with L-3,5,3'-tri[125I]iodothyronine and calf thymus DNA-cellulose. Restriction fragments of the human growth hormone gene were added to determine their ability to inhibit labeled receptor binding to DNA-cellulose. These fragments encompassed nucleotide sequences from about three kilobase pairs upstream to about four kilobase pairs downstream from the transcription initiation site. The thyroid hormone-receptor complex bound preferentially to the 5'-flanking sequences of the growth hormone gene in a region between nucleotide coordinates -290 and -129. The receptor also bound to an analogous promoter region in the human placental lactogen gene, which has 92% nucleotide sequence homology with the growth hormone gene. These binding regions appear to be distinct from those that are recognized by the receptor for glucocorticoids, which stimulate growth hormone gene expression synergistically with thyroid hormone. The presence of thyroid hormone was required for binding of its receptor to the growth hormone gene promoter, suggesting that thyroid hormone renders the receptor capable of recognizing specific gene regions. PMID:3466175

  3. Thyroid hormone receptors bind to defined regions of the growth hormone and placental lactogen genes.

    PubMed

    Barlow, J W; Voz, M L; Eliard, P H; Mathy-Harter, M; De Nayer, P; Economidis, I V; Belayew, A; Martial, J A; Rousseau, G G

    1986-12-01

    The intracellular receptor for thyroid hormone is a protein found in chromatin. Since thyroid hormone stimulates transcription of the growth hormone gene through an unknown mechanism, the hypothesis that the thyroid hormone-receptor complex interacts with defined regions of this gene has been investigated in a cell-free system. Nuclear extracts from human lymphoblastoid IM-9 cells containing thyroid hormone receptors were incubated with L-3,5,3'-tri[125I]iodothyronine and calf thymus DNA-cellulose. Restriction fragments of the human growth hormone gene were added to determine their ability to inhibit labeled receptor binding to DNA-cellulose. These fragments encompassed nucleotide sequences from about three kilobase pairs upstream to about four kilobase pairs downstream from the transcription initiation site. The thyroid hormone-receptor complex bound preferentially to the 5'-flanking sequences of the growth hormone gene in a region between nucleotide coordinates -290 and -129. The receptor also bound to an analogous promoter region in the human placental lactogen gene, which has 92% nucleotide sequence homology with the growth hormone gene. These binding regions appear to be distinct from those that are recognized by the receptor for glucocorticoids, which stimulate growth hormone gene expression synergistically with thyroid hormone. The presence of thyroid hormone was required for binding of its receptor to the growth hormone gene promoter, suggesting that thyroid hormone renders the receptor capable of recognizing specific gene regions.

  4. Chronic ethanol exposure produces time- and brain region-dependent changes in gene coexpression networks.

    PubMed

    Osterndorff-Kahanek, Elizabeth A; Becker, Howard C; Lopez, Marcelo F; Farris, Sean P; Tiwari, Gayatri R; Nunez, Yury O; Harris, R Adron; Mayfield, R Dayne

    2015-01-01

    Repeated ethanol exposure and withdrawal in mice increases voluntary drinking and represents an animal model of physical dependence. We examined time- and brain region-dependent changes in gene coexpression networks in amygdala (AMY), nucleus accumbens (NAC), prefrontal cortex (PFC), and liver after four weekly cycles of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) vapor exposure in C57BL/6J mice. Microarrays were used to compare gene expression profiles at 0-, 8-, and 120-hours following the last ethanol exposure. Each brain region exhibited a large number of differentially expressed genes (2,000-3,000) at the 0- and 8-hour time points, but fewer changes were detected at the 120-hour time point (400-600). Within each region, there was little gene overlap across time (~20%). All brain regions were significantly enriched with differentially expressed immune-related genes at the 8-hour time point. Weighted gene correlation network analysis identified modules that were highly enriched with differentially expressed genes at the 0- and 8-hour time points with virtually no enrichment at 120 hours. Modules enriched for both ethanol-responsive and cell-specific genes were identified in each brain region. These results indicate that chronic alcohol exposure causes global 'rewiring' of coexpression systems involving glial and immune signaling as well as neuronal genes.

