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Sample records for immunologic rheumatic disorders

  1. [Recent advances in immunologic laboratory testing for rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Akahoshi, Tohru

    2004-09-01

    Immunologic laboratory tests serve critical roles in the care of patients with various rheumatic diseases. These tests can provide relevant information of rheumatic diseases based on their immunopathophysiological condition. Although immunologic laboratory tests are quite useful for the determination of diagnosis and the estimation of disease activity, organ involvement and prognosis, they are frequently misused and resulted in an inappropriate diagnosis and treatment. Appropriate use of immunologic laboratory tests and accurate clinical interpretation of the test results can prevent false diagnosis and unnecessary treatment. In order to improve clinical care of patients with rheumatic diseases, clinicians caring patients with rheumatic disease should recognize meanings, characteristics and limitations of each result of immunologic laboratory testing. This article reviewed recent advances in immunologic laboratory testing such as antinuclear antibody, anti-DNA antibody and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody, and introduced guidelines for these testing. These guidelines based on evidences of EBM may contribute to the appropriate use of immunologic laboratory tests for rheumatic diseases.

  2. Immunologic endocrine disorders.

    PubMed

    Michels, Aaron W; Eisenbarth, George S

    2010-02-01

    Autoimmunity affects multiple glands in the endocrine system. Animal models and human studies highlight the importance of alleles in HLA-like molecules determining tissue-specific targeting that, with the loss of tolerance, leads to organ-specific autoimmunity. Disorders such as type 1A diabetes, Graves disease, Hashimoto thyroiditis, Addison disease, and many others result from autoimmune-mediated tissue destruction. Each of these disorders can be divided into stages beginning with genetic susceptibility, environmental triggers, active autoimmunity, and finally metabolic derangements with overt symptoms of disease. With an increased understanding of the immunogenetics and immunopathogenesis of endocrine autoimmune disorders, immunotherapies are becoming prevalent, especially in patients with type 1A diabetes. Immunotherapies are being used more in multiple subspecialty fields to halt disease progression. Although therapies for autoimmune disorders stop the progress of an immune response, immunomodulatory therapies for cancer and chronic infections can also provoke an unwanted immune response. As a result, there are now iatrogenic autoimmune disorders arising from the treatment of chronic viral infections and malignancies. Copyright 2010 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Refractory Rheumatic Disorder: Atypical Postpregnancy Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Mourgues, Cindy; Malochet-Guinamand, Sandrine; Soubrier, Martin

    2015-01-01

    This is a case report on a young patient with severe osteoporosis that was initially revealed when she presented with polyarthralgia during her second pregnancy. Postpartum, the pain increased and her X-ray did not show any abnormalities. A bone scintigraphy was performed. It indicated an inflammatory rheumatic disorder. Six months after partum, an investigation of right coxalgia revealed a spontaneous basicervical fracture. Given the persistent polyarthralgia, the patient underwent a new scintigraphy, which revealed areas of what looked to be old rib and L1 fractures. A subsequent full body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan revealed signal abnormalities that could indicate multiple lower limb bone fractures. Despite exhaustive biological, radiological, and histological testing, no secondary cause for the osteoporosis was found. The patient was started on teriparatide. We finally concluded that, despite the atypical presentation, the patient was suffering from postpregnancy osteoporosis. It is possible that the frequency of occurrence of this still poorly understood disease is underestimated. PMID:25785219

  4. Immunologic Endocrine Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Michels, Aaron W.; Eisenbarth, George S.

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmunity affects multiple glands in the endocrine system. Animal models and human studies highlight the importance of alleles in HLA (human leukocyte antigen)-like molecules determining tissue specific targeting that with the loss of tolerance leads to organ specific autoimmunity. Disorders such as type 1A diabetes, Grave's disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, Addison's disease, and many others result from autoimmune mediated tissue destruction. Each of these disorders can be divided into stages beginning with genetic susceptibility, environmental triggers, active autoimmunity, and finally metabolic derangements with overt symptoms of disease. With an increased understanding of the immunogenetics and immunopathogenesis of endocrine autoimmune disorders, immunotherapies are becoming prevalent, especially in type 1A diabetes. Immunotherapies are being used more in multiple subspecialty fields to halt disease progression. While therapies for autoimmune disorders stop the progress of an immune response, immunomodulatory therapies for cancer and chronic infections can also provoke an unwanted immune response. As a result, there are now iatrogenic autoimmune disorders arising from the treatment of chronic viral infections and malignancies. PMID:20176260

  5. Fibrositis: Misnomer for a Common Rheumatic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Robert M.

    1981-01-01

    Fibrositis is a misnomer for a very common form of nonarticular rheumatism. The name implies an inflammatory process in fibroconnective tissue which has never been verified. The symptoms of fibrositis are ill-defined musculoskeletal pain made worse by stress, cold, noise and unaccustomed exercise; there is usually a significant element of depression, nonrestorative sleep, chronic fatigue and early morning stiffness. Results of physical examination are strikingly normal, apart from painful tender spots which are remarkably consistent in location from patient to patient. It is important to realize that fibrositis can complicate diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus, where its prompt recognition is essential in averting inappropriate medication. Drug therapy alone is seldom effective in alleviating symptoms; a carefully planned education program is necessary to readjust both psyche and soma. PMID:6167073

  6. An immunological perspective on rheumatic heart disease pathogenesis: more questions than answers.

    PubMed

    Bright, Philip David; Mayosi, Bongani M; Martin, William John

    2016-10-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and the related rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are autoimmune diseases thought to be triggered by group A streptococcal (GAS) pharyngitis. RHD is a leading cause of mortality in the developing world. The strong epidemiological association between GAS throat infection and ARF is highly suggestive of causation, but does not exclude other infections as contributory. There is good evidence of both humoral and cellular autoreactivity and GAS/self cross-reactivity in established RHD. RHD pathogenesis could feasibly be triggered and driven by humoral and/or cellular molecular cross-reactivity between GAS and host cardiac tissues (molecular mimicry). However, good evidence of humoral pathogenicity is lacking and the specific triggering event for RHD remains unknown. It is likely that the critical immunological events leading to ARF/RHD occur at the point of contact between GAS and the immune system in the throat, strongly implicating the mucosal immune system in RHD pathogenesis. Additionally, there is circumstantial evidence that continued live GAS may play a role in ARF/RHD pathogenesis. We suggest that future avenues for study should include the exclusion of GAS components directly contributing to RHD pathogenesis; large genome-wide association studies of patients with RHD looking for candidate genes involved in RHD pathogenesis; genome-wide association studies of GAS from patients with ARF taken at diagnosis to look for characteristics of rheumatogenic strains; and performing case/control studies of GAS pharyngitis/ARF/patients with RHD, and controls to identify microbiological, immunological and environmental differences to elucidate RHD pathogenesis.

  7. Antiphospholipid syndrome and rheumatic fever: a case spanning three decades of changing concepts and common immunological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Alcock, R; Elsik, M; Yiannikas, C; Yiannikas, J

    2011-10-01

    We present a case of primary antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), initially diagnosed as acute rheumatic fever, resulting in severe mitral valve incompetence. This case raises questions of the specificity of the Jones diagnostic criteria for rheumatic fever in a population where it is infrequently encountered. There are similarities in clinical, pathological and echocardiographic presentations between rheumatic fever and APS, in addition to common immunological mechanisms. Our case highlights the possibility that rather than rheumatic fever being primarily responsible for her recurrent attacks of chorea and arthritis, the streptococcal infections in our patient occurred either in the setting of underlying antiphospholipid antibodies ('second hit' phenomenon), or may have triggered the development of pathogenic antibodies (molecular mimicry), subsequently leading to the clinical evolution of APS. During the three decades of our patient and her recurrent problems, there has been an evolving knowledge of the mechanisms of APS and rheumatic fever, allowing us to extend our understanding beyond symptoms and syndromes, to a better realization of the underlying immunological relationship between the two.

  8. Control of Pain in the Rheumatic Disorders*

    PubMed Central

    Hart, F. Dudley

    1968-01-01

    Pain may be attacked in the rheumatic diseases (1) centrally, with drugs ranging in efficiency from those which are potentially addictive and under the Dangerous Drugs Act (e.g., pethidine) and are therefore rarely used, down to simple analgesics such as paracetamol; (2) peripherally, by local action, whether it be by applications of heat or cold, by injections of local anaesthetics or anti-inflammatory agents, or by surgery; (3) peripherally, by anti-inflammatory non-analgesic agents taken systemically, such as the corticosteroids; and (4) peripherally, by anti-inflammatory-analgesic-antipyretic agents taken systemically, such as aspirin. The exact sites of action of the pyrazoles, indomethacin, the anthranilic compounds, and other anti-inflammatory-analgesic-antipyretic drugs are as yet uncertain, but along with these methods of attacking the pain-producing areas help must also be given to the distressed mind behind the joints. Faith in the future, cheerfulness, freedom from depression, and the development of a philosophy to deal with the uncertainties of the disease are essential. It has been said that you don't have to be a doctor to treat uncomplicated lobar pneumonia: anybody with a bottle of penicillin in his hands holds the cure. It is the incurable diseases that are really worth treating, and that make demands on the physician. To quote Tuker: “My last word is this. Whoever has the care of a sorely stricken arthritic must encourage him to fulfil himself intellectually and spiritually, and to achieve—no matter what, but to achieve, so that he may nightly lay himself down on his bed of pain looking forward happily to the morrow's task, mind centred upon it, no matter what it is; sticking in stamps, research into anything you like, dabbling with pastel or water colours, writing chatty letters to friends. Anything at all, but let it be for him the most pressing thing of the day, and let him believe that you think it is. Help him and let him live, live

  9. Systemic Light Chain Amyloidosis Mimicking Rheumatic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Secondary amyloidosis can complicate chronic inflammatory autoimmune diseases. However, the clinical findings of primary amyloidosis may mimic those of primary rheumatologic disorders. We present the case of a 53-year-old woman who presented with dystrophic nail changes, dry eyes, bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome, Raynaud's phenomenon, and high titer positive nucleolar pattern antinuclear antibody. She was initially misdiagnosed as having Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease (UCTD). On further workup, she was eventually diagnosed with lambda light chain systemic amyloidosis by abdominal fat pad biopsy. Her symptoms completely resolved after autologous stem cell transplantation. With this case, we would like to highlight the similarities in the clinical features between light chain amyloidosis and rheumatological disorders. We would also like to emphasize the importance of the prompt recognition of the clinical features of amyloidosis which are crucial to triggering appropriate diagnostic procedures, since early diagnosis is a key to improving outcomes in this disease with an otherwise poor prognosis. PMID:28042297

  10. B-cell survival factors in autoimmune rheumatic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Morais, Sandra A.; Vilas-Boas, Andreia

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune rheumatic disorders have complex etiopathogenetic mechanisms in which B cells play a central role. The importance of factors stimulating B cells, notably the B-cell activating factor (BAFF) and A proliferation inducing ligand (APRIL) axis is now recognized. BAFF and APRIL are cytokines essential for B-cell proliferation and survival from the immature stages to the development of plasma cells. Their levels are increased in some subsets of patients with autoimmune disorders. Several recent biologic drugs have been developed to block this axis, namely belimumab [already licensed for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) treatment], tabalumab, atacicept and blisibimod. Many clinical trials to evaluate the safety and efficacy of these drugs in several autoimmune disorders are ongoing, or have been completed recently. This review updates the information on the use of biologic agents blocking BAFF/APRIL for patients with SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren’s syndrome and myositis. PMID:26288664

  11. Miscellaneous neurologic, cardiac, pulmonary, and metabolic disorders with rheumatic manifestations.

    PubMed

    Larkin, J G

    1993-01-01

    Problems both old and new are featured in this year's selection of rheumatologic aspects of miscellaneous diseases. Paralysis of one or more limbs can lead to many musculoskeletal complications, and the approach of Auguste Dejerine-Klumpke in 1918 can be compared with that of the present-day physician. The reappearance of rheumatic fever continues to excite interest. The specificity of the modified Jones criteria has been questioned, as have the benefits of long-term antibiotic prophylaxis following an attack of the disease. Meanwhile, metabolic disorders may be the first diseases to come under novel scrutiny using the techniques of genetic engineering, with outstanding possibilities for advancing both understanding and treatment. Dermatologic diseases other than psoriasis may be associated with arthropathy. Many of these symptom complexes may be variants of the recently described SAPHO (synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis) syndrome.

  12. Systemic aspects of soft tissue rheumatic disorders (STRDs).

    PubMed

    Owlia, Mohammad Bagher; Mehrpoor, Golbarg

    2014-06-01

    To determine the markers of systemic inflammation in soft tissue rheumatic disorders (STRDs). Case series. Rheumatology Clinic, Yazd, Iran, from November 2010 to December 2011. Patients aged 20 years or above with known diagnosis of STRD according to clinical criteria and/ or paraclinical investigations for at least 3 weeks duration were longitudinally followed. Patients with diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, hypothyroidism, or any other known systemic conditions (other than diabetes mellitus) were excluded. After careful and detailed history taking, laboratory tests indicating systemic inflammation including erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and routine screening rheumatologic tests were assessed. Of the 90 patients, 75% were female and 25% were male and 28 (31.1%) of patients had diabetes mellitus. Fifty six (62%) and 49 (54%) of all studies cases had some degrees of morning stiffness and remarkable fatigue respectively. Twenty two (24%) had elevated CRP and 5 (5.5%) had abnormal ESR. Rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-CCP was positive in 5 (5.5%) and 12 (13.3%) of patients accordingly. Three (3.3%) patients suffered from anemia of chronic disease. Mean ESR was 48 ± 7.34 (hl) and mean CRP was 10.06 ± 1.96 mg/dl. Mean RF was 10.8 ± 1.64 U/ml and mean anti- CCP was 18.5 ± 2.71 U/ml. Mean hemoglobin was between 10.4 ± 1.01 g/dl. Features of subtle systemic inflammation are positive in some cases of soft tissue rheumatism.

  13. The Immunological Contribution to Heterotopic Ossification Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Convente, Michael R.; Wang, Haitao; Pignolo, Robert J.; Kaplan, Frederick S.; Shore, Eileen M.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of bone outside the endogenous skeleton is a significant clinical event, rendering affected individuals with immobility and a diminished quality of life. This bone, termed heterotopic ossification (HO), can appear in patients following invasive surgeries and traumatic injuries, as well as progressively manifest in several congenital disorders. A unifying feature of both genetic and non-genetic episodes of HO is immune system involvement at the early stages of disease. Activation of the immune system sets the stage for the downstream anabolic events that eventually result in ectopic bone formation, rendering the immune system a particularly appealing site of early therapeutic intervention for optimal management of disease. In this review we will discuss the immunological contributions to HO disorders, with specific focus on contributing cell types, signaling pathways, relevant in vivo animal models, and potential therapeutic targets. PMID:25687936

  14. Increased risk of comorbid rheumatic disorders in vitiligo patients: A nationwide population-based study.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chong Won; Eun, Sung Hye; Choi, Kwang Hyun; Bae, Jung Min

    2017-08-01

    Vitiligo is a common acquired depigmentation disorder. Previous studies have shown that vitiligo is associated with a variety of autoimmune disorders. However, a large-scale epidemiological study focused on comorbid rheumatic disorders has not been undertaken. To clarify the associations between vitiligo and various rheumatic disorders, we performed a cross-sectional study using data from the Korean National Health Insurance claims database. Between 2009 and 2013, totals of 86 210 patients with vitiligo and 172 420 age- and sex-matched controls without vitiligo were enrolled in this study. Vitiligo patients were found to be at increased risk of systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, Sjögren's syndrome and rheumatoid arthritis, but no significant association was found between vitiligo and dermatomyositis/polymyositis, Behçet's disease or ankylosing spondylitis. Subgroup analysis showed an increased risk of dermatomyositis/polymyositis in male and ankylosing spondylitis in female vitiligo patients. The risks of dermatomyositis/polymyositis or ankylosing spondylitis were higher in young vitiligo patients. Our study confirms a significant association between vitiligo and rheumatic disorders. Differences in comorbid rheumatic disorders by age group and sex suggest the need for patient-specific approaches. Careful consideration of rheumatic disorders is required for the proper management of comorbidities in vitiligo patients. © 2017 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  15. [Acute rheumatic fever].

    PubMed

    Maier, Alexander; Kommer, Vera

    2016-03-01

    We report on a young women with acute rheumatic fever. Acute rheumatic fever has become a rare disease in Germany, especially in adults. This carries the risk that it can be missed in the differential diagnostic considerations of acute rheumatic disorders and febrile status. If rheumatic fever is not diagnosed and treated correctly, there is a considerable risk for rheumatic valvular heart disease. In this article diagnosis, differential diagnosis and therapy of rheumatic fever are discussed extensively.

  16. [Ultrasonography in chronic inflammatory rheumatic and connective tissue disorders].

    PubMed

    Mérot, O; Le Goff, B

    2014-08-01

    Musculoskeletal ultrasonography is now widely used by almost all rheumatologists thanks to an improvement in the quality of ultrasound unit and probe and to the systematic teaching of this imaging technique to the rheumatology fellows. Applications have broadened from the study of degenerative and mechanical diseases to inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Ultrasound is more sensitive than clinical examination. Power Doppler allows the direct visualisation of inflammation within the tissues. Finally, it is a prognostic tool helping the physician in the management of the disease. This review will focus on the value and applications of ultrasonography in the 2 most frequent rheumatic diseases: rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis. We will also give some recent data on the usefulness of this imaging technique in the study of musculoskeletal manifestations associated with connective tissue disease.

  17. Miscellaneous neurologic, cardiac, pulmonary, and metabolic disorders with rheumatic manifestations.

    PubMed

    Larkin, J

    1994-01-01

    The First International Workshop on Hypertrophic Osteoarthropathy crystallized the current knowledge of this puzzling syndrome. Cytokine release by large thrombocytes in the periphery is the favored etiology, although specific therapy remains unavailable. An article on the rheumatologic consequences of alcohol is reviewed, along with a number of case reports of joint problems in rare skin and metabolic diseases. Understanding the mechanisms of rarities, including rheumatic fever, interleukin-2-induced arthritis, and a unique "menstrual arthritis" might give insight into the etiology of more common arthropathies.

  18. Parasitic Helminths: New Weapons against Immunological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Osada, Yoshio; Kanazawa, Tamotsu

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of allergic and autoimmune diseases is increasing in developed countries, possibly due to reduced exposure to microorganisms in childhood (hygiene hypothesis). Epidemiological and experimental evidence in support of this hypothesis is accumulating. In this context, parasitic helminths are now important candidates for antiallergic/anti-inflammatory agents. Here we summarize antiallergic/anti-inflammatory effects of helminths together along with our own study of the effects of Schistosoma mansoni on Th17-dependent experimental arthritis. We also discuss possible mechanisms of helminth-induced suppression according to the recent advances of immunology. PMID:20169100

  19. [Bad memories: understanding and removal of pathogenic consequences of immunological memory in inflammatory rheumatic diseases. The IMPAM consortium].

    PubMed

    Kamradt, T; Radbruch, A; Chang, H-D

    2012-08-01

    The Research Consortium IMPAM (IMprinting of the PAthogenic Memory for rheumatic inflammation) has recently been funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research in Germany. Within this consortium ten different research groups, coordinated by the German Rheumatism Research Center (DRFZ) and the University Hospital Jena, will examine the molecular dialogue between immune system memory cells and mesenchymal cells in chronic rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis or ankylosing spondylitis. The consortium's aim is to understand and modulate these interactions therapeutically, such that the pathogenic imprinting of proinflammatory memory cells can be extinguished and the anti-inflammatory capacity of the patients' regulatory cells can be restored.

  20. Rheumatic complaints and musculoskeletal disorders in workers of a meat processing industry.

    PubMed

    Krapac, L; Sladoljev, M; Saćer, D; Sakić, D

    1997-06-01

    The effects of unsatisfactory microclimatic conditions and forced body position on the occurrence of fatigue and pain at work and disorders of the musculoskeletal system were evaluated in 90 female workers employed in the meat processing industry. The control group consisted of 95 workers whose work did not involve repetitive operation patterns and took place in a satisfactory microclimate. The mean age of both groups was 35 years. The data on symptoms were collected through a questionnaire. Further medical and functional examination of the locomotor system was carried out in both groups. Compared to the control, a significantly higher percentage of the exposed workers complained of fatigue and pain during work and manifested marked disorders. Most of degenerative rheumatic diseases of the spine were diagnosed in both groups. Other disorders found in the exposed workers in higher prevalence than in the control were: extraarticular rheumatic diseases as fibromyalgia, humeroscapular periarthritis, and epicondylitis. This paper proposes primary and secondary prevention of rheumatic diseases for workers in the meat processing industry.

  1. PTSD, a Disorder with an Immunological Component

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhewu; Young, M. Rita I.

    2016-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been associated with an inflammatory state. However, few studies have addressed the mechanisms underlying this immune imbalance that favors inflammation or how this imbalance contributes to PTSD. Whether the immune imbalance influences responsiveness or unresponsiveness of patients to PTSD treatments is currently not known. This review brings forward an immune emphasis to a mental health disorder that is unprecedented in its prevalence among combat Veterans of the ongoing conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan and which also afflicts civilians who have undergone extreme traumatic experiences, such as following natural disasters, serious accidents, or assaults. Included is an overview of the correlative associations in human subjects between PTSD and inflammation and studies in animal models of PTSD, demonstrating causal contributions of inflammation and immune dysregulation to PTSD-like behavior following stress exposure. PMID:27375619

  2. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and rheumatic diseases in the indigenous Qom population of Rosario, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Rosana; Silvestre, Adriana M R; Goñi, Mario; García, Vanina; Mathern, Nora; Jorfen, Marisa; Miljevic, Julio; Dhair, Daniel; Laithe, Matias; Conti, Silvana; Midauar, Fadua; Martin, Maria Celeste; Barrios, Maria Cecilia; Nieto, Romina; Prigione, Cristina; Sanabria, Alvaro; Gervasoni, Viviana; Grabbe, Emilio; Gontero, Romina; Peláez-Ballestas, Ingris; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and rheumatic diseases among the indigenous Qom (Toba) population in the city of Rosario, Santa Fe, Argentina. An analytical cross-sectional study using methodology of the Community Oriented Program for the Control of Rheumatic Diseases (COPCORD) was performed. Subjects ≥18 years of age were interviewed by advanced students of medicine and nursing, bilingual translator-facilitators, and coordinators. Individuals with musculoskeletal pain (positive cases) were evaluated sequentially for 7 days by internists and rheumatologists for diagnosis and treatment. The study included 1656 individuals (77 % of the census population). Of these, 1020 (61.5 %) were female, with mean age of 35.3 (SD 13.9) years, and 1028 (62.0 %) were bilingual. The public health care system covers 87.1 % of the population. Musculoskeletal pain in the previous 7 days and/or at some time during their life was present in 890 subjects (53.7 %). Of those with pain in the last 7 days, 302 (64.1 %) subjects had an Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI) score ≥0.8. The most frequent pain sites were lumbar spine (19.3 %), knees (13.0 %), and hands (12.0 %). The prevalence of rheumatic diseases was as follows: mechanical back pain (20.1 %), rheumatic regional pain syndrome (2.9 %), osteoarthritis (4.0 %) rheumatoid arthritis (2.4 %), inflammatory back pain (0.2 %), systemic sclerosis (0.1 %), Sjögren syndrome (0.1 %), fibromyalgia (0.1 %), mixed connective tissue disease (0.06 %), and systemic lupus erythematosus (0.06 %). The prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders was 53.7 % and rheumatic diseases 29.6 %. Rheumatoid arthritis prevalence was 2.4 % using COPCORD methodology, one of the highest reported at present.

  3. Treatment of inflammatory rheumatic disorders in pregnancy: what are the safest treatment options?

    PubMed

    Ostensen, M; Ramsey-Goldman, R

    1998-11-01

    The interaction of pregnancy and the rheumatic diseases varies, ranging from life-threatening conditions such as thromboembolic events and progressive renal disease in some autoimmune disorders, to minor flares of peripheral arthritis in inflammatory rheumatic disease. As a consequence, treatment strategy will vary according to the maternal or fetal compromise expected. All nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including high dose aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid), can cause adverse effects during pregnancy related to the inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. Prolongation of gestation and labour, constriction of the ductus arteriosus, persistent fetal circulation, impairment of renal function and bleeding are risks of third trimester exposure of pregnant women to all inhibitors of cyclo-oxygenase. Most of these adverse effects can be prevented by discontinuing NSAIDs 8 weeks prior to delivery. Low dose aspirin has not been associated with fetal or neonatal toxicity. Some corticosteroids such as prednisone and prednisolone do not readily cross the placenta and can be safely used during pregnancy as immunosuppressive drugs. Maternal complications related to corticosteroids may occur and close monitoring is therefore mandatory. There is limited information on the safety of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs including gold, antimalarials, penicillamine (D-penicillamine), sulfasalazine and cyclosporin. Of these agents, sulfasalazine has the best record for tolerability and can be used by pregnant patients. Gold compounds and penicillamine should be discontinued when pregnancy is recognised. Hydroxychloroquine has not been associated with congenital malformations and seems preferable to chloroquine in patients requiring treatment with antimalarials. Use of cyclosporin may be an alternative to other therapy in pregnant patients with severe rheumatic disease. Indications for treatment with colchicine during pregnancy are few, except for familial Mediterranean

  4. Membrane-associated immunoglobulins of human lymphocytes in immunologic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Nicod, Isabelle; Girard, J. P.; Cruchaud, A.

    1973-01-01

    Membrane-associated immunoglobulins of peripheral blood lymphocytes were studied by indirect immunofluorescence for γ, α, μ, κ and λ chains in healthy subjects and patients with immunologic disease. In healthy subjects, heavy chains were found on 30·7% of lymphocytes (γ 15·3%, α 7·2% and μ 8·2%) and light chains on 32·8% of cells (κ 20·4% and λ 12·4%). Patients with humoral immune deficiencies had fewer immunoglobulin-bearing cells; sarcoidosis or thymectomy patients had normal or decreased immunoglobulin-bearing lymphocytes; cells with light chains were fewer than those with heavy chains on their lymphocytes. In some cases, normal levels of serum immunoglobulins were found in the absence of the corresponding immunoglobulin-bearing cells, and in others normal immunoglobulin-bearing lymphocytes were present in the absence of the corresponding serum immunoglobulins. These data suggest that (1) immunoglobulin-bearing lymphocytes in blood do not reflect the condition of immunoglobulin-synthesizing cells in peripheral lymphoid tissues, and (2) in certain immunologic disorders, either some B-lymphocytes do not synthesize immunoglobulins, or immunoglobulins are in such a situation that the whole molecule or part of the molecule is not visualized by current methods. PMID:4587505

  5. Autoimmune rheumatic disease and sleep: a review.

    PubMed

    Sangle, Shirish R; Tench, Colin M; D'Cruz, David P

    2015-11-01

    Sleep has an important role to play in the human immune system and it is critical in the restoration and maintenance of homeostasis. Sleep deprivation and disorders may have a profound impact on health, well being and the ability to resist infection. Autoimmune rheumatic diseases are multisystem disorders that involve complicated hormonal and immunological pathophysiology. Previous studies have suggested that sleep deprivation may lead to immunological disturbance in experimental mouse models. Sleep disorders may trigger immune system abnormalities inducing autoantibody production, possibly leading to the development of autoimmune disease such as systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma or rheumatoid arthritis. Indeed, in experimental models, it has been suggested that sleep deprivation may induce the onset of autoimmune disease. Chronic deprivation of sleep is common in modern society and has been seen in various autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases. We have reviewed various aspects of sleep deprivation and sleep apnoea syndrome, and their effects on the immune system and their relevance to autoimmune diseases. We hope that these data will encourage greater awareness of the role that improved sleep hygiene may play in the management of these rheumatic diseases.

  6. The impact of concomitant fibromyalgia on visual analogue scales of pain, fatigue and function in patients with various rheumatic disorders.

    PubMed

    Levy, Ofer; Segal, Refael; Maslakov, Ilya; Markov, Andrey; Tishler, Moshe; Amit-Vazina, Mirit

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of concomitant fibromyalgia on the rating of pain, fatigue, and dysfunction, in patients with various rheumatic disorders. A cross-sectional study was carried out in a hospital-based rheumatology unit. Standard clinical and laboratory data were obtained and all patients completed questionnaires on pain, fatigue, and daily function. The rate of concomitant fibromyalgia was estimated using the 1990 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) classification criteria for fibromyalgia and the analysis concentrated on visual analogue scales (VAS). Six hundred and eighteen visits of 383 patients with inflammatory as well as non-inflammatory rheumatic disorders were analyzed. Concomitant fibromyalgia was noted in 74 patients (23% of the cohort). Patients with rheumatic diseases and concomitant fibromyalgia had significantly higher mean VAS scores for pain, fatigue, and function (79±17, 81±18, 80±18, respectively) as compared to patients who had no features of fibromyalgia (47±28, 50±29, 44±30 respectively; all p values <0.001). The scores reported by patients with rheumatic diseases and concomitant fibromyalgia were similar to the scores obtained from patients with primary FM. Concomitant FM is common both among patients with inflammatory and patients with non inflammatory rheumatic disorders. Concomitant FM has a remarkable impact on the severity of symptoms and, moreover, patients with concomitant FM exhibit extreme and significantly distinct levels of pain and fatigue which is as severe as that reported by patients with primary FM. It seems that fibromyalgic features dominate and become the main cause of morbidity in rheumatological patients with concomitant FM.

  7. Prevalent Vertebral Fractures among Children Initiating Glucocorticoid Therapy for the Treatment of Rheumatic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Huber, A.M.; Gaboury, I.; Cabral, D.A.; Lang, B.; Ni, A.; Stephure, D.; Taback, S.; Dent, P.; Ellsworth, J.; LeBlanc, C.; Saint-Cyr, C.; Scuccimarri, R.; Hay, J.; Lentle, B.; Matzinger, M.; Shenouda, N.; Moher, D.; Rauch, F.; Siminoski, K.; Ward, L.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Vertebral fractures are an under-recognized problem in children with inflammatory disorders. We studied spine health among 134 children (87 girls) with rheumatic conditions (median age 10 years) within 30 days of initiating glucocorticoid (GC) therapy. Methods Children were categorized as follows: juvenile dermatomyositis (juvenile DM, N=30), juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA; N=28), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and related conditions (N=26), systemic arthritis (N=22), systemic vasculitis (N=16), and other conditions (N=12). Thoracolumbar spine radiograph and dual energy x-ray absorptiometry for lumbar spine areal bone mineral density (LS BMD) were performed within 30 days of GC initiation. Genant semi-quantitative grading was used for vertebral morphometry. Second metacarpal morphometry was carried out on a hand radiograph. Clinical factors including disease and physical activity, calcium and vitamin D intake, cumulative GC dose, underlying diagnosis, LS BMD Z-score and back pain were analyzed for association with vertebral fracture. Results Thirteen vertebral fractures were noted in 9 children (7%). Six patients had a single vertebral fracture and three patients had two to three fractures. Fractures were clustered in the mid-thoracic region (69%). Three vertebral fractures (23%) were moderate (Grade 2); the others were mild (Grade 1). For the entire cohort, mean (±SD) LS BMD Z-score was significantly different from zero (−0.55±1.2, p<0.001) despite a mean height Z-score that was similar to the healthy average (0.02±1.0, p=0.825). Back pain was highly associated with increased odds for fracture (OR 10.6, 95% CI 2.1 to 53.8, p=0.004). Conclusions In pediatric rheumatic conditions, vertebral fractures can be present prior to prolonged GC exposure. PMID:20391507

  8. Immunology.

    PubMed

    Toskala, Elina

    2014-09-01

    Knowledge of our immune system functions is critical for understanding allergic airway disease development as well as for selection of appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic options for patients with respiratory allergies. This review explains the current understanding of the basic immunology of the upper airways and the pathophysiology of allergic responses, including the mechanisms behind allergic rhinitis. The immune system can be divided to 2 main defense systems that function differently-innate immunity and adaptive immunity. Innate immunity includes several defensive mechanisms such as anatomic or physical barriers, physiological barriers, phagocytosis, and inflammation. The adaptive immune response is activated in an antigen-specific way to provide for the elimination of antigen and induce lasting protection. Hypersensitivity reactions occur when an exaggerated adaptive immune response is activated. Allergic rhinitis is an example of a type I, immunoglobulin E, mediated hypersensitivity reaction. Today we have several immunomodulatory treatment options for patients with allergic airway diseases, such as subcutaneous and sublingual immunotherapy. An understanding of the basics of our immune system and its method of functions is key for using these therapies appropriately. © 2014 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  9. Association between mental health disorders and sexual dysfunction in patients suffering from rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Anyfanti, Panagiota; Pyrpasopoulou, Athina; Triantafyllou, Areti; Triantafyllou, Georgios; Gavriilaki, Eleni; Chatzimichailidou, Sofia; Gkaliagkousi, Eugenia; Petidis, Konstantinos; Aslanidis, Spyros; Douma, Stella

    2014-11-01

    Sexual functioning may be notoriously affected in patients suffering from rheumatic diseases, yet the extent to which physical and/or psychological factors contribute to sexual dysfunction in this particular group of patients remains underinvestigated. This cross-sectional study aimed at investigating whether an association exists between psychological status (anxiety, depression) and sexual dysfunction, independently of other physical factors, in patients with rheumatic disorders. A total of 509 consecutive rheumatologic patients, aged 54.7 ± 14.2 years, 423 female and 86 male, were studied. Female and male sexual function was evaluated with the Female Sexual Dysfunction Index (FSFI) and the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaire, respectively. The Hamilton Anxiety Scale and the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale were used to detect presence of anxiety and depression, respectively. Sexual dysfunction affected 69.9%, anxiety 37.5%, and depression 22% of our patients. A strong and negative correlation was found between anxiety and both FSFI (r = -0.169, P < 0.001) and IIEF score (r = -0.304, P = 0.004). Similarly, depressive symptomatology was strongly and negatively correlated with both FSFI (r = -0.178, P < 0.001) and IIEF score (r = -0.222, P = 0.04). In the logistic regression analysis, apart from increasing age and female sex, depression (P = 0.027) and anxiety (P = 0.049) were identified as the only predictors of sexual dysfunction, even after adjustment for a variety of physical factors. Mental distress and sexual dysfunction are extremely common in rheumatologic patients. Sexual dysfunction is significantly associated with anxiety and depression in both men and women and may be independently predicted by their presence in this group of patients. Physicians dealing with rheumatologic patients should be aware of these results and incorporate screening and treatment of the above comorbidities in

  10. Immunological disorders associated with polychlorinated biphenyls and related halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noguchi, G.E.; Leatherland, J.F.; Woo, P.T.K.

    1998-01-01

    This review characterizes immunological disorders in fish associated with the widespread environmental contaminants, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and related halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (HAHs). Special attention is devoted to comparing the sensitivity of fish species, identifying sensitive immunological endpoints and postulating mechanisms of action.

  11. Membranous Nephropathy Associated With Immunological Disorder-Related Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dauvergne, Maxime; Moktefi, Anissa; Rabant, Marion; Vigneau, Cécile; Kofman, Tomek; Burtey, Stephane; Corpechot, Christophe; Stehlé, Thomas; Desvaux, Dominique; Rioux-Leclercq, Nathalie; Rouvier, Philippe; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Frouget, Thierry; Daugas, Eric; Jablonski, Mathieu; Dahan, Karine; Brocheriou, Isabelle; Remy, Philippe; Grimbert, Philippe; Lang, Philippe; Chazouilleres, Oliver; Sahali, Dil; Audard, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The association between membranous nephropathy (MN) and immunological disorder-related liver disease has not been extensively investigated, and the specific features of this uncommon association, if any, remain to be determined. We retrospectively identified 10 patients with this association. We aimed to describe the clinical, biological, and pathological characteristics of these patients and their therapeutic management. The possible involvement of the phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) in these apparent secondary forms of MN was assessed by immunohistochemistry with renal and liver biopsy specimens. The mean delay between MN and liver disease diagnoses was 3.9 years and the interval between the diagnosis of the glomerular and liver diseases was <1.5 years in 5 patients. MN was associated with a broad spectrum of liver diseases including primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). AIH whether isolated (n = 3) or associated with PBC (n = 2) or PSC (n = 2) was the most frequent autoimmune liver disease. Circulating PLA2R antibodies were detected in 4 out of 9 patients but the test was performed under specific immunosuppressive treatment in 3 out of 9 patients. Seven of the 9 patients with available renal tissue specimens displayed enhanced expression of PLA2R in glomeruli whereas PLA2R was not expressed in liver parenchyma from these patients or in normal liver tissue. The study of immunoglobulin (Ig) subclasses of deposits in glomeruli revealed that the most frequent pattern was the coexistence of IgG1 and IgG4 immune deposits with IgG4 predominating. Detection of PLA2R antibodies in glomeruli but not in liver parenchyma is a common finding in patients with MN associated with autoimmune liver disease, suggesting that these autoantibodies are not exclusively detected in idiopathic MN. PMID:26222864

  12. Immunological and autoimmune considerations of Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Gesundheit, Benjamin; Rosenzweig, Joshua P; Naor, David; Lerer, Bernard; Zachor, Ditza A; Procházka, Vaclav; Melamed, Michal; Kristt, Donald A; Steinberg, Abraham; Shulman, Cory; Hwang, Paul; Koren, Gideon; Walfisch, Asnat; Passweg, Jacob R; Snowden, John A; Tamouza, Ryad; Leboyer, Marion; Farge-Bancel, Dominique; Ashwood, Paul

    2013-08-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) are a group of heterogeneous neurodevelopmental conditions presenting in early childhood with a prevalence ranging from 0.7% to 2.64%. Social interaction and communication skills are impaired and children often present with unusual repetitive behavior. The condition persists for life with major implications for the individual, the family and the entire health care system. While the etiology of ASD remains unknown, various clues suggest a possible association with altered immune responses and ASD. Inflammation in the brain and CNS has been reported by several groups with notable microglia activation and increased cytokine production in postmortem brain specimens of young and old individuals with ASD. Moreover several laboratories have isolated distinctive brain and CNS reactive antibodies from individuals with ASD. Large population based epidemiological studies have established a correlation between ASD and a family history of autoimmune diseases, associations with MHC complex haplotypes, and abnormal levels of various inflammatory cytokines and immunological markers in the blood. In addition, there is evidence that antibodies that are only present in some mothers of children with ASD bind to fetal brain proteins and may be a marker or risk factor for ASD. Studies involving the injection of these ASD specific maternal serum antibodies into pregnant mice during gestation, or gestational exposure of Rhesus monkeys to IgG subclass of these antibodies, have consistently elicited behavioral changes in offspring that have relevance to ASD. We will summarize the various types of studies associating ASD with the immune system, critically evaluate the quality of these studies, and attempt to integrate them in a way that clarifies the areas of immune and autoimmune phenomena in ASD research that will be important indicators for future research.

  13. The impact of frequently encountered cardiovascular risk factors on sexual dysfunction in rheumatic disorders.

    PubMed

    Anyfanti, P; Pyrpasopoulou, A; Triantafyllou, A; Doumas, M; Gavriilaki, E; Triantafyllou, G; Gkaliagkousi, E; Chatzimichailidou, S; Petidis, K; Avagianou, P-A; Zamboulis, C; Aslanidis, S; Douma, S

    2013-07-01

    Traditional cardiovascular risk factors have been acknowledged as major contributors to sexual dysfunction in the general population. The purpose of this study was to explore their impact on sexual function in rheumatologic patients. A total of 557 consecutive rheumatologic patients, 449 females and 108 males, had their sexual function evaluated with the Female Sexual Functioning Index (FSFI) and the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaire respectively. Personal data regarding presence of cardiovascular risk factors were collected and analysed in association with the FSFI and IIEF scores. Mean age of the participants was 54.1 ± 14.1 years, mean body mass index was 27.5 ± 5.29 and mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure was 130.5 ± 19.82 and 79.5 ± 10.51 mmHg respectively. Hypertension was present in 39% of the participants, diabetes mellitus in 10.2%, dyslipidaemia in 33.6% and history of cardiovascular events in 8.6%, whereas smoking was recorded by 28.4% and alcohol consumption by 7.4%. Sexual dysfunction affected 68.6% of our study population (73.5% of females and 48.1% of males, p < 0.001). Logistic regression analysis revealed that age was the only factor associated with a significantly higher prevalence of sexual dysfunction (p < 0.001 for both genders, p = 0.013 in males and p < 0.001 in females). Increased age was identified as the only independent predictor of sexual dysfunction in our population. Apart from age, traditional cardiovascular risk factors failed to explain the increased prevalence of sexual dysfunction in these patients. Other contributing factors (physical and/or psychological) might account for the increased occurrence of sexual dysfunction in rheumatic disorders.

  14. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and rheumatic diseases in an urban community in Monagas State, Venezuela: a COPCORD study.

    PubMed

    Granados, Ysabel; Cedeño, Ligia; Rosillo, Celenia; Berbin, Sol; Azocar, Miriam; Molina, María Elena; Lara, Onelia; Sanchez, Gloris; Peláez-Ballestas, Ingris

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and rheumatic diseases in an urban community in Venezuela. We conducted a cross-sectional, community-based study using the COPCORD (Community Oriented Program for Control of Rheumatic Diseases) methodology in subjects older than 18 years. Positive cases were evaluated by rheumatologists. We surveyed 3,973 individuals (1,606 males and 2,367 females), with a mean age of 43.7 years (standard deviation (SD) 17.6). Mean duration of education was 8.9 years (SD 3.7), 79.2 % had a monthly income of < US$569, and 46.4 % were working. Excluding trauma, the prevalence of pain in the 7 days prior to interview was 19.9 % (95 % confidence interval (CI) 18.7-21.2 %). Mean pain intensity on a visual analog scale was 6.3 (SD 2.2), and 30.1 % (95 % CI 28.7-31.6 %) had a history of pain. Respondents reported pain in the knees, back, hands, shoulders, and ankles in the last 7 days; 4.7 % described current functional limitation, with 16.5 % reporting limitations in the past. Regarding treatment, 23.9 % received medication, 6.4 % received physical therapy, and 2.6 % received alternative treatment. The main diagnoses were osteoarthritis in 15.0 % (95 % CI 13.9-16.1 %), rheumatic regional pain syndromes in 6.3 % (95 % CI 5.5-7.1 %), back pain in 2.8 % (95 % CI 2.3-3.4 %), rheumatoid arthritis in 0.4 % (95 % CI 0.2-0.6 %), crystal arthropathy in 0.3 % (95 % CI 0.1-0.5 %), fibromyalgia in 0.2 % (95 % CI 0.1-0.4 %), and systemic lupus erythematosus in 0.07 % (95 % CI 0.01-0.2 %). The prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders was 22.4 %, and the most prevalent disease was osteoarthritis. Pain, in which a patient is receiving treatment for musculoskeletal disorders, and physical disability were associated with the presence of a rheumatic disease.

  15. Screening for latent TB in patients with rheumatic disorders prior to biologic agents in a 'high-risk' TB population: comparison of two interferon gamma release assays.

    PubMed

    Melath, Sunil; Ismajli, Mediola; Smith, Robin; Patel, Ishita; Steuer, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Patients with rheumatic disorders treated with TNF inhibitors are at increased risk of developing TB. There is no 'gold-standard' for the diagnosis of latent TB prior to initiation of biologic agents. We report our own experience of comparing two interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs) in screening for latent TB in a 'high-risk' TB area in patients with rheumatic disorders. The study demonstrated good concordance between the two tests. We believe the additional cost of these assays is justified in high-risk populations prior to biologic agents, with 16% of the current study population with at least one positive IGRA assay.

  16. Rheumatic diseases that can be confused with work-related upper extremity disorders.

    PubMed

    June, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    Rheumatic illnesses are a common cause for musculoskeletal complaints in the general population. All ages can be affected, including people in the prime of their working years. Secondary problems, such as entrapment neuropathies, enthesopathies, and Raynaud's syndrome, can be associated with various inflammatory arthritides. A detailed history and physical are the most important tools in screening for potential inflammatory disease in workers with upper extremity complaints.

  17. Bone histomorphometric changes in children with rheumatic disorders on chronic glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Jennifer; Holmyard, Douglas; Silverman, Earl; Sochett, Etienne; Grynpas, Marc

    2016-11-10

    Rheumatic diseases are associated with an increased fracture risk. The tissue level characteristics of the bone involvement in children have not been well elucidated. Our objectives were to describe the bone micro-architectural characteristics in children with rheumatic diseases on chronic glucocorticoids, and to determine associations between micro-architectural findings with clinical and radiological variables. Children on chronic glucocorticoids for an underlying rheumatic disease were referred for evaluation of bone fragility given the presence of vertebral compression fractures. A trans-iliac bone biopsy was performed as part of the clinical assessment. Histomorphometric analysis and quantitative backscattered electron imaging (qBSE) of the biopsy samples were undertaken. Data of 15 children (14.0 ± 3.2 years) with a duration of glucocorticoid exposure of 6.2 ± 4.1 years and average prednisone dose of 14.1 ± 6.2 mg/m(2)/day were assessed. Histomorphometric analyses demonstrated significant decrease in trabecular thickness (p = 0.01), osteoid thickness (p < 0.01), osteoblast surface (p = 0.02) and increase in trabecular separation (p = 0.04) compared to published age-matched normative data. Severity of the trabecular deficit was correlated to glucocorticoid dose, height and body mass index Z score, but not bone mineral density or measures of disease activity. Using qBSE to measure bone mineralization, the subjects were shown to have a heterogeneous and hypermineralized profile, with higher cumulative glucocorticoid dose being associated with greater mineralization (p < 0.01). In children with rheumatic diseases presenting with vertebral fractures, there is evidence of abnormal bone matrix mineralization and impairments of bone micro-architecture that correlate to glucocorticoid dose.

