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Sample records for immunoglobulin lambda variable

  1. Genomic variation in the porcine immunoglobulin lambda variable region.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xi; Schwartz, John C; Murtaugh, Michael P

    2016-04-01

    Production of a vast antibody repertoire is essential for the protection against pathogens. Variable region germline complexity contributes to repertoire diversity and is a standard feature of mammalian immunoglobulin loci, but functional V region genes are limited in swine. For example, the porcine lambda light chain locus is composed of 23 variable (V) genes and 4 joining (J) genes, but only 10 or 11 V and 2 J genes are functional. Allelic variation in V and J may increase overall diversity within a population, yet lead to repertoire holes in individuals lacking key alleles. Previous studies focused on heavy chain genetic variation, thus light chain allelic diversity is not known. We characterized allelic variation of the porcine immunoglobulin lambda variable (IGLV) region genes. All intact IGLV genes in 81 pigs were amplified, sequenced, and analyzed to determine their allelic variation and functionality. We observed mutational variation across the entire length of the IGLV genes, in both framework and complementarity determining regions (CDRs). Three recombination hotspot motifs were also identified suggesting that non-allelic homologous recombination is an evolutionarily alternative mechanism for generating germline antibody diversity. Functional alleles were greatest in the most highly expressed families, IGLV3 and IGLV8. At the population level, allelic variation appears to help maintain the potential for broad antibody repertoire diversity in spite of reduced gene segment choices and limited germline sequence modification. The trade-off may be a reduction in repertoire diversity within individuals that could result in an increased variation in immunity to infectious disease and response to vaccination.

  2. Genomic variation in the porcine immunoglobulin lambda variable region

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xi; Schwartz, John C.; Murtaugh, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Production of a vast antibody repertoire is essential for protection against pathogens. Variable region germline complexity contributes to repertoire diversity and is a standard feature of mammalian immunoglobulin loci, but functional V region genes are limited in swine. For example, the porcine lambda light chain locus is composed of 23 variable (V) genes and 4 joining (J) genes, but only 10 or 11 V and 2 J genes are functional. Allelic variation in V and J may increase overall diversity within a population, yet lead to repertoire holes in individuals lacking key alleles. Previous studies focused on heavy chain genetic variation, thus light chain allelic diversity is not known. We characterized allelic variation of the porcine immunoglobulin lambda variable (IGLV) region genes. All intact IGLV genes in 81 pigs were amplified, sequenced, and analyzed to determine their allelic variation and functionality. We observed mutational variation across the entire length of the IGLV genes, in both framework and complementarity determining regions (CDRs). Three recombination hotspots were also identified, suggesting that non-allelic homologous recombination is an evolutionarily alternative mechanism for generating germline antibody diversity. Functional alleles were greatest in the most highly expressed families, IGLV3 and IGLV8. At the population level, allelic variation appears to help maintain the potential for broad antibody repertoire diversity in spite of reduced gene segment choices and limited germline sequence modification. The trade-off may be a reduction in repertoire diversity within individuals that could result in increased variation in immunity to infectious disease and response to vaccination. PMID:26791019

  3. Characterization of a lymphoblastoid line deleted for lambda immunoglobulin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Hough, C.A., White, B.N., Holden, J.A.

    1995-04-01

    While characterizing the cat eye syndrome (CES) supernumerary chromosome for the presence of {lambda} immunoglobulin gene region sequences, a lymphoblastoid cell line from one CES patient was identified in which there was selection of cells deleted from some IGLC and IGLV genes. Two distinct deletions, one on each chromosome 22, were identified, presumably arising from independent somatic recombination events occurring during B-lymphocyte differentiation. The extent of the deleted regions was determined using probes from the various IGLV subgroups and they each covered at least 82 kilobases. The precise definition of the deletions was not possible because of conservation of some restriction sites in the IGLV region. The cell line was used to map putative IGLV genes within the recombinant phage {lambda}V{lambda}135 to the distal part of the IGLV gene region. 35 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Phylogeny, genomic organization and expression of lambda and kappa immunoglobulin light chain genes in a reptile, Anolis carolinensis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian; Wei, Zhiguo; Yang, Zhi; Wang, Tao; Ren, Liming; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Meng, Qingyong; Guo, Ying; Zhu, Qinghong; Robert, Jacques; Hammarström, Lennart; Li, Ning; Zhao, Yaofeng

    2010-05-01

    The reptiles are the last major taxon of jawed vertebrates in which immunoglobulin light chain isotypes have not been well characterized. Using the recently released genome sequencing data, we show in this study that the reptile Anolis carolinensis expresses both lambda and kappa light chain genes. The genomic organization of both gene loci is structurally similar to their respective counterparts in mammals. The identified lambda locus contains three constant region genes each preceded by a joining gene segment, and a total of 37 variable gene segments. In contrast, the kappa locus contains only a single constant region gene, and two joining gene segments with a single family of 14 variable gene segments located upstream. Analysis of junctions of the recombined VJ transcripts reveals a paucity of N and P nucleotides in both expressed lambda and kappa sequences. These results help us to understand the generation of the immunoglobulin repertoire in reptiles and immunoglobulin evolution in vertebrates.

  5. Cell-type preference of immunoglobulin kappa and lambda gene promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Picard, D; Schaffner, W

    1985-01-01

    Immunoglobulin gene constant regions are known to be associated with strictly tissue-specific enhancer elements. Until recently the promoter of the variable region, which becomes linked to the constant region by somatic rearrangement, could have been viewed as a passive recipient of the enhancer stimulus. Here we show that the promoters of the immunoglobulin kappa and lambda light chain genes are approximately 20-30 times more active in lymphoid cells than in non-lymphoid cells. To avoid the problem of differential mRNA stability upon transfection of immunoglobulin genes into non-lymphoid cells we have constructed chimeric genes. All kappa mRNA sequences were progressively deleted to fuse the kappa gene promoter to a globin gene coding body. A similar chimeric gene was constructed with the promoter of the lambda gene. The cell-type preference of the promoter may be exploited during B-lymphocyte differentiation to regulate the immunoglobulin gene promoter independently from the enhancer. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:2998757

  6. Significant Differences in Physicochemical Properties of Human Immunoglobulin Kappa and Lambda CDR3 Regions.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Catherine L; Laffy, Julie M J; Wu, Yu-Chang Bryan; Silva O'Hare, Joselli; Martin, Victoria; Kipling, David; Fraternali, Franca; Dunn-Walters, Deborah K

    2016-01-01

    Antibody variable regions are composed of a heavy and a light chain, and in humans, there are two light chain isotypes: kappa and lambda. Despite their importance in receptor editing, the light chain is often overlooked in the antibody literature, with the focus being on the heavy chain complementarity-determining region (CDR)-H3 region. In this paper, we set out to investigate the physicochemical and structural differences between human kappa and lambda light chain CDR regions. We constructed a dataset containing over 29,000 light chain variable region sequences from IgM-transcribing, newly formed B cells isolated from human bone marrow and peripheral blood. We also used a published human naïve dataset to investigate the CDR-H3 properties of heavy chains paired with kappa and lambda light chains and probed the Protein Data Bank to investigate the structural differences between kappa and lambda antibody CDR regions. We found that kappa and lambda light chains have very different CDR physicochemical and structural properties, whereas the heavy chains with which they are paired do not differ significantly. We also observed that the mean CDR3 N nucleotide addition in the kappa, lambda, and heavy chain gene rearrangements are correlated within donors but can differ between donors. This indicates that terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase may work with differing efficiencies between different people but the same efficiency in the different classes of immunoglobulin chain within one person. We have observed large differences in the physicochemical and structural properties of kappa and lambda light chain CDR regions. This may reflect different roles in the humoral immune response.

  7. Significant Differences in Physicochemical Properties of Human Immunoglobulin Kappa and Lambda CDR3 Regions

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Catherine L.; Laffy, Julie M. J.; Wu, Yu-Chang Bryan; Silva O’Hare, Joselli; Martin, Victoria; Kipling, David; Fraternali, Franca; Dunn-Walters, Deborah K.

    2016-01-01

    Antibody variable regions are composed of a heavy and a light chain, and in humans, there are two light chain isotypes: kappa and lambda. Despite their importance in receptor editing, the light chain is often overlooked in the antibody literature, with the focus being on the heavy chain complementarity-determining region (CDR)-H3 region. In this paper, we set out to investigate the physicochemical and structural differences between human kappa and lambda light chain CDR regions. We constructed a dataset containing over 29,000 light chain variable region sequences from IgM-transcribing, newly formed B cells isolated from human bone marrow and peripheral blood. We also used a published human naïve dataset to investigate the CDR-H3 properties of heavy chains paired with kappa and lambda light chains and probed the Protein Data Bank to investigate the structural differences between kappa and lambda antibody CDR regions. We found that kappa and lambda light chains have very different CDR physicochemical and structural properties, whereas the heavy chains with which they are paired do not differ significantly. We also observed that the mean CDR3 N nucleotide addition in the kappa, lambda, and heavy chain gene rearrangements are correlated within donors but can differ between donors. This indicates that terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase may work with differing efficiencies between different people but the same efficiency in the different classes of immunoglobulin chain within one person. We have observed large differences in the physicochemical and structural properties of kappa and lambda light chain CDR regions. This may reflect different roles in the humoral immune response. PMID:27729912

  8. [Study of the antigenic structure of human immunoglobulin lambda-chain using monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Arsen'eva, E L; Bogacheva, G T; Solomon, A; Weiss, D; Ibragimov, A R; Rokhlin, O V

    1990-01-01

    Nine monoclonals against human Ig lambda chains were produced, 4 antibodies react with C-domain, 5--with V-domain of the lambda chain. Anti-C lambda domain antibodies recognize not less than 3 epitopes and one of them is expressed only on the isolated chain. Anti-V lambda antibodies bind both isolated lambda chain and intact IgG, IgM, IgA. Four epitopes are expressed by few lambda Bence Jones proteins of the III subgroup, the immunogen possessing the same isotype. The 4 mentioned epitopes represent private idiotypic determinants. The epitope 3E10 is characteristic of 50% Bence Jones proteins of the II and III V lambda-subgroups thus representing a common idiotypic determinant. Using anti-V lambda antibodies germ line variability of V lambda III proteins was analysed and the similarity of antigenic structure of normal and myeloma human Ig lambda chains was demonstrated.

  9. Absence of lambda immunoglobulin sequences on the supernumerary chromosome of the "cat eye" syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hough, C A; White, B N; Holden, J J

    1995-09-11

    The supernumerary bisatellited chromosome causing the "cat eye" syndrome (CES) is of chromosome 22 origin and consists of an inverted duplication of the 22pter-->22q11.2 region. To determine the extent of involvement of band q11.2 on the bisatellited chromosome, copy number assessment of sequences homologous to cloned lambda immunoglobulin (lambda Ig) gene region probes was carried out on DNA from individuals with CES using densitometric analysis of Southern blots. None of the 10 lambda Ig sequences studied was found in increased copy number in DNA from any of the 10 CES individuals tested, indicating that these sequences are not present on the supernumerary chromosome. The breakpoints involved in the generation of the bisatellited supernumerary chromosome associated with CES are therefore proximal to the lambda Ig gene region.

  10. [A case of lambda-expressing pulmonary MALT lymphoma with dual clonal rearrangements of kappa and lambda immunoglobulin light chain gene].

    PubMed

    Oh, Hye Ryong; Lee, Mi Ja; Park, Geon; Moon, Dae Soo; Park, Young Jin; Jang, Sook Jin

    2009-06-01

    A 70-yr-old woman was hospitalized with a history of dry cough. Bronchial endoscopy and transbronchial lung biopsy were performed. However, the findings of histopathology and immunohistochemistry were not sufficient to decide whether the lesion was benign or malignant, because of the presence of crush artifacts in the biopsy specimens. We performed B-cell clonality studies using BIOMED-2 multiplex PCR (InVivoScribe Technologies, USA) to detect clonal rearrangements in the immunoglobulin gene. The results of multiplex PCR showed clonal rearrangements of both kappa and lambda immunoglobulin light chain genes. The findings of immunochemistry revealed that the lesion expressed lambda light chain, but not kappa light chain. Based on the clinical, pathologic, and molecular findings, this case was diagnosed as pulmonary MALT lymphoma. We report the first case in Korea of lambda-expressing MALT lymphoma that is shown to have dual clonal rearrangements of kappa and lambda immunoglobulin light chain gene by multiplex PCR.

  11. Organization, complexity and allelic diversity of the porcine (Sus scrofa domestica) immunoglobulin lambda locus.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, John C; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Murtaugh, Michael P

    2012-05-01

    We have characterized the organization, complexity, and expression of the porcine (Sus scrofa domestica) immunoglobulin lambda (IGL) light chain locus, which accounts for about half of antibody light chain usage in swine, yet is nearly totally unknown. Twenty-two IGL variable (IGLV) genes were identified that belong to seven subgroups. Nine genes appear to be functional. Eight possess stop codons, frameshifts, or both, and one is missing the V-EXON. Two additional genes are missing an essential cysteine residue and are classified as ORF (open reading frame). The IGLV genes are organized in two distinct clusters, a constant (C)-proximal cluster dominated by genes similar to the human IGLV3 subgroup, and a C-distal cluster dominated by genes most similar to the human IGLV8 and IGLV5 subgroups. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that the porcine IGLV8 subgroup genes have recently expanded, suggesting a particularly effective role in immunity to porcine-specific pathogens. Moreover, expression of IGLV genes is nearly exclusively restricted to the IGLV3 and IGLV8 genes. The constant locus comprises three tandem cassettes comprised of a joining (IGLJ) gene and a constant (IGLC) gene, whereas a fourth downstream IGLJ gene has no corresponding associated IGLC gene. Comparison of individual BACs generated from the same individual revealed polymorphisms in IGLC2 and several IGLV genes, indicating that allelic variation in IGLV further expands the porcine antibody light chain repertoire.

  12. Absence of {lambda} immunoglobulin sequences on the supernumerary chromosome of the {open_quotes}cat eye{close_quotes} syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Hough, C.A.; White, B.N.; Holden, J.J.A.

    1995-09-11

    The supernumerary bisatellited chromosome causing the {open_quotes}cat eye{close_quotes} syndrome (CES) is of chromosome 22 origin and consists of an inverted duplication of the 22pter{r_arrow}22q11.2 region. To determine the extent of involvement of band q11.2 on the bisatellited chromosome, copy number assessment of sequences homologous to cloned {lambda} immunoglobulin ({lambda} Ig) gene region probes was carried out on DNA from individuals with CES using densitometric analysis of Southern blots. None of the 10 {lambda} Ig sequences studied was found in increased copy number in DNA from any of the 10 CES individuals tested, indicating that these sequences are not present on the supernumerary chromosome. The breakpoints involved in the generation of the bisatellited supernumerary chromosome associated with CES are therefore proximal to the {lambda} Ig gene region. 20 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  13. Rearrangement of mouse immunoglobulin kappa deleting element recombining sequence promotes immune tolerance and lambda B cell production.

    PubMed

    Vela, José Luis; Aït-Azzouzene, Djemel; Duong, Bao Hoa; Ota, Takayuki; Nemazee, David

    2008-02-01

    The recombining sequence (RS) of mouse and its human equivalent, the immunoglobulin (Ig) kappa deleting element (IGKDE), are sequences found at the 3' end of the Ig kappa locus (Igk) that rearrange to inactivate Igk in developing B cells. RS recombination correlates with Ig lambda (Iglambda) light (L) chain expression and likely plays a role in receptor editing by eliminating Igk genes encoding autoantibodies. A mouse strain was generated in which the recombination signal of RS was removed, blocking RS-mediated Igk inactivation. In RS mutant mice, receptor editing and self-tolerance were impaired, in some cases leading to autoantibody formation. Surprisingly, mutant mice also made fewer B cells expressing lambda chain, whereas lambda versus kappa isotype exclusion was only modestly affected. These results provide insight into the mechanism of L chain isotype exclusion and indicate that RS has a physiological role in promoting the formation of lambda L chain-expressing B cells.

  14. Detection of normal B-cell precursors that give rise to colonies producing both kappa and lambda light immunoglobulin chains.

    PubMed Central

    Sauter, H; Paige, C J

    1987-01-01

    The pre-B-cell cloning assay is an in vitro differentiation system in which B-lymphocyte precursors expand and generate colonies containing immunoglobulin-secreting cells. Analysis of surface characteristics, growth requirements, and kinetics suggested that these cells represent early stages of the B-cell differentiation pathway. Here we describe a modification of the assay, which allowed us to determine the differentiative potential of these clonable pre-B cells. Using a nitrocellulose protein-transfer technique, we studied immunoglobulin light chain expression in colonies derived from fetal mouse liver B-cell precursors; in particular, we explored whether the B-cell precursors are already committed to the expression of a particular light chain gene at the initiation of culture. Our results show that fetal liver-derived B-cell progenitors generate colonies in vitro that secrete kappa and lambda light chains at a ratio similar to that found in colonies derived from adult splenic B cells. Further, we document the existence of colonies that are derived from single cells and that simultaneously secrete both types of light chains. This indicates that the progenitors of (kappa + lambda)-producing colonies are light chain-uncommitted at the initiation of culture. These cells are able to rearrange their light chain genes in vitro and differentiate along the B-cell pathway to form colonies secreting both kappa and lambda chains. PMID:3110779

  15. Lambda Immunoglobulin Light Chain Restricted B Cells in the Ascitic Fluid in Association with Terminal Ileal Florid Follicular Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Aqil, Barina; Xie, Wei; Szigeti, Reka

    2016-01-01

    Distinguishing reactive changes from neoplastic processes during lymphoid tissue evaluation is oftentimes difficult. Ancillary studies, such as flow cytometry, may aid the diagnosis by demonstrating monotypic or polytypic light chain expression on the B cells. The detection of immunoglobulin light chain restricted B cell population is considered a surrogate marker of clonality, which can be confirmed by molecular assays. In general, the presence of a monotypic B cell population in the ascitic fluid is considered lymphomatous involvement rather than a reactive condition. We describe a young, previously healthy male patient who developed ascites with a lambda light chain restricted B cell population. Further investigation revealed florid follicular hyperplasia, histologically mimicking diffuse large B cell lymphoma, in the terminal ileum. Follicular hyperplasia in the gastrointestinal tract with lambda light chain restricted B cells has been recently described in the pediatric population. Importantly, our case demonstrates that such entity can occur in older age groups. This recognition could prevent misdiagnosis and unnecessary treatment in similar cases.

  16. Four primordial immunoglobulin light chain isotypes, including lambda and kappa, identified in the most primitive living jawed vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Criscitiello, Michael F; Flajnik, Martin F

    2007-10-01

    The discovery of a fourth immunoglobulin (Ig) light (L) chain isotype in sharks has revealed the origins and natural history of all vertebrate L chains. Phylogenetic comparisons have established orthology between this new shark L chain and the unique Xenopus L chain isotype sigma. More importantly, inclusion of this new L chain family in phylogenetic analyses showed that all vertebrate L chains can be categorized into four ancestral clans originating prior to the emergence of cartilaginous fish: one restricted to elasmobranchs (sigma-cart/type I), one found in all cold-blooded vertebrates (sigma/teleost type 2/elasmobranch type IV), one in all groups except bony fish (lambda/elasmobranch type II), and one in all groups except birds (kappa/elasmobranch type III/teleost type 1 and 3). All four of these primordial L chain isotypes (sigma, sigma-cart, lambda and kappa) have maintained separate V region identities since their emergence at least 450 million years ago, suggestive of an ancient physiological distinction of the L chains. We suggest that, based upon unique, discrete sizes of complementarity determining regions 1 and 2 and other features of the V region sequences, the different L chain isotypes arose to provide different functional conformations in the Ig binding site when they pair with heavy chains.

  17. Triple immunoglobulin gene knockout transchromosomic cattle: bovine lambda cluster deletion and its effect on fully human polyclonal antibody production.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Hiroaki; Sano, Akiko; Wu, Hua; Jiao, Jin-An; Kasinathan, Poothappillai; Sullivan, Eddie J; Wang, Zhongde; Kuroiwa, Yoshimi

    2014-01-01

    Towards the goal of producing fully human polyclonal antibodies (hpAbs or hIgGs) in transchromosomic (Tc) cattle, we previously reported that Tc cattle carrying a human artificial chromosome (HAC) comprising the entire unrearranged human immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy-chain (hIGH), kappa-chain (hIGK), and lambda-chain (hIGL) germline loci produced physiological levels of hIgGs when both of the bovine immunoglobulin mu heavy-chains, bIGHM and bIGHML1, were homozygously inactivated (bIGHM-/-, bIGHML1-/-; double knockouts or DKO). However, because endogenous bovine immunoglobulin light chain loci are still intact, the light chains are produced both from the hIGK and hIGL genomic loci on the HAC and from the endogenous bovine kappa-chain (bIGK) and lambda-chain (bIGL) genomic loci, resulting in the production of fully hIgGs (both Ig heavy-chains and light-chains are of human origin: hIgG/hIgκ or hIgG/hIgλ) and chimeric hIgGs (Ig heavy-chains are of human origin while the Ig light-chains are of bovine origin: hIgG/bIgκ or hIgG/bIgλ). To improve fully hIgG production in Tc cattle, we here report the deletion of the entire bIGL joining (J) and constant (C) gene cluster (bIGLJ1-IGLC1 to bIGLJ5-IGLC5) by employing Cre/loxP mediated site-specific chromosome recombination and the production of triple knockout (bIGHM-/-, bIGHML1-/- and bIGL-/-; TKO) Tc cattle. We further demonstrate that bIGL cluster deletion greatly improves fully hIgGs production in the sera of TKO Tc cattle, with 51.3% fully hIgGs (hIgG/hIgκ plus hIgG/hIgλ).

  18. Monoclonal immunoglobulin M lambda coagulation inhibitor with phospholipid specificity. Mechanism of a lupus anticoagulant.

    PubMed Central

    Thiagarajan, P; Shapiro, S S; De Marco, L

    1980-01-01

    Prolongation of all phospholipid-dependent coagulation tests was found in a patient with macroglobulinemia, despite absence of bleeding manifestations. The purified monoclonal IgM lambda protein and its Fabmu tryptic fragment induced similar changes in normal plasma. Patient IgM and Fabmu completely inhibited Ca++-dependent binding of radiolabeled prothrombin and Factor X to mixed phospholipid micelles. The patient's IgM lambda paraprotein reacted with phosphatidylserine and, to a lesser extent, with phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidic acid, but not with phosphatidylcholine or phosphatidylethanolamine. Prior incubation of phospholipid with patient Fabmu blocked the positive reactions. Substitution of washed platelets for phospholipid led to normalization of patient coagulation tests and corrected all abnormalities produced in normal plasma by patient IgM. Furthermore, binding of 125I-Factor Xa to thrombin-treated platelets was entirely normal in the presence of patient IgM. These studies support the concept that platelets, rather than phospholipid micelles, are the primary locus of prothrombin and Factor X activation in normal hemostasis. Images PMID:6772673

  19. Immunoglobulin G concentration in canine colostrum: Evaluation and variability.

    PubMed

    Mila, Hanna; Feugier, Alexandre; Grellet, Aurélien; Anne, Jennifer; Gonnier, Milène; Martin, Maelys; Rossig, Lisa; Chastant-Maillard, Sylvie

    2015-11-01

    Canine neonates are born hypogammaglobulinemic, and colostrum is their main source of immunoglobulins. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immune quality of canine colostrum and its variability both among bitches and among mammary glands. The immune quality was estimated from immunoglobulin G (IgG) concentration (ELISA test). The correlation of IgG concentration with refractometry was evaluated. From a total of 44 bitches from 13 different breeds from a single breeding kennel, samples of colostrum and blood were collected one day after the parturition onset. Colostrum was collected separately from each pair of mammary glands (180 pairs). The mean colostrum IgG concentration in our population was 20.8 ± 8.1g/L (ranging from 8.0 to 41.7 g/L) with no influence of breed size, litter size, age of dam or serum IgG concentration. Colostrum IgG concentration varied widely among pairs of mammary glands within one bitch (variation coefficient: 42 ± 32.1%). Nevertheless, no single pair of mammary glands was found to produce regularly a secretion of higher quality. No difference in IgG concentration was recorded between anterior and posterior pairs either. The BRIX index and the refractive index were significantly, but moderately correlated with colostrum IgG concentration (r=0.53 and 0.42, respectively). This study demonstrates a great variability in immune quality of colostrum among bitches and among mammary glands within one bitch. Further studies on the suckling behavior of puppies and on determination of the minimal immune quality of colostrum are required to evaluate their impact of this high variability on neonatal mortality in dogs.

  20. Patterns of Somatic Mutations in Immunoglobulin Variable Genes

    PubMed Central

    Golding, G. Brian; Gearhart, Patricia J.; Glickman, Barry W.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism responsible for somatic mutation in the variable genes of antibodies is unknown and may differ from previously described mechanisms that produce mutation in DNA. We have analyzed 421 somatic mutations from the rearranged immunoglobulin variable genes of mice to determine (1) if the nucleotide substitutions differ from those generated during meiosis and (2) if the presence of nearby direct and inverted repeated sequences could template mutations around the variable gene. The results reveal a difference in the pattern of substitutions obtained from somatic mutations vs. meiotic mutations. An increased frequency of T:A to C:G transitions and a decreased frequency of mutations involving a G in the somatic mutants compared to the meiotic mutants is indicated. This suggests that the mutational processes responsible for somatic mutation in antibody genes differs from that responsible for mutation during meiosis. An analysis of the local DNA sequences revealed many direct repeats and palindromic sequences that were capable of templating some of the known mutations. Although additional factors may be involved in targeting mutations to the variable gene, mistemplating by nearby repeats may provide a mechanism for the enhancement of somatic mutation. PMID:3557109

  1. Human placenta: relative content of antibodies of different classes and subclasses (IgG1-IgG4) containing lambda- and kappa-light chains and chimeric lambda-kappa-immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Lekchnov, Evgenii A; Sedykh, Sergey E; Dmitrenok, Pavel S; Buneva, Valentina N; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2015-06-01

    The specific organ placenta is much more than a filter: it is an organ that protects, feeds and regulates the growth of the embryo. Affinity chromatography, ELISA, SDS-PAGE and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry were used. Using 10 intact human placentas deprived of blood, a quantitative analysis of average relative content [% of total immunoglobulins (Igs)] was carried out for the first time: (92.7), IgA (2.4), IgM (2.5), kappa-antibodies (51.4), lambda-antibodies (48.6), IgG1 (47.0), IgG2 (39.5), IgG3 (8.8) and IgG4 (4.3). It was shown for the first time that placenta contains sIgA (2.5%). In the classic paradigm, Igs represent products of clonal B-cell populations, each producing antibodies recognizing a single antigen. There is a common belief that IgGs in mammalian biological fluids are monovalent molecules having stable structures and two identical antigen-binding sites. However, similarly to human milk Igs, placenta antibodies undergo extensive half-molecule exchange and the IgG pool consists of 43.5 ± 15.0% kappa-kappa-IgGs and 41.6 ± 17.0% lambda-lambda-IgGs, while 15.0 ± 4.0% of the IgGs contained both kappa- and lambda-light chains. Kappa-kappa-IgGs and lambda-lambda-IgGs contained, respectively (%): IgG1 (47.7 and 34.4), IgG2 (36.3 and 44.5), IgG3 (7.4 and 11.8) and IgG4 (7.5 and 9.1), while chimeric kappa-lambda-IgGs consisted of (%): 43.5 IgG1, 41.0 IgG2, 5.6 IgG3 and 7.9 IgG4. Our data are indicative of the possibility of half-molecule exchange between placenta IgGs of various subclasses, raised against different antigens, which explains a very well-known polyspecificity and cross-reactivity of different human IgGs.

  2. Immunoglobulin variable region structure and B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Kiyoi, H; Naoe, T

    2001-01-01

    The enormous diversity of immunoglobulin (Ig) variable (V) gene sequences encoding the antibody repertoire are formed by the somatic recombination of relatively few genetic elements. In B-lineage malignancies, Ig gene rearrangements have been widely used for determining clonality and cell origin. The recent development of rapid cloning and sequencing techniques has resulted in a substantial accumulation of IgV region sequences at various stages of B-cell development and has revealed stage-specific trends in the use of V, diversity, joining genes, the degree of noncoding nucleotide addition, and the rate of somatic mutations. Furthermore, sequences from B-lineage malignant cells nearly reflect the characteristics of the normal counterpart at each respective stage of development. Alternatively, from the IgV region structure of the malignant cells, it is possible to speculate at which stage of B-cell development the cells were transformed. As the complete nucleotide sequences of the human Ig heavy and Ig light V region loci have now been determined, the study of Ig genetics has entered into the super-information era.

  3. Thrombocytopenia in common variable immunodeficiency patients - clinical course, management, and effect of immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Pituch-Noworolska, Anna; Siedlar, Maciej; Kowalczyk, Danuta; Szaflarska, Anna; Błaut-Szlósarczyk, Anita; Zwonarz, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a primary immunodeficiency of humoral immunity with heterogeneous clinical features. Diagnosis of CVID is based on hypogammaglobulinaemia, low production of specific antibodies, and disorders of cellular immunity. The standard therapy includes replacement of specific antibodies with human immunoglobulin, prophylaxis, and symptomatic therapy of infections. High prevalence of autoimmunity is characteristic for CVID, most commonly: thrombocytopaenia and neutropaenia, celiac disease, and systemic autoimmune diseases. The study included seven children diagnosed with CVID and treated with immunoglobulin substitution from 2 to 12 years. Thrombocytopenia was diagnosed prior to CVID in four children, developed during immunoglobulin substitution in three children. In one boy with CVID and thrombocytopaenia, haemolytic anaemia occurred, so a diagnosis of Evans syndrome was established. Therapy of thrombocytopaenia previous to CVID included steroids and/or immunoglobulins in high dose, and azathioprine. In children with CVID on regular immunoglobulin substitution, episodes of acute thrombocytopaenia were associated with infections and were treated with high doses of immunoglobulins and steroids. In two patients only chronic thrombocytopaenia was noted. Splenectomy was necessary in one patient because of severe course of thrombocytopaenia. The results of the study indicated a supportive role of regular immunoglobulin substitution in patients with CVID and chronic thrombocytopaenia. However, regular substitution of immunoglobulins in CVID patients did not prevent the occurrence of autoimmune thrombocytopaenia episodes or exacerbations of chronic form. In episodes of acute thrombocytopaenia or exacerbations of chronic thrombocytopaenia, infusions of immunoglobulins in high dose are effective, despite previous regular substitution in the replacing dose.

  4. NE VIII lambda 774 and time variable associated absorption in the QSO UM 675

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamann, Fred; Barlow, Thomas A.; Beaver, E. A.; Burbidge, E. M.; Cohen, Ross D.; Junkkarinen, Vesa; Lyons, R.

    1995-01-01

    We discuss measurements of Ne VIII lambda 774 absorption and the time variability of other lines in the z(sub a) approximately equal z(sub e) absorption system of the z(sub e) = 2.15 QSO UM 675 (0150-203). The C IV lambda 1549 and N V 1240 doublets at z(sub a) = 2.1340 (shifted approximately 1500 km/s from z(sub e) strengthened by a factor of approximately 3 between observations by Sargent, Boksenberg and Steidel (1981 November) and our earliest measurements (1990 November and December). We have no information on changes in other z(sub a) approximately equal z(sub e) absorption lines. Continued monitoring since 1990 November shows no clear changes in any of the absorptions between approximately 1100 and 1640 A rest. The short timescale of the variability (less than or approximately equal to 2.9 yr rest) strongly suggests that the clouds are dense, compact, close to the QSO, and photoionized by the QSO continuum. If the line variability is caused by changes in the ionization, the timescale requires densities greater than approximately 4000/cu cm. Photoionization calculations place the absorbing clouds within approximately 200 pc of the continuum source. The full range of line ionizations (from Ne VIII lambda 774 to C III lambda 977) in optically thin gas (no Lyman limit) implies that the absorbing regions span a factor of more than approximately 10 in distance or approximately 100 in density. Across these regions, the total hydrogen (H I + H II) column ranges from a few times 10(exp 18)/sq cm in the low-ionization gas to approximately 10(exp 20)/sq cm where the Ne VIII doublet forms. The metallicity is roughly solar or higher, with nitrogen possibly more enhanced by factors of a few. The clouds might contribute significant line emission if they nearly envelop the QSO. The presence of highly ionized Ne VIII lambda 774 absorption near the QSO supports recent studies that link z(sub a) approximately equal to z(sub e) systems with X-ray 'wamr absorbers. We show that the

  5. NE VIII lambda 774 and time variable associated absorption in the QSO UM 675

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, Fred; Barlow, Thomas A.; Beaver, E. A.; Burbidge, E. M.; Cohen, Ross D.; Junkkarinen, Vesa; Lyons, R.

    1995-04-01

    We discuss measurements of Ne VIII lambda 774 absorption and the time variability of other lines in the za approximately equal ze absorption system of the ze = 2.15 QSO UM 675 (0150-203). The C IV lambda 1549 and N V 1240 doublets at za = 2.1340 (shifted approximately 1500 km/s from ze strengthened by a factor of approximately 3 between observations by Sargent, Boksenberg and Steidel (1981 November) and our earliest measurements (1990 November and December). We have no information on changes in other za approximately equal ze absorption lines. Continued monitoring since 1990 November shows no clear changes in any of the absorptions between approximately 1100 and 1640 A rest. The short timescale of the variability (less than or approximately equal to 2.9 yr rest) strongly suggests that the clouds are dense, compact, close to the QSO, and photoionized by the QSO continuum. If the line variability is caused by changes in the ionization, the timescale requires densities greater than approximately 4000/cu cm. Photoionization calculations place the absorbing clouds within approximately 200 pc of the continuum source. The full range of line ionizations (from Ne VIII lambda 774 to C III lambda 977) in optically thin gas (no Lyman limit) implies that the absorbing regions span a factor of more than approximately 10 in distance or approximately 100 in density. Across these regions, the total hydrogen (H I + H II) column ranges from a few times 1018/sq cm in the low-ionization gas to approximately 1020/sq cm where the Ne VIII doublet forms. The metallicity is roughly solar or higher, with nitrogen possibly more enhanced by factors of a few. The clouds might contribute significant line emission if they nearly envelop the QSO. The presence of highly ionized Ne VIII lambda 774 absorption near the QSO supports recent studies that link za approximately equal to ze systems with X-ray 'wamr absorbers. We show that the Ne VIII absorbing gas would itself produce measurable warm

  6. Immunoglobulin V/J recombination is accompanied by deletion of joining site and variable region segments.

    PubMed Central

    Seidman, J G; Nau, M M; Norman, B; Kwan, S P; Scharff, M; Leder, P

    1980-01-01

    A site-specific recombination event is responsible for the somatic activation of immunoglobulin genes and for generating a major share of immunoglobulin gene diversity. Although several possible mechanisms can be proposed to account for this process, recombinatio accompanied by deletion is a particularly attractive mechanism because it might utilize inverted repeat sequences noted on the 3' side of all variable regions and on the 5' side of all joining site segments thus far studied. Testing this model is complicated by the fact that antibody cells are at least diploid and gene segments on the inactive chromosome can obscure deletions occurring within the active gene. Accordingly, we have screened several immunoglobulin-producing plasmacytoma lines to select those in which both chromosomes are rearranged. By using appropriate cell lines and variable and joining region probes in in situ hybridization experiments, we show that recombination is accompanied by the deletion of both variable and joining region genes. These experiments also allow us to map the site of V/J recombination of several active immunoglobulin genes and suggest an order and orientation for variable, joining, and constant region sequences. Images PMID:6777777

  7. Immunoglobulin heavy chain variable gene usage and (super)-antigen drive in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bühler, Andreas; Zenz, Thorsten; Stilgenbauer, Stephan

    2010-01-15

    Increasing evidence supports the prognostic relevance of specific immunoglobulin heavy chain variable (IGHV) genes or stereotyped B-cell receptors (BCR) in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The clonotypic BCRs differ in their specificity and affinity toward classical antigens and/or superantigens. The BCR-triggered mechanisms are distinct but could explain in part the different clinical behavior among CLL subgroups.

  8. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin therapy in a patient with myopathic dropped head syndrome and common variable immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Rosato, E; Molinaro, I; Pisarri, S; Salsano, F

    2011-01-01

    Prominent neck extension weakness is an uncommon clinical entity, also termed dropped-head syndrome, that may be part of a generalized neuromuscular disorder. We report here the case of a woman with dropped-head syndrome and pulmonary arterial hypertension secondary to systemic sclerosis. Subsequently, she developed common variable immunodeficiency and subcutaneous immunoglobulin therapy was started. After two months from the start of therapy we did not observe any improvement in the degree of flexion of the head, although the clinical examination shows an improvement in neck extensor muscle strength. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin therapy could be a possible therapeutic option for the treatment of myopathic neck extensor weakness.

  9. Heat-induced formation of a specific binding site for self-assembled Congo Red in the V domain of immunoglobulin L chain lambda.

    PubMed

    Piekarska, B; Konieczny, L; Rybarska, J; Stopa, B; Zemanek, G; Szneler, E; Król, M; Nowak, M; Roterman, I

    2001-11-01

    Moderate heating (40-50 degrees C) of immunoglobulins makes them accessible for binding with Congo Red and some related highly associated dyes. The binding is specific and involves supramolecular dye ligands presenting ribbon-like micellar bodies. The L chain lambda dimer, which upon heating disclosed the same binding requirement with respect to supramolecular dye ligands, was used in this work to identify the site of their attachment. Two clearly defined dye-protein (L lambda chain) complexes arise upon heating, here called complex I and complex II. The first is formed at low temperatures (up to 40-45 degrees C) and hence by a still native protein, while the formation of the second one is associated with domain melting above 55 degrees C. They contain 4 and 8 dye molecules bound per L chain monomer, respectively. Complex I also forms efficiently at high dye concentration even at ambient temperature. Complex I and its formation was the object of the present studies. Three structural events that could make the protein accessible to penetration by the large dye ligand were considered to occur in L chains upon heating: local polypeptide chain destabilization, VL-VL domain incoherence, and protein melting. Of these three possibilities, local low-energy structural alteration was found to correlate best with the formation of complex I. It was identified as decreased packing stability of the N-terminal polypeptide chain fragment, which as a result made the V domain accessible for dye penetration. The 19-amino acid N-terminal fragment becomes susceptible to proteolytic cleavage after being replaced by the dye at its packing locus. Its splitting from the dye-protein complex was proved by amino acid sequence analysis. The emptied packing locus, which becomes the site that holds the dye, is bordered by strands of amino acids numbered 74-80 and 105-110, as shown by model analysis. The character of the temperature-induced local polypeptide chain destabilization and its possible

  10. Quantification of Peptides from Immunoglobulin Constant and Variable Regions by Liquid Chromatography-Multiple Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry for Assessment of Multiple Myeloma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Remily-Wood, Elizabeth R.; Benson, Kaaron; Baz, Rachid C.; Chen, Y. Ann; Hussein, Mohamad; Hartley-Brown, Monique A.; Sprung, Robert W.; Perez, Brianna; Liu, Richard Z.; Yoder, Sean; Teer, Jamie; Eschrich, Steven A.; Koomen, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Quantitative mass spectrometry assays for immunoglobulins (Igs) are compared with existing clinical methods in samples from patients with plasma cell dyscrasias, e.g. multiple myeloma. Experimental design Using LC-MS/MS data, Ig constant region peptides and transitions were selected for liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (LC-MRM). Quantitative assays were used to assess Igs in serum from 83 patients. Results LC-MRM assays quantify serum levels of Igs and their isoforms (IgG1–4, IgA1–2, IgM, IgD, and IgE, as well as kappa(κ) and lambda(λ) light chains). LC-MRM quantification has been applied to single samples from a patient cohort and a longitudinal study of an IgE patient undergoing treatment, to enable comparison with existing clinical methods. Proof-of-concept data for defining and monitoring variable region peptides are provided using the H929 multiple myeloma cell line and two MM patients. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance LC-MRM assays targeting constant region peptides determine the type and isoform of the involved immunoglobulin and quantify its expression; the LC-MRM approach has improved sensitivity compared with the current clinical method, but slightly higher interassay variability. Detection of variable region peptides is a promising way to improve Ig quantification, which could produce a dramatic increase in sensitivity over existing methods, and could further complement current clinical techniques. PMID:24723328

  11. Coding strategy differences between constant and variable segments of immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, P

    1984-01-01

    Vertebrate immunoglobulin (Ig) mRNAs reveal intraspecies variation in codon usage distinct from that seen with yeast or bacterial genes. Comparison of all available Ig gene sequences shows that %(G + C) in codon position III is consistently lower in variable (V) segments than in constant (C) segments. I find an even lower %(G + C) in the hypervariable domains of V segments. This analysis suggests that base substitution in Ig genes correlates positively with local A + T content. PMID:6462913

  12. Structure reveals function of the dual variable domain immunoglobulin (DVD-Ig™) molecule.

    PubMed

    Jakob, Clarissa G; Edalji, Rohinton; Judge, Russell A; DiGiammarino, Enrico; Li, Yingchun; Gu, Jijie; Ghayur, Tariq

    2013-01-01

    Several bispecific antibody-based formats have been developed over the past 25 years in an effort to produce a new generation of immunotherapeutics that target two or more disease mechanisms simultaneously. One such format, the dual-variable domain immunoglobulin (DVD-Ig™), combines the target binding domains of two monoclonal antibodies via flexible naturally occurring linkers, which yields a tetravalent IgG - like molecule. We report the structure of an interleukin (IL)12-IL18 DVD-Ig™ Fab (DFab) fragment with IL18 bound to the inner variable domain (VD) that reveals the remarkable flexibility of the DVD-Ig™ molecule and how the DVD-Ig™ format can function to bind four antigens simultaneously. An understanding of how the inner variable domain retains function is of critical importance for designing DVD-Ig™ molecules, and for better understanding of the flexibility of immunoglobulin variable domains and linkers, which may aid in the design of improved bi- and multi-specific biologics in general.

  13. Lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia associated with common variable immunodeficiency resolved with intravenous immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Arish, N; Eldor, R; Fellig, Y; Bogot, N; Laxer, U; Izhar, U; Rokach, A

    2006-12-01

    Lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia (LIP) is a rare form of interstitial lung disease. A few case reports have described an association with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). Corticosteroids are usually used to treat symptomatic patients but their efficacy has never been studied in a controlled trial. We describe a patient with LIP and CVID who was treated monthly with intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) without steroids. The patient improved dramatically. We believe that, in selected cases of LIP and immunodeficiency, IVIG given monthly should be considered as the only treatment without adding steroids.

  14. Half molecular exchange of IgGs in the blood of healthy humans: chimeric lambda-kappa-immunoglobulins containing HL fragments of antibodies of different subclasses (IgG1-IgG4).

    PubMed

    Sedykh, Sergey E; Lekchnov, Evgenii A; Prince, Viktor V; Buneva, Valentina N; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2016-10-20

    In the classic paradigm, immunoglobulins represent products of clonal B cell populations, each producing antibodies recognizing a single antigen (monospecific). There is a common belief that IgGs in mammalian biological fluids are monospecific molecules having stable structures and two identical antigen-binding sites. But the issue concerning the possibility of exchange by HL-fragments between the antibody molecules in human blood is still unexplored. Different physico-chemical and immunological methods for analysis of half-molecule exchange between human blood IgGs were used. Using eighteen blood samples of healthy humans we have shown unexpected results for the first time: blood antibodies undergo extensive post-transcriptional half-molecule exchange and IgG pools on average consist of 62.4 ± 6.5% IgGs containing kappa light chains (kappa-kappa-IgGs), 29.8.6 ± 5.4% lambda light chains (lambda-lambda-IgGs), and 8.8 ± 2.7% (range 2.6-16.8%) IgGs containing both kappa- and lambda-light chains. Kappa-kappa-IgGs and lambda-lambda-IgGs contained on average (%): IgG1 (36.0 and 32.3), IgG2 (50.9 and 51.4), IgG3 (9.7 and 9.9), and IgG4 (6.5 and 5.7), while chimeric kappa-lambda-IgGs consisted of (%): 25.5 ± 4.2 IgG1, 50.8 ± 3.9 IgG2, 9.1 ± 2.1 IgG3, and 14.5 ± 2.2 IgG4. Our unexpected data are indicative of the possibility of half-molecule exchange between blood IgGs of various subclasses, raised against different antigens. The existence of blood chimeric bifunctional IgGs with different binding sites destroys the classic paradigm. Due to the phenomenon of polyspecificity and cross-reactivity of bifunctional IgGs containing HL-fragments of different types to different antigens, such IgGs may be important in human blood for widening their different biological functions.

  15. SUBGROUPS OF AMINO ACID SEQUENCES IN THE VARIABLE REGIONS OF IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAINS*

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Bruce A.; Pflumm, Mollie N.; User, Urs Rutisha; Edelman, Gerald M.

    1969-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of the first 133 residues of the heavy (γ) chain from a human γG immunoglobulin (He) has been determined. This γ-chain is identical in Gm type to that of protein Eu, the complete sequence of which has been reported. Comparison of the two sequences substantiates the previous suggestion that there are subgroups of variable regions of heavy chains. The variable region of Eu has been assigned to subgroup I and that of He to subgroup II; on the other hand, the constant regions of the two proteins appear to be identical. Comparison of the sequence of the heavy chain of He with the heavy chain sequences determined in other laboratories suggests that the variable region of subgroup II is at least 118 residues long. The nature and distribution of amino acid variations in this heavy chain subgroup resemble those observed in light chain subgroups. These studies provide evidence that the translocation hypothesis applies to heavy as well as to light chains, viz., genes for variable regions (V) are somatically translocated to genes for constant regions (C) to form complete VC structural genes. Images PMID:5264153

  16. Immunoglobulin K light chain deficiency: A rare, but probably underestimated, humoral immune defect.

    PubMed

    Sala, Pierguido; Colatutto, Antonio; Fabbro, Dora; Mariuzzi, Laura; Marzinotto, Stefania; Toffoletto, Barbara; Perosa, Anna R; Damante, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Human immunoglobulin molecules are generated by a pair of identical heavy chains, which identify the immunoglobulin class, and a pair of identical light chains, Kappa or Lambda alternatively, which characterize the immunoglobulin type. In normal conditions, Kappa light chains represent approximately 2/3 of the light chains of total immunoglobulins, both circulating and lymphocyte surface bound. Very few cases of immunoglobulin Kappa or Lambda light chain defects have been reported. Furthermore, the genetic basis of this defect has been extensively explored only in a single case. We report a case of a patient suffering of serious recurrent bacterial infections, which was caused by a very rare form of immunoglobulin disorder, consisting of a pure defect of Kappa light chain. We evaluated major serum immunoglobulin concentrations, as well as total and free Kappa and Lambda light chain concentrations. Lymphocyte phenotyping was also performed and finally we tested the Kappa chain VJ rearrangement as well as the constant Kappa region sequence. Studies performed on VJ rearrangement showed a polyclonal genetic arrangement, whereas the gene sequencing for the constant region of Kappa chain showed a homozygous T to G substitution at the position 1288 (rs200765148). This mutation causes a substitution from Cys to Gly in the protein sequence and, therefore, determines the abnormal folding of the constant region of Kappa chain. We suggest that this defect could lead to an effective reduction of the variability of total antibody repertoire and a consequent defect of an apparently normal immunoglobulin response to common antigens.

  17. Complementarity-determining region 2 is implicated in the binding of staphylococcal protein A to human immunoglobulin VHIII variable regions.

    PubMed

    Randen, I; Potter, K N; Li, Y; Thompson, K M; Pascual, V; Førre, O; Natvig, J B; Capra, J D

    1993-10-01

    Staphylococcal protein A (SPA) has two distinct binding sites on human immunoglobulins. In addition to binding to the Fc region of most IgG molecules, an "alternative" binding site has been localized to the Fab region of human immunoglobulins encoded by heavy chain variable gene segments belonging to the VHIII family. Comparison of amino acid sequences of closely related SPA-binding and -non-binding proteins suggested that VHIII-specific residues in the second complementarity-determining region (CDR2) were likely responsible for SPA binding activity. Site-directed mutagenesis of a single amino acid residue in CDR2 converted an IgM rheumatoid factor which did not bind SPA to an SPA binder. These findings, therefore, locate a critical site involved in SPA binding to the CDR2 of human immunoglobulins encoded by VHIII family gene segments.

  18. Molecular characterization of the immunoglobulin light chain variable region repertoire of human autoantibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Victor, K.D.

    1992-01-01

    The molecular structures of the light chain variable regions encoding human autoantibodies have been studied in detail. The variable region repertoire among this group of antibodies is diverse. There is no evidence for preferential utilization of specific V[sub L] gene families or over-representation of certain V[sub L] gene segments in autoantibodies. Many autoreactive antibodies utilize direct copies of known germline gene segments with little evidence of somatic mutation, supporting the conclusion that at least some germline gene segments encode autoreactivity. Additionally, the structures of several autoantibodies are clearly the product of somatic mutation. Lastly, affinity maturation has been demonstrated in two clonally related IgM rheumatoid factors suggestive of an antigen driven response. The heterogeneity of the V[sub L] region repertoire in human autoantibodies challenges evidence in the literature suggesting that the majority of human autoantibodies utilize the same or closely related germline gene segments with no evidence of somatic mutation. In addition, this study has documented that variation in the length of the light chain is a common feature in human antibodies. Length variation is confined to the V[sub k]-J[sub k] joint of CDR3 and occurs in all V[sub k] gene families. Analysis of the structures of the V[sub k]-J[sub k] joints suggests that both germline derived and non-germline encoded nucleotides (N-segments), probably the result of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase activity, contribute to the junctional diversity of the immunoglobulin light chain variable region. Thus, length variation at the V[sub L]-J[sub L] joint is a frequent event having the potential to expand the diversity of the antibody molecule.

  19. Susceptibility to multiple sclerosis is associated with the proximal immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region.

    PubMed Central

    Walter, M A; Gibson, W T; Ebers, G C; Cox, D W

    1991-01-01

    15 immunoglobulin heavy chain constant (CH) and variable region (VH) polymorphisms were selected to span the entire length of the heavy chain cluster. These polymorphisms were examined in 34 sib pairs concordant for multiple sclerosis (MS) and in 23 sporadic MS patients. Allele frequencies were calculated for the 2 MS patient groups and compared with those found in a control population from the same geographical location and of similar ethnic background. No significant association was found between MS and the 7 CH region polymorphisms examined. However, a significant correlation between the MS phenotype and a VH2 family polymorphism was observed in both MS patient populations (familial MS patients chi 2 = 8.16, P less than 0.005; sporadic MS patients chi 2 = 8.90, P less than 0.005). One allele of the VH2-5 gene segment was found to be over-represented in both MS groups. VH2-5 has recently been physically mapped close to the CH region, between 180 and 360 kb away. These results indicate that a locus near or within the CH-proximal VH region is associated with increased susceptibility to MS. Images PMID:1672695

  20. Immunoglobulin variable-region gene mutational lineage tree analysis: application to autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Steiman-Shimony, Avital; Edelman, Hanna; Barak, Michal; Shahaf, Gitit; Dunn-Walters, Deborah; Stott, David I; Abraham, Roshini S; Mehr, Ramit

    2006-04-01

    Lineage trees have frequently been drawn to illustrate diversification, via somatic hypermutation (SHM), of immunoglobulin variable-region (IGV) genes. In order to extract more information from IGV sequences, we developed a novel mathematical method for analyzing the graphical properties of IgV gene lineage trees, allowing quantification of the differences between the dynamics of SHM and antigen-driven selection in different lymphoid tissues, species, and disease situations. Here, we investigated trees generated from published IGV sequence data from B cell clones participating in autoimmune responses in patients with Myasthenia Gravis (MG), Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), and Sjögren's Syndrome (SS). At present, as no standards exist for cell sampling and sequence extraction methods, data obtained by different research groups from two studies of the same disease often vary considerably. Nevertheless, based on comparisons of data groups within individual studies, we show here that lineage trees from different individual patients are often similar and can be grouped together, as can trees from two different tissues in the same patient, and even from IgG- and IgA-expressing B cell clones. Additionally, lineage trees from most studies reflect the chronic character of autoimmune diseases.

  1. Stochastic rearrangement of immunoglobulin variable-region genes in chicken B-cell development.

    PubMed

    Benatar, T; Tkalec, L; Ratcliffe, M J

    1992-08-15

    The molecular mechanism by which immunoglobulin (Ig) gene rearrangement occurs is highly conserved between mammalian and avian species. However, in avian species, an equivalent to the mammalian pre-B cell, which has undergone Ig heavy-chain gene rearrangement and expresses mu heavy chains in the absence of Ig light-chain rearrangement, has not been convincingly demonstrated. It is consequently unclear whether an ordered progression of gene rearrangement events leading to functional Ig expression occurs in avian species. To examine the sequence of Ig gene rearrangement events in chicken B-cell development, we transformed day 12 embryo bursal cells with the REV-T(CSV) retrovirus. More than 100 clones were analyzed by Southern blotting and polymerase chain reaction for the presence of Ig gene rearrangements. The majority of these clones contained only germline Ig sequences. Several clones contained complete heavy- and light-chain rearrangements and 13 clones contained only heavy-chain rearrangements analogous to stages of mammalian B-cell development. However, 5 clones contained rearrangements of light-chain genes in the absence of complete heavy-chain rearrangement. Consequently, we conclude that rearrangement of chicken Ig light-chain genes does not require heavy-chain variable-region rearrangement. This observation suggests that chicken Ig gene rearrangement events required for Ig expression occur stochastically rather than sequentially.

  2. Chromosomal orientation of the lambda light chain locus: V lambda is proximal to C lambda in 22q11.

    PubMed Central

    Emanuel, B S; Cannizzaro, L A; Magrath, I; Tsujimoto, Y; Nowell, P C; Croce, C M

    1985-01-01

    We have demonstrated that the chromosomal breakpoint at 22q11 of a Burkitt lymphoma cell line (PA682) with an 8;22 translocation interrupts the variable region of the lambda light chain locus. In these cells, all of the C lambda and some V lambda sequences translocate to the 8q+ chromosome whereas some V lambda sequences remain on the 22q-. These results indicate that the lambda light chain locus on the long arm of chromosome 22 is oriented such that V lambda is proximal to C lambda. Images PMID:3923432

  3. Interleukin-21 restores immunoglobulin production ex vivo in patients with common variable immunodeficiency and selective IgA deficiency.

    PubMed

    Borte, Stephan; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang; Liu, Chonghai; Sack, Ulrich; Borte, Michael; Wagner, Ulf; Graf, Dagmar; Hammarström, Lennart

    2009-11-05

    Interleukin-21 (IL-21) is an important promoter for differentiation of human B cells into immunoglobulin (Ig)-secreting cells. The objective of this study was to evaluate an IL-21-based approach to induce immunoglobulin production in B cells from patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) or selective IgA deficiency (IgAD). We show that a combination of IL-21, IL-4, and anti-CD40 stimulation induces class-switch recombination to IgG and IgA and differentiation of Ig-secreting cells, consisting of both surface IgG(+) (sIgG(+)) and sIgA(+) B cells and CD138(+) plasma cells, in patients with CVID or IgAD. Stimulation with IL-21 was far more effective than stimulation with IL-4 or IL-10. Moreover, spontaneous apoptosis of CD19(+) B cells from patients with CVID or IgAD was prevented by a combination of IL-21, IL-4, and anti-CD40 stimulation. Analysis of IL-21 and IL-21 receptor (IL-21R) mRNA expression upon anti-CD3 stimulation of T cells, however, showed no evidence for defective IL-21 expression in CVID patients and sequencing of the coding regions of the IL21 gene did not reveal any mutations, suggesting a regulatory defect. Thus, our work provides an initial basis for a potential therapeutic role of IL-21 to reconstitute immunoglobulin production in CVID and IgAD.

  4. Lightest Double-Lambda Hypernucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakaichi-Maeda, S.; Akaishi, Y.

    1990-12-01

    A variational calculation for (4) _{Lambda Lambda}H is made by employing the phenomenological N Lambda and Lambda Lambda potentials derived recently. It is shown that the binding of (4) _{Lambda Lambda}H below the Lambda+(3}_{Lambda) H threshold is consistent with the (6) _{Lambda Lambda}He data, and also with the (10) _{Lambda Lambda}Be data when repulsive alpha alpha Lambda and alpha Lambda Lambda three-body forces are considered.

  5. Identification of anti-ErbB2 dual variable domain immunoglobulin (DVD-Ig™) proteins with unique activities.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jinming; Yang, Jinsong; Chang, Qing; Lu, Xiaoqing; Wang, Jieyi; Chen, Mingjiu; Ghayur, Tariq; Gu, Jijie

    2014-01-01

    Inhibiting ErbB2 signaling with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) or small molecules is an established therapeutic strategy in oncology. We have developed anti-ErbB2 Dual Variable Domain Immunoglobulin (DVD-Ig) proteins that capture the function of a combination of two anti-ErbB2 antibodies. In addition, some of the anti-ErbB2 DVD-Ig proteins gain the new functions of enhancing ErbB2 signaling and cell proliferation in N87 cells. We further found that two DVD-Ig proteins, DVD687 and DVD688, have two distinct mechanisms of actions in Calu-3 and N87 cells. DVD687 enhances cell cycle progression while DVD688 induces apoptosis in N87 cells. Using a half DVD687, we found that avidity may play a key role in the agonist activity of DVD687 in N87 cells.

  6. Equine immunoglobulins and organization of immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Walther, Stefanie; Rusitzka, Tamara V; Diesterbeck, Ulrike S; Czerny, Claus-Peter

    2015-12-01

    Our understanding of how equine immunoglobulin genes are organized has increased significantly in recent years. For equine heavy chains, 52 IGHV, 40 IGHD, 8 IGHJ and 11 IGHC are present. Seven of these IGHCs are gamma chain genes. Sequence diversity is increasing between fetal, neonatal, foal and adult age. The kappa light chain contains 60 IGKV, 5 IGKJ and 1 IGKC, whereas there are 144 IGLV, 7 IGLJ, and 7 IGLC for the lambda light chain, which is expressed predominantly in horses. Significant transcriptional differences for IGLV and IGLC are identified in different breeds. Allotypic and allelic variants are observed for IGLC1, IGLC5, and IGLC6/7, and two IGLV pseudogenes are also transcribed. During age development, a decrease in IGLVs is noted, although nucleotide diversity and significant differences in gene usage increased. The following paper suggests a standardization of the existing nomenclature of immunoglobulin genes.

  7. [Use of intravenous immunoglobulin in pregnancy. Report of a patient with common variable immunodeficiency].

    PubMed

    Cambray-Gutiérrez, Julio César; García-Ramírez, Ulises Noel; Del Rivero-Hernández, Leonel Gerardo; López-Pérez, Patricia; Chávez-García, Aurora

    2016-01-01

    Antecedentes: La inmunodeficiencia común variable es la inmunodeficiencia primaria más diagnosticada en los adultos; se caracteriza por infecciones sinopulmonares y gastrointestinales de repetición y mayor incidencia de procesos autoinmunes y malignidad. Numerosos pacientes inician con las manifestaciones clínicas durante la edad reproductiva. Caso clínico: Mujer de 34 años de edad con 12 semanas de gestación, en quien se diagnosticó inmunodeficiencia común variable después de cuadros recurrentes de rinosinusitis, faringoadmidalitis y neumonías. Durante el segundo trimestre se prescribió 0.6 g/kg de inmunoglobulina intravenosa cada 21 días; la paciente solo presentó un episodio de faringoamigdalitis, con adecuada respuesta al tratamiento con antibióticos. Durante el tercer trimestre se ajustó la dosis a cada 14 días. La paciente concluyó el embarazo a término sin complicaciones, con producto sin malformaciones y con peso y talla adecuados. Conclusiones: La administración de inmunoglobulina es el principal tratamiento para controlar la inmunodeficiencia común variable. Si bien la dosis inicial recomendada es de 400-800 mg/kg en forma intravenosa cada 3 a 4 semanas, no existe un consenso sobre la dosis que debe emplearse en la mujer que cursa con embarazo. La recomendación es realizar controles de niveles séricos antes de la infusión para determinarla y ajustarla.

  8. Secretion of a chimeric T-cell receptor-immunoglobulin protein.

    PubMed Central

    Gascoigne, N R; Goodnow, C C; Dudzik, K I; Oi, V T; Davis, M M

    1987-01-01

    To produce sufficient quantities of soluble T-cell receptor protein for detailed biochemical and biophysical analyses we have explored the use of immunoglobulin--T-cell receptor gene fusions. In this report we describe a chimeric gene construct containing a T-cell receptor alpha-chain variable (V) domain and the constant (C) region coding sequences of an immunoglobulin gamma 2a molecule. Cells transfected with the chimeric gene synthesize a stable protein product that expresses immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor antigenic determinants as well as protein A binding sites. We show that the determinant recognized by the anticlonotypic antibody A2B4.2 resides on the V alpha domain of the T-cell receptor. The chimeric protein associates with a normal lambda light chain to form an apparently normal tetrameric (H2L2, where H = heavy and L = light) immunoglobulin molecule that is secreted. Also of potential significance is the fact that a T-cell receptor V beta gene in the same construct is neither assembled nor secreted with the lambda light chain, and when expressed with a C kappa region it does not assemble with the chimeric V alpha C gamma 2a protein mentioned above. This indicates that not all T-cell receptor V regions are similar enough to immunoglobulin V regions for them to be completely interchangeable. Images PMID:3472243

  9. A large section of the gene locus encoding human immunoglobulin variable regions of the kappa type is duplicated.

    PubMed

    Pech, M; Smola, H; Pohlenz, H D; Straubinger, B; Gerl, R; Zachau, H G

    1985-06-05

    The structure of a new segment of the gene locus encoding the variable regions of human immunoglobulins of the Kappa type (VK) has been elucidated. This segment (cluster B) encompasses six VK sequences, which belong to three different subgroups and which are arranged in the same transcriptional orientation. Part of cluster B was found to be very similar to another region of the VK gene locus, which was cloned previously (cluster A). Sequence differences between the homologous region of clusters A and B range from 0.2% to 3.7% depending on the position of the VK sequences. The divergence is in the same range for genes and pseudogenes. Hybridization experiments with DNAs from different individuals clearly demonstrate that the two segments are located at different positions within the VK locus and do not represent allelic variants. The sequence homology between clusters A and B is higher than the homology of both clusters to an allelic variant, which is represented by a DNA segment that had been isolated from another individual. These results, together with a report in the literature of two other homologous regions in the VK locus, make it very likely that a major part of even the whole locus is duplicated. In this case, VK gene numbers would be higher than previously estimated on the basis of hybridization studies. An inverse orientation of VK gene clusters would explain published data on rearrangement products in B-cells if an inversion-deletion mechanism is assumed.

  10. Lectins from opportunistic bacteria interact with acquired variable-region glycans of surface immunoglobulin in follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Dunja; Dühren-von Minden, Marcus; Alkhatib, Alabbas; Setz, Corinna; van Bergen, Cornelis A M; Benkißer-Petersen, Marco; Wilhelm, Isabel; Villringer, Sarah; Krysov, Sergey; Packham, Graham; Zirlik, Katja; Römer, Winfried; Buske, Christian; Stevenson, Freda K; Veelken, Hendrik; Jumaa, Hassan

    2015-05-21

    B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) expression is a key feature of most B-cell lymphomas, but the mechanisms of BCR signal induction and the involvement of autoantigen recognition remain unclear. In follicular lymphoma (FL) B cells, BCR expression is retained despite a chromosomal translocation that links the antiapoptotic gene BCL2 to the regulatory elements of immunoglobulin genes, thereby disrupting 1 heavy-chain allele. A remarkable feature of FL-BCRs is the acquisition of potential N-glycosylation sites during somatic hypermutation. The introduced glycans carry mannose termini, which create potential novel binding sites for mannose-specific lectins. Here, we investigated the effect of N-linked variable-region glycosylation for BCR interaction with cognate antigen and with lectins of different origins. N-glycans were found to severely impair BCR specificity and affinity to the initial cognate antigen. In addition, we found that lectins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cenocepacia bind and stimulate FL cells. Human exposure to these bacteria can occur by contact with soil and water. In addition, they represent opportunistic pathogens in susceptible hosts. Understanding the role of bacterial lectins might elucidate the pathogenesis of FL and establish novel therapeutic approaches.

  11. Effect of Excipients on Liquid-Liquid Phase Separation and Aggregation in Dual Variable Domain Immunoglobulin Protein Solutions.

    PubMed

    Raut, Ashlesha S; Kalonia, Devendra S

    2016-03-07

    Liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) and aggregation can reduce the physical stability of therapeutic protein formulations. On undergoing LLPS, the protein-rich phase can promote aggregation during storage due to high concentration of the protein. Effect of different excipients on aggregation in protein solution is well documented; however data on the effect of excipients on LLPS is scarce in the literature. In this study, the effect of four excipients (PEG 400, Tween 80, sucrose, and hydroxypropyl beta-cyclodextrin (HPβCD)) on liquid-liquid phase separation and aggregation in a dual variable domain immunoglobulin protein solution was investigated. Sucrose suppressed both LLPS and aggregation, Tween 80 had no effect on either, and PEG 400 increased LLPS and aggregation. Attractive protein-protein interactions and liquid-liquid phase separation decreased with increasing concentration of HPβCD, indicating its specific binding to the protein. However, HPβCD had no effect on the formation of soluble aggregates and fragments in this study. LLPS and aggregation are highly temperature dependent; at low temperature protein exhibits LLPS, at high temperature protein exhibits aggregation, and at an intermediate temperature both phenomena occur simultaneously depending on the solution conditions.

  12. Immunoglobulin variable region hypermutation is associated with a DNA repair deficit

    SciTech Connect

    Valles-Ayoub, Y.; Govan, H.L. III; Braun, J. )

    1991-03-11

    The molecular mechanism of Ig variable region hypermutation is unknown, but has been hypothesized to involve an error-prone DNA repair process. In this study, the authors used a novel PCR-based assay to compare repair of UV-induced DNA damage in mantle zone versus germinal center B lymphocytes. They observed that DNA repair activity within rearranged VDJ loci was sluggish in germinal center B lymphocytes compared to repair activity monitored in mantle zone B lymphocytes. In contrast, DNA repair times within the germline V{sub H}5 gene family, the variable region J{sub H}{endash}C{sub H} intron, and the N-ras gene was rapid and similar in both germinal center and mantle zone B cells. These results reflect a DNA repair deficit which, as expected for hypermutation, is selective for rearranged Ig VDG in germinal center cells. To directly measure the fidelity of DNA repair, the repaired PCR-amplified gene segments were analyzed for sequence changes by restriction enzyme digestion. In experiments thus far, repair of germline V{sub H}5 was error-free in both germinal center and mantle zone B cells. However, while rearranged V{sub H}5 segments were also error-free in mantle zone cells, they were highly mutated in germinal center cells. These findings provide direct biochemical evidence for the role of a sequence- and stage-specific error-prone DNA repair pathway in Ig V gene hypermutation.

  13. [Adverse effects with ambulatory intravenous immunoglobulin administration in adult patients with common variable immunodeficiency].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Mireles, Karen A; Galguera-Sauceda, Angélica; Gaspar-López, Arturo; López-Rocha, Eunice G; Campos-Romero, Freya; Del Rivero-Hernández, Leonel; Amaya-Mejía, Adela; Galindo-Pacheco, Lucy; O'Farril-Romanillos, Patricia; Segura-Méndez, Nora Hilda

    2014-01-01

    Antecedentes: la inmunodeficiencia común variable es la inmunodeficiencia primaria sintomática más frecuente, afecta a 1 por cada 25,000 a 75,000 sujetos. Se distingue por la ausencia o disminución de anticuerpos. Su tratamiento consiste en el reemplazo de anticuerpos con inmunoglobulina humana y la vía de administración más frecuente es la intravenosa, a dosis de 400 a 800 mg/kg de peso/dosis cada tres a cuatro semanas. Los efectos adversos asociados con la administración de inmunoglobulina intravenosa (IgIV) ocurren incluso en 25% de todas las infusiones realizadas, las reacciones severas afectan a menos de 1% de los pacientes. Entre las reacciones adversas severas están la insuficiencia renal aguda, que sobreviene 1 a 10 días después del inicio de tratamiento con IgIV. En nuestro centro elaboramos e implementamos un esquema ambulatorio para la aplicación de IgIV que permite su administración en un promedio de 3 h, sin efectos adversos graves. Objetivos: describir los efectos adversos y evaluar la frecuencia de insuficiencia renal secundaria a la aplicación ambulatoria de IgIV en pacientes adultos con inmunodeficiencia común variable. Material y método: estudio descriptivo y prospectivo en el que participaron pacientes adultos con diagnóstico definitivo de inmunodeficiencia común variable, que recibían IgIV a dosis de sustitución cada tres semanas, a quienes se realizó exploración física, somatometría, determinación sérica de creatinina, albúmina y urea, depuración de creatinina en orina de 24 horas, cálculo de la tasa de filtración glomerular por la fórmula CKD-EPI y evaluación de la función renal inmediata, así como la asociada con la administración acumulada de IgIV a través del cálculo de la tasa de filtración glomerular. Los resultados se analizaron con estadística descriptiva para el reporte de los efectos en la función renal y la dosis acumulada de IgIV. Resultados: se determinó la frecuencia de reacciones adversas

  14. Lambda Vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czajkowski, Michael

    2014-06-01

    There is an explosion in the quantity and quality of IMINT data being captured in Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) today. While automated exploitation techniques involving computer vision are arriving, only a few architectures can manage both the storage and bandwidth of large volumes of IMINT data and also present results to analysts quickly. Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Laboratories (ATL) has been actively researching in the area of applying Big Data cloud computing techniques to computer vision applications. This paper presents the results of this work in adopting a Lambda Architecture to process and disseminate IMINT data using computer vision algorithms. The approach embodies an end-to-end solution by processing IMINT data from sensors to serving information products quickly to analysts, independent of the size of the data. The solution lies in dividing up the architecture into a speed layer for low-latent processing and a batch layer for higher quality answers at the expense of time, but in a robust and fault-tolerant way. This approach was evaluated using a large corpus of IMINT data collected by a C-130 Shadow Harvest sensor over Afghanistan from 2010 through 2012. The evaluation data corpus included full motion video from both narrow and wide area field-of-views. The evaluation was done on a scaled-out cloud infrastructure that is similar in composition to those found in the Intelligence Community. The paper shows experimental results to prove the scalability of the architecture and precision of its results using a computer vision algorithm designed to identify man-made objects in sparse data terrain.

  15. Rearrangement of immunoglobulin light chain genes in the chicken occurs prior to colonization of the embryonic bursa of Fabricius.

