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Sample records for immunoglobulin gene regions

  1. Ectopic recombination within homologous immunoglobulin mu gene constant regions in a mouse hybridoma cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, M D; Read, L R

    1992-01-01

    We have transferred a pSV2neo vector containing the wild-type constant region of the immunoglobulin mu gene (C mu) into the mutant hybridoma igm482, which bears a 2-bp deletion in the third constant-region exon of its haploid chromosomal mu gene (C mu 3). Independent igm482 transformants contain the wild-type immunoglobulin C mu region stably integrated in ectopic chromosomal positions. We report here that the wild-type immunoglobulin C mu region can function as the donor sequence in a gene conversion event which corrects the 2-bp deletion in the mutant igm482 chromosomal C mu 3 exon. The homologous recombination event restores normal immunoglobulin M production in the mutant cell. Images PMID:1406631

  2. Immunoglobulins and immunoglobulin genes of the horse.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Bettina

    2006-01-01

    Antibodies of the horse were studied intensively by many notable immunologists throughout the past century until the early 1970's. After a large gap of interest in horse immunology, additional basic studies on horse immunoglobulin genes performed during the past 10 years have resulted in new insights into the equine humoral immune system. These include the characterization of the immunoglobulin lambda and kappa light chain genes, the immunoglobulin heavy chain constant (IGHC) gene regions, and initial studies regarding the heavy chain variable genes. Horses express predominately lambda light chains and seem to have a relatively restricted germline repertoire of both lambda and kappa chain variable genes. The IGHC region contains eleven constant heavy chain genes, seven of which are gamma heavy chain genes. It is suggested that all seven genes encoding IgG isotypes are expressed and have distinct functions in equine immune responses.

  3. Sequence of the dog immunoglobulin alpha and epsilon constant region genes

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, M.; Selinger, D.; Mark, G.E.; Hollis, G.F.; Hickey, G.J.

    1995-03-01

    The immunoglobulin alpha (IGHAC) and epsilon (IGHEC) germline constant region genes were isolated from a dog liver genomic DNA library. Sequence analysis indicates that the dog IGHEC gene is encoded by four exons spread out over 1.7 kilobases (kb). The IGHAC sequence encompasses 1.5 kb and includes all three constant region coding exons. The complete exon/intron sequence of these genes is described. 28 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Construction of chimeric antibodies: cloning of immunoglobulin genes including their promoter regions by PCR.

    PubMed

    Mocikat, R; Kütemeier, G; Harloff, C

    1992-03-01

    In the production of recombinant antibodies, it is necessary to have an immunoglobulin gene promoter for driving the expression of the antibody genes. Here we describe a simple PCR method that allows cloning of the immunoglobulin genes together with their own promoters despite the fact that the sequence of the upstream part of the gene is unknown.

  5. Specific amplification by PCR of rearranged genomic variable regions of immunoglobulin genes from mouse hybridoma cells.

    PubMed

    Berdoz, J; Monath, T P; Kraehenbuhl, J P

    1995-04-01

    We have designed a novel strategy for the isolation of the rearranged genomic fragments encoding the L-VH-D-JH and L-V kappa/lambda-J kappa/lambda regions of mouse immunoglobulin genes. This strategy is based on the PCR amplification of genomic DNA from mouse hybridomas using multiple specific primers chosen in the 5'-untranslated region and in the intron downstream of the rearranged JH/J kappa/lambda sequences. Variable regions with intact coding sequences, including full-length leader peptides (L) can be obtained without previous DNA sequencing. Our strategy is based on a genomic template that produces fragments that do not need to be adapted for recombinant antibody expression, thus facilitating the generation of chimeric and isotype-switched immunoglobulins.

  6. Organization of immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Tonegawa, S; Brack, C; Hozumi, N; Pirrotta, V

    1978-01-01

    The nucleotide-sequence determination of a cloned, embryonic Vlambda gene directly demonstrated that V genes are separate from a corresponding C gene in embryonic cells. Analysis by restriction enzymes of total cellular DNA from various sources strongly suggested that the two separate immunoglobulin genes become continuous during differentiation of B lymphocytes. There seems to be a strict correlation between the joining event and activation of the joined genes. Cloning of more immunoglobulin genes from embryo and plasma cells will not only provide direct demonstration of such a gene-joining event but also help in the elucidation of a possible relationship of the event to gene activation mechanisms.

  7. Complete physical map of the human immunoglobulin heavy chain constant region gene complex

    SciTech Connect

    Hofker, M.H.; Walter, M.A.; Cox, D.W. )

    1989-07-01

    The authors have found by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis that the human immunoglobulin heavy chain constant region gene complex maps entirely to a 350-kilobase (kb) Mlu I fragment. The enzyme Eag I was used with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis alone and in double digests with Spe I to map the region. C{sub {gamma}}3 maps 60 kb to the 3{prime} side of C{sub {delta}}; C{gamma}2 maps 80 kb to the 3{prime} side of C{sub {alpha}}1. C{sub {psi}{gamma}} maps 35 kb to the 3{prime} side of C{sub {alpha}}1 and is in the same transcriptional orientation as the other genes. Although in the cloned DNA many CpG-containing restriction sites were identified, most of these were methylated in peripheral blood leukocytes. The sites that were not methylated were predominantly found in three clusters, or Hpa I tiny fragment islands. A region showing strong linkage disequilibrium between all C{sub {gamma}} genes spans at least 160 kb. The 70-kb C{sub {mu}}-C{sub {gamma}}3 region, however, shows no linkage disequilibrium, possibly indicating a recombination hot spot. The immunoglobulin heavy chain constant region has been almost entirely cloned and mapped, and thus most rearrangements occurring in this region should be detectable.

  8. Dependence of Enhancer-Mediated Transcription of the Immunoglobulin μ Gene on Nuclear Matrix Attachment Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrester, William C.; van Genderen, Courtney; Jenuwein, Thomas; Grosschedl, Rudolf

    1994-08-01

    Transcription of the immunoglobulin μ heavy chain locus is regulated by an intronic enhancer that is flanked on both sides by nuclear matrix attachment regions (MARs). These MARs have now been shown to be essential for transcription of a rearranged μ gene in transgenic B lymphocytes, but they were not required in stably transfected tissue culture cells. Normal rates of transcriptional initiation at a variable region promoter and the formation of an extended deoxyribonuclease I (DNase I)-sensitive chromatin domain were dependent on MARs, although DNase I hypersensitivity at the enhancer was detected in the absence of MARs. Thus, transcriptional activation of the μ gene during normal lymphoid development requires a synergistic collaboration between the enhancer and flanking MARs.

  9. DNA sequence of immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region gene in thyroid lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Miwa, H; Takakuwa, T; Nakatsuka, S; Tomita, Y; Matsuzuka, F; Aozasa, K

    2001-10-01

    Patho-epidemiological studies have shown that thyroid lymphoma (TL) develops in thyroid affected by chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis (CLTH). CLTH is categorized as an organ-specific autoimmune disease, in which activated B-lymphocytes secrete a number of autoantibodies. Because antigenic stimulation might be involved in the pathogenesis of TL, the variable region in heavy chain (V(H)) genes was characterized in 13 cases with TL and 3 with CLTH. Clonal rearrangement of the V(H) gene was found in 11 cases of TL, and cloning study with sequencing of complimentary determining region (CDR) 3 revealed the presence of a major clone in 4. Three of the 4 cases used V(H) 3 gene, with the homologous germline gene of V3-30 in two cases and VH26 in one case. A biased usage of V(H) 3 and V(H) 4 genes with the homologous germline gene of VH26 in V(H) 3 gene was reported previously in cases with CLTH. A high level of somatic mutation (1-21%, average 12%) with non-random distribution of replacement and silent mutations was accumulated in all cases. The frequency of the occurrence of minor clones ranged from 29-44% per case, indicating the presence of on-going mutation. DNA sequencing of immunoglobulin V(H) gene suggests that TL develops among activated lymphoid cells in CLTH at the germinal center stage under antigen selection. PMID:11676854

  10. Stochastic rearrangement of immunoglobulin variable-region genes in chicken B-cell development.

    PubMed Central

    Benatar, T; Tkalec, L; Ratcliffe, M J

    1992-01-01

    The molecular mechanism by which immunoglobulin (Ig) gene rearrangement occurs is highly conserved between mammalian and avian species. However, in avian species, an equivalent to the mammalian pre-B cell, which has undergone Ig heavy-chain gene rearrangement and expresses mu heavy chains in the absence of Ig light-chain rearrangement, has not been convincingly demonstrated. It is consequently unclear whether an ordered progression of gene rearrangement events leading to functional Ig expression occurs in avian species. To examine the sequence of Ig gene rearrangement events in chicken B-cell development, we transformed day 12 embryo bursal cells with the REV-T(CSV) retrovirus. More than 100 clones were analyzed by Southern blotting and polymerase chain reaction for the presence of Ig gene rearrangements. The majority of these clones contained only germline Ig sequences. Several clones contained complete heavy- and light-chain rearrangements and 13 clones contained only heavy-chain rearrangements analogous to stages of mammalian B-cell development. However, 5 clones contained rearrangements of light-chain genes in the absence of complete heavy-chain rearrangement. Consequently, we conclude that rearrangement of chicken Ig light-chain genes does not require heavy-chain variable-region rearrangement. This observation suggests that chicken Ig gene rearrangement events required for Ig expression occur stochastically rather than sequentially. Images PMID:1502173

  11. Structural characteristics of the variable regions of immunoglobulin genes encoding a pathogenic autoantibody in murine lupus.

    PubMed

    Tsao, B P; Ebling, F M; Roman, C; Panosian-Sahakian, N; Calame, K; Hahn, B H

    1990-02-01

    We have studied several monoclonal anti-double-stranded (ds) DNA antibodies for their ability to accelerate lupus nephritis in young NZB X NZW F1 female mice and to induce it in BALB/c mice. Two identified as pathogens in both strains have characteristics previously associated with nephritogenicity: expression of IgG2a isotype and IdGN2 idiotype. Both pathogenic antibodies used the combination of genes from the VHJ558 and VK9 subfamilies. Two weak pathogens failed to accelerate nephritis in young BW mice, but induced lupus nephritis in BALB/c mice. They both express IdGN2; one is cationic and an IgG3, the other is an IgG2a. Additional MAbs (some IgG2a, one IdGN2-positive) did not accelerate or induce nephritis. We have cloned and sequenced the variable regions of the immunoglobulin genes of one pathogenic autoantibody. No unique V, D, or J gene segments and no evidence of unusual mechanisms in generating diversity were used to construct this antibody. These data argue against use of unique abnormal Ig genes by systemic lupus erythematosus individuals to construct pathogenic autoantibody subsets. Instead, the major abnormality may be immunoregulatory.

  12. The preferential codon usages in variable and constant regions of immunoglobulin genes are quite distinct from each other.

    PubMed

    Miyata, T; Hayashida, H; Yasunaga, T; Hasegawa, M

    1979-12-20

    The pattern of codon utilization in the variable and constant regions of immunoglobulin genes are compared. It is shown that, in these regions, codon utilizations are quite distinct from one another: For most degenerate codons, there is a selective bias that prefers C and/or G ending codons to U and/or A ending codons in the constant region compared with the bias in the variable region. This would strongly suggest that, in immunoglobulin genes, the bias in code word usage is determined by other factors than those concerning with the translational mechanism such as tRNA availability and codon-anticodon interaction. A possibility is also suggested that this differance of code word usage between them is due to the existence of secondary structure in the constant region but not in the variable region.

  13. Equine immunoglobulins and organization of immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Walther, Stefanie; Rusitzka, Tamara V; Diesterbeck, Ulrike S; Czerny, Claus-Peter

    2015-12-01

    Our understanding of how equine immunoglobulin genes are organized has increased significantly in recent years. For equine heavy chains, 52 IGHV, 40 IGHD, 8 IGHJ and 11 IGHC are present. Seven of these IGHCs are gamma chain genes. Sequence diversity is increasing between fetal, neonatal, foal and adult age. The kappa light chain contains 60 IGKV, 5 IGKJ and 1 IGKC, whereas there are 144 IGLV, 7 IGLJ, and 7 IGLC for the lambda light chain, which is expressed predominantly in horses. Significant transcriptional differences for IGLV and IGLC are identified in different breeds. Allotypic and allelic variants are observed for IGLC1, IGLC5, and IGLC6/7, and two IGLV pseudogenes are also transcribed. During age development, a decrease in IGLVs is noted, although nucleotide diversity and significant differences in gene usage increased. The following paper suggests a standardization of the existing nomenclature of immunoglobulin genes.

  14. Immunoglobulin genes of the turtles.

    PubMed

    Magadán-Mompó, Susana; Sánchez-Espinel, Christian; Gambón-Deza, Francisco

    2013-03-01

    The availability of reptile genomes for the use of the scientific community is an exceptional opportunity to study the evolution of immunoglobulin genes. The genome of Chrysemys picta bellii and Pelodiscus sinensis is the first one that has been reported for turtles. The scanning for immunoglobulin genes resulted in the presence of a complex locus for the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH). This IGH locus in both turtles contains genes for 13 isotypes in C. picta bellii and 17 in P. sinensis. These correspond with one immunoglobulin M, one immunoglobulin D, several immunoglobulins Y (six in C. picta bellii and eight in P. sinensis), and several immunoglobulins that are similar to immunoglobulin D2 (five in C. picta belli and seven in P. sinensis) that was previously described in Eublepharis macularius. It is worthy to note that IGHD2 are placed in an inverted transcriptional orientation and present sequences for two immunoglobulin domains that are similar to bird IgA domains. Furthermore, its phylogenetic analysis allows us to consider about the presence of IGHA gene in a primitive reptile, so we would be dealing with the memory of the gene that originated from the bird IGHA. In summary, we provide a clear picture of the immunoglobulins present in a turtle, whose analysis supports the idea that turtles emerged from the evolutionary line from the differentiation of birds and the presence of the IGHA gene present in a common ancestor.

  15. Restricted Immunoglobulin Variable Region (Ig V) Gene Expression Accompanies Secondary Rearrangements of Light Chain Ig V Genes in Mouse Plasmacytomas

    PubMed Central

    Diaw, Lena; Siwarski, David; Coleman, Allen; Kim, Jennifer; Jones, Gary M.; Dighiero, Guillaume; Huppi, Konrad

    1999-01-01

    The many binding studies of monoclonal immunoglobulin (Ig) produced by plasmacytomas have found no universally common binding properties, but instead, groups of plasmacytomas with specific antigen-binding activities to haptens such as phosphorylcholine, dextrans, fructofuranans, or dinitrophenyl. Subsequently, it was found that plasmacytomas with similar binding chain specificities not only expressed the same idiotype, but rearranged the same light (VL) and heavy (VH) variable region genes to express a characteristic monoclonal antibody. In this study, we have examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay five antibodies secreted by silicone-induced mouse plasmacytomas using a broader panel of antigens including actin, myosin, tubulin, single-stranded DNA, and double-stranded DNA. We have determined the Ig heavy and light chain V gene usage in these same plasmacytomas at the DNA and RNA level. Our studies reveal: (a) antibodies secreted by plasmacytomas bind to different antigens in a manner similar to that observed for natural autoantibodies; (b) the expressed Ig heavy genes are restricted in V gene usage to the VH-J558 family; and (c) secondary rearrangements occur at the light chain level with at least three plasmacytomas expressing both κ and λ light chain genes. These results suggest that plasmacytomas use a restricted population of B cells that may still be undergoing rearrangement, thereby bypassing the allelic exclusion normally associated with expression of antibody genes. PMID:10562316

  16. Novel region within the V kappa gene promoter is responsible for tissue and stage-specific expression of immunoglobulin genes in human lymphoid neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Kossakowska, A E; Urbanski, S J

    1989-03-01

    Immunoglobulin gene-specific transacting factors have been shown to play a role in lymphoid tissue-specific expression of immunoglobulin genes. The role of these factors in B-cell differentiation and stage-specific expression of these genes is, however, not fully understood. We have used a model of human lymphoid neoplasia to address this question. Different fragments of unrearranged human variable region of immunoglobulin kappa gene (V kappa) were used for cell-free in vitro transcription and DNA mobility shift assays. Previously described enhancement of in vitro transcription that was only seen with nuclear extracts derived from B-cell neoplasms corresponding to the late stages of B-cell differentiation was shown to be dependent on the actions of these factor(s) on the DNA region within the V kappa gene promoter. This region is located within the 920 bp fragment located 210 bp upstream from the coding region and this fragment represents a possible novel DNA region, which plays a role in the stage- and tissue-specific expression of immunoglobulin genes.

  17. Shared idiotypes and restricted immunoglobulin variable region heavy chain genes characterize murine autoantibodies of various specificities.

    PubMed Central

    Monestier, M; Manheimer-Lory, A; Bellon, B; Painter, C; Dang, H; Talal, N; Zanetti, M; Schwartz, R; Pisetsky, D; Kuppers, R

    1986-01-01

    The study of the Ig variable region heavy chain (VH) genes used to encode antibodies specific for self-epitopes from murine hybridomas showed that three VH families are primarily utilized: VH J558, the largest family, and VH QPC52 and VH 7183, the families most proximal to the Ig joining region heavy chain genes. These monoclonal autoantibodies express cross-reactive idiotopes shared by rheumatoid factors and antibodies specific for Sm. The expression of these idiotypes is independent of major histocompatibility complex and Ig constant region heavy chain haplotypes, self-antigen specificity, and even the VH gene family utilized. Though the experiments described here are limited to murine autoantibodies, similarities exist between murine and human autoimmune diseases. Studies that aim to investigate the relationship between VH gene expression and the presence of cross-reactive idiotypes among human autoantibodies should enable us to better understand the mechanisms of autoimmunity and self-tolerance. Images PMID:2427543

  18. Gene conversion in human rearranged immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Darlow, John M; Stott, David I

    2006-07-01

    Over the past 20 years, many DNA sequences have been published suggesting that all or part of the V(H) segment of a rearranged immunoglobulin gene may be replaced in vivo. Two different mechanisms appear to be operating. One of these is very similar to primary V(D)J recombination, involving the RAG proteins acting upon recombination signal sequences, and this has recently been proven to occur. Other sequences, many of which show partial V(H) replacements with no addition of untemplated nucleotides at the V(H)-V(H) joint, have been proposed to occur by an unusual RAG-mediated recombination with the formation of hybrid (coding-to-signal) joints. These appear to occur in cells already undergoing somatic hypermutation in which, some authors are convinced, RAG genes are silenced. We recently proposed that the latter type of V(H) replacement might occur by homologous recombination initiated by the activity of AID (activation-induced cytidine deaminase), which is essential for somatic hypermutation and gene conversion. The latter has been observed in other species, but not in human Ig genes, so far. In this paper, we present a new analysis of sequences published as examples of the second type of rearrangement. This not only shows that AID recognition motifs occur in recombination regions but also that some sequences show replacement of central sections by a sequence from another gene, similar to gene conversion in the immunoglobulin genes of other species. These observations support the proposal that this type of rearrangement is likely to be AID-mediated rather than RAG-mediated and is consistent with gene conversion.

  19. Altered phenotypic expression of immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable-region (VH) genes in Alicia rabbits probably reflects a small deletion in the VH genes closest to the joining region.

    PubMed

    Allegrucci, M; Newman, B A; Young-Cooper, G O; Alexander, C B; Meier, D; Kelus, A S; Mage, R G

    1990-07-01

    Rabbits of the Alicia strain have a mutation (ali) that segregates with the immunoglobulin heavy-chain (lgh) locus and has a cis effect upon the expression of heavy-chain variable-region (VH) genes encoding the a2 allotype. In heterozygous a1/ali or a3/ali rabbits, serum immunoglobulins are almost entirely the products of the normal a1 or a3 allele and only traces of a2 immunoglobulin are detectable. Adult homozygous ali/ali rabbits likewise have normal immunoglobulin levels resulting from increased production of a-negative immunoglobulins and some residual ability to produce the a2 allotype. By contrast, the majority of the immunoglobulins of wild-type a2 rabbits are a2-positive and only a small percentage are a-negative. Genomic DNAs from homozygous mutant and wild-type animals were indistinguishable by Southern analyses using a variety of restriction enzyme digests and lgh probes. However, when digests with infrequently cutting enzymes were analyzed by transverse alternating-field electrophoresis, the ali DNA fragments were 10-15 kilobases smaller than the wild type. These fragments hybridized to probes both for VH and for a region of DNA a few kilobases downstream of the VH genes nearest the joining region. We suggest that this relatively small deletion affects a segment containing 3' VH genes with important regulatory functions, the loss of which leads to the ali phenotype. These results, and the fact that the 3' VH genes rearrange early in B-cell development, indicate that the 3' end of the VH locus probably plays a key role in regulation of VH gene expression.

  20. The molecular basis of somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Storb, U

    1996-04-01

    Somatic hypermutation amplifies the variable region repertoire of immunoglobulin genes. Recent experimental evidence has thrown light on various molecular models of somatic hypermutation. A link between somatic hypermutation and transcription coupled DNA repair is shaping up.

  1. Immunoglobulin gene diversification in cattle.

    PubMed

    Meyer, A; Parng, C L; Hansal, S A; Osborne, B A; Goldsby, R A

    1997-01-01

    Research in several species has revealed that different types of mammals have evolved divergent molecular and cellular strategies for generating immunoglobulin diversity. Other chapters in this text have highlighted the specific characteristics unique to chicken, rabbit, mouse, human and sheep B lymphocyte development; namely indicating differences in the mechanisms of diversity and the site of primary B cell development. Studies of the bovine system have indicated that like the sheep system, the ileal Peyer's patch (IPP) is a likely chicken bursal equivalent, and is a site of primary B lymphocyte development. Substantial investigation in sheep has indicated that Ig diversity is created by untemplated somatic mutation and intense selective pressure (Reynaud et al., 1991). The frequency of alteration in the sheep Ig light chain gene locus also is characteristic of the bovine system, however, recent evidence from sequencing of bovine lambda light chain genes indicates that one mechanism that contributes to diversity is gene conversion, utilizing several pseudogenes located in the Ig locus (Parng et al., 1996). The mechanism by which this hyperalteration of Ig genes occurs in both sheep and cattle is poorly understood and is thus the focus of considerable investigation. The study of events in the IPP may also have informative ramifications for secondary diversification of the Ig repertoire by somatic hyperalteration in germinal centers.

  2. Somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes is linked to transcription initiation.

    PubMed

    Peters, A; Storb, U

    1996-01-01

    To identify DNA sequences that target the somatic hypermutation process, the immunoglobulin gene promoter located upstream of the variable (V) region was duplicated upstream of the constant (C) region of a kappa transgene. Normally, kappa genes are somatically mutated only in the VJ region, but not in the C region. In B cell hybridomas from mice with this kappa transgene (P5'C), both the VJ region and the C region, but not the region between them, were mutated at similar frequencies, suggesting that the mutation mechanism is related to transcription. The downstream promoter was not occluded by transcripts from the upstream promoter. In fact, the levels of transcripts originating from the two promoters were similar, supporting a mutation model based on initiation of transcripts. Several "hot-spots" of somatic mutation were noted, further demonstrating that this transgene has the hallmarks of somatic mutation of endogenous immunoglobulin genes. A model linking somatic mutation to transcription-coupled DNA repair is proposed.

  3. The octamer/mu E4 region of the immunoglobulin heavy-chain enhancer mediates gene repression in myeloma x T-lymphoma hybrids.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, L; Lieberman, S; Eckhardt, L A

    1993-01-01

    We have shown previously that the immunoglobulin heavy-chain enhancer acts as a repressor of gene transcription in hybrids between immunoglobulin-producing myelomas and a T-lymphoma line. We have now mapped this repressive activity to a 51-bp enhancer subfragment which contains the octamer and mu E4 protein-binding motifs. Even a single copy of this subfragment will repress gene expression in hybrid cells. Mutational analyses of the repressor fragment suggest that in non-B cells, a strong transcriptional repressor(s) functions through the same motifs important for gene activation in B cells. Changes in chromatin structure that accompany reporter gene repression suggest a general mechanism for prohibiting immunoglobulin heavy-chain locus activation in inappropriate cell types. Images PMID:8497268

  4. Organization and expression of immunoglobulin genes in fetal liver hybridomas.

    PubMed

    Perry, R P; Kelley, D E; Coleclough, C; Kearney, J F

    1981-01-01

    The organization and expression of immunoglobulin genes were studied in a series of six hybridomas derived from the fusion of a nonproducing myeloma cell with cells from mouse fetal liver. These hybridomas, which exhibit several phenotypic characteristics of immature B lymphocytes, all have productively rearranged mu heavy chain genes and produce both the membrane and secreted forms of mu mRNA in a ratio of about 1:10. Significantly, none of the hybridomas has an unrearranged (germ line) allelic mu gene. Examination of the kappa light chain genes revealed that all six of the hybridomas contain unrearranged kappa loci and produce 8.4-kilobase transcripts containing kappa constant region sequences. None of the five hybridomas that exhibit a mu-only phenotype contains a rearranged kappa gene other than that derived from the myeloma parent. One hybridoma, which actively secretes kappa immunoglobulin, contains a rearranged kappa gene of fetal liver origin and synthesizes a distinctive kappa mRNA precursor in addition to the 8.4-kilobase transcript. These results demonstrate that rearrangement of heavy chain immunoglobulin genes normally occurs prior to that of light chain genes and further indicate that the transcriptional competence of the kappa constant region locus is established prior to the time of its rearrangement.

  5. Molecular analysis of the immunoglobulin genes in goose.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tian; Wu, Kun; Yuan, Xiaoli; Shao, Shuai; Wang, WenYuan; Wei, Si; Cao, Gengsheng

    2016-07-01

    Immunoglobulins play an important role in adaptive immune system as defense molecules against pathogens. However, our knowledge on avian immunoglobulin genes has been limited to a few species. In this study, we analyzed goose (Anser cygnoides orientalis) immunoglobulin genes. Three IgH classes including IgM, IgA, IgY and λ light chain were identified. The IgM and IgA heavy chain constant regions are characteristically similar to their counterparts described in other vertebrates. In addition to the classic Ig isotypes, we also detected a transcript that encoded a truncated form of IgY (IgY(ΔFc)) in goose. Similar to duck, the IgY(ΔFc) in goose was generated by using different transcriptional termination signal of the same υ gene. Limited variability and only one leader peptide were observed in VH and VL domains, which suggested that gene conversion was the primary mechanism involved in goose antibody diversity. Our study provides more insights into the immunoglobulin genes in goose that had not been fully explored before.

  6. Heterogeneous breakpoints on the immunoglobulin genes are involved in fusion with the 5' region of BCL2 in B-cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Yonetani, N; Ueda, C; Akasaka, T; Nishikori, M; Uchiyama, T; Ohno, H

    2001-09-01

    The 5' flanking region of the BCL2 gene (5'-BCL2) is a breakpoint cluster of rearrangements with immunoglobulin genes (IGs). In contrast to t(14;18)(q32;q21) affecting the 3' region of BCL2, 5'-BCL2 can fuse to not only the heavy chain gene (IGH), but also two light chain gene (IGL) loci. We report here cloning and sequencing of a total of eleven 5'-BCL2 / IGs junctional areas of B-cell tumors, which were amplified by long-distance polymerase chain reaction-based assays. The breakpoints on 5'-BCL2 were distributed from 378 to 2312 bp upstream of the translational initiation site and, reflecting the alteration of regulatory sequences of BCL2, 5'-BCL2 / IGs-positive cells showed markedly higher levels of BCL2 expression than those of t(14;18)-positive cells. In contrast, the breakpoints on the IGs were variable. Two 5'-BCL2 / IGH and two 5'-BCL2 / IGLkappa junctions occurred 5' of the joining (J) segments, suggesting operation of an erroneous variable (V) / diversity (D) / J and V / J rearrangement mechanism. However, two other 5'-BCL2 / IGH junctions affected switch regions, and the kappa-deleting element, which is located 24 kb downstream of the constant region of IGLkappa, followed the 5'-BCL2 in another case. One 5'-BCL2 / IGLkappa and two 5'-BCL2 / IGLlambda junctions involved intronic regions where the normal recombination process does not occur. In the remaining one case, the 5'-BCL2 fused 3' of a Vlambda gene that was upstream of another Vlambda / Jlambda complex carrying a non-producing configuration, indicating that the receptor editing mechanism was likely involved in this rearrangement. Our study revealed heterogeneous anatomy of the 5'-BCL2 / IGs fusion gene leading to transcriptional activation of BCL2, and suggested that the mechanisms underlying the formation of this particular oncogene / IGs recombination are not identical to those of t(14;18).

  7. Rearrangements of immunoglobulin genes during differentiation and evolution.

    PubMed

    Honjo, T; Nakai, S; Nishida, Y; Kataoka, T; Yamawaki-Kataoka, Y; Takahashi, N; Obata, M; Shimizu, A; Yaoita, Y; Nikaido, T; Ishida, N

    1981-01-01

    Immunoglobulin genes are shown to undergo dynamic rearrangements during differentiation as well as evolution. We have demonstrated that a complete immunoglobulin heavy chain gene is formed by at least two types of DNA rearrangement during B cell differentiation. The first type of rearrangement is V-D-J recombination to complete a variable region sequence and the second type is S-S recombination to switch a constant region sequence. Both types of recombination are accompanied by deletion of the intervening DNA segment. Structure and organization of CH genes are elucidated by molecular cloning and nucleotide sequence determination. Organization of H chain genes is summarized as VH-(unknown distance)-JH-(6.5 kb)-C mu-(4.5 kb)-C delta-(unknown distance)-C gamma 3-(34 kb)-C gamma 1-(21 kb)-C gamma 2b-(15 kb)-C gamma 2a-(14.5 kb)-C epsilon-(12.5 kb)-C alpha. The S-S recombination takes place at the S region which is located at the 5' side of each CH gene. Nucleotide sequence of the S region comprises tandem repetition of closely related sequences. The S-S recombination seems to be mediated by short common sequences shared among S regions. A sister chromatid exchange model was proposed as a mechanism for S-S recombination. Comparison of nucleotide sequences of CH genes indicates that immunoglobulin genes have scrambled by intervening sequence-mediated domain transfer during their evolution.

  8. Characterization of a lymphoblastoid line deleted for lambda immunoglobulin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Hough, C.A., White, B.N., Holden, J.A.

    1995-04-01

    While characterizing the cat eye syndrome (CES) supernumerary chromosome for the presence of {lambda} immunoglobulin gene region sequences, a lymphoblastoid cell line from one CES patient was identified in which there was selection of cells deleted from some IGLC and IGLV genes. Two distinct deletions, one on each chromosome 22, were identified, presumably arising from independent somatic recombination events occurring during B-lymphocyte differentiation. The extent of the deleted regions was determined using probes from the various IGLV subgroups and they each covered at least 82 kilobases. The precise definition of the deletions was not possible because of conservation of some restriction sites in the IGLV region. The cell line was used to map putative IGLV genes within the recombinant phage {lambda}V{lambda}135 to the distal part of the IGLV gene region. 35 refs., 4 figs.

  9. [Immunoglobulin genes in lymphoid cells and regulation of their transcription].

    PubMed

    Stepchenko, A G; Urakov, D N; Luchina, N N; Deev, S M; Polianovskiĭ, O L

    1990-01-01

    The hybridoma genomes contain polyploid sets of immunoglobulin genes. We have shown, that the hybridoma PTF-02 genome contains three genes of heavy chains and two genes of light chains. The genes responsible for antibody synthesis were cloned and their structure were determined. Investigation of the kappa gene transcription and its fragments which contain regulatory sequences revealed a nuclear factor. The latter interacts with the octanucleotide localized at the promoter region of the kappa gene. The purified factor activates the transcription of the kappa gene in a heterologous cell-free system. Together with the tissue-specific factor there is also an universal factor interacting with the octanucleotide sequence. We have shown an additional factor in lymphoid cells interact with the protein which binds to the octanucleotide sequence. We have shown an additional factor in lymphoid cells interacting with the protein which binds to the octanucleotide sequence. As a result, there is a family of factors which interact with ATTTGCAT sequence. One major factor (m.w. 60 +/- 2 kDa) is an obligatory component for the initiation of immunoglobulin genes transcription.

  10. Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Variable Region and Major Histocompatibility Region Genes Are Linked to Induced Graves' Disease in Females From Two Very Large Families of Recombinant Inbred Mice

    PubMed Central

    Aliesky, Holly; Banuelos, Bianca; Magana, Jessica; Williams, Robert W.; Rapoport, Basil

    2014-01-01

    Graves' hyperthyroidism is caused by antibodies to the TSH receptor (TSHR) that mimic thyroid stimulation by TSH. Stimulating TSHR antibodies and hyperthyroidism can be induced by immunizing mice with adenovirus expressing the human TSHR A-subunit. Prior analysis of induced Graves' disease in small families of recombinant inbred (RI) female mice demonstrated strong genetic control but did not resolve trait loci for TSHR antibodies or elevated serum T4. We investigated the genetic basis for induced Graves' disease in female mice of two large RI families and combined data with earlier findings to provide phenotypes for 178 genotypes. TSHR antibodies measured by inhibition of TSH binding to its receptor were highly significantly linked in the BXD set to the major histocompatibility region (chromosome 17), consistent with observations in 3 other RI families. In the LXS family, we detected linkage between T4 levels after TSHR-adenovirus immunization and the Ig heavy chain variable region (Igvh, chromosome 12). This observation is a key finding because components of the antigen binding region of Igs determine antibody specificity and have been previously linked to induced thyroid-stimulating antibodies. Data from the LXS family provide the first evidence in mice of a direct link between induced hyperthyroidism and Igvh genes. A role for major histocompatibility genes has now been established for genetic susceptibility to Graves' disease in both humans and mice. Future studies using arrays incorporating variation in the complex human Ig gene locus will be necessary to determine whether Igvh genes are also linked to Graves' disease in humans. PMID:25051451

  11. Rheumatoid factors, B cells and immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Jefferis, R

    1995-04-01

    The paradigm of self, non-self discrimination in the immune system is under review as autoreactive B or T cells are increasingly delineated within normal individuals. The products of autoreactive B cells are, mostly, polyspecific IgM antibodies of low affinity. These 'natural' antibodies include rheumatoid factors (RF) encoded by unmutated germline immunoglobulin genes. In rheumatoid arthritis (RA) the RF may be of the IgM, IgG or IgA isotype, show evidence of somatic mutation and have increased affinity; consistent with maturation of an antigen driven immune response. This response could be initiated or driven by an auto-immunogenic form of IgG or an exogenous cross-reactive antigen. Changes in galactosylation of IgG have been reported to be a valuable diagnostic and prognostic indicator in RA. Speculation that these changes may precipitate some of the disease processes is critically reviewed.

  12. Comparison of somatic mutation frequency among immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Motoyama, N; Miwa, T; Suzuki, Y; Okada, H; Azuma, T

    1994-02-01

    We analyzed the frequency of somatic mutation in immunoglobulin genes from hybridomas that secrete anti-(4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl)acetyl (NP) monoclonal antibodies. A high frequency of mutation (3.3-4.4%) was observed in both the rearranged VH186.2 and V lambda 1 genes, indicating that somatic mutation occurs with similar frequency in these genes in spite of the absence of an intron enhancer in lambda 1 chain genes. In contrast to the high frequency in J-C introns, only two nucleotide substitutions occurred at positions -462 and -555 in the 5' noncoding region in one of the lambda 1-chain genes and in none of the other three so far studied. Since a similar low frequency of somatic mutation was observed in the 5' noncoding region of inactive lambda 2-chain genes rendered inactive because of incorrect rearrangement, this region may not be a target or alternatively, may be protected from the mutator system. We observed a low frequency of nucleotide substitution in unrearranged V lambda 1 genes (approximately 1/15 that of rearranged genes). Together with previous results (Azuma T., N. Motoyama, L. Fields, and D. Loh, 1993. Int. Immunol. 5:121), these findings suggest that the 5' noncoding region, which contains the promoter element, provides a signal for the somatic mutator system and that rearrangement, which brings the promoter into close proximity to the enhancer element, should increase mutation efficiency.

  13. Somatic hypermutations in the immunoglobulin genes of two new human lymphoma lines of lymphatic follicle origin.

    PubMed

    Wu, H Y; Tuomikoski, T; Eray, M; Mattila, P; Knuutila, S; Kaartinen, M

    1994-03-01

    Variable immunoglobulin heavy-chain regions (VDJ) of two newly established human lymphoma cell lines (HF-1 and HF-4) were sequenced. The most homologous germline VH gene found for both the HF-1 and HF-4 sequences was VH26 of the VH3a (V gene) family (82% and 91% homologies, respectively). The JH region of the HF-4 heavy-chain sequence contained two nucleotide differences compared to the published germline JH3 gene. The DHJH region of the HF-1 gene had a record high number (20%) of somatic mutations. The numerous hypermutations found in the HF-1 cell line support the hypothesis that in some human follicular lymphomas, mutations continue to accumulate in immunoglobulin genes during the malignant growth. Follicular lymphoma cell lines, which have an active mutational machinery, in future may help to solve the molecular events behind the somatic hypermutations modifying immunoglobulin genes of B lymphocytes.

  14. Introduction of human gamma 1 immunoglobulin genes into fertilized mouse eggs.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, K; Kikutani, H; Takahashi, N; Taga, T; Akira, S; Kawai, K; Fukuchi, K; Kumahara, Y; Honjo, T; Kishimoto, T

    1984-08-01

    A rearranged human gamma 1 immunoglobulin gene was introduced into fertilized mouse eggs. The phage Ch4A-VCE-gamma 1 was constructed by ligating an EcoRI and BglII fragment of pBR322-CESSV(CE-1) containing the VDJ region with an EcoRI and BamHI fragment of Ch4A-HIg gamma 1-10 containing the gamma 1 constant region. About 200 copies of Ch4A-VCE-gamma 1 genes were introduced into fertilized mouse eggs. Of 489 eggs injected with these genes, 319 survived and were transferred to oviducts of foster mothers. Thirtyeight mice were born and were screened for the presence of human gamma 1 immunoglobulin genes by Southern blot hybridization. Five of these 38 mice had integrated human gamma 1 immunoglobulin genes. None of the human gamma 1 copies in each mouse had undergone deletions or rearrangements as judged by the Southern blotting patterns for several restriction enzymes. Human gamma 1 gene was present in several different tissues. All the mice tested so far transmit the human gamma 1 gene to a fraction of their offspring in an autosomal dominant manner. Spleen cells from transgenic mice were analyzed for immunoglobulin production by reverse plaque assay or immunofluorescence staining of cytoplasmic immunoglobulin, but synthesis and secretion of human gamma 1 chains could not be detected. No human gamma 1 immunoglobulin mRNA was detected in the liver and spleen of a transgenic mouse. The presence of the human gamma 1 immunoglobulin gene appeared to have no effect on the expression of endogenous mouse immunoglobulin genes.

  15. Methylation patterns of immunoglobulin genes in lymphoid cells: correlation of expression and differentiation with undermethylation.

    PubMed

    Storb, U; Arp, B

    1983-11-01

    Different states of eukaryotic gene expression are often correlated with different levels of methylation of DNA sequences containing structural genes and their flanking regions. To assess the potential role of DNA methylation in the expression of immunoglobulin genes, which require complex rearrangements prior to expression, methylation patterns were examined in cell lines representing different stages of lymphocyte maturation. Methylation of the second cytosine in the sequence 5' C-C-G-G 3' was determined by using Hpa II/Msp I endonuclease digestion. Four CH genes (C mu, C delta, C gamma 2b, and C alpha), C kappa, V kappa, C lambda, and V lambda genes were analyzed. The results lead to the following conclusions: (i) transcribed immunoglobulin genes are undermethylated; (ii) the C gene allelic to an expressed C gene is always also undermethylated; and (iii) all immunoglobulin loci tend to become increasingly undermethylated as B cells mature.

  16. Somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes is independent of the Bloom's syndrome DNA helicase.

    PubMed

    Sack, S Z; Liu, Y; German, J; Green, N S

    1998-05-01

    Immunoglobulin gene somatic mutation leads to antibody affinity maturation through the introduction of multiple point mutations in the antigen binding site. No genes have as yet been identified that participate in this process. Bloom's syndrome (BS) is a chromosomal breakage disorder with a mutator phenotype. Most affected individuals exhibit an immunodeficiency of undetermined aetiology. The gene for this disorder, BLM, has recently been identified as a DNA helicase. If this gene were to play a role in immunoglobulin mutation, then people with BS may lack normally mutated antibodies. Since germ-line, non-mutated immunoglobulin genes generally produce low affinity antibodies, impaired helicase activity might be manifested as the immunodeficiency found in BS. Therefore, we asked whether BLM is specifically involved in immunoglobulin hypermutation. Sequences of immunoglobulin variable (V) regions were analysed from small unsorted blood samples obtained from BS individuals and compared with germ-line sequences. BS V regions displayed the normal distribution of mutations, indicating that the defect in BS is not related to the mechanism of somatic mutation. These data strongly argue against BLM being involved in this process. The genetic approach to identifying the genes involved in immunoglobulin mutation will require further studies of DNA repair- and immunodeficient individuals.

  17. Immunoglobulin genes implicated in glioma risk.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Janardan P; Kaur, Navtej; Costa, Sandra; Amorim, Julia; Nabico, Rui; Linhares, Paulo; Vaz, Rui; Viana-Pereira, Marta; Reis, Rui M

    2014-01-01

    Both genetic and environmental factors are thought to be causal in gliomagenesis. Several genes have been implicated in glioma development, but the putative role of a major immunity-related gene complex member, immunoglobulin heavy chain γ (IGHG) has not been evaluated. Prior observations that IGHG-encoded γ marker (GM) allotypes exhibit differential sensitivity to an immunoevasion strategy of cytomegalovirus, a pathogen implicated as a promoter of gliomagenesis, has lead us to hypothesize that these determinants are risk factors for glioma. To test this hypothesis, we genotyped the IGHG locus comprising the GM alleles, specifically GM alleles 3 and 17, of 120 glioma patients and 133 controls via TaqMan® genotyping assay. To assess the associations between GM genotypes and the risk of glioma, we applied an unconditional multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusted for potential confounding variables. In comparison to subjects who were homozygous for the GM 17 allele, the GM 3 homozygotes were over twice as likely, and the GM 3/17 heterozygotes were over three times as likely, to develop glioma. Similar results were achieved when analyzed by combining the data corresponding to alleles GM 3 and GM 3/17 in a dominant model. The GM 3/17 genotype and the combination of GM 3 and GM 3/17 were found to be further associated with over 3 times increased risk for high-grade astrocytoma (grades III-IV). Allele frequency analyses also showed an increased risk for gliomas and high-grade astrocytoma in association with GM 3. Our findings support the premise that the GM 3 allele may present risk for the development of glioma, possibly by modulating immunity to cytomegalovirus.

  18. Rapid cloning of any rearranged mouse immunoglobulin variable genes

    SciTech Connect

    Dattamajumdar, A.K.; Jacobson, D.P.; Hood, L.E.; Osman, G.E.

    1996-12-31

    Immunoglobulins (Ig) have been the focus of extensive study for several decades and have become an important research area for immunologists and molecular biologists. The use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology has accelerated the cloning, sequencing, and characterization of genes of the immune system. However, cloning and sequencing the Ig variable (V) genes using the PCR technology has been a challenging task, primarily due to the very diverse nature of Ig V region genes. We have developed a simple, rapid, and reproducible PCR-based technique to clone any rearranged mouse Ig heavy or light chain genes. A close examination of all Ig heavy and light chain V gene families has resulted in the design of 5{prime} and 3{prime} universal primers from regions that are highly conserved across all heavy or light chain V gene families, and the joining or constant regions, respectively. We present our strategy for designing universal primers for Ig V gene families. These primers were able to rapidly amplify the rearranged Ig V genes, belonging to diverse Ig V gene families from very different cell lines, i.e., J558, MOPC-21, 36-60, and a chicken ovalbumin specific B-cell hybridoma. In addition, the present study provides the complete alignment of nucleotide sequences of all heavy and light chain variable gene families. This powerful method of cloning Ig V genes, therefore, allows rapid and precise analysis of B-cell hybridomas, B-cell repertoire, and B-cell ontogeny. 55 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Immunoglobulin genes and their transcriptional control in teleosts.

    PubMed

    Hikima, Jun-ichi; Jung, Tae-Sung; Aoki, Takashi

    2011-09-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig), which exists only in jawed vertebrates, is one of the most important molecules in adaptive immunity. In the last two decades, many teleost Ig genes have been identified by in silico data mining from the enormous gene and EST databases of many fish species. In this review, the organization of Ig gene segments, the expressed Ig isotypes and their transcriptional controls are discussed. The Ig heavy chain (IgH) locus in teleosts encodes the variable (V), the diversity (D), the joining (J) segments and three different isotypic constant (C) regions including Cμ, Cδ, and Cζ/τ genes, and is organized as a "translocon" type like the IgH loci of higher vertebrates. In contrast, the Ig light (L) chain locus is arranged in a "multicluster" or repeating set of VL, JL, and CL segments. The IgL chains have four isotypes; two κ L1/G and L3/F), σ (L2) and λ. The transcription of IgH genes in teleosts is regulated by a VH promoter and the Eμ3' enhancer, which both function in a B cell-specific manner. The location of the IgH locus, structure and transcriptional function of the Eμ3' enhancer are important to our understanding of the evolutional changes that have occurred in the IgH gene locus.

  20. Cloning and sequencing of human lambda immunoglobulin genes by the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Songsivilai, S; Bye, J M; Marks, J D; Hughes-Jones, N C

    1990-12-01

    Universal oligonucleotide primers, designed for amplifying and sequencing genes encoding the rearranged human lambda immunoglobulin variable region, were validated by amplification of the lambda light chain genes from four human heterohybridoma cell lines and in the generation of a cDNA library of human V lambda sequences from Epstein-Barr virus-transformed human peripheral blood lymphocytes. This technique allows rapid cloning and sequencing of human immunoglobulin genes, and has potential applications in the rescue of unstable human antibody-producing cell lines and in the production of human monoclonal antibodies.

  1. Targeting of AID-mediated sequence diversification to immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Kothapalli, Naga Rama; Fugmann, Sebastian D

    2011-04-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is a key enzyme for antibody-mediated immune responses. Antibodies are encoded by the immunoglobulin genes and AID acts as a transcription-dependent DNA mutator on these genes to improve antibody affinity and effector functions. An emerging theme in field is that many transcribed genes are potential targets of AID, presenting an obvious danger to genomic integrity. Thus there are mechanisms in place to ensure that mutagenic outcomes of AID activity are specifically restricted to the immunoglobulin loci. Cis-regulatory targeting elements mediate this effect and their mode of action is probably a combination of immunoglobulin gene specific activation of AID and a perversion of faithful DNA repair towards error-prone outcomes.

  2. Immunoglobulin λ Gene Rearrangement Can Precede κ Gene Rearrangement

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Berg, Jörg; Mcdowell, Mindy; Jäck, Hans-Martin; Wabl, Matthias

    1990-01-01

    Imore » mmunoglobulin genes are generated during differentiation of B lymphocytes by joining gene segments. A mouse pre-B cell contains a functional immunoglobulin heavy-chain gene, but no light-chain gene. Although there is only one heavy-chain locus, there are two lightchain loci: κ and λ .It has been reported that κ loci in the germ-line configuration are never (in man) or very rarely (in the mouse) present in cells with functionally rearranged λ -chain genes. Two explanations have been proposed to explain this: (a) the ordered rearrangement theory, which postulates that light-chain gene rearrangement in the pre-B cell is first attempted at the κ locus, and that only upon failure to produce a functional κ chain is there an attempt to rearrange the λ locus; and (b) the stochastic theory, which postulates that rearrangement at the λ locus proceeds at a rate that is intrinsically much slower than that at the κ locus. We show here that λ -chain genes are generated whether or not the κ locus has lost its germ-line arrangement, a result that is compatible only with the stochastic theory.« less

  3. [Immunoglobulin genes encoding antibodies directed to oncodevelopmental carbohydrate antigens].

    PubMed

    Zenita, K; Yago, K; Fujimoto, E; Kannagi, R

    1990-07-01

    We investigated the immunoglobulin genes which encode the variable region of the monoclonal antibodies directed to the onco-developmental carbohydrate antigens such SSEA-1, fucosyl SSEA-1, SSEA-3 and SSEA-4. The VH region of these antibodies was preferentially encoded by the gene members of the X24, VH7183 and Q52 families, the families which are known to be located at the 3'-end region of the murine germ line VH gene. This result is interesting particularly when considering that the members of the 3'-end VH families are known to be preferentially expressed in embryonic B lymphocytes by an intrinsic genetic program. The comparative study of the nucleic acid sequences of mRNAs encoding these antibodies and the sequences of the corresponding germ line VH genes disclosed that the sequences encoding the antibodies contain no mutation from the germ line VH genes, or contain only a few somatic mutations, which are thought to be insignificant for the reactivity of the antibodies to the nominal antigens. These results imply that some of the embryonic B lymphocytes that express the unmutated germ line VH genes of the 3'-end families can be reactive with embryonic carbohydrate antigens, albeit rearranged with appropriate D-JH gene segments, and coupled with proper light chains. The VH region of the syngenic monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies directed to these anti-carbohydrate antibodies were also encoded preferentially by the members of the 3'-end VH families. We propose here that a part of the virgin embryonic B lymphocytes, which express the antibody encoded by the gene members of the 3'-end VH families at the cell surface, will be stimulated by the embryonic carbohydrate antigens which are abundantly present in the internal milieu of the embryo. The clonally expanded B lymphocytes, in turn, will facilitate the proliferation of other populations of embryonic B lymphocytes expressing the corresponding anti-idiotypic antibodies, which are also encoded by the gene members

  4. Mapping of Heavy Chain Genes for Mouse Immunoglobulins M and D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chih-Ping; Tucker, Philip W.; Mushinski, J. Frederic; Blattner, Frederick R.

    1980-09-01

    A single DNA fragment containing both μ and δ immunoglobulin heavy chain genes has been cloned from normal BALB/c mouse liver DNA with a new λ phage vector Charon 28. The physical distance between the membrane terminal exon of μ and the first domain of δ is 2466 base pairs, with δ on the 3' side of μ . A single transcript could contain a variable region and both μ and δ constant regions. The dual expression of immunoglobulins M and D on spleen B cells may be due to alternate splicing of this transcript.

  5. Immunoglobulin genes: generating diversity with AID and UNG.

    PubMed

    Storb, Ursula; Stavnezer, Janet

    2002-10-29

    Somatic hypermutation and switch recombination of immunoglobulin genes require the activity of the activation-induced deaminase, AID. Recent studies of mice deficient for the uracil-DNA glycosylase UNG, which removes U from DNA, suggest that AID catalyses the deamination of dC to dU during antibody diversification.

  6. Molecular basis for expression of the A48 regulatory idiotope on antibodies encoded by immunoglobulin variable-region genes from various families.

    PubMed Central

    Zaghouani, H; Bonilla, F A; Meek, K; Bona, C

    1989-01-01

    The idiotype defined by the levan-specific BALB/c myeloma protein ABPC48 (A48) has previously been encountered only in antibodies the variable regions of which derive from the VHX24 and V kappa 10 gene families. We have demonstrated expression of the idiotope recognized by the monoclonal anti-A48 idiotype antibody IDA10 on five monoclonal antibodies from different mouse strains, with different specificities including foreign and self antigens and deriving their variable regions from families other than VHX24 and V kappa 10. We analyzed variable region protein structure (deduced from nucleotide sequences) and hydrophilicity profiles of idiotype+ and idiotype- antibodies. We identified four surface-exposed areas (one in the heavy chain and three in the light chain) that may contribute to expression of the idiotope defined by antibody IDA10. Images PMID:2494665

  7. Molecular basis for expression of the A48 regulatory idiotope on antibodies encoded by immunoglobulin variable-region genes from various families.

    PubMed

    Zaghouani, H; Bonilla, F A; Meek, K; Bona, C

    1989-04-01

    The idiotype defined by the levan-specific BALB/c myeloma protein ABPC48 (A48) has previously been encountered only in antibodies the variable regions of which derive from the VHX24 and V kappa 10 gene families. We have demonstrated expression of the idiotope recognized by the monoclonal anti-A48 idiotype antibody IDA10 on five monoclonal antibodies from different mouse strains, with different specificities including foreign and self antigens and deriving their variable regions from families other than VHX24 and V kappa 10. We analyzed variable region protein structure (deduced from nucleotide sequences) and hydrophilicity profiles of idiotype+ and idiotype- antibodies. We identified four surface-exposed areas (one in the heavy chain and three in the light chain) that may contribute to expression of the idiotope defined by antibody IDA10.

  8. Comparative analyses of immunoglobulin genes: surprises and portents.

    PubMed

    Flajnik, Martin F

    2002-09-01

    The study of immunoglobulin genes in non-mouse and non-human models has shown that different vertebrate groups have evolved distinct methods of generating antibody diversity. By contrast, the development of T cells in the thymus is quite similar in all of the species that have been examined. The three mechanisms by which B cells uniquely modify their immunoglobulin genes -- somatic hypermutation, gene conversion and class switching -- are increasingly believed to share some fundamental mechanisms, which studies in different vertebrate groups have helped (and will continue to help) to resolve. When these mechanisms are better understood, we should be able to look to the constitutive pathways from which they have evolved and perhaps determine whether the rearrangement of variable, diversity and joining antibody gene segments -- V(D)J recombination -- was superimposed on an existing adaptive immune system.

  9. Functional epitope analysis of the human CD4 molecule: antibodies that inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gene expression bind to the immunoglobulin CDR3-like region of CD4.

    PubMed Central

    Benkirane, M; Hirn, M; Carrière, D; Devaux, C

    1995-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that monoclonal antibody (MAb) 13B8-2, specific for the immunoglobulin (Ig) complementary determining region 3 (CDR3)-like region of the CD4 molecule, inhibits viral transcription in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected CEM cells and HIV type 1 (HIV-1) promoter activity. Here, we have studied the capacity of several MAb specific for the D1 domain of CD4, including anti-CDR2-like (Leu-3a and ST4) and anti-CDR3-like (13B8-2 and ST40) MAb, and for the D2 domain of CD4 (BL4) to inhibit both provirus transcription in HIV-1LAI-infected CEM cells and transcription of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene under control of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat in transiently transfected CEM cells. We found that HIV-1 promoter activity and provirus transcription are inhibited only by MAb that bind to the CDR3-like region in domain 1 of CD4. Moreover, we demonstrated that the Fab fragment of an anti-CDR3-like region-specific anti-CD4 MAb is a powerful inhibitor of HIV-1 promoter activity. These results have implications for understanding the role of the CDR3-like region in CD4 T-cell signaling, which controls provirus transcription. PMID:7474106

  10. Analysis of rearranged immunoglobulin genes indicating a process of clonal evolution in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Hakim, I; Rechavi, G; Brok-Simoni, F; Grossman, Z; Amariglio, N; Mandel, M; Ramot, B; Ben-Bassat, I; Katzir, N

    1993-07-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is known to be a stable monoclonal neoplasm. In contrast to early studies demonstrating no more than two hybridizing immunoglobulin heavy chain bands corresponding to the two expected alleles, we have demonstrated an unexpected multiband pattern when the HindIII-digested DNA samples from 38 CLL patients were analysed by Southern blot hybridization using JH and C mu gene probes. In order to characterize the genetic basis for the multiband pattern, we molecularly cloned the immunoglobulin heavy chain genes of one of the patients whose leukaemic DNA sample demonstrated three hybridizing JH bands and a loss of the germline band. The cloned rearranged immunoglobulin genes could be divided, based on the restriction mapping and the hybridization with the various probes, into two basic patterns representing two alleles. In one of the cloned rearranged immunoglobulin genes a secondary rearrangement occurred that resulted in the addition of 300 base-pair long sequence into the switch region, and the creation of a HindIII restriction site. The results of the study suggest that clonal evolution occurs in some CLL, and that many of these neoplasms are indeed oligoclonal due to the accumulation of secondary genetic changes.

  11. Immunoglobulin genes and diversity: what we have learned from domestic animals.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Liu, Zhancai; Ren, Liming; Wei, Zhiguo; Wang, Ping; Li, Ning; Zhao, Yaofeng

    2012-06-20

    This review focuses on the diversity of immunoglobulin (Ig) genes and Ig isotypes that are expressed in domestic animals. Four livestock species-cattle, sheep, pigs, and horses-express a full range of Ig heavy chains (IgHs), including μ, δ, γ, ϵ, and α. Two poultry species (chickens and ducks) express three IgH isotypes, μ, υ, and α, but not δ. The κ and λ light chains are both utilized in the four livestock species, but only the λ chain is expressed in poultry. V(D)J recombination, somatic hypermutation (SHM), and gene conversion (GC) are three distinct mechanisms by which immunoglobulin variable region diversity is generated. Different domestic animals may use distinct means to diversify rearranged variable regions of Ig genes.

  12. Comparative mapping of DNA probes derived from the V{sub k} immunoglobulin gene regions on human and great ape chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, N.; Wienberg, J.; Ermert, K.

    1995-03-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of cosmid clones of human V{sub K} gene regions to human and primate chromosomes contributed to the dating of chromosome reorganizations in evolution. A clone from the K locus at 2p11-p12 (cos 106) hybridized to the assumed homologous chromosome bands in the chimpanzees Pan troglodytes (PTR) and P. paniscus (PPA), the Gorilla gorilla (GGO), and the orangutan Pongo Pygmaeus (PPY). Human and both chimpanzees differed from gorilla and orangutan by the mapping of cos 170, a clone derived from chromosome 2cen-q11.2; the transposition of this orphon to the other side of the centromere can, therefore, be dated after the human/chimpanzee and gorilla divergence. Hybridization to homologous bands was also found with a cosmid clone containing a V{sub K}I orphon located on chromosome 1 (cos 115, main signal at 1q31-q32), although the probe is not fully unique. Also, a clone derived from the orphon V{sub K} region on chromosome 22q11 (cos 121) hybridized to the homologous bands in the great apes. This indicates that the orphons on human chromosomes 1 and 22 had been translocated early in primate evolution. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Identification of a DNA binding protein that recognizes the nonamer recombinational signal sequence of immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Halligan, B D; Desiderio, S V

    1987-10-01

    Extracts of nuclei from B- and T-lymphoid cells contain a protein that binds specifically to the conserved nonamer DNA sequence within the recombinational signals of immunoglobulin genes. Complexes with DNA fragments from four kappa light-chain joining (J) segments have the same electrophoretic mobility. Nonamer-containing DNA fragments from heavy-chain and light-chain genes compete for binding. Within the 5'-flanking DNA of the J kappa 4 gene segment, the binding site has been localized to a 27-base-pair interval spanning the nonamer region. The binding activity is recovered as a single peak after ion-exchange chromatography. The site of binding of the protein and its presence in nuclei of lymphoid cells suggest that it may function in the assembly of immunoglobulin genes.

  14. Limited number of immunoglobulin VH regions expressed in the mutant rabbit "Alicia".

    PubMed

    DiPietro, L A; Short, J A; Zhai, S K; Kelus, A S; Meier, D; Knight, K L

    1990-06-01

    A unique feature of rabbit Ig is the presence of VH region allotypic specificities. In normal rabbits, more than 80% of circulating immunoglobulin molecules bear the VHa allotypic specificities, al, a2 or a3; the remaining 10% to 20% of immunoglobulin molecules lack VHa allotypic specificities and are designated VHa-. A mutant rabbit designated Alicia, in contrast, has predominantly serum immunoglobulin molecules that lack the VHa allotypic specificities (Kelus and Weiss, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1986. 83: 4883). To study the nature and molecular complexity of VHa- molecules, we cloned and determined the nucleotide sequence of seven cDNA prepared from splenic RNA of an Alicia rabbit. Six of the clones appeared to encode VHa- molecules; the framework regions encoded by these clones were remarkably similar to each other, each having an unusual insertion of four amino acids at position 10. This insertion of four amino acids has been seen in only 2 of 54 sequenced rabbit VH genes. The similarity of the sequences of the six VHa- clones to each other and their dissimilarity to most other VH genes leads us to suggest that the VHa- molecules in Alicia rabbits are derived predominantly from one or a small number of very similar VH genes. Such preferential utilization of a small number of VH genes may explain the allelic inheritance of VH allotypes.

  15. Cloning of immunoglobulin kappa light chain genes from mouse liver and myeloma MOPC 173.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, M; Zachau, H G; Mach, B

    1979-07-25

    The organization of the kappa chain constant region gene was compared in DNA from an immunoglobulin-producing mouse myeloma (MOPC 173) and from liver. In situ hybridization using the Southern blotting technique revealed constant region gene-containing EcoRI-DNA fragments of 14 and 20 kb in the myeloma tissue whereas one EcoRI-DNA fragment with a length of 15 kb was found in liver DNA. After enrichment by RPC-5 chromatography and preparative electrophoresis the 14 kb fragment from MOPC 173 DNA and the 15 kb fragment from liver DNA were cloned in the bacteriophage lambda vector Charon 4A using in vitro packaging. Extensive characterization of the two fragments by restriction endonuclease mapping, in situ hybridization, and electron microscopy (R-loop and heteroduplex) showed that both fragments contain the constant region but no MOPC 173 variable region gene. Both fragments are homologous over a length of 12.5 kb including the constant region but differ from one another starting about 2.7 kb from the 5' end of the constant region gene. This indicates that the 14 kb EcoRI-DNA fragment from the myeloma tissue clearly resulted from somatic DNA rearrangement although it does not seem to carry the MOPC 173 variable region gene. These observations suggest that somatic DNA rearrangement of immunoglobulin light chain genes can involve both homologous chromosomes.Images

  16. Analysis of the immunoglobulin A protease gene of Streptococcus sanguis.

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, J V; Plaut, A G; Wright, A

    1991-01-01

    The amino acid sequence T-P-P-T-P-S-P-S is tandemly duplicated in the heavy chain of human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1), the major antibody in secretions. The bacterial pathogen Streptococcus sanguis, a precursor to dental caries and a cause of bacterial endocarditis, yields IgA protease that cleaves only the Pro-Thr peptide bond in the left duplication, while the type 2 IgA proteases of the genital pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae and the respiratory pathogen Haemophilus influenzae cleave only the P-T bond in the right half. We have sequenced the entire S. sanguis iga gene cloned into Escherichia coli. A segment consisting of 20 amino acids tandemly repeated 10 times, of unknown function, occurs near the amino-terminal end of the enzyme encoded in E. coli. Identification of a predicted zinc-binding region in the S. sanguis enzyme and the demonstration that mutations in this region result in production of a catalytically inactive protein support the idea that the enzyme is a metalloprotease. The N. gonorrhoeae and H. influenzae enzymes were earlier shown to be serine-type proteases, while the Bacteroides melaninogenicus IgA protease was shown to be a cysteine-type enzyme. The streptococcal IgA protease amino acid sequence has no significant homology with either of the two previously determined IgA protease sequences, that of type 2 N. gonorrhoeae and type 1 H. influenzae. The differences in both structure and mechanism among these functionally analogous enzymes underscore their role in the infectious process and offer some prospect of therapeutic intervention. Images PMID:1987065

  17. Molecular analysis of immunoglobulin genes in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Kosmas, C; Stamatopoulos, K; Stavroyianni, N; Belessi, C; Viniou, N; Yataganas, X

    1999-04-01

    The study of immunoglobulin genes in multiple myeloma over the last five years has provided important information regarding biology, ontogenetic location, disease evolution, pathogenic consequences and tumor-specific therapeutic intervention with idiotypic vaccination. Detailed analysis of V(H) genes has revealed clonal relationship between switch variants expressed by the bone marrow plasma cell and myeloma progenitors in the marrow and peripheral blood. V(H) gene usage is biased against V4-34 (encoding antibodies with cold agglutinin specificity; anti-l/i) explaining the absence of autoimmune phenomena in myeloma compared to other B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. V(H) genes accumulate somatic hypermutations following a distribution compatible with antigen selection, but with no intraclonal heterogeneity. V(L) genes indicate a bias in usage of VkappaI family members and somatic hypermutation, in line with antigen selection, of the expressed Vkappa genes is higher than any other B-cell lymphoid disorder. A complementary imprint of antigen selection as evidenced by somatic hypermutation of either the V(H) or V(L) clonogenic genes has been observed. The absence of ongoing somatic mutations in either V(H) or V(L) genes gives rise to the notion that the cell of origin in myeloma is a post-germinal center memory B-cell. Clinical application of sensitive PCR methods in order to detect clonal immunoglobulin gene rearrangements has made relevant the monitoring and follow-up of minimal residual disease in stem cell autografts and after myeloablative therapy. The fact that surface immunoglobulin V(H) and V(L) sequences constitute unique tumor-specific antigenic determinants has stimulated investigators to devise strategies aiming to generate active specific immunity against the idiotype of malignant B-cells in myeloma by constructing vaccines based on expressed single-chain Fv fragments, DNA plasmids carrying V(H)+V(L) clonogenic genes for naked DNA vaccination, or

  18. Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor gene association with cryptorchidism.

    PubMed

    Niepiekło-Miniewska, Wanda; Kuśnierczyk, Piotr; Havrylyuk, Anna; Kamieniczna, Marzena; Nakonechnyy, Andrij; Chopyak, Valentyna; Kurpisz, Maciej

    2015-12-01

    Cryptorchidism is a condition where a testis persists in the abdominal cavity. Thus, due to elevated temperature we may expect induction of aberrant immune reactions depending on genetic constitution of individual. This may be reflected by development of anti-sperm antibodies (ASA) in cryptorchid males. Also, natural killer (NK) cells which belong to innate immunity may control adaptive immunity. Therefore, the gene system encoding polymorphic NK cell immunoglobulin receptors (KIRs) has been studied. 109 prepubertal boys with cryptorchidism and 136 ethnically matched young male donors were selected to study NK cell KIRs. DNA was isolated using automatic Maxwell(®) system from the peripheral venous blood drawn onto anticoagulant. Olerup SSP KIR Genotyping kit including Taq polymerase was used for detection of KIR genes. Human leukocyte antigen-C (HLA-C) groups, C1 and C2 were established using a Olerup SSP KIR HLA Ligand kit. KIR2DL2 (killer immunoglobulin-like receptor two-domain long 2) and KIR2DS2 (killer immunoglobulin-like receptor two-domain short 2) genes were less frequent in patients than in control individuals (corrected p values: 0.0110 and 0.0383, respectively). However, no significant differences were observed between ASA-positive and ASA-negative patients, or between bilateral or unilateral cryptorchidism. No association between KIR ligands C1 and C2, alone or together with KIR2DL2, was found. However, the results suggest that KIR2DL2+/KIR2DS2+ genotype may be, to some extent, protective against cryptorchidism.

  19. The VH and CH immunoglobulin genes of swine: implications for repertoire development.

    PubMed

    Butler, J E; Sun, J; Kacskovics, I; Brown, W R; Navarro, P

    1996-11-01

    Swine have the largest number of IgG subclass genes of all species so far studied but have a single gene for IgA which occurs in two allelic forms that differ in hinge length. Swine also have constant region genes for C mu and C epsilon, but lack a gene homologous to that which encodes IgD in rodents and primates, despite the otherwise high degree of sequence similarity of all other swine CH genes with those of humans. Swine have < 20 VH genes, a single JH and perhaps a limited number of DH segments. Newborn piglets show preferential VH and DH usage and may use gene conversion as a mechanism for expanding their antibody repertoire. Despite the close similarity of their Ig gene sequences to humans, swine belong to the group of animals that includes rabbits, chickens and cattle when classified on the basis of B cell development. This group, unlike rodents and humans, have a single VH family, use hindgut follicles early in life (rather than bone marrow throughout life) to diversify their antibody repertoire and probably all use gene conversion. It is proposed that IgD may serve a function in repertoire development in rodents and humans which is unnecessary in the chicken-lagomorph-artiodactyl group. The diversity of immunoglobulins and immunoglobulin genes among species justifies the quest of veterinary immunologists to define the system for their species of interest rather than making extrapolations from mouse and human immune systems.

  20. The complete sequence of the human CD79b (Ig{beta}/B29) gene: Identification of a conserved exon/intron organization, immunoglobulin-like regulatory regions, and allelic polymorphism

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, S.; Chiorazzi, N.; Gregersen, P.K. |

    1994-12-31

    We determined the complete genomic sequence of the human CD79b (Ig{beta}/B29) gene. The CD79b gene product is associated with the membrane immunoglobulin signaling complex which is composed of immunoglobulin (Ig) itself, associated in a noncovalent fashion with CD79b and a second polypeptide chain, CD79a (Ig{alpha}/mb1). The sequence and exon/intron organization of the human and mouse CD79b genes are highly similar. The gene organization suggests that some variant forms of CD79b may arise by virtue of alternative splicing of mRNA. In addition, a number of conserved regulatory sequences commonly found in Ig genes are present in sequences which flank the human CD79b gene. Some of these sequences are distinct from those found in the CD79a promoter. These differences may explain why transcription of CD79b, but not CD79a, is observed in plasma cells. A new Taq 1 restriction fragment length polymorphism is described that is not associated with any structural polymorphisms of the expressed CD79b polypeptide. 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Allelic exclusion of immunoglobulin genes: models and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Vettermann, Christian; Schlissel, Mark S

    2010-09-01

    The allelic exclusion of immunoglobulin (Ig) genes is one of the most evolutionarily conserved features of the adaptive immune system and underlies the monospecificity of B cells. While much has been learned about how Ig allelic exclusion is established during B-cell development, the relevance of monospecificity to B-cell function remains enigmatic. Here, we review the theoretical models that have been proposed to explain the establishment of Ig allelic exclusion and focus on the molecular mechanisms utilized by developing B cells to ensure the monoallelic expression of Ig kappa and Ig lambda light chain genes. We also discuss the physiological consequences of Ig allelic exclusion and speculate on the importance of monospecificity of B cells for immune recognition.

  2. Somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes in human neonates.

    PubMed

    Ridings, J; Nicholson, I C; Goldsworthy, W; Haslam, R; Roberton, D M; Zola, H

    1997-05-01

    The antibody response in the young infant is limited in several ways; in particular, responses generally are of low affinity and restricted to IgM. This raises the question whether the affinity maturation process, consisting of somatic mutation of immunoglobulin genes coupled with selection of high-affinity variants, is operative in the neonate. Re-arranged V(H)6 genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from cord blood and from peripheral blood of infants. Heteroduplex analysis detected mutation in only 2/18 cord blood samples, while mutations were seen from about 10 days of age onwards. Cloning and sequencing of mutated neonatal V(H)6 genes showed that mutated sequences contained relatively few mutations (one to three mutations per sequence) compared with published values of about 10 in adult IgM sequences. Selection was not evident in the majority of neonatal samples. Thus mutation can occur in the human neonate, but is minimal and generally not accompanied by selection. The age at which affinity maturation develops effectively is yet to be defined.

  3. AID-targeting and hypermutation of non-immunoglobulin genes does not correlate with proximity to immunoglobulin genes in germinal center B cells.

    PubMed

    Gramlich, Hillary Selle; Reisbig, Tara; Schatz, David G

    2012-01-01

    Upon activation, B cells divide, form a germinal center, and express the activation induced deaminase (AID), an enzyme that triggers somatic hypermutation of the variable regions of immunoglobulin (Ig) loci. Recent evidence indicates that at least 25% of expressed genes in germinal center B cells are mutated or deaminated by AID. One of the most deaminated genes, c-Myc, frequently appears as a translocation partner with the Ig heavy chain gene (Igh) in mouse plasmacytomas and human Burkitt's lymphomas. This indicates that the two genes or their double-strand break ends come into close proximity at a biologically relevant frequency. However, the proximity of c-Myc and Igh has never been measured in germinal center B cells, where many such translocations are thought to occur. We hypothesized that in germinal center B cells, not only is c-Myc near Igh, but other mutating non-Ig genes are deaminated by AID because they are near Ig genes, the primary targets of AID. We tested this "collateral damage" model using 3D-fluorescence in situ hybridization (3D-FISH) to measure the distance from non-Ig genes to Ig genes in germinal center B cells. We also made mice transgenic for human MYC and measured expression and mutation of the transgenes. We found that there is no correlation between proximity to Ig genes and levels of AID targeting or gene mutation, and that c-Myc was not closer to Igh than were other non-Ig genes. In addition, the human MYC transgenes did not accumulate mutations and were not deaminated by AID. We conclude that proximity to Ig loci is unlikely to be a major determinant of AID targeting or mutation of non-Ig genes, and that the MYC transgenes are either missing important regulatory elements that allow mutation or are unable to mutate because their new nuclear position is not conducive to AID deamination.

  4. Genomic organization and expression of immunoglobulin genes in the Chinese hamster (Cricetulus griseus).

    PubMed

    Qin, T; Zhu, H; Wang, D; Hao, H; Du, W

    2015-01-01

    In science, the hamsters are widely used as a model for studying the human diseases because they display many features like humans. The utility of the Chinese hamster as a biology model can be further enhanced by further characterization of the genes encoding components of the immune system. Here, we report the genomic organization and expression of the Chinese hamster immunoglobulin heavy and light chain genes. The Chinese hamster IgH locus contains 268 VH segments (132 potentially functional genes, 12 ORFs and 124 pseudogenes), 4 DH segments, 6 JH segments, four constant region genes (μ, γ, ε and α) and one reverse δ remnant fragment. The Igκ locus contains only a single Cκ gene, 4 Jκ segments and 48 Vκ segments (15 potentially functional genes and 33 pseudogenes), whereas the Igλ locus contains 4 Cλ genes, but only Cλ 3 and Cλ 4 each preceded by a Jλ gene segment. A total of 49 Vλ segments (39 potentially functional genes, 3 ORFs and 7 pseudogenes) were identified. Analysis of junctions of the recombined V(D)J transcripts reveals complex diversity in both expressed H and κ sequences, but the microhomology-directed VJ recombination obviously results in very limited diversity in the Chinese hamster λ gene despite more potential germline-encoded combinatorial diversity. This is the first study to make a comprehensive analysis of the Ig genes in the Chinese hamster, which provides insights into the Ig genes in placental mammals.

  5. Hydractinia Allodeterminant alr1 Resides in an Invertebrate Immunoglobulin Superfamily-like Gene Complex

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Sabrina F. P.; Powell, Anahid E.; Rosengarten, Rafael D.; Nicotra, Matthew L.; Moreno, Maria; Grimwood, Jane; Lakkis, Fadi G.; Dellaporta, Stephen L.; Buss, Leo W.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Allorecognition, the ability to discriminate between self and non-self, is ubiquitous amongst colonial metazoans and widespread amongst aclonal taxa [1–3]. Genetic models for the study of allorecognition have been developed in the jawed vertebrates [4], invertebrate chordate Botryllus [5, 6], and cnidarian Hydractinia [7]. In Botryllus, two genes contribute to the histocompatibility response, FuHC [5, 8] and fester [6]. In the cnidarian Hydractinia, one of the two known allorecognition loci, alr2, has been isolated [7] and a second linked locus, alr1, has been mapped to the same chromosomal region, called the allorecognition complex (ARC) [9, 10]. Here we isolate alr1 by positional cloning and report it to encode a transmembrane receptor protein with two hypervariable extracellular regions similar to immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains. Variation in the extracellular domain largely predicts fusibility within and between laboratory strains and wild-type isolates. Alr1 was found embedded in a family of immunoglobulin superfamily-like (IgSF) genes, thus establishing that the ARC histocompatibility complex is an invertebrate IgSF-like gene complex. PMID:20537535

  6. The immunoglobulin genes: structure and specificity in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tobin, Gerard

    2007-06-01

    The rearrangement of the immunoglobulin genes (IG) provides a large diversity of B-cell receptors conformations and allows the immune system to respond differently to foreign antigens. In chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), there are a restricted number of stereotyped B-cell receptors rearranged by the tumor B-cells between CLL patients. These subsets with stereotyped receptors appear to have clinical implications, for example cases that rearrange the IGHV3-21 gene display poor clinical prognosis. The number of subsets with stereotyped receptors has been reported at a frequency of over 20% of CLL cases; however, the specificities of these receptors are still not clearly defined. Reactivity to epitopes from bacterial antigen, cytoskeleton components such as vimentin, and antigens on viable and apoptotic T-cell have been proposed. The role of antigen in CLL development is currently being more clearly defined with identification of stereotyped receptors, and their antigen specificity and the continued role antigen stimulation plays in CLL disease will be an important question in the future.