  18. Iatrogenic rheumatic syndromes in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Quiceno, G Andres; Cush, John J

    2007-02-01

    Rheumatic complaints are common in the geriatric population. However, uncommonly autoimmune or musculoskeletal complaints and disorders may arise as a consequence of pharmacotherapy. These rare events include stain myopathy, drug-induced lupus, arthralgias, vasculitis, or tight skin syndromes. This article discusses the possible iatrogenic causes of rheumatic conditions, potential inciting agents, and the various types of rheumatic manifestations seen in the elderly.

  19. Iatrogenic rheumatic syndromes in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Quiceno, G Andres; Cush, John J

    2005-08-01

    Rheumatic complaints are common in the geriatric population. However, uncommonly autoimmune or musculoskeletal complaints and disorders may arise as a consequence of pharmacotherapy. These rare events include statin myopathy, drug-induced lupus, arthralgias, vasculitis, or tight skin syndromes. This article will discuss the possible iatrogenic causes of rheumatic conditions, potential inciting agents, and the various types of rheumatic manifestations seen in the elderly.

  20. [Immunologic disorders in pathogenesis of chronic generalized parodontitis].

    PubMed

    Volozhin, A I; Poriadin, G V; Kazimiski, T I; Barer, G M; Askerova, S Sh; Salmasi, Zh M

    2005-01-01

    Systemic immunity was studied in patients with chronic generalized parodontitis. This group of patients had distinct changes in immunologic system: depression of T- and stimulation of B-cellular immunity without accumulation of plasma cells and initiation of effective humoral response. Increased peripheral blood number of lymphocytes expressing induction of apoptosis CD95 receptors and ligand for this receptor CD95L (Fas-L) can lead to intensification of lymphocyte apoptosis and may be the reason for T-cell deficit development. The results of the study confirm the important role of immune system disturbances in pathogenesis of chronic generalized parodontitis.

  1. Incident vertebral fractures and risk factors in the first three years following glucocorticoid initiation among pediatric patients with rheumatic disorders

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Claire MA; Ma, Jinhui; Taljaard, Monica; Roth, Johannes; Scuccimarri, Rosie; Miettunen, Paivi; Lang, Bianca; Huber, Adam M; Houghton, Kristin; Jaremko, Jacob L; Ho, Josephine; Shenouda, Nazih; Matzinger, Mary Ann; Lentle, Brian; Stein, Robert; Sbrocchi, Anne Marie; Oen, Kiem; Rodd, Celia; Jurencak, Roman; Cummings, Elizabeth; Couch, Robert; Cabral, David A; Atkinson, Stephanie; Alos, Nathalie; Rauch, Frank; Siminoski, Kerry; Ward, Leanne M

    2015-01-01

    Vertebral fractures are an important yet under-recognized manifestation of osteoporosis in children with chronic, glucocorticoid-treated illnesses. Our goal was to determine the incidence and clinical predictors of vertebral fractures in the three years following glucocorticoid initiation among pediatric patients with rheumatic disorders. Incident vertebral fractures were evaluated according to the Genant semi-quantitative method on lateral radiographs at baseline and then annually in the 3 years following glucocorticoid initiation. Extended Cox models were used to assess the association between vertebral fractures and clinical risk predictors. A total of 134 children with rheumatic disorders were enrolled in the study (mean ± standard deviation (SD) age 9.9±4.4 years, 65% girls). The unadjusted vertebral fracture incidence rate was 4.4 per 100 person-years, with a three-year incidence proportion of 12.4%. The highest annual incidence occurred in the first year (6.0%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.9–11.7). Almost one-half of the patients with fractures were asymptomatic. Every 0.5 mg/kg increase in average daily glucocorticoid (prednisone equivalents) dose was associated with a 2.0-fold increased fracture risk (hazard ratio (HR) 2.0, 95% CI 1.1–3.5). Other predictors of increased vertebral fracture risk included: (1) Increases in disease severity scores between baseline and 12 months, (2) Increases in body mass index Z-scores in the first 6 of each 12-month period preceding the annual fracture assessment, and (3) Decreases in lumbar spine bone mineral density Z-scores in the first 6 months of glucocorticoid therapy. As such, we observed that a clinically significant number of children with rheumatic disorders developed incident vertebral fractures in the three years following glucocorticoid initiation. Almost half of the children were asymptomatic and thereby would have been undiagnosed in the absence of radiographic monitoring. In addition, discrete

  2. Incident Vertebral Fractures and Risk Factors in the First Three Years Following Glucocorticoid Initiation Among Pediatric Patients With Rheumatic Disorders.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Claire M A; Ma, Jinhui; Taljaard, Monica; Roth, Johannes; Scuccimarri, Rosie; Miettunen, Paivi; Lang, Bianca; Huber, Adam M; Houghton, Kristin; Jaremko, Jacob L; Ho, Josephine; Shenouda, Nazih; Matzinger, Mary Ann; Lentle, Brian; Stein, Robert; Sbrocchi, Anne Marie; Oen, Kiem; Rodd, Celia; Jurencak, Roman; Cummings, Elizabeth A; Couch, Robert; Cabral, David A; Atkinson, Stephanie; Alos, Nathalie; Rauch, Frank; Siminoski, Kerry; Ward, Leanne M

    2015-09-01

    Vertebral fractures are an important yet underrecognized manifestation of osteoporosis in children with chronic, glucocorticoid-treated illnesses. Our goal was to determine the incidence and clinical predictors of vertebral fractures in the 3 years following glucocorticoid initiation among pediatric patients with rheumatic disorders. Incident vertebral fractures were evaluated according to the Genant semiquantitative method on lateral radiographs at baseline and then annually in the 3 years following glucocorticoid initiation. Extended Cox models were used to assess the association between vertebral fractures and clinical risk predictors. A total of 134 children with rheumatic disorders were enrolled in the study (mean ± standard deviation (SD) age 9.9 ± 4.4 years; 65% girls). The unadjusted vertebral fracture incidence rate was 4.4 per 100 person-years, with a 3-year incidence proportion of 12.4%. The highest annual incidence occurred in the first year (6.0%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.9% to 11.7%). Almost one-half of the patients with fractures were asymptomatic. Every 0.5 mg/kg increase in average daily glucocorticoid (prednisone equivalents) dose was associated with a twofold increased fracture risk (hazard ratio (HR) 2.0; 95% CI 1.1 to 3.5). Other predictors of increased vertebral fracture risk included: (1) increases in disease severity scores between baseline and 12 months; (2) increases in body mass index Z-scores in the first 6 months of each 12-month period preceding the annual fracture assessment; and (3) decreases in lumbar spine bone mineral density Z-scores in the first 6 months of glucocorticoid therapy. As such, we observed that a clinically significant number of children with rheumatic disorders developed incident vertebral fractures in the 3 years following glucocorticoid initiation. Almost one-half of the children were asymptomatic and thereby would have been undiagnosed in the absence of radiographic monitoring. In addition, discrete

  3. Prevalence and factors associated with musculoskeletal disorders and rheumatic diseases in indigenous Maya-Yucateco people: a cross-sectional community-based study.

    PubMed

    Peláez-Ballestas, I; Alvarez-Nemegyei, J; Loyola-Sánchez, A; Escudero, M L

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and rheumatic diseases in indigenous Maya-Yucateco communities using Community-Oriented Program for Control of Rheumatic Diseases (COPCORD) methodology. The study population comprised subjects aged ≥18 years from 11 communities in the municipality of Chankom, Yucatan. An analytical cross-sectional study was performed, and a census was used. Subjects positive for musculoskeletal (MSK) pain were examined by trained physicians. A total of 1523 community members were interviewed. The mean age was 45.2 years (standard deviation (SD) 17.9), and 917 (60.2 %) were women. Overall, 592 individuals (38.8 %; 95 % CI 36.3-41.3 %) had experienced MSK pain in the last 7 days. The pain intensity was reported as "strong" to "severe" in 43.4 %. The diagnoses were rheumatic regional pain syndromes in 165 (10.8 %; 95 % CI 9.4-12.5), low back pain in 153 (10.0 %; 95 % CI 8.5-11.6), osteoarthritis in 144 (9.4 %; 95 % CI 8.0-11.0), fibromyalgia in 35 (2.2 %; 95 % CI 1.6-3.1), rheumatoid arthritis in 17 (1.1 %; 95 % CI 0.6-1.7), undifferentiated arthritis in 8 (0.5 %; 95 % CI 0.2-0.8), and gout in 1 (0.06 %; 95 % CI 0.001-0.3). Older age, being female, disability, and physically demanding work were associated with a greater likelihood of having a rheumatic disease. In conclusion, MSK pain and rheumatic diseases were highly prevalent. The high impact of rheumatic diseases on daily activities in this indigenous population suggests the need to organize culturally-sensitive community interventions for the prevention of disabilities caused by MSK disorders and diseases.

  4. Monoclonal gammopathy and rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Raposo, Ana; Peixoto, Daniela; Bogas, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    It is common to find monoclonal gammopathy in the investigation workout for an unrelated disorder. There are studies relating rheumatic diseases and therapies which show an increased risk of monoclonal gammopathy. The specific mechanisms are not well understood but chronic antigen stimulation assumes an important role. Specific rheumatic diseases have consistently been associated with lymphoproliferative disorders but less attention has been paid to the possible association between monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and multiple myeloma. We reviewed previous studies regarding monoclonal gammopathy and different rheumatic diseases and treatments associated focusing on prevalence, risk factors and possible pathogenic mechanisms. The clinical approach of a monoclonal gammopathy and its follow-up are explained.

  5. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and rheumatic diseases in Cuenca, Ecuador: a WHO-ILAR COPCORD study.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Pacheco, Sergio; Feicán-Alvarado, Astrid; Sanín, Luz Helena; Vintimilla-Ugalde, Jaime; Vintimilla-Moscoso, Fernando; Delgado-Pauta, Jorge; Lliguisaca-Segarra, Angelita; Dután-Erráez, Holger; Guevara-Mosquera, Daniel; Ochoa-Robles, Verónica; Cardiel, Mario H; Peláez-Ballestas, Ingris

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and rheumatic diseases in subjects over 18 years of age from the canton of Cuenca, Ecuador. Cross-sectional analytical community-based study was conducted in subjects over 18 years of age using the validated Community-Oriented Program for the Control of Rheumatic Diseases (COPCORD) questionnaire. Random sampling was used. The questionnaire was administered by standardized health workers. Subjects were visited house by house. Subjects positive for musculoskeletal (MSK) pain in the last 7 days and at some point in life were assessed by rheumatologists to confirm the diagnosis. A total of 4877 subjects participated, with an average age of 42.8 (SD 18.8) years of age; 59.7 % were women; 69.7 % lived in urban areas. 32.5 % reported MSK pain in the last 7 days and 45.7 % at some point in life. The prevalence of knee osteoarthritis was 7.4 %, hand osteoarthritis 5.3 %, low back pain 9.3 %, rheumatoid arthritis 0.8 %, fibromyalgia 2 %, gout 0.4 %, and lupus 0.06 %. Subjects from rural areas reported experiencing more MSK pain in the last 7 days and at some point in life, lower income, poorer health-care coverage, and increased physical activity involving repetitive tasks such as lifting weights or cooking with firewood. MSK pain prevalence was high. Osteoarthritis and low back pain were the most common diseases. Age, sex, physical activity, repetitive tasks, living in a rural area, and lack of health-care coverage were found to be associated with MSK pain.

  6. Attitudes of Israeli Rheumatologists to the Use of Medical Cannabis as Therapy for Rheumatic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ablin, Jacob N.; Elkayam, Ori; Fitzcharles, Mary-Ann

    2016-01-01

    Background While medical cannabis has been used for thousands of years in the treatment of pain and other symptoms, evidence-based use is limited and practitioners face multiple areas of uncertainty regarding the rational use of these compounds. Nonetheless, an increasing public interest and advocacy in favor of medical cannabis is causing the issue to be encountered ever more frequently by physicians in different fields of medicine and particularly in rheumatology. In view of this situation, we have surveyed the attitudes of Israeli rheumatologists to the use of medical cannabis. Objectives As rheumatologists are specialized in caring for patients presenting with musculoskeletal complaints, the confidence of rheumatologists’ knowledge of cannabinoids was surveyed. Methods All members of the Israeli Society of Rheumatology were surveyed by e-mail for their confidence and knowledge of cannabinoids and their perceived competence to prescribe herbal cannabis. Results A total of 23 out of 119 (19.3%) Israeli rheumatologists approached returned the questionnaire. Three-quarters of responders were not confident about their knowledge of cannabinoid molecules or ability to write a prescription for herbal cannabis, and 78% were not confident to write a prescription for herbal cannabis; 74% of responders held the opinion that there was some role for cannabinoids in the management of rheumatic disease. Conclusion Israeli rheumatologists lack confidence in their knowledge of cannabinoids in general, yet are open to the possibility of introducing this treatment. Additional data and guidance are necessary in order to allow rational utilization of cannabinoids for management of rheumatic pain. PMID:27101219

  7. Understanding rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Pedro Ming; Pereira, Rosa Rodrigues; Guilherme, Luiza

    2012-05-01

    Through a comprehensive review of the recent findings on rheumatic fever, we intend to propose a new physiopathologic model for this disease. A Medline search was performed for all articles containing the terms rheumatic fever or rheumatic heart disease in title or abstract from 1970 to 2011. Best evidence qualitative technique was used to select the most relevant. The scientific interest on rheumatic fever has notably diminished throughout the twentieth century as evidenced by the comparison of the proportion of articles in which RF was a subject in 1950 (0.26%) and today (0.03%) [Pubmed]. However, RF remains a major medical and social problem in the developing world and in the so-called hotspots, where it still causes around 500.000 deaths each year, not too different from the pre-antibiotic era. The role of genetic factors in RF susceptibility is discussed. Familiar aggregation, similarity of disease patterns between siblings, identical twin, and HLA correlation studies are evidence for a genetic influence on RF susceptibility. The suspect-involved genes fall mainly into those capable of immunologic mediation. Molecular mimicry explains the triggering of RF, but an intense and sustained inflammation is needed to cause sequels. Also, RF patients vary greatly in terms of symptoms. It is likely that a genetic background directing immune response towards a predominantly Th1 or Th2 pattern contributes to these features. The recent findings on rheumatic fever provide important insight on its physiopathology that helps understanding this prototype post-infectious autoimmune disease giving insights on other autoimmune conditions.

  8. Pregnancy and Rheumatic Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Living Well with Rheumatic Disease Pregnancy & Rheumatic Disease Pregnancy and Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts Diseases with the ... is under control. What are the effects of pregnancy on rheumatic disease? The effects of pregnancy on ...

  9. HIV and Rheumatic Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions HIV & Rheumatic Diseases HIV and Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts Rheumatic diseases related ... knows he or she has HIV. What are HIV-associated rheumatic diseases? Some diseases of the joints ...

  10. Genetic and immunologic aspects of sleep and sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Parish, James M

    2013-05-01

    The study of genetics is providing new and exciting insights into the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. Both normal sleep and several types of sleep disturbances have been found to have significant genetic influences, as have traits of normal sleep, such as those evident in EEG patterns and the circadian sleep-wake cycle. The circadian sleep-wake cycle is based on a complex feedback loop of genetic transcription over a 24-h cycle. Restless legs syndrome (RLS) and periodic limb movements in sleep (PLMS) have familial aggregation, and several genes have a strong association with them. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms linked to RLS/PLMS, although none has a definite functional correlation. Narcolepsy/cataplexy are associated with HLA DQB1*0602 and a T-cell receptor α locus, although functional correlations have not been evident. Obstructive sleep apnea is a complex disorder involving multiple traits, such as anatomy of the oropharynx, ventilatory control, and traits associated with obesity. Although there is clear evidence of familial aggregation in the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, no specific gene or locus has been identified for it. Angiotensin-converting enzyme has been proposed as a risk variant, but evidence is weak. Fatal familial insomnia and advanced sleep phase syndrome are sleep disorders with a definite genetic basis.

  11. Genetic and Immunologic Aspects of Sleep and Sleep Disorders

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The study of genetics is providing new and exciting insights into the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. Both normal sleep and several types of sleep disturbances have been found to have significant genetic influences, as have traits of normal sleep, such as those evident in EEG patterns and the circadian sleep-wake cycle. The circadian sleep-wake cycle is based on a complex feedback loop of genetic transcription over a 24-h cycle. Restless legs syndrome (RLS) and periodic limb movements in sleep (PLMS) have familial aggregation, and several genes have a strong association with them. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms linked to RLS/PLMS, although none has a definite functional correlation. Narcolepsy/cataplexy are associated with HLA DQB1*0602 and a T-cell receptor α locus, although functional correlations have not been evident. Obstructive sleep apnea is a complex disorder involving multiple traits, such as anatomy of the oropharynx, ventilatory control, and traits associated with obesity. Although there is clear evidence of familial aggregation in the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, no specific gene or locus has been identified for it. Angiotensin-converting enzyme has been proposed as a risk variant, but evidence is weak. Fatal familial insomnia and advanced sleep phase syndrome are sleep disorders with a definite genetic basis. PMID:23648914

  12. [Skin changes in rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Dobrić, Ivan

    2005-01-01

    The Intruduction includes those eflorescences that might be useful for diagnostics in rheumatology. Further in the text we have described four groups of rheumatic disorders. The first group: rheumatic diseases (lupus erythematosus, dermatomyositis, systemic scleroderma, the mixed connective tissue disease, allergic vasculitis, polyarteritis) which are the most common from the dermatological point of view. The second group: rheumatic diseases (Wegener's granulomatosis, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren, Reiter and Behçet syndrome and Kawasaki's disease) which are rarely of interest to our dermatologists. In this group there is also psoriatic arthritis, which is not rare in dermatology but its diagnostics and treatment belong to rheumatologists' field of expertise. The third group: infections (rheumatic fever, diseminated gonococcal infection, subacute bacterial endocarditis, Lyme disesease). The fourth group: metabolic disorders (gout). The diseases of the first group are described completely. In the second, third and fourth group of the diseases we have included only skin changes.

  13. ANTI-RHEUMATIC FORMULATIONS FROM AYURVEDA

    PubMed Central

    Raut, A. A.; Joshi, A. D.; Antarkar, D. S.; Joshi, V. R.; Vaidya, A. B.

    1991-01-01

    Rheumatic disorders like Amavata, Sandhivata and Vatarakta are elaborately described in ayurvedic literature. Preliminary survey of literature shows that about 247 formulations are recommended for these rheumatic disorders. These formulations generally include guggulu compounds, compounds of plant powders, decoctions, medicated ghees, oils, electuaries etc. Therapeutic potential of ayurvedic concepts and a brief review of Ayurvedic formulations are also discussed. PMID:22556565

  14. Communicating with the rheumatic patient.

    PubMed

    Wright, V; Hopkins, R

    1977-05-01

    To explore the meanings attached to words by patients and doctors, a multiple-choice questionnaire was given to 214 rheumatic patients, 110 non-rheumatic patients, 227 rheumatologists and 36 general practitioners. Words and phrases dealt with symptoms in descriptive terms, common disorders and parts of the body relevant to rheumatology. Poor agreement was obtained for 'back' among rheumatologists and hospital doctors, and for 'arthritis' among general practitioners. The word 'sciatica' means very different things to different doctors. Among rheumatic sufferers good agreement was only reached for 'rheumatism' and 'hereditary'. Non-rheumatic sufferers obtained better agreement than the rheumatic patients. This may have been due to more in the professional classes among the former group. The poorest agreement among rheumatic patients was for 'numbness', 'sciatica', 'slipped disc', 'vertebra', 'cervical', 'spinal cord', 'arthritis', 'deformity', 'anaemia', 'ligaments', 'osteoarthritis', 'lumbar', 'sacrum' and 'back'. Poor doctor-patient correlation between patients and rheumatologists occurred for 'numbness', 'spinal cord', 'cervical', 'sacrum', 'loin', 'slipped disc', 'arthritis', 'osteoarthritis' and 'steroids'.

  15. Somatoform disorders and rheumatic diseases: from DSM-IV to DSM-V.

    PubMed

    Alciati, A; Atzeni, F; Sgiarovello, P; Sarzi-Puttini, P

    2014-06-06

    Medically unexplained symptoms are considered 'somatoform disorders' in the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV). The introduction of this nosographic category has been helpful in drawing attention to a previously neglected area, but has not been successful in promoting an understanding of the disorders' biological basis and treatment implications, probably because of a series of diagnostic shortcomings. The newly proposed DSM-V diagnostic criteria try to overcome the limitations of the DSM-IV definition, which was organised centrally around the concept of medically unexplained symptoms, by emphasising the extent to which a patient's thoughts, feelings and behaviours concerning their somatic symptoms are disproportionate or excessive. This change is supported by a growing body of evidence showing that psychological and behavioural features play a major role in causing patient disability and maintaining high level of health care use. Pain disorders is the sub-category of DSM-IV somatoform disorders that most closely resembles fibromyalgia. Regardless of the diagnostic changes recently brought about by DSM-V, neuroimaging studies have identified important components of the mental processes associated with a DSM- IV diagnosis of pain disorder.

  16. Specific Management of Post-Chikungunya Rheumatic Disorders: A Retrospective Study of 159 Cases in Reunion Island from 2006-2012

    PubMed Central

    Javelle, Emilie; Ribera, Anne; Degasne, Isabelle; Gaüzère, Bernard-Alex; Marimoutou, Catherine; Simon, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    Background Since 2003, the tropical arthritogenic chikungunya (CHIK) virus has become an increasingly medical and economic burden in affected areas as it can often result in long-term disabilities. The clinical spectrum of post-CHIK (pCHIK) rheumatic disorders is wide. Evidence-based recommendations are needed to help physicians manage the treatment of afflicted patients. Patients and methods We conducted a 6-year case series retrospective study in Reunion Island of patients referred to a rheumatologist due to continuous rheumatic or musculoskeletal pains that persisted following CHIK infection. These various disorders were documented in terms of their clinical and therapeutic courses. Post-CHIK de novo chronic inflammatory rheumatisms (CIRs) were identified according to validated criteria. Results We reviewed 159 patient medical files. Ninety-four patients (59%) who were free of any articular disorder prior to CHIK met the CIR criteria: rheumatoid arthritis (n=40), spondyloarthritis (n=33), undifferentiated polyarthritis (n=21). Bone lesions detectable by radiography occurred in half of the patients (median time: 3.5 years pCHIK). A positive therapeutic response was achieved in 54 out of the 72 patients (75%) who were treated with methotrexate (MTX). Twelve out of the 92 patients (13%) received immunomodulatory biologic agents due to failure of contra-indication of MTX treatment. Other patients mainly presented with mechanical shoulder or knee disorders, bilateral distal polyarthralgia that was frequently associated with oedema at the extremities and tunnel syndromes. These pCHIK musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) were managed with pain-killers, local and/or general anti-inflammatory drugs, and physiotherapy. Conclusion Rheumatologists in Reunion Island managed CHIK rheumatic disorders in a pragmatic manner following the outbreak in 2006. This retrospective study describes the common mechanical and inflammatory pCHIK disorders. We provide a diagnostic and

  17. Factors associated with regional rheumatic pain disorders in a population of Puerto Ricans with diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Font, Yvonne M.; Castro-Santana, Lesliane E.; Nieves-Plaza, Mariely; Maldonado, Mirna; Mayor, Ángel M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence and factors associated with bursitis/tendonitis disorders in Puerto Ricans with diabetes mellitus (DM). A cross-sectional study was performed in 202 adult Puerto Ricans (100 DM patients and 102 non-diabetic subjects). For each participant, a complete medical history and a musculoskeletal exam were systematically performed. Socio-demographic parameters, health-related behaviors, comorbidities, and pharmacotherapy were determined for all subjects. For DM patients, disease duration, glycemic control, and DM long-term complications were also examined. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to determine the factors associated with bursitis/tendonitis disorders. The mean (SD) age for DM patients and non-diabetic controls were 53.3 (12.9) and 50.0 (13.1) years; 64.0 and 64.7 % of DM patients and controls were females, respectively. Overall, the prevalence of bursitis/tendonitis was higher in DM patients than among non-diabetics (59.0 % vs. 29.4 %, p<0.01). In multivariate analyses, DM patients had 2.47 (95 % CI 1.05, 5.84) the odds of having bursitis/tendonitis as compared to non-diabetics. Specifically, DM patients had a higher frequency of flexor tenosynovitis, De Quervain’s tenosynovitis, lateral epicondylitis, medial epicondylitis, trochanteric bursitis, and anserine bursitis than non-diabetic subjects (p<0.05). Among DM patients, multivariate analyses showed that those with bursitis/tendonitis were more likely to be female [OR (95 % CI) 4.55 (1.42, 14.55)] and have peripheral vascular disease [OR (95 % CI) 8.48 (1.71, 41.93)]. In conclusion, bursitis/tendonitis disorders were common in this population of Hispanics with DM. Among DM patients, bursitis/tendonitis disorders were more frequent in women and those with long-term complications such as peripheral vascular disease. PMID:24522480

  18. Diagnosing soft tissue rheumatic disorders of the upper limb in epidemiological studies of vibration-exposed populations

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Keith T

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate approaches adopted to diagnose soft tissue rheumatic disorders of the upper limb (ULDs) in vibration-exposed populations and in other settings, and to compare their methodological qualities. Methods Systematic searches were made of the Medline, Embase, and CINAHL electronic bibliographic databases, and of various supplementary sources (textbooks, reviews, conference and workshop proceedings, personal files). For vibration-exposed populations, qualifying papers were scored in terms of the provenance of their measuring instruments (adequacy of documentation, standardisation, reliability, criterion-related and content validity). Similar criteria were applied to general proposals for whole diagnostic schemes, and evidence was collated on the test-retest reliability of symptom histories and clinical signs. Results In total, 23 relevant reports were identified concerning vibration-exposed populations - 21 involving symptoms and 9 involving examination/diagnosis. Most of the instruments employed scored poorly in terms of methodological quality. The search also identified, from the wider literature, more than a dozen schemes directed at classifying ULDs, and 18 studies of test-retest reliability of symptoms and physical signs in the upper limb. Findings support the use of the standardised Nordic questionnaire for symptom inquiry and suggest that a range of physical signs can be elicited with reasonable between-observer agreement. Four classification schemes rated well in terms of content validity. One of these had excellent documentation, and one had been tested for repeatability, agreement with an external reference standard, and utility in distinguishing groups that differed in disability, prognosis and associated risk factors. Conclusions Hitherto, most studies of ULDs in vibration-exposed populations have used custom-specified diagnostic methods, poorly documented, and non-stringent in terms of standardisation and supporting evidence of

  19. Factors associated with regional rheumatic pain disorders in a population of Puerto Ricans with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Font, Yvonne M; Castro-Santana, Lesliane E; Nieves-Plaza, Mariely; Maldonado, Mirna; Mayor, Angel M; Vilá, Luis M

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence and factors associated with bursitis/tendonitis disorders in Puerto Ricans with diabetes mellitus (DM). A cross-sectional study was performed in 202 adult Puerto Ricans (100 DM patients and 102 non-diabetic subjects). For each participant, a complete medical history and a musculoskeletal exam were systematically performed. Socio-demographic parameters, health-related behaviors, comorbidities, and pharmacotherapy were determined for all subjects. For DM patients, disease duration, glycemic control, and DM long-term complications were also examined. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to determine the factors associated with bursitis/tendonitis disorders. The mean (SD) age for DM patients and non-diabetic controls were 53.3 (12.9) and 50.0 (13.1) years; 64.0 and 64.7 % of DM patients and controls were females, respectively. Overall, the prevalence of bursitis/tendonitis was higher in DM patients than among non-diabetics (59.0 % vs. 29.4 %, p < 0.01). In multivariate analyses, DM patients had 2.47 (95 % CI 1.05, 5.84) the odds of having bursitis/tendonitis as compared to non-diabetics. Specifically, DM patients had a higher frequency of flexor tenosynovitis, De Quervain's tenosynovitis, lateral epicondylitis, medial epicondylitis, trochanteric bursitis, and anserine bursitis than non-diabetic subjects (p < 0.05). Among DM patients, multivariate analyses showed that those with bursitis/tendonitis were more likely to be female [OR (95 % CI) 4.55 (1.42, 14.55)] and have peripheral vascular disease [OR (95 % CI) 8.48 (1.71, 41.93)]. In conclusion, bursitis/tendonitis disorders were common in this population of Hispanics with DM. Among DM patients, bursitis/tendonitis disorders were more frequent in women and those with long-term complications such as peripheral vascular disease.

  20. Yoga in Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Susan J.; Haaz, Steffany; Mill, Christopher; Bernatsky, Sasha; Bingham, Clifton O.

    2015-01-01

    Yoga is a popular activity which may be well suited for some individuals with certain rheumatic disorders. Regular yoga practice can increase muscle strength and endurance, proprioception and balance, with emphasis on movement through a full range of motion to increase flexibility and mobility. Additional beneficial elements of yoga include breathing, relaxation, body awareness and meditation, which can reduce stress and anxiety and promote a sense of calmness, general well-being and improved quality of life. Yoga also encourages a meditative focus, increased body awareness and mindfulness; some evidence suggests yoga may help decrease inflammatory mediators including C-reactive protein and interleukin-6. Yoga is best learned under the supervision of qualified teachers who are well informed about the potential musculoskeletal needs of each individual. Here, we briefly review the literature on yoga in healthy, musculoskeletal, and rheumatic disease populations and offer recommendations for discussing ways to begin yoga with patients. PMID:24173693

  1. Rheumatic Fever.

    PubMed

    Visvanathan; Manjarez; Zabriskie

    1999-10-01

    There have been numerous reports stating that treatment of acute rheumatic fever with either aspirin or corticosteroids does not alter the long-term outcome of rheumatic heart disease. Yet, it should be emphasized that most of these studies were carried out with the first generic corticosteroids before the advent of the more active and more potent corticosteroid agents. In spite of this caveat, there is no question that all the clinical and laboratory parameters of inflammation (erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein) return to normal much more rapidly with corticosteroids than with aspirin alone. It is therefore our belief that steroids should be used when clinical and laboratory evidence of carditis exists, and aspirin should be reserved for cases of acute rheumatic arthritis with no evidence of carditis. The incidence of long-term valvular disease in active carditis may be decreased with steroid therapy. For example, the number of valve replacements differs markedly in centers that do use steroids and in those that do not. In Capetown, South Africa, where steroids are routinely used for carditis, valve replacement is quite rare. In contrast, in Johannesburg, where steroids are rarely used, the rate of valve replacement is quite high. The racial backgrounds of both groups of patients are similar, thus eliminating the question of racial differences. Concerning secondary prophylaxis, there is also controversy concerning the best second-line therapy. It is now well known that monthly intramuscular injections of benzathine penicillin are really effective for only 20 days. Thus, there is a window in which penicillin coverage is not adequate. To circumvent this problem, some investigators give benzathine penicillin every 3 weeks. These injections are quite painful, however, and it has been our "rule" that compliance with this treatment is inversely proportional to the ratio of the size of the child to the mother. In our own experience over 30 years with the

  2. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and rheumatic disease in the Warao, Kari'ña, and Chaima indigenous populations of Monagas State, Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Granados, Ysabel; Rosillo, Celenia; Cedeño, Ligia; Martínez, Yanira; Sánchez, Gloris; López, Geovalis; Pérez, Fernando; Martínez, Damarys; Maestre, Gabriela; Berbin, Sol; Chacón, Rosa; Stekman, Iván; Valls, Evart; Peláez-Ballestas, Ingris

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and rheumatic diseases in the Warao, Kari'ña, and Chaima indigenous populations of Monagas State, Venezuela. A cross-sectional, analytical, community-based study was conducted in 1537 indigenous subjects ≥18 years old (38.6 % male, mean age 41.4 ± 17.5 years). The cross-culturally validated Community Oriented Program for the Control of Rheumatic Diseases (COPCORD) diagnostic questionnaire was applied. Subjects with a positive COPCORD diagnosis (either historic or current pain) were evaluated by primary care physicians and rheumatologists. A descriptive analysis was performed and comparisons made using analysis of variance and the chi-square test. Pain in the last 7 days was reported by 32.9 %, with pain intensity, according to a Likert-type scale [no pain, 195 (38.5 %); minimal pain, 231 (45.6 %); strong pain, 68 (13.4 %); intense pain, 5 (0.9 %)], 38.0 % reported historical pain, and 641 (41.7 %) had either historic or current pain. Of the COPCORD-positive subjects, pain most frequently occurred in the knee, back, and hands. Musculoskeletal and rheumatic diseases included osteoarthritis (14.1 %), back pain (12.4 %), rheumatic regional pain syndromes (RRPS) (9.7 %), undifferentiated arthritis (1.5 %), rheumatoid arthritis (1.1 %), and fibromyalgia (0.5 %). Chaima (18.3 %) and Kari'ña (15.6 %) subjects had a high prevalence of osteoarthritis, and Warao subjects had a high prevalence of low back pain (13.8 %). The prevalence of RRPS was high in all three ethnic groups. The Chaima group had the highest prevalence of rheumatic diseases, with 2.0 % having rheumatoid arthritis. This study provides useful information for health care policy-making in indigenous communities.

  3. [Rheumatic fever].

    PubMed

    Cherkashin, D V; Kumchin, A N; Shchulenin, S N; Svistov, A S

    2013-01-01

    This lecture-style paper highlights all major problems pertinent to rheumatic fever Definition of acute RF and chronic rheumatic heart disease is proposed and desirability of the use of these terms in clinical practice is explained. Present-day epidemiology of RF is described with reference to marked differences in its prevalence in developed and developing countries. Modern classification of acute RF is described as adopted by the Russian Association of Rheumatologists and recommended for the use in Russian medical facilities. Discussion of etiological issues is focused on such virulence factors as beta-hemolytic streptococcus A and genetic predisposition confirming hereditary nature of RE Its clinical features are described along with laboratory and instrumental methods applied for its diagnostics. Large and small diagnostic criteria of RF are considered. Special attention is given to the treatment of RF and its complications (antibiotic, pathogenetic, and drug therapy). Its primary and secondary prophylaxis is discussed in detail, preparations for the purpose are listed (with doses and duration of application). In conclusion, criteria for the efficacy of therapy are presented along with indications for hospitalization and emergency treatment.

  4. Procedural pain and patient-reported side effects with weekly injections of subcutaneous methotrexate in children with rheumatic disorders.

    PubMed

    Bechard, Melanie Anne; Lemieux, Julie Rachelle; Roth, Johannes; Watanabe Duffy, Karen; Duffy, Ciaran Maire; Aglipay, Mary Ombac; Jurencak, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of subcutaneous methotrexate in treating pediatric rheumatic disorders, the amount of pain associated with the injections has not been quantified. Our study aims 1) to quantify the amount of pain associated with subcutaneous injections of methotrexate, 2) to explore predictors of pain, 3) to determine the frequency of patient-reported clinical adverse effects of methotrexate, and 4) identify coping strategies of patients and caregivers. Patients aged 4-17 years with rheumatologic diseases who were receiving weekly subcutaneous methotrexate injections for at least 4 weeks were invited to participate in this prospective cohort study. They were trained to use the Faces Pain Scale-Revised (FPS-R) and Faces, Legs, Arms, Cry, Consolability (FLACC) tools to rate pain associated with the injections. All patients underwent focused interviews exploring their experiences with methotrexate injections. Forty-one patients consented to the study. The mean age was 11.2 years (SD = 3.9 years) and 68% were female. Most patients were diagnosed with JIA (73%). Mean duration of methotrexate therapy was 2.5 years (SD = 2.1 yrs). All but one of the patients used methotrexate 25 mg/ml solution for injection in 1 cc or 3 cc syringe with 30 gauge ½" needle. Median amount of pain was 2/10 on the FPS-R and 1/10 on the FLACC. Higher intensity of pain was significantly associated with presence of side effects (p = 0.004), but not duration of therapy (p = 0.20) or age (p = 0.24). Most participants (61%) experienced at least one adverse effect; nausea (56%) and vomiting (34%) were the most common symptoms reported. Patients and caregivers reported using ice (34%), comfort positions (51%), rewards (49%), reassurance (54%), distraction (51%), and analgesic medications (22%) to cope with the injections. Subcutaneous injections of methotrexate are associated with a mild amount of pain. Presence of side effects may amplify the amount of perceived pain

  5. Rheumatic symptoms in autoimmune thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Tagoe, Clement E

    2015-02-01

    Autoimmune thyroiditis (ATD) is generally regarded as a classic example of single organ autoimmunity with a high association with endocrine thyroid disorders. However, it is closely associated with several autoimmune diseases including rheumatologic syndromes and has long been known to have several rheumatic manifestations particularly in association with hypothyroidism. More recently, it has also been implicated in rheumatologic syndromes in the absence of hypothyroidism or subclinical hypothyroidism. There is also an emerging body of evidence that ATD is highly linked to chronic generalized pain syndromes including fibromyalgia. This review examines the rheumatic symptoms of ATD described in the current literature and discusses the clinical relevance of ATD in general rheumatology.

  6. Structural, Genetic, and Functional Signatures of Disordered Neuro-Immunological Development in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Vishal; Ramdas, Shweta; Ochoa, Courtney Rothrock; Wallace, David; Bhide, Pradeep; Kohane, Isaac

    2012-01-01

    Background Numerous linkage studies have been performed in pedigrees of Autism Spectrum Disorders, and these studies point to diverse loci and etiologies of autism in different pedigrees. The underlying pattern may be identified by an integrative approach, especially since ASD is a complex disorder manifested through many loci. Method Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) was studied through two different and independent genome-scale measurement modalities. We analyzed the results of copy number variation in autism and triangulated these with linkage studies. Results Consistently across both genome-scale measurements, the same two molecular themes emerged: immune/chemokine pathways and developmental pathways. Conclusion Linkage studies in aggregate do indeed share a thematic consistency, one which structural analyses recapitulate with high significance. These results also show for the first time that genomic profiling of pathways using a recombination distance metric can capture pathways that are consistent with those obtained from copy number variations (CNV). PMID:23239965

  7. Interaction of pregnancy and autoimmune rheumatic disease.

    PubMed

    Østensen, Monika; Villiger, Peter M; Förger, Frauke

    2012-05-01

    During pregnancy, the fetus represents a natural allograft that is not normally rejected. While the maternal immune system retains the ability to respond to foreign antigens, tolerance mechanisms are up-regulated to protect the fetus from immunologic attacks by the mother. The profound immunologic adaptations during and after pregnancy do influence maternal autoimmune rheumatic diseases in several ways. One is triggering the onset of a rheumatic disease in the post partum period, the other influencing disease activity of established rheumatic disease. The review will discuss the mechanisms of increased susceptibility of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the first year post partum with a specific emphasis on the role of fetal cells or antigens persisting in the maternal circulation (so called microchimerism). Furthermore, the different influences of pregnancy on established rheumatic diseases will be highlighted. A marked beneficial effect of pregnancy is observed on RA whereas several other rheumatic diseases as ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) show either no particular effect or an aggravation of symptoms during pregnancy. Differences emerging in regard to modulation of disease symptoms during pregnancy seem related to response to hormones, the type of cytokine profile and immune response prevailing as well as further downstream interactions of molecular pathways that are important in disease pathogenesis.

  8. [Rheumatic diseases in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Märker-Hermann, E; Bauer, H; Gromnica-Ihle, E

    2008-11-01

    Rheumatic diseases can influence the reproduction, the course of pregnancy and the development of the fetus. The inflammatory rheumatic disease itself can be modulated in its activity in terms of amelioration or exacerbation of the rheumatic symptoms. The associations between rheumatic diseases and pregnancy will be illustrated with rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, and systemic lupus erythematosus as examples. Antirheumatic drug therapy during pregnancy and the breast feeding period has to be adapted critically.

  9. Mycoplasma fermentans, but not M penetrans, detected by PCR assays in synovium from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatic disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Schaeverbeke, T; Gilroy, C B; Bébéar, C; Dehais, J; Taylor-Robinson, D

    1996-01-01

    AIM/BACKGROUND: Mycoplasmas, especially Mycoplasma fermentans, were suggested more than 20 years ago as a possible cause of rheumatoid arthritis but this hypothesis was never substantiated. In view of the superior sensitivity of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay over culture, the aim was to use this method to seek M fermentans and M penetrans in synovial samples from patients with various arthritides. METHODS: Synovial fluid samples (n = 154) and synovial biopsy specimens (n = 20) from 133 patients with various rheumatic disorders were stored at -80 degrees C for between one and 40 months. Aliquots (500 microliters) of the synovial fluid samples were centrifuged and the deposit, and also the synovial biopsy specimens (approximately 1 g) were placed in lysis buffer with proteinase K for DNA extraction. The DNA was tested by using a semi-nested PCR assay for M fermentans and a single-round PCR for M penetrans. RESULTS: M fermentans was detected in the joints of eight (21%) of 38 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, two (20%) of 10 patients with spondyloarthropathy with peripheral arthritis, one (20%) of five patients with psoriatic arthritis, and four (13%) of 31 patients with unclassified arthritis. M fermentans was not found in the joints of the seven patients with reactive arthritis, the 29 with osteoarthritis or post-traumatic hydrarthrosis, the nine with gouty arthritis, nor the four with chronic juvenile arthritis. M penetrans was not detected in any sample. CONCLUSIONS: These findings show that the presence of M fermentans in the joint is associated with inflammatory rheumatic disorders of unknown cause, including rheumatoid arthritis. However, whether this organism triggers or perpetuates disease of behaves as a passenger remains conjectural. PMID:8943749

  10. Immunological Profile of HTLV-1-Infected Patients Associated with Infectious or Autoimmune Dermatological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Mariana Costa; Araújo, Marcelo Grossi; Campi-Azevedo, Ana Carolina; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Peruhype-Magalhães, Vanessa; Trindade, Bruno Caetano; dos Santos Dias, Raquel; Martins, Marina Lobato; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna Barbara de Freitas; Guedes, Antônio Carlos; Gonçalves, Denise Utsch; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the frequency, the activation and the cytokine and chemokine profile of HTLV-1 carriers with or without dermatological lesions were thoroughly described and compared. The results indicated that HTLV-1-infected patients with dermatological lesions have distinct frequency and activation status when compared to asymptomatic carriers. Alterations in the CD4+HLA-DR+, CD8+ T cell, macrophage-like and NKT subsets as well as in the serum chemokines CCL5, CXCL8, CXCL9 and CXCL10 were observed in the HTLV-1-infected group with skin lesions. Additionally, HTLV-1 carriers with dermatological skin lesions showed more frequently high proviral load as compared to asymptomatic carriers. The elevated proviral load in HTLV-1 patients with infectious skin lesions correlated significantly with TNF-α/IL-10 ratio, while the same significant correlation was found for the IL-12/IL-10 ratio and the high proviral load in HTLV-1-infected patients with autoimmune skin lesions. All in all, these results suggest a distinct and unique immunological profile in the peripheral blood of HTLV-1-infected patients with skin disorders, and the different nature of skin lesion observed in these patients may be an outcome of a distinct unbalance of the systemic inflammatory response upon HTLV-1 infection. PMID:23936564

  11. Regulation of immunological disorders by invariant Vα19-Jα33 TCR-bearing cells.

    PubMed

    Shimamura, Michio; Huang, Yi-Ying; Goji, Hiroshi; Endo, Shin; Migishima, Rika; Yokoyama, Minesuke

    2011-03-01

    We have previously shown that over-expression of the invariant Vα19-Jα33 TCR α transgene (Tg) using a natural TCR α promoter in mice induces the development of NK1.1(+) T cells (Vα19 NKT cells) in lymphoid organs, including the liver and intestine. These cells produce different spectra of immunoregulatory cytokines such as IL-4, IL-10, IL-17, and IFN-γ depending on the duration and intensity of the invariant TCR stimulation. In this study, we examined the effects of over-expression of invariant Vα19-Jα33 TCR-bearing cells on disease progress in the models of immunological disorders. The introduction of invariant Vα19 TCR Tg into non-obese diabetic mice delayed the onset of the disease. In addition, delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) to sheep erythrocytes was suppressed in the Vα19 Tg mice. DTH was also suppressed in the wild type mice previously transferred with Vα19 Tg(+) but not non-Tg cells. Thus, invariant Vα19 TCR-bearing cells are suggested to participate in the homeostasis of immunity to suppress disease progression resulting from Th1-immunity excess.

  12. WIP null mice display a progressive immunological disorder that resembles Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome.

    PubMed

    Curcio, C; Pannellini, T; Lanzardo, S; Forni, G; Musiani, P; Antón, I M

    2007-01-01

    The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is an X-linked immunodeficiency syndrome caused by mutations in the WAS protein (WASP). This participates in signalling and cytoskeletal homoeostasis, and some of its activities are regulated by its binding to the WASP interacting protein (WIP). WIP deficiency, however, has not yet been shown to be of pathological significance in humans. Here we show that, in WIP null (WIP(-/-)) mice, it produces haematological alterations and anatomical abnormalities in several organs, most probably as a consequence of autoimmune attacks. Granulocytosis and severe lymphopenia are associated with a proportional increase in segmented cells and fewer bone marrow erythrocytes and lymphocytes. Splenomegaly is accompanied by an increase of haematopoietic tissue and red pulp, reduction of the white pulp, and fewer B (B220(+)) lymphocytes (also apparent in the lymph nodes and Peyer's patches). Ulcerative colitis, interstitial pneumonitis, glomerular nephropathy with IgA deposits, autoantibodies, and joint inflammation are also evident. These progressive immunological disorders closely mimic those seen in WAS. WIP deficiency may thus be implicated in some cases in which mutations in the gene encoding WASP are not detected. Copyright (c) 2006 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  13. Immunological profile of HTLV-1-infected patients associated with infectious or autoimmune dermatological disorders.