    PubMed Central

    Mansikka, A; Sandberg, M; Lassila, O; Toivanen, P

    1990-01-01

    We have applied polymerase-chain-reaction-directed immunoglobulin gene analysis to study the embryonic differentiation of chicken B cells. Immunoglobulin light chain DNA segments in the rearranged configuration were amplified from cells of the intraembryonic mesenchyme as early as day 7 of incubation. We showed by sequencing that the rearranged variable region genes in these early B-cell progenitors were not different from the germ-line V lambda 1 gene (the single functional light chain variable region gene in chickens). In the bursal B lymphocytes, on the other hand, clear gene conversion events were first observed at day 15 of embryonic development. The present data indicate that rearrangement of light chain genes in the chicken occurs independently of the bursa of Fabricius and that diversification of the variable region begins only later, when the surface immunoglobulin-positive B cells are proliferating in the bursal follicles. Images PMID:2123557

  16. Gene Expression Profiling in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of Patients with Common Variable Immunodeficiency: Modulation of Adaptive Immune Response following Intravenous Immunoglobulin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Alessandro; Tinazzi, Elisa; Rizzi, Monica; Beri, Ruggero; Argentino, Giuseppe; Ottria, Andrea; Lunardi, Claudio; Puccetti, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Background Regular intravenous immunoglobulin treatment is used to replace antibody deficiency in primary immunodeficiency diseases; however the therapeutic effect seems to be related not only to antibody replacement but also to an active role in the modulation of the immune response. Common variable immunodeficiency is the most frequent primary immunodeficiency seen in clinical practice. Methods We have studied the effect of intravenous immunoglobulin replacement in patients with common variable immunodeficiency by evaluating the gene-expression profiles from Affimetrix HG-U133A. Some of the gene array results were validated by real time RT-PCR and by the measurement of circulating cytokines and chemokines by ELISA. Moreover we performed FACS analysis of blood mononuclear cells from the patients enrolled in the study. Results A series of genes involved in innate and acquired immune responses were markedly up- or down-modulated before therapy. Such genes included CD14, CD36, LEPR, IRF-5, RGS-1, CD38, TNFRSF25, IL-4, CXCR4, CCR3, IL-8. Most of these modulated genes showed an expression similar to that of normal controls after immunoglobulin replacement. Real time RT-PCR of selected genes and serum levels of IL-4, CXCR4 before and after therapy changed accordingly to gene array results. Interestingly, serum levels of IL-8 remained unchanged, as the corresponding gene, before and after treatment. FACS analysis showed a marked decrease of CD8+T cells and an increase of CD4+T cells following treatment. Moreover we observed a marked increase of CD23−CD27−IgM−IgG− B cells (centrocytes). Conclusions Our results are in accordance with previous reports and provide further support to the hypothesis that the benefits of intravenous immunoglobulin therapy are not only related to antibody replacement but also to its ability to modulate the immune response in common variable immunodeficiency. PMID:24831519

  17. Expression and Functional Properties of an Anti-Triazophos High-Affinity Single-Chain Variable Fragment Antibody with Specific Lambda Light Chain

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Liang, Xiao; Xiang, Dandan; Guo, Yirong; Liu, Yihua; Zhu, Guonian

    2016-01-01

    Triazophos is a widely used organophosphorous insecticide that has potentially adverse effects to organisms. In the present study, a high-affinity single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody with specific lambda light chain was developed for residue monitoring. First, the specific variable regions were correctly amplified from a hybridoma cell line 8C10 that secreted monoclonal antibody (mAb) against triazophos. The regions were then assembled as scFv via splicing by overlap extension polymerase chain reaction. Subsequently, the recombinant anti-triazophos scFv-8C10 was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli strain HB2151 in soluble form, purified through immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography, and verified via Western blot and peptide mass fingerprinting analyses. Afterward, an indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was established based on the purified anti-triazophos scFv-8C10 antibody. The assay exhibited properties similar to those based on the parent mAb, with a high sensitivity (IC50 of 1.73 ng/mL) to triazophos and no cross reaction for other organophosphorus pesticides; it was reliable in detecting triazophos residues in spiked water samples. Moreover, kinetic measurement using a surface plasmon resonance biosensor indicated that the purified scFv-8C10 antibody had a high affinity of 1.8 × 10−10 M and exhibited good binding stability. Results indicated that the recombinant high-affinity scFv-8C10 antibody was an effective detection material that would be promising for monitoring triazophos residues in environment samples. PMID:27338340

  18. High rate of somatic point mutation in vitro in and near the variable-region segment of an immunoglobulin heavy chain gene.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, J; Jäck, H M; Ellis, N; Wabl, M

    1986-01-01

    The "silent" allele at the immunoglobulin heavy-chain locus in the pre-B-lymphocyte line 18-81 contains a correctly assembled gene. However, an amber termination codon within the variable-region gene segment prematurely terminates translation into complete heavy chain. Revertants that do produce heavy chain are generated at a high rate, which is termed hypermutation. By DNA sequencing of subclones, we have confirmed that whenever mu chain is produced by the usually silent allele, a true reversion is found in the DNA. Mutations are not confined to the position of the amber termination codon but are also found at other sites in and near the variable-region gene segment. Images PMID:3092221

  19. What does the free space Lambda Lambda interaction predict for Lambda Lambda hypernuclei?

    PubMed

    Albertus, C; Amaro, J E; Nieves, J

    2002-07-15

    Data on LambdaLambda hypernuclei provide a unique method to learn details about the strangeness S = -2 sector of the baryon-baryon interaction. From the free space Bonn-Jülich potentials, determined from data on baryon-baryon scattering in the S = 0,-1 channels, we construct an interaction in the S = -2 sector to describe the experimentally known LambdaLambda hypernuclei. After including short-range (Jastrow) and RPA correlations, we find masses for these LambdaLambda hypernuclei in a reasonable agreement with data, taking into account theoretical and experimental uncertainties. Thus, we provide a natural extension, at low energies, of the Bonn-Jülich one-boson exchange potentials to the S = -2 channel.

  20. Fish Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Mashoof, Sara; Criscitiello, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    The B cell receptor and secreted antibody are at the nexus of humoral adaptive immunity. In this review, we summarize what is known of the immunoglobulin genes of jawed cartilaginous and bony fishes. We focus on what has been learned from genomic or cDNA sequence data, but where appropriate draw upon protein, immunization, affinity and structural studies. Work from major aquatic model organisms and less studied comparative species are both included to define what is the rule for an immunoglobulin isotype or taxonomic group and what exemplifies an exception. PMID:27879632

  1. The influence of IgM-enriched immunoglobulin therapy on neonatal mortality and hematological variables in newborn infants with blood culture-proven sepsis.

    PubMed

    Abbasoğlu, Aslıhan; Ecevit, Ayşe; Tuğcu, Ali Ulaş; Yapakçı, Ece; Tekindal, Mustafa Agah; Tarcan, Aylin; Ecevit, Zafer

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of adjuvant immunoglobulin M (IgM)-enriched intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy on mortality rate, hematological variables and length of hospital stay in newborn infants with blood culture-proven sepsis. Demographic and clinical features and outcome measures of 63 newborn infants with blood culture-proven sepsis were documented retrospectively from the medical records. The patients were divided into two groups according to their treatment history. The patients in Group 1 received antibiotic therapy only and the patients in Group 2 received both antibiotic and adjuvant IgMenriched IVIG. The study revealed that mortality rates were 28.1% and 12.9% in Group 1 and Group 2, respectively. The mortality rate was lower in Group 2, but the difference between the two groups was not statistically significant (p=0.21). Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus was the most common type of bacteria isolated from the blood culture in both groups. When changing laboratory results were compared between the two groups, hemoglobin, leukocyte count and C-reactive protein levels were different during the first three days of antibiotic treatment. Our study revealed that if diagnosed at an early stage and treated aggressively with appropriate and effective antibiotics, adjuvant IgM-enriched IVIG treatment has no additional benefits in neonatal sepsis.

  2. A reappraisal of immunoglobulin variable gene primers and its impact on assessing clonal relationships between PB B cells and BM plasma cells in AL amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Nagaaki; Poshusta, Tanya L; Manske, Michelle K; Dispenzieri, Angela; Gertz, Morie A; Abraham, Roshini S; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina

    2011-12-01

    Monoclonal tumor plasma cells as well as non-terminally differentiated B cells having a clonal relationship to the tumor cells have been detected in the peripheral blood (PB) of some multiple myeloma (MM) patients but rarely in light chain (primary systemic) amyloidosis (AL) patients. Previously, our group found these peripheral clonotypic B cells in three AL patients. Here, we report detailed analysis of a larger cohort of AL patients to validate the prior findings and to investigate the effect of this cell population on clinical outcome. Fourteen AL patients were selected from a clinical prospective trial, and the relationship between immunoglobulin light chain variable gene (V(L)) representation in PB B cells and the clonal population in the bone marrow (BM) was investigated. A clonal relationship was not detected, and the present study provides important insights into the disparity with the earlier data, including clinical history of the patients and methodological analysis.

  3. Development of a highly-sensitive multi-plex assay using monoclonal antibodies for the simultaneous measurement of kappa and lambda immunoglobulin free light chains in serum and urine.

    PubMed

    Campbell, John P; Cobbold, Mark; Wang, Yanyun; Goodall, Margaret; Bonney, Sarah L; Chamba, Anita; Birtwistle, Jane; Plant, Timothy; Afzal, Zaheer; Jefferis, Roy; Drayson, Mark T

    2013-05-31

    Monoclonal κ and λ immunoglobulin free light chain (FLC) paraproteins in serum and urine are important markers in the diagnosis and monitoring of B cell dyscrasias. Current nephelometric and turbidimetric methods that use sheep polyclonal antisera to quantify serum FLC have a number of well-observed limitations. In this report, we describe an improved method using specific mouse anti-human FLC monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Anti-κ and anti-λ FLC mAbs were, separately, covalently coupled to polystyrene Xmap® beads and assayed, simultaneously, in a multi-plex format by Luminex® (mAb assay). The mAbs displayed no cross-reactivity to bound LC, the alternate LC type, or other human proteins and had improved sensitivity and specificity over immunofixation electrophoresis (IFE) and Freelite™. The assay gives good linearity and sensitivity (<1 mg/L), and the competitive inhibition format gave a broad calibration curve up to 437.5 mg/L and prevented anomalous results for samples in antigen excess i.e. high FLC levels. The mAbs displayed good concordance with Freelite™ for the quantitation of normal polyclonal FLC in plasma from healthy donors (n=249). The mAb assay identified all monoclonal FLC in serum from consecutive patient samples (n=1000; 50.1% with monoclonal paraprotein by serum IFE), and all FLC in a large cohort of urine samples tested for Bence Jones proteins (n=13090; 22.8% with monoclonal κ, 9.0% with monoclonal λ, and 0.8% with poly LC detected by urine IFE). Importantly this shows that the mAbs are at least close to the ideal of detecting FLC from all patients and neoplastic plasma cell clones. Given the overall effectiveness of the anti-FLC mAbs, further clinical validation is now warranted on serial samples from a range of patients with B cell disorders. Use of these mAbs on other assay platforms should also be investigated.

  4. The Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) immunoglobulin heavy chain suggests the importance of clan III variable segments in repertoire diversity.

    PubMed

    Breaux, Breanna; Deiss, Thaddeus C; Chen, Patricia L; Cruz-Schneider, Maria Paula; Sena, Leonardo; Hunter, Margaret E; Bonde, Robert K; Criscitiello, Michael F

    2017-01-25

    Manatees are a vulnerable, charismatic sentinel species from the evolutionarily divergent Afrotheria. Manatee health and resistance to infectious disease is of great concern to conservation groups, but little is known about their immune system. To develop manatee-specific tools for monitoring health, we first must have a general knowledge of how the immunoglobulin heavy (IgH) chain locus is organized and transcriptionally expressed. Using the genomic scaffolds of the Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris), we characterized the potential IgH segmental diversity and constant region isotypic diversity and performed the first Afrotherian repertoire analysis. The Florida manatee has low V(D)J combinatorial diversity (3744 potential combinations) and few constant region isotypes. They also lack clan III V segments, which may have caused reduced VH segment numbers. However, we found productive somatic hypermutation concentrated in the complementarity determining regions. In conclusion, manatees have limited IGHV clan and combinatorial diversity. This suggests that clan III V segments are essential for maintaining IgH locus diversity.

  5. Immunoglobulin patterns in humans over 95 years of age.

    PubMed Central

    Radl, J; Sepers, J M; Skvaril, F; Morell, A; Hijmans, W

    1975-01-01

    Immunoglobulin patterns were investigated in seventy-three volunteers older than 95 years. An idiopathic paraproteinaemia was found in 19% of the cases. A restriction of heterogeneity and an imbalance in the kappa/lambda ratio of the immunoglobulins was seen in a number of other sera. Determinations of immunoglobulin levels in sera of individuals without paraproteinaemia showed an increase in IgA and IgG. The quantitations of the IgG subclasses demonstrated that an increase in the IgG1 and IgG3 subclasses is responsible for the elevated level of the IgG. The variation in the immunoglobulin levels increased significantly with age of IgM and for the three major IgG subclasses. No abnormalities were found in the urine or in the mixed saliva. These results indicate that selective changes in the extent of the antibody-immunoglobulin repertoire characterize the immunoglobulin pattern of ageing man. PMID:1212818

  6. Immunoglobulin variable gene segment V{sub H}81X of the mouse is embedded in L1 transposon sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Bachl, J.; Defranoux, N.; Wabl, M.

    1995-01-11

    L1 elements are widely distributed over the mammalian genome, but the question of their biological significance is still open. The mouse heavy (H) chain variable region V{sub H}81X is overrepresented in the pre-B-cell repertoire; the significance of this is controversial, and V{sub H}81X has been the subject of much research. Here we present data showing that the mouse H chain variable region X{sub H}81X is embedded in the remnants of a LINE-1 element.

  7. Clonal immunoglobulin gene rearrangement in nodular lymphoid hyperplasia of the gastrointestinal tract associated with common variable immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Laszewski, M J; Kemp, J D; Goeken, J A; Mitros, F A; Platz, C E; Dick, F R

    1990-09-01

    The authors report a case of common variable immunodeficiency associated with nodular lymphoid hyperplasia of the gastrointestinal tract in which a clonal population of lymphoid cells was detected by immunophenotypic and genotypic studies on tissue obtained by colonoscopic biopsy. The patient has been followed up for more than 50 months without clinical, radiographic, or pathologic evidence of lymphoma. The significance of clonal rearrangement in the setting of immunodeficiency and the role of genotypic studies in defining lymphoid malignancy are discussed.

  8. [Cloning and expression of a single human immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable domain with vascular endothelial growth factor binding activity].

    PubMed

    Liu, Heng; Liu, Siguo; Wu, Yi; Zili, M; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Aimin; Chen, Jianquan; Cheng, Guoxiang

    2010-11-01

    In the application of therapeutic antibodies, large molecular weight of antibodies is always a problem that prevents them from penetrating into tissues or binding to antigenic determinants. To overcome this problem, we investigated the function of the heavy chain variable domain of a monoclonal anti-VEGF human IgM antibody derived from the Five-Feature Translocus Mice. We cloned the cDNA of the heavy chain variable domain, which was then inserted into pET28a vector and expressed in Escherichia coli. After purification and renaturation of the denatured recombinant protein, we obtained a 16 kDa antibody fragment, which is named as rhVVH. By immunoassaying its VEGF-binding capability in vitro, we proved that rhVVH retains this activity as the complete IgM. Importantly, rhVVH is shown to inhibit the HUVEC cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner. Our results indicate that the single heavy chain variable domain might inherit part of the biological function of the complete IgM antibody, which provided a valuable potential in further research on antibody miniaturisation.

  9. Liquid-Liquid Phase Separation in a Dual Variable Domain Immunoglobulin Protein Solution: Effect of Formulation Factors and Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Raut, Ashlesha S; Kalonia, Devendra S

    2015-09-08

    Dual variable domain immunoglobulin proteins (DVD-Ig proteins) are large molecules (MW ∼ 200 kDa) with increased asymmetry because of their extended Y-like shape, which results in increased formulation challenges. Liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) of protein solutions into protein-rich and protein-poor phases reduces solution stability at intermediate concentrations and lower temperatures, and is a serious concern in formulation development as therapeutic proteins are generally stored at refrigerated conditions. In the current work, LLPS was studied for a DVD-Ig protein molecule as a function of solution conditions by measuring solution opalescence. LLPS of the protein was confirmed by equilibrium studies and by visually observing under microscope. The protein does not undergo any structural change after phase separation. Protein-protein interactions were measured by light scattering (kD) and Tcloud (temperature that marks the onset of phase separation). There is a good agreement between kD measured in dilute solution with Tcloud measured in the critical concentration range. Results indicate that the increased complexity of the molecule (with respect to size, shape, and charge distribution on the molecule) increases contribution of specific and nonspecific interactions in solution, which are affected by formulation factors, resulting in LLPS for DVD-Ig protein.

  10. Rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) improves the PCR-based isolation of immunoglobulin variable region genes from murine and human lymphoma cells and cell lines.

    PubMed

    Doenecke, A; Winnacker, E L; Hallek, M

    1997-10-01

    The isolation of rearranged immunoglobulin (Ig) variable region (V) genes is usually performed by PCR with consensus primers binding to conserved regions within the V sequences. However, the isolation of Ig genes by this method is hampered in 15-35% by technical difficulties, mostly mismatches of oligonucleotide primers to V sequences. In order to obtain DNA sequences from V heavy chain (VH) genes which could not be amplified with consensus primers, we used a modified PCR technique, the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) PCR in combination with new heavy chain constant region primers for the isolation of human and murine VH genes. In comparison, consensus primer PCR with different sets of previously published oligonucleotide primers was used. Both methods were applied to isolate VH genes from murine B cell lymphoma (A20 and BCL1), myeloma (NS1) and hybridoma (SP6) cell lines and from freshly isolated human chronic lymphocytic leukemia and lymphoma cells. RACE PCR allowed the amplification and subsequent cloning of the complete VH gene in all cases. In contrast, consensus primer PCR failed to isolate the VH sequence of the murine A20 cell line; this was explained by a mismatch of consensus primers with VH sequences. When both PCR methods amplified VH sequences, the DNA sequences obtained were identical. Taken together, RACE PCR represents a reliable and versatile method for the isolation of VH genes from human and murine lymphoma cells, in particular if consensus primer PCR fails.

  11. Somatic mutation in constant regions of mouse lambda 1 light chains.

    PubMed Central

    Motoyama, N; Okada, H; Azuma, T

    1991-01-01

    To study the distribution of somatic mutation, we determined nucleotide sequences of rearranged lambda 1-chain genomic DNA from four hybridomas obtained from C57BL/6 mice that had been immunized with (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl)acetyl-conjugated chicken gamma globulin. In total, 114 nucleotide substitutions were observed, with neither insertion nor deletion. Sixty-one mutations occurred in the variable-joining region genes (V lambda 1-J lambda 1) and 49 in joining-constant (J lambda 1-C lambda 1) introns. Although frequency decreased with distance from the V lambda 1-J lambda 1 coding region, somatic mutations occurred in the entire J lambda 1-C lambda 1 intron and even in the C lambda 1 region. We found four nucleotide substitutions in C lambda 1 genes, all of which were replacement mutations. Therefore, the mechanism responsible for somatic mutation is operative into the C lambda 1 exons. Nucleotide sequences of rearranged but inactive lambda 2-chain genes from two hybridomas were also examined and compared with those of lambda 1-chain genes. The clustering of replacement mutations in complementarity-determining regions in the inactive lambda 2-chain genes similar to the active lambda 1-chain genes suggested a mechanism that induces somatic mutation preferentially in this region even in the absence of antigenic selection. PMID:1910169

  12. Atypical Antigen Recognition Mode of a Shark Immunoglobulin New Antigen Receptor (IgNAR) Variable Domain Characterized by Humanization and Structural Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kovalenko, Oleg V.; Olland, Andrea; Piché-Nicholas, Nicole; Godbole, Adarsh; King, Daniel; Svenson, Kristine; Calabro, Valerie; Müller, Mischa R.; Barelle, Caroline J.; Somers, William; Gill, Davinder S.; Mosyak, Lidia; Tchistiakova, Lioudmila

    2013-01-01

    The immunoglobulin new antigen receptors (IgNARs) are a class of Ig-like molecules of the shark immune system that exist as heavy chain-only homodimers and bind antigens by their single domain variable regions (V-NARs). Following shark immunization and/or in vitro selection, V-NARs can be generated as soluble, stable, and specific high affinity monomeric binding proteins of ∼12 kDa. We have previously isolated a V-NAR from an immunized spiny dogfish shark, named E06, that binds specifically and with high affinity to human, mouse, and rat serum albumins. Humanization of E06 was carried out by converting over 60% of non-complementarity-determining region residues to those of a human germ line Vκ1 sequence, DPK9. The resulting huE06 molecules have largely retained the specificity and affinity of antigen binding of the parental V-NAR. Crystal structures of the shark E06 and its humanized variant (huE06 v1.1) in complex with human serum albumin (HSA) were determined at 3- and 2.3-Å resolution, respectively. The huE06 v1.1 molecule retained all but one amino acid residues involved in the binding site for HSA. Structural analysis of these V-NARs has revealed an unusual variable domain-antigen interaction. E06 interacts with HSA in an atypical mode that utilizes extensive framework contacts in addition to complementarity-determining regions that has not been seen previously in V-NARs. On the basis of the structure, the roles of various elements of the molecule are described with respect to antigen binding and V-NAR stability. This information broadens the general understanding of antigen recognition and provides a framework for further design and humanization of shark IgNARs. PMID:23632026

  13. Atypical antigen recognition mode of a shark immunoglobulin new antigen receptor (IgNAR) variable domain characterized by humanization and structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, Oleg V; Olland, Andrea; Piché-Nicholas, Nicole; Godbole, Adarsh; King, Daniel; Svenson, Kristine; Calabro, Valerie; Müller, Mischa R; Barelle, Caroline J; Somers, William; Gill, Davinder S; Mosyak, Lidia; Tchistiakova, Lioudmila

    2013-06-14

    The immunoglobulin new antigen receptors (IgNARs) are a class of Ig-like molecules of the shark immune system that exist as heavy chain-only homodimers and bind antigens by their single domain variable regions (V-NARs). Following shark immunization and/or in vitro selection, V-NARs can be generated as soluble, stable, and specific high affinity monomeric binding proteins of ∼12 kDa. We have previously isolated a V-NAR from an immunized spiny dogfish shark, named E06, that binds specifically and with high affinity to human, mouse, and rat serum albumins. Humanization of E06 was carried out by converting over 60% of non-complementarity-determining region residues to those of a human germ line Vκ1 sequence, DPK9. The resulting huE06 molecules have largely retained the specificity and affinity of antigen binding of the parental V-NAR. Crystal structures of the shark E06 and its humanized variant (huE06 v1.1) in complex with human serum albumin (HSA) were determined at 3- and 2.3-Å resolution, respectively. The huE06 v1.1 molecule retained all but one amino acid residues involved in the binding site for HSA. Structural analysis of these V-NARs has revealed an unusual variable domain-antigen interaction. E06 interacts with HSA in an atypical mode that utilizes extensive framework contacts in addition to complementarity-determining regions that has not been seen previously in V-NARs. On the basis of the structure, the roles of various elements of the molecule are described with respect to antigen binding and V-NAR stability. This information broadens the general understanding of antigen recognition and provides a framework for further design and humanization of shark IgNARs.

  14. Restricted immunoglobulin variable region gene usage by normal Ly-1 (CD5+) B cells that recognize phosphatidyl choline

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    5-15% of lymphocytes in the peritoneums of normal adult B10.H-2aH- 4bp/Wts (2a4b) mice are CD5+ (Ly-1) B cells that recognize phosphatidyl choline (PtC), a phospholipid component of all mammalian cells. We produced a set of IgM-secreting hybridomas from the peritoneal cells of normal, adult 2a4b mice. We found that this set of hybridomas shows a similarly high frequency of antibodies specific for PtC (21 of 86) that also react with bromelain-treated mouse erythrocytes. Restriction fragment analysis of Ig gene rearrangements and analysis of expressed Ig idiotypes reveal that these cells use a restricted set of variable region genes to generate the PtC-specific antibodies. The Ig genes used by the PtC-specific hybridomas appear to be the same as those found in the PtC-specific Ly-1 B cell lymphomas, CH27 and CH34. PMID:2499651

  15. Measurement of the Lambda b lifetime in the exclusive decay Lambda b --> J/psi Lambda.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Jesus, A C S Assis; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kothari, B; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lellouch, J; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'dell, V; O'neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Panikashvili, N; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schliephake, T; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; van Eijk, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, C; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2007-10-05

    We have measured the Lambda b lifetime using the exclusive decay Lambda b --> J/psi Lambda, based on 1.2 fb(-1) of data collected with the D0 detector during 2002-2006. From 171 reconstructed Lambda b decays, where the J/psi and Lambda are identified via the decays J/psi --> mu+ mu- and Lambda --> ppi, we measured the Lambda b lifetime to be tau(Lambda b)=1.218 (+0.130)/(-0.115) (stat) +/- 0.042(syst) ps. We also measured the B0 lifetime in the decay B0 --> J/psi(mu+ mu-)K(0)/(S)(pi+ pi-) to be tau(B0)=1.501 (+0.078)/(-0.074) (stat) +/- 0.050(syst) ps, yielding a lifetime ratio of tau(Lambda b)/tau(B0)=0.811 (+0.096)/(-0.087) (stat) +/- 0.034(syst).

  16. FLARE-LIKE VARIABILITY OF THE Mg II {lambda}2800 EMISSION LINE IN THE {gamma}-RAY BLAZAR 3C 454.3

    SciTech Connect

    Leon-Tavares, J.; Chavushyan, V.; Patino-Alvarez, V.; Carraminana, A.; Carrasco, L.; Valtaoja, E.; Arshakian, T. G.; Popovic, L. C.; Tornikoski, M.; Laehteenmaeki, A.; Lobanov, A.

    2013-02-01

    We report the detection of a statistically significant flare-like event in the Mg II {lambda}2800 emission line of 3C 454.3 during the outburst of autumn 2010. The highest levels of emission line flux recorded over the monitoring period (2008-2011) coincide with a superluminal jet component traversing through the radio core. This finding crucially links the broad emission line fluctuations to the non-thermal continuum emission produced by relativistically moving material in the jet and hence to the presence of broad-line region clouds surrounding the radio core. If the radio core were located at several parsecs from the central black hole, then our results would suggest the presence of broad-line region material outside the inner parsec where the canonical broad-line region is envisaged to be located. We briefly discuss the implications of broad emission line material ionized by non-thermal continuum in the context of virial black hole mass estimates and gamma-ray production mechanisms.

  17. Life of Lambda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Futhey, Tracy

    2005-01-01

    In this column, the author discusses the four key questions related to the National LambdaRail (NLR) networking technology. NLR uses Dense Wave Division Multiplexing (DWDM) to enable multiple networks to coexist on a national fiber footprint, and is owned and operated not by carriers, but by the research and education community. The NLR Board…

  18. Conformational flexibility of a human immunoglobulin light chain variable domain by relaxation dispersion nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: implications for protein misfolding and amyloid assembly.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sujoy; Pondaven, Simon P; Jaroniec, Christopher P

    2011-07-05

    The conformational flexibility of a human immunoglobulin κIV light-chain variable domain, LEN, which can undergo conversion to amyloid under destabilizing conditions, was investigated at physiological and acidic pH on a residue-specific basis by multidimensional solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. Measurements of backbone chemical shifts and amide (15)N longitudinal and transverse spin relaxation rates and steady-state nuclear Overhauser enhancements indicate that, on the whole, LEN retains its native three-dimensional fold and dimeric state at pH 2 and that the protein backbone exhibits limited fast motions on the picosecond to nanosecond time scale. On the other hand, (15)N Carr--Purcell--Meiboom--Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion NMR data show that LEN experiences considerable slower, millisecond time scale dynamics, confined primarily to three contiguous segments of about 5-20 residues and encompassing the N-terminal β-strand and complementarity determining loop regions 2 and 3 in the vicinity of the dimer interface. Quantitative analysis of the CPMG relaxation dispersion data reveals that at physiological pH these slow backbone motions are associated with relatively low excited-state protein conformer populations, in the ~2-4% range. Upon acidification, the minor conformer populations increase significantly, to ~10-15%, with most residues involved in stabilizing interactions across the dimer interface displaying increased flexibility. These findings provide molecular-level insights about partial protein unfolding at low pH and point to the LEN dimer dissociation, initiated by increased conformational flexibility in several well-defined regions, as being one of the important early events leading to amyloid assembly.

  19. Recombination events near the immunoglobulin Cmu gene join variable and constant region genes, switch heavy-chain expression, or inactivate the locus.

    PubMed

    Cory, S; Webb, E; Gough, J; Adams, J M

    1981-04-28

    Immunoglobulin heavy-chain expression is initiated by recombination between a variable region (VH) gene and one of several joining region (JH) genes located near the mu constant region (Cmu) gene, and the active VH gene can subsequently switch to another CH gene. That the general mechanism for CH switching involves recombination between sites within the JH-Cmu intervening sequence and the 5' flanking region of another CH gene is supported here by Southern blot hybridization analysis of eight IgG- and IgA-secreting plasmacytomas. An alternative model requiring successive VH linkage to similar JH clusters near each CH gene is shown to be very unlikely since the mouse genome appears to contain only one complement of the JH locus and no JH gene was detectable within large cloned sequences flanking germline C gamma 3 and C gamma 1 genes. Thus, VH-JH joining and CH switching are mediated by separate regions of "the joining-switch" or J-S element. In each plasmacytoma examined, the J-S element had undergone recombination within both the JH locus and the switch region and was shown to be linked to the functional CH gene in an IgG3, and IgG1, and three IgA secretors. Both JH joining and CH switching occurred by deletion of DNA. Switch recombination occurred at more than one site within the J-S element in different lines, even for recombination with the same CH gene. Significantly, although heavy-chain expression is restricted to one allele ("allelic exclusion"), all rearranged in each plasmacytoma. Some rearrangements were aberrant, involving, for example, deletion of all JH genes from the allele. Hence, an error-prone recombination machinery may account for allelic exclusion in many plasmacytomas.

  20. B-lymphoma cells process and present their endogenous immunoglobulin to major histocompatibility complex-restricted T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, S; Bogen, B

    1989-01-01

    Antigen-presenting B-lymphoma cells were transfected with the gene encoding the immunoglobulin lambda 2 light chain of MOPC315 cells (lambda 2(315). The lambda 2 chain is expressed on the cell surface of the transfectants together with the endogenous heavy chain. The transfectants present an idiotope of the lambda 2(315) light chain to class II-restricted T-cell clones. Recognition by the T cells requires processing of the lambda 2(315) light chain. From these data we conclude that B-lymphoma cells constitutively process and present their immunoglobulins. Secretion and reuptake of the light chain was not necessary for the presentation. Thus, B cells bear two types of idiotypes on their membrane, a native form as surface immunoglobulin and a processed form in the context of products of the major histocompatibility complex. Images PMID:2492101

  1. The normal counterpart of IgD myeloma cells in germinal center displays extensively mutated IgVH gene, Cmu-Cdelta switch, and lambda light chain expression.

    PubMed

    Arpin, C; de Bouteiller, O; Razanajaona, D; Fugier-Vivier, I; Brière, F; Banchereau, J; Lebecque, S; Liu, Y J

    1998-04-20

    Human myeloma are incurable hematologic cancers of immunoglobulin-secreting plasma cells in bone marrow. Although malignant plasma cells can be almost eradicated from the patient's bone marrow by chemotherapy, drug-resistant myeloma precursor cells persist in an apparently cryptic compartment. Controversy exists as to whether myeloma precursor cells are hematopoietic stem cells, pre-B cells, germinal center (GC) B cells, circulating memory cells, or plasma blasts. This situation reflects what has been a general problem in cancer research for years: how to compare a tumor with its normal counterpart. Although several studies have demonstrated somatically mutated immunoglobulin variable region genes in multiple myeloma, it is unclear if myeloma cells are derived from GCs or post-GC memory B cells. Immunoglobulin (Ig)D-secreting myeloma have two unique immunoglobulin features, including a biased lambda light chain expression and a Cmu-Cdelta isotype switch. Using surface markers, we have previously isolated a population of surface IgM-IgD+CD38+ GC B cells that carry the most impressive somatic mutation in their IgV genes. Here we show that this population of GC B cells displays the two molecular features of IgD-secreting myeloma cells: a biased lambda light chain expression and a C&mu-Cdelta isotype switch. The demonstration of these peculiar GC B cells to differentiate into IgD-secreting plasma cells but not memory B cells both in vivo and in vitro suggests that IgD-secreting plasma and myeloma cells are derived from GCs.

  2. Shared epitopes of avian immunoglobulin light chains.

    PubMed

    Benčina, Mateja; Cizelj, Ivanka; Berčič, Rebeka Lucijana; Narat, Mojca; Benčina, Dušan; Dovč, Peter

    2014-04-15

    Like all jawed vertebrates, birds (Aves) also produce antibodies i.e. immunoglobulins (Igs) as a defence mechanism against pathogens. Their Igs are composed of two identical heavy (H) and light (L) chains which are of lambda isotype. The L chain consists of variable (VL), joining (JL) and constant (CL) region. Using enzyme immunoassays (EIA) and two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) (3C10 and CH31) to chicken L chain, we analysed their cross-reactivity with sera from 33 avian species belonging to nine different orders. Among Galliformes tested, mAbs 3C10 and CH31 reacted with L chains of chicken, turkey, four genera of pheasants, tragopan and peafowl, but not with sera of grey partridge, quail and Japanese quail. Immunoglobulins of guinea-fowl reacted only with mAb 3C10. Both mAbs reacted also with the L chain of Eurasian griffon (order Falconiformes) and domestic sparrow (order Passeriformes). Sera from six other orders of Aves did not react with either of the two mAbs. EIA using mAbs 3C10 and CH31 enabled detection of antibodies to major avian pathogens in sera of chickens, turkeys, pheasants, peafowl, Eurasian griffon and guinea-fowl (only with mAb 3C10). The N-terminal amino acid sequence of pheasant L chain (19 residues) was identical to that of chicken. Sequences of genes encoding the L chain constant regions of pheasants, turkey and partridge were determined and deposited in the public database (GenBank accession numbers: FJ 649651, FJ 649652 and FJ 649653, respectively). Among them, amino acid sequence of pheasants is the most similar to that of chicken (97% similarity), whereas those of turkey and partridge have greater similarity to each other (89%) than to any other avian L chain sequence. The characteristic deletion of two amino acids which is present in the L chain constant region in Galliformes has been most likely introduced to their L chain after their divergence from Anseriformes.

  3. Bone marrow lambda-type light chain crystalline structures associated with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Schvartz, H; Bonhomme, P; Caulet, S; Beorchia, A; Patey, M; Caulet, T

    1985-01-01

    A 58-year-old man showed bone marrow crystalline structures associated with a lambda light chain producing multiple myeloma. Analysis and processing of electron images clearly displayed the periodic structure of the crystals. Immunochemistry suggested that they contained the whole or a fragmented constant portion of immunoglobulin.

  4. Tertiary structure of human {Lambda}6 light chains.

    SciTech Connect

    Pokkuluri, P. R.; Solomon, A.; Weiss, D. T.; Stevens, F. J.; Schiffer, M.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology; Univ. of Tennessee Medical Center /Graduate School of Medicine

    1999-01-01

    AL amyloidosis is a disease process characterized by the pathologic deposition of monoclonal light chains in tissue. To date, only limited information has been obtained on the molecular features that render such light chains amyloidogenic. Although protein products of the major human V kappa and V lambda gene families have been identified in AL deposits, one particular subgroup--lambda 6--has been found to be preferentially associated with this disease. Notably, the variable region of lambda 6 proteins (V lambda 6) has distinctive primary structural features including the presence in the third framework region (FR3) of two additional amino acid residues that distinguish members of this subgroup from other types of light chains. However, the structural consequences of these alterations have not been elucidated. To determine if lambda 6 proteins possess unique tertiary structural features, as compared to light chains of other V lambda subgroups, we have obtained x-ray diffraction data on crystals prepared from two recombinant V lambda 6 molecules. These components, isolated from a bacterial expression system, were generated from lambda 6-related cDNAs cloned from bone marrow-derived plasma cells from a patient (Wil) who had documented AL amyloidosis and another (Jto) with multiple myeloma and tubular cast nephropathy, but no evident fibrillar deposits. The x-ray crystallographic analyses revealed that the two-residue insertion located between positions 68 and 69 (not between 66 and 67 as previously surmised) extended an existing loop region that effectively increased the surface area adjacent to the first complementarity determining region (CDR1). Further, an unusual interaction between the Arg 25 and Phe 2 residues commonly found in lambda 6 molecules was noted. However, the structures of V lambda 6 Wil and Jto also differed from each other, as evidenced by the presence in the latter of certain ionic and hydrophobic interactions that we posit increased protein

  5. Phenotyping polyclonal kappa and lambda light chain molecular mass distributions in patient serum using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Barnidge, David R; Dasari, Surendra; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina; Fontan, Adrian; Willrich, Maria A V; Tschumper, Renee C; Jelinek, Diane F; Snyder, Melissa R; Dispenzieri, Angela; Katzmann, Jerry A; Murray, David L

    2014-11-07

    We previously described a microLC-ESI-Q-TOF MS method for identifying monoclonal immunoglobulins in serum and then tracking them over time using their accurate molecular mass. Here we demonstrate how the same methodology can be used to identify and characterize polyclonal immunoglobulins in serum. We establish that two molecular mass distributions observed by microLC-ESI-Q-TOF MS are from polyclonal kappa and lambda light chains using a combination of theoretical molecular masses from gene sequence data and the analysis of commercially available purified polyclonal IgG kappa and IgG lambda from normal human serum. A linear regression comparison of kappa/lambda ratios for 74 serum samples (25 hypergammaglobulinemia, 24 hypogammaglobulinemia, 25 normal) determined by microflowLC-ESI-Q-TOF MS and immunonephelometry had a slope of 1.37 and a correlation coefficient of 0.639. In addition to providing kappa/lambda ratios, the same microLC-ESI-Q-TOF MS analysis can determine the molecular mass for oligoclonal light chains observed above the polyclonal background in patient samples. In 2 patients with immune disorders and hypergammaglobulinemia, we observed a skewed polyclonal molecular mass distribution which translated into biased kappa/lambda ratios. Mass spectrometry provides a rapid and simple way to combine the polyclonal kappa/lambda light chain abundance ratios with the identification of dominant monoclonal as well as oligoclonal light chain immunoglobulins. We anticipate that this approach to evaluating immunoglobulin light chains will lead to improved understanding of immune deficiencies, autoimmune diseases, and antibody responses.

  6. Characterization of antibodies directed against the immunoglobulin light kappa chain variable chain region (VK) of hepatitis C virus-related type-II mixed cryoglobulinemia and B-cell proliferations.

    PubMed

    de Re, Valli; Simula, Maria Paola; Pavan, Alessandro; Garziera, Marica; Marin, Dolores; Dolcetti, Riccardo; de Vita, Salvatore; Sansonno, Domenico; Geremia, Silvano; Toffoli, Giuseppe

    2009-09-01

    Autoimmune type-II cryoglobulinemia (II-MC) is sustained by hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and B-cell (oligo)clones. This is the reason why the disease may be considered an "indolent B-cell lymphoma (NHL)." B clones show a restricted use of immunoglobulin variable genes (BCR), in particular in the use of the variable kappa (VK)3-20/15 light chain, and show a homology between their BCR functional regions and those of autoimmune rheumatoid factors. We underlined the BCR unique repertoire with frequent rheumatoid factor activity also observed in other autoimmune disorders associated with NHL. The immunoglobulin idiotype is a clonal B-cell marker and an ideal target for immunotherapy. Five monoclonal antibodies were produced in our laboratory toward the VK3-20 of a subject with HCV infection and a II-MC-associated NHL. Epitope determination was performed using the epitope excision approach. Monoclonal antibody reactivity was tested in vitro in ELISA, Western blot, and cytofluorimetry. Data confirmed that a panel of antibodies, reactive against shared idiotypes, can be produced from patients with HCV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative diseases, thus obviating the need to produce an anti-idiotype antibody for each patient.

  7. Quantitative immunoglobulins in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Crisp, Howard C; Quinn, James M

    2009-01-01

    Although age-related changes in serum immunoglobulins are well described in childhood, alterations in immunoglobulins in the elderly are less well described and published. This study was designed to better define expected immunoglobulin ranges and differences in adults of differing decades of life. Sera from 404 patients, aged 20-89 years old were analyzed for quantitative immunoglobulin G (IgG), immunoglobulin M (IgM), and immunoglobulin A (IgA). The patients with diagnoses or medications known to affect immunoglobulin levels were identified while blinded to their immunoglobulin levels. A two-factor ANOVA was performed using decade of life and gender on both the entire sample population as well as the subset without any disease or medication expected to alter immunoglobulin levels. A literature review was also performed on all English language articles evaluating quantitative immunoglobulin levels in adults >60 years old. For the entire population, IgM was found to be higher in women when compared with men (p < 0.001) and lower in the oldest sample population compared with the youngest population (p < 0.001). For the population without diseases known to affect immunoglobulin levels, the differences in IgM with gender and age were maintained (p < or = 0.001) and IgA levels were generally higher in the older population when compared with the younger population (p = 0.009). Elderly patients without disease known to affect immunoglobulin levels have higher serum IgA levels and lower serum IgM levels. Women have higher IgM levels than men throughout life. IgG levels are not significantly altered in an older population.

  8. Immunoglobulin E in histoplasmosis.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, R A; Arnold, D R

    1980-01-01

    Immunoglobulin M, G, A, and E serum levels were quantitated in 20 patients with active histoplasmosis (group I), 24 healthy subjects who were skin test positive to histoplasmin (group II), and 47 healthy persons who were skin test negative to histoplasmin (group III). The results established that patients with this disease have increased immunoglobulin G (P less than 0.05), immunoglobulin A (P less than 0.001), and immunoglobulin E (P less than 0.01) serum levels when compared with the 71 healthy subjects in groups II and III. PMID:7399706

  9. {Lambda} single-particle energies

    SciTech Connect

    Bodmer, A.R.; Usmani, Q.N.; Sami, M.

    1995-08-01

    We are continuing our work on the {Lambda} hyperon single-particle (s.p.) energies and their interpretation in terms of the basic {Lambda}-nuclear interactions. In particular we are interpreting the results obtained by S.C. Pieper, A. Usmani and Q.N. Usmani. We obtain about 30 MeV for the repulsive contribution of the three-body {Lambda}NN forces in nuclear matter. We are able to exclude purely {open_quotes}dispersive{close_quotes} {Lambda}NN forces. We are investigating the mix of dispersive and two-pion-exchange {Lambda}NN forces which provide a fit to the s.p. data. For interactions, which provide a fit to the s.p. data, the {Lambda} binding energy as a function of the nuclear matter density shows characteristic saturation features with a maximum at a density not very different from that of normal nuclear matter. We obtain a more precise measure of the space-exchange part of the {Lambda}-nuclear force than was previously available, corresponding to an exchange parameter {approx_equal} 0.32. The space-exchange force is rather directly related to the effective mass of a {Lambda} in the nuclear medium and turns out to be about 70% of its free mass. As a result, we also obtain a much better value for the p-state {Lambda}-nucleus potential which is about 40% of the s-state potential. The A binding to nuclear matter is determined to be {approx_equal} 28 MeV.

  10. Thermodynamic stability contributes to immunoglobulin specificity.

    PubMed

    Dimitrov, Jordan D; Kaveri, Srinivas V; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien

    2014-05-01

    Antigen-binding specificity of immunoglobulins is important for their function in immune defense. However, immune repertoires contain a considerable fraction of immunoglobulins with promiscuous binding behavior, the physicochemical basis of which is not well understood. Evolution of immunoglobulin specificity occurs through iterative processes of mutation and selection, referred to as affinity maturation. Recent studies reveal that some somatic mutations could compromise the thermodynamic stability of the variable regions of immunoglobulins. By integrating this observation with the wealth of data on the evolution of novel enzyme activities, we propose that antibody specificity is linked to the thermodynamic stability of the antigen-binding regions, which provides a quantitative distinction between highly specific and promiscuous antibodies.

  11. Immunoglobulin treatment in primary antibody deficiency.

    PubMed

    Maarschalk-Ellerbroek, L J; Hoepelman, I M; Ellerbroek, P M

    2011-05-01

    The primary antibody deficiency syndromes are characterised by recurrent respiratory tract infections and the inability to produce effective immunoglobulin (Ig) responses. The best-known primary antibody deficiencies are common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA), immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclass deficiency, and selective antibody deficiency with normal immunoglobulins (SADNI). Therapy in these patients consists of prophylactic antibiotics and/or Ig replacement therapy. Diagnostic delay remains common owing to limited awareness of the presenting features and may result in increased morbidity and mortality. Replacement therapy with immunoglobulins increases life expectancy and reduces the frequency and severity of infections, but the effect on end-organ damage is still unknown. Both intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) and subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIg) treatment appear to be safe, with comparable efficacy. A starting dose of 300-400 mg/kg/month in IVIg and 100 mg/week for SCIg is recommended. IgG trough levels should be >5 g/L for patients with agammaglobulinaemia and 3 g/L greater than the initial IgG level for patients with CVID; however, the clinical response should be foremost in choosing the dose and trough level. Infusion-related adverse reactions are generally mild owing to improved manufacturing processes. In this paper, aspects of Ig replacement therapy in primary antibody-deficient patients will be addressed.

  12. Human lambda light-chain constant region gene CMor lambda: the primary structure of lambda VI Bence Jones protein Mor.

    PubMed Central

    Frangione, B; Moloshok, T; Prelli, F; Solomon, A

    1985-01-01

    Serologic, structural, and genetic analyses have shown that the constant (C) region of human kappa light chains is encoded by a single gene, whereas that of lambda chains is encoded by multiple genes. We have determined the complete C region amino acid sequence of two monoclonal lambda VI light chains, Bence Jones proteins Sut and Mor. The C region of lambda chains Sut and Mor consists of 105 residues, as is characteristic for human lambda light chains, of which 102 are identical in sequence. Protein Sut has the C region sequence associated with the C lambda isotype Mcg-, Kern-, Oz+ and represents a product of the C lambda 3 (Kern-, Oz+) gene. Protein Mor has a C region sequence associated with Mcg-, Kern-, and Oz- proteins but differs from protein Sut by the presence of three amino acid interchanges at positions 168, 176, and 194. These substitutions distinguish protein Mor from lambda chains encoded by the C lambda 1 (Mcg+), C lambda 2 (Kern-, Oz-), and C lambda 3 (Kern-, Oz+) genes and provide further evidence for polymorphism of the human C lambda genome. The gene encoding the C region sequence of lambda chain Mor is designated CMor lambda. PMID:3923477

  13. Immunohistochemical study of expression of immunoglobulins in canine B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Sokołowska, J; Micuń, J; Zabielska, K; Malicka, E; Lechowski, R

    2010-01-01

    Nineteen canine lymphomas were included in this study. Tumors were classified according to the updated Kiel classification adapted for canine lymphomas by Fournel-Fleury et al. Immunoglobulin light chains (kappa and lambda) and IgM and IgG expression were determined by immunohistochemical method. In all examined cases neoplastic cells were positive for one of the immunoglobulin light chains. Expression of lambda light chains and kappa light chains was observed in 18/19 and 1/19 tumors, respectively. In the majority of neoplastic cells in each examined specimen this reaction had a membranous pattern (skappa/slambda). In all examined cases the presence of immunoglobulin light chains was also observed in the cytoplasm of some neoplastic cells (ckappa/clambda). These cells were usally rare and never constituted a dominant population. The expression of immunoglobulin was found in 13/19 cases. Most lymphomas were sIgM positive (11/13 cases). In one case expression of IgG was found, and in another lymphoma two populations of neoplastic cells with different expression of examined immunoglobulins (cells with IgM+ and IgG+ phenotypes) were observed. The reaction also had a membranous pattern. The cells containing cytoplasmic immunoglobulins were rare, and in most cases were of the same type as the surface immunoglobulins. Our study has confirmed that canine lymphomas are a monoclonal proliferation of B-cells usually expressing immunoglobulin lambda light chains and that the vast majority of tumors deriving from B-cells express IgM. Our study also indicates a possibility of occurence of biclonal lymphomas in canine species.

  14. 6th International Immunoglobulin Symposium: poster presentations.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Cruz, E; Kaveri, S V; Peter, H-H; Durandy, A; Cantoni, N; Quinti, I; Sorensen, R; Bussel, J B; Danieli, M G; Winkelmann, A; Bayry, J; Käsermann, F; Späth, P; Helbert, M; Salama, A; van Schaik, I N; Yuki, N

    2009-12-01

    The posters presented at the 6th International Immunoglobulin Symposium covered a wide range of fields and included both basic science and clinical research. From the abstracts accepted for poster presentation, 12 abstracts were selected for oral presentations in three parallel sessions on immunodeficiencies, autoimmunity and basic research. The immunodeficiency presentations dealt with novel, rare class-switch recombination (CSR) deficiencies, attenuation of adverse events following IVIg treatment, association of immunoglobulin (Ig)G trough levels and protection against acute infection in patients with X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA) and common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), and the reduction of class-switched memory B cells in patients with specific antibody deficiency (SAD). The impact of intravenous immunoglobulin on fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, pregnancy and postpartum-related relapses in multiple sclerosis and refractory myositis, as well as experiences with subcutaneous immunoglobulin in patients with multi-focal motor neuropathy, were the topics presented in the autoimmunity session. The interaction of dendritic cell (DC)-SIGN and alpha2,6-sialylated IgG Fc and its impact on human DCs, the enrichment of sialylated IgG in plasma-derived IgG, as wells as prion surveillance and monitoring of anti-measles titres in immunoglobulin products, were covered in the basic science session. In summary, the presentations illustrated the breadth of immunoglobulin therapy usage and highlighted the progress that is being made in diverse areas of basic and clinical research, extending our understanding of the mechanisms of immunoglobulin action and contributing to improved patient care.

  15. Isolation and characterization of lambda pleu bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Davis, M G; Calvo, J M

    1977-02-01

    In the Escherichia coli lysogen HfrH73 described by Shimada et al. (1973), none of the enzymes coded for by the leucine operon is synthesized due to an insertion of phage lambda into cistron leuA. The orientation of lambda in the chromosome is ara leuDCB lambda JAN leuA. After heat induction of the lysogen, plaque-forming transducing phages of two types are formed at low frequency. One type (e.g., lambda pleu9) transduces leuD, leuC, and leuB strains to prototrophy. The other type (e.g., lambda pleu 13) transduces leuA strains to prototrophy. lambda pleu 13 forms lysogens at low frequency (about 0.2%) by integration into the leucine operon. These lysogens are unstable, segregating phage-sensitive clones at high frequency (about 1%). Phages carrying different portions of the leucine operon were formed by aberrant excision after heat induction of strain CV437 (leuA371 lambda pleu13). A phage carrying the entire leucine operon (lambda K2) was constructed by a cross between lambda pleu9 and lambda pleu13. An analysis of leucine-forming enzyme levels in strains lysogenized with lambdaK2 indicated that leuO and leuP are present and functional in lambda K2. leu-specific messenger ribonucleic acid from E. coli hybridizes to the heavy (r) strand of lambdaK2. The leucine operon of lambda G4 pleuABCD (an S7 derivative of lambda K2) exists intact on a 7.3 x 10(6)-dalton fragment (lambdaG4EcoRI-B) generated by cleavage with endonuclease EcoRI. Heteroduplexes formed between lambda G4 and lambda show a 5.4 x 10(6)-dalton piece of bacterial deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) replacing a 4.5 x 10(6)-dalton piece of lambda DNA starting at 0.46 fractional unit on the map of lambda. Fragment lambda G4EcoRI-B has about 0.6 x 10(6) daltons of lambda DNA from the b2 region at one end and about 1.4 x 10(6) daltons of lambda DNA from the int region at the other end.

  16. Identification of human antibody fragment clones specific for tetanus toxoid in a bacteriophage. lambda. immunoexpression library

    SciTech Connect

    Mullinax, R.L.; Gross, E.A.; Amberg, J.R.; Hogrefe, H.H.; Kubitz, M.M.; Greener, A.; Alting-Mees, M.; Ardourel, D.; Short, J.M.; Sorge, J.A. ); Hay, B.N.; Shopes, B. )

    1990-10-01

    The authors have applied a molecular biology approach to the identification of human monoclonal antibodies. Human peripheral blood lymphocyte mRNA was converted to cDNA and a select subset was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction. These products, containing coding sequences for numerous immunoglobulin heavy- and {kappa} light-chain variable and constant region domains, were inserted into modified bacteriophase {lambda} expression vectors and introduced into Escherichia coli by infection to yield a combinatorial immunoexpression library. Clones with binding activity to tetanus toxoid were identified by filter hybridization with radiolabeled antigen and appeared at a frequency of 0.2{percent} in the library. These human antigen binding fragments, consisting of a heavy-chain fragment covalently linked to a light chain, displayed high affinity of binding to tetanus toxoid with equilibrium constants in the nanomolar range but did not cross-react with other proteins tested. They estimate that this human immunoexpression library contains 20,000 clones with high affinity and specificity to our chosen antigen.

  17. Immunoglobulin in intestinal secretions.

    PubMed

    Cutropia de Guirao, C

    1977-12-01

    The objective of the present investigation is the study and interpretation of the role played by the immunoglobulins, especially IgA, during acute diarrhea in children. IgA, IGG and IgM values in serum and IgA in intestinal secretions were studied in a group of children (between 3 months and 5 years of age) during diarrhea, convalescence and in normals. The method of simple radial immunodiffusion according to Mancini was employed. IgA is the immunoglobulin which suffers the greastest alteration in acute diarrhea. The precipitation halos (the average values), were lower during the diarrhea than in convalescence and in normals.

  18. {lambda}NN Three-Body Force due to Coherent {lambda}-{sigma} Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Akaishi, Yoshinori; Myint, Khin Swe

    2008-04-29

    The overbinding problem of {sub {lambda}}{sup 5}He is solved by introducing a concept of coherent {lambda}-{sigma} coupling which is equivalent to a {lambda}NN three-body force. This three-body force is coherently enhanced in the 0{sup +} states of {sub {lambda}}{sup 4}H and {sub {lambda}}{sup 4}He. The 0{sup +}-1{sup +} splitting in these hypernuclei is mainly due to coherent {lambda}-{sigma} coupling and partly due to the {lambda}N spin-spin interaction. A {lambda}NN three-body potential is derived from the coupled-channel treatment. The origin of the repulsive and attractive nature of the three-body force is discussed. Coherent {lambda}-{sigma} coupling becomes more important in neutron-rich hypernuclei and especially in neutron-star matter at high densities. The possible existence of ''hyperheavy hydrogen'', {sub {lambda}}{sup 6}H, is suggested.

  19. Generation and characterization of ABT-981, a dual variable domain immunoglobulin (DVD-Ig(TM)) molecule that specifically and potently neutralizes both IL-1α and IL-1β.

    PubMed

    Lacy, Susan E; Wu, Chengbin; Ambrosi, Dominic J; Hsieh, Chung-Ming; Bose, Sahana; Miller, Renee; Conlon, Donna M; Tarcsa, Edit; Chari, Ravi; Ghayur, Tariq; Kamath, Rajesh V

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) cytokines such as IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-1Ra contribute to immune regulation and inflammatory processes by exerting a wide range of cellular responses, including expression of cytokines and chemokines, matrix metalloproteinases, and nitric oxide synthetase. IL-1α and IL-1β bind to IL-1R1 complexed to the IL-1 receptor accessory protein and induce similar physiological effects. Preclinical and clinical studies provide significant evidence for the role of IL-1 in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA), including cartilage degradation, bone sclerosis, and synovial proliferation. Here, we describe the generation and characterization of ABT-981, a dual variable domain immunoglobulin (DVD-Ig) of the IgG1/k subtype that specifically and potently neutralizes IL-1α and IL-1β. In ABT-981, the IL-1β variable domain resides in the outer domain of the DVD-Ig, whereas the IL-1α variable domain is located in the inner position. ABT-981 specifically binds to IL-1α and IL-1β, and is physically capable of binding 2 human IL-1α and 2 human IL-1β molecules simultaneously. Single-dose intravenous and subcutaneous pharmacokinetics studies indicate that ABT-981 has a half-life of 8.0 to 10.4 d in cynomolgus monkey and 10.0 to 20.3 d in rodents. ABT-981 exhibits suitable drug-like-properties including affinity, potency, specificity, half-life, and stability for evaluation in human clinical trials. ABT-981 offers an exciting new approach for the treatment of OA, potentially addressing both disease modification and symptom relief as a disease-modifying OA drug.

  20. Photoproduction of the Lambda*(1520) Hyperon

    SciTech Connect

    Z. W. Zhao, H. Y. Lu, L. Graham, K. Park, R. W. Gothe

    2010-08-01

    The photoproduction of the Lambda*(1520) on both the proton and neutron have been studied by using the CLAS eg3 run data set. The reactions are gammad-->K+Lambda*(n) and gammad-->K0Lambda*(p) with Lambda*-->pK-. Preliminary total and differential cross sections have been extracted in the photon energy region 1.75 GeVLambda*(1520) on the neutron is reported, and we will extend the results on the proton to higher energies than in previous studies.

  1. Microscopic theory of the lambda transition

    SciTech Connect

    Toyoda, T.

    1982-06-01

    Starting with a microscopic hamiltonian for a many-boson system with a hardcore interaction, the grand potential of the system, which contains the order-parameter of the lambda transition as one of the thermodynamical variables, is derived by making use of the finite temperature loop expansion. The divergence difficulty caused by the hardcore interaction is circumvented by the conventional field theoretic perturbation renormalization such that the chemical potential is renormalized instead of the conventional mass renormalization. The grand potential obtained consists of the superfluid part and the finite temperature elementary excitation part. The elementary excitation energy spectrum shows the Goldstone boson mode, namely, the photon, for the zero external field. A non-vanishing external field destroys such a Goldstone boson mode by causing an energy gap at zero momentum. The chemical potential and the critical temperature are also obtained for the weak coupling case. It is shown how the Bose-Einstein condensation is affected by the hardcore interaction.

  2. Recombinant immunoglobulin variable domains generated from synthetic genes provide a system for in vitro characterization of light-chain amyloid proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, P. W.; Raffen, R.; Hanson, D. K.; Deng, Y. L.; Berrios-Hammond, M.; Westholm, F. A.; Murphy, C.; Eulitz, M.; Wetzel, R.; Solomon, A.

    1995-01-01

    The primary structural features that render human monoclonal light chains amyloidogenic are presently unknown. To gain further insight into the physical and biochemical factors that result in the pathologic deposition of these proteins as amyloid fibrils, we have selected for detailed study three closely homologous protein products of the light-chain variable-region single-gene family VkIV. Two of these proteins, REC and SMA, formed amyloid fibrils in vivo. The third protein, LEN, was excreted by the patient at levels of 50 g/day with no indication of amyloid deposits. Sequences of amyloidogenic proteins REC and SMA differed from the sequence of the nonpathogenic protein LEN at 14 and 8 amino acid positions, respectively, and these amino acid differences have been analyzed in terms of the three-dimensional structure of the LEN dimer. To provide a replenishable source of these human proteins, we constructed synthetic genes coding for the REC, SMA, and LEN variable domains and expressed these genes in Escherichia coli. Immunochemical and biophysical comparisons demonstrated that the recombinant VkIV products have tertiary structural features comparable to those of the patient-derived proteins. This well-defined set of three clinically characterized human kIV light chains, together with the capability to produce these kIV proteins recombinantly, provide a system for biophysical and structural comparisons of two different amyloidogenic light-chain proteins and a nonamyloidogenic protein of the same subgroup. This work lays the foundation for future investigations of the structural basis of light-chain amyloidogenicity. PMID:7795526

  3. Linear immunoglobulin A bullous dermatosis.

    PubMed

    Fortuna, Giulio; Marinkovich, M Peter

    2012-01-01

    Linear immunoglobulin A (IgA) bullous dermatosis, also known as linear IgA disease, is an autoimmune mucocutaneous disorder characterized by subepithelial bullae, with IgA autoantibodies directed against several different antigens in the basement membrane zone. Its immunopathologic characteristic resides in the presence of a continuous linear IgA deposit along the basement membrane zone, which is clearly visible on direct immunofluorescence. This disorder shows different clinical features and distribution when adult-onset of linear IgA disease is compared with childhood-onset. Diagnosis is achieved via clinical, histopathologic, and immunopathologic examinations. Two common therapies are dapsone and sulfapyridine, which reduce the inflammatory response and achieve disease remission in a variable period of time.

  4. Structure and function of immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Harry W; Cavacini, Lisa

    2010-02-01

    Immunoglobulins are heterodimeric proteins composed of 2 heavy and 2 light chains. They can be separated functionally into variable domains that bind antigens and constant domains that specify effector functions, such as activation of complement or binding to Fc receptors. The variable domains are created by means of a complex series of gene rearrangement events and can then be subjected to somatic hypermutation after exposure to antigen to allow affinity maturation. Each variable domain can be split into 3 regions of sequence variability termed the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) and 4 regions of relatively constant sequence termed the framework regions. The 3 CDRs of the heavy chain are paired with the 3 CDRs of the light chain to form the antigen-binding site, as classically defined. The constant domains of the heavy chain can be switched to allow altered effector function while maintaining antigen specificity. There are 5 main classes of heavy chain constant domains. Each class defines the IgM, IgG, IgA, IgD, and IgE isotypes. IgG can be split into 4 subclasses, IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, and IgG4, each with its own biologic properties, and IgA can similarly be split into IgA1 and IgA2.

  5. Abnormal kappa:lambda light chain ratio in circulating immune complexes as a marker for B cell activity in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Low, J M; Chauhan, A K; Moore, T L

    2007-01-01

    Patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) have been shown to have elevated levels of circulating immune complexes (CICs) which correlated with disease activity. Our aim was to assess B cell activity by measuring the amount of and the kappa:lambda chain immunoglobulin light (L) chain ratio in CICs from JIA patients and to determine potential evidence for either an antigen-driven response or B-cell receptor editing. We used an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure kappa and lambda chains present in the CICs from the sera of patients with JIA. Statistical analysis was performed using Pearson's correlation, one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni post hoc analysis. Sera from 44 JIA patients were examined for the concentration of L chains in CICs. Healthy controls had a kappa:lambda chain ratio of 1.2:1, whereas this ratio was reversed among JIA subgroups with RF-positive polyarthritis (1:1.2), RF-negative polyarthritis (1:1.3), oligoarthritis (1:2.3) and systemic-onset arthritis (1:2.5). In addition, overall lambda chain selection was not significantly associated with a particular immunoglobulin heavy (H) chain and occurred with all immunoglobulin isotypes. We showed preferential selection of lambda chains contributing to the formation of potentially pathogenic CICs from JIA patients, of all onset types compared to healthy controls, in an H chain-independent manner. The reversal of kappa:lambda chain ratio within the JIA CICs and association with all immunoglobulin isotypes demonstrated the potential for L chain editing. Furthermore, we conclude that a reversal of the normal kappa:lambda chain ratio in JIA CICs may be used as a marker for increased B-cell activity.

  6. Measurement of the Lambda(b) lifetime in the exclusive decay Lambda(b) ---> J / psi Lambda

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota /Charles U.

    2007-04-01

    We have measured the {lambda}{sub b} lifetime using the exclusive decay {lambda}{sub b}{yields}J/{psi}{lambda}, based on 1.2 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector during 2002-2006. From 171 reconstructed {lambda}{sub b} decays, where the J/{psi} and {lambda} are identified via the decays J/{psi}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and {lambda}{yields}p{pi}, we measured the {lambda}{sub b} lifetime to be {tau}({lambda}{sub b})=1.218{sub -0.115}{sup +0.130}(stat){+-}0.042(syst) ps. We also measured the B{sup 0} lifetime in the decay B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}({mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -})K{sub S}{sup 0}({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) to be {tau}(B{sup 0})=1.501{sub -0.074}{sup +0.078}(stat){+-}0.050(syst) ps, yielding a lifetime ratio of {tau}({lambda}{sub b})/{tau}(B{sup 0})=0.811{sub -0.087}{sup +0.096}(stat){+-}0.034(syst = )

  7. [Avidity of polyreactive immunoglobulins].

    PubMed

    Bobrovnik, S A

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of the mechanism of interaction between polyreactive immunoglobulins (PRIG) and antigen was conducted and it was shown that most of the traditional methods of antibody affinity evaluation are not applicable for PRIG affinity. The comparative assessment of the mouse and human PRIG avidity against ovalbumin and horse myoglobin and the avidity of specific monoclonal antibodies against ovalbumin have shown that the avidity of PRIG not only is much less than the avidity of monoclonal antibodies but even exceeds it.

  8. Lambda-Chain Production in Human Lymphoblast-Mouse Fibroblast Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Orkin, Stuart H.; Buchanan, Philip D.; Yount, William J.; Reisner, Howard; Littlefield, John W.

    1973-01-01

    Mutant human lymphoblast cells deficient in hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.8) activity were hybridized with thymidine kinase (EC 2.7.1.21)-deficient mouse fibroblasts. Hybrid cells were readily selected, as both parental lines were nonreverting and eliminated by hypoxanthine-amethopterinthymidine medium. Human lambda (λ) chain was the only immunoglobulin chain produced by the lymphoblast parent, as determined by immunofluorescent techniques. Two independent hybrid clones chosen for detailed study synthesized human λ chain, and continued to do so after prolonged culture. As in both parental lines, no human immunoglobulin heavy chains, complements C3 or C4, or α1-antitrypsin, or mouse immunoglobulin chains or complement C5 were detectable in the hybrids. Selection against thymidine kinase-containing hybrid cells with 5-bromodeoxyuridine did not eliminate positive λ-chain reactivity, suggesting that the kinase and λ-chain loci are not linked. The continued production of an immunoglobulin chain by human lymphoblast-mouse fibroblast hybrids contrasts with the extinction of other differentiated functions in several hybrid systems, and indicates that gene localization and linkage analysis for human immunoglobulin chains should be feasible with this system. Images PMID:4599625

  9. Immunoglobulin genes of the turtles.

    PubMed

    Magadán-Mompó, Susana; Sánchez-Espinel, Christian; Gambón-Deza, Francisco

    2013-03-01

    The availability of reptile genomes for the use of the scientific community is an exceptional opportunity to study the evolution of immunoglobulin genes. The genome of Chrysemys picta bellii and Pelodiscus sinensis is the first one that has been reported for turtles. The scanning for immunoglobulin genes resulted in the presence of a complex locus for the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH). This IGH locus in both turtles contains genes for 13 isotypes in C. picta bellii and 17 in P. sinensis. These correspond with one immunoglobulin M, one immunoglobulin D, several immunoglobulins Y (six in C. picta bellii and eight in P. sinensis), and several immunoglobulins that are similar to immunoglobulin D2 (five in C. picta belli and seven in P. sinensis) that was previously described in Eublepharis macularius. It is worthy to note that IGHD2 are placed in an inverted transcriptional orientation and present sequences for two immunoglobulin domains that are similar to bird IgA domains. Furthermore, its phylogenetic analysis allows us to consider about the presence of IGHA gene in a primitive reptile, so we would be dealing with the memory of the gene that originated from the bird IGHA. In summary, we provide a clear picture of the immunoglobulins present in a turtle, whose analysis supports the idea that turtles emerged from the evolutionary line from the differentiation of birds and the presence of the IGHA gene present in a common ancestor.

  10. Variational Monte Carlo calculations for the binding energy of sub. Lambda. Lambda. sup 31 Si

    SciTech Connect

    Ahsan, M.H. ); Kaykobad, M. ); Ali, S. )

    1991-01-01

    The binding energy of the {Lambda}{Lambda} hypernucleus {sub {Lambda}{Lambda}}{sup 31}Si has been calculated variationally with a {sup 28}Si+{ital n}+{Lambda}+{Lambda} four-body model. The integrations have been carried out with the help of a Monte Carlo technique. Three different types of {Lambda}-{Lambda} and {Lambda}-{ital N} potentials have been used. {ital n}-{sup 28}Si and {Lambda}-{sup 28}Si potentials have been generated by folding the {ital N}-{ital N} and {Lambda}-{ital N} potentials into the harmonic-oscillator shell-model density distribution of {sup 28}Si. The calculated values of the binding energy for the three different potentials are 40.19, 46.30, and 39.90 MeV. These values are compared with the reported experimental value of 38.2{plus minus}6.3 MeV. The dependence of the binding energy on the depth of the {Lambda}-{Lambda} interaction has also been investigated.

  11. Production and Characterization of a Set of Mouse-Human Chimeric Immunoglobulin G (IgG) Subclass and IgA Monoclonal Antibodies with Identical Variable Regions Specific for Pseudomonas aeruginosa Serogroup O6 Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Michael J.; Gerçeker, A. Alev; Reff, Mitchell E.; Pier, Gerald B.

    1998-01-01

    The heavy- and light-chain variable regions from a murine monoclonal antibody that recognize Pseudomonas aeruginosa serogroup O6 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were used to generate a series of chimeric mouse-human monoclonal antibodies with identical variable regions. The murine variable-region gene segments were cloned into an immunoglobulin (Ig) cDNA expression vector that contained the human kappa light-chain and IgG1 constant regions. The IgG1 heavy-chain constant region was then replaced with the human IgG2, IgG3, IgG4, or IgA1 heavy-chain constant region. The five different expression vectors were transfected into Chinese hamster ovary cells for antibody production. The chimeric antibodies exhibited immunoreactivity and affinity similar to that of the parental murine IgG antibody toward whole cells of a serogroup O6 strain. In vitro complement deposition assays demonstrated that the chimeric IgG4 and IgA antibodies did not mediate the deposition of complement component C3 onto the surface of either purified LPS or whole bacteria. The chimeric IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies were similar in their ability to deposit C3 onto the surface of both bacteria and LPS, while IgG2 antibody was more effective at depositing C3 onto the surface of bacteria than onto purified LPS. The pattern of opsonophagocytic activity of the chimeric monoclonal antibodies was similar to that of complement deposition onto bacterial cells in that the chimeric IgG1 and IgG3 had the highest opsonic activity. Although IgG2 deposited more C3 onto the bacterial surface than did IgG4 or IgA, all three of these isotypes had low opsonic activity against the serogroup O6 target strain. This series of related antibodies will help reveal functional differences in efficacy among protective antibodies to P. aeruginosa and will be critical for defining the optimal formulation of either a vaccine for active immunization or a polyclonal intravenous IgG or monoclonal antibody cocktail for passive immunotherapy. PMID

  12. Generation and characterization of ABBV642, a dual variable domain immunoglobulin molecule (DVD-Ig) that potently neutralizes VEGF and PDGF-BB and is designed for the treatment of exudative age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Ding, Kun; Eaton, Lucia; Bowley, Diana; Rieser, Matthew; Chang, Qing; Harris, Maria C; Clabbers, Anca; Dong, Feng; Shen, Jikui; Hackett, Sean F; Touw, Debra S; Bixby, Jacqueline; Zhong, Suju; Benatuil, Lorenzo; Bose, Sahana; Grinnell, Christine; Preston, Gregory M; Iyer, Ramesh; Sadhukhan, Ramkrishna; Marchie, Susan; Overmeyer, Gary; Ghayur, Tariq; van Riet, Deborah A; Tang, Shibo; Campochario, Peter A; Gu, Jijie

    Exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of moderate and severe vision loss in developed countries. Intraocular injections of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF or VEGF-A)-neutralizing proteins provide substantial benefit, but frequent, long-term injections are needed. In addition, many patients experience initial visual gains that are ultimately lost due to subretinal fibrosis. Preclinical studies and early phase clinical trials suggest that combined suppression of VEGF and platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) provides better outcomes than suppression of VEGF alone, due to more frequent regression of neovascularization (NV) and suppression of subretinal fibrosis. We generated a dual variable domain immunoglobulin molecule, ABBV642 that specifically and potently binds and neutralizes VEGF and PDGF-BB. ABBV642 has been optimized for treatment of exudative AMD based on the following design characteristics: 1) high affinity binding to all VEGF-A isoforms and both soluble and extracellular matrix (ECM)-associated PDGF-BB; 2) potential for extended residence time in the vitreous cavity to decrease the frequency of intraocular injections; 3) rapid clearance from systemic circulation compared with molecules with wild type Fc region for normal FcRn binding, which may reduce the risk of systemic complications; and 4) low risk of potential effector function. The bispecificity of ABBV642 allows for a single injection of a single therapeutic agent, and thus a more streamlined development and regulatory path compared with combination products. In a mouse model of exudative AMD, ABBV642 was observed to be more effective than aflibercept. ABBV642 has potential to improve efficacy with reduced injection frequency in patients with exudative AMD, thereby reducing the enormous disease burden for patients and society.