  5. Regional Expression of MTG Genes in the Developing Mouse Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Alishahi, Amin; Koyano-Nakagawa, Naoko; Nakagawa, Yasushi

    2009-01-01

    Myeloid translocation gene (MTG) proteins are transcriptional repressors that are highly conserved across species. We studied the expression of three members of this gene family, MTGR1, MTG8, and MTG16 in developing mouse central nervous system by in situ hybridization. All of these genes are detected as early as embryonic day 11.5. Because these genes are known to be induced by proneural genes during neurogenesis, we analyzed the expression of MTG genes in relation to two proneural genes, Neurog2 (also known as Ngn2 or Neurogenin 2) and Ascl1 (also known as Mash1). While MTGR1 are generally expressed in regions that also express Neurog2, MTG8 and MTG16 expression is associated more tightly with that of Ascl1-expressing neural progenitor cells. These results suggest the possibility that expression of MTG genes is differentially controlled by specific proneural genes during neurogenesis. PMID:19618476

  6. Strong early seed-specific gene regulatory region

    DOEpatents

    Broun, Pierre; Somerville, Chris

    2002-01-01

    Nucleic acid sequences and methods for their use are described which provide for early seed-specific transcription, in order to modulate or modify expression of foreign or endogenous genes in seeds, particularly embryo cells. The method finds particular use in conjunction with modifying fatty acid production in seed tissue.

  7. Strong early seed-specific gene regulatory region

    DOEpatents

    Broun, Pierre; Somerville, Chris

    1999-01-01

    Nucleic acid sequences and methods for their use are described which provide for early seed-specific transcription, in order to modulate or modify expression of foreign or endogenous genes in seeds, particularly embryo cells. The method finds particular use in conjunction with modifying fatty acid production in seed tissue.

  8. Spatially differentiated expression of quadruplicated green-sensitive RH2 opsin genes in zebrafish is determined by proximal regulatory regions and gene order to the locus control region.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, Taro; Masuda, Ryoko; Ashino, Ryuichi; Kawamura, Shoji

    2015-11-04

    Fish are remarkably diverse in repertoires of visual opsins by gene duplications. Differentiation of their spatiotemporal expression patterns and absorption spectra enables fine-tuning of feature detection in spectrally distinct regions of the visual field during ontogeny. Zebrafish have quadruplicated green-sensitive (RH2) opsin genes in tandem (RH2-1, -2, -3, -4), which are expressed in the short member of the double cones (SDC). The shortest wavelength RH2 subtype (RH2-1) is expressed in the central to dorsal area of the adult retina. The second shortest wave subtype (RH2-2) is expressed overlapping with RH2-1 but extending outside of it. The second longest wave subtype (RH2-3) is expressed surrounding the RH2-2 area, and the longest wave subtype (RH2-4) is expressed outside of the RH2-3 area broadly occupying the ventral area. Expression of the four RH2 genes in SDC requires a single enhancer (RH2-LCR), but the mechanism of their spatial differentiation remains elusive. Functional comparison of the RH2-LCR with its counterpart in medaka revealed that the regulatory role of the RH2-LCR in SDC-specific expression is evolutionarily conserved. By combining the RH2-LCR and the proximal upstream region of each RH2 gene with fluorescent protein reporters, we show that the RH2-LCR and the RH2-3 proximal regulatory region confer no spatial selectivity of expression in the retina. But those of RH2-1, -2 and -4 are capable of inducing spatial differentiation of expression. Furthermore, by analyzing transgenic fish with a series of arrays consisting of the RH2-LCR and multiple upstream regions of the RH2 genes in different orders, we show that a gene expression pattern related to an upstream region is greatly influenced by another flanking upstream region in a relative position-dependent manner. The zebrafish RH2 genes except RH2-3 acquired differential cis-elements in the proximal upstream regions to specify the differential expression patterns. The input from these

  9. Synonymous Substitutions in the Xdh Gene of Drosophila: Heterogeneous Distribution along the Coding Region

    PubMed Central

    Comeron, J. M.; Aguade, M.

    1996-01-01

    The Xdh (rosy) region of Drosophila subobscura has been sequenced and compared to the homologous region of D. pseudoobscura and D. melanogaster. Estimates of the numbers of synonymous substitutions per site (Ks) confirm that Xdh has a high synonymous substitution rate. The distributions of both nonsynonymous and synonymous substitutions along the coding region were found to be heterogeneous. Also, no relationship has been detected between Ks estimates and codon usage bias along the gene, in contrast with the generally observed relationship among genes. This heterogeneous distribution of synonymous substitutions along the Xdh gene, which is expression-level independent, could be explained by a differential selection pressure on synonymous sites along the coding region acting on mRNA secondary structure. The synonymous rate in the Xdh coding region is lower in the D. subobscura than in the D. pseudoobscura lineage, whereas the reverse is true for the Adh gene. PMID:8913749