  7. The ubiquitous octamer-binding protein(s) is sufficient for transcription of immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D G; Carayannopoulos, L; Capra, J D; Tucker, P W; Hanke, J H

    1990-03-01

    All immunoglobulin genes contain a conserved octanucleotide promoter element, ATGCAAAT, which has been shown to be required for their normal B-cell-specific transcription. Proteins that bind this octamer have been purified, and cDNAs encoding octamer-binding proteins have been cloned. Some of these proteins (referred to as OTF-2) are lymphoid specific, whereas at least one other, and possibly more (referred to as OTF-1), is found ubiquitously in all cell types. The exact role of these different proteins in directing the tissue-specific expression of immunoglobulin genes is unclear. We have identified two human pre-B-cell lines that contain extremely low levels of OTF-2 yet still express high levels of steady-state immunoglobulin heavy-chain mRNA in vivo and efficiently transcribe an immunoglobulin gene in vitro. Addition of a highly enriched preparation of OTF-1 made from one of these pre-B cells or from HeLa cells specifically stimulated in vitro transcription of an immunoglobulin gene. Furthermore, OFT-1 appeared to have approximately the same transactivation ability as OTF-2 when normalized for binding activity. These results suggest that OTF-1, without OTF-2, is sufficient for transcription of immunoglobulin genes and that OTF-2 alone is not responsible for the B-cell-specific regulation of immunoglobulin gene expression.

  8. Mutation affecting the expression of immunoglobulin variable regions in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Kelus, A S; Weiss, S

    1986-07-01

    We have found a variant of the allotype allele a2 in the rabbit, which presumably arose by mutation, that segregates as expected for an allele at the a locus. This allele is called "ali" and the corresponding rabbit strain is called "Alicia." In heterozygous animals (ali/a1 and ali/a3) the concentration of a2 molecules is lower by a factor of 1000 than in standard a2/a2 homozygotes. In homozygous ali/ali individuals the a2 concentration varies with age--i.e., very low in young rabbits and higher in older ones--but it never reaches normal levels. The low level of a2 is compensated by increased amounts of a-negative molecules. Southern blot analysis did not reveal any gross changes in the intron between JH and C mu (joining region of immunoglobulin heavy chain and constant region of immunoglobulin mu chain) or in the number of VH gene segments encoding a locus specificities. We suggest that the ali phenotype is due to a mutation in a control element.

  9. [Somatic hypermutagenesis in immunoglobulin genes. I. Connection of somatic mutations with repeats. A statistical weighting method].

    PubMed

    Solov'ev, V V; Rogozin, I V; Kolchanov, N A

    1989-01-01

    Based on the analysis of a number of immunoglobulin genes' nucleotide sequences, it has been suggested, that somatic mutations emerge by means of imperfect duplexes correction, formed by mispairing of complementary regions of direct and inverted repeats. In the present work provides new data, confirming this mechanism of somatic hypermutagenesis. It has been shown that the presented sample of V- and J-segments of immunoglobulin genes is abundant in nonrandom imperfect direct repeats and complementary palindromes. To prove the connection of somatic mutations with the correction of imperfect duplexes, made up by the regions of these repeats, we have developed the method of statistical weights, permitting us to analyse the samples of mutations and repeats and to reveal the reliability of the connection between them. Using this method we have investigated the collection of 203 nucleotide substitutions in V- and J-segments and have shown a statistically reliable (P less than 10(-4) connection of these mutation positions with imperfect repeats.

  10. A preliminary analysis of the immunoglobulin genes in the African elephant (Loxodonta africana).

    PubMed

    Guo, Yongchen; Bao, Yonghua; Wang, Hui; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Zhao, Zhihui; Li, Ning; Zhao, Yaofeng

    2011-02-25

    The genomic organization of the IgH (Immunoglobulin heavy chain), Igκ (Immunoglobulin kappa chain), and Igλ (Immunoglobulin lambda chain) loci in the African elephant (Loxodonta africana) was annotated using available genome data. The elephant IgH locus on scaffold 57 spans over 2,974 kb, and consists of at least 112 V(H) gene segments, 87 D(H) gene segments (the largest number in mammals examined so far), six J(H) gene segments, a single μ, a δ remnant, and eight γ genes (α and ε genes are missing, most likely due to sequence gaps). The Igκ locus, found on three scaffolds (202, 50 and 86), contains a total of 153 V(κ) gene segments, three J(κ) segments, and a single C(κ) gene. Two different transcriptional orientations were determined for these V(κ) gene segments. In contrast, the Igλ locus on scaffold 68 includes 15 V(λ) gene segments, all with the same transcriptional polarity as the downstream J(λ)-C(λ) cluster. These data suggest that the elephant immunoglobulin gene repertoire is highly diverse and complex. Our results provide insights into the immunoglobulin genes in a placental mammal that is evolutionarily distant from humans, mice, and domestic animals.

  11. A novel monoclonal antibody against the constant region of goose immunoglobulin light chain.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yongli; Gao, Mingchun; Ma, Bo; Sheng, Qiaoling; Wang, Qian; Liu, Dandan; Wang, Junwei

    2014-04-01

    A monoclonal antibody (MAb) against the antigenic determinant of the constant region of goose immunoglobulin light chain (GoIgCL) was produced and characterized for the first time here. Goose immunoglobulin (Ig) in serum was purified by immunoaffinity chromatography and the resulting protein was used as immunogen to immunize BALB/c mice. At the same time, the GoIgCL gene was expressed and purified as the screening antigen for selecting MAb against GoIgCL. One hybridoma that produces antibodies against GoIgCL was selected by indirect ELISA. Then the characterization of the MAb was analyzed by ELISA, Western blot, and flow cytometry. It was found to be IgG1 with κ light chain; the MAB has high specificity to Ig in goose serum, bile, and B lymphocytes from peripheral blood, reacts only with the light chain of goose Ig, and can distinguish Ig from other birds. Therefore, the MAb generated in this study can be used as a specific reagent for detection of goose disease-specific antibodies and as a powerful tool for basic immunology research on geese.

  12. Molecular characterization of the immunoglobulin light chain variable region repertoire of human autoantibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Victor, K.D.

    1992-01-01

    The molecular structures of the light chain variable regions encoding human autoantibodies have been studied in detail. The variable region repertoire among this group of antibodies is diverse. There is no evidence for preferential utilization of specific V[sub L] gene families or over-representation of certain V[sub L] gene segments in autoantibodies. Many autoreactive antibodies utilize direct copies of known germline gene segments with little evidence of somatic mutation, supporting the conclusion that at least some germline gene segments encode autoreactivity. Additionally, the structures of several autoantibodies are clearly the product of somatic mutation. Lastly, affinity maturation has been demonstrated in two clonally related IgM rheumatoid factors suggestive of an antigen driven response. The heterogeneity of the V[sub L] region repertoire in human autoantibodies challenges evidence in the literature suggesting that the majority of human autoantibodies utilize the same or closely related germline gene segments with no evidence of somatic mutation. In addition, this study has documented that variation in the length of the light chain is a common feature in human antibodies. Length variation is confined to the V[sub k]-J[sub k] joint of CDR3 and occurs in all V[sub k] gene families. Analysis of the structures of the V[sub k]-J[sub k] joints suggests that both germline derived and non-germline encoded nucleotides (N-segments), probably the result of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase activity, contribute to the junctional diversity of the immunoglobulin light chain variable region. Thus, length variation at the V[sub L]-J[sub L] joint is a frequent event having the potential to expand the diversity of the antibody molecule.

  13. Human and rat mast cell high-affinity immunoglobulin E receptors: Characterization of putative. alpha. -chain gene products

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Akira; Benfey, P.N.; Leder, P. ); Tepler, I. Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA ); Berenstein, E.H.; Siraganian, R.P. )

    1988-03-01

    The authors have cloned and determined the entire nucleotide sequence of cDNAs corresponding to the putative {alpha} subunits of the human and rat mast cell high-affinity IgE receptors. Both human and rat cDNAs encode an NH{sub 2}-terminal signal peptide, two immunoglobulin-like extracellular domains (encoded by discrete exons), a hydrophobic transmembrane region, and a positively charged cytoplasmic tail. The human and rat {alpha} subunits share an overall homology with one another and the immunoglobulin gene family, suggesting that they arose from a common ancestral gene and continue to share structural homology with their ligands. In addition, the rat gene is transcribed into at least three distinct forms, each of which yields a somewhat different coding sequence.

  14. Human heavy chain disease protein WIS: implications for the organization of immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, E C; Prelli, F; Frangione, B

    1979-01-01

    Protein WIS is a human gamma3 heavy (H) chain disease immunoglobulin variant whose amino acid sequence is most readily interpreted by postulating that three residues of the amino terminus are followed by a deletion of most of the variable (VH) domain, which ends at the variable-constant (VC) joining region. Then there is a stretch of eight residues, three of which are unusual, while the other five have striking homology to the VC junction sequence. This is followed by a second deletion, which ends at the beginning of the quadruplicated hinge region. These findings are consistent with mutations resulting in deletions of most of the gene coding for the V region and CH1 domain followed by splicing at the VC joining region and at the hinge. These structural features fit well the notion of genetic discontinuity between V and C genes and also suggest similar mechanisms of excision and splicing in the interdomain regions of the C gene of the heavy chain. PMID:106391

  15. Nucleotide sequences of immunoglobulin eta genes of chimpanzee and orangutan: DNA molecular clock and hominoid evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Sakoyama, Y.; Hong, K.J.; Byun, S.M.; Hisajima, H.; Ueda, S.; Yaoita, Y.; Hayashida, H.; Miyata, T.; Honjo, T.

    1987-02-01

    To determine the phylogenetic relationships among hominoids and the dates of their divergence, the complete nucleotide sequences of the constant region of the immunoglobulin eta-chain (C/sub eta1/) genes from chimpanzee and orangutan have been determined. These sequences were compared with the human eta-chain constant-region sequence. A molecular clock (silent molecular clock), measured by the degree of sequence divergence at the synonymous (silent) positions of protein-encoding regions, was introduced for the present study. From the comparison of nucleotide sequences of ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin and ..beta..- and delta-globulin genes between humans and Old World monkeys, the silent molecular clock was calibrated: the mean evolutionary rate of silent substitution was determined to be 1.56 x 10/sup -9/ substitutions per site per year. Using the silent molecular clock, the mean divergence dates of chimpanzee and orangutan from the human lineage were estimated as 6.4 +/- 2.6 million years and 17.3 +/- 4.5 million years, respectively. It was also shown that the evolutionary rate of primate genes is considerably slower than those of other mammalian genes.

  16. Isolation and chromosomal mapping of the human immunoglobulin-associated B29 gene (IGB)

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, W.J. Jr.; Thompson, A.A.; Korenberg, J.; Xianing Chen; May, W.; Wall, R.; Denny, C.T. )

    1993-04-01

    The B29 gene encodes a B-cell-specific membrane protein in the immunoglobulin antigen receptor complex. B29 is a crucial member of this receptor complex and is believed to function as an effector of signal transduction in a manner analogous to that of the CD3 components of the T cell antigen receptor. The authors have isolated a full-length human B29 cDNA clone by using a murine B29 cDNA probe. They show that there is an extremely high degree of evolutionary conservation between the human and mouse proteins, particularly in the transmembrane and intracytoplasmic regions, where the identity is 96%. In addition, the intracytoplasmic region in both proteins contains an identical peptide motif that is present in a number of molecules involved in lymphocyte activation. Genomic Southern blot analysis of human cell lines hybridized with both murine and human B29 cDNAs gives patterns consistent with a single-copy gene occupying a small region of the genomic sequence. Using human B29 cosmid DNA, they have localized the B29 gene to human chromosome 17q23 via fluorescence in situ hybridization. B29 is the first gene localized to this area of the genome. Interestingly, a subset of human B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemias (CLL) has translocations in this locus on chromosome 17. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Susceptibility to multiple sclerosis is associated with the proximal immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region.

    PubMed Central

    Walter, M A; Gibson, W T; Ebers, G C; Cox, D W

    1991-01-01

    15 immunoglobulin heavy chain constant (CH) and variable region (VH) polymorphisms were selected to span the entire length of the heavy chain cluster. These polymorphisms were examined in 34 sib pairs concordant for multiple sclerosis (MS) and in 23 sporadic MS patients. Allele frequencies were calculated for the 2 MS patient groups and compared with those found in a control population from the same geographical location and of similar ethnic background. No significant association was found between MS and the 7 CH region polymorphisms examined. However, a significant correlation between the MS phenotype and a VH2 family polymorphism was observed in both MS patient populations (familial MS patients chi 2 = 8.16, P less than 0.005; sporadic MS patients chi 2 = 8.90, P less than 0.005). One allele of the VH2-5 gene segment was found to be over-represented in both MS groups. VH2-5 has recently been physically mapped close to the CH region, between 180 and 360 kb away. These results indicate that a locus near or within the CH-proximal VH region is associated with increased susceptibility to MS. Images PMID:1672695

  18. Multiple productive immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangements in chronic lymphocytic leukemia are mostly derived from independent clones

    PubMed Central

    Plevova, Karla; Francova, Hana Skuhrova; Burckova, Katerina; Brychtova, Yvona; Doubek, Michael; Pavlova, Sarka; Malcikova, Jitka; Mayer, Jiri; Tichy, Boris; Pospisilova, Sarka

    2014-01-01

    In chronic lymphocytic leukemia, usually a monoclonal disease, multiple productive immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangements are identified sporadically. Prognostication of such cases based on immunoglobulin heavy variable gene mutational status can be problematic, especially if the different rearrangements have discordant mutational status. To gain insight into the possible biological mechanisms underlying the origin of the multiple rearrangements, we performed a comprehensive immunogenetic and immunophenotypic characterization of 31 cases with the multiple rearrangements identified in a cohort of 1147 patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. For the majority of cases (25/31), we provide evidence of the co-existence of at least two B lymphocyte clones with a chronic lymphocytic leukemia phenotype. We also identified clonal drifts in serial samples, likely driven by selection forces. More specifically, higher immunoglobulin variable gene identity to germline and longer complementarity determining region 3 were preferred in persistent or newly appearing clones, a phenomenon more pronounced in patients with stereotyped B-cell receptors. Finally, we report that other factors, such as TP53 gene defects and therapy administration, influence clonal selection. Our findings are relevant to clonal evolution in the context of antigen stimulation and transition of monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. PMID:24038023

  19. Interaction between immunoglobulin allotypes and NK receptor genes in diabetes post-hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Granados-Montiel, Julio; Zúñiga, Joaquin; Azocar, Jose; Feris, Edmond J; Terreros, Daniel; Larsen, Charles E; Clavijo, Olga P; Cruz-Lagunas, Alfredo; Middleton, Derek; Alper, Chester A; Pandey, Janardan P; Yunis, Edmond J

    2011-06-01

    Genetic interactions between natural killer (NK) cells immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genes and immunoglobulin allotypes have been previously reported in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients. Puerto Rican Americans with a history of intravenous drug use who developed DM following HCV infection (n=32) were compared to individuals infected with HCV without diabetes (n=121) and to DM non-infected individuals (n=95). Subjects were genotyped for KIRs and immunoglobulin allotypes. We found interactions of immunoglobulin allotypes KM3/KM3 with NK inhibitory receptors 2DL3/2DL3, 2DL1 in the absence of 2DS4 associated with susceptibility to DM in HCV infected individuals. These data suggest the possibility that a subset of patients with HCV could have an immune-mediated component contributing to the development of DM.

  20. Ability to develop broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies is not restricted by the germline immunoglobulin gene repertoire1

    PubMed Central

    Scheepers, Cathrine; Shrestha, Ram K.; Lambson, Bronwen E.; Jackson, Katherine J. L.; Wright, Imogen A.; Naicker, Dshanta; Goosen, Mark; Berrie, Leigh; Ismail, Arshad; Garrett, Nigel; Karim, Quarraisha Abdool; Karim, Salim S. Abdool; Moore, Penny L.; Travers, Simon A.; Morris, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    The human immunoglobulin repertoire is vast, producing billions of unique antibodies from a limited number of germline immunoglobulin genes. The immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region (IGHV) is central to antigen binding and is comprised of 48 functional genes. Here we analyzed whether HIV-1 infected individuals who develop broadly neutralizing antibodies show a distinctive germline IGHV profile. Using both 454 and Illumina technologies we sequenced the IGHV repertoire of 28 HIV-infected South African women from the Center for the AIDS Programme of Research in South African (CAPRISA) 002 and 004 cohorts, 13 of whom developed broadly neutralizing antibodies. Of the 259 IGHV alleles identified in this study, approximately half were not found in the International Immunogenetics Database (IMGT). This included 85 entirely novel alleles and 38 alleles that matched rearranged sequences in non-IMGT databases. Analysis of the rearranged H chain V region genes of monoclonal antibodies isolated from 7 of the CAPRISA women and previously isolated broadly neutralizing antibodies from other donors provided evidence that at least 8 novel or non-IMGT alleles contributed to functional antibodies. Importantly, we found that despite a wide range in the number of IGHV alleles in each individual, including alleles used by known broadly neutralizing antibodies, there were no significant differences in germline IGHV repertoires between individuals who do and do not develop broadly neutralizing antibodies. This study reports novel IGHV repertoires and highlights the importance of a fully comprehensive immunoglobulin database for germline gene usage prediction. Furthermore, these data suggest a lack of genetic bias in broadly neutralizing antibody development in HIV-1 infection, with implications for HIV vaccine design. PMID:25825450

  1. Expression of a microinjected immunoglobulin gene in the spleen of transgenic mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinster, Ralph L.; Ritchie, Kindred A.; Hammer, Robert E.; O'Brien, Rebecca L.; Arp, Benjamin; Storb, Ursula

    1983-11-01

    Transgenic mice were produced by microinjection of a rearranged, functional immunoglobulin κ gene into fertilized mouse eggs and implantation of the microinjected embryos into foster mothers. Mice that integrated the injected gene were mated and the DNA, RNA and serum κ chains of their offspring were analysed. The data from offspring of three different transgenic mice indicate that the microinjected gene is expressed in the spleen, but not the liver of mice which inherited the injected gene.

  2. The role of CTCF binding sites in the 3' immunoglobulin heavy chain regulatory region.

    PubMed

    Birshtein, Barbara K

    2012-01-01

    The immunoglobulin heavy chain locus undergoes a series of DNA rearrangements and modifications to achieve the construction and expression of individual antibody heavy chain genes in B cells. These events affect variable regions, through VDJ joining and subsequent somatic hypermutation, and constant regions through class switch recombination (CSR). Levels of IgH expression are also regulated during B cell development, resulting in high levels of secreted antibodies from fully differentiated plasma cells. Regulation of these events has been attributed primarily to two cis-elements that work from long distances on their target sequences, i.e., an ∼1 kb intronic enhancer, Eμ, located between the V region segments and the most 5' constant region gene, Cμ; and an ∼40 kb 3' regulatory region (3' RR) that is located downstream of the most 3' C(H) gene, Cα. The 3' RR is a candidate for an "end" of B cell-specific regulation of the Igh locus. The 3' RR contains several B cell-specific enhancers associated with DNase I hypersensitive sites (hs1-4), which are essential for CSR and for high levels of IgH expression in plasma cells. Downstream of this enhancer-containing region is a region of high-density CTCF binding sites, which extends through hs5, 6, and 7 and further downstream. CTCF, with its enhancer-blocking activities, has been associated with all mammalian insulators and implicated in multiple chromosomal interactions. Here we address the 3' RR CTCF-binding region as a potential insulator of the Igh locus, an independent regulatory element and a predicted modulator of the activity of 3' RR enhancers. Using chromosome conformation capture technology, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and genetic approaches, we have found that the 3' RR with its CTCF-binding region interacts with target sequences in the V(H), Eμ, and C(H) regions through DNA looping as regulated by protein binding. This region impacts on B cell-specific Igh processes at different stages of B cell

  3. Mathematical analysis of antigen selection in somatically mutated immunoglobulin genes associated with autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, C M; Boursier, L; D'Cruz, D P; Dunn-Walters, D K; Spencer, J

    2010-09-01

    Affinity maturation is a process by which low-affinity antibodies are transformed into highly specific antibodies in germinal centres. This process occurs by hypermutation of immunoglobulin heavy chain variable (IgH V) region genes followed by selection for high-affinity variants. It has been proposed that statistical tests can identify affinity maturation and antigen selection by analysing the frequency of replacement and silent mutations in the complementarity determining regions (CDRs) that contact antigen and the framework regions (FRs) that encode structural integrity. In this study three different methods that have been proposed for detecting selection: the binomial test, the multinomial test and the focused binomial test, have been assessed for their reliability and ability to detect selection in human IgH V genes. We observe first that no statistical test is able to identify selection in the CDR antigen-binding sites, second that tests can reliably detect selection in the FR and third that antibodies from nasal biopsies from patients with Wegener's granulomatosis and pathogenic antibodies from systemic lupus erythematosus do not appear to be as stringently selected for structural integrity as other groups of functional sequences.

  4. Significant Differences in Physicochemical Properties of Human Immunoglobulin Kappa and Lambda CDR3 Regions

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Catherine L.; Laffy, Julie M. J.; Wu, Yu-Chang Bryan; Silva O’Hare, Joselli; Martin, Victoria; Kipling, David; Fraternali, Franca; Dunn-Walters, Deborah K.

    2016-01-01

    Antibody variable regions are composed of a heavy and a light chain, and in humans, there are two light chain isotypes: kappa and lambda. Despite their importance in receptor editing, the light chain is often overlooked in the antibody literature, with the focus being on the heavy chain complementarity-determining region (CDR)-H3 region. In this paper, we set out to investigate the physicochemical and structural differences between human kappa and lambda light chain CDR regions. We constructed a dataset containing over 29,000 light chain variable region sequences from IgM-transcribing, newly formed B cells isolated from human bone marrow and peripheral blood. We also used a published human naïve dataset to investigate the CDR-H3 properties of heavy chains paired with kappa and lambda light chains and probed the Protein Data Bank to investigate the structural differences between kappa and lambda antibody CDR regions. We found that kappa and lambda light chains have very different CDR physicochemical and structural properties, whereas the heavy chains with which they are paired do not differ significantly. We also observed that the mean CDR3 N nucleotide addition in the kappa, lambda, and heavy chain gene rearrangements are correlated within donors but can differ between donors. This indicates that terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase may work with differing efficiencies between different people but the same efficiency in the different classes of immunoglobulin chain within one person. We have observed large differences in the physicochemical and structural properties of kappa and lambda light chain CDR regions. This may reflect different roles in the humoral immune response. PMID:27729912

  5. Structural analysis of substitution patterns in alleles of human immunoglobulin VH genes.

    PubMed

    Romo-González, Tania; Vargas-Madrazo, Enrique

    2005-05-01

    The diversity in repertoires of antibodies (Abs) needed in response to the antigen challenge is produced by evolutionary and somatic processes. The mechanisms operating at a somatic level have been studied in great detail. In contrast, neither the mechanisms nor the strategies of diversification at an evolutionary level have yet been understood in similar detail. Particularly, the substitution patterns in alleles of immunoglobulin genes (Igs) have not been systematically studied. Furthermore, there is a scarcity of studies which link the analysis at a genetic level of the diversification of repertoires with the structural consequences at the protein level of the changes in DNA information. For the purpose of systematically characterizing the strategies of evolutionary diversification through sequence variation at alleles, in this work, we built a database for all the alleles of the IGHV locus in humans reported until now. Based on these data, we performed diverse analyses of substitution patterns and linked these results with studies at the protein level. We found that the sequence diversification in different alleles does not operate with equal intensity for all V genes. Our studies, both of the number of substitutions and of the type of amino acid change per sub-segment of the V-REGION evidenced differences in the selective pressure to which these regions are exposed. The implications of these results for understanding the evolutionary diversification strategies, as well as for the somatic generation of antibody repertoires are discussed.

  6. [Somatic hypermutagenesis in immunoglobulin genes. II. Properties of somatic mutations and clonal selection].

    PubMed

    Rogozin, I B; Solov'ev, V V

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of the collection of 203 somatic mutations in immunoglobulin genes was carried out. It was shown, that the high frequency of these mutations in CDRs of V-genes may be connected with the high concentration of repeats in these regions. In addition, the observed clusterization of mutations may emerge from simultaneous correction of several pertubations of complementarity in the heteroduplex, formed by the repeat regions. It was revealed, that somatic mutations in FRs are characterized by reliably smaller changes of some important amino acid physical-chemical properties than in CDRs. These data obviously indicate the occurrence of B-lymphocytes clonal selection. Analysis of synonymous substitutions has shown, that stabilizing selection seems to provide the conservatism of FRs (it leads to the conservation of the protein three-dimensional structure) and movement selection may provide the proliferation of B-lymphocytes with considerable changes in CDRs, if these mutations improve antigens binding. Preferential fixation of transitions in comparison with transversions, particularly expressed in FRs, may also be connected with the fact, that transitions lead to smaller changes of amino acid physical-chemical properties and they are rejected by selection to a smaller extent.

  7. Transfection of an immunoglobulin kappa gene into mature human B lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Bich-Thuy, L.T.; Queen, C.

    1988-01-01

    The authors show in this report that the transcription induced by interleukin-2 or pokeweed mitogens of the kappa MOPC 41 immunoglobulin light-chain gene transfected into primary human or murine B lymphocytes initiates from a previously unobserved start site about 26 base pairs upstream of the start site used in myeloma cell lines.

  8. In situ visualisation of immunoglobulin genes in normal and malignant lymphoid cells

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, C; Telhada, M; do Carmo-Fonseca, M; Parreira, L

    1995-01-01

    Aims—To directly visualise immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy (H) and light chain genes (κ and λ) in metaphase chromosomes and interphase nuclei of normal and malignant lymphocytes using small genomic probes targeted to intragenic sequences. Methods—Cytogenetic preparations from phytohaemagglutinin stimulated lymphocytes, B-chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL) cells, and a B-prolymphocytic leukaemia (B-PLL) cell line, containing a t(11;14), were hybridised in situ using biotin or digoxigenin labelled plasmid probes. The κ genes were visualised with a combination of probes for the Cκ, Jκ, Vκ1, and Vκ2 segments, the λ genes with a probe containing the Jλ2-Cλ2, Jλ3-Cλ3 segments and the H genes with a probe for Cλ2. Hybridisation sites were visualised using appropriate fluorochrome conjugates and images were analysed by digital microscopy. Results—In both normal and malignant lymphoid cells, the κ and λ genes were visualised as a single dot signal, whereas the H λ genes were resolved as either two or three separate signals per chromatid in metaphase chromosomes or per allele in interphase nuclei. In the malignant PLL cells, double hybridisation experiments with a painting library specific for the chromosome 11 showed that the λ region was retained in the translocated chromosome, with an in situ resolution pattern similar to that of the normal allele. Conclusions—This study shows that a high resolution in situ analysis of the three Ig loci can be efficiently performed with small size genomic probes on both normal and malignant lymphoid cells. Such an approach offers a flexible tool for the molecular characterisations of these loci on chromosomes and individual neoplastic cells. Images PMID:16695998

  9. Mismatch-mediated error prone repair at the immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Chahwan, Richard; Edelmann, Winfried; Scharff, Matthew D; Roa, Sergio

    2011-12-01

    The generation of effective antibodies depends upon somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) of antibody genes by activation induced cytidine deaminase (AID) and the subsequent recruitment of error prone base excision and mismatch repair. While AID initiates and is required for SHM, more than half of the base changes that accumulate in V regions are not due to the direct deamination of dC to dU by AID, but rather arise through the recruitment of the mismatch repair complex (MMR) to the U:G mismatch created by AID and the subsequent perversion of mismatch repair from a high fidelity process to one that is very error prone. In addition, the generation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) is essential during CSR, and the resolution of AID-generated mismatches by MMR to promote such DSBs is critical for the efficiency of the process. While a great deal has been learned about how AID and MMR cause hypermutations and DSBs, it is still unclear how the error prone aspect of these processes is largely restricted to antibody genes. The use of knockout models and mice expressing mismatch repair proteins with separation-of-function point mutations have been decisive in gaining a better understanding of the roles of each of the major MMR proteins and providing further insight into how mutation and repair are coordinated. Here, we review the cascade of MMR factors and repair signals that are diverted from their canonical error free role and hijacked by B cells to promote genetic diversification of the Ig locus. This error prone process involves AID as the inducer of enzymatically-mediated DNA mismatches, and a plethora of downstream MMR factors acting as sensors, adaptors and effectors of a complex and tightly regulated process from much of which is not yet well understood.

  10. Immunoglobulin gene rearrangements in Chinese and Italian patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Marinelli, Marilisa; Ilari, Caterina; Xia, Yi; Del Giudice, Ilaria; Cafforio, Luciana; Della Starza, Irene; Raponi, Sara; Mariglia, Paola; Bonina, Silvia; Yu, Zhen; Yang, Wenjuan; Qiu, Lugui; Chan, Thomas; Piciocchi, Alfonso; Kwong, Yok-Lam; Tse, Eric; Li, Jianyong; Guarini, Anna; Xu, Wei; Foà, Robin

    2016-04-12

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common type of leukemia in the Western world, whereas in Asia the incidence is about 10 times lower. The basis for this ethnic and geographic variation is currently unknown. The aim of this study was to characterize IGHVDJ rearrangements and stereotype of the HCDR3 region in a series of 623 Chinese CLL, in order to identify possible differences in immunoglobulin gene usage and their potential pathogenetic implications. Chinese CLL were compared to 789 Italian CLL. Chinese patients showed a higher proportion of mutated IGHV and a more frequent usage of IGHV3-7, IGHV3-74, IGHV4-39 and IGHV4-59 genes. A significantly lower usage of IGHV1-69 and IGHV1-2 was documented, with comparable IGHV3-21 frequency (3% Chinese vs 3.8% Italian CLL). The proportion of known stereotyped receptors was significantly lower in Chinese (19.7%) than in Italian CLL (25.8%), despite a significantly higher frequency of subset #8 (p= 0.0001). Moreover, new paired clusters were identified among Chinese cases. Overall, these data support a potential different antigenic exposure between Eastern and Western CLL.

  11. Immunoglobulin gene rearrangements in Chinese and Italian patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Giudice, Ilaria Del; Cafforio, Luciana; Starza, Irene Della; Raponi, Sara; Mariglia, Paola; Bonina, Silvia; Yu, Zhen; Yang, Wenjuan; Qiu, Lugui; Chan, Thomas; Piciocchi, Alfonso; Kwong, Yok-Lam; Tse, Eric; Li, Jianyong; Guarini, Anna; Xu, Wei; Foà, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common type of leukemia in the Western world, whereas in Asia the incidence is about 10 times lower. The basis for this ethnic and geographic variation is currently unknown. The aim of this study was to characterize IGHVDJ rearrangements and stereotype of the HCDR3 region in a series of 623 Chinese CLL, in order to identify possible differences in immunoglobulin gene usage and their potential pathogenetic implications. Chinese CLL were compared to 789 Italian CLL. Chinese patients showed a higher proportion of mutated IGHV and a more frequent usage of IGHV3-7, IGHV3-74, IGHV4-39 and IGHV4-59 genes. A significantly lower usage of IGHV1-69 and IGHV1-2 was documented, with comparable IGHV3-21 frequency (3% Chinese vs 3.8% Italian CLL). The proportion of known stereotyped receptors was significantly lower in Chinese (19.7%) than in Italian CLL (25.8%), despite a significantly higher frequency of subset #8 (p= 0.0001). Moreover, new paired clusters were identified among Chinese cases. Overall, these data support a potential different antigenic exposure between Eastern and Western CLL. PMID:26943037

  12. Molecular analysis of immunoglobulin genes reveals frequent clonal relatedness in double monoclonal gammopathies.

    PubMed

    Tschumper, R C; Dispenzieri, A; Abraham, R S; Henderson, K J; Jelinek, D F

    2013-04-19

    Monoclonal gammopathies (MGs) are hematological diseases characterized by high levels of a monoclonal immunoglobulin (Ig) or M-protein. Within this group are patients with more than one M-protein, referred to as double MGs (DMGs). The M-proteins in DMG patients may have different heavy chain (HC) isotypes that are associated with different light chains (LCs), or different HCs that are LC matched. In this study, we examined the clonal relatedness of the M-proteins in the latter type in a cohort of 14 DMG patients. By using PCR, we identified 7/14 DMG patients that expressed two Ig HC isotypes with identical Ig HC variable (IGHV), diversity (IGHD), joining (IGHJ), and complementarity determining region (HCDR3) sequences. Two additional DMG patients had two Ig transcripts using the same IGHV, IGHD and IGHJ genes but with slight differences in variable region or HCDR3 mutations. LC analysis confirmed that a single LC was expressed in 3/7 DMG patients with identical HC transcripts and in the two DMGs with highly similar transcripts. The PCR findings were confirmed by immunofluorescence for HC and LC expression. Clonally related HC-dissimilar/LC-matched DMGs may occur often and defines a new subtype of MG that may serve as a tool for studies of disease pathogenesis.

  13. Studies on immunoglobulin gene rearrangement in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded pathology specimens.

    PubMed

    Dubeau, L; Weinberg, K; Jones, P A; Nichols, P W

    1988-03-01

    Studies on immunoglobulin gene rearrangement in lymphoid lesions are an increasingly important application of molecular biology in diagnostic medicine. The authors have therefore examined the possibility of detecting such rearrangements in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded pathology specimens. Southern blots of DNA obtained from optimally fixed tissues were very similar to blots of unfixed material, except that the electrophoretic mobility of the fixed DNA fragments was sometimes slightly reduced. High-molecular-weight DNA was not recovered from suboptimally fixed partially autolysed samples. Increasing the time of exposure to formalin resulted in loss of hybridizable DNA. Monoclonal rearrangements of heavy and light chain immunoglobulin genes could be detected in formalin-fixed specimens provided that these fixation artifacts were taken into consideration. This technique expands the pool of material available for studies on gene rearrangement and should facilitate the use of such studies in clinical medicine.

  14. Molecular cloning and comparative analysis of immunoglobulin heavy chain genes from Phasianus colchicus, Meleagris gallopavo, and Coturnix japonica.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin Won; Kim, Jin-Kyoo; Seo, Hee Won; Cho, Byung Wook; Song, Gwonhwa; Han, Jae Yong

    2010-08-15

    To date, immunoglobulin (Ig) genes have only been fully characterized in a small number of aves, which pose a major obstacle to understanding Ig evolution. Thus, we cloned the cDNAs of three immunoglobulin classes, IgA, IgM, and IgY, from Phasianus colchicus, Coturnix japonica, and Meleagris gallopavo. Multiple sequence alignments revealed that the highest degree of sequence homology in all Ig classes was observed between pheasant and turkey whereas the degree of homology between the galliforms and non-galliforms was relatively low compared to that among the galliforms. When the constant region domains of the four human Ig classes were compared with the corresponding regions in aves, the average percent homology between human CH2 and avian CH3, and between human CH3 and avian CH4, was greater than between identical domains in IgA and IgY, which are in partial agreement with the hypothesis that the avian CH2 domain evolved to form the mammalian hinge via domain condensation. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the galliform Ig heavy chain constant regions were divided into quail and the common ancestor of chicken, turkey, and pheasant, and that chicken was separated from turkey and pheasant, which were grouped together. These results add to our knowledge of galliform Igs and the diversification of these genes.

  15. Epstein-Barr virus infection in vitro can rescue germinal center B cells with inactivated immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Chaganti, Sridhar; Bell, Andrew I; Pastor, Noelia Begue; Milner, Anne E; Drayson, Mark; Gordon, John; Rickinson, Alan B

    2005-12-15

    Immunoglobulin genotyping of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disease has suggested that such lesions often arise from atypical post-germinal center B cells, in some cases carrying functionally inactivated immunoglobulin genes. To investigate whether EBV can rescue cells that are failed products of the somatic hypermutation process occurring in germinal centers (GCs), we isolated GC cells from tonsillar cell suspensions and exposed them to EBV in vitro. Screening more than 100 EBV-transformed cell lines of GC origin identified 6 lines lacking surface immunoglobulin, a phenotype never seen among lines derived from circulating naive or memory B cells. Furthermore, 3 of the 6 surface immunoglobulin-negative GC lines carried inactivating mutations in the immunoglobulin H (IgH) variable gene sequence. The ability of EBV to rescue aberrant products of the germinal center reaction in vitro strengthens the probability that a parallel activity contributes to EBV's lymphomagenic potential in vivo.

  16. Uniform detection of immunoglobulin-gene rearrangement in benign lymphoepithelial lesions.

    PubMed

    Fishleder, A; Tubbs, R; Hesse, B; Levine, H

    1987-04-30

    The term "benign lymphoepithelial lesion" is used to describe the salivary-gland lymphocytic infiltration and epithelial changes typically found in association with Sjögren's syndrome. We used Southern blot hybridization techniques to examine the immunoglobulin genes in salivary-gland tissue derived from eight patients with benign lymphoepithelial lesions. Three of these patients had intrasalivary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma complicating the lesions, whereas the lesions in the remaining five were all histologically benign. Ten samples from the eight patients all revealed rearrangement of both the heavy-chain and light-chain immunoglobulin genes. In one of the patients in whom non-Hodgkin's lymphoma involved both the salivary-gland lesion and an ipsilateral lymph node, the rearrangements of the heavy-chain and light-chain immunoglobulin genes detected at the two sites were identical. One other patient had two distinct benign lymphoepithelial lesions removed two years apart. The rearrangements of the heavy-chain as well as the kappa light-chain genes detected in these two lesions were entirely different. These data suggest that B-cell clonal expansion has an integral role in the pathophysiology of the benign lymphoepithelial lesion and may explain the increased incidence of lymphoma noted in association with this disorder.

  17. Immunoglobulin gene insertions and deletions in the affinity maturation of HIV-1 broadly reactive neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kepler, Thomas B; Liao, Hua-Xin; Alam, S Munir; Bhaskarabhatla, Rekha; Zhang, Ruijun; Yandava, Chandri; Stewart, Shelley; Anasti, Kara; Kelsoe, Garnett; Parks, Robert; Lloyd, Krissey E; Stolarchuk, Christina; Pritchett, Jamie; Solomon, Erika; Friberg, Emma; Morris, Lynn; Karim, Salim S Abdool; Cohen, Myron S; Walter, Emmanuel; Moody, M Anthony; Wu, Xueling; Altae-Tran, Han R; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Kwong, Peter D; Boyd, Scott D; Fire, Andrew Z; Mascola, John R; Haynes, Barton F

    2014-09-10

    Induction of HIV-1 broad neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) is a goal of HIV-1 vaccine development but has remained challenging partially due to unusual traits of bnAbs, including high somatic hypermutation (SHM) frequencies and in-frame insertions and deletions (indels). Here we examined the propensity and functional requirement for indels within HIV-1 bnAbs. High-throughput sequencing of the immunoglobulin (Ig) VHDJH genes in HIV-1 infected and uninfected individuals revealed that the indel frequency was elevated among HIV-1-infected subjects, with no unique properties attributable to bnAb-producing individuals. This increased indel occurrence depended only on the frequency of SHM point mutations. Indel-encoded regions were generally proximal to antigen binding sites. Additionally, reconstruction of a HIV-1 CD4-binding site bnAb clonal lineage revealed that a large compound VHDJH indel was required for bnAb activity. Thus, vaccine development should focus on designing regimens targeted at sustained activation of bnAb lineages to achieve the required SHM and indel events.

  18. Biased Immunoglobulin Light Chain Gene Usage in the Shark.

    PubMed

    Iacoangeli, Anna; Lui, Anita; Naik, Ushma; Ohta, Yuko; Flajnik, Martin; Hsu, Ellen

    2015-10-15

    This study of a large family of κ L chain clusters in nurse shark completes the characterization of its classical Ig gene content (two H chain isotypes, μ and ω, and four L chain isotypes, κ, λ, σ, and σ-2). The shark κ clusters are minigenes consisting of a simple VL-JL-CL array, where V to J recombination occurs over an ~500-bp interval, and functional clusters are widely separated by at least 100 kb. Six out of ~39 κ clusters are prerearranged in the germline (germline joined). Unlike the complex gene organization and multistep assembly process of Ig in mammals, each shark Ig rearrangement, somatic or in the germline, appears to be an independent event localized to the minigene. This study examined the expression of functional, nonproductive, and sterile transcripts of the κ clusters compared with the other three L chain isotypes. κ cluster usage was investigated in young sharks, and a skewed pattern of split gene expression was observed, one similar in functional and nonproductive rearrangements. These results show that the individual activation of the spatially distant κ clusters is nonrandom. Although both split and germline-joined κ genes are expressed, the latter are prominent in young animals and wane with age. We speculate that, in the shark, the differential activation of the multiple isotypes can be advantageously used in receptor editing.

  19. A human follicular lymphoma B cell line hypermutates its functional immunoglobulin genes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wu, H; Pelkonen, E; Knuutila, S; Kaartinen, M

    1995-12-01

    The functional immunoglobulin (Ig) genes of B lymphocytes undergo somatic mutations during immune responses. These mutations modify the antigen binding site of the immunoglobulins, thereby enhancing the average affinity of the antibodies produced. The molecular mechanism underlying these B cell hypermutations remains unresolved, partly because it is difficult to grow normal B cells in long-term cell cultures and because there is no suitable transformed or malignant B cell line which generates mutations in its immunoglobulin genes in vitro. Here, we show that the recently established follicular lymphoma line HF-1.3.4 generates somatic hypermutations in vitro at a high frequency of 0.7 x 10(-6) mutations per base pair per generation in standard cell cultures (RPMI 1640 + 5% fetal calf serum). This shows for the first time that B cell hypermutation can occur without T cells or T cell factors. The mutation frequency increased approximately tenfold to 1 x 10(-5) mutations/base pair/generation with B cell-specific growth factors (interleukins-2 and -4 and three antibodies stimulatory to HF-1.3.4 cells). This HF-1.3.4 lymphoma line may help to elucidate the molecular mechanism of Ig gene hypermutation.

  20. Immunoglobulin VH gene diversity and somatic hypermutation during SIV infection of rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Guo, Kejun; Halemano, Kalani; Schmitt, Kimberly; Katuwal, Miki; Wang, Yaqiong; Harper, Michael S; Heilman, Karl J; Kuwata, Takeo; Stephens, Edward B; Santiago, Mario L

    2015-07-01

    B cell functional defects are associated with delayed neutralizing antibody development in pathogenic lentivirus infections. However, the timeframe for alterations in the antibody repertoire and somatic hypermutation (SHM) remains unclear. Here, we utilized the SIV/rhesus macaque (RM) model to investigate the dynamics of immunoglobulin V(H) gene diversity and SHM following infection. Three RMs were infected with SIVmac239, and V(H)1, V(H)3, and V(H)4 genes were amplified from peripheral blood at 0, 2, 6, 24, and 36 weeks postinfection for next-generation sequencing. Analysis of over 3.8 million sequences against currently available RM germline V(H) genes revealed a highly biased V(H) gene repertoire in outbred RMs. SIV infection did not significantly perturb the predominant IgG1 response, but overall immunoglobulin SHM declined during the course of SIV infection. Moreover, SHM at the AID deamination hotspot, WRC, rapidly decreased and was suppressed throughout SIV infection. In contrast, a transient increase in mutations at the APOBEC3G deamination hotspot, CCC, coincided with a spike in APOBEC3G expression during acute SIV infection. The results outline a timetable for altered V(H) gene repertoire and IgG SHM in the SIV/RM model and suggest a burst of APOBEC3G-mediated antibody SHM during acute SIV infection.

  1. Identification of the ancestral killer immunoglobulin-like receptor gene in primates

    PubMed Central

    Sambrook, Jennifer G; Bashirova, Arman; Andersen, Hanne; Piatak, Mike; Vernikos, George S; Coggill, Penny; Lifson, Jeff D; Carrington, Mary; Beck, Stephan

    2006-01-01

    Background Killer Immunoglobulin-like Receptors (KIR) are essential immuno-surveillance molecules. They are expressed on natural killer and T cells, and interact with human leukocyte antigens. KIR genes are highly polymorphic and contribute vital variability to our immune system. Numerous KIR genes, belonging to five distinct lineages, have been identified in all primates examined thus far and shown to be rapidly evolving. Since few KIR remain orthologous between species, with only one of them, KIR2DL4, shown to be common to human, apes and monkeys, the evolution of the KIR gene family in primates remains unclear. Results Using comparative analyses, we have identified the ancestral KIR lineage (provisionally named KIR3DL0) in primates. We show KIR3DL0 to be highly conserved with the identification of orthologues in human (Homo sapiens), common chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes), gorilla (Gorilla gorilla), rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) and common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus). We predict KIR3DL0 to encode a functional molecule in all primates by demonstrating expression in human, chimpanzee and rhesus monkey. Using the rhesus monkey as a model, we further show the expression profile to be typical of KIR by quantitative measurement of KIR3DL0 from an enriched population of natural killer cells. Conclusion One reason why KIR3DL0 may have escaped discovery for so long is that, in human, it maps in between two related leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor clusters outside the known KIR gene cluster on Chromosome 19. Based on genomic, cDNA, expression and phylogenetic data, we report a novel lineage of immunoglobulin receptors belonging to the KIR family, which is highly conserved throughout 50 million years of primate evolution. PMID:16911775

  2. HIV-1 gp140 epitope recognition is influenced by immunoglobulin DH gene segment sequence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuge; Kapoor, Pratibha; Parks, Robert; Silva-Sanchez, Aaron; Alam, S Munir; Verkoczy, Laurent; Liao, Hua-Xin; Zhuang, Yingxin; Burrows, Peter; Levinson, Michael; Elgavish, Ada; Cui, Xiangqin; Haynes, Barton F; Schroeder, Harry

    2016-02-01

    Complementarity Determining Region 3 of the immunoglobulin (Ig) H chain (CDR-H3) lies at the center of the antigen-binding site where it often plays a decisive role in antigen recognition and binding. Amino acids encoded by the diversity (DH) gene segment are the main component of CDR-H3. Each DH has the potential to rearrange into one of six DH reading frames (RFs), each of which exhibits a characteristic amino acid hydrophobicity signature that has been conserved among jawed vertebrates by natural selection. A preference for use of RF1 promotes the incorporation of tyrosine into CDR-H3 while suppressing the inclusion of hydrophobic or charged amino acids. To test the hypothesis that these evolutionary constraints on DH sequence influence epitope recognition, we used mice with a single DH that has been altered to preferentially use RF2 or inverted RF1. B cells in these mice produce a CDR-H3 repertoire that is enriched for valine or arginine in place of tyrosine. We serially immunized this panel of mice with gp140 from HIV-1 JR-FL isolate and then used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or peptide microarray to assess antibody binding to key or overlapping HIV-1 envelope epitopes. By ELISA, serum reactivity to key epitopes varied by DH sequence. By microarray, sera with Ig CDR-H3s enriched for arginine bound to linear peptides with a greater range of hydrophobicity but had a lower intensity of binding than sera containing Ig CDR-H3s enriched for tyrosine or valine. We conclude that patterns of epitope recognition and binding can be heavily influenced by DH germ line sequence. This may help explain why antibodies in HIV-infected patients must undergo extensive somatic mutation in order to bind to specific viral epitopes and achieve neutralization. PMID:26687685

  3. Laser-based microdissection of single cells from tissue sections and PCR analysis of rearranged immunoglobulin genes from isolated normal and malignant human B cells.

    PubMed

    Küppers, Ralf; Schneider, Markus; Hansmann, Martin-Leo

    2013-01-01

    Normal and malignant B cells carry rearranged immunoglobulin (Ig) variable region genes, which due to their practically limitless diversity represent ideal clonal markers for these cells. We describe here an approach to isolate single cells from frozen tissue sections by microdissection using a laser-based method. From the isolated cells rearranged IgH and Igκ genes are amplified in a semi-nested PCR approach, using a collection of V gene family-specific primers recognizing nearly all V gene segments together with primers for the J gene segments. By sequence analysis of V genes from distinct cells, the clonal relationship of the B lineage cells can unequivocally be determined and related to the histological distribution of the cells. The approach is also useful to determine V, D, and J gene usage. Moreover, the presence and pattern of somatic Ig V gene mutations give valuable insight into the stage of differentiation of the B cells.

  4. Rescue and expression of human immunoglobulin genes to generate functional human monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lewis, A P; Parry, N; Peakman, T C; Crowe, J S

    1992-07-01

    Human monoclonal antibody production has been hampered for many years by the instability of cell lines and low levels of expression of the antibodies. We describe here the rescue of human immunoglobulin genes utilizing micro-mRNA preparation from a small number of human hybridoma cells and conventional cDNA cloning. This allows cloning and immediate high-level expression from full-length human heavy and light chain cDNA molecules and provides a mechanism to rescue whole human monoclonal antibodies of proven efficacy.

  5. Clonal rearrangements of immunoglobulin genes and progression to B cell lymphoma in cutaneous lymphoid hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Wood, G S; Ngan, B Y; Tung, R; Hoffman, T E; Abel, E A; Hoppe, R T; Warnke, R A; Cleary, M L; Sklar, J

    1989-07-01

    Cutaneous lymphoid hyperplasia (CLH) is a disorder characterized by the development of one or more skin lesions containing dense lymphoid infiltrates that exhibit the histopathologic features of a benign, reactive process. Nevertheless, some cases have been associated with the subsequent development of clinically overt lymphomas. This suggests that monoclonal populations may exist in some cases of CLH and that these cases may represent a subset more likely to evolve into lymphoma. To determine if such a subset of CLH can be distinguished, Southern blot analysis of DNA was used to study the immunogenotypic features of lesions from 14 patients with clinical, histopathologic, and immunopathologic findings characteristic of CLH. Five cases exhibited detectable clonal rearrangements of immunoglobulin genes. Furthermore, one of these five cases evolved into overt diffuse large cell lymphoma of B cell lineage during a 2-year follow-up of recurrent disease at the original cutaneous site. The immunoglobulin gene rearrangements of this lymphoma were identical to those of the prior CLH lesion. There was no evidence of detectable t(14;18) chromosomal translocations or clonal rearrangements of the beta gene of the T cell receptor in any case. It was concluded that CLH can be divided into two subsets based on the presence or absence of a clonal B cell population, and that overt lymphoma can arise from the former subset and contain the same B cell clone identified in the pre-existent CLH lesion.

  6. Reevaluation of the role of DNA polymerase theta in somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Martomo, Stella A; Saribasak, Huseyin; Yokoi, Masayuki; Hanaoka, Fumio; Gearhart, Patricia J

    2008-09-01

    DNA polymerase theta has been implicated in the process of somatic hypermutation in immunoglobulin variable genes based on several reports of alterations in the frequency and spectra of mutations from Polq(-/-) mice. However, these studies have contrasting results on mutation frequencies and the types of nucleotide substitutions, which question the role of polymerase theta in hypermutation. DNA polymerase eta has a dominant effect on mutation and may substitute in the absence of polymerase theta to affect the pattern. Therefore, we have examined mutation in mice deficient for both polymerases theta and eta. The mutation frequencies in rearranged variable genes from Peyer's patches were similar in wild type, Polq(-/-), Polh(-/-), and Polq(-/-)Polh(-/-) mice. The types of substitutions were also similar between wild type and Polq(-/-) clones, and between Polh(-/-) and Polq(-/-)Polh(-/-) clones. Furthermore, there was no difference in heavy chain class switching in splenic B cells from the four groups of mice. These results indicate that polymerase theta does not play a significant role in the generation of somatic mutation in immunoglobulin genes.

  7. The somatic hypermutation activity of a follicular lymphoma links to large insertions and deletions of immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Wu, H Y; Kaartinen, M

    1995-07-01

    A biopsy specimen from a patient with follicular lymphoma was divided into two fragments. DNA was extracted from one fragment and a 1.2 kb region of the functional heavy chain (IgH) gene was amplified, cloned and sequenced (eight clones). From the other fragment a cell line (HF-1) was started. The IgH gene region was amplified from the cell line, and sequenced without cloning. The nine sequences obtained could be arranged into a genealogical tree where the individual sequences differed from the deduced ancestor by 16-29 single nucleotide changes, some also by an insertion and/or a deletion. It is apparent that the sequence alterations were caused by somatic mutations during the growth of the lymphoma. The comparison of the sequences with two published (allelic) germline sequences of the human JH region showed approximately 20% non-homology. The differences included five additional multinucleotide insertion/deletion changes, the longest of them a 101-nucleotide insertion. Two long insertions were homologous to the adjacent germline sequences. We propose that most of the changes observed, including long deletions and insertions, represent or are linked to somatic hypermutation events of the Ig gene type. Although in a few cases large deletions and insertions (> 2 bp) have been found in mutated immunoglobulin genes, our results, for the first time, firmly link these deletions/insertions to somatic hypermutations; their frequency was found to be 2.2% of the observed mutational events in the non-translated gene regions. HF-1 is the first follicular lymphoma line successfully established from a lymphoma known to have hypermutated its Ig genes during the malignant growth. It is a candidate cell line to be studied for its ability to generate mutations of B cell type in cell cultures.

  8. Localized DNA Demethylation at Recombination Intermediates during Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Gene Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Selimyan, Roza; Gerstein, Rachel M.; Ivanova, Irina; Precht, Patricia; Subrahmanyam, Ramesh; Perlot, Thomas; Alt, Frederick W.; Sen, Ranjan

    2013-01-01

    Multiple epigenetic marks have been proposed to contribute to the regulation of antigen receptor gene assembly via V(D)J recombination. Here we provide a comprehensive view of DNA methylation at the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) gene locus prior to and during V(D)J recombination. DNA methylation did not correlate with the histone modification state on unrearranged alleles, indicating that these epigenetic marks were regulated independently. Instead, pockets of tissue-specific demethylation were restricted to DNase I hypersensitive sites within this locus. Though unrearranged diversity (DH) and joining (JH) gene segments were methylated, DJH junctions created after the first recombination step were largely demethylated in pro-, pre-, and mature B cells. Junctional demethylation was highly localized, B-lineage-specific, and required an intact tissue-specific enhancer, Eμ. We propose that demethylation occurs after the first recombination step and may mark the junction for secondary recombination. PMID:23382652

  9. Localized DNA demethylation at recombination intermediates during immunoglobulin heavy chain gene assembly.

    PubMed

    Selimyan, Roza; Gerstein, Rachel M; Ivanova, Irina; Precht, Patricia; Subrahmanyam, Ramesh; Perlot, Thomas; Alt, Frederick W; Sen, Ranjan

    2013-01-01

    Multiple epigenetic marks have been proposed to contribute to the regulation of antigen receptor gene assembly via V(D)J recombination. Here we provide a comprehensive view of DNA methylation at the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) gene locus prior to and during V(D)J recombination. DNA methylation did not correlate with the histone modification state on unrearranged alleles, indicating that these epigenetic marks were regulated independently. Instead, pockets of tissue-specific demethylation were restricted to DNase I hypersensitive sites within this locus. Though unrearranged diversity (D(H)) and joining (J(H)) gene segments were methylated, DJ(H) junctions created after the first recombination step were largely demethylated in pro-, pre-, and mature B cells. Junctional demethylation was highly localized, B-lineage-specific, and required an intact tissue-specific enhancer, Eμ. We propose that demethylation occurs after the first recombination step and may mark the junction for secondary recombination.

  10. Induction of somatic hypermutation in immunoglobulin genes is dependent on DNA polymerase iota.

    PubMed

    Faili, Ahmad; Aoufouchi, Said; Flatter, Eric; Guéranger, Quentin; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès; Weill, Jean-Claude

    2002-10-31

    Somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes is a unique, targeted, adaptive process. While B cells are engaged in germinal centres in T-dependent responses, single base substitutions are introduced in the expressed Vh/Vl genes to allow the selection of mutants with a higher affinity for the immunizing antigen. Almost every possible DNA transaction has been proposed to explain this process, but each of these models includes an error-prone DNA synthesis step that introduces the mutations. The Y family of DNA polymerases--pol eta, pol iota, pol kappa and rev1--are specialized for copying DNA lesions and have high rates of error when copying a normal DNA template. By performing gene inactivation in a Burkitt's lymphoma cell line inducible for hypermutation, we show here that somatic hypermutation is dependent on DNA polymerase iota.

  11. Generation of immunoglobulin light chain gene diversity in Raja erinacea is not associated with somatic rearrangement, an exception to a central paradigm of B cell immunity

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    In all vertebrate species examined to date, rearrangement and somatic modification of gene segmental elements that encode portions of the antigen-combining sites of immunoglobulins are integral components of the generation of antibody diversity. In the phylogenetically primitive cartilaginous fishes, gene segments encoding immunoglobulin heavy and light chain loci are arranged in multiple clusters, in which segmental elements are separated by only 300-400 bp. In some cases, segmental elements are joined in the germline of nonlymphoid cells (joined genes). Both genomic library screening and direct amplification of genomic DNA have been used to characterize at least 89 different type I light chain gene clusters in the skate, Raja. Analyses of predicted nucleotide sequences and predicted peptide structures are consistent with the distribution of genes into different sequence groups. Predicted amino acid sequence differences are preferentially distributed in complementarity-determining versus framework regions, and replacement-type substitutions exceed neutral substitutions. When specific germline sequences are related to the sequences of individual cDNAs, it is apparent that the joined genes are expressed and are potentially somatically mutated. No evidence was found for the presence of any type I light chain gene in Raja that is not germline joined. The type I light chain gene clusters in Raja appear to represent a novel gene system in which combinatorial and junctional diversity are absent. PMID:7790811

  12. Aberrant and unstable expression of immunoglobulin genes in persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Bessudo, A; Rassenti, L; Havlir, D; Richman, D; Feigal, E; Kipps, T J

    1998-08-15

    We examined the IgM VH gene subgroup use-distribution in serial blood samples of 37 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients and a group of HIV-seronegative healthy adults. The IgM VH gene repertoires of healthy adults were relatively similar to one another and were stable over time. In contrast, individuals infected with HIV had IgM VH gene repertoires that were significantly more heterogeneous and unstable. Persons at early stages of HIV infection generally had abnormal expression levels of Ig VH3 genes and frequently displayed marked fluctuations in the relative expression levels of this VH gene subgroup over time. In contrast, persons with established acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) had a significantly lower incidence of abnormalities in Ig VH3 expression levels, although continued to display abnormalities and instability in the expression levels of the smaller Ig VH gene subgroups. Moreover, the skewing and/or fluctuations in the expressed-IgM VH gene repertoire appeared greatest for persons at earlier stages of HIV infection. These studies show that persons infected with HIV have aberrant and unstable expression of immunoglobulin genes suggestive of a high degree humoral immune dysregulation and ongoing humoral immune responses to HIV-associated antigens and superantigens.

  13. Hashimoto's thyroiditis lacks detectable clonal immunoglobulin and T cell receptor gene rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ezra, J; Wu, A; Sheibani, K

    1988-12-01

    The development of B cell lymphoma, predominantly of the large-cell type, in patients with autoimmune diseases such as Hashimoto's thyroiditis or Sjogren's syndrome is well known. In Sjogren's syndrome, it has been recently shown that the benign-appearing lymphocytic infiltrates of the lymphoepithelial lesions in the salivary glands have clonal rearrangements of immunoglobulin genes in their DNA, even in the absence of malignant lymphoma. To investigate whether a similar situation occurs in Hashimoto's thyroiditis, we studied the thyroid glands from four patients with this disease. In all four cases, there was a benign-appearing lymphocytic infiltrate in the thyroid, with eosinophilic changes in the Hurthle cells. In immunologic studies, we determined that the lymphocytes were polyclonal in each case. We extracted DNA from the frozen tissue blocks of these four patients and analyzed it by molecular hybridization for the presence of clonal immunoglobulin (IgH, kappa, and lambda) and T cell receptor beta chain gene rearrangements, and detected none in any case. Therefore, we conclude that the lymphocytes in Hashimoto's thyroiditis are immunologically and immunogenetically polyclonal proliferations of cells, and that the initial lesion of Hashimoto's thyroiditis does not contain a detectable clone of cells that may eventually develop into malignant lymphoma.

  14. Rearrangements of chicken immunoglobulin genes in lymphoid cells transformed by the avian retroviral oncogene v-rel.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Lim, M Y; Bose, H; Bishop, J M

    1988-01-01

    The retroviral oncogene v-rel transforms poorly characterized lymphoid cells. We have explored the nature of these cells by analyzing the configuration and expression of immunoglobulin genes in chicken hemopoietic cells transformed by v-rel. None of the transformed cells expressed their immunoglobulin genes. The cells fell into three classes: class I cells have their immunoglobulin genes potentially in an embryonic configuration; class II and class III cells have lost one copy of the lambda light chain locus and have one copy of the heavy chain locus rearranged into a configuration that differs from what is found in mature B cells. In class II cells, the other heavy chain locus may be in embryonic configuration, whereas it is deleted in class III cells. The first of these classes may represent the earliest stage of the lymphoid lineage yet encountered among virus-transformed cells, whereas the second and third classes represent an apparently anomalous rearrangement whose origin remains unknown.

  15. Killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor genes and ligands and their role in hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Varbanova, Viktoria; Naumova, Elissaveta; Mihaylova, Anastasiya

    2016-04-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are considered crucial for the elimination of emerging tumor cells. Effector NK-cell functions are controlled by interactions of inhibitory and activating killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) on NK cells with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I ligands on target cells. KIR and HLA are highly polymorphic genetic systems segregating independently, creating a great diversity in KIR/HLA gene profiles in different individuals. There is an increasing evidence supporting the relevance of KIR and HLA ligand gene background for the occurrence and outcome of certain cancers. However, the data are still controversial and the mechanisms of receptor-ligand mediated NK-cell action remain unclear. Here, the main characteristics and functions of KIRs and their HLA class I ligands are reviewed. In addition, we review the HLA and KIR correlations with different hematological malignancies and discuss our current understanding of the biological significance and mechanisms underlying these associations.

  16. Efficient Immunoglobulin Gene Disruption and Targeted Replacement in Rabbit Using Zinc Finger Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Offner, Sonja; Ros, Francesca; Lifke, Valeria; Zeitler, Bryan; Rottmann, Oswald; Vincent, Anna; Zhang, Lei; Jenkins, Shirin; Niersbach, Helmut; Kind, Alexander J.; Gregory, Philip D.; Schnieke, Angelika E.; Platzer, Josef

    2011-01-01

    Rabbits are widely used in biomedical research, yet techniques for their precise genetic modification are lacking. We demonstrate that zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) introduced into fertilized oocytes can inactivate a chosen gene by mutagenesis and also mediate precise homologous recombination with a DNA gene-targeting vector to achieve the first gene knockout and targeted sequence replacement in rabbits. Two ZFN pairs were designed that target the rabbit immunoglobulin M (IgM) locus within exons 1 and 2. ZFN mRNAs were microinjected into pronuclear stage fertilized oocytes. Founder animals carrying distinct mutated IgM alleles were identified and bred to produce offspring. Functional knockout of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus was confirmed by serum IgM and IgG deficiency and lack of IgM+ and IgG+ B lymphocytes. We then tested whether ZFN expression would enable efficient targeted sequence replacement in rabbit oocytes. ZFN mRNA was co-injected with a linear DNA vector designed to replace exon 1 of the IgM locus with ∼1.9 kb of novel sequence. Double strand break induced targeted replacement occurred in up to 17% of embryos and in 18% of fetuses analyzed. Two major goals have been achieved. First, inactivation of the endogenous IgM locus, which is an essential step for the production of therapeutic human polyclonal antibodies in the rabbit. Second, establishing efficient targeted gene manipulation and homologous recombination in a refractory animal species. ZFN mediated genetic engineering in the rabbit and other mammals opens new avenues of experimentation in immunology and many other research fields. PMID:21695153

  17. Elevated PC responsive B cells and anti-PC antibody production in transgenic mice harboring anti-PC immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Pinkert, C A; Manz, J; Linton, P J; Klinman, N R; Storb, U

    1989-12-01

    The rearrangement of heavy and light chain immunoglobulin genes is necessary for the production of functional antibody molecules. The myeloma MOPC 167 produces specific antibodies to the antigen phosphorylcholine (PC), which is present on bacterial surfaces, fungi and other environmental contaminants. Rearranged heavy and light chain immunoglobulin genes cloned from MOPC 167 were microinjected into mouse eggs. Within the resulting transgenic mice, expression of the transgenes were limited to lymphoid tissues. Transgenic mice produced elevated levels of anti-PC antibodies constitutively, at 16 days of age, when normal non-transgenic mice were not fully immunocompetent. A triggering antigenic stimulus was not necessary to evoke anti-PC immunoglobulin production. Additionally, the frequency of PC-responsive B cells in these transgenic mice was further increased upon specific immunization.

  18. Extended haplotypes in rheumatoid arthritis and preliminary evidence for an interaction with immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Puttick, A; Briggs, D; Welsh, K; Jacoby, R; Williamson, E; Jones, V

    1986-06-01

    The incidence of extended haplotypes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex was compared between 20 probands with RA, their unaffected family members, and 42 controls. One haplotype only, HLA-Bw62 BfS C4A*3 C4B*3 DR4 GLO2, was significantly increased in the patient group, whereas HLA-B7 BfS C4A*3 C4B*1 DR2 GLO1, which was the most common haplotype in the control groups, was absent. The immunoglobulin allotype Glm(2) was significantly increased in frequency in the RA patients, and analysis showed that of the seven patients carrying Bw62-DR4, five were G1m(2) positive. Further, the increase in frequency of the phenotype Gm(1,2,17,21,3,5,23) was also significant and was carried by two of four probands with the extended haplotype HLA-Bw62 BfS C4A*3 C4B*3 DR4 GLO2 and by one proband also bearing this haplotype but with a null allele at the C4A locus. The striking association of G1m(2) and Bw62 with DR4 in our patients suggests that in interaction of immunoglobulin genes with DR4 is stronger when DR4 is associated with particular haplotypes rather than with DR4 in general.

  19. Genetic analysis of dilated cardiomyopathy--HLA and immunoglobulin genes may confer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Nishi, H; Kimura, A; Fukuta, S; Kusukawa, R; Kawamura, K; Nimura, Y; Nagano, M; Yasuda, H; Kawai, C; Sugimoto, T

    1992-10-01

    To identify genetic factors in the immune system which control the susceptibility to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), HLA class II DNA typing was performed in 61 Japanese patients, using PCR/SSO probe analyses. The frequencies of HLA-DQB1*0503 (15% vs 5%; RR = 3.06, chi 2 = 7.19) and DQB1*0604 (21% vs 10%; RR = 2.41, chi 2 = 6.20) were significantly increased and that of HLA-DQB1*0502 (RR = 1.74) was slightly increased in the DCM patients. The frequency of DQB1*0303 (16% vs 31%; RR = 0.44, chi 2 = 5.16) was significantly decreased in the patients. The increased HLA-DQB1 alleles have a histidine residue in common at the 30th codon for the HLA-DQ beta chain. Among the genetic markers studied by Southern blot analyses, IGLV (immunoglobulin lambda light chain, pV3.3) showed a strong association with DCM, i.e. A2/A2 genotype was found in 37.7% of patients whereas it was observed in only 18.9% of the control subjects (RR = 2.6, chi 2 = 7.77). The frequency of this genotype was higher in patients under age 45 years at the time of diagnosis (45.5%, RR = 3.6, chi 2 = 10.02). These results suggest that HLA and immunoglobulin genes are closely linked to susceptibility to DCM.

  20. Lectins from opportunistic bacteria interact with acquired variable-region glycans of surface immunoglobulin in follicular lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Dunja; Dühren-von Minden, Marcus; Alkhatib, Alabbas; Setz, Corinna; van Bergen, Cornelis A. M.; Benkißer-Petersen, Marco; Wilhelm, Isabel; Villringer, Sarah; Krysov, Sergey; Packham, Graham; Zirlik, Katja; Römer, Winfried; Buske, Christian; Stevenson, Freda K.; Veelken, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) expression is a key feature of most B-cell lymphomas, but the mechanisms of BCR signal induction and the involvement of autoantigen recognition remain unclear. In follicular lymphoma (FL) B cells, BCR expression is retained despite a chromosomal translocation that links the antiapoptotic gene BCL2 to the regulatory elements of immunoglobulin genes, thereby disrupting 1 heavy-chain allele. A remarkable feature of FL-BCRs is the acquisition of potential N-glycosylation sites during somatic hypermutation. The introduced glycans carry mannose termini, which create potential novel binding sites for mannose-specific lectins. Here, we investigated the effect of N-linked variable-region glycosylation for BCR interaction with cognate antigen and with lectins of different origins. N-glycans were found to severely impair BCR specificity and affinity to the initial cognate antigen. In addition, we found that lectins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cenocepacia bind and stimulate FL cells. Human exposure to these bacteria can occur by contact with soil and water. In addition, they represent opportunistic pathogens in susceptible hosts. Understanding the role of bacterial lectins might elucidate the pathogenesis of FL and establish novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:25784678

  1. Topoisomerase I deficiency causes RNA polymerase II accumulation and increases AID abundance in immunoglobulin variable genes.

    PubMed

    Maul, Robert W; Saribasak, Huseyin; Cao, Zheng; Gearhart, Patricia J

    2015-06-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) is a DNA cytosine deaminase that diversifies immunoglobulin genes in B cells. Recent work has shown that RNA polymerase II (Pol II) accumulation correlates with AID recruitment. However, a direct link between Pol II and AID abundance has not been tested. We used the DT40 B-cell line to manipulate levels of Pol II by decreasing topoisomerase I (Top1), which relaxes DNA supercoiling in front of the transcription complex. Top1 was decreased by stable transfection of a short hairpin RNA against Top1, which produced an accumulation of Pol II in transcribed genes, compared to cells transfected with sh-control RNA. The increased Pol II density enhanced AID recruitment to variable genes in the λ light chain locus, and resulted in higher levels of somatic hypermutation and gene conversion. It has been proposed by another lab that AID itself might directly suppress Top1 to increase somatic hypermutation. However, we found that in both AID(+/+) and AID(-/-) B cells from DT40 and mice, Top1 protein levels were identical, indicating that the presence or absence of AID did not decrease Top1 expression. Rather, our results suggest that the mechanism for increased diversity when Top1 is reduced is that Pol II accumulates and recruits AID to variable genes.

  2. Rearrangement of immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor genes in Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Roth, M. S.; Schnitzer, B.; Bingham, E. L.; Harnden, C. E.; Hyder, D. M.; Ginsburg, D.

    1988-01-01

    The precise cellular origin of the malignant cell population in Hodgkin's disease (HD) is unknown. Recent application of Southern blotting techniques to detect clonal rearrangements of immunoglobulin (Ig) and T-cell receptor (TCR) genes has yielded conflicting results. The authors report the detailed analysis of tumor tissue DNA obtained from 18 cases of HD using Ig and TCR gene probes. The distribution of HD subtypes was similar to that in other series. Samples were examined for rearrangement by means of multiple restriction enzymes with specific probes for the Ig heavy chain, Ig kappa, Ig lambda, TCR beta, and TCR gamma loci. Only germline bands were detected in all 18 cases with the Ig gene probes and in 15 of 18 cases with the TCR probes. In 2 cases blot analysis suggested a predominance of polyclonal (or oligoclonal) T cells. In 1 case monoclonal rearrangement of the TCR beta gene was detected. Based on the intensity of the rearrangement and the small percentage of Reed-Sternberg (R-S) cells in this case, the clonal population detected was most likely not the R-S cell itself. The data do not support the frequent occurrence of Ig or TCR monoclonal gene rearrangement in HD. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3358458

  3. Assessment by Southern blot analysis of UV-induced damage and repair in human immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, M S; Bianchi, N O; de la Chapelle, A

    1990-09-01

    Irradiation of DNA with UV light induces pyrimidine dimers and (6-4) photoproducts. The presence of one of these photolesions in the restriction site of a given endonuclease inhibits DNA cleavage and induces the formation of fragments by incomplete DNA digestion which appear as additional, facultative bands in Southern hybridization autoradiograms. The number and size of these fragments show a positive correlation with the UV dose. The response to UV light of immunoglobulin light-chain constant kappa and heavy-chain constant mu genes was analyzed with 2 specific probes. Constant kappa and mu genes when irradiated as part of the chromatin of living lymphocytes showed a UV sensitivity similar to that of naked DNA. The same genes from granulocytes had 50-60 times lower UV sensitivity. When cells were allowed to repair photolesions for 24 h the facultative bands from granulocytes disappeared indicating that these cells were able to remove photolesions from constant kappa and mu genes. Facultative bands from lymphocytes showed a smaller decrease of density after 24 h repair. This suggests that lymphocytes are less efficient than granulocytes in removing UV damage from constant kappa and mu genes.

  4. Restricted use of fetal VH3 immunoglobulin genes by unselected B cells in the adult. Predominance of 56p1-like VH genes in common variable immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Braun, J; Berberian, L; King, L; Sanz, I; Govan, H L

    1992-05-01

    The large VH3 family of human immunoglobulin genes is commonly used throughout B cell ontogeny. However, B cells of the fetus and certain autoantibody-producing clones are restricted to a recurrent subset of VH3 genes, and VH3 B cells are deficient in certain immunodeficiency diseases. In this study, we have sequenced a set of rearranged VH3 genes generated by genomic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from normal adults and those with common variable immunodeficiency (CVI). In both groups, all cones were readily identifiable with the fetal VH3 subset, and were further distinguished by limited DH motifs and exclusive use of JH4. In CVI, the residual population of VH3 B cells were notable for predominant use of 56p1-like VH genes. All clones displayed sequence divergence (including somatic mutation) with evidence of strong selection against complementarity-determining region (CDR) coding change. A survey of other V gene families indicates that human V gene diversity may be restricted in general by germline mechanisms. These findings suggest that the expressed antibody repertoire in the human adult may be much smaller than anticipated, and selected by processes in part distinct from the paradigm of maximal antigen-binding diversity.

  5. p21 is dispensable for AID-mediated class switch recombination and mutagenesis of immunoglobulin genes during somatic hypermutation.

    PubMed

    Shansab, Maryam; Selsing, Erik

    2011-03-01

    In B cells, activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) induces somatic hypermutation (SHM) at rearranged immunoglobulin (Ig) variable (V) regions. Previous studies have shown that both monoubiquitination of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and translesional DNA polymerase activity are important for inducing mutagenesis during SHM. Regulation of PCNA ubiquitination by p21, also known as Cdkn1a and p21(Cip1/Waf1), is an important mechanism that controls mutation loads in mammalian cells. In this study, we have assessed whether p21 has an in vivo function in regulating mutagenesis in B cells by analyzing SHM frequency in p21-deficient mice. Our results show that p21 is dispensable for SHM. This suggests that, during SHM of Ig genes, p21 does not act to regulate mutagenesis load. We also show that p21 transcript levels are the same in both wildtype and AID-deficient B cells during B cell activation, and that AID-mediated class switch recombination (CSR) is not affected by p21 deficiency; thereby indicating that p21 regulation in B cells is not altered by AID-induced DNA damage and that p21 has no affect on AID-dependent Ig gene diversification. Our results suggest that regulation of p21 in activated B cells is probably more important for maintaining proper cell cycle progression as opposed to promoting SHM of Ig genes.