  13. Measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry of $\\Lambda$ and $\\bar{\\Lambda}$ production in $p \\bar{p}$ collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2016-02-09

    Here, we study $\\Lambda$ and $\\bar{\\Lambda}$ production asymmetries in $p \\bar{p} \\rightarrow \\Lambda (\\bar{\\Lambda}) X$, $p \\bar{p} \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\Lambda (\\bar{\\Lambda}) X$, and $p \\bar{p} \\rightarrow \\mu^\\pm \\Lambda (\\bar{\\Lambda}) X$ events recorded by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV. We find an excess of $\\Lambda$'s ($\\bar{\\Lambda}$'s) produced in the proton (antiproton) direction. This forward-backward asymmetry is measured as a function of rapidity. We confirm that the $\\bar{\\Lambda}/\\Lambda$ production ratio, measured by several experiments with various targets and a wide range of energies, is a universal function of "rapidity loss", i.e., the rapidity difference of the beam proton and the lambda.

  14. Measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry of $$\\Lambda$$ and $$\\bar{\\Lambda}$$ production in $$p \\bar{p}$$ collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2016-02-09

    Here, we studymore » $$\\Lambda$$ and $$\\bar{\\Lambda}$$ production asymmetries in $$p \\bar{p} \\rightarrow \\Lambda (\\bar{\\Lambda}) X$$, $$p \\bar{p} \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\Lambda (\\bar{\\Lambda}) X$$, and $$p \\bar{p} \\rightarrow \\mu^\\pm \\Lambda (\\bar{\\Lambda}) X$$ events recorded by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider at $$\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$$ TeV. We find an excess of $$\\Lambda$$'s ($$\\bar{\\Lambda}$$'s) produced in the proton (antiproton) direction. This forward-backward asymmetry is measured as a function of rapidity. We confirm that the $$\\bar{\\Lambda}/\\Lambda$$ production ratio, measured by several experiments with various targets and a wide range of energies, is a universal function of "rapidity loss", i.e., the rapidity difference of the beam proton and the lambda.« less

  15. Study of Lambda+(c) Cabibbo favored decays containing a Lambda baryon in the final state

    SciTech Connect

    Link, J.M.; Yager, P.M.; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Castromonte, C.; Machado, A.A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; de Miranda, J.M.; Pepe, I.M.; Polycarpo, E.; dos Reis, A.C.; Carrillo, S.; Casimiro, E.; Cuautle, E.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Uribe, C.; Vazquez, F.; Agostino, L.; Cinquini, L.; Cumalat, J.P.; /Colorado U. /Fermilab /Frascati /Guanajuato U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Indiana U. /Korea U. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /North Carolina U. /Pavia U. /INFN, Pavia /Rio de Janeiro, Pont. U. Catol. /Puerto Rico U., Mayaguez /South Carolina U. /Tennessee U. /Vanderbilt U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2005-05-01

    Using data from the FOCUS experiment (FNAL-E831), they study the decay of {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} baryons into final states contain a {Lambda} hyperon. The branching fractions of {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} into {Lambda}{pi}{sup +}, {Lambda}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {Lambda}{bar K}{sup 0}K{sup +} relative to that into pK{sup -} {pi}{sup +} are measured to be 0.217 {+-} 0.013 {+-} 0.020, 0.508 {+-} 0.024 {+-} 0.024 and 0.142 {+-} 0.018 {+-} 0.022, respectively. New measurements are also reported. Further, an analysis of the subresonant structure for the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Lambda}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay mode is presented.

  16. The discovery of immunoglobulin E.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, Domenico

    2016-03-01

    The discovery of immunoglobulin E (IgE) was a breakthrough in the field of allergy and immunology. Our understanding of mechanisms of allergic reactions and the role of IgE in these disorders has paralleled to the discovery of treatment modalities for patients with allergy. The first clue to the existence of a substance responsible for hypersensitivity reactions was demonstrated in 1921 by Prausnitz and Kustner, and after four decades it was identified as an immunoglobulin subclass by Ishizakas and co-workers. In 1968, the WHO International Reference Centre for Immunoglobulins announced the presence of a fifth immunoglobulin isotype, IgE.

  17. Recent developments in Lambda networking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Laat, C.; Grosso, P.

    About 6 years ago the first baby-steps were made on opening up dark fiber and DWDM infrastructure for direct use by ISP's after the transformation of the old style Telecom sector into a market driven business. Since then Lambda workshops, community groups like GLIF and a number of experiments have led to many implementations of hybrid national research and education networks and lightpath-based circuit exchanges as pioneered by SURFnet in GigaPort and NetherLight in collaboration with StarLight in Chicago and Canarie in Canada. This article looks back on those developments, describes some current open issues and research developments and proposes a concept of terabit networking.

  18. Expression of cloned immunoglobulin genes introduced into mouse L cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gilles, S D; Tonegawa, S

    1983-01-01

    Functionally rearranged immunoglobulin heavy-chain (gamma 2b) and light-chain (lambda 1 and kappa) genes were introduced into mouse L tk- cells by co-transformation with the Herpes virus tk gene. Cloned cell lines were selected in HAT medium and tested for the presence of transfected immunoglobulin gene sequences by Southern blotting analysis. It was found that the gamma 2b gene was accurately transcribed at a low level in transfected mouse L cells and cytoplasmic gamma 2b, heavy-chain protein was detected by immunoprecipitation of cell extracts. Light-chain genes, on the other hand, were not accurately transcribed. Instead, lambda 1 or kappa RNA species were detected which were approximately 200 to 300 bases longer than the authentic mRNAs. These results suggest that the expression of rearranged heavy-chain and light-chain genes are controlled differently and that these differences can be seen in transfected, non-lymphoid cells. Images PMID:6316279

  19. Chebyshev acceleration for lambda mode calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Belchior, A. Jr.; Moreira, J.M.L. )

    1992-01-01

    Coordenadoria para Projetos Especals (COPESP) has been making an effort to develop a power distribution mapping system utilizing self-powered neutron detectors. The scheme adopted to estimate the power distribution is based on an expansion of lambda modes for a given reactor state. Two-dimensional lambda modes were obtained previously with a modified version of the CITATION code. The method was based on the orthogonality properties of the lambda modes. Several modes could be obtained, but the convergence was slow because of the lack of an appropriate accelerating scheme in the CITATION code for calculating lambda modes. This work presents the acceleration scheme implemented into the CITATION code to obtain lambda modes.

  20. [Blood serum immunoglobulins in thyrotoxicosis].

    PubMed

    Epishin, A V

    1978-01-01

    Serum immunoglobulin content was determined in 85 patients with thyrotoxicosis and in 80 healthy persons by radial immunodiffusion in agar after Mancini by means of monospecific antisera (made at the N. F. Gamaleya Institute of Epidemiology immunoglobulins of classes G and M. The most pronounced increase was noted in patients with severe and moderate thyrotoxicosis.

  1. Further observations of the lambda 10830 He line in stars and their significance as a measure of stellar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.

    1975-01-01

    Measurements of the lambda 1030 He line in 198 stars are given along with data on other features in that spectral range. Nearly 80% of all G and K stars show some lambda 10830; of these, half are variable and 1/4 show emission. It was confirmed that lambda 10830 is not found in M stars, is weak in F stars, and is particularly strong in close binaries. The line is found in emission in extremely late M and S stars, along with P gamma, but P gamma is not in emission in G and K stars with lambda 10830 emissions. Variable He emission and Ti I emission are found in the RV Tauri variables R Scuti and U Mon. In R Aqr the Fe XIII coronal line lambda 10747 and a line at lambda 11012 which may be singlet He or La II are found, as well as lambda 10830 and P gamma. The nature of coronas or hot chromospheres in the various stars is discussed. It was concluded that the lambda 10830 intensity must be more or less proportional to the energy deposited in the chromosphere corona by non-thermal processes.

  2. Correlations among different markers determined by immunochemical methods used for the diagnosis and monitoring of intact immunoglobulin multiple myeloma cases.

    PubMed

    Dogaru, Monica; Lazăr, Veronica; Coriu, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the correlations between the concentration of free light chains (kappa, lambda and ratio kappa/lambda) and two other markers, M- protein and pathological total intact immunoglobulin in four groups of patients with intact immunoglobulin multiple myeloma (IIMM) at the diagnosis and during the treatment. In this study 354 samples coming from 46 patients with IIMM were assayed, out of which: 19, IgGkappa; 13, IgGlambda; 7, IgAkappa; 7, IgAlambda. At the diagnosis, immunofixation was positive in all samples and serum protein electrophoresis quantified M- protein for all patients. Free light chains concentrations were abnormal in 92.25% of patients with concentrations above the reference ranges in all patients with IgGkappa and IgAkappa MM. The intact immunoglobulins were elevated in 83.12% of cases. Pearson correlation coefficient showed correlations among the free light chains serum levels (kappa, lambda and ratio kappa/lambda), M- protein and intact immunoglobulins in two groups with IIMM (IgGlambda, IgAlambda). Spearman correlation coefficient values analysis showed that there is a good correlation between M-protein and FLCs (kappa, lambda and ratio kappa/lambda) in three patient groups (IgGkappa, IgGlambda and IgAlambda), excepting IgAkappa myeloma group where the correlation was insignificant. Regarding the intact immunoglobulin, Spearman coefficient showed significant correlations with FLCs concentrations in two groups (IgGlambda and IgAlambda) and an insignificant correlation in the group with IgGkappa MM. For the group of patients with IgAkappa myeloma, the Spearman coefficient showed that IgA concentrations did not correlate with the concentrations of FLCs. The individual correlation (for each patient) among FLCs, M- protein and intact immunoglobulins in 8 patients with IgGkappa IIMM proved to be more significant as compared with the degree of correlation established for the entire group of patients among these markers

  3. Simultaneous presentation of kappa-restricted chronic lymphocytic leukemia and lambda light chain AL amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    von Keudell, Gottfried; Sanchorawala, Vaishali; O'Hara, Carl; C Seldin, David; Sloan, J Mark

    2014-06-01

    We report on a 58-year-old man who presented with simultaneous kappa-restricted chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and a lambda-restricted plasma cell dyscrasia causing AL amyloidosis involving the kidney and GI tract. While monoclonal immunoglobulins occasionally produced by CLL has previously been implicated in AL amyloidosis, this is the first case of AL amyloidosis resulting from a distinct plasma cell dyscrasia that is not clonally related to the concurrent CLL. Appropriate treatment depended on detailed pathologic diagnosis of both disease processes.

  4. A new high molecular weight immunoglobulin class from the carcharhine shark: implications for the properties of the primordial immunoglobulin.

    PubMed Central

    Berstein, R M; Schluter, S F; Shen, S; Marchalonis, J J

    1996-01-01

    All immunoglobulins and T-cell receptors throughout phylogeny share regions of highly conserved amino acid sequence. To identify possible primitive immunoglobulins and immunoglobulin-like molecules, we utilized 3' RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) and a highly conserved constant region consensus amino acid sequence to isolate a new immunoglobulin class from the sandbar shark Carcharhinus plumbeus. The immunoglobulin, termed IgW, in its secreted form consists of 782 amino acids and is expressed in both the thymus and the spleen. The molecule overall most closely resembles mu chains of the skate and human and a new putative antigen binding molecule isolated from the nurse shark (NAR). The full-length IgW chain has a variable region resembling human and shark heavy-chain (VH) sequences and a novel joining segment containing the WGXGT motif characteristic of H chains. However, unlike any other H-chain-type molecule, it contains six constant (C) domains. The first C domain contains the cysteine residue characteristic of C mu1 that would allow dimerization with a light (L) chain. The fourth and sixth domains also contain comparable cysteines that would enable dimerization with other H chains or homodimerization. Comparison of the sequences of IgW V and C domains shows homology greater than that found in comparisons among VH and C mu or VL, or CL thereby suggesting that IgW may retain features of the primordial immunoglobulin in evolution. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8622930

  5. Bacteriophage lambda: early pioneer and still relevant

    PubMed Central

    Casjens, Sherwood R.; Hendrix, Roger W.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular genetic research on bacteriophage lambda carried out during its golden age from the mid 1950's to mid 1980's was critically important in the attainment of our current understanding of the sophisticated and complex mechanisms by which the expression of genes is controlled, of DNA virus assembly and of the molecular nature of lysogeny. The development of molecular cloning techniques, ironically instigated largely by phage lambda researchers, allowed many phage workers to switch their efforts to other biological systems. Nonetheless, since that time the ongoing study of lambda and its relatives have continued to give important new insights. In this review we give some relevant early history and describe recent developments in understanding the molecular biology of lambda's life cycle. PMID:25742714

  6. {lambda}0 Polarization in Exclusive pp Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Felix, J.

    2006-09-25

    Among all properties of baryons, the polarization they acquire when created from unpolarized p-nucleus collisions is the most recent discovered one; so far, the origin of this polarization remains unexplained in spite of the experimental evidences accumulated in the past thirty years. Up to these days, {lambda}0 is the most studied baryon for polarization, due to it is very easy to produce {lambda}0's at the energies of the principal high energy physics accelerators of the world. This article is a review of the experimental experience accumulated on the polarization of {lambda}0 in unpolarized exclusive pp collisions as function of xF, PT, and M({lambda}0K+) in the past fifteen years here at the Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Guanajuato, inside Fermilab e690 and Brookhaven National Laboratory e766 collaborations.

  7. Bacteriophage lambda: Early pioneer and still relevant.

    PubMed

    Casjens, Sherwood R; Hendrix, Roger W

    2015-05-01

    Molecular genetic research on bacteriophage lambda carried out during its golden age from the mid-1950s to mid-1980s was critically important in the attainment of our current understanding of the sophisticated and complex mechanisms by which the expression of genes is controlled, of DNA virus assembly and of the molecular nature of lysogeny. The development of molecular cloning techniques, ironically instigated largely by phage lambda researchers, allowed many phage workers to switch their efforts to other biological systems. Nonetheless, since that time the ongoing study of lambda and its relatives has continued to give important new insights. In this review we give some relevant early history and describe recent developments in understanding the molecular biology of lambda's life cycle.

  8. Calculation of two-dimensional lambda modes

    SciTech Connect

    Belchior, A. Jr. ); Moreira, J.M.L. )

    1991-01-01

    A system for on-line monitoring of power distribution in small reactors (known as MAP) is under development at COPESP-IPEN. Signals of self-powered neutron detectors are input to a program that estimates the power distribution as an expansion of lambda modes. The modal coefficients are obtained from a least-mean-squares technique adequate for real-time analysis. Three-dimensional lambda modes are synthesized out of one- and two-dimensional lambda modes. As a part of this project, a modification of a computer code was carried out in order to obtain the lambda modes. The results of this effort are summarized. The lambda modes are the solutions of the time-independent multigroup neutron diffusion equation, an eigenvalue equation. Normally, the computer codes produce the fundamental mode corresponding to the largest eigenvalue; their respective interpretations are neutron flux distribution and effective multiplication factor. For calculating higher order lambda modes it is usually necessary to eliminate the contribution of the lower modes from the fission source.

  9. Initiation au Lambda-Calcul (An Initiation into Lambda Calculus)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-15

    un style do preuve par r~curronce, qui est ’analogue do la r6currence structurelle traditionnelle des structuros libros , mais tenant compte du fait quo...pas libro dans M. La th6orie do la OT-r6duction nWest pas aussi 6l6ganto quo cello do la 0-r6duction souls, A causo do I’ambiguil:6 dos expressions do...donne 16 typo des variables libros . Pour los variables lies, 11 est usuet do dclarer tour typo done un champ suppl6mentaire do lop6ratour

  10. Immunoglobulin levels of vitiligo patients.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rubaiya; Ahsan, Mohammad Shamsul; Azad, Mohammad Abul Kalam; Ullah, Md Ashik; Bari, Wasimul; Islam, Sheikh Nazrul; Yeasmin, Sabina; Hasnat, Abul

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, the serum immunoglobulin profiles of vitiligo patients were compared with that of cohort control and evaluated the correlation between immunoglobulin level with their socioeconomic factors and nutritional status. Thirty vitiligo patients were recruited randomly from the Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh for this study. Thirty healthy individuals as control group matched by age, sex, education and socioeconomic factors to the patient group were selected. Serum immunoglobulin concentrations were determined by turbidimetry method using immunoglobulin kit. The concentration of IgG and IgA decreased significantly (P<0.05), but the change of IgM was not significant. Socioeconomic data revealed that most of the patients were young and female. Moreover statistical analysis revealed that there was significant correlation between immunoglobulin (IgG and IgA only) concentrations and BMI and number of depigmented patches with IgG concentrations. Finally it can be concluded that the change of serum immunoglobulin concentration in vitiligo patients could be due to the disease condition as pathomechanism suggested the aberrations in cellular immunity. But study with larger number of population is required for further evaluation of the relationship between the immune response and disease state to confirm these findings.

  11. Immunoglobulin G(κ) [IgG(κ)] and IgG(λ) Paraproteinemia in a Child with AIDS and Response to Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Seeborg, Filiz Odabasi; Gay, Hannah; Schmiege, Lorenz M.; Bernard, David; Shearer, William T.

    2005-01-01

    We report an 8-year-old boy with AIDS, extremely elevated serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) concentration and IgG kappa [IgG(κ)] and IgG lambda [IgG(λ)] paraproteinemia. This paraproteinemia partially responded to highly active antiretroviral therapy. This case emphasizes the importance of controlling B-cell activation. PMID:16275950

  12. Isolation and characterization of mutations in the bacteriophage lambda terminase genes.

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, A; Yau, P; Murialdo, H; Gold, M

    1991-01-01

    The terminase enzyme of bacteriophage lambda is a hetero-oligomeric protein which catalyzes the site-specific endonucleolytic cleavage of lambda DNA and its packaging into phage proheads; it is composed of the products of the lambda Nul and A genes. We have developed a simple method to select mutations in the terminase genes carried on a high-copy-number plasmid, based on the ability of wild-type terminase to kill recA strains of Escherichia coli. Sixty-three different spontaneous mutations and 13 linker insertion mutations were isolated by this method and analyzed. Extracts of cells transformed by mutant plasmids displayed variable degrees of reduction in the activity of one or both terminase subunits as assayed by in vitro lambda DNA packaging. A method of genetically mapping plasmid-borne mutations in the A gene by measuring their ability to rescue various lambda Aam phages showed that the A mutations were fairly evenly distributed across the gene. Mutant A genes were also subcloned into overproducing plasmid constructs, and it was determined that more than half of them directed the synthesis of normal amounts of full-length A protein. Three of the A gene mutants displayed dramatically reduced in vitro packaging activity only when immature (uncut) lambda DNA was used as the substrate; therefore, these mutations may lie in the endonuclease domain of terminase. Interestingly, the putative endonuclease mutations mapped in two distinct locations in the A gene separated by a least 400 bp. Images PMID:1830578

  13. A quark model of {bar {Lambda}}{Lambda} production in {bar p}p interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Alberg, M.A. |; Henley, E.M.; Wilets, L.; Kunz, P.D.

    1993-12-31

    A quark model which includes both scalar and vector contributions to the reaction mechanism (SV quark model) is used in a DWBA calculation of {anti {Lambda}}{Lambda} production in {bar p}p interactions. Total and differential cross-sections, polarizations, depolarizations, and spin-correlation coefficients are computed for laboratory momenta from threshold to 1695 MeV/c. The free parameters of the calculation are the scalar and vector strengths, a quark cluster size parameter, and the parameters of the unknown {anti {Lambda}}{Lambda} potentials. Good agreement with experiment is found for constructive interference of the scalar and vector terms, and for {anti {Lambda}}{Lambda} potentials which differ from those suggested by several authors on the basis of SU(3) arguments. The fit to the data is better than that obtained by other quark models, which use only scalar or vector annihilation terms. The agreement with experiment is also better than that found in meson-exchange models. The recent suggestion [1] that measurement of the depolarization parameter D{sub nn} can be used to discriminate between meson-exchange and quark models is examined in detail. We conclude that a measurement of D{sub nn} will provide a test of which of these models, as presently constructed, is the more appropriate description of strangeness production in the {bar p}p {yields} {anti {Lambda}}{Lambda} reaction.

  14. Binding energy of (Lambda)He-7 and test of charge symmetry breaking in the Lambda N interaction potential

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, O; Honda, D; Kaneta, M; Kato, F; Kawama, D; Maruyama, N; Matsumura, A; Nakamura, S N; Nomura, H; Nonaka, K; Ohtani, A; Okayasu, Y; Osaka, M; Oyamada, M; Sumihama, M; Tamura, H; Baker, O K; Cole, L; Christy, M; Gueye, P; Keppel, C; Tang, L; Yuan, L; Acha, A; Baturin, P; Boeglin, W; Kramer, L; Markowitz, P; Pamela, P; Perez, N; Raue, B; Reinhold, J; Rivera, R; Kato, S; Sato, Y; Takahashi, T; Daniel, A; Hungerford, Ed V; Ispiryan, M; Kalantarians, N; Lan, K J; Li, Y; Miyoshi, T; Randeniya, S; Rodriguez, V M; Bosted, P; Carlini, R; Ent, R; Fenker, H; Gaskell, D; Jones, M; Mack, D; Roche, J; Smith, G; Tvaskis, V; Vulcan, W; Wood, S; Yan, C; Asaturyan, A; Asaturyan, R; Egiyan, K; Mkrtchyan, H; Margaryan, A; Navasardyan, T; Tadevosyan, V; Zamkochian, S; Hu, B; Song, Y; Luo, W; Androic, D; Furic, M; Petkovic, T; Seva, T; Ahmidouch, A; Danagoulian, S; Gasparian, A; Halkyard, R; Johnson, K; Simicevic, N; Wells, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, M I; Gan, L; Benmokhtar, F; Horn, T; Elassar, M; Gibson, E F

    2011-09-01

    The binding energy of 7LambdaHe has been obtained for the first time with reaction spectroscopy using the (e, e'K+) reaction at Jefferson Lab's Hall C. A comparison among the binding energies of the A = 7 T = l iso-triplet hypernuclei, 7LambdaHe, 7LambdaLi*and 7LambdaBe, is made and possible charge symmetry breaking (CSB) in the LambdaN potential is discussed. For 7LambdaHe and 7LambdaBe, the shifts in binding energies are opposite to those predicted by a recent cluster model calculation, which assumes that the unexplained part of the binding energy difference between 4LambdaH and 4LambdaHe, is due to the CSB of the LambdaN potential. Further examination of CSB in light hypernuclear systems is required both experimentally and theoretically.

  15. A preliminary analysis of the immunoglobulin genes in the African elephant (Loxodonta africana).

    PubMed

    Guo, Yongchen; Bao, Yonghua; Wang, Hui; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Zhao, Zhihui; Li, Ning; Zhao, Yaofeng

    2011-02-25

    The genomic organization of the IgH (Immunoglobulin heavy chain), Igκ (Immunoglobulin kappa chain), and Igλ (Immunoglobulin lambda chain) loci in the African elephant (Loxodonta africana) was annotated using available genome data. The elephant IgH locus on scaffold 57 spans over 2,974 kb, and consists of at least 112 V(H) gene segments, 87 D(H) gene segments (the largest number in mammals examined so far), six J(H) gene segments, a single μ, a δ remnant, and eight γ genes (α and ε genes are missing, most likely due to sequence gaps). The Igκ locus, found on three scaffolds (202, 50 and 86), contains a total of 153 V(κ) gene segments, three J(κ) segments, and a single C(κ) gene. Two different transcriptional orientations were determined for these V(κ) gene segments. In contrast, the Igλ locus on scaffold 68 includes 15 V(λ) gene segments, all with the same transcriptional polarity as the downstream J(λ)-C(λ) cluster. These data suggest that the elephant immunoglobulin gene repertoire is highly diverse and complex. Our results provide insights into the immunoglobulin genes in a placental mammal that is evolutionarily distant from humans, mice, and domestic animals.

  16. A Preliminary Analysis of the Immunoglobulin Genes in the African Elephant (Loxodonta africana)

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yongchen; Bao, Yonghua; Wang, Hui; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Zhao, Zhihui; Li, Ning; Zhao, Yaofeng

    2011-01-01

    The genomic organization of the IgH (Immunoglobulin heavy chain), Igκ (Immunoglobulin kappa chain), and Igλ (Immunoglobulin lambda chain) loci in the African elephant (Loxodonta africana) was annotated using available genome data. The elephant IgH locus on scaffold 57 spans over 2,974 kb, and consists of at least 112 VH gene segments, 87 DH gene segments (the largest number in mammals examined so far), six JH gene segments, a single μ, a δ remnant, and eight γ genes (α and ε genes are missing, most likely due to sequence gaps). The Igκ locus, found on three scaffolds (202, 50 and 86), contains a total of 153 Vκ gene segments, three Jκ segments, and a single Cκ gene. Two different transcriptional orientations were determined for these Vκ gene segments. In contrast, the Igλ locus on scaffold 68 includes 15 Vλ gene segments, all with the same transcriptional polarity as the downstream Jλ-Cλ cluster. These data suggest that the elephant immunoglobulin gene repertoire is highly diverse and complex. Our results provide insights into the immunoglobulin genes in a placental mammal that is evolutionarily distant from humans, mice, and domestic animals. PMID:21364892

  17. Chronic myopathy due to immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Manoli, Irini; Kwan, Justin Y.; Wang, Qian; Rushing, Elisabeth J.; Tsokos, Maria; Arai, Andrew E.; Burch, Warner M.; Dispenzieri, Angela; McPherron, Alexandra C.; Gahl, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid myopathy associated with a plasma cell dyscrasia is a rare cause of muscle hypertrophy. It can be a challenging diagnosis, since pathological findings are often elusive. In addition, the mechanism by which immunoglobulin light-chain deposition stimulates muscle overgrowth remains poorly understood. We present a 53–year old female with a 10-year history of progressive generalized muscle overgrowth. Congo-red staining and immunohistochemistry revealed perivascular lambda light chain amyloid deposits, apparent only in a second muscle biopsy. The numbers of central nuclei and satellite cells were increased, suggesting enhanced muscle progenitor cell formation. Despite the chronicity of the light chain disease, the patient showed complete resolution of hematologic findings and significant improvement of her muscle symptoms following autologous bone marrow transplantation. This case highlights the importance of early diagnosis and therapy for this treatable cause of a chronic myopathy with muscle hypertrophy. PMID:23465863

  18. Preparation and assay of phage lambda.

    PubMed

    Dale, J W; Greenaway, P J

    1985-01-01

    Lambda, a temperate bacteriophage of E. coli, has two alternative modes of replication in sensitive cells, known as the lytic and lysogenic cycles. In the lytic cycle, after the lambda DNA enters the cells, various phage functions are expressed that result in the production of a large number of mature phage particles and cell lysis. In the lysogenic mode, which normally occurs in only a small proportion of the infected cells, the phage forms a more or less stable relationship with the host bacterium; this stable state is known as lysogeny. In a lysogenic cell, phage DNA is normally incorporated into the chromosomal DNA via specific attachment sites on both the phage DNA and the host chromosome. Replication of lambda DNA then occurs only during replication of the host chromosome, and the phage genome is inherited by each daughter cell at cell division. The phage is maintained in this prophage state through the action of a repressor protein, coded for by the phage gene cl. This repressor protein turns off the expression of virtually the whole of the lambda genome. If the repressor is inactivated, the expression of phage genes is initiated. This leads to the excision of lambda DNA from the host chromosome and entry into the lytic cycle. The balance between the lytic and lysogenic modes of replication is a delicate and complex one in which a key factor is the concentration of the cl gene product. Some of the many sources of further information about the basic biology of lambda phage are listed in the references to this chapter.

  19. Lambda Exonuclease Digestion of CGG Trinucleotide Repeats

    PubMed Central

    Conroy, R.S.; Koretsky, A.P.; Moreland, J.

    2011-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome and other triplet repeat diseases are characterized by an elongation of a repeating DNA triplet. The ensemble-averaged lambda exonuclease digestion rate of different substrates, including one with an elongated FMR1 gene containing 120 CGG repeats, was measured using absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. Using magnetic tweezers sequence-dependent digestion rates and pausing was measured for individual lambda exonucleases. Within the triplet repeats a lower average and narrower distribution of rates and a higher frequency of pausing was observed. PMID:19562332

  20. [Subcutaneous immunoglobulin substitution and therapy].

    PubMed

    Gulácsy, Vera; Maródi, László

    2011-01-09

    Patients with combined primary immunodeficiency or B-cell deficiency with low serum concentration of immunoglobulin G can be efficiently treated with immunoglobulin G concentrates. From the 1950s IgG was used intramuscularly, and from the 1980s intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) replacement has become widely available for replacement therapy. Among the potential side effects of IVIG (including anaphylaxis), further disadvantages of IVIG are hospitalization during treatment and varying concentrations of IgG. Over the past ten years, subcutaneous IgG (SCIG) preparations have become reasonable alternatives to IVIG. SCIG given weekly assures a more balanced serum IgG level, side affects are mostly local and temporary; systemic, severe adverse events have not been observed. In addition, SCIG can be used for home treatment of patients which improves their quality of life remarkably.

  1. Serum immunoglobulins in Nigerian neonates.

    PubMed

    Akinwolere, O A; Akinkugbe, F M; Oyewole, A I; Salimonu, L S

    1989-01-01

    Serum immunoglobulins G, M and A levels were studied in 187 Nigerian neonates. Estimations were done by the radial immunodifusion method of Mancini. Immunoglobulin G shows a fall in value in the first few days of life to about 62% of the value in the last days of the neonatal period. There is however a gradual increase in the level of IgM to about double at the end of the neonatal period. IgA level remained relatively constantly low throughout this period. The effect of maternal education on the levels of immunoglobulins of their neonates was also investigated. This had a positive influence at the secondary educational level, affecting only the IgG and IgA.

  2. Immunoglobulin negative follicle centre cell lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Gregg, E. O.; Al-Saffar, N.; Jones, D. B.; Wright, D. H.; Stevenson, F. K.; Smith, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) could not be detected on the surface or in the cytoplasm of neoplastic cells from five cases of follicle centre cell lymphoma with centroblastic/centrocytic follicular histology when examined by immunohistology of frozen or wax embedded sections. Examination by fluorescein labelled antibodies of cells in suspensions prepared from the biopsies revealed a monotypic surface Ig positive population in one case and a surface or cytoplasmic Ig kappa:lambda light chain imbalance in a further two cases consistent with neoplastic B cell involvement: in all cases the proportion of cells failing to express Ig or T cell markers ranged from 24 to 75%. The monoclonal antibodies B1 (Pan B cell), FMC4 (HLA class II) and J5 (cALL antigen) stained the majority of cells in suspension with residual cells staining with UCHT1 or OKT11 (T cell monoclonal antibodies). In frozen sections, neoplastic follicular cells did not stain with UCHT1. However, in the one case tested these cells stained with the antibodies B1 and FMC4. In paraffin sections J chain could be demonstrated in the cytoplasm of three out of five cases. Cells from four cases were cultured in vitro for Ig production: two failed to produce Ig and monotypic light chains were the sole Ig product of the remaining two cases. The failure to express Ig by the majority of the neoplastic cells from the cases described in this report is at variance with the follicular histology of these neoplasms. Mechanisms responsible for this failure are discussed with reference to current models of B cell differentiation. Images Figure 1 PMID:6437429

  3. Immunogenic and antigenic epitopes of immunoglobulins I. Cross-reactivity of murine monoclonal antibodies to human IgG with the immunoglobulins of certain animal species.

    PubMed Central

    Jefferis, R; Lowe, J; Ling, N R; Porter, P; Senior, S

    1982-01-01

    Antibody-producing hybridoma clones have been isolated following immunization of mice with human IgG. Twenty-five monoclonal antibodies (nine anti-C gamma 3, fourteen anti-C gamma 2, one anit-kappa and one anti-lambda) were selected for study of their cross-reactivity with the IgG of fifteen mammalian species and chicken immunoglobulin. Each antibody exhibited a unique reaction profile suggesting that human IgG expresses a very large repertoire of immunogenic epitopes. Whilst some antibodies showed a very restricted cross-reactivity profile for others a very wide reactivity profile was observed-including two clones producing autoantibodies. Antibodies demonstrating cross-reactivity between human Fc gamma and 7S chicken immunoglobulin allow its definitive assignment as a homologue of human IgG. Four clones demonstrated specificity for bovine IgG subclass gamma 1 and gamma 2 and the degree of reactivity allows their application to qualitative and quantitative assay systems. These studies suggest new perspectives for the characterization of immunoglobulins and the standardization of anti-immunoglobulin reagents. PMID:6173313

  4. The Lambda Orionis association. [star cluster anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murdin, P.; Penston, M. V.

    1977-01-01

    The Lambda Orionis association has the photometric properties of a typical young cluster with an age of about 4 million yr. Its distance is 400 + or - 40 pc. Attention is drawn to the lack of a dense molecular cloud and associated infrared sources in this young grouping

  5. Three-dimensional implicit lambda methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Napolitano, M.; Dadone, A.

    1983-01-01

    This paper derives the three dimensional lambda-formulation equations for a general orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system and provides various block-explicit and block-implicit methods for solving them, numerically. Three model problems, characterized by subsonic, supersonic and transonic flow conditions, are used to assess the reliability and compare the efficiency of the proposed methods.

  6. Deposition of kappa and lambda light chains in amyloid filaments of dialysis-related amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Brancaccio, D; Ghiggeri, G M; Braidotti, P; Garberi, A; Gallieni, M; Bellotti, V; Zoni, U; Gusmano, R; Coggi, G

    1995-10-01

    beta 2-Microglobulin (beta 2m) is considered to be the amyloidogenic precursor in dialysis-related amyloidosis, although the implication of other relevant cofactors in the pathogenesis of this disease has also been hypothesized. It is conceivable that substances found in amyloid deposits might represent something more than simple codeposition, possibly playing a pathogenic role in amyloidogenesis. Along these lines, a detailed analysis of the protein composition of amyloid fibrils purified from synovial material surgically obtained from nine patients on long-term dialysis was carried out. By the use of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, several other protein components, in addition to beta 2m, were found. These were characterized by NH2 amino-terminal sequencing and immunoblotting. In fibrils obtained by water extraction, which fulfill the electron microscopy criteria of highly pure amyloid material, polyclonal kappa and lambda light chains were detected with a concentration of 15 micrograms/mL in the water extraction material; the beta 2m concentration was 200 micrograms/mL. Light microscopy immunohistochemistry was performed on samples from five patients. Amyloid deposits reacted with anti-beta 2m, and anti-light (kappa, lambda), chain antibodies. The immunoreaction of amyloid filaments to anti-beta 2m, anti-lambda, and anti-kappa light chain antibodies was also tested by electron microscopy by use of the immunogold staining procedure. Amyloid filaments were labeled by the three antibodies and showed a different intensity of immunostaining apparently related to their different aggregation pattern. These observations demonstrate that polyclonal immunoglobulin light chains (kappa and lambda) are not contaminants but, together with beta 2m, represent a major constituent of amyloid deposits in dialysis-related osteoarticular amyloidosis, thus indicating their possible role in amyloidogenesis.

  7. The Hyperon {Lambda}(1405) in p+p reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Siebenson, Johannes

    2011-10-21

    We present an analysis of the hyperon {Lambda}(1405) for p+p reactions at 3.5 GeV kinetic beam energy. The data were taken with the High Acceptance Di-Electron Spectrometer (HADES). A {Lambda}(1405) signal could be reconstructed in both charged decay channels ({Lambda}(1405){yields}{Sigma}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}).

  8. Multiple myeloma with monoclonal IgG and IgD of lambda type exhibiting, under treatment, a shift from mainly IgG to mainly IgD.

    PubMed Central

    Gallart, T; Bladé, J; Martínez-Quesada, J; Sierra, J; Rozman, C; Vives, J

    1985-01-01

    A patient with multiple myeloma (MM), who initially presented with a predominant IgG lambda and a minor IgD lambda paraprotein pattern, is described. After chemotherapy, levels of the IgD lambda protein increased and the IgG lambda levels decreased. The following results were obtained when serum IgD was predominant. In the bone marrow, there were three plasma cell populations: a major one containing only delta chains, a minor one containing only gamma chains, and another minor one containing both delta and gamma chains. All these plasma cell populations contained lambda chains. Stimulation of circulating mononuclear cells with pokeweed mitogen (PWM) achieved differentiation of circulating B lymphocytes into plasma cells: 30% with only cytoplasmic delta lambda chains and 10% with only cytoplasmic gamma lambda chains. These IgG-containing plasma cells showed cytoplasmic reactivity with rabbit antiserum raised against monoclonal IgD which was shown to contain specificities recognizing both delta chains and idiotypic determinants present in both serum IgD lambda and IgG lambda. Circulating B lymphocytes were 'monoclonal': almost all expressed surface delta lambda chains, and a small proportion of them expressed both delta gamma and lambda chains. High levels of IgD were detected in the supernatants of all cultures, but high concentrations of IgG were only detected in those from PWM-stimulated cultures with very low levels of IgM and IgA. These findings suggest that plasma cells producing either IgD or IgG were derived from a common B-cell clone. Double paraproteinaemia exhibiting a shift in immunoglobulin production from IgG to IgD has not been previously described. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3922877

  9. Dynamic processes in Be star atmospheres. 2: He I 2P-nD line formation in lambda Eridani (outburst)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Myron A.; Hubeny, Ivan; Lanz, Thierry; Meylan, Thomas

    1994-01-01

    The He I lambda 6678 line of early Be stars generally shows violet (V) and red (R) emission whenever hydrogen alpha emission is present, but its use as a diagnostic has been handicapped by a poor understanding of the processes that drive it into emission. In an attempt to address this problem we obtained three series of eschelle spectra of the first two members of the singlet and triplet 2P-nD series of lambda Eri (B2e) during 1992 November 3-5 at Kitt Peak. During these observations lambda 6678 showed substantial emission variability in both the wings and central profile, providing an opportunity to compare its behavior with that of the lambda 4922, lambda 5876, and lambda 4471 lines. We found that the responses of the lines were different in several respects. Whereas the emissions in the V wings of all four lines scaled together, the R wing of the lambda 4922 line invariably responded with increased absorption whenever the R wing of lambda 6678 line showed increased emission. These same trends occurred within the central photospheric profiles. The R-wing behavior shows that much, but not all of the emission in lambda 6678 is caused by matter projected against the stellar disk. The excitation temperatures of the neighboring 2(sup 1) P transitions, lambda 6678 and lambda 4922 must be greater than and less than the photospheric continuum temperature, respectively. We have investigated departures from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) for the He I spectrum in a variety of ad hoc, perturbed model atmospheres. We have found only one way to cause the source function of lambda 6678 to increase so strongly, namely, by increasing the atmospheric temperature in the line formation region to 30,000 - 40,000 K. This effect was discovered by Auer and Mihalas for O3-O4 atmospheric models, but it has not been applied to active B stars. Our models suggest that lambda 6678 emission in Be stars can be used as a sensitive monitor of localized hot spots on these stars' surfaces

  10. Measurement of the Branching Fraction and Lambda-bar Polarization in B0 -> Lambda-par p pi-

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-08-03

    We present a measurement of the B{sup 0} {yields} {bar {Lambda}}p{pi}{sup -} branching fraction performed using the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. Based on a sample of 467 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs we measure {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {bar {Lambda}}p{pi}{sup -}) [3.07 {+-} 0.31(stat.) {+-} 0.23(syst.)] x 10{sup -6}. The measured differential spectrum as a function of the dibaryon invariant mass m({bar {Lambda}}p) shows a near-threshold enhancement similar to that observed in other baryonic B decays. We study the {bar {Lambda}} polarization as a function of {bar {Lambda}} energy in the B{sup 0} rest frame (E*{sub {bar {Lambda}}}) and compare it with theoretical expectations of fully longitudinally right-polarized {bar {Lambda}} at large E*{sub {bar {Lambda}}}.

  11. Study of the decay asymmetry parameter and CP violation parameter in the Lambda(c)+ ---> Lambda pi+ decay

    SciTech Connect

    Link, J.M.; Yager, P.M.; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Castromonte, C.; Machado, A.A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; de Miranda, J.M.; Pepe, I.M.; Polycarpo, E.; dos Reis, A.C.; Carrillo, S.; Casimiro, E.; Cuautle, E.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Uribe, C.; Vazquez, F.; Agostino, L.; Cinquini, L.; Cumalat, J.P.; /Colorado U. /Fermilab /Frascati /Guanajuato U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Indiana U. /Korea U. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /North Carolina U. /Pavia U. /INFN, Pavia /Rio de Janeiro, Pont. U. Catol. /Puerto Rico U., Mayaguez /South Carolina U. /Tennessee U. /Vanderbilt U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2005-09-01

    Using data from the FOCUS (E831) experiment at Fermilab, we present a new measurement of the weak decay-asymmetry parameter a{sub {Lambda}{sub c}} in {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Lambda}{pi}{sup +} decay. Comparing particle with antiparticle decays, we obtain the first measurement of the CP violation parameter {Alpha} {triple_bond} a{sub {Lambda}{sub c}} + a{sub {ovr {Lambda}{sub c}}}/a{sub {Lambda}{sub c}} - a{sub {ovr {Lambda}{sub c}}}. We obtain a{sub {Lambda}{sub c}} = -0.78 {+-} 0.16 {+-} 0.13 and {Alpha} = -0.07 {+-} 0.19 {+-} 0.12 where errors are statistical and systematic.

  12. Serum levels of immunoglobulin free light chains in patients with chronic hepatitis C presenting cryoglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Isabela S; Cabral, Milena S; Jesus, Larissa S; Paraná, Raymundo; Atta, Ajax M; Sousa Atta, Maria Luiza B

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects B-lymphocytes, provokes cellular dysfunction and causes lymphoproliferative diseases such as cryoglobulinemia and non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma. In the present study, we investigated the serum levels of kappa and lambda free light chains (FLC) of immunoglobulins and the kappa/lambda FLC ratio in Brazilian patients with chronic HCV infection and cryoglobulinemia. We also analyzed the immunochemical composition of the cryoglobulins in these patients. Twenty-eight cryoglobulinemic HCV patients composed the target group, while 37 HCV patients without cryoglobulinemia were included as controls. The median levels of kappa and lambda FLC were higher in patients with cryoglobulinemia compared to controls (p=0.001 and p=0.003, respectively), but the kappa/lambda FLC ratio was similar in patients with and without cryoglobulinemia (p>0.05). The median FLC ratio was higher in HCV patients presenting with advanced fibrosis of the liver compared to HCV patients without fibrosis (p=0.004). Kappa and lambda FLC levels were strongly correlated with the IgA, IgG and IgM levels in the patients with cryoglobulinemia. In patients without cryoglobulinemia, the kappa FLC level was only correlated with the IgG level, whereas the lambda FLC were weakly correlated with the IgA, IgG and IgM levels. An immunochemical pattern of mixed cryoglobulins (MC), predominantly IgM, IgG, IgA and kappa light chain, was verified in these immune complexes. We concluded that HCV-infected patients presenting cryoglobulinemia have vigorous polyclonal B-lymphocyte activation due to chronic HCV infection and persistent immune stimulation.

  13. 7th International Immunoglobulin Conference: Immunodeficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, R E; Ochs, H D

    2014-01-01

    Awareness of the challenges involved in diagnosing and treating a heterogeneous group of immunodeficiency disorders is growing. The improvements in neonatal screening offer new methods to ensure that primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) are diagnosed as early as possible, enabling accurate treatment and the prevention of life-threatening infections and other complications. Additionally, the need to individualize patient therapy in order to optimize both clinical outcomes and quality-of-life is obvious and is exemplified by the ability to switch between intravenous and subcutaneous immunoglobulin administration offering flexible treatment regimens. However, further research is crucial in order to determine the optimal treatment for secondary immunodeficiencies, and to gain greater understanding of the underlying causes of PIDs, including common variable immunodeficiency. The information relating to the growth of patient registries is encouraging, with approximately 25 000 patients with PIDs included in the two registries discussed. Registries such as this are vital for future research, as well as providing an educational resource. PMID:25546748

  14. Structural repertoire of immunoglobulin λ light chains.

    PubMed

    Chailyan, Anna; Marcatili, Paolo; Cirillo, Davide; Tramontano, Anna

    2011-05-01

    The immunoglobulin λ isotype is present in nearly all vertebrates and plays an important role in the human immune system. Despite its importance, few systematic studies have been performed to analyze the structural conformation of its variable regions, contrary to what is the case for κ and heavy chains. We show here that an analysis of the structures of λ chains allows the definition of a discrete set of recurring conformations (canonical structures) of their hypervariable loops and, most importantly, the identification of sequence constraints that can be used to predict their structure. We also show that the structural repertoire of λ chains is different and more varied than that of the κ chains, consistently with the current view of the involvement of the two major light-chain families in complementary strategies of the immune system to ensure a fine tuning between diversity and stability in antigen recognition.

  15. Purification of human immunoglobulins by sequential precipitation with caprylic acid and ammonium sulphate.

    PubMed

    Perosa, F; Carbone, R; Ferrone, S; Dammacco, F

    1990-03-27

    We have tested the usefulness of sequential precipitation with caprylic acid and ammonium sulfate to purify human monoclonal and polyclonal immunoglobulins from sera of 11 patients with monoclonal gammapathy (4 IgG kappa, 2 IgG lambda, 2 IgM kappa, 1 IgA kappa, 2 IgA lambda), four patients with autoimmune diseases and four healthy donors. In terms of purity and activity of Ig as well as execution time and cost, this two-step non-chromatographic procedure is highly efficient for the purification of IgG, IgA and IgM, thus offering several advantages over other methods of purification. Therefore, this procedure may have useful application in the preparation of human Ig for structural studies and therapeutic purposes.

  16. The interactions of calreticulin with immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin Y.

    PubMed

    Møllegaard, Karen Mai; Duus, Karen; Træholt, Sofie Dietz; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Liu, Yan; Palma, Angelina S; Feizi, Ten; Hansen, Paul R; Højrup, Peter; Houen, Gunnar

    2011-07-01

    Calreticulin is a chaperone of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) assisting proteins in achieving the correctly folded structure. Details of the binding specificity of calreticulin are still a matter of debate. Calreticulin has been described as an oligosaccharide-binding chaperone but data are also accumulating in support of calreticulin as a polypeptide binding chaperone. In contrast to mammalian immunoglobulin G (IgG), which has complex type N-glycans, chicken immunoglobulin Y (IgY) possesses a monoglucosylated high mannose N-linked glycan, which is a ligand for calreticulin. Here, we have used solid and solution-phase assays to analyze the in vitro binding of calreticulin, purified from human placenta, to human IgG and chicken IgY in order to compare the interactions. In addition, peptides from the respective immunoglobulins were included to further probe the binding specificity of calreticulin. The experiments demonstrate the ability of calreticulin to bind to denatured forms of both IgG and IgY regardless of the glycosylation state of the proteins. Furthermore, calreticulin exhibits binding to peptides (glycosylated and non-glycosylated) derived from trypsin digestion of both immunoglobulins. Additionally, calreticulin peptide binding was examined with synthetic peptides covering the IgG Cγ2 domain demonstrating interaction with approximately half the peptides. Our results show that the dominant binding activity of calreticulin in vitro is toward the polypeptide moieties of IgG and IgY even in the presence of the monoglucosylated high mannose N-linked oligosaccharide on IgY.

  17. Membrane-bound immunoglobulins on human leukemic cells. Evidence for humoral immune responses of patients to leukemia-associated antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Metzgar, R S; Mohanakumar, T; Miller, D S

    1975-01-01

    Immunoglobulins were detected on the membranes of human leukemic cells by a microcytotoxicity technique. A significant percentage of lymphocytes from normal donors failed to react with goat antisera to human heavy chain determinants or to lambda-light chains. Lymphocytes from some normal donors, however, did react with antisera to k-light chains. A high percentage (50-90) of cells from some leukemia patients were killed by antisera to light chains and by one or more antisera to heavy chain determinants. Trypsin treatment of leukemic cells resulted in a loss of cytotoxic activity with all immunoglobulin antisera. Reactivity with the k-light chain antiserum was detectable 2 h after trypsinization of chronic myeloid leukemic (CML) cells and 8 h after treatment of acute lymphocytic leukemic (ALL) cells. Reactivity with the antisera to heavy chain determinants and lambda-light chains could not be detected 8 and 48 h after trypsinization of CML and ALL cells, respectively. The cytotoxic activity of the immunoglobulin antisera to heavy chains was abolished by absorption with the specific immunoglobulin used to define the antisera by precipitation. Eluates (pH 3.2) prepared from leukemic cells which reacted by cytotoxicity with the immunoglobulin antisera were shown to contain immunoglobulins of different heavy chain classes. In addition, some of the eluates had cytotoxic antibody activity to human leukemia cells. The specificity of the eluted antibodies is similar to the specificity previously described for cytophilic antibodies from leukemic patients and nonhuman primate antisera to human leukemia cells. The possible in vitro detection and in vivo significance of the eluted non-complement-fixing antibodies is considered. PMID:807598

  18. The {Lambda}(1405) in Full QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Menadue, Benjamin J.; Kamleh, Waseem; Leinweber, Derek B.; Mahbub, M. Selim

    2011-12-14

    At 1405.1 MeV, the lowest-lying negative-parity state of the {Lambda} baryon lies surprising low. Indeed, this is lower than the lowest negative-parity state of the nucleon, even though the {Lambda}(1405) possesses a valence strange quark. However, previous Lattice QCD studies have been unable to identify such a low-lying state. Using the PACS-CS (2+1)-flavour full-QCD ensembles, available through the ILDG, we utilise a variational analysis with source and sink smearing to isolate this elusive state. We find three low-lying odd-parity states, and for the first time reproduce the correct level ordering with respect to the nearby scattering thresholds.

  19. The lambda point experiment in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipa, J. A.

    1988-01-01

    The motivation and potential for performing very high resolution measurements of the heat capacity singularity at the lambda point of helium in microgravity conditions was briefly discussed. It is clear that tests extending deep into the asymptotic region can be performed, where the theoretical predictions take on their simplest form. This advantageous situation should lead to a major improvement in the understanding of the range of applicability of current theoretical ideas in this field. The lambda transition holds out the prospect of giving the maximum advance of any system, and with the application of cryogenic techniques, the potential of this system can be realized. The technology for the initial experiments is already developed, and results could be obtained in 1990.

  20. Overview of the Lambda-* Performance Reasoning Frameworks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    to check the satisfaction of these kinds of quality requirements have existed for several years, they are still not widely used because typical...sporadic server algorithm [Sprunt 1989]. The Lambda-* reasoning frameworks make the use of existing and new analysis theories (e.g., GRMA and the theory...sink pins within the same response can be ready to execute at the same time, they must have different priorities. These constraints exist for very

  1. Proteolysis of lymphocytic surface immunoglobulin.

    PubMed Central

    Hough, D W; McIlroy, B M; Stevenson, G T

    1977-01-01

    Limited proteolysis of lymphocytic surface immunoglobulins in guinea-pig, rabbit and man was investigated by immunofluorescence using conjugated antisera specific for immunoglobulin fragments. The cell surface IgM of guinea pig L2C leukaemic lymphocytes and rabbit blood lymphocytes was cleaved in situ at its hinge region by papain. The Fcmicron fragment remained attached to the membrane and could be stained with the appropriate anti-Fc conjugate. The surface IgD and IgM of human chronic lymphocytic leukaemia cells was cleared from the cell surface by papain, as shown by reagents directed against both Fab and Fc region determinants. This could be due either to proteolytic degradation of membrane bound Fc or to initial cleavage of Ig from the membrane at some point other than the hinge region. PMID:321347

  2. Molecular analysis of the immunoglobulin genes in goose.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tian; Wu, Kun; Yuan, Xiaoli; Shao, Shuai; Wang, WenYuan; Wei, Si; Cao, Gengsheng

    2016-07-01

    Immunoglobulins play an important role in adaptive immune system as defense molecules against pathogens. However, our knowledge on avian immunoglobulin genes has been limited to a few species. In this study, we analyzed goose (Anser cygnoides orientalis) immunoglobulin genes. Three IgH classes including IgM, IgA, IgY and λ light chain were identified. The IgM and IgA heavy chain constant regions are characteristically similar to their counterparts described in other vertebrates. In addition to the classic Ig isotypes, we also detected a transcript that encoded a truncated form of IgY (IgY(ΔFc)) in goose. Similar to duck, the IgY(ΔFc) in goose was generated by using different transcriptional termination signal of the same υ gene. Limited variability and only one leader peptide were observed in VH and VL domains, which suggested that gene conversion was the primary mechanism involved in goose antibody diversity. Our study provides more insights into the immunoglobulin genes in goose that had not been fully explored before.

  3. Faecal eosinophil cationic protein and serum immunoglobulin E in relation to infant feeding practices.

    PubMed

    Hua, Man-Chin; Chen, Chien-Chang; Liao, Sui-Ling; Yao, Tsung-Chieh; Tsai, Ming-Han; Lai, Shen-Hao; Chiu, Chih-Yung; Yeh, Kuo-Wei; Huang, Jing-Long

    2017-03-01

    Background To date, the effects of exclusive breastfeeding duration and timing of solid food introduction on allergy prevention are unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of variable feeding practices on intestinal inflammation in infants using faecal eosinophil cationic protein as a surrogate marker and to assess whether faecal eosinophil cationic protein is associated with serum immunoglobulin E. Methods Subjects ( n = 206) were enrolled from the Prediction of Allergies in Taiwanese CHildren (PATCH) birth cohort study. Stool samples were collected at 6 and 12 months for determining eosinophil cationic protein, and blood was collected for determining total and allergen-specific immunoglobulin E at 12 months. We compared these biomarkers between infants with variable exclusive breastfeeding duration and infants introduced to solid foods at various periods. The association between faecal eosinophil cationic protein, total serum immunoglobulin E and specific immunoglobulin E was also analysed. Results Faecal eosinophil cationic protein was significantly higher in exclusively breastfed infants compared with formula-fed infants and infants who were not exclusively breastfed at 6 months of age ( P < 0.05). At 12 months, infants who were introduced to solid foods at 5-6 months had the lowest faecal eosinophil cationic protein compared with those who were introduced at earlier and later periods. There was no significant association between faecal eosinophil cationic protein and serum immunoglobulin E. Conclusion We found that breastfeeding exclusively for >6 months did not reduce serum immunoglobulin E, but rather increased intestinal inflammation. Faecal eosinophil cationic protein was not associated with total serum immunoglobulin E and specific immunoglobulin E and might not be a useful indictor of immunoglobulin E sensitization in infancy.

  4. Regulation of replication of lambda phage and lambda plasmid DNAs at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Gabig, M; Obuchowski, M; Srutkowska, S; Wegrzyn, G

    1998-06-01

    It was previously demonstrated that while lysogenic development of bacteriophage lambda in Escherichia coli proceeds normally at low temperature (20-25 degrees C), lytic development is blocked under these conditions owing to the increased stability of the phage CII protein. This effect was proposed to be responsible for the increased stimulation of the pE promoter, which interferes with expression of the replication genes, leading to inhibition of phage DNA synthesis. Here we demonstrate that the burst size of phage lambda cIb2, which is incapable of lysogenic development, increases gradually over the temperature range from 20 to 37 degrees C, while no phage progeny are observed at 20 degrees C. Contrary to previous reports, it is possible to demonstrate that pE promoter activation by CII may be more efficient at lower temperature. Using density-shift experiments, we found that phage DNA replication is completely blocked at 20 degrees C. Phage growth was also inhibited in cells overexpressing cII, which confirms that CII is responsible for inhibition of phage DNA replication. Unexpectedly, we found that replication of plasmids derived from bacteriophage lambda is neither inhibited at 20 degrees C nor in cells overexpressing cII. We propose a model to explanation the differences in replication observed between lambda phage and lambda plasmid DNA at low temperature.

  5. Efficacy and tolerability of 16% subcutaneous immunoglobulin compared with 20% subcutaneous immunoglobulin in primary antibody deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Niebur, H B; Duff, C M; Shear, G F; Nguyen, D; Alberdi, T K; Dorsey, M J; Sleasman, J W

    2015-01-01

    Multiple subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIG) products are available to treat primary antibody deficiency (PAD). The efficacy and tolerability of 16% SCIG (Vivaglobin®) was compared with 20% SCIG (Hizentra®) in PAD subjects. The study was a prospective, single-centre, open-label study of PAD subjects transitioning Vivaglobin to equivalent Hizentra doses, rounded to the nearest vial size. Comparisons included immunoglobulin (Ig)G levels; tetanus, varicella and Streptococcus pneumoniae titres; adverse events (AEs), annual infection rate and quality of life during 8 weeks of Vivaglobin and 24 weeks of Hizentra. Thirty-two subjects (aged 2–75 years) participated. Rounding to the nearest Hizentra vial size resulted in a 12·8% (± 2·9%) increase in SCIG dose. Median immunoglobulin (Ig)G level following 8 weeks of Vivaglobin was similar to 24 weeks of Hizentra (1050 versus 1035 mg/dl, respectively; P = 0·77). Both products had similar protective titres to tetanus, varicella and serotypes of S. pneumoniae, which were variable but well above protective levels. After 12 weeks of Hizentra, subjects reported fewer local site reactions compared with Vivaglobin. Switching products resulted in increased systemic AEs in some subjects but, overall, not significantly higher than during Vivaglobin treatment. Average infusion time decreased from 104·7 min (3·3 sites) with Vivaglobin to 70·7 min (2·2 sites) with Hizentra (P = 0·0005). Acute serious bacterial infections were similar. Treatment satisfaction was superior with Hizentra. Hizentra and Vivaglobin have similar pharmacokinetics and efficacy. Although transition to a different SCIG product initially increased AEs, Hizentra is well tolerated and can be infused more rapidly and with fewer sites compared to Vivaglobin. PMID:25761372

  6. Efficacy and tolerability of 16% subcutaneous immunoglobulin compared with 20% subcutaneous immunoglobulin in primary antibody deficiency.

    PubMed

    Niebur, H B; Duff, C M; Shear, G F; Nguyen, D; Alberdi, T K; Dorsey, M J; Sleasman, J W

    2015-09-01

    Multiple subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIG) products are available to treat primary antibody deficiency (PAD). The efficacy and tolerability of 16% SCIG (Vivaglobin(®) ) was compared with 20% SCIG (Hizentra(®) ) in PAD subjects. The study was a prospective, single-centre, open-label study of PAD subjects transitioning Vivaglobin to equivalent Hizentra doses, rounded to the nearest vial size. Comparisons included immunoglobulin (Ig)G levels; tetanus, varicella and Streptococcus pneumoniae titres; adverse events (AEs), annual infection rate and quality of life during 8 weeks of Vivaglobin and 24 weeks of Hizentra. Thirty-two subjects (aged 2-75 years) participated. Rounding to the nearest Hizentra vial size resulted in a 12·8% (± 2·9%) increase in SCIG dose. Median immunoglobulin (Ig)G level following 8 weeks of Vivaglobin was similar to 24 weeks of Hizentra (1050 versus 1035 mg/dl, respectively; P = 0·77). Both products had similar protective titres to tetanus, varicella and serotypes of S. pneumoniae, which were variable but well above protective levels. After 12 weeks of Hizentra, subjects reported fewer local site reactions compared with Vivaglobin. Switching products resulted in increased systemic AEs in some subjects but, overall, not significantly higher than during Vivaglobin treatment. Average infusion time decreased from 104·7 min (3·3 sites) with Vivaglobin to 70·7 min (2·2 sites) with Hizentra (P = 0·0005). Acute serious bacterial infections were similar. Treatment satisfaction was superior with Hizentra. Hizentra and Vivaglobin have similar pharmacokinetics and efficacy. Although transition to a different SCIG product initially increased AEs, Hizentra is well tolerated and can be infused more rapidly and with fewer sites compared to Vivaglobin.

  7. Differential Photoproduction Cross Sections of the Sigma0(1385), Lambda(1405), and Lambda(1520)

    SciTech Connect

    Moriya, Kei; Schumacher, Reinhard A.

    2013-10-01

    We report the exclusive photoproduction cross sections for the Sigma(1385), Lambda(1405), and Lambda(1520) in the reactions gamma + p -> K+ + Y* using the CLAS detector for energies from near the respective production thresholds up to a center-of-mass energy W of 2.85 GeV. The differential cross sections are integrated to give the total exclusive cross sections for each hyperon. Comparisons are made to current theoretical models based on the effective Lagrangian approach and fitted to previous data. The accuracy of these models is seen to vary widely. The cross sections for the Lambda(1405) region are strikingly different for the Sigma+pi-, Sigma0 pi0, and Sigma- pi+ decay channels, indicating the effect of isospin interference, especially at W values close to the threshold.

  8. The vectorial release of nascent immunoglobulin peptides

    PubMed Central

    Bevan, Michael J.

    1971-01-01

    A microsomal preparation from a mouse plasmacytoma, MOPC 47A, that secretes immunoglobulin A was used to study the release of nascent immunoglobulin peptides in vitro. Nascent chains were released with puromycin and characterized with specific antiserum against the immunoglobulin product of the tumour. When the tissue had been prelabelled with [3H]leucine the experiments were complicated by the large background of completed radioactive polypeptides in the microsomal preparation. Up to one-third of the released radioactivity in the microsomal preparation could be recognized as immunoglobulin. With [3H]-puromycin as the radioactive label, however, the results are much easier to interpret, although the proportion of released radioactivity that can be identified as immunoglobulin is lower (up to one-tenth). Both types of experiment demonstrate that all of the recognizable nascent immunoglobulin chains remain in association with the microsomal vesicles after release from the ribosomes. PMID:5124814

  9. Immunohistological analysis in diagnosis of plasma cell myeloma based on cytoplasmic kappa/lambda ratio of CD38-positive plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Shoko; Yokote, Taiji; Hirata, Yuji; Iwaki, Kazuki; Akioka, Toshikazu; Miyoshi, Takuji; Nishiwaki, Uta; Masuda, Yuki; Hiraoka, Nobuya; Takayama, Ayami; Nishimura, Yasuichiro; Tsuji, Motomu; Hanafusa, Toshiaki

    2012-11-01

    The accurate determination of cytoplasmic immunoglobulin (cIg) light chain (LC) expression is important to differentiate reactive plasmacytosis from a clonal plasma cell neoplasm such as plasma cell myeloma (PCM). Through retrospective analysis, we studied the cytoplasmic kappa/lambda ratio of CD38-positive plasma cells in the bone marrow from 19 PCM patients and 19 controls. To demonstrate cIg LC expression, the bone marrow was immunostained for IgA, IgG, IgM, kappa, and lambda. The kappa/lambda ratio was defined as the ratio of the kappa-positive cell to the lambda-positive cell in plasma cells. PCM cells were distinguished from normal plasma cells by cut-off levels between 0.59 and 4.0, a sensitivity of 94.7%, and a specificity of 94.7%. The detection of the cytoplasmic kappa/lambda ratio of CD38-positive plasma cells may be a useful tool in the diagnosis of PCM and the correct diagnosis of PCM may be achieved more simply.

  10. The T-cell receptor as immunoglobulin: paradigm regained.

    PubMed

    Marchalonis, J J; Schluter, S F; Edmundson, A B

    1997-12-01

    The quest to determine the molecular nature of T-lymphocyte receptors for antigen was a "holy grail" to immunologists for over 25 years. This paper updates a review written 15 years ago (Marchalonis JJ, Hunt JC. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med 171:127-145, 1982), which proposed that "these molecules apparently do not bear determinants specified by the major histocompatibility complex, but express Ig-related variable regions and constant regions unique to T-cell products." We review subsequent contributions from molecular biology, protein chemistry, peptide immunochemistry, and structural biology establishing that T-cell receptors (TCRs) are members of the immunoglobulin family restricted to T cells that share 3-dimensional structural features, sequence homology, antigenic cross-reactivity, and common mechanisms of diversification with conventional immunoglobulins. These molecules and their light- and heavy-chain siblings appeared contemporaneously in vertebrate evolution with the emergence of sharks. We illustrate how extrapolation of concepts from immunoglobulin to T-cell receptors has aided in the understanding of these often enigmatic molecules, and, conversely, how concepts derived for T-cell receptors such as the role of "superantigens" can be directly applied to conventional immunoglobulins. A second precept that follows from the symmetry of the combining sites of Igs and TCRs is that MHC-restricted antibodies should exist. Such molecules have in fact been reported, and the x-ray crystallography for T-cell receptors suggests that the combining sites recognizing simultaneously MHC and peptide epitopes resemble the combining sites of antibodies directed against protein determinants. Additional immunoglobulin molecules of nonmammalian species have been detected and characterized based upon conserved homology to TCR and Igs, and it is anticipated that further study will enable the identification of more antigen-specific members of the family in mammals as well.

  11. Measurement of the Lambda0b lifetime in the decay lambda0b--> J/psiLambda0 with the D0 detector.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Agram, J-L; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Arnoud, Y; Askew, A; Asman, B; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Baldin, B; Balm, P W; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Beauceron, S; Begel, M; Bellavance, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Blumenschein, U; Boehnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borcherding, F; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Butler, J M; Bystricky, J; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapin, D; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevalier, L; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Christiansen, T; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Coss, J; Cothenet, A; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cristetiu, M; Cummings, M A C; Cutts, D; da Motta, H; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Dean, S; Déliot, F; Delsart, P A; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dong, H; Doulas, S; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Eltzroth, J T; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Eroshin, O V; Estrada, J; Evans, D; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fast, J; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Freeman, W; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Genser, K; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golling, T; Gómez, B; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Groer, L; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Gurzhiev, S N; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Hagopian, S; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, C; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Harder, K; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Huang, J; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jain, V; Jakobs, K; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Jöstlein, H; Juste, A; Kado, M M; Käfer, D; Kahl, W; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kau, D; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Kesisoglou, S; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Kim, K H; Klima, B; Klute, M; Kohli, J M; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Krzywdzinski, S; Kuleshov, S; Kulik, Y; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Lager, S; Lahrichi, N; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Le Bihan, A-C; Lebrun, P; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Leonidopoulos, C; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linn, S L; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Lubatti, H J; Lueking, L; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A-M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; Mattingly, S E K; Mayorov, A A; McCarthy, R; McCroskey, R; Meder, D; Melanson, H L; Melnitchouk, A; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Miettinen, H; Mihalcea, D; Mitrevski, J; Mokhov, N; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Montgomery, H E; Moore, R W; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nelson, S; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Nurse, E; O'dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Oshima, N; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Perea, P M; Perez, E; Peters, O; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Phaf, L; Piegaia, R; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pope, B G; da Silva, W L Prado; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Przybycien, M B; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rani, K J; Rapidis, P A; Ratoff, P N; Reay, N W; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schukin, A A; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shephard, W D; Shpakov, D; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smith, R P; Smolek, K; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Song, Y; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stanton, N R; Stark, J; Steele, J; Steinbrück, G; Stevenson, K; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tentindo-Repond, S; Thomas, E; Thooris, B; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torborg, J; Towers, S; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vlimant, J-R; Von Toerne, E; Vreeswijk, M; Vu Anh, T; Wahl, H D; Walker, R; Wang, L; Wang, Z-M; Warchol, J; Warsinsky, M; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wegner, M; Wermes, N; White, A; White, V; Whiteson, D; Wicke, D; Wijngaarden, D A; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wittlin, J; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xu, Q; Xuan, N; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yen, Y; Yip, K; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zabi, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zdrazil, M; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhang, X; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zitoun, R; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G; Zylberstejn, A

    2005-03-18

    We present measurements of the Lambda(0)(b) lifetime in the exclusive decay channel Lambda(0)(b)--> J/psiLambda(0), with J/psi--> mu(+)mu(-) and Lambda(0)--> ppi(-), the B0 lifetime in the decay B0-->J/psiK(0)(S) with J/psi--> mu(+)mu(-) and K(0)(S)-->pi(+)pi(-), and the ratio of these lifetimes. The analysis is based on approximately 250 pb(-1) of data recorded with the D0 detector in pp collisions at sqrt[s] = 1.96 TeV. The Lambda(0)(b) lifetime is determined to be tau(Lambda(0)(b)) = 1.22(+0.22)(-0.18)(stat) +/- 0.04(syst) ps, the B0 lifetime tau(B0) = 1.40(+0.11)(-0.10)(stat) +/- 0.03(syst) ps, and the ratio tau(Lambda(0)(b))/tau(B0) = 0.87(+0.17)(-0.14)(stat) +/- 0.03(syst). In contrast with previous measurements using semileptonic decays, this is the first determination of the Lambda(0)(b) lifetime based on a fully reconstructed decay channel.

  12. Short-term effect of levosimendan on free light chain kappa and lambda levels in patients with decompensated chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Ibrahim Halil; Yavuzer, Kemal; Batur, Mustafa Kemal

    2010-09-01

    To investigate the effects of levosimendan, a positive inotropic agent, on the new heart failure markers immunoglobulin free light chains kappa and lambda (FLC-kappa and FLC-lambda) in decompensated chronic heart failure (HF), 59 patients with New York Heart Association (NYHA) class III-IV HF were enrolled. Patients were randomized into levosimendan (n = 31) and standard HF treatment (n = 29) groups. Serum FLC-kappa and FLC-lambda, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), and ejection fraction (EF) were measured before treatment and on the 5th day of treatment initiation. Forty-two percent of subjects were females (n = 25) and overall mean age was 64.1 +/- 10.7 years. FLC-kappa (P < 0.05) and FLC-lambda (P < 0.05) were significantly decreased in the levosimendan group compared to baseline, but no difference in either marker in the standard treatment group was observed. Pre- and post-treatment FLC-kappa/FLC-lambda ratios in both groups were similar, whereas FLC-kappa and FLC-lambda levels and the FLC-kappa/FLC-lambda ratio showed no significant correlation with NYHA class, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and ejection fraction (EF) levels; and BNP and EF changes after the treatment. Symptomatic improvement in the levosimendan group according to the NYHA class was significantly better than in the standard treatment group (P = 0.044). While 55.2% of patients in the levosimendan group showed a 1-degree shift to lower NYHA classes, 10.3% showed a 2-degree decrease. In conclusion, levosimendan caused short-term hemodynamic and symptomatic improvements, with a more pronounced decrease in FLC levels in patients with advanced decompensated HF.

  13. 7th International Immunoglobulin Conference: Immunoglobulin in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, R S; Borte, M

    2014-12-01

    Intravenous and subcutaneous immunoglobulins (IVIg and SCIg, respectively) are increasingly used in clinical practice, not only as replacement therapy but also for immunomodulation. Physicians have learned that primary immunodeficiency (PID) patients are susceptible to recurrent respiratory tract infections even when appropriately treated with immunoglobulin (Ig) therapy. Further investigation will establish whether a combined therapeutic approach including Ig dose optimization will prevent progressive lung disease in PID. The wear-off effects observed with IVIg can be minimized by adjusting the dosing regimen. It is also possible to avoid the cyclic wear-off following transition to SCIg administration. Consideration of benefit versus risk with Ig therapy includes evaluating the potential occurrence of thromboembolic and haemolytic events, which may be more frequent when Ig is administered in high doses and in the presence of pre-existing risk factors. The ability to select an administration method from IVIg, SCIg or hyaluronidase-facilitated SCIg infusions provides patient choice and alternatives if one or other administration route is not suitable for a patient. The evolution in indications, applications, and understanding of Ig therapy described here has reinforced the need for robust methods to prioritize Ig use.

  14. Immunoglobulins in human aqueous humour.

    PubMed Central

    Sen, D. K.; Sarin, G. S.; Saha, K.