  10. A 5′- Regulatory Region and Two Coding Region Polymorphisms Modulate Promoter Activity and Gene Expression of the Growth Suppressor Gene ZBED6 in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yong-Zhen; Li, Ming-Xun; Wang, Jing; Zhan, Zhao-Yang; Sun, Yu-Jia; Sun, Jia-Jie; Li, Cong-Jun; Lan, Xian-Yong; Lei, Chu-Zhao; Zhang, Chun-Lei; Chen, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Zinc finger, BED-type containing 6 (ZBED6) is an important transcription factor in placental mammals, affecting development, cell proliferation and growth. Polymorphisms in its promoter and coding regions are likely to impact ZBED6 transcription and growth traits. In this study, rapid amplification of 5’ cDNA ends (5'-RACE) analysis revealed two transcription start sites (TSS) for the bovine ZBED6 starting within exon 1 of the ZC3H11A gene (TSS-1) and upstream of the translation start codon of the ZBED6 gene (TSS-2). There was one SNP in the promoter and two missense mutations in the coding region of the bovine ZBED6 by sequencing of the pooled DNA samples (Pool-Seq, n = 100). The promoter and coding region are the key regions for gene function; polymorphisms in these regions can alter gene expression. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analysis showed that ZBED6 has a broad tissue distribution in cattle and is highly expressed in skeletal muscle. Eleven promoter-detection vectors were constructed, which enabled the cloning of putative promoter sequences and analysis of ZBED6 transcriptional activity by luciferase reporter gene assays. The core region of the basal promoter of bovine ZBED6 is located within region -866 to -556. The activity of WT-826G-pGL3 in driving reporter gene transcription is significantly higher than that of the M-826A-pGL3 construct (P < 0.01). Analysis of gene expression patterns in homozygous full-sibling Chinese Qinchuan cattle showed that the mutant-type Hap-AGG exhibited a lower mRNA level than the wild-type Hap-GCA (P < 0.05) in longissimus dorsi muscle (LDM). Moreover, ZBED6 mRNA expression was low in C2C12 cells overexpressing the mutant-type ZBED6 (pcDNA3.1+-Hap-GG) (P < 0.01). Our results suggest that the polymorphisms in the promoter and coding regions may modulate the promoter activity and gene expression of bovine ZBED6 in the skeletal muscles of these cattle breeds. PMID:24223190

  11. Differential protein analysis of serum exosomes post-intravenous immunoglobulin therapy in patients with Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Song, Qi-Fang; Jin, Jing-Jie; Huang, Ping; Wang, Zhou-Ping; Xie, Xiao-Fei; Gu, Xiao-Qiong; Gao, Xue-Juan; Jia, Hong-Ling

    2017-08-14

    Kawasaki disease, which is characterised by systemic vasculitides accompanied by acute fever, is regularly treated by intravenous immunoglobulin to avoid lesion formation in the coronary artery; however, the mechanism of intravenous immunoglobulin therapy is unclear. Hence, we aimed to analyse the global expression profile of serum exosomal proteins before and after administering intravenous immunoglobulin. Two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry analysis was used to identify the differentially expressed proteome of serum exosomes in patients with Kawasaki disease before and after intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. Our analysis revealed 69 differential protein spots in the Kawasaki disease group with changes larger than 1.5-fold and 59 differential ones in patients after intravenous immunoglobulin therapy compared with the control group. Gene ontology analysis revealed that the acute-phase response disappeared, the functions of the complement system and innate immune response were enhanced, and the antibacterial humoral response pathway of corticosteroids and cardioprotection emerged after administration of intravenous immunoglobulin. Further, we showed that complement C3 and apolipoprotein A-IV levels increased before and decreased after intravenous immunoglobulin therapy and that the insulin-like growth factor-binding protein complex acid labile subunit displayed reverse alteration before and after intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. These observations might be potential indicators of intravenous immunoglobulin function. Our results show the differential proteomic profile of serum exosomes of patients with Kawasaki disease before and after intravenous immunoglobulin therapy, such as complement C3, apolipoprotein A-IV, and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein complex acid labile subunit. These results may be useful in the identification of markers for monitoring intravenous immunoglobulin therapy in patients with Kawasaki disease.