    PubMed

    Coelho-dos-Reis, Jordana Grazziela Alves; Passos, Livia; Duarte, Mariana Costa; Araújo, Marcelo Grossi; Campi-Azevedo, Ana Carolina; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Peruhype-Magalhães, Vanessa; Trindade, Bruno Caetano; Dos Santos Dias, Raquel; Martins, Marina Lobato; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna Barbara de Freitas; Guedes, Antônio Carlos; Gonçalves, Denise Utsch; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the frequency, the activation and the cytokine and chemokine profile of HTLV-1 carriers with or without dermatological lesions were thoroughly described and compared. The results indicated that HTLV-1-infected patients with dermatological lesions have distinct frequency and activation status when compared to asymptomatic carriers. Alterations in the CD4(+)HLA-DR(+), CD8(+) T cell, macrophage-like and NKT subsets as well as in the serum chemokines CCL5, CXCL8, CXCL9 and CXCL10 were observed in the HTLV-1-infected group with skin lesions. Additionally, HTLV-1 carriers with dermatological skin lesions showed more frequently high proviral load as compared to asymptomatic carriers. The elevated proviral load in HTLV-1 patients with infectious skin lesions correlated significantly with TNF-α/IL-10 ratio, while the same significant correlation was found for the IL-12/IL-10 ratio and the high proviral load in HTLV-1-infected patients with autoimmune skin lesions. All in all, these results suggest a distinct and unique immunological profile in the peripheral blood of HTLV-1-infected patients with skin disorders, and the different nature of skin lesion observed in these patients may be an outcome of a distinct unbalance of the systemic inflammatory response upon HTLV-1 infection.

  14. Evaluation of early rheumatic disorders in PIP joints using a cw-transillumination method: first clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prapavat, Viravuth; Luhmann, Till; Krause, Andreas; Backhaus, Marina; Beuthan, Juergen; Mueller, Gerhard J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents first clinical results of an in vivo experimental study on the detection of early pathological changes of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using a near IR cw- transillumination method on finger joints (PIP). The inflammation of a joint system when caused by RA leads to changes in the synovial membrane and synovial. Measurements have shown that these rheumatic induced processes results in a variation in optical properties within the joint system. Using a cw system the PIP-joint is transilluminated with diode lasers at the articular cavity in order to use the entire scattered distribution of the transmitted radiation intensity for diagnostic purposes. The study includes results of in vivo measurements on 24 joints with known status and the evaluation of the feasibility of different distribution properties for detection of early RA.

  15. Incident Vertebral Fractures among Children with Rheumatic Disorders 12 Months Post-Glucocorticoid Initiation: a National Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Rodd, Celia; Lang, Bianca; Ramsay, Timothy; Alos, Nathalie; Huber, Adam M.; Cabral, David A.; Scuccimarri, Rosie; Miettunen, Paivi M.; Roth, Johannes; Atkinson, Stephanie A.; Couch, Robert; Cummings, Elizabeth A.; Dent, Peter B.; Ellsworth, Janet; Hay, John; Houghton, Kristin; Jurencak, Roman; Larché, Maggie; LeBlanc, Claire; Oen, Kiem; Saint-Cyr, Claire; Stein, Robert; Stephure, David; Taback, Shayne; Lentle, Brian; Matzinger, MaryAnn; Shenouda, Nazih; Moher, David; Rauch, Frank; Siminoski, Kerry; Ward, Leanne M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine the frequency of incident vertebral fractures (IVF) 12 months after glucocorticoid (GC) initiation in children with rheumatic diseases and to identify children at higher risk. Methods Children with rheumatic diseases initiating GC were enrolled in a prospective observational study. Annual spine radiographs were evaluated using the Genant semi-quantitative method. Spine areal bone mineral density (aBMD) was measured every 6 months. Clinical features, including cumulative GC dose, back pain, disease and physical activity, calcium and vitamin D intake, and spine aBMD Z-scores were analyzed for association with IVF. Results Seven (6%) of 118 children (95% Confidence Interval 2.9 to 11.7) had IVF. Their diagnoses were: juvenile dermatomyositis (n = 2), systemic lupus erythematosus (n = 3), systemic vasculitis (n = 1) and mixed connective tissue disease (n = 1). One child was omitted from the analyses after 4 months because of osteoporosis treatment for symptomatic IVF. Children with IVF received on average 50% more GC than those without (p=0.030), had a greater increase in body mass index (BMI) at 6 months (p=0.010), and had greater decrements in spine aBMD Z-scores in the first 6 months (p=0.048). Four (67%) of 6 children with IVF and data to 12 months had spine aBMD Z-scores less than −2.0 at 12 months compared to 16% of children without IVF (p=0.011). Conclusions The incidence of VF 12 months following GC initiation was 6%; most children were asymptomatic. Children with IVF received more GC, had greater increases in BMI and greater declines in spine aBMD Z-scores in the first 6 months. PMID:22213727

  16. Correlation of baseline hormonal disorders with immunological failure and mortality in male HIV patients during follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ying; Ding, Hai bo; Chen, Wei; Zhou, Ying; Wang, Wen; Wang, Yu; Lu, Xu; Liu, Jing; Kang, Jing; Geng, Wenqing; Shang, Hong; Liu, Pei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To assess the effect that hormonal disturbances have on HIV prognosis in male patients. A prospective follow-up study was conducted among male HIV patients who started antiretroviral therapy (ART) between July 1, 2011 and June 30, 2014. The final follow-up session occurred before December 31, 2014. We examined the correlation between pre-ART hormone levels and disease prognosis. The Kaplan–Meier method and the multivariate Cox proportional hazard model were used to identify hormone-related predictors of immunological failure and mortality. During the follow-up of 163 male HIV patients, mortality rate occurred at a rate of 16.0% (26/163). Of these deaths, 84.6% (22/26) were acquired immunodeficiency syndrome–related. Furthermore, 53 patients were found to have suffered from immunological failure. Both pre-ART CD4+ T cell counts and the clinical stage assigned to the patients correlated strongly with dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels. Hyponatremia, high cortisol levels, tuberculosis, and being at World Health Organization (WHO)-defined clinical stage 4 were characteristics that associated significantly with mortality. Being at WHO clinical stage 4 was, itself, a factor that significantly associated with immunological failure. High cortisol levels were found to be an important hormonal disorder that associated with mortality. None of the hormones examined in this study had a strong correlation with immunological failure. PMID:28033281

  17. The clinical potential of influencing Nrf2 signaling in degenerative and immunological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Bifeng; Doan, An; Hybertson, Brooks M

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2; encoded in humans by the NFE2L2 gene) is a transcription factor that regulates the gene expression of a wide variety of cytoprotective phase II detoxification and antioxidant enzymes through a promoter sequence known as the antioxidant-responsive element (ARE). The ARE is a promoter element found in many cytoprotective genes; therefore, Nrf2 plays a pivotal role in the ARE-driven cellular defense system against environmental stresses. Agents that target the ARE/Nrf2 pathway have been tested in a wide variety of disorders, with at least one new Nrf2-activating drug now approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Examination of in vitro and in vivo experimental results, and taking into account recent human clinical trial results, has led to an opinion that Nrf2-activating strategies – which can include drugs, foods, dietary supplements, and exercise – are likely best targeted at disease prevention, disease recurrence prevention, or slowing of disease progression in early stage illnesses; they may also be useful as an interventional strategy. However, this rubric may be viewed even more conservatively in the pathophysiology of cancer. The activation of the Nrf2 pathway has been widely accepted as offering chemoprevention benefit, but it may be unhelpful or even harmful in the setting of established cancers. For example, Nrf2 activation might interfere with chemotherapies or radiotherapies or otherwise give tumor cells additional growth and survival advantages, unless they already possess mutations that fully activate their Nrf2 pathway constitutively. With all this in mind, the ARE/Nrf2 pathway remains of great interest as a possible target for the pharmacological control of degenerative and immunological diseases, both by activation and by inhibition, and its regulation remains a promising biological target for the development of new therapies. PMID:24520207

  18. Membranous Nephropathy Associated With Immunological Disorder-Related Liver Disease: A Retrospective Study of 10 Cases.

    PubMed

    Dauvergne, Maxime; Moktefi, Anissa; Rabant, Marion; Vigneau, Cécile; Kofman, Tomek; Burtey, Stephane; Corpechot, Christophe; Stehlé, Thomas; Desvaux, Dominique; Rioux-Leclercq, Nathalie; Rouvier, Philippe; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Frouget, Thierry; Daugas, Eric; Jablonski, Mathieu; Dahan, Karine; Brocheriou, Isabelle; Remy, Philippe; Grimbert, Philippe; Lang, Philippe; Chazouilleres, Oliver; Sahali, Dil; Audard, Vincent

    2015-07-01

    The association between membranous nephropathy (MN) and immunological disorder-related liver disease has not been extensively investigated, and the specific features of this uncommon association, if any, remain to be determined.We retrospectively identified 10 patients with this association. We aimed to describe the clinical, biological, and pathological characteristics of these patients and their therapeutic management. The possible involvement of the phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) in these apparent secondary forms of MN was assessed by immunohistochemistry with renal and liver biopsy specimens.The mean delay between MN and liver disease diagnoses was 3.9 years and the interval between the diagnosis of the glomerular and liver diseases was <1.5 years in 5 patients. MN was associated with a broad spectrum of liver diseases including primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). AIH whether isolated (n = 3) or associated with PBC (n = 2) or PSC (n = 2) was the most frequent autoimmune liver disease. Circulating PLA2R antibodies were detected in 4 out of 9 patients but the test was performed under specific immunosuppressive treatment in 3 out of 9 patients. Seven of the 9 patients with available renal tissue specimens displayed enhanced expression of PLA2R in glomeruli whereas PLA2R was not expressed in liver parenchyma from these patients or in normal liver tissue. The study of immunoglobulin (Ig) subclasses of deposits in glomeruli revealed that the most frequent pattern was the coexistence of IgG1 and IgG4 immune deposits with IgG4 predominating.Detection of PLA2R antibodies in glomeruli but not in liver parenchyma is a common finding in patients with MN associated with autoimmune liver disease, suggesting that these autoantibodies are not exclusively detected in idiopathic MN.

  19. Diagnostic criteria of acute rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Burke, Rebecca J; Chang, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Acute rheumatic fever is an inflammatory sequela of Group A Streptococcal pharyngitis that affects multiple organ systems. The incidence of acute rheumatic fever has been declining even before the use of antibiotics became widespread, however the disease remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in children, particularly in developing countries and has been estimated to affect 19 per 100,000 children worldwide. Acute rheumatic fever is a clinical diagnosis, and therefore subject to the judgment of the clinician. Because of the variable presentation, the Jones criteria were first developed in 1944 to aid clinicians in the diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever. The Jones criteria have been modified throughout the years, most recently in 1992 to aid clinicians in the diagnosis of initial attacks of acute rheumatic fever and to minimize overdiagnosis of the disease. Diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever is based on the presence of documented preceding Group A Streptococcal infection, in addition to the presence of two major manifestations or one major and two minor manifestations of the Jones criteria. Without documentation of antecedent Group A Streptococcal infection, the diagnosis is much less likely except in a few rare scenarios. Carditis, polyarthritis and Sydenham's chorea are the most common major manifestations of acute rheumatic fever. However, despite the predominance of these major manifestations of acute rheumatic fever, there can be significant overlap with other disorders such as Lyme disease, serum sickness, drug reactions, and post-Streptococcal reactive arthritis. This overlap between disease processes has led to continued investigation of the pathophysiology as well as development of new biomarkers and laboratory studies to aid in the diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever and distinction from other disease processes.

  20. Multinational evidence-based recommendations for the use of methotrexate in rheumatic disorders with a focus on rheumatoid arthritis: integrating systematic literature research and expert opinion of a broad international panel of rheumatologists in the 3E Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Visser, K; Katchamart, W; Loza, E; Martinez-Lopez, J A; Salliot, C; Trudeau, J; Bombardier, C; Carmona, L; van der Heijde, D; Bijlsma, J W J; Boumpas, D T; Canhao, H; Edwards, C J; Hamuryudan, V; Kvien, T K; Leeb, B F; Martín-Mola, E M; Mielants, H; Müller-Ladner, U; Murphy, G; Østergaard, M; Pereira, I A; Ramos-Remus, C; Valentini, G; Zochling, J; Dougados, M

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To develop evidence-based recommendations for the use of methotrexate in daily clinical practice in rheumatic disorders. Methods: 751 rheumatologists from 17 countries participated in the 3E (Evidence, Expertise, Exchange) Initiative of 2007–8 consisting of three separate rounds of discussions and Delphi votes. Ten clinical questions concerning the use of methotrexate in rheumatic disorders were formulated. A systematic literature search in Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library and 2005–7 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism meeting abstracts was conducted. Selected articles were systematically reviewed and the evidence was appraised according to the Oxford levels of evidence. Each country elaborated a set of national recommendations. Finally, multinational recommendations were formulated and agreement among the participants and the potential impact on their clinical practice was assessed. Results: A total of 16 979 references was identified, of which 304 articles were included in the systematic reviews. Ten multinational key recommendations on the use of methotrexate were formulated. Nine recommendations were specific for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), including the work-up before initiating methotrexate, optimal dosage and route, use of folic acid, monitoring, management of hepatotoxicity, long-term safety, mono versus combination therapy and management in the perioperative period and before/during pregnancy. One recommendation concerned methotrexate as a steroid-sparing agent in other rheumatic diseases. Conclusions: Ten recommendations for the use of methotrexate in daily clinical practice focussed on RA were developed, which are evidence based and supported by a large panel of rheumatologists, enhancing their validity and practical use. PMID:19033291

  1. Dehydroepiandrosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and related steroids: their role in inflammatory, allergic and immunological disorders.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Joseph S

    2005-06-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) are metabolic intermediates in the production of potent androgens, estrogens and other less well-characterized steroids. DHEA(S) and closely related steroid hormones have a variety of immunological effects both in vitro and in vivo in experimental animals and humans. Many of these effects have been demonstrated in animal models where there is little circulating DHEA(S), and the demonstrated effects are generally seen at concentrations of DHEA(S) which are supra-physiological in man. The physiological role of DHEA(S) in the immunological system is unknown. Furthermore, the molecular mechanism of action of DHEA(S) is unclear. In this review, I focus on studies of the immunological effects of DHEA(S) and closely related steroid metabolites and analogs, mainly derived from literature published in the last five years. My purpose is to describe the demonstrated effects and to highlight some of the remaining major research issues in this field. These issues include defining the molecular mechanism of DHEA(S) action; determining whether the effect of DHEA(S) is related to the steroid itself or to a metabolic product of DHEA; determining the relationship of physiological function to the pharmacological effects; and determining the molecular basis for species-specific differences in effects.

  2. [Rheumatic diseases during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Fischer-Betz, R

    2012-09-01

    The treatment of inflammatory rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, spondylitis ankylosans and systemic lupus erythematosus, is improving continuously. This has lead to an increasing number of young patients with a wish to have children. Greater insight into the course of rheumatic diseases during pregnancy and post partum has enabled optimized support for women with rheumatic diseases wishing to have children. To ensure a favorable outcome, pregnancy should be started during a period of disease stability and should be monitored closely. A careful assessment of possible risks and the justified use of antirheumatic drugs before, during and after pregnancy are key issues for success.

  3. Rheumatic Diseases and Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    BOJINCA, Violeta; JANTA, Iustina

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT There are many studies which demonstrate a higher risk for malignancy in patients with rheumatic diseases. There have been a number of possible explanations for the differences in the risk of certain malignancies in patients with rheumatic disease, compared with general population, but a clear mechanism is difficult to identify. Rheumatoid syndromes may be associated with malignancy as paraneoplastic conditions, which can antedate the neoplasm diagnosis. On the other hand, autoimmune rheumatic diseases have a higher risk of malignancy by themselves or because of the immunosuppressant treatments. PMID:23482881

  4. Tai chi and rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenchen

    2011-02-01

    Tai chi is a complex multicomponent mind-body exercise. Many studies have provided evidence that tai chi benefits patients with a variety of chronic disorders. This form of mind-body exercise enhances cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength, balance, and physical function and seems to be associated with reduced stress, anxiety, and depression and improved quality of life. Thus, despite certain limitations in the evidence, tai chi can be recommended to patients with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and fibromyalgia as a complementary and alternative medical approach. This article overviews the current knowledge about tai chi to better inform clinical decision making for rheumatic patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Biologic treatments for systemic rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Shirota, Y; Illei, GG; Nikolov, NP

    2009-01-01

    Many rheumatologic disorders, most notably Sjögren's syndrome, are associated with dental complications and in some cases oral diseases may trigger or drive connective tissue disease. During the past three decades the treatment in rheumatology was revolutionized by the introduction of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. Advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases have led to the discovery of critical mechanisms of inflammation and autoimmunity and the invention of new target-specific biologic agents. In this review, we will summarize the current state of biologic therapies in rheumatology and discuss the implications of these on oral health and disease. PMID:18282173

  6. Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spondylitis, Q&A Bursitis and Tendinitis, Q&A Fibromyalgia, Q&A Gout, Q&A Juvenile Arthritis, Q& ... role. For example, lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, and fibromyalgia are more common among women. Other Rheumatic Diseases ...

  7. Outcome measures in inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory rheumatic diseases are generally multifaceted disorders and, therefore, measurement of multiple outcomes is relevant to most of these diseases. Developments in outcome measures in the rheumatic diseases are promoted by the development of successful treatments. Outcome measurement will increasingly deal with measurement of low levels of disease activity and avoidance of disease consequences. It is an advantage for patient management and knowledge transfer if the same outcomes are used in practice and in trials. Continuous measures of change are generally the most powerful and, therefore, are preferred as primary outcomes in trials. For daily clinical practice, outcome measures should reflect the patients' state and have to be easily derivable. The objective of this review is to describe recent developments in outcome measures for inflammatory rheumatic diseases for trials and clinical practice, with an emphasis on rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:19849821

  8. [Clinical-immunological disorders in uveitis in patients with Behçet's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Teplinskaia, L E; Kaliberdina, A F; Zaĭtseva, N S; Bulanova, T D; Katsnel'son, L A

    1994-01-01

    The results of comprehensive clinicoimmunologic examinations of 38 uveitis patients with Behçet's disease indicate that uveitis in the presence of Behçet's disease should be referred to multifactorial diseases to whose pathogenesis immunopathologic reactions in various combinations and genetic predisposition contribute much. Generalization of the process in the eye predominated in the clinical picture with involvement of the anterior and posterior segments, retinal vessels, this being combined with general somatic symptoms (aphthae on the buccal mucosa, genitals, arthritides, urethritis/cystitis symptoms, positive 'pricking' test). Study of the immunity status revealed depressed lymphocyte proliferative response to mitogen in 58.8% of patients, hyperimmunoglobulinemia of the A and M classes in 63.3%, impaired complex formation (increased levels of circulating immune complexes in 78.3% and cryoglobulin presence in 57.1%), and various combinations of these immunologic signs. The results indicated patients' infection with herpes virus, streptococcus, toxoplasma. An associative connection of Behçet's disease with A (II) red cell phenotype in 54.8% of patients (p < 0.05) suggests a relationship between genetic factors and the conditions of a specific geographic region. A variety of immunologic changes necessitated the use of corticosteroids, hemoperfusion, cytostatics, and immunity stimulants in the treatment of uveitis in Behçet's disease patients.

  9. [Physical therapy and rheumatism of soft tissues].

    PubMed

    Gross, D

    1982-08-28

    Soft tissue rheumatism (extraarticular rheumatism) is a group of common disorders found separately as independent disorders or as a symptom of systemic joint or spine diseases. The most frequent soft tissue rheumatisms are tendinopathies, rheumatism of muscles with myofascial pains, fibrositis of subcutaneous tissue and, finally, bursitis and inflammations of tendon sheaths. The commonest therapeutic procedures are non-steroidal anatirheumatic drugs, local infiltrations of corticosteroids, and physiotherapy. In the acute stages cold packs are the best physical measure against subjective pain. In subacute and chronic cases the pain in subcutaneous tissues can be lessened by connective tissue massage and underwater jet massage, muscle pain by heat and active exercises, and tendinopathies by ultrasonics and electrotherapy but very seldom by heat. In chronic bursitis and tendovaginitis, iontophoresis with potassium iodine may be helpful. Reflex pains in muscles are due to lesions of the spine and should therefore be treated by spine extension and manipulations. Every pain in soft tissue has one source in the anatomic lesion of the tissue and the second in psychogenic disorders. The latter must be sought when soft tissue pains are found all over the body on the lines of a generalized fibrositis syndrome.

  10. Diagnosis and classification of mast cell proliferative disorders: delineation from immunologic diseases and non-mast cell hematopoietic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Valent, Peter; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Schwartz, Lawrence B; Horny, Hans-Peter

    2004-07-01

    In mast cell (MC) disorders (mastocytosis), clinical symptoms are caused by the release of chemical mediators from MCs, the pathologic infiltration of neoplastic MCs in tissues, or both. Cutaneous mastocytosis is a benign disease in which MC infiltration is confined to the skin. In pediatric cases cutaneous mastocytosis might regress spontaneously. Systemic mastocytosis (SM) is more frequently diagnosed in adults and is a persistent (clonal) disease of bone marrow-derived myelomastocytic progenitors. The somatic c-kit mutation D816V is found in the majority of such patients. The natural clinical course in SM is variable. Whereas most patients remain at the indolent stage for many years, some have aggressive SM (ASM) at diagnosis. Other patients have an associated clonal hematologic non-MC lineage disease (AHNMD). MC leukemia (MCL) is a rare disease variant characterized by circulating MCs and fatal disease progression. The diagnoses of ASM, SM-AHNMD, and MCL might be confused with a variety of endocrinologic, vascular, or immunologic disorders. It is therefore of particular importance to be aware of the possibility of an underlying (malignant) MC disease in patients with unexplained vascular instability, unexplained (anaphylactoid) shock, idiopathic flushing, diarrhea, headache, and other symptoms that might be mediator related. An important diagnostic clue in such cases is an increased serum tryptase level. The current review provides an overview of mastocytosis and its subvariants and a practical guide that might help to delineate mastocytosis from unrelated systemic disorders.

  11. Detection of cases of inflammatory rheumatic disorders: performance of a telephone questionnaire designed for use by patient interviewers

    PubMed Central

    Guillemin, F; Saraux, A; Fardellone, P; Guggenbuhl, P; Behier, J; Coste, J

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To assess the performance in the detection of cases of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and the spondyloarthropathies (SpA) of a questionnaire suitable for use in telephone surveys conducted by patient interviewers. Methods: A questionnaire was designed with reference to the signs, symptoms, and epidemiological criteria for RA (ACR 1987) and SpA (ESSG 1991). Three groups of respondents were recruited from the rheumatology outpatient clinics of 10 university hospitals: 235 with RA, 175 with SpA, and 195 controls with other rheumatological disorders. All diagnoses were confirmed by a rheumatologist. Patient from self help groups and social organisations were trained by a polling company professional to conduct a standard telephone interview using the new questionnaire. Results: In an RA-control comparison, logistic regression showed that a set of five items, predominantly ACR criteria, were the most informative. Self reported diagnosis performed best (sensitivity 0.99, specificity 0.87). In an SpA-control comparison, a set of three items from the ESSG criteria were the most informative, with self reported diagnosis again performing best (sensitivity 0.85, specificity 0.96). Overall agreements with clinical diagnoses were 97.7% for RA and 94.4% SpA, dropping to 90.4% and 79.1%, respectively, when self reported diagnosis was excluded. Without self reported diagnosis, questions about peripheral joint and spinal pain made significant contributions to diagnostic performance. Conclusion: A questionnaire in plain language was developed for use in detecting cases of RA and SpA. It performed satisfactorily when administered by patient interviewers and is now available for epidemiological surveys of the general population. PMID:12972474

  12. Cardiorheumatology: cardiac involvement in systemic rheumatic disease

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Megha; Hermann, Joerg; Gabriel, Sherine E.; Weyand, Cornelia M.; Mulvagh, Sharon; Mankad, Rekha; Oh, Jae K.; Matteson, Eric L.; Lerman, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune rheumatic diseases can affect the cardiac vasculature, valves, myocardium, pericardium, and conduction system, leading to a plethora of cardiovascular manifestations that can remain clinically silent or lead to substantial cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although the high risk of cardiovascular pathology in patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatological diseases is not owing to atherosclerosis alone, this particular condition contributes substantially to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality—the degree of coronary atherosclerosis observed in patients with rheumatic diseases can be as accelerated, diffuse, and extensive as in patients with diabetes mellitus. The high risk of atherosclerosis is not solely attributable to traditional cardiovascular risk factors: dysfunctional immune responses, a hallmark of patients with rheumatic disorders, are thought to cause chronic tissue-destructive inflammation. Prompt recognition of cardiovascular abnormalities is needed for timely and appropriate management, and aggressive control of traditional risk factors remains imperative in patients with rheumatic diseases. Moreover, therapies directed towards inflammatory process are crucial to reduce cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality. In this Review, we examine the multiple cardiovascular manifestations in patients with rheumatological disorders, their underlying pathophysiology, and available management strategies, with particular emphasis on the vascular aspects of the emerging field of ‘cardiorheumatology’. PMID:25533796

  13. Autoimmune thyroid disease in patients with rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Robazzi, Teresa Cristina Martins Vicente; Adan, Luis Fernando Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid function abnormalities and thyroid autoantibodies have been frequently described in patients with rheumatologic autoimmune diseases, such as Sjögren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and scleroderma. Limited data are available regarding the prevalence and clinical characteristics of autoimmune thyroiditis in other rheumatologic disorders, such as rheumatic fever and juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus. The authors review the association of endocrine autoimmune and rheumatic autoimmune diseases, assessing various age groups and clinical conditions. The bibliographic survey was conducted through the search for scientific articles indexed in the general health sciences databases, such as Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS), Medline/PubMed, and Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO). The following descriptors were used: "rheumatic autoimmune diseases and autoimmune thyroid diseases"; "thyroid disorders and rheumatic diseases"; "thyroiditis and rheumatic diseases"; "autoimmune diseases and thyroid"; and "pediatric rheumatic diseases and autoimmune thyroid diseases". This study showed that, despite contradictory results in the literature, there is a greater prevalence of the association between autoimmune thyroid diseases and rheumatic diseases, highlighting the possibility of common pathogenic mechanisms among them.

  14. Role of neuro-immunological factors in the pathophysiology of mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Anindya; Derecki, Noel C; Lovenberg, Timothy W; Drevets, Wayne C

    2016-05-01

    Mood disorders, despite the widespread availability of monoamine-based antidepressant treatments, are associated with persistently high rates of disability, together with elevated rates of mortality due to suicide, cardiovascular disease, and other causes. The development of more effective treatments has been hindered by the lack of knowledge about the etiology and pathogenesis of mood disorders. An emerging area of science that promises novel pathways to antidepressant and mood stabilizing therapies surrounds evidence that immune cells and their signaling play a major role in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD). Here, we review evidence that the release of neuroactive cytokines, particularly interleukins such as IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α, is altered in these disorders and discuss mechanisms such as the ATP-gated ion channel P2X7, through which cytokine signaling can influence neuro-glial interactions. Brain P2X7, an emerging target and antagonism of P2X7 holds promise as a novel mechanism for targeting treatment-resistant depression. We further discuss the role of microglia and astroglia in central neuroinflammation and their interaction with the peripheral immune system We present extant clinical evidence that bolsters the role of neuroinflammation and neuroactive cytokines in mood disorders. To that end, the role of clinical imaging by probing neuroinflammatory markers is also discussed briefly. Finally, we present data using preclinical neuroinflammation models that produce depression-like behaviors in experimental animals to identify neuroinflammatory mechanisms which may aid in novel neuroimmune target identification for the development of exciting pharmacological interventions in mood disorders.

  15. Pregnancy and rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Gayed, M; Gordon, C

    2007-11-01

    Pregnancy is an issue that should be discussed with all patients with rheumatic diseases who are in the reproductive age group. Infertility is rarely due to the disease but can be associated with cyclophosphamide therapy. Most rheumatic diseases that are well controlled prior to pregnancy do not deteriorate in pregnancy, providing that the patient continues with appropriate disease-modifying therapy. Some patients with inflammatory arthritis go in to remission during pregnancy. Patients with renal involvement may be at increased risk of disease flare. This needs to be distinguished from pre-eclampsia. Intrauterine growth restriction is more likely in patients with active systemic disease, hypertension, a history of thrombosis and renal involvement. Premature delivery may need to be planned to reduce the risks of stillbirth and can be associated with a variety of neonatal complications. Post-partum flare is common in all the rheumatic diseases.

  16. [Mixed cryoglobulinemia and related immunological disorders after hepatic transplantation for hepatitis C cirrhosis. Case report].

    PubMed

    Sarmiento, Elizabeth; Rodríguez Molina, Juan José; Carbone, Javier

    2004-01-01

    Cryoglobulinemia may be found in up to 30% of patients that had received liver transplants after hepatitis C virus (HCV) cirrhosis. Three types of cryoglobulinemia are recognized: type I, composed of monoclonal immunoglobulins associated with lymphoproliferative diseases and myeloma; type II cryoglobulinemia are comprised of a monoclonal component which has rheumatoid factor activity and hence binds to polyclonal immunoglobulins (in certain parts of the world have been found to be associated with hepatitis C infection); and type III cryoglobulinemia consist exclusively of polyclonal immunoglobulins with rheumatoid factor activity (associated with connective tissue diseases and chronic infections including hepatitis C). Immunocompetence, autoimmunity and clonal expansion of B cell lymphocytes have not been analysed simultaneously in previous reports of patients with cryoglobulinemia after liver transplantation. We here describe immunological abnormalities associated with cryoglobulinemia in a patient who had received liver transplant for HCV cirrhosis. In addition, in the present work HCV RNA determination was performed directly in the cryocrit and not only in peripheral blood. We have observed enrichment of HCV RNA in the cryoprecipitates which might be a better demonstration of the possible role of HCV in the pathogenesis of the cryoglobulinemia.

  17. [Dissertations 25 years after date 35. Periodontal disease in Down syndrome: an immunological disorder].

    PubMed

    Reuland-Bosma, W

    2013-10-01

    In Down syndrome the prevalence of periodontal disease is high. Twentyfive years ago in a series of controlled experiments, based on an experimental gingivitis model, clinical, histological and immunological characteristics of a group children with Down syndrome and matched control children were evaluated. In the Down syndrome children the gingival inflammation occurred earlier and was more extensive. On the tissue level the early response was characterized by a polymorphonuclear leucocytes response. Chemotaxis assays were performed to rule out impaired function. It was found that random migration for the peripheral blood-polymorphonuclear leucocytes and chemotaxis in both groups of children were comparable; hence such a factor cannot be responsible the early polymorphonuclear leucocytes' response in the children with Down syndrome. The most striking feature in the group with Down syndrome was the delayed and impaired response of lymphocytes during plaque development compared to the controls. This impaired lymphocyte function was also observed in a pilot study on 1 child with Down syndrome. It showed a less pronounced T cell suppressor function and a lack of immune regulation. The high level of gingival inflammation in children with Down syndrome must therefore be related to their impaired adaptive immunity.

  18. [Mirror therapy for inflammatory rheumatic pain: Potentials and limitations].

    PubMed

    Bekrater-Bodmann, R

    2015-11-01

    Mirror therapy reduces chronic pain and might also be suitable for the treatment of inflammatory rheumatic pain. On the basis of the relevant literature this article a) characterizes the universal alterations in body perception and body representation in chronic pain, b) describes the potential mechanisms underlying mirror therapy and c) discusses the chances of success of mirror therapy for the treatment of inflammatory rheumatic pain. Literature search on the effectiveness and mechanisms of mirror therapy and derived procedures for the potential treatment of pain in inflammatory rheumatic disorders. There is evidence that mirror therapy can alleviate chronic pain experiences by correcting the accompanying distorted body perception as well as body representation by multimodal sensory stimulation. As there is probably a similar distortion in persons with chronic pain related to inflammatory rheumatic disorders, mirror therapy might also have positive effects in this field; however, the accompanying characteristics of these disorders, such as motor impairment and motor-evoked pain, may complicate the implementation of this kind of treatment. Mirror therapy represents an intervention with few side effects and might have positive effects on the experience of chronic pain in patients with inflammatory rheumatic disorders. Further clinical research is required in order to evaluate the potential of mirror therapy and associated interventional methods for the treatment of inflammatory rheumatic pain.

  19. Role of Neuro-Immunological Factors in the Pathophysiology of Mood Disorders: Implications for Novel Therapeutics for Treatment Resistant Depression.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Anindya; Drevets, Wayne C

    Mood disorders are associated with persistently high rates of morbidity and mortality, despite the widespread availability of antidepressant treatments. One limitation to extant therapeutic options has been that nearly all approved antidepressant pharmacotherapies exert a similar primary action of blocking monoamine transporters, and few options exist for transitioning treatment resistant patients to alternatives with distinct mechanisms. An emerging area of science that promises novel pathways to antidepressant and mood-stabilizing therapies has followed from evidence that immunological factors play major roles in the pathophysiology of at least some mood disorder subtypes. Here we review evidence that the compounds that reduce the release or signaling of neuroactive cytokines, particularly IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α, can exert antidepressant effects in subgroups of depressed patients who are identified by blood-based biomarkers associated with inflammation. Within this context we discuss the role of microglia in central neuroinflammation, and the interaction between the peripheral immune system and the central synaptic microenvironment during and after neuroinflammation. Finally we review data using preclinical neuroinflammation models that produce depression-like behaviors in experimental animals to guide the discovery of novel neuro-immune drug targets.

  20. Tai Chi and Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chenchen

    2011-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Many patients with chronic rheumatic diseases such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and fibromyalgia experience high levels of pain, psychological distress and negative emotions and have limited therapeutic options. Tai Chi is a complex multi-component mind-body exercise that increasing numbers of Americans are practicing, particularly those with musculoskeletal conditions. Clinical trials and observational studies have provided encouraging evidence that Tai Chi, both short and long-term, has benefits for patients with a variety of chronic disorders. As a form of physical exercise, Tai Chi enhances cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength, balance, and physical function. It also appears to be associated with reduced stress, anxiety and depression as well as improved quality of life. Thus, despite the noted limitations in the evidence, and the need for further methodologically rigorous studies, Tai Chi can be safely recommended to patients with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and fibromyalgia as a complementary and alternative medical approach to affect patient well-being. This overview synthesizes the current body of knowledge about this ancient Chinese mind-body medicine to better inform clinical decision-making for our rheumatic patients. PMID:21220083

  1. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in indigenous populations.

    PubMed

    Steer, Andrew C; Carapetis, Jonathan R

    2009-12-01

    Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease are diseases of socioeconomic disadvantage. These diseases are common in developing countries and in Indigenous populations in industrialized countries. Clinicians who work with Indigenous populations need to maintain a high index of suspicion for the potential diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever, particularly in patients presenting with joint pain. Inexpensive medicines, such as aspirin, are the mainstay of symptomatic treatment of rheumatic fever; however, antiinflammatory treatment has no effect on the long-term rate of progression or severity of chronic valvular disease. The current focus of global efforts at prevention of rheumatic heart disease is on secondary prevention (regular administration of penicillin to prevent recurrent rheumatic fever), although primary prevention (timely treatment of streptococcal pharyngitis to prevent rheumatic fever) is also important in populations in which it is feasible.

  2. Insights into the Immunological Properties of Intrinsically Disordered Malaria Proteins Using Proteome Scale Predictions

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Andrew J.; Irani, Vashti; MacRaild, Christopher A.; Anders, Robin F.; Norton, Raymond S.; Beeson, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Malaria remains a significant global health burden. The development of an effective malaria vaccine remains as a major challenge with the potential to significantly reduce morbidity and mortality. While Plasmodium spp. have been shown to contain a large number of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) or disordered protein regions, the relationship of protein structure to subcellular localisation and adaptive immune responses remains unclear. In this study, we employed several computational prediction algorithms to identify IDPs at the proteome level of six Plasmodium spp. and to investigate the potential impact of protein disorder on adaptive immunity against P. falciparum parasites. IDPs were shown to be particularly enriched within nuclear proteins, apical proteins, exported proteins and proteins localised to the parasitophorous vacuole. Furthermore, several leading vaccine candidates, and proteins with known roles in host-cell invasion, have extensive regions of disorder. Presentation of peptides by MHC molecules plays an important role in adaptive immune responses, and we show that IDP regions are predicted to contain relatively few MHC class I and II binding peptides owing to inherent differences in amino acid composition compared to structured domains. In contrast, linear B-cell epitopes were predicted to be enriched in IDPs. Tandem repeat regions and non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms were found to be strongly associated with regions of disorder. In summary, immune responses against IDPs appear to have characteristics distinct from those against structured protein domains, with increased antibody recognition of linear epitopes but some constraints for MHC presentation and issues of polymorphisms. These findings have major implications for vaccine design, and understanding immunity to malaria. PMID:26513658

  3. Role of genetic mutations in development of immunological and clinical disorders in children with chronic pyelonephritis.

    PubMed

    Harshman, Vira P; Kryuchko, Tetyana O; Kolenko, Iryna O; Kushnereva, Tetyana V; Tkachenko, Olha Y

    At the present time, the study of mechanisms of recognition of foreign agents, which is realized by means of Toll-like receptors (TLR) of the innate immune system, has become one of the main tasks of clinical immunology. The aim of our study was to investigate the prevalence of polymorphism of Toll-like receptor 4 (Asp299Gly, Gly299Gly) among children with chronic pyelonephritis (CP) and determine the association of this TLR4 polymorphism with phenotypic features of chronic pyelonephritis and level of interleukin-6 (IL-6). The clinical and laboratory examination of 60 children with chronic pyelonephritis during the stage of exacerbation, who were under inpatient treatment at the pediatric department of Children's Regional Clinical Hospital in Poltava, was performed. The group of healthy patients included 95 people, living in the Poltava region. Significantly higher frequency of the mutant allele 299Gly among children with CP was revealed. Significant correlation between the presence of 299Gly TLR4, association of U. urealyticum and M. hominis in lower sections of urinary tract and highest levels of IL-6 concentration was reflected. Sick children with polymorphous locus of TLR4 gene had higher risk of CP early manifestation and formation of its recurrent course with protracted urinary syndrome and unstable remission in comparison with the carriers of "wild" genotype. Obtained results prove the important role of TLR4 in the realization of innate immune response in children with CP and allow considering the TLR4 polymorphism as an additional prognostic indicator in this category of patients.

  4. Whole-exome sequencing in obsessive-compulsive disorder identifies rare mutations in immunological and neurodevelopmental pathways.

    PubMed

    Cappi, C; Brentani, H; Lima, L; Sanders, S J; Zai, G; Diniz, B J; Reis, V N S; Hounie, A G; Conceição do Rosário, M; Mariani, D; Requena, G L; Puga, R; Souza-Duran, F L; Shavitt, R G; Pauls, D L; Miguel, E C; Fernandez, T V

    2016-03-29

    Studies of rare genetic variation have identified molecular pathways conferring risk for developmental neuropsychiatric disorders. To date, no published whole-exome sequencing studies have been reported in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). We sequenced all the genome coding regions in 20 sporadic OCD cases and their unaffected parents to identify rare de novo (DN) single-nucleotide variants (SNVs). The primary aim of this pilot study was to determine whether DN variation contributes to OCD risk. To this aim, we evaluated whether there is an elevated rate of DN mutations in OCD, which would justify this approach toward gene discovery in larger studies of the disorder. Furthermore, to explore functional molecular correlations among genes with nonsynonymous DN SNVs in OCD probands, a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was generated based on databases of direct molecular interactions. We applied Degree-Aware Disease Gene Prioritization (DADA) to rank the PPI network genes based on their relatedness to a set of OCD candidate genes from two OCD genome-wide association studies (Stewart et al., 2013; Mattheisen et al., 2014). In addition, we performed a pathway analysis with genes from the PPI network. The rate of DN SNVs in OCD was 2.51 × 10(-8) per base per generation, significantly higher than a previous estimated rate in unaffected subjects using the same sequencing platform and analytic pipeline. Several genes harboring DN SNVs in OCD were highly interconnected in the PPI network and ranked high in the DADA analysis. Nearly all the DN SNVs in this study are in genes expressed in the human brain, and a pathway analysis revealed enrichment in immunological and central nervous system functioning and development. The results of this pilot study indicate that further investigation of DN variation in larger OCD cohorts is warranted to identify specific risk genes and to confirm our preliminary finding with regard to PPI network enrichment for particular

  5. Whole-exome sequencing in obsessive-compulsive disorder identifies rare mutations in immunological and neurodevelopmental pathways

    PubMed Central

    Cappi, C; Brentani, H; Lima, L; Sanders, S J; Zai, G; Diniz, B J; Reis, V N S; Hounie, A G; Conceição do Rosário, M; Mariani, D; Requena, G L; Puga, R; Souza-Duran, F L; Shavitt, R G; Pauls, D L; Miguel, E C; Fernandez, T V

    2016-01-01

    Studies of rare genetic variation have identified molecular pathways conferring risk for developmental neuropsychiatric disorders. To date, no published whole-exome sequencing studies have been reported in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). We sequenced all the genome coding regions in 20 sporadic OCD cases and their unaffected parents to identify rare de novo (DN) single-nucleotide variants (SNVs). The primary aim of this pilot study was to determine whether DN variation contributes to OCD risk. To this aim, we evaluated whether there is an elevated rate of DN mutations in OCD, which would justify this approach toward gene discovery in larger studies of the disorder. Furthermore, to explore functional molecular correlations among genes with nonsynonymous DN SNVs in OCD probands, a protein–protein interaction (PPI) network was generated based on databases of direct molecular interactions. We applied Degree-Aware Disease Gene Prioritization (DADA) to rank the PPI network genes based on their relatedness to a set of OCD candidate genes from two OCD genome-wide association studies (Stewart et al., 2013; Mattheisen et al., 2014). In addition, we performed a pathway analysis with genes from the PPI network. The rate of DN SNVs in OCD was 2.51 × 10−8 per base per generation, significantly higher than a previous estimated rate in unaffected subjects using the same sequencing platform and analytic pipeline. Several genes harboring DN SNVs in OCD were highly interconnected in the PPI network and ranked high in the DADA analysis. Nearly all the DN SNVs in this study are in genes expressed in the human brain, and a pathway analysis revealed enrichment in immunological and central nervous system functioning and development. The results of this pilot study indicate that further investigation of DN variation in larger OCD cohorts is warranted to identify specific risk genes and to confirm our preliminary finding with regard to PPI network enrichment for particular

  6. Characteristics of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) and their role in immunological disorders (an update).

    PubMed

    Yazdani, Reza; Sharifi, Mehri; Shirvan, Aylar Saba; Azizi, Gholamreza; Ganjalikhani-Hakemi, Mazdak

    2015-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a novel family of hematopoietic effectors and regulators of innate immunity. Although these cells are morphologically similar to B cells and T cells, however they do not express antigen receptors. ILCs seems to have emerging roles in innate immune responses against infectious or non-infectious microorganisms, protection of the epithelial barrier, lymphoid organogenesis and inflammation, tissue remodeling and regulating homeostasis of tissue stromal cells. In addition, it has recently been reported that ILCs have a crucial role in several disorders such as allergy and autoimmunity. Based on their phenotype and functions, ILCs are classified into three major groups called ILCs1, ILCs2, and ILCs3. Here we reviewed the most recent data concerning diverse ILC phenotypes, subclasses, functions in immune responses as well as in immune mediated disorders.

  7. Post-Encephalitic Parkinsonism and Sleep Disorder Responsive to Immunological Treatment: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, Valerio; Testani, Elisa; Iorio, Raffaele; Frisullo, Giovanni; Luigetti, Marco; Di Giuda, Daniela; Marca, Giacomo Della

    2016-10-01

    We describe a 70-year-old man who, after a viral encephalitis associated with pneumonia, progressively developed a parkinsonism associated with lethargy. Encephalitis manifested with persistent hiccups, seizures and impairment of consciousness. After 2 weeks, the initial neurologic symptoms subsided and the patient progressively developed movement disorders (rigidity and bradykinesia, resistant to L-DOPA), lethargy and behavioral hypersomnia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed thalamic and hippocampal signal abnormalities, immunohistochemistry on a mouse brain substrate revealed serum autoantibodies binding to the brainstem neuropil. Polysomnographic monitoring was consistent with a very severe disruption of sleep: the sleep-wake cycle was fragmented, and the NREM-REM ultradian cycle was irregular. Intravenous immune globulin therapy resulted in the complete reversal of the movement and the sleep disorders. Our observation confirms that parkinsonism and sleep disorders may be consequences of encephalitis, that an immune-mediated pathogenesis is likely, and, consequently, that immunotherapy can be beneficial in these patients. The polysomnographic monitoring suggests that lethargia, rather than a mere hypersomnia, is the result of a combination between sleep disruption and altered motor control.