    1977-01-01

    The immunoglobulin concentrations in human aqueous humour from 44 patients aged 35 to 85 years with cataracts were measured by a standard immunodiffusion method. IgG was found in all the samples (mean level 7-0 mg/100 ml. IgD, IgA or IgM could not be detected. There was no significant difference in IgG levels in aqueous humour between the two sexes, in different age groups, and in the different types of cataracts. PMID:403928

  15. The immunoglobulin heavy chain locus in the reptile Anolis carolinensis.

    PubMed

    Gambón Deza, Francisco; Sánchez Espinel, Christian; Magadán Mompó, Susana

    2009-05-01

    We describe the entire immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) locus from the reptile Anolis carolinensis. The heavy chain constant (C(H)) region includes C mu, C delta and C upsilon genes. This is the first description of a C upsilon gene in the reptilian class. Variable (V(H)), diversity (D(H)) and joining (J(H)) genes are located 5' from the constant (C(H)) chain complex locus. The C mu and C upsilon genes encode antibodies with four immunoglobulin domains. The C delta gene encoded an 11 domain delta heavy chain as in Eublepharis macularius. Seventy V(H) genes, belonging to 28 families, were identified, and they can be sorted into five broader groups. The similarity of the organization of the reptilian genes with those of amphibians and mammals suggests the existence of a process of heavy chain genomic reorganization before the radiation of tetrapod vertebrates.

  16. Design of broadly tuned FIR FEL based on a variable-period microwiggler

    SciTech Connect

    Qing-Xiang Liu |; Yong Xu

    1995-12-31

    A varible-period microwiggler is proposed and investigated. The fundamental period of the microwiggler is designed as {lambda}o=2mm, and the period of the microwiggler can be turned from {lambda}o to n{lambda}o (n=1,2,3,{hor_ellipsis}) The wiggler fields with the period 3{lambda}o, 4{lambda}o, and 5{lambda}o are measured and compared with the theoretical results. Finally, a broadly tuned FIR FEL is designed based on the performance of the variable-period microwiggler.

  17. Immunoglobulin D Multiple Myeloma With Rapidly Progressing Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Jwalant; Kamal, Jeanne; Eter, Ahmad; El-Sayegh, Suzanne; El-Charabaty, Elie

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulin D (IgD) multiple myeloma (MM) is a very rare form of myeloma affecting less than 2% of all myeloma patients. It has a multiorgan involvement with renal failure being the key feature. We present here a case of IgD MM in a 62-year-old white male, smoker with past medical history of hypertension, who presented to emergency department with complaints of lower abdominal pain, constipation and decreased urination. Physical exam was unremarkable. Laboratory investigation showed S.Cr 5.99 mg/dL, hemoglobin 8.7 g/dL and corrected S.Ca 10.6 mg/dL. Urine dipstick showed 100 protein and TP/Cr ratio was 23. Serology was positive for serum free lambda chain level of 8,947.6 mg/L as well with free κ/λ ratio < 0.01. The results of serum and urine electrophoresis and immunofixation were also supportive of diagnosis of IgD MM. IgD level was remarkably elevated (27,300 mg/L) too. CT scan of abdomen/pelvis was negative for obstructive uropathy. Skeletal survey showed a solitary lytic lesion in the iliac crest. His kidney function deteriorated next day requiring hemodialysis. The bone marrow biopsy was positive for plasma cell hypercellularity (70-80%) and flow cytometry showed 8% monoclonal IgD lambda plasma cells. The patient was started on bortezomib and dexamethasone and he underwent bone marrow transplant 6 months later. He is doing well hematologically now but he remains dialysis-dependent. IgD MM is a very rare disease affecting younger population with poor prognosis; patients often end up on hemodialysis despite better control of the hematological component. PMID:26124916

  18. Immunoglobulin D Multiple Myeloma With Rapidly Progressing Renal Failure.

    PubMed

    Modi, Jwalant; Kamal, Jeanne; Eter, Ahmad; El-Sayegh, Suzanne; El-Charabaty, Elie

    2015-08-01

    Immunoglobulin D (IgD) multiple myeloma (MM) is a very rare form of myeloma affecting less than 2% of all myeloma patients. It has a multiorgan involvement with renal failure being the key feature. We present here a case of IgD MM in a 62-year-old white male, smoker with past medical history of hypertension, who presented to emergency department with complaints of lower abdominal pain, constipation and decreased urination. Physical exam was unremarkable. Laboratory investigation showed S.Cr 5.99 mg/dL, hemoglobin 8.7 g/dL and corrected S.Ca 10.6 mg/dL. Urine dipstick showed 100 protein and TP/Cr ratio was 23. Serology was positive for serum free lambda chain level of 8,947.6 mg/L as well with free κ/λ ratio < 0.01. The results of serum and urine electrophoresis and immunofixation were also supportive of diagnosis of IgD MM. IgD level was remarkably elevated (27,300 mg/L) too. CT scan of abdomen/pelvis was negative for obstructive uropathy. Skeletal survey showed a solitary lytic lesion in the iliac crest. His kidney function deteriorated next day requiring hemodialysis. The bone marrow biopsy was positive for plasma cell hypercellularity (70-80%) and flow cytometry showed 8% monoclonal IgD lambda plasma cells. The patient was started on bortezomib and dexamethasone and he underwent bone marrow transplant 6 months later. He is doing well hematologically now but he remains dialysis-dependent. IgD MM is a very rare disease affecting younger population with poor prognosis; patients often end up on hemodialysis despite better control of the hematological component.

  19. Remarks on the generalized Tukey's lambda family of distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, H.; Bowman, K.O.; Shenton, L.R.

    1980-01-01

    The family of curves generated by the mapping of the uniform density F/sup -1/(lambda) = ..cap alpha.. + ..beta..(lambda/sup ..gamma..delta/ - (1-lambda)/sup ..gamma../)/..gamma.., 0 < lambda < 1, is considered. Primary interest is the application of the above density to approximating theoretical distribution functions of test statistics such as S.D., skewness, and kurtosis under non-normality. Moments are straight forward to evaluate in terms of gamma functions, or polygamma functions in special cases. 1 figure, 8 tables. (RWR)

  20. Charge-symmetry breaking {Lambda}-nucleon interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Bodmer, A.R.; Murali, M.; Usmani, Q.N.

    1995-08-01

    Some time ago we showed that the charge-symmetry-breaking interaction, as obtained from the mass four hypernuclei ({sub {Lambda}}{sup 4}H, {sub {Lambda}}{sup 4}He), was spin-independent; a result which cannot be understood with the conventional meson-exchange models. The calculations of ({sub {Lambda}}{sup 4}H, {sub {Lambda}}{sup 4}He) are currently being extended to include noncentral nuclear and hypernuclear forces which could modify this result. At a more fundamental level we intend to study quark-structure contributions to the charge-symmetry-breaking interaction.

  1. Blood Test: Immunoglobulin A (IgA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 2-Year-Old Blood Test: Immunoglobulin A (IgA) KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Test: Immunoglobulin A (IgA) Print A A A What's in this article? ... Questions en español Análisis de sangre: inmunoglobulina A (IgA) What It Is An IgA test measures the ...

  2. Pharmacoeconomics of immunoglobulins in primary immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Simoens, Steven

    2009-08-01

    Primary immunodeficiency disorders are associated with increased patient susceptibility to recurrent infections. Since the 1950s, intramuscular, intravenous and subcutaneous immunoglobulin products have been used to replace functionally deficient or absent immunoglobulins, reduce the incidence of infections and prevent organ damage caused by infections. This article aims to review the use of immunoglobulin therapy in primary immunodeficiency by focusing on costs, effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, supply and off-label use. To date, the economic burden of primary immunodeficiency is unknown. Past studies have supported minimal differences in effectiveness between intravenous and subcutaneous immunoglobulins. Subcutaneous therapy may be considered for patients who prefer treatment at home. The small number of economic evaluations and their methodological limitations precludes the recommendation of a specific product for use in primary immunodeficiency on pharmacoeconomic grounds. Demand for immunoglobulins has increased over time, leading to periodic shortages and emphasizing the importance of its appropriate use.

  3. [Serum immunoglobulin E level in bronchial asthma].

    PubMed

    Denchev, K; Radkov, M; Lipcheva, N

    1976-01-01

    Serum immunoglobulin E level was determined in 50 patients with bronchial asthma, treated in the out-patients department and clinical conditions at the Faculty Hospital--Varna. The quantitative determination of immunoglobulin E was carried out by radial immunodiffusion according to Mancini with monospecific anti-IgE globulin serum from Behringswerke (GFR). A considerable elevation of immunoglobulin E in the patients' sera was found, at an average of 394 IU (control 124 IU). A discrepancy in serum immunoglobulin E level was established with the different clinical forms of asthma. The highest are the values with infectious-allergic astmha-424 IU. High are the values both in the treated and not-treated with corticosteroids, without an essential difference between the two patient groups. Some of the rest immunoglobulins showed also an elevationppIgG 2620 mg% and IgA 366 mg%.

  4. Immunoglobulin-E reactivity to wine glycoproteins in heavy drinkers.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Quintela, Arturo; Gomez-Rial, Jose; Valcarcel, Catalina; Campos, Joaquin; Sanz, Maria-Luisa; Linneberg, Allan; Gude, Francisco; Vidal, Carmen

    2011-03-01

    N-glycans from plant and invertebrate allergens can induce extensive immunoglobulin-E (IgE) cross-reactivity in vitro. IgE antibodies against these N-glycans, also termed cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants or CCDs, are prevalent in alcohol drinkers. This study investigated the prevalence and biological significance of IgE antibodies to N-glycans from wine glycoproteins in heavy drinkers. A structured questionnaire, skin prick tests, serum IgE levels, IgE-immunoblotting to wine extracts, and basophil activation tests were used to characterize 20 heavy drinkers and 10 control subjects. Eleven heavy drinkers (55%) showed IgE binding to proteins in wine extracts. The proteins were identified by mass spectrometry as grape-derived vacuolar invertase and thaumatin-like protein. Immunoblot reactivity was closely associated with the presence of IgE to CCDs and was inhibited by preincubation with a glycoconjugate containing bromelain-type N-glycans. The same conjugate, CCD-bearing allergens, and wine extracts activated basophils in patients with high-titer CCD-specific IgE but not in healthy controls. There was no relationship between immunoblot reactivity and consumption of any specific type of wine. No patient reported symptoms of hypersensitivity to Hymenoptera venom, food, or wine. In conclusion, heavy drinkers frequently show IgE reactivity to the N-glycans of wine glycoproteins. Glycans and wine glycoprotein extracts can induce basophil activation in sensitized alcoholics. The clinical significance of these findings remains to be elucidated.

  5. Hematogones With Lambda Light Chain Restriction in a 4-Year-Old Boy With Burkitt Lymphoma: A Potential Diagnostic Pitfall.

    PubMed

    Guillory, Tesha; Li, Shiyong; Bergsagel, Daniel J; Weinzierl, Elizabeth; Bunting, Silvia T

    2016-05-01

    Hematogones are immature normal B cell precursors with a characteristic immunophenotype profile on flow cytometry that typically do not express surface immunoglobulin light chains. In this report, we describe a case in which the hematogones exhibit light chain restriction. Our patient was a 4-year-old boy with a complicated medical history involving treatment for a presumed bilateral Wilms tumor of the kidney that on later resection was diagnosed as Burkitt lymphoma. Flow cytometry analysis of his bone marrow revealed a small distinct population of cells expressing dim cluster of differentiation (CD)10, CD19, CD22, CD38, dim CD58, human leukocyte antigen-D related (HLA-DR), and dim CD45, which are characteristic of hematogones. These cells, however, demonstrated dim surface immunoglobulin lambda light-chain restriction. Molecular study results for immunoglobulin heavy and kappa light-chain gene rearrangements were negative. We present this case to raise awareness of the potential pitfalls of working up bone marrow for involvement by B cell lymphoproliferative disorder.

  6. Restriction of immunoglobulin heterogeneity, autoimmunity and serum protein levels in aged people.

    PubMed Central

    Riesen, W; Keller, H; Skvaril, F; Morell, A; Barandun, S

    1976-01-01

    Ninety-one sera of persons above 80 years of age were screened for autoantibody activity against lipoproteins (anti-LDL 7, anti-HDL 6 positive), for rheumatoid factor activity (Latex 14, Waaler-Rose 7 positive) and for antinuclear factors (11 positive). Among the sera with autoantibody activity 29 percent showed deviations of the normal kappa/lambda ratio of immunoglobulins, as opposed to 22 percent of the sera without detected autoantibody activity. In 3 percent of the sera an M component was detected. Determination of the alpha1-acid glycoprotein, alpha1-antitrypsin, haptoglobin, haemopexin, complement component C3c and C4, IgG, IgA and IgM levels showed significant increases in alpha-, and beta-globulins as well as in IgG and IgA in sera of the aged persons as compared to a normal population between 20 and 60 years old. No significant difference was noted between the gamma-globulin concentration in sera of aged persons with or without autoantibody activity. The evaluation of the relationship between serum protein levels and alterations of the kappa/lambda ratio indicated that the alpha- and the beta-globulins were significantly raised in sera with altered kappa/lambda ratios, whereas, with the exception of M component containing sera the gamma-globulin levels seemed not significantly affected by changes in this ratio. PMID:62632

  7. Immunoglobulins, antibody repertoire and B cell development.

    PubMed

    Butler, J E; Zhao, Y; Sinkora, M; Wertz, N; Kacskovics, I

    2009-03-01

    Swine share with most placental mammals the same five antibody isotypes and same two light chain types. Loci encoding lambda, kappa and Ig heavy chains appear to be organized as they are in other mammals. Swine differ from rodents and primates, but are similar to rabbits in using a single VH family (VH3) to encode their variable heavy chain domain, but not the family used by cattle, another artiodactyl. Distinct from other hoofed mammals and rodents, Ckappa:Clambda usage resembles the 1:1 ratio seen in primates. Since IgG subclasses diversified after speciation, same name subclass homologs do not exist among swine and other mammals unless very closely related. Swine possess six putative IgG subclasses that appear to have diversified by gene duplication and exon shuffle while retaining motifs that can bind to FcgammaRs, FcRn, C1q, protein A and protein G. The epithelial chorial placenta of swine and the precosial nature of their offspring have made piglets excellent models for studies on fetal antibody repertoire development and on the postnatal role of gut colonization, maternal colostrum and neonatal infection on the development of adaptive immunity during the "critical window" of immunological development. This chapter traces the study of the humoral immune system of this species through its various eras of discovery and compiles the results in tables and figures that should be a useful reference for educators and investigators.

  8. Lambda-instability of Keplerian orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumin, Yurii

    Although the Lambda-term is commonly recognized to be of crucial importance for the large-scale (cosmological) dynamics, its influence can be appreciable also at much less scales, particularly, for the long-term evolution of Keplerian orbits. Such effects were studied in the recent years in a number of papers, e.g. [1, 2]; however this was done only under the assumption of static de Sitter asymptotics at infinity. A more realistic treatment of this problem should be based, evidently, on the nonstationary Friedmann-Robertson-Walker asymptotics, which is commonly accepted in modern cosmology; and such an approach was outlined in our earlier paper [3]. The present report is devoted to the results of numerical integration of the equations of motion of a test particle experiencing a gravitational field of the massive central body against the Lambda-background. Apart from the tiny secular effect of Hubble type, which is naturally expected and was already discussed before [4], we have found a strong instability, which can develop at certain values of the orbital parameters. The growth rate of this instability is much larger than the typical Hubble velocity, and it can eventually lead to disruption of the Keplerian orbit and injection of the test particle with a considerable velocity. From our point of view, the revealed phenomenon may have important astrophysical applications, particularly, for explanation of the very fast proper motions of some stars, anomalous interstellar separation in multiple systems, etc. References: 1. A. Balaguera-Antolínez, C.G. Böhmer, M. Nowakowski. Class. Quant. Grav., v.23, p.485 (2006). 2. V. Kagramanova, J. Kunz, C Lämmerzahl. Phys. Lett. B, v.634, p.465 (2006). 3. Yu.V. Dumin. Phys. Rev. Lett., v.98, p.059001 (2007). 4. Yu.V. Dumin. Proc. 11th Marcel Grossmann Meeting on General Relativity (World Sci., Singapore, 2008), p.1752.

  9. Atypical immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xia; Feng, Jun; Cao, Xinxin; Zhang, Lu; Zhou, Daobin; Li, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Primary immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis (AL amyloidosis) is a plasma cell disorder which mainly affects heart, kidneys, liver, and peripheral nervous system. Cases of atypical AL amyloidosis presented as spontaneous vertebral compression fractures have been rarely reported, and data about the management and clinical outcomes of the patients are scarce. Methods: Herein, we present 3 new cases of AL amyloidosis with spontaneous vertebral compression fracture and review 13 cases retrieved from the literature. Results: Moreover, we observed overrepresentations of liver involvement and bone marrow involvement in AL amyloidosis with spontaneous vertebral compression fracture. Conclusion: We believe that better awareness of the rare clinical presentation as spontaneous vertebral compression fracture of AL amyloidosis can facilitate earlier diagnosis and earlier treatment. PMID:27603350

  10. Correlation between UV dose requirement for lambda bacteriophage induction and lambda repressor concentration.

    PubMed Central

    Baluch, J; Sussman, R

    1978-01-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 wild type and a uvrA mutant derivative were used to construct isogenic strains bearing one, two, three, or more phage lambda cI genomes and containing increasing concentration of lambda repressor as measured by in vitro operator DNA-binding assays. The survival and phage induction in response to UV irradiation were determined. In both strains, dose-response relationships were obtained as a function of the cellular repressor concentration. The uvrA lysogens required one-tenth the UV fluence of the wild-type counterparts for induction. Lysogenic strains containing plasmids that overproduce the lambdaind+ repressor and the same lysogens with plasmids overproducing the lambdaind- repressor displayed the same survival curves as the nonlysogenic parental strain; however, only the former produced infectious centers (at a frequency of 2 x 10(-3) to 5 x 10(-4) in response to radiation. PMID:353300

  11. Immunological studies of human placentae: the distribution and character of immunoglobulins in chorionic villi.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, P M; Natvig, J B; Ystehede, U A; Faulk, W P

    1977-01-01

    All four human IgG subclasses, and both kappa and lambda light chains, were detected by immunofluorescence in similar distributions in chorionic villi of human placentae. IgG1 and IgG3 were the predominant subclasses. No evidence was obtained for local enzymatic digestion of IgG during placental transfer. Most of the IgG on the trophoblastic basement membrane (TBM) was loosely bound and could be removed by prolonged washing, although some appeared to be more tightly bound to small segments of the TBM. IgM, but not IgA, was present in small amounts in placental villous structures. Immunoglobulin was never observed within the syncytiotrophoblast. Antisera to IgG genetic (Gm) markers were used to locate IgG thought to be of foetal or maternal origin. The presence of paternal Gm markers not carried by the mother was taken as evidence for foetal IgG. Foetal (paternal) Gm markers were observed in placentae, although maternal IgG was the major immunoglobulin present in placental villi. Both maternal and foetal IgG were demonstrated in fibrinoid deposits, vessel walls and the cytoplasm of some stromal cells. Only foetal IgG was definitively observed in the immunoglobulin that is tightly bound to the TBM. PMID:342151

  12. Surrogate or conventional light chains are required for membrane immunoglobulin mu to activate the precursor B cell transition [published erratum appears in J Exp Med 1997 Jan 6;185(1):183

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    To examine the role of light chains in early B cell development we combined RAG-1 and lambda 5 mutations to produce mice that expressed neither conventional nor surrogate light chains (RAG-1-/-, lambda 5-/- ). Unique heavy and light chain genes were then introduced into the double and single mutant backgrounds. Membrane immunoglobulin (Ig)mu (mIg mu) associated with Ig alpha-Ig beta but was unable to activate the pre-B cell transition in RAG-1-/-lambda 5-/- mice. Either lambda 5 or kappa light chains were sufficient to complement this deficiency. Therefore light chains are absolutely required for a functional Ig signaling module in early B cell development. Our data provide direct evidence for the existence of two pathways for induction of early B cell development: one which is activated through surrogate light chains and mIg mu, and an alternative pathway which uses conventional light chains and mIg mu. PMID:8920890

  13. High Resolution Spectroscopy of 16N_Lambda by Electroproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Cusanno, Francesco; Urciuoli, Guido; Acha Quimper, Armando; Ambrozewicz, Pawel; Aniol, Konrad; Baturin, Pavlo; Bertin, Pierre; Benaoum, Hachemi; Blomqvist, Ingvar; Boeglin, Werner; Breuer, Herbert; Brindza, Paul; Bydzovsky, Petr; Camsonne, Alexandre; Chang, C.; Chang, C.C.; Chang, C.; Chang, C.C.; Chang, C.; Chang, C.C.; Chang, C.; Chang, C.C.; Chen, Jian-Ping; Choi, Seonho; Chudakov, Eugene; Cisbani, Evaristo; Colilli, Stefano; Coman, Luminita; Craver, Brandon; de Cataldo, Giacinto; De Jager, Cornelis; De Leo, Raffaele; Deur, Alexandre; Ferdi, Catherine; Feuerbach, Robert; Folts, Edward; Frullani, Salvatore; Garibaldi, Franco; Gayou, Olivier; Giuliani, Fausto; Gomez, Javier; Gricia, Massimo; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Hayes, David; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmstrom, Timothy; Hyde, Charles; Ibrahim, Hassan; Iodice, Mauro; Jiang, Xiaodong; Kaufman, Lisa; Kino, Kouichi; Kross, Brian; Lagamba, Luigi; LeRose, John; Lindgren, Richard; Lucentini, Maurizio; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; Marrone, Stefano; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; McCormick, Kathy; Michaels, Robert; Millener, D.; Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Moffit, Bryan; Monaghan, Peter; Moteabbed, Maryam; Munoz Camacho, Carlos; Nanda, Sirish; Nappi, E.; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Norum, Blaine; Okasyasu, Y.; Paschke, Kent; Perdrisat, Charles; Piasetzky, Eliazer; Punjabi, Vina; Qiang, Yi; Raue, Brian; Reimer, Paul; Reinhold, Joerg; Reitz, Bodo; Roche, Rikki; Rodriguez, Victor; Saha, Arunava; Santavenere, Fabio; Sarty, Adam; Segal, John; Shahinyan, Albert; Singh, Jaideep; Sirca, Simon; Snyder, Ryan; Solvignon, Patricia; Sotona, M.; Sotona, Miloslav; Sotona, M.; Sotona, Miloslav; Sotona, M.; Sotona, Miloslav; Sotona, M.; Sotona, Miloslav; Subedi, Ramesh; Sulkosky, Vince; Sulkosky, Vincent; Sulkosky, Vince; Sulkosky, Vincent; Suzuki, Tomokazu; Ueno, Hiroaki; Ulmer, Paul; Veneroni, P.P.; Voutier, Eric; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Zeng, X.; Zorn, Carl

    2009-01-01

    An experimental study of the 16O(e, e'K+)16N_Lambda reaction has been performed at Jefferson Lab. A thin film of falling water was used as a target. This permitted a simultaneous measurement of the p(e, e'K+)Lambda,Sigma_0 exclusive reactions and a precise calibration of the energy scale. A ground-state binding energy of 13.76 ± 0.16 MeV was obtained for 16N_Lambda with better precision than previous measurements on the mirror hypernucleus 16O_Lambda. Precise energies have been determined for peaks arising from a Lambda in s and p orbits coupled to the p1/2 and p3/2 hole states of the 15N core nucleus.

  14. Phillips' Lambda function: Data summary and physical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irisov, V.; Plant, W.

    2016-03-01

    Measurements of Phillips' Lambda function describing the average length of breakers on the ocean per unit area at speed cb are summarized. An expression is developed that fits these data within reasonable bounds. A physical model for the Lambda function is derived based on the assumption that breaking occurs when the surface steepness exceeds a threshold value. The energy contained in the breaking region is related to the fifth power of the breaker speed, as Phillips showed, and from this the probability of finding a breaker with a speed cb may be determined from a simulation of the long-wave surface based on a linear superposition of Fourier components. This probability is directly related to the Lambda function so that a form for this function can be determined. The Lambda function so determined agrees in both shape and intensity with the fit to the measured Lambda functions.

  15. Perspectives on Immunoglobulins in Colostrum and Milk

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Walter L.; Theil, Peter K.

    2011-01-01

    Immunoglobulins form an important component of the immunological activity found in milk and colostrum. They are central to the immunological link that occurs when the mother transfers passive immunity to the offspring. The mechanism of transfer varies among mammalian species. Cattle provide a readily available immune rich colostrum and milk in large quantities, making those secretions important potential sources of immune products that may benefit humans. Immune milk is a term used to describe a range of products of the bovine mammary gland that have been tested against several human diseases. The use of colostrum or milk as a source of immunoglobulins, whether intended for the neonate of the species producing the secretion or for a different species, can be viewed in the context of the types of immunoglobulins in the secretion, the mechanisms by which the immunoglobulins are secreted, and the mechanisms by which the neonate or adult consuming the milk then gains immunological benefit. The stability of immunoglobulins as they undergo processing in the milk, or undergo digestion in the intestine, is an additional consideration for evaluating the value of milk immunoglobulins. This review summarizes the fundamental knowledge of immunoglobulins found in colostrum, milk, and immune milk. PMID:22254105

  16. Intestinal immunoglobulins in children with coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Savilahti, E.

    1972-01-01

    The numbers of immunoglobulin-containing cells in jejunal biopsy specimens of 19 children with active coeliac disease aged 0·5 to 16·5 years were studied by direct immunofluorescence. Intestinal juice immunoglobulins were measured in 14 of these patients. The number of IgA-containing cells was twice and the number of IgM-containing cells 2·5 times that of age-matched controls. There were also more IgG-, IgE-, and IgD-containing cells in the jejunal mucosa of the coeliac patients, but the absolute numbers of these cells were low. The immunoglobulin content of the intestinal juice was not altered in coeliacs. A follow-up biopsy specimen was available from seven patients kept on a strict gluten-free diet for one to four months. A significant fall in the numbers of immunoglobulin-containing cells was seen, and they did not differ at that time from the controls. Two patients were followed until full normalization of the jejunal structure and they had normal numbers of immunoglobulin-containing cells. In children with coeliac disease in contrast to adult coeliacs, the study shows that the IgA-producing system is quantitatively stimulated during gluten challenge. The rapid drop in the numbers of immunoglobulin-containing cells after gluten withdrawal suggests that there is no quantitative abnormality in the local immunoglobulin-producing system of the gut in coeliac disease. ImagesFig. 3 PMID:4568803

  17. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin in treating inflammatory neuromuscular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Min-Suk; Gold, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Intravenous immunoglobulin administration has long been used in the treatment of autoimmune neuromuscular disorders. Immunoglobulins may be administered by intramuscular, intravenous or subcutaneous routes. Methods: This is a report on the long-term clinical follow up of six patients with inflammatory neuromuscular disorders, that is, three chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), one multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), one inclusion body myositis (IBM) and one myasthenia gravis (MG), treated with subcutaneous immunoglobulins for a mean of 3.25 years. Results: One MMN and two CIDP patients received a weekly dose of subcutaneous immunoglobulins equivalent to intravenous immunoglobulin. One CIDP patient received a 50% dose reduction, the IBM patient received a 30% reduction and the MG patient a 20% reduction. The lower dose chosen in the majority of patients was based not only on clinical effects, but also on studies of primary immunodeficiency syndromes. One patient with CIDP showed clinical fluctuation, which was successfully treated with an adaptation of the dose of subcutaneous immunoglobulins, while the remaining patients with neuromuscular disorders had a stable clinical course for 2 years. No serious side effects were observed. Conclusions: Our results suggest that subcutaneous immunoglobulins can be an attractive alternative therapy in autoimmune neuromuscular disorders. PMID:26136842

  18. 7th International Immunoglobulin Conference: Immunodeficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, R E; Ochs, H D

    2014-01-01

    Most primary immunodeficiency disorders (PID) are the result of single gene defects. Based on this fact, more than 240 different entities have been identified. Those PIDs with predominant antibody deficiency are treated with immunoglobulin (Ig) replacement therapy. This review focuses on the diagnosis, clinical characteristics and treatment of patients suffering from PID, or secondary immunodeficiency disorders (SID) caused, for instance, by irradiation, immunosuppressive drugs or thymectomy. Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most commonly diagnosed and least understood form of PID, with a heterogeneous range of symptoms and genotypes, requiring individualized treatment plans. This includes adjusting the dose and treatment interval, administrating Ig by intravenous or subcutaneous injection by either pump or push, and finally deciding which treatment options are best for a given patient. Ig therapy can also be used to treat immunodeficiencies resulting from lymphoproliferative and autoimmune diseases or immunosuppression following organ transplantation; however, there is an urgent need for research in this field. Accurate and early diagnosis of PID is important to ensure that optimal treatment is started early to maintain the patient's health. Detailed patient registries have been established to increase awareness of PID, as well as provide a valuable resource for further research. PMID:25546741

  19. Biased immunoglobulin light chain gene usage in the shark1

    PubMed Central

    Iacoangeli, Anna; Lui, Anita; Naik, Ushma; Ohta, Yuko; Flajnik, Martin; Hsu, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    This study of a large family of kappa light (L) chain clusters in nurse shark completes the characterization of its classical immunoglobulin (Ig) gene content (two heavy chain classes, mu and omega, and four L chain isotopes, kappa, lambda, sigma, and sigma-2). The shark kappa clusters are minigenes consisting of a simple VL-JL-CL array, where V to J recombination occurs over a ~500 bp interval, and functional clusters are widely separated by at least 100 kb. Six out of ca. 39 kappa clusters are pre-rearranged in the germline (GL-joined). Unlike the complex gene organization and multistep assembly process of Ig in mammals, each shark Ig rearrangement, somatic or in the germline, appears to be an independent event localized to the minigene. This study examined the expression of functional, non-productive, and sterile transcripts of the kappa clusters compared to the other three L chain isotypes. Kappa cluster usage was investigated in young sharks, and a skewed pattern of split gene expression was observed, one similar in functional and non-productive rearrangements. These results show that the individual activation of the spatially distant kappa clusters is non-random. Although both split and GL-joined kappa genes are expressed, the latter are prominent in young animals and wane with age. We speculate that, in the shark, the differential activation of the multiple isotypes can be advantageously used in receptor editing. PMID:26342033

  20. Measurement of the production fraction times branching fraction $\\boldsymbol{ f(b\\to\\Lambda_{b})\\cdot \\mathcal{B}(\\Lambda_{b}\\to J/\\psi \\Lambda)}$

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; /Nijmegen U. /Fermilab

    2011-05-01

    The {Lambda}{sub b}(udb) baryon is observed in the decay {Lambda}{sub b} {yields} J/{psi}{Lambda} using 6.1 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions collected with the D0 detector at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The production fraction multiplied by the branching fraction for this decay relative to that for the decay B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}K{sub s}{sup 0} is measured to be 0.345 {+-} 0.034 (stat.) {+-} 0.033 (syst.) {+-} 0.003 (PDG). Using the world average value of f(b {yields} B{sup 0}) {center_dot} {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}K{sub s}{sup 0}) = (1.74 {+-} 0.08) x 10{sup -5}, they obtain f(b {yields} {Lambda}{sub b}) {center_dot} {Beta}({Lambda}{sub b} {yields} J/{psi}{Lambda}) = (6.01 {+-} 0.60 (stat.) {+-} 0.58 (syst.) {+-} 0.28 (PDG)) x 10{sup -5}. This measurement represents an improvement in precision by about a factor of three with respect to the current world average.

  1. Immunohistochemical comparison of CD5, lambda, and kappa expression in primary and recurrent buccal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kitabatake, Kenichirou; Iino, Mituyoshi; Goto, Kaoru

    2011-09-06

    Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma is a type of extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma and is a distinct subtype of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.Primary MALT lymphomas can also occur in the oral cavity, although their appearance in this location is rare. The neoplastic cells of which MALT lymphomas are composed express B-cell antigens and show monotypic immunoglobulin expression with light-chain restriction.Although neoplastic MALT lymphoma cells do not express CD5, previous studies have shown that CD5 positive MALT lymphomas are more prone to dissemination than those that do not express CD5. Moreover, there are some reports that describe kappa- and lambda- dual light chain expression in B cell malignant neoplasms.A 66-year-old Japanese woman with swelling of the right buccal mucosa was referred to our hospital. The lesion was excised and was pathologically diagnosed as a MALT lymphoma tumor with a t(11;18)(q21;q21) chromosome translocation.Swelling of the right buccal mucosa recurred 2 years later. The recurrent tumor was then excised and pathologically diagnosed as MALT lymphoma.Immunohistochemical examination of CD5, lambda, and kappa expressions revealed that the primary tumor was positive for CD5, kappa, and lambda, but the recurrent tumor was weakly positive for CD5 and kappa.With respect to lambda positivity, the recurrent tumor showed negativity.Our study suggests that immunohistochemical expression of CD5, kappa, and lambda in oral MALT lymphoma have the risk of recurrence.We first described the recurrence of CD5 positive MALT lymphoma in the oral cavity and compared the immunohistochemical expressions of CD5, lambda, and kappa between the primary and recurrent tumors.

  2. Immunoglobulin Replacement Therapy for Primary Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Sriaroon, Panida; Ballow, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Immunoglobulin replacement therapy has been standard treatment in patients with primary immunodeficiency diseases for the past 3 decades. The goal of therapy is to reduce serious bacterial infections in individuals with antibody function defects. Approximately one-third of patients receiving intravenous immunoglobulin treatment experience adverse reactions. Recent advances in manufacturing processes have resulted in products that are safer and better tolerated. Self-infusion by the subcutaneous route has become popular and resulted in better quality of life. This review summarizes the use of immunoglobulin therapy in primary immunodeficiency diseases including its properties, dosing, adverse effects, and different routes of administration.

  3. Effect of specimen type on free immunoglobulin light chains analysis on the Roche Diagnostics cobas 8000 analyzer.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Louis S; Steussy, Bryan; Morris, Cory S; Krasowski, Matthew D

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of free immunoglobulin light chains is typically performed on serum; however, the use of alternative specimen types has potential benefits. Using the Freelite™ kappa and lambda free light chains assay on a Roche Diagnostics cobas 8000 c502 analyzer, we compared three specimen types (serum, EDTA-plasma and lithium heparin plasma separator gel-plasma) on 100 patients. Using Deming regression and eliminating outliers (limiting data to light chain concentrations below 400 mg/L), the three specimen types showed comparable results for kappa light chain concentration, lambda light chain concentration, and kappa/lambda ratio with slopes close to 1.0 and y-intercepts close to zero. EDTA-plasma showed slightly more positive bias relative to serum than lithium heparin. Analysis using EDTA-plasma and lithium heparin plasma showed comparable linearity, precision, and temperature stability. A single sample showing hook effect (not in the comparison set) gave comparable results using either plasma specimen type. For the Freelite™ kappa and lambda free light chains assay, both EDTA-plasma or lithium heparin-plasma can serve as acceptable substitutes for serum, at least for the Roche cobas 8000 analyzer.

  4. DNA breaks in hypermutating immunoglobulin genes: evidence for a break-and-repair pathway of somatic hypermutation.

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Q; Maizels, N

    2001-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that immunoglobulin gene hypermutation in vivo employs a pathway in which DNA breaks are introduced and subsequently repaired to produce mutations, we have used a PCR-based assay to detect and identify single-strand DNA breaks in lambda1 genes of actively hypermutating primary murine germinal center B cells. We find that there is a two- to threefold excess of breaks in lambda1 genes of hypermutating B cells, relative to nonhypermutating B cells, and that 1.3% of germinal center B cells contain breaks in the lambda1 gene that are associated with hypermutation. Breaks were found in both top and bottom DNA strands and were localized to the region of lambda1 that actively hypermutates, but duplex breaks accounted for only a subset of breaks identified. Almost half of the breaks in hypermutating B cells occurred at hotspots, sites at which two or more independent breaks were identified. Breaksite hotspots were associated with characteristic sequence motifs: a pyrimidine-rich motif, either RCTYT or CCYC; and RGYW, a sequence motif associated with hypermutation hotspots. The sequence motifs identified at breaksite hotspots should inform the design of substrates for characterization of activities that participate in the hypermutation pathway. PMID:11333245

  5. The amino acid sequence of a carbohydrate-containing immunoglobulin-light-chain-type amyloid-fibril protein.

    PubMed Central

    Tveteraas, T; Sletten, K; Westermark, P

    1985-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of an amyloid-fibril protein Es492 of immunoglobulin-lambda-light-chain origin (AL) was elucidated. The amyloid fibrils were obtained from the spleen of a patient who died from systemic amyloidosis. The amino acid sequence was elucidated from structural studies of peptides derived from digestion of the protein with trypsin, thermolysin, chymotrypsin and Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase and from cleavage of the protein with CNBr and BNPS-skatole. A heterogeneity in the length of the polypeptide was seen in the C-terminal region. The protein was by sequence homology to other lambda-chains shown to be of the V lambda II subgroup. Although an extensive homology was seen, some amino acid residues in positions 26, 31, 32, 40, 44, 93, 97, 98 and 99 have not previously been reported in these positions of V lambda II proteins. The significance of these residues in the fibril formation is unclear. The protein was found to contain carbohydrate, with glycosylation sites in two of the hypervariable regions. PMID:3936482

  6. Exclusive semileptonic decays of {lambda}{sub b}{yields}{lambda}l{sup +}l{sup -} in supersymmetric theories

    SciTech Connect

    Aslam, M. Jamil; Wang Yuming; Lue Caidian

    2008-12-01

    The weak decays of {lambda}{sub b}{yields}{lambda}l{sup +}l{sup -} (l=e, {mu}) are investigated in the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) and also in supersymmetric (SUSY) SO(10) grand unified models. In the MSSM special attention is paid to the neutral Higgs bosons (NHBs) as they make quite a large contribution in exclusive B{yields}X{sub s}l{sup +}l{sup -} decays at large tan{beta} regions of parameter space of SUSY models, since part of SUSY contributions is proportional to tan{sup 3}{beta}. The analysis of decay rate, forward-backward asymmetries, lepton polarization asymmetries, and the polarization asymmetries of the {lambda} baryon in {lambda}{sub b}{yields}{lambda}l{sup +}l{sup -} show that the values of these physical observables are greatly modified by the effects of NHBs. In the SUSY SO(10) grand unified theory model, the new physics contribution comes from the operators which are induced by the NHBs' penguins and also from the operators having chirality opposite to that of the corresponding standard model (SM) operators. SUSY SO(10) effects show up only in the decay {lambda}{sub b}{yields}{lambda}+{tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} where the longitudinal and transverse lepton polarization asymmetries deviate significantly from the SM value while the effects in the decay rate, forward-backward asymmetries, and polarization asymmetries of final state {lambda} baryon are very mild. The transverse lepton polarization asymmetry in {lambda}{sub b}{yields}{lambda}+{tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} is almost zero in the SM and in the MSSM model. However, it can reach to -0.1 in the SUSY SO(10) grand unified theory model and could be seen at the future colliders; hence this asymmetry observable will provide us useful information to probe new physics and discriminate between different models.

  7. 7th International Immunoglobulin Conference: Poster presentations.

    PubMed

    Warnatz, K; Ballow, M; Stangel, M; Bril, V

    2014-12-01

    The pan-European survey provides useful information on the accessibility and trends of intravenous and subcutaneous immunoglobulin (IVIg/SCIg) therapy, which is used to treat primary immunodeficiency disorders (PIDs). Although immunoglobulin (Ig) therapy is the first-line treatment for PIDs, the mechanisms of action of Ig therapy may differ according to the condition it is used to treat. Moreover, intriguing presentations suggest that further investigation is required to understand more clearly both the haematological and immunoregulatory effects of therapeutic immunoglobulin. This can ultimately provide more information on optimizing Ig therapy efficacy, and establish whether individualized dosing regimens for patients will be conducive to better clinical outcomes. In addition to treating autoimmune and inflammatory conditions, there is evidence to suggest that immunoglobulins can potentially play a role in transplantation, which warrants further investigation for future use.

  8. The Structure and Function of the DNA from Bacteriophage Lambda

    PubMed Central

    Hogness, David S.

    1966-01-01

    The position and orientation of genes in lambda and lambda dg DNA are described. The position of six genes located in the right half of isolated lambda DNA was found to be -(N, iλ)--O-P---Q-R-(right end of DNA), which is their order on the genetic map of the vegetative phage. The order of the three genes of the galactose operon (k, t, and e) located in the left half of lambda dg DNA was found to be (left end of DNA)----k-t-e-, consistent with Campbell's model (5) for the formation of this variant. Gene orientation, defined as the direction of transcription along the DNA, is inferred to be from right to left for the galactose operon in lambda dg DNA. The strand of lambda DNA which functions as template in transcription of N, an "early" gene required for normal replication of lambda DNA, was determined as a first step in ascertaining the orientation of this gene. The method includes isolation of each strand, formation of each of two heteroduplex molecules consisting of one strand from wild-type and one from an N mutant) and comparison of their N activities. The second step, which consists of ascertaining the 5'-to-3' direction of each strand, is discussed, as is a determination of the orientation of gene R. PMID:5967430

  9. Hepatopancreatic intoxication of lambda cyhalothrin insecticide on albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Elhalwagy, Manal EA; Abd-Alrahman, Sherif H; Nahas, AA; Ziada, Reem M; Mohamady, Aziza H

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite the known adverse effects of lambda cyhalothrin insecticide, little is known about its hepatopancreatic intoxication effects. The present study was carried out to elucidate sub-chronic effect of Karat 2.5% EC formulation of lambda cyhalothrin on male albino rats. Methods: To explore the effects of exposure to lambda cyhalothrin on rats and its mechanism, low (1/40 of LD50, 5 mg/kg/day) and high dose (1/4 of LD50, 50 mg/kg/day) lambda cyhalothrin were applied to rats via drinking water for 3 months. Blood samples were collected monthly, and the animals were dissected for liver and pancreas’s examination at the end of the experiment. Lambda cyhalothrin administration was associated with the elevation in lipid peroxidation marker, malondialdehyde (MDA), reduction in SH-protein a major marker for antioxidant, as well as basel paraoxonase (PON) in both treated groups throughout the experimental periods. Results: In addition, significant elevations in liver enzymes alanin amino transferase, (ALT), and aspartate amino transferase (AST), as well as plasma acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and glucose level. While, significant reduction in insulin level through the experimental periods. Results of histopathological and histochemical studies showed that lambda cyhalothrin exposure induces liver and pancreatic tissues damage and depletion in glycogen content was pronounced in liver of both treated groups. Conclusions: In conclusion subchronic intoxication with lambda cyhalothrin formulation induced remarkable changes in the examined parameters. PMID:26221269

  10. The control of lambda DNA terminase synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Murialdo, H; Davidson, A; Chow, S; Gold, M

    1987-01-01

    Nu1 and A, the genes coding for bacteriophage lambda DNA terminase, rank among the most poorly translated genes expressed in E. coli. To understand the reason for this low level of translation the genes were cloned into plasmids and their expression measured. In addition, the wild type DNA sequences immediately preceding the genes were reduced and modified. It was found that the elements that control translation are contained in the 100 base pairs upstream from the initiation codon. Interchanging these upstream sequences with those of an efficiently translated gene dramatically increased the translation of terminase subunits. It seems unlikely that the rare codons present in the genes, and any feature of their mRNA secondary structure play a role in the control of their translation. The elimination of cos from plasmids containing Nu1 and A also resulted in an increase in terminase production. This result suggests a role for cos in the control of late gene expression. The terminase subunit overproducer strains are potentially very useful for the design of improved DNA packaging and cosmid mapping techniques. Images PMID:3029667

  11. Lambda Probe Measurements of Laboratory Spheromaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorne, E.; Bellan, P. M.; Hsu, S. C.; Moynihan, C.

    2003-10-01

    A combined current and magnetic probe (lambda probe) has been constructed and is being tested for the purpose of investigating the behavior of spheromaks formed by the Caltech planar spheromak gun. The probe consists of a 1.5cm diameter, 52 turn Rogowski coil and a single loop magnetic coil, housed in a ceramic shell attached to a 95cm long hollow, steel shaft. A high voltage power supply was used to test the probe's ability to measure pulsed currents with submicrosecond rise times. A calibrated current pulse was provided by a 1μF capacitor discharged by a krytron switch to a low inductance circuit. Magnetic calibration was obtained by using the capacitor bank to power a 16cm diameter Helmholtz coil. Both magnetic and current calibration were in good agreement with estimates based on geometry. An existing steel shaft will be replaced by a ceramic shaft in order to minimize undesired effects on the plasma by a conductor. Once sealed with epoxy, the probe will be ready for insertion into the vacuum chamber and used to measure the magnetic field and parallel current during spheromak formation.

  12. Observation of the Baryonic B decay B0bar to Lambda_c^+ anti-Lambda K-

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /Sassari U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-11-08

    The authors report the observation of the baryonic B decay {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {bar {Lambda}}K{sup -} with a significance larger than 7 standard deviations based on 471 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage ring at SLAC. They measure the branching fraction for the decay {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {bar {Lambda}}K{sup -} to be (3.8 {+-} 0.8{sub stat} {+-} 0.2{sub sys} {+-} 1.0 {sub {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}}) x 10{sup -5}. The uncertainties are statistical, systematic, and due to the uncertainty in the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} branching fraction. They find that the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} K{sup -} invariant mass distribution shows an enhancement above 3.5 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  13. Immature surface Ig+ B cells can continue to rearrange kappa and lambda L chain gene loci

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Pro and pre B cells possess the long-term capacity to proliferate in vitro on stromal cells and interleukin 7 (IL-7) and can differentiate to surface immunoglobulin (sIg+) cells upon removal of IL-7 from the cultures. A key event in this differentiation is the extensive cell loss due to apoptosis. Because the proto-oncogene bcl-2 can promote cell survival, we established pre-B cell lines from E mu-bcl-2 transgenic mice. These pre-B cells have the same properties as those derived from non-bcl-2 transgenic mice except that they do not die by apoptosis. This allowed us to study the fate of newly formed B cells in vitro for a longer period of time. Here we show that early during the differentiation of pre-B cells, upregulation of RAG-1 and RAG-2 expression go hand in hand with rearrangements of the Ig gene loci. Moreover, the newly formed sIg+ B cells continue to express RAG-1 and RAG-2 and continue to rearrange L chain gene loci, even in the absence of proliferation, in an orderly fashion, so that kappa L+ sIg+ cells can become lambda L+ sIg+ or sIg- cells, whereas lambda L+ sIg+ cells can become sIg-, but not kappa L+ sIg+ cells. Thus, deposition of a complete Ig molecule on the surface of a B cell does not automatically stop the Ig-rearrangement machinery. PMID:8376934

  14. Suppression of the {Lambda}-{Sigma} coupling in nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Bodmer, A.R.; Usmani, Q.N.

    1995-08-01

    We initiated a study of the modification of the coupling of the {Lambda}N to the {Sigma}N channel in nuclear matter with the Fermi hypernetted-chain variational approach. This modification of the {Lambda}N-{Sigma}N coupling is a central problem in hypernuclear physics and is related closely to the strongly repulsive three-body forces which are needed to account for hypernuclear binding energies. All earlier calculations have only considered this problem in the so-called G-matrix approximation which neglects important higher-order effects. An important result of this work will be a better understanding of the density dependence of {Lambda} binding in nuclear matter, which can then be tested in the calculation of the {Lambda} single-particle energies.

  15. Accuracy and coverage assessment of Oryctolagus cuniculus (rabbit) genes encoding immunoglobulins in the whole genome sequence assembly (OryCun2.0) and localization of the IGH locus to chromosome 20.

    PubMed

    Gertz, E Michael; Schäffer, Alejandro A; Agarwala, Richa; Bonnet-Garnier, Amélie; Rogel-Gaillard, Claire; Hayes, Hélène; Mage, Rose G

    2013-10-01

    We report on the analyses of genes encoding immunoglobulin heavy and light chains in the rabbit 6.51× whole genome assembly. This OryCun2.0 assembly confirms previous mapping of the duplicated IGK1 and IGK2 loci to chromosome 2 and the IGL lambda light chain locus to chromosome 21. The most frequently rearranged and expressed IGHV1 that is closest to IG DH and IGHJ genes encodes rabbit VHa allotypes. The partially inbred Thorbecke strain rabbit used for whole-genome sequencing was homozygous at the IGK but heterozygous with the IGHV1a1 allele in one of 79 IGHV-containing unplaced scaffolds and IGHV1a2, IGHM, IGHG, and IGHE sequences in another. Some IGKV, IGLV, and IGHA genes are also in other unplaced scaffolds. By fluorescence in situ hybridization, we assigned the previously unmapped IGH locus to the q-telomeric region of rabbit chromosome 20. An approximately 3-Mb segment of human chromosome 14 including IGH genes predicted to map to this telomeric region based on synteny analysis could not be located on assembled chromosome 20. Unplaced scaffold chrUn0053 contains some of the genes that comparative mapping predicts to be missing. We identified discrepancies between previous targeted studies and the OryCun2.0 assembly and some new BAC clones with IGH sequences that can guide other studies to further sequence and improve the OryCun2.0 assembly. Complete knowledge of gene sequences encoding variable regions of rabbit heavy, kappa, and lambda chains will lead to better understanding of how and why rabbits produce antibodies of high specificity and affinity through gene conversion and somatic hypermutation.

  16. Secretory immunoglobulin A and immunoglobulin G in horse saliva.

    PubMed

    Palm, Anna-Karin E; Wattle, Ove; Lundström, Torbjörn; Wattrang, Eva

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to increase the knowledge on salivary antibodies in the horse since these constitute an important part of the immune defence of the oral cavity. For that purpose assays to detect horse immunoglobulin A (IgA) including secretory IgA (SIgA) were set up and the molecular weights of different components of the horse IgA system were estimated. Moreover, samples from 51 clinically healthy horses were tested for total SIgA and IgG amounts in saliva and relative IgG3/5 (IgG(T)) and IgG4/7 (IgGb) content were tested in serum and saliva. Results showed a mean concentration of 74μg SIgA/ml horse saliva and that there was a large inter-individual variation in salivary SIgA concentration. For total IgG the mean concentration was approx. 5 times lower than that of SIgA, i.e. 20μg IgG/ml saliva and the inter-individual variation was lower than that observed for SIgA. The saliva-serum ratio for IgG isotypes IgG3/5 and IgG4/7 was also assessed in the sampled horses and this analysis showed that the saliva-serum ratio of IgG4/7 was in general approximately 4 times higher than that of IgG3/5. The large inter-individual variation in salivary SIgA levels observed for the normal healthy horses in the present study emphasises the need for a large number of observations when studying this parameter especially in a clinical setting. Moreover, our results also indicated that some of the salivary IgG does not originate from serum but may be produced locally. Thus, these results provide novel insight, and a base for further research, into salivary antibody responses of horses.

  17. ClpP/ClpX-mediated degradation of the bacteriophage lambda O protein and regulation of lambda phage and lambda plasmid replication.

    PubMed

    Wegrzyn, A; Czyz, A; Gabig, M; Wegrzyn, G

    2000-01-01

    The O protein is a replication initiator that binds to the orilambda region and promotes assembly of the bacteriophage lambda replication complex. This protein, although protected from proteases by other elements of the replication complex, in a free form is rapidly degraded in the host, Escherichia coli, by the ClpP/ClpX protease. Nevertheless, the physiological role of this rapid degradation remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that the copy number of plasmids derived from bacteriophage lambda is significantly higher in wild-type cells growing in rich media than in slowly growing bacteria. However, lambda plasmid copy number in bacteria devoid of the ClpP/ClpX protease was not dependent on the bacterial growth rate and in all minimal media tested was comparable to that observed in wildtype cells growing in a rich medium. Contrary to lambda plasmid replication, the efficiency of lytic growth of bacteriophage lambda was found to be dependent on the host growth rate in both wild-type bacteria and clpP and clpX mutants. The activities of two major lambda promoters operating during the lytic development, p(R) and p(L), were found to be slightly dependent on the host growth rate. However, when p(R) activity was significantly decreased in the dnaA mutant, production of phage progeny was completely abolished at low growth rates. These results indicate that the O protein (whose level in E. coli cells depends on the activity of ClpP/ClpX protease) is a major limiting factor in the regulation of lambda plasmid replication at low bacterial growth rates. However, this protein seems to be only one of the limiting factors in the bacteriophage lambda lytic development under poor growth conditions of host cells. Therefore, it seems that the role of the rapid ClpP/ClpX-mediated proteolysis of the O protein is to decrease the efficiency of early DNA replication of the phage in slowly growing host cells.

  18. Optically active zwitterionic lambda(5)Si,lambda(5)Si'-disilicates: syntheses, crystal structures, and behavior in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Theis, Bastian; Burschka, Christian; Tacke, Reinhold

    2008-01-01

    The zwitterionic lambda(5)Si,lambda(5)Si'-disilicates 1-8 were synthesized and characterized by solid-state and solution NMR spectroscopy. In addition, compounds 26 H(2)O, 32 CH(3)CN, 45/2 CH(3)CN, 6CH(3)OH, 7, and 8CH(3)OHCH(3)CN were studied by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The optically active (Delta,Delta,R,R,R,R)-configured compounds 1-8 contain two pentacoordinate (formally negatively charged) silicon atoms and two tetracoordinate (formally positively charged) nitrogen atoms. One (ammonio)alkyl group is bound to each of the two silicon centers, and two tetradentate (R,R)-tartrato(4-) ligands bridge the silicon atoms. Although these lambda(5)Si,lambda(5)Si'-disilicates contain SiO(4)C skeletons, some of them display a remarkable stability in aqueous solution as shown by NMR spectroscopy and ESI mass spectrometry.

  19. Formation of oligomeric structures from plasmid DNA carrying cos lambda that is packaged into bacteriophage lambda heads.

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, T; Matsubara, K

    1983-01-01

    Plasmids that carry cos lambda, the region necessary for lambda phage packaging and that are as small as four kilobases in size can be packaged into lambda phage heads in head-to-tail tandem oligomeric structures. Multimeric oligomers as large as undecamers have been detected. Oligomer formation depends upon the products of red and gam of lambda, and the general recombination occurs between different plasmids that share homologous DNA regions. The packaging efficiency of plasmids depends on its copy number in cells and its genome size. Upon injection into a cell, the DNA establishes itself as a plasmid in a tandem structure. When such a plasmid in a high oligomeric structure is used as the source of packaging DNA, the packaging efficiency of the plasmids is elevated. The oligomers are stable in recA cells, whereas they drift toward lower oligomers in recA+ cells. Images PMID:6217189

  20. Immunoglobulin classes of Aleutian disease virus antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Porter, D D; Porter, H G; Suffin, S C; Larsen, A E

    1984-01-01

    Aleutian disease virus (ADV) persistently infects mink and causes marked hypergammaglobulinemia. Immunoglobulin class-specific antisera were used to define the total immunoglobulin of each class by radial immunodiffusion and the immunoglobulin class of ADV-specific antibody by immunofluorescence in experimentally and naturally infected mink. Electrophoretic gamma globulin closely reflects the immunoglobulin G (IgG) level in mink, and the majority of the increased immunoglobulin and ADV antibody in infected mink is IgG. IgM becomes elevated within 6 days after infection, reaches peak levels by 15 to 18 days, and returns to normal by 60 days after infection. The first ADV antibody demonstrable is IgM, and most mink have virus-specific IgM antibody for at least 85 days postinfection. Serum IgA levels in normal mink are not normally distributed, and ADV infection causes a marked elevation of IgA. Low levels of ADV-specific IgA antibody can be shown throughout the course of infection. Failure of large amounts of virus-specific IgG antibody to inhibit the reaction of virus-specific IgM and IgA antibodies suggests that the various classes of antibodies are directed against spatially different antigenic determinants. The IgM and IgA were shown not to be rheumatoid factors. PMID:6319283

  1. Non-LTE radiative transfer with lambda-acceleration - Convergence properties using exact full and diagonal lambda-operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macfarlane, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    We investigate the convergence properties of Lambda-acceleration methods for non-LTE radiative transfer problems in planar and spherical geometry. Matrix elements of the 'exact' A-operator are used to accelerate convergence to a solution in which both the radiative transfer and atomic rate equations are simultaneously satisfied. Convergence properties of two-level and multilevel atomic systems are investigated for methods using: (1) the complete Lambda-operator, and (2) the diagonal of the Lambda-operator. We find that the convergence properties for the method utilizing the complete Lambda-operator are significantly better than those of the diagonal Lambda-operator method, often reducing the number of iterations needed for convergence by a factor of between two and seven. However, the overall computational time required for large scale calculations - that is, those with many atomic levels and spatial zones - is typically a factor of a few larger for the complete Lambda-operator method, suggesting that the approach should be best applied to problems in which convergence is especially difficult.

  2. Interferon Lambda: Modulating Immunity in Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Syedbasha, Mohammedyaseen; Egli, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    Interferon lambdas (IFN-λs; IFNL1-4) modulate immunity in the context of infections and autoimmune diseases, through a network of induced genes. IFN-λs act by binding to the heterodimeric IFN-λ receptor (IFNLR), activating a STAT phosphorylation-dependent signaling cascade. Thereby hundreds of IFN-stimulated genes are induced, which modulate various immune functions via complex forward and feedback loops. When compared to the well-characterized IFN-α signaling cascade, three important differences have been discovered. First, the IFNLR is not ubiquitously expressed: in particular, immune cells show significant variation in the expression levels of and susceptibilities to IFN-λs. Second, the binding affinities of individual IFN-λs to the IFNLR varies greatly and are generally lower compared to the binding affinities of IFN-α to its receptor. Finally, genetic variation in the form of a series of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) linked to genes involved in the IFN-λ signaling cascade has been described and associated with the clinical course and treatment outcomes of hepatitis B and C virus infection. The clinical impact of IFN-λ signaling and the SNP variations may, however, reach far beyond viral hepatitis. Recent publications show important roles for IFN-λs in a broad range of viral infections such as human T-cell leukemia type-1 virus, rotaviruses, and influenza virus. IFN-λ also potentially modulates the course of bacterial colonization and infections as shown for Staphylococcus aureus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although the immunological processes involved in controlling viral and bacterial infections are distinct, IFN-λs may interfere at various levels: as an innate immune cytokine with direct antiviral effects; or as a modulator of IFN-α-induced signaling via the suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 and the ubiquitin-specific peptidase 18 inhibitory feedback loops. In addition, the modulation of adaptive immune functions via macrophage and

  3. Immunoglobulin isotypes in childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Najam, F I; Giasuddin, A S; Shembesh, A H

    1999-01-01

    Immunoglobulin isotypes (IgG, IgA, IgM, IgD, IgE) in serum were investigated in 64 Libyan children with mild to moderately severe asthma (age: 1-12 years; sex: 39 males, 25 females) (Group A) and in 57 healthy Libyan children (age: 1-12 years; sex: 30 males, 27 females (Group B). The patients were classified according to age into three groups (A1: 1-3 years; A2: > 3-5 years; A3: > 5-12 years); according to disease activity into two groups (AA: active disease; NA: inactive disease); and according to age plus disease activity into six groups (AA1, NA1; AA2, NA2; AA3, NA3). The healthy children were also divided according to age into three groups (B1: 1-3 years; B2: > 3-5 years; B3: > 5-12 years). IgG, IgA, IgM and IgD were measured by radial immunodiffusion method and IgE was estimated by enzyme immunoassay technique utilizing immunokits from bioMerieux, France. Serum levels of IgG, IgD and IgE were elevated significantly in patients compared to controls (A vs B: p < 0.05) while IgA and IgM levels were normal (p > 0.05). IgG and IgD levels were raised in A3 (p < 0.05), while IgD levels were raised in both A2 and A3 (p < 0.05) and IgE was elevated in all age groups (p < 0.05). However, IgG was elevated significantly in AA only, while IgD and IgE levels were high in both AA and NA (p < 0.05) and IgE was even considerably higher in AA compared to NA (p < 0.02). Further elevated levels were observed for IgG in AA3 only (p < 0.05), for IgD in NA2 (p < 0.01), AA3 (p < 0.01) and NA3 (p < 0.05) and IgE was much higher in patients with active disease than with inactive disease in all age groups (p < 0.05). The fact that asthmatic attack in majority of our patients can be explained as mediated through IgE and the possibilities that IgG and IgD may play roles as aetiopathogenetic or protective regulatory factors in childhood asthma are discussed.

  4. Variability of the immunological state of germfree colostrum-deprived Minnesota miniature piglets.

    PubMed Central

    Setcavage, T M; Kim, Y B

    1976-01-01

    Minnesota miniature piglets obtained by hysterectomy and deprived of colostrum were examined for the presence of immunoglobulin by immunoelectrophoresis, double-gel diffusion, and radial immunodiffusion techniques with specific anti-immunoglobulin chain sera. A large amount of variability existed between different litters of piglets and between different piglets within the same litter, ranging from no detectable immunoglobulin in the serum to very high immunoglobulin levels approaching that of the adult pig. All known classes of porcine immunoglobulin including immunoglobulin G, immunoglobulin M, and immunoglobulin A could be found in the sera from litters where there was extensive placental damage. This contaminating immunoglobulin was shown to have antibody activity to actinophage MSP-2 even when present in very low concentrations. The low level contamination with immunoglobulin G, which was the most frequently encountered type of contaminant, was demonstrated to be similar to sow immunoglobulin G both antigenically and in its molecular size. The data demonstrates that individual piglets must be tested for immunoglobulin content rather than being assumed to be immunologically "virgin" and emphasizes the need for an intact placenta barrier to obtain piglets free from maternal immunoglobulin and devoid of antigenic stimulation. Images PMID:1262064

  5. Measurement of the branching fraction ${\\mathcal{B}}(\\Lambda^0_b\\rightarrow \\Lambda^+_c\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-)$ at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2011-12-01

    We report an analysis of the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay in a data sample collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron corresponding to 2.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. We reconstruct the currently largest samples of the decay modes {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}(2595){sup +}{pi}{sup -} (with {Lambda}{sub c}(2595){sup +} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}), {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}(2625){sup +}{pi}{sup -} (with {Lambda}{sub c}(2625){sup +} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}), {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Sigma}{sub c}(2455){sup ++}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -} (with {Sigma}{sub c}(2455){sup ++} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}), and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Sigma}{sub c}(2455)0{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} (with {Sigma}{sub c}(2455)0 {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) and measure the branching fractions relative to the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} branching fraction. We measure the ratio {Beta}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/ {Beta}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})=3.04 {+-} 0.33(stat){sub -0.55}{sup +0.70}(syst) which is used to derive {Beta}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})=(26.8{sub -11.2}{sup +11.9}) x 10{sup -3}.

  6. Switch Transcripts in Immunoglobulin Class Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Matthias; Jung, Steffen; Radbruch, Andreas

    1995-03-01

    B cells can exchange gene segments for the constant region of the immunoglobulin heavy chain, altering the class and effector function of the antibodies that they produce. Class switching is directed to distinct classes by cytokines, which induce transcription of the targeted DNA sequences. These transcripts are processed, resulting in spliced "switch" transcripts. Switch recombination can be directed to immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) by the heterologous human metallothionein II_A promoter in mutant mice. Induction of the structurally conserved, spliced switch transcripts is sufficient to target switch recombination to IgG1, whereas transcription alone is not.

  7. Measurement of the Lambda b0 lifetime in Lambda b0-->J/psi Lambda 0 in pp collisions at square root s=1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abulencia, A; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Budroni, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carrillo, S; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Cyr, D; DaRonco, S; D'Auria, S; Davies, T; D'Onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, M; Delli Paoli, F; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; DiTuro, P; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garberson, F; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraan, A C; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Labarga, L; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prokoshin, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptochos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ranjan, N; Rappoccio, S; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Saltzberg, D; Sánchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tesarek, R J; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, J; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2007-03-23

    We report a measurement of the Lambda b0 lifetime in the exclusive decay Lambda b0-->J/psi Lambda 0 in pp collisions at square root s=1.96 TeV using an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb-1 of data collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. Using fully reconstructed decays, we measure tau(Lambda b0)=1.593(-0.078)(+0.083)(stat)+/-0.033(syst) ps. This is the single most precise measurement of tau(Lambda b0) and is 3.2sigma higher than the current world average.

  8. Application of Oxford classification, and overexpression of transforming growth factor-β1 and immunoglobulins in immunoglobulin A nephropathy: correlation with World Health Organization classification of immunoglobulin A nephropathy in a Chinese patient cohort.

    PubMed

    Meng, Hongxue; Zhang, Lei; E, Xiaoqiang; Ye, Fei; Li, Huining; Han, Changsong; Yamakawa, Mitsunori; Jin, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) is characterized by the qualitative abnormality of immunoglobulin A (IgA) in circulation and deposits of IgA in the renal mesangium. Transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) plays a key role in fibrogenesis and the progression of renal damage. This study aimed to investigate the clinicopathologic data on IgAN in northeastern China and the presence of TGF-β1, total IgA, and secretory IgA in the glomeruli and sera, as well as changes in galactose-deficient IgA1 in the serum. We investigated the clinicopathologic data of 1050 cases of IgAN diagnosed in a single center over 13 years. We then assessed the concentrations of TGF-β1 and immunoglobulins in the serum of 100 patients with IgAN and 56 healthy control subjects by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and investigated their presence in the glomeruli by immunofluorescence and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. From our data, 76.17% of the IgAN cases belonged to classes I and II according to the World Health Organization classification, representing the early stage. Compared with other studies, we found significantly lower frequencies of segmental glomerulosclerosis (27.71%) but higher frequencies of endocapillary proliferation (50.67%), and a similar proportion of mesangial hypercellularity (68.48%) and tubular atrophy/interstitial fibrosis (moderate, 17.81%; severe, 1.52%) in the northeastern Chinese cohort. There was an increased presence of TGF-β1 and immunoglobulins in the serum and glomeruli of IgAN, which correlates with the progression of pathologic classification. The pathologic variables of the Oxford classification correlated significantly with the WHO classifications. TGF-β1 and immunoglobulins could be used as biomarkers of IgAN pathogenic mechanisms, acting as important adjuncts to the original Oxford Classification.

  9. First observation and measurement of the resonant structure of the lambda_b->lambda_c pi-pi+pi- decay mode

    SciTech Connect

    Azzurri, P.; Barria, P.; Ciocci, M.A.; Donati, S.; Vataga, E.

    2009-12-01

    The authors present the first observation of the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay using data from an integrated luminosity of approximately 2.4 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. They also present the first observation of the resonant decays {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Sigma}{sub c}(2455){sup 0} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Sigma}{sub c}(2455){sup ++}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}(2595){sup +}{pi}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}(2625){sup +}{pi}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, and measure their relative branching ratios.

  10. Polymerization of immunoglobulin domains: A model system for the development of facilitated macromolecular assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, F.J.; Myatt, E.A.

    1991-12-31

    We have recently determined that monoclonal immunoglobulin light chains (Bence Jones proteins) are capable of reversible polymerization at room temperature. This property, as exhibited by immunoglobulin light chains (normally a component of an intact antibody molecule), may have novel implications for the development of ``molecular nanotechnology.`` The polymerization capability of the immunoglobulin light chain is associated with the so-called variable domain of this molecule. The variable domain is a durable, compact beta-sheet structure of molecular weight approximately 12,000. Most of the primary sequence variation is limited to one portion of the molecule, that portion associated with the contribution of immunoglobulin light chains to the recognition and binding of thousand of different antigens by antibodies. As a consequence of these variations, different light chains polymerize with different degrees of avidity, from negligible to extensive. The polymerization process depends on solution parameters such as Ph. Thus, polymerization might be induced at one pH and suppressed or reversed at another. Combinations of molecules of appropriate specificities could assemble into structures of predetermined three-dimensional forms and properties. These features suggest that Bence Jones proteins represent a powerful model system within which to develop empirical rules relevant to a technology of protein-based ``construction``. Development of these rules will require the combined efforts of biophysical and crystallographic studies, protein engineering, and molecular modeling. 53 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Polymerization of immunoglobulin domains: A model system for the development of facilitated macromolecular assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, F.J.; Myatt, E.A.

    1991-01-01

    We have recently determined that monoclonal immunoglobulin light chains (Bence Jones proteins) are capable of reversible polymerization at room temperature. This property, as exhibited by immunoglobulin light chains (normally a component of an intact antibody molecule), may have novel implications for the development of molecular nanotechnology.'' The polymerization capability of the immunoglobulin light chain is associated with the so-called variable domain of this molecule. The variable domain is a durable, compact beta-sheet structure of molecular weight approximately 12,000. Most of the primary sequence variation is limited to one portion of the molecule, that portion associated with the contribution of immunoglobulin light chains to the recognition and binding of thousand of different antigens by antibodies. As a consequence of these variations, different light chains polymerize with different degrees of avidity, from negligible to extensive. The polymerization process depends on solution parameters such as Ph. Thus, polymerization might be induced at one pH and suppressed or reversed at another. Combinations of molecules of appropriate specificities could assemble into structures of predetermined three-dimensional forms and properties. These features suggest that Bence Jones proteins represent a powerful model system within which to develop empirical rules relevant to a technology of protein-based construction''. Development of these rules will require the combined efforts of biophysical and crystallographic studies, protein engineering, and molecular modeling. 53 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Evaluation of serum immunoglobulin E levels in bronchial asthma

    PubMed Central

    Sandeep, Thirunavukkarasu; Roopakala, Mysore Subrahmanyam; Silvia, Chickballapur Rayappa Wilma Delphine; Chandrashekara, Srikantaiah; Rao, Mohan

    2010-01-01

    Background: Immunoglobulin E and associated cellular responses are responsible for allergic airway diseases. A hypersensitivity reaction initiated by immunologic mechanisms, mediated by IgE antibodies occurs in allergic asthma Aim: To estimate and compare serum IgE levels in mild, moderate, and severe asthmatics and in normal subjects and to obtain a mathematical model describing the relationship between serum IgE levels and severity of asthma. Materials and Methods: A stratified sample of 60 patients within age group of 18-60 years and 31 male and 29 female asthmatic patients and 13 healthy controls within 18-60 years were included in this study and classified according to GINA classification. Serum IgE levels were estimated by using ELISA kit. Results: Mean IgE levels ranged from 151.95 IU/ml in normal subjects to 1045.32 IU/ml in severe asthmatics. The model developed was 27% efficient. Conclusion: Serum Immunoglobulin E levels were high in asthmatics as compared to normal subjects. On an average, the levels increased as the severity of asthma increased. However, there was no statistically significant correlation since the variability in each level of asthma was very large PMID:20931031

  13. Eastern Equine Encephalitis Treated With Intravenous Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Mukerji, Shibani S.; Lam, Alice D.

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 68-year-old man from southeastern Massachusetts presenting with encephalitis due to eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) virus. Despite the high morbidity and mortality rate of EEE, the patient made a near complete recovery in the setting of receiving early intravenous immunoglobulins. PMID:26740855

  14. Eastern Equine Encephalitis Treated With Intravenous Immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Mukerji, Shibani S; Lam, Alice D; Wilson, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 68-year-old man from southeastern Massachusetts presenting with encephalitis due to eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) virus. Despite the high morbidity and mortality rate of EEE, the patient made a near complete recovery in the setting of receiving early intravenous immunoglobulins.

  15. Immunoglobulins in tears of normal Indian people.

    PubMed Central

    Sen, D. K.; Sarin, G. S.; Mani, K.; Saha, K.

    1976-01-01

    Immunoglobulin concentrations in tears from 50 healthy Indians aged from 14 to 50 years were measured by a standard immunodiffusion method. The levels of IgA were substantial; those of IgG were very low; and IgD and IgM were not present. The mean IgA level was 24-6 mg/100 ml. PMID:1276121

  16. Prediction of narrow N* and {Lambda}* with hidden charm

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jiajun; Molina, R.; Oset, E.; Zou, B. S.