  12. Short 5'-flanking regions of the Amy gene of Drosophila kikkawai affect amylase gene expression and respond to food environments.

    PubMed

    Inomata, Nobuyuki; Nakashima, Shuichi

    2008-04-15

    Evolution of the duplicated genes and regulation in gene expression is of great interest, especially in terms of adaptation. Molecular population genetic and evolutionary studies on the duplicated amylase genes of Drosophila species have suggested that their 5'-flanking (cis-regulatory) regions play an important role in evolution of these genes. For better understanding of evolution of the duplicated amylase genes and gene expression, we studied functional significance of the Amy1 gene of Drosophila kikkawai using in vitro deletion mutagenesis followed by P-element-mediated germline transformation. We found that a 1.6-kb of the 5'-flanking region can produce strikingly higher level of larval amylase activity on starch food compared with that on glucose food. We found two cis-regulatory elements, which increase larval amylase activity on starch food. We also found a larval cis-regulatory element, which responds to the food difference. This food-response element is necessary for the function of the element increasing larval activity on starch food. A 5-bp deletion in a putative GRE caused high amylase activity, indicating a cis-regulatory element decreasing amylase activity. These cis-regulatory elements identified in the 5'-flanking region could be the targets of natural selection.

  13. PCR primers for 30 novel gene regions in the nuclear genomes of Lepidoptera.

    PubMed

    Wahlberg, Niklas; Peña, Carlos; Ahola, Milla; Wheat, Christopher W; Rota, Jadranka

    2016-01-01

    We report primer pairs for 30 new gene regions in the nuclear genomes of Lepidoptera that can be amplified using a standard PCR protocol. The new primers were tested across diverse Lepidoptera, including nonditrysians and a wide selection of ditrysians. These new gene regions give a total of 11,043 bp of DNA sequence data and they show similar variability to traditionally used nuclear gene regions in studies of Lepidoptera. We feel that a PCR-based approach still has its place in molecular systematic studies of Lepidoptera, particularly at the intrafamilial level, and our new set of primers now provides a route to generating phylogenomic datasets using traditional methods.

  14. The Characterisation of Three Types of Genes that Overlie Copy Number Variable Regions

    PubMed Central

    Woodwark, Cara; Bateman, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Background Due to the increased accuracy of Copy Number Variable region (CNV) break point mapping, it is now possible to say with a reasonable degree of confidence whether a gene (i) falls entirely within a CNV; (ii) overlaps the CNV or (iii) actually contains the CNV. We classify these as type I, II and III CNV genes respectively. Principal Findings Here we show that although type I genes vary in copy number along with the CNV, most of these type I genes have the same expression levels as wild type copy numbers of the gene. These genes must, therefore, be under homeostatic dosage compensation control. Looking into possible mechanisms for the regulation of gene expression we found that type I genes have a significant paucity of genes regulated by miRNAs and are not significantly enriched for monoallelically expressed genes. Type III genes, on the other hand, have a significant excess of genes regulated by miRNAs and are enriched for genes that are monoallelically expressed. Significance Many diseases and genomic disorders are associated with CNVs so a better understanding of the different ways genes are associated with normal CNVs will help focus on candidate genes in genome wide association studies. PMID:21637334

  15. Frequency analysis of functional immunoglobulin C- and V-gene expression by mitogen-reactive B cells in germfree mice fed chemically defined ultra-filtered "antigen-free" diet.

    PubMed

    Hooijkaas, H; van der Linde-Preesman, A A; Bitter, W M; Benner, R; Pleasants, J R; Wostmann, B S