  6. The role of G-density in switch region repeats for immunoglobulin class switch recombination

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zheng Z.; Pannunzio, Nicholas R.; Hsieh, Chih-Lin; Yu, Kefei; Lieber, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    The boundaries of R-loops are well-documented at immunoglobulin heavy chain loci in mammalian B cells. Within primary B cells or B cell lines, the upstream boundaries of R-loops typically begin early in the repetitive portion of the switch regions. Most R-loops terminate within the switch repetitive zone, but the remainder can extend a few hundred base pairs further, where G-density on the non-template DNA strand gradually drops to the genome average. Whether the G-density determines how far the R-loops extend is an important question. We previously studied the role of G-clusters in initiating R-loop formation, but we did not examine the role of G-density in permitting the elongation of the R-loop, after it had initiated. Here, we vary the G-density of different portions of the switch region in a murine B cell line. We find that both class switch recombination (CSR) and R-loop formation decrease significantly when the overall G-density is reduced from 46% to 29%. Short 50 bp insertions with low G-density within switch regions do not appear to affect either CSR or R-loop elongation, whereas a longer (150 bp) insertion impairs both. These results demonstrate that G-density is an important determinant of the length over which mammalian genomic R-loops extend. PMID:25378327

  7. Diagnostic value of immunoglobulin κ light chain gene rearrangement analysis in B-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    KOKOVIC, IRA; NOVAKOVIC, BARBARA JEZERSEK; NOVAKOVIC, SRDJAN

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of the immunoglobulin κ light chain (IGK) gene is an alternative method for B-cell clonality assessment in the diagnosis of mature B-cell proliferations in which the detection of clonal immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) gene rearrangements fails. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the added value of standardized BIOMED-2 assay for the detection of clonal IGK gene rearrangements in the diagnostic setting of suspected B-cell lymphomas. With this purpose, 92 specimens from 80 patients with the final diagnosis of mature B-cell lymphoma (37 specimens), mature T-cell lymphoma (26 specimens) and reactive lymphoid proliferation (29 specimens) were analyzed for B-cell clonality. B-cell clonality analysis was performed using the BIOMED-2 IGH and IGK gene clonality assays. The determined sensitivity of the IGK assay was 67.6%, while the determined sensitivity of the IGH assay was 75.7%. The sensitivity of combined IGH+IGK assay was 81.1%. The determined specificity of the IGK assay was 96.2% in the group of T-cell lymphomas and 96.6% in the group of reactive lesions. The determined specificity of the IGH assay was 84.6% in the group of lymphomas and 86.2% in the group of reactive lesions. The comparison of GeneScan (GS) and heteroduplex pretreatment-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (HD-PAGE) methods for the analysis of IGK gene rearrangements showed a higher efficacy of GS analysis in a series of 27 B-cell lymphomas analyzed by both methods. In the present study, we demonstrated that by applying the combined IGH+IGK clonality assay the overall detection rate of B-cell clonality was increased by 5.4%. Thus, we confirmed the added value of the standardized BIOMED-2 IGK assay for assessment of B-cell clonality in suspected B-cell lymphomas with inconclusive clinical and cyto/histological diagnosis. PMID:25501347

  8. B cells in autoimmune diseases: Insights from analyses of immunoglobulin variable (Ig V) gene usage

    PubMed Central

    Foreman, Angela Lee; Van de Water, Judy; Gougeon, Marie-Lise; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2007-01-01

    The role of B cells in autoimmune diseases has not been fully elucidated. It is also unclear whether breaking of B cell tolerance in patients with autoimmune diseases is due to underlying defects in the molecular mechanisms involved in the arrangement of antibody genes or deficiencies in the subsequent selective influences that shape the antibody repertoire. Analysis of immunoglobulin (Ig) variable (V) gene usage is beginning to provide answers to some of these questions. Such analyses have identified some differences in the basic Ig V gene repertoire of patients with autoimmune diseases compared to healthy controls, even though none of these differences can be considered major. Defects in positive and negative selection, mutational targeting and, in some cases, receptor editing have also been detected. In addition, analysis of Ig V gene usage in target organs and tissues of patients with autoimmune diseases have clearly demonstrated that there is a highly compartmentalized clonal expansion of B cells driven by a limited number of antigens in these tissues. Great progress has been made in the structural and functional characterization of disease-associated antibodies, largely because of the development of the combinatorial library technique. Use of antibodies generated by this technique offers great promise in identifying B cell epitopes on known target antigens and in gaining greater insights into the pathogenic role of B cells in both B- and T-cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. PMID:17537385

  9. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of immunoglobulin M heavy chain gene of blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala).

    PubMed

    Xia, Hu; Wu, Kang; Liu, Wanjing; Gul, Yasmeen; Wang, Weimin; Zhang, Xuezhen

    2014-09-01

    Immunoglobulins (Igs), which bind antigens with high specificity, are essential molecules in adaptive immune system of jawed vertebrates. In this study, cDNA encoding the secreted form of the immunoglobulin heavy chain of IgM (sIgM) was cloned from the mesonephros of blunt snout bream (Megalabrama amblycephala) using RT-PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The full-length cDNA of sIgM heavy chain gene has 1961 nucleotides encoding a putative protein of 569 amino acids, constant region shares high amino acid identity with that of Ctenopharyngodon idella (80%), Carassius auratus langsdorfii (65%) and Danio rerio (59%). Multiple protein sequence alignment revealed that blunt snout bream sIgM was clustered with the homologues of cyprinid fish and constructed one clade. Using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis, the level of sIgM mRNA was determined, with a V-shape change pattern: decreased initially from unfertilized egg stage to 4 cells stage and increased from 16 cells stage to prelarva. This sharp drop indicates that sIgM mRNA is maternally transferred, and was continuously degraded until 16 cells stage. The drastic rising in sIgM level from blastula stage to prelarva might be attributed to embryonic stem cell differentiation procedure. Compared with juvenile fish, the expression of sIgM was significantly higher in pronephros, liver, spleen, gill and muscle of adult fish. After the injection of Aeromonas hydrophila, the expression pattern of sIgM was found first down-regulated at 4 h, then up-regulated and reached the peak at 7 d and 21 d in mesonephros, spleen, liver and gill, respectively. PMID:24979225

  10. AID-induced remodeling of immunoglobulin genes and B cell fate.

    PubMed

    Laffleur, Brice; Denis-Lagache, Nicolas; Péron, Sophie; Sirac, Christophe; Moreau, Jeanne; Cogné, Michel

    2014-03-15

    Survival and phenotype of normal and malignant B lymphocytes are critically dependent on constitutive signals by the B cell receptor (BCR) for antigen. In addition, either antigen ligation of the BCR or various mitogenic stimuli result in B cell activation and induction of activation-induced deaminase (AID). AID activity can in turn mediate somatic hypermutation (SHM) of immunoglobulin (Ig) V regions and also deeply remodel the Ig heavy chain locus through class switch recombination (CSR) or locus suicide recombination (LSR). In addition to changes linked to affinity for antigen, modifying the class/isotype (i.e. the structure and function) of the BCR or suddenly deleting BCR expression also modulates the fate of antigen-experienced B cells.

  11. Ets proteins: new factors that regulate immunoglobulin heavy-chain gene expression.

    PubMed

    Rivera, R R; Stuiver, M H; Steenbergen, R; Murre, C

    1993-11-01

    We used a DNA-protein interaction screening method to isolate a cDNA, Erg-3, whose product binds to a site, designated pi, present in the immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy-chain gene enhancer. Erg-3 is an alternatively spliced product of the erg gene and contains an Ets DNA-binding domain. Fli-1 and PU.1, related Ets proteins, also bind to the same site. In addition, PU.1 binds to a second site, designated microB, in the Ig heavy-chain enhancer. We demonstrate that the pi binding site is crucial for Ig heavy-chain gene enhancer function. In addition, we show that Erg-3 and Fli.1, but not PU.1, can activate a reporter construct containing a multimer of protein-binding sites, synergistically with helix-loop-helix protein E12. We discuss how combinatorial interactions between members of the helix-loop-helix and Ets families may account for the tissue specificity of these proteins.

  12. A comparative overview of immunoglobulin genes and the generation of their diversity in tetrapods.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Wei, Zhiguo; Li, Ning; Zhao, Yaofeng

    2013-01-01

    In the past several decades, immunoglobulin (Ig) genes have been extensively characterized in many tetrapod species. This review focuses on the expressed Ig isotypes and the diversity of Ig genes in mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibians. With regard to heavy chains, five Ig isotypes - IgM, IgD, IgG, IgA, and IgE - have been reported in mammals. Among these isotypes, IgM, IgD, and IgA (or its analog, IgX) are also found in non-mammalian tetrapods. Birds, reptiles, and amphibians express IgY, which is considered the precursor of IgG and IgE. Some species have developed unique isotypes of Ig, such as IgO in the platypus, IgF in Xenopus, and IgY (ΔFc) in ducks and turtles. The κ and λ light chains are both utilized in tetrapods, but the usage frequencies of κ and λ chains differ greatly among species. The diversity of Ig genes depends on several factors, including the germline repertoire and recombinatorial and post-recombinatorial diversity, and different species have evolved distinct mechanisms to generate antibody diversity.

  13. Editing of mouse and human immunoglobulin genes by CRISPR-Cas9 system

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Taek-Chin; Compagno, Mara; Chiarle, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Applications of the CRISPR-Cas9 system to edit the genome have widely expanded to include DNA gene knock-out, deletions, chromosomal rearrangements, RNA editing and genome-wide screenings. Here we show the application of CRISPR-Cas9 technology to edit the mouse and human immunoglobulin (Ig) genes. By delivering Cas9 and guide-RNA (gRNA) with retro- or lenti-virus to IgM+ mouse B cells and hybridomas, we induce class-switch recombination (CSR) of the IgH chain to the desired subclass. Similarly, we induce CSR in all human B cell lines tested with high efficiency to targeted IgH subclass. Finally, we engineer mouse hybridomas to secrete Fab′ fragments instead of the whole Ig. Our results indicate that Ig genes in mouse and human cells can be edited to obtain any desired IgH switching helpful to study the biology of normal and lymphoma B cells. We also propose applications that could transform the technology of antibody production. PMID:26956543

  14. Editing of mouse and human immunoglobulin genes by CRISPR-Cas9 system.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Taek-Chin; Compagno, Mara; Chiarle, Roberto

    2016-03-09

    Applications of the CRISPR-Cas9 system to edit the genome have widely expanded to include DNA gene knock-out, deletions, chromosomal rearrangements, RNA editing and genome-wide screenings. Here we show the application of CRISPR-Cas9 technology to edit the mouse and human immunoglobulin (Ig) genes. By delivering Cas9 and guide-RNA (gRNA) with retro- or lenti-virus to IgM(+) mouse B cells and hybridomas, we induce class-switch recombination (CSR) of the IgH chain to the desired subclass. Similarly, we induce CSR in all human B cell lines tested with high efficiency to targeted IgH subclass. Finally, we engineer mouse hybridomas to secrete Fab' fragments instead of the whole Ig. Our results indicate that Ig genes in mouse and human cells can be edited to obtain any desired IgH switching helpful to study the biology of normal and lymphoma B cells. We also propose applications that could transform the technology of antibody production.

  15. Human immunoglobulin subclasses. Partial amino acid sequence of the constant region of a γ4 chain

    PubMed Central

    Pink, J. R. L.; Buttery, S. H.; De Vries, G. M.; Milstein, C.

    1970-01-01

    The heavy chain of a human myeloma protein (Vin) belonging to the γ4 subclass was subjected to tryptic digestion after reduction and carboxymethylation. Cyanogen bromide fragments were also prepared and all 19 tryptic peptides that account for one of them (the Fc-like fragment) were studied. Selected peptic peptides were isolated and provided evidence for the order of 15 of the tryptic peptides. In addition the sequence of two large peptic peptides derived from two sections of the molecule including all the interchain bridges is presented. Comparison with published data on other chains allows us to propose a sequence of γ4 chains that extends from just before the presumed starting point of the invariable region (at about residue 113) to the C-terminal end of the chain (approx. residue 446), except for a section of about 50 residues. The results of the comparison suggest that the immunoglobulin subclasses have a recent independent evolutionary origin in different species. Implications for complement fixation and for the evolutionary origin of antibody diversity are also discussed. PMID:4192699

  16. Hinge-Region O-Glycosylation of Human Immunoglobulin G3 (IgG3)*

    PubMed Central

    Plomp, Rosina; Dekkers, Gillian; Rombouts, Yoann; Visser, Remco; Koeleman, Carolien A.M.; Kammeijer, Guinevere S.M.; Jansen, Bas C.; Rispens, Theo; Hensbergen, Paul J.; Vidarsson, Gestur; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) is one of the most abundant proteins present in human serum and a fundamental component of the immune system. IgG3 represents ∼8% of the total amount of IgG in human serum and stands out from the other IgG subclasses because of its elongated hinge region and enhanced effector functions. This study reports partial O-glycosylation of the IgG3 hinge region, observed with nanoLC-ESI-IT-MS(/MS) analysis after proteolytic digestion. The repeat regions within the IgG3 hinge were found to be in part O-glycosylated at the threonine in the triple repeat motif. Non-, mono- and disialylated core 1-type O-glycans were detected in various IgG3 samples, both poly- and monoclonal. NanoLC-ESI-IT-MS/MS with electron transfer dissociation fragmentation and CE-MS/MS with CID fragmentation were used to determine the site of IgG3 O-glycosylation. The O-glycosylation site was further confirmed by the recombinant production of mutant IgG3 in which potential O-glycosylation sites had been knocked out. For IgG3 samples from six donors we found similar O-glycan structures and site occupancies, whereas for the same samples the conserved N-glycosylation of the Fc CH2 domain showed considerable interindividual variation. The occupancy of each of the three O-glycosylation sites was found to be ∼10% in six serum-derived IgG3 samples and ∼13% in two monoclonal IgG3 allotypes. PMID:25759508

  17. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of four isotypes of immunoglobulin light chain genes in orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Shan; Cheng, Chao-An; Lin, Chih-Hung; Lee, Chiou-Yueh; Tseng, Shih-Jou; Tzeng, Chyng-Shyan; Chang, Chi-Yao

    2013-03-01

    To date, many immunoglobulin (Ig) genes have been identified in diverse teleost species, but the contributions of different types of light chain (IgL) to the immune response remain unclear. Screening of a stimulated kidney cDNA library from orange-spotted grouper (Osg, Epinephelus coioides) resulted in the identification of 26 full Ig light chain (OsgIgL) coding sequences. These 26 OsgIgLs encoded peptides from 235 to 248 amino acid residues and could be grouped into five variable (V(L)) and four constant (C(L)) isotypes. The C(L) regions contained three conserved cysteine residues that may participate in intra- or inter-chain disulfide bond formation. The four C(L) isotypes could be sub-grouped into two serological types: κ (C(L)-I, C(L)-II and C(L)-III) and σ (C(L)-IV), by phylogenetic analysis. The OsgIgL genes were found to be expressed in various tissues, with greatest levels of expression observed in the head-kidney and spleen. The major expression type was C(L)-I, which comprised 92% and 91% of total OsgIgL gene expression in the head-kidney and spleen, respectively. Transcription of all four C(L) isotypes was differentially affected in response to various immunostimulators, including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), poly I:C and grouper iridovirus (GIV). Induction of OsgIgL genes in response to immunostimulators was particularly dramatic in the spleen, suggesting this organ holds particular importance for the regulation of OsgIgL expression. Furthermore, vaccination of grouper with formalin-inactivated GIV also induced differential patterns of expression in all four OsgIgL isotypes. In summary, the significant and diverse patterns of transcriptional induction observed for OsgIgL isotypes in the spleen and head-kidney imply that each isotype may have unique roles in the immune response.

  18. Epigenetic Regulation of Individual Modules of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus 3′ Regulatory Region

    PubMed Central

    Birshtein, Barbara K.

    2014-01-01

    The Igh locus undergoes an amazing array of DNA rearrangements and modifications during B cell development. During early stages, the variable region gene is constructed from constituent variable (V), diversity (D), and joining (J) segments (VDJ joining). B cells that successfully express an antibody can be activated, leading to somatic hypermutation (SHM) focused on the variable region, and class switch recombination (CSR), which substitutes downstream constant region genes for the originally used Cμ constant region gene. Many investigators, ourselves included, have sought to understand how these processes specifically target the Igh locus and avoid other loci and potential deleterious consequences of malignant transformation. Our laboratory has concentrated on a complex regulatory region (RR) that is located downstream of Cα, the most 3′ of the Igh constant region genes. The ~40 kb 3′ RR, which is predicted to serve as a downstream major regulator of the Igh locus, contains two distinct segments: an ~28 kb region comprising four enhancers, and an adjacent ~12 kb region containing multiple CTCF and Pax5 binding sites. Analysis of targeted mutations in mice by a number of investigators has concluded that the entire 3′ RR enhancer region is essential for SHM and CSR (but not for VDJ joining) and for high levels of expression of multiple isotypes. The CTCF/Pax5 binding region is a candidate for influencing VDJ joining early in B cell development and serving as a potential insulator of the Igh locus. Components of the 3′ RR are subject to a variety of epigenetic changes during B cell development, i.e., DNAse I hypersensitivity, histone modifications, and DNA methylation, in association with transcription factor binding. I propose that these changes provide a foundation by which regulatory elements in modules of the 3′ RR function by interacting with each other and with target sequences of the Igh locus. PMID:24795714

  19. Epigenetic Regulation of Individual Modules of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus 3' Regulatory Region.

    PubMed

    Birshtein, Barbara K

    2014-01-01

    The Igh locus undergoes an amazing array of DNA rearrangements and modifications during B cell development. During early stages, the variable region gene is constructed from constituent variable (V), diversity (D), and joining (J) segments (VDJ joining). B cells that successfully express an antibody can be activated, leading to somatic hypermutation (SHM) focused on the variable region, and class switch recombination (CSR), which substitutes downstream constant region genes for the originally used Cμ constant region gene. Many investigators, ourselves included, have sought to understand how these processes specifically target the Igh locus and avoid other loci and potential deleterious consequences of malignant transformation. Our laboratory has concentrated on a complex regulatory region (RR) that is located downstream of Cα, the most 3' of the Igh constant region genes. The ~40 kb 3' RR, which is predicted to serve as a downstream major regulator of the Igh locus, contains two distinct segments: an ~28 kb region comprising four enhancers, and an adjacent ~12 kb region containing multiple CTCF and Pax5 binding sites. Analysis of targeted mutations in mice by a number of investigators has concluded that the entire 3' RR enhancer region is essential for SHM and CSR (but not for VDJ joining) and for high levels of expression of multiple isotypes. The CTCF/Pax5 binding region is a candidate for influencing VDJ joining early in B cell development and serving as a potential insulator of the Igh locus. Components of the 3' RR are subject to a variety of epigenetic changes during B cell development, i.e., DNAse I hypersensitivity, histone modifications, and DNA methylation, in association with transcription factor binding. I propose that these changes provide a foundation by which regulatory elements in modules of the 3' RR function by interacting with each other and with target sequences of the Igh locus.

  20. The Immunoglobulin-like Gene spe-45 Acts during Fertilization in Caenorhabditis elegans like the Mouse Izumo1 Gene.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Hitoshi; Tajima, Tatsuya; Comstra, Heather Skye; Gleason, Elizabeth J; L'Hernault, Steven W

    2015-12-21

    The Caenorhabditis elegans spe-9 class genes, which show specific or predominant expression in the male germline, are indispensable for fertilization [1, 2]. However, due to the rapid evolution of genes involved in reproduction, we do not currently know if there are spe-9 class genes in mammals that play similar roles during fertilization to those found in C. elegans. In mice, the Izumo1 gene encodes a sperm-specific transmembrane (TM) protein with a single immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domain that is absolutely required for gamete fusion [3, 4]. In this study, we hypothesized that C. elegans has a new member of the spe-9 class genes coding for an IZUMO1-like protein. We screened C. elegans microarray data [5, 6] to identify male germline-enriched genes that encode membrane proteins with Ig-like domains. A deletion (tm3715) in one such gene (F28D1.8) caused hermaphrodites to show a male germline-dependent self-sterility, so we have named it spe-45. Mutant spe-45 worms seemed to normally undergo spermatogenesis (spermatid production by meiosis) and spermiogenesis (spermatid activation into actively motile spermatozoa). spe-45 mutant spermatozoa, however, could not complete gamete fusion, which is a characteristic of all spe-9 class mutants [1, 2]. Moreover, spe-45 self-sterile worms were rescued by a transgene expressing chimeric SPE-45 protein in which its Ig-like domain was replaced by the Ig-like domain from mouse IZUMO1. Hence, C. elegans SPE-45 and mouse IZUMO1 appear to have retained a common function(s) that is required during fertilization.

  1. Identification of Immunoglobulin Gene Sequences from a Small Read Number of mRNA-Seq Using Hybridomas

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Takeshi; Hayashi, Masayasu; Semba, Yuichiro; Fujita, Masatoshi; Sato, Yuko; Kimura, Hiroshi; Harada, Akihito

    2016-01-01

    Identification of immunoglobulin genes in hybridomas is essential for producing antibodies for research and clinical applications. A couple of methods such as RACE and degenerative PCR have been developed for determination of the Igh and Igl/Igk coding sequences (CDSs) but it has been difficult to process a number of hybridomas both with accuracy and rapidness. Here, we propose a new strategy for antibody sequence determination by mRNA-seq of hybridomas. We demonstrated that hybridomas highly expressed the Igh and Igl/Igk genes and that de novo transcriptome assembly using mRNA-seq data enabled identification of the CDS of both Igh and Igl/Igk accurately. Furthermore, we estimated that only 30,000 sequenced reads are required to identify immunoglobulin sequences from four different hybridoma clones. Thus, our approach would facilitate determining variable CDSs drastically. PMID:27788226

  2. Immunoglobulin gene translocations in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: A report of 35 patients and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    DE BRAEKELEER, MARC; TOUS, CORINE; GUÉGANIC, NADIA; LE BRIS, MARIE-JOSÉE; BASINKO, AUDREY; MOREL, FRÉDÉRIC; DOUET-GUILBERT, NATHALIE

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) represents the most common hematological malignancy in Western countries, with a highly heterogeneous clinical course and prognosis. Translocations involving the immunoglobulin (IG) genes are regularly identified. From 2000 to 2014, we identified an IG gene translocation in 18 of the 396 patients investigated at diagnosis (4.6%) and in 17 of the 275 analyzed during follow-up (6.2%). A total of 4 patients in whom the IG translocation was identified at follow-up did not carry the translocation at diagnosis. The IG heavy locus (IGH) was involved in 27 translocations (77.1%), the IG κ locus (IGK) in 1 (2.9%) and the IG λ locus (IGL) in 7 (20.0%). The chromosome band partners of the IG translocations were 18q21 in 16 cases (45.7%), 11q13 and 19q13 in 4 cases each (11.4% each), 8q24 in 3 cases (8.6%), 7q21 in 2 cases (5.7%), whereas 6 other bands were involved once (2.9% each). At present, 35 partner chromosomal bands have been described, but the partner gene has solely been identified in 10 translocations. CLL associated with IG gene translocations is characterized by atypical cell morphology, including plasmacytoid characteristics, and the propensity of being enriched in prolymphocytes. The IG heavy chain variable region (IGHV) mutational status varies between translocations, those with unmutated IGHV presumably involving cells at an earlier stage of B-cell lineage. All the partner genes thus far identified are involved in the control of cell proliferation and/or apoptosis. The translocated partner gene becomes transcriptionally deregulated as a consequence of its transposition into the IG locus. With the exception of t(14;18)(q32;q21) and its variants, prognosis appears to be poor for the other translocations. Therefore, searching for translocations involving not only IGH, but also IGL and IGK, by banding and molecular cytogenetics is required. Furthermore, it is important to identify the partner gene to ensure the patients receive

  3. Intraclass diversification of immunoglobulin heavy chain genes in the African lungfish.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianyi; Tacchi, Luca; Wei, Zhiguo; Zhao, Yaofeng; Salinas, Irene

    2014-05-01

    Lungfish (Dipnoi) are the closest living relatives to tetrapods, and they represent the transition from water to land during vertebrate evolution. Lungfish are armed with immunoglobulins (Igs), one of the hallmarks of the adaptive immune system of jawed vertebrates, but only three Ig forms have been characterized in Dipnoi to date. We report here a new diversity of Ig molecules in two African lungfish species (Protopterus dolloi and Protopterus annectens). The African lungfish Igs consist of three IgMs, two IgWs, three IgNs, and an IgQ, where both IgN and IgQ originated evidently from the IgW lineage. Our data also suggest that the IgH genes in the lungfish are organized in a transiting form from clusters (IgH loci in cartilaginous fish) to a translocon configuration (IgH locus in tetrapods). We propose that the intraclass diversification of the two primordial gnathostome Ig classes (IgM and IgW) as well as acquisition of new isotypes (IgN and IgQ) has allowed lungfish to acquire a complex and functionally diverse Ig repertoire to fight a variety of microorganisms. Furthermore, our results support the idea that "tetrapod-specific" Ig classes did not evolve until the vertebrate adaptation to land was completed ~360 million years ago.

  4. Intraclass diversification of immunoglobulin heavy chain genes in the African lungfish

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tianyi; Tacchi, Luca; Wei, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    Lungfish (Dipnoi) are the closest living relatives to tetrapods, and they represent the transition from water to land during vertebrate evolution. Lungfish are armed with immunoglobulins (Igs), one of the hallmarks of the adaptive immune system of jawed vertebrates, but only three Ig forms have been characterized in Dipnoi to date. We report here a new diversity of Ig molecules in two African lungfish species (Protopterus dolloi and Protopterus annectens). The African lungfish Igs consist of three IgMs, two IgWs, three IgNs, and an IgQ, where both IgN and IgQ originated evidently from the IgW lineage. Our data also suggest that the IgH genes in the lungfish are organized in a transiting form from clusters (IgH loci in cartilaginous fish) to a translocon configuration (IgH locus in tetrapods). We propose that the intraclass diversification of the two primordial gnathostome Ig classes (IgM and IgW) as well as acquisition of new isotypes (IgN and IgQ) has allowed lungfish to acquire a complex and functionally diverse Ig repertoire to fight a variety of microorganisms. Furthermore, our results support the idea that “tetrapod-specific” Ig classes did not evolve until the vertebrate adaptation to land was completed ∼360 million years ago. PMID:24676685

  5. The octamer motif in immunoglobulin genes: extraction of structural constraints from two-dimensional NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Weisz, K; Shafer, R H; Egan, W; James, T L

    1992-08-25

    Phase-sensitive two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser enhancement (2D NOE) and double-quantum-filtered correlated (2QF-COSY) spectra were recorded at 500 MHz for the DNA duplex d(CATTTGCATC).d(GATGCAAATG), which contains the octamer element of immunoglobulin genes. Exchangeable and nonexchangeable proton resonances including those of the H5' and H5" protons were assigned. Overall, the decamer duplex adopts a B-type DNA conformation. Scalar coupling constants for the sugar protons were determined by quantitative simulations of 2QF-COSY cross-peaks. These couplings are consistent with a two-state dynamic equilibrium between a minor N- and a major S-type conformer for all residues. The pseudorotation phase angle P of the major conformer is in the range 117-135 degrees for nonterminal pyrimidine nucleotides and 153-162 degrees for nonterminal purine nucleotides. Except for the terminal residues, the minor conformer comprises less than 25% of the population. Distance constraints obtained by a complete relaxation matrix analysis of the 2D NOE intensities with the MARDIGRAS algorithm confirm the dependence of the sugar pucker on pyrimidine and purine bases. Averaging by fast local motions has at most small effects on the NOE-derived interproton distances.

  6. Rearrangement and expression of endogenous immunoglobulin genes occur in many murine B cells expressing transgenic membrane IgM.

    PubMed

    Stall, A M; Kroese, F G; Gadus, F T; Sieckmann, D G; Herzenberg, L A; Herzenberg, L A

    1988-05-01

    Transgenic mice carrying immunoglobulin genes coding for mu heavy chain and kappa light chain have been used to study the mechanisms involved in allelic and isotypic exclusion. We report here that individual cells from transgenic mice carrying a functionally rearranged mu heavy chain gene (capable of generating both membrane and secreted forms of IgM) can rearrange an endogenous mu heavy chain gene and simultaneously produce both transgenic and endogenous IgM. These "double-producing" cells express both endogenous and transgenic IgM in the cytoplasm (detected by immunohistology) and on the cell surface (detected by multiparameter fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis). In addition, they secrete mixed IgM molecules containing both transgenic and endogenous mu heavy chains (detected in serum by radioimmune assay). The transgenic mice studied also have relatively large numbers of cells that produce endogenous immunoglobulin in the absence of detectable transgenic immunoglobulin ("endogenous-only cells"). The mechanisms that generate double-producing cells and endogenous-only cells appear to be under genetic control because the frequencies of these B-cell populations are characteristic for a given transgenic line. Thus, our findings indicate that more is involved in triggering allelic exclusion than the simple presence or absence of membrane mu heavy chains (as has been previously postulated).

  7. Somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes: lessons from proliferating cell nuclear antigenK164R mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Langerak, Petra; Krijger, Peter H L; Heideman, Marinus R; van den Berk, Paul C M; Jacobs, Heinz

    2009-03-12

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) encircles DNA as a ring-shaped homotrimer and, by tethering DNA polymerases to their template, PCNA serves as a critical replication factor. In contrast to high-fidelity DNA polymerases, the activation of low-fidelity translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerases seems to require damage-inducible monoubiquitylation (Ub) of PCNA at lysine residue 164 (PCNA-Ub). TLS polymerases can tolerate DNA damage, i.e. they can replicate across DNA lesions. The lack of proofreading activity, however, renders TLS highly mutagenic. The advantage is that B cells use mutagenic TLS to introduce somatic mutations in immunoglobulin (Ig) genes to generate high-affinity antibodies. Given the critical role of PCNA-Ub in activating TLS and the role of TLS in establishing somatic mutations in immunoglobulin genes, we analysed the mutation spectrum of somatically mutated immunoglobulin genes in B cells from PCNAK164R knock-in mice. A 10-fold reduction in A/T mutations is associated with a compensatory increase in G/C mutations-a phenotype similar to Poleta and mismatch repair-deficient B cells. Mismatch recognition, PCNA-Ub and Poleta probably act within one pathway to establish the majority of mutations at template A/T. Equally relevant, the G/C mutator(s) seems largely independent of PCNAK(164) modification.

  8. Immunoglobulin and T Cell Receptor Genes: IMGT® and the Birth and Rise of Immunoinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Lefranc, Marie-Paule

    2014-01-01

    IMGT®, the international ImMunoGeneTics information system®1, (CNRS and Université Montpellier 2) is the global reference in immunogenetics and immunoinformatics. By its creation in 1989, IMGT® marked the advent of immunoinformatics, which emerged at the interface between immunogenetics and bioinformatics. IMGT® is specialized in the immunoglobulins (IG) or antibodies, T cell receptors (TR), major histocompatibility (MH), and proteins of the IgSF and MhSF superfamilies. IMGT® has been built on the IMGT-ONTOLOGY axioms and concepts, which bridged the gap between genes, sequences, and three-dimensional (3D) structures. The concepts include the IMGT® standardized keywords (concepts of identification), IMGT® standardized labels (concepts of description), IMGT® standardized nomenclature (concepts of classification), IMGT unique numbering, and IMGT Colliers de Perles (concepts of numerotation). IMGT® comprises seven databases, 15,000 pages of web resources, and 17 tools, and provides a high-quality and integrated system for the analysis of the genomic and expressed IG and TR repertoire of the adaptive immune responses. Tools and databases are used in basic, veterinary, and medical research, in clinical applications (mutation analysis in leukemia and lymphoma) and in antibody engineering and humanization. They include, for example IMGT/V-QUEST and IMGT/JunctionAnalysis for nucleotide sequence analysis and their high-throughput version IMGT/HighV-QUEST for next-generation sequencing (500,000 sequences per batch), IMGT/DomainGapAlign for amino acid sequence analysis of IG and TR variable and constant domains and of MH groove domains, IMGT/3Dstructure-DB for 3D structures, contact analysis and paratope/epitope interactions of IG/antigen and TR/peptide-MH complexes and IMGT/mAb-DB interface for therapeutic antibodies and fusion proteins for immune applications (FPIA). PMID:24600447

  9. Detection of immunoglobulin IGH gene rearrangements on formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded tissue in lymphoid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Moharrami, G; Ghorbian, S; Seifi, M; Estiar, M A; Fakhrjoo, A; Sakhinia, M; Sakhinia, E

    2014-01-01

    Human lymphomas are aggressive malignant diseases, which can be categorized based on their B and T cell lineage. B-cell lymphomas form around 90% of the total lymphoma cases, the remnants of malignancies arise from the T cell branch. Lymphomas are mostly characterized as clonal proliferations of specific tumor cells. The detection of malignant lymphomas are extensively investigated by their morphological features, immunohistochemistry and flowcytometric immunophenotyping, but in some of cases remained unknown. The BIOMED-2 protocols were used to determine the clonality of IGH gene rearrangements in patients with lymphoma. PCR amplification was performed on FFPE of 50 patients with B-cell lymphoma, which consisted of 11 cases with HLs, 25 cases of B-NHLs and 14 cases of B-LPD (lymphoproliferative disorders) that diagnosed as unclassifiable lymphoma. The rate of positive clonality was detected in 96% (24/25) of B-NHLs, whereas in 4% (1/25) of cases clonality was showed in a polyclonal pattern. In B-HLs, 82% (9/11) of cases showed clonality and 18% (2/11) of the cases showed polyclonality. The rate of positive clonality observed in 64.3% (9/14) of cases with B-LPD and 35.7% (5/14) of cases clonality was not detected in any of immunoglobulin gene family (FR1, FR2, FR3). In groups with DLBCL, clonality was detected in 95% (19/20) of the cases. In patients diagnosed with FL and MALTs 100% cases showed clonality for complete IGH. Our study revealed that EuroClonality BIOMED-2 protocols could be considered as a valuable and reliable method for clonality detection, especially in IGH analysis.

  10. Immunoglobulin Gene Polymorphisms are Susceptibility Factors for Clinical and Autoantibody Subgroups of the Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    O’Hanlon, Terrance P.; Rider, Lisa G.; Schiffenbauer, Adam; Targoff, Ira N.; Malley, Karen; Pandey, Janardan P.; Miller, Frederick W.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate possible associations of GM and KM markers in European Americans (EA) and African Americans (AA) with adult and juvenile forms of the idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM). Methods We performed serologic analyses of polymorphic determinants associated with immunoglobulin gamma heavy (GM) and kappa light chains (KM) in large populations of EA (n=514: 297 adults and 217 juveniles) and AA IIM patients (n=109: 73 adults and 50 juveniles) representing the major clinicopathologic and autoantibody groups. Results For EA dermatomyositis (DM) patients, the GM 3 23 5,13 phenotype was a risk factor for both adults (OR=2.2; Pc=0.020) and juveniles (OR=2.2; Pc=0.0013). Of interest, the GM 13 allotype was a risk factor for juvenile DM (JDM) for both EA (OR=3.9; Pc<0.0001) and AA (OR=4.8; Pc=0.033). However, the GM 1,3,17 5,13,21 phenotype was a risk factor for JDM in EA but not in AA. Among the IIM autoantibody groups, GM 3 23 5,13 was a risk factor for EA adults with anti-Jo-1 autoantibodies (OR=3.4; Pc=0.0031), while the GM 3 allotype was protective for adults with anti-threonyl tRNA synthetase or anti-RNP autoantibodies (OR=0.1; Pc=0.047 and OR=0.2; Pc=0.034, respectively). In contrast, GM 6 was a risk factor for AA adults with anti-SRP autoantibodies (OR=7.5; Pc=0.041). Conclusions These data suggest that polymorphic alleles of GM and KM loci are differentially associated with IIM subgroups defined by age, ethnicity, clinical features and autoantibodies, and expand the list of immune response genes possibly important in the pathogenesis of myositis. PMID:18821675

  11. Solution structure of the octamer motif in immunoglobulin genes via restrained molecular dynamics calculations.

    PubMed

    Weisz, K; Shafer, R H; Egan, W; James, T L

    1994-01-11

    The solution structure of the DNA decamer d(CATTTGCATC)-d(GATGCAAATG), comprising the octamer motif of immunoglobulin genes, is determined by restrained molecular dynamics (rMD) simulations. The restraint data set includes interproton distances and torsion angles for the deoxyribose sugar ring which were previously obtained by a complete relaxation matrix analysis of the two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser enhancement (2D NOE) intensities and by the quantitative simulation of cross-peaks in double-quantum-filtered correlated (2QF-COSY) spectra. The influence of torsion angles and the number of experimental distance restraints on the structural refinement has been systematically examined. Omitting part of the experimental NOE-derived distances results in reduced restraint violations and lower R factors but impairs structural convergence in the rMD refinement. Eight separate restrained molecular dynamics simulations were carried out for 20 ps each, starting from either energy-minimized A- or B-DNA. Mutual atomic root-mean-square (rms) differences among the refined structures are well below 1 A and comparable to the rms fluctuations of the atoms about their average position, indicating convergence to essentially identical structures. The average refined structure was subjected to an additional 100 ps of rMD simulations and analyzed in terms of average torsion angles and helical parameters. The B-type duplex exhibits clear sequence-dependent variations in its geometry with a narrow minor groove at the T3.A3 tract and a large positive roll at the subsequent TG.CA step. This is accompanied by a noticeable bend of the global helix axis into the major groove. There is also evidence of significant flexibility of the sugar-phosphate backbone with rapid interconversion among different conformers.

  12. Potential role of killer immunoglobulin receptor genes among individuals vaccinated against hepatitis B virus in Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    Melhem, Nada M; Mahfouz, Rami A; Kreidieh, Khalil; Abdul-Khalik, Rabab; El-Khatib, Rolla; Talhouk, Reem; Musharrafieh, Umayya; Hamadeh, Ghassan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To explore the role of killer immunoglobulin receptor (KIR) genes in responsiveness or non-responsiveness to vaccination against hepatitis B virus. METHODS We recruited 101 voluntary participants between March 2010 and December 2011. Sera samples from vaccinated and non-vaccinated participants were tested for the presence of anti-HBs antibodies as a measure of protection against hepatitis B, hepatitis B surface antigen and hepatitis B core antibody as indicators of infection by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. KIR gene frequencies were determined by polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS Sera samples from 99 participants were tested for the levels of anti-HBs as an indicator of protection (≥ 10 mIU/mL) following vaccination as defined by the World Health Organization international reference standard. Among the vaccinated participants, 47% (35/74) had anti-HBs titers above 100 mIU/mL, 22% (16/74) had anti-HBs ranging between 10-100 mIU/mL, and 20% (15/74) had values of less than 10 mIU/mL. We report the lack of significant association between the number of vaccine dosages and the titer of antibodies among our vaccinated participants. The inhibitory KIR2DL1, KIR2DL4, KIR3DL1, KIR3DL2, and KIR3DL were detected in more than 95%, whereas KIR2DL2, KIR2DL3, KIR2DL5 (KR2DL5A and KIR2DL5B) were expressed in 56%, 84% and 42% (25% and 29%) of participants, respectively. The observed frequency of the activating KIR genes ranged between 35% and 55% except for KIR2DS4, detected in 95% of the study participants (40.6% 2DS4*001/002; 82.2% 2DS4*003/007). KIR2DP1 pseudogene was detected in 99% of our participants, whereas KIR3DP*001/02/04 and KIR3DP1*003 had frequencies of 17% and 100%, respectively. No association between the frequency of KIR genes and anti-HBs antibodies was detected. When we compared the frequency of KIR genes between vaccinated individuals with protective antibodies titers and those who lost their protective antibody levels, we did not detect a significant

  13. Mice with megabase humanization of their immunoglobulin genes generate antibodies as efficiently as normal mice.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Andrew J; Macdonald, Lynn E; Stevens, Sean; Karow, Margaret; Dore, Anthony T; Pobursky, Kevin; Huang, Tammy T; Poueymirou, William T; Esau, Lakeisha; Meola, Melissa; Mikulka, Warren; Krueger, Pamela; Fairhurst, Jeanette; Valenzuela, David M; Papadopoulos, Nicholas; Yancopoulos, George D

    2014-04-01

    Mice genetically engineered to be humanized for their Ig genes allow for human antibody responses within a mouse background (HumAb mice), providing a valuable platform for the generation of fully human therapeutic antibodies. Unfortunately, existing HumAb mice do not have fully functional immune systems, perhaps because of the manner in which their genetic humanization was carried out. Heretofore, HumAb mice have been generated by disrupting the endogenous mouse Ig genes and simultaneously introducing human Ig transgenes at a different and random location; KO-plus-transgenic humanization. As we describe in the companion paper, we attempted to make mice that more efficiently use human variable region segments in their humoral responses by precisely replacing 6 Mb of mouse Ig heavy and kappa light variable region germ-line gene segments with their human counterparts while leaving the mouse constant regions intact, using a unique in situ humanization approach. We reasoned the introduced human variable region gene segments would function indistinguishably in their new genetic location, whereas the retained mouse constant regions would allow for optimal interactions and selection of the resulting antibodies within the mouse environment. We show that these mice, termed VelocImmune mice because they were generated using VelociGene technology, efficiently produce human:mouse hybrid antibodies (that are rapidly convertible to fully human antibodies) and have fully functional humoral immune systems indistinguishable from those of WT mice. The efficiency of the VelocImmune approach is confirmed by the rapid progression of 10 different fully human antibodies into human clinical trials.

  14. Phylogenetic conservation of immunoglobulin heavy chains: direct comparison of hamster and mouse Cmu genes.

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, K L; Duncan, W R; Tucker, P W

    1985-01-01

    We have analyzed the JH-Cmu locus of the Syrian hamster by DNA cloning and sequencing. The single Cmu gene is highly homologous to that of the mouse. The hamster equivalents of the JH and switch (S) recombination regions are arranged as in the mouse, but surprisingly are not highly conserved. Also unlike its close murine relative, the Smu regions among inbred hamster strains are not polymorphic. The complete nucleotide sequence of hamster and mouse Cmu genes have been compared to partial Cmu sequences of other species. Conservation within a portion of the 3' untranslated region may signify functional requirements for 3' end processing. Mutational frequencies within exons and introns of hamster and mouse do not support the theory that the rate of DNA transitions to transversions decreases with evolutionary distance. Images PMID:2994005

  15. Association between plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 4G/5G gene polymorphism and immunoglobulin A nephropathy susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tian-Biao; Jiang, Zong-Pei

    2015-02-01

    The association between plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) 4 G/5 G gene polymorphism and immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) risk is still controversial. A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the association between PAI-1 4 G/5 G gene polymorphism and IgAN susceptibility. A predefined literature search and selection of eligible relevant studies were performed to collect data from electronic database. Four articles were identified for the analysis of association between PAI-1 4 G/5 G gene polymorphism and IgAN risk. 4 G allele was not associated with IgAN susceptibility in overall populations and in Asians. Furthermore, 4 G/4 G and 5 G/5 G genotype were not associated with IgAN for overall populations, Asians. In conclusion, PAI-1 4 G/5 G gene polymorphism was not associated with IgAN risk in overall populations and in Asians. However, more studies should be performed in the future.

  16. Immunoglobulin genes undergo legitimate repair in human B cells not only after cis- but also frequent trans-class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Laffleur, B; Bardet, S M; Garot, A; Brousse, M; Baylet, A; Cogné, M

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) genes specifically recruit activation-induced deaminase (AID) for 'on-target' DNA deamination, initiating either variable (V) region somatic hypermutation, or double-strand break intermediates of class switch recombination (CSR). Such breaks overwhelmingly undergo legitimate intra-Ig repair rather than rare illegitimate and potentially oncogenic junctions outside of Ig loci. We show that in human B cells, legitimate synapsis and repair efficiently join Ig genes whether physically linked on one chromosome or located apart on both alleles. This indicates mechanisms faithfully recognizing and/or pairing loci with homology in structure and accessibility, thus licensing interchromosomal trans-CSR junctions while usually preventing illegitimate interchromosomal recombination with AID off-target genes. Physical linkage of IgH genes in cis on the same allele just increases the likelihood of legitimate repair by another fourfold. The strongest force driving CSR might thus be recognition of legitimate target genes. Formation of IgH intra-allelic loops along this process would then constitute a consequence rather than a pre-requisite of this gene-pairing process.

  17. Evidence for a quadruplex structure in the polymorphic hs1.2 enhancer of the immunoglobulin heavy chain 3' regulatory regions and its conservation in mammals.

    PubMed

    Sette, Marco; D'Addabbo, Pietro; Kelly, Geoffrey; Cicconi, Alessandro; Micheli, Emanuela; Cacchione, Stefano; Poma, Anna; Gargioli, Cesare; Giambra, Vincenzo; Frezza, Domenico

    2016-11-01

    Regulatory regions in the genome can act through a variety of mechanisms that range from the occurrence of histone modifications to the presence of protein-binding loci for self-annealing sequences. The final result is often the induction of a conformational change of the DNA double helix, which alters the accessibility of a region to transcription factors and consequently gene expression. A ∼300 kb regulatory region on chromosome 14 at the 3' end (3'RR) of immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy-chain genes shows very peculiar features, conserved in mammals, including enhancers and transcription factor binding sites. In primates, the 3'RR is present in two copies, both having a central enhancer named hs1.2. We previously demonstrated the association between different hs1.2 alleles and Ig plasma levels in immunopathology. Here, we present the analysis of a putative G-quadruplex structure (tetraplex) consensus site embedded in a variable number tandem repeat (one to four copies) of hs1.2 that is a distinctive element among the enhancer alleles, and an investigation of its three-dimensional structure using bioinformatics and spectroscopic approaches. We suggest that both the role of the enhancer and the alternative effect of the hs1.2 alleles may be achieved through their peculiar three-dimensional-conformational rearrangement. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 768-778, 2016. PMID:27287611

  18. Pronounced cohabitation of active immunoglobulin genes from three different chromosomes in transcription factories during maximal antibody synthesis.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Kyun; Xiang, Yougui; Feng, Xin; Garrard, William T

    2014-06-01

    To understand the relationships between nuclear organization and gene expression in a model system, we employed three-dimensional imaging and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-chromosome conformation capture (3C) techniques to investigate the topographies of the immunoglobulin (Ig) genes and transcripts during B-cell development. Remarkably, in plasma cells, when antibody synthesis peaks, active Ig genes residing on three different chromosomes exhibit pronounced colocalizations in transcription factories, often near the nuclear periphery, and display trans-chromosomal enhancer interactions, and their transcripts frequently share interchromatin trafficking channels. Conceptually, these features of nuclear organization maximize coordinated transcriptional and transcript trafficking control for potentiating the optimal cytoplasmic assembly of the resulting translation products into protein multimers.

  19. Preferential utilization of conserved immunoglobulin heavy chain variable gene segments during human fetal life.

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, H W; Wang, J Y

    1990-01-01

    The ability to respond to specific antigens develops in a programmed fashion. Although the antibody repertoire in adults is presumably generated by stochastic combinatorial joining of rearranged heavy variable, diversity, and joining (VH-DH-JH) and light (VL-JL) chains, experimental evidence in the mouse has shown nonrandom utilization of variable gene segments during ontogeny and in response to specific antigens. In this study, we have performed sequence analysis of 104-day human fetal liver-derived, randomly isolated constant region C+ mu transcripts and demonstrate a consistent preference during fetal life for a small subset of three highly conserved VH3 family gene segments. In addition, the data show that this preferential gene segment utilization extends to the DHQ52 and the JH3 and JH4 loci. Sequence analysis of two "sterile" DH-JH transcripts suggests that transcriptional activation of the JH-proximal DHQ52 element may precede initiation of DH-JH rearrangement and influence fetal DH utilization. Sequence comparisons reveal striking nucleotide polymorphism in allelic gene segments which is poorly reflected in the peptide sequence, implying considerable evolutionary selection pressure. Although vertebrate species utilize a variety of strategies to generate their antibody repertoire, preferential utilization of VH3 elements is consistently found during early development. These data support the hypothesis that VH3 gene segments play an essential role in the development of the immune response. Images PMID:2117273

  20. Immunoglobulin genes and antibody responses in the spotted wolffish (Anarhichas minor Olafsen).

    PubMed

    Espelid, S; Halse, M; Solem, S T; Jørgensen, T O

    2001-07-01

    The spotted wolffish Anarhichas minor Olafsen is a promising new species in aquaculture in the cold waters of northern Norway. In this paper, some basic immunological studies of this marine species are reported. Of comparative interest are the cDNA sequences of the immunoglobulin transcript and the antibody responses to model antigens. Of more practical importance are the humoral immune responses and antibody specificities to potentially pathogenic bacteria. Full length cDNA clones encoding the immunoglobulin heavy and light chains in the spotted wolffish were sequenced demonstrating variable degrees of similarity to other teleost fish species. Also in the spotted wolffish the CH4 domain was deleted in the transmembrane form of the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) as a receptor on B cells, with the transmembrane exon spliced directly to the CH3 domain. The antibody responses to various antigens like hapten-carrier molecules, protein antigens and bacterial pathogens were relatively high, but with some interesting exceptions. Anti-hapten responses to NIP and FITC were high while anti-DNS responses were low, but more surprisingly, there was hardly any B-cell response to the carrier molecule LPH. On the other hand, protein antigens like CGG and BSA were highly immunogenic in the spotted wolffish as were the bacterial antigens Vibrio anguillarum, V. salmonicida and Aeromonas salmonicida.

  1. A transgenic insertion on mouse chromosome 17 inactivates a novel immunoglobulin superfamily gene potentially involved in sperm-egg fusion.

    PubMed

    Lorenzetti, Diego; Poirier, Christophe; Zhao, Ming; Overbeek, Paul A; Harrison, Wilbur; Bishop, Colin E

    2014-04-01

    Fertilization is the process that leads to the formation of a diploid zygote from two haploid gametes. This is achieved through a complex series of cell-to-cell interactions between a sperm and an egg. The final event of fertilization is the fusion of the gametes' membranes, which allows the delivery of the sperm genetic material into the egg cytoplasm. In vivo studies in the laboratory mouse have led to the discovery of membrane proteins that are essential for the fusion process in both the sperm and egg. Specifically, the sperm protein Izumo1 was shown to be necessary for normal fertility. Izumo1-deficient spermatozoa fail to fuse with the egg plasma membrane. Izumo1 is a member of the Immunoglobulin Superfamily of proteins, which are known to be involved in cell adhesion. Here, we describe BART97b, a new mouse line with a recessive mutation that displays a fertilization block associated with a failure of sperm fusion. BART97b mutants carry a deletion that inactivates Spaca6, a previously uncharacterized gene expressed in testis. Similar to Izumo1, Spaca6 encodes an immunoglobulin-like protein. We propose that the Spaca6 gene product may, together with Izumo1, mediate sperm fusion by binding an as yet unidentified egg membrane receptor.

  2. Switch Transcripts in Immunoglobulin Class Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Matthias; Jung, Steffen; Radbruch, Andreas

    1995-03-01

    B cells can exchange gene segments for the constant region of the immunoglobulin heavy chain, altering the class and effector function of the antibodies that they produce. Class switching is directed to distinct classes by cytokines, which induce transcription of the targeted DNA sequences. These transcripts are processed, resulting in spliced "switch" transcripts. Switch recombination can be directed to immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) by the heterologous human metallothionein II_A promoter in mutant mice. Induction of the structurally conserved, spliced switch transcripts is sufficient to target switch recombination to IgG1, whereas transcription alone is not.

  3. [Analyses of the rearrangement of T-cell receptor- and immunoglobulin genes in the diagnosis of lymphoproliferative disorders].

    PubMed

    Griesser, D H

    1995-01-01

    Rearrangements are developmentally regulated genetic recombinations in T and B cells which generate functional T cell receptor (TcR) and immunoglobulin genes, respectively. Different variable, sometimes diversity, and joining gene segments which are discontinuously spread out within their chromosomal location in germline configuration, are randomly assembled in individual lymphocytes. These rearrangements can be detected by Southern Blot analysis if more than 5% of a total lymphocyte population in a biopsy specimen carries the same clonal rearrangement. We analyzed DNA from 324 snap-frozen biopsy specimens from lympho-proliferative disorders. None of the 20 reactive lesions and four malignant myelomonocytic tumors had a clonal antigen receptor gene rearrangement. All 117 malignant B cell lymphomas of different subtypes and 95 of 97 malignant T cell lymphomas showed a clonal gene rearrangement. Only two angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy(AILD)-type T cell lymphomas did not have immune receptor gene rearrangements. They were morphologically indistinguishable from the other 47 T/AILD lymphomas with clonal rearrangement patterns. In most cases TcR beta and immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) gene probes were sufficient for lineage assignment of the clonal T or B lymphocyte population. In 18% of B lymphomas, however, a cross-lineage rearrangement of TcR beta genes, and in 20% of the T cell lymphomas a clonal IgH gene rearrangement was detected. After exclusion of centrocytic, large cell anaplastic lymphomas (LCAL) of B-type, and T/AILD lymphomas which are overrepresented in our study, only 10% of the remaining 147 T and B cell lymphomas had aberrant rearrangements. TcR rearrangements other than those of the beta chain genes were extremely rare in B cell lymphomas, as were Ig kappa rearrangements in T lymphomas. Only two T/AILD lymphomas had IgH and Ig kappa rearrangement in addition to their clonal T cell receptor gene rearrangements. Both samples likely contain a clonal B

  4. Characterization of immunoglobulin gene somatic hypermutation in the absence of activation-induced cytidine deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Nancy S.; Satorius, Colleen L.; Plebani, Alessandro; Durandy, Anne; Lipsky, Peter E.

    2008-01-01

    Somatic hypermutation (SHM) of Ig genes depends upon the deamination of C nucleotides in WRCY (W=A/T, R=A/G, Y=C/T) motifs by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AICDA). Despite this, a large number of mutations occur in WA motifs that can be accounted for by the activity of polymerase eta (POL η). To determine whether there are AICDA-independent mutations and to characterize the relationship between AICDA- and POL η-mediated mutations, 1,470 H chain and 1,313 kappa and lambda chain rearrangements from three AICDA−/− patients were analyzed. The Ig mutation frequency of all VH genes from AICDA−/− patients was 40-fold less than that of normal donors whereas the mutation frequency of mutated VH sequences from AICDA−/− patients was 6.8-fold less than normal donors. AICDA−/− B cells lack mutations in WRCY/RGYW motifs as well as replacement mutations and mutational targeting in complementarity determining regions. A significantly reduced mutation frequency in WA motifs compared to normal donors and an increased percentage of transitions, which may relate to reduced uracil DNA-glycosylase (UNG) activity, suggest a role for AICDA in regulating POL η and UNG activity. Similar results were observed in VL rearrangements. The residual mutations were predominantly G:C substitutions, indicating that AICDA-independent cytidine deamination was a likely, yet inefficient, mechanism for mutating Ig genes. PMID:18606684

  5. Variable region sequences and idiotypic expression of a protective human immunoglobulin M antibody to capsular polysaccharides of Neisseria meningitidis group B and Escherichia coli K1.

    PubMed Central

    Azmi, F H; Lucas, A H; Raff, H V; Granoff, D M

    1994-01-01

    We determined the heavy (H)- and light (L)-chain variable (V) region nucleotide and translated amino acid sequences of the human immunoglobulin M(kappa) monoclonal antibody (MAb) 5E1, which is specific for the polysaccharide capsule of Escherichia coli K1 and Neisseria meningitidis group B (poly[alpha(2-->8)-N-acetylneuraminic acid]) and which is protective in animal models of infection. The 5E1 VH gene is a member of the VHIIIb family and is 97% homologous to the 9.1 germ line gene. The 5E1 VL gene is a member of the kappa I subgroup and is 98% homologous to the germ line gene, 15A, also known as KLO12. The VL and/or VH genes used by 5E1 are highly homologous to the V genes encoding antibodies to the Haemophilus influenzae type b polysaccharide and to antibodies reactive with self-antigens such as erythrocyte "i," DNA, and thyroid peroxidase. We also produced three murine anti-idiotype (Id) MAbs against 5E1. All three anti-Ids recognize a minor subset of antimeningococcal B polysaccharide antibodies present in serum from normal adults. Two of the anti-Ids define distinct Ids associated with antibodies having kappa I-15A V regions. These 15A-associated Ids are expressed by some heterologous human antimeningococcal B polysaccharide MAbs, and they also are independently expressed by two human MAbs that are specific for either the H. influenzae b polysaccharide or the i erythrocyte antigen and that utilize the kappa I-15A V region. Taken together, these data indicate that the 5E1 antibody uses V regions that recur in the human antibody repertoires to this polysaccharide and to structurally dissimilar polysaccharides and autoantigens. Thus, the poor immunogenicity of poly[alpha(2-->8)-N-acetylneuraminic acid] cannot be explained by the unavailability of certain critical VH and VL genes required for generation of antibody response. PMID:8168940

  6. Refinement of the BCL2/immunoglobulin heavy chain fusion gene in t(14;18)(q32;q21) by polymerase chain reaction amplification for long targets.

    PubMed

    Akasaka, T; Akasaka, H; Yonetani, N; Ohno, H; Yamabe, H; Fukuhara, S; Okuma, M

    1998-01-01

    The t(14;18)(q32;q21) translocation, involving the BCL2 gene and junctional segments (JH) of the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene (IGH), constitutes the most common chromosomal translocation in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of B-cell type. Although the breakpoints in BCL2 are largely clustered within the major breakpoint region (MBR) and minor cluster region (mcr), it is known that some breakpoints map away from these regions, resulting in negative amplification of the junctional sequence by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for < 1 kb targets. To circumvent this problem, we applied a novel PCR technology for long DNA targets, long-distance (LD-) PCR, to the detection of t(14;18) in clinical materials. Oligonucleotide primers were designed to be quite distant from the two known cluster regions in BCL2, and those for the corresponding IGH were complementary to the enhancer and constant regions. In all 52 cases identified as carrying BCL2/JH fusion by conventional Southern blot analysis, LD-PCR successfully amplified fragments encompassing the junctions, which were readily identifiable on ethidium bromide-stained gel. The size of the LD-PCR products ranged from 3.9 kb to 10.7 kb in MBR/IGH fusion and 1.9 kb to 16 kb in mcr/IGH fusion. Furthermore, we established an LD-PCR protocol for > 20 kb targets, which covered the intervening region between the MBR and mcr. Restriction analysis of the LD-PCR products revealed that breakpoints in 33 cases fell within the 150 bp-MBR region, and in 3 cases were within the mcr determined previously by others. In contrast, the breakpoints of the remaining 16 cases were distributed over a large region from the MBR through mcr. Nucleotide sequence analysis of a potential cluster region revealed the presence of an Alu repeat sequence. Restriction analysis of LD-PCR products with BstEII demonstrated a predominant usage of the JH6 segment (71%) at the BCL2/JH junctions. LD-PCR using primers for the constant region genes showed that class switch

  7. Regulatory elements necessary for termination of transcription within the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene locus

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, B.B.

    1992-01-01

    Previous experimentation demonstrated that regulation of the IgM only phenotype in both pre-B and immature B cells was primarily at the transcriptional level. Expression of IgD mRNA involves transcription of the entire 29 kilobase rearranged [mu]-[delta] locus. Mature B cells transcribe the [beta] exons at approximately half the level that they transcribe the [delta] gene. Early B cells however, transcribe the [mu] gene with approximately 90% more efficiency than they do the [delta] gene. Specifically, early B cells show a transcription termination event occurring within a 1 kilobase region of the [mu]-[delta] intron. This dissertation analyzes the sequence elements necessary to encode the transcription termination event within the [mu]-[delta] intron. This work shows that the termination motif consists of specific sequences within the [mu]m poly(A) site as well as a region of the [mu]-[delta] intron contained within a 1200 base pair fragment. The 1200 base pair fragment extends from the Pst I site within the intron and ends just prior to the C[delta]1 exon. This fragment contains a 162 base pair unique sequence inverted repeat (USIR). Furthermore, the [mu]m site is specifically required because the [mu]s site was unable to substitute, despite extensive usage. In addition, the USIR-containing intron functions in an orientation-dependent manner. Analysis of this termination motif in a variety of lymphoid and non-lymphoid cells suggests that this motif is an intrinsic polymerase II termination motif. This implies that transcription termination in early B cells is by a default model and that active regulation of this motif involves an anti-termination event in mature B cells.

  8. Clonal rearrangement for immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor genes in systemic Castleman's disease. Association with Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, C. A.; Frizzera, G.; Patton, D. F.; Peterson, B. A.; McClain, K. L.; Gajl-Peczalska, K. J.; Kersey, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    Castleman's disease is a morphologically and clinically heterogeneous lymphoproliferative disorder. Both a localized benign variant and an aggressive form with systemic manifestations have been described. To investigate the differences between these variants of Castleman's disease, the authors analyzed lymph node DNA from 4 patients with the localized type and 4 with the systemic type of Castleman's disease for immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor gene rearrangements. The role of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) was also studied by viral genomic DNA probes. They detected clonal rearrangements in 3 of the 4 patients with the systemic variant of Castleman's; no patients with localized disease had rearrangements. Copies of EBV genome were also detected in 2 of the 3 patients with clonal rearrangements. These results suggest that systemic Castleman's disease is a disorder distinct from the classical localized variant in that it may evolve into a clonal lymphoproliferation. Images Figure 1 PMID:2833104

  9. Malleable immunoglobulin genes and hematopathology - the good, the bad, and the ugly: a paper from the 2007 William Beaumont hospital symposium on molecular pathology.

    PubMed

    Bagg, Adam

    2008-09-01

    Immunoglobulin gene rearrangement analysis is one of the more commonly performed assays available on the hematopathology menu of clinical molecular pathology laboratories. The analysis of these rearrangements provides useful information on a number of different levels in the evaluation of lymphoproliferations. An appreciation of the various mechanisms involved in the numerous physiological pathways affecting the immunoglobulin genes, and hence antibody molecules, is central to an understanding of B-cell development vis-à-vis the generation of immunological diversity. Knowledge about the intricate complexities of these mechanisms is also germane to an evaluation of testing methodologies. With this information, it is easier to develop an understanding of how contemporary molecular testing of immunoglobulin gene rearrangements has evolved, from historically quite heterogeneous, fairly flawed, and rather ugly approaches to current more-standardized protocols. In addition, recognition of how such genetic changes with good intentions can turn bad has fostered increasing insights into the pathogenesis of B-cell lymphomas and leukemias. Despite the significant improvements in the design of immunoglobulin gene rearrangement assays, numerous pitfalls and caveats remain. Accordingly, it is crucial to consider such testing a tool, and although most useful, it is one of many tools that may be required to build cogent diagnoses.

  10. Exploring the genes associated with the response to intravenous immunoglobulin in patients with Kawasaki disease using DNA microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yanlin; Wang, Hong; Liu, Xiaomei; Yu, Xianyi; Chen, Rui; Wang, Ce; Yu, Xuexin; Sun, Le

    2015-02-01

    In this study we aimed to screen genes associated with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) responding in patients with Kawasaki disease (KD) and thus explore the underlying molecular mechanism of IVIG resistance. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified by samr package in R. Then, protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks were constructed by STRING software. We further collected the regulatory data from TRANSFAC database, followed by regulatory interaction network construction. A total 194 of DEGs, including 185 up- and 9 down-regulated DEGs, were identified between IVIG-responding and non-responding patients with KD at acute stage. In contrast, no DEGs were found at convalescent stage. PPI networks and regulatory networks were constructed based on the 185 up-regulated genes at acute stage. The degrees of TFRC (transferrin receptor protein 1) and GADD45A (growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible alpha) were higher than other genes, and meanwhile MYC (V-Myc Myelocytomatosis Viral Oncogene Homolog) and E2F1 (E2F Transcription Factor 1) were found to be two TFs (transcription factors) with the highest degrees. In conclusions, the response to IVIG in Kawasaki disease patients may be involved in the expression of TFRC, GADD45A, MYC and E2F1. PMID:25449331

  11. Immunoglobulin genes influence the magnitude of humoral immunity to cytomegalovirus glycoprotein B.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Janardan P; Kistner-Griffin, Emily; Radwan, Faisal F; Kaur, Navtej; Namboodiri, Aryan M; Black, Laurel; Butler, Mary Ann; Carreón, Tania; Ruder, Avima M

    2014-12-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a risk factor for many human diseases, but among exposed individuals, not everyone is equally likely to develop HCMV-spurred diseases, implying the presence of host genetic factors that might modulate immunity to this virus. Here, we show that antibody responsiveness to HCMV glycoprotein B (gB) is significantly associated with particular immunoglobulin GM (γ marker) genotypes. Anti-HCMV gB antibody levels were highest in GM 17/17 homozygotes, intermediate in GM 3/17 heterozygotes, and lowest in GM 3/3 homozygotes (28.2, 19.0, and 8.1 µg/mL, respectively; P=.014). These findings provide mechanistic insights in the etiopathogenesis of HCMV-spurred diseases.

  12. IMGT/HighV-QUEST Statistical Significance of IMGT Clonotype (AA) Diversity per Gene for Standardized Comparisons of Next Generation Sequencing Immunoprofiles of Immunoglobulins and T Cell Receptors.

    PubMed

    Aouinti, Safa; Malouche, Dhafer; Giudicelli, Véronique; Kossida, Sofia; Lefranc, Marie-Paule

    2015-01-01

    The adaptive immune responses of humans and of other jawed vertebrate species (gnasthostomata) are characterized by the B and T cells and their specific antigen receptors, the immunoglobulins (IG) or antibodies and the T cell receptors (TR) (up to 2.1012 different IG and TR per individual). IMGT, the international ImMunoGeneTics information system (http://www.imgt.org), was created in 1989 by Marie-Paule Lefranc (Montpellier University and CNRS) to manage the huge and complex diversity of these antigen receptors. IMGT built on IMGT-ONTOLOGY concepts of identification (keywords), description (labels), classification (gene and allele nomenclature) and numerotation (IMGT unique numbering), is at the origin of immunoinformatics, a science at the interface between immunogenetics and bioinformatics. IMGT/HighV-QUEST, the first web portal, and so far the only one, for the next generation sequencing (NGS) analysis of IG and TR, is the paradigm for immune repertoire standardized outputs and immunoprofiles of the adaptive immune responses. It provides the identification of the variable (V), diversity (D) and joining (J) genes and alleles, analysis of the V-(D)-J junction and complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) and the characterization of the 'IMGT clonotype (AA)' (AA for amino acid) diversity and expression. IMGT/HighV-QUEST compares outputs of different batches, up to one million nucleotide sequencesfor the statistical module. These high throughput IG and TR repertoire immunoprofiles are of prime importance in vaccination, cancer, infectious diseases, autoimmunity and lymphoproliferative disorders, however their comparative statistical analysis still remains a challenge. We present a standardized statistical procedure to analyze IMGT/HighV-QUEST outputs for the evaluation of the significance of the IMGT clonotype (AA) diversity differences in proportions, per gene of a given group, between NGS IG and TR repertoire immunoprofiles. The procedure is generic and

  13. Role of human leukocyte antigen, killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors, and cytokine gene polymorphisms in leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Fialho, Raquel Nunes; Martins, Luís; Pinheiro, João Paulo; Bettencourt, Bruno Filipe; Couto, Ana Rita; Santos, Margarida Rodrigues; Peixoto, Maria José; Garrett, Francisco; Leal, João; Tomás, Ana Maria; Bruges-Armas, Jácome

    2009-11-01

    Leptospirosis is an emerging zoonotic disease caused by pathogenic species of the genus Leptospira. It has a broad range of clinical presentations in humans. Although progress has been made in the characterization of the host immune system factors that may affect disease progression and outcome, to date few reports have addressed the role of genetic polymorphisms in the susceptibility to leptospirosis. In this work a group of patients with a history of leptospiral infection and a control group were compared for polymorphisms in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA), in killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR), and in cytokine genes. Alleles in the HLA-A and -B loci were associated with susceptibility, as were the class I haplotype A*01-B*08-Cw*07 and the 8.1 ancestral haplotype (A*01-B*08-Cw*07-DRB1*03-DQB1*02). Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-4Ralpha genes also had significantly higher frequencies in the patient group. No association was reported between KIR gene profile and leptospirosis. This work highlights the importance of using genetic polymorphisms to better understand the mechanisms involved in the immune response to leptospirosis.

  14. Circular Dichroism Reveals Evidence of Coupling Between Immunoglobulin Constant and Variable Region Secondary Structure†

    PubMed Central

    Janda, Alena; Casadevall, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    Antibodies (Ab) are bifunctional molecules with two domains, a constant region (C) that confers effector properties and a variable (V) region responsible of antigen (Ag) binding. Historically the C and V regions were considered to be functionally independent, with Ag specificity being solely determined by the V region. However, recent studies suggest that the C region can affect Ab fine specificity. This has led to the proposal that the CH domain influences the structure of the V region, thus affecting Ab affinity and fine specificity. An inference from this proposal is that V region identical monoclonal Abs (mAbs) differing in C region (eg isotype) would manifest different secondary structures arising from isotype-induced variation in the V-C region after Ag binding. We hypothesized that such effects could translate into differences in Circular Dichroism (CD) upon Ag-Ab complex formation. Consequently we studied the interaction of a set of V region identical IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgG3 mAbs with glucuronoxylomannan (GXM). The native CD spectra of the pairs IgG1/IgG2a and IgG3/IgG2b were strikingly similar, implying similar secondary structure content. GXM binding by IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b and IgG3 produced different CD changes, with the pairs IgG1/IgG2a and IgG3/IgG2b again manifesting qualitatively similar trends in secondary structure changes. The magnitude of the changes differed among the isotypes with IgG2a > IgG3> IgG2b> IgG1. These differences in CD changes were interpreted to reflect differences in V-C secondary structure. PMID:20299100

  15. Triple immunoglobulin gene knockout transchromosomic cattle: bovine lambda cluster deletion and its effect on fully human polyclonal antibody production.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Hiroaki; Sano, Akiko; Wu, Hua; Jiao, Jin-An; Kasinathan, Poothappillai; Sullivan, Eddie J; Wang, Zhongde; Kuroiwa, Yoshimi

    2014-01-01

    Towards the goal of producing fully human polyclonal antibodies (hpAbs or hIgGs) in transchromosomic (Tc) cattle, we previously reported that Tc cattle carrying a human artificial chromosome (HAC) comprising the entire unrearranged human immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy-chain (hIGH), kappa-chain (hIGK), and lambda-chain (hIGL) germline loci produced physiological levels of hIgGs when both of the bovine immunoglobulin mu heavy-chains, bIGHM and bIGHML1, were homozygously inactivated (bIGHM-/-, bIGHML1-/-; double knockouts or DKO). However, because endogenous bovine immunoglobulin light chain loci are still intact, the light chains are produced both from the hIGK and hIGL genomic loci on the HAC and from the endogenous bovine kappa-chain (bIGK) and lambda-chain (bIGL) genomic loci, resulting in the production of fully hIgGs (both Ig heavy-chains and light-chains are of human origin: hIgG/hIgκ or hIgG/hIgλ) and chimeric hIgGs (Ig heavy-chains are of human origin while the Ig light-chains are of bovine origin: hIgG/bIgκ or hIgG/bIgλ). To improve fully hIgG production in Tc cattle, we here report the deletion of the entire bIGL joining (J) and constant (C) gene cluster (bIGLJ1-IGLC1 to bIGLJ5-IGLC5) by employing Cre/loxP mediated site-specific chromosome recombination and the production of triple knockout (bIGHM-/-, bIGHML1-/- and bIGL-/-; TKO) Tc cattle. We further demonstrate that bIGL cluster deletion greatly improves fully hIgGs production in the sera of TKO Tc cattle, with 51.3% fully hIgGs (hIgG/hIgκ plus hIgG/hIgλ).

  16. Triple Immunoglobulin Gene Knockout Transchromosomic Cattle: Bovine Lambda Cluster Deletion and Its Effect on Fully Human Polyclonal Antibody Production

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Hiroaki; Sano, Akiko; Wu, Hua; Jiao, Jin-an; Kasinathan, Poothappillai; Sullivan, Eddie J.; Wang, Zhongde; Kuroiwa, Yoshimi

    2014-01-01

    Towards the goal of producing fully human polyclonal antibodies (hpAbs or hIgGs) in transchromosomic (Tc) cattle, we previously reported that Tc cattle carrying a human artificial chromosome (HAC) comprising the entire unrearranged human immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy-chain (hIGH), kappa-chain (hIGK), and lambda-chain (hIGL) germline loci produced physiological levels of hIgGs when both of the bovine immunoglobulin mu heavy-chains, bIGHM and bIGHML1, were homozygously inactivated (bIGHM−/−, bIGHML1−/−; double knockouts or DKO). However, because endogenous bovine immunoglobulin light chain loci are still intact, the light chains are produced both from the hIGK and hIGL genomic loci on the HAC and from the endogenous bovine kappa-chain (bIGK) and lambda-chain (bIGL) genomic loci, resulting in the production of fully hIgGs (both Ig heavy-chains and light-chains are of human origin: hIgG/hIgκ or hIgG/hIgλ) and chimeric hIgGs (Ig heavy-chains are of human origin while the Ig light-chains are of bovine origin: hIgG/bIgκ or hIgG/bIgλ). To improve fully hIgG production in Tc cattle, we here report the deletion of the entire bIGL joining (J) and constant (C) gene cluster (bIGLJ1-IGLC1 to bIGLJ5-IGLC5) by employing Cre/loxP mediated site-specific chromosome recombination and the production of triple knockout (bIGHM−/−, bIGHML1−/− and bIGL−/−; TKO) Tc cattle. We further demonstrate that bIGL cluster deletion greatly improves fully hIgGs production in the sera of TKO Tc cattle, with 51.3% fully hIgGs (hIgG/hIgκ plus hIgG/hIgλ). PMID:24603704

  17. Sense transcription through the S region is essential for immunoglobulin class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Dania; Oruc, Zéliha; Puget, Nadine; Laviolette-Malirat, Nathalie; Philippe, Magali; Carrion, Claire; Le Bert, Marc; Khamlichi, Ahmed Amine

    2011-04-20

    Class switch recombination (CSR) occurs between highly repetitive sequences called switch (S) regions and is initiated by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). CSR is preceded by a bidirectional transcription of S regions but the relative importance of sense and antisense transcription for CSR in vivo is unknown. We generated three mouse lines in which we attempted a premature termination of transcriptional elongation by inserting bidirectional transcription terminators upstream of Sμ, upstream of Sγ3 or downstream of Sγ3 sequences. The data show, at least for Sγ3, that sense transcriptional elongation across S region is absolutely required for CSR whereas its antisense counterpart is largely dispensable, strongly suggesting that sense transcription is sufficient for AID targeting to both DNA strands. PMID:21378751

  18. B-cell differentiation in the chicken: expression of immunoglobulin genes in the bursal and peripheral lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Mansikka, A; Veromaa, T; Vainio, O; Toivanen, P

    1989-03-01

    We have studied the expression of immunoglobulin genes in the chicken B-cell precursors, and of a B-cell surface marker (Bu-1) on the bursal and peripheral B cells during normal ontogeny. Since there is no way of distinguishing the precursor cells from the more mature bursal lymphocytes on the basis of surface markers, we chose to study the total bursal lymphocyte population at ages when the numbers of the various precursor cells (bursal, early post-bursal, and post-bursal stem cells) in the bursa are estimated to be at their highest. Thereafter, comparisons with the more mature lymphocytes in the peripheral organs were made. As a result, levels of the lambda and mu transcripts and expression of Bu-1 antigen in the chicken B-cell precursors were found to be unchanged during the post-hatching period. In the light of these experiments, the later events of B-cell differentiation, i.e. the development from the bursal to post-bursal B lymphocytes, occurs without the lambda, mu, and Bu-1 gene loci involved. On the other hand, the higher level of lambda and mu expression in the splenic B lymphocytes indicates that the post-bursal stem cells mature into highly active plasma cells after seeding to the peripheral organs.

  19. Bronchoalveolar lavage of cranial and caudal lung regions in selected normal calves: cellular, microbiological, immunoglobulin, serological and histological variables.

    PubMed Central

    Pringle, J K; Viel, L; Shewen, P E; Willoughby, R A; Martin, S W; Valli, V E

    1988-01-01

    Of a group of 30 clinically normal male Holstein calves two to eight weeks of age, six two week old and six four week old calves met various radiographical and clinicopathological criteria for normality. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed by fiberoptic bronchoscopy on cranial and caudal lung regions in all 30 calves and samples analyzed for free cells, microorganisms, and immunoglobulins. Lateral chest radiographs and lung biopsies were also conducted on each calf. Calves were euthanized and necropsied ten days after bronchoalveolar lavage was conducted. Reported in this paper are results from the 12 normal calves. Microorganisms were present in small numbers in the lower respiratory tract of some normal calves. There were no differences in the above parameters between cranial and caudal lobes. There were statistically significant changes in bronchoalveolar lavage cell proportions with age although there were no detectable differences in clinical signs. Four week old calves had a lower percentage of macrophages and a higher percentage of epithelial cells than two week old animals (p less than 0.05). There was also a trend toward an increased percentage of neutrophils in older calves but this was not significant (p greater than 0.05). Total bronchoalveolar lavage protein also appeared to increase with age (p less than 0.05). In both groups a higher proportion of IgG2 in bronchoalveolar lavage compared to serum was found, suggesting the presence of a local selective transfer mechanism into respiratory secretions. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:3370559

  20. Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor genes in Latvian patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Nikitina-Zake, Liene; Rajalingham, Raja; Rumba, Ingrida; Sanjeevi, Carani B

    2004-12-01

    T1DM is very common in Sweden and is positively associated with HLA class II genes. Approximately 89% of the newly diagnosed patients carry the high-risk HLA DR4-DQ8 and DR3-DQ2. The remaining 11% develop T1DM without them. This can be due to involvement of other genes and environmental factors. Natural killer (NK) cells of the innate immune system are important in antiviral and antitumor immunity. They are implicated in the etiology of autoimmune T1DM. Human NK cells express killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) that belong to the polymorphic multigene family in chromosome 19q3.4. They modulate NK cell response by interacting with HLA class I. In addition, polymorphic MICA in HLA class I interacts with non-polymorphic NKG2D receptor on NK cells. We have studied, in addition to HLA-DR and -DQ, genes of the innate immune system MICA and KIR in Latvian patients (n = 98) with T1DM and controls (n = 100). They were genotyped using standard PCR-based typing methods. MICA allele 5 is positively associated with T1DM. KIR2DL2 and KIR2DS2 were both positively associated. Combined association of MICA4 and KIR2DL2 gave an odds ration (OR) of 26.7. However, the combined risk of KIR2DL2 and HLA class II genes, HLADR3 (OR = 73.4), DR4 (OR = 66.8), and DR3 and DR4 (OR = 88.3), was higher. The maximum risk was when KIR2DL2, MICA5, and DR3/DR4 were in combination. In conclusion, our results suggest that a balance between innate and acquired immunity is important, and an imbalance coud lead to T1DM.