    2011-10-24

    The interaction between various charmed mesons and charmed baryons, such as D-bar{Sigma}{sub c}-D-bar{Lambda}{sub c}, D-bar*{Sigma}{sub c}-D-bar*{Lambda}{sub c}, and related strangeness channels, are studied within the framework of the coupled channel unitary approach with the local hidden gauge formalism. Six narrow N* and {Lambda}* resonances are dynamically generated with mass above 4 GeV and width smaller than 100 MeV. These predicted new resonances definitely cannot be accommodated by quark models with three constituent quarks. We make estimates of production cross sections of these predicted resonances in p-barp collisions for PANDA at the forthcoming FAIR facility.

  17. Persistence behaviour of thiamethoxam and lambda cyhalothrin in transplanted paddy.

    PubMed

    Barik, Suhrid Ranjan; Ganguly, Pritam; Kunda, Samir Kumar; Kole, Ramen Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Anjan

    2010-10-01

    A field study was conducted in Pre-Kharif season 2007 on paddy to determine the persistence of thiamethoxam (12.6%) and lambda cyhalothrin (9.4%) [in a 'Readymix' formulation Alika 247 ZC], following the application of 33 g. a.i. ha⁻¹ (T₁) and 66 g. a.i. ha⁻¹ (T₂). Spraying of insecticide was done during milking stage of the crop (63 days after transplantation). Thiamethoxam and lambda cyhalothrin residues were estimated by HPLC and GLC respectively. The half-life values were 5.2-5.8 and 4.8 days for thiamethoxam and lambda cyhalothrin respectively. No residue was detected in the harvested paddy, straw, grain, and soil samples.

  18. Observational constraints on late-time {lambda}(t) cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Carneiro, S.; Pigozzo, C.; Dantas, M. A.; Alcaniz, J. S.

    2008-04-15

    The cosmological constant {lambda}, i.e., the energy density stored in the true vacuum state of all existing fields in the Universe, is the simplest and the most natural possibility to describe the current cosmic acceleration. However, despite its observational successes, such a possibility exacerbates the well-known {lambda} problem, requiring a natural explanation for its small, but nonzero, value. In this paper we study cosmological consequences of a scenario driven by a varying cosmological term, in which the vacuum energy density decays linearly with the Hubble parameter, {lambda}{proportional_to}H. We test the viability of this scenario and study a possible way to distinguish it from the current standard cosmological model by using recent observations of type Ia supernova (Supernova Legacy Survey Collaboration), measurements of the baryonic acoustic oscillation from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and the position of the first peak of the cosmic microwave background angular spectrum from the three-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe.

  19. Probing the Lambda-DGP Braneworld model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravanpak, Arvin; Farajollahi, Hossein; Fadakar, Golnaz

    2016-09-01

    We study cosmic dynamics in the context of the normal branch of the DGP braneworld model. Using current Planck data, we find the best fitting model and associated cosmological parameters in non-flat ΛDGP. With the transition redshift as a basic variable and statefinder parameters, our result shows that the Universe starts its accelerated expansion phase slightly earlier than expected in ΛCDM cosmology. The result also alleviates the coincidence problem of the ΛCDM model.

  20. Measurement of Lambda and Lambda(macro) particles in Au+Au collisions at the square root of S(NN) = 130 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adcox, K; Adler, S S; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Aphecetche, L; Arai, Y; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Barrette, J; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bellaiche, F G; Belyaev, S T; Bennett, M J; Berdnikov, Y; Botelho, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J; Butsyk, S; Carey, T A; Chand, P; Chang, J; Chang, W C; Chavez, L L; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choudhury, R K; Christ, T; Chujo, T; Chung, M S; Chung, P; Cianciolo, V; Cole, B A; D'Enterria, D G; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dinesh, B V; Drees, A; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Ebisu, K; Efremenko, Y V; el-Chenawi, K; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Ferdousi, T; Fields, D E; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Godoi, A L; Goto, Y; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gupta, S K; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hara, H; Hartouni, E P; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Ho, D S; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Imai, K; Ippolitov, M S; Ishihara, M; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jia, J; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Kametani, S; Kang, J H; Kann, M; Kapoor, S S; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D J; Kim, H J; Kim, S Y; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klein-Boesing, C; Klinksiek, S; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lajoie, J G; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Li, Z; Lim, D J; Liu, M X; Liu, X; Liu, Z; Maguire, C F; Mahon, J; Makdisi, Y I; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Mark, S K; Markacs, S; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masaike, A; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Merschmeyer, M; Messer, F; Messer, M; Miake, Y; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagasaka, Y; Nagle, J L; Nakada, Y; Nandi, B K; Newby, J; Nikkinen, L; Nilsson, P; Nishimura, S; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Osterman, L; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Paffrath, L; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Petridis, A N; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Pitukhin, P; Plasil, F; Pollack, M; Pope, K; Purschke, M L; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Rosati, M; Rose, A A; Ryu, S S; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, A; Sakaguchi, T; Sako, H; Sakuma, T; Samsonov, V; Sangster, T C; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schlei, B R; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Shin, Y H; Sibiriak, I G; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Simon-Gillo, J; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sorensen, S; Stankus, P W; Starinsky, N; Steinberg, P; Stenlund, E; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugioka, M; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Sumi, Y; Sun, Z; Suzuki, M; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Taniguchi, E; Tannenbaum, M J; Thomas, J; Thomas, J H; Thomas, T L; Tian, W; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tsvetkov, A A; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Ushiroda, T; Van Hecke, H W; Velissaris, C; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vorobyov, A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, H; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Witzig, C; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yagi, K; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, Z; Zhou, S; Zhou, S

    2002-08-26

    We present results on the measurement of Lambda and Lambda(macro) production in Au+Au collisions at square root of (S (NN) = 130 GeV with the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The transverse momentum spectra were measured for minimum bias and for the 5% most central events. The Lambda;/Lambda ratios are constant as a function of p(T) and the number of participants. The measured net Lambda density is significantly larger than predicted by models based on hadronic strings (e.g., HIJING) but in approximate agreement with models which include the gluon-junction mechanism.

  1. Midrapidity Lambda and Lambda(macro) production in Au+Au collisions at the square root of [s(NN)]=130 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Allgower, C; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Deng, W S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Filimonov, K; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Guedon, M; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Yu I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; LoCurto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mitchell, J; Moiseenko, V A; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Saulys, A C; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schüttauf, A; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Shvetcov, V S; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; de Toledo, A Szanto; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thomas, J H; Thompson, M; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Voloshin, S A; Wang, F; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

    2002-08-26

    We report the first measurement of strange (Lambda) and antistrange (Lambda macro) baryon production from square root of [s(NN)]=130 GeV Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Rapidity density and transverse mass distributions at midrapidity are presented as a function of centrality. The yield of Lambda and Lambda; hyperons is found to be approximately proportional to the number of negative hadrons. The production of Lambda; hyperons relative to negative hadrons increases very rapidly with transverse momentum. The magnitude of the increase cannot be described by existing hadronic string fragmentation models alone.

  2. The algebraic theory of latent projectors in lambda matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denman, E. D.; Leyva-Ramos, J.; Jeon, G. J.

    1981-01-01

    Multivariable systems such as a finite-element model of vibrating structures, control systems, and large-scale systems are often formulated in terms of differential equations which give rise to lambda matrices. The present investigation is concerned with the formulation of the algebraic theory of lambda matrices and the relationship of latent roots, latent vectors, and latent projectors to the eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and eigenprojectors of the companion form. The chain rule for latent projectors and eigenprojectors for the repeated latent root or eigenvalues is given.

  3. Properties of the Lambda(1670)(1-)/2 resonance.

    PubMed

    Manley, D M; Abaev, V V; Allgower, C E; Bekrenev, V; Briscoe, W J; Clajus, M; Comfort, J R; Craig, K; Grosnick, D; Isenhower, D; Knecht, N; Koetke, D D; Kulbardis, A A; Kozlenko, N G; Kruglov, S; Lolos, G; Lopatin, I V; Manweiler, R; Marusić, A; McDonald, S; Nefkens, B M K; Olmsted, J; Papandreou, Z; Peaslee, D C; Phaisangittisakul, N; Prakhov, S; Price, J W; Ramirez, A F; Sadler, M; Shafi, A; Spinka, H; Stanislaus, T D S; Starostin, A; Staudenmaier, H M; Strakovsky, I I; Supek, I; Tippens, W B

    2002-01-07

    Recently the Crystal Ball Collaboration measured precise new data for the near-threshold reaction K(-)p-->etaLambda, which is dominated by formation of the Lambda(1670)1 / 2(-). In this Letter, we present results of a unitary, multichannel analysis that incorporates the new Crystal Ball data. For our preferred fit, we obtain mass M = 1673+/-2 MeV, width Gamma = 23+/-6 MeV, and elasticity x = 0.37+/-0.07. This elasticity is significantly larger than previously recognized. Resonance parameters of our preferred fit are in striking agreement with the quark-model predictions of Koniuk and Isgur.

  4. Observation of. lambda. -hypernuclei in the reaction /sup 12/C(. pi. /sup +/,K/sup +/)/sub. lambda. //sup 12/C

    SciTech Connect

    Milner, E.C.

    1985-12-01

    The observation of ..lambda..-hypernuclear levels in /sub ..lambda..//sup 12/C by associated production through the (..pi../sup +/,K/sup +/) reaction is reported. Spectrometers used in the measurements are discussed. The /sub ..lambda..//sup 12/C excitation energy spectra were recorded at laboratory scattering angles of 5.6/sup 0/, 10.3/sup 0/, and 15.2/sup 0/. The spectra show two major peaks - one attributed to the ground state, and one about 11 MeV higher in excitation. The peak near 11 MeV excitation energy is believed to be almost entirely composed of a multiplet of three J/sup ..pi../ = 2/sup +/ states. Relativistic DWBA calculations imply support for the expectation that higher spin states are preferentially populated in the (..pi../sup +/,K/sup +/) reaction, compared to the (K/sup -/,..pi../sup -/) reaction in which lower spin states are excited. 29 refs., 40 figs.

  5. Membrane-associated immunoglobulins of human lymphocytes in immunologic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Nicod, Isabelle; Girard, J. P.; Cruchaud, A.

    1973-01-01

    Membrane-associated immunoglobulins of peripheral blood lymphocytes were studied by indirect immunofluorescence for γ, α, μ, κ and λ chains in healthy subjects and patients with immunologic disease. In healthy subjects, heavy chains were found on 30·7% of lymphocytes (γ 15·3%, α 7·2% and μ 8·2%) and light chains on 32·8% of cells (κ 20·4% and λ 12·4%). Patients with humoral immune deficiencies had fewer immunoglobulin-bearing cells; sarcoidosis or thymectomy patients had normal or decreased immunoglobulin-bearing lymphocytes; cells with light chains were fewer than those with heavy chains on their lymphocytes. In some cases, normal levels of serum immunoglobulins were found in the absence of the corresponding immunoglobulin-bearing cells, and in others normal immunoglobulin-bearing lymphocytes were present in the absence of the corresponding serum immunoglobulins. These data suggest that (1) immunoglobulin-bearing lymphocytes in blood do not reflect the condition of immunoglobulin-synthesizing cells in peripheral lymphoid tissues, and (2) in certain immunologic disorders, either some B-lymphocytes do not synthesize immunoglobulins, or immunoglobulins are in such a situation that the whole molecule or part of the molecule is not visualized by current methods. PMID:4587505

  6. Immunoglobulin expression and synthesis by human haemic cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, J; Hough, D; Karpas, A; Smith, J L

    1977-01-01

    Twenty-six human cell lines derived from a variety of lymphoid and non-lymphoid malignancies, were investigated for their immunological markers, with special reference to the class of immunoglobulin expressed. Twenty-five of the lines stained positively for surface immunoglobulin and IgD together with IgM proved to be the major immunoglobulin classes on these cells. Six of the lines were chosen for a study of their immunoglobulin synthesis patterns over an 18-h period and the immunoglobulin produced was analysed on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Patterns obtained from the cell lines were similar to that from normal lymph node lymphocytes and differed markedly to plasma cells. Two of the cell lines had abnormal immunoglobulin synthesis patterns characterized as free light chains in one case. The cell lines are evaluated for their usefulness as models of immunoglobulin synthesis and analogues of normal and neoplastic states. PMID:608682

  7. A Novel Immunoglobulin-Immunoglobulin Interaction in Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Kawa, Shigeyuki; Kitahara, Kei; Hamano, Hideaki; Ozaki, Yayoi; Arakura, Norikazu; Yoshizawa, Kaname; Umemura, Takeji; Ota, Masao; Mizoguchi, Sadaaki; Shimozuru, Yasunori; Bahram, Seiamak

    2008-01-01

    Well over six decades since its first description, the Rheumatoid Factor (RF)—autoantibodies recognizing Fc (constant) portion of IgG through their own Fab (antigen binding variable segments)—is believed to have come of age. Autoimmune pancreatitis is a unique form of pancreatitis, biologically characterized by an elevated serum IgG4 concentration. Given the fact that IgG4 myeloma proteins can act as RF, we initially hypothesized that IgG4 in autoimmune pancreatitis might do likewise, hence potentially contributing to disease pathogenesis. Indeed Western blotting clearly showed that IgG4 binds to IgG1 κ, IgG2 κ, IgG3 κ myeloma proteins, as well as to IgG Fc, in line with a typical RF activity. Further experiments however unraveled the unexpected fact that unlike hitherto known RF, IgG4 does not engage IgG Fc through its Fab, but its very own Fc. These data therefore collectively describe a Novel RF (NRF) in autoimmune pancreatitis. In the future, the relevance of NRF, beyond autoimmune pancreatitis, in both diagnosis/prognosis as well as pathophysiology of autoimmune and other systemic diseases where IgG4's role seems paramount, needs to be systematically assessed. PMID:18297131

  8. Influence of the germline sequence on the thermodynamic stability and fibrillogenicity of human lambda 6 light chains.

    PubMed

    del Pozo Yauner, Luis; Ortiz, Ernesto; Sánchez, Rosalba; Sánchez-López, Rosana; Güereca, Leopoldo; Murphy, Charles L; Allen, Amy; Wall, Jonathan S; Fernández-Velasco, D Alejandro; Solomon, Alan; Becerril, Baltazar

    2008-08-01

    Light chain-associated amyloidosis is a fatal disease characterized by the aggregation and pathologic deposition of monoclonal light chain-related fragments as amyloid fibrils in organs or tissues throughout the body. Notably, it has been observed that proteins encoded by the lambda variable light chain (V(L)) gene segment 6a are invariably associated with amyloid deposition; however, the contribution of the gene to this phenomenon has not been established. In this regard, we have determined the thermodynamic stability and kinetics of in vitro fibrillogenesis of a recombinant (r) V(L) protein, designated 6aJL2, which contains the predicted sequences encoded by the 6a and JL2 germline genes. Additionally, we studied a 6a mutant (6aJL2-Arg25Gly), that is present in approximately 25% of all amyloid-associated lambda6 light chains. Remarkably, the wild-type 6aJL2 protein was more stable than were all known amyloidogenic kappa and lambda light chains for which stability parameters are available; more importantly, it was even more so (and less fibrillogenic) than the only clinically proven nonamyloidogenic lambda6 protein, Jto. Conversely, the mutated 6aJL2-R25G molecule was considerably less stable and more fibrillogenic than was the native 6aJL2. Our data indicate that the propensity of lambda6 light chains to form amyloid can not be attributed to thermodynamic instability of the germline-encoded Vlambda6 domain, but rather, is dependent on sequence alterations that render such proteins amyloidogenic.

  9. X-Ray Flare Characteristics in lambda Eridani

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Myron A.

    1997-01-01

    This proposal was for a joint X-ray/ultraviolet/ground-based study of the abnormal Be star lambda Eri, which has previously shown evidence of X-ray flaring from ROSAT observations in 1991. The X-ray component consisted of observations from both the ASCA and ROSAT satellites.

  10. X-Ray Flare Characteristics in Lambda Eridani

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Myron A.

    1997-01-01

    This proposal was for a joint X-ray/ultraviolet/ground-based study of the abnormal Be star lambda Eri, which has previously shown evidence of X-ray flaring from ROSAT observations in 1991. The X-ray component consisted of observations from both the ASCA and ROSAT satellites.

  11. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin therapy for inflammatory neuropathy: current evidence base and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Rajabally, Yusuf A

    2014-06-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy is of proven effect in chronic inflammatory neuropathies, including chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). In more recent years, there have been a number of anecdotal case reports and small series, followed by a few trials of variable design, of subcutaneous immunoglobulin therapy in these neuropathies. To date, limited evidence suggests that the subcutaneous route may be a more clinically effective, better-tolerated, at least cost-equivalent and a more patient-friendly option than the still more used intravenous alternative. Long-term efficacy is not as yet established in neuropathic indications by randomised controlled clinical trial evidence, and it is likely that the subcutaneous route may not be suitable in all cases with some hints to this effect appearing from the limited data available to date. Further studies are ongoing, including those of dose comparison, and more are likely to be planned in future. The literature on the use of subcutaneous immunoglobulin therapy in chronic inflammatory neuropathy is reviewed here. The current use in clinical practice, day-to-day benefits, including quality of life measures and health economics as published thus far, are evaluated. The limitations of this form of treatment in CIDP and MMN are also analysed in the light of current literature and taking into account the remaining unknowns. Future prospects and research with this mode of immunoglobulin therapy administration are discussed.

  12. On the genomics of immunoglobulins in the gray, short-tailed opossum Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinxin; Olp, Jonathan J; Miller, Robert D

    2009-08-01

    Annotated maps of the IGH, IGK, and IGL loci in the gray, short-tailed opossum Monodelphis domestica were generated from analyses of the available whole genome sequence for this species. Analyses of their content and organization confirmed a number of previous conclusions based on characterization of complementary DNAs encoding opossum immunoglobulin heavy and light chains and limited genomic analysis, including (a) the predominance of a single immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region (IGHV) subgroup and clan, (b) the presence of a single immunoglobulin (Ig)G subclass, (c) the apparent absence of an IgD, and (d) the general organization and V gene complexity of the IGK and IGL light chain loci. In addition, several unexpected discoveries were made including the presence of a partial V to D, germline-joined IGHV segment, the first germline-joined Ig V gene to be found in a mammal. In addition was the presence of a larger number of IGKV subgroups than had been previously identified. With this report, annotated maps of the major histocompatibility complex, T-cell receptor, and immunoglobulin loci have been completed for M. domestica, the only non-eutherian mammalian species for which this has been accomplished, strengthening the utility of this species as a model organism.

  13. Autoreactivity of primary human immunoglobulins ancestral to hypermutated human antibodies that neutralize HCMV.

    PubMed

    McLean, Gary R; Cho, Chin-wen; Schrader, John W

    2006-05-01

    The human antibody response to the AD-2S1 epitope of glycoprotein B (gB) of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is dominated by a family of closely related somatically mutated antibodies. These antibodies neutralize viral infectivity and the genes encoding them are derived from two commonly used germ-line variable (V) region genes, IGHV3-30 and IGKV3-11. Recombination of these V genes with the appropriate junctional diversity generates genes that encode primary immunoglobulins that bind to AD-2S1. To further understand the initial primary immunoglobulin response to AD-2S1 we synthesized the germ-line-based ancestor of one such family of antibodies and showed that it bound gB at the AD-2S1 epitope. Here we show that the germ-line ancestor of a second family of antibodies likewise binds to gB. We further show that one of the ancestral primary immunoglobulins, but not the other, also recognized autoantigens. In contrast, the hypermutated derivatives did not demonstrate autoreactivity and minor structural changes in the primary immunoglobulin were sufficient to generate or abolish autoreactivity or to change specificity. Thus, our demonstration that the ancestor of a highly mutated, non-autoreactive antiviral IgG antibody binds nuclear and cell-surface autoantigens indicates for the first time that self-reactivity is not necessarily a barrier to development into a follicular B lymphocyte that undergoes antigen-initiated affinity maturation.

  14. Lymphoplasmacytic hypophysitis associated with immunoglobulin G4.

    PubMed

    Khong, Peter; Enno, Alar; Darwish, Balsam

    2014-02-01

    We present the unusual case of a 33-year-old woman who presented with a 2 year history of amenorrhoea and an expanding sellar lesion. Initial MRI revealed a lesion in the pituitary fossa, thought to be a pituitary adenoma. One year later, the lesion had enlarged by 5mm, with associated enhancement of the dura of the planum sphenoidale and pituitary stalk. Histopathology revealed a lymphocytic and plasma cell inflammatory infiltrate suggestive of lymphoplasmacytic hypophysitis associated with immunoglobulin G4.

  15. Black hole chemistry: thermodynamics with Lambda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubizňák, David; Mann, Robert B.; Teo, Mae

    2017-03-01

    We review recent developments on the thermodynamics of black holes in extended phase space, where the cosmological constant is interpreted as thermodynamic pressure and treated as a thermodynamic variable in its own right. In this approach, the mass of the black hole is no longer regarded as internal energy, rather it is identified with the chemical enthalpy. This leads to an extended dictionary for black hole thermodynamic quantities; in particular a notion of thermodynamic volume emerges for a given black hole spacetime. This volume is conjectured to satisfy the reverse isoperimetric inequality—an inequality imposing a bound on the amount of entropy black hole can carry for a fixed thermodynamic volume. New thermodynamic phase transitions naturally emerge from these identifications. Namely, we show that black holes can be understood from the viewpoint of chemistry, in terms of concepts such as Van der Waals fluids, reentrant phase transitions, and triple points. We also review the recent attempts at extending the AdS/CFT dictionary in this setting, discuss the connections with horizon thermodynamics, applications to Lifshitz spacetimes, and outline possible future directions in this field.

  16. Approaches for the direct estimation of lambda, and demographic contributions to lambda, using capture-recapture data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.D.; Hines, J.E.

    2002-01-01

    We first consider the estimation of the finite rate of population increase or population growth rate, lambda sub i, using capture-recapture data from open populations. We review estimation and modelling of lambda sub i under three main approaches to modelling open-population data: the classic approach of Jolly (1965) and Seber (1965), the superpopulation approach of Crosbie & Manly (1985) and Schwarz & Arnason (1996), and the temporal symmetry approach of Pradel (1996). Next, we consider the contributions of different demographic components to lambda sub i using a probabilistic approach based on the composition of the population at time i + 1 (Nichols et al., 2000b). The parameters of interest are identical to the seniority parameters, gamma sub i, of Pradel (1996). We review estimation of gamma sub i under the classic, superpopulation, and temporal symmetry approaches. We then compare these direct estimation approaches for lambda sub i and gamma sub i with analogues computed using projection matrix asymptotics. We also discuss various extensions of the estimation approaches to multistate applications and to joint likelihoods involving multiple data types.

  17. Immunoglobulin therapy in idiopathic hypothalamic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Huppke, Peter; Heise, Alexander; Rostasy, Kevin; Huppke, Brenda; Gärtner, Jutta

    2009-09-01

    Idiopathic hypothalamic dysfunction is a rare disorder presenting at age 3-7 years. Severe hypothalamic and brainstem dysfunction leads to death in 25% of patients. The disease is presumed to be autoimmune, or in some cases paraneoplastic. No successful treatment has been reported. Patient V. developed hyperphagia, hypersomnia, and extreme aggression at age 7 years, accompanied by episodes of hyperthermia, hypothermia, sinus bradycardia, hypernatremia, hyponatremia, persistent hyperprolactinemia, hypothyroidism, and growth-hormone deficiency. At age 9 years, a diagnosis of idiopathic hypothalamic dysfunction was rendered, and immunoglobulin therapy was commenced. Nine courses of immunoglobulins, at a dose of 2 g/kg every 4 weeks, were administered. Reproducible improvements in behavior and no further episodes of hyponatremia or hypernatremia and sinus bradycardia were evident. The endocrinologic abnormalities and poor thermoregulation remained. Administration of immunoglobulins during late stages of idiopathic hypothalamic dysfunction led to improvement in some but not all signs. Assuming an autoimmune basis for this disorder, treatment during early stages of disease should be more effective. To facilitate such early treatment, increased awareness of this disorder is necessary, to allow for early diagnosis.

  18. Antarctic teleost immunoglobulins: more extreme, more interesting.

    PubMed

    Coscia, Maria Rosaria; Varriale, Sonia; Giacomelli, Stefano; Oreste, Umberto

    2011-11-01

    We have investigated the immunoglobulin molecule and the genes encoding it in teleosts living in the Antarctic seas at the constant temperature of -1.86 °C. The majority of Antarctic teleosts belong to the suborder Notothenioidei (Perciformes), which includes only a few non-Antarctic species. Twenty-one Antarctic and two non-Antarctic Notothenioid species were included in our studies. We sequenced immunoglobulin light chains in two species and μ heavy chains, partially or totally, in twenty species. In the case of heavy chain, genomic DNA and the cDNA encoding the secreted and the membrane form were analyzed. From one species, Trematomus bernacchii, a spleen cDNA library was constructed to evaluate the diversity of VH gene segments. T. bernacchii IgM, purified from the serum and bile, was characterized. Homology Modelling and Molecular Dynamics were used to determine the molecular structure of T. bernacchii and Chionodraco hamatus immunoglobulin domains. This paper sums up the previous results and broadens them with the addition of unpublished data.

  19. [Serum and secretory immunoglobulins in allergic diseases].

    PubMed

    Atovmian, O I; German, G P; Chernokhvostova, E V

    1985-07-01

    A total of 158 patients with pollinosis, bronchial asthma, urticaria and Quincke's edema were examined. The immunoglobulin and C3 levels in sera and the immunoglobulin and albumin levels in saliva were determined by the method of single radial immunodiffusion with the corresponding monospecific antisera. In all the groups of patients subjected to examination the presence of polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia was detected, which was manifested by a rise in the levels of IgG, IgA and especially IgM; the level of IgD was low. A decrease in the level of C3 was detected in pollinosis patients in the absence of the exacerbation of the disease. No circulating immune complexes were detected. An essential increase in the level of IgG in saliva was revealed, which was due to the local synthesis of this immunoglobulin. In winter the level of salivary IgA in pollinosis patients was found to be essentially below normal, but at the period of exacerbation it increased twofold, probably in response to local stimulation with antigen-allergen. Patients with bronchial asthma and pollinosis were found to have a high level of free secretory component (SC); in pollinosis the level of free SC sharply increased during the stage of exacerbation, which was due to the increase of its synthesis and secretion by the epithelial cells of the mucous membranes. The importance of these data for the pathogenesis of allergic diseases are discussed.

  20. [BIOLOGICAL AND IMMUNOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF POLYREACTIVE IMMUNOGLOBULINS].

    PubMed

    Bobrovnik, S A; Demchenko, M A; Komisarenko, S V

    2015-01-01

    A previously unknown phenomenon of acquired polyreactivity for serum immunoglobulins, which were subjected either to solutions of KSCN (3.0-5.0 M), low/high pH (pH 2.2-3.0), or heating to 58-60 degrees C, was described by us in 1990 year. Much later, eleven years after that, similar data were published by others, which completely confirmed our results concerning the influence of either chaotropic ions or the drastic shift of pH on immunoglobulins polyreactive properties. Our further investigations of polyreactive serum immunoglobulins (PRIG) properties have shown that the mechanism of non-specific interaction between PRIG and antigens much differs from the mechanism of interaction between specific antibodies and corresponding antigens. Later we have shown that the increasing of PRIG reactivity could be induced in vivo, and PRIG are one of serum components for human or animal sera. Then, it could be suggested that PRIG can perform certain biological functions. Studying of PRIG's effect on the phagocytosis of microbes by peritoneal cells or the tumor growth have shown that PRIG can play a certain role in protecting the body from infections and probably can influence on the development of various pathological processes. Recently we have also found that PRIG IgG contents significantly increases in aged people. These data demonstrate that further investigations of PRIG's immunochemical properties and studying of their biological role in organism protection from various diseases is very intriguing and important.

  1. [Immunoglobulins in patients with Nocardia brasiliensis actinomycetoma].

    PubMed

    Méndez-Tovar, L J; Mondragón-González, R; Manzano-Gayosso, P; López-Martínez, R; Hernández-Hernández, F; Bonifaz, A; Anides Fonseca, A; Araiza, J; Vega-López, F

    2004-01-01

    Considering that some authors have reported an increasing of some immunoglobulins in actinomycetoma patients, in this study we propose to determine differential production of IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4 and IgGM in 25 patients with actinomycetoma and 25 healthy individuals from a mycetoma endemic area. Immunoglobulins were determined by ELISA technique. To sensibilize the plates, six Nocardia brasiliensis antigens were used: a crude antigen denominated NB and five derivatives (NB2, NB4, NB6, NB8 and NB10) obtained by their isoelectric point. Results showed that all IgG subclasses were higher in the patients' sera than in control sera, with a maximal difference to IgG3 and IgG4. To the latter subclass, six antigens were highly reactives. IgM levels were similar in both groups. As it occurs in other infections, in the actinomycetoma pathogenesis probably participate the increase or deficiency of a determined immunoglobulin class, as well as the relationship between different subclasses.

  2. Solar cycle dependence of the sun's radius at lambda = 525.0 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulrich, Roger K.; Bertello, L.

    1995-01-01

    The Mount Wilson (California) synoptic program of solar magnetic observations scans the solar disk between 1 and 20 times per day. As part of this program, the radius is determined as an average distance between the image center and the point where the intensity in the FeI line at lambda = 525.0 nm drops to 25 percent of its value at the disk's center. The data base of information was analyzed and corrected for effects such as scattered light and atmospheric reflection. The solar variability and the measurement techniques are described. The observation data sets, the corrections made to the data, and the observed variations, are discussed. It is stated that similar spectral lines at lambda = 525.0 nm, which are common in the solar spectrum, probably exhibit similar radius changes. All portions of the sun are weighted equally so that it is concluded that, within spectral lines, the radiating area of the sun is increased at the solar maximum.

  3. Symptomatic Primary Selective Immunoglobulin M Deficiency with Nonprotective Pneumococcal Titers Responsive to Subcutaneous Immunoglobulin Treatment.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shiven S; Fergeson, Jennifer E; Glaum, Mark C; Lockey, Richard F

    2016-01-01

    Selective immunoglobulin M deficiency (SIgMD) is a rare disorder with varying clinical features. The prevalence of SIgMD is 0.03-3%. Patients may be asymptomatic or else present with recurrent infection, autoimmunity, atopic disease and/or malignancy. About 50% of patients with symptomatic SIgMD also have impaired antibody responses to the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine. We report on an adult who presented with symptomatic SIgMD with impaired pneumococcal polysaccharide antibody responses and lymphopenia, who experienced a significant clinical improvement in the frequency of infections after subcutaneous immunoglobulin replacement therapy.

  4. Successful treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus with subcutaneous immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Brasileiro, A; Fonseca Oliveira, J; Pinheiro, S; Paiva-Lopes, M J

    2016-05-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients is well established. However, side effects might limit its use and lead to the consideration of therapeutic alternatives, such as the subcutaneous formulation of immunoglobulin, which has been used in some patients with other autoimmune diseases. We report a case of SLE refractory to classical therapies. High-dose intravenous immunoglobulin was effective, but gave rise to significant side effects. The patient was successfully treated with subcutaneous human immunoglobulin, achieving and maintaining clinical and laboratory remission. A lower immunoglobulin dose was needed and no side effects were observed, compared to the intravenous administration. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin could be a better-tolerated and cost-saving therapeutic option for select SLE patients.

  5. Synthesis of immunoglobulins by human endocervix in organ culture.

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, M. E.; Buchan, A.; Skinner, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    The synthesis of immunoglobulins by the uterine cervix was investigated in an endocervical organ-culture system. Using Ouchterlony immunodiffusion gels immunoglobulin G, immunoglobulin A and secretory piece were detected in washings of endocervical explants and in explant incubation medium. Synthesis of immunoglobulin in the organ-culture system was investigated by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis of radiolabelled polypeptides; 2 polypeptides co-migrated with the heavy and light chains of a reference polyclonal immunoglobulin G and were confirmed, by use of anti-human globulin and iodinated staphylococcal protein A, to be the heavy and light chains of immunoglobulin G. This experimental system will provide a useful model in future investigations of the efficacy of a local vaccine in human subjects. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:6803822

  6. Synthesis of immunoglobulins by human endocervix in organ culture.

    PubMed

    Cowan, M E; Buchan, A; Skinner, G R

    1982-04-01

    The synthesis of immunoglobulins by the uterine cervix was investigated in an endocervical organ-culture system. Using Ouchterlony immunodiffusion gels immunoglobulin G, immunoglobulin A and secretory piece were detected in washings of endocervical explants and in explant incubation medium. Synthesis of immunoglobulin in the organ-culture system was investigated by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis of radiolabelled polypeptides; 2 polypeptides co-migrated with the heavy and light chains of a reference polyclonal immunoglobulin G and were confirmed, by use of anti-human globulin and iodinated staphylococcal protein A, to be the heavy and light chains of immunoglobulin G. This experimental system will provide a useful model in future investigations of the efficacy of a local vaccine in human subjects.

  7. [Development and study of properties of immunoglobulins against Lassa fever].

    PubMed

    Krasnianskiĭ, V P; Gradoboev, V N; Borisevich, I V; Potryvaeva, N V; Lebedinskaia, E V; Chernikova, N K; Timan'kova, G D

    1997-01-01

    A horse may serve the producer of immune antiserum to Lassa virus. Specific immunoglobulin with at least 1:512 titer of virus-neutralizing antibodies to Lassa fever was obtained by alcohol sedimentation after Cohn from the blood serum of immunized horses. The preparation does not differ from heterologous commercial immunoglobulins. Preclinical studies of immunoglobulin to Lassa fever demonstrated its safety and a high specific activity. The agent can be injected both alone and in combination with virasole.

  8. {lambda}{sup 0} Polarization in pp{yields}p{lambda}{sup 0}K{sup +} at 800 GeV/c

    SciTech Connect

    Valencia, E.; Felix, J.; Reyes, M. A.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Berisso, M. C.; Kreisler, M. N.; Lee, S.; Markianos, K.; Wesson, D.; Christian, D. C.; Gottschalk, E.; Gutierrez, G.; Wehmann, A.; Gara, A.; Knapp, B. C.; Hartouni, E. P.

    2008-07-02

    We determined {lambda}{sup 0} polarization as function of X{sub F}, P{sub T}, M{sub X}, and E{sub {lambda}}, with respect to the normal of the following two different production planes: The first one defined by the momentum of the 800 GeV/c proton beam and the moment of {lambda}{sup 0}; the second one, by the momentum of the transferred object and the momentum of {lambda}{sup 0}, from the sample created in the FNAL E690 experiment. We present results, compare and discuss them.

  9. The lambda-scheme method applied to Stirling engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, R.

    1985-12-01

    An integration method of the motion equations is the so-called 'lambda-scheme': such a method suggests that, in the numerical procedure of the approximation of the derivatives in space with finite differences, the physical domains of dependence have to be correctly taken into account, according to the wave propagation through the flow. In the lambda-scheme method, the codes are simple, the computing time is kept very low, while accuracy (second-order in space and time) of the results is very satisfactory. As a matter of fact, the simulation model here discussed leads to a deeper analysis and a closer prediction of Stirling engine performances. As a first approach, a feasibility analysis is carried out for an expansion space-heat exchanger flow duty simulation.

  10. Efficient epitope mapping by bacteriophage {lambda} surface display

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwabara, I.; Maruyama, H.; Zuberi, R.I.

    1997-01-01

    A bacteriophage {lambda} surface expression system, {lambda}foo, was used for epitope mapping of human galectin-3. We constructed random epitope and peptide libraries and compared their efficiencies in the mapping. The galectin-3 cDNA was randomly digested by DNase I to make random epitope libraries. The libraries were screened by affinity selection using a microtiter plate coated with monoclonal antibodies. Direct DNA sequencing of the selected clones defined two distinct epitope sites consisting of nine and 11 amino-acid residues. Affinity selection of random peptide libraries recovered a number of sequences that were similar to each other but distinct from the galectin-3 sequence. These results demonstrate that a single affinity selection of epitope libraries with antibodies is able to define an epitope determinant as small as nine residues long and is more efficient in epitope mapping than random peptide libraries. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Secondary hypogammaglobulinemia in Waldmann's disease treated with subcutaneous immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Patuzzo, G; Tinazzi, E; Micheletti, M; Puccetti, A; Lunardi, C

    2016-03-01

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL) is rare disorder characterized by congenital malformation or obstruction of intestinal lymphatic drainage; it is responsible for protein losing enteropathy leading to lymphopenia, hypoalbuminemia and hypogammaglobulinemia. A low-fat diet associated with medium-chain triglyceride supplementation is the cornerstone of PIL management. The administration of intravenous immunoglobulins does not always lead to satisfactory plasma levels and therefore the replacement therapy with immunoglobulins is controversial. We describe here the case of a patient with PIL and severe hypogammaglobulinemia treated with immunoglobulins. The striking aspect of this case is the clinical and serological benefit obtained with the subcutaneous compared to the intravenous immunoglobulins administration.

  12. Hydrometer test for estimation of immunoglobulin concentration in bovine colostrum.

    PubMed

    Fleenor, W A; Stott, G H

    1980-06-01

    A practical field method for measuring immunoglobulin concentration in bovine colostrum has been developed from the linear relationship between colostral specific gravity and immunoglobulin concentration. Fourteen colostrums were collected within 24 h postpartum from nursed and unnursed cows and were assayed for specific gravity and major colostral constituents. Additionally, 15 colostrums were collected immediately postpartum prior to suckling and assayed for specific gravity and immunoglobulin concentration. Regression analysis provided an equation to estimate colostral immunoglobulin concentration from the specific gravity of fresh whole colostrum. From this, a colostrometer was developed for practical field use.

  13. Single radial immunodiffusion analysis for quantitation of colostral immunoglobulin concentration.

    PubMed

    Fleenor, W A; Stott, G H

    1981-05-01

    Relative accuracy of the single radial immunodiffusion technique to measure immunoglobulin concentrations of colostral preparations (whey, whole, or fat-free) has been assessed. Fresh colostrum samples were analyzed for major constituents. Gammaglobulin as a standard was compared to total immunoglobulin concentration derived from single radial immunodiffusion analysis of colostral preparations with no differences except between standard and whey. Differences were in part from either enhancement or interference of immunoglobulin diffusion by colostral constituents. Removal of casein and fat during whey preparations caused a concentrating effect upon immunoglobulin constituents resulting in exaggerated precipitin rings. Whey has produced unreliable results: therefore, whole colostrum is recommended for single radial immunodiffusion analysis.

  14. Characterization of SAL605 negative resist at {lambda}=13 nm

    SciTech Connect

    La Fontaine, B.; Ciarlo, D.; Gaines, D.P.; Kania, D.R.

    1996-05-24

    We have characterized the response of the negative resist SAL605 in the extreme ultraviolet ({lambda}=13 nm). The sensitivity was found to be {approx}1 mJ/cm{sup 3} for all conditions studied. We have identified processing conditions leading to high ({gamma}{gt}4) contrast. The resist response was modeled using Prolith/2 and the development parameters were obtained from the exposure curves.

  15. Lambda modes of the neutron diffusion equation in hexagonal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Barrachina, T.; Ginestar, D.; Verdu, G.

    2006-07-01

    A nodal collocation method is proposed to compute the dominant Lambda modes of nuclear reactor core with a hexagonal geometry. This method is based on a triangular mesh and assumes that the neutronic flux can be approximated as a finite expansion in terms of Dubiner's polynomials. The method transforms the initial differential eigenvalue problem into a generalized algebraic one, from which the dominant modes of the reactor can be computed. The performance of the method is tested with two benchmark problems. (authors)

  16. An investigation of the {anti p}p {yields} {anti {Lambda}} {Lambda} and {anti p}p {yields} {anti {Sigma}}{sup 0} {Lambda} + c.c. reactions near threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Tayloe, R.; PS185 Collaboration

    1995-12-31

    Experiment PS 185 studies the production of antihyperon-hyperon pairs in antiproton-proton collisions at LEAR in the near-threshold energy region. The {ital {anti p} p} {r_arrow} {anti {Lambda}}{Lambda} reaction has been thoroughly studied by PS185 and many high-quality data have been reported. New results, including total and differential cross sections along with spin observables, are presented here for the channels {ital {anti p} p} {r_arrow} {anti {Lambda}}{Lambda} and {ital {anti p}p} {r_arrow} {anti {Sigma}}{sup 0}{Lambda} + c.c at incident lab antiproton momenta of 1.726 and 1. 771 GeV/c. The data from the relatively unstudied and complementary {ital {anti p}p} {r_arrow} {anti {Sigma}}{sup 0}{Lambda} + c.c channel is compared to that from {ital {anti p}p} {r_arrow} {anti {Lambda}}{Lambda} at similar energies above the reaction threshold.

  17. Measurement of sigma Lambda b0/sigma B0 x B(Lambda b0-->Lambda c+pi-)/B(B0-->D+pi-) in pp collisions at square root s=1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abulencia, A; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Budroni, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carillo, S; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Cyr, D; DaRonco, S; D'Auria, S; Davies, T; D'Onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, M; Delli Paoli, F; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; DiTuro, P; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garberson, F; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraan, A C; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Le, Y; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ranjan, N; Rappoccio, S; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Saltzberg, D; Sánchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tseng, J; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, J; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2007-03-23

    We present the first observation of the baryon decay Lambda b0-->Lambda c+pi- followed by Lambda c+-->pK-pi+ in 106 pb-1 pp collisions at square root s=1.96 TeV in the CDF experiment. In order to reduce systematic error, the measured rate for Lambda b0 decay is normalized to the kinematically similar meson decay B0-->D+pi- followed by D+-->pi+K-pi+. We report the ratio of production cross sections (sigma) times the ratio of branching fractions (B) for the momentum region integrated above pT>6 GeV/c and pseudorapidity range |eta|<1.3: sigma(pp-->Lambda b0X)/sigma(pp-->B0X)xB(Lambda b0-->Lambda c+pi-)/B(B0-->D+pi-)=0.82+/-0.08(stat)+/-0.11(syst)+/-0.22[B(Lambda c+-->pK-pi+)].

  18. ({lambda}, p) Spectrum Analysis in p+A Interactions at 10 GeV/c

    SciTech Connect

    Aslanyan, P. Zh.; Emelyanenko, V. N.

    2007-06-13

    Experimental data from the 2m propane bubble chamber have been analyzed for exotic baryon states search. A number of peculiarities were found in the effective mass spectra of: {lambda}{pi}+({sigma}*+(1382),PDG), {lambda}p and {lambda}pp subsystems. A few events detected on the photographs of the propane bubble chamber exposed to a 10 GeV/c proton beam, were interpreted as S=-2 H0 light(lambda}{lambda})) and heavy H0,+. New event, detected on the photographs of the propane bubble chamber was interpreted as heavy H+(2488) dibaryon by two weak decay channels of K-pp or {sigma}+p{pi}-.

  19. Subset of Kappa and Lambda Germline Sequences Result in Light Chains with a Higher Molecular Mass Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Barnidge, David R; Lundström, Susanna L; Zhang, Bo; Dasari, Surendra; Murray, David L; Zubarev, Roman A

    2015-12-04

    In our previous work, we showed that electrospray ionization of intact polyclonal kappa and lambda light chains isolated from normal serum generates two distinct, Gaussian-shaped, molecular mass distributions representing the light-chain repertoire. During the analysis of a large (>100) patient sample set, we noticed a low-intensity molecular mass distribution with a mean of approximately 24 250 Da, roughly 800 Da higher than the mean of the typical kappa molecular-mass distribution mean of 23 450 Da. We also observed distinct clones in this region that did not appear to contain any typical post-translational modifications that would account for such a large mass shift. To determine the origin of the high molecular mass clones, we performed de novo bottom-up mass spectrometry on a purified IgM monoclonal light chain that had a calculated molecular mass of 24 275.03 Da. The entire sequence of the monoclonal light chain was determined using multienzyme digestion and de novo sequence-alignment software and was found to belong to the germline allele IGKV2-30. The alignment of kappa germline sequences revealed ten IGKV2 and one IGKV4 sequences that contained additional amino acids in their CDR1 region, creating the high-molecular-mass phenotype. We also performed an alignment of lambda germline sequences, which showed additional amino acids in the CDR2 region, and the FR3 region of functional germline sequences that result in a high-molecular-mass phenotype. The work presented here illustrates the ability of mass spectrometry to provide information on the diversity of light-chain molecular mass phenotypes in circulation, which reflects the germline sequences selected by the immunoglobulin-secreting B-cell population.

  20. Collaborative study to establish human immunoglobulin BRP batch 3 and human immunoglobulin (molecular size) BRP batch 1.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, E; Daas, A; Behr-Gross, M-E

    2006-11-01

    A study was carried out by the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines (EDQM) as part of the joint Biological Standardisation Programme of the Council of Europe and the European Commission with the aim to establish replacement batches of the European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) human immunoglobulin Biological Reference Preparation (BRP) batch 2. Twenty-eight laboratories participated in this study. The suitability of the candidate reference preparations to serve as working references in the tests for distribution of the molecular size, anticomplementary activity and Fc function, in accordance with the specifications of the Ph. Eur. monographs Human normal immunoglobulin for intravenous administration (0918), Human normal immunoglobulin (0338) and Anti-T lymphocyte immunoglobulin for human use, animal (1928) was demonstrated. The candidates were therefore established as human immunoglobulin BRP batch 3 and Human immunoglobulin (molecular size) BRP batch 1. The prescribed use of the latter BRP is limited to the test for distribution of molecular size.

  1. Measurement of the Lambda0(b) Lifetime in Lambda0(b) ---> J/psi Lambda0 in p anti-p Collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara

    2006-09-01

    The authors report a measurement of the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} lifetime in the exclusive decay {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{Lambda}{sup 0} in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. Using fully reconstructed decays, they measure {tau}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}) = 1.593{sub -0.078}{sup +0.083}(stat.) {+-} 0.033(syst.) ps. This is the single most precise measurement of {tau}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}) and is 3.2 {sigma} higher than the current world average.

  2. Study of inclusive. Lambda. production in e sup + e minus annihilations at 29 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Geld, T.L.; Neal, H.; Akerlof, C.; Chapman, J.; Errede, D.; Ken, M.T.; Kesten, P.; Meyer, D.I.; Nitz, D.; Thun, R.; Tschirhart, R. ); Abachi, S.; Derrick, M.; Kooijman, P.; Musgrave, B.; Price, L.; Repond, J.; Sugano, K. ); Blockus, D.; Brabson, B.B.; Brom, J.; Jung, C.; Ogren, H.; Rust, D.R.; Snyder, A. ); Cork, B. ); Baringer, P.; Bylsma, B.G.; Debonte, R.; Low, E.H.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miller, D.H.; Ng, C.R.; Rangan, K.; Shibata, E. )

    1992-06-01

    Cross sections are presented for the inclusive production of {Lambda} hyperons in electron-positron annihilations at {radical}{ital s} =29 GeV based on the full 291-pb{sup {minus}1} sample of data taken in the High Resolution Spectrometer experiment at the SLAC {ital e}{sup +}{ital e}{minus} storage ring PEP. These results, and the associated correlation analyses, are consistent with the Lund model predictions with the strange diquark suppression ratio {delta} fixed at 0.59{plus minus}0.10{plus minus}0.18, as compared to the standard Lund value of 0.32. The {Lambda} multiplicity has been found to be 0.182{plus minus}0.020 per event. The opposite-strangeness multiplicity {l angle}{ital n}{sub {Lambda}}{Lambda}{bar a}{r angle} has been measured to be 0.046{plus minus}0.020, whereas the like-strangeness multiplicity {l angle}{ital n}{sub {Lambda}{Lambda}}+{bar {Lambda}}{bar {Lambda}}{r angle} is 0.009{plus minus}0.028. A strong correlation is found between {Lambda}'s and {bar {Lambda}} 's; when one is found in an event, the other is found in the same event with a probability that exceeds 50%.

  3. Study of the ^7_{Lambda}He hypernucleus in formalism of the Faddeev equations

    SciTech Connect

    Igor Filikhin; Vladimir M. Suslov; Branislav Vlahovic

    2006-02-01

    P-shell A = 7 hypernuclei are considered in the cluster {sub {Lambda}}{sup 5}He + N + N model. The folding procedure are applied to construct the {sub {Lambda}}{sup 5}He-N interaction. We use the OBE simulating NSC97f potential for {Lambda}N interaction and various phenomenological potentials for {alpha}{Lambda} interaction. Configuration space Faddeev calculations are performed for hyperon binding energy of the {sub {Lambda}}{sup 7}He(1/2{sup +}) and {sub {lambda}}{sup 7}Li(1/2{sup +} and 3/2{sup +}, T=0) nuclei. Predicted value for B{sub {Lambda}}({sub {Lambda}}{sup 7}He) is 5.35 MeV. This value is obtained when the {sup {Lambda}}{sup 6}He(2{sup -}) excitation energy is equal 0.26 MeV by the adjustment of pair {sub {Lambda}}{sup 5}He-N effective potential to reproduce the experimental value of the {sub {Lambda}}{sup 7}Li(3/2{sup +}) excitation energy. Our results are compared with those of E. Hiyama et al.

  4. The role of template superhelicity in the initiation of bacteriophage lambda DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Alfano, C; McMacken, R

    1988-01-01

    The prepriming steps in the initiation of bacteriophage lambda DNA replication depend on the action of the lambda O and P proteins and on the DnaB helicase, single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB), and DnaJ and DnaK heat shock proteins of the E. coli host. The binding of multiple copies of the lambda O protein to the phage replication origin (ori lambda) initiates the ordered assembly of a series of nucleoprotein structures that form at ori lambda prior to DNA unwinding, priming and DNA synthesis steps. Since the initiation of lambda DNA replication is known to occur only on supercoiled templates in vivo and in vitro, we examined how the early steps in lambda DNA replication are influenced by superhelical tension. All initiation complexes formed prior to helicase-mediated DNA-unwinding form with high efficiency on relaxed ori lambda DNA. Nonetheless, the DNA templates in these structures must be negatively supertwisted before they can be replicated. Once DNA helicase unwinding is initiated at ori lambda, however, later steps in lambda DNA replication proceed efficiently in the absence of superhelical tension. We conclude that supercoiling is required during the initiation of lambda DNA replication to facilitate entry of a DNA helicase, presumably the DnaB protein, between the DNA strands. Images PMID:2847118

  5. Search for CP violation in charged-Xi and Lambda hyperon decays

    SciTech Connect

    Holmstrom, T.; Leros, N.; Burnstein, R.A.; Chakravorty, A.; Chan, A.; Chen, Y.C.; Choong, W.S.; Clark, K.; Dukes, E.C.; Durandet, C.; Felix, J.; Fu, Y.; Gidal, G.; Gu, P.; Gustafson, H.R.; Ho, C.; Huang, M.; James, C.; Jenkins, C.M.; Jones, T.; Kaplan, D.M.; /Virginia U. /Lausanne U. /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /UC, Berkeley /Fermilab /Guanajuato U. /IIT, Chicago /Lausanne U. /LBL, Berkeley /Michigan U. /South Alabama U. /Virginia U.

    2004-12-01

    The authors have compared the p and {bar p} angular distributions in 117 million {Xi}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{pi}{sup -} {yields} p{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -} and 41 million {Xi}{sup +} {yields} {bar {Lambda}}{pi}{sup +} {yields} {bar p}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} decays using a subset of the data from the HyperCP experiment (ES71) at Fermilab. They find no evidence of CP violation, with the direct-CP-violating parameter A{sub {Xi}{Lambda}} {triple_bond} (a{sub {Xi}}a{sub {Lambda}} - {bar a}{sub {Xi}}{bar a}{sub {Lambda}})/(a{sub {Xi}}a{sub {Lambda}} + {bar a}{sub {Xi}}{bar a}{sub {Lambda}}) = [0.0 {+-} 5.1(stat) {+-} 4.4(syst)] x 10{sup -4}.

  6. Immunoglobulin Fc gamma receptor promotes immunoglobulin uptake, immunoglobulin-mediated calcium increase, and neurotransmitter release in motor neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohamed, Habib A.; Mosier, Dennis R.; Zou, Ling L.; Siklos, Laszlo; Alexianu, Maria E.; Engelhardt, Jozsef I.; Beers, David R.; Le, Wei-dong; Appel, Stanley H.

    2002-01-01

    Receptors for the Fc portion of immunoglobulin G (IgG; FcgammaRs) facilitate IgG uptake by effector cells as well as cellular responses initiated by IgG binding. In earlier studies, we demonstrated that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patient IgG can be taken up by motor neuron terminals and transported retrogradely to the cell body and can alter the function of neuromuscular synapses, such as increasing intracellular calcium and spontaneous transmitter release from motor axon terminals after passive transfer. In the present study, we examined whether FcgammaR-mediated processes can contribute to these effects of ALS patient immunoglobulins. F(ab')(2) fragments (which lack the Fc portion) of ALS patient IgG were not taken up by motor axon terminals and were not retrogradely transported. Furthermore, in a genetically modified mouse lacking the gamma subunit of the FcR, the uptake of whole ALS IgG and its ability to enhance intracellular calcium and acetylcholine release were markedly attenuated. These data suggest that FcgammaRs appear to participate in IgG uptake into motor neurons as well as IgG-mediated increases in intracellular calcium and acetylcholine release from motor axon terminals. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Poliomyelitis: immunoglobulin-containing cells in the central nervous system in acute and convalescent phases of the human disease.

    PubMed Central

    Esiri, M M

    1980-01-01

    The immunoperoxidase method has been used to demonstrate the presence of immunoglobulin-containing cells in the central nervous system in acute and convalescent phases of poliomyelitis. These cells were found in considerable numbers in the areas of damage during the acute phase, and persisted at the same sites, though in smaller numbers, during the convalescent phase for at least 8 months. Most of the positively stained cells were plasma cells. IgA was the commonest heavy chain type demonstrated, with lesser amounts also of IgG and, during the acute phase, IgM. In the acute phase more lambda than kappa light chain was demonstrated but in the convalescent phase this ratio was reversed. More light chain than heavy chain was demonstrable during the acute phase. The significance of these results is briefly discussed. Images Fig. 2 PMID:6771081

  8. [Dermatomyositis and Panniculitis: the function of immunoglobulins].

    PubMed

    Abdelhafidh, Nadia Ben; Toujeni, Sana; Kefi, Asma; Bousetta, Najeh; Sayhi, Sameh; Gharsallah, Imen; Othmani, Salah

    2016-01-01

    Panniculitis is an inflammatory disease of subcutaneous adipose tissue which is rarely associated with dermatomyositis. It can occur before, after or simultaneously with muscle damage. In most cases, the evolution of panniculitis and of other dermatomyositis affections is favorable with corticosteroids and/or immunosuppressants. We report the case of a 48 year-old patient who developed panniculitis lesions 2 months before having muscular signs. Skin involvement was resistant to corticosteroid treatment associated with immunosuppressants drugs. This led to the use of polyvalent immunoglobulin treatment improving both skin and muscle damage.

  9. [Secretory immunoglobulin A in amniotic fluid].

    PubMed

    Briese, V; Straube, W; Brock, J; Lorenz, U

    1983-01-01

    Secretory immunoglobulin A (S-IgA) was estimated in amniotic fluid samples by means of the single radial immunodiffusion according to Mancini. A monospecific antiserum against human secretory component was used. 163 amniotic fluid samples from normal pregnancies and risk pregnancies respectively were investigated. Within the 3rd trimenon the S-IgA content in amniotic fluid increased significantly. With respect to literature and examinations performed previously a connection between S-IgA content in amniotic fluid and fetal lung maturity seems to be possible.

  10. Utilizing Synthetic Spectra to Refine Lambda Boo Stars' UV Classification Criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Kwang-Ping; Neff, James E.; Johnson, Dustin; Tarbell, Erik; Romo, Christopher; Steele, Patricia; Gray, Richard O.; Corbally, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Lambda Boo-type stars are a group of late B to early F-type Population I dwarfs that show deficiencies of iron-peak elements (up to 2 dex), but their C, N, O, and S abundances are near solar. This stellar class has recently regained the spotlight because of the directly-imaged planets around a confirmed Lambda Boo star, HR 8799, and a suggested Lambda Boo star Beta Pictoris. The discovery of a giant asteroid belt around Vega, another possible Lambda Boo star, also suggests hidden planets. This possible link between Lambda Boo stars and planet-bearing stars motivates us to study Lambda Boo stars systematically. Since the peculiar nature of the prototype Lambda Bootis was first noticed in 1943, Lambda Boo candidates published in the literature have been selected using widely different criteria. The Lambda Boo label has been applied to almost any peculiar A-type stars that do not fit elsewhere. In order to determine the origin of Lambda Boo stars' unique abundance pattern and to better discriminate between theories explaining the Lambda Boo phenomenon, a consistent working definition of Lambda Boo stars is needed. We have re-evaluated all published Lambda Boo candidates and their available ultraviolet and visible spectra. Using observed and synthetic spectra, we explored the classification of Lambda Boo stars and developed quantitative criteria that discriminate metal-poor stars from bona fide Lambda Boo stars. With model spectra, we demonstrated that the (C I 1657 Angstrom)/ (Al II 1671 Angstrom) line ratio is the best single criterion to distinguish between Lambda Boo stars and metal weak stars, and that one cannot use a single C I/Al II cut-off value as a Lambda Boo classification criterion. The C I/Al II cut-off value is a function of a star's effective temperature and metallicity. Using these stricter Lambda Boo classification criteria, we concluded that neither Beta Pictoris nor Vega should be classified as Lambda Boo stars.

  11. 21 CFR 866.5530 - Immunoglobulin G (Fc fragment specific) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... immunoglobulin G (resulting from breakdown of immunoglobulin G antibodies) in urine, serum, and other body fluids. Measurement of immunoglobulin G Fc fragments aids in the diagnosis of plasma cell...

  12. Anti-Fab antibodies in humans. Predominance of minor immunoglobulin G subclasses in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Persselin, J E; Stevens, R H

    1985-01-01

    Isoelectric focusing analyses of sera from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) demonstrate two populations of antibodies directed against the Fab portion of pooled human IgG. One population is composed of polyclonal alkaline anti-Fab antibodies (alpha FABA) and the other, acidic alpha FABA which are more clonally restricted. In this study we have identified the immunoglobulin classes and subclasses of these antibodies in RA sera. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) demonstrated alpha FABA in RA sera to be predominantly IgG. A large portion of IgG alpha FABA existed as immune complexes, inasmuch as dialysis of RA sera against 6 M urea before ELISA analysis was necessary for maximal detection of alpha FABA activity. Chromatofocusing of RA sera isolated alpha FABA of different charges and revealed the acidic clonally restricted alpha FABA to be IgG4 and IgG3, whereas the polyclonal alkaline group contained IgG1, IgG2, and IgG3. Overall, acidic IgG3 and IgG4 comprised 70% of IgG alpha FABA, and high levels of IgG4 were seen in most RA sera. When alpha FABA were elevated in normal sera, they were primarily of the IgG4 subclass, and also existed as immune complexes. Serum anti-Fab activity was removed by adsorption of sera with Fab fragments. Anti-Fab antibodies of both kappa and lambda light-chain types were present in RA sera, and F(ab')2 fragments of RA serum immunoglobulin were found to possess anti-Fab activity. These studies indicate that alpha FABA in RA sera are limited to the IgG class, and that most of these antibodies exist as immune complexes and display clonal and minor IgG subclass restriction. Images PMID:3928684

  13. Pathogenic Leptospira species express surface-exposed proteins belonging to the bacterial immunoglobulin superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, James; Barocchi, Michele A.; Croda, Julio; Young, Tracy A.; Sanchez, Yolanda; Siqueira, Isadora; Bolin, Carole A.; Reis, Mitermayer G.; Riley, Lee W.; Haake, David A.; Ko, Albert I.

    2005-01-01

    Summary Proteins with bacterial immunoglobulin-like (Big) domains, such as the Yersinia pseudotuberculosis invasin and Escherichia coli intimin, are surface-expressed proteins that mediate host mammalian cell invasion or attachment. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a new family of Big domain proteins, referred to as Lig (leptospiral Ig-like) proteins, in pathogenic Leptospira. Screening of L. interrogans and L. kirschneri expression libraries with sera from leptospirosis patients identified 13 lambda phage clones that encode tandem repeats of the 90 amino acid Big domain. Two lig genes, designated ligA and ligB, and one pseudo-gene, ligC, were identified. The ligA and ligB genes encode amino-terminal lipoprotein signal peptides followed by 10 or 11 Big domain repeats and, in the case of ligB, a unique carboxy-terminal non-repeat domain. The organization of ligC is similar to that of ligB but contains mutations that disrupt the reading frame. The lig sequences are present in pathogenic but not saprophytic Leptospira species. LigA and LigB are expressed by a variety of virulent leptospiral strains. Loss of Lig protein and RNA transcript expression is correlated with the observed loss of virulence during culture attenuation of pathogenic strains. High-pressure freeze substitution followed by immunocytochemical electron microscopy confirmed that the Lig proteins were localized to the bacterial surface. Immunoblot studies with patient sera found that the Lig proteins are a major antigen recognized during the acute host infection. These observations demonstrate that the Lig proteins are a newly identified surface protein of pathogenic Leptospira, which by analogy to other bacterial immunoglobulin superfamily virulence factors, may play a role in host cell attachment and invasion during leptospiral pathogenesis. PMID:12890019

  14. Passive transfer of colostral immunoglobulins in calves.

    PubMed

    Weaver, D M; Tyler, J W; VanMetre, D C; Hostetler, D E; Barrington, G M

    2000-01-01

    Passive transfer of colostral immunoglobulins has long been accepted as imperative to optimal calf health. Many factors, including timing of colostrum ingestion, the method and volume of colostrum administration, the immunoglobulin concentration of the colostrum ingested, and the age of the dam have been implicated in affecting the optimization of absorption. The practice of colostrum pooling, the breed and presence of the dam, and the presence of respiratory acidosis in the calf also may affect passive transfer. Various tests have been reported to accurately measure passive transfer status in neonatal calves. The radial immunodiffusion and the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) are the only tests that directly measure serum IgG concentration. All other available tests including serum total solids by refractometry, sodium sulfite turbidity test, zinc sulfate turbidity test, serum gamma-glutamyl transferase activity, and whole blood glutaraldehyde gelation estimate serum IgG concentration based on concentration of total globulins or other proteins whose passive transfer is statistically associated with that of IgG. This paper presents a comprehensive review of the literature of passive transfer in calves including factors that affect passive transfer status, testing modalities, effects of failure of passive transfer on baseline mortality, consequences of failure of passive transfer, and some treatment options. Many previously accepted truisms regarding passive transfer in calves should be rejected based on the results of recent research.

  15. The immunoglobulins of cold-blooded vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Pettinello, Rita; Dooley, Helen

    2014-11-24

    Although lymphocyte-like cells secreting somatically-recombining receptors have been identified in the jawless fishes (hagfish and lamprey), the cartilaginous fishes (sharks, skates, rays and chimaera) are the most phylogenetically distant group relative to mammals in which bona fide immunoglobulins (Igs) have been found. Studies of the antibodies and humoral immune responses of cartilaginous fishes and other cold-blooded vertebrates (bony fishes, amphibians and reptiles) are not only revealing information about the emergence and roles of the different Ig heavy and light chain isotypes, but also the evolution of specialised adaptive features such as isotype switching, somatic hypermutation and affinity maturation. It is becoming increasingly apparent that while the adaptive immune response in these vertebrate lineages arose a long time ago, it is most definitely not primitive and has evolved to become complex and sophisticated. This review will summarise what is currently known about the immunoglobulins of cold-blooded vertebrates and highlight the differences, and commonalities, between these and more "conventional" mammalian species.

  16. The Immunoglobulins of Cold-Blooded Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Pettinello, Rita; Dooley, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Although lymphocyte-like cells secreting somatically-recombining receptors have been identified in the jawless fishes (hagfish and lamprey), the cartilaginous fishes (sharks, skates, rays and chimaera) are the most phylogenetically distant group relative to mammals in which bona fide immunoglobulins (Igs) have been found. Studies of the antibodies and humoral immune responses of cartilaginous fishes and other cold-blooded vertebrates (bony fishes, amphibians and reptiles) are not only revealing information about the emergence and roles of the different Ig heavy and light chain isotypes, but also the evolution of specialised adaptive features such as isotype switching, somatic hypermutation and affinity maturation. It is becoming increasingly apparent that while the adaptive immune response in these vertebrate lineages arose a long time ago, it is most definitely not primitive and has evolved to become complex and sophisticated. This review will summarise what is currently known about the immunoglobulins of cold-blooded vertebrates and highlight the differences, and commonalities, between these and more “conventional” mammalian species. PMID:25427250

  17. Lambda Hyperon and Anti-Lambda Hyperon Production in Proton-Antiproton Collisions at SQRT.S = 1.8 Tev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesson, Dennis Keith

    1990-01-01

    The characteristics of Lambda and |Lambda production have been studied from data obtained from p p collisions at sqrt{rm s} = 1.8 TeV during the first running period of experiment E735 from January to May of 1987. The experiment was conducted at the Fermi National Laboratory Tevatron collider. Five million triggers from an integrated luminosity of about 1over 3 nb^{ -1} were written to tape during this initial run of E735. Using a magnetic spectrometer arm a sample of 413 Lambda's + = Lambda's were found in these events. The transverse momentum spectrum, the ratio Lambda/(all charged particles) and the ratio Lambda/proton were studied from this sample. These were compared to the findings at lower energies and also to the results of a Monte Carlo program from another experiment. The average transverse momentum was found to be 0.77 +/- 0.06 +/- 0.08, an increase of about 24% from the value found at sqrt{rm s} = 540 GeV (CERN SPS) and an increase of about 55% from sqrt{rm s} = 53 GeV (CERN ISR). The Lambda/(all charged particle) ratio was also found to increase from 0.009 +/- 0.001 at sqrt{rm s} = 53 GeV (CERN ISR) and 0.019 +/- 0.004 at sqrt{rm s} = 540 GeV (CERN SPS), to 0.026 +/- 0.002 +/- 0.004 at our energy of sqrt{rm s} = 1.8 TeV. The lambda/proton ratio was found to be 0.38 +/- 0.03 +/- 0.06. This ratio shows no increase from lower energies. The lambda/proton ratio was used to find the strangeness suppression factor (lambda) from the quark combinatoric model of hadron production. We obtain a value lambda = 0.34 +/- 0.05 in agreement with the values found at lower energies. The increase in the ratio lambda/all charged particles as a function of center of mass energy is not inconsistent with the formation of quark-gluon plasma. However, the constant ratio of lambda/proton production is not expected in quark-gluon plasma production. Moreover, our data seem to agree with the UA5 Monte Carlo data, which does not include quark-gluon plasma production. Based on Lambda

  18. Longitudinal Spin Transfer to Lambda and Anti-Lambda Hyperons Produced in Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at Center of Mass Energy = 200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cendejas, Ramon

    Studies on the spin structure of the proton have been an active area of research; after the EMC experiment and subsequent experiments found that only about 30% of the total proton spin is carried by quark spins. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is the world's first and only polarized proton collider. The Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) has full azimuthal acceptance and is ideally suited to advance studies of the proton spin. The longitudinal spin transfer, DLL, of lambda and anti-lambda hyperons in longitudinally polarized proton-proton collisions is sensitive to quark and anti-quark polarization in the polarized proton; as well as to polarized fragmentation; and has been proposed as a possible probe of (anti-)strange quark polarization. The STAR collaboration has previously reported an initial proof-of-concept measurement of DLL of lambda and anti-lambda hyperons from a data sample obtained at sqr(s)=200 GeV in 2005. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 2 pb- with 50% beam polarization. Considerably larger data samples corresponding to 6.5 pb- and 25 pb- with beam polarizations of 57% at sqr(s)=200 GeV were obtained in 2006 and 2009 using an upgraded instrument. Improvements were made on the analysis procedure to reduce background contribution to the lambda + anti-lambda measurements. These new measurements of DLL form the main topic of this dissertation. The sample of hyperons residing within a jet that triggered the experiment are classified as near-side hyperons, and are analyzed separately from an away-side sample that has similar precision. In addition to DLL, the double longitudinal spin asymmetry, A LL, for the production of lambda and anti-lambda hyperons has been extracted. The dependences of DLL on pseudo-rapidity, pT , and the fragmentation ratio, z, are studied. The stated DLL from lambda and anti-lambda each disfavor one of the published model predictions for DLL for a combined lambda and anti-lambda sample, and are

  19. UTILIZING SYNTHETIC UV SPECTRA TO EXPLORE THE PHYSICAL BASIS FOR THE CLASSIFICATION OF LAMBDA BOÖTIS STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Kwang-Ping; Johnson, Dustin M.; Tarbell, Erik S.; Romo, Christopher A.; Prabhaker, Arvind; Neff, James E.; Steele, Patricia A.; Gray, Richard O.; Corbally, Christopher J.

    2016-04-15

    Lambda Boo-type stars are a group of late B to early F-type Population I dwarfs that show mild to extreme deficiencies of iron-peak elements (up to 2 dex), but their C, N, O, and S abundances are near solar. This intriguing stellar class has recently regained the spotlight because of the directly imaged planets around a confirmed Lambda Boo star, HR 8799, and a suggested Lambda Boo star, Beta Pictoris. The discovery of a giant asteroid belt around Vega, another possible Lambda Boo star, also suggests hidden planets. The possible link between Lambda Boo stars and planet-bearing stars motivates us to study Lambda Boo stars systematically. Since the peculiar nature of the prototype Lambda Boötis was first noticed in 1943, Lambda Boo candidates published in the literature have been selected using widely different criteria. In order to determine the origin of Lambda Boo stars’ unique abundance pattern and to better discriminate between theories explaining the Lambda Boo phenomenon, a consistent working definition of Lambda Boo stars is needed. We have re-evaluated all published Lambda Boo candidates and their available ultraviolet and visible spectra. In this paper, using observed and synthetic spectra, we explore the physical basis for the classification of Lambda Boo stars, and develop quantitative criteria that discriminate metal-poor stars from bona fide Lambda Boo stars. Based on these stricter Lambda Boo classification criteria, we conclude that neither Beta Pictoris nor Vega should be classified as Lambda Boo stars.

  20. Utilizing Synthetic UV Spectra to Explore the Physical Basis for the Classification of Lambda Boötis Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Kwang-Ping; Neff, James E.; Johnson, Dustin M.; Tarbell, Erik S.; Romo, Christopher A.; Prabhaker, Arvind; Steele, Patricia A.; Gray, Richard O.; Corbally, Christopher J.

    2016-04-01

    Lambda Boo-type stars are a group of late B to early F-type Population I dwarfs that show mild to extreme deficiencies of iron-peak elements (up to 2 dex), but their C, N, O, and S abundances are near solar. This intriguing stellar class has recently regained the spotlight because of the directly imaged planets around a confirmed Lambda Boo star, HR 8799, and a suggested Lambda Boo star, Beta Pictoris. The discovery of a giant asteroid belt around Vega, another possible Lambda Boo star, also suggests hidden planets. The possible link between Lambda Boo stars and planet-bearing stars motivates us to study Lambda Boo stars systematically. Since the peculiar nature of the prototype Lambda Boötis was first noticed in 1943, Lambda Boo candidates published in the literature have been selected using widely different criteria. In order to determine the origin of Lambda Boo stars’ unique abundance pattern and to better discriminate between theories explaining the Lambda Boo phenomenon, a consistent working definition of Lambda Boo stars is needed. We have re-evaluated all published Lambda Boo candidates and their available ultraviolet and visible spectra. In this paper, using observed and synthetic spectra, we explore the physical basis for the classification of Lambda Boo stars, and develop quantitative criteria that discriminate metal-poor stars from bona fide Lambda Boo stars. Based on these stricter Lambda Boo classification criteria, we conclude that neither Beta Pictoris nor Vega should be classified as Lambda Boo stars.