  8. Evaluation of Immunological Disorders of T Lymphocytes and Endocrinological Disorders as Pathogen Factors in Patients With Metaplasia of Urinary Bladder

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-19

    The Follow-up Duration Was 1-8 Years.; The Main Reasons Behind Visiting the Hospital Were Recurrent Urinary Tract Infection,; Urinary Urgencies, Pollakiuria, Difficulty in Initiating Micturition, Pain in Hypogastrium,; Night Wetting and Day Wetting, Menstruation's Disorders, Urolithiasis, Defects of Urinary; System and Hematuria.

  9. Radiological imaging in pediatric rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Matuszewska, Genowefa; Zaniewicz-Kaniewska, Katarzyna; Włodkowska-Korytkowska, Monika; Smorawińska, Patrycja; Saied, Fadhil; Kunisz, Wojciech; Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona

    2014-01-01

    Summary Radiological imaging plays a fundamental role in the diagnosis and monitoring of rheumatic diseases. The basic method of imaging is a classic X-ray picture, which for many years has been used as a single method for the recognition and evaluation of the effects of disease management. In today’s modern day treatment of rheumatic diseases, ultrasonography and magnetic resonance are more commonly performed for early detection of inflammatory changes in the region of soft tissue, subchondral bone and bone marrow. In spite of their usefulness and fundamental role in the diagnosis, X-ray still remains an essential tool in the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis in children and is complementary to today’s methods of imaging diagnostics. In clinical practice, X-ray imaging is still an important examination performed not only to recognize the disorders, but also to provide a differential diagnosis. It helps estimate disease progression and is used to monitor the effects of treatment and the development of possible complications. Differential diagnosis of rheumatic diseases is performed on the basis of localization and type of radiographic changes. The surrounding periarticular soft tissues, bone structures, joint space, with special attention to articular bone surfaces and epiphyses, are analyzed. The aim of this work is to describe characteristic inflammatory changes present on X-ray imaging typical for the most commonly diagnosed rheumatic diseases in children, such as juvenile idiopathic arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic scleroderma, mixed connective tissue disease, juvenile dermatomyositis, juvenile spondyloarthropathy and systemic vascular disease. PMID:24669280

  10. IMMUNOLOGICAL METHODS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Environmental microbiology does not deal with all aspects of immunology or the immune responses per se, but instead adapts immunology-based research technologies or immunoassays for the study of microorganisms and chemical contaminants in association with the environment. The primary immunologic-bas...

  11. Radiologic atlas of rheumatic diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Dihlmann, W.

    1986-01-01

    This book is an ''atlas of rheumatic joint disease'' selected from 20 years of personal experience by the author. The author sets a goal of demonstrating the value of soft-tissue imaging in the diagnosis of early joint disease. This goal is achieved with high quality reproductions, many of which are presented in duplicate to illustrate bone and soft-tissue changes. The contents include an introductory overview of the ''Mosaic of Arthritis'' followed by sections on adult rheumatoid arthritis, seronegative spondyloarthropathies, classic collagen disease, enthesiopathies, and lastly a section on gout and psuedogout. The subject index is specific and indexes figures with boldface type. Each section is introduced by a brief outline or overview of the radiographic spectrum of the joint disorder to be illustrated.

  12. Inflammatory Cytokines: Potential Biomarkers of Immunologic Dysfunction in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaohong; Zhong, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Autism is a disorder of neurobiological origin characterized by problems in communication and social skills and repetitive behavior. After more than six decades of research, the etiology of autism remains unknown, and no biomarkers have been proven to be characteristic of autism. A number of studies have shown that the cytokine levels in the blood, brain, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of autistic subjects differ from that of healthy individuals; for example, a series of studies suggests that interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) are significantly elevated in different tissues in autistic subjects. However, the expression of some cytokines, such as IL-1, IL-2, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), is controversial, and different studies have found various results in different tissues. In this review, we focused on several types of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines that might affect different cell signal pathways and play a role in the pathophysiological mechanism of autistic spectrum disorders. PMID:25729218

  13. [Ocular manifestations of rheumatic diseases. Cooperation between internist/ophthalmologist].

    PubMed

    Tyndall, A; Steiger, U

    1993-05-01

    A red or painful eye may be the clue to a systemic condition, many of which are of a rheumatological or immunological nature. Conjunctivitis may occur in Sjögren's Syndrome, Reiter's Syndrome (and other sero negative spondyloarthropathies) and with infections such as chlamydia and viruses. 70% of cases of episcleritis are idiopathic, the other 30% being associated with rheumatoid arthritis or other connective tissue diseases or herpes zoster infection. Scleritis may be seen with connective tissue diseases or auto immune conditions (rheumatoid arthritis, Wegener granulomatosis, polyarteritis nodosa, relapsing polychondritis, SLE), infections (herpes, tuberculosis, syphilis, aspergillosis) or metabolic (gout, porphyria, cystinosis). Retinal vasculitis is seen in SLE, Behçet's Disease, sarcoidosis, polyarteritis nodosa, Whipple's disease and Crohn's disease among others. However, uveitis presents perhaps the greatest diagnostic challenge and interface between ophthalmology and rheumatology. Some syndromes are purely ophthalmological (eg: Fuch's heterochromic cyclitis) but others may lead to the diagnosis of a rheumatic disorder (eg: recurrent unilateral acute anterior uveitis and ankylosing spondylitis). Systemic syndromes most likely to be associated with uveitis are Reiter's disease, ankylosing spondylitis, sarcoidosis, juvenile arthritis, interstitial nephritis, inflammatory bowel disease, syphilis. The patterns are different, eg: acute painful unilateral anterior uveitis with ankylosing spondylitis and chronic asymptomatic bilateral uveitis in juvenile arthritis (ANA positive, pauci-articular) or bilateral symptomatic uveitis in sarcoidosis. An illustrative case will be presented and an algorithm for the evaluation of uveitis discussed.

  14. Approaches to Managing Autoimmune Cytopenias in Novel Immunological Disorders with Genetic Underpinnings Like Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rao, V Koneti

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a rare disorder of apoptosis. It is frequently caused by mutations in FAS (TNFRSF6) gene. Unlike most of the self-limiting autoimmune cytopenias sporadically seen in childhood, multi lineage cytopenias due to ALPS are often refractory, as their inherited genetic defect is not going to go away. Historically, more ALPS patients have died due to overwhelming sepsis following splenectomy to manage their chronic cytopenias than due to any other cause, including malignancies. Hence, current recommendations underscore the importance of avoiding splenectomy in ALPS, by long-term use of corticosteroid-sparing immunosuppressive agents like mycophenolate mofetil and sirolimus. Paradigms learnt from managing ALPS patients in recent years is highlighted here and can be extrapolated to manage refractory cytopenias in patients with as yet undetermined genetic bases for their ailments. It is also desirable to develop international registries for children with rare and complex immune problems associated with chronic multilineage cytopenias in order to elucidate their natural history and long-term comorbidities due to the disease and its treatments.

  15. Approaches to Managing Autoimmune Cytopenias in Novel Immunological Disorders with Genetic Underpinnings Like Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rao, V. Koneti

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a rare disorder of apoptosis. It is frequently caused by mutations in FAS (TNFRSF6) gene. Unlike most of the self-limiting autoimmune cytopenias sporadically seen in childhood, multi lineage cytopenias due to ALPS are often refractory, as their inherited genetic defect is not going to go away. Historically, more ALPS patients have died due to overwhelming sepsis following splenectomy to manage their chronic cytopenias than due to any other cause, including malignancies. Hence, current recommendations underscore the importance of avoiding splenectomy in ALPS, by long-term use of corticosteroid-sparing immunosuppressive agents like mycophenolate mofetil and sirolimus. Paradigms learnt from managing ALPS patients in recent years is highlighted here and can be extrapolated to manage refractory cytopenias in patients with as yet undetermined genetic bases for their ailments. It is also desirable to develop international registries for children with rare and complex immune problems associated with chronic multilineage cytopenias in order to elucidate their natural history and long-term comorbidities due to the disease and its treatments. PMID:26258116

  16. [Paraneoplastic rheumatic syndromes].

    PubMed

    Gracia-Ramos, Abraham Edgar; Vera-Lastra, Olga Lidia

    2012-01-01

    Paraneoplastic rheumatic syndromes are defined as those events associated with cancer that occur away from the primary tumor or its metastases and are induced by the presence of the tumor through biological products like hormones, peptides, autocrine or paracrine mediators, antibodies or cytotoxic lymphocytes. Of these, hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, carcinomatous polyarthritis, dermatomyositis/polymyositis, and paraneoplastic vasculitis are the most frequently recognized. Other less known associations are based upon a smaller number of case reports, and include palmar fasciitis, panniculitis, erythema nodosum, Raynaud¥s phenomenon, erythromelalgia and Lupus-like syndrome. Usually the clinical course of rheumatic paraneoplastic syndrome and cancer parallels the resolution of the tumor usually leads to resolution of this syndrome. It is difficult make the distinction between idiopathic rheumatic syndromes from those that result from cancer. Still, there are several clinical data that can guide us to the presence of an occult malignancy, and should be identified as the detection of cancer can lead to early treatment and better prognosis.

  17. Environmental factors and human health: fibrous and particulate substance-induced immunological disorders and construction of a health-promoting living environment.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Takemi; Matsuzaki, Hidenori; Lee, Suni; Kumagai-Takei, Naoko; Yamamoto, Shoko; Hatayama, Tamayo; Yoshitome, Kei; Nishimura, Yasumitsu

    2016-03-01

    Among the various scientific fields covered in the area of hygiene such as environmental medicine, epidemiology, public health and preventive medicine, we are investigating the immunological effects of fibrous and particulate substances in the environment and work surroundings, such as asbestos fibers and silica particles. In addition to these studies, we have attempted to construct health-promoting living conditions. Thus, in this review we will summarize our investigations regarding the (1) immunological effects of asbestos fibers, (2) immunological effects of silica particles, and (3) construction of a health-promoting living environment. This review article summarizes the 2014 Japanese Society for Hygiene (JSH) Award Lecture of the 85th Annual Meeting of the JSH entitled "Environmental health effects: immunological effects of fibrous and particulate matter and establishment of health-promoting environments" presented by the first author of this manuscript, Prof. Otsuki, Department of Hygiene, Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, Japan, the recipient of the 2014 JSH award. The results of our experiments can be summarized as follows: (1) asbestos fibers reduce anti-tumor immunity, (2) silica particles chronically activate responder and regulatory T cells causing an unbalance of these two populations of T helper cells, which may contribute to the development of autoimmune disorders frequently complicating silicosis, and (3) living conditions to enhance natural killer cell activity were developed, which may promote the prevention of cancers and diminish symptoms of virus infections.

  18. Soft-tissue rheumatism: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Reveille, J D

    1997-01-27

    Soft tissue rheumatism is one of the most common and most misunderstood categories of disorders facing the primary care physician. Among the more common types are subacromial bursitis, epicondylitis, trochanteric bursitis, anserine bursitis, and fibromyalgia. The keys to the diagnosis of soft-tissue rheumatism are the history and, more importantly, the physical examination. Extensive laboratory testing and radiographs are not as helpful in evaluating patients with these complaints. Treatment consists of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and nonnarcotic analgesics. Especially in patients with localized disorders, intralesional injections of corticosteroids are particularly effective and safe and should be part of the armamentarium of the primary care practitioner. Fibromyalgia is a particularly challenging form of nonarticular rheumatism. The clinical presentation is rather characteristic, with the patient typically being a woman 30-60 years of age who presents with diffuse somatic pain. Patients often give a history of sleep disturbance, may be depressed, and show characteristic tender areas, or trigger points. Laboratory findings are normal. Management includes reassurance, correction of the underlying sleep disturbance with low doses of a tricyclic antidepressant, treatment with muscle relaxants and nonnarcotic analgesics or NSAIDs, and an exercise program with a strong aerobic component.

  19. Role of Adipokines in Atherosclerosis: Interferences with Cardiovascular Complications in Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Scotece, Morena; Conde, Javier; Gómez, Rodolfo; López, Verónica; Pino, Jesús; González, Antonio; Lago, Francisca; Gómez-Reino, Juan J.; Gualillo, Oreste

    2012-01-01

    Patients with rheumatic diseases have an increased risk of mortality by cardiovascular events. In fact, several rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and ankylosing spondylitis are associated with a higher prevalence of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Although traditional cardiovascular risk factors have been involved in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases in rheumatic patients, these alterations do not completely explain the enhanced cardiovascular risk in this population. Obesity and its pathologic alteration of fat mass and dysfunction, due to an altered pattern of secretion of proinflammatory adipokines, could be one of the links between cardiovascular and rheumatic diseases. Indeed, the incidence of CVDs is augmented in obese individuals with rheumatic disorders. Thus, in this paper we explore in detail the relationships among adipokines, rheumatic diseases, and cardiovascular complications by giving to the reader a holistic vision and several suggestions for future perspectives and potential clinical implications. PMID:22910888

  20. Rheumatic fever, autoimmunity, and molecular mimicry: the streptococcal connection.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Madeleine W

    2014-01-01

    The group A streptococcus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and its link to autoimmune sequelae, has acquired a new level of understanding. Studies support the hypothesis that molecular mimicry between the group A streptococcus and heart or brain are important in directing immune responses in rheumatic fever. Rheumatic carditis, Sydenham chorea and a new group of behavioral disorders called pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections are reviewed with consideration of autoantibody and T cell responses and the role of molecular mimicry between the heart, brain and group A streptococcus as well as how immune responses contribute to pathogenic mechanisms in disease. In rheumatic carditis, studies have investigated human monoclonal autoantibodies and T cell clones for their crossreactivity and their mechanisms leading to valve damage in rheumatic heart disease. Although studies of human and animal sera from group A streptococcal diseases or immunization models have been crucial in providing clues to molecular mimicry and its role in the pathogenesis of rheumatic fever, study of human monoclonal autoantibodies have provided important insights into how antibodies against the valve may activate the valve endothelium and lead to T cell infiltration. Passive transfer of anti-streptococcal T cell lines in a rat model of rheumatic carditis illustrates effects of CD4+ T cells on the valve. Although Sydenham chorea has been known as the neurological manifestation of rheumatic fever for decades, the combination of autoimmunity and behavior is a relatively new concept linking brain, behavior and neuropsychiatric disorders with streptococcal infections. In Sydenham chorea, human mAbs and their expression in transgenic mice have linked autoimmunity to central dopamine pathways as well as dopamine receptors and dopaminergic neurons in basal ganglia. Taken together, the studies reviewed provide a basis for understanding streptococcal sequelae and

  1. [Soft tissue rheumatism in erderly].

    PubMed

    Szczepański, Leszek

    2008-01-01

    Disorders of soft, peri-articular tissues are a common cause of musculoskeletal pain in elderly patients. Nevertheless, most physicians underestimate the role of soft tissue rheumatism in the pathomechanism of the pain. The impairments of soft tissue can not be diagnosed by X-rays examinations, whereas degenerative lesions of joints are easy diagnosed using this method even despite of their uncertain role in producing the symptoms. The incidence of pain syndromes originated from soft tissues differ regarding to the age of patients. In young subjects the incidence of all of them is generally low. Syndromes provoked by overloading during work: repetitive strain syndrome, canal tunnel syndrome, tennis elbow, golfers elbow, shoulder tendon coin disorders and myofascial pain syndrome are common in middle-aged patients. The morbidity of fibromialgia syndrome is also lower in old people probably as the result of diminished numbers and degenerative changes in nociceptive fibers. The syndromes prevailing in elderly patients include trochanteric syndrome and the pain syndromes provoked by muscle spasm depended on posture abnormalities. In the soft tissue pain syndrome prevention adapted to old age kinesitherapy and avoiding muscle overloading are recommended. Soft tissue pain syndromes are usually treated with non steroidal anti inflammatory drugs. In local pain syndromes better results can be obtained by local treatment. Local injections of glikocorticosteroids are usually very effective and safe.

  2. Rheumatism in Foundry Workers

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, J. S.; Molyneux, M. K.; Dingwall-Fordyce, Ianthe

    1966-01-01

    In order to investigate loss of work from rheumatic diseases in the metal trades, employees in 10 foundries were questioned. Of 325 foundry workers aged 35 to 74 years, who had worked for at least 10 years on the foundry floor, 299 were examined clinically and radiologically for evidence of rheumatic disease. Radiographs of the hands, knees, and dorsal and lumbar spine were taken as a routine, and the pelvis was included in those aged 45 and over. A comparison was made with a control series of radiographs, from men, matched for age, in a random population sample examined earlier in the town of Leigh. Rheumatic complaints in general were less frequent in the foundry workers than in the random sample, and the foundry workers less often gave a history of prolonged incapacity (three months or more) due to this cause. Radiological evidence of disc degeneration in the lumbar spine, however, was more frequent in the foundry workers than in the controls and was of greater severity. Further, the foundry workers more commonly had symptoms and signs of lumbar disc prolapse. On the other hand, the controls had more osteo-arthrosis of the hips and knees and lost more work from pain at these sites. This was associated with a difference of body habitus, obesity being less frequent in the foundry workers. Foundry workers directly exposed to hot conditions did not have less back or leg pain than those not so exposed despite a greater prevalence of disc degeneration. Measurements of air temperature, humidity, and radiant heat were made in a foundry while pouring was in progress. The air temperature rose from 18°C. to 26°C. and the humidity ranged from 70% to 54%. The mean intensity of radiation incident on the clothed surface of a foundry worker was 0·12 watt/cm.2. This was compared with conditions during therapeutic exposure to radiant heat. The radiant heat under conditions of `heat therapy' varied between 0·16 and 0·37 watt/cm.2. The possible influence of radiant heat on the

  3. [Structures of acute rheumatic care].

    PubMed

    Stier-Jarmer, M; Liman, W; Stucki, G; Braun, J

    2006-12-01

    frequently treated rheumatic disease in wards specialising in rheumatology, followed by soft tissue disorders (e.g. fibromyalgia), diseases with systemic involvement of connective tissue and inflammatory spinal disorders such as ankylosing spondylitis.

  4. The role of viral agents in aetiopathogenesis of acute rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Olgunturk, Rana; Okur, Ilyas; Cirak, Meltem Y; Oguz, Ayse Deniz; Akalin, Nursel; Turet, Sevgi; Tunaoglu, Sedef

    2011-01-01

    The reason why abnormal immune response exists in acute rheumatic fever is not exactly explained. The influence of co-pathogens like certain viruses were mentioned regarding the initiation of the immunological reaction in acute rheumatic fever patients by several authors since 1970. This study was designed to find the role or effect of some viral infections in the development of rheumatic fever. In this study, 47 cases with acute rheumatic fever (acute rheumatic arthritis, acute rheumatic carditis, and chorea), 20 cases with chronic rheumatic fever, 20 cases with streptococcal pharyngitis, and 20 healthy age- and gender-matched control cases were involved. Serological and molecular tests were made including hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, rubella virus, herpes simplex virus (HSV group 1), and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). HBsAg, rubella IgM and EBV IgM positivity were not seen in any of patients with rheumatic fever. Although antiHBs seropositivity was higher in the control group, it was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). There was no difference in rubella IgG, HSV IgM seropositivity, either (p > 0.05). EBV DNA was searched by the polymerase chain reaction technique; due to the latent nature of the virus, no significant difference was found between the control group and the other groups (p > 0.05). In this study, no positive correlation could be found to support the synergism theories regarding the streptoccocus infection and viral infections in the development of acute rheumatic fever. Only EBV DNA positivity was found in all acute rheumatic fever cases but not in the control group may lead to further studies with larger series of patients.

  5. Adipokines, Metabolic Syndrome and Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Abella, Vanessa; Scotece, Morena; López, Verónica; Lazzaro, Verónica; Pino, Jesús; Gómez-Reino, Juan J.; Gualillo, Oreste

    2014-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of cardiometabolic disorders that result from the increasing prevalence of obesity. The major components of MetS include insulin resistance, central obesity, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. MetS identifies the central obesity with increased risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Patients with rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and ankylosing spondylitis, have increased prevalence of CVDs. Moreover, CVD risk is increased when obesity is present in these patients. However, traditional cardiovascular risk factors do not completely explain the enhanced cardiovascular risk in this population. Thus, MetS and the altered secretion patterns of proinflammatory adipokines present in obesity could be the link between CVDs and rheumatic diseases. Furthermore, adipokines have been linked to the pathogenesis of MetS and its comorbidities through their effects on vascular function and inflammation. In the present paper, we review recent evidence of the role played by adipokines in the modulation of MetS in the general population, and in patients with rheumatic diseases. PMID:24741591

  6. Adipokines, metabolic syndrome and rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Abella, Vanessa; Scotece, Morena; Conde, Javier; López, Verónica; Lazzaro, Verónica; Pino, Jesús; Gómez-Reino, Juan J; Gualillo, Oreste

    2014-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of cardiometabolic disorders that result from the increasing prevalence of obesity. The major components of MetS include insulin resistance, central obesity, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. MetS identifies the central obesity with increased risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Patients with rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and ankylosing spondylitis, have increased prevalence of CVDs. Moreover, CVD risk is increased when obesity is present in these patients. However, traditional cardiovascular risk factors do not completely explain the enhanced cardiovascular risk in this population. Thus, MetS and the altered secretion patterns of proinflammatory adipokines present in obesity could be the link between CVDs and rheumatic diseases. Furthermore, adipokines have been linked to the pathogenesis of MetS and its comorbidities through their effects on vascular function and inflammation. In the present paper, we review recent evidence of the role played by adipokines in the modulation of MetS in the general population, and in patients with rheumatic diseases.

  7. [Rheumatic forefoot deformities].

    PubMed

    Fuhrmann, R

    2014-11-01

    The frequency and extent of rheumatic forefoot deformities have been greatly reduced since the introduction of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD). The accompanying reduction in arthritic destruction of joints opens up new treatment options whereby priority is given to joint preservation. This is true for the first middle foot ray as well as for the small toe rays. Whereas resection arthroplasty of the metatarsophalangeal joints II-V was previously considered the gold standard treatment, joint-preserving operative procedures (e.g. metatarsal osteotomy and periarticular soft tissue interventions) are now being increasingly more propagated. Resection arthroplasty of the first midfoot ray has major biomechanical disadvantages so that it is not surprising that reconstructive procedures are given priority. In patients with severe arthritic destruction of the first metatarsophalangeal joint, arthrodesis has substantial biomechanical advantages compared to resection arthroplasty. Nevertheless, it has not yet been confirmed that fusion leads to superior clinical results.

  8. Rheumatic Fever Programme in Samoa.

    PubMed

    Viali, Satupaitea; Saena, Puleiala; Futi, Vailogoua

    2011-02-11

    Rheumatic fever is very common in Samoa. The following paper describes the Rheumatic Fever Programme in Samoa and looks at the incidence of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD). The incidence of ARF has decreased to 30 per 100,000 in 2005, 12.8 per 100,000 in 2007, 7.3 per 100,000 in 2008, and 9.5 per 100,000 in 2009. The incidence of RHD has decreased to 40.2 per 100,000 in 2007, 34 per 100,000 in 2008, and 31.8 per 100,000 in 2009. Cardiac surgery in New Zealand is expensive, but is cheaper to perform in Samoa. RHD screening with echocardiogram at schools may be the best way to reduce the burden and suffering from RHD.

  9. [Cardiovascular involvement in rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Driazhenko, I V

    2005-01-01

    Cardiovascular system involvement with early development of atherosclerosis is characteristic for rheumatic diseases. Among causes of death in various rheumatic diseases cardiovascular pathology also prevails. This paper contains a review of most important studies of impairment of the heart, arterial and venous parts of cardiovascular system in patients with diffuse diseases of connective tissue, rheumatoid arthritis and systemic vasculitides. The role of immune mechanisms, endothelial dysfunction, dyslipidemia in pathogenesis of cardiovascular disturbances with development of myocardial and vascular remodeling in rheumatic diseases is also discussed. Major risk factors of cardiovascular pathology in rheumatic patients are presented. Treatment of a cardiovascular pathology in these patients presumes the use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, aldosterone antagonists and statins.

  10. Rheumatic manifestations of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Lebiedz-Odrobina, Dorota; Kay, Jonathan

    2010-11-01

    DM is associated with various musculoskeletal manifestations. The strength of this relationship varies among the various musculoskeletal disorders; the associations are based mostly on epidemiologic data. For most of these conditions, definitive pathophysiologic correlates are lacking.Hand and shoulder disorders occur more frequently than other musculoskeletal manifestations of DM. Recognition of the association between DM and shoulder adhesive capsulitis, DD, and stenosing flexor tenosynovitis facilitates their correct diagnosis in the setting of DM and prompt initiation of appropriate treatment, which may include optimizing glycemic control. Conversely, awareness and identification of the characteristic musculoskeletal manifestations of DM may facilitate earlier diagnosis of DM and initiation of glucose-lowering therapy to retard the development of diabetic complications.Much less has been published about the musculoskeletal complications of DM than about its micro- and macrovascular complications. Prospective case-control cohort studies are needed to establish the true prevalence of musculoskeletal complications of DM and the metabolic syndrome, especially in this era of tighter glycemic control.The potential relationship between DM and the development of OA needs to be clarified in large, prospective, case-control cohort studies. The effect on musculoskeletal manifestations of various therapeutic regimens to manage DM should be studied prospectively. Treatment regimens for some musculoskeletal conditions associated with DM, such as DISH, should be studied in larger prospective, randomized,controlled clinical trials.At the molecular level, further studies are warranted to clarify the potential contribution of AGEs and adipokines to the development of OA and diabetic musculoskeletal syndromes, such as shoulder adhesive capsulitis, DD, stenosing flexor tenosynovitis, and LJM. Identification of such molecular targets for therapy would promote the development of

  11. Historical aspects of rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Steer, Andrew C

    2015-01-01

    Few diseases have experienced such a remarkable change in their epidemiology over the past century, without the influence of a vaccine, than rheumatic fever. Rheumatic fever has all but disappeared from industrialised countries after being a frequent problem in the 1940s and 1950s. That the disease still occurs at high incidence in resource limited settings and in Indigenous populations in industrialised countries, particularly in Australia and New Zealand, is an indication of the profound effect of socio-economic factors on the disease. Although there have been major changes in the epidemiology of rheumatic fever, diagnosis remains reliant on careful clinical judgement and management is remarkably similar to that 50 years ago. Over the past decade, increasing attention has been given to rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease as public health issues, including in Australia and particularly in New Zealand, as well as in selected low and middle income countries. Perhaps the greatest hope for public health control of rheumatic fever is the development of a vaccine against Streptococcus pyogenes, and there are encouraging initiatives in this area. However, an effective vaccine is some time away and in the meantime public health efforts need to focus on effective translation of the known evidence around primary and secondary prophylaxis into policy and practice.

  12. Vitamin D and rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Rossini, M; Gatti, D; Viapiana, O; Caimmi, C; Idolazzi, L; Fracassi, E; Adami, S

    2014-07-28

    Vitamin D has some well-known effects on calcium, phosphate and bone metabolism, but it has recently shown to have many other effects, which may potentially be relevant to patients with extra-skeletal rheumatic diseases. Such effects may be justified by: 1) the presence of the vitamin D receptors also on extra-osseous cells, such as cartilage cells, sinoviocytes, muscle cells; 2) the proven role of vitamin D in the control of the transcription of genes involved in rheumatic diseases; 3) the evidence that vitamin D has multiple endocrine effects not only on calcium homeostasis; 4) the activation of vitamin D not only in the kidneys, but also in monocyte-macrophage and lymphocytic cell lines and in some epithelial cells with additional intracrine and paracrine effects. Vitamin D deficiency has been reported in numerous metabolic, degenerative, inflammatory and autoimmune rheumatic diseases. In some cases this association was also related to the risk of developing a rheumatic disease or the degree of disease activity. However there is no conclusive evidence of the efficacy of a preventive or therapeutic strategy based on vitamin D supplementation in extra-skeletal rheumatic diseases. This review aims to provide an overview of the latest evidence concerning the relationship between vitamin D and the most relevant rheumatic diseases.

  13. What rheumatologists should know about orofacial manifestations of autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Abrão, Aline Lauria Pires; Santana, Caroline Menezes; Bezerra, Ana Cristina Barreto; Amorim, Rivadávio Fernandes Batista de; Silva, Mariana Branco da; Mota, Licia Maria Henrique da; Falcão, Denise Pinheiro

    Orofacial manifestations occur frequently in rheumatic diseases and usually represent early signs of disease or of its activity that are still neglected in clinical practice. Among the autoimmune rheumatic diseases with potential for oral manifestations, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), inflammatory myopathies (IM), systemic sclerosis (SSc), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), relapsing polychondritis (RP) and Sjögren's syndrome (SS) can be cited. Signs and symptoms such as oral hyposalivation, xerostomia, temporomandibular joint disorders, lesions of the oral mucosa, periodontal disease, dysphagia, and dysphonia may be the first expression of these rheumatic diseases. This article reviews the main orofacial manifestations of rheumatic diseases that may be of interest to the rheumatologist for diagnosis and monitoring of autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

  14. What rheumatologists should know about orofacial manifestations of autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Abrão, Aline Lauria Pires; Santana, Caroline Menezes; Bezerra, Ana Cristina Barreto; Amorim, Rivadávio Fernandes Batista de; Silva, Mariana Branco da; Mota, Licia Maria Henrique da; Falcão, Denise Pinheiro

    2016-02-11

    Orofacial manifestations occur frequently in rheumatic diseases and usually represent early signs of disease or of its activity that are still neglected in clinical practice. Among the autoimmune rheumatic diseases with potential for oral manifestations, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), inflammatory myopathies (IM), systemic sclerosis (SSc), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), relapsing polychondritis (RP) and Sjögren's syndrome (SS) can be cited. Signs and symptoms such as oral hyposalivation, xerostomia, temporomandibular joint disorders, lesions of the oral mucosa, periodontal disease, dysphagia, and dysphonia may be the first expression of these rheumatic diseases. This article reviews the main orofacial manifestations of rheumatic diseases that may be of interest to the rheumatologist for diagnosis and monitoring of autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

  15. Immunological reagents

    PubMed Central

    Batty, Irene

    1976-01-01

    The need for material standards in the field of clinical immunology, together with the mode of operation of the combined World Health Organization/International Union of Immunological Societies programme for the provision of such standards, are discussed. Attention is drawn to the importance of the use of International Units in reporting concentrations of complex constituents, e.g., immunoglobulins in body fluids, and to the availability of standard materials against which such components can be calibrated. The necessity for the standardization of nomenclature is also emphasized. PMID:1088095

  16. Photosensitivity in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Werth, Victoria P; Bashir, Muhammad; Zhang, Wei

    2004-01-01

    There have been a number of recent advances in the genetic understanding of photosensitive rheumatic diseases, especially subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus and dermatomyositis. These advances support the concept that increased numbers of ultraviolet light-induced apoptotic cells in skin lead to a supra-threshold concentration of antigenic peptides. The current genetic data suggest that increased keratinocyte apopotosis can result from increased amounts of TNF-alpha that induce apoptosis due to a ultraviolet light-sensitive TNF promoter polymorphism or to decreased clearance of apototic cells due to polymorphisms associated with decreased serum levels of collectins such as C1q and mannose-binding lectin. These diseases are frequently oligogenic, and other yet to be elucidated genes will, in individual patients, lead to increased numbers of apoptotic cells associated with these cutaneous autoimmune diseases. In the presence of specific MHC class I and II genes, antigen-presenting cells initiate a primary immune response that leads to cutaneous, and likely systemic, autoimmune disease.

  17. Endothelial dysfunction in rheumatic autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Murdaca, Giuseppe; Colombo, Barbara Maria; Cagnati, Paola; Gulli, Rossella; Spanò, Francesca; Puppo, Francesco

    2012-10-01

    Rheumatic autoimmune diseases have been associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and various types of vasculopathies. Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory condition which starts as a "response to injury" favoring endothelial dysfunction which is associated with increased expression of adhesion molecules, pro-inflammatory cytokines, pro-thrombotic factors, oxidative stress upregulation and abnormal vascular tone modulation. Endothelial dysfunction in rheumatic autoimmune diseases involves innate immune responses, including macrophages and dendritic cells expression of scavenger and toll-like receptors for modified or native LDL as well as neutrophil and complement activation, and dysregulation of adaptive immune responses, including proliferation of autoreactive T-helper-1 lymphocytes and defective function of dendritic and regulatory T cells. Specific differences for endothelial function among different disorders include: a) increased amounts of pro-atherogenic hormones, decreased amounts of anti-atherogenic hormones and increased insulin resistance in rheumatoid arthritis; b) autoantibodies production in systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid syndrome; c) smooth muscle cells proliferation, destruction of internal elastic lamina, fibrosis and coagulation and fibrinolytic system dysfunction in systemic sclerosis. Several self-antigens (i.e. high density lipoproteins, heat shock proteins, β2-glycoprotein1) and self-molecules modified by oxidative events (i.e. low density lipoproteins and oxidized hemoglobin) have been identified as targets of autoimmune responses. Endothelial dysfunction leads to accelerated atherosclerosis in rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and spondyloarthropaties whereas obliterative vasculopathy is associated with systemic sclerosis. In this paper, we will briefly review the most relevant information upon endothelial dysfunction and inflammatory mechanisms in atherosclerosis and we will summarize the similarities

  18. Rheumatic fever in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Webb, Rachel; Wilson, Nigel

    2013-03-01

    Acute rheumatic fever and its sequel rheumatic heart disease remain major unsolved problems in New Zealand, causing significant morbidity and premature death. The disease burden affects predominantly indigenous Māori and Pacific Island children and young adults. In the past decade these ethnic disparities are even widening. Secondary prophylaxis using 28-day intramuscular penicillin has been the mainstay of disease control. In the greater Auckland region, audit shows community nurse-led penicillin delivery rates of 95% and recurrence rates of less than 5%. The true penicillin failure rate of 0.07 per 100 patient years supports 4 weekly penicillin rather than more frequent dose regimens. Landmark primary prevention research has been undertaken supporting sore throat primary prevention programmes in regions with very high rheumatic fever rates. Echocardiographic screening found 2.4% previously undiagnosed rheumatic heart disease in socially disadvantaged children. Combined with secondary prevention, echocardiography screening has the potential to reduce the prevalence of severe rheumatic heart disease.

  19. A timely reminder--rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Lilic, Nikola; Kumar, Priyanka

    2013-04-19

    Rheumatic fever is a disease diagnosed using the Jones criteria. The Jones criteria were designed using data from areas with a low prevalence of rheumatic fever. In New Zealand there is a high prevalence of rheumatic fever amongst Maori and Pacific peoples. A case is presented where a child of Samoan ethnicity is diagnosed and treated for rheumatic fever without fulfilling the Jones criteria. Evidence supporting the broadening of the diagnostic criteria in high prevalence areas is highlighted.

  20. Palindromic Rheumatism: Does It Cause Joint Pain?

    MedlinePlus

    ... rheumatoid arthritis? Is palindromic rheumatism a precursor to rheumatoid arthritis? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. About a third of the ... have palindromic rheumatism will go on to develop rheumatoid arthritis. Palindromic rheumatism is characterized by sudden and recurrent ...

  1. Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease at the Department of Child Health, School of Medicine, University of North Sumatera/Dr. Pirngadi Hospital, Medan (1983-1985).

    PubMed

    Naim, M; Tjipta, G D; Siregar, A A; Halim, S

    1989-01-01

    A retrospective study on rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in children was conducted at the Department of Child Health, Dr. Pirngadi Hospital Medan, during 1983-1985. The patients consisted of 43 females and 30 males. Most of the patients were over 12 years of age. Of the 73 patients there were 60 patients (82.19%) accompanied by valvular disorders. The most frequent major criteria of Jones found in this study were carditis and polyarthritis. Thirty one patients (42.46%) had functional status (NYHA) of grade II-IV, and 43 patients (58.90%) had cardiomegaly. The major ECG findings were enlargement of the atria or ventricles and first degree AV block. Compliance was only achieved in 25 (34.24%) cases. Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease still remain a challenge for the medical professionals to cope with in the region.

  2. [Metabolic syndrome in inflammatory rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Malesci, D; Valentini, G; La Montagna, G

    2006-01-01

    Toward the end of the last century a better knowledge of cardiovascular (CV) risk factors and their associations led investigators to propose the existence of a unique pathophysiological condition called "metabolic" or "insulin resistance syndrome". Among all, insulin-resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia are considered its most important treatment targets. Different definitions have been provided by World Health Organization (WHO) and by The Third Report of The National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Treatment Panel (NCEP-ATP III). In particular, abdominal obesity, hypertension, low HDL cholesterol and hyperglicemia are the most common items used for its definition. The presence of MetS is effective in predicting the future risk of diabetes and coronaropathies. The evidence of a higher CV risk rate among different rheumatic inflammatory diseases has recently been associated with high prevalence of MetS in some cases. Rheumatoid or psoriatic arthritis have the large series among arthritis, whereas systemic lupus erythematosus among connective tissue disorders. This review analyses all most important studies about the evidence of MetS in rheumatic patients and the main clinical and prognostic significance of this relation.

  3. Adult-onset acute rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Dainari; Ueda, Kohei; Tsukuda, Kyozo; Utsu, Noriaki; Kohki, Shimazu; Fushimi, Hiroaki; Miyakoshi, Kazuho

    2012-01-01

    A 62-year-old man was hospitalized for acute rheumatic fever. He had previously suffered from rheumatic fever at 15 years of age. The rheumatic fever was complicated by carditis, which caused valve disease that required surgical treatment. The incidence of rheumatic fever has decreased in most developed countries with improvements in sanitary conditions. The low incidence of this disease makes a timely and accurate diagnosis difficult. Due to the fact that both the first occurrence and recurrence of acute rheumatic fever can occur in the elderly and adults, this potential disease should not be overlooked when making a differential diagnosis.

  4. Rheumatic manifestations in inflammatory bowel diseases: a link between GI and rheumatology.

    PubMed

    Perez-Alamino, Rodolfo; Maldonado-Ficco, Hernan; Maldonado-Cocco, José A

    2016-02-01

    Musculoskeletal symptoms are the most frequent extra-intestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), ranging between 10 and 40 % of cases. Pathogenesis is still unclear, although several factors have been associated (genetic, environmental, and immunologic pathways). Rheumatic manifestations in IBD patients are heterogeneous, including axial and peripheral involvement, dactylitis, enthesitis, uveitis, as well as skin involvement. Currently, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography are important tools for detecting early pathological changes in IBD patients with suspected rheumatic disease. New advances into the genetics and pathophysiology have provided more effective and targeted therapy for IBD patients with rheumatic manifestations. Given the high prevalence, awareness of the musculoskeletal symptoms is essential to avoid a misdiagnosis. Finally, an interdisciplinary approach of IBD patients, including rheumatologist and gastroenterologist, will improve the quality of life these patients.

  5. Exercise in pediatric rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Klepper, Susan E

    2008-09-01

    The present review discusses the current knowledge about exercise capacity and physical activity in children with rheumatic disease and examines the role of exercise in managing these conditions. Recent studies suggest exercise capacity is significantly impaired in a large proportion of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and other rheumatic diseases. These deficits are not limited to children with active inflammation. Children, especially girls, with rheumatoid factor positive polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, have the greatest deficits. Poor fitness and low levels of weight-bearing physical activity contribute to low bone mass and strength. Children and adolescents with juvenile dermatomyositis and systemic lupus erythematosus also exhibit impaired exercise capacity. There is some evidence that structured aerobic and neuromuscular training may improve exercise capacity, functional performance, and quality of life in children and adolescents with rheumatic disease. A sedentary lifestyle contributes to secondary impairments in aerobic and muscular fitness, bone health, and functional limitations in children and adolescents with rheumatic disease despite advances in the pharmacological management of these inflammatory conditions. Increased levels of moderate to vigorous physical activity and structured exercise may improve exercise capacity, performance of daily activities, and overall quality of life.

  6. Localization of human T-cell lymphotropic virus-1 gag proviral sequences in dermato-immunological disorders with eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Nagy, K; Marschalkó, Márta; Kemény, B; Horváth, A

    2005-01-01

    The mechanisms leading to the development of eosinophilia were investigated in 65 patients with immunodermatological disorders, including the role of eosinophilotactic cytokines and the possible involvement of human T-cell leukemia virus, HTLV. HTLV-1 gag proviral sequences were revealed in two cases of lymphoproliferative disorders such as angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia (ALHE) and CD4+ cutaneous lymphoma, respectively. Increased level of GM-CSF was detected in 33% of disorders studied. Elevated level of IL-5 and eotaxin was detected in 27% and 30%, respectively, of patients with bullous diseases. Elevated level of GM-CSF and eotaxin was found in 33% and 46%, respectively, of patients with inflammatory diseases. Neither of the four cytokines, however proved to be responsible alone or together for the induction of eosinophilia. The possible indirect role of human retroviruses through induction of eosinophilic chemotactic cytokines is hypothesized.

  7. The Immunobiology of Tourette's Disorder, Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcus, and Related Disorders: A Way Forward

    PubMed Central

    Kurlan, Roger; Leckman, James

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and related conditions including Tourette's disorder (TD) are chronic, relapsing disorders of unknown etiology associated with marked impairment and disability. Associated immune dysfunction has been reported and debated in the literature since the late 80s. The immunologic culprit receiving the most interest has been Group A Streptococcus (GAS), which began to receive attention as a potential cause of neuropsychiatric symptoms, following the investigation of the symptoms reported in Sydenham's chorea (SC) and rheumatic fever, such as motor tics, vocal tics, and both obsessive-compulsive and attention deficit/hyperactivity symptoms. Young children have been described as having a sudden onset of these neuropsychiatric symptoms temporally associated with GAS, but without supporting evidence of rheumatic fever. This presentation of OCD and tics has been termed pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with Streptococcus (PANDAS). Of note, SC, OCD, and TD often begin in early childhood and share common anatomic areas—the basal ganglia of the brain and the related cortical and thalamic sites—adding support to the possibility that these disorders might share a common immunologic and/or genetic vulnerability. Relevant manuscripts were identified through searches of the PsycINFO and MedLine databases using the following keywords: OCD, immune, PANDAS, Sydenham chorea, Tourette's disorder Group A Streptococcus. Articles were also identified through reference lists from research articles and other materials on childhood OCD, PANDAS, and TD between 1966 and December 2010. Considering the overlap of clinical and neuroanatomic findings among these disorders, this review explores evidence regarding the immunobiology as well as the relevant clinical and therapeutic aspects of TD, OCD, and PANDAS. PMID:20807070

  8. Th2 immune deviation induced by pregnancy: the two faces of autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Doria, Andrea; Iaccarino, Luca; Arienti, Silvia; Ghirardello, Anna; Zampieri, Sandra; Rampudda, Maria Elisa; Cutolo, Maurizio; Tincani, Angela; Todesco, Silvano

    2006-08-01

    One of the most important immunological modifications during pregnancy is the Th1/Th2 shift, due to the progressive increase of progesterone and estrogens during pregnancy, which reach their peak-level in the third trimester of gestation. At high levels, estrogens seem mainly to suppress Th1 cytokines and stimulate Th2-mediated immunological responses as well as antibody production. For this reason Th1-mediated diseases, like rheumatoid arthritis (RA), tend to improve and Th2-mediated disease, like systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), tend to worsen during pregnancy. SLE is the autoimmune rheumatic disease in which pregnancy most frequently occurs because it predominantly affects young females in their childbearing age. Other autoimmune rheumatic diseases, including RA, are less frequently observed during pregnancy due to their low female-to-male ratio and peak onset after the age of 40. This review is focused on the disease course, gestational outcome and management of patients with SLE and RA during pregnancy.

  9. Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in Bangladesh: A review.

    PubMed

    Islam, A K M Monwarul; Majumder, A A S

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are the most-common cardiovascular disease in young people aged <25 years, globally. They are important contributors to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in Bangladesh. Classical risk factors, i.e. poverty, overcrowding, ignorance, and insufficient health care services were responsible for the high incidence and prevalence of these diseases over the last century. In concert with the progresses in socioeconomic indicators, advances in health sectors, improved public awareness, and antibiotic prophylaxis, acute RF came into control. However, chronic RHD continues to be prevalent, and the actual disease burden may be much higher. RHD predominantly affects the young adults, seriously incapacitates them, follows a protracted course, gets complicated because of delayed diagnosis and is sometimes maltreated. The treatment is often palliative and expensive. Large-scale epidemiological and clinical researches are needed to formulate evidence-based national policy to tackle this important public health issue in future.

  10. Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in Bangladesh: A review

    PubMed Central

    Islam, A.K.M. Monwarul; Majumder, A.A.S.

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are the most-common cardiovascular disease in young people aged <25 years, globally. They are important contributors to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in Bangladesh. Classical risk factors, i.e. poverty, overcrowding, ignorance, and insufficient health care services were responsible for the high incidence and prevalence of these diseases over the last century. In concert with the progresses in socioeconomic indicators, advances in health sectors, improved public awareness, and antibiotic prophylaxis, acute RF came into control. However, chronic RHD continues to be prevalent, and the actual disease burden may be much higher. RHD predominantly affects the young adults, seriously incapacitates them, follows a protracted course, gets complicated because of delayed diagnosis and is sometimes maltreated. The treatment is often palliative and expensive. Large-scale epidemiological and clinical researches are needed to formulate evidence-based national policy to tackle this important public health issue in future. PMID:26896274

  11. The interplay of nature versus nurture in predisposition to the rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Reveille, J D

    1993-02-01

    The revolution in microbiology and genetics that has transpired in the past few years has brought fresh debate in the question of the relative contributions of nature and nurture in susceptibility to the rheumatic diseases. For nature, a variety of immunologically relevant genes have been identified whose presence has been shown to be associated either with an increased risk for certain diseases or for complications or subsets thereof. For nurture, the role of infectious agents in disease triggering and modification has been found.