  1. Nonimmunoglobulin target loci of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) share unique features with immunoglobulin genes

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Lucia; Begum, Nasim A.; Burroughs, A. Maxwell; Doi, Tomomitsu; Kawai, Jun; Daub, Carsten O.; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Honjo, Tasuku

    2012-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is required for both somatic hypermutation and class-switch recombination in activated B cells. AID is also known to target nonimmunoglobulin genes and introduce mutations or chromosomal translocations, eventually causing tumors. To identify as-yet-unknown AID targets, we screened early AID-induced DNA breaks by using two independent genome-wide approaches. Along with known AID targets, this screen identified a set of unique genes (SNHG3, MALAT1, BCL7A, and CUX1) and confirmed that these loci accumulated mutations as frequently as Ig locus after AID activation. Moreover, these genes share three important characteristics with the Ig gene: translocations in tumors, repetitive sequences, and the epigenetic modification of chromatin by H3K4 trimethylation in the vicinity of cleavage sites. PMID:22308462

  2. Nonimmunoglobulin target loci of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) share unique features with immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Kato, Lucia; Begum, Nasim A; Burroughs, A Maxwell; Doi, Tomomitsu; Kawai, Jun; Daub, Carsten O; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Honjo, Tasuku

    2012-02-14

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is required for both somatic hypermutation and class-switch recombination in activated B cells. AID is also known to target nonimmunoglobulin genes and introduce mutations or chromosomal translocations, eventually causing tumors. To identify as-yet-unknown AID targets, we screened early AID-induced DNA breaks by using two independent genome-wide approaches. Along with known AID targets, this screen identified a set of unique genes (SNHG3, MALAT1, BCL7A, and CUX1) and confirmed that these loci accumulated mutations as frequently as Ig locus after AID activation. Moreover, these genes share three important characteristics with the Ig gene: translocations in tumors, repetitive sequences, and the epigenetic modification of chromatin by H3K4 trimethylation in the vicinity of cleavage sites.

  3. Precise and in situ genetic humanization of 6 Mb of mouse immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Lynn E; Karow, Margaret; Stevens, Sean; Auerbach, Wojtek; Poueymirou, William T; Yasenchak, Jason; Frendewey, David; Valenzuela, David M; Giallourakis, Cosmas C; Alt, Frederick W; Yancopoulos, George D; Murphy, Andrew J

    2014-04-01

    Genetic humanization, which involves replacing mouse genes with their human counterparts, can create powerful animal models for the study of human genes and diseases. One important example of genetic humanization involves mice humanized for their Ig genes, allowing for human antibody responses within a mouse background (HumAb mice) and also providing a valuable platform for the generation of fully human antibodies as therapeutics. However, existing HumAb mice do not have fully functional immune systems, perhaps because of the manner in which they were genetically humanized. Heretofore, most genetic humanizations have involved disruption of the endogenous mouse gene with simultaneous introduction of a human transgene at a new and random location (so-called KO-plus-transgenic humanization). More recent efforts have attempted to replace mouse genes with their human counterparts at the same genetic location (in situ humanization), but such efforts involved laborious procedures and were limited in size and precision. We describe a general and efficient method for very large, in situ, and precise genetic humanization using large compound bacterial artificial chromosome-based targeting vectors introduced into mouse ES cells. We applied this method to genetically humanize 3-Mb segments of both the mouse heavy and κ light chain Ig loci, by far the largest genetic humanizations ever described. This paper provides a detailed description of our genetic humanization approach, and the companion paper reports that the humoral immune systems of mice bearing these genetically humanized loci function as efficiently as those of WT mice.

  4. Spaceflight-associated changes in immunoglobulin VH gene expression in the amphibian Pleurodeles waltl.

    PubMed

    Bascove, Matthieu; Huin-Schohn, Cécile; Guéguinou, Nathan; Tschirhart, Eric; Frippiat, Jean-Pol

    2009-05-01

    Understanding why the immune system is depressed during spaceflight is of obvious importance for future human deep-space missions, such as the foreseen missions to Mars. However, little is known about the effects of these flights on humoral immunity. We previously immunized adult Pleurodeles waltl (urodele amphibian) onboard the Mir space station and showed that heavy-chain variable (VH) domains of specific IgM antibodies are encoded by genes belonging to the VHII and VHVI families. We have now determined how these animals use their individual VHII and VHVI genes by screening IgM heavy-chain cDNA libraries and by quantifying IgM heavy-chain transcripts encoded by these genes. Results were compared with those obtained using control animals immunized on Earth under the same conditions as onboard Mir. Our experiments revealed an increase in the expression of IgM heavy-chain mRNAs encoded by the VHII and VHVI.C genes and a strong decrease in the expression of IgM heavy-chain mRNAs encoded by the VHVI.A and VHVI.B genes in spaceflight animals. Consequently, different heavy-chain mRNAs are expressed by spaceflight animals, demonstrating that this environment affects the humoral response. These observations may be due to a change in B-cell selection under spaceflight conditions.

  5. Deciphering the importance of the palindromic architecture of the immunoglobulin heavy-chain 3' regulatory region.

    PubMed

    Saintamand, Alexis; Vincent-Fabert, Christelle; Garot, Armand; Rouaud, Pauline; Oruc, Zeliha; Magnone, Virginie; Cogné, Michel; Denizot, Yves

    2016-01-01

    The IgH 3' regulatory region (3'RR) controls class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) in B cells. The mouse 3'RR contains four enhancer elements with hs1,2 flanked by inverted repeated sequences and the centre of a 25-kb palindrome bounded by two hs3 enhancer inverted copies (hs3a and hs3b). hs4 lies downstream of the palindrome. In mammals, evolution maintained this unique palindromic arrangement, suggesting that it is functionally significant. Here we report that deconstructing the palindromic IgH 3'RR strongly affects its function even when enhancers are preserved. CSR and IgH transcription appear to be poorly dependent on the 3'RR architecture and it is more or less preserved, provided 3'RR enhancers are present. By contrast, a 'palindromic effect' significantly lowers VH germline transcription, AID recruitment and SHM. In conclusion, this work indicates that the IgH 3'RR does not simply pile up enhancer units but also optimally exposes them into a functional architecture of crucial importance. PMID:26883548

  6. Deciphering the importance of the palindromic architecture of the immunoglobulin heavy-chain 3' regulatory region.

    PubMed

    Saintamand, Alexis; Vincent-Fabert, Christelle; Garot, Armand; Rouaud, Pauline; Oruc, Zeliha; Magnone, Virginie; Cogné, Michel; Denizot, Yves

    2016-02-17

    The IgH 3' regulatory region (3'RR) controls class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) in B cells. The mouse 3'RR contains four enhancer elements with hs1,2 flanked by inverted repeated sequences and the centre of a 25-kb palindrome bounded by two hs3 enhancer inverted copies (hs3a and hs3b). hs4 lies downstream of the palindrome. In mammals, evolution maintained this unique palindromic arrangement, suggesting that it is functionally significant. Here we report that deconstructing the palindromic IgH 3'RR strongly affects its function even when enhancers are preserved. CSR and IgH transcription appear to be poorly dependent on the 3'RR architecture and it is more or less preserved, provided 3'RR enhancers are present. By contrast, a 'palindromic effect' significantly lowers VH germline transcription, AID recruitment and SHM. In conclusion, this work indicates that the IgH 3'RR does not simply pile up enhancer units but also optimally exposes them into a functional architecture of crucial importance.

  7. Deciphering the importance of the palindromic architecture of the immunoglobulin heavy-chain 3' regulatory region

    PubMed Central

    Saintamand, Alexis; Vincent-Fabert, Christelle; Garot, Armand; Rouaud, Pauline; Oruc, Zeliha; Magnone, Virginie; Cogné, Michel; Denizot, Yves

    2016-01-01

    The IgH 3' regulatory region (3'RR) controls class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) in B cells. The mouse 3'RR contains four enhancer elements with hs1,2 flanked by inverted repeated sequences and the centre of a 25-kb palindrome bounded by two hs3 enhancer inverted copies (hs3a and hs3b). hs4 lies downstream of the palindrome. In mammals, evolution maintained this unique palindromic arrangement, suggesting that it is functionally significant. Here we report that deconstructing the palindromic IgH 3'RR strongly affects its function even when enhancers are preserved. CSR and IgH transcription appear to be poorly dependent on the 3'RR architecture and it is more or less preserved, provided 3'RR enhancers are present. By contrast, a ‘palindromic effect' significantly lowers VH germline transcription, AID recruitment and SHM. In conclusion, this work indicates that the IgH 3'RR does not simply pile up enhancer units but also optimally exposes them into a functional architecture of crucial importance. PMID:26883548

  8. Immunoglobulin VH genes are transcribed by T cells in association with a new 5' exon

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    We previously detected mRNAs in a number of human T cell lines with a probe from within the Ig VH gene locus. We now show these mRNAs consist of Ig VH genes expressed in T cells. In one human T cell line, two RNA species have been studied and found to come from transcripts of unrearranged VH segments in which the leader exon, normally associated with VH transcripts in B cells, is replaced by a novel 5' exon (ET) not encoding a hydrophobic leader peptide. In genomic DNA, this new ET exon is adjacent to a pseudo-VH gene that has not been observed in mature mRNA. This implies that RNA splicing controls association of the new exon with the expressed VH segments. Hence, VH transcription does indeed occur in T cells, but is qualitatively different from that in B cells. PMID:3133445

  9. Forward Genetics Identifies a Requirement for the Izumo-like Immunoglobulin Superfamily spe-45 Gene in Caenorhabditis elegans Fertilization.

    PubMed

    Singaravelu, Gunasekaran; Rahimi, Sina; Krauchunas, Amber; Rizvi, Anam; Dharia, Sunny; Shakes, Diane; Smith, Harold; Golden, Andy; Singson, Andrew

    2015-12-21

    Fertilization is a conserved process in all sexually reproducing organisms whereby sperm bind and fuse with oocytes. Despite the importance of sperm-oocyte interactions in fertilization, the molecular underpinnings of this process are still not well understood. The only cognate ligand-receptor pair identified in the context of fertilization is sperm-surface Izumo and egg-surface Juno in the mouse [1]. Here we describe a genetic screening strategy to isolate fertilization mutants in Caenorhabditis elegans in order to generate a more complete inventory of molecules required for gamete interactions. From this screening strategy, we identified, cloned, and characterized spe-45, a gene that encodes an Izumo-like immunoglobulin superfamily protein. Mammalian Izumo is required for male fertility and has the same basic mutant phenotype as spe-45. Worms lacking spe-45 function produce morphologically normal and motile sperm that cannot fuse with oocytes despite direct contact in the reproductive tract. The power of this screen to identify proteins with ancient sperm functions suggests that characterization of additional mutants from our screen may reveal other deeply conserved components in fertility pathways and complement studies in other organisms.

  10. PCR amplification and high throughput sequencing of immunoglobulin heavy chain genes from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded human biopsies.

    PubMed

    Tabibian-Keissar, Hilla; Schibby, Ginette; Michaeli, Miri; Rakovsky-Shapira, Aviya; Azogui-Rosenthal, Noemie; Dunn-Walters, Deborah K; Rosenblatt, Kinneret; Mehr, Ramit; Barshack, Iris

    2013-02-01

    The use of high throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies in biomedicine is expanding in a variety of fields in recent years. The 454 system is an HTS platform that is ideally suited to characterize B cell receptor (BCR) repertoires by sequencing of immunoglobulin (Ig) genes, as it is able to sequence stretches of several hundred nucleotides. Most studies that used this platform for antibody repertoire analyses have started from fresh or frozen tissues or peripheral blood samples, and rely on starting with optimal quality DNA. In this paper we demonstrate that BCR repertoire analysis can be done using DNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) human tissue samples. The heterogeneity of BCR repertoires we obtained confirms the plausibility of HTS of DNA from FFPE specimens. The establishment of experimental protocols and computational tools that enable sequence data analysis from the low quality DNA of FFPE tissues is important for enabling research, as it would enable the use of the rich source of preserved samples in clinical biobanks and biopsy archives.

  11. High prevalence of immunoglobulin light chain gene aberrations as revealed by FISH in multiple myeloma and MGUS.

    PubMed

    Türkmen, Seval; Binder, Anastasia; Gerlach, Antje; Niehage, Sylke; Theodora Melissari, Maria; Inandiklioglu, Nihal; Dörken, Bernd; Burmeister, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignant B-cell neoplasm characterized by an uncontrolled proliferation of aberrant plasma cells in the bone marrow. Chromosome aberrations in MM are complex and represent a hallmark of the disease, involving many chromosomes that are altered both numerically and structurally. Nearly half of the cases are nonhyperdiploid and show IGH translocations with the following partner genes: CCND1, FGFR3 and MMSET, MAF, MAFB, and CCND3. The remaining 50% are grouped into a hyperdiploid group that is characterized by multiple trisomies involving chromosomes 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 15, 19, and 21. In this study, we analyzed the immunoglobulin light chain kappa (IGK, 2p12) and lambda (IGL, 22q11) loci in 150 cases, mostly with MM but in a few cases monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), without IGH translocations. We identified aberrations in 27% (= 40 patients) including rearrangements (12%), gains (12%), and deletions (4.6%). In 6 of 18 patients with IGK or/and IGL rearrangements, we detected a MYC rearrangement which suggests that MYC is the translocation partner in the majority of these cases. PMID:24729354

  12. Immunoglobulin K light chain deficiency: A rare, but probably underestimated, humoral immune defect.

    PubMed

    Sala, Pierguido; Colatutto, Antonio; Fabbro, Dora; Mariuzzi, Laura; Marzinotto, Stefania; Toffoletto, Barbara; Perosa, Anna R; Damante, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Human immunoglobulin molecules are generated by a pair of identical heavy chains, which identify the immunoglobulin class, and a pair of identical light chains, Kappa or Lambda alternatively, which characterize the immunoglobulin type. In normal conditions, Kappa light chains represent approximately 2/3 of the light chains of total immunoglobulins, both circulating and lymphocyte surface bound. Very few cases of immunoglobulin Kappa or Lambda light chain defects have been reported. Furthermore, the genetic basis of this defect has been extensively explored only in a single case. We report a case of a patient suffering of serious recurrent bacterial infections, which was caused by a very rare form of immunoglobulin disorder, consisting of a pure defect of Kappa light chain. We evaluated major serum immunoglobulin concentrations, as well as total and free Kappa and Lambda light chain concentrations. Lymphocyte phenotyping was also performed and finally we tested the Kappa chain VJ rearrangement as well as the constant Kappa region sequence. Studies performed on VJ rearrangement showed a polyclonal genetic arrangement, whereas the gene sequencing for the constant region of Kappa chain showed a homozygous T to G substitution at the position 1288 (rs200765148). This mutation causes a substitution from Cys to Gly in the protein sequence and, therefore, determines the abnormal folding of the constant region of Kappa chain. We suggest that this defect could lead to an effective reduction of the variability of total antibody repertoire and a consequent defect of an apparently normal immunoglobulin response to common antigens.

  13. Associations between genes for killer immunoglobulin-like receptors and their ligands in patients with solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Al Omar, Suliman; Middleton, Derek; Marshall, Ernie; Porter, Dawn; Xinarianos, George; Raji, Olaide; Field, John K; Christmas, Stephen E

    2010-10-01

    Killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotypes were analyzed from panels of lung (non-small-cell lung cancer [NSCLC] and small-cell lung cancer [SCLC]), colon, and kidney cancer patients and compared with normal control subjects. No significant differences were noted between KIR gene frequencies in patients compared with normal subjects. When combinations of KIR genes and their HLA ligands were considered, there were significant decreases in frequencies of both KIR2DL2 and KIR2DL3 in homozygotes for their ligand HLA-C1, and an increase in the frequency of KIR3DL1 and its ligand HLA-Bw4 in kidney cancer patients compared with controls. Both associations were partly attributable to changes in ligand frequencies alone. NSCLC patients showed a significant increase in the frequency of KIR2DL1 and its ligand HLA-C2 and a corresponding decrease in frequency of KIR2DL3 and its ligand HLA-C1 in homozygotes. In NSCLC, the Ile80 form of HLA-Bw4 was decreased in KIR3DL1+ HLA-Bw4+ patients, whereas in SCLC the Ile80 form was increased and the Thr80 form decreased in KIR3DS1+ HLA-Bw4+ patients. These findings are consistent with increased co-expression of high-affinity inhibitory KIRs and their ligands, potentially resulting in decreased natural killer cell function, and hence with natural killer cells having a protective role in lung and kidney cancer but not colon cancer.

  14. Iodine supplementation of the pregnant dam alters intestinal gene expression and immunoglobulin uptake in the newborn lamb.

    PubMed

    McGovern, F M; Magee, D A; Browne, J A; MacHugh, D E; Boland, T M

    2016-04-01

    Excess iodine intake by the pregnant dam reduces lamb serum antibody concentration, specifically immunoglobulin G (IgG). An experiment was conducted to investigate the mechanisms under pinning the reduced serum IgG concentration at 24 h postpartum in the progeny of iodine supplemented dams. Forty-five mature twin bearing ewes (n=15/treatment) were allocated to one of three dietary treatments as follows: basal diet (Control); basal diet plus 26.6 mg of iodine per ewe per day as calcium iodate (CaIO3); or potassium iodide (KI). Ewes were individually housed and fed from d 119 of gestation until parturition. All lambs received colostrum at 1, 10 and 18 h postpartum via stomach tube. At 1 h postpartum lambs from the control and an iodine supplemented treatment (n=10 per treatment from control and CaIO3) were euthanised before colostrum consumption and ileal segments isolated to determine the gene expression profile of a panel of genes identified as having a role in antibody transfer. Preceding euthanasia, lambs were blood sampled for determination of serum IgG, total thyroxine and free tri-iodothyronine concentrations. Progeny of CaIO3 supplemented dams had lower tri-iodothyronine concentrations (P<0.01) at 1 h postpartum and lower serum IgG concentrations (P<0.001) at 24 h postpartum when compared with the progeny of control dams. Iodine (CaIO3) supplementation of the dam increased the relative expression (P<0.05) of the B2M, PIGR and MYC genes in the ileum of the lamb, before colostrum consumption; while the expression of THRB declined when compared with the progeny of C dams (P<0.01). In conclusion, the results of this study show that it is the actual inclusion of excess iodine in the diet of the ewe, regardless of the carrier element, that negatively affects passive transfer in the newborn lamb. This study presents novel data describing the relationship between maternal iodine nutrition and its effect on the thyroid hormone status and subsequent gene expression in

  15. The hinge region fragment of immunoglobulin G improves immunogenicity of recombinant gonadotrophin-releasing hormone conjugated to the T-helper epitope in designing peptide vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jinshu; Wu, Jie; Wang, Xuejun; Zhang, Yin; Li, Wenjia; Zhu, Zheng; Zhu, Dongya; Hu, Zhuoyi; Roque, Rouel S; Liu, Jingjing

    2009-01-01

    In our previous study, the hinge fragment (225–232/225′–232′) of human immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) was used as a space peptide linker for synthesizing the GnRH3–hinge–MVP chimeric peptide, whereby three repeated gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) units and a T-cell epitope from measles virus fusion protein (MVP) were amide-bond-linked at the N and C terminus, respectively, to the hinge peptide for producing anti-GnRH antibody responses. To investigate whether or not the hinge region fragment can improve the immunogenicity of GnRH, we further synthesized and purified GnRH3–hinge–MVP, GnRH3–hinge and GnRH3–MVP using recombinant DNA technology. Under high pH conditions, GnRH3–hinge–MVP was capable of forming double-chain structures. Immunization of male mice with the immunogens of GnRH3–hinge–MVP resulted in the generation of high-titre antibodies specific for GnRH. The synthetic GnRH3–hinge and GnRH3–MVP induced a lower titre of anti-GnRH antibody than GnRH3–hinge–MVP. This was followed by a decrease in serum testosterone levels, which resulted in a low level of expression of the relaxin-like factor gene in the testis. Our data suggest that peptide and T-cell epitopes oriented at the N-terminus or C-terminus of hinge peptides simplify the antigenic peptide conjugates and may be considered as potential synthetic immunogens. PMID:19740311

  16. Immunoglobulin genes in Andalusia (Spain). Genetic diversity in the Mediterranean space.

    PubMed

    Fortes-Lima, César; Dugoujon, Jean-Michel; Hernández, Candela L; Reales, Guillermo; Calderón, Rosario

    2014-11-01

    Andalusia is the most densely populated region of Spain since ancient times, and has a rich history of contacts across the Mediterranean. Earlier studies have underlined the relatively high frequency of the Sub-Saharan GM 1,17 5* haplotype in western Andalusia (Huelva province, n=252) and neighbouring Atlantic regions. Here, we provide novel data on GM/KM markers in eastern Andalusians (n=195) from Granada province, where African GM*1,17 5* frequency is relatively high (0.044). The most frequent GM haplotypes in Andalusia parallel the most common in Europe. Altogether, these data allow us to gain insight into the genetic diversity of southern Iberia. Additionally, we assess population structure by comparing our Iberian samples with 41 Mediterranean populations. GM haplotype variation across the Mediterranean reflects intense and complex interactions between North Africans and South Europeans along human history, highlighting that African influence over the Iberian Peninsula does not follow an isotropic pattern.

  17. Immunoglobulin genes in Andalusia (Spain). Genetic diversity in the Mediterranean space.

    PubMed

    Fortes-Lima, César; Dugoujon, Jean-Michel; Hernández, Candela L; Reales, Guillermo; Calderón, Rosario

    2014-11-01

    Andalusia is the most densely populated region of Spain since ancient times, and has a rich history of contacts across the Mediterranean. Earlier studies have underlined the relatively high frequency of the Sub-Saharan GM 1,17 5* haplotype in western Andalusia (Huelva province, n=252) and neighbouring Atlantic regions. Here, we provide novel data on GM/KM markers in eastern Andalusians (n=195) from Granada province, where African GM*1,17 5* frequency is relatively high (0.044). The most frequent GM haplotypes in Andalusia parallel the most common in Europe. Altogether, these data allow us to gain insight into the genetic diversity of southern Iberia. Additionally, we assess population structure by comparing our Iberian samples with 41 Mediterranean populations. GM haplotype variation across the Mediterranean reflects intense and complex interactions between North Africans and South Europeans along human history, highlighting that African influence over the Iberian Peninsula does not follow an isotropic pattern. PMID:25444709

  18. IMGT/HighV-QUEST Statistical Significance of IMGT Clonotype (AA) Diversity per Gene for Standardized Comparisons of Next Generation Sequencing Immunoprofiles of Immunoglobulins and T Cell Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Aouinti, Safa; Malouche, Dhafer; Giudicelli, Véronique; Kossida, Sofia; Lefranc, Marie-Paule

    2015-01-01

    The adaptive immune responses of humans and of other jawed vertebrate species (gnasthostomata) are characterized by the B and T cells and their specific antigen receptors, the immunoglobulins (IG) or antibodies and the T cell receptors (TR) (up to 2.1012 different IG and TR per individual). IMGT, the international ImMunoGeneTics information system (http://www.imgt.org), was created in 1989 by Marie-Paule Lefranc (Montpellier University and CNRS) to manage the huge and complex diversity of these antigen receptors. IMGT built on IMGT-ONTOLOGY concepts of identification (keywords), description (labels), classification (gene and allele nomenclature) and numerotation (IMGT unique numbering), is at the origin of immunoinformatics, a science at the interface between immunogenetics and bioinformatics. IMGT/HighV-QUEST, the first web portal, and so far the only one, for the next generation sequencing (NGS) analysis of IG and TR, is the paradigm for immune repertoire standardized outputs and immunoprofiles of the adaptive immune responses. It provides the identification of the variable (V), diversity (D) and joining (J) genes and alleles, analysis of the V-(D)-J junction and complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) and the characterization of the ‘IMGT clonotype (AA)’ (AA for amino acid) diversity and expression. IMGT/HighV-QUEST compares outputs of different batches, up to one million nucleotide sequencesfor the statistical module. These high throughput IG and TR repertoire immunoprofiles are of prime importance in vaccination, cancer, infectious diseases, autoimmunity and lymphoproliferative disorders, however their comparative statistical analysis still remains a challenge. We present a standardized statistical procedure to analyze IMGT/HighV-QUEST outputs for the evaluation of the significance of the IMGT clonotype (AA) diversity differences in proportions, per gene of a given group, between NGS IG and TR repertoire immunoprofiles. The procedure is generic and

  19. Ancient Genetic Signatures of Orang Asli Revealed by Killer Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor Gene Polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    NurWaliyuddin, Hanis Z A; Norazmi, Mohd N; Edinur, Hisham A; Chambers, Geoffrey K; Panneerchelvam, Sundararajulu; Zafarina, Zainuddin

    2015-01-01

    The aboriginal populations of Peninsular Malaysia, also known as Orang Asli (OA), comprise three major groups; Semang, Senoi and Proto-Malays. Here, we analyzed for the first time KIR gene polymorphisms for 167 OA individuals, including those from four smallest OA subgroups (Che Wong, Orang Kanaq, Lanoh and Kensiu) using polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific primer (PCR-SSP) analyses. The observed distribution of KIR profiles of OA is heterogenous; Haplotype B is the most frequent in the Semang subgroups (especially Batek) while Haplotype A is the most common type in the Senoi. The Semang subgroups were clustered together with the Africans, Indians, Papuans and Australian Aborigines in a principal component analysis (PCA) plot and shared many common genotypes (AB6, BB71, BB73 and BB159) observed in these other populations. Given that these populations also display high frequencies of Haplotype B, it is interesting to speculate that Haplotype B may be generally more frequent in ancient populations. In contrast, the two Senoi subgroups, Che Wong and Semai are displaced toward Southeast Asian and African populations in the PCA scatter plot, respectively. Orang Kanaq, the smallest and the most endangered of all OA subgroups, has lost some degree of genetic variation, as shown by their relatively high frequency of the AB2 genotype (0.73) and a total absence of KIR2DL2 and KIR2DS2 genes. Orang Kanaq tradition that strictly prohibits intermarriage with outsiders seems to have posed a serious threat to their survival. This present survey is a demonstration of the value of KIR polymorphisms in elucidating genetic relationships among human populations. PMID:26565719

  20. Ancient Genetic Signatures of Orang Asli Revealed by Killer Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor Gene Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    NurWaliyuddin, Hanis Z. A.; Norazmi, Mohd N.; Edinur, Hisham A.; Chambers, Geoffrey K.; Panneerchelvam, Sundararajulu; Zafarina, Zainuddin

    2015-01-01

    The aboriginal populations of Peninsular Malaysia, also known as Orang Asli (OA), comprise three major groups; Semang, Senoi and Proto-Malays. Here, we analyzed for the first time KIR gene polymorphisms for 167 OA individuals, including those from four smallest OA subgroups (Che Wong, Orang Kanaq, Lanoh and Kensiu) using polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific primer (PCR-SSP) analyses. The observed distribution of KIR profiles of OA is heterogenous; Haplotype B is the most frequent in the Semang subgroups (especially Batek) while Haplotype A is the most common type in the Senoi. The Semang subgroups were clustered together with the Africans, Indians, Papuans and Australian Aborigines in a principal component analysis (PCA) plot and shared many common genotypes (AB6, BB71, BB73 and BB159) observed in these other populations. Given that these populations also display high frequencies of Haplotype B, it is interesting to speculate that Haplotype B may be generally more frequent in ancient populations. In contrast, the two Senoi subgroups, Che Wong and Semai are displaced toward Southeast Asian and African populations in the PCA scatter plot, respectively. Orang Kanaq, the smallest and the most endangered of all OA subgroups, has lost some degree of genetic variation, as shown by their relatively high frequency of the AB2 genotype (0.73) and a total absence of KIR2DL2 and KIR2DS2 genes. Orang Kanaq tradition that strictly prohibits intermarriage with outsiders seems to have posed a serious threat to their survival. This present survey is a demonstration of the value of KIR polymorphisms in elucidating genetic relationships among human populations. PMID:26565719

  1. Systemic gene transfer of binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) prevents disease progression in murine collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shields, A M; Klavinskis, L S; Antoniou, M; Wooley, P H; Collins, H L; Panayi, G S; Thompson, S J; Corrigall, V M

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant human binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) has previously demonstrated anti-inflammatory properties in multiple models of inflammatory arthritis. We investigated whether these immunoregulatory properties could be exploited using gene therapy techniques. A single intraperitoneal injection of lentiviral vector containing the murine BiP (Lenti-mBiP) or green fluorescent protein (Lenti-GFP) transgene was administered in low- or high-dose studies during early arthritis. Disease activity was assessed by visual scoring, histology, serum cytokine and antibody production measured by cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and ELISA, respectively. Lentiviral vector treatment caused significant induction of interferon (IFN)-γ responses regardless of the transgene; however, further specific effects were directly attributable to the BiP transgene. In both studies Lenti-mBiP suppressed clinical arthritis significantly. Histological examination showed that low-dose Lenti-mBiP suppressed inflammatory cell infiltration, cartilage destruction and significantly reduced pathogenic anti-type II collagen (CII) antibodies. Lenti-mBiP treatment caused significant up-regulation of soluble cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (sCTLA-4) serum levels and down-regulation of interleukin (IL)-17A production in response to CII cell restimulation. In-vitro studies confirmed that Lenti-mBiP spleen cells could significantly suppress the release of IL-17A from CII primed responder cells following CII restimulation in vitro, and this suppression was associated with increased IL-10 production. Neutralization of CTLA-4 in further co-culture experiments demonstrated inverse regulation of IL-17A production. In conclusion, these data demonstrate proof of principle for the therapeutic potential of systemic lentiviral vector delivery of the BiP transgene leading to immunoregulation of arthritis by induction of soluble CTLA-4 and suppression of IL-17A production. PMID:25228326

  2. Interaction of KIR genes and G1M immunoglobulin allotypes confer susceptibility to type 2 diabetes in Puerto Rican Americans.

    PubMed

    Zuniga, Joaquin; Romero, Viviana; Azocar, Jose; Stern, Joel N H; Clavijo, Olga; Almeciga, Ingrid; Encinales, Liliana; Avendano, Angel; Fridkis-Hareli, Masha; Pandey, Janardan P; Yunis, Edmond J

    2006-11-01

    The susceptibility to type 2 diabetes (T2D) involves genetic factors. We studied the distribution of KIR and MHC class I ligands phenotype and genotype frequencies, as well as immunoglobulin KM and GM allotype frequencies in a group of patients (N = 95) with T2D and ethnically matched healthy controls (N = 74) with Puerto Rican ethnic background. We found a slight increase of the 2DL3/2DL3 homozygous genotype in T2D. Moreover, the association between 2DL3/2DL3 genotype was significant in the presence of 2DS4 (pC = 0.01). Also, we observed an epistatic effect of the interaction of 2DL3/2DL3, 2DS4 with allele z of G1M in T2D (pC = 0.004, OR = 3.60, 95% CI, 1.62-8.10). This genetic interaction between KIR and G1M allotypes, associated with T2D, was also significant by multiple logistic regression analysis (p < 0.0001, OR = 4.90, 95% CI, 2.12-11.3). We did not detect population stratification using unlinked short tandem repeat (STR) markers, demonstrating that the patients and controls were ethnically matched. Hence, we have demonstrated in this study an epistatic interaction between KIR genes and the G1M allotype that influences the susceptibility to T2D in Puerto Rican Americans. Our findings are important for understanding the autoimmune or innate immune inflammatory-mediated mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of T2D.

  3. Rearrangement and expression of beta-T-cell receptor and immunoglobulin genes in established Ph1 chronic myelogenous leukemia cell lines.

    PubMed

    Berenson, J; Koeffler, H P

    1989-01-01

    We have determined the arrangement and expression of immunoglobulin (Ig) and beta-T-cell receptor (TCR) genes in six established Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph1) chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cell lines, and correlated these results with their phenotypic characteristics. Three cell lines with nonlymphoid characteristics, EM2, EM3, and K562, did not demonstrate rearrangement or expression of Ig or beta-TCR genes. A new cell line, MB, with a mature B-cell phenotype recently established in our laboratory, contained light and heavy chain immunoglobulin gene rearrangements and expressed mature Ig RNA. In a cell line with an early lymphoid phenotype, BV173, this analysis showed rearrangement of Ig heavy chain and beta-TCR genes, unrearranged Ig light chain DNA, and expression of only an immature beta-TCR transcript. This line provides evidence for T-cell lineage involvement in Ph1 CML. One cell line without markers of any cell type, KCL-22, demonstrated rearranged, unexpressed Ig heavy chain genes, suggesting these cells are at the very earliest stages of lymphoid differentiation. These lines should provide valuable tools to dissect the molecular biology of differentiation in CML and in early lymphocytes.

  4. Beswitched. The looping out model for immunoglobulin class switching.

    PubMed

    von Schwedler, U; Jäck, H M; Wabl, M

    1990-08-01

    During the switch in expression of an immunoglobulin class, the gene segment encoding the constant region of the heavy chain is replaced in a way that leads to a deletion. Three different models of how this deletion is generated have been proposed: recombination between homologs, unequal sister chromatid exchange, and looping out and deletion. While none of the predicted recombination products of the first two models have been found, the products of the looping out--inversions and circular DNA--have been isolated. Thus looping out and deletion appears to be the appropriate model to explain the genetic events leading to the immunoglobulin heavy chain class switch. PMID:2282364

  5. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor regulates an essential transcriptional element in the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene.

    PubMed

    Wourms, Michael J; Sulentic, Courtney E W

    2015-05-01

    Ig heavy chain (Igh) transcription involves several regulatory elements including the 3'Igh regulatory region (3'IghRR). 3'IghRR activity is modulated by several transcription factors, including NF-κB and AP-1 and potentially the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). The prototypical AhR ligand 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) inhibits antibody secretion and 3'IghRR activity. However, the exact mechanism is unknown and TCDD can modulate NF-κB and AP-1 in an AhR-independent manner. To determine if the AhR is a significant regulator of the 3'IghRR, we utilized a mouse B-cell line that stably expresses a 3'IghRR-regulated transgene and either an AhR antagonist or shRNA targeting the AhR. Disruption of the AhR pathway reversed TCDD-induced suppression of the 3'IghRR-regulated transgene and of endogenous Ig demonstrating a biologically significant effect of the AhR on 3'IghRR activation. Altered human 3'IGHRR activity by AhR ligands, which include dietary, environmental, and pharmaceutical chemicals, may have significant implications to human diseases previously associated with the 3'IGHRR.

  6. Clonal Progression during the T Cell-Dependent B Cell Antibody Response Depends on the Immunoglobulin DH Gene Segment Repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Trad, Ahmad; Tanasa, Radu Iulian; Lange, Hans; Zemlin, Michael; Schroeder, Harry W.; Lemke, Hilmar

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of the third complementarity determining region of the IgH chain is constrained by natural selection of immunoglobulin diversity (DH) sequence. To test the functional significance of this constraint in the context of thymus-dependent (TD) immune responses, we immunized BALB/c mice with WT or altered DH sequence with 2-phenyloxazolone-coupled chicken serum albumin (phOx-CSA). We chose this antigen because studies of the humoral immune response to the hapten phOx were instrumental in the development of the current theoretical framework on which our understanding of the forces driving TD responses is based. To allow direct comparison, we used the classic approach of generating monoclonal Ab (mAb) from various stages of the immune response to phOx to assess the effect of changing the sequence of the DH on clonal expansion, class switching, and affinity maturation, which are hallmarks of TD responses. Compared to WT, TD-induced humoral IgM as well as IgG antibody production in the D-altered ΔD-DμFS and ΔD-iD strains were significantly reduced. An increased prevalence of IgM-producing hybridomas from late primary, secondary, and tertiary memory responses suggested either impaired class switch recombination (CSR) or impaired clonal expansion of class switched B cells with phOx reactivity. Neither of the D-altered strains demonstrated the restriction in the VH/VL repertoire, the elimination of VH1 family-encoded antibodies, the focusing of the distribution of CDR-H3 lengths, or the selection for the normally dominant Ox1 clonotype, which all are hallmarks of the anti-phOx response in WT mice. These changes in clonal selection and expansion, as well as CSR indicate that the genetic constitution of the DH locus, which has been selected by evolution, can strongly influence the functional outcome of a TD humoral response. PMID:25157256

  7. Characterization of a new ARID family transcription factor (Brightlike/ARID3C) that co-activates Bright/ARID3A-mediated immunoglobulin gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Tidwell, Josephine A; Schmidt, Christian; Heaton, Phillip; Wilson, Van; Tucker, Philip W

    2011-10-01

    Two members, Bright/ARID3A and Bdp/ARID3B, of the ARID (AT-Rich Interaction Domain) transcription family are distinguished by their ability to specifically bind to DNA and to self-associate via a second domain, REKLES. Bright and Bdp positively regulate immunoglobulin heavy chain gene (IgH) transcription by binding to AT-rich motifs within Matrix Associating Regions (MARs) residing within a subset of V(H) promoters and the Eμ intronic enhancer. In addition, REKLES provides Bright nuclear export function, and a small pool of Bright is directed to plasma membrane sub-domains/lipid rafts where it associates with and modulates signaling of the B cell antigen receptor (BCR). Here, we characterize a third, highly conserved, physically condensed ARID3 locus, Brightlike/ARID3C. Brightlike encodes two alternatively spliced, SUMO-I-modified isoforms that include or exclude (Δ6) the REKLES-encoding exon 6. Brightlike transcripts and proteins are expressed preferentially within B lineage lymphocytes and coordinate with highest Bright expression in activated follicular B cells. Brightlike, but not BrightlikeΔ6, undergoes nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling with a fraction localizing within lipid rafts following BCR stimulation. Brightlike, but not BrightlikeΔ6, associates with Bright in solution, at common DNA binding sites in vitro, and is enriched at Bright binding sites in chromatin. Although possessing little transactivation capacity of its own, Brightlike significantly co-activates Bright-dependent IgH transcription with maximal activity mediated by the unsumoylated form. In sum, this report introduces Brightlike as an additional functional member of the family of ARID proteins, which should be considered in regulatory circuits, previously ascribed to be mediated by Bright.

  8. Trans-activation of transcription, from promoters containing immunoglobulin gene octamer sequences, by myeloma cell mRNA in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, G E; Old, R W

    1988-01-01

    To study factors required for immunoglobulin gene transcription hybrid promoters were made by linking octamer elements to a Xenopus albumin gene construct containing only 50bp of the albumin gene promoter. When injected into oocytes these hybrid promoters directed transcription far less efficiently than the unmodified 50bp albumin gene promoter fragment. Activity of the hybrid promoter, but not the unmodified albumin promoter, could be stimulated by preinjection of poly(A)+ RNA from NS1 myeloma cells. This stimulation may be caused by translation of the NS1 poly(A)+ RNA into transcription factors that act on the octamer. Both the reduction in transcription caused by octamer insertion and the extent of the inducibility by NS1 RNA are greater when two, rather than one, octamers are inserted. Images PMID:2898754

  9. Functional FcγRIIB Gene Variants Influence Intravenous Immunoglobulin (IVIG) Response in Kawasaki Disease (KD) Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Sadeep; Wiener, Howard; Olson, Aaron K.; Edberg, Jeffrey C; Bowles, Neil E.; Patel, Hitendra; Portman, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Capsule Summary In Kawasaki Disease patients, the authors show associations between high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) response and a polymorphism in the FCγRIIB. This provides basis for defining the IVIG regulatory mechanisms and pharmacogenomic approach to IVIG therapy. PMID:21601260

  10. The ribosomal gene spacer region in archaebacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achenbach-Richter, L.; Woese, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    Sequences for the spacer regions that separate the 16S and 23S ribosomal RNA genes have been determined for four more (strategically placed) archaebacteria. These confirm the general rule that methanogens and extreme halophiles have spacers that contain a single tRNAala gene, while tRNA genes are not found in the spacer region of the true extreme thermophiles. The present study also shows that the spacer regions from the sulfate reducing Archaeglobus and the extreme thermophile Thermococcus (both of which cluster phylogenetically with the methanogens and extreme halophiles) contain each a tRNAala gene. Thus, not only all methanogens and extreme halophiles show this characteristic, but all organisms on the "methanogen branch" of the archaebacterial tree appear to do so. The finding of a tRNA gene in the spacer region of the extreme thermophile Thermococcus celer is the first known phenotypic property that links this organism with its phylogenetic counterparts, the methanogens, rather than with its phenotypic counterparts, the sulfur-dependent extreme thermophiles.

  11. Total Proteome Analysis Identifies Migration Defects as a Major Pathogenetic Factor in Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Variable Region (IGHV)-unmutated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia*

    PubMed Central

    Eagle, Gina L.; Zhuang, Jianguo; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Till, Kathleen J.; Jithesh, Puthen V.; Lin, Ke; Johnson, Gillian G.; Oates, Melanie; Park, Kevin; Kitteringham, Neil R.; Pettitt, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    The mutational status of the immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region defines two clinically distinct forms of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) known as mutated (M-CLL) and unmutated (UM-CLL). To elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the adverse clinical outcome associated with UM-CLL, total proteomes from nine UM-CLL and nine M-CLL samples were analyzed by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ)-based mass spectrometry. Based on the expression of 3521 identified proteins, principal component analysis separated CLL samples into two groups corresponding to immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region mutational status. Computational analysis showed that 43 cell migration/adhesion pathways were significantly enriched by 39 differentially expressed proteins, 35 of which were expressed at significantly lower levels in UM-CLL samples. Furthermore, UM-CLL cells underexpressed proteins associated with cytoskeletal remodeling and overexpressed proteins associated with transcriptional and translational activity. Taken together, our findings indicate that UM-CLL cells are less migratory and more adhesive than M-CLL cells, resulting in their retention in lymph nodes, where they are exposed to proliferative stimuli. In keeping with this hypothesis, analysis of an extended cohort of 120 CLL patients revealed a strong and specific association between UM-CLL and lymphadenopathy. Our study illustrates the potential of total proteome analysis to elucidate pathogenetic mechanisms in cancer. PMID:25645933

  12. Human T-cell tumours containing chromosome 14 inversion or translocation with breakpoints proximal to immunoglobulin joining regions at 14q32.

    PubMed

    Mengle-Gaw, L; Willard, H F; Smith, C I; Hammarström, L; Fischer, P; Sherrington, P; Lucas, G; Thompson, P W; Baer, R; Rabbitts, T H

    1987-08-01

    T-cell tumours are frequently found to carry an inversion of chromosome 14 (inv(14)) (q11;q32) or more rarely a chromosome 14 translocation t(14;14) with the same cytogenetic breakpoints (q11;q32). We have examined the molecular junctions of an inv(14) and a translocation t(14;14) using T-cell receptor (TCR) alpha joining (J) region probes. Both of these chromosomal abnormalities have breakpoints within the TCR J alpha locus at 14q11 and both have breakpoints which are proximal (i.e. on the centromeric side) to the immunoglobulin heavy chain JH region at 14q32. The cloned segments corresponding to the junctions at 14q32 are not associated with obvious immunoglobulin-like sequences. This contrasts to the previously described inv(14) in the cell line SUP-T1 and places a potential cluster of chromosome 14 breakpoints downstream of the Ig JH locus. The possible role of the varying breakpoints in the development of these tumours is discussed.

  13. Immunoglobulin double-isotype expression by trans-mRNA in a human immunoglobulin transgenic mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, A; Nussenzweig, M C; Mizuta, T R; Leder, P; Honjo, T

    1989-01-01

    We have studied immunoglobulin double-isotype expression in a transgenic mouse (TG.SA) in which expression of the endogenous immunoglobulin heavy chain locus is almost completely excluded by a nonallelic rearranged human mu transgene. By flow-cytometric analyses, we have shown that a small, but significant, portion (about 4%) of transgenic spleen cells expresses human mu (transgene) and mouse gamma (endogenous) chains when cultured in vitro with bacterial lipopolysaccharide and interleukin 4. By using amplification of cDNA by the polymerase chain reaction, followed by cloning and sequencing of the amplified cDNA fragment, we have demonstrated expression of trans-mRNA consisting of the transgenic variable and endogenous constant (gamma 1) region sequences. Such trans-mRNA could be produced by either switch recombination or trans-splicing between the transgene and endogenous sterile gamma 1-gene transcripts. These results indicate that trans-splicing might be a possible mechanism for the immunoglobulin double-isotype expression in normal B lymphocytes that have not rearranged the second expressed constant region gene. Images PMID:2510157

  14. The flow cytometry-defined light chain cytoplasmic immunoglobulin index and an associated 12-gene expression signature are independent prognostic factors in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Papanikolaou, X; Alapat, D; Rosenthal, A; Stein, C; Epstein, J; Owens, R; Yaccoby, S; Johnson, S; Bailey, C; Heuck, C; Tian, E; Joiner, A; van Rhee, F; Khan, R; Zangari, M; Jethava, Y; Waheed, S; Davies, F; Morgan, G; Barlogie, B

    2015-08-01

    As part of Total Therapy (TT) 3b, baseline marrow aspirates were subjected to two-color flow cytometry of nuclear DNA content and cytoplasmic immunoglobulin (DNA/CIG) as well as plasma cell gene expression profiling (GEP). DNA/CIG-derived parameters, GEP and standard clinical variables were examined for their effects on overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Among DNA/CIG parameters, the percentage of the light chain-restricted (LCR) cells and their cytoplasmic immunoglobulin index (CIg) were linked to poor outcome. In the absence of GEP data, low CIg <2.8, albumin <3.5 g/dl and age ⩾65 years were significantly associated with inferior OS and PFS. When GEP information was included, low CIg survived the model along with GEP70-defined high risk and low albumin. Low CIg was linked to beta-2-microglobulin >5.5 mg/l, a percentage of LCR cells exceeding 50%, C-reactive protein ⩾8 mg/l and GEP-derived high centrosome index. Further analysis revealed an association of low CIg with 12 gene probes implicated in cell cycle regulation, differentiation and drug transportation from which a risk score was developed in TT3b that held prognostic significance also in TT3a, TT2 and HOVON trials, thus validating its general applicability. Low CIg is a powerful new prognostic variable and has identified potentially drug-able targets. PMID:25753926

  15. Fixed nuclei as alternative template of BIOMED-2 multiplex polymerase chain reaction for immunoglobulin gene clonality testing in B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yuan; Chen, Jie; Wang, Jianchao; Zheng, Ke; Liao, Dianying; Liao, Xiaomei; Liu, Weiping; Wang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of immunoglobulin (Ig) gene rearrangements with BIOMED-2 multiplex PCR has become a standard detection of clonality in mature B cell malignancies. Conventionally, this method is relatively labor-intensive and time-consuming, as it requires DNA isolation from bone marrow aspirates (BM) or peripheral blood (PB) in patients with BM or PB involvement. On the other hand, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is routinely used as genetic screening in B cell malignancies, but the surplus fixed nuclei initially prepared for FISH usually turn useless afterwards. We sought to use these surplus nuclei after FISH as a template to perform PCR-based Ig gene clonality testing. Templates of 12 patients with mature B cell malignancies, which consisted of both DNA isolated with commercial DNA isolation kit from fresh BM or PB (DNA group) and the fixed nuclei initially prepared for FISH (nuclei group) from the same individuals, were subjected to PCR with BIOMED-2 primer sets for immunoglobulin heavy chain and kappa light chain under recommended conditions. Our result, for the first time, showed a high consistency between the two groups in detecting B cell clonality, which indicates that nuclei for FISH can function as a reliable template comparable to fresh tissue-isolated DNA in PCR based Ig clonality testing. This offers a simple, rapid and more economical alternative to standard Ig testing based on regular DNA.

  16. The flow cytometry-defined light chain cytoplasmic immunoglobulin index and an associated 12-gene expression signature are independent prognostic factors in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Papanikolaou, X; Alapat, D; Rosenthal, A; Stein, C; Epstein, J; Owens, R; Yaccoby, S; Johnson, S; Bailey, C; Heuck, C; Tian, E; Joiner, A; van Rhee, F; Khan, R; Zangari, M; Jethava, Y; Waheed, S; Davies, F; Morgan, G; Barlogie, B

    2015-08-01

    As part of Total Therapy (TT) 3b, baseline marrow aspirates were subjected to two-color flow cytometry of nuclear DNA content and cytoplasmic immunoglobulin (DNA/CIG) as well as plasma cell gene expression profiling (GEP). DNA/CIG-derived parameters, GEP and standard clinical variables were examined for their effects on overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Among DNA/CIG parameters, the percentage of the light chain-restricted (LCR) cells and their cytoplasmic immunoglobulin index (CIg) were linked to poor outcome. In the absence of GEP data, low CIg <2.8, albumin <3.5 g/dl and age ⩾65 years were significantly associated with inferior OS and PFS. When GEP information was included, low CIg survived the model along with GEP70-defined high risk and low albumin. Low CIg was linked to beta-2-microglobulin >5.5 mg/l, a percentage of LCR cells exceeding 50%, C-reactive protein ⩾8 mg/l and GEP-derived high centrosome index. Further analysis revealed an association of low CIg with 12 gene probes implicated in cell cycle regulation, differentiation and drug transportation from which a risk score was developed in TT3b that held prognostic significance also in TT3a, TT2 and HOVON trials, thus validating its general applicability. Low CIg is a powerful new prognostic variable and has identified potentially drug-able targets.

  17. A human Fab fragment specific for thyroid peroxidase generated by cloning thyroid lymphocyte-derived immunoglobulin genes in a bacteriophage lambda library.

    PubMed

    Portolano, S; Seto, P; Chazenbalk, G D; Nagayama, Y; McLachlan, S M; Rapoport, B

    1991-08-30

    A human Fab fragment (SP2) which binds specifically to human thyroid peroxidase has been generated by expressing random combinations of heavy and light chain immunoglobulin genes (derived from Graves' thyroid cDNA) in a bacteriophage lambda library. In common with many serum TPO autoantibodies, the cloned Fab fragment is IgG1 kappa and has a high affinity for TPO (approximately 10(-9) M). On the basis of their nucleotide sequences, the heavy and light chain genes coding for SP2 belong to families VHI, (D), JH3 and VKI, JK2, respectively. These data provide the first characterization at a molecular level of a human thyroid peroxidase antibody associated with autoimmune thyroid disease.

  18. Gene Regions Responding to Skeletal Muscle Atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Frank W.

    1997-01-01

    Our stated specific aims for this project were: 1) Identify the region(s) of the mouse IIb myosin heavy chain (MHC) promoter necessary for in vivo expression in mouse fast-twitch muscle, and 2) Identify the region(s) of the mouse IIb MHC promoter responsive to immobilization in mouse slow-twitch muscle in vivo. We sought to address these specific aims by introducing various MHC IIb promoter/reporter gene constructs directly into the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscles of living mice. Although the method of somatic gene transfer into skeletal muscle by direct injection has been successfully used in our laboratory to study the regulation of the skeletal alpha actin gene in chicken skeletal muscle, we had many difficulties utilizing this procedure in the mouse. Because of the small size of the mouse soleus and the difficulty in obtaining consistent results, we elected not to study this muscle as first proposed. Rather, our MHC IIb promoter deletion experiments were performed in the gastrocnemius. Further, we decided to use hindlimb unloading via tail suspension to induce an upregulation of the MHC IIb gene, rather than immobilization of the hindlimbs via plaster casts. This change was made because tail suspension more closely mimics spaceflight, and this procedure in our lab results in a smaller loss of overall body mass than the mouse hindlimb immobilization procedure. This suggests that the stress level during tail suspension is less than during immobilization. This research has provided an important beginning point towards understanding the molecular regulation of the MHC lIb gene in response to unweighting of skeletal muscle Future work will focus on the regulation of MHC IIb mRNA stability in response to altered loading of skeletal muscle

  19. An inherited immunoglobulin class-switch recombination deficiency associated with a defect in the INO80 chromatin remodeling complex

    PubMed Central

    Kracker, Sven; Di Virgilio, Michela; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Cuenin, Cyrille; Forveille, Monique; Deau, Marie-Céline; McBride, Kevin M.; Majewski, Jacek; Gazumyan, Anna; Seneviratne, Suranjith; Grimbacher, Bodo; Kutukculer, Necil; Herceg, Zdenko; Cavazzana, Marina; Jabado, Nada; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Fischer, Alain; Durandy, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Background Immunoglobulin class-switch recombination defects (CSR-D) are rare primary immunodeficiencies characterized by impaired production of switched immunoglobulin isotypes and normal or elevated IgM levels. They are caused by impaired T:B cooperation or intrinsic B cell defects. However, many immunoglobulin CSR-Ds are still undefined at the molecular level. Objective This study's objective was to delineate new causes of immunoglobulin CSR-Ds and thus gain further insights into the process of immunoglobulin class-switch recombination (CSR). Methods Exome sequencing in 2 immunoglobulin CSR-D patients identified variations in the INO80 gene. Functional experiments were performed to assess the function of INO80 on immunoglobulin CSR. Results We identified recessive, nonsynonymous coding variations in the INO80 gene in 2 patients affected by defective immunoglobulin CSR. Expression of wild-type INO80 in patients' fibroblastic cells corrected their hypersensitivity to high doses of γ-irradiation. In murine CH12-F3 cells, the INO80 complex accumulates at Sα and Eμ regions of the IgH locus, and downregulation of INO80 as well as its partners Reptin and Pontin impaired CSR. In addition, Reptin and Pontin were shown to interact with activation-induced cytidine deaminase. Finally, an abnormal separation of sister chromatids was observed upon INO80 downregulation in CH12-F3 cells, pinpointing its role in cohesin activity. Conclusion INO80 deficiency appears to be associated with defective immunoglobulin CSR. We propose that the INO80 complex modulates cohesin function that may be required during immunoglobulin switch region synapsis. PMID:25312759

  20. Burkitt's lymphoma is a malignancy of mature B cells expressing somatically mutated V region genes.

    PubMed Central

    Klein, U.; Klein, G.; Ehlin-Henriksson, B.; Rajewsky, K.; Küppers, R.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The developmental stage from which stems the malignant B cell population in Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) is unclear. An approach to answering this question is provided by the sequence analysis of rear-ranged immunoglobulin (Ig) variable region (V) genes from BL for evidence of somatic mutations, together with a phenotypic characterization. As somatic hypermutation of Ig V region genes occurs in germinal center B cells, somatically mutated Ig genes are found in germinal center B cells and their descendents. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Rearranged V kappa region genes from 10 kappa-expressing sporadic and endemic BL-derived cell lines (9 IgM and 1 IgG positive) and three kappa-expressing endemic BL biopsy specimens were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. In addition, VH region gene sequences from these cell lines were determined. RESULTS: All BL cell lines and the three biopsy specimens carried somatically mutated V region genes. The average mutation frequency of rearranged V kappa genes from eight BL cell lines established from sporadic BL was 1.8%. A higher frequency (6%) was found in five endemic cases (three biopsy specimens and two BL cell lines). CONCLUSIONS: The detection of somatic mutations in the rearranged V region genes suggests that both sporadic and endemic BL represent a B-cell malignancy originating from germinal center B cells or their descendants. Interestingly, the mutation frequency detected in sporadic BL is in a range similar to that characteristic for IgM-expressing B cells in the human peripheral blood and for mu chain-expressing germinal center B cells, whereas the mutation frequency found in endemic BL is significantly higher. PMID:8529116

  1. Homologous Elements hs3a and hs3b in the 3′ Regulatory Region of the Murine Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain (Igh) Locus Are Both Dispensable for Class-switch Recombination*

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yi; Pieretti, Joyce; Ju, Zhongliang; Wei, Shiniu; Christin, John R.; Bah, Fatmata; Birshtein, Barbara K.; Eckhardt, Laurel A.

    2011-01-01

    Immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) genes are formed, tested, and modified to yield diverse, specific, and high affinity antibody responses to antigen. The processes involved must be regulated, however, to avoid unintended damage to chromosomes. The 3′ regulatory region of the Igh locus plays a major role in regulating class-switch recombination (CSR), the process by which antibody effector functions are modified during an immune response. Loss of all known enhancer-like elements in this region dramatically impairs CSR, but individual element deletions have no effect on this process. In the present study, we explored the hypothesis that an underlying functional redundancy in the homologous elements hs3a and hs3b was masking the importance of either element to CSR. Several transgenic mouse lines were generated, each carrying a bacterial artificial chromosome transgene that mimicked Igh locus structure but in which hs3a was missing and hs3b was flanked by loxP sites. Matings to Cyclization Recombination Enzyme-expressing mice established “pairs” of lines that differed only in the presence or absence of hs3b. Remarkably, CSR remained robust in the absence of both hs3a and hs3b, suggesting that the remaining two elements of the 3′ regulatory region, hs1.2 and hs4, although individually dispensable for CSR, are, together, sufficient to support CSR. PMID:21673112

  2. Homologous elements hs3a and hs3b in the 3' regulatory region of the murine immunoglobulin heavy chain (Igh) locus are both dispensable for class-switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yi; Pieretti, Joyce; Ju, Zhongliang; Wei, Shiniu; Christin, John R; Bah, Fatmata; Birshtein, Barbara K; Eckhardt, Laurel A

    2011-08-01

    Immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) genes are formed, tested, and modified to yield diverse, specific, and high affinity antibody responses to antigen. The processes involved must be regulated, however, to avoid unintended damage to chromosomes. The 3' regulatory region of the Igh locus plays a major role in regulating class-switch recombination (CSR), the process by which antibody effector functions are modified during an immune response. Loss of all known enhancer-like elements in this region dramatically impairs CSR, but individual element deletions have no effect on this process. In the present study, we explored the hypothesis that an underlying functional redundancy in the homologous elements hs3a and hs3b was masking the importance of either element to CSR. Several transgenic mouse lines were generated, each carrying a bacterial artificial chromosome transgene that mimicked Igh locus structure but in which hs3a was missing and hs3b was flanked by loxP sites. Matings to Cyclization Recombination Enzyme-expressing mice established "pairs" of lines that differed only in the presence or absence of hs3b. Remarkably, CSR remained robust in the absence of both hs3a and hs3b, suggesting that the remaining two elements of the 3' regulatory region, hs1.2 and hs4, although individually dispensable for CSR, are, together, sufficient to support CSR. PMID:21673112

  3. Homologous elements hs3a and hs3b in the 3' regulatory region of the murine immunoglobulin heavy chain (Igh) locus are both dispensable for class-switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yi; Pieretti, Joyce; Ju, Zhongliang; Wei, Shiniu; Christin, John R; Bah, Fatmata; Birshtein, Barbara K; Eckhardt, Laurel A

    2011-08-01

    Immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) genes are formed, tested, and modified to yield diverse, specific, and high affinity antibody responses to antigen. The processes involved must be regulated, however, to avoid unintended damage to chromosomes. The 3' regulatory region of the Igh locus plays a major role in regulating class-switch recombination (CSR), the process by which antibody effector functions are modified during an immune response. Loss of all known enhancer-like elements in this region dramatically impairs CSR, but individual element deletions have no effect on this process. In the present study, we explored the hypothesis that an underlying functional redundancy in the homologous elements hs3a and hs3b was masking the importance of either element to CSR. Several transgenic mouse lines were generated, each carrying a bacterial artificial chromosome transgene that mimicked Igh locus structure but in which hs3a was missing and hs3b was flanked by loxP sites. Matings to Cyclization Recombination Enzyme-expressing mice established "pairs" of lines that differed only in the presence or absence of hs3b. Remarkably, CSR remained robust in the absence of both hs3a and hs3b, suggesting that the remaining two elements of the 3' regulatory region, hs1.2 and hs4, although individually dispensable for CSR, are, together, sufficient to support CSR.

  4. A Comprehensive Analysis of the Phylogeny, Genomic Organization and Expression of Immunoglobulin Light Chain Genes in Alligator sinensis, an Endangered Reptile Species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xifeng; Cheng, Gang; Lu, Yan; Zhang, Chenglin; Wu, Xiaobing; Han, Haitang; Zhao, Yaofeng; Ren, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Crocodilians are evolutionarily distinct reptiles that are distantly related to lizards and are thought to be the closest relatives of birds. Compared with birds and mammals, few studies have investigated the Ig light chain of crocodilians. Here, employing an Alligator sinensis genomic bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library and available genome data, we characterized the genomic organization of the Alligator sinensis IgL gene loci. The Alligator sinensis has two IgL isotypes, λ and κ, the same as Anolis carolinensis. The Igλ locus contains 6 Cλ genes, each preceded by a Jλ gene, and 86 potentially functional Vλ genes upstream of (Jλ-Cλ)n. The Igκ locus contains a single Cκ gene, 6 Jκs and 62 functional Vκs. All VL genes are classified into a total of 31 families: 19 Vλ families and 12 Vκ families. Based on an analysis of the chromosomal location of the light chain genes among mammals, birds, lizards and frogs, the data further confirm that there are two IgL isotypes in the Alligator sinensis: Igλ and Igκ. By analyzing the cloned Igλ/κ cDNA, we identified a biased usage pattern of V families in the expressed Vλ and Vκ. An analysis of the junctions of the recombined VJ revealed the presence of N and P nucleotides in both expressed λ and κ sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of the V genes revealed V families shared by mammals, birds, reptiles and Xenopus, suggesting that these conserved V families are orthologous and have been retained during the evolution of IgL. Our data suggest that the Alligator sinensis IgL gene repertoire is highly diverse and complex and provide insight into immunoglobulin gene evolution in vertebrates.

  5. A Comprehensive Analysis of the Phylogeny, Genomic Organization and Expression of Immunoglobulin Light Chain Genes in Alligator sinensis, an Endangered Reptile Species

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yan; Zhang, Chenglin; Wu, Xiaobing; Han, Haitang; Zhao, Yaofeng; Ren, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Crocodilians are evolutionarily distinct reptiles that are distantly related to lizards and are thought to be the closest relatives of birds. Compared with birds and mammals, few studies have investigated the Ig light chain of crocodilians. Here, employing an Alligator sinensis genomic bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library and available genome data, we characterized the genomic organization of the Alligator sinensis IgL gene loci. The Alligator sinensis has two IgL isotypes, λ and κ, the same as Anolis carolinensis. The Igλ locus contains 6 Cλ genes, each preceded by a Jλ gene, and 86 potentially functional Vλ genes upstream of (Jλ-Cλ)n. The Igκ locus contains a single Cκ gene, 6 Jκs and 62 functional Vκs. All VL genes are classified into a total of 31 families: 19 Vλ families and 12 Vκ families. Based on an analysis of the chromosomal location of the light chain genes among mammals, birds, lizards and frogs, the data further confirm that there are two IgL isotypes in the Alligator sinensis: Igλ and Igκ. By analyzing the cloned Igλ/κ cDNA, we identified a biased usage pattern of V families in the expressed Vλ and Vκ. An analysis of the junctions of the recombined VJ revealed the presence of N and P nucleotides in both expressed λ and κ sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of the V genes revealed V families shared by mammals, birds, reptiles and Xenopus, suggesting that these conserved V families are orthologous and have been retained during the evolution of IgL. Our data suggest that the Alligator sinensis IgL gene repertoire is highly diverse and complex and provide insight into immunoglobulin gene evolution in vertebrates. PMID:26901135

  6. A Comprehensive Analysis of the Phylogeny, Genomic Organization and Expression of Immunoglobulin Light Chain Genes in Alligator sinensis, an Endangered Reptile Species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xifeng; Cheng, Gang; Lu, Yan; Zhang, Chenglin; Wu, Xiaobing; Han, Haitang; Zhao, Yaofeng; Ren, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Crocodilians are evolutionarily distinct reptiles that are distantly related to lizards and are thought to be the closest relatives of birds. Compared with birds and mammals, few studies have investigated the Ig light chain of crocodilians. Here, employing an Alligator sinensis genomic bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library and available genome data, we characterized the genomic organization of the Alligator sinensis IgL gene loci. The Alligator sinensis has two IgL isotypes, λ and κ, the same as Anolis carolinensis. The Igλ locus contains 6 Cλ genes, each preceded by a Jλ gene, and 86 potentially functional Vλ genes upstream of (Jλ-Cλ)n. The Igκ locus contains a single Cκ gene, 6 Jκs and 62 functional Vκs. All VL genes are classified into a total of 31 families: 19 Vλ families and 12 Vκ families. Based on an analysis of the chromosomal location of the light chain genes among mammals, birds, lizards and frogs, the data further confirm that there are two IgL isotypes in the Alligator sinensis: Igλ and Igκ. By analyzing the cloned Igλ/κ cDNA, we identified a biased usage pattern of V families in the expressed Vλ and Vκ. An analysis of the junctions of the recombined VJ revealed the presence of N and P nucleotides in both expressed λ and κ sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of the V genes revealed V families shared by mammals, birds, reptiles and Xenopus, suggesting that these conserved V families are orthologous and have been retained during the evolution of IgL. Our data suggest that the Alligator sinensis IgL gene repertoire is highly diverse and complex and provide insight into immunoglobulin gene evolution in vertebrates. PMID:26901135

  7. Mediation of cytotoxic functions by classes and subclasses of sheep antibody reactive with cell surface immunoglobulin idiotypic and constant region determinants.

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, F K; Elliott, E V

    1978-01-01

    Sheep antibodies, reactive with either the idiotypic or constant region antigenic determinants of the immunoglobulin light chain on guinea-pig L2C leukaemic cells, were separated into IgM and into the two subclasses of IgG, IgG1 and IgG2. Antibody of both IgG subclasses inhibited the migration of L2C cells along plastic surfaces; IgM was only weakly inhibitory. Antibody of class IgM and of subclass IgG1 mediated complement cytotoxicity against the L2C cells whereas only that of subclass IgG2 mediated K-cell cytotoxicity; the effector arms were rabbit complement and sheep peripheral leucocytes, respectively. PMID:75184

  8. Molecular characterization of T-cell immunoglobulin mucin domain-3 and Galectin-9 genes of swamp- and riverine-type water buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Duran, P L H; Padiernos, R B C; Abella, E A; Konnai, S; Mingala, C N

    2015-12-01

    Molecular characterization of T-cell immunoglobulin mucin domain-3 (TIM-3) and Galectin-9 (GAL-9) genes of swamp- and riverine-type water buffaloes was conducted to compare these genes with other species; determine the unique characteristic specific in water buffalo; and provide baseline information for the assessment of disease progression in buffalo species. TIM-3 and GAL-9 genes were amplified, purified, sequenced and characterized. The sequence result of TIM-3 in both types of water buffaloes contained 843 nucleotides encoding to 280 amino acids while GAL-9 of swamp-type and riverine-type water buffaloes contained 1023 and 972 nucleotides encoding to 340 and 323 amino acids, respectively. Meanwhile, the nucleotide and amino sequence of TIM-3 in water buffalo were 83-98% and 94-97% identical with other artiodactyl species, respectively. On the other hand, GAL-9 nucleotide and amino acid sequence in water buffalo were 85-98% and 76-96% identical with other artiodactyl species. The tyrosine-kinase phosphorylation motif and potential glycosylation sites were conserved within the tribe Bovinae. It is imperative to have further studies in the assessment of the role of these genes in disease progression in water buffalo during chronic infection. The study is the first report that describes the genetic characteristic of TIM-3 and GAL-9 genes in water buffalo. PMID:26441033

  9. Molecular characterization of T-cell immunoglobulin mucin domain-3 and Galectin-9 genes of swamp- and riverine-type water buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Duran, P L H; Padiernos, R B C; Abella, E A; Konnai, S; Mingala, C N

    2015-12-01

    Molecular characterization of T-cell immunoglobulin mucin domain-3 (TIM-3) and Galectin-9 (GAL-9) genes of swamp- and riverine-type water buffaloes was conducted to compare these genes with other species; determine the unique characteristic specific in water buffalo; and provide baseline information for the assessment of disease progression in buffalo species. TIM-3 and GAL-9 genes were amplified, purified, sequenced and characterized. The sequence result of TIM-3 in both types of water buffaloes contained 843 nucleotides encoding to 280 amino acids while GAL-9 of swamp-type and riverine-type water buffaloes contained 1023 and 972 nucleotides encoding to 340 and 323 amino acids, respectively. Meanwhile, the nucleotide and amino sequence of TIM-3 in water buffalo were 83-98% and 94-97% identical with other artiodactyl species, respectively. On the other hand, GAL-9 nucleotide and amino acid sequence in water buffalo were 85-98% and 76-96% identical with other artiodactyl species. The tyrosine-kinase phosphorylation motif and potential glycosylation sites were conserved within the tribe Bovinae. It is imperative to have further studies in the assessment of the role of these genes in disease progression in water buffalo during chronic infection. The study is the first report that describes the genetic characteristic of TIM-3 and GAL-9 genes in water buffalo.

  10. Age-related decrease in the proportion of germinal center B cells from mouse Peyer's patches is accompanied by an accumulation of somatic mutations in their immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    González-Fernández, A; Gilmore, D; Milstein, C

    1994-11-01

    Somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes and the generation of memory B cells seems to take place in germinal centers, which are chronically present in Peyer's patches. Age-associated changes in the germinal center B cell compartment of Peyer's patches and in the mutations of a kappa light chain transgene were analyzed in unimmunized mice. Somatic mutations accumulate in germinal center B cells slowly and continuously to reach an apparent plateau when the animals are around 5 months old. In contrast, the proportion of germinal center B cells reaches a maximum in very young mice (about 2 months old) and decreases progressively thereafter. These results suggest that the highly mutated B cells in older mice arise by the successive accumulation of mutations in memory cells. The data also show that the optimum time for the analysis of hypermutation of transgenes in Peyer's patches is when the mice are about 5 months old.

  11. Characterization of cDNAs of the human pregnancy-specific beta1-glycoprotein family, a new subfamily of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Q.X.; Tease, L.A.; Shupert, W.L.; Chan, W.Y. )

    1990-03-20

    Three highly homologous cDNAs encoding human pregnancy-specific {beta}1-glycoprotein (SP1) were isolated from a human placental cDNA library. These cDNAs share >90% nucleotide homology in their coding sequences, and >79% of the encoded amino acids are homologous. Proteins encoded by these cDNAs are very similar to members of the carcinoembryonic antigen family and contain repeating domains, conserved disulfided bridges, and {beta}-sheet structure typical of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily. However, the high degree of sequence homology and relatively lesser degree of glycosylation among the SP1 proteins suggest that they exist as a unique family instead of being members of the CEA family. Both soluble and potentially membrane-bound forms of SP1 proteins were present in the placenta. Northern blot analysis using specific probes confirmed the expression of multiple mRNA species in human term placenta.

  12. High Throughput Sequencing Analysis of the Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Gene from Flow-Sorted B Cell Sub-Populations Define the Dynamics of Follicular Lymphoma Clonal Evolution.

    PubMed

    Carlotti, Emanuela; Wrench, David; Rosignoli, Guglielmo; Marzec, Jacek; Sangaralingam, Ajanthah; Hazanov, Lena; Michaeli, Miri; Hallam, Simon; Chaplin, Tracy; Iqbal, Sameena; Calaminici, Maria; Young, Bryan; Mehr, Ramit; Campbell, Peter; Fitzgibbon, Jude; Gribben, John G

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of evolution of Follicular Lymphoma (FL) clones during disease progression is important for monitoring and targeting this tumor effectively. Genetic profiling of serial FL biopsies and examples of FL transmission following bone marrow transplant suggest that this disease may evolve by divergent evolution from a common ancestor cell. However where this ancestor cell resides and how it evolves is still unclear. The analysis of the pattern of somatic hypermutation of the immunoglobulin gene (Ig) is traditionally used for tracking the physiological clonal evolution of B cells within the germinal center and allows to discriminate those cells that have just entered the germinal center and display features of ancestor cells from those B cells that keep re-circulating across different lymphoid organs. Here we investigated the pattern of somatic hypermutation of the heavy chain of the immunoglobulin gene (IgH-VH) in 4 flow-sorted B cells subpopulations belonging to different stages of differentiation, from sequential lymph node biopsies of cases displaying diverse patterns of evolution, using the GS-FLX Titanium sequencing platform. We observed an unexpectedly high level of clonality, with hundreds of distinct tumor subclones in the different subpopulations from the same sample, the majority detected at a frequency <10-2. By using a lineage trees analysis we observed in all our FL and t-FL cases that the oligoclonal FL population was trapped in a narrow intermediate stage of maturation that maintains the capacity to undergo SHM, but was unable to further differentiate. The presence of such a complex architecture highlights challenges currently encountered in finding a cure for this disease. PMID:26325507

  13. A new immunoglobulin variant: gamma3 heavy chain disease protein CHI.

    PubMed Central

    Frangione, B

    1976-01-01

    Protein CHI is a defective human gamma3 heavy chain immunoglobulin with a deletion encompassing a portion of the variable and constant regions. Joining of the two pieces takes place at the beginning of an extra fragment (Fh) in the constant region where repetitive sequences are found, apparently as the result of gene duplications and/or unequal crossover between gamma genes. It is postulated that a 45 nucleotide fragment is the repetitive unit coding for the extra fragment. PMID:818639

  14. Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) gene diversity in a population naturally exposed to malaria in Porto Velho, Northern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Perce-da-Silva, D S; Silva, L A; Lima-Junior, J C; Cardoso-Oliveira, J; Ribeiro-Alves, M; Santos, F; Porto, L C M S; Oliveira-Ferreira, J; Banic, D M

    2015-03-01

    Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) are expressed mainly in natural killer cells and specifically recognize human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules. The repertoire of KIR genes and KIR-HLA pairs is known to play a key role in the susceptibilities to and the outcomes of several diseases, including malaria. The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution of KIR genes, KIR genotypes and KIR-HLA pair combinations in a population naturally exposed to malaria from Brazilian Amazon. All 16 KIR genes investigated were present in the studied population. Overall, 46 KIR genotypes were defined. The two most common genotypes in the Porto Velho communities, genotypes 1 and 2, were present at similar frequencies as in the Americas. Principal component analysis based on the frequencies of the KIR genes placed the Porto Velho population closer to the Venezuela Mestizos, USA California hispanic and Brazil Paraná Mixed in terms of KIR gene frequencies. This analysis highlights the multi-ethnic profile of the Porto Velho population. Most of the individuals were found to have at least one inhibitory KIR-HLA pair. Seventy-five KIR-HLA pair combinations were identified. The KIR-2DL2/3_HLA-C1, KIR3DL1_HLA-Bw4 and KIR2DL1_HLA-C2 pairs were the most common. There was no association between KIR genes, KIR genotypes or KIR-HLA pair combinations and malaria susceptibility in the studied population. This is the first report on the distribution of KIR and known HLA ligands in the Porto Velho population. Taken together, these results should provide baseline information that will be relevant to population evolutionary history, malaria and other diseases studies in populations of the Brazilian Amazon.

  15. Analytical Detection of Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Gene Rearrangements in Gastric Lymphoid Infiltrates by Peak Area Analysis of the Melting Curve in the LightCycler System

    PubMed Central

    Retamales, Eduardo; Rodriguez, Luis; Guzman, Leda; Aguayo, Francisco; Palma, Mariana; Backhouse, Claudia; Argandona, Jorge; Riquelme, Erick; Corvalan, Alejandro

    2007-01-01

    Because it is difficult to differentiate gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma from chronic gastritis in gastric lymphoid infiltrates, molecular detection of monoclonality through immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) gene rearrangements is commonly performed. However, heterogeneity in the performance and results obtained from IgH gene rearrangements has been reported. To improve the accuracy in the diagnosis of gastric lymphoid infiltrates, we developed an analytical approach based on one-peak area analysis of the melting curve in the LightCycler System. Using a training-testing approach, the likelihood ratio method was selected to find a discriminative function of 4.64 in the training set (10 gastric MALT lymphomas and 10 chronic gastritis cases). This discriminative function was validated in the testing set (five gastric MALT lymphomas, six abnormal lymphocytic infiltrates with subsequently demonstrated gastric MALT lymphomas, and six cases of chronic gastritis). All but one case of gastric MALT lymphoma, as well as abnormal lymphocytic infiltrates, clustered under 4.64, and all chronic gastritis cases clustered above 4.64. These results were validated by conventional electrophoreses confirming one or two sharp bands in cases of gastric MALT lymphomas and a smear of multiple bands in cases of chronic gastritis. Analytical detection of IgH gene rearrangement in gastric lymphoid infiltrates by one-peak area analysis correctly distinguishes gastric MALT lymphomas from chronic gastritis, even in cases with diagnosis of abnormal lymphocytic infiltrates. PMID:17591935

  16. A comparison of human and macaque (Macaca mulatta) immunoglobulin germline V regions and its implications for antibody engineering.