  1. Lambda bacteriophage-mediated transduction of ColE1 deoxyribonucleic acid having a lambda bacteriophage-cohesive end site: selection of packageable-length deoxyribonucleic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Umene, K; Shimada, K; Tsuzuki, T; Mori, R; Takagi, Y

    1979-01-01

    An in vitro recombinant ColE1-cos lambda deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecule, pKY96, has 70% of the length of lambda phage DNA. The process of lambda phage-mediated transduction of pKY96 generated a small amount of transducing phage particles containing ColE1-cos lambda DNA molecules of 80 or 101% of the length of lambda phage DNA, in addition to those containing original pKY96 DNA molecules. The newly isolated larger plasmid DNAs were transduced 100 times more efficiently than pKY96 DNA. Their structures were compared with that of a prototype pKY96 DNA, and the mechanism of the formation of these molecules is discussed. Images PMID:158007

  2. Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with selective immunoglobulin E deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Magen, Eli; Schlesinger, Menachem; Ben-Zion, Itzhak; Vardy, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence and clinical characteristics of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-infected dyspeptic patients with selective immunoglobulin E deficiency (IgEd). METHODS: All individuals who underwent serum total immunoglobulin E (IgE) measurement at the Leumit Healthcare Services (Israel) in 2012 were identified in an electronic database search (n = 18487). From these, selected case group subjects were ≥ 12 years of age and had serum total IgE < 2 kIU/L (n = 158). The control group was selected from a random sampling of the remaining subjects ≥ 12 years of age to obtain a case-control ratio of 1:20 (n = 3160). Dyspeptic diseases, diagnosed no more than 5 years before serum total IgE testing, were identified and retrieved from the electronic database using specific International Classification of Diseases diagnostic codes. Results of C13-urea breath tests were used to identify subjects infected with H. pylori. Categorical variables between case and control subjects were analyzed using Fisher’s exact tests, whereas continuous variables were analyzed using χ2 tests. RESULTS: Dyspepsia was present in 27.2% (43/158) of case subjects and 22.7% (718/3160) of controls. Of these, significantly more case subjects (32/43, 74.4%) than controls (223/718, 31.1%) were positive for H. pylori (P < 0.01). Esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed in 19 case and 94 control subjects, revealing that gastritis was more prevalent in IgEd case subjects than in controls (57.9% vs 29.8%, P < 0.05). Furthermore, a significantly greater proportion of case subjects presented with peptic duodenal ulcers (63.2% vs 15.9%, P < 0.01). Histopathologic examination showed marked chronic inflammation, lymphoid follicle formation and prominent germinal centers, with polymorphonuclear cell infiltration of gastric glands, that was similar in case and control biopsy tissues. Finally, IgEd case subjects that underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy were more likely to exhibit treatment

  3. Genomic structure and expression of immunoglobulins in Squamata.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, David N; Garet, Elina; Estevez, Olivia; Sánchez-Espinel, Christian; Gambón-Deza, Francisco

    2016-04-01

    The Squamata order represents a major evolutionary reptile lineage, yet the structure and expression of immunoglobulins in this order has been scarcely studied in detail. From the genome sequences of four Squamata species (Gekko japonicus, Ophisaurus gracilis, Pogona vitticeps and Ophiophagus hannah) and RNA-seq datasets from 18 other Squamata species, we identified the immunoglobulins present in these animals as well as the tissues in which they are found. All Squamata have at least three immunoglobulin classes; namely, the immunoglobulins M, D, and Y. Unlike mammals, however, we provide evidence that some Squamata lineages possess more than one Cμ gene which is located downstream from the Cδ gene. The existence of two evolutionary lineages of immunoglobulin Y is shown. Additionally, it is demonstrated that while all Squamata species possess the λ light chain, only Iguanidae species possess the κ light chain.

  4. Inhibitory effect of tocotrienol on eukaryotic DNA polymerase {lambda} and angiogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Mizushina, Yoshiyuki . E-mail: mizushin@nutr.kobegakuin.ac.jp; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Shibata, Akira; Awata, Yasutoshi; Kuriyama, Isoko; Shimazaki, Noriko; Koiwai, Osamu; Uchiyama, Yukinobu; Sakaguchi, Kengo; Miyazawa, Teruo; Yoshida, Hiromi

    2006-01-20

    Tocotrienols, vitamin E compounds that have an unsaturated side chain with three double bonds, selectively inhibited the activity of mammalian DNA polymerase {lambda} (pol {lambda}) in vitro. These compounds did not influence the activities of replicative pols such as {alpha}, {delta}, and {epsilon}, or even the activity of pol {beta} which is thought to have a very similar three-dimensional structure to the pol {beta}-like region of pol {lambda}. Since {delta}-tocotrienol had the strongest inhibitory effect among the four ({alpha}- to {delta}-) tocotrienols, the isomer's structure might be an important factor in the inhibition of pol {lambda}. The inhibitory effect of {delta}-tocotrienol on both intact pol {lambda} (residues 1-575) and a truncated pol {lambda} lacking the N-terminal BRCA1 C-terminus (BRCT) domain (residues 133-575, del-1 pol {lambda}) was dose-dependent, with 50% inhibition observed at a concentration of 18.4 and 90.1 {mu}M, respectively. However, del-2 pol {lambda} (residues 245-575) containing the C-terminal pol {beta}-like region was unaffected. Tocotrienols also inhibited the proliferation of and formation of tubes by bovine aortic endothelial cells, with {delta}-tocotrienol having the greatest effect. These results indicated that tocotrienols targeted both pol {lambda} and angiogenesis as anti-cancer agents. The relationship between the inhibition of pol {lambda} and anti-angiogenesis by {delta}-tocotrienol was discussed.

  5. Lambda light chain myeloma with co-migrating paraprotein at beta region on agarose gel electrophoresis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Siti Sarah, M; Nor Aini, U; Nurismah, M I; Hafiza, A; Khalidah, M; Mokhtar, A B; Das, S

    2014-01-01

    Paraproteinemia is one of the diagnostic features of multiple myeloma. A commonly used method is the detection of paraprotein by agarose gel electrophoresis (AGE) followed by by immunofixation electrophoresis (IFE) to confirm monoclonality. Due to their smaller size, immunoglobulin A (IgA) and light chain only paraproteins may appear at the beta or even alpha 2 protein fractions. Here, we discuss a case report of a 47-year-old man who presented with pathological fracture of third thoracic (T3) vertebra. Serum protein electrophoresis (SPE) was initially reported as no paraprotein detected. However, a bone biopsy was reported to show plasma cell proliferation with light chain restriction. A repeat sample for protein electrophoresis together with IFE revealed lambda light chain paraprotein co-migrating at the beta region. The beta band plus paraprotein was quantitated as 4.3 g/L (7.0%), which was within normal limits of the beta protein fraction. Hence, it has to be remembered that if the SPE is negative, it does not necessarily mean that the paraprotein is absent in cases which are highly suspicious.

  6. {Lambda}CDM universe in f(R) gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Dunsby, Peter K. S.; Elizalde, Emilio; Saez-Gomez, Diego; Goswami, Rituparno; Odintsov, Sergei

    2010-07-15

    Several different explicit reconstructions of f(R) gravity are obtained from the background Friedmann-Laimatre-Robertson-Walker expansion history. It is shown that the only theory whose Lagrangian is a simple function of the Ricci scalar R, that admits an exact {Lambda}CDM expansion history, is standard general relativity with a positive cosmological constant and the only way to obtain this behavior of the scale factor for more general functions of R is to add additional degrees of freedom to the matter sector.

  7. Hydrodynamic and electrophoretic fingerprinting in the pH, p[lambda] domain

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, J.H.

    1992-01-01

    A new technique, hydrodynamic fingerprinting, is presented for the characterization and study of colloidal dispersions on the basis of their hydrodynamic behavior. In the hydrodynamic fingerprint the hydrodynamic size as measured by photon correlation spectroscopy is presented as a function of two colloidal state variables simultaneously. There is an acid-base variable, pH, and a conductivity variable, p[lambda]. Hydrodynamic fingerprinting is applied to four polymer latexes, two polystyrene latexes, one with a sulfate surface and one with a carboxyl surface, and two methyl maehacrylate-ethyl acrylate latexes, one of which contains 2% acrylic acid. It is shown that hydrodynamic fingerprinting can be used to study colloidal stability, expandable properties of colloids, time effects in colloidal solutions, and the surface chemistry of the colloid-solution interface. A combinatorial hydrodynamic-electrokinetic fingerprinting analysis of the acid copolymer latex is also presented. This approach can be used to gain insight into ambiguous electrokinetic behavior, and to study the surface charge characteristics of colloidal dispersions.

  8. Rapid method to detect rubella immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin A antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, H; Shimizu, H; Kampa, D; Doerr, H W

    1975-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) G was removed from serum specimens by precipitation with gamma chain-specific anti-human IgG of rabbit origin. The remaining rubella virus-specific IgM (and IgA) antibodies were then detected by the rubella hemagglutination-inhibition test. This procedure has proven to be as reliable as estimations carried out with IgM fractions separated on a sucrose density gradient. PMID:1176596

  9. Radiative decays of the Sigma0(1385) and Lambda(1520) hyperons

    SciTech Connect

    Simon Taylor; Gordon Mutchler; CLAS Collaboration

    2005-03-01

    The electromagnetic decays of the {Sigma}{sup 0}(1385) and {Lambda}(1520) hyperons were studied in photon-induced reactions {gamma} p {yields} K{sup +} {Lambda}(1116){gamma} in the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. We report the first observation of the radiative decay of the {Sigma}{sup 0}(1385) and a measurement of the {Lambda}(1520) radiative decay width. For the {Sigma}{sup 0}(1385) {yields} {Lambda}(1116){gamma} transition, we measured a partial width of 479 {+-} 120(stat){sub -100}{sup +81}(sys) keV, larger than all of the existing model predictions. For the {Lambda}(1520) {yields} {Lambda}(1116){gamma} transition, we obtained a partial width of 167 {+-} 43(stat){sub -12}{sup +26}(sys) keV.

  10. Serum immunoglobulin profile in normal Kashmiri adults.

    PubMed

    Bhat, G A; Mubarik, M; Bhat, M Y

    1995-01-01

    Serum levels of the immunoglobulins IgG, IgA and IgM were estimated in 102 apparently healthy Kashmiri adults in the age group of 16-60 years, using single radial immunodiffusion method of Mancini et al. The mean serum levels of IgG, IgA and IgM were observed to be 1289.19 +/- 234.9, 216.18 +/- 50.70 and 118.97 +/- 41.88 respectively. No significant difference in the mean serum levels was observed between the two sexes as such, but IgM showed a significant increase in females in the age group of 16-30 years. IgA showed a significant increase with age, with no such increase in case of IgG and IgM.

  11. Immunoglobulins in tear in trachoma patients.

    PubMed Central

    Sen, D. K.; Sarin, G. S.; Saha, K.

    1977-01-01

    Tear immunoglobulin concentrations have been measured in 100 healthy people and 62 patients in different stages of trachoma. In healthy people the average IgA level was 27-8 mg/100 ml. There was no significant difference in the IgA level in various age groups and between the sexes. IgG was detected in 92 samples, and it was less than 1 mg/100 ml. IgM in tears was detected in only one sample. IgD was not detected in any specimen. In tracoma cases, the mean IgA level was found to be significantly lower (22-0 mg/100 ml) than in healthy people. There was no significant difference in IgA level between different stages of trachoma, IgG, IgD, and IgM could not be detected in any sample from the trachoma cases. PMID:856248

  12. 7th International Immunoglobulin Conference: Immunomodulation

    PubMed Central

    Danieli, M G; Shoenfeld, Y

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a debilitating autoimmune disease that is usually treated aggressively to slow the rate of joint destruction. The therapeutic strategy used at the French centre, described here, is to use the non-biological disease-modifying drug, methotrexate, as first-line therapy and to add biological agents as second-line treatment. The two other autoimmune diseases discussed in this session were immunobullous skin diseases, and secondary recurrent miscarriage (RM). In the former conditions, low levels of pathogenic autoantibodies can be achieved with adjuvant intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy, usually in combination with an immunosuppressant. Secondary RM has an autoimmune basis, as shown by high tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels and specific human leucocyte antigen (HLA) polymorphisms. Although the mechanism is not yet known, IVIg may also be an effective treatment, despite the generally low doses used in published studies. PMID:25546788

  13. 7(th) International Immunoglobulin Conference: Poster presentations.

    PubMed

    Warnatz, K; Ballow, M; Stangel, M; Bril, V

    2014-12-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) therapy is the mainstay of treatment for primary antibody deficiency disorders and has proved to be efficacious in specific autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Additionally, due to the role of Ig in complement activation, it is being used increasingly in solid organ transplantation. Furthermore, Ig is the primary or secondary treatment in some immune-mediated neuropathies such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) or multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). This session discusses trends of Ig use in Europe, proposed mechanisms of action, adverse effects and the potential role of Ig therapy in transplantation. Dr Šedivá reported that Ig therapy is available in all European countries, although dosing is not always optimal, due partly to reimbursement plans. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIg) has become increasingly accessible in recent years; however, the chosen route of administration still varies widely between countries. Dr Berger's presentation on optimization of Ig therapy in neuropathies, and Dr Rojavin's report on a pharmacometric model to determine the serum IgG levels achieved by different dosing regimens in primary antibody deficiency (PAD) patients, led to the challenging concept of using individualized dosing strategies. Dr Klehmet reported on the potential benefit of using antigen-specific T cell responses as a biomarker of IVIg responsiveness in CIDP patients, while Dr von Gunten provided an insight into the mechanisms of action of Ig preparations, suggesting that the immunoregulatory effects of IgG may be mediated by IgG antibodies against glycans. Dr Basta reported on the potential thrombogenic adverse effects associated with Ig therapy. Although these adverse events are rare, further studies are needed to clarify the relationship between Ig replacement and immunomodulatory therapy and these adverse reactions. In transplantation, Dr Carbone described that prophylactic IVIg treatment was found to decrease the

  14. 7th International Immunoglobulin Conference: Poster Presentations

    PubMed Central

    Warnatz, K; Ballow, M; Stangel, M; Bril, V

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) therapy is the mainstay of treatment for primary antibody deficiency disorders and has proved to be efficacious in specific autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Additionally, due to the role of Ig in complement activation, it is being used increasingly in solid organ transplantation. Furthermore, Ig is the primary or secondary treatment in some immune-mediated neuropathies such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) or multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). This session discusses trends of Ig use in Europe, proposed mechanisms of action, adverse effects and the potential role of Ig therapy in transplantation. Dr Šedivá reported that Ig therapy is available in all European countries, although dosing is not always optimal, due partly to reimbursement plans. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIg) has become increasingly accessible in recent years; however, the chosen route of administration still varies widely between countries. Dr Berger's presentation on optimization of Ig therapy in neuropathies, and Dr Rojavin's report on a pharmacometric model to determine the serum IgG levels achieved by different dosing regimens in primary antibody deficiency (PAD) patients, led to the challenging concept of using individualized dosing strategies. Dr Klehmet reported on the potential benefit of using antigen-specific T cell responses as a biomarker of IVIg responsiveness in CIDP patients, while Dr von Gunten provided an insight into the mechanisms of action of Ig preparations, suggesting that the immunoregulatory effects of IgG may be mediated by IgG antibodies against glycans. Dr Basta reported on the potential thrombogenic adverse effects associated with Ig therapy. Although these adverse events are rare, further studies are needed to clarify the relationship between Ig replacement and immunomodulatory therapy and these adverse reactions. In transplantation, Dr Carbone described that prophylactic IVIg treatment was found to decrease the

  15. SUPPRESSION OF IMMUNOGLOBULIN CLASS SYNTHESIS IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Lawton, Alexander R.; Asofsky, Richard; Hylton, Martha B.; Cooper, Max D.

    1972-01-01

    Germfree BALB/c mice have been treated from birth with intraperitoneal injections of purified goat antibodies to mouse IgM. The treated mice, and controls which had received an equivalent amount of goat γ-globulin, were sacrificed at 8 or 13 wk of age. Compared to controls, mice given anti-µ (a) had very few germinal centers in spleen and lymph node, (b) had decreased numbers of mature plasma cells synthesizing IgM and IgG1 in spleen, and virtual absence of IgA-synthesizing plasma cells in the gut, (c) had greatly diminished numbers of B lymphocytes bearing membrane-bound immunoglobulins of the IgM, IgG1, IgG2, and IgA classes in spleen, (d) had reduced synthesis of IgM, IgG2, and IgA by in vitro spleen cultures, and (e) had significant decreases in serum levels of IgM, IgG1, IgG2, and IgA. The treated animals failed to make antibodies to ferritin after hyperimmunization, and lacked natural antibodies to sheep erythrocytes. These results indicate that cells ultimately committed to synthesis of IgG1, IgG2, and IgA immunoglobulins are derived from cells which have expressed IgM determinants at an earlier stage of differentiation. They are consistent with a proposed two-stage model for plasma cell differentiation. The first stage is antigen independent, involves sequential activation of Cµ, Cγ, and Cα genes by progeny of a single stem cell, and results in the formation of B lymphocytes bearing membrane-bound recognition antibodies of each class. The second, antigen-dependent, stage results in formation of mature plasmacytes and memory cells. PMID:4551216

  16. Immunoglobulin genetics of Ornithorhynchus anatinus (platypus) and Tachyglossus aculeatus (short-beaked echidna).

    PubMed

    Belov, Katherine; Hellman, Lars

    2003-12-01

    In this paper, we review data on the monotreme immune system focusing on the characterisation of lymphoid tissue and of antibody responses, as well the recent cloning of immunoglobulin genes. It is now known that monotremes utilise immunoglobulin isotypes that are structurally identical to those found in marsupials and eutherians, but which differ to those found in birds and reptiles. Monotremes utilise IgM, IgG, IgA and IgE. They do not use IgY. Their IgG and IgA constant regions contain three domains plus a hinge region. Preliminary analysis of monotreme heavy chain variable region diversity suggests that the platypus primarily uses a single VH clan, while the short-beaked echidna utilises at least 4 distinct VH families which segregate into all three mammalian VH clans. Phylogenetic analysis of the immunoglobulin heavy chain constant region gene sequences provides strong support for the Theria hypothesis. The constant region of IgM has proven to be a useful marker for estimating the time of divergence of mammalian lineages.

  17. Production of individualized V gene databases reveals high levels of immunoglobulin genetic diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corcoran, Martin M.; Phad, Ganesh E.; Bernat, Néstor Vázquez; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane; Sumida, Noriyuki; Persson, Mats A. A.; Martin, Marcel; Hedestam, Gunilla B. Karlsson

    2016-12-01

    Comprehensive knowledge of immunoglobulin genetics is required to advance our understanding of B cell biology. Validated immunoglobulin variable (V) gene databases are close to completion only for human and mouse. We present a novel computational approach, IgDiscover, that identifies germline V genes from expressed repertoires to a specificity of 100%. IgDiscover uses a cluster identification process to produce candidate sequences that, once filtered, results in individualized germline V gene databases. IgDiscover was tested in multiple species, validated by genomic cloning and cross library comparisons and produces comprehensive gene databases even where limited genomic sequence is available. IgDiscover analysis of the allelic content of the Indian and Chinese-origin rhesus macaques reveals high levels of immunoglobulin gene diversity in this species. Further, we describe a novel human IGHV3-21 allele and confirm significant gene differences between Balb/c and C57BL6 mouse strains, demonstrating the power of IgDiscover as a germline V gene discovery tool.

  18. Efficacy of subcutaneous immunoglobulins in primary immunodeficiency with Crohn's-like phenotype: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Sanges, M; Spadaro, G; Miniero, M; Mattera, D; Sollazzo, R; D'Armiento, F P; De Palma, G D; Pecoraro, A; Borrelli, F; Genovese, A; D'Arienzo, A

    2015-01-01

    Common variable immune deficiency (CVID) is the most frequent primary immunodeficiency in adults. In CVID, the prevalence of gastrointestinal manifestations ranges between 2 and 50% with a complication-related morbidity second only to that of the respiratory tract. In some cases, clinical and endoscopic features are undistinguishable from those of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We describe the case of a 28-year-old man in which a diagnosis of Crohn's disease was firstly suspected. Subsequently, a diagnosis of Crohn's-like disease in a patient with CVID was made and a replacement therapy with human normal immunoglobulin intravenously was started. Unfortunately, serum IgG levels remained below 2.0 g/l in pre-infusional controls with persistence of gastrointestinal symptoms and malnutrition despite anti-inflammatory therapy (mesalazine, corticosteroids). Then, the patient began treatment with human normal immunoglobulins administered subcutaneously. The follow-up visits showed a progressive increase in serum IgG. Moreover, the patient reported improvement of gastrointestinal symptoms with reduction of diarrhoea, and laboratory tests showed a progressive and significant improvement. We confirm that therapy with subcutaneously administered immunoglobulins is safe and effective. In addition, our observations indicate that, for patients with CVID and enteropathic complications, replacement therapy with subcutaneous IgG may be the treatment of choice.

  19. Production of individualized V gene databases reveals high levels of immunoglobulin genetic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Corcoran, Martin M.; Phad, Ganesh E.; Bernat, Néstor Vázquez; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane; Sumida, Noriyuki; Persson, Mats A.A.; Martin, Marcel; Hedestam, Gunilla B. Karlsson

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge of immunoglobulin genetics is required to advance our understanding of B cell biology. Validated immunoglobulin variable (V) gene databases are close to completion only for human and mouse. We present a novel computational approach, IgDiscover, that identifies germline V genes from expressed repertoires to a specificity of 100%. IgDiscover uses a cluster identification process to produce candidate sequences that, once filtered, results in individualized germline V gene databases. IgDiscover was tested in multiple species, validated by genomic cloning and cross library comparisons and produces comprehensive gene databases even where limited genomic sequence is available. IgDiscover analysis of the allelic content of the Indian and Chinese-origin rhesus macaques reveals high levels of immunoglobulin gene diversity in this species. Further, we describe a novel human IGHV3-21 allele and confirm significant gene differences between Balb/c and C57BL6 mouse strains, demonstrating the power of IgDiscover as a germline V gene discovery tool. PMID:27995928

  20. T Cell Immunoglobulin Mucin-3 Crystal Structure Reveals a Galectin-9-Independent Ligand-Binding Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Cao,E.; Zang, X.; Ramagopal, U.; Mukhopadhaya, A.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Zencheck, W.; Lary, J.; Cole, J.; et al.

    2007-01-01

    The T cell immunoglobulin mucin (Tim) family of receptors regulates effector CD4+ T cell functions and is implicated in autoimmune and allergic diseases. Tim-3 induces immunological tolerance, and engagement of the Tim-3 immunoglobulin variable (IgV) domain by galectin-9 is important for appropriate termination of T helper 1-immune responses. The 2 {angstrom} crystal structure of the Tim-3 IgV domain demonstrated that four cysteines, which are invariant within the Tim family, form two noncanonical disulfide bonds, resulting in a surface not present in other immunoglobulin superfamily members. Biochemical and biophysical studies demonstrated that this unique structural feature mediates a previously unidentified galectin-9-independent binding process and suggested that this structural feature is conserved within the entire Tim family. The current work provided a graphic example of the relationship between sequence, structure, and function and suggested that the interplay between multiple Tim-3-binding activities contributes to the regulated assembly of signaling complexes required for effective Th1-mediated immunity.

  1. ON THE COMPLETENESS AND QUASIPOWER BASIS PROPERTY OF SYSTEMS \\{z^nf(\\lambda_nz)\\}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskolkov, V. A.

    1990-02-01

    This paper discusses questions of completeness and the quasipower property in spaces A_R of systems of functions \\{z^nf(\\lambda_nz)\\} under some natural conditions on the Taylor coefficients of the function f(z), assumed regular in a disk \\vert z\\vert. The complex numbers \\lambda_n ( n=0,1,\\dots) are subject to the condition \\vert\\lambda_n\\vert\\leqslant1. Bibliography: 8 titles.

  2. ASTEROSEISMOLOGICAL MODELING OF THE MULTIPERIODIC {lambda} BOOTIS STAR 29 CYGNI

    SciTech Connect

    Casas, R.; Moya, A.; Martin-Ruiz, S.; Amado, P. J.; Garrido, R.; Suarez, J. C.; Rodriguez-Lopez, C

    2009-05-20

    The present work focuses on the discussion of the {lambda} Bootis nature of the multiperiodic {delta} Scuti star HD 192640 (29 Cyg), through a comprehensive asteroseismic modeling. Some of the most recent asteroseismic tools are used to check whether the observed low metallicity is internal, i.e., intrinsic, present throughout the star, or due to superficial processes as accretion, diffusive settling, radiative levitation, mass loss, etc. The modeling method uses some of the most recent tools, including: (1) effects of rotation on equilibrium models, on the adiabatic oscillation spectrum, and its influence in multicolor observables, (2) nonadiabatic stability of radial and nonradial modes, (3) inclusion of the atmosphere-pulsation interaction for a more accurate multicolor mode identification, and (4) ratio between radial modes n = 4 and n = 5 in the framework of Petersen diagrams. The analysis performed reveals that the models fulfilling all the constraints are those in the middle of the main sequence (MS), with subsolar metallicity, except some other unlikely possibilities. Therefore, this study does not support the idea of the {lambda} Bootis stars being zero-age MS or pre-MS stars interacting with their primordial cloud of gas and dust, but suggest the explanation of their nature as submetallic MS objects. Nevertheless, more accurate multicolor photometric observations are required for a more conclusive study using the procedure presented here, since the observational errors are too large for a definitive rejection of any of the possible explanations.

  3. Detection of single lambda DNA fragments by flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.E.; Goodwin, P.M.; Ambrose, W.P.; Martin, J.C.; Marrone, B.L.; Keller, R.A. )

    1993-01-01

    The authors have demonstrated flow cytometric detection and sizing of single pieces of fluorescently stained lambda DNA (48.5 kb) and individual Kpn I restriction fragments of lambda DNA at 17.05 kb and 29.95 kb. DNA fragments were stained stoichiometrically with an intercalating dye such that the fluorescence from each fragment was directly proportional to fragment length. Laser powers range from 10 to 100 mW and transit times through the focused laser beam were several milliseconds. Measurements were made using time-resolved single photon counting of the detected fluorescence emission from individual stained DNA fragments. Samples were analyzed at rates of about 50 fragments per second. The measured fluorescence intensities are linearly correlated with DNA fragment length over the range measured. Detection sensitivity and resolution needed for analysis of small pieces of DNA are discussed and a comparison of single photon counting measurements of DNA fragments to measurements using more conventional flow cytometers is made. Applications of this methodology to DNA sizing and DNA fingerprinting are discussed.

  4. Surface immunoglobulin of guinea-pig leukaemic lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, G T; Eady, R P; Hough, D W; Jurd, R D; Stevenson, F K

    1975-01-01

    The surface immunoglobulin of the transplantable L2C leukaemia of strain 2 guinea-pigs has been investigated. The immunoglobulin is seen to be synthesized when the cells are maintained in culture, indicating its intrinsic origin. Immunolabelling of the cell surface and immunochemical study of the Fab released by limited surface proteolysis indicate the presence of immunoglobulin of class IgM. IgG and free light chains were not detected, and there is unlikely to be an appreciable amount of immunoglobulin of any other class. The amount of immunoglobulin present, in terms of 4-chain monomers, is approximately 100,000 molecules per cell. Its half-life, calculated from the rate of reappearance in vitro of surface Fab after proteolytic clearing, is approximately 5 hours. Immunoglobulin secreted into the environment appears to arise predominantly or entirely from the cell surface: there is no evidence of an appreciable export of immunoglobulin which does not have a surface phase. Papain at 0.06 mg/ml rapidly removes the surface Fab. Residual Fcmu can then be detected by immunofluorescence, suggesting that papain cleaves surface IgM at a hinge region with the molecule in situ on the membrane. The released Fab is only moderately susceptible to degradation by papain at the enzyme: substrate ratio prevailing. It has been possible to isolate it from the papain digest by immuno-adsorption, with a notional yield of 75 mug per 10-10 cells, and then to prepare antisera against it. PMID:48498

  5. Dynamics of immunoglobulin sequence diversity in HIV-1 infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Hoehn, Kenneth B.; Gall, Astrid; Bashford-Rogers, Rachael; Fidler, S. J.; Kaye, S.; Weber, J. N.; McClure, M. O.; Kellam, Paul; Pybus, Oliver G.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in immunoglobulin (Ig) sequencing technology are leading to new perspectives on immune system dynamics. Much research in this nascent field has focused on resolving immune responses to viral infection. However, the dynamics of B-cell diversity in early HIV infection, and in response to anti-retroviral therapy, are still poorly understood. Here, we investigate these dynamics through bulk Ig sequencing of samples collected over 2 years from a group of eight HIV-1 infected patients, five of whom received anti-retroviral therapy during the first half of the study period. We applied previously published methods for visualizing and quantifying B-cell sequence diversity, including the Gini index, and compared their efficacy to alternative measures. While we found significantly greater clonal structure in HIV-infected patients versus healthy controls, within HIV patients, we observed no significant relationships between statistics of B-cell clonal expansion and clinical variables such as viral load and CD4+ count. Although there are many potential explanations for this, we suggest that important factors include poor sampling resolution and complex B-cell dynamics that are difficult to summarize using simple summary statistics. Importantly, we find a significant association between observed Gini indices and sequencing read depth, and we conclude that more robust analytical methods and a closer integration of experimental and theoretical work is needed to further our understanding of B-cell repertoire diversity during viral infection. PMID:26194755

  6. Degradation of lambda-carrageenan by Pseudoalteromonas carrageenovora lambda-carrageenase: a new family of glycoside hydrolases unrelated to kappa- and iota-carrageenases.

    PubMed

    Guibet, Marion; Colin, Sébastien; Barbeyron, Tristan; Genicot, Sabine; Kloareg, Bernard; Michel, Gurvan; Helbert, William

    2007-05-15

    Carrageenans are sulfated galactans found in the cell walls of red seaweeds. They are classified according to the number and the position of sulfate ester groups. lambda-Carrageenan is the most sulfated carrageenan and carries at least three sulfates per disaccharide unit. The sole known depolymerizing enzyme of lambda-carrageenan, the lambda-carrageenase from Pseudoalteromonas carrageenovora, has been purified, cloned and sequenced. Sequence analyses have revealed that the lambda-carrageenase, referred to as CglA, is the first member of a new family of GHs (glycoside hydrolases), which is unrelated to families GH16, that contains kappa-carrageenases, and GH82, that contains iota-carrageenases. This large enzyme (105 kDa) features a low-complexity region, suggesting the presence of a linker connecting at least two independent modules. The N-terminal region is predicted to fold as a beta-propeller. The main degradation products have been purified and characterized as neo-lambda-carratetraose [DP (degree of polymerization) 4] and neo-lambda-carrahexaose (DP6), indicating that CglA hydrolyses the beta-(1-->4) linkage of lambda-carrageenan. LC-MALLS (liquid chromatography-multi-angle laser light scattering) and (1)H-NMR monitoring of the enzymatic degradation of lambda-carrageenan indicate that CglA proceeds according to an endolytic mode of action and a mechanism of inversion of the anomeric configuration. Using 2-aminoacridone-labelled neo-lambda-carrabiose oligosaccharides, in the present study we demonstrate that the active site of CglA comprises at least 8 subsites (-4 to +4) and that a DP6 oligosaccharide binds in the subsites -4 to +2 and can be hydrolysed into DP4 and DP2.

  7. [Analytical performances of SPAPLUS® turbidimeter for the dosage of immunoglobulins and beta-2 microglobulin in serum].

    PubMed

    Thevenet, Isabelle; Benat, Clarisse; Chauzeix, Jasmine; Blancher, Antoine; Puissant-Lubrano, Bénédicte

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the analytical performances of the SPAPLUS(®) immunoturbidimeter assays manufactured by The Binding Site(®) for the quantification of thirteen immunological parameters in serum: IgG, IgA, IgM and IgD immunoglobulins, IgG subclasses (1 to 4), IgA subclasses (1 and 2), beta-2 microglobulin, free light chains kappa and lambda. The within-day precision (repeatability) and the between-day precision (reproducibility) were obtained for two or three concentration levels depending of the parameter and were below the recommendations of the manufacturer, except for the repeatability of IgG1 (at a level of concentration of 6.7 g/L). An agreement above 90% (with Bland and Altman analysis) was observed between the results obtained with SPAPLUS(®) and those obtained with the nephelometer IMMAGE(®) 800 or radial immunodiffusion. The evaluation confirmed the linearity of the assays and the absence of contamination for all the parameters tested. We also assessed the practicability of the SPAPLUS(®) in terms of maintenance, frequency of calibration and cadence tests. The SPAPLUS(®) immunoturbidimeter displays good analytical performances for the immunological parameters evaluated in the present work.

  8. Generation of Monoclonal Antibodies against Immunoglobulin Proteins of the Domestic Ferret (Mustela putorius furo)

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo) serves as an animal model for the study of several viruses that cause human disease, most notably influenza. Despite the importance of this animal model, characterization of the immune response by flow cytometry (FCM) is severely hampered due to the limited number of commercially available reagents. To begin to address this unmet need and to facilitate more in-depth study of ferret B cells including the identification of antibody-secreting cells, eight unique murine monoclonal antibodies (mAb) with specificity for ferret immunoglobulin (Ig) were generated using conventional B cell hybridoma technology. These mAb were screened for reactivity against ferret peripheral blood mononuclear cells by FCM and demonstrate specificity for CD79β+ B cells. Several of these mAb are specific for the light chain of surface B cell receptor (BCR) and enable segregation of kappa and lambda B cells. Additionally, a mAb that yielded surface staining of nearly all surface BCR positive cells (i.e., pan ferret Ig) was generated. Collectively, these MαF-Ig mAb offer advancement compared to the existing portfolio of polyclonal anti-ferret Ig detection reagents and should be applicable to a wide array of immunologic assays including the identification of antibody-secreting cells by FCM. PMID:28286781

  9. Targeting Of Somatic Hypermutation By immunoglobulin Enhancer And Enhancer-Like Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Buerstedde, Jean-Marie; Alinikula, Jukka; Arakawa, Hiroshi; McDonald, Jessica J.; Schatz, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Somatic hypermutation (SH) generates point mutations within rearranged immunoglobulin (Ig) genes of activated B cells, providing genetic diversity for the affinity maturation of antibodies. SH requires the activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) protein and transcription of the mutation target sequence, but how the Ig gene specificity of mutations is achieved has remained elusive. We show here using a sensitive and carefully controlled assay that the Ig enhancers strongly activate SH in neighboring genes even though their stimulation of transcription is negligible. Mutations in certain E-box, NFκB, MEF2, or Ets family binding sites—known to be important for the transcriptional role of Ig enhancers—impair or abolish the activity. Full activation of SH typically requires a combination of multiple Ig enhancer and enhancer-like elements. The mechanism is evolutionarily conserved, as mammalian Ig lambda and Ig heavy chain intron enhancers efficiently stimulate hypermutation in chicken cells. Our results demonstrate a novel regulatory function for Ig enhancers, indicating that they either recruit AID or alter the accessibility of the nearby transcription units. PMID:24691034

  10. Circular dimers of a lambda DNA in infected, nonlysogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Freifelder, D; Baran, N; Folkmanis, A; Freifelder, D L

    1977-09-01

    Covalently closed circular dimers of phage lambda DNA have been found in Escherichia coli infected with lambda. These dimers can be formed by either the lambda Red or Int systems, by a nonrecombinational replicative mechanism requiring the activity of the lambda O and P genes or by joining of the cohesive ends. Dimers mediated by the E. coli Rec system have not been observed. Those formed by the Int system often result from recombination between different DNA molecules; however, the Red-mediated dimers may be a result of replicative extension of a single DNA molecule. Trimers have also been observed but studied only briefly.

  11. Direct and general selection for lysogens of Escherichia coli by phage lambda recombinant clones.

    PubMed

    Henry, M F; Cronan, J E

    1991-06-01

    We report a simple in vivo technique for introducing an antibiotic resistance marker into phage lambda. This technique could be used for direct selection of lysogens harboring recombinant phages from the Kohara lambda bank (a collection of ordered lambda clones carrying Escherichia coli DNA segments). The two-step method uses homologous recombination and lambda DNA packaging to replace the nonessential lambda DNA lying between the lysis genes and the right cohesive (cos) end with the neomycin phosphotransferase (npt) gene from Tn903. This occurs during lytic growth of the phage on a plasmid-containing host strain. Neomycin-resistant (npt+) recombinant phages are then selected from the lysates containing the progeny phage by transduction of a polA1 lambda lysogenic host strain to neomycin resistance. We have tested this method with two different Kohara lambda phage clones; in both cases, neomycin resistance cotransduced with the auxotrophic marker carried by the lambda clone, indicating complete genetic linkage. Linkage was verified by restriction mapping of purified DNA from a recombinant phage clone. We also demonstrate that insertion of the npt+ recombinant phages into the lambda prophage can be readily distinguished from insertion into bacterial chromosomal sequences.

  12. Measurement of the Lambda_b Lifetime in Lambda_b -> Lambda_c+ pi- Decays in p-pbar Collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2009-12-01

    We report a measurement of the lifetime of the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} baryon in decays to the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {pi}{sup -} final state in a sample corresponding to 1.1 fb{sup -1} collected in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider. Using a sample of about 3000 fully reconstructed {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} events we measure {tau}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}) = 1.401 {+-} 0.046 (stat) {+-} 0.035 (syst) ps (corresponding to c{tau}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}) = 420.1 {+-} 13.7 (stat) {+-} 10.6 (syst) {micro}m, where c is the speed of light). The ratio of this result and the world average B{sup 0} lifetime yields {tau}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0})/{tau}(B{sup 0}) = 0.918 {+-} 0.038 (stat and syst), in good agreement with recent theoretical predictions.

  13. [Replacement therapy with subcutaneous immunoglobulin in primary immunodeficiency in children].

    PubMed

    Pac, Małgorzata

    2011-06-01

    Primary antibody deficiency (PAD) is the most common form of primary immunodeficiency (PID), and presents up to 60-70% of PID. The hallmark of PAD are low antibody level and recurrent infections. Patients require life-long immunoglobulin replacement therapy. Now they can be treated either with intravenous (IVIG) or subcutaneous (SCIG) immunoglobulin. The last one is indicated in patients with unacceptable adverse reactions to the intravenous immunoglobulin preparations, with poor vein access or willing to improve the quality of their life. Several data and clinical trials proved that SCIG therapy is at least as safe and efficacious as IVIG to prevent infections in patients with PAD.

  14. A year in the life of the immunoglobulin superfamily.

    PubMed

    Williams, A F

    1987-01-01

    The superfamily of molecules with immunoglobulin-like domains has recently been gaining new members-largely on the basis of sequence homology. Here Alan Williams reviews this new work and reveals how the comparison of sequence patterns enables decisions on membership to be made. Accommodation of the new structures demands the provision of new categories, and forces the abandonment of the conserved disulphide bond as the last invariant characteristic of an immunoglobulin-type domain. They may, however, provide more dues to the origins and evolution of the immunoglobulin superfamily.

  15. Effect of zinc supplementation on mycospecific immunoglobulins in tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Dipak Kumar; Maity, Chitta Ranjan; Nag, Debabrata

    2010-02-01

    The effect of zinc supplementation on the serum level of IgA, IgG, IgM mycospecific immunoglobulins in tuberculosis patients alongwith normal control and disease control subjects were studied. It was observed that with antituberculous drugs for one month (without zinc supplementation), the serum level of immunoglobulins in tuberculosis subjects although decreased significantly, but with zinc supplementation along with antituberculous drugs for one month the decrease in the level of immunoglobulins in serum was more significant. This may be attributed to the effect of zinc supplementation favouring the normal compartmentalisation state of iron and also to the immunomodulatory effect of zinc.

  16. Human myeloma light chains with increased molecular weight: high frequency among lambda chains.

    PubMed

    Bouvet, J P; Pillot, J; Liacopoulos, P

    1983-04-01

    The discovery of a human myeloma protein comprising a kappa L-chain with an increased mol. wt of 30,000) (Bouvet et. al., 1980) prompted investigations on the incidence of such heavier L-chains among other human myeloma proteins. In 105 samples examined, 34 were found to have L-chains heavier than normal (23,000-24,000), ranging from 25,000 up to 31,000, and five of lighter mol. wt (21,000-22,000). These mol. wt abnormalities were detected by electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate 10% polyacrylamide gels (SDS-PAGE) after reduction with 2-mercaptoethanol. The mol. wt of three of the heavier kappa or lambda chains was also estimated by filtration through a Sephadex G100 column and by sedimentation equilibrium. All three methods indicated a mol. wt increase of about 15-25% as compared with the usual mol. wt. The distribution of the high mol. wt chains among all L-chains examined was found to be 11 out of 62 kappa chains (17.7%) and 23 out of 43 lambda chains (53%) (P less than 0.001). A preferential association of such L-chains with H-chains producing multiple bands in SDS-PAGE (P less than 0.01) and an association between multiple L-chain and multiple H-chain band (P less than 0.05) were also observed. In contrast, no abnormal L-chain was found in immunoglobulins from normal subjects. Spontaneous degradation of the normal H-chains sometimes yielded fragments of 30,000 mol. wt. These fragments were easily distinguishable from abnormal L-chains. The nature of extra mol. wt in heavy L-chains was investigated for the presence of carbohydrate moiety. Four large and three normal size L-chains were examined for amino-sugar and sialic acid content. A small amount (one residue per molecule) of amino-sugar was detected only in two normal and two heavy L-chains, whereas sialic acid was only found in the heaviest (27,000-30,000) L-chains (Lh) and in small percentage (one or two residues per molecule). Total sugar estimation in one Lh chain indicated a proportion not exceeding

  17. Family analysis of immunoglobulin classes and subclasses in children with autistic disorder.

    PubMed

    Spiroski, Mirko; Trajkovski, Vladimir; Trajkov, Dejan; Petlichkovski, Aleksandar; Efinska-Mladenovska, Olivija; Hristomanova, Slavica; Djulejic, Eli; Paneva, Meri; Bozhikov, Jadranka

    2009-11-01

    Autistic disorder is a severe neurodevelopment disorder characterized by a triad of impairments in reciprocal social interaction, verbal and nonverbal communication, and a pattern of repetitive stereotyped activities, behaviours and interests. There are strong lines of evidence to suggest that the immune system plays an important role in the pathogenesis of autistic disorder. The aim of this study was to analyze quantitative plasma concentration of immunoglobulin classes, and subclasses in autistic patients and their families. The investigation was performed retrospectively in 50 persons with autistic disorder in the Republic of Macedonia. Infantile autistic disorder was diagnosed by DSM-IV and ICD-10 criteria. Plasma immunoglobulin classes (IgM, IgA, and IgG) and subclasses (IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, and IgG4) were determined using Nephelometer Analyzer BN-100. Multiple comparisons for the IgA variable have shown statistically significant differences between three pairs: male autistic from the fathers (p = 0,001), female autistic from the mothers (p = 0,008), as well as healthy sisters from the fathers (p = 0,011). Statistically significant differences found between three groups regarding autistic disorder (person with autistic disorder, father/mother of a person with autistic disorder, and brother/sister) independent of sex belongs to IgA, IgG2, and IgG3 variables. Multiple comparisons for the IgA variable have shown statistically significant differences between children with autistic disorder from the fathers and mothers (p < 0,001), and healthy brothers and sisters from the fathers and mothers (p < 0,001). Comparison between healthy children and children with autistic disorder from the same family should be tested for immunoglobulin classes and subclasses in order to avoid differences between generations.

  18. Cerebrospinal-fluid-derived immunoglobulin G of different multiple sclerosis patients shares mutated sequences in complementarity determining regions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vaibhav; Stoop, Marcel P; Stingl, Christoph; Luitwieler, Ronald L; Dekker, Lennard J; van Duijn, Martijn M; Kreft, Karim L; Luider, Theo M; Hintzen, Rogier Q

    2013-12-01

    B lymphocytes play a pivotal role in multiple sclerosis pathology, possibly via both antibody-dependent and -independent pathways. Intrathecal immunoglobulin G in multiple sclerosis is produced by clonally expanded B-cell populations. Recent studies indicate that the complementarity determining regions of immunoglobulins specific for certain antigens are frequently shared between different individuals. In this study, our main objective was to identify specific proteomic profiles of mutated complementarity determining regions of immunoglobulin G present in multiple sclerosis patients but absent in healthy controls. To achieve this objective, we purified immunoglobulin G from the cerebrospinal fluid of 29 multiple sclerosis patients and 30 healthy controls and separated the corresponding heavy and light chains via SDS-PAGE. Subsequently, bands were excised, trypsinized, and measured with high-resolution mass spectrometry. We sequenced 841 heavy and 771 light chain variable region peptides. We observed 24 heavy and 26 light chain complementarity determining regions that were solely present in a number of multiple sclerosis patients. Using stringent criteria for the identification of common peptides, we found five complementarity determining regions shared in three or more patients and not in controls. Interestingly, one complementarity determining region with a single mutation was found in six patients. Additionally, one other patient carrying a similar complementarity determining region with another mutation was observed. In addition, we found a skew in the κ-to-λ ratio and in the usage of certain variable heavy regions that was previously observed at the transcriptome level. At the protein level, cerebrospinal fluid immunoglobulin G shares common characteristics in the antigen binding region among different multiple sclerosis patients. The indication of a shared fingerprint may indicate common antigens for B-cell activation.

  19. OT1_hmaness_1: Planets, Debris Disks, and the Lambda Bootis Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maness, H.

    2010-07-01

    We propose to explore the link between lambda Bootis stars, debris disks, and planetesimal formation and evolution. The lambda Boo stars are a rare type of peculiar A star (2%), which are Population 1 and metal poor. Planet bearing systems and debris disk stars appear unusually well represented in the lambda Boo class: for example, beta Pic, Vega, and HR 8799 are all lambda Boo candidates. A small sample of 14 lambda Boo stars observed by Spitzer suggests an occurrence of infrared excess approaching 100%. Only two lambda Boo stars are included in the DEBRIS/DUNES Herschel key program debris disk surveys. We will use PACS/Herschel to make sensitive, high-resolution maps of 27 new lambda Boo stars. Like DEBRIS/DUNES, we will reach the stellar photosphere for all targets, enabling a measurement of the true rate of excess infrared emission among lambda Boo stars compared to normal A stars. The depletion pattern of heavy elements in the atmospheres of lambda Boo stars suggests they may have accreted gas from which dust grains have condensed and been removed: this gas may be circumstellar gas that has formed planetesimals or dusty interstellar gas. While the circumstellar disk scenario predicts sizes of a few hundred AU, the cloud accretion scenario predicts 1000-2000 AU bow structures oriented in the direction of the relative motion of the cloud and star. With target distances of < 140 pc, these bow structures are expected to be resolved for all targets. These will be the first mid-infrared observations of lambda Boo stars outside of the low density Local Bubble: if interstellar medium interactions dominate the lambda Boo phenomenon then systematic variations in excess strength and morphology may occur with distance.

  20. Longitudinal Spin Transfer to Lambda and Lambda bar Hyperons in Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at sqrt s = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05

    The longitudinal spin transfer, D{sub LL}, from high energy polarized protons to {Lambda} and {bar {Lambda}} hypersons has been measured for the first time in proton-proton collisions at {radical}s = 200 GeV with the STAR detector at RHIC. The measurements cover pseudorapidity, {eta}, in the range |{eta}| < 1.2 and transverse momenta, p{sub T}, up to 4 GeV/c. The longitudinal spin transfer is found to be D{sub LL} = -0.03{+-}0.13(stat){+-}0.04(syst) for inclusive {Lambda} and D{sub LL} = -0.12{+-}0.08(stat){+-}0.03(syst) for inclusive {bar {Lambda}} hyperons with <{eta}> = 0.5 and = 3.7 GeV/c. The dependence on {eta} and p{sub T} is presented.

  1. AL amyloidosis with IgD-lambda monoclonal gammopathy and lambda-type Bence-Jones protein: successful treatment by autologous stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sakurai-Chin, Chanhyok; Ubara, Yoshifumi; Suwabe, Tatsuya; Hoshino, Junichi; Yonaha, Tomoki; Hasegawa, Eiko; Sumida, Keiichi; Hiramatsu, Rikako; Yamanouchi, Masayuki; Hayami, Noriko; Yamauchi, Junji; Tominaga, Naoyuki; Sawa, Naoki; Takemoto, Fumi; Masuoka, Kazuhiro; Takaichi, Kenmei; Oohashi, Kenichi

    2010-10-01

    A 45-year-old Japanese woman had been diagnosed with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) featuring urinary Bence-Jones protein of the lambda type (BJP-lambda) for 11 years. She then developed eyelid purpura, dyspnea, and flank pain. Abdominal CT scans revealed renal infarction. Biopsy of the kidney, heart, jejunum, and skin demonstrated amyloid deposits in the vessel walls, but not in the glomeruli. She was diagnosed as having AL amyloidosis with IgD-lambda monoclonal gammopathy and BJP-lambda. Autologous stem cell transplantation (SCT) was done after chemotherapy with vincristine, daunorubicin, dexamethasone (VAD), and high-dose melphalan (HDM). This reduced the IgD level from 156 to 0.1 mg/dL, along with the disappearance of BJP, despite cerebral infarction during chemotherapy. We recommend SCT for patients with IgD-associated AL amyloidosis.

  2. Rapid subcutaneous immunoglobulin administration every second week results in high and stable serum immunoglobulin G levels in patients with primary antibody deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, R; Gardulf, A; Hansen, S; Leibl, H; Engl, W; Lindén, M; Müller, A; Hammarström, L

    2008-01-01

    Subcutaneous immunoglobulin G (SCIG) infusions as life-long replacement therapy in patients with primary antibody deficiences (PAD) is being applied increasingly. However, only a few published pharmacokinetic studies are available for this route of administration. Therefore, the pharmacokinetics of a 16% immunoglobulin G (IgG) preparation intended for subcutaneous use were investigated in patients with common variable immunodeficiency and X-linked agammaglobulinaemia. SCIG infusions (200 mg/kg body weight) were administered to 12 adult patients every 14 days for 24 weeks (total of 144 infusions). Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined based on serum IgG trough levels and antibody levels against tetanus. The median half-life of the total serum IgG and for the tetanus antibodies was 40·6 and 23·3 days respectively. Median in vivo recovery of serum IgG and tetanus immunoglobulins were 36% and 46% respectively. Median, preinfusion serum IgG trough levels per patient were high without major variations between infusions and ranged from 7·24 to 7·86 g/l. Safety, in terms of adverse events including systemic adverse reactions and local tissue reactions at infusions sites, was monitored throughout the study. Six mild, local tissue reactions were observed during the study in one patient. No systemic adverse reactions related to the study drug were observed and no serious other adverse event occurred during the study. It is concluded that the bi-weekly SCIG therapy was well tolerated in the study and that it results in high and stable serum IgG levels, offering an alternative therapy regimen to patients suffering from PAD. PMID:18341618

  3. Developing therapeutic immunoglobulins: European regulatory perspectives and implications.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Manfred

    2008-01-01

    Prepared from pooled human blood/plasma, therapeutic immunoglobulins contain the natural antibody spectrum of the entire donor population and mediate a range of therapeutic effects when administered to patients. They are particularly indicated for the prevention of serious and life-threatening infections in patients with immune systems failing to produce functional antibodies. Other than treatment of such rare primary immunodeficiencies (primary antibody deficiencies), therapeutic immunoglobulins are also used in certain inflammatory and autoimmune disorders, including immune thrombocytopenic purpura, Guillain Barré syndrome, and Kawasaki disease. The conditions for licensure of therapeutic immunoglobulins in the EU and the associated regulatory issues and procedures are reviewed. Regulatory expectations about the manufacture and control of immunoglobulins are highlighted and safety and efficacy requirements described. Although the main focus is on European pharmaceutical legislation, other applicable public information is considered.

  4. Rabbit anti-rabies immunoglobulins production and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinjian; Liu, Qiongqiong; Feng, Xiaomin; Tang, Qi; Wang, Zhongcan; Li, Suqing; Feng, Zhenqing; Zhu, Jin; Guan, Xiaohong

    2011-04-01

    Due to the disadvantages of human and equine rabies immunoglobulin, it is necessary to develop a substitute for HRIG and ERIG, especially for those people living in the developing countries. Because of higher affinity and lower immunogenicity of rabbit's immunoglobulins, anti-rabies immunoglobulins specific to rabies virus were produced in rabbits as a bioreactor, and had been characterized by ELISA, affinity assay, immunofluorescence assay (IFA), immunocytochemistry, rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT). ELISA, affinity assay and IFA showed that rabbit RIG (RRIG) bound specifically to rabies virions. RFFIT result showed that RRIG has neutralization activity. This result was confirmed in vivo in a Kunming mouse challenge model and the protection rate of the treatment with RRIG was higher (25%) than that offered by HRIG when mice were challenged with a lethal RV dose. Our results demonstrate that RRIG is safe and efficacious as a candidate drug to replace rabies immunoglobulin in post-exposure prophylaxis.

  5. [The use of human immunoglobulins--adverse reactions].

    PubMed

    Pituch-Noworolska, Anna; Błaut-Szlósarczyk, Anita; Zwonarz, Katarzyna

    2010-09-01

    The primary immunodeficiency, mainly humoral immunity, secondary immunodeficiency and autoimmune diseases are the indications for immunoglobulins substitution. The prolonged substitution in primary immunodeficiency includes regular intravenous infusion of immunoglobulins in 0.4-0.6 g/kg of body weight every 21-28 days. The purpose of such substitution is decrease of frequency and diminishes the clinical course of infections. The high-dose use of immunoglobulins (1-2 g/kg body weight) is preferred in autoimmune diseases based on suppressive and anti-inflammatory activity of immunoglobulins. The subcutaneous administration of immunoglobulins is an alternative to intravenous way, but the singular dose (0.1 g/kg body weight) is too low for suppressive and anti-inflammatory activity of immunoglobulins, so this substitution is indicated in primary immunodeficiency only. The adverse events of immunoglobulins differentiate because of time of occurrence and clinical character. The rapid symptoms occurred just after beginning of infusion and often present the clinical features of anaphylactoid reaction. During the infusion the occurring adverse symptoms are mild and the life-threatening situations are very rare. The next periods of typical adverse reaction are 24-48 hrs after infusion, 72 hrs and later. The mechanisms leading to adverse reaction to immunoglobulins are based on presence of IgG dimmers, stimulating high production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by immunocompetent cells. High level of cytokines is associated with high fever, chills, flu-like symptoms, feeling malaise and sick. The reaction of anti-IgA antibodies present in patient serum with IgA in immunoglobulins preparation is responsible for moderate and severe adverse clinical symptoms. The late adverse events present the symptoms of aseptic meningo-encephalitis. In case of adverse events the stopping of infusion, additions saline/ glucose infusion, anti-histaminic drugs of I and II generation and steroids

  6. Vortex Loops at the Superfluid Lambda Transition: An Exact Theory?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Gary A.

    2003-01-01

    A vortex-loop theory of the superfluid lambda transition has been developed over the last decade, with many results in agreement with experiments. It is a very simple theory, consisting of just three basic equations. When it was first proposed the main uncertainty in the theory was the use Flory scaling to find the fractal dimension of the random-walking vortex loops. Recent developments in high-resolution Monte Carlo simulations have now made it possible to verify the accuracy of this Flory-scaling assumption. Although the loop theory is not yet rigorously proven to be exact, the Monte Carlo results show at the least that it is an extremely good approximation. Recent loop calculations of the critical Casimir effect in helium films in the superfluid phase T < Tc will be compared with similar perturbative RG calculations in the normal phase T > Tc; the two calculations are found to match very nicely right at Tc.

  7. The Ba II [lambda]4554 resonance line and solar granulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olshevsky, V. L.; Shchukina, N. G.

    We present the results of an investigation of the impact of NLTE effects and of granulation inhomogeneities on the solar Ba II [lambda]4554 Å line. Our analysis is based on both the classical one-dimensional (1D) solar atmosphere models and on the new generation of three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamical models. We show that NLTE and 3D effects have to be taken into account for reliable diagnostics of the solar atmosphere using this line. We analyse the influence of different parameters on the line shape. It turns out to be most sensitive to collisional broadening and barium abundance. Uncertainties in the oscillator strength, micro- and macroturbulence (in 1D-case) have a secondary importance. We have derived the barium abundance assuming NLTE. We find ABa = 2.16 in good agreement with the recent result of Asplund et al. (2005).

  8. Spectral diagnostics of high energy emission in lambda Eri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Myron

    1995-01-01

    Multi-line observations of the optical spectrum of lambda Eri demonstrates that rapidly varying, low-velocity emissions occur in several He I lines even when H alpha shows no emission. A peculiar aspect of the He I emissions is that the ratio 5876/6678 is = 1. A theory of helium line formation generally admits two common emission mechanisms. The first is recombination/cascades, which is well known to give a ratio of greater than or equal to 3. The second is a non-LTE effect that occurs in hot (O-type) photospheres when resonance He I 584 radiation becomes transparent and drives single lines along into the emission. To accommodate a ratio of 5876/6678 = 1 may require that both processes sometimes operate at the same time, presumably in separate localities near the surface of this star.

  9. A Lambda 1400 spectrophotometric census of the Orion belt region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Douglas N.; Shore, Steven N.

    1986-01-01

    Low dispersion IUE spectrophotometry were used to generate a pair of photometric indices which measure the strength of the broad continuum absorption feature at 1400 A, likely an autoionizing transition of Si II. Calibration of the indices as identifiers of silicon overabundance is based on measurements of 25 IUE spectral standards and a sample of O8-A0 IV-V stars, 18 of them silicon stars. The correlations of delta alpha 1400 with delta alpha 5200 and delta (VI-G) support the association of the lambda 5200 feature with silicon. Using this technique, a magnitude limited survey of 28 B-stars in sub-groups b1, b2 and b3 of the Orion OB1 association was conducted. Two previously unrecognized candidate (perhaps weakly overabundant) silicon stars, HD 37187 and BD - 0 deg 984 are identified.

  10. Directed evolution of nucleotide-based libraries using lambda exonuclease.

    PubMed

    Lim, Bee Nar; Choong, Yee Siew; Ismail, Asma; Glökler, Jörn; Konthur, Zoltán; Lim, Theam Soon

    2012-12-01

    Directed evolution of nucleotide libraries using recombination or mutagenesis is an important technique for customizing catalytic or biophysical traits of proteins. Conventional directed evolution methods, however, suffer from cumbersome digestion and ligation steps. Here, we describe a simple method to increase nucleotide diversity using single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) as a starting template. An initial PCR amplification using phosphorylated primers with overlapping regions followed by treatment with lambda exonuclease generates ssDNA templates that can then be annealed via the overlap regions. Double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) is then generated through extension with Klenow fragment. To demonstrate the applicability of this methodology for directed evolution of nucleotide libraries, we generated both gene shuffled and regional mutagenesis synthetic antibody libraries with titers of 2×108 and 6×107, respectively. We conclude that our method is an efficient and convenient approach to generate diversity in nucleic acid based libraries, especially recombinant antibody libraries.

  11. Polarization of Lambda0 and anti-Lambda0 inclusively produced by 610-GeV/c Sigma- and 525-GeV/c proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Lopez, J.L.; Nelson, K.D.; Engelfried, J.; Akgun, U.; Alkhazov, G.; Amaro-Reyes, J.; Atamantchouk, A.G.; Ayan, A.S.; Balatz, M.Y.; Blanco-Covarrubias, A.; Bondar, N.F.; /Ball State U. /Bogazici U. /Carnegie Mellon U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Fermilab /Serpukhov, IHEP /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Moscow, ITEP /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. /Moscow State U. /St. Petersburg, INP

    2007-06-01

    We have measured the polarization of {Lambda}{sup 0} and {bar {Lambda}{sup 0}} inclusively produced by 610 GeV/c {Sigma}{sup -} and 525 GeV/c proton beams in the experiment SELEX during the 1996/7 fixed target run at Fermilab. The polarization was measured as a function of the {Lambda} longitudinal momentum fraction x{sub F} and transverse momentum p{sub t}. For the {Lambda}{sup 0} produced by {Sigma}{sup -} the polarization is increasing with x{sub F} , from slightly negative at x{sub F} {approx} 0 to about 15% at large x{sub F} ; it shows a non-monotonic behavior as a function of p{sub t}. For the proton beam, the {Lambda}{sup 0} polarization is negative and decreasing as a function of x{sub F} and p{sub t}. The {bar {Lambda}{sup 0}} polarization is compatible with 0 for both beam particles over the full kinematic range. The target dependence was examined but no statistically significant difference was found.

  12. LambdaStation: Exploiting Advance Networks In Data Intensive High Energy Physics Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey B. Newman

    2009-09-11

    Lambda Station software implements selective, dynamic, secure path control between local storage & analysis facilities, and high bandwidth, wide-area networks (WANs). It is intended to facilitate use of desirable, alternate wide area network paths which may only be intermittently available, or subject to policies that restrict usage to specified traffic. Lambda Station clients gain awareness of potential alternate network paths via Clarens-based web services, including path characteristics such as bandwidth and availability. If alternate path setup is requested and granted, Lambda Station will configure the local network infrastructure to properly forward designated data flows via the alternate path. A fully functional implementation of Lambda Station, capable of dynamic alternate WAN path setup and teardown, has been successfully developed. A limited Lambda Station-awareness capability within the Storage Resource Manager (SRM) product has been developed. Lambda Station has been successfully tested in a number of venues, including Super Computing 2008. LambdaStation software, developed by the Fermilab team, enables dynamic allocation of alternate network paths for high impact traffic and to forward designated flows across LAN. It negotiates with reservation and provisioning systems of WAN control planes, be it based on SONET channels, demand tunnels, or dynamic circuit networks. It creates End-To-End circuit between single hosts, computer farms or networks with predictable performance characteristics, preserving QoS if supported in LAN and WAN and tied security policy allowing only specific traffic to be forwarded or received through created path. Lambda Station project also explores Network Awareness capabilities.

  13. The risk of renal disease is increased in lambda myeloma with bone marrow amyloid deposits

    PubMed Central

    Kozlowski, Piotr; Montgomery, Scott; Befekadu, Rahel; Hahn-Strömberg, Victoria

    2017-01-01

    Background Light chain amyloidosis (AL) is a rare deposition disease and is present in 10–15% of patients with myeloma (MM). In contrast to symptomatic AL in MM, presence of bone marrow (BM) amyloid deposits (AD) in MM is not connected to kidney damage. Renal AD but not BM-AD occur mostly in MM with lambda paraprotein (lambda MM). Methods We investigated amyloid presence in BM clots taken at diagnosis in 84 patients with symptomatic MM and compared disease characteristics in MM with kappa paraprotein (kappa MM)/lambda MM with and without BM-AD. Results Lambda MM with BM-AD was compared with kappa MM without BM-AD, kappa MM with BM-AD, and lambda MM without BM-AD: lambda MM with BM-AD patients had a significantly higher mean creatinine level (4.23 mg/dL vs 1.69, 1.14, and 1.28 mg/dL, respectively) and a higher proportion presented with severe kidney failure (6/11 [55%] vs 6/32 [19%], 1/22 [5%], and 3/19 [16%], respectively). Proteinuria was more common in lambda MM with BM-AD patients compared with kappa MM without BM-AD patients (8/11 [73%] vs 5/32 [16%], respectively). Conclusion Kidney damage was more common in lambda MM with BM-AD indicating presence of renal AD. PMID:28293126

  14. Dermatomyosite et panniculite: place des immunoglobulines

    PubMed Central

    Abdelhafidh, Nadia Ben; Toujeni, Sana; Kefi, Asma; Bousetta, Najeh; Sayhi, Sameh; Gharsallah, Imen; Othmani, Salah

    2016-01-01

    La panniculite est une maladie inflammatoire du tissu adipeux sous-cutané rarement associée à la dermatomyosite. Elle peut survenir avant, après ou en même temps que l'atteinte musculaire. Dans la plupart des cas, l’évolution de la panniculite et des autres atteintes de la dermatomyosite est favorable sous traitement corticoïde et/ou immunosuppresseur. Nous rapportons le cas d'une patiente âgée de 48 ans ayant présenté des lésions de panniculite précédant de 2 mois les signes musculaires. L'atteinte cutanée était résistante au traitement corticoïde associés aux immunosuppresseurs ce qui a nécessité le recours au traitement par Immunoglobulines polyvalentes permettant ainsi une amélioration à la fois de l'atteinte cutanée et musculaire. PMID:27516827

  15. [Determination of serum immunoglobulins in asthmatic patients].

    PubMed

    Cabrera Jiménez, M; Valdés Sánchez, A F; Argüelles Sobrino, D; Gómez Echevarría, A H; Lastra Alfonso, G

    1989-01-01

    One hundred eighty one asthmatic patients were evaluated at the Allergy Consultation in Hermanos Ameijeiras Clinical Surgical Hospital. A case history was made for each of the patients, where the family background and personal history of allergy was collected; possible precipitating factors (such as inhalable, food, infectious, irritant, as well as climate factors) and physical and respiratory examinations. Serum immunoglobulin tests (by means of the ultramicroanalitic system (SUMA) and the rest of Igs: IgA, IgG, IgM by means of Mancini's simple radial immunodifusion method were made. Total eosinophil count was made to all of the patients in the study as well as serial studies of the faces. An increase in the IgE and IgM figures was found in asthmatic patients related to individual controls, and in relation to the normal figures for the adult population in our country. IgA and IgG determinations were normal both in the asthmatic and control groups, related to the standard figures.

  16. Immunoglobulin class-switch recombination deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Durandy, Anne; Kracker, Sven

    2012-07-30

    Immunoglobulin class-switch recombination deficiencies (Ig-CSR-Ds) are rare primary immunodeficiencies characterized by defective switched isotype (IgG/IgA/IgE) production. Depending on the molecular defect in question, the Ig-CSR-D may be combined with an impairment in somatic hypermutation (SHM). Some of the mechanisms underlying Ig-CSR and SHM have been described by studying natural mutants in humans. This approach has revealed that T cell-B cell interaction (resulting in CD40-mediated signaling), intrinsic B-cell mechanisms (activation-induced cytidine deaminase-induced DNA damage), and complex DNA repair machineries (including uracil-N-glycosylase and mismatch repair pathways) are all involved in class-switch recombination and SHM. However, several of the mechanisms required for full antibody maturation have yet to be defined. Elucidation of the molecular defects underlying the diverse set of Ig-CSR-Ds is essential for understanding Ig diversification and has prompted better definition of the clinical spectrum of diseases and the development of increasingly accurate diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.

  17. Cytomegalovirus Immunoglobulin After Thoracic Transplantation: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Grossi, Paolo; Mohacsi, Paul; Szabolcs, Zoltán; Potena, Luciano

    2016-03-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a highly complex pathogen which, despite modern prophylactic regimens, continues to affect a high proportion of thoracic organ transplant recipients. The symptomatic manifestations of CMV infection are compounded by adverse indirect effects induced by the multiple immunomodulatory actions of CMV. These include a higher risk of acute rejection, cardiac allograft vasculopathy after heart transplantation, and potentially bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome in lung transplant recipients, with a greater propensity for opportunistic secondary infections. Prophylaxis for CMV using antiviral agents (typically oral valganciclovir or intravenous ganciclovir) is now almost universal, at least in high-risk transplants (D+/R-). Even with extended prophylactic regimens, however, challenges remain. The CMV events can still occur despite antiviral prophylaxis, including late-onset infection or recurrent disease, and patients with ganciclovir-resistant CMV infection or who are intolerant to antiviral therapy require alternative strategies. The CMV immunoglobulin (CMVIG) and antiviral agents have complementary modes of action. High-titer CMVIG preparations provide passive CMV-specific immunity but also exert complex immunomodulatory properties which augment the antiviral effect of antiviral agents and offer the potential to suppress the indirect effects of CMV infection. This supplement discusses the available data concerning the immunological and clinical effects of CMVIG after heart or lung transplantation.

  18. Immunoglobulin isotypes in Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar.

    PubMed

    Hordvik, Ivar

    2015-02-27

    There are three major immunoglobulin (Ig) isotypes in salmonid fish: IgM, IgD and IgT, defined by the heavy chains μ, δ and τ, respectively. As a result of whole genome duplication in the ancestor of the salmonid fish family, Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) possess two highly similar Ig heavy chain gene complexes (A and B), comprising two μ genes, two δ genes, three intact τ genes and five τ pseudogenes. The μA and μB genes correspond to two distinct sub-populations of serum IgM. The IgM-B sub-variant has a characteristic extra cysteine near the C-terminal part of the heavy chain and exhibits a higher degree of polymer disulfide cross-linking compared to IgM-A. The IgM-B:IgM-A ratio in serum is typically 60:40, but skewed ratios are also observed. The IgT isotype appears to be specialized to mucosal immune responses in salmonid fish. The concentration of IgT in serum is 100 to 1000 times lower than IgM. Secreted forms of IgD have been detected in rainbow trout, but not yet in Atlantic salmon.

  19. Immunoglobulin light chains, glycosaminoglycans and amyloid.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, F. J.; Kisilevsky, R.; Biosciences Division; Queen's Univ.

    2000-03-01

    Immunoglobulin light chains are the precursor proteins for fibrils that are formed during primary amyloidosis and in amyloidosis associated with multiple myeloma. As found for the approximately 20 currently described forms of focal, localized, or systemic amyloidoses, light chain-related fibrils extracted from physiological deposits are invariably associated with glycosaminoglycans, predominantly heparan sulfate. Other amyloid-related proteins are either structurally normal, such as g2-microglobulin and islet amyloid polypeptide, fragments of normal proteins such as serum amyloid A protein or the precursor protein of the g peptide involved in Alzheimer's disease, or are inherited forms of single amino acid variants of a normal protein such as found in the familial forms of amyloid associated with transthyretin. In contrast, the primary structures of light chains involved in fibril formation exhibit extensive mutational diversity rendering some proteins highly amyloidogenic and others non-pathological. The interactions between light chains and glycosaminoglycans are also affected by amino acid variation and may influence the clinical course of disease by enhancing fibril stability and contributing to resistance to protease degradation. Relatively little is currently known about the mechanisms by which glycosaminoglycans interact with light chains and light-chain fibrils. It is probable that future studies of this uniquely diverse family of proteins will continue o shed light on the processes of amyloidosis, and contribute as well to a greater understanding of the normal physiological roles of glycosaminoglycans.

  20. Immunological studies of an atypical (myeloma) immunoglobulin

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, S. G. O.; Bennich, H.