  12. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease among children--American Samoa, 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    Beaudoin, Amanda; Edison, Laura; Introcaso, Camille E; Goh, Lucy; Marrone, James; Mejia, Amelita; Van Beneden, Chris

    2015-05-29

    Acute rheumatic fever is a nonsuppurative, immune-mediated consequence of group A streptococcal pharyngitis (strep throat). Recurrent or severe acute rheumatic fever can cause permanent cardiac valve damage and rheumatic heart disease, which increases the risk for cardiac conditions (e.g., infective endocarditis, stroke, and congestive heart failure). Antibiotics can prevent acute rheumatic fever if administered no more than 9 days after symptom onset. Long-term benzathine penicillin G (BPG) injections are effective in preventing recurrent acute rheumatic fever attacks and are recommended to be administered every 3-4 weeks for 10 years or until age 21 years to children who receive a diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever. During August 2013, in response to anecdotal reports of increasing rates of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease, CDC collaborated with the American Samoa Department of Health and the Lyndon B. Johnson Tropical Medical Center (the only hospital in American Samoa) to quantify the number of cases of pediatric acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in American Samoa and to assess the potential roles of missed pharyngitis diagnosis, lack of timely prophylaxis prescription, and compliance with prescribed BPG prophylaxis. Using data from medical records, acute rheumatic fever incidence was calculated as 1.1 and 1.5 cases per 1,000 children aged ≤18 years in 2011 and 2012, respectively; 49% of those with acute rheumatic fever subsequently received a diagnosis of rheumatic heart disease. Noncompliance with recommended prophylaxis with BPG after physician-diagnosed acute rheumatic fever was noted for 22 (34%) of 65 patients. Rheumatic heart disease point prevalence was 3.2 cases per 1,000 children in August 2013. Establishment of a coordinated acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease control program in American Samoa, likely would improve diagnosis, treatment, and patient compliance with BPG prophylaxis.

  13. Frequency of rheumatic diseases in Portugal: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Monjardino, Teresa; Lucas, Raquel; Barros, Henrique

    2011-01-01

    To describe the frequency of rheuma­tic diseases in Portugal through a systematic review of published literature, critically appraising available information and identifying data collection gaps. We systematically reviewed the literature to retrieve data on the occurrence of rheumatic diseases in Portugal through MEDLINE and Índex das Revistas Médicas Portuguesas searches, PhD theses, and national health surveys reports. Original articles in English or Portuguese published between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2010 were included. We retrieved information for the prevalence of rheumatic diseases, osteoarthritis, back pain, work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMDs), osteoporosis, fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritis and other systemic rheumatic diseases and for the incidence of back pain, osteoporotic fracture and other systemic rheumatic diseases. The prevalence of rheumatic diseases ranged from 16.0% to 24.0% and the prevalence of osteoarthritis was 11.1% (95% confidence intervals (95%CI): 9.4-13.1) in the knee and 5.5% (95%CI: 4.3-7.0) in the hip. Regarding back pain, period prevalence ranged from 8.0% (95%CI: 6.1-10.1) to 29.5% (95%CI: 23.4-36.2) in children and from 12.3% (95%CI: 10.5-14.3) to 51.3% (95%CI: 48.6-53.9) in adults. The prevalence of WRMDs ranged from 5.9% to 84.2% (95%CI: 80.8-87.3). The yearly incidence of osteoporotic fracture (per 100 000) ranged from 93.3 to 481 (95%CI: 407-564) in women and from 31.9 to 154 (95%CI: 106-218) in men. The prevalence of osteoporosis in women ranged from 11.0% to 15.4% (95%CI: 13.4-17.6) and in men from 1.1% to 16.8% (95%CI: 12.2-22.3). The prevalence of fibromyalgia ranged from 3.6% (95%CI: 2.0-5.2) to 3.7% (95%CI: 2.0-5.4). The prevalence estimates of ankylosing spondylitis and of spondyloarthritis were 0.6% and 1.6% (95%CI: 0.8-2.7), respectively. The prevalence of systemic lupus erythematosus was estimated in 0.2% (95%CI: 0.1-0.8). There is a broad spectrum of information available

  14. SEROLOGICAL STUDIES IN RHEUMATIC FEVER

    PubMed Central

    Fischel, Edward E.; Pauli, Ruth H.

    1949-01-01

    1. An attempt was made to repeat and extend various tests which have been presumed to demonstrate specific antigens and antibodies in rheumatic fever. 2. The "phase reaction" appears to be an inconstant phenomenon probably related to a colloidal abnormality of the serum, rather than to a specific antigen-antibody system. 3. No specific autoantibodies to human tissue extracts were demonstrable by complement fixation or by the collodion particle technique. Variable results were noted with the same test sera on different occasions, and positive reactions with control tissues and control sera were observed. 4. The possibility should be considered that autoantibodies are not necessarily specific for rheumatic fever but may be manifestations of the occurrence of a type of reaction similar to a biologically false positive Wassermann reaction. PMID:18129865

  15. The macrophages in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Laria, Antonella; Lurati, Alfredomaria; Marrazza, Mariagrazia; Mazzocchi, Daniela; Re, Katia Angela; Scarpellini, Magda

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages belong to the innate immune system giving us protection against pathogens. However it is known that they are also involved in rheumatic diseases. Activated macrophages have two different phenotypes related to different stimuli: M1 (classically activated) and M2 (alternatively activated). M1 macrophages release high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, reactive nitrogen and oxygen intermediates killing microorganisms and tumor cells; while M2 macrophages are involved in resolution of inflammation through phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils, reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and increased synthesis of mediators important in tissue remodeling, angiogenesis, and wound repair. The role of macrophages in the different rheumatic diseases is different according to their M1/M2 macrophages phenotype. PMID:26929657

  16. Hormone therapy in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Cutolo, Maurizio

    2010-05-01

    Steroid hormones are deeply involved in the pathophysiology of immune-mediated rheumatic diseases and used for their treatment. Purpose of the review is to update on recent roles and mechanisms of action of important steroid hormones such as glucocorticoids, estrogens, and D hormone (vitamin D) in order to optimize their therapeutical use. Endogenous glucocorticoids are characterized by a circadian rhythm of production that must be respected in case of exogenous low-dose long-term glucocorticoid replacement therapy of rheumatic diseases. Estrogens are enhancers of the humoral immune response and increase cell proliferation. Therefore, estrogens represent a risk factor for the development of autoimmunity and their therapeutical use must be avoided in patients with active immune-mediated diseases. Vitamin D, as synthesized in the skin from cholesterol, is a real steroid hormone (D hormone). The immunosuppressive activities of D hormone are reduced in chronic rheumatic diseases, as low plasma levels of the hormone are evident and justify its therapeutical use. The optimization of the therapeutical use of steroid hormones such as glucocorticoids, estrogens or D hormone is now possible following recent basic and clinical research achievements.

  17. Macrophage Activation Syndrome in Paediatric Rheumatic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Islam, M I; Talukder, M K; Islam, M M; Laila, K; Rahman, S A

    2017-04-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a potentially fatal complication of rheumatic disorders, which commonly occurs in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA).This study was carried out with the aims of describing the clinical features, laboratory findings and outcomes of MAS associated with paediatric rheumatic diseases in the Department of Paediatrics, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU) and compare these results with previous studies on MAS. This retrospective study was conducted in the paediatric rheumatology wing of the Department of Paediatrics, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Dhaka, Bangladesh. Clinical and laboratory profile of all the diagnosed cases of MAS were analyzed from the medical records from January 2010 to July 2015. Among 10 MAS patients, 6 were female and 4 were male. Seven patients of systemic JIA, two patients of SLE and one patient with Kawasaki Disease developed MAS in their course of primary disease. Mean duration of primary disease prior to development of MAS was 2.9 years and mean age of onset was 9.1 years. High continued fever and new onset hepatosplenomegaly were the hallmark of the clinical presentation. White blood cell count and platelet count came down from the mean of 16.2 to 10.2×10⁹/L and 254 to 90×10⁹/L. Mean erythrocyte sedimentation rate was dropped from 56 to 29 mm/hr. Six patients had abnormal liver enzyme level (ALT) and 5 had evidence of coagulopathy (prolonged prothrombin time and APTT) at the onset of disease. Hyperferritinnemia were found in all the patients. Bone marrow study was done in 5 patients but features of hamophagocytosis were found only in 2 patients. All patients received intravenous steroid and 3 patients who did not respond to steroid received additional cyclosporine. Mortality rate was 30% in this series. Macrophage activation syndrome is a fatal complication of paediatric rheumatic diseases among which s-JIA was predominant. Early diagnosis and

  18. Advanced heart block in acute rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Hubail, Zakariya; Ebrahim, Ishaq M

    2016-04-01

    First degree heart block is considered a minor criterion for the diagnosis of this condition. The cases presented here demonstrate that higher degrees of heart block do occur in rheumatic fever. Children presenting with acquired heart block should be worked-up for rheumatic fever. Likewise, it is imperative to serially follow the electrocardiogram in patients already diagnosed with acute rheumatic fever, as the conduction abnormalities can change during the course of the disease.

  19. Lysosomal storage disorder in non-immunological hydrops fetalis (NIHF) - more common than assumed? Report of four cases with transient NIHF and a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Lysosomal storage disorders (LSD) are a rare cause of non immunological hydrops fetalis (NIHF) and congenital ascites. The reported incidence is about 1%. The incidence of idiopathic NIHF is estimated to be about 18%. Patients and methods We report four cases with transient hydrops fetalis resulting from LSD and performed a literature review on LSD with NIHF and congenital ascites in combination. Results At present, 12 different LSDs are described to be associated with NIHF or congenital ascites. Most patients had a family history of NIHF, where the preceding sibling had not been examined. A diagnostic approach to the fetus with NIHF due to suspected LSD either in utero or postnatal is suggested. Transient forms of NIHF and/or ascites in association with MPS IVA, MPS VII and NPC are described for the first time in this publication. Conclusions LSD should be considered in transient hydrops. Enzymatic studies in chorionic villous sample or amniotic cultured cells, once the most common conditions associated with fetal ascites or hydrops have been ruled out, are important. This paper emphasizes the fact that LSD is significantly higher than the estimated 1% in previous studies, which is important for genetic counseling as there is a high risk of recurrence and the availability of enzyme replacement therapy for an increasing number of LSD. PMID:23137060

  20. [Immunological markers of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Matuszewska, Agnieszka; Madej, Marta; Wiland, Piotr

    2016-03-25

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common connective tissue disease of autoimmune origin. The disease is characterized by chronic inflammation leading to bone erosions and organ involvement. RA is a progressive disease. It affects the quality of life, leading to disability and death mainly due to premature cardiovascular disease. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are essential for prognosis and quality of life improvement. In 2010 the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) established new RA classification criteria. Besides clinical symptoms it includes two immunologic criteria: rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (anti-CCP antibodies). RF is the first well-known RA immunologic marker. It is observed in 80-85% of patients with RA. Elevated serum level of RF has been associated with increased disease activity, radiographic progression, and the presence of extraarticular manifestations. The sensitivity of RF is 50-90%, and specificity is 50-95%. Anti-CCP antibodies appear to be a more specific marker than RF. They are often present at the very beginning of the disease, or even years before the first symptoms. The prognostic value of anti-CCP antibodies is well established. High serum level of anti-CCP correlates with poor prognosis and early erosions of the joints. The sensitivity of anti-CCP2 is 48-80%, and specificity is 96-98%. New immunologic markers include anti-carbamylated protein antibodies (anti-CarP) and antibodies against heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (anti-hnRNP A2/B1, RA33). Scientists aim to identify a highly sensitive and specific biomarker of the disease that not only has diagnostic and prognostic value but also may predict the response to treatment.

  1. Acupuncture in the Treatment of Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Amezaga Urruela, Matxalen; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E.

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture has been used for millennia in traditional Chinese medicine as a technique believed to restore the balance of energy in the body caused by disease through the use of needles inserted into specific points or energy channels. This energy is called the De qi. The use of acupuncture for the treatment of pain in musculoskeletal disorders is increasing. Some patients seek alternative therapies because of lack of improvement with conventional treatments. The potential physiological effects of acupuncture on pain relief have been attributed to biochemical processes such as the release of endorphins into the limbic structures, subcortical areas and brain stem, mechanisms that are also present in placebo-induced analgesia. In addition, pain relief with acupuncture is also associated with patient expectations, beliefs and interactions with their acupuncturists. In this review, we summarize the latest evidence on the treatment of musculoskeletal conditions including rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, neck pain, shoulder pain, low back pain and knee pain with traditional Chinese acupuncture (TCA), electroacupuncture (EA), and the use of moxibustion. Acupuncture is relatively safe but there are still reports of serious and fatal side effects that must be taken into account when recommending this therapy. Many of the latest trials assessing the benefits of acupuncture in rheumatic diseases found that acupuncture was not better than sham acupuncture implying that the analgesic effects observed are related to a strong placebo response. While the literature on this topic is extensive, many of the studies lack methodological rigor, and additional large, well-controlled, high quality trials are still needed to determine if acupuncture might be useful in the treatment of chronic rheumatic diseases. PMID:23055010

  2. Acupuncture in the treatment of rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Amezaga Urruela, Matxalen; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E

    2012-12-01

    Acupuncture has been used for millennia in traditional Chinese medicine as a technique believed to restore the balance of energy in the body caused by disease through the use of needles inserted into specific points or energy channels. This energy is called the de qi. The use of acupuncture for the treatment of pain in musculoskeletal disorders is increasing. Some patients seek alternative therapies because of lack of improvement with conventional treatments. The potential physiological effects of acupuncture on pain relief have been attributed to biochemical processes, such as the release of endorphins into the limbic structures, subcortical areas and brain stem, mechanisms that are also present in placebo-induced analgesia. In addition, pain relief with acupuncture is also associated with patient expectations, beliefs, and interactions with their acupuncturists. In this review, we summarize the latest evidence on the treatment of musculoskeletal conditions including rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, neck pain, shoulder pain, low back pain, and knee pain with traditional Chinese acupuncture (TCA), electroacupuncture (EA), and the use of moxibustion. Acupuncture is relatively safe, but there are still reports of serious and fatal side effects that must be taken into account when recommending this therapy. Many of the latest trials assessing the benefits of acupuncture in rheumatic diseases found that acupuncture was not better than sham acupuncture, implying that the analgesic effects observed are related to a strong placebo response. While the literature on this topic is extensive, many of the studies lack methodological rigor, and additional large, well-controlled, high quality trials are still needed to determine if acupuncture might be useful in the treatment of chronic rheumatic diseases.

  3. Autoantibodies in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection: pitfalls for the diagnosis of rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Palazzi, Carlo; Buskila, Dan; D'Angelo, Salvatore; D'Amico, Emilio; Olivieri, Ignazio

    2012-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus infection (HCV) is one of the best mimes in medicine. About 40-70% of patients suffering from this disorder develop at least one extra-hepatic disorder that can have a rheumatic nature (arthralgias, arthritis, vasculitis and sicca syndrome) and must be differentiated from the primitive rheumatic diseases. In addition, HCV infection can also alter the laboratory tests. Several alterations of first line laboratory tests can be usually found in both chronic HCV infection and chronic inflammatory rheumatic disorders. In the present review we analyze the interference of HCV in tests more specifically used in rheumatology: rheumatoid factor and other autoantibodies (ANA, anti-ENA, ANCA, anti-DNA, antiphospholipid, anti-CCP). In patients suffering from HCV infection, the diagnosis of connective tissue diseases (CTD) or rheumatoid arthritis (RA) should be made only when the detected symptoms or laboratory data are not inducible by HCV, otherwise only a diagnosis of "possible CTD" or "possible RA" should be considered.

  4. Liver Immunology

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanos, Dimitrios P.; Gao, Bin; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2014-01-01

    The liver is the largest organ in the body and is generally regarded by non-immunologists as not having lymphoid function. However, such is far from accurate. This review highlights the importance of the liver as a lymphoid organ. Firstly, we discuss experimental data surrounding the role of liver as a lymphoid organ. The liver facilitates a tolerance rather than immunoreactivity, which protects the host from antigenic overload of dietary components and drugs derived from the gut and is also instrumental to fetal immune tolerance. Loss of liver tolerance leads to autoaggressive phenomena which if are not controlled by regulatory lymphoid populations may lead to the induction of autoimmune liver diseases. Liver-related lymphoid subpopulations also act as critical antigen-presenting cells. The study of the immunological properties of liver and delineation of the microenvironment of the intrahepatic milieu in normal and diseased livers provides a platform to understand the hierarchy of a series of detrimental events which lead to immune-mediated destruction of the liver and the rejection of liver allografts. The majority of emphasis within this review will be on the normal mononuclear cell composition of the liver. However, within this context, we will discus select, but not all, immune mediated liver disease and attempt to place these data in the context of human autoimmunity. PMID:23720323

  5. Reproductive immunology.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Ole B

    2013-08-01

    Much research has been done to investigate why the fetus in most pregnancies, in spite of being semi-allogenic, is not rejected by the immune system. Experiments in transgenic mice have suggested that dysfunctions in both the innate immune system (NK cells) and the adaptive immune system (T-cells and T regulatory cells) result in increased fetal loss rate. Many studies have suggested that women with pathological pregnancies such as recurrent miscarriages have signs of generally exaggerated inflammatory immune responses both before and during pregnancy and signs of breakage of tolerance to autoantigens and fetal antigens. In addition, several abnormalities of innate immune responses seem to characterize women with pathological pregnancies. These abnormalities involve disadvantageous interactions between uterine NK cells and HLA-G and HLA-C on the trophoblast that may have pro-inflammatory effects. Also, humoral factors belonging to the innate immune system such as mannose-binding lectin seem to be associated with pregnancy outcome probably by modifying the level of inflammation at the feto-maternal interface. The pro-inflammatory conditions at the feto-maternal interface characterizing pathological pregnancy are suggested to predispose to adaptive immunological processes against alloantigens on the trophoblast that may further increase the risk of pathological pregnancy outcome. The best documented adaptive immune reaction against fetal alloantigens is directed against male-specific minor histocompatibility (HY) antigens. Anti-HY immunity seems to play a role especially in women with secondary recurrent miscarriage. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Probiotics: use in allergic disorders: a Nutrition, Allergy, Mucosal Immunology, and Intestinal Microbiota (NAMI) Research Group Report.

    PubMed

    Isolauri, Erika; Salminen, Seppo

    2008-07-01

    The underlying denominators and treatment targets in allergic disorders may be outlined as aberrant barrier functions of the skin epithelium and gut mucosa and dysregulation of the immune response to ubiquitous environmental antigens. Dietary methods to control symptoms and reduce the risk of allergic disease have hitherto focused on elimination diets, alone or in combination with other environmental measures. The results have not been satisfactory regarding long-term prevention, and new approaches are urgently needed. Realization of this, together with the demonstration that the immunophysiologic regulation in the gut depends on the establishment of the healthy gut microbiota, has led to the introduction of novel modes of therapeutic intervention on the basis of the consumption of monocultures and mixed cultures of beneficial live probiotic microorganisms. The current aims of intervention are to avert deviant microbiota development, strengthen the gut barrier function, and alleviate abnormal immune responsiveness. Specific probiotics, selected from members of the healthy intestinal microbiota most of them belonging to Lactobacillus or Bifidobacterium, aid in degradation/structural modification of enteral antigens, regulation of the secretion of inflammatory mediators, and direction of the development of the immune system during the critical period of life when these functions are immature and inexperienced and the risk of allergic disease is heightened. In humans, documented effects have been reported for alleviation of intestinal inflammation, normalization of gut mucosal dysfunction, and down-regulation of hypersensitivity reactions, thereby preferentially targeting allergic conditions with intestinal involvement. The probiotic performance of strains differs; each probiotic strain is a unique organism itself with specific properties that cannot be extrapolated from other, even closely related, strains. Moreover, it would seem simplistic to assume that a single

  7. Epstein-Barr virus-related lymphoproliferative disorders following bone marrow transplantation: an immunologic and genotypic analysis.

    PubMed

    Davey, D D; Kamat, D; Laszewski, M; Goeken, J A; Kemp, J D; Trigg, M E; Purtilo, D T; Davis, J; Dick, F R

    1989-01-01

    Four patients from 1.5 to 18 yr of age who had received partially matched T-cell-depleted bone marrow transplants for acute leukemia succumbed to a widespread lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD) at 56 to 147 days after transplant. Premortem diagnosis of LPD was suggested in two because plasmacytoid cells were observed in the blood and bone marrow, and in the cerebrospinal fluid of one of these patients. Serum clonal immunoglobulins (Igs) were also demonstrated in these two patients premortem, while the other two had clonal Igs in serum obtained at autopsy. Autopsies revealed a plasmacytoid infiltrate or immunoblastic lymphoma involving lymph nodes, spleen, liver, lungs, gastrointestinal tract, and kidneys. Immunoglobulin gene rearrangement studies performed in three revealed B-cell clonality. Both immunohistochemical and DNA gene rearrangement studies were useful in differentiating the LPD from the pretransplant leukemia. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome was found in the tissues of the three patients studied. The diagnosis of EBV-induced LPD must be considered in bone marrow transplant patients who deteriorate and who exhibit serum clonal Igs or prominent plasmacytoid cells in laboratory specimens.

  8. 21 CFR 866.5240 - Complement components immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... tissues. Complement is a group of serum proteins which destroy infectious agents. Measurements of these proteins aids in the diagnosis of immunologic disorders, especially those associated with deficiencies...

  9. 21 CFR 866.5240 - Complement components immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... tissues. Complement is a group of serum proteins which destroy infectious agents. Measurements of these proteins aids in the diagnosis of immunologic disorders, especially those associated with deficiencies...

  10. 21 CFR 866.5240 - Complement components immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... tissues. Complement is a group of serum proteins which destroy infectious agents. Measurements of these proteins aids in the diagnosis of immunologic disorders, especially those associated with deficiencies...

  11. Newly Recognized Mendelian Disorders with Rheumatic Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Adriana Almeida; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2015-01-01

    Summary A number of novel monogenic diseases that present with innate and/or acquired immune dysregulation reveal novel immune pathways that cause human inflammatory diseases and suggest novel targets for treatment. PMID:26196376

  12. Antioxidants in vegan diet and rheumatic disorders.

    PubMed

    Hänninen; Kaartinen, K; Rauma, A L; Nenonen, M; Törrönen, R; Häkkinen, A S; Adlercreutz, H; Laakso, J

    2000-11-30

    Plants are rich natural sources of antioxidants in addition to other nutrients. Interventions and cross sectional studies on subjects consuming uncooked vegan diet called living food (LF) have been carried out. We have clarified the efficacy of LF in rheumatoid diseases as an example of a health problem where inflammation is one of the main concerns. LF is an uncooked vegan diet and consists of berries, fruits, vegetables and roots, nuts, germinated seeds and sprouts, i.e. rich sources of carotenoids, vitamins C and E. The subjects eating LF showed highly increased levels of beta and alfa carotenes, lycopen and lutein in their sera. Also the increases of vitamin C and vitamin E (adjusted to cholesterol) were statistically significant. As the berry intake was 3-fold compared to controls the intake of polyphenolic compounds like quercetin, myricetin and kaempherol was much higher than in the omnivorous controls. The LF diet is rich in fibre, substrate of lignan production, and the urinary excretion of polyphenols like enterodiol and enterolactone as well as secoisolaricirecinol were much increased in subjects eating LF. The shift of fibromyalgic subjects to LF resulted in a decrease of their joint stiffness and pain as well as an improvement of their self-experienced health. The rheumatoid arthritis patients eating the LF diet also reported similar positive responses and the objective measures supported this finding. The improvement of rheumatoid arthritis was significantly correlated with the day-to-day fluctuation of subjective symptoms. In conclusion the rheumatoid patients subjectively benefited from the vegan diet rich in antioxidants, lactobacilli and fibre, and this was also seen in objective measures.

  13. A history of pediatric immunology.

    PubMed

    Stiehm, E Richard; Johnston, Richard B

    2005-03-01

    Immunology has played a prominent role in the history of medicine. Pediatric immunologists have focused on immune aberrations in pediatric disorders, particularly those involving host defense mechanisms. These efforts have paid rich dividends in terms of fundamental knowledge of the immune system and major therapeutic advances, including 1) i.v. immunoglobulin therapy, 2) hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and 3) gene therapy. Pediatric immunology as an organized discipline emerged in the early 1950s, when pediatricians and their basic scientist colleagues began to focus on clinical and basic research related to immunodeficiency. Since then, key organizations and infrastructure have been developed to support this research and the clinical care of immunodeficient patients. We review here the evolution of contemporary pediatric immunology, particularly in North America, from its roots in 19th-century Europe to its current expression as one of the fundamental scientific and clinical disciplines of pediatrics.

  14. Sarcoidosis: Immunopathogenesis and Immunological Markers

    PubMed Central

    Loke, Wei Sheng Joshua; Herbert, Cristan; Thomas, Paul S.

    2013-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disorder invariably affecting the lungs. It is a disease with noteworthy variations in clinical manifestation and disease outcome and has been described as an “immune paradox” with peripheral anergy despite exaggerated inflammation at disease sites. Despite extensive research, sarcoidosis remains a disease with undetermined aetiology. Current evidence supports the notion that the immune response in sarcoidosis is driven by a putative antigen in a genetically susceptible individual. Unfortunately, there currently exists no reliable biomarker to delineate the disease severity and prognosis. As such, the diagnosis of sarcoidosis remains a vexing clinical challenge. In this review, we outline the immunological features of sarcoidosis, discuss the evidence for and against various candidate etiological agents (infective and noninfective), describe the exhaled breath condensate, a novel method of identifying immunological biomarkers, and suggest other possible immunological biomarkers to better characterise the immunopathogenesis of sarcoidosis. PMID:26464848

  15. Rheumatic symptoms associated with hypothyroidism in children.

    PubMed

    Keenan, G F; Ostrov, B E; Goldsmith, D P; Athreya, B H

    1993-10-01

    We describe five children with varied rheumatic manifestations, including fibromyalgia and arthralgias, ultimately proved to be associated with hypothyroidism. All musculoskeletal symptoms improved after thyroid replacement therapy. We conclude that rheumatic manifestations of hypothyroidism can be as varied in children as in adults.

  16. State of the art: Reproduction and pregnancy in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Østensen, Monika; Andreoli, Laura; Brucato, Antonio; Cetin, Irene; Chambers, Christina; Clowse, Megan E B; Costedoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie; Cutolo, Maurizio; Dolhain, Radboud; Fenstad, M H; Förger, Frauke; Wahren-Herlenius, Marie; Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo; Koksvik, Hege; Nelson-Piercy, Catherine; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Tincani, Angela; Villiger, Peter M; Wallenius, Marianne; von Wolff, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Throughout the last decade, increasing awareness has been raised on issues related to reproduction in rheumatic diseases including basic research to clarify the important role of estrogens in the etiology and pathophysiology of immune/inflammatory diseases. Sub- or infertility is a heterogeneous condition that can be related to immunological mechanisms, to pregnancy loss, to disease burden, to therapy, and to choices in regard to family size. Progress in reproductive medicine has made it possible for more patients with rheumatic disease to have children. Active disease in women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) affects their children's birth weight and may have long-term effects on their future health status. Pregnancy complications as preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction are still increased in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), however, biomarkers can monitor adverse events, and several new therapies may improve outcomes. Pregnancies in women with APS remain a challenge, and better therapies for the obstetric APS are needed. New prospective studies indicate improved outcomes for pregnancies in women with rare diseases like systemic sclerosis and vasculitis. TNF inhibitors hold promise for maintaining remission in rheumatological patients and may be continued at least in the first half of pregnancy. Pre-conceptional counseling and interdisciplinary management of pregnancies are essential for ensuring optimal pregnancy outcomes.

  17. Global research priorities in rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Carapetis, Jonathan R; Zühlke, Liesl J

    2011-01-01

    We now stand at a critical juncture for rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) control. In recent years, we have seen a surge of interest in these diseases in regions of the world where RF/RHD mostly occur. This brings real opportunities to make dramatic progress in the next few years, but also real risks if we miss these opportunities. Most public health and clinical approaches in RF/RHD arose directly from programmes of research. Many unanswered questions remain, including those around how to implement what we know will work, so research will continue to be essential in our efforts to bring a global solution to this disease. Here we outline our proposed research priorities in RF/RHD for the coming decade, grouped under the following four challenges: Translating what we know already into practical RHD control; How to identify people with RHD earlier, so that preventive measures have a higher chance of success; Better understanding of disease pathogenesis, with a view to improved diagnosis and treatment of ARF and RHD; and Finding an effective approach to primary prevention. We propose a mixture of basic, applied, and implementation science. With concerted efforts, strong links to clinical and public health infrastructure, and advocacy and funding support from the international community, there are good prospects for controlling these RF and RHD over the next decade. PMID:21677798

  18. Immunological characterization and transcription profiling of peripheral blood (PB) monocytes in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and specific polysaccharide antibody deficiency (SPAD): case study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction There exists a small subset of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) characterized by fluctuating behavioral symptoms and cognitive skills following immune insults. Some of these children also exhibit specific polysaccharide antibody deficiency (SPAD), resulting in frequent infection caused by encapsulated organisms, and they often require supplemental intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) (ASD/SPAD). This study assessed whether these ASD/SPAD children have distinct immunological findings in comparison with ASD/non-SPAD or non-ASD/SPAD children. Case description We describe 8 ASD/SPAD children with worsening behavioral symptoms/cognitive skills that are triggered by immune insults. These ASD/SPAD children exhibited delayed type food allergy (5/8), treatment-resistant seizure disorders (4/8), and chronic gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms (5/8) at high frequencies. Control subjects included ASD children without SPAD (N = 39), normal controls (N = 37), and non-ASD children with SPAD (N = 12). Discussion and Evaluation We assessed their innate and adaptive immune responses, by measuring the production of pro-inflammatory and counter-regulatory cytokines by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in responses to agonists of toll like receptors (TLR), stimuli of innate immunity, and T cell stimulants. Transcription profiling of PB monocytes was also assessed. ASD/SPAD PBMCs produced less proinflammatory cytokines with agonists of TLR7/8 (IL-6, IL-23), TLR2/6 (IL-6), TLR4 (IL-12p40), and without stimuli (IL-1ß, IL-6, and TNF-α) than normal controls. In addition, cytokine production of ASD/SPAD PBMCs in response to T cell mitogens (IFN-γ, IL-17, and IL-12p40) and candida antigen (Ag) (IL-10, IL-12p40) were less than normal controls. ASD/non-SPAD PBMDs revealed similar results as normal controls, while non-ASD/SPAD PBMCs revealed lower production of IL-6, IL-10 and IL-23 with a TLR4 agonist. Only common features observed between ASD/SPAD and non

  19. 21 CFR 866.5160 - Beta-globulin immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Beta-globulin immunolog-ical test system. 866.5160 Section 866.5160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES..., glycoproteins, and complement, and are rarely associated with specific pathologic disorders. (b) Classification...

  20. [5-HT3 receptor antagonist als analgetics in rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Müller, W; Fiebich, B L; Stratz, T

    2006-10-01

    Various rheumatic diseases like fibromyalgia, systemic inflammatory rheumatic disorders and localized diseases, such as arthritides and activated arthroses, tendinopathies and periarthropathies, as well as trigger points can be improved considerably by treatment with the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist tropisetron. Particularly in the latter group of diseases, local injections have done surprisingly rapid analgesic action. This effect matches that of local anesthetics, but lasts considerably longer and is comparable to local injections of local anesthetics combined with corticosteroids. The action of the 5-HT3 receptor antagonists can be attributed to an antinociceptive effect that occurs at the same time as an antiphlogistic and probably also an immunosuppressive effect. Whereas an inhibited release of substance P from the nociceptors, and possibly some other neurokins as well, seems to be the most likely explanation for the antinociceptive action, the antiphlogistic effect is primarily due to an inhibited formation of various different phlogistic substances; in some conditions, like systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases, for example, the 5-HT3 receptor antagonists may exert an immunosuppressive effect in addition to this.

  1. Immunology for rheumatology residents: working toward a Canadian national curriculum consensus.

    PubMed

    Chow, Shirley L; Herman-Kideckel, Sari; Mahendira, Dharini; McDonald-Blumer, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Immunologic mechanisms play an integral role in understanding the pathogenesis and management of rheumatic conditions. Currently, there is limited access to formal instruction in immunology for rheumatology trainees across Canada. The aims of this study were (1) to describe current immunology curricula among adult rheumatology training programs across Canada and (2) to compare the perceived learning needs of rheumatology trainees from the perspective of program directors and trainees to help develop a focused nationwide immunology curriculum. Rheumatology trainees and program directors from adult rheumatology programs across Canada completed an online questionnaire and were asked to rank a comprehensive list of immunology topics. A modified Delphi approach was implemented to obtain consensus on immunology topics. Only 42% of program directors and 31% of trainees felt the current method of teaching immunology was effective. Results illustrate concordance between program directors and trainees for the highest-ranked immunology topics including innate immunity, adaptive immunity, and cells and tissues of the immune system. However, there was discordance among other topics, such as diagnostic laboratory immunology and therapeutics. There is a need to improve immunology teaching in rheumatology training programs. Results show high concordance between the basic immunology topics. This study provides the groundwork for development of future immunology curricula.

  2. Anaemia in inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Günter; Schett, Georg

    2013-04-01

    Anaemia is frequently observed in patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Depending on its severity, anaemia negatively affects cardiovascular performance, physical activity and the quality of life of patients. However, anaemia is considered to be a symptom of the underlying inflammatory disease and, thus, neglected as a complex medical condition that warrants specific diagnosis and treatment. Although inflammation-induced alterations in iron homeostasis and erythropoiesis have a dominant role in the pathogenesis of this type of anaemia, multiple other factors such as chronic blood loss, haemolysis, disease and treatment-associated adverse effects or vitamin deficiencies can also take part in the development of anaemia. Accordingly, the prevalence of anaemia is positively associated with the severity of the underlying disease. This Review will summarize epidemiological data on anaemia in inflammatory rheumatic diseases, along with a detailed description of underlying pathophysiological pathways, available diagnostic tools and practical diagnostic strategies. Discussion of established and newly emerging treatment regimens, as well as the need for further research in this clinically relevant field, will also be included.

  3. Prevention research and rheumatic disease.

    PubMed

    Rao, Jaya K; Hootman, Jennifer M

    2004-03-01

    Prevention may occur in clinical, community, or population settings and is often classified into primary, secondary, and tertiary types. To provide a context for this review, we define the three types and provide general and arthritis-specific examples of prevention strategies. Next, we highlight recently published longitudinal cohort and intervention studies that focus on arthritis prevention in the following topic areas: cognitive and behavioral strategies, obesity, exercise, and occupational injury prevention. Few studies examined primary prevention strategies. In one study, an educational intervention significantly changed tick-related knowledge and behaviors among a population at risk of Lyme disease. Another population-based study used a mailed, stage-based educational program to successfully increase physical activity levels; this intervention may have practical application as a primary or tertiary prevention strategy for arthritis. Tertiary prevention research received much attention: Recent studies extend the benefits of exercise and cognitive-behavioral interventions to persons with different rheumatic conditions (eg, neck pain, low back pain, systemic lupus erythematosus, fibromyalgia). Longitudinal cohort studies improve our understanding of the relationships between computer use and carpal tunnel syndrome among office workers, birth weight and hand osteoarthritis, and baseline balance and functional declines among older adults with knee pain. Prevention of arthritis and its complications is an active focus of investigation. Primary prevention research remains a challenge because of the prolonged time frame for disease expression. Scientific evidence continues to provide support for tertiary prevention strategies among people with documented rheumatic disease.

  4. Rhythm and conduction analysis of patients with acute rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Balli, Sevket; Oflaz, Mehmet Burhan; Kibar, Ayse Esin; Ece, Ibrahim

    2013-02-01

    Various rhythm and conduction abnormalities can develop in acute rheumatic fever. This study investigated rhythm and conduction abnormalities in children with acute rheumatic fever using a standard 12-lead electrocardiogram and 24-h rhythm Holter recordings. This multicenter retrospective study, performed between August 2011 and March 2012, enrolled 73 consecutive children with acute rheumatic fever. Standard electrocardiography was used to measure PR and corrected QT intervals. Holter recordings were evaluated for all the patients, and 52 of the patients (71.2 %) had carditis that was either isolated or together with other major criteria. A positive correlation was detected between carditis and the mean PR interval on standard electrocardiography, but this was not significant (p > 0.05). Standard electrocardiography showed a significant positive correlation between PR and corrected QT intervals (p = 0.03; r = 0.55). Standard electrocardiography showed only three patients (4.2 %) with premature contractions, whereas 24-h electrocardiography showed 26 patients (35.6 %) with premature contractions. Carditis was positively correlated with premature contractions (p < 0.01; r = 0.57). One patient with junctional rhythm and one patient with left bundle block were detected by standard electrocardiography. Whereas some patients with carditis exhibited no arrhythmic evidence on standard electrocardiograms, complete atrioventricular block, supraventricular tachycardia, and Mobitz type 1 block were observed on 24-h Holter recordings. A positive correlation also was observed between the presence of premature contractions and serum levels of acute-phase reactants (p = 0.03; r = 0.62). These findings led to the conclusion that rhythm and conduction disorders in acute rheumatic fever are more common than previously thought.

  5. IL-10 and ET-1 as biomarkers of rheumatic valve disease

    PubMed Central

    Leão, Sydney Correia; Lima, Maria Regina Menezes; do Nascimento, Hertaline Menezes; Octacilio-Silva, Shirlei; Rodrigues, Tania Maria de Andrade

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the immunological profile and gene expression of endothelin-1 (ET-1) in mitral valves of patients with rheumatic fever originated from a reference service in cardiovascular surgery. Methods This was a quantitative, observational and cross-sectional study. Thirty-five subjects (divided into four groups) participated in the study, 25 patients with chronic rheumatic heart disease and ten control subjects. The mean age of the sample studied was 34.5 years. Seventeen of them (48.58%) were male and 18 (51.42%) were female. Inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-4 and IL-10) were measured and ten mitral valves of patients who underwent first valve replacement were collected for determination of gene expression of endothelin-1 by real time PCR. Results Among the groups studied (patients vs. controls), there was a statistically significant difference in IL-10 levels (P=0.002), and no differences in other cytokines. Expression of endothelin-1 was observed in 70% of samples. Quantitatively, average of ET-1 expression was 62.85±25.63%. Conclusion Inflammatory cytokine IL-10 participates in the maintenance of chronicity of rheumatic fever in patients who underwent valve replacement and those who are undergoing medical treatment. The expression of endothelin-1 in heart valve lesions in patients undergoing mitral valve replacement confirms its association with inflammatory activity in rheumatic fever. PMID:24896159

  6. Rheumatic fever & rheumatic heart disease: the last 50 years.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R Krishna; Tandon, R

    2013-04-01

    Rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) continue to be a major health hazard in most developing countries as well as sporadically in developed economies. Despite reservations about the utility, echocardiographic and Doppler (E&D) studies have identified a massive burden of RHD suggesting the inadequacy of the Jones' criteria updated by the American Heart Association in 1992. Subclinical carditis has been recognized by E&D in patients with acute RF without clinical carditis as well as by follow up of RHD patients presenting as isolated chorea or those without clinical evidence of carditis. Over the years, the medical management of RF has not changed. Paediatric and juvenile mitral stenosis (MS), upto the age of 12 and 20 yr respectively, severe enough to require operative treatement was documented. These negate the belief that patients of RHD become symptomatic ≥20 years after RF as well as the fact that congestive cardiac failure in childhood indicates active carditis and RF. Non-surgical balloon mitral valvotomy for MS has been initiated. Mitral and/or aortic valve replacement during active RF in patients not responding to medical treatment has been found to be life saving as well as confirming that congestive heart failure in acute RF is due to an acute haemodynamic overload. Pathogenesis as well as susceptibility to RF continue to be elusive. Prevention of RF morbidity depends on secondary prophylaxis which cannot reduce the burden of diseases. Primary prophylaxis is not feasible in the absence of a suitable vaccine. Attempts to design an antistreptococcal vaccine utilizing the M-protein has not succeeded in the last 40 years. Besides pathogenesis many other questions remain unanswered.

  7. Virtual Immunology: Software for Teaching Basic Immunology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berçot, Filipe Faria; Fidalgo-Neto, Antônio Augusto; Lopes, Renato Matos; Faggioni, Thais; Alves, Luiz Anastácio

    2013-01-01

    As immunology continues to evolve, many educational methods have found difficulty in conveying the degree of complexity inherent in its basic principles. Today, the teaching-learning process in such areas has been improved with tools such as educational software. This article introduces "Virtual Immunology," a software program available…

  8. Virtual Immunology: Software for Teaching Basic Immunology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berçot, Filipe Faria; Fidalgo-Neto, Antônio Augusto; Lopes, Renato Matos; Faggioni, Thais; Alves, Luiz Anastácio

    2013-01-01

    As immunology continues to evolve, many educational methods have found difficulty in conveying the degree of complexity inherent in its basic principles. Today, the teaching-learning process in such areas has been improved with tools such as educational software. This article introduces "Virtual Immunology," a software program available…

  9. [Rheumatic diseases in colonial Mexico].

    PubMed

    Aceves-Avila, F J; Fraga, A

    1997-01-01

    The medical texts published in New Spain between the XVI and XVIII century have not been searched until now for evidence of the existence of rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatic diseases before the descriptions made by Sydenham. We surveyed most of the medical books written and published in New Spain from the arrival of the Spaniards to the XVIII century, and we divided the diseases with articular manifestations into four groups, according to their main clinical characteristics: pain without swelling in anatomical region; pain without swelling in several joints; pain and swelling in joints, and joint complaints associated with contagious diseases. We found that a difference was established between gout and rheumatoid arthritis one hundred years before Sydenham, according to the different evolutions of both diseases, and we present one of the oldest descriptions of reactive arthritis.

  10. Social implications of rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Kłak, Anna; Raciborski, Filip; Samel-Kowalik, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Social consequences of a disease constitute limitations in performing roles relating to working life as well as family and social life caused by the disease, mainly chronic. The aim of the study was to analyze the social consequences of rheumatic diseases in the aspect of disability pensions with respect to incapacity for work and quality of life. The occurrence of rheumatic diseases is related not only to increased risk of different types of organic changes, but above all disability. In Europe almost 50% of persons suffering from diseases of the musculoskeletal system who are currently unemployed were breadwinners. Nearly 60% of them received legal disability status. The loss of work ability is, among other things, the consequence of progressive disability. In Europe 40% of persons suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) had to stop working due to the disease. Most of the persons diagnosed with RA were of working age. It results in the decrease in the quality of life as well as economic difficulties (decreased incomes and increased disease-related costs). In Poland the results of the analysis of the Social Insurance Institution (ZUS) of first-time disability recognition issued for the purpose of disability pensions in 2014 showed that the incapacity for work was caused by diseases relating to general health condition (65.5%). Diseases of the musculoskeletal system were the cause of partial inability to work of 21.6% of persons who received a disability pension for the first time (as many as 5,349 certificates were issued). Early diagnosis and implementation of effective treatment are the necessary conditions for a patient to sustain activity, both professional and social, which is of crucial importance to reduce the negative effects of the disease.

  11. Enhancing the care of women with rheumatic diseases during pregnancy: challenges and unmet needs in the Middle East.

    PubMed

    Al-Emadi, S; Abutiban, F; El Zorkany, B; Ziade, N; Al-Herz, A; Al-Maini, M; Khan, B; Ghanem, A; Al Rayes, H; Al Saleh, J; Al-Osaimi, H; Østensen, M

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy in women with rheumatic disorders is known to be associated with risks for both the mother and fetus; however, these risks can be minimized with proper planning and careful management of the disease. In the Middle East, there are specific cultural challenges that may have a negative impact on the care that women with rheumatic disorders receive. There is a need for cross-collaboration between specialist physicians, improved awareness of rheumatic disorders among the general public and more open discussion with patients about the potential complications of pregnancy. Women in the region are often unwilling to discuss their disease with their partner and are even less likely to seek advice regarding family planning from their physician. The objective of this review is to highlight the specific challenges of pregnancy management and to discuss why establishing specialist pregnancy clinics for women with rheumatic disorders could be an effective solution. Such clinics can provide high quality care before, during and after pregnancy as shown in several European and US centers. Additionally, such clinics could be useful for the collection of pregnancy outcomes data from the Middle East, which may currently be lacking in the region, in order to highlight where further improvements can be made. With specialist care and analysis of pregnancy outcomes, the standard of care for women with rheumatic disorders in this area could be significantly improved.

  12. Rheumatic manifestations of hepatitis C virus chronic infection: Indications for a correct diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Palazzi, Carlo; D'Amico, Emilio; D'Angelo, Salvatore; Gilio, Michele; Olivieri, Ignazio

    2016-01-28

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a hepato- and lymphotropic agent that is able to induce several autoimmune rheumatic disorders: vasculitis, sicca syndrome, arthralgias/arthritis and fibromyalgia. The severity of clinical manifestations is variable and sometimes life-threatening. HCV infection can mimic many primitive rheumatic diseases, therefore, it is mandatory to distinguish HCV-related manifestations from primitive ones because the prognosis and therapeutic strategies can be fairly dissimilar. The new direct-acting antivirals drugs can help to avoid the well-known risks of worsening or new onset of autoimmune diseases during the traditional interferon-based therapies.