    PubMed

    Thullier, Philippe; Chahboun, Siham; Pelat, Thibaut

    2010-01-01

    Seventy-five V regions encoded by the sequenced genome of one Macaca mulatta specimen have been identified by homology, and paired with similar human counterparts. When the human V region of each pair presented no allelic polymorphism, it was directly compared with its homolog. This was the case for 37 pairs, and percents of identity ranged between 84 to 97%. When the human V region presented allelic polymorphism, this polymorphism was found to be significantly smaller (p<0.0001, p<0.0001, p = 0.03 for IGHV, IGLV, IGKV regions respectively), 4.2-fold on average, than the differences observed between human and macaque V regions. Similar results were obtained when analysing framework regions (FRs) only. These results, in agreement with others, demonstrate the existence of differences between human and macaque V regions, confirm the need for the humanization of macaque V regions intended for therapeutic use and call into question the validity of patents relying on the "undistinguishable" character of human and macaque V regions or FRs.

  17. Immunoglobulin genes and the acquisition of HIV infection in a randomized trial of recombinant adenovirus HIV vaccine.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Janardan P; Namboodiri, Aryan M; Bu, Shizhong; De Dieu Tapsoba, Jean; Sato, Alicia; Dai, James Y

    2013-06-20

    Our knowledge of the host genetic factors that contribute to the acquisition of HIV infection is limited. To identify the host genetic correlates of HIV1 acquisition, we genotyped 777 participants of a randomized trial of recombinant adenovirus HIV1 vaccine for Fcγ receptor IIa (FcγRIIa), FcγRIIIa, and several GM and KM alleles-genetic markers of immunoglobulin γ and κ chains, respectively. None of the genotypes by itself was significantly associated with the acquisition of HIV1 infection. However, particular combinations of GM and KM as well as those of GM and FcγRIIIa loci were significantly associated with the acquisition of HIV1 infection epistatically: KM1/3-GM3/17 (interaction p=0.0246; FDR=0.2952), KM1/3-GM5/21 (interaction p=0.0016; FDR=0.0960), and GM23+/-FcγRIIIa (interaction p=0.0060; FDR=0.1200). These results suggest the involvement of GM, KM, and FcγRIIIa loci in the acquisition of HIV infection. Additional studies are warranted.

  18. Association between total immunoglobulin E and antibody responses to naturally acquired Ascaris lumbricoides infection and polymorphisms of immune system-related LIG4, TNFSF13B and IRS2 genes.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, N; Mercado, D; Vergara, C; Sánchez, J; Kennedy, M W; Jiménez, S; Fernández, A M; Gutiérrez, M; Puerta, L; Caraballo, L

    2009-08-01

    The 13q33-34 region harbours a susceptibility locus to Ascaris lumbricoides, although the underlying genes are unknown. Immunoglobulin (Ig)E and IgG confer protective immunity and here we sought to investigate in an endemic population whether LIG4, TNFSF13B and IRS2 genes influence IgE and IgG levels against Ascaris and the ABA-1 allergen as a putative resistance marker. Mite-allergic asthmatic patients were analysed for potential relationships between Ascaris predisposition and allergy. One thousand and sixty-four subjects from Cartagena, Colombia, were included. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped using TaqMan assays. Antibody levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Linear and logistic regressions were used to model effects of genotypes on antibody levels. The GG genotype of LIG4 (rs1805388) was associated with higher IgE levels to Ascaris compared with other genotypes. TNFSF13B (rs10508198) was associated positively with IgG levels against Ascaris extract and IgE levels against ABA-1. In asthmatics, IRS2 (rs2289046) was associated with high total IgE levels. Associations held up after correction by population stratification using a set of 52 ancestry markers, age, sex and disease status. There was no association with asthma or mite sensitization. In a tropical population, LIG4 and TNFSF13B polymorphisms are associated with specific IgE and IgG to Ascaris, supporting previous linkage studies implicating the 13q33 region. Our results suggest that genes protecting against parasite infections can be different to those predisposing to asthma and atopy.

  19. Association between total immunoglobulin E and antibody responses to naturally acquired Ascaris lumbricoides infection and polymorphisms of immune system-related LIG4, TNFSF13B and IRS2 genes

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, N; Mercado, D; Vergara, C; Sánchez, J; Kennedy, M W; Jiménez, S; Fernández, A M; Gutiérrez, M; Puerta, L; Caraballo, L

    2009-01-01

    The 13q33–34 region harbours a susceptibility locus to Ascaris lumbricoides, although the underlying genes are unknown. Immunoglobulin (Ig)E and IgG confer protective immunity and here we sought to investigate in an endemic population whether LIG4, TNFSF13B and IRS2 genes influence IgE and IgG levels against Ascaris and the ABA-1 allergen as a putative resistance marker. Mite-allergic asthmatic patients were analysed for potential relationships between Ascaris predisposition and allergy. One thousand and sixty-four subjects from Cartagena, Colombia, were included. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped using TaqMan assays. Antibody levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Linear and logistic regressions were used to model effects of genotypes on antibody levels. The GG genotype of LIG4 (rs1805388) was associated with higher IgE levels to Ascaris compared with other genotypes. TNFSF13B (rs10508198) was associated positively with IgG levels against Ascaris extract and IgE levels against ABA-1. In asthmatics, IRS2 (rs2289046) was associated with high total IgE levels. Associations held up after correction by population stratification using a set of 52 ancestry markers, age, sex and disease status. There was no association with asthma or mite sensitization. In a tropical population, LIG4 and TNFSF13B polymorphisms are associated with specific IgE and IgG to Ascaris, supporting previous linkage studies implicating the 13q33 region. Our results suggest that genes protecting against parasite infections can be different to those predisposing to asthma and atopy. PMID:19604268

  20. Dynamic changes in binding of immunoglobulin heavy chain 3' regulatory region to protein factors during class switching.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sanjukta; Ju, Zhongliang; Hassan, Rabih; Volpi, Sabrina A; Emelyanov, Alexander V; Birshtein, Barbara K

    2011-08-19

    The 3' regulatory region (3' RR) of the Igh locus works at long distances on variable region (V(H)) and switch region (I) region promoters to initiate germ line (non-coding) transcription (GT) and promote class switch recombination (CSR). The 3' RR contains multiple elements, including enhancers (hs3a, hs1.2, hs3b, and hs4) and a proposed insulator region containing CTCF (CCCTC-binding factor) binding sites, i.e. hs5/6/7 and the downstream region ("38"). Notably, deletion of each individual enhancer (hs3a-hs4) has no significant phenotypic consequence, suggesting that the 3' RR has considerable structural flexibility in its function. To better understand how the 3' RR functions, we identified transcription factor binding sites and used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays to monitor their occupancy in splenic B cells that initiate GT and undergo CSR (LPS±IL4), are deficient in GT and CSR (p50(-/-)), or do not undergo CSR despite efficient GT (anti-IgM+IL4). Like 3' RR enhancers, hs5-7 and the 38 region were observed to contain multiple Pax5 binding sites (in addition to multiple CTCF sites). We found that the Pax5 binding profile to the 3' RR dynamically changed during CSR independent of the specific isotype to which switching was induced, and binding focused on hs1.2, hs4, and hs7. CTCF-associated and CTCF-independent cohesin interactions were also identified. Our observations are consistent with a scaffold model in which a platform of active protein complexes capable of facilitating GT and CSR can be formed by varying constellations of 3' RR elements.

  1. A single predominantly expressed polymorphic immunoglobulin VH gene family, related to mammalian group, I, clan, II, is identified in cattle.

    PubMed

    Saini, S S; Hein, W R; Kaushik, A

    1997-06-01

    In order to understand the generation of antibody diversity in cattle, seven cDNAs, from heterohybridomas secreting bovine IgM and IgG1 antibodies, were cloned and structurally analyzed for rearranged bovine VDJ genes. All of the seven bovine VH genes, together with four available bovine VH gene sequences, shared a high nucleotide sequence homology (84.2-93.5%). Based upon the criteria of nucleic acid homology > or =80%, all of the bovine VH gene sequences isolated from the expressed antibody repertoire constitute a single VH gene family, which we have designated as bovine VH1 (Bov VH1). An analysis of 44 bovine IgM-secreting mouse x cattle heterohybridomas, originating from polyclonally-activated PBLs from bovine leukemia virus-infected cattle, revealed that all of these expressed Bov VH1 (100%) based upon DNA sequencing and Northern dot blot. The bovine VH genes showed highest DNA sequence similarity, ranging between 81.5 and 87.6%, with a single sheep VH gene family (related to human VH4) and are, thus, closest to the VH genes from another ruminant species. The Bov VH1 gene family is most homologous to the murine VH Q-52 (71.8-78%) and human VH4 (67.4-69.8%) gene families, which belong to mammalian group, I, clan, II, VH genes. The CDR3 length of rearranged bovine VDJ genes is characteristically long (15-23 amino acids). The bovine JH gene segments were most homologous to human JH4 (82.1-87.2%) and JH5 (84.6-89.7%) genes, suggesting the existence of at least two JH gene segments. An analysis of CDRs provides evidence that somatic hypermutations contribute significantly to the generation of antibody diversity in cattle. Southern blot analysis of BamH I, EcoR I and Hind III digested genomic DNA from four cattle breeds (Holstein, Jersey, Hereford and Charolais) revealed three RFLP patterns; the genomic complexity of Bov VH1 ranged between 13 and 15 genes. These observations provide evidence for polymorphism at the bovine Ig-VH locus, similar to that seen in mice

  2. Clonality Analysis of Immunoglobulin Gene Rearrangement by Next-Generation Sequencing in Endemic Burkitt Lymphoma Suggests Antigen Drive Activation of BCR as Opposed to Sporadic Burkitt Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Amato, Teresa; Abate, Francesco; Piccaluga, Pierpaolo; Iacono, Michele; Fallerini, Chiara; Renieri, Alessandra; De Falco, Giulia; Ambrosio, Maria Raffaella; Mourmouras, Vaselious; Ogwang, Martin; Calbi, Valeria; Rabadan, Roul; Hummel, Michael; Pileri, Stefano; Bellan, Cristiana

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Recent studies using next-generation sequencing (NGS) analysis disclosed the importance of the intrinsic activation of the B-cell receptor (BCR) pathway in the pathogenesis of sporadic Burkitt lymphoma (sBL) due to mutations of TCF3/ID3 genes. Since no definitive data are available on the genetic landscape of endemic Burkitt (eBL), we first assessed the mutation frequency of TCF3/ID3 in eBL compared with sBL and subsequently the somatic hypermutation status of the BCR to answer whether an extrinsic activation of BCR signaling could also be demonstrated in Burkitt lymphoma. Methods: We assessed the mutations of TCF3/ID3 by RNAseq and the BCR status by NGS analysis of the immunoglobulin genes (IGs). Results: We detected mutations of TCF3/ID3 in about 30% of the eBL cases. This rate is significantly lower than that detected in sBL (64%). The NGS analysis of IGs revealed intraclonal diversity, suggesting an active targeted somatic hypermutation process in eBL compared with sBL. Conclusions: These findings support the view that the antigenic pressure plays a key role in the pathogenetic pathways of eBL, which may be partially distinct from those driving sBL development. PMID:26712879

  3. Influence of the hinge region on complement activation, C1q binding, and segmental flexibility in chimeric human immunoglobulins.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, L K; Shopes, R J; Oi, V T; Morrison, S L

    1990-01-01

    We have characterized a series of genetically engineered chimeric human IgG3 and IgG4 anti-dansyl (DNS) antibodies with identical antibody-combining sites but different hinge region amino acid compositions to determine how the hinge region influences Fab fragment segmental flexibility, C1q binding, and complement activation. Our data support the correlation between "upper hinge" length and Fab segmental flexibility; moreover, we confirm that a hinge region is essential for C1q binding and complement activation. However, the hinge length by itself is not sufficient for complement activity in IgG molecules. We have demonstrated that the IgG4 hinge, which imparts restricted segmental flexibility, reduces the ability of IgG3 molecules to activate complement. We also find that the IgG3 hinge region, which imparts greater segmental motion, is not sufficient to create complement activation activity in IgG4 anti-DNS antibodies. Finally, we conclude that (i) segmental motion is correlated with "upper hinge" length, (ii) hinge length and segmental flexibility is not enough to alter complement binding and activation, and (iii) segmental flexibility does not correlate with proficiency to activate the complement cascade. PMID:2296577

  4. Compensatory Aspects of Allele Diversity at Immunoglobulin Loci: Gene Correlations in Rabbit Populations Devoid of Light Chain Diversity (Oryctolagus Cuniculus L.; Kerguelen Islands)

    PubMed Central

    van-der-Loo, W.; Bousses, P.; Arthur, C. P.; Chapuis, J. L.

    1996-01-01

    Is there a selective advantage of increased diversity at one immunoglobulin locus when diversity at another locus is low? A previous paper demonstrated excess heterozygosity at the rabbit light chain b locus when heterozygosity was low at the heavy chain constant region e locus. Here we consider the reverse situation by analyzing allele distributions at heavy chain loci in populations fixed for the light chain b locus. We analyzed the a locus that encodes the predominantly expressed heavy chain variable region, and the d and e loci that control different parts of the Ig gamma class constant region. While there was excess heterozygosity, genetic differentiation between localities was extensive and was most pronounced for females. This was in marked contrast with observations in areas where b-locus diversity was important and confirms a negative correlation between e- and b-locus heterozygosity. Trigenic disequilibria corresponded to a significant negative correlation between e- and a-locus heterozygosity due mainly to strong variation among localities within the context of pronounced (digenic) linkage disequilibria. Although substantial, the average increase in a/e-locus single heterozygosity implemented by higher order disequilibria within localities was not significant. PMID:8913759

  5. Phage-displayed T-cell epitope grafted into immunoglobulin heavy-chain complementarity-determining regions: an effective vaccine design tested in murine cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Manoutcharian, K; Terrazas, L I; Gevorkian, G; Acero, G; Petrossian, P; Rodriguez, M; Govezensky, T

    1999-09-01

    A new type of immunogenic molecule was engineered by replacing all three complementarity-determining-region (CDR) loops of the human immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy-chain variable (V(H)) domain with the Taenia crassiceps epitope PT1 (PPPVDYLYQT) and by displaying this construct on the surfaces of M13 bacteriophage. When BALB/c mice were immunized with such phage particles (PIgphage), a strong protection against challenge infection in very susceptible female hosts was obtained. When specifically stimulated, the in vivo-primed CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells isolated from mice immunized with PT1, both as a free peptide and as the PIgphage construct, proliferated in vitro, indicating efficient epitope presentation by both major histocompatibility complex class II and class I molecules in the specifically antigen-pulsed macrophages used as antigen-presenting cells. These data demonstrate the immunogenic potential of recombinant phage particles displaying CDR epitope-grafted Ig V(H) domains and establish an alternative approach to the design of an effective subunit vaccine for prevention of cysticercosis. The key advantage of this type of immunogen is that no adjuvant is required for its application. The proposed strategy for immunogen construction is potentially suitable for use in any host-pathogen interaction.

  6. Phage-Displayed T-Cell Epitope Grafted into Immunoglobulin Heavy-Chain Complementarity-Determining Regions: an Effective Vaccine Design Tested in Murine Cysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Manoutcharian, Karen; Terrazas, Luis Ignacio; Gevorkian, Goar; Acero, Gonzalo; Petrossian, Pavel; Rodriguez, Miriam; Govezensky, Tzipe

    1999-01-01

    A new type of immunogenic molecule was engineered by replacing all three complementarity-determining-region (CDR) loops of the human immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy-chain variable (VH) domain with the Taenia crassiceps epitope PT1 (PPPVDYLYQT) and by displaying this construct on the surfaces of M13 bacteriophage. When BALB/c mice were immunized with such phage particles (PIgphage), a strong protection against challenge infection in very susceptible female hosts was obtained. When specifically stimulated, the in vivo-primed CD4+ and CD8+ T cells isolated from mice immunized with PT1, both as a free peptide and as the PIgphage construct, proliferated in vitro, indicating efficient epitope presentation by both major histocompatibility complex class II and class I molecules in the specifically antigen-pulsed macrophages used as antigen-presenting cells. These data demonstrate the immunogenic potential of recombinant phage particles displaying CDR epitope-grafted Ig VH domains and establish an alternative approach to the design of an effective subunit vaccine for prevention of cysticercosis. The key advantage of this type of immunogen is that no adjuvant is required for its application. The proposed strategy for immunogen construction is potentially suitable for use in any host-pathogen interaction. PMID:10456929

  7. Immunoglobulin E in histoplasmosis.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, R A; Arnold, D R

    1980-01-01

    Immunoglobulin M, G, A, and E serum levels were quantitated in 20 patients with active histoplasmosis (group I), 24 healthy subjects who were skin test positive to histoplasmin (group II), and 47 healthy persons who were skin test negative to histoplasmin (group III). The results established that patients with this disease have increased immunoglobulin G (P less than 0.05), immunoglobulin A (P less than 0.001), and immunoglobulin E (P less than 0.01) serum levels when compared with the 71 healthy subjects in groups II and III. PMID:7399706

  8. Immunoglobulin genomics in the prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster).

    PubMed

    Qin, Tong; Zhao, Huijing; Zhu, Huabin; Wang, Dong; Du, Weihua; Hao, Haisheng

    2015-08-01

    In science, the prairie voles are ideal models for studying the regulatory mechanisms of social behavior in humans. The utility of the prairie vole as a biology model can be further enhanced by characterization of the genes encoding components of the immune system. Here, we report the genomic organization of the prairie vole immunoglobulin heavy and light chain genes. The prairie vole IgH locus on chromosome 1 spans over 1600kb, and consists of at least 79 VH segments (28 potentially functional genes, 2 ORFs and 49 pseudogenes), 7 DH segments, 4 JH segments, four constant region genes (μ, γ, ɛ, and α), and two transmembrane regions of δ gene. The Igκ locus, found on three scaffolds (JH996430, JH996605 and JH996566), contains a totle of 124 Vκ segments (47 potentially functional genes, 1 ORF and 76 pseudogenes), 5 Jκ segments and a single Cκ gene. Two different transcriptional orientations were determined for these Vκ gene segments. In contrast, the Igλ locus on scaffold JH996473 and JH996489 includes 21 Vλ gene segments (14 potentially functional genes, 1 ORF and 6 pseudogenes), all with the same transcriptional polarity as the downstream Jλ-Cλ cluster. Phylogenetic analysis and sequence alignments suggested the prairie vole's large germline VH, Vκ and Vλ gene segments appear to form limited gene families. Therefore, this species may generate antibody diversity via a gene conversion-like mechanism associated with its pseudogene reserves.

  9. Immunoglobulin genomics in the prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster).

    PubMed

    Qin, Tong; Zhao, Huijing; Zhu, Huabin; Wang, Dong; Du, Weihua; Hao, Haisheng

    2015-08-01

    In science, the prairie voles are ideal models for studying the regulatory mechanisms of social behavior in humans. The utility of the prairie vole as a biology model can be further enhanced by characterization of the genes encoding components of the immune system. Here, we report the genomic organization of the prairie vole immunoglobulin heavy and light chain genes. The prairie vole IgH locus on chromosome 1 spans over 1600kb, and consists of at least 79 VH segments (28 potentially functional genes, 2 ORFs and 49 pseudogenes), 7 DH segments, 4 JH segments, four constant region genes (μ, γ, ɛ, and α), and two transmembrane regions of δ gene. The Igκ locus, found on three scaffolds (JH996430, JH996605 and JH996566), contains a totle of 124 Vκ segments (47 potentially functional genes, 1 ORF and 76 pseudogenes), 5 Jκ segments and a single Cκ gene. Two different transcriptional orientations were determined for these Vκ gene segments. In contrast, the Igλ locus on scaffold JH996473 and JH996489 includes 21 Vλ gene segments (14 potentially functional genes, 1 ORF and 6 pseudogenes), all with the same transcriptional polarity as the downstream Jλ-Cλ cluster. Phylogenetic analysis and sequence alignments suggested the prairie vole's large germline VH, Vκ and Vλ gene segments appear to form limited gene families. Therefore, this species may generate antibody diversity via a gene conversion-like mechanism associated with its pseudogene reserves. PMID:26073565

  10. Dissecting the Structure-Function Relationship of a Fungicidal Peptide Derived from the Constant Region of Human Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Ciociola, Tecla; Pertinhez, Thelma A.; Giovati, Laura; Sperindè, Martina; Magliani, Walter; Ferrari, Elena; Gatti, Rita; D'Adda, Tiziana; Spisni, Alberto; Polonelli, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic peptides encompassing sequences related to the complementarity-determining regions of antibodies or derived from their constant region (Fc peptides) were proven to exert differential antimicrobial, antiviral, antitumor, and/or immunomodulatory activities in vitro and/or in vivo, regardless of the specificity and isotype of the parental antibody. Alanine substitution derivatives of these peptides exhibited unaltered, increased, or decreased candidacidal activities in vitro. The bioactive IgG-derived Fc N10K peptide (NQVSLTCLVK) spontaneously self-assembles, a feature previously recognized as relevant for the therapeutic activity of another antibody-derived peptide. We evaluated the contribution of each residue to the peptide self-assembling capability by circular-dichroism spectroscopy. The interaction of the N10K peptide and its derivatives with Candida albicans cells was studied by confocal, transmission, and scanning electron microscopy. The apoptosis and autophagy induction profiles in yeast cells treated with the peptides were evaluated by flow cytometry, and the therapeutic efficacy against candidal infection was studied in a Galleria mellonella model. Overall, the results indicate a critical role for some residues in the self-assembly process and a correlation of that capability with the candidacidal activities of the peptides in vitro and their therapeutic effects in vivo. PMID:26856836

  11. Intravenous immunoglobulin in patients with anti-GAD antibody-associated neurological diseases and patients with inflammatory myopathies: effects on clinicopathological features and immunoregulatory genes.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2005-12-01

    Controlled trials with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) were conducted in patients with Stiff-Person Syndrome (SPS) and dermatomyositis (DM), two humorally mediated neurological disorders, and in inclusion body myositis (IBM), a T-cell-mediated inflammatory myopathy. The clinical efficacy was compared with alterations on tissue expression of complement, cytokines, chemokines, adhesion molecules, and immunoregulatory genes. The following patients were randomized in three separate trials to receive IVIg or placebo for 3 mo: (a) 16 patients with anti-GAD antibody-positive SPS; (b) 15 patients with DM resistant to therapies; and (c) 19 patients with IBM. After a washout, they crossed to the alternative therapy for another 3 mo. Efficacy was based on the difference in the respective disease scores from baseline to the second and third month of the infusions. In patients with SPS and DM, the scores changed positively and significantly from months 1 through 3, but returned to baseline when the patients crossed to placebo. In contrast, the scores in the placebo-randomized group remained constant or worsened from months 1 to 3, but improved significantly after crossing to IVIg. The muscle scores of patients with IBM did not significantly change between IVIg or placebo. In SPS, the anti-GAD65 antibody titers declined after IVIg but not after placebo. In DM, there was reduction of complement consumption, interception of membranolytic attack complex formation, downregulation of inflammation, fibrosis, cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules, and alterations in thousands of immunoregulatory genes. We conclude that IVIg is a safe and effective therapy for patients with SPS and DM unresponsive to other agents. In tissues, IVIg restores tissue cytoarchitecture by suppressing the inflammatory mediators at the protein, mRNA, and gene level.

  12. Evaluation of sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility of an optimized method for detecting clonal rearrangements of immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor genes in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections.

    PubMed

    Slack, D N; McCarthy, K P; Wiedemann, L M; Sloane, J P

    1993-12-01

    Following our recent reports of detecting clonal immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor gene rearrangements by the polymerase chain reaction, we have improved and simplified the technique for use in diagnostic histopathology laboratories and determined, on coded samples, the sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility of the modified methodology in distinguishing malignant lymphoma from reactive lymphoid hyperplasia and nonlymphoid tumors. Using only three primer pairs for the immunoglobulin heavy chain and T-cell receptor beta and gamma chain genes on well-characterized lesions of widely varying morphology and immunophenotype, clonal rearrangements were detected in 65% of B-cell lymphomas, and 77-82% of T-cell tumors. Specificity and observer consistency ranged from 93-97%. The method requires very careful control, particularly to avoid misinterpretation of results because of contamination and nonspecific amplification, but in its present form is relatively simple and inexpensive, and gives results on single paraffin-embedded sections within 24 h. PMID:8118599

  13. Diffusion of Immunoglobulin G in Shed Vaginal Epithelial Cells and in Cell-Free Regions of Human Cervicovaginal Mucus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying-Ying; Schroeder, Holly A.; Nunn, Kenetta L.; Woods, Karen; Anderson, Deborah J.; Cone, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Human cervicovaginal mucus (CVM) is a viscoelastic gel containing a complex mixture of mucins, shed epithelial cells, microbes and macromolecules, such as antibodies, that together serve as the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Here, to investigate the affinity between IgG and different mucus constituents, we used Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) to measure the diffusion of IgG in fresh, minimally modified CVM. We found that CVM exhibits substantial spatial variations that necessitate careful selection of the regions in which to perform FRAP. In portions of CVM devoid of cells, FRAP measurements using different IgG antibodies and labeling methods consistently demonstrate that both exogenous and endogenous IgG undergo rapid diffusion, almost as fast as in saline, in good agreement with the rapid diffusion of IgG in mid-cycle endocervical mucus that is largely devoid of cells. This rapid diffusion indicates the interactions between secreted mucins and IgG must be very weak and transient. IgG also accumulated in cellular debris and shed epithelial cells that had become permeable to IgG, which may allow shed epithelial cells to serve as reservoirs of secreted IgG. Interestingly, in contrast to cell-free regions of CVM, the diffusion of cell-associated IgG was markedly slowed, suggesting greater affinity between IgG and cellular constituents. Our findings contribute to an improved understanding of the role of IgG in mucosal protection against infectious diseases, and may also provide a framework for using FRAP to study molecular interactions in mucus and other complex biological environments. PMID:27362256

  14. High-dose intravenous immunoglobulin therapy for rapidly progressive interstitial pneumonitis accompanied by anti-melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 antibody-positive amyopathic dermatomyositis

    PubMed Central

    Hamada-Ode, Kazu; Taniguchi, Yoshinori; Kimata, Takahito; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Shimamura, Yoshiko; Kuwana, Masataka; Fujimoto, Shimpei; Terada, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Anti-melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) antibody-positive amyopathic dermatomyositis (ADM) associated with rapidly progressive interstitial pneumonitis (RPIP) frequently has a poor prognosis and optimal treatment is not well defined. Here, we report a 62-year-old Japanese man with anti-MDA5 antibody-positive ADM associated with RPIP presented with progressive shortness of breath, Heliotrope rash, Gottron’s papules, arthralgia, and fatigue but no sign of muscle weakness. Laboratory investigation revealed serum levels of the following biomarkers: ferritin, 1393 ng/mL; Krebs von der Lungen-6, 1880 U/mL; and creatine kinase, 85 U/L. Computed tomography (CT) images showed diffuse ground-glass opacity in both lung fields. Because anti-MDA5 was positive, we made a diagnosis of ADM associated with RPIP and initiated treatment. Following five courses of combination therapy with prednisolone, cyclosporine A, and intravenous cyclophosphamide (IVCY), IVCY treatment was switched to high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin therapy (IVIg) because of the reactivation of interstitial pneumonia with an increased serum ferritin level. Additional treatment with IVIg improved RPIP, with normalization of anti-ADM antibody levels. Therefore, IVIg mayt be a new candidate treatment for anti-MDA5 antibody-positive ADM associated with RPIP. PMID:27708934

  15. Intravenous immunoglobulin reduces tau pathology and preserves neuroplastic gene expression in the 3xTg mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Counts, Scott E; Perez, Sylvia E; He, Bin; Mufson, Elliott J

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent negative results of the Gammaglobulin Alzheimer's Partnership (GAP) trial, the good tolerability to intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and its potential benefit for patient subpopulations have highlighted the importance of understanding IVIG's mechanism of action. IVIG contains antibodies to amyloid suggesting an amyloid clearance mechanism. However, the suboptimal results of the amyloid immunotherapy trials suggest an additional mechanism. Therefore, we tested whether IVIG alters the expression of tau neurofibrillary tangle (NFT)-like deposits within hippocampal CA1 neurons of the 3xTg mouse model of AD. Three-month-old mice were treated intravenously with IVIG (10%, 400 mg/kg) or placebo (10% BSA/saline) every two weeks for either three or six months. At sacrifice, plasma was isolated for gene expression profiling and brains were processed for immunohistochemistry using the AT-180 antibody, which recognizes hyperphosphorylated tau in NFTs. Stereologic analysis of CA1 neurons following three months of treatment revealed no difference in AT-180+ neuron number but a significant 15-20% decrease in AT-180 intraneuronal optical density with IVIG compared to placebo. By contrast, the number of AT-180+ CA1 neurons was reduced by 25-30% following six months of IVIG treatment compared to placebo. Expression profiling studies showed that IVIG treatment resulted in a significant 40-50% increase in plasma levels of genes regulating neuronal cytoskeletal plasticity function and calcium-mediated signaling compared to placebo. Moreover, several transcripts encoding protein phosphatase subunits were 40-50% higher in IVIG-treated mice. Hence, IVIG reduces hippocampal NFT pathology in the 3xTg mouse through a mechanism that may involve preservation of neuronal plasticity and tau phosphorylation homeostasis. PMID:25156574

  16. VH Replacement Footprint Analyzer-I, a Java-Based Computer Program for Analyses of Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Genes and Potential VH Replacement Products in Human and Mouse.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lin; Lange, Miles D; Zhang, Zhixin

    2014-01-01

    VH replacement occurs through RAG-mediated secondary recombination between a rearranged VH gene and an upstream unrearranged VH gene. Due to the location of the cryptic recombination signal sequence (cRSS, TACTGTG) at the 3' end of VH gene coding region, a short stretch of nucleotides from the previous rearranged VH gene can be retained in the newly formed VH-DH junction as a "footprint" of VH replacement. Such footprints can be used as markers to identify Ig heavy chain (IgH) genes potentially generated through VH replacement. To explore the contribution of VH replacement products to the antibody repertoire, we developed a Java-based computer program, VH replacement footprint analyzer-I (VHRFA-I), to analyze published or newly obtained IgH genes from human or mouse. The VHRFA-1 program has multiple functional modules: it first uses service provided by the IMGT/V-QUEST program to assign potential VH, DH, and JH germline genes; then, it searches for VH replacement footprint motifs within the VH-DH junction (N1) regions of IgH gene sequences to identify potential VH replacement products; it can also analyze the frequencies of VH replacement products in correlation with publications, keywords, or VH, DH, and JH gene usages, and mutation status; it can further analyze the amino acid usages encoded by the identified VH replacement footprints. In summary, this program provides a useful computation tool for exploring the biological significance of VH replacement products in human and mouse.

  17. Autoreactivity of primary human immunoglobulins ancestral to hypermutated human antibodies that neutralize HCMV.

    PubMed

    McLean, Gary R; Cho, Chin-wen; Schrader, John W

    2006-05-01

    The human antibody response to the AD-2S1 epitope of glycoprotein B (gB) of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is dominated by a family of closely related somatically mutated antibodies. These antibodies neutralize viral infectivity and the genes encoding them are derived from two commonly used germ-line variable (V) region genes, IGHV3-30 and IGKV3-11. Recombination of these V genes with the appropriate junctional diversity generates genes that encode primary immunoglobulins that bind to AD-2S1. To further understand the initial primary immunoglobulin response to AD-2S1 we synthesized the germ-line-based ancestor of one such family of antibodies and showed that it bound gB at the AD-2S1 epitope. Here we show that the germ-line ancestor of a second family of antibodies likewise binds to gB. We further show that one of the ancestral primary immunoglobulins, but not the other, also recognized autoantigens. In contrast, the hypermutated derivatives did not demonstrate autoreactivity and minor structural changes in the primary immunoglobulin were sufficient to generate or abolish autoreactivity or to change specificity. Thus, our demonstration that the ancestor of a highly mutated, non-autoreactive antiviral IgG antibody binds nuclear and cell-surface autoantigens indicates for the first time that self-reactivity is not necessarily a barrier to development into a follicular B lymphocyte that undergoes antigen-initiated affinity maturation.

  18. Immunoglobulin variable gene segment V{sub H}81X of the mouse is embedded in L1 transposon sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Bachl, J.; Defranoux, N.; Wabl, M.

    1995-01-11

    L1 elements are widely distributed over the mammalian genome, but the question of their biological significance is still open. The mouse heavy (H) chain variable region V{sub H}81X is overrepresented in the pre-B-cell repertoire; the significance of this is controversial, and V{sub H}81X has been the subject of much research. Here we present data showing that the mouse H chain variable region X{sub H}81X is embedded in the remnants of a LINE-1 element.

  19. Characterization of the immunoglobulin A protease of Ureaplasma urealyticum.

    PubMed Central

    Spooner, R K; Russell, W C; Thirkell, D

    1992-01-01

    Ureaplasma urealyticum strains of all serotypes express a specific human immunoglobulin A1 protease that cleaves immunoglobulin A1 to produce intact Fab and Fc fragments. The use of a variety of inhibitors suggests that the enzyme is a serine protease. N-terminal sequencing of the Fc digestion product showed that the enzyme cleaves between the proline and threonine residues 235 and 236 in the hinge region of the heavy chain of immunoglobulin A1. Images PMID:1587621

  20. Assembly and analysis of cosmid contigs in the CEA-gene family region of human chromosome 19.

    PubMed Central

    Tynan, K; Olsen, A; Trask, B; de Jong, P; Thompson, J; Zimmermann, W; Carrano, A; Mohrenweiser, H

    1992-01-01

    The carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-like genes are members of a large gene family which is part of the immunoglobulin superfamily. The CEA family is divided into two major subgroups, the CEA-subgroup and the pregnancy-specific glycoprotein (PSG)-subgroup. In the course of an effort to develop a set of overlapping cosmids spanning human chromosome 19, we identified 245 cosmids in a human chromosome 19 cosmid library (6-7X redundant) by hybridization with an IgC-like domain fragment of the CEA gene. A fluorescence-based restriction enzyme digest fingerprinting strategy was used to assemble 212 probe-positive cosmids, along with 115 additional cosmids from a collection of approximately 8,000 randomly selected cosmids, into five contigs. Two of the contigs contain CEA-subgroup genes while the remaining three contigs contain PSG-subgroup genes. These five contigs range in size from 100 kb to over 300 kb and span an estimated 1 Mb. The CEA-like gene family was determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization to map in the q13.1-q13.2 region of human chromosome 19. Analysis of the two CEA-subgroup contigs provided verification of the contig assembly strategy and insight into the organization of 9 CEA-subgroup genes. PMID:1579453

  1. Brain regions and genes affecting postural control.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, R; Strazielle, C

    2007-01-01

    Postural control is integrated in all facets of motor commands. The role of cortico-subcortical pathways underlying postural control, including cerebellum and its afferents (climbing, mossy, and noradrenergic fibers), basal ganglia, motor thalamus, and parieto-frontal neocortex has been identified in animal models, notably through the brain lesion technique in rats and in mice with spontaneous and induced mutations. These studies are complemented by analyses of the factors underlying postural deficiencies in patients with cerebellar atrophy. With the gene deletion technique in mice, specific genes expressed in cerebellum encoding glutamate receptors (Grid2 and Grm1) and other molecules (Prkcc, Cntn6, Klf9, Syt4, and En2) have also been shown to affect postural control. In addition, transgenic mouse models of the synucleinopathies and of Huntington's disease cause deficiencies of motor coordination resembling those of patients with basal ganglia damage.

  2. The product of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus immediate early gene K4.2 regulates immunoglobulin secretion and calcium homeostasis by interacting with and inhibiting pERP1.

    PubMed

    Wong, Lai-Yee; Brulois, Kevin; Toth, Zsolt; Inn, Kyung-Soo; Lee, Sun-Hwa; O'Brien, Kathryn; Lee, Hyera; Gao, Shou-Jiang; Cesarman, Ethel; Ensser, Armin; Jung, Jae U

    2013-11-01

    Chaperones are proteins that assist the noncovalent folding and assembly of macromolecular polypeptide chains, ultimately preventing the formation of nonfunctional or potentially toxic protein aggregates. Plasma cell-induced-endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident protein 1 (pERP1) is a cellular chaperone that is preferentially expressed in marginal-zone B cells and is highly upregulated during plasma cell differentiation. While initially identified as a dedicated factor for the assembly of secreted IgM, pERP1 has since been implicated in suppressing calcium mobilization, and its expression is misregulated in multiple tumors. A number of herpesvirus immediate early gene products play important roles in the regulation of viral gene expression and/or evasion of host immune responses. Here, we report that the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) immediate early viral gene K4.2 encodes an endoplasmic reticulum-localized protein that interacts with and inhibits pERP1. Consequently, K4.2 expression interfered with immunoglobulin secretion by delaying the kinetics of immunoglobulin assembly and also led to increased responsiveness of B-cell receptor signal transduction by enhancing phosphotyrosine signals and intracellular calcium fluxes. Furthermore, K4.2 expression also appeared to contribute to maximal lytic replication by enhancing viral glycoprotein expression levels and ultimately promoting infectious-virus production. Finally, immunohistochemistry analysis showed that pERP1 expression was readily detected in KSHV-positive cells from multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD) and Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) lesions, suggesting that pERP1 may have potential roles in the KSHV life cycle and malignancy. In conclusion, our data suggest that K4.2 participates in lytic replication by enhancing calcium flux and viral glycoprotein expression, but also by interfering with immunoglobulin assembly to potentially dampen the adaptive immune response. PMID:23986581

  3. Identification of genes for the constant region of rabbit T-cell receptor beta chains.

    PubMed Central

    Angiolillo, A L; Lamoyi, E; Bernstein, K E; Mage, R G

    1985-01-01

    We describe cDNA clones from thymus mRNA of a young rabbit that have sequences highly homologous to the human and murine T-cell receptor beta-chain constant region (C beta). In rabbit, man, and mouse there is a conserved extra cysteine in the constant region that could lead to a free thiol group or alternative disulfide bond formation depending on the locations and total numbers of cysteines in assembled receptor molecules. A cDNA clone (CL ANA 11) with 571 bases 5' of the C beta coding sequence has an open reading frame starting at a methionine codon that encodes 141 amino acids in frame with the C beta sequence. The encoded sequence has no resemblance to known immunoglobulin or beta-chain variable regions or other known proteins. An oligonucleotide probe from the 5' end of the encoded protein hybridizes to an approximately equal to 2-kilobase genomic DNA fragment that contains C beta gene sequences and to an approximately equal to 8-kilobase mRNA species in the thymus mRNA preparation from which the clone was derived. Within the 5' coding sequence there is a stretch of 211 bases containing strings of alternating purines and pyrimidines that may form Z-DNA. The sequence of the last 55 base pairs adjacent to C beta resembles the corresponding segment of mouse cDNA clone 86T3 that contains sequence 5' of the mouse C beta 1 gene. Although the function of a potential protein encoded by the 5' end of CL ANA 11 is unknown, it could play a role in regulation of thymocyte growth and differentiation. Images PMID:2989826

  4. The uteroglobin gene region: hormonal regulation, repetitive elements and complete nucleotide sequence of the gene.

    PubMed Central

    Suske, G; Wenz, M; Cato, A C; Beato, M

    1983-01-01

    Differential uteroglobin induction represents an appropriate model for the molecular analysis of the mechanism by which steroid hormones control gene expression in mammals. We have analyzed the structure and hormonal regulation of a 35 Kb region of genomic DNA in which the uteroglobin gene is located. The complete sequence of 3,700 nucleotides including the uteroglobin gene and its flanking regions has been determined, and the limits of the gene established by S1 nuclease mapping. Several regions containing repeated sequences were mapped by blot hybridization, one of which is located within the large intron in the uteroglobin gene. Analysis of the RNAs extracted from endometrium, lung and liver, after treatment with estrogen and/or progesterone shows that within the 35 Kb region, the uteroglobin gene is the only DNA segment whose transcription into stable RNA is induced by progesterone. Images PMID:6304644

  5. Preferential rearrangement of the immunoglobulin kappa chain joining region J kappa 1 and J kappa 2 segments in mouse spleen DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Nishi, M; Kataoka, T; Honjo, T

    1985-01-01

    The V kappa-KpnI family, which constitutes approximately equal to 36% of mouse kappa chain variable region gene (V kappa) segments, conserves the Kpn I site (G-G-T-A-C-C) at the position corresponding to residues 35-37. Using this cleavage site, we were able to assess the relative recombination frequency of the kappa chain joining region gene (J kappa) segments in mouse spleen DNA. The J kappa 1 and J kappa 2 segments were used 2- to 5-fold more frequently than were the J kappa 4 and J kappa 5 segments. The J kappa 3 segment was shown to be incapable of recombining with the V kappa segment. The relative recombination frequency of the J kappa segments did not change significantly by lipopolysaccharide stimulation of normal mouse spleens. The relative frequency of the J kappa usage was unaltered in immune disorders such as in nude (nu/nu), MRL (lpr/lpr), and BXSB mice. Seven V kappa-KpnI-J kappa 1 clones were isolated, and their nucleotide sequences were determined. Two of them were derived from the identical germ-line V kappa segment but differed in the nucleotide sequence of the V-J junction. The maximal number of V kappa germ-line segments was estimated to be less than 300 by statistical calculation. Images PMID:3931074

  6. Identification of wheat chromosomal regions containing expressed resistance genes.

    PubMed Central

    Dilbirligi, Muharrem; Erayman, Mustafa; Sandhu, Devinder; Sidhu, Deepak; Gill, Kulvinder S

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to isolate and physically localize expressed resistance (R) genes on wheat chromosomes. Irrespective of the host or pest type, most of the 46 cloned R genes from 12 plant species share a strong sequence similarity, especially for protein domains and motifs. By utilizing this structural similarity to perform modified RNA fingerprinting and data mining, we identified 184 putative expressed R genes of wheat. These include 87 NB/LRR types, 16 receptor-like kinases, and 13 Pto-like kinases. The remaining were seven Hm1 and two Hs1(pro-1) homologs, 17 pathogenicity related, and 42 unique NB/kinases. About 76% of the expressed R-gene candidates were rare transcripts, including 42 novel sequences. Physical mapping of 121 candidate R-gene sequences using 339 deletion lines localized 310 loci to 26 chromosomal regions encompassing approximately 16% of the wheat genome. Five major R-gene clusters that spanned only approximately 3% of the wheat genome but contained approximately 47% of the candidate R genes were observed. Comparative mapping localized 91% (82 of 90) of the phenotypically characterized R genes to 18 regions where 118 of the R-gene sequences mapped. PMID:15020436

  7. The regions of sequence variation in caulimovirus gene VI.

    PubMed

    Sanger, M; Daubert, S; Goodman, R M

    1991-06-01

    The sequence of gene VI from figwort mosaic virus (FMV) clone x4 was determined and compared with that previously published for FMV clone DxS. Both clones originated from the same virus isolation, but the virus used to clone DxS was propagated extensively in a host of a different family prior to cloning whereas that used to clone x4 was not. Differences in the amino acid sequence inferred from the DNA sequences occurred in two clusters. An N-terminal conserved region preceded two regions of variation separated by a central conserved region. Variation in cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) gene VI sequences, all of which were derived from virus isolates from hosts from one host family, was similar to that seen in the FMV comparison, though the extent of variation was less. Alignment of gene VI domains from FMV and CaMV revealed regions of amino acid sequence identical in both viruses within the conserved regions. The similarity in the pattern of conserved and variable domains of these two viruses suggests common host-interactive functions in caulimovirus gene VI homologues, and possibly an analogy between caulimoviruses and certain animal viruses in the influence of the host on sequence variability of viral genes.

  8. Identification of genes from the Treacher Collins candidate region

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, M.; Dixon, J.; Edwards, S. |

    1994-09-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCOF1) is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development. The TCOF1 locus has previously been mapped to chromosome 5q32-33. The candidate gene region has been defined as being between two flanking markers, ribosomal protein S14 (RPS14) and Annexin 6 (ANX6), by analyzing recombination events in affected individuals. It is estimated that the distance between these flanking markers is 500 kb by three separate analysis methods: (1) radiation hybrid mapping; (2) genetic linkage; and (3) YAC contig analysis. A cosmid contig which spans the candidate gene region for TCOF1 has been constructed by screening the Los Alamos National Laboratory flow-sorted chromosome 5 cosmid library. Cosmids were obtained by using a combination of probes generated from YAC end clones, Alu-PCR fragments from YACs, and asymmetric PCR fragments from both T7 and T3 cosmid ends. Exon amplifications, the selection of genomic coding sequences based upon the presence of functional splice acceptor and donor sites, was used to identify potential exon sequences. Sequences found to be conserved between species were then used to screen cDNA libraries in order to identify candidate genes. To date, four different cDNAs have been isolated from this region and are being analyzed as potential candidate genes for TCOF1. These include the genes encoding plasma glutathione peroxidase (GPX3), heparin sulfate sulfotransferase (HSST), a gene with homology to the ETS family of proteins and one which shows no homology to any known genes. Work is also in progress to identify and characterize additional cDNAs from the candidate gene region.

  9. Immunoglobulin G Expression in Human Sperm and Possible Functional Significance

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Meiling; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Pu, Qinxue; Huang, Tao; Xie, Qingdong; Wang, Yan; Li, Jing; Wang, Yun; Gu, Huan; Huang, Tianhua; Li, Zhiling; Gu, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG), the major molecule of the immune system, which was traditionally thought to be produced by differentiated B-lymphocytes, had recently been found in non-immune cells including spermatozoa of rabbit testis. To study if human sperms could produce IgG that might play a role in fertilization, we employed immunofluorescent staining, Western blot, in situ hybridization, RT-PCR (reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction) and immunoelectron microscope and found that human sperms were capable of synthesizing IgG. IgG protein and mRNA were detected in the cytoplasm, mainly the neck region of the sperm and IgG immunoreactivity was found to cover the entire sperm cell. The essential enzymes necessary for IgG synthesis and class switching, RAG1 (recombination activating gene 1), RAG2 (recombination activating gene 2) and AID (activation-induced cytidine deaminase), were also detected in the sperm cells. Furthermore, we found that anti-IgG antibody could inhibit sperm from penetrating Zona-free hamster egg with statistical significance. These discoveries suggested that immunoglobulin G could be produced by human sperms and it might play a role during fertilization. PMID:26833114

  10. Shared epitopes of avian immunoglobulin light chains.

    PubMed

    Benčina, Mateja; Cizelj, Ivanka; Berčič, Rebeka Lucijana; Narat, Mojca; Benčina, Dušan; Dovč, Peter

    2014-04-15

    Like all jawed vertebrates, birds (Aves) also produce antibodies i.e. immunoglobulins (Igs) as a defence mechanism against pathogens. Their Igs are composed of two identical heavy (H) and light (L) chains which are of lambda isotype. The L chain consists of variable (VL), joining (JL) and constant (CL) region. Using enzyme immunoassays (EIA) and two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) (3C10 and CH31) to chicken L chain, we analysed their cross-reactivity with sera from 33 avian species belonging to nine different orders. Among Galliformes tested, mAbs 3C10 and CH31 reacted with L chains of chicken, turkey, four genera of pheasants, tragopan and peafowl, but not with sera of grey partridge, quail and Japanese quail. Immunoglobulins of guinea-fowl reacted only with mAb 3C10. Both mAbs reacted also with the L chain of Eurasian griffon (order Falconiformes) and domestic sparrow (order Passeriformes). Sera from six other orders of Aves did not react with either of the two mAbs. EIA using mAbs 3C10 and CH31 enabled detection of antibodies to major avian pathogens in sera of chickens, turkeys, pheasants, peafowl, Eurasian griffon and guinea-fowl (only with mAb 3C10). The N-terminal amino acid sequence of pheasant L chain (19 residues) was identical to that of chicken. Sequences of genes encoding the L chain constant regions of pheasants, turkey and partridge were determined and deposited in the public database (GenBank accession numbers: FJ 649651, FJ 649652 and FJ 649653, respectively). Among them, amino acid sequence of pheasants is the most similar to that of chicken (97% similarity), whereas those of turkey and partridge have greater similarity to each other (89%) than to any other avian L chain sequence. The characteristic deletion of two amino acids which is present in the L chain constant region in Galliformes has been most likely introduced to their L chain after their divergence from Anseriformes.

  11. Shared epitopes of avian immunoglobulin light chains.

    PubMed

    Benčina, Mateja; Cizelj, Ivanka; Berčič, Rebeka Lucijana; Narat, Mojca; Benčina, Dušan; Dovč, Peter

    2014-04-15

    Like all jawed vertebrates, birds (Aves) also produce antibodies i.e. immunoglobulins (Igs) as a defence mechanism against pathogens. Their Igs are composed of two identical heavy (H) and light (L) chains which are of lambda isotype. The L chain consists of variable (VL), joining (JL) and constant (CL) region. Using enzyme immunoassays (EIA) and two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) (3C10 and CH31) to chicken L chain, we analysed their cross-reactivity with sera from 33 avian species belonging to nine different orders. Among Galliformes tested, mAbs 3C10 and CH31 reacted with L chains of chicken, turkey, four genera of pheasants, tragopan and peafowl, but not with sera of grey partridge, quail and Japanese quail. Immunoglobulins of guinea-fowl reacted only with mAb 3C10. Both mAbs reacted also with the L chain of Eurasian griffon (order Falconiformes) and domestic sparrow (order Passeriformes). Sera from six other orders of Aves did not react with either of the two mAbs. EIA using mAbs 3C10 and CH31 enabled detection of antibodies to major avian pathogens in sera of chickens, turkeys, pheasants, peafowl, Eurasian griffon and guinea-fowl (only with mAb 3C10). The N-terminal amino acid sequence of pheasant L chain (19 residues) was identical to that of chicken. Sequences of genes encoding the L chain constant regions of pheasants, turkey and partridge were determined and deposited in the public database (GenBank accession numbers: FJ 649651, FJ 649652 and FJ 649653, respectively). Among them, amino acid sequence of pheasants is the most similar to that of chicken (97% similarity), whereas those of turkey and partridge have greater similarity to each other (89%) than to any other avian L chain sequence. The characteristic deletion of two amino acids which is present in the L chain constant region in Galliformes has been most likely introduced to their L chain after their divergence from Anseriformes. PMID:24603015

  12. Hotspots for Vitamin-Steroid-Thyroid Hormone Response Elements Within Switch Regions of Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Loci Predict a Direct Influence of Vitamins and Hormones on B Cell Class Switch Recombination.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, Julia L; Penkert, Rhiannon R; Xu, Beisi; Fan, Yiping; Partridge, Janet F; Maul, Robert W; Gearhart, Patricia J

    2016-03-01

    Vitamin A deficiencies are common throughout the world and have a significant negative influence on immune protection against viral infections. Mouse models demonstrate that the production of IgA, a first line of defense against viruses at mucosal sites, is inhibited in the context of vitamin A deficiency. In vitro, the addition of vitamin A to activated B cells can enhance IgA expression, but downregulate IgE. Previous reports have demonstrated that vitamin A modifies cytokine patterns, and in so doing may influence antibody isotype expression by an indirect mechanism. However, we have now discovered hundreds of potential response elements among Sμ, Sɛ, and Sα switch sites within immunoglobulin heavy chain loci. These hotspots appear in both mouse and human loci and include targets for vitamin receptors and related proteins (e.g., estrogen receptors) in the nuclear receptor superfamily. Full response elements with direct repeats are relatively infrequent or absent in Sγ regions although half-sites are present. Based on these results, we pose a hypothesis that nuclear receptors have a direct effect on the immunoglobulin heavy chain class switch recombination event. We propose that vitamin A may alter S site accessibility to activation-induced deaminase and nonhomologous end-joining machinery, thereby influencing the isotype switch, antibody production, and protection against viral infections at mucosal sites.

  13. Gene recovery microdissection (GRM) a process for producing chromosome region-specific libraries of expressed genes

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, A T; Coleman, M A; Tucker, J D

    2001-02-08

    Gene Recovery Microdissection (GRM) is a unique and cost-effective process for producing chromosome region-specific libraries of expressed genes. It accelerates the pace, reduces the cost, and extends the capabilities of functional genomic research, the means by which scientists will put to life-saving, life-enhancing use their knowledge of any plant or animal genome.

  14. Gene search in the FSHD region on 4q35

    SciTech Connect

    Deutekom, J.C.T. van; Romberg, S.; Geel, M. van

    1994-09-01

    In the search for the FSHD gene on 4q35, four overlapping cosmids spanning a region of 95 kb including the deletion-prone repeated units were subcloned as well as subjected to cDNA selection and exon trap strategies. A total of 300 selected clones with an average length of 500 bp were mapped back to the cosmids. None of the clones appeared to be single copy. Sequence data of most clones and the related genomic regions were compared. cDNA clones with a high homolgy (>90%) and a low repetitive hybridization pattern were further analyzed by Zoo- and Northern blotting and by sequence analysis programs like GRAIL. Excellent and good exons could be identified and some clones showed evolutionary conservation. With the best cDNA, genomic and exon trap clones, several cDNA libraries were screened. The obtained cDNAs identified different genes, none of which originated from 4q35. 3{prime} RACE experiments were performed using primers derived of predicted exons especially in a 2.2 kb EcoRI fragment about 20 kb centromeric of the repeats. So far, only non-4q35 genes could be identified. Altogether, our results support other recent studies indicating that the FSHD gene is most likely not encoded by the 3.3 kb repeated units. Moreover, the region centromeric of these repeats appeared to contain abundant repetitive sequences and homologies to several other chromosomes, complicating the identification of the FSHD gene.

  15. Anterior-posterior regionalized gene expression in the Ciona notochord

    PubMed Central

    Veeman, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background In the simple ascidian chordate Ciona the signaling pathways and gene regulatory networks giving rise to initial notochord induction are largely understood and the mechanisms of notochord morphogenesis are being systematically elucidated. The notochord has generally been thought of as a non-compartmentalized or regionalized organ that is not finely patterned at the level of gene expression. Quantitative imaging methods have recently shown, however, that notochord cell size, shape and behavior vary consistently along the anterior-posterior (AP) axis. Results Here we screen candidate genes by whole mount in situ hybridization for potential AP asymmetry. We identify 4 genes that show non-uniform expression in the notochord. Ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) is expressed more strongly in the secondary notochord lineage than the primary. CTGF is expressed stochastically in a subset of notochord cells. A novel calmodulin-like gene (BCamL) is expressed more strongly at both the anterior and posterior tips of the notochord. A TGF-β ortholog is expressed in a gradient from posterior to anterior. The asymmetries in ERM, BCamL and TGF-β expression are evident even before the notochord cells have intercalated into a single-file column. Conclusions We conclude that the Ciona notochord is not a homogeneous tissue but instead shows distinct patterns of regionalized gene expression. PMID:24288133

  16. Characterization of the gene for the membrane and secretory form of the IgM heavy-chain constant region gene (C mu) of the cow (Bos taurus).

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, M; Rabbani, H; Pilström, L; Hammarström, L

    1998-01-01

    Our present understanding of the evolution of immunoglobulins is derived from a few vertebrate species. In order to obtain additional information on the development of the humoral immune system, we cloned and determined the nucleotide sequence of the bovine cDNA and genomic IgM heavy-chain constant region gene (C mu). The gene contains four constant region domain-encoding exons (CH1 to CH4) and two exons encoding the transmembrane domain (TM1, TM2), expressed in the membrane-bound receptor form of the IgM. The sequence of a cDNA clone encoding the 3' portion of the membrane form of the mu-chain revealed that the TM1 exon is spliced to the CH4 exon, as occurs in other mammals. Comparison of deduced amino acid sequence data from different vertebrates revealed a high similarity to sheep C mu (88%) and a lower degree of similarity to pig (62%), rat (62%), rabbit (58%) human (56%), hamster (55%), mouse (54%), chicken (28%) and horned shark (22%) C mu. Images Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:9659232

  17. [Avidity of polyreactive immunoglobulins].

    PubMed

    Bobrovnik, S A

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of the mechanism of interaction between polyreactive immunoglobulins (PRIG) and antigen was conducted and it was shown that most of the traditional methods of antibody affinity evaluation are not applicable for PRIG affinity. The comparative assessment of the mouse and human PRIG avidity against ovalbumin and horse myoglobin and the avidity of specific monoclonal antibodies against ovalbumin have shown that the avidity of PRIG not only is much less than the avidity of monoclonal antibodies but even exceeds it.

  18. A novel cyclin gene (CCNF) in the region of the polycystic kidney disease gene (PKD1)

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, B.; Pohlschmidt, M.; Leung, L.S.

    1994-11-01

    The major locus for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (PKD1) is located in a gene-rich region on chromosome 16p13.3. Recently the identification of the gene responsible for PKD1 has been described. While searching for candidate genes in this region, the authors isolated a new member of the cyclin family. They have characterized the transcript by sequencing, determination of the exon intron boundaries, and Northern blot analysis. Cyclin F is related to A- and B-type cyclins by sequence, but its function is unknown.

  19. Scope of action of the immunoglobulin mutator system.

    PubMed

    Wabl, M R; Jäck, H M; von Borstel, R C; Steinberg, C M

    1989-01-01

    The authors have developed a method to measure the rate of spontaneous mutations taking place in IgH, the gene encoding the immunoglobulin heavy chain. When an amber chain-termination codon mutates to a sense codon, translation of the polypeptide chain will be completed, and mutant cells producing the heavy chain can be detected with a fluorescent labelled antibody. The protocol used is the compartmentalization test which minimizes any effect of selection. In subclones of the pre-B lymphocyte line 18-81, the spontaneous mutation rate in the part of IgH encoding the variable region is somewhat greater than 10(-5) mutations per base pair per generation. This supports the hypothesis that hypermutation is not dependent on cell stimulation by an antigen. In a hybrid between a cell of this line and a myeloma (which represents the terminal stage of the B-cell lineage), the mutation rate was too low to be determined by this test, less than 10(-9). When the same loss to gain procedure system was used with an opal chain-terminating codon in the part of IgH encoding the constant region (C mu), a high rate of reversion by deletion was found. Long (more than one exon) and short (less than one exon) deletions occurred at rates of 1.7 x 10(-5) and 1.4 x 10(-7) per generation, respectively. It is thought that the high rate of deletion is not related to somatic hypermutation but rather to DNA rearrangement during the heavy-chain class switch, which is occurring in these pre-B cell lines. The point mutation rate was too low to be detected above the background of deletion mutants, less than 5 x 10(-8). The immunoglobulin mutator system works weakly, if at all, on two other, nonimmunoglobulin, genes tested: B2m (beta 2 microglobulin) and the gene for ouabain resistance. PMID:2512197

  20. New DNA markers in the Huntington's disease gene candidate region.

    PubMed

    Lin, C S; Altherr, M; Bates, G; Whaley, W L; Read, A P; Harris, R; Lehrach, H; Wasmuth, J J; Gusella, J F; MacDonald, M E

    1991-09-01

    The search for the Huntington's disease (HD) gene has prompted construction of a complete long-range restriction map of a 2.5-Mb candidate region, distal to the DNA marker D4S10. To facilitate the procurement of cloned DNA from this candidate region, we have augmented the existing regional mapping panel of somatic cell hybrids with hybrid HHW1071 containing a t(4p16;12) chromosome from a patient with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome. This translocation maps between D4S180 and D4S127, subdividing the HD candidate region and setting a proximal limit to the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome region. Using the expanded mapping panel, we have regionally assigned 14 independently cloned cosmids, five proximal to the t(4;12) breakpoint in the same region as D4S10 and nine distal to the breakpoint. By a combination of overlap with previously mapped cosmids and pulsed-field gel analysis, each of these cosmids has been positioned on the long-range restriction map of 4p16.3, increasing the clone coverage of the candidate region to approximately 40%. Single-copy probes from mapped cosmids were used to identify eight new DNA polymorphisms spanning the HD candidate region. These new DNA markers should prove valuable for analysis of recombination and linkage disequilibrium in HD, as well as for preclinical diagnosis of the disorder.

  1. The red-green visual pigment gene region in adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Aubourg, P; Feil, R; Guidoux, S; Kaplan, J C; Moser, H; Kahn, A; Mandel, J L

    1990-01-01

    Although recent data established that a specific very-long-chain fatty acyl-CoA synthetase is defective in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD), the ALD gene is still unidentified. The ALD locus has been mapped to Xq28, like the red and green color pigment genes. Abnormal color vision has been observed in 12 of 27 patients with adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN), a milder form of ALD. Furthermore, rearrangements of the color vision gene cluster were found in four of eight ALD kindreds. This led us to propose that a single DNA rearrangement could underlie both ALD and abnormal color vision in these patients. Study of 34 French ALD patients failed to reveal a higher than expected frequency of green/red visual pigment rearrangements 3' to the red/green color vision gene complex. The previous report of such rearrangements was based on small numbers and lack of knowledge that the frequency of "abnormal" color vision arrays on molecular analysis was twice as high as expected on the basis of the frequency of phenotypic color vision defects. The red/green color pigment (R/GCP) region was studied by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis in 14 of these patients, and we did not find any fragment size difference between the patients and normal individuals who have the same number of pigment genes. The R/GCP region was also analyzed in 29 French and seven North American ALD patients by using six genomic DNA probes, isolated from a cosmid walk, that flank the color vision genes. No deletions were found with probes that lie 3' of the green pigment genes. One of the eight previously reported ALD individuals has a long deletion 5' of the red pigment gene, a deletion causing blue cone monochromacy. This finding and the previous findings of a 45% frequency of phenotypic color vision defects in patients with AMN may suggest that the ALD/AMN gene lies 5' to the red pigment gene and that the frequent phenotypic color vision anomalies owe their origin to deleted DNA that includes regulatory genes for

  2. Hox Genes and Regional Patterning of the Vertebrate Body Plan

    PubMed Central

    Mallo, Moises; Wellik, Deneen M.; Deschamps, Jacqueline

    2010-01-01

    Several decades have passed since the discovery of Hox genes in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Their unique ability to regulate morphologies along the anteroposterior (AP) axis (Lewis, 1978) earned them well-deserved attention as important regulators of embryonic development. Phenotypes due to loss- and gain-of-function mutations in mouse Hox genes have revealed that the spatiotemporally controlled expression of these genes is critical for the correct morphogenesis of embryonic axial structures. Here, we review recent novel insight into the modalities of Hox protein function in imparting specific identity to anatomical regions of the vertebral column, and in controlling the emergence of these tissues concomitantly with providing them with axial identity. The control of these functions must have been intimately linked to the shaping of the body plan during evolution. PMID:20435029

  3. Hox genes and regional patterning of the vertebrate body plan.

    PubMed

    Mallo, Moises; Wellik, Deneen M; Deschamps, Jacqueline

    2010-08-01

    Several decades have passed since the discovery of Hox genes in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Their unique ability to regulate morphologies along the anteroposterior (AP) axis (Lewis, 1978) earned them well-deserved attention as important regulators of embryonic development. Phenotypes due to loss- and gain-of-function mutations in mouse Hox genes have revealed that the spatio-temporally controlled expression of these genes is critical for the correct morphogenesis of embryonic axial structures. Here, we review recent novel insight into the modalities of Hox protein function in imparting specific identity to anatomical regions of the vertebral column, and in controlling the emergence of these tissues concomitantly with providing them with axial identity. The control of these functions must have been intimately linked to the shaping of the body plan during evolution.

  4. Urban land use limits regional bumble bee gene flow.

    PubMed

    Jha, Shalene; Kremen, C

    2013-05-01

    Potential declines in native pollinator communities and increased reliance on pollinator-dependent crops have raised concerns about native pollinator conservation and dispersal across human-altered landscapes. Bumble bees are one of the most effective native pollinators and are often the first to be extirpated in human-altered habitats, yet little is known about how bumble bees move across fine spatial scales and what landscapes promote or limit their gene flow. In this study, we examine regional genetic differentiation and fine-scale relatedness patterns of the yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, to investigate how current and historic habitat composition impact gene flow. We conducted our study across a landscape mosaic of natural, agricultural and urban/suburban habitats, and we show that B. vosnesenskii exhibits low but significant levels of differentiation across the study system (F(ST) = 0.019, D(est) = 0.049). Most importantly, we reveal significant relationships between pairwise F(ST) and resistance models created from contemporary land use maps. Specifically, B. vosnesenskii gene flow is most limited by commercial, industrial and transportation-related impervious cover. Finally, our fine-scale analysis reveals significant but declining relatedness between individuals at the 1-9 km spatial scale, most likely due to local queen dispersal. Overall, our results indicate that B. vosnesenskii exhibits considerable local dispersal and that regional gene flow is significantly limited by impervious cover associated with urbanization.

  5. Biology of Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Berlot, Giorgio; Rossini, Perla; Turchet, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous Immunoglobulins (IvIg) are often administered to critically ill patients more as an act of faith than on the basis of relevant clinical studies. This particularly applies to the treatment of sepsis in adult patients, in whom the current guidelines even recommend against their use, despite that many studies demonstrated either their beneficial effects in different subsets of patients and that some preparations of IvIg are more effective than other. The biology of Ig are reviewed, aiming to a more in-depth understanding of their properties in order to clarify their possible indications in different clinical settings. PMID:25674545

  6. Genetic control of basal serum immunoglobulin E level and its effect on specific reaginic sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Marsh, D G; Bias, W B; Ishizaka, K

    1974-09-01

    Studies of the distribution of total serum immunoglobulin E levels in nonallergic and allergic populations defined a cut-off point between low and high immunoglobulin E at 95 U/ml, based on Mendelian recessive inheritance of high immunoglobulin E level. Subsequent investigations of the distribution of total serum immunoglobulin E levels in 28 allergic families confirmed the recessive hypothesis. The results of quantitative skin tests in eight families, performed with between five and eight highly purified grass and ragweed pollen allergens per family, demonstrate that the immunoglobulin E-regulating gene exerts a profound effect on specific immunoglobulin E-mediated sensitivity, often masking the effect of HL-A associated immune response genes.

  7. Divergence of human [alpha]-chain constant region gene sequences: A novel recombinant [alpha]2 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Chintalacharuvu, K. R.; Morrison, S.L. ); Raines, M. )

    1994-06-01

    IgA is the major Ig synthesized in humans and provides the first line of defense at the mucosal surfaces. The constant region of IgA heavy chain is encoded by the [alpha] gene on chromosome 14. Previous studies have indicated the presence of two [alpha] genes, [alpha]1 and [alpha]2 existing in two allotypic forms, [alpha]2 m(1) and [alpha]2 m(2). Here the authors report the cloning and complete nucleotide sequence determination of a novel human [alpha] gene. Nucleotide sequence comparison with the published [alpha] sequences suggests that the gene arose as a consequence of recombination or gene conversion between the two [alpha]2 alleles. The authors have expressed the gene as a chimeric protein in myeloma cells indicating that it encodes a functional protein. The novel IgA resembles IgA2 m(2) in that disulfide bonds link H and L chains. This novel recombinant gene provides insights into the mechanisms of generation of different constant regions and suggests that within human populations, multiple alleles of [alpha] may be present providing IgAs of different structures.

  8. Genetic recombination is targeted towards gene promoter regions in dogs.

    PubMed

    Auton, Adam; Rui Li, Ying; Kidd, Jeffrey; Oliveira, Kyle; Nadel, Julie; Holloway, J Kim; Hayward, Jessica J; Cohen, Paula E; Greally, John M; Wang, Jun; Bustamante, Carlos D; Boyko, Adam R

    2013-01-01

    The identification of the H3K4 trimethylase, PRDM9, as the gene responsible for recombination hotspot localization has provided considerable insight into the mechanisms by which recombination is initiated in mammals. However, uniquely amongst mammals, canids appear to lack a functional version of PRDM9 and may therefore provide a model for understanding recombination that occurs in the absence of PRDM9, and thus how PRDM9 functions to shape the recombination landscape. We have constructed a fine-scale genetic map from patterns of linkage disequilibrium assessed using high-throughput sequence data from 51 free-ranging dogs, Canis lupus familiaris. While broad-scale properties of recombination appear similar to other mammalian species, our fine-scale estimates indicate that canine highly elevated recombination rates are observed in the vicinity of CpG rich regions including gene promoter regions, but show little association with H3K4 trimethylation marks identified in spermatocytes. By comparison to genomic data from the Andean fox, Lycalopex culpaeus, we show that biased gene conversion is a plausible mechanism by which the high CpG content of the dog genome could have occurred.

  9. Genetic Recombination Is Targeted towards Gene Promoter Regions in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Auton, Adam; Rui Li, Ying; Kidd, Jeffrey; Oliveira, Kyle; Nadel, Julie; Holloway, J. Kim; Hayward, Jessica J.; Cohen, Paula E.; Greally, John M.; Wang, Jun; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Boyko, Adam R.

    2013-01-01

    The identification of the H3K4 trimethylase, PRDM9, as the gene responsible for recombination hotspot localization has provided considerable insight into the mechanisms by which recombination is initiated in mammals. However, uniquely amongst mammals, canids appear to lack a functional version of PRDM9 and may therefore provide a model for understanding recombination that occurs in the absence of PRDM9, and thus how PRDM9 functions to shape the recombination landscape. We have constructed a fine-scale genetic map from patterns of linkage disequilibrium assessed using high-throughput sequence data from 51 free-ranging dogs, Canis lupus familiaris. While broad-scale properties of recombination appear similar to other mammalian species, our fine-scale estimates indicate that canine highly elevated recombination rates are observed in the vicinity of CpG rich regions including gene promoter regions, but show little association with H3K4 trimethylation marks identified in spermatocytes. By comparison to genomic data from the Andean fox, Lycalopex culpaeus, we show that biased gene conversion is a plausible mechanism by which the high CpG content of the dog genome could have occurred. PMID:24348265

  10. Serum Leukocyte Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor A3 (LILRA3) Is Increased in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis and Is a Strong Independent Indicator of Disease Severity; 6.7kbp LILRA3 Gene Deletion Is Not Associated with Diseases Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    An, Hongyan; Lim, Chai; Guillemin, Gilles J.; Vollmer-Conna, Ute; Rawlinson, William; Bryant, Katherine; Tedla, Nicodemus

    2016-01-01

    Leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor A3 (LILRA3) is a soluble immune regulatory molecule primarily expressed by monocytes and macrophages. A homozygous 6.7kbp LILRA3 gene deletion that removes the first seven of its eight exons is predicted to lead to lack of LILRA3 protein, although this has not been experimentally confirmed. Moreover, there are conflicting results with regards to the link between the LILRA3 homozygous genetic deletion and susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS) in different European populations. The aim of this study was to investigate whether LILRA3 gene deletion is associated with MS susceptibility in a North American cohort of European ancestry and assess if serum LILRA3 protein level is a marker of clinical subtype and/or disease severity in MS. A total of 456 patients with MS and 99 unrelated healthy controls were genotyped for the 6.7kbp LILRA3 gene deletion and levels of LILRA3 protein in sera determined by in-house sandwich ELISA. We showed that LILRA3 gene deletion was not associated with MS susceptibility and did not affect the age of disease onset, clinical subtype or disease severity. However, we discovered for the first time that homozygous LILRA3 gene deletion results in lack of production of LILRA3 protein. Importantly, LILRA3 protein level was significantly increased in sera of patients with MS when compared with control subjects, particularly in more severe type primary progressive MS. Multiple regression analysis showed that LILRA3 level in serum was one of the strongest independent markers of disease severity in MS, which potentially can be used as a diagnostic marker. PMID:26871720

  11. Immunoglobulin profile in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, M S; Dhar, N K; Agrawal, P; Khurana, S K; Neena, B; Malik, S C

    1992-08-01

    The present study was conducted on 40 new consecutive schizophrenic patients admitted in the psychiatry ward. The diagnosis of schizophrenia was done by Research Diagnosis Criteria (RDC). Serum immunoglobulins were were estimated in schizophrenic patients and were age and sex matched with 40 healthy individuals, comprising the control group. The IgG and IgA mean levels of schizophrenic patients were found to be significantly higher (p < 0.01) than the normal healthy individuals. There were however no significant differences between the schizophrenic patients and control group regarding total proteins, albumin and globulin levels. In subtypes of schinophrenia based on phenomenology only, paranoid group scored significantly higher (p < 0.01) IgG and IgA mean values than other types of Schizophrenia (catatonic, disorganised and undifferentiated).

  12. CD28/CTLA-4 ligands: the gene encoding CD86 (B70/B7.2) maps to the same region as CD80 (B7/B7.1) gene in human chromosome 3q13-q23.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Ruiz, E; Somoza, C; Sánchez-Madrid, F; Lanier, L L

    1995-05-01

    CD86 (B70/B7.2) is an antigen of the immunoglobulin superfamily expressed on monocytes, dendritic cells and activated B, T, and natural killer cells. CD86 was recently identified as a second ligand for the T cell antigens CD28 and CTLA-4, and plays an important role in the co-stimulation of T cells in a primary immune response. We report here the assignment of the CD86 gene to human chromosome 3 using Southern blot analysis on a panel of hamster x human somatic cell hybrid genomic DNA. Fluorescence hybridization in situ on metaphase chromosomes coupled with GTG banding (G-bands by trypsin using Giemsa staining) confirmed this assignment and localized the CD86 gene to 3q13-q23 region. The CD86 gene is, therefore, located in the proximity of the CD80 (B7/B7.1) gene, the first identified ligand for CD28 and CTLA-4, previously mapped to chromosome 3q13.3-q21. Deletions, inversions and insertions of chromosome 3q21-q26, as well as translocations of 3q21 with other chromosomes have been described in many cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and myelodisplastic syndromes (MDS), suggesting that this region contains several genes involved in the leukemic process.