    1985-04-01

    The frequencies of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-reactive B cells and their antibody specificity repertoire have been determined in the spleen and bone marrow (BM) of conventional (CV) and "antigen-free" C3H/HeCr mice of various ages. The antigen-free mice were germfree (GF)-raised and were fed an ultrafiltered solution of chemically defined (CD) low m.w. nutrients, and were thus devoid of exogenous antigenic stimulation. Spleen and BM cells were grown in a limiting dilution culture system that allows the growth and development of every newly formed LPS-reactive B cell into a clone of IgM-secreting cells which are capable of switching to other immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy chain isotypes (C-gene expression). The secretion of IgM and IgG1 was determined in the protein A plaque assay, whereas specific IgM antibody-secreting cells (V-gene expression) were detected in plaque assays specific for various heterologous erythrocytes and sheep red blood cells (SRBC) coupled with a number of different haptens. The absolute frequency of LPS-reactive B cells and their capacity to switch to IgG1-secretion was not significantly different in 8- to 12-wk-old and 52-wk-old GF-CD mice and their age-matched CV controls. Moreover, no differences were observed in the frequencies of antigen-specific B cells within the pool of LPS reactive B cells. These frequencies ranged from 1 in 20 to 1 in 50 for NIP4-SRBC and NNP2-SRBC, from 1 in 100 to 1 in 150 for NIP0.4-SRBC, from 1 in 50 to 1 in 100 for TNP30-SRBC, and from 1 in 1000 to 1 in 2000 for SRBC and horse red blood cells. Within the limitations of having determined the switching capacity of IgM to IgG1 only and having assessed only a minor fraction of the total B cell antibody-specificity repertoire, the data indicate that young and old GF-CD mice, although devoid of exogenous antigenic and/or mitogenic stimulation, generate B cells with a similar switching capacity and a similar IgM antibody specificity repertoire as CV mice.

  16. Analysis of somatic hypermutation in mouse Peyer's patches using immunoglobulin kappa light-chain transgenes.

    PubMed Central

    González-Fernández, A; Milstein, C

    1993-01-01

    We have exploited mice transgenic for an immunoglobulin kappa light chain in order to show that immunoglobulin genes in the B cells of Peyer's patches in unimmunized mice carry a high level of somatic mutations. Most of the mutations are found in the subpopulation of B cells which, based on peanut agglutinin binding, derive from the germinal centers. The number of mutations per clone and their distribution along the variable gene segment (indicative of untemplated point mutations) are very similar to those found in antigen-specific splenic B cells of normal mice after secondary immunization. The mutations accumulate mainly in complementarity-determining region 1, in particular in some specific codons (Ser-26, Ser-31, and Ser-77) which have been previously recognized as intrinsic hypermutational hotspots. These results suggest that, as in the spleen, somatic mutation occurs in B cells which have migrated to the germinal centers, probably as a consequence of stimulation by antigens present in the gut environment. Transgenic animals are increasingly being used to define the signals involved in hypermutation. However, their subsequent study is very time-consuming because it is based on immunization and analysis of hybridomas or antigen-selected cells. We propose that the use of Peyer's patches of unimmunized adult mice offers a reliable and simple approach to analyze hypermutation of transgenes. PMID:8234326

  17. Leporid immunoglobulin G shows evidence of strong selective pressure on the hinge and CH3 domains.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Ana; Woof, Jenny M; Almeida, Tereza; Abrantes, Joana; Alves, Paulo C; Gortázar, Christian; Esteves, Pedro J

    2014-09-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) is the predominant serum immunoglobulin and has the longest serum half-life of all the antibody classes. The European rabbit IgG has been of significant importance in immunological research, and is therefore well characterized. However, the IgG of other leporids has been disregarded. To evaluate the evolution of this gene in leporids, we sequenced the complete IGHG for six other genera: Bunolagus, Brachylagus, Lepus, Pentalagus, Romerolagus and Sylvilagus. The newly sequenced leporid IGHG gene has an organization and structure similar to that of the European rabbit IgG. A gradient in leporid IgG constant domain diversity was observed, with the CH1 being the most conserved and the CH3 the most variable domain. Positive selection was found to be acting on all constant domains, but with a greater incidence in the CH3 domain, where a cluster of three positively selected sites was identified. In the hinge region, only three polymorphic positions were observed. The same hinge length was observed for all leporids. Unlike the variation observed for the European rabbit, all 11 Lepus species studied share exactly the same hinge motif, suggesting its maintenance as a result of an advantageous structure or conformation.

  18. Analysis of the sexual development-promoting region of Schizophyllum commune TRP1 gene.

    PubMed

    Sen, Kikuo; Kinoshita, Hideki; Tazuke, Kazuyuki; Maki, Yoshinori; Yoshiura, Yumi; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Shibai, Hiroshiro; Kurosawa, Shin-Ichi

    2016-10-01

    This study aims to elucidate the mechanism of sexual development of basidiomycetous mushrooms from mating to fruit body formation. Sequencing analysis showed the TRP1 gene of basidiomycete Schizophyllum commune encoded an enzyme with three catalytic regions of GAT (glutamine amidotransferase), IGPS (indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthase), and PRAI (5-phosphoribosyl anthranilate isomerase); among these three regions, the trp1 mutant (Trp(-)) had a missense mutation (L→F) of a 338th amino acid residue of the TRP1 protein within the IGPS region. To investigate the function of IGPS region related to sexual development, dikaryons with high, usual, and no expression of the IGPS region of TRP1 gene were made. The dikaryotic mycelia with high expression of the IGPS formed mature fruit bodies earlier than those with usual and no expression of the IGPS. These results showed that the IGPS region in TRP1 gene promoted sexual development of S. commune.