  13. Risk assessment of skin in rheumatic disease.

    PubMed

    Firth, Jill

    Patients with a rheumatic disease are considered to be at high risk of developing skin problems because of their restricted mobility, vascular complications and the type of medication they are taking.

  14. X-ray atlas of rheumatic diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Dihlmann, W.

    1986-01-01

    This atlas comprises instructive X-rays of the various inflammatory rheumatic joint diseases in all stages at the extremities and the spinal column. In addition, the complex pattern of the wide range of arthroses, also known as degenerative rheumatic disease is included. Besides the instructive pointers to X-ray diagnosis, the book is also a guide to differential diagnosis. Hence, this book is actually an X-ray atlas of joint diseases in general. Selected Contents: Introduction: What Does ''Rheumatism'' Actually Mean./Radiographic Methodology in Rheumatic Diseases of the Locomotor System/The Mosaic of Arthritis/Adult Rheumatoid Arthritis/Seronegative Spondylarthritis/Classic Collagen Diseases/Enthesiopathies/Gout-Pseudogout

  15. Cytokines and pregnancy in rheumatic disease.

    PubMed

    Østensen, Monika; Förger, Frauke; Villiger, Peter M

    2006-06-01

    Cytokines are important mediators involved in the successful outcome of pregnancy. The concept of pregnancy as biased toward a Th2 immune response states that Th1 type cytokines are associated with pregnancy failure and that Th2 cytokines are protective and counteract pregnancy-related disorders. Studies at the level of the maternal-fetal interface, in the maternal circulation and in cells of peripheral blood have shown that the Th2 concept of pregnancy is an oversimplification. Both Th1 and Th2 type cytokines play a role at different stages of pregnancy and are adapted to the localization and function of cells and tissues. The changes of local and systemic cytokine patterns during pregnancy correspond to neuroendocrine changes with hormones as powerful modulators of cytokine expression. Several autoimmune disorders show a modulation of disease activity during and after pregnancy. In rheumatic diseases with a predominance of a Th1 immune response, a shift to a Th2 type immune response during pregnancy has been regarded as beneficial. Studies of pregnant patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have shown a cytokine expression similar to that found in healthy pregnant women. Significant differences were present only for a few cytokines and seemed related to the activity of the underlying disease. Interestingly, a gestational increase of cytokine inhibitors interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) and soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor (sTNFR) in the circulation corresponded to low disease activity in RA. The influence of hormones and cytokines on autoimmune disease is an issue for further study.

  16. Cutting edge issues in rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Chang, Christopher

    2012-04-01

    Although the incidence of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease has decreased significantly in regions of the world where antibiotics are easily accessible, there remains a high incidence in developing nations as well as in certain regions where there is a high incidence of genetic susceptibility. These diseases are a function of poverty, low socioeconomic status, and barriers to healthcare access, and it is in the developing world that a comprehensive prevention program is most critically needed. Development of group A streptococcal vaccines has been under investigation since the 1960s and 50 years later, we still have no vaccine. Factors that contribute to this lack of success include a potential risk for developing vaccine-induced rheumatic heart disease, as well as difficulties in covering the many serological subtypes of M protein, a virulence factor found on the surface of the bacterium. Yet, development of a successful vaccine program for prevention of group A streptococcal infection still offers the best chance for eradication of rheumatic fever in the twenty-first century. Other useful approaches include continuation of primary and secondary prevention with antibiotics and implementation of health care policies that provide patients with easy access to antibiotics. Improved living conditions and better hygiene are also critical to the prevention of the spread of group A streptococcus, especially in impoverished regions of the world. The purpose of this article is to discuss current and recent developments in the diagnosis, pathogenesis, and management of rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease.

  17. Rheumatic diseases: a general practitioner's view.

    PubMed

    Knox, J D

    1987-12-01

    Patients with rheumatic complaints are the subject of some 10% of the general practitioner's work. Approximately half of this work is related to the hitherto relatively neglected group of varied soft-tissue conditions, most of which are self-limiting and of a minor nature. Against a background of such diagnostic 'noise', the general practitioner has to remain alert for the fainter 'signal' of serious disease--rheumatic and non-rheumatic--at an early stage. Continuity of care calls on special qualities, behaviours and abilities in the doctor to boost and maintain morale, to coordinate management and to participate in team care. In addition to more traditional therapeutic measures, including analgesics, NSAIDs, disease-modifying drugs and physiotherapy, joint replacement is seen as a significant contribution. There is room for improvement in the structure process and outcomes of delivery of care as it may relate to rheumatic diseases. A simple illustration, based on a general practice audit of gout, is suggested as a possible model by which quality of care could be enhanced at the level of individual patients. While there is not a great deal of scope afforded to the general practitioner in the exercise of primary prevention of the rheumatic diseases, early diagnosis and timely support for carers of patients suffering from chronic rheumatic diseases are areas worth attention. Promotion of self-help is seen as a worthwhile activity in humanitarian and economic terms, though it calls for an appropriate balance to be struck.

  18. A scientific update on biosimilar infliximab (CT-P13) in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The development of biologic drugs has undoubtedly enhanced the spectrum of treatments available for immune-mediated inflammatory rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. However, despite their clear clinical benifits, use of biologics is often hindered by their high costs. The manufacture and subsequent approval of more cost-effective 'biosimilar' versions of these drugs may address this issue and improve patient access. CT-P13 (Remsima(®), Inflectra(®)), a biosimilar of infliximab (Remicade(®)), has shown comparable efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetics to its originator drug in clinical studies. The articles in this supplement present a scientific update on the development and use of biosimilars in rheumatic disorders, with specific focus on CT-P13. The information discussed highlights the predicted positive clinical and economic impact of biosimilars on the management of rheumatic diseases.

  19. Immunology of atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Piloto Valdés, L J; Valdés Sánchez, A F; Gómez Echevarría, A H

    1988-01-01

    Thirty-two adult patients with atopic dermatitis were studied at the Allergology Service of the "Hnos. Ameijeiras" Clinical Surgical Hospital. The diagnosis was established following the criteria of Hanifin and Lobitz. A detailed medical history was written for the patients; the study of some immunological parameters, such as the serum immunoglobulin quantification, delayed skin tests with a battery of antigens, and the spontaneous rosette-test, was also carried out. Almost all the patients showed serum IgE values above 150 UI, by means of the ELISA test modified by C.E.N.I.C. The mean values of the spontaneous rosette-test were low; this was more noticeable during the exacerbation period of the lesions. Candida sp, Mantoux and Streptokinase-Streptodornase antigens showed negative results in a high proportion of patients with atopic dermatitis, in relation with the control group. In atopic dermatitis, there are humoral disorders of immunity; this was demonstrated in our group by increased values of IgE and cellular disorders due to skin anergy, and to a low percentage of rosette forming cells; this does not allow to state that these phenomena have an active participation in the etiopathogenesis of this entity.

  20. The worldwide epidemiology of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Seckeler, Michael D; Hoke, Tracey R

    2011-01-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are significant public health concerns around the world. Despite decreasing incidence, there is still a significant disease burden, especially in developing nations. This review provides background on the history of ARF, its pathology and treatment, and the current reported worldwide incidence of ARF and prevalence of RHD. PMID:21386976

  1. Consensus guidelines on pediatric acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Anita; Kumar, R Krishna; Gera, Rani Prem Kumar; Radhakrishnan, S; Mishra, Smita; Ahmed, Z

    2008-07-01

    Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic chronic valvular heart disease is an important preventable cause of morbidity and mortality in suburban and rural India. Its diagnosis is based on clinical criteria. These criteria need verification and revision in the Indian context. Furthermore, there are glaring differences in management protocols available in literature. These facts prompted Indian Academy of Pediatrics to review the management of rheumatic fever. Management of Rheumatic fever was reviewed and recommendation was formulated at national consultative meeting on 20th May 2007 at New Delhi. To formulate uniform guidelines on management of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in the Indian context. Guidelines were formulated for the management of streptococcal pharyngitis, acute rheumatic fever and its cardiac complication as well as secondary prophylaxis for recurrent episodes. (1) Streptococcal eradication with appropriate antibiotics (Benzathine penicillin single dose or penicillin V oral or azithromycin). (2) Diagnosis of rheumatic fever based on Jones criteria. (3) Control inflammatory process with aspirin with or without steroids (total duration of treatment of 12 weeks). (4) Treatment of chorea according to severity (therapy to continue for 2-3 weeks after clinical improvement). (5) Protocol for managing cardiac complication like valvular heart disease, congestive heart failure and atrial fibrillation. (6) Secondary prophylaxis with benzathine penicillin and management of anaphylaxis.

  2. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Watson, Gabriella; Jallow, Bintou; Le Doare, Kirsty; Pushparajah, Kuberan; Anderson, Suzanne T

    2015-04-01

    Poststreptococcal complications, such as acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD), are common in resource-limited settings, with RHD recognised as the most common cause of paediatric heart disease worldwide. Managing these conditions in resource-limited settings can be challenging. We review the investigation and treatment options for ARF and RHD and, most importantly, prevention methods in an African setting.

  3. Virtual immunology: software for teaching basic immunology.

    PubMed

    Berçot, Filipe Faria; Fidalgo-Neto, Antônio Augusto; Lopes, Renato Matos; Faggioni, Thais; Alves, Luiz Anastácio

    2013-01-01

    As immunology continues to evolve, many educational methods have found difficulty in conveying the degree of complexity inherent in its basic principles. Today, the teaching-learning process in such areas has been improved with tools such as educational software. This article introduces "Virtual Immunology," a software program available free of charge in Portuguese and English, which can be used by teachers and students in physiology, immunology, and cellular biology classes. We discuss the development of the initial two modules: "Organs and Lymphoid Tissues" and "Inflammation" and the use of interactive activities to provide microscopic and macroscopic understanding in immunology. Students, both graduate and undergraduate, were questioned along with university level professors about the quality of the software and intuitiveness of use, facility of navigation, and aesthetic organization using a Likert scale. An overwhelmingly satisfactory result was obtained with both students and immunology teachers. Programs such as "Virtual Immunology" are offering more interactive, multimedia approaches to complex scientific principles that increase student motivation, interest, and comprehension.

  4. Rheumatic heart disease in indigenous populations.

    PubMed

    White, Harvey; Walsh, Warren; Brown, Alex; Riddell, Tania; Tonkin, Andrew; Jeremy, Richmond; Brieger, David; Zeitz, Chris; Kritharides, Leonard

    2010-01-01

    Rates of acute rheumatic fever and chronic rheumatic heart disease in Aboriginal people, Torres Strait Islanders and Māori continue to be unacceptably high. The impact of rheumatic heart disease is inequitable on these populations as compared with other Australians and New Zealanders. The associated cardiac morbidity, including the development of rheumatic valve disease, and cardiomyopathy, with possible sequelae of heart failure, development of atrial fibrillation, systemic embolism, transient ischaemic attacks, strokes, endocarditis, the need for interventions including cardiac surgery, and impaired quality of life, and shortened life expectancy, has major implications for the individual. The adverse health and social effects may significantly limit education and employment opportunities and increase dependency on welfare. Additionally there may be major adverse impacts on family and community life. The costs in financial terms and missed opportunities, including wasted young lives, are substantial. Prevention of acute rheumatic fever is dependent on the timely diagnosis and treatment of sore throats and skin infections in high-risk groups. Both Australia and New Zealand have registries for acute rheumatic fever but paradoxically neither includes all cases of chronic rheumatic heart disease many of whom would benefit from close surveillance and follow-up. In New Zealand and some Australian States there are programs to give secondary prophylaxis with penicillin, but these are not universal. Surgical outcomes for patients with rheumatic valvular disease are better for valve repair than for valve replacement. Special attention to the selection of the appropriate valve surgery and valve choice is required in pregnant women. It may be necessary to have designated surgical units managing Indigenous patients to ensure high rates of surgical repair rather than valve replacement. Surgical guidelines may be helpful. Long-term follow-up of the outcomes of surgery in

  5. Laboratory evaluation in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Birtane, Murat; Yavuz, Selçuk; Taştekin, Nurettin

    2017-03-26

    Autoantibodies can help clinicians to allow early detection of autoimmune diseases and their clinical manifestations, to determine effective monitoring of prognosis and the treatment response. From this point, they have a high impact in rheumatic disease management. When used carefully they allow rapid diagnosis and appropriate treatment. However, as they may be present in healthy population they may cause confusion for interpreting the situation. False positive test results may lead to wrong treatment and unnecessary anxiety for patients. Autoantibody positivity alone does not make a diagnosis. Similarly, the absence of autoantibodies alone does not exclude diagnosis. The success of the test is closely related to sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratios. So, interpretation of these is very important for a proper laboratory evaluation. In conclusion, in spite of the remarkable advances in science and technology, a deeply investigated anamnesis and comprehensive physical examination still continue to be the best diagnostic method. The most correct approach is that clinicians apply laboratory tests to confirm or exclude preliminary diagnosis based on anamnesis and physical examination. This review will discuss these issues.

  6. Laboratory evaluation in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Birtane, Murat; Yavuz, Selçuk; Taştekin, Nurettin

    2017-01-01

    Autoantibodies can help clinicians to allow early detection of autoimmune diseases and their clinical manifestations, to determine effective monitoring of prognosis and the treatment response. From this point, they have a high impact in rheumatic disease management. When used carefully they allow rapid diagnosis and appropriate treatment. However, as they may be present in healthy population they may cause confusion for interpreting the situation. False positive test results may lead to wrong treatment and unnecessary anxiety for patients. Autoantibody positivity alone does not make a diagnosis. Similarly, the absence of autoantibodies alone does not exclude diagnosis. The success of the test is closely related to sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratios. So, interpretation of these is very important for a proper laboratory evaluation. In conclusion, in spite of the remarkable advances in science and technology, a deeply investigated anamnesis and comprehensive physical examination still continue to be the best diagnostic method. The most correct approach is that clinicians apply laboratory tests to confirm or exclude preliminary diagnosis based on anamnesis and physical examination. This review will discuss these issues. PMID:28396844

  7. [Clinical-immunological and microbiological parallels in chronic generalized parodontitis and peptic ulcer of the stomach].

    PubMed

    Orekhova, L Iu; Neĭzberg, D M; Stiuf, I Iu

    2006-01-01

    Clinical, immunological and DNA diagnostic examinations of 101 patients with chronic generalized parodontitis and peptic ulcer have revealed similar features of immunological disorders of gastric and oral mucosa and the role of Helicobacter pylori.

  8. Birth of the science of immunology.

    PubMed

    Schmalstieg, Frank C; Goldman, Armond S

    2010-05-01

    The science of immunology emerged in the last of the 19th and the first of the 20th century. Substantial progress in physics, chemistry and microbiology was essential for its development. Indeed, microorganisms became one of the principal investigative tools of the major founders of that science - Louis Pasteur, Robert Koch, Ilya Ilich Metchnikoff, Paul Ehrlich and Jules Bordet. It is pertinent that these pioneering scientists were born when questioning and exploration were encouraged because of the legacies of the previous century of enlightenment. Mentors greatly aided their development. Their discoveries were shaped by their individual personalities. In turn they developed other contributors to the nascent field. Their discoveries included the types of leukocytes, the roles of neutrophils in inflammation and defence, cellular lysis due to complement, the principles of humoral and cellular immunology, passive and active immunization, tissue antigens, anaphylaxis, anaphylactoid reactions and autoimmunity. Their work formed the basis of modern immunology that developed many decades later. Immunology has enormously impacted our understanding of the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of infections, immune-mediated disorders and inflammation. Burgeoning advances forecast further important clinical applications of immunology. Yet, their applications will be problematic because few physicians sufficiently understand the science. We propose that understanding modern immunology requires a grasp of how that science developed - who made the discoveries, how they were made, their successes and failures, their interactions and debates all reveal the foundation of modern immunology.

  9. Ocular diseases: immunological and molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jing; Huang, Yi-Fei; Zhang, Wen-Jing; Chen, Xiao-Fei; Guo, Yu-Mian

    2016-01-01

    Many factors, such as environmental, microbial and endogenous stress, antigen localization, can trigger the immunological events that affect the ending of the diverse spectrum of ocular disorders. Significant advances in understanding of immunological and molecular mechanisms have been researched to improve the diagnosis and therapy for patients with ocular inflammatory diseases. Some kinds of ocular diseases are inadequately responsive to current medications; therefore, immunotherapy may be a potential choice as an alternative or adjunctive treatment, even in the prophylactic setting. This article first provides an overview of the immunological and molecular mechanisms concerning several typical and common ocular diseases; second, the functions of immunological roles in some of systemic autoimmunity will be discussed; third, we will provide a summary of the mechanisms that dictate immune cell trafficking to ocular local microenvironment in response to inflammation. PMID:27275439

  10. Epidemiology of tuberculosis immunology.

    PubMed

    Fox, G J; Menzies, D

    2013-01-01

    Immunological impairment plays a major role in the epidemiology of TB. Globally, the most common causes of immunological impairment are malnutrition, diabetes, HIV/AIDS, aging, and smoking. With the notable exception of HIV, each factor leads to relatively mild immunological impairment in individuals. However, as these conditions affect a significant proportion of the population, they contribute substantially to the incidence of TB at a global scale. Understanding immunological impairment is central to understanding the global TB pandemic, and vital to the development of effective disease control strategies.

  11. Contraception for adolescents with chronic rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Benito; Kozu, Katia T; Leal, Gabriela N; Silva, Marco F; Fernandes, Elisabeth G C; França, Camila M P; Souza, Fernando H C; Silva, Clovis A

    Contraception is an important issue and should be a matter of concern in every medical visit of adolescent and young patients with chronic rheumatic diseases. This narrative review discusses contraception methods in adolescents with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE), antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). Barrier methods are safe and their use should be encouraged for all adolescents with chronic rheumatic diseases. Combined oral contraceptives (COC) are strictly prohibited for JSLE and APS patients with positive antiphospholipid antibodies. Reversible long-acting contraception can be encouraged and offered routinely to the JSLE adolescent patient and other rheumatic diseases. Progestin-only pills are safe in the majority of rheumatic diseases, although the main concern related to its use by adolescents is poor adherence due to menstrual irregularity. Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate injections every three months is a highly effective contraception strategy, although its long-term use is associated with decreased bone mineral density. COC or other combined hormonal contraceptive may be options for JIA and JDM patients. Oral levonorgestrel should be considered as an emergency contraception method for all adolescents with chronic rheumatic diseases, including patients with contraindication to COC. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  12. Contraception for adolescents with chronic rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Benito; Kozu, Katia T; Leal, Gabriela N; Silva, Marco F; Fernandes, Elisabeth G C; França, Camila M P; Souza, Fernando H C; Silva, Clovis A

    2016-07-16

    Contraception is an important issue and should be a matter of concern in every medical visit of adolescent and young patients with chronic rheumatic diseases. This narrative review discusses contraception methods in adolescents with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE), antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). Barrier methods are safe and their use should be encouraged for all adolescents with chronic rheumatic diseases. Combined oral contraceptives (COC) are strictly prohibited for JSLE and APS patients with positive antiphospholipid antibodies. Reversible long-acting contraception can be encouraged and offered routinely to the JSLE adolescent patient and other rheumatic diseases. Progestin-only pills are safe in the majority of rheumatic diseases, although the main concern related to its use by adolescents is poor adherence due to menstrual irregularity. Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate injections every three months is a highly effective contraception strategy, although its long-term use is associated with decreased bone mineral density. COC or other combined hormonal contraceptive may be options for JIA and JDM patients. Oral levonorgestrel should be considered as an emergency contraception method for all adolescents with chronic rheumatic diseases, including patients with contraindication to COC. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  13. [Rheumatic carditis in the adult. Anatomoclinical correlation].

    PubMed

    Guadalajara, J F; Gual, J J; Valvuena, N; Vera, A; Laplaza, I; Salinas, L

    1990-01-01

    The histologic findings of 325 necropsies of rheumatic patients at the National Institute of Cardiology in Mexico, between 1980-1985 were studied forty five of them had Aschoff nodules plus valvular inflammation-Out of these 45 cases two groups were formed: children-adolescent group (24 cases) and an adult group (21 cases). The clinical, histologic and laboratory findings were compared. Clinical records were reviewed searching for history of rheumatic fever. Active rheumatic fever was suspected in 16 patients in the younger group (67%) and only in 3 adults (14.2%). As far as Jones' criteria is concerned, the most common finding was carditis, principally in the younger group (83%). In the adult group, it appeared in 50% of the patients. All other criteria were only occasionally seen or could not be identified during the patients lifetime. The most common laboratory finding which could suggest active rheumatic fever were: a high levels of anti-streptolysin in younger patients (95%) and elevation of erythro-sedimentation in adults (83%). We conclude that in active rheumatic fever of the adult; Jones criteria are not met, so the illness is difficult to recognize, and there is clinical-histologic discrepancy. In this context the disease has a "silent" evolution.

  14. Overt and occult rheumatic diseases: the child with chronic fever.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Joost; Kuis, Wietse

    2002-07-01

    Identification of the genes involved in hereditary periodic fever syndromes has led to the recognition of a new pathophysiological category, the autoinflammatory disorders. The main non-hereditary autoinflammatory disease in childhood is systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA), others being the chronic infantile neurological cutaneous arthropathy (CINCA) syndrome and the periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and adenopathy (PFAPA) syndrome. Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) has been traced to mutations in the MEFV gene. Mutations in the MVK gene, encoding the enzyme mevalonate kinase, cause the hyper-IgD periodic fever syndrome (HIDS). The tumour necrosis factor(TNF)-receptor-associated periodic syndromes (TRAPS) have been linked to mutations in theTNFRSF1A gene, encoding a TNF-alpha receptor, and the CIAS1 gene is mutated in familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome. We discuss how this knowledge has influenced diagnosis and treatment of these rare genetic disorders and how it might change our approach to the more common rheumatic diseases.

  15. Immune System and Its Link to Rheumatic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Immune System & Its Link to Rheumatic Disease The Immune System and Its Link to Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts ... of a vessel of the body). What’s the immune system? The immune system allows us to identify and ...

  16. Immunological aspects of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Woollard, Kevin J

    2013-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in several countries. The underlying process is atherosclerosis, a slowly progressing chronic disorder that can lead to intravascular thrombosis. There is overwhelming evidence for the underlying importance of our immune system in atherosclerosis. Monocytes, which comprise part of the innate immune system, can be recruited to inflamed endothelium and this recruitment has been shown to be proportional to the extent of atherosclerotic disease. Monocytes undergo migration into the vasculature, they differentiate into macrophage phenotypes, which are highly phagocytic and can scavenge modified lipids, leading to foam cell formation and development of the lipid-rich atheroma core. This increased influx leads to a highly inflammatory environment and along with other immune cells can increase the risk in the development of the unstable atherosclerotic plaque phenotype. The present review provides an overview and description of the immunological aspect of innate and adaptive immune cell subsets in atherosclerosis, by defining their interaction with the vascular environment, modified lipids and other cellular exchanges. There is a particular focus on monocytes and macrophages, but shorter descriptions of dendritic cells, lymphocyte populations, neutrophils, mast cells and platelets are also included.

  17. Introduction to immunology and autoimmunity.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D A; Germolec, D R

    1999-01-01

    Autoimmune disease occurs when the immune system attacks self-molecules as a result of a breakdown of immunologic tolerance to autoreactive immune cells. Many autoimmune disorders have been strongly associated with genetic, infectious, and/or environmental predisposing factors. Comprising multiple disorders and symptoms ranging from organ-specific to systemic, autoimmune diseases include insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, thyroiditis, and multiple sclerosis. There are also implications of autoimmune pathology in such common health problems as arteriosclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, schizophrenia, and certain types of infertility. Largely of unknown etiology, autoimmune disorders affect approximately 3% of the North American and European populations, > 75% of those affected being women. This discussion provides a brief introduction to the immune system and tolerance maintenance, an overview of selected autoimmune diseases and possible mechanisms of immune autoreactivity, and a review of experimental autoimmune models. PMID:10502528

  18. [Rheumatic joint diseases in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yuya; Yokosawa, Masahiro; Kaneko, Shunta; Sumida, Takayuki

    2014-10-01

    The most frequent rheumatic joint disease in the elderly is rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Recent advances in the treatment of RA improve prognosis, and gradually increase the elderly patients with RA. There are some differences in clinical features between the patients with elderly onset RA and young onset RA, such as systemic symptoms and distribution of affected joints. In addition, it is occasionally difficult to differentiate elderly onset RA from the other rheumatic diseases like polymyalgia rheumatica and RS3PE syndrome, pseudogout, and osteoarthritis. Since elderly patients tend to have more co-morbidity and co-existing diseases requiring treatment with other drugs, a risk/benefit profile must always be taken into consideration when choosing the treatment in elderly patients with rheumatic joint diseases.

  19. The number needed to offend: a cross-sectional study of potential offensiveness of rheumatic diagnostic labels.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Ortiz, José Dionisio; Russell, Anthony S; Davis, Paul; Vargas-Serafin, Cesar Omar; Ramirez-Gomez, Andrea; Aceves-Avila, Francisco Javier; De la Mora-Molina, Hector; Gonzalez-Leija, Mireya Elizabeth; Pacheco-Lorenzo, Raul; Ramos-Remus, Cesar

    2014-04-01

    This study aims to explore the different connotations and potential offensiveness of ten mechanistic labels in newly referred Mexican patients with rheumatic symptoms as well as in Mexican and Canadian rheumatologists. Patients with musculoskeletal complaints newly referred for a rheumatology assessment were interviewed consecutively before they saw the rheumatologist. Patients were asked to choose one of nine feelings provoked by ten different illness mechanism labels. Rheumatologists gave a medical diagnosis after seeing the patients. Mexican and Canadian rheumatologists were invited to answer a structured questionnaire about their feelings at the moment they identified each of the ten different provided scenarios. Patients' and rheumatologists' feelings were classified as "offended" or "nonoffended." The "offensive score" was used to calculate a "number needed to offend" (NNO). One hundred and fifty patients were included. Inherited, immunological, and inflammatory labels had the fewest negative connotations (NNOs 17, 12, and 14, respectively), and psychological, functional, idiopathic, and sleep disturbance labels had the most (NNO 2 and 3, respectively). Functional labels were almost four times more offensive than organic labels. Stratified by rheumatologist diagnosis, patients with functional disorders were more accepting of organic-based mechanistic labels. A higher potential to offend was observed when patients with functional somatic conditions were given functional mechanistic labels (NNOs 1 to 4). The survey was completed by 186 Mexican rheumatologists and 71 Canadian rheumatologists. Primarily functional disorders such as somatization and anxiety had a high potential to evoke offensive feelings (NNOs 3 to 7). No significant differences in the NNO were found between Mexican and Canadian rheumatologists. Getting or giving mechanistic/explanatory labels is emotional. Both patients and rheumatologists experienced offended feelings with functional or

  20. Antinuclear antibodies in rheumatic disease: a proposal for a function-based classification.

    PubMed

    Pisetsky, D S

    2012-09-01

    Antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) are a diverse group of autoantibodies that bind macromolecular components of the cell nucleus. While some ANAs occur in normal individuals, others are expressed almost exclusively in patients with rheumatic disease and serve as markers for diagnosis and prognosis. Despite the clinical associations of ANAs, the relationship of these antibodies to specific disease manifestations is often unknown because the target antigens are intracellular molecules that are ubiquitously expressed. In systemic lupus erythematosus, the role of ANAs in disease manifestations is better understood, especially for antibodies to DNA and related nucleosomal antigens. These antibodies can promote nephritis by the formation of immune complexes that are deposited in the kidney. In addition, anti-DNA, along with antibodies to RNA-binding proteins such as anti-Sm, can induce non-specific immune abnormalities based on the induction of type interferon 1 by plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Despite ANA expression in rheumatic disease, studies in animal models of inflammation and tissue injury indicate that antibodies to certain nuclear molecules such as HMGB1 have protective effects. Together, these considerations suggest a function-based classification of ANAs based on their expression in normal and autoimmune individuals as well as their capacity to induce or attenuate immunological disturbances. This classification provides a framework to elucidate the serological features of rheumatic disease and the often uncertain relationship between ANA expression and disease manifestations.

  1. Glucocorticoid Receptor: Implications for Rheumatic Diseases “Glucocorticoids in Rheumatic Diseases”

    PubMed Central

    Kino, Tomoshige; Charmandari, Evangelia; Chrousos, George P.

    2013-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, mediates most of the known biologic effects of glucocorticoids. The human GR gene consists of 9 exons and expresses 2 alternative splicing isoforms, the GRα and GRβ. GRα is the classic receptor that binds to glucocorticoids and mediates most of the known actions of glucocorticoids, while GRβ does not bind to these hormones and exerts a dominant negative effect upon the GRα-induced transcriptional activity. Each of the two GR splice isoforms has 8 translational variants with specific transcriptional activity and tissue distribution. GRα consists of three subdomains, translocates from the cytoplasm into the nucleus upon binding to glucocorticoids, and regulates the transcriptional activity of numerous glucocorticoid-responsive genes either by binding to its cognate DNA sequences or by interacting with other transcription factors. In addition to these genomic actions, the GR also exerts rapid, non-genomic effects, which are possibly mediated by membrane-localized receptors or by translocation into the mitochondria. All these actions of the GR appear to play an important role in the regulation of the immune system. Specifically, the splicing variant GRβ may be involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases, while the circadian regulation of the GR activity via acetylation by the Clock transcription factor may have therapeutic implications for the preferential timing of glucocorticoid administration in autoimmune inflammatory disorders. PMID:22018181

  2. The New Cellular Immunology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claman, Henry N.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the nature of the immune response and traces many of the discoveries that have led to the present state of knowledge in immunology. The new cellular immunology is directing its efforts toward improving health by proper manipulation of the immune mechanisms of the body. (JR)

  3. The New Cellular Immunology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claman, Henry N.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the nature of the immune response and traces many of the discoveries that have led to the present state of knowledge in immunology. The new cellular immunology is directing its efforts toward improving health by proper manipulation of the immune mechanisms of the body. (JR)

  4. Autoimmune neuropathies associated to rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Alberto R M; Faber, Ingrid; Nucci, Anamarli; Appenzeller, Simone; França, Marcondes C

    2017-04-01

    Systemic manifestations are frequent in autoimmune rheumatic diseases and include peripheral nervous system damage. Neuron cell body, axons and myelin sheath may all be affected in this context. This involvement results in severe and sometimes disabling symptoms. Sensory, motor and autonomic features may be present in different patterns that emerge as peculiar clinical pictures. Prompt recognition of these neuropathies is pivotal to guide treatment and reduce the risks of long term disability. In this review, we aim to describe the main immune-mediated neuropathies associated to rheumatic diseases: sensory neuronopathies, multiple mononeuropathies and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, with an emphasis on clinical features and therapeutic options.

  5. Targeting the Inflammasome in Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Sara S.; Stannard, Jasmine

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the inflammasome, a protein complex responsible for many cellular functions, including the activation of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18, has been identified as a key participant in many rheumatic diseases including autoimmune, inflammatory and autoinflammatory syndromes. This review will discuss the recent advances in understanding the role of this complex in various rheumatic diseases. Further, it will focus on available therapies which directly and indirectly target the inflammasome and its downstream cytokines to quiet inflammation and possibly dampen autoimmune processes. PMID:26118952

  6. Immunological alterations in hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Calvaruso, Vincenza; Craxì, Antonio

    2013-12-21

    A higher prevalence of immunological processes has recently been reported in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, focusing the attention of physicians and researchers on the close association between HCV and immune disorders. HCV lymphotropism represents the most important step in the pathogenesis of virus-related immunological diseases and experimental, virologic, and clinical evidence has demonstrated a trigger role for HCV both in systemic autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren syndrome, hemolytic anemia and severe thrombocytopenia, and in organ-specific autoimmune diseases, such as autoimmune hepatitis, thyroid disorders and diabetes. This review will outline the principal aspects of such HCV-induced immunological alterations, focusing on the prevalence of these less characterized HCV extrahepatic manifestations.

  7. Geographically specific infections and arthritis, including rheumatic syndromes associated with certain fungi and parasites, Brucella species and Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    McGill, P E

    2003-04-01

    This overview is designed to introduce the reader to the broad spectrum of rheumatic syndromes associated with certain fungal and parasitic diseases, brucellosis and leprosy. Musculoskeletal disorders caused by fungi are uncommon and difficult to diagnose, particularly in the early stages. Deep fungal infections involve-in order of frequency-bone, soft tissues and joints. Rare but well-defined rheumatic syndromes occur in a variety of parasitic diseases. Brucellosis remains a major challenge to both human public health and clinical acumen in many countries today. The arthritis of leprosy deserves wider recognition and study as it contributes to disability and may hold clues to the mechanism of inflammation in other rheumatic disorders. All of the above may afflict residents in endemic areas and occasionally appear far from the source of origin in travellers or migrants, and usually cause diagnostic confusion.

  8. Possible pathogenic nature of the recently discovered TT virus: does it play a role in autoimmune rheumatic diseases?

    PubMed

    Gergely, Peter; Perl, Andras; Poór, Gyula

    2006-11-01

    Pathogenesis of viral origin has long been suggested in autoimmune rheumatic diseases. Beside the well-defined virus induced transient or chronic rheumatic diseases often resembling systemic autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, viruses can contribute to disease pathogenesis by several different pathomechanisms. TT virus is a recently discovered virus of extremely high genetic diversity which commonly infects humans. Despite accumulated evidence on the biological characteristics of TTV, its pathogenicity is still in question; many consider TTV as a harmless endosymbiont. The recent paper overviews the biology of TT virus and investigates the hypothesis that TTV might have a causative role in human diseases with special attention to the possibility that TTV might trigger autoimmunity in rheumatic disorders.

  9. Health planning in rheumatic diseases. Elaboration of a master plan for rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases of Catalonia.

    PubMed

    Larrosa, Marta; Surís, Xavier; Pueyo, María J; Auleda, Jaume; de la Puente, María Luísa

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatic diseases (RDs) are among the most common chronic health problems of the Catalan adult population. They cause important problems for individuals, their families and for the society overall, with high direct and indirect economic costs. The Department of Health of Catalonia promoted the creation of a Master Plan for the rheumatic diseases, as a tool for planning an integral approach to these problems. To present the work methodology that has been used in the development of the Master Plan and its final proposals. First an analysis of the burden caused by these problems in our community was performed and the objectives of the Plan were established. Later, strategic lines were defined and work groups organized to analyze proposals for improvement, which after consensus were accepted. The proposals of the Plan comprise actions in the scope of prevention, rationalization in the use of resources and the formation of professionals among others. Changes in the health care model for RDs were proposed in order to improve specialized and primary care coordination with clinics and musculoskeletal functional units. The Master Plan recommends actions to improve the attention of the population through operative planning and the services to different providers. The Master Plan will establish the health policy action lines directed against these disorders. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  10. The new immunology.

    PubMed

    Siminovitch, K A

    1992-03-01

    Among the biomedical sciences, immunology stands out as a discipline in which knowledge emanating from fundamental research has rapidly been transferred to the clinical paradigm, with consequent improvement in human health. Virtually all medical subspecialties have benefitted from diagnostic reagents and technologies provided by basic immunology. In terms of numbers of lives saved, immunologic-based therapeutic strategies, most notably vaccination, rank among the most effective measures ever achieved by medical intervention. Yet, despite immunology's profound impact on medicine and the longstanding recognition of many of the general principles and cellular components involved in immunity, until relatively recently, the operational workings of the immune system eluded precise definition. The abstract nature of the immune system rendered the field intangible or, at the very least, confusing, to the nonimmunologic medical community. However, in recent years, this situation has changed radically, as cell cloning, hybridoma, and recombinant DNA technologies have provided the means to delineate the precise immunologic cellular structures and interactions. The purpose of this review is to highlight a few of the most significant advances in immunology during the past decade, and to show how they have made possible the translation of abstract concepts of classical immunology into tangible, structural information. Striking gains in the understanding of antigen recognition, one of the most fundamental aspects of immunity, are described as an illustrative case.

  11. Pediatric allergy and immunology in Israel.

    PubMed

    Geller-Bernstein, Carmi; Etzioni, Amos

    2013-03-01

    After the geographic and sociodemographic settings as well as the health care in Israel are briefly described, the scope of pediatric allergy and immunology in Israel is presented. This includes specific disorders commonly encountered, the environment that induces symptoms, the specialists who treat them, and the common challenges of patients, parents, doctors, and allied health personnel who collaborate to manage the maladies and patient care. Allergies usually affect some overall 15-20% of the pediatric population. The main allergens are inhaled, ingested, or injected (insects stings). Generally, the incidence of the various allergens affecting children in Israel, is similar to other parts of the Western world. Owing to the high consanguinity rate in the Israeli population, the prevalence of the various immunodeficiency conditions (in the adaptive as well as the innate system) is higher than that reported worldwide. Pediatric allergists/immunologists also treat autoimmune disorders affecting the pediatric group. Pediatric allergy and clinical immunology are not separate specialties. The 25 specialists who treat children with allergic/immunologic diseases have undergone a basic training in Pediatrics. They also received an additional 2-yr training in allergy and clinical immunology and then have to pass the board examinations. They work mainly in pediatric allergy units, in several hospitals that are affiliated to the five medical schools in the country. Aside from clinical work, most of the centers are also heavily involved in clinical and basic research in allergy and immunology. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Evaluation of antibodies to thymine ROS-modified DNA poly(dT), in patients with immunologic disorders: relationships to anti n-DNA and anti ENA autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Brusca, I; Li Vigni, P; Sucato, R; Cilluffo, N; La Chiusa, S M

    2002-03-01

    Hydroxyl radical, one of the most potent of all reactive oxygen species, is known to modify adenine and thymine in cellular DNA, producing some modified DNA fragments (ROS-DNA) with different antigenic properties. Despite several in vitro studies about ROS-DNA, data regarding their clinical significance are scanty. The aim of our study was to seek out the presence and clinical significance of the anti poly(dT) auto-antibodies in a group of patients suspected of autoimmune disease. We initially evaluated more than 900 consecutive sera of hospitalized patients (range age from 6 to 70 yrs) referred to our laboratory during 18 months. Anti n-DNA, anti-ENA and poly(dT) autoantibodies were performed on 158 ANA positive sera and 28 ANA negative sera from patients strongly suspected of rheumatic diseases or affected by HCV infection. Anti poly (dT) were found in 22 out of 186 sera. As regards the clinical evaluation, 8 patients were affected by SLE, 5 by Scleroderma, 3 by HCV-related chronic hepatitis, 4 by recurrent abortions (without presence of the anti-cardiolipin antibodies and other clinical symptoms). In two patients the ACR criteria and the clinical aspects did not allow a definite diagnosis. Anti-Histones were detected in 18 out of 22 poly (dT) positive patients. Our data suggest that anti poly(dT) autoantibodies are sensitive markers of various autoimmune diseases, but with a minor specificity as compared to anti n-DNA for the diagnosis of SLE.

  13. [The temporomandibular joint and inflammatory rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Marotte, H

    2016-09-01

    Some inflammatory rheumatic diseases can involve the temporomandibular joint, such as rheumatoid arthritis and spondylarthritis. The aim of our work was to evaluate the current prevalence of these inflammatory TMJ diseases, to indicate the new therapeutics and to describe the collaboration between rheumatologist and maxillofacial surgeon in these pathologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. ALCOHOLISM AND PSORIASIS-AN IMMUNOLOGICAL RELATIONSHIP

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, T.N.; Suresh, T.R.; Devar, J.V.; Jayaram, Vasantha

    1991-01-01

    SUMMARY Studies on association of psychiatric diseases and immunopathology has been an area of recent research activities. Alcohol has been implicated in some immune mediated disorders. Observation of occurrence of psoriasis, an immune mediated skin disorder in alcoholic patients has not been reported anywhere in literature. We report here 4 cases of alcoholism related psoriasis and discuss the possible immunological relationship between these two disorders. The need for study of effect of alcoholism on cell-medicated immunity associated conditions like auto-immune disorders and malignancy is presented. PMID:21897472

  15. The immunological synapse

    PubMed Central

    Dustin, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular interactions underlying regulation of the immune response take place in a nano-scale gap between T cells and antigen presenting cells, termed the immunological synapse. If these interactions are regulated appropriately, the host is defended against a wide range of pathogens and deranged host cells. If these interactions are dis-regulated, the host is susceptible to pathogens or tumor escape at one extreme and autoimmunity at the other. Treatments targeting the synapse have helped to establish immunotherapy as a mainstream element in cancer treatment. This Masters primer will cover the basics of the immunological synapse and some of the applications to tumor immunology. PMID:25367977

  16. Epidemiological studies in incidence, prevalence, mortality, and comorbidity of the rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Sherine E; Michaud, Kaleb

    2009-01-01

    Epidemiology is the study of the distribution and determinants of disease in human populations. Over the past decade there has been considerable progress in our understanding of the fundamental descriptive epidemiology (levels of disease frequency: incidence and prevalence, comorbidity, mortality, trends over time, geographic distributions, and clinical characteristics) of the rheumatic diseases. This progress is reviewed for the following major rheumatic diseases: rheumatoid arthritis (RA), juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, osteoarthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, giant cell arteritis, polymyalgia rheumatica, gout, Sjögren's syndrome, and ankylosing spondylitis. These findings demonstrate the dynamic nature of the incidence and prevalence of these conditions--a reflection of the impact of genetic and environmental factors. The past decade has also brought new insights regarding the comorbidity associated with rheumatic diseases. Strong evidence now shows that persons with RA are at a high risk for developing several comorbid disorders, that these conditions may have atypical features and thus may be difficult to diagnose, and that persons with RA experience poorer outcomes after comorbidity compared with the general population. Taken together, these findings underscore the complexity of the rheumatic diseases and highlight the key role of epidemiological research in understanding these intriguing conditions.

  17. [Etiologic possibilities for the development of rheumatic diseases through environmental mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Bañuelos-Ramírez, David; Cedillo-Ramírez, María L; Yáñez-Santos, Jorge A

    2007-09-01

    Living beings and the environment that supports them have a mutual interdependence and therefore any event that occurs within an ecosystem affects all parts. The influence that the environment has on subjects that maydevelop an illness has been amply recognized. For some autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the possibility of its development under ultraviolet light and prolonged exposure to sunlight has been recognized. Microorganisms may activate other illnesses such as reactive arthritis. Substances such as alfalfa are also able to unleash disease activity. Laboratory workers who manipulate sera of patients with autoimmune rheumatic disorders develop antibodies to the sera that they are working with. It is thus that environmental sciences and focused research allow the development of a new approach to the study of possible pathogenic mechanisms in the appearance of certain rheumatic disorders. This article reviews the main existing evidence and proposes certain hypotheses derived from it.

  18. Anti-rheumatic drugs and cartilage.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, P

    1988-08-01

    In this chapter an attempt has been made to draw together the known biology of cartilage and some of the mechanisms thought to be responsible for its failure in arthritis. The picture is far from complete but we are now in a good position to use this information to help appraise the pros and cons of the wide range of drugs now available to treat articular disorders. For convenience, these drugs were classified as NSAIDs, corticosteroids and chondroprotective agents. The influence of each of these classes on the metabolism of cartilage was examined in the light of published laboratory and clinical studies. It has been clearly shown that not all NSAIDs are the same. While many of the older drugs provided no benefit to cartilage metabolism, and in some instances suppressed it, the more recently discovered molecules appear to be free of these undesirable effects. Tiaprofenic acid, diclofenac and piroxicam emerged as drugs with little or no harmful effects on cartilage metabolism when used at concentrations within the human therapeutic range. For all NSAIDs, their potential effects on cartilage must be weighed against their respective anti-inflammatory potency, half-life, and effects on the gastric mucosa and other tissues. Other chapters in this book have addressed these important problems. The long-acting corticosteroids, betamethasone and triamcinolone hexacetonide, also appear to offer some benefit in the management of OA; however, as in RA, their use should be restricted to short-term applications. In terms of cartilage metabolism the chondroprotective agents pentosan polysulphate, Arteparon and Rumalon have been the most extensively studied class of drugs. While the laboratory studies have provided convincing evidence of their chondroprotective efficacy, it has been difficult to prove this clinically. This dichotomy of opinion (laboratory versus clinical) stems largely from the inadequacy of the methodologies currently available for the objective clinical

  19. Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Carmen Maria Lara; Borella, Elisabetta; Palma, Lavinia; Ragozzino, Silvio; De Ramón, Enrique; Gomez-Huelgas, Ricardo; Punzi, Leonardo; Doria, Andrea

    2015-02-01

    Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) is defined by buds of granulation tissue within lung distal airspaces. The diagnosis requires the histopathologic evidence of organizing pneumonia along with a suggestive clinical and radiographic pattern. This disorder is characterized by a good response to corticosteroids and an excellent prognosis. It can occur in association with a broad spectrum of clinical conditions or can be isolated, in this last case named cryptogenic organizing pneumonia. We searched for BOOP in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases (ARD) in the literature, and we found 32 well-documented cases. We reported here demographic features, manifestations, treatment and outcome of patients with BOOP associated with ARD. Notably, BOOP can be the presenting feature in some patients with ARD; thus, a close follow-up of patients with BOOP is recommended.