  13. Human mucin gene MUC5AC: organization of its 5'-region and central repetitive region.

    PubMed Central

    Escande, F; Aubert, J P; Porchet, N; Buisine, M P

    2001-01-01

    Human mucin gene MUC5AC is clustered with MUC2, MUC5B and MUC6 on chromosome 11p15.5. We report here the full length cDNA sequence upstream of the repetitive region of human MUC5AC. We have also determined the sequence of its large central tandem repeat array. The 5'-region reveals high degree of sequence similarity with MUC2 and MUC5B and codes for 1336 amino acids organized into a signal peptide, four pro-von Willebrand factor-like D domains (D1, D2, D' and D3) and a short domain which connects to the central repetitive region. In the central region, 17 major domains have been identified. Nine code for cysteine-rich domains (Cys-domains 1-9) and exhibit high sequence similarity to the cysteine-rich domains described in the central region of MUC2 and MUC5B. Cys-domains 1-5 are interspersed by domains enriched with serine, threonine, and proline residues. Cys-domains 1-9 are interspersed by four domains (TR1-TR4) composed of various numbers of MUC5AC-type repeats. Southern-blot analyses reveal allelic variations both in length and nucleotide sequence. The length polymorphism which is due to variable numbers of tandem repeats is located in TR1 and TR4, whereas a mutation polymorphism detected with TaqI is located in Cys-domain 6. In this study, the organization of MUC5AC has been entirely elucidated showing extensive similarity to the other chromosome 11p15 MUC genes, particularly MUC5B, and providing additional arguments for common evolution from a single ancestral gene. PMID:11535137

  14. Immunoglobulin Resistance in Kawasaki Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hartas, Georgios A.; Hashmi, Syed Shahrukh; Pham-Peyton, Chi; Tsounias, Emmanouil; Bricker, John T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for immunoglobulin resistance, including clinical symptoms such as arthritis and the pH of intravenous immunoglobulin. Methods: The data of children with Kawasaki disease who had received immunoglobulin were evaluated. Data regarding the brand of immunoglobulin administered were abstracted from the pharmacy records. Results: Eighty consecutive children with Kawasaki disease were evaluated (Mdnage=28 months, 66% male). The prevalence of immunoglobulin resistance was 30%. Arthritis was a presenting symptom in the acute phase of Kawasaki disease in 8% (6/80, all male) and was seen in significant association with immunoglobulin resistance in comparison to those without arthritis (16.7% vs. 0.2%, p=0.008). Next, the immunoglobulin brand types were divided into two groups: the relatively high pH group (n=16), including Carimune (pH 6.6±0.2), and the low pH group (n=63), including Gamunex (pH 4–4.5) or Privigen (pH 4.6–5). Overall, no significant difference in immunoglobulin responsiveness was found between the low pH and the high pH groups (73% vs. 56%, p=0.193), although the low pH group showed a trend toward a larger decrease in erythrocyte sedimentation rate (p=0.048), lower steroid use (p=0.054), and lower coronary involvement (p=0.08) than those in the high pH group. Conclusions: Children presenting with arthritis in the acute phase of Kawasaki disease may be at risk for immunoglobulin resistance. PMID:25852966

  15. Parallel Evolution of Genes and Languages in the Caucasus Region

    PubMed Central

    Balanovsky, Oleg; Dibirova, Khadizhat; Dybo, Anna; Mudrak, Oleg; Frolova, Svetlana; Pocheshkhova, Elvira; Haber, Marc; Platt, Daniel; Schurr, Theodore; Haak, Wolfgang; Kuznetsova, Marina; Radzhabov, Magomed; Balaganskaya, Olga; Romanov, Alexey; Zakharova, Tatiana; Soria Hernanz, David F.; Zalloua, Pierre; Koshel, Sergey; Ruhlen, Merritt; Renfrew, Colin; Wells, R. Spencer; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Balanovska, Elena

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed 40 SNP and 19 STR Y-chromosomal markers in a large sample of 1,525 indigenous individuals from 14 populations in the Caucasus and 254 additional individuals representing potential source populations. We also employed a lexicostatistical approach to reconstruct the history of the languages of the North Caucasian family spoken by the Caucasus populations. We found a different major haplogroup to be prevalent in each of four sets of populations that occupy distinct geographic regions and belong to different linguistic branches. The haplogroup frequencies correlated with geography and, even more strongly, with language. Within haplogroups, a number of haplotype clusters were shown to be specific to individual populations and languages. The data suggested a direct origin of Caucasus male lineages from the Near East, followed by high levels of isolation, differentiation and genetic drift in situ. Comparison of genetic and linguistic reconstructions covering the last few millennia showed striking correspondences between the topology and dates of the respective gene and language trees, and with documented historical events. Overall, in the Caucasus region, unmatched levels of gene-language co-evolution occurred within geographically isolated populations, probably due to its mountainous terrain. PMID:21571925

  16. The majority of human genes have regions repeated in other human genes.

    PubMed

    Britten, Roy J

    2005-04-12

    Amino acid sequence comparisons have been made between all of 25,193 human proteins with each of the others by using blast software (National Center for Biotechnology Information) and recording the results for regions that are significantly related in sequence, that is, have an expectation of <1 x 10(-3). The results are presented for each amino acid as the number of identical or similar amino acids matched in these aligned regions. This approach avoids summing or dealing directly with the different regions of any one protein that are often related to different numbers and types of other proteins. The results are presented graphically for a sample of 140 proteins. Relationships are not observed for 26.5% of the 12,728,866 amino acids. The average number of related amino acids is 36.5 for the majority (73.5%) that show relationships. The median number of recognized relationships is approximately 3 for all of the amino acids, and the maximum number is 718. The results demonstrate the overwhelming importance of gene regional duplication forming families of proteins with related domains and show the variety of the resulting patterns of relationship. The magnitude of the set of relationships leads to the conclusion that the principal process by which new gene functions arise has been by making use of preexisting genes. PMID:15802472

  17. Structural Heterogeneity and Functional Domains of Murine Immunoglobulin G Fc Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravetch, Jeffrey V.; Luster, Andrew D.; Weinshank, Richard; Kochan, Jarema; Pavlovec, Amalia; Portnoy, Daniel A.; Hulmes, Jeffrey; Pan, Yu-Ching E.; Unkeless, Jay C.

    1986-11-01

    Binding of antibodies to effector cells by way of receptors to their constant regions (Fc receptors) is central to the pathway that leads to clearance of antigens by the immune system. The structure and function of this important class of receptors on immune cells is addressed through the molecular characterization of Fc receptors (FcR) specific for the murine immunoglobulin G isotype. Structural diversity is encoded by two genes that by alternative splicing result in expression of molecules with highly conserved extracellular domains and different transmembrane and intracytoplasmic domains. The proteins encoded by these genes are members of the immunoglobulin supergene family, most homologous to the major histocompatibility complex molecule Eβ. Functional reconstitution of ligand binding by transfection of individual FcR genes demonstrates that the requirements for ligand binding are encoded in a single gene. These studies demonstrate the molecular basis for the functional heterogeneity of FcR's, accounting for the possible transduction of different signals in response to a single ligand.

  18. Molecular basis of the allelic inheritance of rabbit immunoglobulin VH allotypes: implications for the generation of antibody diversity.

    PubMed

    Knight, K L; Becker, R S

    1990-03-23

    Rabbits are unique in that their immunoglobulin VH regions bear allotypic markers encoded by allelic genes. The presence of these markers on most serum immunoglobulins is difficult to explain, as the germline contains several hundred VH genes. We cloned VH genes from normal rabbits of the VHa allotypes a1, a2, and a3 and from a mutant a2 rabbit, Alicia, which expresses almost no a2 allotype. The D-proximal VH gene VH1 of normal rabbits encoded prototype a1, a2, or a3 allotype VH regions in a1, a2, or a3 rabbits, respectively; VH1 was shown to be preferentially utilized in leukemic rabbit B cells. This VH1 gene was deleted from the germline of the Alicia rabbit. These data suggest that the allelic inheritance of a allotypes results from preferential utilization of VH1 in VDJ rearrangements. We suggest that antibody diversity in rabbit primarily results from somatic hypermutation and gene conversion.

  19. Preferrential rearrangement in normal rabbits of the 3' VHa allotype gene that is deleted in Alicia mutants; somatic hypermutation/conversion may play a major role in generating the heterogeneity of rabbit heavy chain variable region sequences.

    PubMed

    Allegrucci, M; Young-Cooper, G O; Alexander, C B; Newman, B A; Mage, R G

    1991-02-01

    The rabbit is unique in having well-defined allotypes in the variable region of the heavy chain. Products of the VHa locus, (with alleles a1, a2, and a3), account for the majority of the serum immunoglobulins. A small percentage of the serum immunoglobulins are a-negative. In 1986, Kelus and Weiss described a mutation that depressed the expression of the Ig VH a2 genes in an a1/a2 rabbit. From this animal the Alicia rabbit strain was developed and the mutation was termed ali. We previously showed, using Southern analysis and the transverse alternating field electrophoresis technique, that the difference between the ali rabbit and normal is a relatively small deletion including some of the most 3' VH genes. The most JH proximal 3' VH1 genes in DNA from normal rabbits of a1, a2 and a3 haplotypes encode a1, a2 and a3 molecules respectively, and it has been suggested that these genes are responsible for allelic inheritance of VHa allotypes. The present study suggests that the 3' end of the VH locus probably plays a key role in regulation of VH gene expression in rabbits because VH gene(s) in this region are the target(s) of preferential VDJ rearrangements. This raises the possibility that mechanisms such as somatic gene conversion and hypermutation are at work to generate the antibody repertoire in this species. Our data support the view that the 3' VH1 gene may be the preferred target for rearrangement in normal rabbits, and for the normal chromosome in heterozygous ali animals. However, homozygous ali rabbits with a deletion that removed the a2-encoding VH1 on both chromosomes do survive, rearrange other VH genes and produce normal levels of immunoglobulins as well as a significant percentage of B cells which bear the a2 allotype. This challenges the view that one VH gene, VH1, is solely responsible for the inheritance pattern of VHa allotypes.

  20. Comparison of prophylactic and therapeutic immunisation with an ErbB-2 (HER2) fusion protein and immunoglobulin V-gene repertoire analysis in a transgenic mouse model of spontaneous breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Arunima; Dyring, Charlotte; Stott, David I

    2014-02-12

    ErbB-2 is associated with several solid tumours of which breast cancer is the commonest cancer in women worldwide. Though anti-ErbB-2 antibody appears to play a significant role in prevention and therapy, naturally occurring anti-ErbB-2 antibody associated with the cleaved ectodomain of overexpressed ErbB-2 self antigen is detectable in patients. It is therefore essential to understand the course of antibody mediated protection during disease progression. 100% of FVB/N(neu) mice expressing mutated, constitutively active ErbB-2 develop mammary carcinoma. It has been shown that vaccination with ErbB-2 associated with a T helper cell epitope P30 can offer protection against transplantable tumour but it is unclear whether the same vaccine protects against naturally developing tumour. We have analysed the course of the disease following prophylactic, and therapeutic vaccination in this spontaneous, eutopic mammary carcinoma model that more closely resembles the human disease. 100% protection against tumour development was observed subsequent to prophylactic immunisation but disease progression was unaffected by therapeutic vaccination. The antibody response exhibited restricted expansion of the Immunoglobulin (Ig) variable (V)-gene repertoire by ErbB-2 specific B cells compared with the non-antigen specific B cell pool and control mice. The serum antibody profile was similar in therapeutically injected mice without any effect on tumour burden. PMID:24231440

  1. Flexible long-range loops in the VH gene region of the Igh locus facilitate the generation of a diverse antibody repertoire.

    PubMed

    Medvedovic, Jasna; Ebert, Anja; Tagoh, Hiromi; Tamir, Ido M; Schwickert, Tanja A; Novatchkova, Maria; Sun, Qiong; Huis In 't Veld, Pim J; Guo, Chunguang; Yoon, Hye Suk; Denizot, Yves; Holwerda, Sjoerd J B; de Laat, Wouter; Cogné, Michel; Shi, Yang; Alt, Frederick W; Busslinger, Meinrad

    2013-08-22

    The immunoglobulin heavy-chain (Igh) locus undergoes large-scale contraction in pro-B cells, which facilitates VH-DJH recombination by juxtaposing distal VH genes next to the DJH-rearranged gene segment in the 3' proximal Igh domain. By using high-resolution mapping of long-range interactions, we demonstrate that local interaction domains established the three-dimensional structure of the extended Igh locus in lymphoid progenitors. In pro-B cells, these local domains engaged in long-range interactions across the Igh locus, which depend on the regulators Pax5, YY1, and CTCF. The large VH gene cluster underwent flexible long-range interactions with the more rigidly structured proximal domain, which probably ensures similar participation of all VH genes in VH-DJH recombination to generate a diverse antibody repertoire. These long-range interactions appear to be an intrinsic feature of the VH gene cluster, because they are still generated upon mutation of the Eμ enhancer, IGCR1 insulator, or 3' regulatory region in the proximal Igh domain.

  2. Effects of serum immunoglobulins from patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) on depolarisation-induced calcium transients in isolated dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Joanne M; Dharmalingam, Backialakshmi; Marsh, Stephen J; Thompson, Victoria; Goebel, Andreas; Brown, David A

    2016-03-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is thought to have an auto-immune component. One such target recently proposed from the effects of auto-immune IgGs on Ca(2+) transients in cardiac myocytes and cell lines is the α1-adrenoceptor. We have tested whether such IgGs exerted comparable effects on nociceptive sensory neurons isolated from rat dorsal root ganglia. Depolarisation-induced [Ca(2+)]i transients were generated by applying 30 mM KCl for 2 min and monitored by Fura-2 fluorescence imaging. No IgGs tested (including 3 from CRPS patients) had any significant effect on these [Ca(2+)]i transients. However, IgG from one CRPS patient consistently and significantly reduced the K(+)-induced response of cells that had been pre-incubated for 24h with a mixture of inflammatory mediators (1 μM histamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, bradykinin and PGE2). Since this pre-incubation also appeared to induce a comparable inhibitory response to the α1-agonist phenylephrine, this is compatible with the α1-adrenoceptor as a target for CRPS auto-immunity. A mechanism whereby this might enhance pain is suggested.

  3. Phylogeny of immunoglobulin heavy chain isotypes: structure of the constant region of Ambystoma mexicanum upsilon chain deduced from cDNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Fellah, J S; Kerfourn, F; Wiles, M V; Schwager, J; Charlemagne, J

    1993-01-01

    An RNA polymerase chain reaction strategy was used to amplify and clone a cDNA segment encoding for the complete constant part of the axolotl IgY heavy (C upsilon) chain. C upsilon is 433 amino acids long and organized into four domains (C upsilon 1-C upsilon 4); each has the typical internal disulfide bond and invariant tryptophane residues. Axolotl C upsilon is most closely related to Xenopus C upsilon (40% identical amino acid residues) and C upsilon 1 shares 46.4% amino acid residues among these species. The presence of additional cysteines in C upsilon 1 and C upsilon 2 domains is consistent with an additional intradomain S-S bond similar to that suggested for Xenopus C upsilon and C chi, and for the avian C upsilon and the human C epsilon. C upsilon 4 ends with the Gly-Lys dipeptide characteristic of secreted mammalian C gamma 3, human C epsilon 4, and avian and anuran C upsilon 4, and contains the consensus [G/GT(AA)] nucleotide splice signal sequence for joining C upsilon 4 to the transmembrane region. These results are consistent with the hypothesis of an ancestral structural relationship between amphibian, avian upsilon chains, and mammalian epsilon chains. However, these molecules have different biological properties: axolotl IgY is secretory Ig, anuran and avian IgY behave like mammalian IgG, and mammalian IgE is implicated in anaphylactic reactions. PMID:8344718

  4. Cloning of the complete gene for carcinoembryonic antigen: analysis of its promoter indicates a region conveying cell type-specific expression.

    PubMed Central

    Schrewe, H; Thompson, J; Bona, M; Hefta, L J; Maruya, A; Hassauer, M; Shively, J E; von Kleist, S; Zimmermann, W

    1990-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a widely used tumor marker, especially in the surveillance of colonic cancer patients. Although CEA is also present in some normal tissues, it is apparently expressed at higher levels in tumorous tissues than in corresponding normal tissues. As a first step toward analyzing the regulation of expression of CEA at the transcriptional level, we have isolated and characterized a cosmid clone (cosCEA1), which contains the entire coding region of the CEA gene. A close correlation exists between the exon and deduced immunoglobulin-like domain borders. We have determined a cluster of transcriptional starts for CEA and the closely related nonspecific cross-reacting antigen (NCA) gene and have sequenced their putative promoters. Regions of sequence homology are found as far as approximately 500 nucleotides upstream from the translational starts of these genes, but farther upstream they diverge completely. In both cases we were unable to find classic TATA or CAAT boxes at their expected positions. To characterize the CEA and NCA promoters, we carried out transient transfection assays with promoter-indicator gene constructs in the CEA-producing adenocarcinoma cell line SW403, as well as in nonproducing HeLa cells. A CEA gene promoter construct, containing approximately 400 nucleotides upstream from the translational start, showed nine times higher activity in the SW403 than in the HeLa cell line. This indicates that cis-acting sequences which convey cell type-specific expression of the CEA gene are contained within this region. Images PMID:2342461

  5. Rearrangement by inversion of a T-cell receptor delta variable region gene located 3' of the delta constant region gene.

    PubMed Central

    Korman, A J; Maruyama, J; Raulet, D H

    1989-01-01

    We have located a T-cell receptor variable (V) delta gene segment immediately 3' of the delta constant (C) region gene and 5' to the known joining (J) alpha gene segments. This V delta gene is in the opposite transcriptional polarity to C delta and has rearranged to C delta by inversion in a gamma/delta-expressing hybridoma, DN7.3. This V delta gene is commonly rearranged in adult but not fetal gamma/delta-expressing thymocytes and has not been observed among alpha gene rearrangements reported to date. The reciprocal joining sequence isolated from this cell line contains N region nucleotides between the recombination signal sequences, in contrast to previously analyzed reciprocal joints. The results are discussed in the context of models accounting for ordered V gene usage during lymphocyte development. Images PMID:2789518

  6. Secondary Rearrangements and Hypermutation Generate Sufficient B Cell Diversity to Mount Protective Antiviral Immunoglobulin Responses

    PubMed Central

    López-Macías, Constantino; Kalinke, Ulrich; Cascalho, Marilia; Wabl, Matthias; Hengartner, Hans; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.; Lamarre, Alain

    1999-01-01

    Variable (V) region gene replacement was recently implicated in B cell repertoire diversification, but the contribution of this mechanism to antibody responses is still unknown. To investigate the role of V gene replacements in the generation of antigen-specific antibodies, we analyzed antiviral immunoglobulin responses of “quasimonoclonal” (QM) mice. The B cells of QM mice are genetically committed to exclusively express the anti-(4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl) acetyl specificity. However, ∼20% of the peripheral B cells of QM mice undergo secondary rearrangements and thereby potentially acquire new specificities. QM mice infected with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, or poliovirus mounted virus-specific neutralizing antibody responses. In general, kinetics of the antiviral immunoglobulin responses were delayed in QM mice; however, titers similar to control animals were eventually produced that were sufficient to protect against VSV-induced lethal disease. VSV neutralizing single-chain Fv fragments isolated from phage display libraries constructed from QM mice showed VH gene replacements and extensive hypermutation. Thus, our data demonstrate that secondary rearrangements and hypermutation can generate sufficient B cell diversity in QM mice to mount protective antiviral antibody responses, suggesting that these mechanisms might also contribute to the diversification of the B cell repertoire of normal mice. PMID:10359583

  7. Estimating Copy Number and Allelic Variation at the Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Locus Using Short Reads.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shishi; Yu, Jane A; Song, Yun S

    2016-09-01

    The study of genomic regions that contain gene copies and structural variation is a major challenge in modern genomics. Unlike variation involving single nucleotide changes, data on the variation of copy number is difficult to collect and few tools exist for analyzing the variation between individuals. The immunoglobulin heavy variable (IGHV) locus, which plays an integral role in the adaptive immune response, is an example of a complex genomic region that varies in gene copy number. Lack of standard methods to genotype this region prevents it from being included in association studies and is holding back the growing field of antibody repertoire analysis. Here we develop a method that takes short reads from high-throughput sequencing and outputs a genetic profile of the IGHV locus with the read coverage depth and a putative nucleotide sequence for each operationally defined gene cluster. Our operationally defined gene clusters aim to address a major challenge in studying the IGHV locus: the high sequence similarity between gene segments in different genomic locations. Tests on simulated data demonstrate that our approach can accurately determine the presence or absence of a gene cluster from reads as short as 70 bp. More detailed resolution on the copy number of gene clusters can be obtained from read coverage depth using longer reads (e.g., ≥ 100 bp). Detail at the nucleotide resolution of single copy genes (genes present in one copy per haplotype) can be determined with 250 bp reads. For IGHV genes with more than one copy, accurate nucleotide-resolution reconstruction is currently beyond the means of our approach. When applied to a family of European ancestry, our pipeline outputs genotypes that are consistent with the family pedigree, confirms existing multigene variants and suggests new copy number variants. This study paves the way for analyzing population-level patterns of variation in IGHV gene clusters in larger diverse datasets and for quantitatively

  8. Estimating Copy Number and Allelic Variation at the Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Locus Using Short Reads

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Shishi; Song, Yun S.

    2016-01-01

    The study of genomic regions that contain gene copies and structural variation is a major challenge in modern genomics. Unlike variation involving single nucleotide changes, data on the variation of copy number is difficult to collect and few tools exist for analyzing the variation between individuals. The immunoglobulin heavy variable (IGHV) locus, which plays an integral role in the adaptive immune response, is an example of a complex genomic region that varies in gene copy number. Lack of standard methods to genotype this region prevents it from being included in association studies and is holding back the growing field of antibody repertoire analysis. Here we develop a method that takes short reads from high-throughput sequencing and outputs a genetic profile of the IGHV locus with the read coverage depth and a putative nucleotide sequence for each operationally defined gene cluster. Our operationally defined gene clusters aim to address a major challenge in studying the IGHV locus: the high sequence similarity between gene segments in different genomic locations. Tests on simulated data demonstrate that our approach can accurately determine the presence or absence of a gene cluster from reads as short as 70 bp. More detailed resolution on the copy number of gene clusters can be obtained from read coverage depth using longer reads (e.g., ≥ 100 bp). Detail at the nucleotide resolution of single copy genes (genes present in one copy per haplotype) can be determined with 250 bp reads. For IGHV genes with more than one copy, accurate nucleotide-resolution reconstruction is currently beyond the means of our approach. When applied to a family of European ancestry, our pipeline outputs genotypes that are consistent with the family pedigree, confirms existing multigene variants and suggests new copy number variants. This study paves the way for analyzing population-level patterns of variation in IGHV gene clusters in larger diverse datasets and for quantitatively

  9. Organization and evolution of D region class I genes in the mouse major histocompatibility complex

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Chromosome walking has been used to study the organization of the class I genes in the D and Qa regions of the MHC of the BALB/c mouse and in the D region of the AKR mouse. Five and eight class I genes are found in the D and Qa regions of the BALB/c mouse, respectively, while the AKR mouse contains only a single class I D region gene that has been identified by transfection as the Dk gene. Restriction map homologies and crosshybridization experiments suggest that the multiple class I genes in the D region of the BALB/c mouse have been generated by unequal crossing-over involving class I genes from the Qa region. The expanded D region of BALB/c and other H-2d haplotype mouse strains appears to be metastable, since evidence for gene contraction in the Dd region has been found in two mutant strains. Thus the D region and also the Qa region class I genes are in a dynamic state, evolving by gene expansion and contraction. PMID:3701254

  10. Indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of immunoglobulin G reactive with a recombinant protein expressed from the gene encoding the 116-kilodalton protein of Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Duffy, M F; Whithear, K G; Noormohammadi, A H; Markham, P F; Catton, M; Leydon, J; Browning, G F

    1999-04-01

    Serology remains the method of choice for laboratory diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. Currently available serological tests employ complex cellular fractions of M. pneumoniae as antigen. To improve the specificity of M. pneumoniae diagnosis, a recombinant protein was assessed as a serodiagnostic reagent. A panel of recombinant proteins were expressed from a cloned M. pneumoniae gene that encodes a 116-kDa surface protein antigen. The recombinant proteins were assessed for reactivity with patient sera and the most antigenic was further assessed for its serodiagnostic potential by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The ELISA based on the recombinant protein was equivalent in sensitivity to the commercial test (Serodia Myco II; Fujirebio Inc.) to which it was compared. Southern and Western blotting data suggested that the recombinant protein derived from the 116-kDa protein of M. pneumoniae could provide a species-specific diagnostic tool, although further assessment is required.

  11. Antipsychotic Induced Gene Regulation in Multiple Brain Regions

    PubMed Central

    Girgenti, Matthew James; Nisenbaum, Laura K.; Bymaster, Franklin; Terwilliger, Rosemarie; Duman, Ronald S; Newton, Samuel Sathyanesan

    2010-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of action of antipsychotic drugs is not well understood. Their complex receptor affinity profiles indicate that their action could extend beyond dopamine receptor blockade. Single gene expression studies and high-throughput gene profiling have shown the induction of genes from several molecular classes and functional categories. Using a focused microarray approach we investigated gene regulation in rat striatum, frontal cortex and hippocampus after chronic administration of haloperidol or olanzapine. Regulated genes were validated by in-situ hybridization, realtime PCR and immunohistochemistry. Only limited overlap was observed in genes regulated by haloperidol and olanzapine. Both drugs elicited maximal gene regulation in the striatum and least in the hippocampus. Striatal gene induction by haloperidol was predominantly in neurotransmitter signaling, G-protein coupled receptors and transcription factors. Olanzapine prominently induced retinoic acid and trophic factor signaling genes in the frontal cortex. The data also revealed the induction of several genes that could be targeted in future drug development efforts. The study uncovered the induction of several novel genes, including somatostatin receptors and metabotropic glutamate receptors. The results demonstrating the regulation of multiple receptors and transcription factors suggests that both typical and atypical antipsychotics could possess a complex molecular mechanism of action. PMID:20070867

  12. A monoclonal autoantibody that promotes central nervous system remyelination in a model of multiple sclerosis is a natural autoantibody encoded by germline immunoglobulin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.J.; Rodriguez, M.

    1995-03-01

    Antibodies directed against self-Ags are frequently considered detrimental, and have been shown to play a pathogenic role in certain autoimmune diseases. However, the presence of autoreactive Abs in normal individuals suggests that some autoantibodies could participate in normal physiology. Our previous studies demonstrated that monoclonal autoantibodies SCH94.03 and SCH94.32, generated from the splenocytes of uninfected SJL/J mice injected with normal homogenized spinal cord, promote central nervous system remyelination when passively transferred into syngeneic mice chronically infected with Theiler`s murine encephalomyelitis virus, an established experimental model of multiple sclerosis. In this study we show that these two monoclonal autoantibodies are identical, and have phenotypic characteristics of natural autoantibodies. By using a solid phase assay system, SCH94.03 and SCH94.32 showed reactivity toward several protein Ags and chemical haptens, with prominent reactivity toward spectrin, (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl) acetyl, and fluorescein. Sequence analysis showed that both SCH94.03 and SCH94.32 were encoded by identical germline Ig light chain V{sub K}10/J{sub K}l and heavy chain V23/DFL16.1/J{sub H}2 genes, with no definitive somatic mutations. These results indicate that a natural autoantibody participates in a beneficial physiologic response to central nervous system injury. 60 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Tumor suppressor genes are larger than apoptosis-effector genes and have more regions of active chromatin: Connection to a stochastic paradigm for sequential gene expression programs.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Marlene; Mauro, James A; Ramsamooj, Michael; Blanck, George

    2015-08-01

    Apoptosis- and proliferation-effector genes are substantially regulated by the same transactivators, with E2F-1 and Oct-1 being notable examples. The larger proliferation-effector genes have more binding sites for the transactivators that regulate both sets of genes, and proliferation-effector genes have more regions of active chromatin, i.e, DNase I hypersensitive and histone 3, lysine-4 trimethylation sites. Thus, the size differences between the 2 classes of genes suggest a transcriptional regulation paradigm whereby the accumulation of transcription factors that regulate both sets of genes, merely as an aspect of stochastic behavior, accumulate first on the larger proliferation-effector gene "traps," and then accumulate on the apoptosis effector genes, thereby effecting sequential activation of the 2 different gene sets. As IRF-1 and p53 levels increase, tumor suppressor proteins are first activated, followed by the activation of apoptosis-effector genes, for example during S-phase pausing for DNA repair. Tumor suppressor genes are larger than apoptosis-effector genes and have more IRF-1 and p53 binding sites, thereby likewise suggesting a paradigm for transcription sequencing based on stochastic interactions of transcription factors with different gene classes. In this report, using the ENCODE database, we determined that tumor suppressor genes have a greater number of open chromatin regions and histone 3 lysine-4 trimethylation sites, consistent with the idea that a larger gene size can facilitate earlier transcriptional activation via the inclusion of more transactivator binding sites.

  14. Leporid immunoglobulin G shows evidence of strong selective pressure on the hinge and CH3 domains

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Ana; Woof, Jenny M.; Almeida, Tereza; Abrantes, Joana; Alves, Paulo C.; Gortázar, Christian; Esteves, Pedro J.

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) is the predominant serum immunoglobulin and has the longest serum half-life of all the antibody classes. The European rabbit IgG has been of significant importance in immunological research, and is therefore well characterized. However, the IgG of other leporids has been disregarded. To evaluate the evolution of this gene in leporids, we sequenced the complete IGHG for six other genera: Bunolagus, Brachylagus, Lepus, Pentalagus, Romerolagus and Sylvilagus. The newly sequenced leporid IGHG gene has an organization and structure similar to that of the European rabbit IgG. A gradient in leporid IgG constant domain diversity was observed, with the CH1 being the most conserved and the CH3 the most variable domain. Positive selection was found to be acting on all constant domains, but with a greater incidence in the CH3 domain, where a cluster of three positively selected sites was identified. In the hinge region, only three polymorphic positions were observed. The same hinge length was observed for all leporids. Unlike the variation observed for the European rabbit, all 11 Lepus species studied share exactly the same hinge motif, suggesting its maintenance as a result of an advantageous structure or conformation. PMID:25185680

  15. Immunoglobulin isotypes in Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar.

    PubMed

    Hordvik, Ivar

    2015-02-27

    There are three major immunoglobulin (Ig) isotypes in salmonid fish: IgM, IgD and IgT, defined by the heavy chains μ, δ and τ, respectively. As a result of whole genome duplication in the ancestor of the salmonid fish family, Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) possess two highly similar Ig heavy chain gene complexes (A and B), comprising two μ genes, two δ genes, three intact τ genes and five τ pseudogenes. The μA and μB genes correspond to two distinct sub-populations of serum IgM. The IgM-B sub-variant has a characteristic extra cysteine near the C-terminal part of the heavy chain and exhibits a higher degree of polymer disulfide cross-linking compared to IgM-A. The IgM-B:IgM-A ratio in serum is typically 60:40, but skewed ratios are also observed. The IgT isotype appears to be specialized to mucosal immune responses in salmonid fish. The concentration of IgT in serum is 100 to 1000 times lower than IgM. Secreted forms of IgD have been detected in rainbow trout, but not yet in Atlantic salmon.

  16. 5' control regions of the apolipoprotein(a) gene and members of the related plasminogen gene family.

    PubMed Central

    Wade, D P; Clarke, J G; Lindahl, G E; Liu, A C; Zysow, B R; Meer, K; Schwartz, K; Lawn, R M

    1993-01-01

    Elevated blood levels of apolipoprotein(a), the component of lipoprotein(a) that distinguishes it from low density lipoprotein, are a major risk factor for atherosclerosis. The apolipoprotein(a) gene is highly similar to the plasminogen gene and to at least four other genes or pseudogenes. The 5' untranslated and flanking sequences of these six genes contain extensive regions of near identity and share sequence elements involved in the initiation of transcription and translation. About 1000 base pairs of flanking DNA of each gene are sufficient to promote transcription in cultured hepatocytes. The apolipoprotein(a) gene promoter contains functional interleukin 6-responsive elements, consistent with the reported acute-phase response of apolipoprotein(a). Flanking genomic fragments of the apoliprotein(a) gene from two individuals with vastly different plasma apolipoprotein(a) concentrations have sequence differences that are reflected in differences in the rate of in vitro transcription. Images PMID:7679504

  17. Absence of {lambda} immunoglobulin sequences on the supernumerary chromosome of the {open_quotes}cat eye{close_quotes} syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Hough, C.A.; White, B.N.; Holden, J.J.A.

    1995-09-11

    The supernumerary bisatellited chromosome causing the {open_quotes}cat eye{close_quotes} syndrome (CES) is of chromosome 22 origin and consists of an inverted duplication of the 22pter{r_arrow}22q11.2 region. To determine the extent of involvement of band q11.2 on the bisatellited chromosome, copy number assessment of sequences homologous to cloned {lambda} immunoglobulin ({lambda} Ig) gene region probes was carried out on DNA from individuals with CES using densitometric analysis of Southern blots. None of the 10 {lambda} Ig sequences studied was found in increased copy number in DNA from any of the 10 CES individuals tested, indicating that these sequences are not present on the supernumerary chromosome. The breakpoints involved in the generation of the bisatellited supernumerary chromosome associated with CES are therefore proximal to the {lambda} Ig gene region. 20 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  18. SAW: a graphical user interface for the analysis of immunoglobulin variable domain sequences.

    PubMed

    Elgavish, R A; Schroeder, H W

    1993-12-01

    The Sequence Analysis Workshop (SAW) is an interactive program for sequence analysis of immunoglobulin variable domains. Sequences for SAW can be obtained from GenBank or from a standard text file. SAW can compare a variable domain to as many as 100 different sequences, calculate the extent of homology, sort the sequences by their degree of similarity, translate the nucleotide codons into amino acids and then display the results in either a graphical or text format. These comparisons allow the investigator to determine the likely germ-line progenitors of a variable domain and to visualize how it differs from other antibody genes by functional region. SAW supports replacement and silent site substitution analysis by either codon or region, thus providing rapid insight into the forces that have shaped mutations. The sequence comparisons can be printed out as an aid for paper analysis or for preparation of figures for publication. SAW is written in Microsoft C for use with the Microsoft Windows graphics environment. The use of color and graphics, the generation of subsidiary windows that contain the results of specific analyses and the mouse-driven control of the program make SAW an easy-to-use tool for immunoglobulin sequence comparison. PMID:8292340

  19. Corepressor-dependent silencing of chromosomal regions encoding neuronal genes.

    PubMed

    Lunyak, Victoria V; Burgess, Robert; Prefontaine, Gratien G; Nelson, Charles; Sze, Sing-Hoi; Chenoweth, Josh; Schwartz, Phillip; Pevzner, Pavel A; Glass, Christopher; Mandel, Gail; Rosenfeld, Michael G

    2002-11-29

    The molecular mechanisms by which central nervous system-specific genes are expressed only in the nervous system and repressed in other tissues remain a central issue in developmental and regulatory biology. Here, we report that the zinc-finger gene-specific repressor element RE-1 silencing transcription factor/neuronal restricted silencing factor (REST/NRSF) can mediate extraneuronal restriction by imposing either active repression via histone deacetylase recruitment or long-term gene silencing using a distinct functional complex. Silencing of neuronal-specific genes requires the recruitment of an associated corepressor, CoREST, that serves as a functional molecular beacon for the recruitment of molecular machinery that imposes silencing across a chromosomal interval, including transcriptional units that do not themselves contain REST/NRSF response elements.

  20. Identification of a set of genes showing regionally enriched expression in the mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    D'Souza, Cletus A; Chopra, Vikramjit; Varhol, Richard; Xie, Yuan-Yun; Bohacec, Slavita; Zhao, Yongjun; Lee, Lisa LC; Bilenky, Mikhail; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; He, An; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Goldowitz, Daniel; Marra, Marco A; Holt, Robert A; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Jones, Steven JM

    2008-01-01

    Background The Pleiades Promoter Project aims to improve gene therapy by designing human mini-promoters (< 4 kb) that drive gene expression in specific brain regions or cell-types of therapeutic interest. Our goal was to first identify genes displaying regionally enriched expression in the mouse brain so that promoters designed from orthologous human genes can then be tested to drive reporter expression in a similar pattern in the mouse brain. Results We have utilized LongSAGE to identify regionally enriched transcripts in the adult mouse brain. As supplemental strategies, we also performed a meta-analysis of published literature and inspected the Allen Brain Atlas in situ hybridization data. From a set of approximately 30,000 mouse genes, 237 were identified as showing specific or enriched expression in 30 target regions of the mouse brain. GO term over-representation among these genes revealed co-involvement in various aspects of central nervous system development and physiology. Conclusion Using a multi-faceted expression validation approach, we have identified mouse genes whose human orthologs are good candidates for design of mini-promoters. These mouse genes represent molecular markers in several discrete brain regions/cell-types, which could potentially provide a mechanistic explanation of unique functions performed by each region. This set of markers may also serve as a resource for further studies of gene regulatory elements influencing brain expression. PMID:18625066

  1. Analysis of the regions flanking the human insulin gene and sequence of an Alu family member.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, G I; Pictet, R; Rutter, W J

    1980-01-01

    The regions around the human insulin gene have been studied by heteroduplex, hybridization and sequence analysis. These studies indicated that there is a region of heterogeneous length located approximately 700 bp before the 5' end of the gene; and that the 19 kb of cloned DNA which includes the 1430 bp insulin gene as well as 5650 bp before and 11,500 bp after the gene is single copy sequence except for 500 bp located 6000 bp from the 3' end of the gene. This 500 bp segment contains a member of the Alu family of dispersed middle repetitive sequences as well as another less highly repeated homopolymeric segment. The sequence of this region was determined. This Alu repeat is bordered by 19 bp direct repeats and also contains an 83 bp sequence which is present twice. The regions flanking the human and rat I insulin genes were compared by heteroduplex analysis to localize homologous sequences in the flanking regions which could be involved in the regulation of insulin biosynthesis. The homology between the two genes is restricted to the region encoding preproinsulin and a short region of approximately 60 bp flanking the 5' side of the genes. Images PMID:6253909

  2. Sequence analysis of the ERCC2 gene regions in human, mouse, and hamster reveals three linked genes

    SciTech Connect

    Lamerdin, J.E.; Stilwagen, S.A.; Ramirez, M.H.

    1996-06-15

    The ERCC2 (excision repair cross-complementing rodent repair group 2) gene product is involved in transcription-coupled repair as an integral member of the basal transcription factor BTF2/TFIIH complex. Defects in this gene can result in three distinct human disorders, namely the cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D, trichothiodystrophy, and Cockayne syndrome. We report the comparative analysis of 91.6 kb of new sequence including 54.3 kb encompassing the human ERCC2 locus, the syntenic region in the mouse (32.6 kb), and a further 4.7 kb of sequence 3{prime} of the previously reported ERCC2 region in the hamster. In addition to ERCC2, our analysis revealed the presence of two previously undescribed genes in all three species. The first is centromeric (in the human) to ERCC2 and is most similar to the kinesin light chain gene in sea urchin. The second gene is telomeric (in the human) to ERCC2 and contains a motif found in ankyrins, some cell proteins, and transcription factors. Multiple EST matches to this putative new gene indicate that it is expressed in several human tissues, including breast. The identification and description of two new genes provides potential candidate genes for disorders mapping to this region of 19q13.2. 42 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. HIV-associated mucosal gene expression: region-specific alterations

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Robin M.; Keshavarzian, Ali; Losurdo, John; Swanson, Garth; Siewe, Basile; Forsyth, Christopher B.; French, Audrey L.; Demarais, Patricia; Engen, Phillip; Raeisi, Shohreh; Mutlu, Ece; Landay, Alan L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Despite the use of HAART to control HIV, systemic immune activation and inflammation persists with the consequence of developing serious non-AIDS events. The mechanisms that contribute to persistent systemic immune activation have not been well defined. The intestine is the major source of “sterile” inflammation and plays a critical role in immune function; thus, we sought to determine whether intestinal gene expression was altered in virally controlled HIV-infected individuals. Design and methods Gene expression was compared in biopsy samples collected from HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected individuals from the ileum, right colon (ascending colon), and left colon (sigmoid). Affymetrix gene arrays were performed on tissues and pathway analyses were conducted. Gene expression was correlated with systemic markers of intestinal barrier dysfunction and inflammation and intestinal microbiota composition. Results Genes involved in cellular immune response, cytokine signaling, pathogen-influenced signaling, humoral immune response, apoptosis, intracellular and second messenger signaling, cancer, organismal growth and development, and proliferation and development were upregulated in the intestine of HIV-infected individuals with differences observed in the ileum, right, and left colon. Gene expression in the ileum primarily correlated with systemic markers of inflammation (e.g., IL7R, IL2, and TLR2 with serum TNF) whereas expression in the colon correlated with the microbiota community (e.g., IFNG, IL1B, and CD3G with Bacteroides). Conclusion These data demonstrate persistent, proinflammatory changes in the intestinal mucosa of virally suppressed HIV-infected individuals. These changes in intestinal gene expression may be the consequence of or contribute to barrier dysfunction and intestinal dysbiosis observed in HIV. PMID:25587909

  4. Targeted disruption of the porcine immunoglobulin kappa light chain locus.

    PubMed

    Ramsoondar, J; Mendicino, M; Phelps, C; Vaught, T; Ball, S; Monahan, J; Chen, S; Dandro, A; Boone, J; Jobst, P; Vance, A; Wertz, N; Polejaeva, I; Butler, J; Dai, Y; Ayares, D; Wells, K

    2011-06-01

    Inactivation of the endogenous pig immunoglobulin (Ig) loci, and replacement with their human counterparts, would produce animals that could alleviate both the supply and specificity issues of therapeutic human polyclonal antibodies (PAbs). Platform genetics are being developed in pigs that have all endogenous Ig loci inactivated and replaced by human counterparts, in order to address this unmet clinical need. This report describes the deletion of the porcine kappa (κ) light chain constant (Cκ) region in pig primary fetal fibroblasts (PPFFs) using gene targeting technology, and the generation of live animals from these cells via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) cloning. There are only two other targeted loci previously published in swine, and this is the first report of a targeted disruption of an Ig light chain locus in a livestock species. Pigs with one targeted Cκ allele (heterozygous knockout or ±) were bred together to generate Cκ homozygous knockout (-/-) animals. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) from Cκ -/- pigs were devoid of κ-containing Igs. Furthermore, there was an increase in lambda (λ) light chain expression when compared to that of wild-type littermates (Cκ +/+). Targeted inactivation of the Ig heavy chain locus has also been achieved and work is underway to inactivate the pig lambda light chain locus.

  5. Clonal deletion of specific thymocytes by an immunoglobulin idiotype.

    PubMed Central

    Bogen, B; Dembic, Z; Weiss, S

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated whether immunoglobulin can induce clonal deletion of thymocytes by employing two strains of transgenic mice. One strain is transgenic for an alpha/beta T cell receptor (TCR) which recognizes a processed idiotypic peptide of the lambda 2(315) light chain variable region, bound to the I-Ed class II major histocompatibility complex molecule. The other mouse strain is transgenic for the lambda 2(315) gene. Double transgenic offspring from a TCR-transgenic female mated with a lambda 2(315) transgenic male exhibit a pronounced clonal deletion of CD4+CD8+ thymocytes. Analysis of neonates from the reciprocal (lambda 2(315)-transgenic female x TCR-transgenic male) cross suggests that the deletion in double transgenic offspring most likely is caused by lambda 2(315) produced within the thymus rather than by maternally derived IgG, lambda 2(315). Nevertheless, IgG, lambda 2(315) can cause deletion of CD4+CD8+ thymocytes when injected in large amounts intraperitoneally into either adult or neonatal TCR-transgenic mice. Deletion is evident 48 and 72 h after injection, but by day 7 the thymus has already regained its normal appearance. A serum concentration of several hundred microgram/ml is required for deletion to be observed. Therefore, the heterogeneous idiotypes of serum Ig are probably each of too low concentration to cause thymocyte deletion in normal animals. Images PMID:8428591

  6. Chronic Ethanol Exposure Produces Time- and Brain Region-Dependent Changes in Gene Coexpression Networks

    PubMed Central

    Osterndorff-Kahanek, Elizabeth A.; Becker, Howard C.; Lopez, Marcelo F.; Farris, Sean P.; Tiwari, Gayatri R.; Nunez, Yury O.; Harris, R. Adron; Mayfield, R. Dayne

    2015-01-01

    Repeated ethanol exposure and withdrawal in mice increases voluntary drinking and represents an animal model of physical dependence. We examined time- and brain region-dependent changes in gene coexpression networks in amygdala (AMY), nucleus accumbens (NAC), prefrontal cortex (PFC), and liver after four weekly cycles of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) vapor exposure in C57BL/6J mice. Microarrays were used to compare gene expression profiles at 0-, 8-, and 120-hours following the last ethanol exposure. Each brain region exhibited a large number of differentially expressed genes (2,000-3,000) at the 0- and 8-hour time points, but fewer changes were detected at the 120-hour time point (400-600). Within each region, there was little gene overlap across time (~20%). All brain regions were significantly enriched with differentially expressed immune-related genes at the 8-hour time point. Weighted gene correlation network analysis identified modules that were highly enriched with differentially expressed genes at the 0- and 8-hour time points with virtually no enrichment at 120 hours. Modules enriched for both ethanol-responsive and cell-specific genes were identified in each brain region. These results indicate that chronic alcohol exposure causes global ‘rewiring‘ of coexpression systems involving glial and immune signaling as well as neuronal genes. PMID:25803291

  7. Chronic ethanol exposure produces time- and brain region-dependent changes in gene coexpression networks.

    PubMed

    Osterndorff-Kahanek, Elizabeth A; Becker, Howard C; Lopez, Marcelo F; Farris, Sean P; Tiwari, Gayatri R; Nunez, Yury O; Harris, R Adron; Mayfield, R Dayne

    2015-01-01

    Repeated ethanol exposure and withdrawal in mice increases voluntary drinking and represents an animal model of physical dependence. We examined time- and brain region-dependent changes in gene coexpression networks in amygdala (AMY), nucleus accumbens (NAC), prefrontal cortex (PFC), and liver after four weekly cycles of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) vapor exposure in C57BL/6J mice. Microarrays were used to compare gene expression profiles at 0-, 8-, and 120-hours following the last ethanol exposure. Each brain region exhibited a large number of differentially expressed genes (2,000-3,000) at the 0- and 8-hour time points, but fewer changes were detected at the 120-hour time point (400-600). Within each region, there was little gene overlap across time (~20%). All brain regions were significantly enriched with differentially expressed immune-related genes at the 8-hour time point. Weighted gene correlation network analysis identified modules that were highly enriched with differentially expressed genes at the 0- and 8-hour time points with virtually no enrichment at 120 hours. Modules enriched for both ethanol-responsive and cell-specific genes were identified in each brain region. These results indicate that chronic alcohol exposure causes global 'rewiring' of coexpression systems involving glial and immune signaling as well as neuronal genes.

  8. Thyroid hormone receptors bind to defined regions of the growth hormone and placental lactogen genes.

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, J W; Voz, M L; Eliard, P H; Mathy-Harter, M; De Nayer, P; Economidis, I V; Belayew, A; Martial, J A; Rousseau, G G

    1986-01-01

    The intracellular receptor for thyroid hormone is a protein found in chromatin. Since thyroid hormone stimulates transcription of the growth hormone gene through an unknown mechanism, the hypothesis that the thyroid hormone-receptor complex interacts with defined regions of this gene has been investigated in a cell-free system. Nuclear extracts from human lymphoblastoid IM-9 cells containing thyroid hormone receptors were incubated with L-3,5,3'-tri[125I]iodothyronine and calf thymus DNA-cellulose. Restriction fragments of the human growth hormone gene were added to determine their ability to inhibit labeled receptor binding to DNA-cellulose. These fragments encompassed nucleotide sequences from about three kilobase pairs upstream to about four kilobase pairs downstream from the transcription initiation site. The thyroid hormone-receptor complex bound preferentially to the 5'-flanking sequences of the growth hormone gene in a region between nucleotide coordinates -290 and -129. The receptor also bound to an analogous promoter region in the human placental lactogen gene, which has 92% nucleotide sequence homology with the growth hormone gene. These binding regions appear to be distinct from those that are recognized by the receptor for glucocorticoids, which stimulate growth hormone gene expression synergistically with thyroid hormone. The presence of thyroid hormone was required for binding of its receptor to the growth hormone gene promoter, suggesting that thyroid hormone renders the receptor capable of recognizing specific gene regions. PMID:3466175

  9. Differential Regulation of the Period Genes in Striatal Regions following Cocaine Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Falcon, Edgardo; Ozburn, Angela; Mukherjee, Shibani; Roybal, Kole; McClung, Colleen A.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that disruptions in circadian rhythms contribute to the pathophysiology of multiple psychiatric diseases, including drug addiction. In fact, a number of the genes involved in the regulation of circadian rhythms are also involved in modulating the reward value for drugs of abuse, like cocaine. Thus, we wanted to determine the effects of chronic cocaine on the expression of several circadian genes in the Nucleus Accumbens (NAc) and Caudate Putamen (CP), regions of the brain known to be involved in the behavioral responses to drugs of abuse. Moreover, we wanted to explore the mechanism by which these genes are regulated following cocaine exposure. Here we find that after repeated cocaine exposure, expression of the Period (Per) genes and Neuronal PAS Domain Protein 2 (Npas2) are elevated, in a somewhat regionally selective fashion. Moreover, NPAS2 (but not CLOCK (Circadian Locomotor Output Cycles Kaput)) protein binding at Per gene promoters was enhanced following cocaine treatment. Mice lacking a functional Npas2 gene failed to exhibit any induction of Per gene expression after cocaine, suggesting that NPAS2 is necessary for this cocaine-induced regulation. Examination of Per gene and Npas2 expression over twenty-four hours identified changes in diurnal rhythmicity of these genes following chronic cocaine, which were regionally specific. Taken together, these studies point to selective disruptions in Per gene rhythmicity in striatial regions following chronic cocaine treatment, which are mediated primarily by NPAS2. PMID:23776671

  10. Functional analysis and nucleotide sequence of the promoter region of the murine hck gene.

    PubMed Central

    Lock, P; Stanley, E; Holtzman, D A; Dunn, A R

    1990-01-01

    The structure and function of the promoter region and exon 1 of the murine hck gene have been characterized in detail. RNase protection analysis has established that hck transcripts initiate from heterogeneous start sites located within the hck gene. Fusion gene constructs containing hck 5'-flanking sequences and the bacterial Neor gene have been introduced into the hematopoietic cell lines FDC-P1 and WEHI-265 by using a self-inactivating retroviral vector. The transcriptional start sites of the fusion gene are essentially identical to those of the endogenous hck gene. Analysis of infected WEHI-265 cell lines treated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) reveals a 3- to 5-fold elevation in the levels of endogenous hck mRNA and a 1.4- to 2.6-fold increase in the level of Neor fusion gene transcripts, indicating that hck 5'-flanking sequences are capable of conferring LPS responsiveness on the Neor gene. The 5'-flanking region of the hck gene contains sequences similar to an element which is thought to be involved in the LPS responsiveness of the class II major histocompatibility gene A alpha k. A subset of these sequences are also found in the 5'-flanking regions of other LPS-responsive genes. Moreover, this motif is related to the consensus binding sequence of NF-kappa B, a transcription factor which is known to be regulated by LPS. Images PMID:2388619

  11. Comparative Sequence Analysis of the Sorghum Rph Region and the Maize Rp1 Resistance Gene Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishna, Wusirika; Emberton, John; SanMiguel, Phillip; Ogden, Matthew; Llaca, Victor; Messing, Joachim; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L.

    2002-01-01

    A 268-kb chromosomal segment containing sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) genes that are orthologous to the maize (Zea mays) Rp1 disease resistance (R) gene complex was sequenced. A region of approximately 27 kb in sorghum was found to contain five Rp1 homologs, but most have structures indicating that they are not functional. In contrast, maize inbred B73 has 15 Rp1 homologs in two nearby clusters of 250 and 300 kb. As at maize Rp1, the cluster of R gene homologs is interrupted by the presence of several genes that appear to have no resistance role, but these genes were different from the ones found within the maize Rp1 complex. More than 200 kb of DNA downstream from the sorghum Rp1-orthologous R gene cluster was sequenced and found to contain many duplicated and/or truncated genes. None of the duplications currently exist as simple tandem events, suggesting that numerous rearrangements were required to generate the current genomic structure. Four truncated genes were observed, including one gene that appears to have both 5′ and 3′ deletions. The maize Rp1 region is also unusually enriched in truncated genes. Hence, the orthologous maize and sorghum regions share numerous structural features, but all involve events that occurred independently in each species. The data suggest that complex R gene clusters are unusually prone to frequent internal and adjacent chromosomal rearrangements of several types. PMID:12481055

  12. The structural basis of germline-encoded VH3 immunoglobulin binding to staphylococcal protein A

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The ability of human VH3 immunoglobulins (Ig) to bind to staphylococcal protein A (SPA) via their Fab region is analogous to the binding of bacterial superantigens to T cell receptors. The present report establishes the structural basis for the interaction of SPA and VH3 Ig. We have studied a panel of 27 human monoclonal IgM that were derived from fetal B lymphocytes. As such, these IgM were expected to be encoded by unmutated germline genes. Binding to SPA in ELISA occurred with 15 of 15 VH3 IgM, but none of 12 IgM from the VH1, VH4, VH5, or VH6 families. The VH sequences of the 27 IgM were derived from 20 distinct VH elements, including 11 from the VH3 family. Use of D, JH, and CL genes was similar among VH3 and non-VH3 IgM. A comparison of the corresponding VH protein sequences, and those of previously studied IgM, identified a probable site for SPA binding that includes VH3 residues in framework region 3 (FR3), and perhaps FR1 and 3' complementary determining region 2. The results thus demonstrate that among human IgM, specificity for SPA is encoded by at least 11 different VH3 germline genes. Furthermore, like the T cell superantigens, SPA likely binds to residues in the VH framework region, outside the classical antigen-binding site of the hypervariable loops. PMID:8315388

  13. Strong early seed-specific gene regulatory region

    SciTech Connect

    Broun, Pierre; Somerville, Chris

    2002-01-01

    Nucleic acid sequences and methods for their use are described which provide for early seed-specific transcription, in order to modulate or modify expression of foreign or endogenous genes in seeds, particularly embryo cells. The method finds particular use in conjunction with modifying fatty acid production in seed tissue.

  14. Strong early seed-specific gene regulatory region

    DOEpatents

    Broun, Pierre; Somerville, Chris

    1999-01-01

    Nucleic acid sequences and methods for their use are described which provide for early seed-specific transcription, in order to modulate or modify expression of foreign or endogenous genes in seeds, particularly embryo cells. The method finds particular use in conjunction with modifying fatty acid production in seed tissue.

  15. Functional conservation of the promoter regions of vertebrate tyrosinase genes.

    PubMed

    Sato, S; Tanaka, M; Miura, H; Ikeo, K; Gojobori, T; Takeuchi, T; Yamamoto, H

    2001-11-01

    Tyrosinase is the key enzyme for synthesizing melanin pigments, which primarily determine mammalian skin coloration. Considering the important roles of pigments in the evolution and the adaptation of vertebrates, phylogenetic changes in the coding and flanking regulatory sequences of the tyrosinase gene are particularly intriguing. We have now cloned cDNA encoding tyrosinase from Japanese quail and snapping turtle. These nonmammalian cDNA are highly homologous to those of the mouse and human tyrosinases, whereas the 5' flanking sequences are far less conserved except for a few short sequence motifs. Nevertheless, we demonstrate that the 5' flanking sequences from the quail or turtle tyrosinase genes are capable of directing the expression of a fused mouse tyrosinase cDNA when introduced into cultured mouse albino melanocytes. This experimental method, which reveals the functional conservation of regulatory sequences in one cell type (the melanocyte), may be utilized to evaluate phylogenetic differences in mechanisms controlling specific gene expression in many other types of cells. We also provide evidence that the 5' flanking sequences from these nonmammalian genes are functional in vivo by producing transgenic mice. Phylogenetic changes of vertebrate tyrosinase promoters and the possible involvement of conserved sequence motifs in melanocyte-specific expression of tyrosinase are discussed. PMID:11764277

  16. Complex repetitive arrangements of gene sequence in the candidate region of the spinal muscular atrophy gene in 5q13

    SciTech Connect

    Theodosiou, A.M.; Nesbit, A.M.; Daniels, R.J.; Campbell, L.; Francis, M.J.; Christodoulou, Z.; Morrison, K.E.; Davies, K.E. |

    1994-12-01

    Childhood-onset proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a heritable neurological disorder, which has been mapped by genetic linkage analysis to chromosome 5q13, in the interval between markers D5S435 and D5S557. Here, we present gene sequences that have been isolated from this interval, several of which show sequence homologies to exons of {beta}-glucuronidase. These gene sequences are repeated several times across the candidate region and are also present on chromosome 5p. The arrangement of these repetitive gene motifs is polymorphic between individuals. The high degree of variability observed may have some influence on the expression of the genes in the region. Since SMA is not inherited as a classical autosomal recessive disease, novel genomic rearrangements arising from aberrant recombination events between the complex repeats may be associated with the phenotype observed.

  17. Analysis of the sexual development-promoting region of Schizophyllum commune TRP1 gene.

    PubMed

    Sen, Kikuo; Kinoshita, Hideki; Tazuke, Kazuyuki; Maki, Yoshinori; Yoshiura, Yumi; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Shibai, Hiroshiro; Kurosawa, Shin-Ichi

    2016-10-01

    This study aims to elucidate the mechanism of sexual development of basidiomycetous mushrooms from mating to fruit body formation. Sequencing analysis showed the TRP1 gene of basidiomycete Schizophyllum commune encoded an enzyme with three catalytic regions of GAT (glutamine amidotransferase), IGPS (indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthase), and PRAI (5-phosphoribosyl anthranilate isomerase); among these three regions, the trp1 mutant (Trp(-)) had a missense mutation (L→F) of a 338th amino acid residue of the TRP1 protein within the IGPS region. To investigate the function of IGPS region related to sexual development, dikaryons with high, usual, and no expression of the IGPS region of TRP1 gene were made. The dikaryotic mycelia with high expression of the IGPS formed mature fruit bodies earlier than those with usual and no expression of the IGPS. These results showed that the IGPS region in TRP1 gene promoted sexual development of S. commune. PMID:27296855

  18. Analysis of the sexual development-promoting region of Schizophyllum commune TRP1 gene.

    PubMed

    Sen, Kikuo; Kinoshita, Hideki; Tazuke, Kazuyuki; Maki, Yoshinori; Yoshiura, Yumi; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Shibai, Hiroshiro; Kurosawa, Shin-Ichi

    2016-10-01

    This study aims to elucidate the mechanism of sexual development of basidiomycetous mushrooms from mating to fruit body formation. Sequencing analysis showed the TRP1 gene of basidiomycete Schizophyllum commune encoded an enzyme with three catalytic regions of GAT (glutamine amidotransferase), IGPS (indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthase), and PRAI (5-phosphoribosyl anthranilate isomerase); among these three regions, the trp1 mutant (Trp(-)) had a missense mutation (L→F) of a 338th amino acid residue of the TRP1 protein within the IGPS region. To investigate the function of IGPS region related to sexual development, dikaryons with high, usual, and no expression of the IGPS region of TRP1 gene were made. The dikaryotic mycelia with high expression of the IGPS formed mature fruit bodies earlier than those with usual and no expression of the IGPS. These results showed that the IGPS region in TRP1 gene promoted sexual development of S. commune.

  19. Genetic Organization of the Region around UNC-15 (I), a Gene Affecting Paramyosin in CAENORHABDITIS ELEGANS

    PubMed Central

    Rose, A. M.; Baillie, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans mutants in the gene unc-15 (I) affect the muscle protein paramyosin (Waterston, Fishpool and Brenner 1977). We have characterized 20 ethyl methanesulfonate-induced mutations in essential genes closely linked to unc-15. These lethals defined 16 new complementation groups. In the 0.65 map-unit interval around unc-15 defined by dpy-14 and unc-56, seven newly identified genes have been mapped relative to five existing genes. At present, the average distance between genes in this region is approximately 0.05 map units. Two genes, unc-15 and unc-13, are only 0.025 map units apart. Partial fine-structure maps of alleles of these two genes have been constructed. This analysis of unc-15 and genes adjacent to it is the first in a series of genetic and biochemical studies directed towards understanding the control of unc-15 expression. PMID:7262541

  20. Single nucleotide polymorphism in transcriptional regulatory regions and expression of environmentally responsive genes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xuting; Tomso, Daniel J.; Liu Xuemei; Bell, Douglas A. . E-mail: BELL1@niehs.nih.gov

    2005-09-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the human genome are DNA sequence variations that can alter an individual's response to environmental exposure. SNPs in gene coding regions can lead to changes in the biological properties of the encoded protein. In contrast, SNPs in non-coding gene regulatory regions may affect gene expression levels in an allele-specific manner, and these functional polymorphisms represent an important but relatively unexplored class of genetic variation. The main challenge in analyzing these SNPs is a lack of robust computational and experimental methods. Here, we first outline mechanisms by which genetic variation can impact gene regulation, and review recent findings in this area; then, we describe a methodology for bioinformatic discovery and functional analysis of regulatory SNPs in cis-regulatory regions using the assembled human genome sequence and databases on sequence polymorphism and gene expression. Our method integrates SNP and gene databases and uses a set of computer programs that allow us to: (1) select SNPs, from among the >9 million human SNPs in the NCBI dbSNP database, that are similar to cis-regulatory element (RE) consensus sequences; (2) map the selected dbSNP entries to the human genome assembly in order to identify polymorphic REs near gene start sites; (3) prioritize the candidate polymorphic RE containing genes by searching the existing genotype and gene expression data sets. The applicability of this system has been demonstrated through studies on p53 responsive elements and is being extended to additional pathways and environmentally responsive genes.

  1. Four out of eight genes in a mouse chromosome 7 congenic donor region are candidate obesity genes.

    PubMed

    Sarahan, Kari A; Fisler, Janis S; Warden, Craig H

    2011-09-22

    We previously identified a region of mouse chromosome 7 that influences body fat mass in F2 littermates of congenic × background intercrosses. Current analyses revealed that alleles in the donor region of the subcongenic B6.C-D7Mit318 (318) promoted a twofold increase in adiposity in homozygous lines of 318 compared with background C57BL/6ByJ (B6By) mice. Parent-of-origin effects were discounted through cross-fostering studies and an F1 reciprocal cross. Mapping of the donor region revealed that it has a maximal size of 2.8 Mb (minimum 1.8 Mb) and contains a maximum of eight protein coding genes. Quantitative PCR in whole brain, liver, and gonadal white adipose tissue (GWAT) revealed differential expression between genotypes for three genes in females and two genes in males. Alpha-2,8-sialyltransferase 8B (St8sia2) showed reduced 318 mRNA levels in brain for females and males and in GWAT for females only. Both sexes of 318 mice had reduced Repulsive guidance molecule-a (Rgma) expression in GWAT. In brain, Family with sequence similarity 174 member b (Fam174b) had increased expression in 318 females, whereas Chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 2 (Chd2-2) had reduced expression in 318 males. No donor region genes were differentially expressed in liver. Sequence analysis of coding exons for all genes in the 318 donor region revealed only one single nucleotide polymorphism that produced a nonsynonymous missense mutation, Gln7Pro, in Fam174b. Our findings highlight the difficulty of using expression and sequence to identify quantitative trait genes underlying obesity even in small genomic regions.

  2. Four out of eight genes in a mouse chromosome 7 congenic donor region are candidate obesity genes

    PubMed Central

    Sarahan, Kari A.; Fisler, Janis S.

    2011-01-01

    We previously identified a region of mouse chromosome 7 that influences body fat mass in F2 littermates of congenic × background intercrosses. Current analyses revealed that alleles in the donor region of the subcongenic B6.C-D7Mit318 (318) promoted a twofold increase in adiposity in homozygous lines of 318 compared with background C57BL/6ByJ (B6By) mice. Parent-of-origin effects were discounted through cross-fostering studies and an F1 reciprocal cross. Mapping of the donor region revealed that it has a maximal size of 2.8 Mb (minimum 1.8 Mb) and contains a maximum of eight protein coding genes. Quantitative PCR in whole brain, liver, and gonadal white adipose tissue (GWAT) revealed differential expression between genotypes for three genes in females and two genes in males. Alpha-2,8-sialyltransferase 8B (St8sia2) showed reduced 318 mRNA levels in brain for females and males and in GWAT for females only. Both sexes of 318 mice had reduced Repulsive guidance molecule-a (Rgma) expression in GWAT. In brain, Family with sequence similarity 174 member b (Fam174b) had increased expression in 318 females, whereas Chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 2 (Chd2-2) had reduced expression in 318 males. No donor region genes were differentially expressed in liver. Sequence analysis of coding exons for all genes in the 318 donor region revealed only one single nucleotide polymorphism that produced a nonsynonymous missense mutation, Gln7Pro, in Fam174b. Our findings highlight the difficulty of using expression and sequence to identify quantitative trait genes underlying obesity even in small genomic regions. PMID:21730028

  3. Regulatory regions in the yeast FBP1 and PCK1 genes.

    PubMed

    Mercado, J J; Gancedo, J M

    1992-10-19

    By deletion analysis of the fusion genes FBP1-lacZ and PCK1-lacZ we have identified a number of strong regulatory regions in the genes FBP1 and PCK1 which encode fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. Lack of expression of beta-galactosidase in fusions lacking sequences from the coding regions suggests the existence of downstream activating elements. Both promoters have several UAS and URS regions as well as sites implicated in catabolite repression. We have found in both genes consensus sequences for the binding of the same regulatory proteins, such as yAP1, MIG1 or the complex HAP2/HAP3/HAP4. Neither deletion nor overexpression of the MIG1 gene affected the regulated expression of the FBP1 or PCK1 genes.

  4. Variants in ELL2 influencing immunoglobulin levels associate with multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, Bhairavi; Thorleifsson, Guðmar; Jöud, Magnus; Ali, Mina; Johnsson, Ellinor; Ajore, Ram; Sulem, Patrick; Halvarsson, Britt-Marie; Eyjolfsson, Guðmundur; Haraldsdottir, Vilhelmina; Hultman, Christina; Ingelsson, Erik; Kristinsson, Sigurður Y.; Kähler, Anna K.; Lenhoff, Stig; Masson, Gisli; Mellqvist, Ulf-Henrik; Månsson, Robert; Nelander, Sven; Olafsson, Isleifur; Sigurðardottir, Olof; Steingrimsdóttir, Hlif; Vangsted, Annette; Vogel, Ulla; Waage, Anders; Nahi, Hareth; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Rafnar, Thorunn; Turesson, Ingemar; Gullberg, Urban; Stefánsson, Kári; Hansson, Markus; Thorsteinsdóttir, Unnur; Nilsson, Björn

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by an uninhibited, clonal growth of plasma cells. While first-degree relatives of patients with MM show an increased risk of MM, the genetic basis of inherited MM susceptibility is incompletely understood. Here we report a genome-wide association study in the Nordic region identifying a novel MM risk locus at ELL2 (rs56219066T; odds ratio (OR)=1.25; P=9.6 × 10−10). This gene encodes a stoichiometrically limiting component of the super-elongation complex that drives secretory-specific immunoglobulin mRNA production and transcriptional regulation in plasma cells. We find that the MM risk allele harbours a Thr298Ala missense variant in an ELL2 domain required for transcription elongation. Consistent with a hypomorphic effect, we find that the MM risk allele also associates with reduced levels of immunoglobulin A (IgA) and G (IgG) in healthy subjects (P=8.6 × 10−9 and P=6.4 × 10−3, respectively) and, potentially, with an increased risk of bacterial meningitis (OR=1.30; P=0.0024). PMID:26007630

  5. Physical analysis of the COR region: a cluster of six genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, K.; Stiles, J.I.; Pietras, D.F.; Melnick, L.; Sherman, F.

    1987-02-01

    Six genes, CYC1, UTR1, UTR3, OSM1, tRNAGly, and RAD7, have been localized within an 8-kilobase region on chromosome X of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The physical structures and the transcripts of these genes were identified by analyzing a normal strain and six deletion mutants by genomic blotting, transcriptional analysis, and gene disruption procedures. The well-studied CYC1 gene encodes iso-1-cytochrome c; the tRNAGly gene encodes a tRNA; deletion of OSM1 and RAD7 causes sensitivity to hypertonic medium and UV irradiation, respectively. There were no observable phenotypes in strains having deletions of the UTR1, UTR3, and tRNAGly gene. The high density of transcripts, with little or almost no intragenic regions, indicates that the chromosomal organization of S. cerevisiae resembles the chromosomal organization of procaryotes rather than higher eucaryotes.

  6. Fine mapping of the human pentraxin gene region on chromosome 1q23

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, M.T.; Whitehead, A.S.; Divane, A.

    1996-12-31

    The 1q21 to 25 region of human chromosome 1 contains genes which encode proteins with immune- and inflammation-associated functions. These include the pentraxin genes, for C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid P(SAP) protein (APCS), and a CRP pseudogene (CRPP1). The region of chromosome 1 containing this cluster is syntenic with distal mouse chromosome 1. We constructed an approximately 1.4 megabase yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contig with the pentraxin genes at its core. This four-YAC contig includes other genes with immune functions including the FCER1A gene, which encodes the {alpha}-subunit of the IgE high-affinity Fc receptor and the 1F1-16 gene, an interferon-{gamma}-induced gene. In addition, it contains the histone H3F2 and H4F2 genes and the gene for erythroid {alpha}-spectrin (SPTA1). The gene order is cen.-SPTA1-H4F2-H3F2-1F1-16-CRP-CRPP1-APCS-FCERIA-tel. The contig thus consists of a cluster of genes whose products either have immunological importance, bind DNA, or both. 68 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Association between the MHC gene region and variation of serum IgE levels against specific mould allergens in the horse

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    To investigate whether the equine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene region influences the production of mould-specific immunoglobulin E antibodies (IgE), alleles of the equine leukocyte antigen (ELA-A) locus and three microsatellite markers (UM-011, HTG-05 and HMS-42) located on the same chromosome as the equine MHC were determined in 448 Lipizzan horses. Statistical analyses based on composite models, showed significant associations of the ELA-A and UM-011 loci with IgE titres against the recombinant Aspergillus fumigatus 7 antigen (rAsp f 7). UM-011 was also significantly associated with IgE titres against the recombinant Aspergillus fumigatus 8 antigen (rAsp f 8). In addition to the loci mentioned above, the MHC class II DQA and DRA loci were determined in 76 Lipizzans from one stud. For IgE levels against rAsp f 7, the composite model showed the strongest association for DQA (P < 0.01) while for rAsp f 8 specific IgE levels, similarly to the results found with all 448 horses, the strongest association was found with UM-011 (P = 0.01), which is closely linked with the MHC class II DRB locus. These results suggest that the equine MHC gene region and possibly MHC class II loci, influence the specific IgE response in the horse. However, although the strongest associations were found with DQA and UM-011, this study did not distinguish if the observed effects were due to the MHC itself or to other tightly linked genes. PMID:12927090

  8. In the QTL region surrounding porcine MHC, gene order is conserved with human genome.

    PubMed

    Genêt, C; Renard, C; Cabau, C; Rogel-Gaillard, C; Gellin, J; Milan, D

    2001-03-01

    On the porcine genome, the region surrounding the Major Histocompatibility Complex, also called Swine Leukocyte Antigens (SLA), is of particular interest not only owing to itq role in the control of immune response, but also because of its influence on many traits such as growth, fatness, and meat quality. To help in the identification of responsible genes, detailed comparative maps of the MHC region in mammalian species and powerful mapping tools allowing accurate ordering of genes and markers in this region are needed. In this report, we describe the use of the recently developed IMpRH radiation hybrid panel, to construct a higher density radiation hybrid map of swine Sscr 7p-q12, containing 23 additional loci. Our results show that the gene order is conserved between the two MHC-containing regions, even if an inversion is observed above the QTL region in the region containing DEK, SCA1, and EDN1 genes. The framework map produced shows that the IMpRH panel permits the ordering of genes and markers in the three MHC classes and would thus allow accurate localization of ESTs and candidate genes. PMID:11252175

  9. Gene Expression in the Hippocampus: Regionally Specific Effects of Aging and Caloric Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Zeier, Zane; Madorsky, Irina; Xu, Ying; Ogle, William O.; Notterpek, Lucia; Foster, Thomas C.

    2010-01-01

    We measured changes in gene expression, induced by aging and caloric restriction (CR), in three hippocampal subregions. When analysis included all regions, aging was associated with expression of genes linked to mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammation, and stress responses, and in some cases, expression was reversed by CR. An age-related increase in ubiquintination was observed, including increased expression of ubiquitin conjugating enzyme genes and cytosolic ubiquitin immunoreactivity. CR decreased cytosolic ubiquitin and upregulated deubiquitinating genes. Region specific analyses indicated that CA1 was more susceptible to aging stress, exhibiting a greater number of altered genes relative to CA3 and the dentate gyrus (DG), and an enrichment of genes related to the immune response and apoptosis. CA3 and the DG were more responsive to CR, exhibiting marked changes in the total number of genes across diet conditions, reversal of age-related changes in p53 signaling, glucocorticoid receptor signaling, and enrichment of genes related to cell survival and neurotrophic signaling. Finally, CR differentially influenced genes for synaptic plasticity in CA1 and CA3. It is concluded that regional disparity in response to aging and CR relates to differences in vulnerability to stressors, the availability of neurotrophic, and cell survival mechanisms, and differences in cell function. PMID:21055414

  10. Detection of chromosomal regions showing differential gene expression in human skeletal muscle and in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Bisognin, Andrea; Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Danieli, Gian Antonio

    2004-01-01

    Background Rhabdomyosarcoma is a relatively common tumour of the soft tissue, probably due to regulatory disruption of growth and differentiation of skeletal muscle stem cells. Identification of genes differentially expressed in normal skeletal muscle and in rhabdomyosarcoma may help in understanding mechanisms of tumour development, in discovering diagnostic and prognostic markers and in identifying novel targets for drug therapy. Results A Perl-code web client was developed to automatically obtain genome map positions of large sets of genes. The software, based on automatic search on Human Genome Browser by sequence alignment, only requires availability of a single transcribed sequence for each gene. In this way, we obtained tissue-specific chromosomal maps of genes expressed in rhabdomyosarcoma or skeletal muscle. Subsequently, Perl software was developed to calculate gene density along chromosomes, by using a sliding window. Thirty-three chromosomal regions harbouring genes mostly expressed in rhabdomyosarcoma were identified. Similarly, 48 chromosomal regions were detected including genes possibly related to function of differentiated skeletal muscle, but silenced in rhabdomyosarcoma. Conclusion In this study we developed a method and the associated software for the comparative analysis of genomic expression in tissues and we identified chromosomal segments showing differential gene expression in human skeletal muscle and in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, appearing as candidate regions for harbouring genes involved in origin of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma representing possible targets for drug treatment and/or development of tumor markers. PMID:15176974

  11. Identification of a locus control region for quadruplicated green-sensitive opsin genes in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, Taro; Chinen, Akito; Kawamura, Shoji

    2007-07-31

    Duplication of opsin genes has a crucial role in the evolution of visual system. Zebrafish have four green-sensitive (RH2) opsin genes (RH2-1, RH2-2, RH2-3, and RH2-4) arrayed in tandem. They are expressed in the short member of the double cones (SDC) but differ in expression areas in the retina and absorption spectra of their encoding photopigments. The shortest and the second shortest wavelength subtypes, RH2-1 and RH2-2, are expressed in the central-to-dorsal retina. The longer wavelength subtype, RH2-3, is expressed circumscribing the RH2-1/RH2-2 area, and the longest subtype, RH2-4, is expressed further circumscribing the RH2-3 area and mainly occupying the ventral retina. The present report shows that a 0.5-kb region located 15 kb upstream of the RH2 gene array is an essential regulator for their expression. When the 0.5-kb region was deleted from a P1-artificial chromosome (PAC) clone encompassing the four RH2 genes and when one of these genes was replaced with a reporter GFP gene, the GFP expression in SDCs was abolished in the zebrafish to which a series of the modified PAC clones were introduced. Transgenic studies also showed that the 0.5-kb region conferred the SDC-specific expression for promoters of a non-SDC (UV opsin) and a nonretinal (keratin 8) gene. Changing the location of the 0.5-kb region in the PAC clone conferred the highest expression for its proximal gene. The 0.5-kb region was thus designated as RH2-LCR analogous to the locus control region of the L-M opsin genes of primates.

  12. Functional characterization of the 5'-regulatory region of the murine apolipoprotein gene.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, D K; Alley, G M; Ge, Y-W; Du, Y

    2002-11-01

    The apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene causes a major risk factor for the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). To study the transcription control of the mouse (m) APOE gene, we first tested the promoter activity of a 721-base-pair (bp) 5'-flanking region, which is located 771 bp upstream from the translation initiation codon. We cloned the 721-bp region upstream of the reporter chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene into a promoterless vector (pBLCAT3). The mAPOE promoter and vector DNA were separately transfected in rat glial C6 and neuronal PC12 cell lines. The 721-bp APOE region (from position 329 to 1050) is functionally active in different cell lines tested. The serial deletion analysis indicates that the 266-bp promoter region (from 784 to 1050) has the highest and the 67-bp region (from 983 to 1050) the lowest activity on the reporter gene in neuronal and astrocytic cell lines. These studies suggest that the 147-bp region (from 637 to 784) has a negative regulatory effect on the reporter gene. In the gel shift assay, the 67-bp region binds to a specific transcription factor(s) in PC12 nuclear extracts. Our results suggest that mAPOE can also be expressed in neuronal cells in addition to the astrocytic cells. Characterization of mAPOE promoter is important for the AD drug development discovery and APOE transgenic mice studies.