    1967-01-01

    An 8S myeloma component, isolated from serum of a patient with myelomatosis is described, which appears to have no antigenic determinants in common with human, α-, δ-, γ- or μ-polypeptide chains as revealed by immuno-electrophoresis and Ouchterlony gel diffusion analysis. The myeloma protein migrates in the fast γ-region on electrophoresis at pH 8.6 and has an elution volume on Sephadex G-200 similar to that of 6.5S IgA. The isolated myeloma component has an approximate molecular weight of 200,000 and a total carbohydrate content of 10.7 per cent. Reduction with β-mercaptoethanol and acid dissociation yields light polypeptide chains of Type L and a carbohydrate-rich component, in the ratio of 1:4. Antisera specific to determinants on the heavy chains of the myeloma protein showed no reaction with the immunoglobulins A, D, G or M. Instead unique determinants were found on the heavy polypeptide chains. ImagesFIG. 3FIG. 1FIG. 7FIG. 9FIG. 10 PMID:4168094

  1. Autoantibodies and immunoglobulins in collagenous colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Bohr, J; Tysk, C; Yang, P; Danielsson, D; Järnerot, G

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aetiology and pathogenesis of collagenous colitis are unknown. Autoimmunity has been suggested, but no serological findings have supported such a theory. AIMS AND METHODS: Serum from 38 collagenous colitis patients and 38 matched healthy controls was analysed for autoantibodies--that is, antinuclear antibodies, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies, smooth muscle and mitochondrial antibodies, rheumatoid factor and antibodies to thyroglobulin and microsomal antigen, together with antibodies to endomysium, gliadin, and cardiolipin. The serum values of IgA, IgG, IgM, and IgG-subclasses, and complement factors C3 and C4 were also determined. RESULTS: In patients with collagenous colitis the mean value of IgM was significantly increased 2.5 g/l (95% CI; 1.9, 3.2) compared with 1.4 g/l (95% CI; 1.2, 1.7) in controls (p = 0.002). Antinuclear antibodies occurred in nine of 38 patients compared with three of 38 controls, this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.11). The results of all other immunoglobulins, complement factors, and specific antibodies showed no statistical difference between patients and controls. CONCLUSIONS: No firm evidence for an autoimmune genesis in collagenous colitis is found in this study, although the findings of a positive ANA-titre in some patients and an increased IgM level might give some support for this hypothesis. PMID:8881813

  2. Immunoglobulin: production, mechanisms of action and formulations

    PubMed Central

    Novaretti, Marcia Cristina Zago; Dinardo, Carla Luana

    2011-01-01

    Human immunoglobulin (Ig) began to be applied in the clinical practice with the treatment of primary immunodeficiencies. Quickly, applications of Ig increased, as its anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory functions were elucidated. Currently, Ig is the most commonly used blood product. Ig is obtained by processing plasma; methods, in particular, techniques to reduce plasma viral loads have been evolving over the years and include: pasteurization, solvent/ detergent treatment, caprylic acid treatment and nanofiltration. These methods contribute to increased safety and quality of blood products. The mechanisms of action of Ig not only involve the blockade of Fc receptors of phagocytes, but also control complement pathways, idiotype-anti-idiotype dimer formation, blockage of superantigen binding to T cells, inhibition of dendritic cells and stimulation of regulatory T cells (Tregs). There are several formulations of Ig available, each one with its own peculiar characteristics. In Brazil, there is stringent legislation regulating the quality of Ig. Only Ig products that completely fulfill the quality control criteria are released for use. These standards involve different tests from visual inspection to determination of anti-complementary activity. This paper will further review the history and current status of Ig, including its production and mechanisms of action. The formulations available in Brazil and also the criteria of quality control currently applied will be presented. PMID:23049343

  3. Measurement of the Branching Ratio Lambda_c+ -> p pi+ pi-

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Hinojosa, Guillermo; /San Luis Potosi U.

    2008-03-01

    The confirmation of the Cabibbo-suppressed charm baryon decay mode {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} is reported. All data analyzed are from SELEX, a fixed target experiment at Fermilab that took data during 1996 and 1997, mainly with a 600 GeV/c {Sigma}{sup -} beam. The branching ratio of the Cabibbo-suppressed decay mode {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} relative to the Cabibbo-favored mode {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -}{pi}{sup +} is measured to be: {Gamma}({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Gamma}({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.103 {+-} 0.022.

  4. The new generation of liquid intravenous immunoglobulin formulations in patient care: a comparison of intravenous immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Stein, Mark R

    2010-09-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IGIV) replacement therapy is the standard of care for primary immunodeficiencies with impaired humoral immunity. It is also the immunomodulatory therapy of choice for some types of neuroimmunologic and autoimmune hematologic disorders and for immunomodulation in bone marrow and some solid organ transplants. Currently available IGIV products include older lyophilized formulations, 5% liquid products, and newer, liquid, ready-to-use, 10% formulations. Differences in the formulations, manufacturing processes, excipients, pH, and other physicochemical properties of IGIV products may affect their clinical efficacy and tolerability. Among at-risk patients, the possibility of serious complications such as renal insufficiency, heart failure, thrombotic events, and immunological reactions may be increased if an IGIV formulation has sugar as a stabilizer, has high sodium or immunoglobulin A (IgA) content, or is hyperosmolar. The 10% liquid formulations may offer advantages because of their lower IgA concentrations, optimal pH, glycine or proline stabilizers, low sodium content, and lower osmolality. Liquid formulations are more convenient for patients and health care providers due to shorter infusion times and easier preparation and administration.

  5. Penetration depth lambda(T) of YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) films determined from the kinetic inductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Juyoung; Lemberger, Thomas R.

    1993-05-01

    We examine the temperature dependence of the magnetic penetration depth lambda(T) of YBa2Cu3O(7-delta), determined from the kinetic inductance of a film patterned into a long meander line. This technique has sufficient sensitivity to study lambda(T) to lower temperatures than have been examined previously. A numerical model which includes both the magnetic and kinetic inductances of the samples extracts lambda(T) from the measured voltage. In reasonable agreement with other measurements, lambda(0) about 2100 A is deduced from fitting lambda(0)-squared/lambda(T)-squared to the function 1 - (T/Tc)-squared for T/Tc greater than 0.4. We find lambda(T)/lambda(0) - 1 is proportional to (T/Tc)-squared for T/Tc between 0.06 and 0.4.

  6. Immunoglobulin VH determinants defined by monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Hybridoma clones secreting antibodies against common VH determinants were readily produced by fusion of cells from mice immunized with isolated V mu fragments of human immunoglobulins (Ig), but not with intact Ig molecules or isolated heavy chains. Four monoclonal antibodies to the V mu fragments of different IgM paraproteins were selected for analysis: MH-44 (mu kappa), GB-24 (mu kappa), NF-11 (gamma 1 kappa), and SA-44 (gamma 1 kappa). Each antibody reacted with the homologous V mu fragment, homologous mu chain, and normal gamma chains, but not with the intact IgM molecules, intact IgG, or isolated light chains, as determined by radioimmunoassay. The VH reaction spectra with a panel of myeloma heavy chains showed overlapping but distinctive patterns for the four antibodies. Each of the four monoclonal anti-VH antibodies appeared to react with a different "hidden" VH determinant that is not exposed on undenatured, intact Ig molecules and differs from conventional VH subgroup determinants. In immunofluorescence studies, the monoclonal anti-VH antibodies did not bind to surface Ig on viable B lymphocytes, but visibly stained subpopulations of fixed B lymphocytes, pre-B cells, and normal plasma cells. The mean frequencies of VH+ plasma cells were 30% (MH-44), 17% (GB-24), 13% (NF-11), and 3% (SA-44), and similar frequencies were obtained for the VH+ B cell subpopulations. While subpopulations of B cells could be identified at all stages in differentiation by immunofluorescence with the anti-VH antibodies, neither resting nor activated T cells expressed these VH determinants in detectable amounts. PMID:6185604

  7. Immunoglobulin heavy chains in medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bony fish present an immunological system, which evolved independently from those of animals that migrated to land 400 million years ago. The publication of whole genome sequences and the availability of several cDNA libraries for medaka (Oryzias latipes) permitted us to perform a thorough analysis of immunoglobulin heavy chains present in this teleost. Results We identified IgM and IgD coding ESTs, mainly in spleen, kidney and gills using published cDNA libraries but we did not find any sequence that coded for IgT or other heavy chain isotypes described in fish. The IgM - ESTs corresponded with the secreted and membrane forms and surprisingly, the latter form only presented two constant heavy chain domains. This is the first time that this short form of membrane IgM is described in a teleost. It is different from that identified in Notothenioid teleost because it does not present the typical splicing pattern of membrane IgM. The identified IgD-ESTs only present membrane transcripts, with Cμ1 and five Cδ exons. Furthermore, there are ESTs with sequences that do not have any VH which disrupt open reading frames. A scan of the medaka genome using transcripts and genomic short reads resulted in five zones within a region on chromosome 8 with Cμ and Cδ exons. Some of these exons do not form part of antibodies and were at times interspersed, suggesting a recombination process between zones. An analysis of the ESTs confirmed that no antibodies are expressed from zone 3. Conclusions Our results suggest that the IGH locus duplication is very common among teleosts, wherein the existence of a recombination process explains the sequence homology between them. PMID:21676244

  8. 7th International Immunoglobulin Conference: Immunomodulation

    PubMed Central

    Danieli, M G; Shoenfeld, Y

    2014-01-01

    Immunomodulation uses synthetic, natural and recombinant preparations to modify the immune response to a desired level, typically to treat specific autoimmune diseases, as will be discussed in this section. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common systemic autoimmune disease, affecting 1% of the population worldwide. Currently, a first-line disease-modifying therapy for RA is methotrexate; however, more than 40 monoclonal antibodies are in use or under investigation for the treatment of RA. This panoply of biological disease-modifying agents means that clinicians can make use of drugs with different mechanisms of action should one type become ineffective. In autoimmune pemphigus conditions, identification of pathogenic autoantibodies against intercellular cadherin desmoglein 1 and/or 3 antigens is one of the criteria for appropriate diagnosis. In pemphigoid conditions, autoantibodies are directed against bullous pemphigoid antigens BP230 and BP180, and in both types of immunobullous disease intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), as adjuvant therapy in combination with a cytotoxic drug, is effective in reducing autoantibody levels, disease severity and background steroid use. Further studies are required to establish the role of monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of autoimmune bullous disease. IVIg may also be effective in another at-risk population with autoimmune disease, namely secondary recurrent miscarriage (RM). However, the mechanism of action of IVIg in secondary RM is largely unknown, although levels of natural killer cell biomarkers, particularly CD56+, have been shown to decline after IVIg treatment [1-6]. Data from meta-analyses of heterogeneous placebo-controlled trials indicate that IVIg may be effective in secondary RM, but most trials to date have used immunomodulatory doses lower than those considered to be efficient in autoimmune disease. The results of a recently completed study may help to address this question. PMID:25546784

  9. Hyaluronidase facilitated subcutaneous immunoglobulin in primary immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Jolles, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig)-replacement therapy represents the mainstay of treatment for patients with primary antibody deficiency and is administered either intravenously (IVIg) or subcutaneously (SCIg). While hyaluronidase has been used in clinical practice for over 50 years, the development of a high-purity recombinant form of this enzyme (recombinant human hyaluronidase PH20) has recently enabled the study of repeated and more prolonged use of hyaluronidase in facilitating the delivery of SC medicines. It has been used in a wide range of clinical settings to give antibiotics, local anesthetics, insulin, morphine, fluid replacement, and larger molecules, such as antibodies. Hyaluronidase has been used to help overcome the limitations on the maximum volume that can be delivered into the SC space by enabling dispersion of SCIg and its absorption into lymphatics. The rate of facilitated SCIg (fSCIg) infusion is equivalent to that of IVIg, and the volume administered at a single site can be greater than 700 mL, a huge increase over conventional SCIg, at 20–40 mL. The use of fSCIg avoids the higher incidence of systemic side effects of IVIg, and it has higher bioavailability than SCIg. Data on the long-term safety of this approach are currently lacking, as fSCIg has only recently become available. fSCIg may help several areas of patient management in primary antibody deficiency, and the extent to which it may be used in future will depend on long-term safety data and cost–benefit analysis. PMID:27471693

  10. Searches for the baryon- and lepton-number violating decays $B^0\\rightarrow\\Lambda_c^ \\ell^-$, $B^-\\rightarrow\\Lambda\\ell^-$, and $B^-\\rightarrow\\bar{\\Lambda}\\ell^-$

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Milan U. /Milan U. /Milan U. /Milan U. /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-06-22

    Searches for B mesons decaying to final states containing a baryon and a lepton are performed, where the baryon is either {Lambda}{sub c} or {Lambda} and the lepton is a muon or an electron. These decays violate both baryon and lepton number and would be a signature of physics beyond the standard model. No significant signal is observed in any of the decay modes, and upper limits in the range (3.2 - 520) x 10{sup -8} are set on the branching fractions at the 90% confidence level.

  11. Observation of the baryonic B-decay B0bar -> LambdaC antiproton K- pi

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-10-20

    The authors report the observation of the baryonic B-decay {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{bar p}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, excluding contributions from the decay {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{bar {Lambda}}K{sup -}. Using a data sample of 467 million B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage ring at SLAC, the measured branching fraction is (4.33 {+-} 0.82){sub stat} {+-} 0.33{sub syst} {+-} 1.13{sub {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}} x 10{sup -5}. In addition they find evidence for the resonant decay {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {Sigma}{sub c}(2455){sup ++}{bar p}K{sup -} and determine its branching fraction to be (1.11 {+-} 0.30{sub stat} {+-} 0.09{sub syst} {+-} 0.29{sub {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}}) x 10{sup -5}. The errors are statistical, systematic, and due to the uncertainty in the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} branching fraction. For the resonant decay {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{bar p}{bar K}*{sup 0} we obtain an upper limit of 2.42 x 10{sup -5} at 90% confidence level.

  12. {lambda}{sup 0} Polarization in Exclusive pp Reactions From the FNAL e690 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Felix, J.; Berisso, M. C.; Christian, D. C.; Gottschalk, E. E.; Gutierrez, G.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Wehmann, A.; Gara, A.; Hartouni, E. P.; Knapp, B. C.; Kreisler, M. N.; Lee, S.; Markianos, K.; Moreno, G.; Reyes, M. A.; Wesson, D.

    2009-04-20

    It is an experimental evidence that all baryons are created polarized from unpolarized p-nucleus collisions. So far, the origin of this polarization remains unexplained in spite of the experimental evidences accumulated in the past thirty years. Up to these days, {lambda}{sup 0} is the most studied baryon for polarization, for it is copiously produced in p--nucleus collisions at the energies of the principal high energy physics accelerators of the world. This paper is an overview of the experimental evidences accumulated on the polarization of {lambda}{sup 0} from unpolarized exclusive pp collisions as function of x{sub F}, P{sub T}, and M({lambda}{sup 0}K{sup +}) in the past fifteen years inside Fermilab e690 experiment, in the particular reactions pp{yields}p{lambda}{sup 0}K{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}, pp{yields}pp{lambda}{sup 0}{lambda}{sup -0}, pp{yields}p{lambda}{sup 0}K{sup +}, produced at 800 GeV.

  13. The Production Processes and Biological Effects of Intravenous Immunoglobulin

    PubMed Central

    Barahona Afonso, Ana Filipa; João, Cristina Maria Pires

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin is a highly diverse autologous molecule able to influence immunity in different physiological and diseased situations. Its effect may be visible both in terms of development and function of B and T lymphocytes. Polyclonal immunoglobulin may be used as therapy in many diseases in different circumstances such as primary and secondary hypogammaglobulinemia, recurrent infections, polyneuropathies, cancer, after allogeneic transplantation in the presence of infections and/or GVHD. However, recent studies have broadened the possible uses of polyclonal immunoglobulin showing that it can stimulate certain sub-populations of T cells with effects on T cell proliferation, survival and function in situations of lymphopenia. These results present a novel and considerable impact of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) treatment in situations of severe lymphopenia, a situation that can occur in cancer patients after chemo and radiotherapy treatments. In this review paper the established and experimental role of polyclonal immunoglobulin will be presented and discussed as well as the manufacturing processes involved in their production. PMID:27005671

  14. Uninvolved immunoglobulins predicting hematological response in newly diagnosed AL amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Muchtar, Eli; Magen, Hila; Itchaki, Gilad; Cohen, Amos; Rosenfeld, Ra'ama; Shochat, Tzippy; Kornowski, Ran; Iakobishvili, Zaza; Raanani, Pia

    2016-02-01

    Immunoparesis serves as a marker for elevated risk for progression in plasma cell proliferative disorders. However, the impact of immunoparesis in AL amyloidosis has not been addressed. Immunoparesis was defined qualitatively as any decrease below the low reference levels of the uninvolved immunoglobulins and quantitatively, as the relative difference between the uninvolved immunoglobulins and the lower reference values. Forty-one newly diagnosed AL amyloidosis patients were included. Sixty-six percent of patients had a suppression of the uninvolved immunoglobulins. The median relative difference of the uninvolved immunoglobulins was 18% above the low reference levels [range (-71%)-210%]. Ninety percent of the patients were treated with novel agents-based regimens, mostly bortezomib-containing regimens. Nineteen percent of the patients did not attain response to first line treatment. Patients with relative difference of uninvolved immunoglobulins below -25% of the low reference levels were less likely to respond to first line treatment compared to patients with a relative difference of -25% and above [odds ratio for no response vs. partial response and better 30 [(95% CI 4.1-222.2), P=0.0004]. Patients who failed first line treatment were successfully salvaged with lenalidomide-based treatment. Immunoparesis, if assessed quantitatively, may serve as a predictor of response in AL amyloidosis patients treated with bortezomib-containing regimens.

  15. Evolutionary Genomics of Immunoglobulin-Encoding Loci in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sabyasachi; Hirano, Masayuki; Tako, Rea; McCallister, Chelsea; Nikolaidis, Nikolas

    2012-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (or antibodies) are an essential element of the jawed vertebrate adaptive immune response system. These molecules have evolved over the past 500 million years and generated highly specialized proteins that recognize an extraordinarily large number of diverse substances, collectively known as antigens. During vertebrate evolution the diversification of the immunoglobulin-encoding loci resulted in differences in the genomic organization, gene content, and ratio of functional genes and pseudogenes. The tinkering process in the immunoglobulin-encoding loci often gave rise to lineage-specific characteristics that were formed by selection to increase species adaptation and fitness. Immunoglobulin loci and their encoded antibodies have been shaped repeatedly by contrasting evolutionary forces, either to conserve the prototypic structure and mechanism of action or to generate alternative and diversified structures and modes of function. Moreover, evolution favored the development of multiple mechanisms of primary and secondary antibody diversification, which are used by different species to effectively generate an almost infinite collection of diverse antibody types. This review summarizes our current knowledge on the genomics and evolution of the immunoglobulin-encoding loci and their protein products in jawed vertebrates. PMID:23024601

  16. Characterization of a labile naloxone binding site (lambda site) in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Grevel, J; Yu, V; Sadée, W

    1985-05-01

    A high-affinity binding site selective for naloxone and other 4,5-epoxymorphinans (lambda site) has been previously described in rat brain. Following homogenization of freshly dissected brain, the lambda sites convert from a high-affinity to a low-affinity state. When measured with [3H]naloxone, the decay is very rapid at 20 degrees C (t 1/2 less than 2 min), whereas it is progressively slowed at lower temperatures. Proteinase inhibitors, antoxidants, and sulfhydryl group-protecting agents failed to prevent this conversion. Kinetic measurements of mu and lambda binding at varying temperatures demonstrated that the decrease in lambda binding does not coincide with the concurrent increase in mu binding and that the loss of high-affinity lambda binding at 20 degrees C can be partially restored when the temperature is lowered to 0 degrees C. The low-affinity state of the lambda site is rather stable in the Tris buffer homogenates and is susceptible to digestion by a protease. The (-)-isomer of WIN 44,441, a benzomorphan drug, binds to lambda sites with moderate affinity (dissociation constant, KD = 63 nM), whereas the (+)-isomer does not (KD greater than 10,000 nM), thus establishing stereoselectivity of the binding process. Neither the high-affinity nor the low-affinity state of lambda binding is significantly affected by the presence of 100 mM sodium chloride or 50 microM Gpp(NH)p, (a GTP analog), which is in contrast to the dramatic effect of these agents on the established opioid receptor system. Naltrexone, naloxone, nalorphine, and morphine (in this order of decreasing potency) bind to the lambda site in vivo in intact rat brain over dosage ranges that are commonly employed in pharmacological studies.

  17. L-moments and TL-moments of the generalized lambda distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asquith, W.H.

    2007-01-01

    The 4-parameter generalized lambda distribution (GLD) is a flexible distribution capable of mimicking the shapes of many distributions and data samples including those with heavy tails. The method of L-moments and the recently developed method of trimmed L-moments (TL-moments) are attractive techniques for parameter estimation for heavy-tailed distributions for which the L- and TL-moments have been defined. Analytical solutions for the first five L- and TL-moments in terms of GLD parameters are derived. Unfortunately, numerical methods are needed to compute the parameters from the L- or TL-moments. Algorithms are suggested for parameter estimation. Application of the GLD using both L- and TL-moment parameter estimates from example data is demonstrated, and comparison of the L-moment fit of the 4-parameter kappa distribution is made. A small simulation study of the 98th percentile (far-right tail) is conducted for a heavy-tail GLD with high-outlier contamination. The simulations show, with respect to estimation of the 98th-percent quantile, that TL-moments are less biased (more robost) in the presence of high-outlier contamination. However, the robustness comes at the expense of considerably more sampling variability. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The holin of bacteriophage lambda forms rings with large diameter.

    PubMed

    Savva, Christos G; Dewey, Jill S; Deaton, John; White, Rebecca L; Struck, Douglas K; Holzenburg, Andreas; Young, Rye

    2008-08-01

    Holins control the length of the infection cycle of tailed phages (the Caudovirales) by oligomerizing to form lethal holes in the cytoplasmic membrane at a time dictated by their primary structure. Nothing is currently known about the physical basis of their oligomerization or the structure of the oligomers formed by any known holin. Here we use electron microscopy and single-particle analysis to characterize structures formed by the bacteriophage lambda holin (S105) in vitro. In non-ionic or mild zwitterionic detergents, purified S105, but not the lysis-defective variant S105A52V, forms rings of at least two size classes, the most common having inner and outer diameters of 8.5 and 23 nm respectively, and containing approximately 72 S105 monomers. The height of these rings, 4 nm, closely matches the thickness of the lipid bilayer. The central channel is of unprecedented size for channels formed by integral membrane proteins, consistent with the non-specific nature of holin-mediated membrane permeabilization. S105 present in detergent-solubilized rings and in inverted membrane vesicles showed similar sensitivities to proteolysis and cysteine-specific modification, suggesting that the rings are representative of the lethal holes formed by S105 to terminate the infection cycle and initiate lysis.

  19. Comparison of Cluster Lensing Profiles with Lambda CDM Predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Broadhurst, Tom; Umetsu, Keiichi; Medezinski, Elinor; Oguri, Masamune; Rephaeli, Yoel; /Tel Aviv U. /San Diego, CASS

    2008-05-21

    We derive lens distortion and magnification profiles of four well known clusters observed with Subaru. Each cluster is very well fitted by the general form predicted for Cold Dark Matter (CDM) dominated halos, with good consistency found between the independent distortion and magnification measurements. The inferred level of mass concentration is surprisingly high, 8 < c{sub vir} < 15 ( = 10.39 {+-} 0.91), compared to the relatively shallow profiles predicted by the {Lambda}CDM model, c{sub vir} = 5.06 {+-} 1.10 (for = 1.25 x 10{sup 15} M{sub {circle_dot}}/h). This represents a 4{sigma} discrepancy, and includes the relatively modest effects of projection bias and profile evolution derived from N-body simulations, which oppose each other with little residual effect. In the context of CDM based cosmologies, this discrepancy implies some modification of the widely assumed spectrum of initial density perturbations, so clusters collapse earlier (z {ge} 1) than predicted (z < 0.5) when the Universe was correspondingly denser.

  20. High accuracy heat capacity measurements through the lambda transition of helium with very high temperature resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairbanks, W. M.; Lipa, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    A measurement of the heat capacity singularity of helium at the lambda transition was performed with the aim of improving tests of the Renormalization Group (RG) predictions for the static thermodynamic behavior near the singularity. The goal was to approach as closely as possible to the lambda-point while making heat capacity measurements of high accuracy. To do this, a new temperature sensor capable of unprecedented resolution near the lambda-point, and two thermal control systems were used. A short description of the theoretical background and motivation is given. The initial apparatus and results are also described.

  1. Ghost-gluon running coupling, power corrections, and the determination of {lambda}{sub MS}

    SciTech Connect

    Boucaud, Ph.; Leroy, J. P.; Le Yaouanc, A.; Micheli, J.; Pene, O.; De Soto, F.; Rodriguez-Quintero, J.

    2009-01-01

    We compute a formula including operator-product expansion power corrections to describe the running of a QCD coupling nonperturbatively defined through the ghost and gluon dressing functions. This turns out to be rather accurate. We propose the 'plateau' procedure to compute {lambda}{sub MS} from the lattice computation of the running coupling constant. We show a good agreement between the different methods which have been used to estimate {lambda}{sub MS}{sup N{sub f}}{sup =0}. We argue that {lambda}{sub MS} or the strong coupling constant computed with different lattice spacings may be used to estimate the lattice spacing ratio.

  2. Experimental Investigation Into the Aerodynamic Ground Effect of a Tailless Chevron and Lambda-shaped UCAVs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    58 Figure 39: Lambda UCAV Model and Wind Tunnel in Gridgen ..…… ………....……..60 Figure 40: Lambda UCAV Model’s...created in this study and converted it to an IGES file. The IGES file was then used in Gridgen to build a grid that was used in Fluent solver...and wind tunnel in Gridgen (28). Figure 39: Lambda UCAV model and windtunnel in Gridgen at 8 degrees AOA (28) The FLUENT solver’s resuting OGE CL

  3. High Resolution Spectroscopy of {sub {lambda}}{sup 12}B by Electroproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Iodice, M.; Cusanno, F.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Acha, A.; Ambrozewicz, P.; Coman, L.; Markowitz, P.; Moteabbed, M.; Raue, B.; Reinhold, J.; Aniol, K. A.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Baturin, P.; Jiang, X.; McCormick, K.; Bertin, P. Y.; Camsonne, A.; Ferdi, C.; Blomqvist, K. I.

    2007-08-03

    An experiment measuring electroproduction of hypernuclei has been performed in hall A at Jefferson Lab on a {sup 12}C target. In order to increase counting rates and provide unambiguous kaon identification two superconducting septum magnets and a ring imaging Cherenkov detector were added to the hall A standard equipment. An unprecedented energy resolution of less than 700 keV FWHM has been achieved. Thus, the observed {sub {lambda}}{sup 12}B spectrum shows for the first time identifiable strength in the core-excited region between the ground-state s-wave {lambda} peak and the 11 MeV p-wave {lambda} peak.

  4. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate preferentially induces aggregation of amyloidogenic immunoglobulin light chains

    PubMed Central

    Hora, Manuel; Carballo-Pacheco, Martin; Weber, Benedikt; Morris, Vanessa K.; Wittkopf, Antje; Buchner, Johannes; Strodel, Birgit; Reif, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Antibody light chain amyloidosis is a rare disease caused by fibril formation of secreted immunoglobulin light chains (LCs). The huge variety of antibody sequences puts a serious challenge to drug discovery. The green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is known to interfere with fibril formation in general. Here we present solution- and solid-state NMR studies as well as MD simulations to characterise the interaction of EGCG with LC variable domains. We identified two distinct EGCG binding sites, both of which include a proline as an important recognition element. The binding sites were confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis and solid-state NMR analysis. The EGCG-induced protein complexes are unstructured. We propose a general mechanistic model for EGCG binding to a conserved site in LCs. We find that EGCG reacts selectively with amyloidogenic mutants. This makes this compound a promising lead structure, that can handle the immense sequence variability of antibody LCs. PMID:28128355

  5. Concurrent Drug-Induced Linear Immunoglobulin A Dermatosis and Immunoglobulin A Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Seok; Choi, Misoo; Nam, Chan Hee; Kim, Jee Young; Park, Byung Cheol; Kim, Myung Hwa; Hong, Seung Phil

    2015-06-01

    Diseases associated with immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibody include linear IgA dermatosis, IgA nephropathy, Celiac disease, Henoch-Schönlein purpura, etc. Although usually idiopathic, IgA antibody is occasionally induced by drugs (e.g., vancomycin, carbamazepine, ceftriaxone, and cyclosporine), malignancies, infections, and other causes. So far, only a few cases of IgA bullous dermatosis coexisting with IgA nephropathy have been reported. A 64-year-old female receiving intravenous ceftriaxone and metronidazole for liver abscess had purpuric macules and papules on her extremities. One week later, she had generalized edema and skin rash with bullae and was diagnosed with concurrent linear IgA dermatosis and IgA nephropathy. After steroid treatment, the skin lesion subsided within two weeks, and kidney function slowly returned to normal. As both diseases occurred after a common possible cause, we predict their pathogeneses are associated.

  6. Interference of immunoglobulins in two glucagon radioimmunoassays. [Blood donor and patient immunoglobulins

    SciTech Connect

    Von Schenck, H.; Grubb, A.O.

    1982-05-01

    Radioimmunoassays of glucagon in plasma may be complicated by interaction with other substances of high molecular mass. Precipitates of such substances with ammonium sulfate showed, after isoelectric focusing, two fractions having glucagon immunoreactivity. One fraction (pI approx.10) evidently is associated with the Fc portion (but not the Fab portion) of purified polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG). Equal amounts of purified monoclonal IgG of various subclasses, especially IgG 1, gave different ''glucagon'' readings, suggesting that some IgG may interfere more strongly than others. The other fraction (pI 5-6) appeared less consistently, and on gel chromatography appeared to be slightly larger than IgG. Together these fractions add about 50-100 ng/L to the immunoreactive glucagon values in plasma. Therefore methods in which glucagon is extracted before assay should be used for determining the concentration of glucagon present physiologically.

  7. Determination of the {ital b}{r_arrow}{ital c} handedness using nonleptonic {Lambda}{sub {ital c}} decays

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, B.; Koerner, J.G.; Kraemer, M.

    1994-03-01

    We consider possibilities to determine the handedness of {ital b}{r_arrow}{ital c} current transitions using semileptonic baryonic {Lambda}{sub {ital b}}{r_arrow}{Lambda}{sub {ital c}} transitions. We propose to analyze the longitudinal polarization of the daughter baryon {Lambda}{sub {ital c}} by using momentum-spin correlation measurements in the form of forward-backward (FB) asymmetry measures involving its nonleptonic decay products. We use an explicit form factor model to determine the longitudinal polarization of {Lambda}{sub {ital c}} in the semileptonic decay {Lambda}{sub {ital b}}{r_arrow}{Lambda}{sub {ital c}}+{ital l}{sup {minus}}+{bar {nu}}{sub {ital l}}. The mean longitudinal polarization of {Lambda}{sub {ital c}} is negative (positive) for left-chiral (right-chiral) {ital b}{r_arrow}{ital c} current transitions. The frame-dependent longitudinal polarization of {Lambda}{sub {ital c}} is large ({congruent}80%) in the {Lambda}{sub {ital b}} rest frame and somewhat smaller (30%--40%) in the lab frame when the {Lambda}{sub {ital b}}`s are produced on the {ital Z}{sup 0} peak. We suggest to use nonleptonic decay modes of {Lambda}{sub {ital c}} to analyze its polarization and thereby to determine the chirality of the {ital b}{r_arrow}{ital c} transition. Since {Lambda}{sub {ital b}}`s produced on the {ital Z}{sup 0} are expected to be polarized we discuss issues of the polarization transfer in {Lambda}{sub {ital b}}{r_arrow}{Lambda}{sub {ital c}} transitions. We also investigate the {ital p}{sub {perpendicular}}- and {ital p}-cut sensitivity of our predictions for the polarization of {Lambda}{sub {ital c}}.

  8. Russell body inducing threshold depends on the variable domain sequences of individual human IgG clones and the cellular protein homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Stoops, Janelle; Byrd, Samantha; Hasegawa, Haruki

    2012-10-01

    Russell bodies are intracellular aggregates of immunoglobulins. Although the mechanism of Russell body biogenesis has been extensively studied by using truncated mutant heavy chains, the importance of the variable domain sequences in this process and in immunoglobulin biosynthesis remains largely unknown. Using a panel of structurally and functionally normal human immunoglobulin Gs, we show that individual immunoglobulin G clones possess distinctive Russell body inducing propensities that can surface differently under normal and abnormal cellular conditions. Russell body inducing predisposition unique to each immunoglobulin G clone was corroborated by the intrinsic physicochemical properties encoded in the heavy chain variable domain/light chain variable domain sequence combinations that define each immunoglobulin G clone. While the sequence based intrinsic factors predispose certain immunoglobulin G clones to be more prone to induce Russell bodies, extrinsic factors such as stressful cell culture conditions also play roles in unmasking Russell body propensity from immunoglobulin G clones that are normally refractory to developing Russell bodies. By taking advantage of heterologous expression systems, we dissected the roles of individual subunit chains in Russell body formation and examined the effect of non-cognate subunit chain pair co-expression on Russell body forming propensity. The results suggest that the properties embedded in the variable domain of individual light chain clones and their compatibility with the partnering heavy chain variable domain sequences underscore the efficiency of immunoglobulin G biosynthesis, the threshold for Russell body induction, and the level of immunoglobulin G secretion. We propose that an interplay between the unique properties encoded in variable domain sequences and the state of protein homeostasis determines whether an immunoglobulin G expressing cell will develop the Russell body phenotype in a dynamic cellular setting.

  9. Intravenous and subcutaneous immunoglobulin G replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Bonilla, Francisco A

    2016-11-01

    Human polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) for therapeutic use has been available for decades. This drug was developed for treatment of antibody deficiency (replacement therapy), although its use has expanded into many anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory applications in recent years. This review focuses on IgG prescribing for replacement therapy. IgG for replacement is most often administered via the intravenous IgG (IVIG) or subcutaneous IgG (SCIG) routes. IVIG is usually administered every 34 weeks, and SCIG is usually administered weekly, although variations may be considered in all cases. Recently, a new product became available that uses hyaluronidase to facilitate absorption of large doses of SCIG less frequently (every 34 weeks, as with IVIG). There are important differences between the pharmacokinetics of these three routes of administration. IVIG therapy leads to high peaks and low troughs between infusions. IgG concentration fluctuates much less over time with SCIG. Hyaluronidase-facilitated SCIG is intermediate. SCIG may have lower bioavailability in comparison with IVIG and may require higher doses over time; this is not true for hyaluronidase SCIG. However, there are large variations in IgG half-life among individuals and with different products. Therefore, individualization of therapy is essential. Mild systemic flu-like adverse effects may affect up to 2025% of patients who receive IVIG, smaller fractions may experience more-severe symptoms, whereas anaphylaxis is exceedingly rare. General flu-like systemic adverse effects are minimal with SCIG (intermediate with hyaluronidase SCIG), but transient (24 hours), mild, local inflammatory symptoms at infusion sites are relatively common with both forms. Additional rare but important complications of IgG therapy include thrombotic events and hemolysis that can be seen at high doses with any route of administration. Renal adverse effects may occur with IVIG as well. The variety of IgG products and routes of

  10. Stress modulates intestinal secretory immunoglobulin A

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Rodríguez, Rafael; Godínez-Victoria, Marycarmen; Abarca-Rojano, Edgar; Pacheco-Yépez, Judith; Reyna-Garfias, Humberto; Barbosa-Cabrera, Reyna Elizabeth; Drago-Serrano, Maria Elisa

    2013-01-01

    Stress is a response of the central nervous system to environmental stimuli perceived as a threat to homeostasis. The stress response triggers the generation of neurotransmitters and hormones from the hypothalamus pituitary adrenal axis, sympathetic axis and brain gut axis, and in this way modulates the intestinal immune system. The effects of psychological stress on intestinal immunity have been investigated mostly with the restraint/immobilization rodent model, resulting in an up or down modulation of SIgA levels depending on the intensity and time of exposure to stress. SIgA is a protein complex formed by dimeric (dIgA) or polymeric IgA (pIgA) and the secretory component (SC), a peptide derived from the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR). The latter receptor is a transmembrane protein expressed on the basolateral side of gut epithelial cells, where it uptakes dIgA or pIgA released by plasma cells in the lamina propria. As a result, the IgA-pIgR complex is formed and transported by vesicles to the apical side of epithelial cells. pIgR is then cleaved to release SIgA into the luminal secretions of gut. Down modulation of SIgA associated with stress can have negative repercussions on intestinal function and integrity. This can take the form of increased adhesion of pathogenic agents to the intestinal epithelium and/or an altered balance of inflammation leading to greater intestinal permeability. Most studies on the molecular and biochemical mechanisms involved in the stress response have focused on systemic immunity. The present review analyzes the impact of stress (mostly by restraint/immobilization, but also with mention of other models) on the generation of SIgA, pIgR and other humoral and cellular components involved in the intestinal immune response. Insights into these mechanisms could lead to better therapies for protecting against pathogenic agents and avoiding epithelial tissue damage by modulating intestinal inflammation. PMID:24348350

  11. Gut immunity in a protochordate involves a secreted immunoglobulin-type mediator binding host chitin and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dishaw, Larry J; Leigh, Brittany; Cannon, John P; Liberti, Assunta; Mueller, M Gail; Skapura, Diana P; Karrer, Charlotte R; Pinto, Maria R; De Santis, Rosaria; Litman, Gary W

    2016-02-15

    Protochordate variable region-containing chitin-binding proteins (VCBPs) consist of immunoglobulin-type V domains and a chitin-binding domain (CBD). VCBP V domains facilitate phagocytosis of bacteria by granulocytic amoebocytes; the function of the CBD is not understood. Here we show that the gut mucosa of Ciona intestinalis contains an extensive matrix of chitin fibrils to which VCBPs bind early in gut development, before feeding. Later in development, VCBPs and bacteria colocalize to chitin-rich mucus along the intestinal wall. VCBP-C influences biofilm formation in vitro and, collectively, the findings of this study suggest that VCBP-C may influence the overall settlement and colonization of bacteria in the Ciona gut. Basic relationships between soluble immunoglobulin-type molecules, endogenous chitin and bacteria arose early in chordate evolution and are integral to the overall function of the gut barrier.

  12. Non-immune immunoglobulins shield Schistosoma japonicum from host immunorecognition

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chuang; Hou, Nan; Piao, Xianyu; Liu, Shuai; Cai, Pengfei; Xiao, Yan; Chen, Qijun

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a major human parasitic disease with a global impact. Schistosoma japonicum, the most difficult to control, can survive within host veins for decades. Mechanisms of immune evasion by the parasite, including antigenic variation and surface masking, have been implicated but not well defined. In this study, we defined the immunoglobulin-binding proteomes of S. japonicum using human IgG, IgM, and IgE as the molecular bait for affinity purification, followed by protein identification by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Several proteins situated at the tegument of S. japonicum were able to nonselectively bind to the Fc domain of host immunoglobulins, indicating a mechanism for the avoidance of host immune attachment and recognition. The profile of the immunoglobulin-binding proteomes provides further clues for immune evasion mechanisms adopted by S. japonicum. PMID:26299686

  13. Quantitative levels of immunoglobulin E in advanced tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Casterline, C L; Evans, R; Ward, G W

    1976-07-01

    Quantitative levels of immunoglobulin E (IgE) were determined in samples of sera obtained from 29 patients with proven moderate to far-advanced tuberculosis. The sensitive radioimmunoassay test for IgE was used. Statistical analysis of the results revealed no difference in IgE values as compared to a control group of normal sera. In contrast to other chronic pulmonary infections, such as bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, the IgE level in pulmonary tuberculous infection is of no diagnostic significance. Simultaneous determination of levels of immunoglobulins G, A, M, and D (IgG, IgA, IgM, IgD) in these same sera by radial immunodiffusion showed elevated IgG and lowered IgM levels in the tuberculous patients, confirming previous studies. The significance of these alterations in immunoglobulin levels is unclear and may represent a secondary phenomenon rather than a primary host response.

  14. The binding of immunoglobulin Fc to cationic proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Pambakian, S; Poston, R N

    1987-01-01

    The interaction of cationic proteins with IgG, IgA and IgM were investigated by solid phase radioimmunoassay. All these immunoglobulins showed avid binding, IgM giving the strongest reaction, followed by IgA and then IgG. Fc fragments of IgG gave binding, but F(ab')2 fragments from the three main Ig classes did not, showing that the Fc region is the active part of the molecule. The effects of changes of ionic strength and pH are compatible with the interaction being ionic, and are similar to those seen between immunoglobulins and both Clq and cationic ion exchange gels. The addition of other serum proteins resulted in marked inhibition of the interaction. These phenomena are likely to have fundamental significance for the understanding of interactions of immunoglobulins in vivo and in vitro. Images Fig. 6 PMID:3652520

  15. Non-immune immunoglobulins shield Schistosoma japonicum from host immunorecognition.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chuang; Hou, Nan; Piao, Xianyu; Liu, Shuai; Cai, Pengfei; Xiao, Yan; Chen, Qijun

    2015-08-24

    Schistosomiasis is a major human parasitic disease with a global impact. Schistosoma japonicum, the most difficult to control, can survive within host veins for decades. Mechanisms of immune evasion by the parasite, including antigenic variation and surface masking, have been implicated but not well defined. In this study, we defined the immunoglobulin-binding proteomes of S. japonicum using human IgG, IgM, and IgE as the molecular bait for affinity purification, followed by protein identification by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Several proteins situated at the tegument of S. japonicum were able to nonselectively bind to the Fc domain of host immunoglobulins, indicating a mechanism for the avoidance of host immune attachment and recognition. The profile of the immunoglobulin-binding proteomes provides further clues for immune evasion mechanisms adopted by S. japonicum.

  16. FUNDAMENTAL DIFFERENCES BETWEEN NATURAL ANTIBODIES AND POLYREACTIVE IMMUNOGLOBULINS.

    PubMed

    Bobrovnik, S A; Demchenko, M A; Komisarenko, S V

    2015-01-01

    A problem of similarity and differences between so-called polyreactive immunoglobulins (PRIGs) and natural antibodies (NAbs), capable of cross-reacting with some structurally dissimilar antigens, has been considered. The analysis of mechanisms of an unspecific interaction between PRIGs or NAbs and antigens evidences for the fact that essential differences exist between these substances. These differences permit classifying the abovementioned substances as different types of immunoglobulin molecules. The major difference between PRIGs and NAbs may include both the mechanisms of the above mentioned immunoglobulin molecules binding to antigens and their interaction affinity, as well as an absolutely different influence of some low-molecular substances on the efficiency of the interaction with antigens. Relying on the obtained data it can be assumed that, since PRIGs and NAbs have fundamental differences, they may perform not only similar but also different functions of the immune system.

  17. Properties and mechanisms of immunoglobulins for congenital cytomegalovirus disease.

    PubMed

    Parruti, Giustino; Polilli, Ennio; Ursini, Tamara; Tontodonati, Monica

    2013-12-01

    Immunoglobulins are one major component of adaptive immunity to external and resident microorganisms, evolving very early in phylogenesis. They help eukaryotes in controlling infections, mainly through their neutralizing activity, which quenches both the cytopathic and inflammatory potential of invading microorganisms. Cytomegalovirus (CMV)-related disease is generally blunted in seropositive subjects with conserved specific humoral responses. CMV-seropositive pregnant women, in accordance with such evidence, suffer little or no fetal damage when reexposed to CMV. Several seminal experiences and early experimental models confirmed that repeated infusions of immunoglobulins, either with hyperimmune or standard preparations, may help to reduce maternal-fetal CMV transmission, as well as to quench fetal disease upon transmission. This review focused on experimental evidence supporting the potential role of immunoglobulins as a tool to control fetal CMV-related disease in pregnant women.

  18. Transfer of antibodies across the placenta and in breast milk from mothers on intravenous immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Palmeira, Patricia; Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz T; Arslanian, Christina; Pontes, Gerlândia N; Nagao, Aparecida T; Carneiro-Sampaio, Magda M S

    2009-09-01

    We studied the levels of immunoglobulins in colostrum, milk and sera from two common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) mothers (M1 and M2), and in sera from their newborn infants. During pregnancy they continued intravenous immunoglobulin therapy (IVIG). Antibody levels from maternal and cord blood collected at delivery and colostrum and milk, collected on the 3rd and 7th post-partum days, respectively, were analyzed. Although cord/maternal blood ratios of total immunoglobulins and subclasses, as well as specific antibodies differed between M1 and M2, both showed good placental transfer of anti-protein and anti-polysaccharide antibodies, despite lower cord/maternal blood ratios in M2. Anti-Streptococcus pneumoniae antibody avidity indexes were similar between paired maternal and cord serum. Both mothers' colostrum and milk samples showed only traces of IgA, and IgM and IgG levels in colostrum were within normal range in M1, whereas M2 presented elevated IgG and low IgM levels, when compared with healthy mothers. The study of colostrum and milk activity showed that they strongly inhibited enteropathogenic Escherichia coli adhesion in vitro. CVID patients must be informed about the relevance of regular IVIG administration during pregnancy, not only for their own health but also for their immune immature offspring. Breast-feeding should be encouraged as colostra from these CVID patients strongly inhibited E. coli adhesion to human epithelial cells thus providing immunological protection plus nutritional and psychological benefits for the infant.

  19. Human anti-V3 HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies encoded by the VH5-51/VL lambda genes define a conserved antigenic structure.

    PubMed

    Gorny, Miroslaw K; Sampson, Jared; Li, Huiguang; Jiang, Xunqing; Totrov, Maxim; Wang, Xiao-Hong; Williams, Constance; O'Neal, Timothy; Volsky, Barbara; Li, Liuzhe; Cardozo, Timothy; Nyambi, Phillipe; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Kong, Xiang-Peng

    2011-01-01

    Preferential usage of immunoglobulin (Ig) genes that encode antibodies (Abs) against various pathogens is rarely observed and the nature of their dominance is unclear in the context of stochastic recombination of Ig genes. The hypothesis that restricted usage of Ig genes predetermines the antibody specificity was tested in this study of 18 human anti-V3 monoclonal Abs (mAbs) generated from unrelated individuals infected with various subtypes of HIV-1, all of which preferentially used pairing of the VH5-51 and VL lambda genes. Crystallographic analysis of five VH5-51/VL lambda-encoded Fabs complexed with various V3 peptides revealed a common three dimensional (3D) shape of the antigen-binding sites primarily determined by the four complementarity determining regions (CDR) for the heavy (H) and light (L) chains: specifically, the H1, H2, L1 and L2 domains. The CDR H3 domain did not contribute to the shape of the binding pocket, as it had different lengths, sequences and conformations for each mAb. The same shape of the binding site was further confirmed by the identical backbone conformation exhibited by V3 peptides in complex with Fabs which fully adapted to the binding pocket and the same key contact residues, mainly germline-encoded in the heavy and light chains of five Fabs. Finally, the VH5-51 anti-V3 mAbs recognized an epitope with an identical 3D structure which is mimicked by a single mimotope recognized by the majority of VH5-51-derived mAbs but not by other V3 mAbs. These data suggest that the identification of preferentially used Ig genes by neutralizing mAbs may define conserved epitopes in the diverse virus envelopes. This will be useful information for designing vaccine immunogen inducing cross-neutralizing Abs.

  20. Immunoglobulin M Nephropathy in a Patient with Wilson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ul Abideen, Zain; Sajjad, Zoya; Haroon Khan, Asna; Mamoon, Nadira; Bilal, Muhammad; Mujtaba Quadri, Khaja Hameeduddin

    2016-12-13

    Immunoglobulin M nephropathy (IgMN) is characterized by the deposition of immunoglobulin M in a dominant distribution in the renal glomeruli. Primary immunoglobulin M nephropathy is diagnosed after consistent light microscopy (LM), immunofluorescence (IF), electron microscopy (EM) results, and exclusion of known systemic disorders causing immunoglobulin M deposition in the glomeruli. The secondary disease has been reported with a few conditions though it has never been reported with any primary disease of the liver. We report the case of an adolescent male patient who presented with nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and worsening anasarca. He was found to have nephrotic-range proteinuria that did not respond to conventional corticosteroid treatment. He was subjected to a renal biopsy which revealed a diagnosis of immunoglobulin M nephropathy. His liver function tests were deranged and an ultrasound scan of the abdomen revealed a coarse irregular liver. Workup revealed elevated urine copper excretion and a low ceruloplasmin level. He was diagnosed as a case of Wilson's disease and started on penicillamine and pyridoxine. He was also started on intravenous cyclophosphamide for the corticosteroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome to which he responded remarkably well. His edema settled, proteinuria resolved, and liver functions normalized. Currently, he is in remission and enjoying good health. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first known association between IgM nephropathy and Wilson's disease. It is presently not clear if causation can necessarily be established. This may be the result of defective IgM clearance by the liver or an altered metabolism of the antibody or immune complexes, as with hepatic-associated immunoglobulin M (IgM) nephropathy. Further studies are needed to elucidate the exact mechanism of this disease.

  1. Common Variable Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Saikia, Biman; Gupta, Sudhir

    2016-04-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most common primary immunodeficiency of young adolescents and adults which also affects the children. The disease remains largely under-diagnosed in India and Southeast Asian countries. Although in majority of cases it is sporadic, disease may be inherited in a autosomal recessive pattern and rarely, in autosomal dominant pattern. Patients, in addition to frequent sino-pulmonary infections, are also susceptible to various autoimmune diseases and malignancy, predominantly lymphoma and leukemia. Other characteristic lesions include lymphocytic and granulomatous interstitial lung disease, and nodular lymphoid hyperplasia of gut. Diagnosis requires reduced levels of at least two immunoglobulin isotypes: IgG with IgA and/or IgM and impaired specific antibody response to vaccines. A number of gene mutations have been described in CVID; however, these genetic alterations account for less than 20% of cases of CVID. Flow cytometry aptly demonstrates a disturbed B cell homeostasis with reduced or absent memory B cells and increased CD21(low) B cells and transitional B cell populations. Approximately one-third of patients with CVID also display T cell functional defects. Immunoglobulin therapy remains the mainstay of treatment. Immunologists and other clinicians in India and other South East Asian countries need to be aware of CVID so that early diagnosis can be made, as currently, majority of these patients still go undiagnosed.

  2. Russell body duodenitis with immunoglobulin kappa light chain restriction.

    PubMed

    Munday, William R; Kapur, Lucy Harn; Xu, Mina; Zhang, Xuchen

    2015-01-16

    Russell bodies are eosinophilic intracytoplasmic globules which are likely the result of disturbed secretion of immunoglobulins that accumulate within the plasma cell. Russell body collections have been identified within the stomach, known as Russell body gastritis. Similar lesions within the duodenum are referred to as Russell body duodenitis, which is rare. Several Russell body gastritis case reports are associated with Helicobacter pylori. However, the etiology of Russell body duodenitis remains unclear. Here we report the first case of Russell body duodenitis with immunoglobulin light chain restriction in a background of peptic duodenitis.

  3. The patient: Emerging clinical applications of intravenous immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Harvey, R Donald

    2005-11-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IGIV) originally was used as prophylactic treatment of infections in patients with primary immunodeficiency disease. Today, administration of IGIV, due in large part to its immunomodulatory activity, has expanded to include a number of other disorders. Available data suggest that the accepted indications for IGIV will continue to expand. As the number of clinical applications for this therapy grows, so will market opportunities; current preparations will be modified and improved and new products introduced. Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy has improved the lives of many patients with immune-related disorders. Future applications will ideally advance this paradigm further.

  4. Testing the renormalisation group theory of cooperative transitions at the lambda point of helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipa, J. A.; Li, Q.; Chui, T. C. P.; Marek, D.

    1988-01-01

    The status of high resolution tests of the renormalization group theory of cooperative phase transitions performed near the lambda point of helium is described. The prospects for performing improved tests in space are discussed.

  5. Evidence for B Semileptonic Decays into the Lambda_c Charm Baryon

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, Bjarne; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, Robert N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Banca di Roma /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2008-11-05

    We present the first evidence for B semileptonic decays into the charmed baryon {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} based on 420 fb{sup -1} of data collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage rings. Events are tagged by fully reconstructing one of the B mesons in a hadronic decay mode. We measure the relative branching fraction {Beta}({bar B} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} X{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}})/{Beta}({bar B} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}/{bar {Lambda}}{sub c}{sup -}X) = (3.2 {+-} 0.9{sub stat.} {+-} 0.9{sub syst.})%. The significance of the signal including the systematic uncertainty is 4.9 standard deviations.

  6. Electromagnetic Decay of the $\\Sigma^{0}(1385)$ to $\\Lambda\\gamma$

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Dustin; Adhikari, Krishna; Adikaram-Mudiyanselage, Dasuni; Aghasyan, Mher; Amaryan, Moscov; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes; Ball, J P; Ball, Jacques; Battaglieri, Marco; Batourine, V; Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Bennett, Robert; Biselli, Angela; Branford, Derek; Briscoe, Wilbert; Brooks, William; Burkert, Volker; Careccia, Sharon; Carman, Daniel; Casey, Liam; Cole, Philip; Contalbrigo, Marco; Crede, Volker; D'Angelo, Annalisa; Daniel, AJI; Dashyan, Natalya; De Vita, Raffaella; De Sanctis, Enzo; Deur, Alexandre; Dey, Biplap; Dickson, Richard; Djalali, Chaden; Doughty, David; Dupre, Raphael; Egiyan, Hovanes; El Alaoui, Ahmed; Elfassi, Lamiaa; Eugenio, Paul; Fedotov, Gleb; Fegan, Stuart; Forest, Tony; Gabrielyan, Marianna; Gavalian, Gagik; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Giovanetti, Kevin; Girod, Francois-Xavier; Gohn, Wesley; Golovach, Evgeny; Gothe, Ralf; Graham, Lewis; Guidal, Michel; Guegan, Baptiste; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hakobyan, Hayk; Hanretty, Charles; Holtrop, Maurik; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Isupov, Evgeny; Jawalkar, Sucheta; Jenkins, David; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Joo, Kyungseon; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Khetarpal, Puneet; Kim, Andrey; Kim, Wooyoung; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Franz; Konczykowski, Piotr; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Viacheslav; Lu, Haiyun; MacGregor, Ian; Markov, Nikolai; McAndrew, Josephine; KcKinnon, Bryan; Meyer, Curtis; Micherdzinska, Anna; Mirazita, Marco; Mokeev, Viktor; Moreno, Brahim; Moriya, Kei; Morrison, Brian; Moutarde, Herve; Munevar Espitia, Edwin; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Ni, Andrey; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Paremuzyan, Rafayel; Park, Kijun; Park, Sungkyun; Pasyuk, Eugene; Pasyuk, Evgueni; Pereira, Sergio; Pappalardo, Luciano; Pisano, Silvia; Pogorelko, Oleg; Pozdnyakov, Sergey; Price, John; Procureur, Sebastien; Protopopescu, Dan; Raue, Brian; Ripani, Marco; Ritchie, Barry; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Sabatie, Franck; Saini, Mukesh; Salgado, Carlos; Schott, Diane; Schumacher, Reinhard; Seder, Erin; Seraydaryan, Heghine; Sharabian, Youri; Smith, Elton; Smith, Gregory; Sober, Daniel; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stoler, Paul; Strakovski, Igor; Strauch, Steffen; Taiuti, Mauro; Tang, Wei; Taylor, Charles; Vernarsky, Brian; Vineyard, Michael; Voutier, Eric; Weinstein, Lawrence; Watts, Daniel; Wood, Michael; Zachariou, Nicholas; Zana, Lorenzo; Zhao, Bo; Zhao, Zhiwen

    2011-04-01

    The electromagnetic decay $\\Sigma^0(1385) \\to \\Lambda \\gamma$ was studied using the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. A real photon beam with a maximum energy of 3.8 GeV was incident on a proton target, producing an exclusive final state of $K^+\\Sigma^{*0}$. We report the decay widths ratio $\\Sigma^0(1385) \\to \\Lambda\\gamma$/ $\\Sigma^0(1385) \\to \\Lambda\\pi^0$ = $1.42 \\pm 0.12(\\text{stat})_{-0.07}^{+0.11}(\\text{sys})$%. This ratio is larger than most theoretical predictions by factors ranging from 1.5-3, but is consistent with the only other experimental measurement. From the reported ratio we calculate the partial width and electromagnetic transition magnetic moment for $\\Sigma^0(1385) \\to \\Lambda\\gamma$.

  7. 21 CFR 866.5540 - Immunoglobulin G (Fd fragment specific) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... fragment) of the heavy chain (a subunit) of the immunoglobulin antibody molecule in serum. Measurement of immunoglobulin G Fd fragments aids in the diagnosis of plasma antibody-forming cell abnormalities....

  8. 21 CFR 866.5530 - Immunoglobulin G (Fc fragment specific) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... immunoglobulin G (resulting from breakdown of immunoglobulin G antibodies) in urine, serum, and other body fluids... abnormalities, e.g., gamma heavy chain disease. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device...

  9. Distribution of maternal immunoglobulins in the mouse uterus and embryo in the days after implantation

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    The distribution of maternal immunoglobulins in the mouse uterus and embryo in the days after implantation has been studied on sections incubated with sheep Fab anti-mouse immunoglobulins labeled with peroxidase. At the time of implantation the blastocyst is already surrounded by immunoglobulins that are also present in the blastocoel and early endoderm; uterine glands contain large amounts of immunoglobulins. Later, immunoglobulins are concentrated in the vacuolated endoderm, then the visceral yolk sac and the embryonic gut. They are also present in the various cavities of the embryo. Trophoblast cells progressively contain increasing amounts of immunoglobulins. In the decidua, immunoglobulins coat the cells and also occasionally appear as cytoplasmic granules. The early presence of maternal immunoglobulins may represent the transfer of serum proteins as a means of nutrition for the embryo. It is also very likely to have an immunological significance in the protection of the embryo. PMID:830790

  10. The First Generation of Stars in Lambda-CDM Cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Liang; Abel, T.; Frenk, C.S.; Jenkins, A.; Springel, V.; Yoshida, N.; /Nagoya U.

    2006-10-10

    We have performed a large set of high-resolution cosmological simulations using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) to study the formation of the first luminous objects in the {Lambda}CDM cosmology. We follow the collapse of primordial gas clouds in eight early structures and document the scatter in the properties of the first star-forming clouds. Our first objects span formation redshifts from z {approx} 10 to z {approx} 50 and cover an order of magnitude in halo mass. We find that the physical properties of the central star-forming clouds are very similar in all of the simulated objects despite significant differences in formation redshift and environment. This suggests that the formation path of the first stars is largely independent of the collapse redshift; the physical properties of the clouds have little correlation with spin, mass, or assembly history of the host halo. The collapse of proto-stellar objects at higher redshifts progresses much more rapidly due to the higher densities, which accelerates the formation of molecular hydrogen, enhances initial cooling and shortens the dynamical timescales. The mass of the star-forming clouds cover a broad range, from a few hundred to a few thousand solar masses, and exhibit various morphologies: some have disk-like structures which are nearly rotational supported; others form flattened spheroids; still others form bars. All of them develop a single protostellar ''seed'' which does not fragment into multiple objects up to the moment that the central gas becomes optically thick to H{sub 2} cooling lines. At this time, the instantaneous mass accretion rate onto the centre varies significantly from object to object, with disk-like structures having the smallest mass accretion rates. The formation epoch and properties of the star-forming clouds are sensitive to the values of cosmological parameters.

  11. Analysis techniques for the {Lambda}(1405) in p+p reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Siebenson, Johannes

    2010-12-28

    We present an analysis of the {Lambda}(1405){yields}{Sigma}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}} decay in p+p reactions at 3.5 GeV kinetic beam energy. The data were taken with the High Acceptance Di-Electron Spectrometer (HADES). The extraction of the {Lambda}(1405) signal was achieved by an effective background suppression combined with a quantitatively precise determination and identification of the remaining background sources. The different techniques, used for this analysis, are presented in this work.

  12. FY04 IRAD-funded GSFC Lambda Network (L-Net) Web Pages and Related Presentations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, J. Patrick

    2005-01-01

    This presentation discusses the advances in Networking Technology combining the Global Lambda Integrated Facility (GLIF) cooperation with the National Lambda Rail (NLR) implementation. It also focuses on New NASA science needing Gigbit per second networks (Gbps) with coordinated Earth Observing Program, hurricane predictions, global aerosols, remote viewing and manipulation of large Earth Science Data Sets, integration of laser and radar topographic data with land cover data.

  13. An update on the use of immunoglobulin for the treatment of immunodeficiency disorders

    PubMed Central

    Albin, Stephanie; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    For patients with significant antibody deficiencies, immunoglobulin therapy is the mainstay of treatment as it significantly reduces both the frequency and severity of infections. The formulations and delivery methods of immunoglobulin have evolved over time, and continued improvements have allowed for increased access to this effective medication. This review is an update on the current status of immunoglobulin therapy in immunodeficiency disorders, and discusses the mechanisms, forms and dosing, and indications for immunoglobulin replacement. PMID:25428649

  14. Modified van Vaals-Bergman coaxial cable coil (lambda coil) for high-field imaging.

    PubMed

    Matsuzawa, H; Nakada, T

    1996-03-01

    An easily constructed, low-capacitive coupling volume coil based on the van Vaals-Bergman coaxial cable coil for high field imaging is described. The coil (designated "lambda coil") was constructed using two 5/4 length 50 omega coaxial cables matched to a 50 omega transmission line with LC bridge balun. The standing wave on the single 5/4 lambda length coaxial cable provides two points of current maxima in oppositional direction. Therefore, the four current elements necessary for effective B1 field generation can be obtained by two 5/4 lambda length coaxial cables arranged analogous to 1/2 lambda T-antenna. Capacitive coupling between the coil elements and conductive samples (i.e. animals) is minimized by simply retaining the shield of the coaxial cable for the area of voltage maxima. The lambda coil exhibited excellent performance as a volume coil with a high quality factor and highly homogeneous rf fields. Because of its dramatically simple architecture and excellent performance, the lambda coil configuration appears to be an economical alternative to the original van Vaals-Bergman design, especially for research facilities with a high field magnet and limited bore space.

  15. Leporid immunoglobulin G shows evidence of strong selective pressure on the hinge and CH3 domains.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Ana; Woof, Jenny M; Almeida, Tereza; Abrantes, Joana; Alves, Paulo C; Gortázar, Christian; Esteves, Pedro J

    2014-09-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) is the predominant serum immunoglobulin and has the longest serum half-life of all the antibody classes. The European rabbit IgG has been of significant importance in immunological research, and is therefore well characterized. However, the IgG of other leporids has been disregarded. To evaluate the evolution of this gene in leporids, we sequenced the complete IGHG for six other genera: Bunolagus, Brachylagus, Lepus, Pentalagus, Romerolagus and Sylvilagus. The newly sequenced leporid IGHG gene has an organization and structure similar to that of the European rabbit IgG. A gradient in leporid IgG constant domain diversity was observed, with the CH1 being the most conserved and the CH3 the most variable domain. Positive selection was found to be acting on all constant domains, but with a greater incidence in the CH3 domain, where a cluster of three positively selected sites was identified. In the hinge region, only three polymorphic positions were observed. The same hinge length was observed for all leporids. Unlike the variation observed for the European rabbit, all 11 Lepus species studied share exactly the same hinge motif, suggesting its maintenance as a result of an advantageous structure or conformation.

  16. A microtiter solid-phase radioimmunoassay for platelet-associated immunoglobulin G

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, N.V.; McFall, P.; Schulman, I.

    1983-03-01

    An MSPRIA is described for measuring platelet-associated immunoglobulins by competitive inhibition of the binding of radiolabeled goat anti-human class-specific antibody to solid-phase immunoglobulins. PAIgG can be estimated from calibration curves constructed from soluble IgG inhibitors. The MSPRIA for IgG is antibody class-specific. The coefficient of variability is between 6% and 20%. The MSPRIA is more sensitive than other described assays. Comparative studies demonstrated that ACD-A is the preferred anticoagulant for collecting platelets for the MSPRIA and that sonicated platelets are more reliable than intact platelets in demonstrating elevated PAIgG in immune thrombocytopenias. Intact platelets from 18 normal volunteers had PAIgG ranging from 0.4 to 3.3 fg/platelet (mean +/- S.D. = 1.5 +/- 1). The same platelets when sonicated had a mean +/- S.D. PAIgG of 3.3 +/- 1 fg/platelet, with a range of 1 to 5. Only 60% of 30 adult ITP patients with presumed immune thrombocytopenia had elevated PAIgG levels when their intact platelets were studied. When these same platelets were sonicated, 87% of them had abnormal levels of PAIgG.

  17. A novel anti-Vpre-B antibody identifies immunoglobulin-surrogate receptors on the surface of human pro-B cells

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Vpre-B and lambda 5 genes, respectively, encode V-like and C-like domains of a surrogate immunoglobulin light chain (psi L). Such psi L complex is expressed in early progenitor B (pro-B) cells, before conventional immunoglobulin heavy (microH) and light (L) chains are produced. We raised a wide panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against soluble recombinant Vpre-B proteins to study early events in human B cell development. One of these antibodies, B-MAD688, labeled surrogate Ig-complexes on the surface of microH- pro-B cell lines and normal bone marrow cells in immunofluorescence assays. Immunoprecipitations using surface-labeled pro-B cells and B-MAD688 mAb indicated that human psi L is associated with high molecular weight components homologous to the surrogate heavy (psi H) chains described in mouse. Using B-MAD688 and SLC2 mAbs, we were able to distinguish between psi H psi L and microH psi L complexes on the surface of human pro-B and later precursor, pre-B, cells. The finding of psi H psi L complexes in mouse and man lead us to hypothesize a role for psi H- containing receptors in B cell development. PMID:8676092

  18. 21 CFR 866.5510 - Immunoglobulins A, G, M, D, and E immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Immunoglobulins A, G, M, D, and E immunological... Test Systems § 866.5510 Immunoglobulins A, G, M, D, and E immunological test system. (a) Identification. An immunoglobulins A, G, M, D, and E immunological test system is a device that consists of...

  19. Stability of orally administered immunoglobulin in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeongmin; Kang, Hae-Eun; Woo, Hee-Jong

    2012-10-31

    Oral administration of immunoglobulin in the colostrum or egg yolk has been considered an effective tool for preventing enterobacterial infection via passive immunization. During this process, the transmission and residence of the active immunoglobulin are the most important conditions for successful protection. We investigated the stability of encapsulated colostrum and egg yolk immunoglobulin for the effective transmission of immunoglobulin in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. First, we measured GI transit time. Contrast media passed through and reached the stomach within 10 min, the small intestine within 3.5 h, and the cecum within 5 h. Both the encapsulated colostrum containing anti-hepatitis A virus (HAV) antibody (IgG) and egg yolk with anti-rotavirus antibody (IgY) showed lower antibody activity than the non-encapsulated colostrum did in the stomach after administration; however, significantly higher antibody activities were observed in the encapsulated groups than in the non-encapsulated groups in the small intestine 3.5 h after the administration. In the large intestine, the antibody activities of the encapsulated groups were maintained or slightly increased in a time-dependent manner; however, the titers of each non-capsulated control were as low as the negative controls. Therefore, this encapsulation is considered a useful tool for the delivery of active antibody through the GI tract.

  20. A case of dermatomyositis with rhabdomyolysis, rescued by intravenous immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, Fumitaka; Takada, Kazuki; Ishikawa, Kinya; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Kohsaka, Hitoshi; Miyasaka, Nobuyuki

    2015-07-01

    We describe a case of severe dermatomyositis (DM) complicated by rhabdomyolysis, acute tubular necrosis, and hemophagocytosis. The case failed to respond to corticosteroids, but showed rapid and significant improvement after the addition of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). While the prognosis of DM is poor when it is complicated by rhabdomyolysis, the early administration of IVIG has the potential to be the cornerstone of its management.

  1. A case of immunoglobulin G4-related constrictive pericarditis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wen-Qi; Fang, Fang; Zhen, Wen-Jun; Ouyang, Xiao-Kang; Wang, Huai-Bin; Wang, Zi

    2016-01-01

    A 47-year-old man was admitted with a complaint of upper abdominal distension and shortness of breath. The constrictive pericarditis was diagnosed based on the transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) and chest CT scan. Pathology revealed it is immunoglobulin (Ig) G4-related constrictive pericarditis. Likely, this is the first case of IgG4-related constrictive pericarditis reported in China. PMID:26904579

  2. Phenotype versus immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor genotype of Hodgkin-derived cell lines: activation of immature lymphoid cells in Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Falk, M H; Tesch, H; Stein, H; Diehl, V; Jones, D B; Fonatsch, C; Bornkamm, G W

    1987-08-15

    Three Hodgkin-derived cell lines (L428, L540, and CO) were studied for rearrangements and expression of immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor genes, and their genotype was compared to the phenotype. As far as the genotype is concerned, all 3 cell lines have characteristics of lymphoid cells; L428 of B, and L540 and CO of T-cell origin. L428 cells have one Ig heavy chain allele rearranged to C gamma and transcribed into RNA, while the second is deleted. Furthermore, L428 cells show an unusual immunoglobulin kappa light chain gene rearrangement involving deletion of the kappa constant gene in one allele, while the remaining kappa and lambda loci are in germline configuration. L540 and CO have, in contrast to L428 cells, the immunoglobulin genes in germline and T-cell receptor genes rearranged. The T-cell receptor beta and gamma genes are rearranged in both L540 and CO, whereas a rearrangement in the alpha locus was detected in L540 cells only. RNA of the size of functional beta chain transcripts was found in CO cells and of the size of functional alpha chain transcripts in L540 cells. All 3 cell lines are classified as immature lymphoid cells with respect to the limited expression of B- and T-cell antigens, respectively, and to the incomplete expression of their antigen receptor. The immaturity of lymphoid differentiation contrasts with the expression of activation antigens, i.e. Ki-1, Ki-24, HLA-DR, and IL-2 receptor. The immaturity of the cells excludes the possibility that the cells were activated along the physiological pathway, i.e. by interaction of the cell with antigen. The results obtained on the cell lines are in accordance with in vivo studies and suggest that Hodgkin and Sternberg-Reed cells are immature lymphoid cells which are activated by a still unknown mechanism.

  3. Effect of therapeutic plasma exchange on immunoglobulins in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Guptill, Jeffrey T; Juel, Vern C; Massey, Janice M; Anderson, Amanda C; Chopra, Manisha; Yi, John S; Esfandiari, Ehsanollah; Buchanan, Tim; Smith, Bryan; Atherfold, Paul; Jones, Emma; Howard, James F

    2016-11-01

    An integrated understanding of therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) effects on immunoglobulins, autoantibodies, and natural or acquired (vaccine) protective antibodies in patients with autoimmune myasthenia gravis (MG) is lacking. Prior studies measured TPE effects in healthy volunteers or heterogeneous autoimmune disease populations. We prospectively profiled plasma IgA, IgM, IgG, IgG subclasses (IgG1-4), acetylcholine receptor autoantibodies (AChR+), and protective antibodies in patients with AChR + MG receiving TPE for an exacerbation. TPE was performed according to institutional practice and patients were profiled for up to 12 weeks. Ten patients were enrolled (median age = 72.9 years; baseline MG-Composite = 21; median TPE treatments = 6 during their first course) and all improved. The maximum decrease in all immunoglobulins, including AChR autoantibodies, was achieved on the final day of the first TPE course (∼60-70% reduction). Three weeks post-TPE, mean AChR autoantibody, total IgG, IgG1, and IgG2 titers were below the reference range and had not recovered within 20% of baseline, whereas other measured immunoglobulins approached baseline values. We did not generally observe an "overshoot" of immunoglobulins above pre-TPE levels or accelerated recovery of pathologic AChR autoantibodies. Protective antibody profiles showed similar patterns as other IgGs and were detectable at levels associated with protection from infection. A slow return to baseline for IgGs (except IgG3) was observed, and we did not observe any obvious effect of concomitant medications on this recovery. Collectively, these findings enhance our understanding of the immunological effects of TPE and further support the concept of rapid immunoglobulin depletion for the treatment of patients with MG.

  4. Mucosal immunoglobulins and B cells of teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Irene; Zhang, Yong-An; Sunyer, J Oriol

    2011-12-01

    As physical barriers that separate teleost fish from the external environment, mucosae are also active immunological sites that protect them against exposure to microbes and stressors. In mammals, the sites where antigens are sampled from mucosal surfaces and where stimulation of naïve T and B lymphocytes occurs are known as inductive sites and are constituted by mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT). According to anatomical location, the MALT in teleost fish is subdivided into gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT), and gill-associated lymphoid tissue (GIALT). All MALT contain a variety of leukocytes, including, but not limited to, T cells, B cells, plasma cells, macrophages and granulocytes. Secretory immunoglobulins are produced mainly by plasmablasts and plasma cells, and play key roles in the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis. Until recently, teleost fish B cells were thought to express only two classes of immunoglobulins, IgM and IgD, in which IgM was thought to be the only one responding to pathogens both in systemic and mucosal compartments. However, a third teleost immunoglobulin class, IgT/IgZ, was discovered in 2005, and it has recently been shown to behave as the prevalent immunoglobulin in gut mucosal immune responses. The purpose of this review is to summarise the current knowledge of mucosal immunoglobulins and B cells of fish MALT. Moreover, we attempt to integrate the existing knowledge on both basic and applied research findings on fish mucosal immune responses, with the goal to provide new directions that may facilitate the development of novel vaccination strategies that stimulate not only systemic, but also mucosal immunity.