  20. Malignancies in autoimmune rheumatic diseases - a mini-review.

    PubMed

    Szekanecz, Zoltán; Szekanecz, Eva; Bakó, Gyula; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2011-01-01

    Paraneoplastic symptoms, caused by a malignancy, but not directly related to invasion by the tumor or its metastases, are the result of a wide variety of tumor-derived biologic mediators like hormones, peptides, antibodies, cytotoxic lymphocytes, autocrine and paracrine mediators. Systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma or dermatomyositis, may increase the risk for the development of malignancies, predominantly lymphoproliferative disorders. Immunosuppressive drugs and biological agents may also be carcinogenic. However, sustained inflammatory activity seems to be the primary risk factor for malignancies in autoimmune diseases. Tumor-associated antigens may be produced by inflammatory cells and their production may be increased in rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases.

  1. Imaging of sternocostoclavicular joint in spondyloarthropaties and other rheumatic conditions.

    PubMed

    Guglielmi, G; Cascavilla, A; Scalzo, G; Salaffi, F; Grassi, W

    2009-01-01

    To retrospectively evaluate the role of the various imaging techniques in the study of the sternocostoclavicular joint, in patients with spondyloarthropathies and other rheumatic conditions and to assess potential pitfalls in the radiological diagnosis. Thirty patients, 11 male and 19 female, mean age 45 years, with involvement of the sternocostoclavicular joint as part of rheumatologic disorders (psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, Tietze syndrome, SAPHO syndrome, and condensing osteitis of the clavicle) were studied. Conventional radiography, CT, MRI and bone scintigraphy were performed. The following imaging findings were evaluated: soft tissue swelling, bone sclerosis, cortical bone erosions, joint space narrowing, subchondral sclerosis, periosteal new bone formation, synovial reaction and intrarticular effusion. All the images were independently reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists. Conventional radiography demonstrated only sclerosis of the clavicula in 8 pts (26%) and the sternum in 3 pts (10%), cortical bone erosions in 7 pts (23%), joint space narrowing in 6 pts (23%) and periosteal bone formation in 2 pts (10%). At the CT examination sclerosis of the clavicula and the sternum was observed in 13 pts (44%), cortical bone erosions in 22 pts (76%), joint space narrowing in 10 pts (34%), ligament ossification in 12 pts (41%), subchondral sclerosis in 9 pts (34%) and periosteal bone formation in 10 pts (34%). The MRI was the most sensitive technique in the evaluation of the soft tissue swelling in 9 pts (56%), intrarticular effusion in 13 pts (81%) and synovial reaction in 13 pts (81%). Finally, bone scintigraphy showed an increased uptake at the sterno-costoclavicular joint in all patients who underwent the examination. The radiological evaluation of the anterior chest wall in patients with different rheumatic disorders represents a problem of difficult diagnostic evaluation both for the anatomic region complexity and for the variability of

  2. Prevalence of rheumatic diseases and associated outcomes in rural and urban communities in Bangladesh: a COPCORD study.

    PubMed

    Haq, Syed Atiqul; Darmawan, John; Islam, Mohammad Nazrul; Uddin, Mohammed Zahir; Das, Bidhu Bhushan; Rahman, Fazlur; Chowdhury, Mohammad Abdul Jalil; Alam, Mohammad Noor; Mahmud, Taimur Abul Khair; Chowdhury, Minhaj Rahim; Tahir, Mohammad

    2005-02-01

    To estimate the burden of rheumatic disorders in adults (age >/= 15 yrs) in Bangladeshi rural and urban communities. The survey was carried out in a rural community, an urban slum, and an affluent urban community with samples of 2635, 1317, and 1259 adults, respectively. Through door-to-door surveys, trained interviewers identified subjects with musculoskeletal pain. A socio-culturally adapted and validated Bengali version of the COPCORD (Community Oriented Program for Control of Rheumatic Disorders) questionnaire was used. Trained internists and rheumatologists examined the positive respondents using an English COPCORD examination sheet to identify respondents with definite rheumatic disorders and to reach a diagnosis. The overall point prevalence of musculoskeleletal pain was 26.3%. The point prevalence estimates of musculoskeletal pain in rural, urban slum, and affluent urban communities were 26.2% (women 31.3%, men 21.1%), 24.9% (women 27.5%, men 22.6%), and 27.9% (women 35.5%, men 18.6%), respectively. Most commonly affected sites were low back, knees, hips, and shoulders in all 3 communities. The point prevalence of definite rheumatic disorders was 24.0%. The commonest rheumatic disorders were osteoarthritis of the knees, nonspecific low back pain, lumbar spondylosis, fibromyalgia, and soft tissue rheumatism. Their prevalence estimates were 7.5%, 6.6%, 5.0%, 4.4%, and 2.7%, respectively, in the rural, 9.2%, 9.9%, 2.0%, 3.2%, and 2.5%, respectively, in the urban slum, and 10.6%, 9.2%, 2.3%, 3.3%, and 3.3% in the urban affluent community. The point prevalence of functional disability was 25.5%, 23.3%, and 24.8%, respectively, in the rural, urban slum, and urban affluent communities. Among the positive respondents, 22%, 52%, and 22% reported loss of work for durations of 49.3 +/- 47.5, 50.90 +/- 103.3, and 29.25 +/- 56.5 days, respectively, within the previous year. Rheumatic disorders are common causes of morbidity, disability, and work loss in rural and urban

  3. Epidemiology of rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in a rural community in northern India.

    PubMed Central

    Grover, A.; Dhawan, A.; Iyengar, S. D.; Anand, I. S.; Wahi, P. L.; Ganguly, N. K.

    1993-01-01

    The epidemiology of rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in a rural community (total population 114,610) in northern India was studied by setting up a registry based on primary health care centres. Health workers and schoolteachers were trained to identify suspected patients in school and village surveys (121 villages). Medical specialists screened 5-15-year-olds (n = 31,200). The population was followed up for 3 years (from March 1988 to March 1991). All suspected and registered cases were investigated by serial echocardiography and Doppler ultrasonography at a tertiary care centre. A total of 102 cases were confirmed to have rheumatic fever/rheumatic heart disease (prevalence, 0.09%); 66 were aged 5-15 years (prevalence, 0.21%). A total of 48 patients (24 males, 24 females; mean age, 12.11 +/- 3.7 years) were diagnosed to have a possible first attack of rheumatic fever (incidence, 0.54 per 1000 per year). Arthritis was observed in 36 (75%) and carditis in 18 (37.5%) of cases. Prolapse of the anterior mitral leaflet into the left atrium occurred in 5 (22%) cases with carditis. Mitral regurgitation was observed in all 18 cases of carditis; over the period of observation it disappeared in three cases and progressed to mitral stenosis in a further three. A total of 22 patients (11 males, 11 females; mean age, 19.41 +/- 8.1 years) were registered as rheumatic fever recurrences, and 32 patients (18 females, 14 males; mean age, 22.1 +/- 10.1 years) had chronic rheumatic heart disease. Of those with recurrences, 9 (41%) had carditis and 11 (50%) had arthritis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8440039

  4. Immunological findings in autism.

    PubMed

    Cohly, Hari Har Parshad; Panja, Asit

    2005-01-01

    elevated in autistic brains. In measles virus infection, it has been postulated that there is immune suppression by inhibiting T-cell proliferation and maturation and downregulation MHC class II expression. Cytokine alteration of TNF-alpha is increased in autistic populations. Toll-like-receptors are also involved in autistic development. High NO levels are associated with autism. Maternal antibodies may trigger autism as a mechanism of autoimmunity. MMR vaccination may increase risk for autism via an autoimmune mechanism in autism. MMR antibodies are significantly higher in autistic children as compared to normal children, supporting a role of MMR in autism. Autoantibodies (IgG isotype) to neuron-axon filament protein (NAFP) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) are significantly increased in autistic patients (Singh et al., 1997). Increase in Th2 may explain the increased autoimmunity, such as the findings of antibodies to MBP and neuronal axonal filaments in the brain. There is further evidence that there are other participants in the autoimmune phenomenon. (Kozlovskaia et al., 2000). The possibility of its involvement in autism cannot be ruled out. Further investigations at immunological, cellular, molecular, and genetic levels will allow researchers to continue to unravel the immunopathogenic mechanisms' associated with autistic processes in the developing brain. This may open up new avenues for prevention and/or cure of this devastating neurodevelopmental disorder.

  5. Movement and Other Neurodegenerative Syndromes in Patients with Systemic Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Menezes, Rikitha; Pantelyat, Alexander; Izbudak, Izlem; Birnbaum, Julius

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Patients with rheumatic diseases can present with movement and other neurodegenerative disorders. It may be underappreciated that movement and other neurodegenerative disorders can encompass a wide variety of disease entities. Such disorders are strikingly heterogeneous and lead to a wider spectrum of clinical injury than seen in Parkinson's disease. Therefore, we sought to stringently phenotype movement and other neurodegenerative disorders presenting in a case series of rheumatic disease patients. We integrated our findings with a review of the literature to understand mechanisms which may account for such a ubiquitous pattern of clinical injury. Seven rheumatic disease patients (5 Sjögren's syndrome patients, 2 undifferentiated connective tissue disease patients) were referred and could be misdiagnosed as having Parkinson's disease. However, all of these patients were ultimately diagnosed as having other movement or neurodegenerative disorders. Findings inconsistent with and more expansive than Parkinson's disease included cerebellar degeneration, dystonia with an alien-limb phenomenon, and nonfluent aphasias. A notable finding was that individual patients could be affected by cooccurring movement and other neurodegenerative disorders, each of which could be exceptionally rare (ie, prevalence of ∼1:1000), and therefore with the collective probability that such disorders were merely coincidental and causally unrelated being as low as ∼1-per-billion. Whereas our review of the literature revealed that ubiquitous patterns of clinical injury were frequently associated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings suggestive of a widespread vasculopathy, our patients did not have such neuroimaging findings. Instead, our patients could have syndromes which phenotypically resembled paraneoplastic and other inflammatory disorders which are known to be associated with antineuronal antibodies. We similarly identified immune-mediated and inflammatory markers

  6. Biochemical, immunological and kinetic characterization and partial sequence analysis of a thiol proteinase inhibitor from Bubalus bubalis kidney: An attempt targeting kidney disorders.

    PubMed

    Shamsi, Anas; Ahmed, Azaj; Bano, Bilqees

    2017-01-01

    In the present study a thiol proteinase inhibitor was isolated from buffalo kidney making use of ammonium sulphate precipitation and gel filtration chromatography on Sephacryl S-100HR column. Purified inhibitor is homogeneous as it displayed a single band in gel electrophoresis both under reducing and non-reducing environment and is of 65KDa as revealed by gel filtration and SDS PAGE. Kinetic studies revealed the presence of reversible accompanied with competitive mode of inhibition; showing maximum efficacy against papain (Ki=2.90×10(-4)). It was maximally active at pH 8.0 and was stable for a period of 30, 60 and 90 days at 37, 4 and -20°C respectively. Immunological studies confirmed its purity of epitopes as a single precipitin line is obtained in immunodiffusion. N-terminal analysis revealed that it shared a good homology with mouse kidney cystatin as well as with Human Cys C and Cys E thereby advocating its use as a model for various human oriented studies which targets how the kidney cystatin level varies in accordance with various drugs that are currently being used as a target for variety of diseases.

  7. Ultrasound of enthesopathy in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Falsetti, Paolo; Acciai, Caterina; Lenzi, Lucia; Frediani, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Enthesopathy is the pathologic change of the insertion of tendons, ligaments and joint capsules on the bone. It is a cardinal feature of spondyloarthropathies (SpA), but it can occur in other rheumatic disease. Recent studies using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography (US) have demonstrated that enthesopathy can often be asymptomatic, in both the axial and peripheral skeleton. Therefore, a systematic US study of peripheral entheses could be useful in the diagnostic process of patients with rheumatic diseases, in particular SpA. Recently, power Doppler US (PDUS) has been proved to be useful for differentiating mechanical/degenerative and inflammatory enthesopathy and for monitoring the efficacy of therapy. This article reviews the main histopathologic aspects of enthesopathy and describes the normal US features of enthesis and the basic US features of enthesopathy, in its various stages. The usefulness of US and PDUS in the diagnosis and assessment of enthesopathy is discussed on the basis of the literature and our experience.

  8. The management of rheumatic diseases in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, K; Kaul, M; Clowse, Megan E B

    2010-03-01

    Pregnancy can create a challenge for physicians caring for women with rheumatic diseases. For many women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), pregnancy can provide a reprieve from long-term joint pain and inflammation, but others will not experience remission and will continue to need medication. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) may remain quiet in some women, but in others may become more aggressive during pregnancy, putting both mother and foetus at risk. Women with limited scleroderma can do remarkably well, but scleroderma renal crises can be difficult to manage. A third of pregnancies in women with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) may be refractory to our best therapy. In general, active inflammation from rheumatic diseases poses a stronger threat to the well-being of both mother and foetus than many immunosuppressant medications. Therefore, continued immunosuppression with the least risky medications will allow for the most optimal pregnancy outcomes.

  9. Indications for IVIG in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mulhearn, Ben

    2015-01-01

    The use of IVIG to treat a wide variety of immune-driven diseases has grown rapidly, although the mechanism of action is not completely understood. Increasing demand for IVIG coupled with concerns regarding potential transmissible agents has led to worldwide supply shortages. National agencies have therefore produced guidelines for its use, with the latest England and Wales guideline being published in 2011. Due to the rarity of the rheumatic diseases, the evidence for IVIG use has been shown to be lacking in some areas and promising in others. Conditions in which IVIG has been shown to have benefit include ITP, Guillain–Barré syndrome and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy occurring in the context of rheumatic disease, as well as in SLE, idiopathic inflammatory myopathies and ANCA-associated vasculitides. This review looks at current IVIG use and is designed to be an aid for rheumatologists when considering the use of IVIG in clinical practice. PMID:25406359

  10. How the microbiota shapes rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Van de Wiele, Tom; Van Praet, Jens T; Marzorati, Massimo; Drennan, Michael B; Elewaut, Dirk

    2016-07-01

    The human gut harbours a tremendously diverse and abundant microbial community that correlates with, and even modulates, many health-related processes. The mucosal interfaces are particularly active sites of microorganism-host interplay. Growing insight into the characteristic composition and functionality of the mucosal microbiota has revealed that the microbiota is involved in mucosal barrier integrity and immune function. This involvement affects proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory processes not only at the epithelial level, but also at remote sites such as the joints. Here, we review the role of the gut microbiota in shaping local and systemic immune responses and how disturbances in the host-microorganism interplay can potentially affect the development and progression of rheumatic diseases. Increasing our understanding of how to promote host-microorganism homeostasis could therefore reveal novel strategies for the prevention or alleviation of rheumatic disease.

  11. The management of rheumatic diseases in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, K; Kaul, M; Clowse, MEB

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy can create a challenge for physicians caring for women with rheumatic diseases. For many women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), pregnancy can provide a reprieve from long-term joint pain and inflammation, but others will not experience remission and will continue to need medication. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) may remain quiet in some women, but in others may become more aggressive during pregnancy, putting both mother and foetus at risk. Women with limited scleroderma can do remarkably well, but scleroderma renal crises can be difficult to manage. A third of pregnancies in women with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) may be refractory to our best therapy. In general, active inflammation from rheumatic diseases poses a stronger threat to the well-being of both mother and foetus than many immunosuppressant medications. Therefore, continued immunosuppression with the least risky medications will allow for the most optimal pregnancy outcomes. PMID:20337545

  12. Role of diet in rheumatic disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Sophia; Micheletti, Robert

    2011-02-01

    Millions of people suffer from rheumatic diseases such as gout, fibromyalgia, osteoarthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis. These can be incapacitating and detrimental to quality of life. Diet, nutrition, and weight loss have shown promise in alleviating some of this disease burden. These lifestyle changes may give patients a feeling of control and ownership over their disease as well as a nonpharmacologic means of treatment. This article reviews the available research on the effects of diet and nutrition on rheumatoid disease.

  13. Fever of unknown origin in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Zenone, Thierry

    2007-12-01

    Noninfectious inflammatory diseases (connective tissue diseases, vasculitis syndromes, granulomatous diseases) emerged as the most frequent cause of fever of unknown origin in western countries. Among these diseases, giant cell arteritis and polymyalgia rheumatica are the most frequent specific diagnosis in the elderly and adult-onset Still's disease the most frequent in younger patients. This article focuses on noninfectious inflammatory diseases as a cause of classic fever of unknown origin (mainly rheumatic diseases, such as vasculitis and connective tissue diseases).

  14. New pharmacological strategies in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Schiotis, RE; Buzoianu, AD; Mureșanu, DF; Suciu, S

    2016-01-01

    Targeting the pathogenic pathway of chronic inflammation represents an unmet challenge for controlling disease activity, preventing functional disability, and maintaining an adequate quality of life in patients with rheumatic diseases. Abatacept, a novel molecule that inhibits co-stimulation signal, induces an inhibitory effect on the T-cells. This will further interfere with the activity of several cell lines, leading to the normalization of the immune response. In the latest years, abatacept has been extensively investigated in studies of rheumatoid arthritis for which it was recently approved as a second line biologic treatment in Romania. This review presents the clinical efficacy of abatacept in several rheumatic diseases and highlights the safety profile of this biological agent. Abbreviations: ACR = American College of Rheumatology, ADR = Adverse drug reaction, APC = antigen presenting cell, ApS = psoriatic arthritis, CRP = C reactive protein, CTLA-4 = Cytotoxic T-Cell Lymphocyte Antigen-4, DAS = Disease activity score, DMARDs = Disease modifying antirheumatic drugs, EMA = European Medicine Agency, EULAR = European League Against Rheumatism, FDA = Food and Drugs Administration, HBV = Hepatitis B virus, JIA = Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis, LDA = low disease activity (LDA), MRI = magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), MTX = methotrexate, RA = rheumatoid arthritis, RCT = randomized controlled trial, SS = Sjogren’s syndrome, TCR = T cell receptor PMID:27974925

  15. Rheumatic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Reyna, Tatiana Sofía; Martínez-Reyes, Cynthia; Yamamoto-Furusho, Jesús Kazúo

    2009-11-28

    This article reviews the literature concerning rheumatic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including common immune-mediated pathways, frequency, clinical course and therapy. Musculoskeletal complications are frequent and well-recognized manifestations in IBD, and affect up to 33% of patients with IBD. The strong link between the bowel and the osteo-articular system is suggested by many clinical and experimental observations, notably in HLA-B27 transgenic rats. The autoimmune pathogenic mechanisms shared by IBD and spondyloarthropathies include genetic susceptibility to abnormal antigen presentation, aberrant recognition of self, the presence of autoantibodies against specific antigens shared by the colon and other extra-colonic tissues, and increased intestinal permeability. The response against microorganisms may have an important role through molecular mimicry and other mechanisms. Rheumatic manifestations of IBD have been divided into peripheral arthritis, and axial involvement, including sacroiliitis, with or without spondylitis, similar to idiopathic ankylosing spondylitis. Other periarticular features can occur, including enthesopathy, tendonitis, clubbing, periostitis, and granulomatous lesions of joints and bones. Osteoporosis and osteomalacia secondary to IBD and iatrogenic complications can also occur. The management of the rheumatic manifestations of IBD consists of physical therapy in combination with local injection of corticosteroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; caution is in order however, because of their possible harmful effects on intestinal integrity, permeability, and even on gut inflammation. Sulfasalazine, methotrexate, azathioprine, cyclosporine and leflunomide should be used for selected indications. In some cases, tumor necrosis factor-alpha blocking agents should be considered as first-line therapy.

  16. Severe rheumatic mitral stenosis: a 21st century medusa.

    PubMed

    Carrilho-Ferreira, Pedro; Pedro, Monica Mendes; Varela, Manuel Gato; Diogo, Antonio Nunes

    2011-09-12

    Although the prevalence of rheumatic fever has greatly decreased in developed countries, rheumatic mitral stenosis still causes significant morbidity and mortality. Symptomatic patients have a poor prognosis, with a 0 to 15% 10-year survival rate, particularly if percutaneous or surgical intervention are contraindicated or considered high risk. We present a case of severe rheumatic mitral stenosis with an evolution over 4 decades, in which exceptional venous distention has established.

  17. Immunological memory is associative

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.J.; Forrest, S.; Perelson, A.S.

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to show that immunological memory is an associative and robust memory that belongs to the class of sparse distributed memories. This class of memories derives its associative and robust nature by sparsely sampling the input space and distributing the data among many independent agents. Other members of this class include a model of the cerebellar cortex and Sparse Distributed Memory (SDM). First we present a simplified account of the immune response and immunological memory. Next we present SDM, and then we show the correlations between immunological memory and SDM. Finally, we show how associative recall in the immune response can be both beneficial and detrimental to the fitness of an individual.

  18. Use of Biologic Agents in Ocular Manifestations of Rheumatic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Courtney L.; Culican, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    Biologic agents have dramatically shifted the treatment paradigm for rheumatic disease. Use of these agents can decrease disease burden, allow the patient to be weaned from corticosteroids, and reduce the likelihood of relapse. Eye disease associated with rheumatic conditions may present with a wide range of signs and symptoms. This coexisting pathology should not be overlooked and should be considered a reason for initiation or continuation of biologic therapy. Additionally, many of the ocular manifestations of rheumatic disease respond preferentially to specific targeting molecules. This paper summarizes the available studies on the use, efficacy, and safety of biologic agents in the treatment of ocular manifestations of rheumatic disease. PMID:22229035

  19. Effects of biological and non-biological immunomodulatory therapies on the immunogenicity of vaccines in patients with rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    McMahan, Zsuzsanna H; Bingham, Clifton O

    2014-12-23

    Vaccinations are administered to patients to induce a protective immune response, resulting in immunological memory. Preventing infection through the use of vaccines is particularly important in immunocompromised and immunosuppressed individuals given their increased frequency and severity of infections relative to healthy individuals. Recent surveys show that the vaccination rate is still alarmingly low in patients with rheumatic disease. In this review we briefly discuss the different types of vaccines and then critically examine evidence related to vaccination efficacy in patients with autoimmune disease and the effects of immunomodulatory therapy, with an aim to provide guidance and optimize the administration of vaccines in such individuals.

  20. Oxidative stress parameters in different systemic rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Firuzi, Omidreza; Fuksa, Leos; Spadaro, Chiara; Bousová, Iva; Riccieri, Valeria; Spadaro, Antonio; Petrucci, Rita; Marrosu, Giancarlo; Saso, Luciano

    2006-07-01

    The involvement of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of rheumatic disorders, such as systemic sclerosis (SSc) and chronic polyarthritides, has been suggested yet not thoroughly verified experimentally. We analysed 4 plasmatic parameters of oxidative stress in patients with SSc (n = 17), psoriatic arthritis (PsA) (n = 10) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (n = 9) compared with healthy subjects (n = 22). The biomarkers were: total antioxidant capacity (TAC) measured by ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) method, hydroperoxides determined by ferrous ion oxidation in presence of xylenol orange (FOX) method and sulfhydryl and carbonyl groups assessed by spectrophotometric assays. The results showed significantly increased hydroperoxides in SSc, PsA and RA (3.97 +/- 2.25, 4.87 +/- 2.18 and 5.13 +/- 2.36 micromol L(-1), respectively) compared with the control group (2.31 +/- 1.40 micromol L(-1); P < 0.05). Sulfhydryls were significantly lower in SSc (0.466 +/- 0.081 mmol L(-1)), PsA (0.477 +/- 0.059 mmol L(-1)) and RA (0.439 +/- 0.065 mmol L(-1)) compared with the control group (0.547 +/- 0.066 mmol L(-1); P < 0.05). TAC in all three diseases showed no difference in comparison with controls. Carbonyls were significantly higher in RA than in the control group (32.1 +/- 42 vs 2.21 +/- 1.0 nmol (mg protein)(-1); P < 0.05). The obtained data indicate augmented free radical-mediated injury in these rheumatic diseases and suggest a role for the use of antioxidants in prevention and treatment of these pathologies.

  1. Animal Models to Investigate the Pathogenesis of Rheumatic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rush, Catherine M.; Govan, Brenda L.; Sikder, Suchandan; Williams, Natasha L.; Ketheesan, Natkunam

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are sequelae of group A streptococcal (GAS) infection. Although an autoimmune process has long been considered to be responsible for the initiation of RF/RHD, it is only in the last few decades that the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of the inflammatory condition have been unraveled partly due to experimentation on animal models. RF/RHD is a uniquely human condition and modeling this disease in animals is challenging. Antibody and T cell responses to recombinant GAS M protein (rM) and the subsequent interactions with cardiac tissue have been predominantly investigated using a rat autoimmune valvulitis model. In Lewis rats immunized with rM, the development of hallmark histological features akin to RF/RHD, both in the myocardial and in valvular tissue have been reported, with the generation of heart tissue cross-reactive antibodies and T cells. Recently, a Lewis rat model of Sydenham’s chorea and related neuropsychiatric disorders has also been described. Rodent models are very useful for assessing disease mechanisms due to the availability of reagents to precisely determine sequential events following infection with GAS or post-challenge with specific proteins and or carbohydrate preparations from GAS. However, studies of cardiac function are more problematic in such models. In this review, a historical overview of animal models previously used and those that are currently available will be discussed in terms of their usefulness in modeling different aspects of the disease process. Ultimately, cardiologists, microbiologists, immunologists, and physiologists may have to resort to diverse models to investigate different aspects of RF/RHD. PMID:25414841

  2. [Rheumatic heart disease behind life-threatening heart failure in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Ek, Michelle; Vladic-Stjernholm, Ylva; Günther, Anders; Hällsjö-Sander, Caroline; Jacobsen, Per-Herman

    2016-05-17

    Valvular heart disease constitutes the majority of all causes of heart disease in pregnancy. In the presence of valvular heart disease, the necessary haemodynamic changes of pregnancy might cause heart failure, leading to severe maternal and fetal morbidity and even mortality. In lower-income countries, rheumatic heart disease remains one of the major causes of death related to pregnancy [6]. In low-income countries, rheumatic heart disease is found in 60% to 80% of the pregnant women with heart disease, and 10% to 30% have a congenital disorder including congenital valve disorders [4]. The most common valvular lesion of rheumatic heart disease is mitral stenosis. This valvular lesion can be the cause of extreme disability and even mortality during pregnancy due to an increase in the transvalvular gradient and a rise in left atrial pressure. The maternal mortality associated with mitral stenosis is stratified by New York Heart Association (NYHA) classification: class I, 0.1%; class II, 0.3%; class III, 5.5%; and class IV, 6.0%. Most patients are in class I or II at presentation, but 12% to 25% of patients are in class III or IV [14].

  3. Imaging findings of sacroiliac joints in spondyloarthropathies and other rheumatic conditions.

    PubMed

    Guglielmi, G; Cascavilla, A; Scalzo, G; Carotti, M; Salaffi, F; Grassi, W

    2011-03-01

    The authors sought to evaluate the role of the different imaging techniques in the study of sacroiliac joints in patients with spondyloarthropathies (SpA) and other rheumatic conditions and to assess potential pitfalls in the radiological diagnosis. Forty-three consecutive patients with sacroiliitis as the predominant symptom of a rheumatic disorder were retrospectively studied. Radiography, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were performed. The following imaging findings were evaluated: bone marrow oedema, intra-articular effusion, synovial reaction, joint-space widening, bone sclerosis or hyperostosis, subchondral erosions and, in final stages, joint-space narrowing and ankylosis. All images were independently reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists. Radiography demonstrated bone sclerosis in 10 patients (23%), subchondral erosions in 15 (34%), jointspace widening in 8 (18%), joint-space narrowing in 17 (39%) and ankylosis in 3 (6%). CT examination showed sclerosis of the sacroiliac joint in 17 patients (41%), subchondral erosions in 21 (53%), joint-space widening in 22 (53%), joint-space narrowing in 18 (43%) and ankylosis in 7 (17%). At MR, we found bone marrow oedema in 25 patients (92%), intra-articular effusion in 26 (96%), synovial reaction in 21 (77%) and joint-space widening in 5 (18%). Radiological study of the sacroiliac joints in patients with different rheumatic disorders represents a problem of difficult diagnostic evaluation due to the complexity of the anatomical region and the variability of radiographic findings. The integrated use of conventional radiography, CT and MR imaging is suggested to avoid misdiagnosis.

  4. Immunological and neurotrophic markers of risk status and illness development in high-risk youth: understanding the neurobiological underpinnings of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Anne; Horrocks, Julie; Doucette, Sarah; Keown-Stoneman, Charles; Grof, Paul; Andreazza, Ana; Young, L Trevor

    2014-12-01

    Bipolar disorder is a highly heritable illness that onsets in adolescence and young adulthood. We examined gene expression (mRNA) and protein levels of candidate immune and neurotrophic markers in well-characterized offspring of bipolar parents in order to identify reliable indicators of illness risk status and the early clinical stages of illness development. We measured mRNA expression and protein levels in candidate immune (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-10, IFN-δ) and neurotrophic (brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)) markers from plasma. High-risk offspring were identified from families in which one parent had confirmed bipolar disorder. Control offspring were identified from families in which neither parent met lifetime criteria for a major psychiatric disorder. All parental Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) diagnoses were based on Schedule for Affective Disorders - Lifetime Version (SADS-L) interviews and blind consensus review. As part of an ongoing study, all offspring were prospectively assessed using KSADS-PL format interviews and diagnoses confirmed on blind consensus review. High-risk offspring had significantly increased IL-6 (p = 0.050) and BDNF (p = 0.006) protein levels compared to controls. Those high-risk offspring in earlier compared to later clinical stages of illness development had higher IL-6 (p = 0.050) and BDNF (p = 0.045) protein levels. After adjustments, only differences in BDNF protein levels remained significant. There was a moderating effect of the BDNF genotype on both gene expression and protein levels in high-risk compared to control offspring. The BDNF genotype also moderated the association between clinical stage and gene expression levels in high-risk offspring. These findings provide support for detectable differences in candidate immune and neurotrophic markers in individuals at high risk of developing bipolar disorder and for detectable changes over the clinical stages

  5. What's New in Immunology?

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    Since 1950, immunology has developed with such rapidity as an interdisciplinary science that even those within the field have difficulty keeping adequately informed. For this reason it is important that those who are closer to the subject, wherever possible, apply recent advances to the practice of medicine in general and primary care in particular. This paper describes a limited number of recent advances in the field of cellular immunology and immunodeficiency diseases. Above all, it attempts to relate the practical significance of these discoveries to the care of the patient by the primary care physician. PMID:20469161

  6. The metabolic role of the gut microbiota in health and rheumatic disease: mechanisms and interventions.

    PubMed

    Abdollahi-Roodsaz, Shahla; Abramson, Steven B; Scher, Jose U

    2016-08-01

    The role of the gut microbiome in animal models of inflammatory and autoimmune disease is now well established. The human gut microbiome is currently being studied as a potential modulator of the immune response in rheumatic disorders. However, the vastness and complexity of this host-microorganism interaction is likely to go well beyond taxonomic, correlative observations. In fact, most advances in the field relate to the functional and metabolic capabilities of these microorganisms and their influence on mucosal immunity and systemic inflammation. An intricate relationship between the microbiome and the diet of the host is now fully recognized, with the microbiota having an important role in the degradation of polysaccharides into active metabolites. This Review summarizes the current knowledge on the metabolic role of the microbiota in health and rheumatic disease, including the advances in pharmacomicrobiomics and its potential use in diagnostics, therapeutics and personalized medicine.

  7. Medical immunology: two-way bridge connecting bench and bedside.

    PubMed

    Rijkers, Ger T; Damoiseaux, Jan G M C; Hooijkaas, Herbert

    2014-12-01

    Medical immunology in The Netherlands is a laboratory specialism dealing with immunological analyses as well as pre- and post-analytical consultation to clinicians (clinical immunologists and other specialists) involved in patients with immune mediated diseases. The scope of medical immunology includes immunodeficiencies, autoimmune diseases, allergy, transfusion and transplantation immunology, and lymphoproliferative disorders plus the monitoring of these patients. The training, professional criteria, quality control of procedures and laboratories is well organized. As examples of the bridge function of medical immunology between laboratory (bench) and patient (bedside) the contribution of medical immunologists to diagnosis and treatment of primary immunodeficiency diseases (in particular: humoral immunodeficiencies) as well as autoantibodies (anti-citrullinated proteins in rheumatoid arthritis) are given. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Basic and clinical immunology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinen, Javier; Shearer, William T.

    2003-01-01

    Progress in immunology continues to grow exponentially every year. New applications of this knowledge are being developed for a broad range of clinical conditions. Conversely, the study of primary and secondary immunodeficiencies is helping to elucidate the intricate mechanisms of the immune system. We have selected a few of the most significant contributions to the fields of basic and clinical immunology published between October 2001 and October 2002. Our choice of topics in basic immunology included the description of T-bet as a determinant factor for T(H)1 differentiation, the role of the activation-induced cytosine deaminase gene in B-cell development, the characterization of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells, and the use of dynamic imaging to study MHC class II transport and T-cell and dendritic cell membrane interactions. Articles related to clinical immunology that were selected for review include the description of immunodeficiency caused by caspase 8 deficiency; a case series report on X-linked agammaglobulinemia; the mechanism of action, efficacy, and complications of intravenous immunoglobulin; mechanisms of autoimmunity diseases; and advances in HIV pathogenesis and vaccine development. We also reviewed two articles that explore the possible alterations of the immune system caused by spaceflights, a new field with increasing importance as human space expeditions become a reality in the 21st century.

  9. Immunological Treatments for Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, Sudhir

    2000-01-01

    This article discusses research findings that indicate immunological abnormalities in children with autism, including the dysregulation of the immune system, and concludes that there are sufficient data to suggest a role of the immune system in the pathogenesis of autism. Various biological therapies are analyzed, including intravenous…

  10. Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sukari, Ammar; Nagasaka, Misako; Al-Hadidi, Ameer; Lum, Lawrence G

    2016-11-01

    Hanahan and Weinberg described six distinct biological properties of cancer cells that enable tumor growth and metastasis. These properties were referred to as the traditional hallmarks of cancer. Recent discoveries further elucidated hallmarks including evasion of immune destruction by tumor cells that disrupt anticancer response pathways. This review discusses cancer immunology and new treatment strategies aimed at restoration of antitumor immune responses.

  11. The immunologic revolution: photoimmunology.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Stephen E; Byrne, Scott N

    2012-03-01

    UV radiation targets the skin and is a primary cause of skin cancer (both melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer). Exposure to UV radiation also suppresses the immune response, and UV-induced immune suppression is a major risk factor for skin cancer induction. The efforts of dermatologists and cancer biologists to understand how UV radiation exposure suppresses the immune response and contributes to skin cancer induction led to the development of the subdiscipline we call photoimmunology. Advances in photoimmunology have generally paralleled advances in immunology. However, there are a number of examples in which investigations into the mechanisms underlying UV-induced immune suppression reshaped our understanding of basic immunological concepts. Unconventional immune regulatory roles for Langerhans cells, mast cells, and natural killer T (NKT) cells, as well as the immune-suppressive function of lipid mediators of inflammation and alarmins, are just some examples of how advances in immunodermatology have altered our understanding of basic immunology. In this anniversary issue celebrating 75 years of cutaneous science, we provide examples of how concepts that grew out of efforts by immunologists and dermatologists to understand immune regulation by UV radiation affected immunology in general.

  12. Basic and clinical immunology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinen, Javier; Shearer, William T.

    2003-01-01

    Progress in immunology continues to grow exponentially every year. New applications of this knowledge are being developed for a broad range of clinical conditions. Conversely, the study of primary and secondary immunodeficiencies is helping to elucidate the intricate mechanisms of the immune system. We have selected a few of the most significant contributions to the fields of basic and clinical immunology published between October 2001 and October 2002. Our choice of topics in basic immunology included the description of T-bet as a determinant factor for T(H)1 differentiation, the role of the activation-induced cytosine deaminase gene in B-cell development, the characterization of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells, and the use of dynamic imaging to study MHC class II transport and T-cell and dendritic cell membrane interactions. Articles related to clinical immunology that were selected for review include the description of immunodeficiency caused by caspase 8 deficiency; a case series report on X-linked agammaglobulinemia; the mechanism of action, efficacy, and complications of intravenous immunoglobulin; mechanisms of autoimmunity diseases; and advances in HIV pathogenesis and vaccine development. We also reviewed two articles that explore the possible alterations of the immune system caused by spaceflights, a new field with increasing importance as human space expeditions become a reality in the 21st century.

  13. Immunology & Human Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Jeffrey R.; And Others

    This monograph was designed for the high school biology curriculum. The first section reviews the major areas of importance in immunology. Section three contains six instructional activities for the high school classroom and the second section contains teacher's materials for those activities. The activities address for students some of the major…

  14. Immunological Treatments for Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, Sudhir

    2000-01-01

    This article discusses research findings that indicate immunological abnormalities in children with autism, including the dysregulation of the immune system, and concludes that there are sufficient data to suggest a role of the immune system in the pathogenesis of autism. Various biological therapies are analyzed, including intravenous…

  15. Immunology & Human Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Jeffrey R.; And Others

    This monograph was designed for the high school biology curriculum. The first section reviews the major areas of importance in immunology. Section three contains six instructional activities for the high school classroom and the second section contains teacher's materials for those activities. The activities address for students some of the major…

  16. HIV Molecular Immunology 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Yusim, Karina; Korber, Bette Tina; Brander, Christian; Barouch, Dan; de Boer, Rob; Haynes, Barton F.; Koup, Richard; Moore, John P.; Walker, Bruce D.; Watkins, David

    2016-04-05

    The scope and purpose of the HIV molecular immunology database: HIV Molecular Immunology is a companion volume to HIV Sequence Compendium. This publication, the 2015 edition, is the PDF version of the web-based HIV Immunology Database (http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/ content/immunology/). The web interface for this relational database has many search options, as well as interactive tools to help immunologists design reagents and interpret their results. In the HIV Immunology Database, HIV-specific B-cell and T-cell responses are summarized and annotated. Immunological responses are divided into three parts, CTL, T helper, and antibody. Within these parts, defined epitopes are organized by protein and binding sites within each protein, moving from left to right through the coding regions spanning the HIV genome. We include human responses to natural HIV infections, as well as vaccine studies in a range of animal models and human trials. Responses that are not specifically defined, such as responses to whole proteins or monoclonal antibody responses to discontinuous epitopes, are summarized at the end of each protein section. Studies describing general HIV responses to the virus, but not to any specific protein, are included at the end of each part. The annotation includes information such as cross-reactivity, escape mutations, antibody sequence, TCR usage, functional domains that overlap with an epitope, immune response associations with rates of progression and therapy, and how specific epitopes were experimentally defined. Basic information such as HLA specificities for T-cell epitopes, isotypes of monoclonal antibodies, and epitope sequences are included whenever possible. All studies that we can find that incorporate the use of a specific monoclonal antibody are included in the entry for that antibody. A single T-cell epitope can have multiple entries, generally one entry per study. Finally, maps of all defined linear epitopes relative to the HXB2 reference proteins

  17. HIV Molecular Immunology 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Yusim, Karina; Korber, Bette Tina Marie; Barouch, Dan; Koup, Richard; de Boer, Rob; Moore, John P.; Brander, Christian; Haynes, Barton F.; Walker, Bruce D.

    2015-02-03

    HIV Molecular Immunology is a companion volume to HIV Sequence Compendium. This publication, the 2014 edition, is the PDF version of the web-based HIV Immunology Database (http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/content/immunology/). The web interface for this relational database has many search options, as well as interactive tools to help immunologists design reagents and interpret their results. In the HIV Immunology Database, HIV-specific B-cell and T-cell responses are summarized and annotated. Immunological responses are divided into three parts, CTL, T helper, and antibody. Within these parts, defined epitopes are organized by protein and binding sites within each protein, moving from left to right through the coding regions spanning the HIV genome. We include human responses to natural HIV infections, as well as vaccine studies in a range of animal models and human trials. Responses that are not specifically defined, such as responses to whole proteins or monoclonal antibody responses to discontinuous epitopes, are summarized at the end of each protein section. Studies describing general HIV responses to the virus, but not to any specific protein, are included at the end of each part. The annotation includes information such as crossreactivity, escape mutations, antibody sequence, TCR usage, functional domains that overlap with an epitope, immune response associations with rates of progression and therapy, and how specific epitopes were experimentally defined. Basic information such as HLA specificities for T-cell epitopes, isotypes of monoclonal antibodies, and epitope sequences are included whenever possible. All studies that we can find that incorporate the use of a specific monoclonal antibody are included in the entry for that antibody. A single T-cell epitope can have multiple entries, generally one entry per study. Finally, maps of all defined linear epitopes relative to the HXB2 reference proteins are provided.

  18. Pollutants make rheumatic diseases worse: Facts on polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) exposure and rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Abella, Vanessa; Pérez, Tamara; Scotece, Morena; Conde, Javier; Pirozzi, Claudio; Pino, Jesús; Lago, Francisca; González-Gay, Miguel Ángel; Mera, Antonio; Gómez, Rodolfo; Gualillo, Oreste

    2016-07-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent organic pollutants that bioaccumulate in adipose tissue, disturbing its metabolism and the balance of adipokines, related to obesity. The altering secretion pattern of adipokines from the adipose tissue and the increasing mechanical load in weight-bearing joints presented in obesity condition, are risk factors for osteoarthritis development. The most prevalent rheumatic diseases, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, are chronic conditions that target the whole joints, leading to increasing disability and health care cost. The goal of this focused review is to summarize the current knowledge on the role of PCBs in osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis pathogenesis. A PubMed search was managed using keywords as "rheumatic diseases", "polychlorinated biphenyls", "obesity" and "endocrine disruption". The incidence of rheumatoid arthritis has been reported to be increased especially in urban areas in industrialized countries, emphasizing the importance of environment in the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases. Analysis of two cohorts exposed to PCBs food contamination showed high incidence of arthritis. In addition, PCBs in serum correlated positively with the prevalence of self-reported arthritis. Few studies support the hypothesis that osteoarthritis development could be related to PCBs induction of chondrocytes apoptosis. Evidences have emerged for a relationship between PCBs and development of several types of arthritis. Further research is encouraged to determine the correlation between PCBs exposure and the development of rheumatic diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. HLA, blood groups and secretor status in patients with established rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Jhinghan, B; Mehra, N K; Reddy, K S; Taneja, V; Vaidya, M C; Bhatia, M L

    1986-03-01

    The distribution of HLA-A, -B and -DR antigens as well as blood groups and secretor status was studied in sporadic, North Indian patients of rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease. While HLA-Aw33 occurred with an increased frequency in the patient group (X2 = 4.01), no statistically significant differences were observed in the frequency of B-locus antigens. In the DR locus, HLA-DR3 was found to be significantly increased (50% vs 26.1%, X2 = 13.8) and DR2 significantly reduced (21.8% vs 47.0%, X2 = 15.6). Also, there was a preponderance of non-'O' blood group individuals in the patient group as compared to controls. The DR3 association was significant only in those patients of RHD who did not have any previous history of rheumatic fever. These results indicate that susceptibility to rheumatic heart disease is HLA-class II mediated, with HLA-DR3 influencing susceptibility and DR2 conferring protection.

  20. [Diabetes and rheumatism: is diabetes mellitus also an inflammatory disease?].

    PubMed

    Graf, S; Schumm-Draeger, P-M

    2011-11-01

    New studies have demonstrated similarities in the complex pathomechanisms of diabetes mellitus type 1 (T₁D) and rheumatic diseases and in particular rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Common HLA gene complex characteristics and polymorphisms of inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) play a special role in both disorders. The metabolic syndrome, associated with insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus type 2 (T₂D), often shows criteria of a subclinical chronic inflammation. New forms of therapy with monoclonal antibodies against TNF-α, IL-1 and IL-6 have improved the management of patients with RA. Cytokine-induced inflammation also seems to be important in the pathogenesis and progression of T₁D and T₂D. Whether a therapy with the same monoclonal antibodies established in RA could also be successful in diabetes still has to be investigated in further studies. Both RA and T₁D are autoimmune disorders and show a cumulative incidence with further autoimmune diseases.

  1. Rheumatic Disease Autoantibodies in Autoimmune Liver Diseases.

    PubMed

    Utiyama, Shirley R R; Zenatti, Katiane B; Nóbrega, Heloisa A J; Soares, Juliana Z C; Skare, Thelma L; Matsubara, Caroline; Muzzilo, Dominique A; Nisihara, Renato M

    2016-08-01

    Autoimmune liver diseases (ALDs) are known to be associated with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARDs) and their autoantibodies. We aimed to study the prevalence of SARDs and related autoantibodies, as well as their prognostic implications in a group of patients with ALDs. This was a cross-sectional study. Sixty patients with ALDs (38.3% with autoimmune hepatitis; 11.7% with primary biliary cirrhosis; 25% with primary sclerosing cholangitis and 25% with overlap syndrome) were studied for the presence of SARDs and their autoantibodies. There was autoimmune rheumatic disease in 20% of the studied sample. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were the commonest (11.6% and 5%, respectively). Antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) were present in 35% of the patients, followed by anti-Ro (20.0%); anti-nucleosome (18.3%); rheumatoid factor (10%) anti-CCP (8.3%); anti-RNP (8.3%); anti-ds-DNA (6.6%); anti-La (3.3%); anti-Sm (3.3%), anti-ribosomal P (3.3%). Anti-Ro (p = 0.0004), anti-La (p = 0.03), anti-RNP (p = 0.04) and anti-Sm (p = 0.03) were commonly found in patients with SARD, but not anti-DNA, anti-nucleosome and anti-ribosomal P. No differences were found in liver function tests regarding to the presence of autoantibodies. There was a high prevalence of SARD and their autoantibodies in ALD patients. Anti-Ro, anti-La, anti-RNP and anti-Sm positivity points to an association with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases. The presence of autoantibodies was not related to liver function tests.