  19. Immunoglobulin isotypes in Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar.

    PubMed

    Hordvik, Ivar

    2015-02-27

    There are three major immunoglobulin (Ig) isotypes in salmonid fish: IgM, IgD and IgT, defined by the heavy chains μ, δ and τ, respectively. As a result of whole genome duplication in the ancestor of the salmonid fish family, Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) possess two highly similar Ig heavy chain gene complexes (A and B), comprising two μ genes, two δ genes, three intact τ genes and five τ pseudogenes. The μA and μB genes correspond to two distinct sub-populations of serum IgM. The IgM-B sub-variant has a characteristic extra cysteine near the C-terminal part of the heavy chain and exhibits a higher degree of polymer disulfide cross-linking compared to IgM-A. The IgM-B:IgM-A ratio in serum is typically 60:40, but skewed ratios are also observed. The IgT isotype appears to be specialized to mucosal immune responses in salmonid fish. The concentration of IgT in serum is 100 to 1000 times lower than IgM. Secreted forms of IgD have been detected in rainbow trout, but not yet in Atlantic salmon.

  20. Isolation and characterization of candidate genes of the 5q13 region in spinal muscular atrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Lefebvre, S.; Reboullet, S.; Benichou, B.

    1994-09-01

    Based on a fine genetic and physical map of the region deleted in spinal muscular atrophy, we defined the smallest rearrangements encompassing the SMA gene. This interval is entirely contained in the 903D1 YAC clone. Several approaches to identify candidate genes were applied, including the search for interspecies conservation, exon trapping amplification and direct cDNA selection. Combining these strategies, six different cDNA molecules mapping to the YAC contig were isolated. Four cDNA molecules were isolated using the exon trapping system. They map to chromosome 5p and to more than one locus within the 5q13 region. They are homologous to each other and share sequence homology with the {beta}-glucuronidase gene. Based on interspecies conservation, a fifth candidate gene was identified. Sequence analyses of the cDNAs revealed no homologies with any other described genes. This gene mapped to two loci within the 5q13 region. Two other cDNA molecules isolated by direct cDNA selection are also under investigation. Complete characterization and fine physical mapping of those genes with respect to the physical interval defined by the deletions of the SMA region will allow the identification of the disease gene (or genes).

  1. Absence of {lambda} immunoglobulin sequences on the supernumerary chromosome of the {open_quotes}cat eye{close_quotes} syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Hough, C.A.; White, B.N.; Holden, J.J.A.

    1995-09-11

    The supernumerary bisatellited chromosome causing the {open_quotes}cat eye{close_quotes} syndrome (CES) is of chromosome 22 origin and consists of an inverted duplication of the 22pter{r_arrow}22q11.2 region. To determine the extent of involvement of band q11.2 on the bisatellited chromosome, copy number assessment of sequences homologous to cloned {lambda} immunoglobulin ({lambda} Ig) gene region probes was carried out on DNA from individuals with CES using densitometric analysis of Southern blots. None of the 10 {lambda} Ig sequences studied was found in increased copy number in DNA from any of the 10 CES individuals tested, indicating that these sequences are not present on the supernumerary chromosome. The breakpoints involved in the generation of the bisatellited supernumerary chromosome associated with CES are therefore proximal to the {lambda} Ig gene region. 20 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  2. Complex repetitive arrangements of gene sequence in the candidate region of the spinal muscular atrophy gene in 5q13

    SciTech Connect

    Theodosiou, A.M.; Nesbit, A.M.; Daniels, R.J.; Campbell, L.; Francis, M.J.; Christodoulou, Z.; Morrison, K.E.; Davies, K.E. |

    1994-12-01

    Childhood-onset proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a heritable neurological disorder, which has been mapped by genetic linkage analysis to chromosome 5q13, in the interval between markers D5S435 and D5S557. Here, we present gene sequences that have been isolated from this interval, several of which show sequence homologies to exons of {beta}-glucuronidase. These gene sequences are repeated several times across the candidate