  13. Physical mapping, cloning, and identification of genes within a 500-kb region containing BRCA1.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, M A; Jones, K A; Nicolai, H; Bonjardim, M; Black, D; McFarlane, R; de Jong, P; Quirk, J P; Lehrach, H; Solomon, E

    1995-01-01

    BRCA1 is a breast/ovarian cancer susceptibility gene on human chromosome 17q21. We describe a complete and detailed physical map of a 500-kb region of genomic DNA containing the BRCA1 gene and the partial cloning in phage P1 artificial chromosomes. Approximately 70 exons were isolated from this region, 11 of which were components of the BRCA1 gene. Analysis of the other exons revealed a rho-related G protein and the interferon-induced leucine-zipper protein IFP-35. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:7753812

  14. Brain regions and genes affecting limb-clasping responses.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, R; Strazielle, C

    2011-06-24

    Adult rodents picked up by the tail and slowly descending towards a horizontal surface extend all four limbs in anticipation of contact. Mouse mutants with pathologies in various brain regions and the spinal cord display instead a flexion response, often characterized by paw-clasping and a bat-like posture. These phenotypes are observed in mice with lesions in cerebellum, basal ganglia, and neocortex, as well as transgenic models of Alzheimer's disease. The underlying mechanism appears to include cerebello-cortico-reticular and cortico-striato-pallido-reticular pathways, possibly triggered by changes in noradrenaline and serotonin transmission.

  15. Studies of heat precipitable immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, R.; Roberts, Mary; Pruzansky, J. J.

    1970-01-01

    The nature of the heat precipitation of 3 mononoclonal heat labile immunoglobulins was studied. These included 2 γG pyroglobulins and one γM pyroglobulin. Thermoprecipitable activity of both γG pyroglobulins could be localized to their heavy chains and to the Fab fragments of one of them. Heat precipitability of the γM paraprotein required the presence of the intact γM molecule since 7S subunits did not precipitate. The thermal precipitates appeared to result from intramolecular or intermolecular reactions with the formation of strong covalent bonds rather than weak non-covalent bonds. The importance of disulphide bonding was excluded in the precipitation of both γG but not in the γM pyroglobulins. Heat precipitation of the monoclonal γM resulted in coprecipitation of other proteins, particularly γG globulin, which suggested a specific type of reaction with this immunoglobulin. The interaction of the γM pyroglobulin, normal γG and heat produced an irreversible precipitate. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:4099668

  16. Cloning and characterization of the 5'-flanking region of the Ehox gene

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Woon Kyu . E-mail: wklee@yumc.yonsei.ac.kr; Kim, Yong-Man; Malik, Nasir; Ma Chang; Westphal, Heiner

    2006-03-03

    The paired-like homeobox-containing gene Ehox plays a role in embryonic stem cell differentiation and is highly expressed in the developing placenta and thymus. To understand the mechanisms of regulation of Ehox gene expression, the 5'-flanking region of the Ehox gene was isolated from a mouse BAC library. 5'-RACE analysis revealed a single transcriptional start site 130 nucleotides upstream of the translation initiation codon. Transient transfection with a luciferase reporter gene under the control of serially deleted 5'-flanking sequences revealed that the nt -84 to -68 region contained a positive cis-acting element for efficient expression of the Ehox gene. Mutational analysis of this region and oligonucleotide competition in the electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed the presence of a CCAAT box, which is a target for transcription nuclear factor Y (NFY). NFY is essential for positive gene regulation. No tissue-specific enhancer was identified in the 1.9-kb 5'-flanking region of the Ehox gene. Ehox is expressed during the early stages of embryo development, specifically in Brain at 9.5 dpc, as well as during the late stages of embryo development. These results suggest that NFY is an essential regulatory factor for Ehox transcriptional activity, which is important for the post-implantation stage of the developing embryo.

  17. Renal AH Amyloidosis Associated With a Truncated Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Undetectable by Immunostaining.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Shun; Hatano, Michiyasu; Yazaki, Masahide; Nitta, Kosaku; Nagata, Michio

    2015-12-01

    AH amyloidosis is a rare type of amyloidosis caused by deposition of monoclonal immunoglobulin heavy chain. The key diagnostic feature is positive immunostaining for a single class of immunoglobulin heavy chain. We report a case of AH amyloidosis with immunoglobulin G (IgG) λ monoclonal gammopathy that was diagnosed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) after immunostaining of renal tissue for immunoglobulin heavy chain gave negative results. The molecular weight of the purified renal amyloid protein was ∼11kDa, which was determined by LC-MS/MS analysis to correspond to an amino acid sequence comprising the variable region and a truncated portion of the constant region of IgG heavy chain. The exact same truncated heavy chain was detected by LC-MS/MS of a protein isolated from the patient's serum, suggesting that the truncated serum protein was the precursor of the amyloid protein. Because antibodies to immunoglobulin heavy chain recognize the Fc portion, the large deletion in the constant region could explain the negative results upon immunostaining. Direct protein detection by LC-MS/MS is a powerful aid to diagnose renal AH amyloidosis, particularly when the findings of immunoglobulin staining are inconsistent with the background monoclonal gammopathy.

  18. Vegetative incompatibility in the het-6 region of Neurospora crassa is mediated by two linked genes.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M L; Micali, O C; Hubbard, S P; Mir-Rashed, N; Jacobson, D J; Glass, N L

    2000-01-01

    Non-self-recognition during asexual growth of Neurospora crassa involves restriction of heterokaryon formation via genetic differences at 11 het loci, including mating type. The het-6 locus maps to a 250-kbp region of LGIIL. We used restriction fragment length polymorphisms in progeny with crossovers in the het-6 region and a DNA transformation assay to identify two genes in a 25-kbp region that have vegetative incompatibility activity. The predicted product of one of these genes, which we designate het-6(OR), has three regions of amino acid sequence similarity to the predicted product of the het-e vegetative incompatibility gene in Podospora anserina and to the predicted product of tol, which mediates mating-type vegetative incompatibility in N. crassa. The predicted product of the alternative het-6 allele, HET-6(PA), shares only 68% amino acid identity with HET-6(OR). The second incompatibility gene, un-24(OR), encodes the large subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, which is essential for de novo synthesis of DNA. A region in the carboxyl-terminal portion of UN-24 is associated with incompatibility and is variable between un-24(OR) and the alternative allele un-24(PA). Linkage analysis indicates that the 25-kbp un-24-het-6 region is inherited as a block, suggesting that a nonallelic interaction may occur between un-24 and het-6 and possibly other loci within this region to mediate vegetative incompatibility in the het-6 region of N. crassa. PMID:10880472

  19. Organization, structure, and assembly of immunoglobulin heavy chain diversity DNA segments.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Y; Tonegawa, S

    1982-01-01

    We have identified, cloned, and sequenced eight different DNA segments encoding the diversity (D) regions of mouse immunoglobulin heavy-chain genes. Like the two D segments previously characterized (16, 17), all eight D segments are flanked by characteristic heptamers and nonamers separated by 12-bp spacers. These 10 D segments, and several more D segments identified but not yet sequenced, can be classified into three families based on the extent of sequence homology. The SP2 family consists of nine highly homologous D segments that are all 17-bp long and clustered in a chromosomal region of approximately 60 kb. The FL16 family consists of up to four D segments, two of which were mapped in the 5' end region of the SP2-D cluster. The two FL16D segments are 23 and 17 bp long. The third, the Q52 family, is a single-member family of the 10-bp-long DQ52, located 700 bp 5' to the JH cluster. We argue that the D-region sequences of the majority of heavy chain genes arise from these germline D segments by various somatic mechanisms, including joining of multiple D segments. We present a specific model of D-D joining that does not violate the 12/23-bp spacer rule.

  20. Hox11 genes are required for regional patterning and integration of muscle, tendon and bone.

    PubMed

    Swinehart, Ilea T; Schlientz, Aleesa J; Quintanilla, Christopher A; Mortlock, Douglas P; Wellik, Deneen M

    2013-11-01

    Development of the musculoskeletal system requires precise integration of muscles, tendons and bones. The molecular mechanisms involved in the differentiation of each of these tissues have been the focus of significant research; however, much less is known about how these tissues are integrated into a functional unit appropriate for each body position and role. Previous reports have demonstrated crucial roles for Hox genes in patterning the axial and limb skeleton. Loss of Hox11 paralogous gene function results in dramatic malformation of limb zeugopod skeletal elements, the radius/ulna and tibia/fibula, as well as transformation of the sacral region to a lumbar phenotype. Utilizing a Hoxa11eGFP knock-in allele, we show that Hox11 genes are expressed in the connective tissue fibroblasts of the outer perichondrium, tendons and muscle connective tissue of the zeugopod region throughout all stages of development. Hox11 genes are not expressed in differentiated cartilage or bone, or in vascular or muscle cells in these regions. Loss of Hox11 genes disrupts regional muscle and tendon patterning of the limb in addition to affecting skeletal patterning. The tendon and muscle defects in Hox11 mutants are independent of skeletal patterning events as disruption of tendon and muscle patterning is observed in Hox11 compound mutants that do not have a skeletal phenotype. Thus, Hox genes are not simply regulators of skeletal morphology as previously thought, but are key factors that regulate regional patterning and integration of the musculoskeletal system.

  1. Circuit-wide Transcriptional Profiling Reveals Brain Region-Specific Gene Networks Regulating Depression Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Bagot, Rosemary C; Cates, Hannah M; Purushothaman, Immanuel; Lorsch, Zachary S; Walker, Deena M; Wang, Junshi; Huang, Xiaojie; Schlüter, Oliver M; Maze, Ian; Peña, Catherine J; Heller, Elizabeth A; Issler, Orna; Wang, Minghui; Song, Won-Min; Stein, Jason L; Liu, Xiaochuan; Doyle, Marie A; Scobie, Kimberly N; Sun, Hao Sheng; Neve, Rachael L; Geschwind, Daniel; Dong, Yan; Shen, Li; Zhang, Bin; Nestler, Eric J

    2016-06-01

    Depression is a complex, heterogeneous disorder and a leading contributor to the global burden of disease. Most previous research has focused on individual brain regions and genes contributing to depression. However, emerging evidence in humans and animal models suggests that dysregulated circuit function and gene expression across multiple brain regions drive depressive phenotypes. Here, we performed RNA sequencing on four brain regions from control animals and those susceptible or resilient to chronic social defeat stress at multiple time points. We employed an integrative network biology approach to identify transcriptional networks and key driver genes that regulate susceptibility to depressive-like symptoms. Further, we validated in vivo several key drivers and their associated transcriptional networks that regulate depression susceptibility and confirmed their functional significance at the levels of gene transcription, synaptic regulation, and behavior. Our study reveals novel transcriptional networks that control stress susceptibility and offers fundamentally new leads for antidepressant drug discovery.

  2. Circuit-wide Transcriptional Profiling Reveals Brain Region-Specific Gene Networks Regulating Depression Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Bagot, Rosemary C; Cates, Hannah M; Purushothaman, Immanuel; Lorsch, Zachary S; Walker, Deena M; Wang, Junshi; Huang, Xiaojie; Schlüter, Oliver M; Maze, Ian; Peña, Catherine J; Heller, Elizabeth A; Issler, Orna; Wang, Minghui; Song, Won-Min; Stein, Jason L; Liu, Xiaochuan; Doyle, Marie A; Scobie, Kimberly N; Sun, Hao Sheng; Neve, Rachael L; Geschwind, Daniel; Dong, Yan; Shen, Li; Zhang, Bin; Nestler, Eric J

    2016-06-01

    Depression is a complex, heterogeneous disorder and a leading contributor to the global burden of disease. Most previous research has focused on individual brain regions and genes contributing to depression. However, emerging evidence in humans and animal models suggests that dysregulated circuit function and gene expression across multiple brain regions drive depressive phenotypes. Here, we performed RNA sequencing on four brain regions from control animals and those susceptible or resilient to chronic social defeat stress at multiple time points. We employed an integrative network biology approach to identify transcriptional networks and key driver genes that regulate susceptibility to depressive-like symptoms. Further, we validated in vivo several key drivers and their associated transcriptional networks that regulate depression susceptibility and confirmed their functional significance at the levels of gene transcription, synaptic regulation, and behavior. Our study reveals novel transcriptional networks that control stress susceptibility and offers fundamentally new leads for antidepressant drug discovery. PMID:27181059

  3. Polymorphisms in the Promoter Region of the Chinese Bovine PPARGC1A Gene

    PubMed Central

    Li, M. J.; Liu, M.; Liu, D.; Lan, X. Y.; Lei, C. Z.; Yang, D. Y.; Chen, H.

    2013-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha protein, encoded by the PPARGC1A gene, plays an important role in energy homeostasis. The genetic variations within the PPARGC1A gene promoter region were scanned in 808 Chinese native bovines belonging to three cattle breeds and yaks. A total of 6 SNPs and one 4 bp insertion variation in the promoter region of the bovine PPARGC1A gene were identified: SNP -259 T>A, -301_-298insCTTT, -915 A>G, -1175 T>G, -1590 C>T, -1665 C>T and -1690 G>A, which are in the binding sites of some important transcription factors: sex-determining region Y (SRY), myeloid-specific zinc finger-1 (MZF-1) and octamer factor 1(Oct-1). It is expected that these polymorphisms may regulate PPARGC1A gene transcription and might have consequences at a regulatory level. PMID:25049813

  4. Growth and gene expression are predominantly controlled by distinct regions of the human IL-4 receptor.

    PubMed

    Ryan, J J; McReynolds, L J; Keegan, A; Wang, L H; Garfein, E; Rothman, P; Nelms, K; Paul, W E

    1996-02-01

    IL-4 causes hematopoietic cells to proliferate and express a series of genes, including CD23. We examined whether IL-4-mediated growth, as measured by 4PS phosphorylation, and gene induction were similarly controlled. Studies of M12.4.1 cells expressing human IL-4R truncation mutants indicated that the region between amino acids 557-657 is necessary for full gene expression, which correlated with Stat6 DNA binding activity. This region was not required for 4PS phosphorylation. Tyrosine-to-phenylalanine mutations in the interval between amino acids 557-657 revealed that as long as one tyrosine remained unmutated, CD23 was fully induced. When all three tyrosines were mutated, the receptor was unable to induce CD23. The results indicate that growth regulation and gene expression are principally controlled by distinct regions of IL-4R.

  5. Insertional events as well as translocations may arise during aberrant immunoglobulin switch recombination in a patient with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Pratt, G; Fenton, J A; Davies, F E; Rawstron, A C; Richards, S J; Collins, J E; Owen, R G; Jack, A S; Smith, G M; Morgan, G J

    2001-02-01

    The majority of patients with multiple myeloma have translocations involving the immunoglobulin heavy chain switch regions on chromosome 14q32 and a promiscuous range of partner chromosomes. We describe a patient with an insertion of 132 bp of chromosome 22q12 sequence into the 5' region flanking S(mu) on chromosome 14q32. The 132 bp region from chromosome 22q12 contains the whole of exon 3 from a novel gene of unknown function in man. The significance of such insertional events remains unclear. The description of insertional events occurring as a result of abnormal switch recombination suggests that, in myeloma, dysregulation of oncogenes may occur by a mechanism other than chromosomal translocation.

  6. Insertional events as well as translocations may arise during aberrant immunoglobulin switch recombination in a patient with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Pratt, G; Fenton, J A; Davies, F E; Rawstron, A C; Richards, S J; Collins, J E; Owen, R G; Jack, A S; Smith, G M; Morgan, G J

    2001-02-01

    The majority of patients with multiple myeloma have translocations involving the immunoglobulin heavy chain switch regions on chromosome 14q32 and a promiscuous range of partner chromosomes. We describe a patient with an insertion of 132 bp of chromosome 22q12 sequence into the 5' region flanking S(mu) on chromosome 14q32. The 132 bp region from chromosome 22q12 contains the whole of exon 3 from a novel gene of unknown function in man. The significance of such insertional events remains unclear. The description of insertional events occurring as a result of abnormal switch recombination suggests that, in myeloma, dysregulation of oncogenes may occur by a mechanism other than chromosomal translocation. PMID:11167836

  7. [Clinical significance of analysis of immunoglobulin A levels in saliva].

    PubMed

    Bokor-Bratić, M

    2000-01-01

    plasma cells locally in the salivary glands. There is still little convincing evidence for the origin of predominantly immunoglobulin A secreting plasma cells in salivary glands. DETECTION OF IMMUNOGLOBULIN A IN SALIVA: Radial immunodiffusion (RID) was the most applicable method for detecting salivary immunoglobulin A. However, there are more sensitive and automatic methods such as nephelometry and ELISA. A standard level of immunoglobulin in saliva is still in question since the concentration varies in relation to origin of saliva, method of collection and stimulation of secretion (Table 1). PERIODONTAL DISEASE: Studies of the salivary immunoglobulin A in patients with periodontal disease and healthy persons showed that there are differences which can be used in detection of high-risk groups and individuals. If the bacterial adherence to the mucosa is a prerequisite for bacterial evolution in subgingival or any other region of the oral cavity respectively introduction in periodontitis development, than it is to be presumed that the basic function of salivary immunoglobulin A is inhibition of bacterial adherence rather than antigens destruction. Several bacterial species frequently isolated from the oral cavity of patients with periodontitis have been identified as producers of IgA protease. These enzymes cleave serum IgA and secretory IgA equally well. Additionally, most of the IgA proteases studied have cleaved the A1 and A2 subclass. Several studies have demonstrated that cleavage of human IgA occurs in vivo, resulting in generation of intact Fab alpha and (Fc alpha)2 fragment. Moreover, when bacteria are exposed to Fab alpha fragments released from IgA after cleavage by IgA protease, their surface antigens are likely to be occupied by Fab alpha fragments. These Fab alpha fragments left on the bacterial surface may mediate adhesion. Together, these results indicate that IgA proteases, by promoting adherence, contribute the pathogenic potential of bacteria in the oral

  8. High divergence in primate-specific duplicated regions: Human and chimpanzee Chorionic Gonadotropin Beta genes

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Low nucleotide divergence between human and chimpanzee does not sufficiently explain the species-specific morphological, physiological and behavioral traits. As gene duplication is a major prerequisite for the emergence of new genes and novel biological processes, comparative studies of human and chimpanzee duplicated genes may assist in understanding the mechanisms behind primate evolution. We addressed the divergence between human and chimpanzee duplicated genomic regions by using Luteinizing Hormone Beta (LHB)/Chorionic Gonadotropin Beta (CGB) gene cluster as a model. The placental CGB genes that are essential for implantation have evolved from an ancestral pituitary LHB gene by duplications in the primate lineage. Results We shotgun sequenced and compared the human (45,165 bp) and chimpanzee (39,876 bp) LHB/CGB regions and hereby present evidence for structural variation resulting in discordant number of CGB genes (6 in human, 5 in chimpanzee). The scenario of species-specific parallel duplications was supported (i) as the most parsimonious solution requiring the least rearrangement events to explain the interspecies structural differences; (ii) by the phylogenetic trees constructed with fragments of intergenic regions; (iii) by the sequence similarity calculations. Across the orthologous regions of LHB/CGB cluster, substitutions and indels contributed approximately equally to the interspecies divergence and the distribution of nucleotide identity was correlated with the regional repeat content. Intraspecies gene conversion may have shaped the LHB/CGB gene cluster. The substitution divergence (1.8–2.59%) exceeded two-three fold the estimates for single-copy loci and the fraction of transversional mutations was increased compared to the unique sequences (43% versus ~30%). Despite the high sequence identity among LHB/CGB genes, there are signs of functional differentiation among the gene copies. Estimates for dn/ds rate ratio suggested a purifying

  9. A similar 5'-flanking region is required for estrogen and progesterone induction of ovalbumin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Dean, D C; Gope, R; Knoll, B J; Riser, M E; O'Malley, B W

    1984-08-25

    We have previously transferred an ovalbumin-beta-globin fusion gene (ovalglobin) into primary cultures of chick oviduct cells and demonstrated that an ovalbumin gene 5'-flanking sequence between -221 and -95 is necessary for progesterone-mediated transcriptional induction (Dean, D. C., Knoll, B. J., Riser, M. E., and O'Malley, B. W. (1983) Nature (Lond.) 305, 551-554). Here we compare 5'-flanking sequences required for induction of the ovalglobin gene by 17 beta-estradiol and progesterone. The early gene of simian virus 40 was inserted into the same plasmid as the ovalbumin fusion gene to serve as an internal control. Since transcription of the viral early gene was unaffected by the presence of steroid hormone or deletions in the ovalbumin gene 5'-flanking region, the level of its transcripts could be monitored as a reference standard for ovalglobin transcription. Ovalglobin transcripts initiated principally from the ovalbumin cap site in the presence or absence of progesterone and 17 beta-estradiol. Deletion of 5'-flanking sequences to -197 had little effect on the induction with either hormone, while successive deletions to -180, -161, and -143 resulted in a gradual decrease in the level of induction. Deletion to -95 eliminated the induction. The results of this study indicate that DNA control elements for regulation of the ovalbumin gene by estrogen and progesterone either overlap directly or are clustered in close proximity in the 5'-flanking region near the ovalbumin gene promoter. PMID:6088508

  10. Macrophage nitric oxide synthase gene: two upstream regions mediate induction by interferon gamma and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Lowenstein, C J; Alley, E W; Raval, P; Snowman, A M; Snyder, S H; Russell, S W; Murphy, W J

    1993-01-01

    The promoter region of the mouse gene for macrophage-inducible nitric oxide synthase (mac-NOS; EC 1.14.13.39) has been characterized. A putative TATA box is 30 base pairs upstream of the transcription start site. Computer analysis reveals numerous potential binding sites for transcription factors, many of them associated with stimuli that induce mac-NOS expression. To localize functionally important portions of the regulatory region, we constructed deletion mutants of the mac-NOS 5' flanking region and placed them upstream of a luciferase reporter gene. The macrophage cell line RAW 264.7, when transfected with a minimal promoter construct, expresses little luciferase activity when stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interferon gamma (IFN-gamma), or both. Maximal expression depends on two discrete regulatory regions upstream of the putative TATA box. Region I (position -48 to -209) increases luciferase activity approximately 75-fold over the minimal promoter construct. Region I contains LPS-related responsive elements, including a binding site for nuclear factor interleukin 6 (NF-IL6) and the kappa B binding site for NF-kappa B, suggesting that this region regulates LPS-induced expression of the mac-NOS gene. Region II (position -913 to -1029) alone does not increase luciferase expression, but together with region I it causes an additional 10-fold increase in expression. Together the two regions increase expression 750-fold over activity obtained from a minimal promoter construct. Region II contains motifs for binding IFN-related transcription factors and thus probably is responsible for IFN-mediated regulation of LPS-induced mac-NOS. Delineation of these two cooperative regions explains at the level of transcription how IFN-gamma and LPS act in concert to induce maximally the mac-NOS gene and, furthermore, how IFN-gamma augments the inflammatory response to LPS. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7692452

  11. An integrative analysis of regional gene expression profiles in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Myers, Emma M; Bartlett, Christopher W; Machiraju, Raghu; Bohland, Jason W

    2015-02-01

    Studies of the brain's transcriptome have become prominent in recent years, resulting in an accumulation of datasets with somewhat distinct attributes. These datasets, which are often analyzed only in isolation, also are often collected with divergent goals, which are reflected in their sampling properties. While many researchers have been interested in sampling gene expression in one or a few brain areas in a large number of subjects, recent efforts from the Allen Institute for Brain Sciences and others have focused instead on dense neuroanatomical sampling, necessarily limiting the number of individual donor brains studied. The purpose of the present work is to develop methods that draw on the complementary strengths of these two types of datasets for study of the human brain, and to characterize the anatomical specificity of gene expression profiles and gene co-expression networks derived from human brains using different specific technologies. The approach is applied using two publicly accessible datasets: (1) the high anatomical resolution Allen Human Brain Atlas (AHBA, Hawrylycz et al., 2012) and (2) a relatively large sample size, but comparatively coarse neuroanatomical dataset described previously by Gibbs et al. (2010). We found a relatively high degree of correspondence in differentially expressed genes and regional gene expression profiles across the two datasets. Gene co-expression networks defined in individual brain regions were less congruent, but also showed modest anatomical specificity. Using gene modules derived from the Gibbs dataset and from curated gene lists, we demonstrated varying degrees of anatomical specificity based on two classes of methods, one focused on network modularity and the other focused on enrichment of expression levels. Two approaches to assessing the statistical significance of a gene set's modularity in a given brain region were studied, which provide complementary information about the anatomical specificity of a gene

  12. The immunoglobulin light chain locus of the turkey, Meleagris gallopavo.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yonghua; Wu, Sun; Zang, Yunlong; Wang, Hui; Song, Xiangfeng; Xu, Chunyang; Xie, Bohong; Guo, Yongchen

    2012-06-15

    To date, most jawed vertebrate species encode more than one immunoglobulin light (IgL) chain isotypes. It has been shown that several bird species (chickens, white Pekin or domestic duck, and zebra finches) exclusively express lambda isotype. We analyze here the genomic organization of another bird species turkey IgL genes based on the recently released genome data. The turkey IgL locus located on chromosome 17 spans approximately 75.2kb and contains a single functional V(λ) gene, twenty V(λ) pseudogenes, and a single functional J(λ)-C(λ) block. These data suggest that the genomic organization of bird IgL chain genes seems to be conserved. Ten cDNA clones from turkey Igλ chain containing almost full-length V(λ), J(λ) and C(λ) segments were acquired. The comparison of V(λ) cDNA sequences to all the germline V(λ) segments suggests that turkey species may be generating IgL chain diversity by gene conversion and somatic hypermutation like the chicken. This study provides insights into the immunoglobulin light chain genes in another bird species.

  13. Genetic Architecture of MAPT Gene Region in Parkinson Disease Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Pascale, Esterina; Di Battista, Maria Elena; Rubino, Alfonso; Purcaro, Carlo; Valente, Marcella; Fattapposta, Francesco; Ferraguti, Giampiero; Meco, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) region has been conceptualized as a model of the interaction between genetics and functional disease outcomes in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson disease (PD). Indeed, haplotype-specific differences in expression and alternative splicing of MAPT transcripts affect cellular functions at different levels, increasing susceptibility to a range of neurodegenerative processes. In order to evaluate a possible link between MAPT variants, PD risk and PD motor phenotype, we analyzed the genetic architecture of MAPT in a cohort of PD patients. We observed a statistically significant association between the H1 haplotype and PD risk (79.5 vs 69.5%; χ(2) = 9.9; OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.2-2.4; p = 0.002). The effect was more evident in non tremor dominant (TD) PD subjects (NTD-PD) (82 vs 69.5%; χ(2) = 13.6; OR, 2.03; 95% CI, 1.4-3; p = 0.0003), while no difference emerged between PD subgroup of tremor dominant patients (TD-PD) and control subjects. Examination of specific intra-H1 variations showed that the H1h subhaplotype was overrepresented in NTD-PD patients compared with controls (p = 0.007; OR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.3-6.3). Although we cannot exclude that MAPT variation may be associated with ethnicity, our results may support the hypothesis that MAPT H1 clade and a specific H1 subhaplotype influence the risk of PD and modulate the clinical expression of the disease, including motor phenotype.

  14. Discovery of functional non-coding conserved regions in the α-synuclein gene locus

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Lori; Walter, Michael; Ting, Dennis; Schüle, Birgitt

    2014-01-01

    Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and the Rep-1 microsatellite marker of the α-synuclein ( SNCA) gene have consistently been shown to be associated with Parkinson’s disease, but the functional relevance is unclear. Based on these findings we hypothesized that conserved cis-regulatory elements in the SNCA genomic region regulate expression of SNCA, and that SNPs in these regions could be functionally modulating the expression of SNCA, thus contributing to neuronal demise and predisposing to Parkinson’s disease. In a pair-wise comparison of a 206kb genomic region encompassing the SNCA gene, we revealed 34 evolutionary conserved DNA sequences between human and mouse. All elements were cloned into reporter vectors and assessed for expression modulation in dual luciferase reporter assays.  We found that 12 out of 34 elements exhibited either an enhancement or reduction of the expression of the reporter gene. Three elements upstream of the SNCA gene displayed an approximately 1.5 fold (p<0.009) increase in expression. Of the intronic regions, three showed a 1.5 fold increase and two others indicated a 2 and 2.5 fold increase in expression (p<0.002). Three elements downstream of the SNCA gene showed 1.5 fold and 2.5 fold increase (p<0.0009). One element downstream of SNCA had a reduced expression of the reporter gene of 0.35 fold (p<0.0009) of normal activity. Our results demonstrate that the SNCA gene contains cis-regulatory regions that might regulate the transcription and expression of SNCA. Further studies in disease-relevant tissue types will be important to understand the functional impact of regulatory regions and specific Parkinson’s disease-associated SNPs and its function in the disease process. PMID:25566351

  15. Discovery of functional non-coding conserved regions in the α-synuclein gene locus.

    PubMed

    Sterling, Lori; Walter, Michael; Ting, Dennis; Schüle, Birgitt

    2014-01-01

    Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and the Rep-1 microsatellite marker of the α-synuclein ( SNCA) gene have consistently been shown to be associated with Parkinson's disease, but the functional relevance is unclear. Based on these findings we hypothesized that conserved cis-regulatory elements in the SNCA genomic region regulate expression of SNCA, and that SNPs in these regions could be functionally modulating the expression of SNCA, thus contributing to neuronal demise and predisposing to Parkinson's disease. In a pair-wise comparison of a 206kb genomic region encompassing the SNCA gene, we revealed 34 evolutionary conserved DNA sequences between human and mouse. All elements were cloned into reporter vectors and assessed for expression modulation in dual luciferase reporter assays.  We found that 12 out of 34 elements exhibited either an enhancement or reduction of the expression of the reporter gene. Three elements upstream of the SNCA gene displayed an approximately 1.5 fold (p<0.009) increase in expression. Of the intronic regions, three showed a 1.5 fold increase and two others indicated a 2 and 2.5 fold increase in expression (p<0.002). Three elements downstream of the SNCA gene showed 1.5 fold and 2.5 fold increase (p<0.0009). One element downstream of SNCA had a reduced expression of the reporter gene of 0.35 fold (p<0.0009) of normal activity. Our results demonstrate that the SNCA gene contains cis-regulatory regions that might regulate the transcription and expression of SNCA. Further studies in disease-relevant tissue types will be important to understand the functional impact of regulatory regions and specific Parkinson's disease-associated SNPs and its function in the disease process.

  16. Atypical immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xia; Feng, Jun; Cao, Xinxin; Zhang, Lu; Zhou, Daobin; Li, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Primary immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis (AL amyloidosis) is a plasma cell disorder which mainly affects heart, kidneys, liver, and peripheral nervous system. Cases of atypical AL amyloidosis presented as spontaneous vertebral compression fractures have been rarely reported, and data about the management and clinical outcomes of the patients are scarce. Methods: Herein, we present 3 new cases of AL amyloidosis with spontaneous vertebral compression fracture and review 13 cases retrieved from the literature. Results: Moreover, we observed overrepresentations of liver involvement and bone marrow involvement in AL amyloidosis with spontaneous vertebral compression fracture. Conclusion: We believe that better awareness of the rare clinical presentation as spontaneous vertebral compression fracture of AL amyloidosis can facilitate earlier diagnosis and earlier treatment. PMID:27603350

  17. Analysis of tandem gene copies in maize chromosomal regions reconstructed from long sequence reads

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jiaqiang; Feng, Yaping; Kumar, Dibyendu; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Tingting; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Messing, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Haplotype variation not only involves SNPs but also insertions and deletions, in particular gene copy number variations. However, comparisons of individual genomes have been difficult because traditional sequencing methods give too short reads to unambiguously reconstruct chromosomal regions containing repetitive DNA sequences. An example of such a case is the protein gene family in maize that acts as a sink for reduced nitrogen in the seed. Previously, 41–48 gene copies of the alpha zein gene family that spread over six loci spanning between 30- and 500-kb chromosomal regions have been described in two Iowa Stiff Stalk (SS) inbreds. Analyses of those regions were possible because of overlapping BAC clones, generated by an expensive and labor-intensive approach. Here we used single-molecule real-time (Pacific Biosciences) shotgun sequencing to assemble the six chromosomal regions from the Non-Stiff Stalk maize inbred W22 from a single DNA sequence dataset. To validate the reconstructed regions, we developed an optical map (BioNano genome map; BioNano Genomics) of W22 and found agreement between the two datasets. Using the sequences of full-length cDNAs from W22, we found that the error rate of PacBio sequencing seemed to be less than 0.1% after autocorrection and assembly. Expressed genes, some with premature stop codons, are interspersed with nonexpressed genes, giving rise to genotype-specific expression differences. Alignment of these regions with those from the previous analyzed regions of SS lines exhibits in part dramatic differences between these two heterotic groups. PMID:27354512

  18. Identification of Differentially Expressed Genes through Integrated Study of Alzheimer’s Disease Affected Brain Regions

    PubMed Central

    Berretta, Regina; Moscato, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Background Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in older adults that damages the brain and results in impaired memory, thinking and behaviour. The identification of differentially expressed genes and related pathways among affected brain regions can provide more information on the mechanisms of AD. In the past decade, several studies have reported many genes that are associated with AD. This wealth of information has become difficult to follow and interpret as most of the results are conflicting. In that case, it is worth doing an integrated study of multiple datasets that helps to increase the total number of samples and the statistical power in detecting biomarkers. In this study, we present an integrated analysis of five different brain region datasets and introduce new genes that warrant further investigation. Methods The aim of our study is to apply a novel combinatorial optimisation based meta-analysis approach to identify differentially expressed genes that are associated to AD across brain regions. In this study, microarray gene expression data from 161 samples (74 non-demented controls, 87 AD) from the Entorhinal Cortex (EC), Hippocampus (HIP), Middle temporal gyrus (MTG), Posterior cingulate cortex (PC), Superior frontal gyrus (SFG) and visual cortex (VCX) brain regions were integrated and analysed using our method. The results are then compared to two popular meta-analysis methods, RankProd and GeneMeta, and to what can be obtained by analysing the individual datasets. Results We find genes related with AD that are consistent with existing studies, and new candidate genes not previously related with AD. Our study confirms the up-regualtion of INFAR2 and PTMA along with the down regulation of GPHN, RAB2A, PSMD14 and FGF. Novel genes PSMB2, WNK1, RPL15, SEMA4C, RWDD2A and LARGE are found to be differentially expressed across all brain regions. Further investigation on these genes may provide new insights into the development of AD

  19. Amphibians have immunoglobulins similar to ancestral IgD and IgA from Amniotes.

    PubMed

    Estevez, Olivia; Garet, Elina; Olivieri, David; Gambón-Deza, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    We studied the immunoglobulin genes from either the genomes or RNAs of amphibians. In particular, we obtained data from one frog genome (Nanorana parkeri) and three transcriptomes of the Caudata order (Andrias davidianus, Notophthalmus viridescens and Cynops pyrrhogaster). Apart from the immunoglobulins IgM and IgY previously described, we identified several IgD related immunoglobulins. The species N. parkeri, N. viridescens and C. pyrrhogaster have two IgD genes, while Andrias davidianus has three such genes. The three Caudata species have long IgD immunoglobulins similar to IgD of reptiles, and could be an ancient relic from the common ancestor of IgD of all mammals and reptiles. We also found two IgA isotypes. The results suggest that one of the IgA may be the ancestor of IgA in crocodiles and birds, while the other could be the ancestor IgA found in mammals. These results provide information that could help understand the evolution of immunoglobulins in terrestrial vertebrates.

  20. Myelin-oligodendrocyte glycoprotein is a member of a subset of the immunoglobulin superfamily encoded within the major histocompatibility complex

    SciTech Connect

    Pham-Dinh, D.; Dautigny, A. ); Mattei, M.G.; Roeckel, N. ); Nussbaum, J.H.; Roussel, G. ); Pontarotti, P. ); Mather, I.H. ); Artzt, K. ); Lindahl, K.F. )

    1993-09-01

    Myelin/oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) is found on the surface of myelinating oligodendrocytes and external lamellae of myelin sheaths in the central nervous system, and it is target antigen in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and multiple sclerosis. The authors have isolated bovine, mouse, and rat MOG cDNA clones and shown that the developmental pattern of MOG expression in the rat central nervous system coincides with the late stages of myelination. The amino-terminal, extracellular domain of MOG has characteristics of an immunoglobulin variable domain and is 46% and 41% identical with the amino terminus of bovine butyrophilin (expressed in the lactating mammary gland) and B-G antigens of the chicken major histocompatibility complex (MHC), respectively; these proteins thus form a subset of the immunoglobulin superfamily. The homology between MOG and B-G extends beyond their structure and genetic mapping to their ability to induce strong antibody responses and has implications for the role of MOG in pathological, autoimmune conditions. The authors colocalized the MOG and BT genes to the human MHC on chromosome 6p21.3-p22. The mouse MOG gene was mapped to the homologous band C of chromosome 17, within the M region of the mouse MHC. 38 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Information Theoretical Analysis of a Bovine Gene Atlas Reveals Chromosomal Regions with Tissue Specific Gene Expression.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An essential step to understanding the genomic biology of any organism is to comprehensively survey its transcriptome. We present the Bovine Gene Atlas (BGA) a compendium of over 7.2 million unique 20 base Illumina DGE tags representing 100 tissue transcriptomes collected primarily from L1 Dominette...

  2. Perspectives on Immunoglobulins in Colostrum and Milk

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Walter L.; Theil, Peter K.

    2011-01-01

    Immunoglobulins form an important component of the immunological activity found in milk and colostrum. They are central to the immunological link that occurs when the mother transfers passive immunity to the offspring. The mechanism of transfer varies among mammalian species. Cattle provide a readily available immune rich colostrum and milk in large quantities, making those secretions important potential sources of immune products that may benefit humans. Immune milk is a term used to describe a range of products of the bovine mammary gland that have been tested against several human diseases. The use of colostrum or milk as a source of immunoglobulins, whether intended for the neonate of the species producing the secretion or for a different species, can be viewed in the context of the types of immunoglobulins in the secretion, the mechanisms by which the immunoglobulins are secreted, and the mechanisms by which the neonate or adult consuming the milk then gains immunological benefit. The stability of immunoglobulins as they undergo processing in the milk, or undergo digestion in the intestine, is an additional consideration for evaluating the value of milk immunoglobulins. This review summarizes the fundamental knowledge of immunoglobulins found in colostrum, milk, and immune milk. PMID:22254105

  3. Nucleotide sequence of the transcriptional initiation region of the yeast GAL7 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Nogi, Y; Fukasawa, T

    1983-01-01

    The GAL7 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes Gal-1-P uridylyl transferase, the second enzyme of Leloir pathway for the galactose catabolism. We have determined the sequence of 1003 base pairs surrounding and upstream of the transcriptional initiation site of the GAL7 gene. The region sequenced also encompasses the 3' end of GAL10 gene. The 5' end of GAL7 mRNA was determined on the DNA sequence by the S1 nuclease- and exonuclease VII mapping, which is located 21 to 22 base pairs upstream from the translation initiating ATG codon. The primary structure of the GAL7 5' flanking region has many features common to those of multicellular eukaryotic genes. The 3' end of GAL10 mRNA was also determined by the mapping technique with the single-strand specific nucleases to be about 600 base pairs upstream from the 5' end of GAL7 mRNA. Images PMID:6324089

  4. Characterization of a gene from the EDM1-PSACH region of human chromosome 19p

    SciTech Connect

    Lennon, G.G.; Giorgi, D.; Martin, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    Genetic linkage mapping has indicated that both multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (EDM1), a dominantly inherited chondrodysplasia, and pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH), a skeletal disorder associated with dwarfism, map to a 2-3 Mb region of human chromosome 19p. We have isolated a partial cDNA from this region using hybrid selection, and report on progress towards the characterization of the genomic structure and transcription of the corresponding gene. Sequence analysis of the cDNA to date indicates that this gene is likely to be expressed within extracellular matrix tissues. Defects in this gene or neighboring gene family members may therefore lead to EDM1, PSACH, or other connective tissue and skeletal disorders.

  5. The regulatory region of the human plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) gene.

    PubMed Central

    Riccio, A; Lund, L R; Sartorio, R; Lania, A; Andreasen, P A; Danø, K; Blasi, F

    1988-01-01

    The human gene for plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) has been isolated and its promoter region characterized. PAI-1 regulation by glucocorticoids, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) and the phorbol ester PMA is shown to be exerted at the promoter level. A fragment spanning 805 nucleotides of the 5' flanking and 72 of the 5' untranslated region contain information enough to promote transcription and to respond to glucocorticoids when fused to a reporter gene and transfected into human fibrosarcoma cells. A moderately repetitive DNA sequence, containing a TATA box, a GRE consensus, a Z-DNA forming sequence and two imperfect direct repeats at the extremities, is present a few nucleotides 5' of the human PAI-1 gene transcription start site, raising the possibility that this gene could have been activated by DNA insertion during evolution. Images PMID:3130610

  6. Genetic divergence in domesticated and non-domesticated gene regions of barley chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Yan, Songxian; Sun, Dongfa; Sun, Genlou

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the genetic divergence in the chromosomal regions with domesticated and non-domesticated genes. The objective of our study is to examine the effect of natural selection on shaping genetic diversity of chromosome region with domesticated and non-domesticated genes in barley using 110 SSR markers. Comparison of the genetic diversity loss between wild and cultivated barley for each chromosome showed that chromosome 5H had the highest divergence of 35.29%, followed by 3H, 7H, 4H, 2H, 6H. Diversity ratio was calculated as (diversity of wild type - diversity of cultivated type)/diversity of wild type×100%. It was found that diversity ratios of the domesticated regions on 5H, 1H and 7H were higher than those of non-domesticated regions. Diversity ratio of the domesticated region on 2H and 4H is similar to that of non-domesticated region. However, diversity ratio of the domesticated region on 3H is lower than that of non-domesticated region. Averaged diversity among six chromosomes in domesticated region was 33.73% difference between wild and cultivated barley, and was 27.56% difference in the non-domesticated region. The outcome of this study advances our understanding of the evolution of crop chromosomes. PMID:25812037

  7. Murine candidate bleomycin induced pulmonary fibrosis susceptibility genes identified by gene expression and sequence analysis of linkage regions

    PubMed Central

    Haston, C; Tomko, T; Godin, N; Kerckhoff, L; Hallett, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary fibrosis is a complex disease for which the predisposing genetic variants remain unknown. In a prior study, susceptibility to bleomycin induced pulmonary fibrosis was mapped to loci Blmpf1 and Blmpf2 on chromosomes 17 and 11, respectively, in a C57BL/6J (B6, susceptible) and C3Hf/KAM (C3H, resistant) mouse cross. Methods: Herein, the genetic basis of bleomycin induced pulmonary fibrosis was investigated in an approach combining gene expression and sequencing data with previously mapped linkage intervals. Results: In this study, gene expression analysis with microarrays revealed 1892 genes or ESTs (expressed sequence tags) to be differentially expressed between bleomycin treated B6 and C3H mice and 67 of these genetic elements map to Blmpf1 or Blmpf2. This group included genes involved in an oxidative stress response, in apoptosis, and in immune regulation. A comparison of the B6 and C3H sequence, for Blmpf1 and Blmpf2, made using the NCBI database and available C3H sequence, revealed approximately 35% of the genes in these regions contain non-synonymous coding sequence changes. An assessment of genotype/phenotype correlation among other inbred strains revealed 36% of these B6/C3H sequence variations predict for the known bleomycin induced fibrosis susceptibility of the DBA (susceptible) and A/J (resistant) mouse strains. Conclusions: Combining genomics approaches of differential gene expression and sequence variation potentially identifies approximately 5% the linked genes as fibrosis susceptibility candidate genes in this mouse cross. PMID:15937080

  8. Gene expression patterns in an onychophoran reveal that regionalization predates limb segmentation in pan-arthropods.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Ralf; Eriksson, Bo Joakim; Budd, Graham E; Akam, Michael; Prpic, Nikola-Michael

    2010-01-01

    In arthropods, such as Drosophila melanogaster, the leg gap genes homothorax (hth), extradenticle (exd), dachshund (dac), and Distal-less (Dll) regionalize the legs in order to facilitate the subsequent segmentation of the legs. We have isolated homologs of all four leg gap genes from the onychophoran Euperipatoides kanangrensis and have studied their expression. We show that leg regionalization takes place in the legs of onychophorans even though they represent simple and nonsegmented appendages. This implies that leg regionalization evolved for a different function and was only later co-opted for a role in leg segmentation. We also show that the leg gap gene patterns in onychophorans (especially of hth and exd) are similar to the patterns in crustaceans and insects, suggesting that this is the plesiomorphic state in arthropods. The reversed hth and exd patterns in chelicerates and myriapods are therefore an apomorphy for this group, the Myriochelata, lending support to the Myriochelata and Tetraconata clades in arthropod phylogeny.

  9. PCR primers for 30 novel gene regions in the nuclear genomes of Lepidoptera

    PubMed Central

    Wahlberg, Niklas; Peña, Carlos; Ahola, Milla; Wheat, Christopher W.; Rota, Jadranka

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We report primer pairs for 30 new gene regions in the nuclear genomes of Lepidoptera that can be amplified using a standard PCR protocol. The new primers were tested across diverse Lepidoptera, including nonditrysians and a wide selection of ditrysians. These new gene regions give a total of 11,043 bp of DNA sequence data and they show similar variability to traditionally used nuclear gene regions in studies of Lepidoptera. We feel that a PCR-based approach still has its place in molecular systematic studies of Lepidoptera, particularly at the intrafamilial level, and our new set of primers now provides a route to generating phylogenomic datasets using traditional methods. PMID:27408580

  10. Class Switching in B Cells Lacking 3′ Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Manis, John P.; van der Stoep, Nienke; Tian, Ming; Ferrini, Roger; Davidson, Laurie; Bottaro, Andrea; Alt, Frederick W.

    1998-01-01

    The 40-kb region downstream of the most 3′ immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy chain constant region gene (Cα) contains a series of transcriptional enhancers speculated to play a role in Ig heavy chain class switch recombination (CSR). To elucidate the function of this putative CSR regulatory region, we generated mice with germline mutations in which one or the other of the two most 5′ enhancers in this cluster (respectively referred to as HS3a and HS1,2) were replaced either with a pgk-neor cassette (referred to as HS3aN and HS1,2N mutations) or with a loxP sequence (referred to as HS3aΔ and HS1,2Δ, respectively). B cells homozygous for the HS3aN or HS1,2N mutations had severe defects in CSR to several isotypes. The phenotypic similarity of the two insertion mutations, both of which were cis-acting, suggested that inhibition might result from pgk-neor cassette gene insertion rather than enhancer deletion. Accordingly, CSR returned to normal in B cells homozygous for the HS3aΔ or HS1,2Δ mutations. In addition, induced expression of the specifically targeted pgk-neor genes was regulated similarly to that of germline CH genes. Our findings implicate a 3′ CSR regulatory locus that appears remarkably similar in organization and function to the β-globin gene 5′ LCR and which we propose may regulate differential CSR via a promoter competition mechanism. PMID:9782119

  11. Class switching in B cells lacking 3' immunoglobulin heavy chain enhancers.

    PubMed

    Manis, J P; van der Stoep, N; Tian, M; Ferrini, R; Davidson, L; Bottaro, A; Alt, F W

    1998-10-19

    The 40-kb region downstream of the most 3' immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy chain constant region gene (Calpha) contains a series of transcriptional enhancers speculated to play a role in Ig heavy chain class switch recombination (CSR). To elucidate the function of this putative CSR regulatory region, we generated mice with germline mutations in which one or the other of the two most 5' enhancers in this cluster (respectively referred to as HS3a and HS1,2) were replaced either with a pgk-neor cassette (referred to as HS3aN and HS1,2N mutations) or with a loxP sequence (referred to as HS3aDelta and HS1,2Delta, respectively). B cells homozygous for the HS3aN or HS1,2N mutations had severe defects in CSR to several isotypes. The phenotypic similarity of the two insertion mutations, both of which were cis-acting, suggested that inhibition might result from pgk-neor cassette gene insertion rather than enhancer deletion. Accordingly, CSR returned to normal in B cells homozygous for the HS3aDelta or HS1,2Delta mutations. In addition, induced expression of the specifically targeted pgk-neor genes was regulated similarly to that of germline CH genes. Our findings implicate a 3' CSR regulatory locus that appears remarkably similar in organization and function to the beta-globin gene 5' LCR and which we propose may regulate differential CSR via a promoter competition mechanism.

  12. The heat shock cognate 80 gene of tomato is flanked by matrix attachment regions.

    PubMed

    Chinn, A M; Comai, L

    1996-12-01

    Matrix attachment regions (MARs) are thought to participate in the organization and segregation of independent chromosomal loop domains. Although there are several reports on the action of MARs in the context of heterologous genes, information is more limited on the role of MARs associated with plant genes. Transgenic studies suggest that the upstream, intron and downstream regions of the developmentally regulated heat shock cognate 80 gene (HSC80) of tomato participate in chromatin organization. In this study, we tested the in vitro affinity of the HSC80 gene to chromosomal scaffolds prepared from shoot apices of tomato. We found that a 1.5 kb upstream region and a 1.4 kb downstream region, but not the intron region, are MARs. These MARs interact with tomato and pea scaffolds and bind regardless of the expression status of HSC80 in the tissue from which the nuclei were isolated. Comparison to two known yeast MARs, ARS1 and CENIII, showed that the HSC80 5'MAR binds more avidly to tomato scaffolds than ARS1, while no binding of CENIII was observed. Competition binding between the two HSC80 MARs indicated that the 5'MAR can outcompete the 3'MAR and not vice versa. Last, we observed that the interaction of the 3'MAR with the scaffold could result in an electrophoretic mobility shift resistant to SDS, protease, and phenol treatment. In conclusion, MARs whose binding properties can be clearly differentiated are closely flanking the HSC80 gene. The discovery of MARs in regions which have a distinct function in HSC80 transgenes but not in transient expression assays, is consistent with a chromosomal scaffold role in HSC80 gene regulation.

  13. PHYLOGENY OF IMMUNOGLOBULIN STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Clem, L. W.; Small, P. A.

    1967-01-01

    Lemon sharks immunized with bovine serum albumin produced two molecular forms of antibodies detectable by passive hemagglutination of antigen-coated, tanned sheep erythrocytes. Throughout the course of immunization 2-ME-sensitive antibody was associated with a 19S immunoglobulin fraction (4–5 mg/ml serum) while late in the course of immunization antibody was found also associated with a 7S immunoglobulin fraction (7–8 mg/ml serum). No evidence for any anamnestic response was found in these animals. Naturally occurring hemagglutinins for sheep erythrocytes were found to be 2-ME-sensitive and present in the 19S immunoglobulin fraction. These immunoglobulin fractions were readily purified by DEAE-cellulose chromatography and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration. Both immunoglobulin molecules yielded equimolar amounts of H and L polypeptide chains when subjected to extensive reduction and alkylation followed by gel filtration in 5 M guanidine-HCl. Antigenically reactive H and L chains were obtained by partial reduction and alkylation followed by gel filtration in 1 M propionic acid. The 7S and 19S immunoglobulin H chains were indistinguishable by fingerprints of tryptic digests, disc electrophoretic patterns, antigenic properties, and mass (molecular weight ∼70,000), thus suggesting these two molecules to belong to the same immunoglobulin class. The shark 19S and 7S immunoglobulin L chains were indistinguishable from each other by similar criteria and were different from the H chains. These L chains exhibited the electrophoretic heterogeneity of their mammalian counterparts. The 7S (shark immunoglobulin) molecule was shown to have a molecular weight of ∼160,000 and to consist of 2H and 2L polypeptide chains (total mass ≅180,000). The 19S molecule was shown to have a molecular weight of 800,000–900,000; therefore, there were probably five 7S subunits per 19S molecule, comparable to mammalian γM. Other reasons for considering the 7S and the 19S lemon shark

  14. Sequencing of 15 622 gene-bearing BACs clarifies the gene-dense regions of the barley genome.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Amatriaín, María; Lonardi, Stefano; Luo, MingCheng; Madishetty, Kavitha; Svensson, Jan T; Moscou, Matthew J; Wanamaker, Steve; Jiang, Tao; Kleinhofs, Andris; Muehlbauer, Gary J; Wise, Roger P; Stein, Nils; Ma, Yaqin; Rodriguez, Edmundo; Kudrna, Dave; Bhat, Prasanna R; Chao, Shiaoman; Condamine, Pascal; Heinen, Shane; Resnik, Josh; Wing, Rod; Witt, Heather N; Alpert, Matthew; Beccuti, Marco; Bozdag, Serdar; Cordero, Francesca; Mirebrahim, Hamid; Ounit, Rachid; Wu, Yonghui; You, Frank; Zheng, Jie; Simková, Hana; Dolezel, Jaroslav; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Duma, Denisa; Altschmied, Lothar; Blake, Tom; Bregitzer, Phil; Cooper, Laurel; Dilbirligi, Muharrem; Falk, Anders; Feiz, Leila; Graner, Andreas; Gustafson, Perry; Hayes, Patrick M; Lemaux, Peggy; Mammadov, Jafar; Close, Timothy J

    2015-10-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) possesses a large and highly repetitive genome of 5.1 Gb that has hindered the development of a complete sequence. In 2012, the International Barley Sequencing Consortium released a resource integrating whole-genome shotgun sequences with a physical and genetic framework. However, because only 6278 bacterial artificial chromosome (BACs) in the physical map were sequenced, fine structure was limited. To gain access to the gene-containing portion of the barley genome at high resolution, we identified and sequenced 15 622 BACs representing the minimal tiling path of 72 052 physical-mapped gene-bearing BACs. This generated ~1.7 Gb of genomic sequence containing an estimated 2/3 of all Morex barley genes. Exploration of these sequenced BACs revealed that although distal ends of chromosomes contain most of the gene-enriched BACs and are characterized by high recombination rates, there are also gene-dense regions with suppressed recombination. We made use of published map-anchored sequence data from Aegilops tauschii to develop a synteny viewer between barley and the ancestor of the wheat D-genome. Except for some notable inversions, there is a high level of collinearity between the two species. The software HarvEST:Barley provides facile access to BAC sequences and their annotations, along with the barley-Ae. tauschii synteny viewer. These BAC sequences constitute a resource to improve the efficiency of marker development, map-based cloning, and comparative genomics in barley and related crops. Additional knowledge about regions of the barley genome that are gene-dense but low recombination is particularly relevant. PMID:26252423

  15. Sequencing of 15 622 gene-bearing BACs clarifies the gene-dense regions of the barley genome.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Amatriaín, María; Lonardi, Stefano; Luo, MingCheng; Madishetty, Kavitha; Svensson, Jan T; Moscou, Matthew J; Wanamaker, Steve; Jiang, Tao; Kleinhofs, Andris; Muehlbauer, Gary J; Wise, Roger P; Stein, Nils; Ma, Yaqin; Rodriguez, Edmundo; Kudrna, Dave; Bhat, Prasanna R; Chao, Shiaoman; Condamine, Pascal; Heinen, Shane; Resnik, Josh; Wing, Rod; Witt, Heather N; Alpert, Matthew; Beccuti, Marco; Bozdag, Serdar; Cordero, Francesca; Mirebrahim, Hamid; Ounit, Rachid; Wu, Yonghui; You, Frank; Zheng, Jie; Simková, Hana; Dolezel, Jaroslav; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Duma, Denisa; Altschmied, Lothar; Blake, Tom; Bregitzer, Phil; Cooper, Laurel; Dilbirligi, Muharrem; Falk, Anders; Feiz, Leila; Graner, Andreas; Gustafson, Perry; Hayes, Patrick M; Lemaux, Peggy; Mammadov, Jafar; Close, Timothy J

    2015-10-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) possesses a large and highly repetitive genome of 5.1 Gb that has hindered the development of a complete sequence. In 2012, the International Barley Sequencing Consortium released a resource integrating whole-genome shotgun sequences with a physical and genetic framework. However, because only 6278 bacterial artificial chromosome (BACs) in the physical map were sequenced, fine structure was limited. To gain access to the gene-containing portion of the barley genome at high resolution, we identified and sequenced 15 622 BACs representing the minimal tiling path of 72 052 physical-mapped gene-bearing BACs. This generated ~1.7 Gb of genomic sequence containing an estimated 2/3 of all Morex barley genes. Exploration of these sequenced BACs revealed that although distal ends of chromosomes contain most of the gene-enriched BACs and are characterized by high recombination rates, there are also gene-dense regions with suppressed recombination. We made use of published map-anchored sequence data from Aegilops tauschii to develop a synteny viewer between barley and the ancestor of the wheat D-genome. Except for some notable inversions, there is a high level of collinearity between the two species. The software HarvEST:Barley provides facile access to BAC sequences and their annotations, along with the barley-Ae. tauschii synteny viewer. These BAC sequences constitute a resource to improve the efficiency of marker development, map-based cloning, and comparative genomics in barley and related crops. Additional knowledge about regions of the barley genome that are gene-dense but low recombination is particularly relevant.

  16. Core and region-enriched networks of behaviorally regulated genes and the singing genome.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Osceola; Pfenning, Andreas R; Howard, Jason T; Blatti, Charles A; Liu, Fang; Ward, James M; Wang, Rui; Audet, Jean-Nicoles; Kellis, Manolis; Mukherjee, Sayan; Sinha, Saurabh; Hartemink, Alexander J; West, Anne E; Jarvis, Erich D

    2014-12-12

    Songbirds represent an important model organism for elucidating molecular mechanisms that link genes with complex behaviors, in part because they have discrete vocal learning circuits that have parallels with those that mediate human speech. We found that ~10% of the genes in the avian genome were regulated by singing, and we found a striking regional diversity of both basal and singing-induced programs in the four key song nuclei of the zebra finch, a vocal learning songbird. The region-enriched patterns were a result of distinct combinations of region-enriched transcription factors (TFs), their binding motifs, and presinging acetylation of histone 3 at lysine 27 (H3K27ac) enhancer activity in the regulatory regions of the associated genes. RNA interference manipulations validated the role of the calcium-response transcription factor (CaRF) in regulating genes preferentially expressed in specific song nuclei in response to singing. Thus, differential combinatorial binding of a small group of activity-regulated TFs and predefined epigenetic enhancer activity influences the anatomical diversity of behaviorally regulated gene networks.

  17. The 5'-flanking regions of three pea legumin genes: comparison of the DNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Lycett, G W; Croy, R R; Shirsat, A H; Richards, D M; Boulter, D

    1985-01-01

    Approximately 1200 nucleotides of sequence data from the promoter and 5'-flanking regions of each of three pea (Pisum sativum L.) legumin genes (legA, legB and legC) are presented. The promoter regions of all three genes were found to be identical including the "TATA box", and "CAAT box', and sequences showing homology to the SV40 enhancers. The legA sequence begins to diverge from the others about 300bp from the start codon, whereas the other two genes remain identical for another 550bp. The regions of partial homology exhibit deletions or insertions and some short, comparatively well conserved sequences. The significance of these features is discussed in terms of evolutionary mechanisms and their possible functional roles. The legC gene contains a region that may potentially form either of two mutually exclusive stem-loop structures, one of which has a stem 42bp long, which suggests that it could be fairly stable. We suggest that a mechanism of switching between such alternative structures may play some role in gene control or may represent the insertion of a transposable element. PMID:2997721

  18. POLYMORPHISM IN THE CODING REGION SEQUENCE OF GDF8 GENE IN INDIAN SHEEP.

    PubMed

    Pothuraju, M; Mishra, S K; Kumar, S N; Mohamed, N F; Kataria, R S; Yadav, D K; Arora, R

    2015-11-01

    The present study was undertaken to identify polymorphism in the coding sequence of GDF8gene across indigenous meat type sheep breeds. A 1647 bp sequence was generated, encompassing 208 bp of the 5'UTR, 1128 bp of coding region (exon1, 2 and 3) as well as 311 bp of 3'UTR. The sheep and goat GDF8 gene sequences were observed to be highly conserved as compared to cattle, buffalo, horse and pig. Several nucleotide variations were observed across coding sequence of GDF8 gene in Indian sheep. Three polymorphic sites were identified in the 5'UTR, one in exon 1 and one in the exon 2 regions. Both SNPs in the exonic region were found to be non-synonymous. The mutations c.539T > G and c.821T > A discovered in this study in the exon 1 and exon 2, respectively, have not been previously reported. The information generated provides preliminary indication of the functional diversity present in Indian sheep at the coding region of GDF8gene. The novel as well as the previously reported SNPs discovered in the Indian sheep warrant further analysis to see whether they affect the phenotype. Future studies will need to establish the affect of reported SNPs in the expression of the GDF8 gene in Indian sheep population. PMID:26845859

  19. Regional mutagenesis of the gene encoding the phage Mu late gene activator C identifies two separate regions important for DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yide; Howe, Martha M.

    2008-01-01

    Lytic development of bacteriophage Mu is controlled by a regulatory cascade and involves three phases of transcription: early, middle and late. Late transcription requires the host RNA polymerase holoenzyme and a 16.5-kDa Mu-encoded activator protein C. Consistent with these requirements, the four late promoters Plys, PI, PP and Pmom have recognizable −10 hexamers but lack typical −35 hexamers. The C protein binds to a 16-bp imperfect dyad-symmetrical sequence element centered at −43.5 and overlapping the −35 region. Based on the crystal structure of the closely related Mor protein, the activator of Mu middle transcription, we predict that two regions of C are involved in DNA binding: a helix-turn-helix region and a β-strand region linking the dimerization and helix-turn-helix domains. To test this hypothesis, we carried out mutagenesis of the corresponding regions of the C gene by degenerate oligonucleotide-directed PCR and screened the resulting mutants for their ability to activate a Plys-galK fusion. Analysis of the mutant proteins by gel mobility shift, β-galactosidase and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis assays identified a number of amino acid residues important for C DNA binding in both regions. PMID:18838393

  20. Cloning and characterization of the rad4 gene of Schizosaccharomyces pombe; a gene showing short regions of sequence similarity to the human XRCC1 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Fenech, M; Carr, A M; Murray, J; Watts, F Z; Lehmann, A R

    1991-01-01

    The rad4.116 mutant of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is temperature-sensitive for growth, as well as being sensitive to the killing actions of both ultraviolet light and ionizing radiation. We have cloned the rad4 gene by complementation of the temperature sensitive phenotype of the rad4.116 mutant with a S. pombe gene bank. The rad4 gene fully complemented the UV sensitivity of the rad4.116 mutant. The gene is predicted to encode a protein of 579 amino acids with a basic tail, a possible zinc finger and a nuclear location signal. The amino terminal part of the predicted rad4 ORF contains two short regions of similarity to the C-terminal part of the human XRCC1 gene. Codon usage suggests that the gene is very poorly expressed, and this was confirmed by RNA studies. Gene disruption showed that the rad4 gene was essential for the mitotic growth of S. pombe. Images PMID:1762905

  1. Nonessential region of bacteriophage P4: DNA sequence, transcription, gene products, and functions.

    PubMed Central

    Ghisotti, D; Finkel, S; Halling, C; Dehò, G; Sironi, G; Calendar, R

    1990-01-01

    We sequenced the leftmost 2,640 base pairs of bacteriophage P4 DNA, thus completing the sequence of the 11,627-base-pair P4 genome. The newly sequenced region encodes three nonessential genes, which are called gop, beta, and cII (in order, from left to right). The gop gene product kills Escherichia coli when the beta protein is absent; the gop and beta genes are transcribed rightward from the same promoter. The cII gene is transcribed leftward to a rho-independent terminator. Mutation of this terminator creates a temperature-sensitive phenotype, presumably owing to a defect in expression of the beta gene. Images PMID:2403440

  2. Analysis of spatial-temporal gene expression patterns reveals dynamics and regionalization in developing mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Shen-Ju; Wang, Chindi; Sintupisut, Nardnisa; Niou, Zhen-Xian; Lin, Chih-Hsu; Li, Ker-Chau; Yeang, Chen-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    Allen Brain Atlas (ABA) provides a valuable resource of spatial/temporal gene expressions in mammalian brains. Despite rich information extracted from this database, current analyses suffer from several limitations. First, most studies are either gene-centric or region-centric, thus are inadequate to capture the superposition of multiple spatial-temporal patterns. Second, standard tools of expression analysis such as matrix factorization can capture those patterns but do not explicitly incorporate spatial dependency. To overcome those limitations, we proposed a computational method to detect recurrent patterns in the spatial-temporal gene expression data of developing mouse brains. We demonstrated that regional distinction in brain development could be revealed by localized gene expression patterns. The patterns expressed in the forebrain, medullary and pontomedullary, and basal ganglia are enriched with genes involved in forebrain development, locomotory behavior, and dopamine metabolism respectively. In addition, the timing of global gene expression patterns reflects the general trends of molecular events in mouse brain development. Furthermore, we validated functional implications of the inferred patterns by showing genes sharing similar spatial-temporal expression patterns with Lhx2 exhibited differential expression in the embryonic forebrains of Lhx2 mutant mice. These analysis outcomes confirm the utility of recurrent expression patterns in studying brain development. PMID:26786896

  3. Interferon. gamma. response region in the promoter of the human DPA gene

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhi; Sugawara, Minoru; Ponath, P.D.; Wessendorf, L.; Banerji, J.; Li, Yi; Strominger, J.L. )

    1990-12-01

    The interferon {gamma} (IFN-{gamma}) response region of the human class II major histocompatibility complex gene, DPA, has been localized to a 52-base-pair (bp) DNA fragment in the proximal promotor at {minus}107 to {minus}55 bp after transfection into HeLa cells of a series of 5{prime}, 3{prime}, and gap deletion mutants linked to a reporter gene, human growth hormone, as well as of synthetic oligonucleotides fused to the heterologous promoter thymidine kinase. The 52-mer sequence contains the X and Y box elements conserved in all class II genes; their presence is indispensable for IFN-{gamma} inducibility. Furthermore, an additional 5 bp immediately 5{prime} of the X box of the DPA gene are necessary and sufficient for IFN-{gamma} induction. This region may contain an IFN-{gamma} response element. A closely related sequence has also been found in the vicinity of the critical deletion sites of three other well-studied class II gene promoters, all of which require a much longer sequence 5{prime} of the X box. A fourth element, the W element, located about 15 bp 5{prime} of the X box in all class II genes, is clearly of little importance in IFN-{gamma} inducibility of the DPA gene.

  4. The human insulin gene linked polymorphic region exhibits an altered DNA structure.

    PubMed Central

    Hammond-Kosack, M C; Dobrinski, B; Lurz, R; Docherty, K; Kilpatrick, M W

    1992-01-01

    Regulation of transcription of the human insulin gene appears to involve a series of DNA sequences in the 5' region. Hypersensitivity to DNA structural probes has previously been demonstrated in regulatory regions of cloned genomic DNA fragments, and been correlated with gene activity. To investigate the structure of the DNA in the human insulin gene, bromoacetaldehyde and S1 nuclease were reacted with a supercoiled plasmid containing a 5kb genomic insulin fragment. Both probes revealed the human insulin gene linked polymorphic region (ILPR), a region (-363) upstream of the transcriptional start site which contains multiple repeats of a 14-15mer oligonucleotide with the consensus sequence ACAGGGGT(G/C)(T/C)GGGG, as the major hypersensitive site. Fine mapping and electron microscopic analysis both show a very different behaviour of the two DNA strands in the region of the ILPR and suggest the G-rich strand may be adopting a highly structured conformation with the complementary strand remaining largely single stranded. Images PMID:1741248

  5. Characterization of the mouse TFF1 (pS2) gene promoter region.

    PubMed

    Terada, T; Sakagami, R; Tabuchi, Y; Maeda, M

    2001-02-01

    Trefoil peptides (TFFs) with a unique trefoil domain(s) are presumed to function in protection and repair of the gastrointestinal epithelial layer. Three peptide family members are differently distributed in the mouse gastrointestinal tract: TFF1/pS2 specifically in stomach, TFF2/SP mainly in stomach, pancreas and duodenum, and TFF3/ITF in intestine. We cloned and sequenced the mouse TFF1 gene 5'-upstream region by means of the genomic walking procedure. The cloned region was ligated to the luciferase reporter gene and then introduced into mouse gastric surface mucous GSM10 cells which express TFF1 and TFF2. The minimum promoter was located in the region containing the TATA-box between -39 and the transcriptional start site. Further upstream regions stimulated (-2192-- -1630bp, -641-- -243bp, -137-- -39bp) and inhibited (-1630-- -641bp, -243-- -137 bp) luciferase gene expression. These regions as well as short segments conserved in the mouse and human 5'-upstream sequences may be important for modulation of the mRNA level of the TFF1 gene.

  6. The identification of five novel genes in the cri-du-chat critical region

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, A.D.; Gallardo, T.D.; Lovett, M.

    1994-09-01

    Cri-du-chat is a contiguous gene syndrome associated with deletions in the short arm of chromosome 5 (chr 5). Chr 5p-specific markers have been used to define two critical regions: a larynx malformation region, located at 5p15.3, and a region responsible for the remaining clinical features of the syndrome, which maps to 5p15.2. Thirty cosmids that map to this latter region have been isolated from the LANL chr 5-specific library using 5 STSs. More recently, we have constructed a YAC contig of the region which encompasses 2-3 Mb. The 30 framework cosmids were used in a direct selection with cDNAs from placenta, activated T-cells and cerebellum to isolate an initial set of expressed sequences from this region. Since no genes, to date, have been isolated or localized within the cri-du-chat deletion, a cosmid containing a control reporter gene (ANX6) was used to monitor enrichment. ANX6 cDNAs were enriched by several thousand-fold in the selected cDNAs. A total of nine non overlapping cDNA fragments were obtained from the cDNA pools. These have been ordered within the YAC contig, map to 5 discrete cosmid sets in the critical region and thus conservatively represent five discrete transcription units. The DNA sequences of these fragments are novel by sequence database comparisons. PCR primers were constructed and were used to confirm gene placements in the YAC contig, as well as to investigate the expression profile of these genes in several different tissues and cell types. In one case, these primer sets enabled two of the nine fragments to be linked into a larger cDNA. The nine cDNAs showed various patterns of differential expression in a panel of tissues. These expressed sequences represent the first genes isolated within the cri-du-chat critical region and represent the initial steps in the derivation of a comprehensive inventory and expression profile of the estimated 100 genes that may reside in this region.

  7. Linkage disequilibrium in the region of the autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease gene (PKD1)

    SciTech Connect

    Snarey, A. ); Thomas, S.; Harris, P.C. ); Schneider, M.C. ); Pound, S.E.; Wright, A.F. ); Barton, N.; Somlo, S.; Germino, G.G.; Reeders, S.T.

    1994-08-01

    The gene for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (PKD1) is located on chromosome 16p, between the flanking markers D16S84 and D16S125 (26.6 prox). This region is 750 kb long and has been cloned. The authors have looked at the association of 10 polymorphic markers from the region, with the disease and with each other. This was done in a set of Scottish families that had previously shown association with D16S94, a marker proximal to the PKD1 region. They report significant association between two CA repeat markers and the disease but have not found evidence for a single founder haplotype in these families, indicating the presence of several mutations in this population. Their results favor a location of the PKD1 gene in the proximal part of the candidate region. 25 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  8. Differential gene expression in mouse retina related to regional differences in vulnerability to hyperoxia

    PubMed Central

    Natoli, Riccardo; Valter, Krisztina; Stone, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose In the C57BL/6J mouse retina, hyperoxia-induced degeneration of photoreceptors shows strong regional variation, beginning at a locus ~0.5 mm inferior to the optic disc. To identify gene expression differences that might underlie this variability in vulnerability, we have used microarray techniques to describe regional (superior-inferior) variations in gene expression in the retina. Methods Young adult C57BL/6J mice raised in dim cyclic illumination (12 h at 5 lx and 12 h in darkness) were exposed to hyperoxia (75% oxygen for two weeks). Retinas were collected from hyperoxia-exposed and control animals without fixation and divided into superior and inferior halves. RNA was extracted from each sample, purified, and hybridized to Mouse Gene 1.0 ST arrays (Affymetrix). The consistency of the microarray results was assessed using quantitative PCR for selected genes. Expression data were analyzed to identify genes and ncRNAs whose differential expression between the superior and inferior retina could be associated with relative vulnerability to hyperoxia. Results In control retinas, only two genes showed a fold difference in expression >2 between the superior and inferior retina; another 25 showed a fold difference of 1.5–2.0. Of these 27, the functions of six genes, including ventral anterior homeobox containing gene 2 (Vax2) and T-box 5 (Tbox5), are related to parameters of anatomic development and the functions of five are related to sensory perception. Among the latter, short-wave-sensitive cone opsin (Opn1sw) was more strongly expressed in the inferior retina and medium-wave-sensitive cone opsin (Opn1mw) in the superior retina. This is consistent with known differences in S- and M-cone distribution, confirming our separation of retinal regions. The highest fold difference was reported for membrane metalloendopeptidase (Mme), a member from the metallothionein group of cytoprotective proteins. To identify genes whose regulation by hyperoxia was

  9. Conserved sequences in both coding and 5' flanking regions of mammalian opal suppressor tRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, K; Eden, F C; You, K H; O'Neill, V A; Hatfield, D

    1985-01-01

    The rabbit genome encodes an opal suppressor tRNA gene. The coding region is strictly conserved between the rabbit gene and the corresponding gene in the human genome. The rabbit opal suppressor gene contains the consensus sequence in the 3' internal control region but like the human and chicken genes, the rabbit 5' internal control region contains two additional nucleotides. The 5' flanking sequences of the rabbit and the human opal suppressor genes contain extensive regions of homology. A subset of these homologies is also present 5' to the chicken opal suppressor gene. Both the rabbit and the human genomes also encode a pseudogene. That of the rabbit lacks the 3' half of the coding region. Neither pseudogene has homologous regions to the 5' flanking regions of the genes. The presence of 5' homologies flanking only the transcribed genes and not the pseudogenes suggests that these regions may be regulatory control elements specifically involved in the expression of the eukaryotic opal suppressor gene. Moreover the strict conservation of coding sequences indicates functional importance for the opal suppressor tRNA genes. Images PMID:4022772

  10. Global differential expression of genes located in the Down Syndrome Critical Region in normal human brain

    PubMed Central

    Montoya, Julio Cesar; Fajardo, Dianora; Peña, Angela; Sánchez, Adalberto; Domínguez, Martha C; Satizábal, José María

    2014-01-01

    Background: The information of gene expression obtained from databases, have made possible the extraction and analysis of data related with several molecular processes involving not only in brain homeostasis but its disruption in some neuropathologies; principally in Down syndrome and the Alzheimer disease. Objective: To correlate the levels of transcription of 19 genes located in the Down Syndrome Critical Region (DSCR) with their expression in several substructures of normal human brain. Methods: There were obtained expression profiles of 19 DSCR genes in 42 brain substructures, from gene expression values available at the database of the human brain of the Brain Atlas of the Allen Institute for Brain Sciences", (http://human.brain-map.org/). The co-expression patterns of DSCR genes in brain were calculated by using multivariate statistical methods. Results: Highest levels of gene expression were registered at caudate nucleus, nucleus accumbens and putamen among central areas of cerebral cortex. Increased expression levels of RCAN1 that encode by a protein involved in signal transduction process of the CNS were recorded for PCP4 that participates in the binding to calmodulin and TTC3; a protein that is associated with differentiation of neurons. That previously identified brain structures play a crucial role in the learning process, in different class of memory and in motor skills. Conclusion: The precise regulation of DSCR gene expression is crucial to maintain the brain homeostasis, especially in those areas with high levels of gene expression associated with a remarkable process of learning and cognition. PMID:25767303

  11. The 3' flanking region of the human ABO histo-blood group gene is involved in negative regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sano, Rie; Nakajima, Tamiko; Takahashi, Keiko; Kubo, Rieko; Yazawa, Shin; Kominato, Yoshihiko

    2011-01-01

    Gene expression is driven by promoters, enhancers, silencers, and other cis-regulatory elements upstream and downstream of the gene. Previous studies of the regulation of human ABO gene transcription have focused mainly on the 5' region, including the core promoter and the region proximal to it. However, as the involvement of the 3' flanking region in transcriptional regulation has not yet been examined, we focused on this issue. The 3' region approximately 2.2kb downstream of the ABO gene was PCR-amplified and inserted into a cloning vector, followed by sequence determination and preparation of luciferase reporter vectors. Transient transfections into KATOIII and K562 cells were performed using various reporter plasmids containing the 3' region. The 3' region of the ABO gene, which was characterized by a high degree of sequence repetition, was effectively cloned by a single-copy cloning method. Transfections in KATOIII and K562 cells showed that negative elements were demonstrable within the 3' region. These observations suggest that negative regulatory elements seem to be present in the 3' region of ABO in both epithelial and erythroid lineages. As we had observed a negative region just upstream of the ABO promoter, transcription from ABO could be negatively regulated by repressive regions just upstream of the promoter and downstream of the gene. Further studies of the enhancer will be required for elucidating the molecular basis of ABO gene expression. PMID:21144789

  12. Expression of an auxin- and cytokinin-regulated gene in cambial region in Zinnia

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Z.H.; Varner, J.E. )

    1994-07-05

    The expression patterns of a cDNA clone, p48h-10, of an auxin-induced gene were examined in isolated mesophyll cells of Zinnia and in the organs of Zinnia plants. In the isolated mesophyll cells, the mRNA accumulates in 48 hr of culture with 1-naphthaleneacetic acid alone. Because the first cell division occurs before 36 hr of culture, the gene probably is not involved in cell division. Benzyladenine does not induce expression of this gene, but the combination of 1-naphthaleneacetic acid and benzyladenine induces the mRNA accumulation about 24 hr earlier than does 1-naphthaleneacetic acid alone. Tissue print hybridization shows that the mRNA is present predominantly in the cambial region in stems, leaves, and roots and in the vascular bundles in flower buds but does not occur in the apical regions of shoot or root. The characteristics of the gene expression, including auxin- and cytokinin-regulated induction and cambial region localization, encourage the authors to suggest that the gene is involved in the early process of vascular differentiation.