  5. Mucosal immunoglobulins and B cells of Teleost fish

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Irene; Zhang, Yong-An; Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2012-01-01

    As physical barriers that separate teleost fish from the external environment, mucosae are also active immunological sites that protect them against exposure to microbes and stressors. In mammals, the sites where antigens are sampled from mucosal surfaces and where stimulation of naive T and B lymphocytes occurs are known as inductive sites and are constituted by mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT). According to anatomical location, the MALT in teleost fish is subdivided into gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT), and gill-associated lymphoid tissue (GIALT). All MALT contain a variety of leukocytes, including, but not limited to, T cells, B cells, plasma cells, macrophages and granulocytes. Secretory immunoglobulins are produced mainly by plasmablasts and plasma cells, and play key roles in the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis. Until recently, teleost fish B cells were thought to express only two classes of immunoglobulins, IgM and IgD, in which IgM was thought to be the only one responding to pathogens both in systemic and mucosal compartments. However, a third teleost immunoglobulin class, IgT/IgZ, was discovered in 2005, and it has recently been shown to behave as the prevalent immunoglobulin in gut mucosal immune responses. The purpose of this review is to summarise the current knowledge of mucosal immunoglobulins and B cells of fish MALT. Moreover, we attempt to integrate the existing knowledge on both basic and applied research findings on fish mucosal immune responses, with the goal to provide new directions that may facilitate the development of novel vaccination strategies that stimulate not only systemic, but also mucosal immunity. PMID:22133710

  6. The immunoglobulin heavy chain locus in the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus).

    PubMed

    Gambón-Deza, F; Sánchez-Espinel, C; Magadán-Mompó, S

    2009-08-01

    Immunoglobulins loci in mammals are well known to be organized within a translocon, however their origin remains unresolved. Four of the five classes of immunoglobulins described in humans and rodents (immunoglobulins M, G, E and A-IgM, IgG, IgE and IgA) were found in marsupials and monotremes (immunoglobulin D-IgD was not found) thus showing that the genomic structure of antibodies in mammals has remained constant since its origin. We have recently described the genomic organization of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus in reptiles (IGHM, IGHD and IGHY). These data and the characterization of the IGH locus in platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus), allow us to elucidate the changes that took place in this genomic region during evolution from reptile to mammal. Thus, by using available genome data, we were able to detect that platypus IGH locus contains reptilian and mammalian genes. Besides having an IGHD that is very similar to the one in reptiles and an IGHY, they also present the mammal specific antibody genes IGHG and IGHE, in addition to IGHA. We also detected a pseudogene that originated by recombination between the IGHD and the IGHM (similar to the IGHD2 found in Eublepharis macularius). The analysis of the IGH locus in platypus shows that IGHY was duplicated, firstly by evolving into IGHE and then into IGHG. The IGHA of the platypus has a complex origin, and probably arose by a process of recombination between the IGHM and the IGHY. We detected about 44 VH genes (25 were already described), most of which comprise a single group. When we compared these VH genes with those described in Anolis carolinensis, we find that there is an evolutionary relationship between the VH genes of platypus and the reptilian Group III genes. These results suggest that a fast VH turnover took place in platypus and this gave rise to a family with a high VH gene number and the disappearance of the earlier VH families.

  7. Galaxy formation in Lambda greater than 0 Friedmann models: Consequences for the number counts versus redshift test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martel, Hugo

    1994-01-01

    We study the effect of the cosmological constant Lambda on galaxy formation using a simple spherical top-hat overdensity model. We consider models with Omega(sub 0) = 0.2, lambda(sub 0) = 0, and Omega(sub 0) = 0.2, lambda(sub 0) = 0.8 (where Omega(sub 0) is the density parameter, and lambda(sub 0) identically equal Lambda/3 H(sub 0 exp 2) where H(sub 0) is the Hubble constant). We adjust the initial power spectrum amplitude so that both models reproduce the same large-scale structures. The galaxy formation era in the lambda(sub 0) = 0 model occurs early (z approximately 6) and is very short, whereas in the lambda(sub 0) = 0.8 model the galaxy formation era starts later (z approximately 4), and last much longer, possibly all the way to the present. Consequently, galaxies at low redshift (z less than 1) are significantly more evolved in the lambda(sub 0) = 0 model than in the lambda(sub 0) = 0.8 model. This result implies that previous attempts to determine Lambda using the number counts versus redshift test are probably unreliable.

  8. Linear immunoglobulin A/immunoglobulin G bullous dermatosis associated with Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease.

    PubMed

    Yanagihara, Shigeto; Mizuno, Nobuyuki; Naruse, Akiko; Tateishi, Chiharu; Tsuruta, Daisuke; Ishii, Masamitsu

    2011-08-01

    Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease is characterized by marked bilateral uveitis associated with symmetric vitiligo, alopecia, poliosis and dysacousia. Linear immunoglobulin (Ig)A bullous dermatosis (LABD) is characterized by small, tense, subepidermal bullae caused by IgA type autoantibody targeting the basal lamina. LABD patients sometimes show coexistence of IgG type autoantibody, termed linear IgA/IgG bullous dermatosis (LAGBD). We reported a 35-year-old Japanese male case of combined LAGBD and Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease. His human leukocyte antigen typing was -A24, B52, C*1202, DR*1502, DQ*0601. Immunoblot revealed that patient sera reacted to both 180- and 230-kDa proteins at the IgA and IgG level. Because Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease and LABD are reported to be associated with other autoimmune diseases, it is probable that Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease and LAGBD in our case may be associated with each other in the pathomechanism. However, we cannot exclude the possibility of this being mere coincidence.

  9. Treatment with hyperimmune equine immunoglobulin or immunoglobulin fragments completely protects rodents from Ebola virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xuexing; Wong, Gary; Zhao, Yongkun; Wang, Hualei; He, Shihua; Bi, Yuhai; Chen, Weijin; Jin, Hongli; Gai, Weiwei; Chu, Di; Cao, Zengguo; Wang, Chong; Fan, Quanshui; Chi, Hang; Gao, Yuwei; Wang, Tiecheng; Feng, Na; Yan, Feihu; Huang, Geng; Zheng, Ying; Li, Nan; Li, Yuetao; Qian, Jun; Zou, Yong; Kobinger, Gary; Gao, George Fu; Qiu, Xiangguo; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-01-01

    Recent successes with monoclonal antibody cocktails ZMappTM and MIL77 against Ebola virus (EBOV) infections have reignited interest in antibody-based therapeutics. Since the production process for monoclonal antibodies can be prolonged and costly, alternative treatments should be investigated. We produced purified equine antisera from horses hyperimmunized with EBOV virus-like particles, and tested the post-exposure efficacy of the antisera in a mouse model of infection. BALB/c mice were given up to 2 mg of purified equine antisera per animal, at 30 minutes, 1 or 2 days post-infection (dpi), in which all animals survived. To decrease the possibility of serum sickness, the equine antisera was digested with pepsin to generate F(ab′)2 fragments, with in vitro neutralizing activity comparable to whole immunoglobulin. Full protection was achieved with when treatment was initiated at 1 dpi, but the suboptimal protection observed with the 30 minute and 2 dpi groups demonstrate that in addition to virus neutralization, other Fc-dependent antibody mechanisms may also contribute to survival. Guinea pigs given 20 mg of antisera or F(ab′)2 at or starting at 1 or 2 dpi were also fully protected from EBOV infection. These results justify future efficacy studies for purified equine products in NHPs. PMID:27067649

  10. [DNA extraction from coagulated human blood for application in genotyping techniques for human leukocyte antigen and immunoglobulin-like receptors].

    PubMed

    Cardozo, Daniela Maira; Guelsin, Gláucia Andréia; Clementino, Samaia Laface; Melo, Fabiano Cavalcante de; Braga, Marco Antônio; Souza, Cleonice de; Moliterno, Ricardo Alberto; Visentainer, Jeane Eliete Laguila

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to standardize a method for extracting high-quality DNA from samples of coagulated blood. Forty-eight samples of human coagulated blood were used for DNA extraction by means of the EZ-DNA commercial kit (Biological Industries, Beit Haemek, Israel), the Neoscience column kit (One Lambda Inc., San Diego, CA, USA) and a modified salting-out method. Only the salting-out method was able to extract high concentrations of DNA (mean, 180 ng/(1/4)microl), which were measured using the Qubit fluorescence detector (Invitrogen, USA). This method enabled amplification of HLA (human leukocyte antigen) genes using the Luminex PCR-SSO (polymerase chain reaction - sequence-specific oligonucleotide) technology, which demands good quality DNA, and amplification of KIR (killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor) genes using an in-house PCR-SSP (polymerase chain reaction - sequence-specific primer) technique, which demands a specific concentration of DNA (10 ng/(1/4)microl). We concluded that the modified salting-out technique was very efficient, simple and fast for DNA extraction from human coagulated blood samples, with the aim of genotyping the HLA and KIR genes.

  11. Inducible DNA-protein interactions of the murine kappa immunoglobulin enhancer in intact cells: comparison with in vitro interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Hromas, R; Pauli, U; Marcuzzi, A; Lafrenz, D; Nick, H; Stein, J; Stein, G; Van Ness, B

    1988-01-01

    The large intron of the kappa immunoglobulin gene contains a cis-acting enhancer element, which is important in the tissue-specific expression of the gene. We have confirmed the binding activity of a sequence-specific factor present in lymphoid extracts derived from cell lines expressing, or induced to express, the kappa gene. We have extended these studies to show the binding activity is present in normal activated splenic B cells as well as lambda producing cells, and have demonstrated by DNAse footprint analysis full protection of a sequence containing the 11 bp homology to the SV-40 core enhancer. We have compared these in vitro binding studies with an analysis of protein-DNA interactions in intact murine cell lines using genomic sequencing techniques. We demonstrate significant alterations in DMS reactivity of DNA in the murine 70Z/3 cell line after it is induced to kappa expression. These alterations occur at guanine residues which are part of the the 11 bp core sequence, and are identical to those observed in cells constitutively expressing kappa. This provides direct evidence for the induced binding of the tissue specific factor to intact chromatin. In intact chromatin we also observed significant alteration in the reactivity of a guanine, 3' of the core sequence, which is part of a potential secondary DNA structure, and protection of four residues that are part of a region homologous to the heavy chain enhancer. Images PMID:2830597

  12. VARIABILITY IN OPTICAL SPECTRA OF {epsilon} ORIONIS

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Gregory B.; Morrison, Nancy D. E-mail: nmorris@utnet.utoledo.edu

    2013-04-15

    We present the results of a time series analysis of 130 echelle spectra of {epsilon} Ori (B0 Ia), acquired over seven observing seasons between 1998 and 2006 at Ritter Observatory. The equivalent widths of H{alpha} (net) and He I {lambda}5876 were measured and radial velocities were obtained from the central absorption of He I {lambda}5876. Temporal variance spectra (TVS) revealed significant wind variability in both H{alpha} and He I {lambda}5876. The He I TVS have a double-peaked profile consistent with radial velocity oscillations. A periodicity search was carried out on the equivalent width and radial velocity data, as well as on wavelength-binned spectra. This analysis has revealed several periods in the variability with timescales of two to seven days. Many of these periods exhibit sinusoidal modulation in the associated phase diagrams. Several of these periods were present in both H{alpha} and He I, indicating a possible connection between the wind and the photosphere. Due to the harmonic nature of these periods, stellar pulsations may be the origin of some of the observed variability. Periods on the order of the rotational period were also detected in the He I line in the 1998-1999 season and in both lines during the 2004-2005 season. These periods may indicate rotational modulation due to structure in the wind.

  13. Active optics for high-dynamic variable curvature mirrors.

    PubMed

    Hugot, Emmanuel; Ferrari, Marc; Lemaitre, Gérard R; Madec, Fabrice; Vives, Sébastien; Chardin, Elodie; Le Mignant, David; Cuby, Jean-Gabriel

    2009-10-01

    Variable curvature mirrors of large amplitude are designed by using finite element analysis. The specific case studied reaches at least a 800 mum sag with an optical quality better than lambda/5 over a 120 mm clear aperture. We highlight the geometrical nonlinearity and the plasticity effect.

  14. RAMAN SCATTERED He II {lambda}4332 IN THE SYMBIOTIC STAR V1016 CYGNI

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hee-Won

    2012-05-10

    Raman scattering of He II line photons with atomic hydrogen is important in studying the mass loss processes in many symbiotic stars and a number of young planetary nebulae. We calculate the scattering cross sections and branching ratios associated with the Raman scattered He II {lambda}4332 feature formed through inelastic scattering of He II {lambda}949 with a hydrogen atom. At the line center of He II {lambda}949, the total scattering cross section is computed to be {sigma}{sub tot} = 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -22} cm{sup 2}, and the branching ratio into the level 2s is 0.12. We also present a high-resolution spectrum of the symbiotic star V1016 Cygni obtained with the 1.8 m telescope at Mt. Bohyun to investigate the Raman scattering origin of the broad feature blueward of He II {lambda}4338. Based on the atomic calculation, we perform Monte Carlo calculations for the line formation. The scattering region is assumed to be a part of a uniform spherical shell that subtends a solid angle {Delta}{Omega} = {pi} steradian with a neutral column density N{sub HI} = 1.0 x 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}. By adding a far-UV continuum around He II {lambda}949 normalized by the equivalent width of He II {lambda}949 to be 2.3 Angstrom-Sign , we obtain a good fit for both the Raman scattered He II {lambda}4332 and the broad wings around H{gamma}. Our analysis of the Raman feature blueward of H{gamma} in V1016 Cyg is consistent with the previous study of the Raman features blueward of H{alpha} and H{beta} by Jung and Lee.

  15. Regulation of the switch from early to late bacteriophage lambda DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Baranska, S; Gabig, M; Wegrzyn, A; Konopa, G; Herman-Antosiewicz, A; Hernandez, P; Schvartzman, J B; Helinski, D R; Wegrzyn, G

    2001-03-01

    There are two modes of bacteriophage lambda DNA replication following infection of its host, Escherichia coli. Early after infection, replication occurs according to the theta (theta or circle-to-circle) mode, and is later switched to the sigma (sigma or rolling-circle) mode. It is not known how this switch, occurring at a specific time in the infection cycle, is regulated. Here it is demonstrated that in wild-type cells the replication starting from orilambda proceeds both bidirectionally and unidirectionally, whereas in bacteria devoid of a functional DnaA protein, replication from orilambda is predominantly unidirectional. The regulation of directionality of replication from orilambda is mediated by positive control of lambda p(R) promoter activity by DnaA, since the mode of replication of an artificial lambda replicon bearing the p(tet) promoter instead of p(R) was found to be independent of DnaA function. These findings and results of density-shift experiments suggest that in dnaA mutants infected with lambda, phage DNA replication proceeds predominantly according to the unidirectional theta mechanism and is switched early after infection to the sigma mode. It is proposed that in wild-type E. coli cells infected with lambda, phage DNA replication proceeds according to a bidirectional theta mechanism early after infection due to efficient transcriptional activation of orilambda, stimulated by the host DnaA protein. After a few rounds of this type of replication, the resulting increased copy number of lambda genomic DNA may cause a depletion of free DnaA protein because of its interaction with the multiple DnaA-binding sites in lambda DNA. It is proposed that this may lead to inefficient transcriptional activation of orilambda resulting in unidirectional theta replication followed by sigma type replication.

  16. Influence of experimental alcohol administration on serum immunoglobulin levels: contrasting effects on IgE and other immunoglobulin classes.

    PubMed

    Alonso, M; Gomez-Rial, J; Gude, F; Vidal, C; Gonzalez-Quintela, A

    2012-01-01

    In humans, alcoholic liver disease is associated with hypergammaglobulinemia, particularly with high serum concentrations of IgA. Furthermore, alcohol consumption is associated with high concentrations of IgE and low concentrations of IgG. However, there is little experimental evidence to corroborate these observational findings. The objective of the present study was to investigate the potential short-term effects of alcohol administration on serum immunoglobulin concentrations in mice, and the potential influence of sex and strain on these effects. Eight mouse groups were defined by strain (Swiss vs C57BL/6), sex (male vs female), and experimental procedure (alcohol administration vs control diet). Alcohol was administered in a semi-liquid diet (6.5%v/v); control animals received an isocaloric semi-liquid diet. Immunoglobulin concentrations (IgE, IgA, IgM, IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgG3) were measured at baseline and weekly thereafter for 4 weeks. Serum Th1 (interferon-gamma) and Th2 (IL-4 and IL-13) cytokines were measured at week 4. We found significant variations in baseline immunoglobulin concentrations depending upon mouse sex and strain. Alcohol administration was quickly followed by an increase in serum IgE concentrations in all experimental groups. IgE increase was correlated with serum IL-13 increase. In contrast, alcohol administration was not associated with significant changes in serum IgA and IgM concentration, and appeared to decrease IgG subclass concentrations. Alcohol effects on immunoglobulin concentrations were independent of mouse strain and sex. In conclusion, alcohol administration in mice had contrasting effects on IgE and other immunoglobulin classes. This experimental evidence confirms observational results in humans.

  17. Comparison of techniques of detecting immunoglobulin-binding protein reactivity to immunoglobulin produced by different avian and mammalian species.

    PubMed

    Justiz-Vaillant, A A; Akpaka, P E; McFarlane-Anderson, N; Smikle, M F

    2013-01-01

    The rationale of this study was to use several immunological assays to investigate the reactivity of immunoglobulin binding protein (IBP) to immunoglobulins from various avian and mammalian species. The IBP studied were Staphylococcal protein A (SpA), Streptococcal protein G (SpG), Peptostreptococcal protein L (SpL) and recombinant protein LA (SpLA). The various immunological techniques used were double immunodiffusion (Ouchterlony technique) that tested positive high protein reactivities, direct and competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) that tested moderate and low positive protein binding capacities, respectively. In addition to sandwich ELISAs, immunoblot analyses and Ig-purification by SpA-affinity chromatography, which were sensitive tests and helpful in the screening and confirmatory tests were also used. The Ouchterlony technique showed that compared to the other proteins, SpLA had the highest range of reactivity with animal sera and purified immunoglobulins while SpL was least reactive. With the direct ELISA, SpL reacted with the raccoon sera, rabbit IgG and with IgY from bantam hens and pigeons. While with the direct ELISA, SpA reacted with sera from skunk, coyote, raccoon, mule, donkey and human. The sandwich ELISA revealed high reactivity of both SpG and SpLA with mammalian sera titres ranging from 1:32 (raccoon serum) to 1:1024 (mule and donkey sera). These results suggest that IBP can be used for the detection of immunoglobulin using various immunological assays and this is important for the diagnosis of infectious diseases in animal and bird populations studied and in the purification of immunoglobulins.

  18. Genomic and functional characterization of the diverse immunoglobulin domain-containing protein (DICP) family

    PubMed Central

    Haire, Robert N.; Cannon, John P.; O’Driscoll, Marci L.; Ostrov, David A.; Mueller, M. Gail; Turner, Poem M.; Litman, Ronda T.; Litman, Gary W.; Yoder, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    A heretofore-unrecognized multigene family encoding diverse immunoglobulin (Ig) domain-containing proteins (DICPs) was identified in the zebrafish genome. Twenty-nine distinct loci mapping to three chromosomal regions encode receptor-type structures possessing two classes of Ig ectodomains (D1 and D2). The sequence and number of Ig domains, transmembrane regions and signaling motifs varies between DICPs. Interindividual polymorphism and alternative RNA processing contribute to DICP diversity. Molecular models indicate that most D1 domains are of the variable (V) type; D2 domains are Ig-like. Sequence differences between D1 domains are concentrated in hypervariable regions on the front sheet strands of the Ig fold. Recombinant DICP Ig domains bind lipids, a property shared by mammalian CD300 and TREM family members. These findings suggest that novel multigene families encoding diversified immune receptors have arisen in different vertebrate lineages and effect parallel patterns of ligand recognition that potentially impact species-specific advantages. PMID:22386706

  19. Multiple DNA sequence elements are necessary for the function of an immunoglobulin heavy chain promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, S; Calame, K

    1987-01-01

    Sequences required for the function of the mouse V1 immunoglobulin heavy chain variable-region (VH) promoter were identified by transient transfection of the normal and mutated promoters into plasmacytoma cells. Our results identify four regions required for normal promoter function: (i) the octamer ATGCAAAT, previously identified by others; (ii) a heptamer, CTAATGA; (iii) a pyrimidine-rich region; and (iv) a region between positions -125 and -251 relative to the transcription start site. Sequence analysis of 19 mouse and human VH 5' flanking regions shows that the heptamer and pyrimidine stretch are strongly conserved. We have also demonstrated that the octamer functions in an orientation independent manner in the VH promoter. Images PMID:3118372

  20. Site-specific photobiotinylation of antibodies, light chains, and immunoglobulin fragments.

    PubMed

    Pavlinkova, G; Lou, D; Kohler, H

    2000-09-01

    The high affinity of biotin for avidin has been exploited for many antibody-based assays. This requires that biotin is covalently conjugated to the antibody molecule. Several chemically reactive biotinylation reagents are commercially available. Except for the attachment via sulfhydryl groups in the immunoglobulin (Ig) molecule, these reagents attach biotin randomly to various amino acid side chains. Although non-site-specific modification of antibodies does not interfere in most immunoassays, specific application and sensitive antibodies would benefit from site-specific biotinylation. Here we describe an affinity biotinylation technique based on a photoreactive biotin reagent. The design of this reaction was possible from the discovery of a conserved binding site in the variable Ig domain for nucleotides and nucleosides. The described photoaffinity biotinylation offers the advantages of ease, convenience, and production of a reproducible and defined biotinylated antibody preparation.

  1. Notes on individual sequence variation in humans: Immunoglobulin kappa light chain

    SciTech Connect

    Kurth, J.H. ); Cavalli-Sforza, L.L. )

    1994-06-01

    Little is known concerning the magnitude of variability in the nucleic acid sequence of DNA at the individual level. The authors have collected a large set of sequence data from the human immunoglobulin kappa light-chain-locus constant region (10,444 bp) and subgroup IV variable region (18,580 bp). For the constant region, absolute conservation of sequence was observed, even in intron and coding-region silent sites, with the exception of one previously defined polymorphic site. For the variable region, 12 heterozygous positions were identified, giving a heterozygosity of 6 x 10[sup [minus]4] per nucleotide site. The amount of nucleic acid sequence variation differs significantly ([chi][sup 2] = 4.88) between these two regions, and the observed variation is two orders of magnitude lower than that reported for two Drosophila melanogaster loci. These data suggest that, for at least some regions of the human genome, nucleic acid sequence may be less variable than previously estimated. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Rifampin-stimulated uv resistance of phage lambda on Escherichia coli K12

    SciTech Connect

    Bronner, C.E.; Fluke, D.J.; Pollard, E.C.

    1983-01-01

    The plaque survival of uv-irradiated phage lambda on excision-proficient E.coli strain AB1157 is greater if the host cells are exposed to rifampin for 10 minutes prior to infection. This repair is accompanied by little or no clear-plaque mutagenesis. Host cells uv-irradiated and incubated for 30 minutes in growth medium prior to treatment with rifampin show some Weigle-reactivation in addition to the repair stimulated by rifampin. Some clear-plaque Weigle-mutagenesis is also observed in the presence of rifampin: however, the amount is less than that seen in the absence of rifampin treatment. In contrast, the uv sensitivity of lambda on strain AB1886, an excision-repair deficient mutant, is unchanged by pre-treating the cells with rifampin, and no Weigle-reactivation is observed. These results suggest that repair of lambda on unirradiated cells in the presence of rifampin is an excision-dependent, error-free phenomenon. Since initiation of replication of lambda DNA requires RNA polymerase, and since rifampin blocks transcription by that polymerase, the effect of rifampin on the survival of lambda may be to delay phage replication, thereby allowing more time for excision repair to operate. 6 figures.

  3. The Protein Interaction Network of Bacteriophage Lambda with Its Host, Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Blasche, Sonja; Wuchty, Stefan; Rajagopala, Seesandra V.

    2013-01-01

    Although most of the 73 open reading frames (ORFs) in bacteriophage λ have been investigated intensively, the function of many genes in host-phage interactions remains poorly understood. Using yeast two-hybrid screens of all lambda ORFs for interactions with its host Escherichia coli, we determined a raw data set of 631 host-phage interactions resulting in a set of 62 high-confidence interactions after multiple rounds of retesting. These links suggest novel regulatory interactions between the E. coli transcriptional network and lambda proteins. Targeted host proteins and genes required for lambda infection are enriched among highly connected proteins, suggesting that bacteriophages resemble interaction patterns of human viruses. Lambda tail proteins interact with both bacterial fimbrial proteins and E. coli proteins homologous to other phage proteins. Lambda appears to dramatically differ from other phages, such as T7, because of its unusually large number of modified and processed proteins, which reduces the number of host-virus interactions detectable by yeast two-hybrid screens. PMID:24049175

  4. Lambda Station: Alternate network path forwarding for production SciDAC applications

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Maxim; Bobyshev, Andrey; Crawford, Matt; DeMar, Phil; Grigaliunas, Vyto; Moibenko, Alexander; Petravick, Don; Newman, Harvey; Steenberg, Conrad; Thomas, Michael; /Caltech

    2007-09-01

    The LHC era will start very soon, creating immense data volumes capable of demanding allocation of an entire network circuit for task-driven applications. Circuit-based alternate network paths are one solution to meeting the LHC high bandwidth network requirements. The Lambda Station project is aimed at addressing growing requirements for dynamic allocation of alternate network paths. Lambda Station facilitates the rerouting of designated traffic through site LAN infrastructure onto so-called 'high-impact' wide-area networks. The prototype Lambda Station developed with Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) approach in mind will be presented. Lambda Station has been successfully integrated into the production version of the Storage Resource Manager (SRM), and deployed at US CMS Tier1 center at Fermilab, as well as at US-CMS Tier-2 site at Caltech. This paper will discuss experiences using the prototype system with production SciDAC applications for data movement between Fermilab and Caltech. The architecture and design principles of the production version Lambda Station software, currently being implemented as Java based web services, will also be presented in this paper.

  5. Proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal immunoglobulin G deposits complicated by immunoglobulin A nephropathy in the renal allograft.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Anri; Kawanishi, Kunio; Horita, Shigeru; Koike, Junki; Honda, Kazuho; Ochi, Ayami; Komoda, Mizuki; Tanaka, Yoichiro; Unagami, Kohei; Okumi, Masayoshi; Shimizu, Tomokazu; Ishida, Hideki; Tanabe, Kazunari; Nagashima, Yoji; Nitta, Kosaku

    2016-07-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) A nephropathy (IgAN) is a known autoimmune disease due to abnormal glycosylation of IgA1, and occasionally, IgG co-deposition occurs. The prognosis of IgG co-deposition with IgAN is adverse, as shown in the previous studies. However, in the clinical setting, monoclonality of IgG co-deposition with IgAN has not been observed. We describe a case of proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits (PGNMID) combined with IgAN in a renal allograft. A-21-year-old man developed end-stage renal failure with unknown aetiology and underwent living-donor kidney transplantation from his mother 2 years after being diagnosed. One year after kidney transplantation, proteinuria 2+ and haematuria 2+ were detected; allograft biopsy revealed mesangial IgA and C3 deposits, indicating a diagnosis of IgAN. After tonsillectomy and steroid pulse therapy, proteinuria and haematuria resolved. However, 4 years after transplantation, pedal oedema, proteinuria (6.89 g/day) and allograft dysfunction (serum creatinine (sCr) 203.3 µmol/L) appeared. A second allograft biopsy showed mesangial expansion and focal segmental proliferative endocapillary lesions with IgA1λ and monoclonal IgG1κ depositions. Electron microscopic analysis revealed a massive amount of deposits, located in the mesangial and subendothelial lesions. A diagnosis of PGNMID complicated with IgAN was made, and rituximab and plasmapheresis were added to steroid pulse therapy. With this treatment, proteinuria was alleviated to 0.5 g/day, and the allograft dysfunction recovered to sCr 132.6 µmol/L. This case suggests a necessity for investigation of PGNMID and IgA nephropathy in renal allografts to detect monoclonal Ig deposition disease.

  6. Renal involvement of monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease associated with an unusual monoclonal immunoglobulin A glycan profile.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Syuzou; Usui, Joichi; Narimatsu, Yoshiki; Ito, Hiromi; Narimatsu, Hisashi; Hagiwara, Masahiro; Tsuruoka, Shuichi; Nagata, Michio; Yamagata, Kunihiro

    2010-08-01

    A 38-year-old man was admitted to the hospital for the evaluation of proteinuria, microscopic hematuria, and monoclonal IgA-kappa gammopathy. The initial renal pathological findings showed mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis with endocapillary proliferation, a necrotizing lesion, and cellular crescent formation accompanied by IgA1-kappa deposition in the mesangium. Neither typical immune-complex deposits nor organized-structure deposits were detected. We diagnosed the patient with monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease (MIDD) associated with monoclonal IgA (mIgA). After the initiation of a monthly treatment with melphalan and predonisolone (MP therapy), the patient's serum IgA levels declined, and clinical remission was ultimately achieved. The follow-up renal biopsy showed reduced IgA-kappa staining, and both the endocapillary proliferation and the necrotizing lesion had disappeared. To elucidate the mechanism of IgA deposition, we investigated the glycan profile of the patient's serum mIgA using a mass spectrometry technique. The results revealed an unusual N-glycan profile compared to that of another patient with circulating mIgA lacking renal involvement and that of a healthy control. mIgA deposition in the mesangial area is a rare disease, and the glycan profiling of MIDD with renal involvement has not been reported previously. Thus, the present case suggests that any variation in Ig glycosylation may be a step in the pathogenesis of MIDD with renal involvement and/or contribute to some cases of IgA nephropathy.

  7. Starspot evolution, differential rotation, and magnetic cycles in the chromospherically active binaries lambda andromedae, sigma Geminorum, II Pegasi, and V711 Tauri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Gregory W.; Eaton, Joel A.; Hamer, Jamesia; Hall, Douglas S.

    1995-01-01

    We have analyzed 15-19 yr of photoelectric photometry, obtained manually and with automated telescopes, of the chromospherically active binaries lambda And, sigma Gem, II Peg, and V711 Tau. These observations let us identify individual dark starspots on the stellar surfaces from periodic dimming of the starlight, follow the evolution of these spots, and search for long-term cyclic changes in the properties of these starspots that might reveal magnetic cycles analogous to the Sun's 11 yr sunspot cycle. We developed a computer code to fit a simple two-spot model to our observed light curves that allows us to extract the most easily determinable and most reliable spot parameters from the light curves, i.e., spot longitudes and radii. We then used these measured properties to identify individual spots and to chart their life histories by constructing migration and amplitude curves. We identified and followed 11 spots in lambda And, 16 in sigma Gem, 12 in II Peg, and 15 in V711 Tau. Lifetimes of individual spots ranged from a few months to longer than 6 yr. Differential rotation coefficients, estimated from the observed range of spot rotation periods for each star and defined by equation (2), were 0.04 for lambda And, 0.038 for sigma Gem, 0.005 for II Peg, and 0.006 for V711 Tau, versus 0.19 for the Sun. We searched for cyclic changes in mean brightness, B-V color index, and spot rotation period as evidence for long-term cycles. Of these, long-term variability in mean brightness appears to offer the best evidence for such cycles in these four stars. Cycles of 11.1 yr for lambda And, 8.5 yr for sigma Gem, 11 yr for II Peg, and 16 yr V711 Tau are implied by these mean brightness changes. Cyclic changes in spot rotation period were found in lambda And and possibly II Peg. Errors in B-V were too large for any long-term changes to be detectable.

  8. Experiments with the High Resolution Kaon Spectrometer at Jlab Hall C and the New Spectroscopy of ^12_Lambda B Hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Liguang; Chen, Chunhua; Gogami, Toshiyuki; Kawama, Daisuke; Han, Yuncheng; Yuan, Lulin; Matsumura, Akihiko; Okayasu, Yuichi; Seva, Tomislav; Rodriguez, Victor; Baturin, Pavlo; Acha Quimper, Armando; Achenbach, Carsten; Ahmidouch, Abdellah; Albayrak, Ibrahim; Androic, Darko; Asaturyan, Arshak; Asaturyan, Razmik; Ates, Ozgur; Badui, Rafael; Baker, Oliver; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Boeglin, Werner; Bono, Jason; Bosted, Peter; Brash, Edward; Carter, Philip; Carlini, Roger; Chiba, Atsushi; Christy, Michael; Cole, Leon; Dalton, Mark; Danagoulian, Samuel; Daniel, Aji; De Leo, Raffaele; Dharmawardane, Kahanawita; Doi, Daisuke; Egiyan, Kim; Elaasar, Mostafa; Ent, Rolf; Fenker, Howard; Fujii, Yu; Furic, Miroslav; Gabrielyan, Marianna; Gan, Liping; Garibaldi, Franco; Gaskell, David; Gasparian, Ashot; Gibson, Edward; Gueye, Paul; Hashimoto, Osamu; Honda, D; Horn, Tanja; Hu, Bitao; Hungerford, Ed; Jayalath, Chandana; Jones, Mark; Johnston, Kathleen; Kalantarians, Narbe; Kanda, Hiroki; Kaneta, M; Kato, F; Kato, Seigo; Kawai, Masaharu; Keppel, Cynthia; Khanal, Hari; Kohl, M; Kramer, Laird; Lan, Kejian; Li, Ya; Habarakada Liyanage, Anusha; Luo, Wei; Mack, David; Maeda, Kazushige; Malace, Simona; Margaryan, Amur; Marikyan, Gagik; Markowitz, Pete; Maruta, Tomofumi; Maruyama, Nayuta; Maxwell, Victor; Millener, David; Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Mkrtchyan, Arthur; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet; Motoba, Toshio; Nagao, Sho; Nakamura, Satoshi; Narayan, Amrendra; Neville, Casey; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria; Nunez, Angel; Nuruzzaman, nfn; Nomura, Hiroshi; Nonaka, Kenichi; Ohtani, Atsushi; Oyamada, Masamichi; Perez, Naipy; Petkovic, Tomislav; Pochodzalla, J; Qiu, Xiyu; Randeniya, Kapugodage; Raue, Brian; Reinhold, Joerg; Rivera, R; Roche, Julie; Samanta, Chhanda; Sato, Yoshinori; Sawatzky, Bradley; Segbefia, Edwin; Schott, Diane; Shichijo, Ayako; Simicevic, Neven; Smith, Gregory; Song, Yushou; Sumihama, Mizuki; Tadevosyan, Vardan; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Taniya, Naotaka; Tsukada, Kyo; Tvaskis, Vladas; Veilleux, Micah; Vulcan, William; Wells, Steven; Wesselmann, Frank; Wood, Stephen; Yamamoto, Taku; Yan, Chen; Ye, Z; Yokota, Kosuke; Zhamkochyan, Simon; Zhu, Lingyan

    2014-09-01

    Since the pioneering experiment, E89-009 studying hypernuclear spectroscopy using the $(e,e^{\\prime}K^+)$ reaction was completed, two additional experiments, E01-011 and E05-115, were performed at Jefferson Lab. These later experiments used a modified experimental design, the "Tilt Method", to dramatically suppress the large electromagnetic background, and allowed for a substantial increase in luminosity. Additionally, a new kaon spectrometer, HKS (E01-011), a new electron spectrometer, HES, and a new splitting magnet were added to produce precision, high-resolution hypernuclear spectroscopy. These two experiments, E01-011 and E05-115, resulted in two new data sets, producing sub-MeV energy resolution in the spectra of ${}^{7}_{\\Lambda}\\text{He}$, ${}^{12}_{\\Lambda}\\text{B}$ and ${}^{28}_{\\Lambda} \\text{Al}$ and ${}^{7}_{\\Lambda}\\text{He}$, ${}^{10}_{\\Lambda}\\text{Be}$, ${}^{12}_{\\Lambda}\\text{B}$ and ${}^{52}_{\\Lambda}\\text{V}$. All three experiments obtained a ${}^{12}_{\\Lambda}\\text{B}$, spectrum, which is the most characteristic $p$-shell hypernucleus and is commonly used for calibration. Independent analyses of these different experiments demonstrate excellent consistency and provide the clearest level structure to date of this hypernucleus as produced by the $(e,e^{\\prime}K^+)$ reaction. This paper presents details of these experiments, and the extraction and analysis of the observed ${}^{12}_{\\Lambda}\\text{B}$ spectrum.

  9. [Subcutaneous immunoglobulin. Treatment in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculo-neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Nogués, Martín A; Varela, Francisco J; Seminario, Gisela; Insúa, María C; Bezrodnik, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an acquired disease that may affect nerve roots and peripheral nerves. Despite its low incidence, diagnosis is particularly important because there are different effective treatments. Human immunoglobulin is one of the mainstays of the treatment. Although there are few studies up to date, subcutaneous immunoglobulin (IgSC) has been proposed as an alternative to intravenous administration with similar efficacy. We present three cases with definite CIDP, classified according to the European Federation of Neurological Societies / Peripheral Nerve, Society (EFNS /PNS) criteria in which was used SCIgG as a treatment after success with the intravenous route. The Overall Neuropathy Limitations Scale (ONLS) was used to estimate the changes in the muscular strength before and after treatment.

  10. Immunoglobulin concentrations in human tears in ocular diseases.

    PubMed

    Sen, D K; Sarin, G S

    1979-05-01

    Immunoglobulin concentrations in human tears were determined in 165 patients with different eye diseases by a standard radial immunodiffusion method. IgA was present in all the samples in measurable quantity. The mean IgA values were significantly higher than the controls in patients with acute bacterial conjunctivitis, keratomalacia, corneal graft reaction, blepharoconjunctivitis, and acute keratoconjunctivitis. The values in the patients with vernal conjunctivitis, phlyctenular conjunctivitis, acute bacterial corneal ulcer, and acute endogenous uveitis were not significantly different from those in the controls. IgG could be detected in the majority of the samples but it was in measurable quantity in 18 samples. IgM could be detected in fewer samples. IgD was not detected in any of them. The study indicates that, whenever the immunoglobulin levels in tears are altered in diseased eyes, it is the IgA level that is predominantly altered and not the IgG level.

  11. Fc glycan-modulated immunoglobulin G effector functions.

    PubMed

    Quast, Isaak; Lünemann, Jan D

    2014-07-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) molecules are glycoproteins and residues in the sugar moiety attached to the IgG constant fragment (Fc) are essential for IgG functionality such as binding to cellular Fc receptors and complement activation. The core of this sugar moiety consists of a bi-antennary heptameric structure of mannose and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), further decorated with terminal and branching residues including galactose, sialic acid, fucose, and GlcNAc. Presence or absence of distinct residues such as fucose and sialic acid can dramatically alter pro- and anti-inflammatory IgG activities which could be harnessed for immunotherapeutic purposes. Here we review recent advances in understanding the role of the IgG-Fc glycan during immune responses and for immunotherapy with a focus on sialic acid and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) treatment.

  12. Of ITIMs, ITAMs, and ITAMis: revisiting immunoglobulin Fc receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Getahun, Andrew; Cambier, John C

    2015-11-01

    Receptors for immunoglobulin Fc regions play multiple critical roles in the immune system, mediating functions as diverse as phagocytosis, triggering degranulation of basophils and mast cells, promoting immunoglobulin class switching, and preventing excessive activation. Transmembrane signaling associated with these functions is mediated primarily by two amino acid sequence motifs, ITAMs (immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs) and ITIMs (immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motifs) that act as the receptors' interface with activating and inhibitory signaling pathways, respectively. While ITAMs mobilize activating tyrosine kinases and their consorts, ITIMs mobilize opposing tyrosine and inositol-lipid phosphatases. In this review, we will discuss our current understanding of signaling by these receptors/motifs and their sometimes blurred lines of function.

  13. Rh immunoglobulin utlization after spontaneous and induced abortion.

    PubMed

    Grimes, D A; Ross, W C; Hatcher, R A

    1977-09-01

    To monitor the utilization of Rh immunoglobulin (RhIG), we reviewed the charts of 389 spontaneous and 1350 induced abortion patients treated in 1975 at a metropolitan hospital. The rate of ascertainment of Rh type was significantly higher for induced (99.6%) than for spontaneous abortion patients (95.1%) (P less than 0.001). Utilization of Rh immunoglobulin (RhIG) also was significantly higher for induced (98.9%) than for spontaneous abortion patients (80.6%) (P less than 0.001). Women at risk who did not receive RhIG after spontaneous abortion were mostly young, of low gravidity, and at gestational ages (mean 14.4 weeks) associated with substantial risks of Rh sensitization. Eradication of Rh hemolytic disease requires improvement in the system of identifying and treating patients who need prophylaxis.

  14. Serum immunoglobulins and complement (C'3) in oral lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Sklavounou, A D; Laskaris, G; Angelopoulos, A P

    1983-01-01

    Serum immunoglobulins and complement (C'3) were determined by single radial immunodiffusion according to the method of Mancini and co-workers in fifty patients with oral lichen planus and twenty persons with clinically normal oral mucosa. Significantly increased levels of serum IgG (p less than 0.05) and a significant reduction of serum IgA concentration (p less than 0.05) in the experimental group as compared with normal controls were observed. Mean serum IgM and complement (C'3) levels were similar in patients and controls. No correlation between disease variety or extensiveness and immunoglobulin or complement levels was noticed. These results suggest that patients with oral lichen planus may have a generalized immunologic disorder in which humoral immunity is disturbed. Whether humoral immunity is of etiologic significance, contributes to the disease process, or, finally, represents an event secondary to the pathologic changes seen in the disease remains to be determined.

  15. [Optimization of gel radial diffusion method for serum immunoglobulin analysis].

    PubMed

    Gerasimov, I G; Zorkova, E V

    2002-07-01

    Serum IgA, IgM, and IgG were measured by radial immunodiffusion in gel; immunoglobulin concentrations correlated with the diameter of their diffusion. A theoretically-based equation was derived; use of this equation will help estimate serum Ig content without plotting a calibration curve by the square diameter of the immunodiffusion ring of undiluted reference serum in a wide range of concentrations (0.3-3 mg/ml for IgA and IgM and 2-18 mg/ml for IgG). This modification of measuring serum immunoglobulins by radial immunodiffusion in gel is as accurate as other methods, but is reagent- and time-saving.

  16. Immunoglobulin concentrations in human tears in ocular diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Sen, D K; Sarin, G S

    1979-01-01

    Immunoglobulin concentrations in human tears were determined in 165 patients with different eye diseases by a standard radial immunodiffusion method. IgA was present in all the samples in measurable quantity. The mean IgA values were significantly higher than the controls in patients with acute bacterial conjunctivitis, keratomalacia, corneal graft reaction, blepharoconjunctivitis, and acute keratoconjunctivitis. The values in the patients with vernal conjunctivitis, phlyctenular conjunctivitis, acute bacterial corneal ulcer, and acute endogenous uveitis were not significantly different from those in the controls. IgG could be detected in the majority of the samples but it was in measurable quantity in 18 samples. IgM could be detected in fewer samples. IgD was not detected in any of them. The study indicates that, whenever the immunoglobulin levels in tears are altered in diseased eyes, it is the IgA level that is predominantly altered and not the IgG level. PMID:465402

  17. Quartz Microbalance Study of 400-angstrom Thick Films near the lambda Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Moses H. W.

    2003-01-01

    In a recent measurement we observed the thinning of an adsorbed helium film induced by the confinement of critical fluctuations a few millikelvin below the lambda point. A capacitor set-up was used to measure this Casimir effect. In this poster we will present our measurement of an adsorbed helium film of 400 angstroms near the lambda point with a quartz microbalance. For films this thick, we must take into account the non-linear dynamics of the shear waves in the fluid. In spite of the added complications, we were able to confirm the thinning of the film due to the Casimir effect and the onset of the superfluid transition. In addition, we observe a sharp anomaly at the bulk lambda point, most likely related to critical dissipation of the first sound. This work is carried out in collaboration with Rafael Garcia, Stephen Jordon and John Lazzaretti. This work is funded by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research under grant.

  18. The experimental determination of C lambda using an absorbed dose calorimeter.

    PubMed

    Williams, P C

    1980-01-01

    The absorbed dose conversion factors, C lambda, were introduced, by Greene and Massey, as an interim measure until a primary standard for high energy photon dosimetry could be established. The theoretical basis of these factors has been discussed extensively and a more rigorous definition has emerged. Experiments have been carried out to determine the values of C lambda, for a Tufnol walled, Baldwin-Farmer ionisation chamber over a range of energies from cobalt-60 to 12 MV. The experimental results, based on measurements with a calorimeter, presented here support the more rigorous definition but it is shown that the values obtained depend, to a small extent, on the assumptions made about the detailed construction of the ionisation chamber for which C lambda is measured.

  19. Observation of the Helium 7 {Lambda} hypernucleus by the (e,e'K+) reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Satoshi; Okayasu, Yuichi; Seva, Tomislav; Rodriguez, Victor; Baturin, Pavlo; Yuan, Lulin; Acha Quimper, Armando; Ahmidouch, Abdellah; Androic, Darko; Asaturyan, Arshak; Asaturyan, Razmik; Baker, Oliver; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Boeglin, Wener; Bosted, Peter; Carlini, Roger; Chen, Chunhua; Christy, Michael; Cole, Leon; Danagoulian, Samuel; Daniel, Aji; Dharmawardane, Kahanawita; Egiyan, Kim; Elaasar, Mostafa; Ent, Rolf; Fenker, Howard; Fujii, Yu; Furic, Miroslav; Gan, Liping; Gaskell, David; Gasparian, Ashot; Gibson, Edward; Toshiyuki, Gogami; Gueye, Paul; Han, Yuncheng; Hashimoto, Osamu; Hiyama, E; Honda, D; Horn, Tanja; Hu, Bitao; Hungerford, Ed; Jayalath, Chandana; Jones, Mark; Johnston, Kathleen; Kalantarians, Narbe; Kanda, Hiroki; Kaneta, M; Kato, Seigo; Kato, Shigeki; Kawama, Daisuke; Keppel, Cynthia; Kramer, Laird; Lan, Kejian; Luo, Wei; Mack, David; Maeda, Kazushige; Malace, Simona; Margaryan, Amur; Marikyan, Gagik; Markowitz, Pete; Maruta, Tomofumi; Maruyama, Nayuta; Miyoshi, Toshinuobu; Mkrtchyan, Arthur; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet; Nagao, Sho; Navasardyan, Tigran; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Nonaka, Kenichi; Ohtani, Atsushi; Oyamada, Masamichi; Perez, Naipy; Petkovic, Tomislav; Randeniya, Kapugodage; Raue, Brian; Reinhold, Joerg; Rivera Castillo, Roberto; Roche, Julie; Sato, Yoshinori; Segbefia, Edwin; Simicevic, Neven; Smith, Gregory; Song, Yushou; Sumihama, Mizuki; Tadevosyan, Vardan; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Tang, Liguang; Tsukada, Kyo; Tvaskis, Vladas; Vulcan, William; Wells, Steven; Wood, Stephen; Yan, Chen; Zhamkochyan, Simon

    2013-01-01

    An experiment with a newly developed high-resolution kaon spectrometer (HKS) and a scattered electron spectrometer with a novel configuration was performed in Hall C at Jefferson Lab (JLab). The ground state of a neutron-rich hypernucleus, He 7 {Lambda}, was observed for the first time with the (e,e'K+) reaction with an energy resolution of ~0.6 MeV. This resolution is the best reported to date for hypernuclear reaction spectroscopy. The He 7 {Lambda} binding energy supplies the last missing information of the A=7, T=1 hypernuclear iso-triplet, providing a new input for the charge symmetry breaking (CSB) effect of {Lambda} N potential.

  20. {lambda}NN and {sigma}NN systems at threshold. II. The effect of D waves

    SciTech Connect

    Garcilazo, H.; Valcarce, A.; Fernandez-Carames, T.

    2007-09-15

    Using the two-body interactions obtained from a chiral constituent quark model, we study all {lambda}NN and {sigma}NN states with I=0,1,2 and J=1/2,3/2 at threshold, taking into account all three-body configurations with S and D wave components. We constrain further the limits for the {lambda}N spin-triplet scattering length a{sub 1/2,1}. Using the hypertriton binding energy, we find a narrow interval for the possible values of the {lambda}N spin-singlet scattering length a{sub 1/2,0}. We find that the {sigma}NN system has a quasibound state in the (I,J)=(1,1/2) channel very near threshold with a width of about 2.1 MeV.

  1. Correlated Leading Baryon-antibaryon Production in e+e- to ccbar to Lambda_c+ antiLambda_c- X

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G. /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-22

    We present a study of 649 {+-} 35 e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} c{bar c} events produced at {radical}s {approx} 10.6 GeV containing both a {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} baryon and a {bar {Lambda}}{sub c}{sup -} antibaryon. The number observed is roughly four times that expected if the leading charmed hadron types are uncorrelated, confirming an observation by the CLEO Collaboration. We find a 2-jet topology in these events but very few additional baryons, demonstrating that the primary c and {bar c} are predominantly contained in a correlated baryon-antibaryon system. In addition to the charmed baryons we observe on average 2.6 {+-} 0.2 charged intermediate mesons, predominantly pions, carrying 65% of the remaining energy.

  2. Azimuthal anisotropy of K(0)(S) and Lambda+Lambda production at midrapidity from Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=130 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Allgower, C; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Deng, W S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Filimonov, K; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Guedon, M; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Yu I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; LoCurto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mitchell, J; Moiseenko, V A; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Saulys, A C; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schüttauf, A; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Shvetcov, V S; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thomas, J H; Thompson, M; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Voloshin, S A; Wang, F; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

    2002-09-23

    We report STAR results on the azimuthal anisotropy parameter v(2) for strange particles K(0)(S), Lambda, and Lambda at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=130 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The value of v(2) as a function of transverse momentum, p(t), of the produced particle and collision centrality is presented for both particles up to p(t) approximately 3.0 GeV/c. A strong p(t) dependence in v(2) is observed up to 2.0 GeV/c. The v(2) measurement is compared with hydrodynamic model calculations. The physics implications of the p(t) integrated v(2) magnitude as a function of particle mass are also discussed.

  3. Intracellular Neutralization of Virus by Immunoglobulin A Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazanec, Mary B.; Kaetzel, Charlotte S.; Lamm, Michael E.; Fletcher, David; Nedrud, John G.

    1992-08-01

    IgA is thought to neutralize viruses at the epithelial surface of mucous membranes by preventing their attachment. Since IgA, a polymeric immunoglobulin, is transported through the lining of epithelial cells by the polymeric-immunoglobulin receptor and since viruses are obligate intracellular parasites, we hypothesized that IgA antibodies may also interfere with viral replication by binding to newly synthesized viral proteins within infected cells. Polarized monolayers of Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cells expressing the polymeric-immunoglobulin receptor were infected on the apical surface with Sendai virus. Anti-Sendai virus IgA monoclonal antibody delivered from the basolateral surface colocalized with viral protein within the cell, as documented by immunofluorescence. More importantly, anti-viral IgA reduced virus titers >1000-fold (P < 0.0001) in apical supernatants and >10-fold (P < 0.0001) in cell lysates from monolayers treated with anti-viral IgA compared with those treated with either anti-viral IgG or an irrelevant IgA monoclonal antibody. We believe that the differences in viral titers between cell layers treated with specific IgA, which enters the epithelial cell by binding to the polymeric-immunoglobulin receptor, and those treated with specific IgG, which does not enter the cells, or irrelevant IgA indicate that specific intracellular IgA antibodies can inhibit viral replication. Thus, in addition to the classical role of humoral antibodies in extracellular defense, IgA antibody may be able to neutralize microbial pathogens intracellularly, giving IgA a role in host defense that has traditionally been reserved for cell-mediated immunity.

  4. Altered secretory immunoglobulin A on skin surface after intensive exercise.

    PubMed

    Eda, Nobuhiko; Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Satomi; Tanabe, Yoko; Lee, Eunjae; Akama, Takao

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of high-intensity endurance exercise on skin immunity by estimating secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) and staphylococci on skin surface. Seven healthy adult men (age, 22.3 ± 2.0 years) performed bicycle exercise at 75% HRmax for 60 minutes from 2030 to 2130 hours. Secretory immunoglobulin A was obtained from 1 ml extraction liquids stirred with the microtube homogenizer in the open end of a polypropylene tube for 60 seconds. Secretory immunoglobulin A concentrations were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Staphylococci were harvested by pressed agar-based media against skin surface. Skin surface samples were collected from the chest and the forearm on the first day at 2030 hours (before rest, A1), 2130 hours (after rest, A2), and 2230 hours (after showering, A3); the next morning at 0700 hours (A4); on the second day at 2030 hours (before exercise, B1), 2130 hours (after exercise, B2), and 2230 hours (after showering, B3); and the next morning at 0700 hours (B4). Secretory immunoglobulin A concentration on the forearm was significantly lower at B2 (p < 0.05) and B3 (p < 0.05) than that at B1 and that on the chest at B1 tended to be higher compared with B2 (p = 0.084) and B3 (p = 0.075). The number of staphylococci was significantly higher at B2 than that at B1 (p < 0.01) and B4 (p < 0.01) on the forearm. We conclude that high-intensity endurance exercise might depress immune function and enhance infectious risk on skin surface. Coaches should encourage their athletes to take a shower and change into clean clothes immediately after sports activities and athletes should maintain a clean skin surface to decrease the infectious risk on skin surface.

  5. Dissipation kinetics and assessment of processing factor for chlorpyrifos and lambda-cyhalothrin in cardamom.

    PubMed

    George, Thomas; Beevi, S Naseema; Xavier, George; Kumar, N Pratheesh; George, Jayesh

    2013-06-01

    The dissipation kinetics and method for estimation of residues of chlorpyrifos and lambda-cyhalothrin in cardamom were studied and developed. The limit of detection and limit of quantitation arrived for the compounds were 0.01 and 0.025 μg g(-1), respectively. Gas chromatographic response of chlorpyrifos and lambda-cyhalothrin residues was linear in the range of 0.01-0.50 μg g(-1) and the mean recovery obtained was 97.3 % for chlorpyrifos and 98.9 % for lambda-cyhalothrin with satisfactory relative standard deviation values. The mean initial residues of chlorpyrifos applied at a concentration of 0.05 % in cardamom was 2.5 μg g(-1) and the residue was 8.1 μg g(-1) after processing, with a processing factor of 3.24, while lambda-cyhalothrin when applied at 0.0025 % resulted in initial residues of 1.63 μg g(-1) that magnified to 4.86 μg g(-1) on curing, with a processing factor of 2.98. The half-life of chlorpyrifos was in the range of 5.1-5.24 days while that of lambda-cyhalothrin was in the range of 4.40-4.55 days. The processing factor arrived at in the above experiment lead to the conclusion that the residues of chlorpyrifos got magnified to 3.24-3.68 times and that of lambda-cyhalothrin got magnified to 2.98-3.46 times of initial residues, consequent to loss of weight due to dehydration during curing.

  6. Fate of the insecticide lambda-cyhalothrin in ditch enclosures differing in vegetation density.

    PubMed

    Leistra, Minze; Zweers, Anton J; Warinton, Jacqui S; Crum, Steven J H; Hand, Laurence H; Beltman, Wim H J; Maund, Stephen J

    2004-01-01

    Use of the insecticide lambda-cyhalothrin in agriculture may result in the contamination of water bodies, for example by spray drift. Therefore, the possible exposure of aquatic organisms to this insecticide needs to be evaluated. The exposure of the organisms may be reduced by the strong sorption of the insecticide to organic materials and its susceptibility to hydrolysis at the high pH values in the natural range. In experiments done in May and August, formulated lambda-cyhalothrin was mixed with the water body of enclosures in experimental ditches containing a bottom layer and macrophytes (at different densities) or phytoplankton. Concentrations of lambda-cyhalothrin in the water body and in the sediment layer, and contents in the plant compartment, were measured by gas-liquid chromatography at various times up to 1 week after application. Various water quality parameters were also measured. Concentrations of lambda-cyhalothrin decreased rapidly in the water column: 1 day after application, 24-40% of the dose remained in the water, and by 3 days it had declined to 1.8-6.5%. At the highest plant density, lambda-cyhalothrin residue in the plant compartment reached a maximum of 50% of the dose after 1 day; at intermediate and low plant densities, this maximum was only 3-11% of the dose (after 1-2 days). The percentage of the insecticide in the ditch sediment was 12% or less of the dose and tended to be lower at higher plant densities. Alkaline hydrolysis in the water near the surface of macrophytes and phytoplankton is considered to be the main dissipation process for lambda-cyhalothrin.

  7. Excess production of phage lambda delayed early proteins under conditions supporting high Escherichia coli growth rates.

    PubMed

    Gabig, M; Obuchowski, M; Wegrzyn, A; Szalewska-Pałasz, A; Thomas, M S; Wegrzyn, G

    1998-08-01

    Bacteriophage lambda is unable to lysogenize Escherichia coli hosts harbouring the rpoA341 mutation due to a drastic reduction in transcription from CII-activated lysogenic promoters (pE, pI and paQ). In addition, the level of early transcripts involved in the lytic pathway of lambda development is also decreased in this genetic background due to impaired N-dependent antitermination. Here, it is demonstrated that despite the reduced level of early lytic pL- and pR-derived transcripts, lytic growth of bacteriophage lambda is not affected in rich media. The level of the late lytic, pR-derived transcripts also remains unaffected by the rpoA341 mutation under these conditions. However, it was found that whilst there is no significant difference in the phage burst size in rpoA+ and rpoA341 hosts growing in rich media, phage lambda is not able to produce progeny in the rpoA341 mutant growing in minimal medium, in contrast to otherwise isogenic rpoA+ bacteria. Provision of an excess of the phage replication proteins O and P in trans or overproduction of the antitermination protein N restore the ability of phage lambda to produce progeny in the rpoA341 mutant under the latter conditions. These results suggest that in rich media phage lambda produces some early proteins in excess of that needed for its effective propagation and indicate that replication proteins may be limiting factors for phage lytic growth in poor media.

  8. Comprehensive N-Glycan Profiling of Avian Immunoglobulin Y

    PubMed Central

    Millán Martín, Silvia; Wormald, Mark R.; Zapatero-Rodríguez, Julia; Conroy, Paul J.; O’Kennedy, Richard J.; Rudd, Pauline M.; Saldova, Radka

    2016-01-01

    Recent exploitation of the avian immune system has highlighted its suitability for the generation of high-quality, high-affinity antibodies to a wide range of antigens for a number of therapeutic and biotechnological applications. The glycosylation profile of potential immunoglobulin therapeutics is species specific and is heavily influenced by the cell-line/culture conditions used for production. Hence, knowledge of the carbohydrate moieties present on immunoglobulins is essential as certain glycan structures can adversely impact their physicochemical and biological properties. This study describes the detailed N-glycan profile of IgY polyclonal antibodies from the serum of leghorn chickens using a fully quantitative high-throughput N-glycan analysis approach, based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) separation of released glycans. Structural assignments revealed serum IgY to contain complex bi-, tri- and tetra-antennary glycans with or without core fucose and bisects, hybrid and high mannose glycans. High sialic acid content was also observed, with the presence of rare sialic acid structures, likely polysialic acids. It is concluded that IgY is heavily decorated with complex glycans; however, no known non-human or immunogenic glycans were identified. Thus, IgY is a potentially promising candidate for immunoglobulin-based therapies for the treatment of various infectious diseases. PMID:27459092

  9. Endogenous immunoglobulins and sepsis: New perspectives for guiding replacement therapies.

    PubMed

    Bermejo-Martin, Jesús F; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J

    2015-12-01

    The recently emerging concept of immunosuppression developing in the field of severe sepsis generated the need to measure circulating immunoglobulins as part of the necessary tests to evaluate immunocompetence status in patients suffering from this condition. Serum concentrations can be used as a surrogate marker of the final outcome and as a biomarker to explore the need for supplementation of the host with intravenous immunoglobulin preparations. Available evidence from recent clinical studies pinpoints the main observations. The first is that circulating IgM is a phenomenon associated with progression from severe sepsis to septic shock. Deficient kinetics of circulating IgM during the first 7 days following the start of vasopressors is linked with unfavourable outcome. The second is the development of immunoscores using low levels of IgM, IgG1 and IgA. These immunoscores can predict 28-day mortality with an odds ratio ranging between 3 and 5. Novel techniques for evaluating patient's immune status are shedding new light on the development of modern therapeutics where immunoglobulin replacement may be part of a personalised therapeutic approach.

  10. Immunoglobulin Cmu RNA in T lymphoma cells is not translated.

    PubMed

    Walker, I D; Harris, A W

    1980-11-20

    It is widely believed that immunoglobulin genes might encode at least part of the receptor for antigen on the T lymphocyte. Evidence supporting this comes from the effects of anti-immunoglobulin idiotype antibodies on cellular immune networks and from the presence of idiotypes on immunologically active factors from T cells. Detailed molecular characterization of the receptors, however, has been seriously hampered by the lack of a suitable cellular source from which it might be isolated. The recent demonstration of Kemp et al. that thymocytes and certain cultured lines of mouse T lymphoma cells contain polyadenylated RNA molecules encoded by the immunoglobulin Cmu gene (Cmu RNA) prompted us to identify the corresponding protein molecules in those cells. As the haploid mouse genome contains a single Cmu gene, any polypeptide encoded by this gene should react with at least some of the antibodies present in rabbit anti-mouse IgM antiserum. In this letter we report that a number of T lymphoma lines, regardless of whether they contain Cmu RNA, synthesize no detectable mu polypeptides.

  11. Small quantities of erythrocyte bound immunoglobulins and autoimmune haemolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Sokol, R J; Hewitt, S; Booker, D J; Stamps, R

    1987-01-01

    Enzyme linked and radioimmune direct antiglobulin tests (DAGTs) were used to assess red cell bound IgG, IgA, and IgM in 585 patients referred to an immunohaematology reference centre. One hundred and fifty eight patients with less than or equal to 200 mol IgG and small amounts of IgA and IgM coating their red cells were studied in detail. The presence of autoimmune haemolysis was determined from the clinical, haematological, and biochemical findings; it occurred in at least 25% of the 158 patients, the degree varying widely. There was a highly significant association between small increases in cell bound immunoglobulins and the presence of autoimmune haemolysis. Immunoglobulins of IgG, IgA, and IgM classes could produce autoimmune haemolysis when the classical agglutination DAGTs were negative; the IgA and IgM were usually found in association with IgG. The haemolytic effect was enhanced by the presence of complement and combinations of immunoglobulin classes on the red cells. PMID:3558858

  12. Time Variable Associated Absorption in the QSO UM 675

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, F. W.; Barlow, T. A.; Beaver, E. A.; Burbidge, E. M.; Cohen, R. D.; Junkkarinen, V. T.; Lyons, R. W.

    1994-05-01

    We discuss dramatic changes in the z_a ~ z_e absorption system of the z_e = 2.15 QSO UM 675 (Q0150-203). The C IV lambda 1550 and N V lambda 1240 doublets at z_a = 2.1344 strengthened by a factor of ~ 3 between the observations of Sargent, Boksenberg and Steidel (1988, ApJS, 68, 539; measured November 1981) and our earliest measurements (November and December 1990). During this time, C IV in the z_a = 2.0083 system may also have strengthened. The variability of other lines in these systems is unknown. Continued monitoring is in progress. We consider several models of the z_a ~ z_e absorption environment, and conclude that the absorbing clouds are close to the QSO and photoionized by the QSO continuum. The variability timescale (<~2.9 yrs rest) requires gas densities gap 4000 cm(-3) to allow changes in the ionization balance. This minimum density, and the high ionization needed to produce the Ne VIII lambda 774 and O VI lambda 1035 absorptions reported previously (E. M. Burbidge et al., 1993, BAAS, 24, 1135), requires clouds <~200 pc from the QSO. The full range of absorption line ionizations (including C III lambda 977 and N III lambda 989) implies that the clouds are segregated, spanning a factor of gap 10 in distance or gap 100 in density. Across these regions the H I fraction varies from ~ 10(-3) to ~ 10(-6) . The total hydrogen column ranges from a few times 10(18) cm(-2) in the low ionization gas to ~ 10(20) cm(-2) where the Ne VIII lines form. The Lyman continuum is expected to be optically thin throughout, consistent with the measured absence of a Lyman edge. The metal abundances are roughly solar or above. Implications of these results are discussed. This work is supported by NASA grant NAG 5-1630.

  13. Specific Heat of Helium at Constant Volume along the Lambda Line

    SciTech Connect

    Lipa, J. A.; Nissen, J. A.; Avaloff, D.; Wang, Suwen

    2006-09-07

    We report new measurements of the constant-volume specific heat of helium along the lambda line from 0.15 to 24.4 bars. The pressure in the cell was also recorded as a function of temperature using a gauge with a superconducting readout. This data can be used to convert the results to the constant-pressure specific heat along isobars. The constant-volume data compare well with earlier results and extend the temperature range of the measurements much closer to the lambda line. A preliminary conversion to Cp(T,P) indicates good agreement with universality.

  14. Solution of the symmetric eigenproblem AX=lambda BX by delayed division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurston, G. A.; Bains, N. J. C.

    1986-01-01

    Delayed division is an iterative method for solving the linear eigenvalue problem AX = lambda BX for a limited number of small eigenvalues and their corresponding eigenvectors. The distinctive feature of the method is the reduction of the problem to an approximate triangular form by systematically dropping quadratic terms in the eigenvalue lambda. The report describes the pivoting strategy in the reduction and the method for preserving symmetry in submatrices at each reduction step. Along with the approximate triangular reduction, the report extends some techniques used in the method of inverse subspace iteration. Examples are included for problems of varying complexity.

  15. Structure of Lambda(1405) and threshold behavior of pi Sigma scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Yoichi Ikeda, Tesuo Hyodo, Daisuke Jido, Hiroyuki Kamano, Toru Sato, Koichi Yazaki

    2011-01-01

    The scattering length and effective range of the pi-Sigma channel are studied in order to characterize the strangeness S = -1 meson-baryon scattering and the Lambda (1405) resonance. We examine various off-shell dependence of the amplitude in dynamical chiral models to evaluate the threshold quantities with the constraint at the KN threshold. We find that the pi-Sigma threshold parameters are important to the structure of the Lambda (1405) resonance and provide further constraints on the subthreshold extrapolation of the KN interaction.

  16. Branching ratios from B{sub s} and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew S. Martin

    2004-05-28

    CDF Run II relative branching ratio measurements for 65 pb{sup -1} of data in the channels B{sub s} {yields} D{sub s}{sup {-+}}{pi}{sup {-+}}, {Lambda} {sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} and B {yields} h{sup +}h{sup -} are presented. Further, an observation of B{sub s} {yields} K{sup {+-}} K{sup {-+}} and a measurement of A{sub CP} are presented.

  17. Formation of Primordial Stars in a Lambda-CDM Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Naoki; Omukai, Kazuyuki; Hernquist, Lars; Abel, Tom; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-06-09

    Primordial stars are formed from a chemically pristine gas consisting of hydrogen and helium. They are believed to have been born at some early epoch in the history of the Universe and to have enriched the interstellar medium with synthesized heavy elements before the emergence of ordinary stellar populations. We study the formation of the first generation of stars in the standard cold dark matter model. We follow the gravitational collapse and thermal evolution of primordial gas clouds within early cosmic structures using very high-resolution, cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. Our simulation achieves a dynamic range of {approx} 10{sup 10} in length scale. With accurate treatment of atomic and molecular physics, it allows us to study the chemo-thermal evolution of primordial gas clouds to densities up to {rho} {approx} 2 x 10{sup -8}g cm{sup -3} (n{sub H} {approx} 10{sup 16}cm{sup -3}) without assuming any a priori equation of state; a six orders of magnitudes improvement over previous three-dimensional calculations. We implement an extensive chemistry network for hydrogen, helium and deuterium. All the relevant atomic and molecular cooling and heating processes, including cooling by collision-induced continuum emission, are implemented. For calculating optically thick H{sub 2} cooling at high densities, we use the Sobolev method (Sobolev 1960) and evaluate the molecular line opacities for a few hundred lines. We validate the accuracy of the method by performing a spherical collapse test and comparing the results with those of accurate one-dimensional calculations that treat the line radiative transfer problem in a fully self-consistent manner. We then perform a cosmological simulation adopting the standard {Lambda}CDM model. Dense gas clumps are formed at the centers of low mass ({approx} 10{sup 5-6}M{sub {circle_dot}}) dark matter halos at redshifts z {approx} 20, and they collapse gravitationally when the cloud mass exceeds a few hundred solar masses. To

  18. Phylogeny of immunoglobulin structure and function. VII. Monomeric and tetrameric immunoglobulins of the margate, a marine teleost fish.

    PubMed Central

    Clem, L W; McLean, W E

    1975-01-01

    The margate, a marine teleost fish, was found to contain both high (16S) and low (7S) molecular weight antibodies 17 days after initial immunization. The 16S antibodies were detectable with both haemagglutination and antigen-binding assays, whereas the 7S antibodies were only detected by the latter technique. Margate 16S (molecular weight approximately 700,000) and 7S (molecular weight approximately 175,000) immunoglobulins were isolated and shown to be antigenically indistinguishable. They therefore appear to belong to the same immunoglobulin class and to have a tetramer--monomer relationship. Experiments with stored sera indicated the 7S protein is probably not an in vitro degradation product of the 16S molecule. Images FIG. 3 FIG. 4 PMID:1184121

  19. Identification of Biomarkers Associated with the Healing of Chronic Wounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    chain serum albumin S100 calcium-binding protein A8 immunoglobulin lambda light chain VLJ region immunoglobulin heavy chain ...albumin immunoglobulin kappa light chain VLJ region Table 1. Spot identification by Midwest Bio Services, LLC and the Columbia University, Protein...CH3 region hp2-alpha 2 haptoglobin haptoglobin alpha chain immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region Ig kappa chain minor hp2-alpha 3

  20. Evaluation of the transfer of immunoglobulin from colostrum anaerobic fermentation (colostrum silage) to newborn calves.

    PubMed

    Saalfeld, Mara H; Pereira, Daniela I B; Borchardt, Jessica L; Sturbelle, Regis T; Rosa, Matheus C; Guedes, Marcio C; Gularte, Marcia A; Leite, Fábio P Leivas

    2014-11-01

    Colostrum silage is an anaerobic fermentation methodology of excess farm colostrum used to conserve and provide as milk replacement for calves. The present study aimed to evaluate the levels of immunoglobulins present in bovine colostrum silage and its absorption by newborn calves. The concentration of immunoglobulins was determined in fresh colostrum and colostrum silage stored for 12 months. The absorption of immunoglobulins by calves was assessed immediately after birth and 24 h after colostrum silage intake. The immunoglobulin levels were evaluated by ELISA. The results highlighted that colostrum silage kept similar levels of immunoglobulins as the ones in colostrum in natura, and can be transferred to newborn calves with similar amounts to calves fed with colostrum in natura. It is concluded that colostrum silage keeps viable immunoglobulins, and is able to transfer passive immunity to newborn calves.

  1. Phagocytosis of virulent Porphyromonas gingivalis by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes requires specific immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed Central

    Cutler, C W; Kalmar, J R; Arnold, R R

    1991-01-01

    No studies to date clearly define the interactions between Porphyromonas gingivalis and human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), nor has a protective role for antibody to P. gingivalis been defined. Using a fluorochrome ph