  13. Identification of a conserved sequence in the non-coding regions of many human genes.

    PubMed Central

    Donehower, L A; Slagle, B L; Wilde, M; Darlington, G; Butel, J S

    1989-01-01

    We have analyzed a sequence of approximately 70 base pairs (bp) that shows a high degree of similarity to sequences present in the non-coding regions of a number of human and other mammalian genes. The sequence was discovered in a fragment of human genomic DNA adjacent to an integrated hepatitis B virus genome in cells derived from human hepatocellular carcinoma tissue. When one of the viral flanking sequences was compared to nucleotide sequences in GenBank, more than thirty human genes were identified that contained a similar sequence in their non-coding regions. The sequence element was usually found once or twice in a gene, either in an intron or in the 5' or 3' flanking regions. It did not share any similarities with known short interspersed nucleotide elements (SINEs) or presently known gene regulatory elements. This element was highly conserved at the same position within the corresponding human and mouse genes for myoglobin and N-myc, indicating evolutionary conservation and possible functional importance. Preliminary DNase I footprinting data suggested that the element or its adjacent sequences may bind nuclear factors to generate specific DNase I hypersensitive sites. The size, structure, and evolutionary conservation of this sequence indicates that it is distinct from other types of short interspersed repetitive elements. It is possible that the element may have a cis-acting functional role in the genome. Images PMID:2536922

  14. Immunogenetic mechanisms leading to thyroid autoimmunity: recent advances in identifying susceptibility genes and regions.

    PubMed

    Brand, Oliver J; Gough, Stephen C L

    2011-12-01

    The autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) include Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), which are characterised by a breakdown in immune tolerance to thyroid antigens. Unravelling the genetic architecture of AITD is vital to better understanding of AITD pathogenesis, required to advance therapeutic options in both disease management and prevention. The early whole-genome linkage and candidate gene association studies provided the first evidence that the HLA region and CTLA-4 represented AITD risk loci. Recent improvements in; high throughput genotyping technologies, collection of larger disease cohorts and cataloguing of genome-scale variation have facilitated genome-wide association studies and more thorough screening of candidate gene regions. This has allowed identification of many novel AITD risk genes and more detailed association mapping. The growing number of confirmed AITD susceptibility loci, implicates a number of putative disease mechanisms most of which are tightly linked with aspects of immune system function. The unprecedented advances in genetic study will allow future studies to identify further novel disease risk genes and to identify aetiological variants within specific gene regions, which will undoubtedly lead to a better understanding of AITD patho-physiology.

  15. BIALLELIC POLYMORPHISM IN THE INTRON REGION OF B-TUBULIN GENE OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARASITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nucleotide sequencing of polymerase chain reaction-amplified intron region of the Cryptosporidium parvum B-tubulin gene in 26 human and 15 animal isolates revealed distinct genetic polymorphism between the human and bovine genotypes. The separation of 2 genotypes of C. parvum is...

  16. Extended region of nodulation genes in Rhizobium meliloti 1021. I. Phenotypes of Tn5 insertion mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, J.A.; Tu, J.K.; Ogawa, J.; Sanga, R.; Fisher, R.F.; Long, S.R.

    1987-10-01

    Rhizobium meliloti Nod/sup -/ mutant WL131, a derivative of wild-type strain 102F51, was complemented by a clone bank of wild-type R. meliloti 1021 DNA, and clone pRmJT5 was recovered. Transfer of pRmJT5 conferred alfalfa nodulation on other Rhizobium species, indicating a role in host range determination for pRmJT5. Mutagenesis of pRmJT5 revealed several segments in which transposon insertion causes delay in nodulation, and/or marked reduction of the number of nodules formed on host alfalfa plants. The set of mutants indicated five regions in which nod genes are located; one mutant, nod-216, is located in a region not previously reported to encode a nodulation gene. Other mutant phenotypes correlated with the positions of open reading frames for nodH, nodF and nodE, and with a 2.2-kb EcoRI fragment. A mutant in nodG had no altered phenotype in this strain. One nodulation mutant was shown to be a large deletion of the common nod gene region. The authors present a discussion comparing the various studies made on this extended nod gene region.

  17. Cloning and characterization of 5'-untranslated region of porcine beta casein gene (CSN2).

    PubMed

    Lee, Poongyeon; Chung, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Hyun-Gi; Lee, Hwi-Cheul; Woo, Jae-Seok; Lee, Seunghoon; Jo, Su-Jin; Chang, Won-Kyong; Lee, Hoon-Taek; Kwon, Moosik; Park, Jin-Ki

    2008-10-01

    beta-Casein (CSN2) is a major milk protein in most mammals. The CSN2 gene is generally induced by lactogenic hormones bound to its promoter. The expression of this gene can be enhanced by signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Here, we analyzed the promoter and intron 1 regions of the porcine CSN2 gene. The porcine CSN2 promoter and intron 1 regions (-3098bp to +2446bp) were cloned into the pGL3-Basic vector containing the luciferase reporter gene (pCSN2-PEI). Lactogenic signals induced the transcription of porcine CSN2. By using AG490, a Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitor, we demonstrated that STAT5 positively regulates the transcription of porcine CSN2. Further, seven STAT mutants were generated by site-directed mutagenesis. By performing electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs), we located a critical element for pCSN2-PEI transcription bound to STAT5 in the -102bp to -84bp region. The construct containing only the promoter region (pCSN2-P), however, did not exert any promotive effects on transcription in two cell types-a mouse mammary epithelial cell line (HC11) and porcine mammary gland epithelial cells (PMECs). Thus, the construct containing intron 1 of porcine CSN2 exerts an elevating effect on transcription. We suggest that the transcription of porcine CSN2 is regulated by lactogenic signals via the STAT5 site (-102bp to -84bp) and intron 1.

  18. The Rhodomonas salina mitochondrial genome: bacteria-like operons, compact gene arrangement and complex repeat region.

    PubMed

    Hauth, Amy M; Maier, Uwe G; Lang, B Franz; Burger, Gertraud

    2005-01-01

    To gain insight into the mitochondrial genome structure and gene content of a putatively ancestral group of eukaryotes, the cryptophytes, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial DNA of Rhodomonas salina. The 48 063 bp circular-mapping molecule codes for 2 rRNAs, 27 tRNAs and 40 proteins including 23 components of oxidative phosphorylation, 15 ribosomal proteins and two subunits of tat translocase. One potential protein (ORF161) is without assigned function. Only two introns occur in the genome; both are present within cox1 belong to group II and contain RT open reading frames. Primitive genome features include bacteria-like rRNAs and tRNAs, ribosomal protein genes organized in large clusters resembling bacterial operons and the presence of the otherwise rare genes such as rps1 and tatA. The highly compact gene organization contrasts with the presence of a 4.7 kb long, repeat-containing intergenic region. Repeat motifs approximately 40-700 bp long occur up to 31 times, forming a complex repeat structure. Tandem repeats are the major arrangement but the region also includes a large, approximately 3 kb, inverted repeat and several potentially stable approximately 40-80 bp long hairpin structures. We provide evidence that the large repeat region is involved in replication and transcription initiation, predict a promoter motif that occurs in three locations and discuss two likely scenarios of how this highly structured repeat region might have evolved.

  19. Organization of the 5' region of the rat ATP citrate lyase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, K S; Park, S W; Moon, Y A; Kim, Y S

    1994-01-01

    A genomic clone, encompassing the 5' flanking region and the first seven exons of rat ATP citrate lyase gene, was isolated from a rat genomic library and sequenced. Primer-extension analysis showed that mRNA is transcribed at 4407 nucleotides upstream from the translation start site. Primer-extension analysis and sequencing of ATP citrate lyase cDNA amplified by PCR showed that the promoter used for transcription is identical in mammary gland, lung, liver, brain and kidney. Southern-blot analysis showed that the ATP citrate lyase gene exists as a single copy. The 5' flanking region contains several consensus sequences defined as promoter elements. These include a CAAT box and Sp1-binding sites. However, a TATA box lacks this promoter. The expression of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene was induced by the 5' flanking region (-2370 to -1) in the CHO cell line. The 5' flanking region also contains several sequence elements that may be involved in the transcriptional regulation of the gene. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:7945200

  20. The Neurospora crassa carotenoid biosynthetic gene (albino 3) reveals highly conserved regions among prenyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Carattoli, A; Romano, N; Ballario, P; Morelli, G; Macino, G

    1991-03-25

    In the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa the biosynthesis of carotenoids is regulated by blue light. Here we report the characterization of the albino-3 (al-3) gene of N. crassa, which encodes the carotenoid biosynthetic enzyme geranylgeranyl-pyrophosphate synthetase. This is the first geranylgeranyl-pyrophosphate synthetase gene isolated. Nucleotide sequence comparison of al-3 genomic and cDNA clones revealed that the al-3 gene is not interrupted by introns. Transcription of the al-3 gene has been examined in dark-grown and light-induced mycelia. The analysis revealed that the al-3 gene is not expressed in the dark and that its transcription is induced by blue light (Nelson, M. A., Morelli, G., Carattoli, A., Romano, N., and Macino, G. (1989) Mol. Cell. Biol. 9, 1271-1276). The al-3 gene encodes a polypeptide of 428 amino acids. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of al-3 with the sequences of prenyltransferases of other species, from bacteria to humans, showed three highly conserved homologous regions. These homologous regions may be involved in the formation of the catalytic site of the prenyltransferases.

  1. Cytomegalovirus Immunoglobulin After Thoracic Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Grossi, Paolo; Mohacsi, Paul; Szabolcs, Zoltán; Potena, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a highly complex pathogen which, despite modern prophylactic regimens, continues to affect a high proportion of thoracic organ transplant recipients. The symptomatic manifestations of CMV infection are compounded by adverse indirect effects induced by the multiple immunomodulatory actions of CMV. These include a higher risk of acute rejection, cardiac allograft vasculopathy after heart transplantation, and potentially bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome in lung transplant recipients, with a greater propensity for opportunistic secondary infections. Prophylaxis for CMV using antiviral agents (typically oral valganciclovir or intravenous ganciclovir) is now almost universal, at least in high-risk transplants (D+/R−). Even with extended prophylactic regimens, however, challenges remain. The CMV events can still occur despite antiviral prophylaxis, including late-onset infection or recurrent disease, and patients with ganciclovir-resistant CMV infection or who are intolerant to antiviral therapy require alternative strategies. The CMV immunoglobulin (CMVIG) and antiviral agents have complementary modes of action. High-titer CMVIG preparations provide passive CMV-specific immunity but also exert complex immunomodulatory properties which augment the antiviral effect of antiviral agents and offer the potential to suppress the indirect effects of CMV infection. This supplement discusses the available data concerning the immunological and clinical effects of CMVIG after heart or lung transplantation. PMID:26900989

  2. Intact coding region of the serotonin transporter gene in obsessive-compulsive disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Altemus, M.; Murphy, D.L.; Greenberg, B.; Lesch, K.P.

    1996-07-26

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that obsessive-compulsive disorder is genetically transmitted in some families, although no genetic abnormalities have been identified in individuals with this disorder. The selective response of obsessive-compulsive disorder to treatment with agents which block serotonin reuptake suggests the gene coding for the serotonin transporter as a candidate gene. The primary structure of the serotonin-transporter coding region was sequenced in 22 patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder, using direct PCR sequencing of cDNA synthesized from platelet serotonin-transporter mRNA. No variations in amino acid sequence were found among the obsessive-compulsive disorder patients or healthy controls. These results do not support a role for alteration in the primary structure of the coding region of the serotonin-transporter gene in the pathogenesis of obsessive-compulsive disorder. 27 refs.

  3. Saturation mapping of QTL regions and identification of putative candidate genes for drought tolerance in rice.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T T T; Klueva, N; Chamareck, V; Aarti, A; Magpantay, G; Millena, A C M; Pathan, M S; Nguyen, H T

    2004-08-01

    We have developed 85 new markers (50 RFLPs, 5 SSRs, 12 DD cDNAs, 9 ESTs, 8 HSP-encoding cDNAs and one BSA-derived AFLP marker) for saturation mapping of QTL regions for drought tolerance in rice, in our efforts to identify putative candidate genes. Thirteen of the markers were localized in the close vicinity of the targeted QTL regions. Fifteen of the additional markers mapped, respectively, inside one QTL region controlling osmotic adjustment on chromosome 3 ( oa3.1) and 14 regions that affect root traits on chromosomes 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 and 12. Differential display was used to identify more putative candidate genes and to saturate the QTL regions of the genetic map. Eleven of the isolated cDNA clones were found to be derived from drought-inducible genes. Two of them were unique and did not match any genes in the GenBank, while nine were highly similar to cDNAs encoding known proteins, including a DnaJ-related protein, a zinc-finger protein, a protease inhibitor, a glutathione-S-transferase, a DNA recombinase, and a protease. Twelve new cDNA fragments were mapped onto the genetic linkage map; seven of these mapped inside, or in close proximity to, the targeted QTL regions determining root thickness and osmotic adjustment capacity. The gene I12A1, which codes for a UDP-glucose 4-epimerase homolog, was identified as a putative target gene within the prt7.1/brt7.1 QTL region, as it is involved in the cell wall biogenesis pathway and hence may be implicated in modulating the ability of rice roots to penetrate further into the substratum when exposed to drought conditions. RNAs encoding elongation factor 1beta, a DnaJ-related protein, and a homolog of wheat zinc-finger protein were more prominently induced in the leaves of IR62266 (the lowland rice parent of the mapping materials used) than in those of CT9993 (the upland rice parent) under drought conditions. Homologs of 18S ribosomal RNA, and mRNAs for a multiple-stress induced zinc-finger protein, a protease

  4. Saturation mapping of QTL regions and identification of putative candidate genes for drought tolerance in rice.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T T T; Klueva, N; Chamareck, V; Aarti, A; Magpantay, G; Millena, A C M; Pathan, M S; Nguyen, H T

    2004-08-01

    We have developed 85 new markers (50 RFLPs, 5 SSRs, 12 DD cDNAs, 9 ESTs, 8 HSP-encoding cDNAs and one BSA-derived AFLP marker) for saturation mapping of QTL regions for drought tolerance in rice, in our efforts to identify putative candidate genes. Thirteen of the markers were localized in the close vicinity of the targeted QTL regions. Fifteen of the additional markers mapped, respectively, inside one QTL region controlling osmotic adjustment on chromosome 3 ( oa3.1) and 14 regions that affect root traits on chromosomes 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 and 12. Differential display was used to identify more putative candidate genes and to saturate the QTL regions of the genetic map. Eleven of the isolated cDNA clones were found to be derived from drought-inducible genes. Two of them were unique and did not match any genes in the GenBank, while nine were highly similar to cDNAs encoding known proteins, including a DnaJ-related protein, a zinc-finger protein, a protease inhibitor, a glutathione-S-transferase, a DNA recombinase, and a protease. Twelve new cDNA fragments were mapped onto the genetic linkage map; seven of these mapped inside, or in close proximity to, the targeted QTL regions determining root thickness and osmotic adjustment capacity. The gene I12A1, which codes for a UDP-glucose 4-epimerase homolog, was identified as a putative target gene within the prt7.1/brt7.1 QTL region, as it is involved in the cell wall biogenesis pathway and hence may be implicated in modulating the ability of rice roots to penetrate further into the substratum when exposed to drought conditions. RNAs encoding elongation factor 1beta, a DnaJ-related protein, and a homolog of wheat zinc-finger protein were more prominently induced in the leaves of IR62266 (the lowland rice parent of the mapping materials used) than in those of CT9993 (the upland rice parent) under drought conditions. Homologs of 18S ribosomal RNA, and mRNAs for a multiple-stress induced zinc-finger protein, a protease

  5. The polycystic kidney disease 1 gene lies in a duplicated genomic region

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, C.J.; Hughes, J.; Peral, B. |

    1994-09-01

    The polycystic kidney disease 1 (PKD1) gene is situated in chromosomal band 16p13.3 and encodes a 14 kb transcript. The 5{prime} region of the PKD1 gene is located within a 40-50 kb stretch of genomic DNA which is duplicated several times in the more proximal region, 16p13.1. This proximal area gives rise to at least three transcripts designated homologous gene A (HG-A; 21 kb), HG-B (17 kb) and HG-C (8.5 kb). These three transcripts share substantial homology with each other and the PKD1 transcript. However, the 3{prime} 3.8 kb section of the PKD1 transcript is unique because it is encoded by a region of the gene that lies outside the duplicated area. The presence of the duplicate transcripts in all tissues analyzed has hampered attempts to clone and sequence the bone fide PKD1 gene. Comparison of cDNAs known to arise from the PKD1 transcript to those from the HG transcripts reveals that divergence of 2-3% has occurred between these sequences. To overcome the problem of the duplication, a large 15 kb section of genomic DNA has been sequenced together with several large HG cDNAs. Utilizing a radiation hybrid which contains only the 16p13.3 region and expresses low levels of the PKD1 transcript, we are now attempting to clone the duplicated part of the PKD1 gene by exon linking.

  6. Ancient conserved regions in new gene sequences and the protein databases

    SciTech Connect

    Green, P.; Hillier, L.; Waterston, R. ); Lipman, D.; States, D.; Claverie, J.M. )

    1993-03-19

    Sets of new gene sequences from human, nematode, and yeast were compared with each other and with a set of Escherichia coli genes in order to detect ancient evolutionarily conserved regions (ACRs) in the encoded proteins. Nearly all of the ACRs so identified were found to be homologous to sequences in the protein databases. This suggests that currently known proteins may already include representatives of most ACRs and that new sequences not similar to any database sequence are unlikely to contain ACRs. Preliminary analyses indicate that moderately expressed genes may be more likely to contain ACRs than rarely expressed genes. It is estimated that there are fewer than 900 ACRs in all. 20 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Fine mapping of genes within the IDDM8 region in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hinks, Anne; Barton, Anne; John, Sally; Shephard, Neil; Worthington, Jane

    2006-01-01

    The IDDM8 region on chromosome 6q27, first identified as a susceptibility locus for type 1 diabetes, has previously been linked and associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The region contains a number of potential candidate genes, including programmed cell death 2 (PDCD2), the proteosome subunit beta type 1 (PSMB1), delta-like ligand 1 (DLL-1) and TATA box-binding protein (TBP) amongst others. The aim of this study was to fine map the IDDM8 region on chromosome 6q27, focusing on the genes in the region, to identify polymorphisms that may contribute to susceptibility to RA and potentially to other autoimmune diseases. Validated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; n = 65) were selected from public databases from the 330 kb region of IDDM8. These were genotyped using Sequenom MassArray genotyping technology in two datasets; the test dataset comprised 180 RA cases and 180 controls. We tested 50 SNPs for association with RA and any significant associations were genotyped in a second dataset of 174 RA cases and 192 controls, and the datasets were combined before analysis. Association analysis was performed by chi-square test implemented in Stata software and linkage disequilibrium and haplotype analysis was performed using Helix tree version 4.1. There was initial weak evidence of association, with RA, of a number of SNPs around the loc154449 putative gene and within the KIAA1838 gene; however, these associations were not significant in the combined dataset. Our study has failed to detect evidence of association with any of the known genes mapping to the IDDM8 locus with RA. PMID:16945141

  8. Map position and expression of the genes in the 38 region of Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Butler, H; Levine, S; Wang, X; Bonyadi, S; Fu, G; Lasko, P; Suter, B; Doerig, R

    2001-01-01

    With the completion of the Drosophila genome sequence, an important next step is to extract its biological information by systematic functional analysis of genes. We have produced a high-resolution genetic map of cytological region 38 of Drosophila using 41 deficiency stocks that provide a total of 54 breakpoints within the region. Of a total of 45 independent P-element lines that mapped by in situ hybridization to the region, 14 targeted 7 complementation groups within the 38 region. Additional EMS, X-ray, and spontaneous mutations define a total of 17 complementation groups. Because these two pools partially overlap, the completed analysis revealed 21 distinct complementation groups defined by point mutations. Seven additional functions were defined by trans-heterozygous combinations of deficiencies, resulting in a total of 28 distinct functions. We further produced a developmental expression profile for the 760 kb from 38B to 38E. Of 135 transcription units predicted by GENSCAN, 22 have at least partial homology to mobile genetic elements such as transposons and retroviruses and 17 correspond to previously characterized genes. We analyzed the developmental expression pattern of the remaining genes using poly(A)(+) RNA from ovaries, early and late embryos, larvae, males, and females. We discuss the correlation between GENSCAN predictions and experimentally confirmed transcription units, the high number of male-specific transcripts, and the alignment of the genetic and physical maps in cytological region 38. PMID:11514449

  9. Comparative analysis of the 5'-end regions of two repressible acid phosphatase genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Thill, G P; Kramer, R A; Turner, K J; Bostian, K A

    1983-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of 5'-noncoding and N-terminal coding regions of two coordinately regulated, repressible acid phosphatase genes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae were determined. These unlinked genes encode different, but structurally related polypeptides of molecular weights 60,000 and 56,000. The DNA sequences of their 5'-flanking regions show stretches of extensive homology upstream of, and surrounding, a "TATA" sequence and in a region in which heterogeneous 5' ends of the p60 mRNA were mapped. The predicted amino acid sequences encoded by the N-terminal regions of both genes were confirmed by determination of the amino acid sequence of the native exocellular acid phosphatase and the partial sequence of the presecretory polypeptide synthesized in a cell-free protein synthesizing system. The N-terminal region of the p60 polypeptide was shown to be characterized by a hydrophobic 17-amino acid signal polypeptide which is absent in the native exocellular protein and thought to be necessary for acid phosphatase secretion. Images PMID:6343840

  10. Construction of a yeast artifical chromosome contig spanning the spinal muscular atrophy disease gene region

    SciTech Connect

    Kleyn, P.W.; Wang, C.H.; Vitale, E.; Pan, J.; Ross, B.M.; Grunn, A.; Palmer, D.A.; Warburton, D.; Brzustowicz, L.M.; Gilliam, T.G. ); Lien, L.L.; Kunkel, L.M. )

    1993-07-15

    The childhood spinal muscular atrophies (SMAs) are the most common, serious neuromuscular disorders of childhood second to Duchenne muscular dystrophy. A single locus for these disorders has been mapped by recombination events to a region of 0.7 centimorgan (range, 0.1-2.1 centimorgans) between loci D5S435 and MAP1B on chromosome 5q11.2-13.3. By using PCR amplification to screen yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) DNA pools and the PCR-vectorette method to amplify YAC ends, a YAC contig was constructed across the disease gene region. Nine walk steps identified 32 YACs, including a minimum of seven overlapping YAC clones (average size, 460 kb) that span the SMA region. The contig is characterized by a collection of 30 YAC-end sequence tag sites together with seven genetic markers. The entire YAC contig spans a minimum of 3.2 Mb; the SMA locus is confined to roughly half of this region. Microsatellite markers generated along the YAC contig segregate with the SMA locus in all families where the flanking markers (D5S435 and MAP1B) recombine. Construction of a YAC contig across the disease gene region is an essential step in isolation of the SMA-encoding gene. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Delta sequences in the 5' non-coding region of yeast tRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Gafner, Jürg; Robertis, Eddy M.De; Philippsen, Peter

    1983-01-01

    Two so far undetected tRNA genes were found close to delta (δ) sequences at the sup4 locus on chromosome X in the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The two genes were identified from their abundant transcription products in frog oocytes. Hybridisation experiments allowed the mapping of the transcripts in cloned DNA and DNA sequence analysis revealed the presence of one AGGtRNAArg and one GACtRNAAsp gene. tRNAAsp genes with sequences similar or identical to GACtRNAAsp exist in 14-16 copies per haploid yeast genome, whereas only one copy was detected for AGGtRNAArg. In vivo labelling of total yeast tRNA with 32P followed by hybridisation revealed that the unique AGGtRNAArg gene is transcribed in S. cerevisiae. δ sequences are present 120 bp upstream from the first coding nucleotide in the case of AGGtRNAArg, 80 bp in the case of GACtRNAAsp and 405 bp in the case of the known UACtRNATyr (sup4) gene. δ sequences, as part of Ty elements or alone, were also found by other investigators at similar distances upstream of the mRNA start in mutant alleles of protein-coding yeast genes. Although protein-coding genes are transcribed by RNA polymerase II and tRNA genes by RNA polymerase III, the 5' non-coding region of both types of genes could conceivably have a peculiar DNA or chromatin structure used as preferred landing sites by transposable elements. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 5.Fig. 6. PMID:16453444

  12. Preliminary array analysis reveals novel genes regulated by ovarian steroids in the monkey raphe region.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Arubala P; Bethea, Cynthia L

    2005-06-01

    We hypothesize that ovarian hormones may improve serotonin neuron survival. We sought the effect of estradiol (E) and progesterone (P) on novel gene expression in the macaque dorsal raphe region with Affymetrix array analysis. Nine spayed rhesus macaques were treated with either placebo, E or E+P via Silastic implant for 1 month prior to euthanasia (n=3 per treatment). RNA was extracted from a small block of midbrain containing the dorsal raphe and examined on an Agilent Bioanalyzer. The RNA from each monkey was labeled and hybridized to an Affymetrix HG_U95AV Human GeneChip Array. After filtering and sorting, 25 named genes remained that were regulated by E, and 24 named genes remained that were regulated by supplemental P. These genes further sorted into functional categories that would promote neuronal plasticity, transmitter synthesis, and trafficking, as well as reduce apoptosis. The relative abundance of four pivotal genes was examined in all nine animals with quantitative RT-PCR and normalized by glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). E+/-P caused a significant threefold reduction in JNK-1 (a pro-apoptosis gene, p<0.007); and a significant sixfold decrease in kynurenine mono-oxygenase (produces neurotoxic quinolones, p<0.05). GABA-A receptor (alpha3 subunit; benzodiazepine site) and E2F1 (interferes with cytokine signaling) were unaffected by E, but increased sevenfold (p<0.02) and fourfold (p<0.009), respectively, upon treatment with P. In summary, subsets of genes related to tissue remodeling or apoptosis were up- or down-regulated by E and P in a tissue block containing the dorsal raphe. These changes could promote cellular resilience in the region where serotonin neurons originate.

  13. [Geography of genetic processes in human populations: gene migration in Northern Eurasia (European region)].

    PubMed

    Evsiukov, A N; Zhukova, O V; Papkov, V E; Signeev, V I; Sheremet'eva, V A; Shneĭder, Iu V; Rychkov, Iu G

    1997-11-01

    A method of transformation of census data on population migration into data on gene migrations is proposed. Based on the 1970 Population census of the former Soviet Union, coefficients of effective direct migration m in 91 population of the oblast size in the European part of Russia were estimated. Each coefficient was calculated as the geometric mean of effective values for the island and stepping-stone models of population structure. A map of the geographic distribution of gene migrations was constructed. Low rates of gene migrations were shown to be associated with steppe-forest and deciduous forest zones. Mean coefficients of gene migration estimated from the observed data for the European region and from the map data weighted by the area sizes were respectively m = 0.0156 +/- 0.0011 and m = 0.0232 +/- 0.0011. In view of the fact that the census data were collected simultaneously, all m values were multiplied by 2.8 in order to estimate gene migration rate per generation. Correlation analysis of gene migration coefficients m and genetically effective population sizes Ne demonstrated that these population parameters are independent. This analysis showed the reverse relationship between the rate of gene migration into a population and population density, in particular, density of settlements within the population area.

  14. Identification and physical localization of useful genes and markers to a major gene-rich region on wheat group 1S chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, D; Champoux, J A; Bondareva, S N; Gill, K S

    2001-01-01

    The short arm of Triticeae homeologous group 1 chromosomes is known to contain many agronomically important genes. The objectives of this study were to physically localize gene-containing regions of the group 1 short arm, enrich these regions with markers, and study the distribution of genes and recombination. We focused on the major gene-rich region ("1S0.8 region") and identified 75 useful genes along with 93 RFLP markers by comparing 35 different maps of Poaceae species. The RFLP markers were tested by gel blot DNA analysis of wheat group 1 nullisomic-tetrasomic lines, ditelosomic lines, and four single-break deletion lines for chromosome arm 1BS. Seventy-three of the 93 markers mapped to group 1 and detected 91 loci on chromosome 1B. Fifty-one of these markers mapped to two major gene-rich regions physically encompassing 14% of the short arm. Forty-one marker loci mapped to the 1S0.8 region and 10 to 1S0.5 region. Two cDNA markers mapped in the centromeric region and the remaining 24 loci were on the long arm. About 82% of short arm recombination was observed in the 1S0.8 region and 17% in the 1S0.5 region. Less than 1% recombination was observed for the remaining 85% of the physical arm length. PMID:11290727

  15. Assigning and visualizing germline genes in antibody repertoires.

    PubMed

    Frost, Simon D W; Murrell, Ben; Hossain, A S Md Mukarram; Silverman, Gregg J; Pond, Sergei L Kosakovsky

    2015-09-01

    Identifying the germline genes involved in immunoglobulin rearrangements is an essential first step in the analysis of antibody repertoires. Based on our prior work in analysing diverse recombinant viruses, we present IgSCUEAL (Immunoglobulin Subtype Classification Using Evolutionary ALgorithms), a phylogenetic approach to assign V and J regions of immunoglobulin sequences to their corresponding germline alleles, with D regions assigned using a simple pairwise alignment algorithm. We also develop an interactive web application for viewing the results, allowing the user to explore the frequency distribution of sequence assignments and CDR3 region length statistics, which is useful for summarizing repertoires, as well as a detailed viewer of rearrangements and region alignments for individual query sequences. We demonstrate the accuracy and utility of our method compared with sequence similarity-based approaches and other non-phylogenetic model-based approaches, using both simulated data and a set of evaluation datasets of human immunoglobulin heavy chain sequences. IgSCUEAL demonstrates the highest accuracy of V and J assignment amongst existing approaches, even when the reassorted sequence is highly mutated, and can successfully cluster sequences on the basis of shared V/J germline alleles.

  16. Genetic variability in the regulation of gene expression in ten regions of the human brain.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Trabzuni, Daniah; Guelfi, Sebastian; Varghese, Vibin; Smith, Colin; Walker, Robert; De, Tisham; Coin, Lachlan; de Silva, Rohan; Cookson, Mark R; Singleton, Andrew B; Hardy, John; Ryten, Mina; Weale, Michael E

    2014-10-01

    Germ-line genetic control of gene expression occurs via expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). We present a large, exon-specific eQTL data set covering ten human brain regions. We found that cis-eQTL signals (within 1 Mb of their target gene) were numerous, and many acted heterogeneously among regions and exons. Co-regulation analysis of shared eQTL signals produced well-defined modules of region-specific co-regulated genes, in contrast to standard coexpression analysis of the same samples. We report cis-eQTL signals for 23.1% of catalogued genome-wide association study hits for adult-onset neurological disorders. The data set is publicly available via public data repositories and via http://www.braineac.org/. Our study increases our understanding of the regulation of gene expression in the human brain and will be of value to others pursuing functional follow-up of disease-associated variants.

  17. Evaluation of position effect variegation of the transcription of genes from the FSHD candidate region

    SciTech Connect

    Winokur, S.T.; Wasmuth, J.J.; Altherr, M.R.

    1994-09-01

    The gene for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) lies in close proximity to the telomere of 4q. Deletion of several copies of a 3.2 kb tandem repeat have been associated with FSHD, although no genes have been identified within this repeat. We have shown that this repeat, as well as other repeats in the FSHD region, resemble constitutive heterochromatin both by sequence analysis and FISH cross-hybridization. We hypothesize that alterations in chromatin structure near the telomere of 4q due to deletion of these heterochromatic elements may lead to a position effect variegation of nearby genes. To test this hypothesis, we have isolated exons and candidate cDNAs from the FSHD region. A 2 kb polyadenylated cDNA was isolated from both fetal and infant brain cDNA libraries. Another cDNA hybridizes to a 7 kb skeletal muscle transcript on a Northern blot. Both of these cDNAs are chromosome 4-specific and map to the FSHD region. We have examined the expression pattern of these genes by RT-PCR, RNase protection and Northern analysis. Total RNA was isolated from normal and FSHD-affected lymphoblasts and from human-hamster somatic cell hybrids in which the normal and affected chromosomes 4 from FSHD patients were segregated. RT-PCR and RNase protection were then employed as quantitive assays to evaluate the potential for position effect variegation on RNA production in FSHD patients.

  18. Allelic and haplotypic diversity of 5'promoter region of the MICA gene.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jia; Tian, Wei; Pan, FengHua; Liu, XueXiang; Li, LiXin

    2014-04-01

    In this study, the 5'promoter region of MHC class I chain-related gene A (MICA) was investigated in 104 healthy, unrelated Han individuals recruited from northern China, using PCR-sequencing method. Twelve variable sites were detected, which were in very strong linkage disequilibrium with each other. Twelve different MICA 5'promoter haplotypes were identified, among which Promoter-7 predominated (0.5529). Twenty-six extended haplotypes incorporating MICA 5'promoter and MICA exons 2-5 were observed in this population, 9 of which were in significant linkage disequilibrium (LD). Phylogenetic analysis of 5'promoter refined MICA sub-lineage structure previously constructed according to MICA coding and 3'untranslated regions. Ewens-Watterson homozygosity statistics at MICA 5'promoter region were consistent with neutral expectations. None of the five variable sites detected within the minimal promoter of MICA gene was located in the putative binding sites for transcription factor. Our study provided for the first time the sequence information about 5'promoter of MICA gene at a human population level. The data will facilitate the understanding of regulation of MICA gene expression, which represents a promising pathway for immune intervention against cancer, autoimmune disorders and infections.

  19. Novel polymorphisms of the APOA2 gene and its promoter region affect body traits in cattle.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang; Li, Caixia; Cai, Hanfang; Xu, Yao; Lan, Xianyong; Lei, Chuzhao; Chen, Hong

    2013-12-01

    Apolipoprotein A-II (APOA2) is one of the major constituents of high-density lipoprotein and plays a critical role in lipid metabolism and obesity. However, similar research for the bovine APOA2 gene is lacking. In this study, polymorphisms of the bovine APOA2 gene and its promoter region were detected in 1021 cows from four breeds by sequencing and PCR-RFLP methods. Totally, we detected six novel mutations which included one mutation in the promoter region, two mutations in the exons and three mutations in the introns. There were four polymorphisms within APOA2 gene were analyzed. The allele A, T, T and G frequencies of the four loci were predominant in the four breeds when in separate or combinations analysis which suggested cows with those alleles to be more adapted to the steppe environment. The association analysis indicated three SVs in Nangyang cows, two SVs in Qinchun cows and the 9 haplotypes in Nangyang cows were significantly associated with body traits (P<0.05 or P<0.01). The results of this study suggested the bovine APOA2 gene may be a strong candidate gene for body traits in the cattle breeding program. PMID:24004543

  20. Characterization of the 5'-flanking region of the gene for the alpha chain of human fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Hu, C H; Harris, J E; Davie, E W; Chung, D W

    1995-11-24

    The 5'-flanking region of the gene coding for the alpha chain of human fibrinogen was isolated, sequenced, and characterized. The principal site of transcription initiation was determined by primer extension analysis and the RNase protection assay and shown to be at an adenine residue located 55 nucleotides upstream from the initiator methionine codon, or 13,399 nucleotides down-stream from the polyadenylation site of the gene coding for the gamma chain. Transient expression of constructs containing sequentially deleted 5'-flanking sequences of the alpha chain gene fused to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene showed that the promoter was liver-specific and inducible by interleukin 6 (IL-6). The shortest DNA fragment with significant promoter activity and full response to IL-6 stimulation encompassed the region from -217 to +1 base pairs (bp). Although six potential IL-6 responsive sequences homologous to the type II IL-6 responsive element were present, a single sequence of CTGGGA localized from -122 to -127 bp was shown to be a functional element in IL-6 induction. A hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 (HNF-1) binding site, present from -47 to -59 bp, in combination with other upstream elements, was essential for liver-specific expression of the gene. A functional CCAAT/enhancer binding protein site (C/EBP, -134 to -142 bp) was also identified within 217 bp from the transcription initiation site. An additional positive element (-1393 to -1133 bp) and a negative element (-1133 to -749 bp) were also found in the upstream region of the alpha-fibrinogen gene. PMID:7499335

  1. Molecular cloning of rhamnose-binding lectin gene and its promoter region from snakehead Channa argus.

    PubMed

    Jia, W Z; Shang, N; Guo, Q L

    2010-09-01

    Lectins are sugar-binding proteins that mediate pathogen recognition and cell-cell interactions. A rhamnose-binding lectin (RBL) gene and its promoter region have been cloned and characterized from snakehead Channa argus. From the transcription initiation site, snakehead rhamnose-binding lectin (SHL) gene extends 2,382 bp to the end of the 3' untranslated region (UTR), and contains nine exons and eight introns. The open reading frame (ORF) of the SHL transcript has 675 bp which encodes 224 amino acids. The molecular structure of SHL is composed of two tandem repeat carbohydrate recognition domains (CRD) with 35% internal identity. Analysis of the gene organization of SHL indicates that the ancestral gene of RBL may diverge and evolve by exon shuffling and gene duplication, producing new forms to play their own roles in various organisms. The characteristics of SHL gene 5' flanking region are the presence of consensus nuclear factor of interleukin 6 (NF-IL6) and IFN-gamma activation (GAS) sites. The results provide indirect evidence that up-regulation of SHL expression may be induced in response to inflammatory stimuli, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma). The transcript of SHL mRNA was expressed in the head kidney, posterior kidney, spleen, liver, intestine, heart, muscle, and ovary. No tissue-specific expressive pattern is different from reported STLs, WCLs, and PFLs, suggesting that different types of RBLs exist in species-specific fish that have evolved and adapted to their surroundings.

  2. Comparative sequence analysis of a gene-dense region among closely related species of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Yoshihiro; Matsuo, Takashi; Nozawa, Masafumi; Shin-I, Tadasu; Kohara, Yuji; Aigaki, Toshiro

    2004-12-01

    Comparative sequence analysis among closely related species is essential for investigating the evolution of non-coding sequences, which evolve more rapidly than protein-coding sequences. We sequenced the cytogenetic map 56F10-16, a gene-dense region of D. simulans and D. sechellia, closely related species to D. melanogaster. About 57 kb of the genomic sequences containing 19 genes were annotated from each species according to the corresponding region of the D. melanogaster genome. The order and orientation of genes were perfectly conserved among the three species, and no transposable elements were found. The rate of nucleotide substitutions in the non-coding sequences was lower than that at the fourfold-degenerate sites, implying functional constraints in the non-coding regions. The sequence information from three closely related species, allowed us to estimate the insertions and the deletions that may have occurred in the lineages of D. simulans and D. sechellia using the D. melanogaster sequence as an outgroup. The number of deletions was twice that of insertions for the introns of D. simulans. More remarkably, the deletion outnumbered insertions by 7.5 times for the intergenic sequences of D. sechellia. These results suggest that the non-coding sequences have been shortened by deletion biases. However, the deletion bias was lower than that previously estimated for pseudogenes, suggesting that the non-coding sequences are already rich in functional elements, possibly involved in the regulation of gene expression including transcription and pre-mRNA processing. These features of non-coding sequences may be common to other gene-dense regions contributing to the compactness of the Drosophila genome.

  3. Regulatory region in choline acetyltransferase gene directs developmental and tissue-specific expression in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Lönnerberg, P; Lendahl, U; Funakoshi, H; Arhlund-Richter, L; Persson, H; Ibáñez, C F

    1995-01-01

    Acetylcholine, one of the main neurotransmitters in the nervous system, is synthesized by the enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT; acetyl-CoA:choline O-acetyltransferase, EC 2.3.1.6). The molecular mechanisms controlling the establishment, maintenance, and plasticity of the cholinergic phenotype in vivo are largely unknown. A previous report showed that a 3800-bp, but not a 1450-bp, 5' flanking segment from the rat ChAT gene promoter directed cell type-specific expression of a reporter gene in cholinergic cells in vitro. Now we have characterized a distal regulatory region of the ChAT gene that confers cholinergic specificity on a heterologous downstream promoter in a cholinergic cell line and in transgenic mice. A 2342-bp segment from the 5' flanking region of the ChAT gene behaved as an enhancer in cholinergic cells but as a repressor in noncholinergic cells in an orientation-independent manner. Combined with a heterologous basal promoter, this fragment targeted transgene expression to several cholinergic regions of the central nervous system of transgenic mice, including basal forebrain, cortex, pons, and spinal cord. In eight independent transgenic lines, the pattern of transgene expression paralleled qualitatively and quantitatively that displayed by endogenous ChAT mRNA in various regions of the rat central nervous system. In the lumbar enlargement of the spinal cord, 85-90% of the transgene expression was targeted to the ventral part of the cord, where cholinergic alpha-motor neurons are located. Transgene expression in the spinal cord was developmentally regulated and responded to nerve injury in a similar way as the endogenous ChAT gene, indicating that the 2342-bp regulatory sequence contains elements controlling the plasticity of the cholinergic phenotype in developing and injured neurons. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7732028

  4. Gene organization of the pregnancy-specific glycoprotein region on human chromosome 19: Assembly and analysis of a 700-kb cosmid contig spanning the region

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, A.; Nelson, D.; Gordon, L.

    1994-10-01

    The pregnancy-specific glycoprotein (PSG) gene family consists of 11 closely related genes that form a subgroup of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) gene family on 19q13.2. Using a high-resolution restriction fragment fingerprinting technique, we have assembled 256 cosmids from the PSG region into a single 700-kb contig. Fluorescence in situ hybridization to sperm pronuclei and cosmid walking experiments indicated that this PSG contig was directly telomeric of CGM8 at the telomeric end of the CEA subgroup gene cluster. Detailed restriction mapping and hybridization with gene-specific probes indicated that the order of the 11 previously identified PSG genes is cen - PSG3 - PSG8 - PSG12 - PSG1 - PSG6 - PSG7 - PSG13 - PSG2 - PSG5 - PSG4 - PSG11 - tel. The CEA subgroup gene CGM11 is located at the telomeric end of the PSG gene cluster. The PSG gene are all oriented in tandem with the 5{prime}-3{prime} direction of transcription from telomere to centromere. The detailed map also led to the identification of seven new CEA family genes in the region. One of these (CGM12), located between CGM8 and PSG3, is a member of the CEA subgroup. The remaining six (CGM13 through CGM18) are interspersed among the PSG genes and appear to form a third distinct subgroup within the CEA gene family. 34 refs., 6 figs.

  5. The human growth hormone gene is regulated by a multicomponent locus control region

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.; Cooke, N.E.; Liebhaber, S.A.; Monks, B.R.

    1995-12-01

    This article describes research involving the five-member human growth hormone (hGH)/chorionic somatomammotropin (hCS) gene cluster and its expression in the placenta. The results indicate that interactions among multiple elements are required to restrict hGH transcription to the pituitary and generate appropriate levels of expression in the mouse genome. In addition, the results suggest a role for shared and unique regulatory sequences in locus control region-mediated expression of the hGH/hCS gene cluster in the pituitary and possibly the placenta. 67 refs., 9 figs.

  6. Genomic imprinting controls matrix attachment regions in the Igf2 gene.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michaël; Hagège, Hélène; Murrell, Adele; Brunel, Claude; Reik, Wolf; Cathala, Guy; Forné, Thierry

    2003-12-01

    Genomic imprinting at the Igf2/H19 locus originates from allele-specific DNA methylation, which modifies the affinity of some proteins for their target sequences. Here, we show that AT-rich DNA sequences located in the vicinity of previously characterized differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of the imprinted Igf2 gene are conserved between mouse and human. These sequences have all the characteristics of matrix attachment regions (MARs), which are known as versatile regulatory elements involved in chromatin structure and gene expression. Combining allele-specific nuclear matrix binding assays and real-time PCR quantification, we show that retention of two of these Igf2 MARs (MAR0 and MAR2) in the nuclear matrix fraction depends on the tissue and is specific to the paternal allele. Furthermore, on this allele, the Igf2 MAR2 is functionally linked to the neighboring DMR2 while, on the maternal allele, it is controlled by the imprinting-control region. Our work clearly demonstrates that genomic imprinting controls matrix attachment regions in the Igf2 gene.

  7. Variability of the tandem repeat region of the Escherichia coli tolA gene.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kai; Vanoirbeek, Kristof; Aertsen, Abram; Michiels, Chris W

    2012-06-01

    An intragenic tandem repeat (TR) region has been previously reported in the tolA gene of Escherichia coli. In silico analysis of 123 E. coli tolA sequences from Genbank and PCR analysis of the tolA TR region from 111 additional E. coli strains revealed that this TR region is highly variable. Nine different TR sizes with 8 up to 16 repeat units were found in in silico analysis and 6 of these were also found by PCR analysis. The 13-unit TR emerged as the predominant type using both approaches (47.2% and 86.5%, respectively). Remarkably, TRs in pathogenic strains appeared to be more variable than those in non-pathogens. To demonstrate the occurrence of TR variation in a clonal population, a selection system for TR deletion events was constructed by inserting the 13-unit TR region of MG1655 in frame into a plasmid-borne chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) gene. The resulting cat gene no longer conferred chloramphenicol resistance unless the insert size was reduced by TR contraction. Using this system, Cm-resistant revertants with a TR contraction were recovered at a frequency of 1.1 × 10(-7), and contraction was shown to be recA-dependent and enhanced in a DNA repair-deficient mutS background. PMID:22659144

  8. Segmental duplication, microinversion, and gene loss associated with a complex inversion breakpoint region in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Calvete, Oriol; González, Josefa; Betrán, Esther; Ruiz, Alfredo

    2012-07-01

    Chromosomal inversions are usually portrayed as simple two-breakpoint rearrangements changing gene order but not gene number or structure. However, increasing evidence suggests that inversion breakpoints may often have a complex structure and entail gene duplications with potential functional consequences. Here, we used a combination of different techniques to investigate the breakpoint structure and the functional consequences of a complex rearrangement fixed in Drosophila buzzatii and comprising two tandemly arranged inversions sharing the middle breakpoint: 2m and 2n. By comparing the sequence in the breakpoint regions between D. buzzatii (inverted chromosome) and D. mojavensis (noninverted chromosome), we corroborate the breakpoint reuse at the molecular level and infer that inversion 2m was associated with a duplication of a ~13 kb segment and likely generated by staggered breaks plus repair by nonhomologous end joining. The duplicated segment contained the gene CG4673, involved in nuclear transport, and its two nested genes CG5071 and CG5079. Interestingly, we found that other than the inversion and the associated duplication, both breakpoints suffered additional rearrangements, that is, the proximal breakpoint experienced a microinversion event associated at both ends with a 121-bp long duplication that contains a promoter. As a consequence of all these different rearrangements, CG5079 has been lost from the genome, CG5071 is now a single copy nonnested gene, and CG4673 has a transcript ~9 kb shorter and seems to have acquired a more complex gene regulation. Our results illustrate the complex effects of chromosomal rearrangements and highlight the need of complementing genomic approaches with detailed sequence-level and functional analyses of breakpoint regions if we are to fully understand genome structure, function, and evolutionary dynamics.

  9. Heavy-light chain interrelations of MS-associated immunoglobulins probed by deep sequencing and rational variation.

    PubMed

    Lomakin, Yakov A; Zakharova, Maria Yu; Stepanov, Alexey V; Dronina, Maria A; Smirnov, Ivan V; Bobik, Tatyana V; Pyrkov, Andrey Yu; Tikunova, Nina V; Sharanova, Svetlana N; Boitsov, Vitali M; Vyazmin, Sergey Yu; Kabilov, Marsel R; Tupikin, Alexey E; Krasnov, Alexey N; Bykova, Nadezda A; Medvedeva, Yulia A; Fridman, Marina V; Favorov, Alexander V; Ponomarenko, Natalia A; Dubina, Michael V; Boyko, Alexey N; Vlassov, Valentin V; Belogurov, Alexey A; Gabibov, Alexander G

    2014-12-01

    The mechanisms triggering most of autoimmune diseases are still obscure. Autoreactive B cells play a crucial role in the development of such pathologies and, in particular, production of autoantibodies of different specificities. The combination of deep-sequencing technology with functional studies of antibodies selected from highly representative immunoglobulin combinatorial libraries may provide unique information on specific features in the repertoires of autoreactive B cells. Here, we have analyzed cross-combinations of the variable regions of human immunoglobulins against the myelin basic protein (MBP) previously selected from a multiple sclerosis (MS)-related scFv phage-display library. On the other hand, we have performed deep sequencing of the sublibraries of scFvs against MBP, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1), and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). Bioinformatics analysis of sequencing data and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) studies have shown that it is the variable fragments of antibody heavy chains that mainly determine both the affinity of antibodies to the parent autoantigen and their cross-reactivity. It is suggested that LMP1-cross-reactive anti-myelin autoantibodies contain heavy chains encoded by certain germline gene segments, which may be a hallmark of the EBV-specific B cell subpopulation involved in MS triggering.

  10. A short upstream promoter region mediates transcriptional regulation of the mouse doublecortin gene in differentiating neurons

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Doublecortin (Dcx), a MAP (Microtubule-Associated Protein), is transiently expressed in migrating and differentiating neurons and thereby characterizes neuronal precursors and neurogenesis in developing and adult neurogenesis. In addition, reduced Dcx expression during development has been related to appearance of brain pathologies. Here, we attempt to unveil the molecular mechanisms controlling Dcx gene expression by studying its transcriptional regulation during neuronal differentiation. Results To determine and analyze important regulatory sequences of the Dcx promoter, we studied a putative regulatory region upstream from the mouse Dcx coding region (pdcx2kb) and several deletions thereof. These different fragments were used in vitro and in vivo to drive reporter gene expression. We demonstrated, using transient expression experiments, that pdcx2kb is sufficient to control specific reporter gene expression in cerebellar cells and in the developing brain (E14.5). We determined the temporal profile of Dcx promoter activity during neuronal differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESC) and found that transcriptional activation of the Dcx gene varies along with neuronal differentiation of mESC. Deletion experiments and sequence comparison of Dcx promoters across rodents, human and chicken revealed the importance of a highly conserved sequence in the proximal region of the promoter required for specific and strong expression in neuronal precursors and young neuronal cells. Further analyses revealed the presence in this short sequence of several conserved, putative transcription factor binding sites: LEF/TCF (Lymphoid Enhancer Factor/T-Cell Factor) which are effectors of the canonical Wnt pathway; HNF6/OC2 (Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor-6/Oncecut-2) members of the ONECUT family and NF-Y/CAAT (Nuclear Factor-Y). Conclusions Studies of Dcx gene regulatory sequences using native, deleted and mutated constructs suggest that fragments located upstream of the

  11. Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 is the essential nuclease during immunoglobulin class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Masani, Shahnaz; Han, Li; Yu, Kefei

    2013-04-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) class switch recombination (CSR) is initiated by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) that catalyzes numerous DNA cytosine deaminations within switch regions. The resulting uracils are processed by uracil base excision and/or mismatch repair enzymes that ultimately generate switch region DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Uracil glycosylase 2 (UNG2) is required for CSR, most likely by removing uracils to generate abasic sites. Although it is presumed that the apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) generates DNA strand incisions (a prerequisite for CSR) at these abasic sites, a direct test of the requirement for APE1 in CSR has been difficult because of the embryonic lethality of APE1 ablation in mice. Here, we report the successful deletion of the APE1 gene in a mouse B cell line (CH12F3) capable of robust CSR in vitro. In contrast to the general assumption that APE1 is essential for cellular viability, deletion of APE1 in CH12F3 cells has no apparent effect on cell viability or growth. Moreover, CSR in APE1-null CH12F3 cells is drastically reduced, providing direct evidence for an essential role for APE1 in switch region cleavage and CSR. Finally, deletion of AP endonuclease 2 (APE2) has no effect on CSR in either APE1-proficient or -deficient cells.

  12. Possible deletion of a developmentally regulated heavy-chain variable region gene in autoimmune diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Pei-Ming; Olee, Tsaiwei; Kozin, F.; Carson, D.A.; Chen, P.P. ); Olsen, N.J. ); Siminovitch, K.A. )

    1990-10-01

    Several autoantibody-associated variable region (V) genes are preferentially expressed during early ontogenic development, suggesting strongly that they are of developmental and physiological importance. As such, it is possible that polymorphisms in one or more of these genes may alter susceptibility to autoimmune disease. The authors have searched extensively for a probe related to a developmentally regulated V gene that has the power to differentiate among highly homologous V genes in human populations. Using such a probe (i.e., Humhv3005/P1) related to both anti-DNA and anti-IgG autoantibodies, they studied restriction fragment length polymorphisms in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus and found an apparent heavy-chain V (V{sub H}) gene deletion that was nearly restricted to the autoimmune patients. These data suggest that deletions of physiologically important V{sub H} genes may increase the risk of autoimmunity through indirect effects on the development and homeostasis of the B-cell repertoire.

  13. Association of the AFF3 gene and IL2/IL21 gene region with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hinks, A; Eyre, S; Ke, X; Barton, A; Martin, P; Flynn, E; Packham, J; Worthington, J; Thomson, W

    2010-03-01

    Recent genetic studies have led to identification of numerous loci that are associated with susceptibility to autoimmune diseases. The strategy of using information from these studies has facilitated the identification of novel juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) susceptibility loci, specifically, PTPN22 and IL2RA. Several novel autoimmune susceptibility loci have recently been identified, and we hypothesise that single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within these genes may also be JIA susceptibility loci. Five SNPs within the genes AFF3, IL2/IL21, IL7R, CTLA4 and CD226, previously associated with multiple autoimmune diseases were genotyped, in a large data set of Caucasian JIA patients and controls, and tested for association with JIA. We identified two susceptibility loci for JIA, AFF3 and the IL2/IL21 region and additional weak evidence supporting an association with the CTLA4 and IL7R genes, which warrant further investigation. All results require validation in independent JIA data sets. Further characterisation of the specific causal variants will be required before functional studies can be performed. PMID:20072139

  14. Association of the AFF3 gene and IL2/IL21 gene region with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hinks, A; Eyre, S; Ke, X; Barton, A; Martin, P; Flynn, E; Packham, J; Worthington, J; Thomson, W

    2010-01-01

    Recent genetic studies have led to identification of numerous loci that are associated with susceptibility to autoimmune diseases. The strategy of using information from these studies has facilitated the identification of novel juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) susceptibility loci, specifically, PTPN22 and IL2RA. Several novel autoimmune susceptibility loci have recently been identified, and we hypothesise that single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within these genes may also be JIA susceptibility loci. Five SNPs within the genes AFF3, IL2/IL21, IL7R, CTLA4 and CD226, previously associated with multiple autoimmune diseases were genotyped, in a large data set of Caucasian JIA patients and controls, and tested for association with JIA. We identified two susceptibility loci for JIA, AFF3 and the IL2/IL21 region and additional weak evidence supporting an association with the CTLA4 and IL7R genes, which warrant further investigation. All results require validation in independent JIA data sets. Further characterisation of the specific causal variants will be required before functional studies can be performed. PMID:20072139

  15. Brain region-specific altered expression and association of mitochondria-related genes in autism

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial dysfunction (MtD) has been observed in approximately five percent of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). MtD could impair highly energy-dependent processes such as neurodevelopment, thereby contributing to autism. Most of the previous studies of MtD in autism have been restricted to the biomarkers of energy metabolism, while most of the genetic studies have been based on mutations in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Despite the mtDNA, most of the proteins essential for mitochondrial replication and function are encoded by the genomic DNA; so far, there have been very few studies of those genes. Therefore, we carried out a detailed study involving gene expression and genetic association studies of genes related to diverse mitochondrial functions. Methods For gene expression analysis, postmortem brain tissues (anterior cingulate gyrus (ACG), motor cortex (MC) and thalamus (THL)) from autism patients (n=8) and controls (n=10) were obtained from the Autism Tissue Program (Princeton, NJ, USA). Quantitative real-time PCR arrays were used to quantify the expression of 84 genes related to diverse functions of mitochondria, including biogenesis, transport, translocation and apoptosis. We used the delta delta Ct (∆∆Ct) method for quantification of gene expression. DNA samples from 841 Caucasian and 188 Japanese families were used in the association study of genes selected from the gene expression analysis. FBAT was used to examine genetic association with autism. Results Several genes showed brain region-specific expression alterations in autism patients compared to controls. Metaxin 2 (MTX2), neurofilament, light polypeptide (NEFL) and solute carrier family 25, member 27 (SLC25A27) showed consistently reduced expression in the ACG, MC and THL of autism patients. NEFL (P = 0.038; Z-score 2.066) and SLC25A27 (P = 0.046; Z-score 1.990) showed genetic association with autism in Caucasian and Japanese samples, respectively. The expression of

  16. Proteomic analysis of sera from common variable immunodeficiency patients undergoing replacement intravenous immunoglobulin therapy.

    PubMed

    Spadaro, Giuseppe; D'Orio, Concetta; Genovese, Arturo; Galeotafiore, Antonella; D'Ambrosio, Chiara; Di Giovanni, Stefano; Vitale, Monica; Capasso, Mario; Lamberti, Vincenzo; Scaloni, Andrea; Marone, Gianni; Zambrano, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency is the most common form of symptomatic primary antibody failure in adults and children. Replacement immunoglobulin is the standard treatment of these patients. By using a differential proteomic approach based on 2D-DIGE, we examined serum samples from normal donors and from matched, naive, and immunoglobulin-treated patients. The results highlighted regulated expression of serum proteins in naive patients. Among the identified proteins, clusterin/ApoJ serum levels were lower in naive patients, compared to normal subjects. This finding was validated in a wider collection of samples from newly enrolled patients. The establishment of a cellular system, based on a human hepatocyte cell line HuH7, allowed to ascertain a potential role in the regulation of CLU gene expression by immunoglobulins.

  17. [Regional features of obesity-associated gene polymorphism (rs9939609 FTO gene and gene Trp64Arg ADRB3) in Russian population].

    PubMed

    Baturin, A K; Sorokina, E Iu; Pogozheva, A V; Peskova, E V; Makurina, O N; Tutel'ian, V A

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown a significant association with obesity polymorphisms: rs9939609 gene due to fat mass and obesity FTO in European and some Asian and African American populations Trp64Arg ADRB3 gene in several European populations. Association of variants rs9939609 and Trp64Arg obesity was studied in 1244 the inhabitants of Moscow and Sverdlovsk regions. Genotyping was performed using allele-specific amplification, detection results in real time using TaqMan-probes complementary DNA polymorphic sites. The frequency of the mutant allele of the FTO gene in the population of Moscow and Sverdlovsk region was 45.1%, with the TT genotype was detected in 30.2% of cases, AT--49.5%, AA--20.3%. Women had the presence of the mutant allele more likely than men (48.4 vs. 42.5%). People with obesity were more genotypes AA (26.3%) and AT (52.8%) compared to the surveyed with a BMI of less than 30 kg/m2 (respectively 18.1 and 50.7%). A significantly higher incidence of risk allele A was found in individuals with obesity (52.6 and 43.4%). The presence of the mutant allele of the gene ADRB3 among the population of Moscow and Sverdlovsk regions was noted in 7.4% of cases. While 15.5% of patients had a heterozygous genotype Trp64Arg ADRB3, that is consistent with international research. The frequency of the risk allele and genotype Arg64 Trp64Arg in women (9.3 and 18.5%) was significantly higher than men (6.2 and 12.2%). The presence of the mutant allele and genotype Trp64Arg ADRB3 (respectively, 9.1 and 18.1%) were significantly more marked in the examined obese compared with those with a body mass index less than 30 kg/m2 (7.4 and 14.9%), but these differences were not statistically significant. The results of these studies suggest that genetic variants of the FTO gene rs9939609 genotype and Trp64Arg ADRB3 contribute to the development of obesity among residents of Moscow and Sverdlovsk Region of Russia. The risk of obesity increases in the case of combined polymorphisms in

  18. Localization of candidate regions for a novel gene for Kartagener syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Roelens, Ilse; Sluysmans, Thierry; Jorissen, Mark; Amyere, Mustapha; Vikkula, Miikka

    2006-07-01

    Asymmetric positioning of internal organs is a characteristics of vertebrates. The normal left-right anatomic positioning, situs solitus, sometimes does not occur normaly, leading to laterality defects. Studies in animal models have shown that laterality decisions are mediated by a cascade of genes that lead to the asymmetric expression of Nodal, LEFTA, LEFTB and PITX2 in the lateral plate mesoderm. A search for mutations in genes implicated in left-right patterning in animal models allowed genes associated with heterotaxia defects in humans to be identified. However, these genes explain only a small percentage of human situs defects, suggesting that other genes must play a role. In this study, we report a consanguineous family of Turkish origin, composed of two unaffected parents and three children, two of whom presented Kartagener syndrome. On the basis of their family history, we hypothesize autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. A genotype analysis with polymorphic markers did not show linkage with any known genes or loci causing laterality disorders. Array CGH did not detect a duplication or microdeletion greater than 1 Mb as a possible cause. Genome wide screening using 10 K Affymetrix SNP chips was performed, allowing the identification of two regions of autozygosity, one in chromosome 1 and the other on chromosome 7. In the chromosome 1 locus, a strong candidate gene, encoding the kinesin-associated protein 3 (KIF3AP) was not mutated, based on SSCP/heteroduplex analysis and direct sequencing. These data provide a basis for the identification of a novel gene implicated in Kartagener syndrome.

  19. Isolation of genes from the Batten candidate region using exon amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, T.J.; D`Arigo, K.L.; Haines, J.L.

    1995-06-05

    In order to identify genes originating from the Batten disease candidate region, we have used the technique of exon amplification to identify transcribed sequences. This procedure produces trapped exon clones, which can represent single exons or multiple exons spliced together and is an efficient method for obtaining probes for physical mapping and for screening cDNA libraries. The source of DNA for these experiments was a collection of chromosome 16 cosmid contigs isolated by the direct subcloning of region-specific yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) and hybridization of inter-alu PCR products from these YACs to the flow-sorted Los Alamos chromosome 16 cosmid library. We are now using the resulting exon probes to screen retina and brain cDNA libraries for candidate JNCL genes. 23 refs., 1 fig.

  20. The structure of nucleosomal core particles within transcribed and repressed gene regions.

    PubMed Central

    Studitsky, V M; Belyavsky, A V; Melnikova, A F; Mirzabekov, A D

    1988-01-01

    The arrangement of histones along DNA in nucleosomal core particles within transcribed heat shock gene (hsp 70) region and repressed insertion within ribosomal genes of Drosophila was analysed by using protein-DNA crosslinking methods combined with hybridization tests. In addition, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was employed to compare the overall nucleosomal shape and the nucleosomal DNA size. The arrangement of histones along DNA and general compactness of nucleosomes were shown to be rather similar in transcriptionally active and inactive genomic regions. On the other hand, nucleosomes within transcriptionally active chromatin are characterized by a larger size of nucleosomal DNA produced by micrococcal nuclease digestion and some peculiarity in electrophoretic mobility. Images PMID:3144704

  1. Multiple octamer binding sites in the promoter region of the bovine alpha s2-casein gene.

    PubMed Central

    Groenen, M A; Dijkhof, R J; van der Poel, J J; van Diggelen, R; Verstege, E

    1992-01-01

    Using a set of overlapping oligonucleotides from the promoter region of the bovine alpha s2-casein gene we have identified two nuclear factors which probably are involved in expression of this gene and the related calcium sensitive alpha s1- and beta-casein genes. One of these factors which was present in extracts of all tissues that have been tested including Hela cells turned out to be the octamer binding protein OCT-1. Oct-1 binds with different affinity to 4 sites at positions centred around -480, -260, -210 and -50. The strongest of these 4 binding sites, the one around position -50, is highly conserved in all calcium sensitive caseins of mouse, rat, rabbit and cattle. The other nuclear factor (MGF, mammary gland factor) which is specifically expressed in the mammary gland, binds to a site around position -90. This binding site is also highly conserved in all calcium sensitive caseins of mouse, rat, rabbit and cattle. Images PMID:1508722

  2. A second gene for cerulean cataracts maps to the {beta} crystallin region on chromosome 22

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, P.; Yount, J.; Lovrien, E.

    1996-08-01

    Cogenital cataracts are one of the most common major eye abnormalities and often lead to blindness in infants. At least a third of all cases are familial. Within this group, highly penetrant, autosomal dominant forms of congenital cataracts (ADCC) are most common. ADCC is a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders, in which at least eight different loci have been identified for nine clinically distinct forms. Among these, Armitage et al. mapped a gene for cerulean blue cataracts to chromosome 17q24. Bodker et al. described a large family with cerulean blue cataracts, in which the affected daughter of affected first cousins was presumed to be homozygous for the purported gene. We report linkage in this family to the region on chromosome 22q that includes two {beta} crystallin genes (CRYBB2, CRYBB3) and one pseudogene (CRYBB2P1). The affected female in question is homozygous at all markers. 25 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  3. Immunoglobulin isotypes in childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Najam, F I; Giasuddin, A S; Shembesh, A H

    1999-01-01

    Immunoglobulin isotypes (IgG, IgA, IgM, IgD, IgE) in serum were investigated in 64 Libyan children with mild to moderately severe asthma (age: 1-12 years; sex: 39 males, 25 females) (Group A) and in 57 healthy Libyan children (age: 1-12 years; sex: 30 males, 27 females (Group B). The patients were classified according to age into three groups (A1: 1-3 years; A2: > 3-5 years; A3: > 5-12 years); according to disease activity into two groups (AA: active disease; NA: inactive disease); and according to age plus disease activity into six groups (AA1, NA1; AA2, NA2; AA3, NA3). The healthy children were also divided according to age into three groups (B1: 1-3 years; B2: > 3-5 years; B3: > 5-12 years). IgG, IgA, IgM and IgD were measured by radial immunodiffusion method and IgE was estimated by enzyme immunoassay technique utilizing immunokits from bioMerieux, France. Serum levels of IgG, IgD and IgE were elevated significantly in patients compared to controls (A vs B: p < 0.05) while IgA and IgM levels were normal (p > 0.05). IgG and IgD levels were raised in A3 (p < 0.05), while IgD levels were raised in both A2 and A3 (p < 0.05) and IgE was elevated in all age groups (p < 0.05). However, IgG was elevated significantly in AA only, while IgD and IgE levels were high in both AA and NA (p < 0.05) and IgE was even considerably higher in AA compared to NA (p < 0.02). Further elevated levels were observed for IgG in AA3 only (p < 0.05), for IgD in NA2 (p < 0.01), AA3 (p < 0.01) and NA3 (p < 0.05) and IgE was much higher in patients with active disease than with inactive disease in all age groups (p < 0.05). The fact that asthmatic attack in majority of our patients can be explained as mediated through IgE and the possibilities that IgG and IgD may play roles as aetiopathogenetic or protective regulatory factors in childhood asthma are discussed.

  4. Cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) immunoglobulin heavy chain locus description.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guo-Yun; Mate, Suzanne; Garcia, Karla; Ward, Michael D; Brueggemann, Ernst; Hall, Matthew; Kenny, Tara; Sanchez-Lockhart, Mariano; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Palacios, Gustavo

    2016-07-01

    Cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) have become an important animal model for biomedical research. In particular, it is the animal model of choice for the development of vaccine candidates associated with emerging dangerous pathogens. Despite their increasing importance as animal models, the cynomolgus macaque genome is not fully characterized, hindering molecular studies for this model. More importantly, the lack of knowledge about the immunoglobulin (IG) locus organization directly impacts the analysis of the humoral response in cynomolgus macaques. Recent advances in next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to analyze IG repertoires open the opportunity to deeply characterize the humoral immune response. However, the IG locus organization for the animal is required to completely dissect IG repertoires. Here, we describe the localization and organization of the rearranging IG heavy (IGH) genes on chromosome 7 of the cynomolgus macaque draft genome. Our annotation comprises 108 functional genes which include 63 variable (IGHV), 38 diversity (IGHD), and 7 joining (IGHJ) genes. For validation, we provide RNA transcript data for most of the IGHV genes and all of the annotated IGHJ genes, as well as proteomic data to validate IGH constant genes. The description and annotation of the rearranging IGH genes for the cynomolgus macaques will significantly facilitate scientific research. This is particularly relevant to dissect the immune response during vaccination or infection with dangerous pathogens such as Ebola, Marburg and other emerging pathogens where non-human primate models play a significant role for countermeasure development.

  5. Seasonal and Regional Differences in Gene Expression in the Brain of a Hibernating Mammal

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Christine; Hampton, Marshall; Andrews, Matthew T.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian hibernation presents a unique opportunity to study naturally occurring neuroprotection. Hibernating ground squirrels undergo rapid and extreme physiological changes in body temperature, oxygen consumption, and heart rate without suffering neurological damage from ischemia and reperfusion injury. Different brain regions show markedly different activity during the torpor/arousal cycle: the cerebral cortex shows activity only during the periodic returns to normothermia, while the hypothalamus is active over the entire temperature range. Therefore, region-specific neuroprotective strategies must exist to permit this compartmentalized spectrum of activity. In this study, we use the Illumina HiSeq platform to compare the transcriptomes of these two brain regions at four collection points across the hibernation season: April Active, October Active, Torpor, and IBA. In the cerebral cortex, 1,085 genes were found to be differentially expressed across collection points, while 1,063 genes were differentially expressed in the hypothalamus. Comparison of these transcripts indicates that the cerebral cortex and hypothalamus implement very different strategies during hibernation, showing less than 20% of these differentially expressed genes in common. The cerebral cortex transcriptome shows evidence of remodeling and plasticity during hibernation, including transcripts for the presynaptic cytomatrix proteins bassoon and piccolo, and extracellular matrix components, including laminins and collagens. Conversely, the hypothalamic transcriptome displays upregulation of transcripts involved in damage response signaling and protein turnover during hibernation, including the DNA damage repair gene RAD50 and ubiquitin E3 ligases UBR1 and UBR5. Additionally, the hypothalamus transcriptome also provides evidence of potential mechanisms underlying the hibernation phenotype, including feeding and satiety signaling, seasonal timing mechanisms, and fuel utilization. This study

  6. Seasonal and regional differences in gene expression in the brain of a hibernating mammal.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Christine; Hampton, Marshall; Andrews, Matthew T

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian hibernation presents a unique opportunity to study naturally occurring neuroprotection. Hibernating ground squirrels undergo rapid and extreme physiological changes in body temperature, oxygen consumption, and heart rate without suffering neurological damage from ischemia and reperfusion injury. Different brain regions show markedly different activity during the torpor/arousal cycle: the cerebral cortex shows activity only during the periodic returns to normothermia, while the hypothalamus is active over the entire temperature range. Therefore, region-specific neuroprotective strategies must exist to permit this compartmentalized spectrum of activity. In this study, we use the Illumina HiSeq platform to compare the transcriptomes of these two brain regions at four collection points across the hibernation season: April Active, October Active, Torpor, and IBA. In the cerebral cortex, 1,085 genes were found to be differentially expressed across collection points, while 1,063 genes were differentially expressed in the hypothalamus. Comparison of these transcripts indicates that the cerebral cortex and hypothalamus implement very different strategies during hibernation, showing less than 20% of these differentially expressed genes in common. The cerebral cortex transcriptome shows evidence of remodeling and plasticity during hibernation, including transcripts for the presynaptic cytomatrix proteins bassoon and piccolo, and extracellular matrix components, including laminins and collagens. Conversely, the hypothalamic transcriptome displays upregulation of transcripts involved in damage response signaling and protein turnover during hibernation, including the DNA damage repair gene RAD50 and ubiquitin E3 ligases UBR1 and UBR5. Additionally, the hypothalamus transcriptome also provides evidence of potential mechanisms underlying the hibernation phenotype, including feeding and satiety signaling, seasonal timing mechanisms, and fuel utilization. This study

  7. The human growth hormone gene is regulated by a multicomponent locus control region.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, B K; Monks, B R; Liebhaber, S A; Cooke, N E

    1995-01-01

    The five-member human growth hormone (hGH)/chorionic somatomammotropin (hCS) gene cluster encodes the pituitary-specific hGH-N gene and four highly related genes (hGH-V, hCS-A, hCS-B, and hCS-L) that are expressed only in the placenta. When the hGH-N or hCS-A gene, together with all previously identified cis-acting regulatory sequences, was integrated into the mouse genome, it was expressed only sporadically and at low levels in the transgenic target organs. DNase I mapping of chromatin from expressing and nonexpressing cell types was used to identify a pituitary-specific set of DNase I-hypersensitive sites (HS) and a set of HS common to both the pituitary and placenta, centered approximately 15 and 30 kb 5' of hGH-N, respectively. When contained on a cosmid insert in their native genomic configuration, these HS consistently directed high-level, pituitary-specific expression of hGH-N in transgenic mice and appeared to define a locus control region required for hGH-N expression. Individually, each set of HS was able to mediate position-independent hGH-N expression in the pituitary but demonstrated loss of physiologic control and loss of tissue specificity. The gene-proximal set of HS contained a potent enhancer activity in the pituitary, while the more distal set appeared to function primarily to establish site-of-integration independence. These data indicate that synergistic interactions among multiple elements are required to restrict hGH-N transcription to the pituitary and generate appropriate levels of expression. In addition, these results suggest a role for both shared and unique regulatory sequences in locus control region-mediated expression of the hGH/hCS gene cluster in the pituitary and possibly the placenta. PMID:8524268

  8. Transmission test for linkage disequilibrium: The insulin gene region and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM)

    SciTech Connect

    Spielman, R.S.; McGinnis, R.E. ); Ewens, W.J. )

    1993-03-01

    A population association has consistently been observed between insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and the class 1 alleles of the region of tandem-repeat DNA (5[prime] flanking polymorphism [5[prime]FP])adjacent to the insulin gene on chromosome 11p. This finding suggests that the insulin gene region contains a gene or genes contributing to IDDM susceptibility. However, several studies that have sought to show linkage with IDDM by testing for cosegregation in affected sib pairs have failed to find evidence for linkage. As means for identifying genes for complex diseases, both the association and the affected-sib-pairs approaches have limitations. It is well known that population association between a disease and a genetic marker can arise as an artifact of population structure, even in the absence of linkage. On the other hand, linkage studies with modest numbers of affected sib pairs may fail to detect linkage, especially if there is linkage heterogeneity. The authors consider an alternative method to test for linkage with a genetic marker when population association has been found. Using data from families with at least one affected child, they evaluate the transmission of the associated marker allele from a heterozygous parent to an affected offspring. This approach has been used by several investigators, but the statistical properties of the method as a test for linkage have not been investigated. In the present paper they describe the statistical basis for this transmission test for linkage disequilibrium (transmission/disequilibrium test [TDT]). They then show the relationship of this test to tests of cosegregation that are based on the proportion of haplotypes or genes identical by descent in affected sibs. The TDT provides strong evidence for linkage between the 5[prime]FP and susceptibility to IDDM. 27 refs., 6 tabs.

  9. Localisation of the gene for achondroplasia to the telomeric region of chromosome 4p

    SciTech Connect

    Stoilov, I.; Velinov, M.; Kilpatrick, M.W.

    1994-09-01

    Achondroplasia (ACH), the most common type of genetic dwarfism, is characterized by a variety of skeletal anomalies including disproportionate short stature and rhizomelic shortening of the extremities. The disorder is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, with a prevalence of 1-15 per 100,000 live births. The etiology of ACH remains unknown, although evidence points to a defect in the maturation of the chondrocytes in the growth plate of the cartilage. To determine the location of the gene responsible for ACH, a panel of 14 families with a total of 43 meioses was genotyped for 40 polymorphic markers for loci randomly distributed throughout the genome. The first significant positive Lod score was obtained for the locus D4S127 (Zmax=3.65 at {theta}=0.03). A series of 20 markers for chromosome 4p16.3 loci were then used to determine the most likely position of