  2. Rheumatic fever in indigenous Australian children.

    PubMed

    Parnaby, Matthew G; Carapetis, Jonathan R

    2010-09-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) caused by acute rheumatic fever (ARF) is a disease of poverty, poor hygiene and poor living standards. RHD remains one of the major causes of childhood cardiac disease in developing nations. Within developed nations, there has been a dramatic drop in the prevalence of RHD because of the improvement of living standards, access to health care and the widespread availability of penicillin-based drugs. Despite a dramatic reduction of RHD in Australia overall, it continues to be a major contributor to childhood and adult cardiac disease in Indigenous communities throughout northern and central Australia. Currently, Australia has among the highest recorded rates of ARF and RHD in the world. The most accurate epidemiological data in Australia come from the Northern Territory's RHD control programme. In the Northern Territory, 92% of people with RHD are Indigenous, of whom 85% live in remote communities and towns. The incidence of ARF is highest in 5-14-year-olds, ranging from 150 to 380 per 100,000. Prevalence rates of RHD since 2000 have steadily increased to almost 2% of the Indigenous population in the Northern Territory, 3.2% in those aged 35-44 years. Living in remote communities is a contributing factor to ARF/RHD as well as a major barrier for adequate follow-up and care. Impediments to ARF/RHD control include the paucity of specialist services, rapid turnover of health staff, lack of knowledge of ARF/RHD by health staff, patients and communities, and the high mobility of the Indigenous population. Fortunately, the recently announced National Rheumatic Fever Strategy, comprising recurrent funding to the Northern Territory, Queensland and Western Australia for control programmes, as well as the creation of a National Coordination Unit suggest that RHD control in Australia is now a tangible prospect. For the disease to be eradicated, Australia will have to address the underpinning determinants of poverty, social and living conditions.

  3. Antibodies to ribosomal ribonucleoprotein. Prevalence in systemic rheumatic diseases and partial characterization of the antigen.

    PubMed

    Cortés, J J; Mendoza, F; Reyes, P A

    1987-08-01

    The prevalence of antibodies to ribosomal ribonucleoproteins (rRNP) was studied in patients with rheumatic diseases. Seven patients had precipitating antibodies against rRNP, 6 had systemic lupus erythematosus, one had primary Sjögren's syndrome. Anti-rRNP was not present in mixed connective tissue disease, rheumatoid arthritis, progressive systemic sclerosis, CREST, primary Raynaud's or normal control sera. A partial immunological identity precipitin line was present between (U1) nRNP and rRNP, but these were distinct in physicochemical properties. Western blot analysis of ribosomal extract using anti-rRNP IgG revealed 2 polypeptides called rA and rB which appear to be the important antigenic determinants.

  4. A Review of Acute Rheumatic Fever and Rheumatic Heart Disease Research in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Hung, L C; Nadia, R

    2016-06-01

    A total of 39 titles related to rheumatic fever or rheumatic heart disease in Malaysia were found with online literature search dating back to their inceptions and through 2014. Additional publications from conference journals were included. Nine papers were selected based on clinical relevance and future research implications. There were no population-based studies on the incidence or prevalence of ARF or RHD. In the 1980s, the incidence of admission due to ARF ranged from 2 to 21.1 per 100 000 paediatric admission per year. The burden of disease was significant in the adult population; 74.5% of patients with RHD were female, of which 77.1% were in the reproductive age group of 15-45 years old. Rheumatic mitral valve disease constituted almost half (46.7%) of all mitral valve repairs, ranging from 44.8 - 55.8 patients per year from 1997 - 2003. From 2010-2012, mitral valve interventions increased to 184 per year, of which 85.7% were mitral valve repair. In children with ARF, 25.4% - 41.7% had past history of rheumatic fever or RHD. In patients with rheumatic mitral valve disease undergoing surgical or medical interventions, only 6% reported history of ARF, none had history of GABHS pharyngitis or antibiotic prophylaxis. Only 44.7% of patients with RHD on follow-up were on intramuscular benzathine penicillin prophylaxis. Overall, there is scarcity of publications on ARF and RHD in Malaysia. Priority areas for research include determination of the incidence and prevalence of ARF and RHD, identification of high-risk populations, evaluation on the implementation and adherence of secondary preventive measures, identification of subclinical RHD especially amongst the high-risk population, and a surveillance system to monitor and evaluate preventive measures, disease progression and outcomes.

  5. [Biochemical aspects of chronic rheumatic inflammation].

    PubMed

    Delbrück, A

    1975-01-01

    Morphological phenomena in rheumatoid arthritis are closely correlated to the biochemical aberrations of connective tissue metabolism. Both, morphological and biochemical analysis of the altered tissue portions demonstrate evidence for uncontrolled proliferation resp. metabolism similar to human and experimental malignoma. The present state of biochemical knowledge in this field permits to describe the metabolic state of the afflicted tissue by means of enzyme activity and substrate pattern and to draw some conclusions in respect to the pathogenesis of inflammatory processes involved in chronic rheumatic diseases.

  6. Rheumatic Heart Disease: The Unfinished Global Agenda.

    PubMed

    Nulu, Shanti; Bukhman, Gene; Kwan, Gene F

    2017-02-01

    Primarily affecting the young, rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is a neglected chronic disease commonly causing premature morbidity and mortality among the global poor. Standard clinical prevention and treatment is based on studies from the early antimicrobial era, as research investment halted soon after the virtual eradication of the disease from developed countries. The emergence of new global data on disease burden, new technologies, and a global health equity platform have revitalized interest and investment in RHD. This review surveys past and current evidence for standard RHD diagnosis and treatment, highlighting gaps in knowledge. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Common rheumatic diseases of the Middle East.

    PubMed

    Sit, Michelle T; Arroyo, Ramon

    2009-03-01

    The objective of this article is to educate military physicians and providers about rare, endemic rheumatic diseases that may be encountered in deployments to the Middle East region, specifically Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF), Behcet's disease (BD), and tumor necrosis factor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS). We found review articles using MDConsult and Ovid. Suitable articles were employed to describe the characteristics of each disease. Although these diseases are considered rare, they can be endemic to current areas of deployment. Awareness of these conditions may prevent unnecessary and invasive treatment as well as make the clinician aware of possible disease complications.

  8. [Dermatological and rheumatic symptoms in neoplasmas].

    PubMed

    Krajewska-Włodarczyk, Magdalena; Owczarczyk-Saczonek, Agnieszka; Placek, Waldemar

    2017-01-01

    Some of the symptoms that occur in neoplasmas are not directly related to tumor mass or metastasis. These may be an expression of paraneopastic syndromes and occur simultaneously or during neoplastic disease, but it is extremely important that they can precede the first symptoms of malignancy by several months or years. The clinical picture of paraneopastic syndromes often includes symptoms of defined disease or symptoms which resemble them. The association of neoplasmas and certain dermatological or rheumatic diseases is complex. Most of them are more likely to occur as primary diseases, therefore it is important for dermatologist and rheumatologist have an oncological awareness, especially in cases which are not routinely treated.

  9. Malignant Rheumatic Heart Disease Presenting as Quadrivalvular Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Santosh Kumar; Thakur, Ramesh; Krishna, Vinay; Varma, Chandra Mohan; Goel, Amit; Jha, Mukesh Jitendra; Kumar, Ashutosh; Mishra, Vikas; Tiwari, Pradyot; Sinha, Rupesh

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatic disease may involve the pulmonary valve, but is exceedingly rare. Simultaneous involvement of all four valves is more likely to be the result of combination of causes, such as congenital, rheumatic, infective or degenerative disease. A unitary cause for quadrivalvular involvement would be either rheumatic or myxomatous degeneration. A 16-year-old young boy presented with progressive exertional dyspnea for the past 3 years. On evaluation, he was in atrial fibrillation with congestive heart failure. On examination, evidence of stenosis of the mitral, aortic and tricuspid valves with a history of rheumatic fever in childhood was revealed. Transthoracic echocardiography showed the quadrivalvular involvement. Only few reports are available in the literature describing rheumatic quadrivalvar damage and that too in third and fourth decade. This is probably first to be reported in juvenile age group. PMID:28197258

  10. Lung Infections in Systemic Rheumatic Disease: Focus on Opportunistic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Di Franco, Manuela; Lucchino, Bruno; Spaziante, Martina; Iannuccelli, Cristina; Valesini, Guido; Iaiani, Giancarlo

    2017-01-01

    Systemic rheumatic diseases have significant morbidity and mortality, due in large part to concurrent infections. The lung has been reported among the most frequent sites of infection in patients with rheumatic disease, who are susceptible to developing pneumonia sustained both by common pathogens and by opportunistic microorganisms. Patients with rheumatic disease show a peculiar vulnerability to infectious complications. This is due in part to intrinsic disease-related immune dysregulation and in part to the immunosuppressive treatments. Several therapeutic agents have been associated to a wide spectrum of infections, complicating the management of rheumatic diseases. This review discusses the most frequent pulmonary infections encountered in rheumatic diseases, focusing on opportunistic agents, consequent diagnostic challenges and appropriate therapeutic strategies. PMID:28146077

  11. alpha-Naphthyl acetate esterase activity--a cytochemical marker for T lymphocytees. Correlation with immunologic studies of normal tissues, lymphocytic leukemias, non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease, and other lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Pinkus, G. S.; Hargreaves, H. K.; McLeod, J. A.; Nadler, L. M.; Rosenthal, D. S.; Said, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    Cytochemical identification of T lymphocytes on the basis of alpha-naphthyl acetate esterase (NAE) activity was compared with immunologic markers for cell suspensions and/or cryostat sections of 113 specimens. Nonneoplastic tissues (peripheral blood, lymph nodes, spleens, tonsils, thymus, and pleural fluid) and specimens from various lymphoproliferative disorders, including acute and chronic lymphocytic leukemia, lymphosarcoma cell leukemia, hairy cell leukemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphomas of B-and T-cell types, and Hodgkin's disease, were evaluated. T (E-rosetting) cells demonstrated several patterns of NAE reactivity: 1) a strong globular reaction product, the most specific pattern for T-cell identification, 2) granular cytoplasmic staining, or 3) no reactivity. B lymphocytes revealed a granular pattern of NAE staining, were devoid of enzyme, or, in rare instances, exhibited strong NAE activity. Percentages of lymphoid cells with strong (globular) NAE activity closely paralleled T-cell (E-rosette) values in the majority of cases, with the best correlations observed for peripheral blood studies. However, discordant results were noted for some neoplastic and nonneoplastic tissues, including cases of T-cell lymphoma or leukemia. Markedly discrepant results were noted for thymic lymphocytes, most of which revealed E-rosette formation and weak or absent NAE activity. Lymph nodes involved by Hodgkin's disease demonstrated a heterogeneous pattern of staining in E-rosetting cells and in Reed-Sternberg variants. Cryostat section studies of reactive lymph nodes and nodular lymphomas demonstrated strong NAE staining in lymphoid cells of T-cell (interfollicular, internodular) areas, with little or no positivity in follicles or nodules (B-cell areas). NAE staining patterns further suggested that T cells comprise part of the follicular cuff and possibly represent a minor population of some neoplastic nodules. Although NAE determinations do not represent a consistently reliable

  12. Advances in basic and clinical immunology.

    PubMed

    Chinen, Javier; Finkelman, Fred; Shearer, William T

    2006-08-01

    This review comments on basic and clinical immunology articles that were published in 2005, with a focus on those that appeared in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. In the area of basic immunology, mechanisms of the innate immune system and its interaction with the adaptive immune system were described, with special consideration to applications in biodefense strategies. T regulatory cells were further characterized in their role for the control of allergic, autoimmune, and neoplastic disorders. The function of the thymus Hassall's corpuscles was reported to be the generation of T regulatory cells. Flavonoid molecules obtained from medicinal herbs, including astilbin and epigallocatechin gallate, were discovered to have immunomodulatory properties. Advances in clinical immunology resulted from efforts to develop a newborn screening test for severe combined immunodeficiency and the elucidation of the crystal structure of the IL-2 receptor gamma chain. Mutations in the membrane receptor transmembrane activator and calcium modulator and cyclophilin ligand interactor were found in patients with common variable immunodeficiency. New therapeutic options are described, such as the use of infliximab for granulomas and GM-CSF for chronic ulcers in patients with common variable immunodeficiency. The importance of mucosal immunity in acute HIV infection is cited, as is the role of CD8+ T-cell activation in HIV disease progression in children.

  13. Contributions of basic immunology to human health.

    PubMed

    Albright, J F; Oppenheim, J J

    1991-03-01

    The sixth symposium in the series "Contemporary Topics in Immunology" was held in New Orleans on June 3, 1990, at the joint meeting of The American Association of Immunologists and the American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. The symposium was sponsored jointly by The American Association of Immunologists, the Clinical Immunology Society, and and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, and was titled "The Contributions of Basic Immunology to Human Health." Five speakers, whose research has clear relevance to the treatment and prevention of major human diseases, discussed topics of great current interest: hematopoietic stem cells, cell adhesion and lymphocyte homing; the complexities of autoimmunity and approaches to diverting or depressing autoaggressive immunity; structure and functions of the interferons and the construction of designer and chimeric interferons; the varied functions of transforming growth factors and molecular events that regulate the synthesis of TGF beta; and the roles of cytokines in the expression of human immunodeficiency virus and the prospects for controlling HIV infections by regulating selected cytokines. This symposium will be remembered for the exceptional clarity with which each speaker illustrated how fundamental knowledge in immunology fuels advances in the treatment and prevention of those human disorders that involve the immune system.

  14. Hematology and immunology studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimzey, S. L.; Fischer, C. L.; Johnson, P. C.; Ritzmann, S. E.; Mengel, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    The hematology and immunology program conducted in support of the Apollo missions was designed to acquire specific laboratory data relative to the assessment of the health status of the astronauts prior to their commitment to space flight. A second objective was to detect and identify any alterations in the normal functions of the immunohematologic systems which could be attributed to space flight exposure, and to evaluate the significance of these changes relative to man's continuing participation in space flight missions. Specific changes observed during the Gemini Program formed the basis for the major portion of the hematology-immunology test schedule. Additional measurements were included when their contribution to the overall interpretation of the flight data base became apparent.

  15. Uncertainties - discrepancies in immunology.

    PubMed

    Zinkernagel, Rolf M

    2002-07-01

    The many immunological observations and results from in-vitro or in-vivo experiments vary, and their interpretations differ enormously. A major problem is that within a normal distribution of biological phenomena, which are measurable with many methods, virtually anything is possible. Within a coevolutionary context, the definition of biologically relevant thresholds is an important key to improve our understanding of weaknesses and strengths of the immune system. This review is a personal view, comparing textbook rules and experiments using model antigens with observations on immunity against infections or tumors to critically evaluate our perception and understanding of specificity, affinity maturation, antigen presentation, selection of the class of the immune response, immunological memory and protective immunity, positive selection of T cells and self/nonself discrimination.

  16. [Immunological cell therapy].

    PubMed

    Shibata, Masahiko; Gonda, Kenji; Kumamoto, Kensuke; Takenoshita, Seiichi

    2014-01-01

    Recently there is a great advance in anti-colorectal cancer treatment. Several molecular targeting agents, mostly are antibody drugs, are playing an important role. It has recently been proven that new approaches using antibody to immunological checkpoints are effective against certain types of cancer. This is one of the reasons why cancer immunotherapy is now focused in the clinics. In this chapter, several effective immunotherapy against cancer are shown and discussed. Among several types of cancer immunotherapy, immunological cell therapy including lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cell, cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), gamma delta T cell and dendritic cell therapies are reviewed. Major mechanisms that disturb cancer immunotherapy such as escape mechanisms are also discussed.

  17. Management of rheumatic diseases during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Amy B; Chakravarty, Eliza F

    2010-05-01

    Systemic rheumatic diseases commonly affect women during the childbearing years. Many women with these diseases may be contemplating pregnancy or discover an inadvertent pregnancy, leading to concerns regarding medication use, changes in disease activity during pregnancy, safety of lactation, and future ability to care for a child given the presence of chronic illnesses. There are outstanding reviews that summarize the safety and use of immunosuppressive medications during pregnancy. However, in addition to medication use, providers need to be aware of the available data regarding fertility, pregnancy outcomes, delivery, and lactation issues that may be specific to individual diseases. Optimally, women should plan pregnancies to occur around times of disease quiescence, several months after potentially teratogenic medications have been discontinued. The course of the underlying rheumatic disease during pregnancy is variable, and there are no specific clinical or laboratory variables that consistently predict disease improvement or worsening during pregnancy. Recent data suggest that increased disease activity in women with most autoimmune diseases during pregnancy may lead to increased risk of premature delivery, low-birth-weight infants, and other adverse pregnancy outcomes. Arthritis involving the cervical spine and hips may impact delivery and must be considered by both obstetricians and obstetric anesthesiologists. Data are mixed regarding the impact of breastfeeding on underlying autoimmune diseases; the choice to continue breastfeeding is a personal decision.

  18. [Hepatitis C virus in rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Jendro, M C; Hülsemann, J L; Zeidler, H

    1997-10-01

    HCV-infection is an important infectious disease in rheumatology. It is the cause of mixed cryoglobulinemia and other rheumatic manifestations develop frequently during HCV-infection. These comprise: Sicca-syndrome, thromboembolic events associated with anti-cardiolipin antibodies and fibromyalgia. Also associated with HCV-infection is a non-erosive polyarthritis. This synovitis often fulfills the ACR-criteria for rheumatoid arthritis, but the disease course is different with frequent remissions and non-erosive joint involvement. The following autoantibodies are associated with HCV-infection: Cryoglobulins, rheumatoid factor, antinuclear antibodies (ANA), antismooth muscle antibodies (SMA), anti-phospholipid-antibodies and anti-thyroid-antibodies. In HCV-associated sicca-syndrom, antibodies against Ro (SSA) and La (SSB) are not detected. The course of HCV-infection is often occult, without elevation of liver enzymes. We summarize the clinical and serological signs and symptoms when HCV-infection should be suspected and when HCV-testing should be performed in a rheumatological setting. The identification of HCV-infection in rheumatic patients is important to minimize the risk of aggravating hepatitis by prescription of hepatotoxic drugs and because of the availability of alpha-interferon as a potential virus eradicating agent.

  19. Matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Close, D

    2001-01-01

    The rheumatic diseases continue to represent a significant healthcare burden in the 21st century. However, despite the best standard of care and recent therapeutic advances it is still not possible to consistently prevent the progressive joint destruction that leads to chronic disability. In rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis this progressive cartilage and bone destruction is considered to be driven by an excess of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) enzymes. Consequently, a great number of potent small molecule MMP inhibitors have been examined. Several MMP inhibitors have entered clinical trials as a result of impressive data in animal models, although only one MMP inhibitor, Ro32-3555 (Trocade), a collagenase selective inhibitor, has been fully tested in the clinic, but it did not prevent progression of joint damage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.
  The key stages and challenges associated with the development of an MMP inhibitor in the rheumatic diseases are presented below with particular reference to Trocade. It is concluded that the future success of MMP inhibitors necessitates a greater understanding of the joint destructive process and it is hoped that their development may be accompanied with clearer, more practical, outcome measures to test these drugs for, what remains, an unmet medical need.

 PMID:11890658

  20. Selection bias in rheumatic disease research

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyon K.; Nguyen, Uyen-Sa; Niu, Jingbo; Danaei, Goodarz; Zhang, Yuqing

    2014-01-01

    The identification of modifiable risk factors for the development of rheumatic conditions and their sequelae is crucial for reducing the substantial worldwide burden of these diseases. However, the validity of such research can be threatened by sources of bias, including confounding, measurement and selection biases. In this Review, we discuss potentially major issues of selection bias—a type of bias frequently overshadowed by other bias and feasibility issues, despite being equally or more problematic—in key areas of rheumatic disease research. We present index event bias (a type of selection bias) as one of the potentially unifying reasons behind some unexpected findings, such as the ‘risk factor paradox’—a phenomenon exemplified by the discrepant effects of certain risk factors on the development versus the progression of osteoarthritis (OA) or rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We also discuss potential selection biases owing to differential loss to follow-up in RA and OA research, as well as those due to the depletion of susceptibles (prevalent user bias) and immortal time bias. The lesson remains that selection bias can be ubiquitous and, therefore, has the potential to lead the field astray. Thus, we conclude with suggestions to help investigators avoid such issues and limit the impact on future rheumatology research. PMID:24686510

  1. Immunological relationship among hydrogenases.

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, K L; Seefeldt, L C; Tigyi, G; Doyle, C M; Mortenson, L E; Arp, D J

    1989-01-01

    We examined the immunological cross-reactions of 11 different hydrogenase antigens with 9 different hydrogenase antibodies. Included were antibodies and antigens of both subunits of the hydrogenases of Bradyrhizobium japonicum and Thiocapsa roseopersicina. The results showed a strong relationship among the Ni-Fe dimeric hydrogenases. The two subunits of Ni-Fe dimeric hydrogenases appeared immunologically distinct: specific interactions occurred only when antibodies to the 60- and 30-kilodalton subunits reacted with the 60- and 30-kilodalton-subunit antigens. The interspecies cross-reactions suggested that at least one conserved protein region exists among the large subunits of these enzymes, whereas the small subunits are less conserved. Antibodies to the Fe-only bidirectional hydrogenase of Clostridium pasteurianum reacted with the Desulfovibrio vulgaris bidirectional hydrogenase. Surprisingly, antibodies to the clostridial uptake hydrogenase did not react with any of the Fe-only bidirectional hydrogenases but did react with several of the Ni-Fe dimeric hydrogenases. The two hydrogenases from C. pasteurianum were found to be quite different immunologically. The possible relationship of these findings to the structure and catalytic functions of hydrogenase are discussed. Images PMID:2464579

  2. Immunology in Pittsburgh.

    PubMed

    Finn, Olivera J; Salter, Russell D

    2006-01-01

    The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine has a long tradition of excellence in immunology research and training. Faculty, students, and postdoctoral fellows walk through hallways that are pictorial reminders of the days when Dr. Jonas Salk worked here to develop the polio vaccine, or when Dr. Niels Jerne chaired the Microbiology Department and worked on perfecting the Jerne Plaque Assay for antibody-producing cells. Colleagues and postdoctoral fellows of Professor Salk are still on the faculty of the University of Pittsburgh Medical School as are graduate students of Professor Jerne. A modern research building, the 17 story high Biomedical Science Tower, is a vivid reminder of the day when Dr. Thomas Starzl arrived in Pittsburgh and started building the most prominent solid-organ-transplant program in the world. The immunology research that developed around the problem of graft rejection and tolerance induction trained numerous outstanding students and fellows. Almost 20 yr ago, the University of Pittsburgh founded the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI) with the renowned immunologist Dr. Ronald Herberman at its helm. This started a number of new research initiatives in cancer immunology and immunotherapy. A large number of outstanding young investigators, as well as several well-established tumor immunologists, were recruited to Pittsburgh at that time.

  3. Cosmos-1989 immunology studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1991-01-01

    Evidence from both human and rodent studies has indicated that alterations in immunological parameters occur after space flight. The number of flight experiments has been small, and the full breadth of immunological alterations occurring after space flight remains to be established. Among the major effects on immune responses after space flight that have been reported are: alterations in lymphocyte blastogenesis and natural killer cell activity, alterations in production of cytokines, changes in leukocyte sub-population distribution, and decreases in the ability in the ability of bone marrow cells to respond to colony stimulating factors. Changes have been reported in immunological parameters of both humans and rodents. The significance of these alterations in relation to resistance to infection remains to be established. The current study involved a determination of the effects of flight on Cosmos mission 2044 on leukocyte subset distribution and the sensitivity of bone marrow cells to colony stimulating factor-GM. A parallel study with antiorthostatic suspension was also carried out. The study involved repetition and expansion of studies carried out on Cosmos 1887.

  4. The link between autoimmune diseases and obsessive-compulsive and tic disorders: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Vigil, Ana; Fernández de la Cruz, Lorena; Brander, Gustaf; Isomura, Kayoko; Gromark, Caroline; Mataix-Cols, David

    2016-12-01

    Immunological factors are increasingly recognized as being important in a range of neuropsychiatric disorders. We aimed to summarize the disperse and often conflicting literature on the potential association between autoimmune diseases (ADs) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and tic disorders. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, and PsycINFO for original studies evaluating the relationship between ADs and OCD/tic disorders until July, 13th 2016. Seventy-four studies met inclusion criteria. Overall, the studies were of limited methodological quality. Rates of OCD were higher in rheumatic fever patients who were also affected by its neurological manifestation, Sydenham's chorea. The literature on other ADs was scarce and the findings inconclusive. Few studies examined the association between ADs and tic disorders. A handful of family studies reported elevated rates of ADs in first-degree relatives of individuals with OCD/tic disorders, and vice versa, potentially suggesting shared genetic and/or environmental mechanisms. In conclusion, at present, there is modest evidence for a possible association and familial co-aggregation between ADs and OCD/tic disorders. We offer some suggestions for future research.

  5. Autoimmune vitiligo in rheumatic disease in the mestizo Mexican population.

    PubMed

    Avalos-Díaz, Esperanza; Pérez-Pérez, Elena; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Mayra; Pacheco-Tovar, María-Guadalupe; Herrera-Esparza, Rafael

    2016-08-01

    Vitiligo is a chronic disease characterized by the dysfunction or destruction of melanocytes with secondary depigmentation. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of vitiligo associated with autoimmune rheumatic diseases. The clinical records from a 10-year database of patients with rheumatic diseases and associated vitiligo was analysed, with one group of patients having autoimmune rheumatic disease and another non-autoimmune rheumatic disease. Available serum samples were used to assess the anti-melanocyte antibodies. A total of 5,251 individual clinical files were archived in the last 10 years, and these patients underwent multiple rheumatology consultations, with 0.3% of the group presenting with vitiligo. The prevalence of vitiligo in the autoimmune rheumatic disease group was 0.672%, which was mainly associated with lupus and arthritis. However, patients with more than one autoimmune disease had an increased relative risk to develop vitiligo, and anti-melanocyte antibodies were positive in 92% of these patients. By contrast, the prevalence was 0.082% in the group that lacked autoimmune rheumatic disease and had negative autoantibodies. In conclusion, the association between vitiligo and autoimmune rheumatic diseases was relatively low. However, the relative risk increased when there were other autoimmune comorbidities, such as thyroiditis or celiac disease. Therefore, the presence of multiple autoimmune syndromes should be suspected.

  6. The immunologic considerations in human head transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Mark A; Furr, Allen; Barret, Juan P; Barker, John H

    2017-01-24

    The idea of head transplantation appears at first as unrealistic, unethical, and futile. Here we discuss immunological considerations in human head transplantation. In a separate accompanying article we discuss surgical, ethical, and psychosocial issues concerned in body-to-head transplantation (BHT) [1]. The success of such an unusual allograft, where the donor and the recipient can reject each other, depends on prevention of complex immunologic reactions, especially rejection of the head by the body (graft-vs-host) or probably less likely, the possibility of the head rejecting the total body allograft (host-vs-graft). The technical and immunologic difficulties are enormous, especially since rapid nerve and cord connections and regeneration have not yet been possible to achieve. In this article we begin by briefly reviewing neuro-immunologic issues that may favor BHT such as the blood brain barrier (BBB) and point out its shortcomings. And we touch on the cellular and humoral elements in the brain proper that differ in some respects from those in other organs and in the periphery. Based on recent successes in vascular composite allografts (VCAs), we will elaborate on potential specific advantages and difficulties in BHT of various available immunosuppressive medications already utilized in VCAs. The risk/benefit ratio of these drugs will be emphasized in relation to direct brain toxicity such as seizure disorders, interference, or promotion of nerve regeneration, and potentiation of cerebral viral infections. The final portion of this article will focus on pre-transplant immunologic manipulation of the deceased donor body along with pretreatment of the recipient.

  7. Nutrition and pediatric rheumatic diseases. Hypothesis: cytokines modulate nutritional abnormalities in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Ostrov, B E

    1992-04-01

    Growth abnormalities are common in pediatric rheumatic diseases. Studies suggest that effects of inflammation such as anorexia, and adipose and muscle tissue breakdown contribute to the nutritional and growth aberrations. The effects of the various cytokines produced during inflammation create a vicious cycle of anorexia and increased catabolism, and may be responsible for the nutritional deficits seen. In future, specific treatment with anticytokine monoclonal antibodies may block these effects, minimizing the nutritional consequences of inflammation.

  8. Immunologic and Neurodevelopmental Susceptibilities of Autism

    PubMed Central

    Pessah, Isaac N.; Seegal, Richard F.; Lein, Pamela J.; LaSalle, Janine; Yee, Benjamin K.; Van De Water, Judy; Berman, Robert F.

    2008-01-01

    Symposium 5 focused on research approaches that are aimed at understanding common patterns of immunological and neurological dysfunction contributing to neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism and ADHD. The session focused on genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors that might act in concert to influence autism risk, severity and co-morbidities, and immunological and neurobiological targets as etiologic contributors. The immune system of children at risk of autism may be therefore especially susceptible to psychological stressors, exposure to chemical triggers, and infectious agents. Identifying early biomarkers of risk provides tangible approaches toward designing studies in animals and humans that yield a better understanding of environmental risk factors, and can help identify rational intervention strategies to mitigate these risks. PMID:18394707

  9. Findings of interest from immunology and psychoneuroimmunology.

    PubMed

    Alford, Les

    2007-05-01

    The biopsychosocial paradigm is now the main model when dealing with most human health disorders. One of the strengths of this model is that it encourages broader thinking when assessing and managing patients. It also encourages broader reading into areas not traditionally associated with manual therapy. Immunology and neuroscience are amongst the fastest growing medical sciences. These fields come together in the relatively new area of psychoneuroimmunolgy. This article examines some findings from these fields that are not widely discussed in the physical therapy professions. These findings are of relevance to many of the disciplines within the physical therapies. It is the authors aim to stimulate further interest in the relevant, yet often under explored areas of immunology and psychoneuroimmunology.

  10. Orofacial manifestations in patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Hamburger, John

    2016-10-01

    The main orofacial manifestation of the inflammatory rheumatic diseases is that of Sjögren's syndrome. In addition, there is a constellation of orofacial manifestations of the inflammatory rheumatic diseases, many of which are extra-articular with some constituting presenting signs of the underlying rheumatic disease. This review will discuss the orofacial manifestations in a variety of connective tissue diseases and will also allude to the oral adverse drug reactions that may occur as a consequence of therapy. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Fever of unknown origin (FUO) attributable to indolent lymphoproliferative disorder due to a plasmacytoma expressing immunoglobulin A.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Burke A; Petelin, Andrew P; Turi, George K; Oraji, Attilio

    2012-01-01

    The most common categories causing fevers of unknown origin (FUOs) include infective rheumatic/inflammatory disorders and malignancies. Among neoplastic causes of FUOs, lymphomas, hepatomas, renal hypo-nephromas, and hepatomas are the most common. Other malignancies rarely present with FUOs (eg, multiple myeloma). We describe a 58-year-old man who presented with an FUO accompanied by night sweats, weight loss, and a groin mass. A biopsy of the groin mass (ie, his lymph node) was negative for infectious diseases, rheumatic or inflammatory diseases, and malignancies. Histochemical and immunological studies of the lymph node showed it to contain a plasmacytoma expressing immunoglobulin A (IgA). An immunohistochemical study of the plasma-cell infiltrate demonstrated strong CD138 staining. A bone marrow biopsy was negative for multiple myeloma. We believe this is the first reported rare case of an indolent, lymphoproliferative disorder attributable to an IgA-secreting plasmacytoma presenting as an FUO. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Real efficiency of ambulatory laser treatment at the patients with different rheumatic diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidenco, Elena-Luminita; Ristache, Sanda; Belu, Luminita

    2001-06-01

    We consulted 189 patients, with different locomotory diseases: degenerative, posttraumatic and chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases. We followed the main clinical parameters: pain, limitation of mobility, affected function, inflammation and disorders of sensitivity. We applied an infrared LASER source of 100 mW (BTL), daily, for 5 days. The tolerance of the patients at the LASER treatment was excellent (100%). The evolution of the clinical parameters was variated, but inflammation, limitation of mobility and the affected function significantly improved (30-50%). We found a significant diminution of pain (27- 39%). We believe the LASER treatment in ambulatory conditions is essential for the function of the patients with different locomotory diseases.

  13. Mathematics in modern immunology

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Mario; Lythe, Grant; Molina-París, Carmen; Ribeiro, Ruy M.

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical and statistical methods enable multidisciplinary approaches that catalyse discovery. Together with experimental methods, they identify key hypotheses, define measurable observables and reconcile disparate results. We collect a representative sample of studies in T-cell biology that illustrate the benefits of modelling–experimental collaborations and that have proven valuable or even groundbreaking. We conclude that it is possible to find excellent examples of synergy between mathematical modelling and experiment in immunology, which have brought significant insight that would not be available without these collaborations, but that much remains to be discovered. PMID:27051512

  14. Hematology and immunology studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimzey, S. L.

    1977-01-01

    A coordinated series of experiments were conducted to evaluate immunologic and hemotologic system responses of Skylab crewmen to prolonged space flights. A reduced PHA responsiveness was observed on recovery, together with a reduced number of T-cells, with both values returning to normal 3 to 5 days postflight. Subnormal red cell count, hemoglobin concentration, and hematocrit values also returned gradually to preflight limits. Most pronounced changes were found in the shape of red blood cells during extended space missions with a rapid reversal of these changes upon reentry into a normal gravitational environment.

  15. Islet transplantation: immunological perspectives.

    PubMed

    Inverardi, Luca; Kenyon, Norma S; Ricordi, Camillo

    2003-10-01

    Clinical trials of islet transplantation are showing remarkable success, but they require administration of chronic immunosuppression, and are underscoring the large gap that exists between the number of human donors available and the number of patients that could benefit from the procedure. Recent progress has been made in the definition of key immunological mechanisms that are involved in determining islet transplant outcome. Clinical and preclinical studies, and studies in small animal model systems, will all eventually contribute to the definition of efficient and safe protocols for islet transplantation. If the use of xenografts is successful, it might represent a solution to the shortage of human organs.

  16. Mathematics in modern immunology

    DOE PAGES

    Castro, Mario; Lythe, Grant; Molina-París, Carmen; ...

    2016-02-19

    Mathematical and statistical methods enable multidisciplinary approaches that catalyse discovery. Together with experimental methods, they identify key hypotheses, define measurable observables and reconcile disparate results. Here, we collect a representative sample of studies in T-cell biology that illustrate the benefits of modelling–experimental collaborations and that have proven valuable or even groundbreaking. Furthermore, we conclude that it is possible to find excellent examples of synergy between mathematical modelling and experiment in immunology, which have brought significant insight that would not be available without these collaborations, but that much remains to be discovered.

  17. Immunology of brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Roth, Patrick; Eisele, Günter; Weller, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Brain tumors of different origin, but notably malignant gliomas, are characterized by their immunosuppressive properties which allow them to escape the host's immune surveillance. The activating immune cell ligands that are expressed by tumor cells, together with potentially immunogenic antigens, are overridden by numerous immune inhibitory signals, with TGF-3 as the master immunosuppressive molecule (Figure 4.1).The ongoing investigation of mechanisms of tumor-derived immunosuppression allows for an increasing understanding of brain tumor immunology. Targeting different mechanisms of tumor-derived immunosuppression, such as inhibition of TGF-[, may represent a promising strategy for future immunotherapeutic approaches.

  18. Advancing cytometry for immunology.

    PubMed

    Cossarizza, Andrea; Nolan, John; Radbruch, Andreas; Tárnok, Attila

    2012-12-01

    Cytometry is a key technology for immunology. It allows researchers to scrutinize the cells of the immune system in molecular detail, and to assess phenotype and function at the level of individual cells, no matter how rare these cells may be. The International Society for the Advancement of Cytometry, ISAC, by way of its meetings, online resources and publications (e.g. Cytometry Part A and Current Protocols in Cytometry, which are all published by Wiley) track the ever advancing developments regarding cytometry instrumentation and reagents, and the analysis of complex data sets. In June this year in Leipzig, Germany, ISAC held its annual conference "CYTO 2012", a marketplace of innovation in cytometry.

  19. Mathematics in modern immunology

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, Mario; Lythe, Grant; Molina-París, Carmen; Ribeiro, Ruy M.

    2016-02-19

    Mathematical and statistical methods enable multidisciplinary approaches that catalyse discovery. Together with experimental methods, they identify key hypotheses, define measurable observables and reconcile disparate results. Here, we collect a representative sample of studies in T-cell biology that illustrate the benefits of modelling–experimental collaborations and that have proven valuable or even groundbreaking. Furthermore, we conclude that it is possible to find excellent examples of synergy between mathematical modelling and experiment in immunology, which have brought significant insight that would not be available without these collaborations, but that much remains to be discovered.

  20. Mean platelet volume in acute rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Sert, Ahmet; Aypar, Ebru; Odabas, Dursun

    2013-01-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) is still an endemic disease, especially among school-aged children in developing countries. Mean platelet volume (MPV), which is commonly used as a measure of platelet size, indicates the rate of platelet production and platelet activation. We aimed to investigate MPV in children with ARF. The study population consisted of 40 children with ARF (32 patients with carditis and 8 patients without carditis) and 40 healthy control subjects. White blood cell (WBC) and platelet counts were significantly higher and MPV values were significantly lower in patients with ARF during the acute stage when compared to controls. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein values significantly decreased in patients with ARF after the treatment when compared to baseline, whereas MPV values increased. MPV values were negatively correlated with ESR and WBC, and platelet counts. In conclusion, during the acute stage of ARF, MPV values were lower when compared to controls.

  1. Metabolomics in rheumatic diseases: desperately seeking biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Guma, Monica; Tiziani, Stefano; Firestein, Gary S

    2016-05-01

    Metabolomics enables the profiling of large numbers of small molecules in cells, tissues and biological fluids. These molecules, which include amino acids, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleotides and their metabolites, can be detected quantitatively. Metabolomic methods, often focused on the information-rich analytical techniques of NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry, have potential for early diagnosis, monitoring therapy and defining disease pathogenesis in many therapeutic areas, including rheumatic diseases. By performing global metabolite profiling, also known as untargeted metabolomics, new discoveries linking cellular pathways to biological mechanisms are being revealed and are shaping our understanding of cell biology, physiology and medicine. These pathways can potentially be targeted to diagnose and treat patients with immune-mediated diseases.

  2. Rheumatic mimics and selected triggers of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Daoud, Katja F; Barkhuizen, Andre

    2002-08-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain syndrome of unknown etiology characterized by diffuse pain and tender points, which have been present for more than 3 months. Many patients with systemic illnesses can have diffuse pain similar to that found in fibromyalgia, including rheumatic diseases such as polymyalgia rheumatica, rheumatoid arthritis, idiopathic inflammatory myopathy, systemic lupus erythematosus, and joint hypermobility. Osteomalacia and thyroid disease are also in the differential diagnosis of diffuse pain and are imminently treatable. In addition, there has been interest throughout the past 10 years in infectious diseases including hepatitis C, Lyme disease, coxsackie B, HIV, and parvovirus infection, which may cause or trigger fibromyalgia. This paper provides a framework to use when identifying these diseases as part of the evaluation of a patient with chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain.

  3. Targeting Syk in Autoimmune Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Guo-Min; Kyttaris, Vasileios C.; Tsokos, George C.

    2016-01-01

    Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) is a member of the Src family of non-receptor tyrosine kinases, which associates directly with surface receptors, including B-cell receptor and Fcγ receptor, and is involved in a variety of signal transduction pathways. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus are autoimmune diseases in which autoantibodies, immune complexes, and autoreactive T cells account for the expression of tissue inflammation and damage. Syk inhibitors efficiently suppress RA in patients albeit in the expression of unwanted side effects, including gastrointestinal effects, hypertension, and neutropenia. Syk inhibitors also inhibit clinical manifestations in lupus-prone mice. Here, we review the evidence that supports the use of Syk inhibitors to treat rheumatic and other autoimmune diseases. PMID:27014261

  4. MALDI mass spectrometry imaging in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Beatriz; Cillero-Pastor, Berta; Blanco, Francisco J; Ruiz-Romero, Cristina

    2017-07-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a technique used to visualize the spatial distribution of biomolecules such as peptides, proteins, lipids or other organic compounds by their molecular masses. Among the different MSI strategies, MALDI-MSI provides a sensitive and label-free approach for imaging of a wide variety of protein or peptide biomarkers from the surface of tissue sections, being currently used in an increasing number of biomedical applications such as biomarker discovery and tissue classification. In the field of rheumatology, MALDI-MSI has been applied to date for the analysis of joint tissues such as synovial membrane or cartilage. This review summarizes the studies and key achievements obtained using MALDI-MSI to increase understanding on rheumatic pathologies and to describe potential diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers of these diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: MALDI Imaging, edited by Dr. Corinna Henkel and Prof. Peter Hoffmann. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Rheumatic effects of vibration at work.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Keith T; Bovenzi, Massimo

    2015-06-01

    Occupational exposures to vibration come in many guises, and they are very common at a population level. It follows that an important minority of working-aged patients seen by medical services will have been exposed to this hazard of employment. Vibration can cause human health effects, which may manifest in the patients that rheumatologists see. In this chapter, we identify the health effects of relevance to them, and review their epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, differential diagnosis and vocational and clinical management. On either side of this, we describe the nature and assessment of the hazard, the scale and common patterns of exposure to vibration in the community and the legal basis for controlling health risks, and we comment on the role of health surveillance in detecting early adverse effects and what can be done to prevent the rheumatic effects of vibration at work.

  6. Cardiovascular disease in inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Santos; Nurmohamed, Michael T; González-Gay, Miguel A

    2016-10-01

    Chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases (IRD), including rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and psoriatic arthritis, are prevalent conditions worldwide, with a considerable burden on healthcare systems. They are associated with increased cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality. In this review, we focused on the epidemiology, traditional CV risk factors, genetics, and the link between chronic inflammation, atherosclerosis, and CV disease. Remarkably, patients with IRD have higher vulnerability to atheromatous plaques. The risk of unstable plaques is higher in patients with rheumatoid arthritis than in controls. Active disease is a characteristic ascribed to vulnerability and rupture of plaques and a cause of thrombosis in IRD. Management of CV risk in patients with IRD includes optimal control of disease activity. CV risk stratification by applying risk charts is also essential. Imaging techniques might be useful to determine the actual CV risk of patients with IRD who are included in the category of intermediate or moderate CV risk.

  7. Metabolomics in rheumatic diseases: desperately seeking biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Guma, Monica; Tiziani, Stefano; Firestein, Gary S.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics enables the profiling of large numbers of small molecules in cells, tissues and biological fluids. These molecules, which include amino acids, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleotides and their metabolites, can be detected quantitatively. Metabolomic methods, often focused on the information-rich analytical techniques of NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry, have potential for early diagnosis, monitoring therapy and defining disease pathogenesis in many therapeutic areas, including rheumatic diseases. By performing global metabolite profiling, also known as untargeted metabolomics, new discoveries linking cellular pathways to biological mechanisms are being revealed and are shaping our understanding of cell biology, physiology and medicine. These pathways can potentially be targeted to diagnose and treat patients with immune-mediated diseases. PMID:26935283

  8. Calprotectin in rheumatic diseases: a review

    PubMed Central

    Widuchowska, Małgorzata; Kucharz, Eugeniusz J.

    2016-01-01

    Calprotectin also known as MRP8/14 or S100A8/A9 is a heterodimeric complex of two S100 calcium-binding proteins: myeloid-related protein 8 (MRP-8 or S100A8) and MRP-14 (or S100A9). At present, according to many authors, it is considered that calprotectin MRP8/14 is a potentially more sensitive biomarker of disease activity in rheumatoid disease than conventional inflammatory indices such as the erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein and others. A review of the literature on concentration of calprotectin in patients with some rheumatic diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, adult-onset Still’s disease, systemic vasculitis, polymyalgia rheumatica, ankylosis spondylitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and primary Sjögren’s syndrome) is presented. PMID:28115781

  9. Calprotectin in rheumatic diseases: a review.

    PubMed

    Kopeć-Mędrek, Magdalena; Widuchowska, Małgorzata; Kucharz, Eugeniusz J

    2016-01-01

    Calprotectin also known as MRP8/14 or S100A8/A9 is a heterodimeric complex of two S100 calcium-binding proteins: myeloid-related protein 8 (MRP-8 or S100A8) and MRP-14 (or S100A9). At present, according to many authors, it is considered that calprotectin MRP8/14 is a potentially more sensitive biomarker of disease activity in rheumatoid disease than conventional inflammatory indices such as the erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein and others. A review of the literature on concentration of calprotectin in patients with some rheumatic diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, adult-onset Still's disease, systemic vasculitis, polymyalgia rheumatica, ankylosis spondylitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and primary Sjögren's syndrome) is presented.

  10. Rheumatic effects of vibration at work

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Keith T; Bovenzi, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Occupational exposures to vibration come in many guises and are very common at a population level. It follows that an important minority of working-aged patients seen by medical services will have been exposed to this hazard of employment. Vibration can cause human health effects which may manifest in the patients that rheumatologists see. In this chapter we identify the health effects of relevance to them, and review their epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, and vocational and clinical management. On either side of this, we describe the nature and assessment of the hazard, the scale and common patterns of exposure to vibration in the community, and the legal basis for controlling health risks, and comment on the role of health surveillance in detecting early adverse effects and what can be done to prevent the rheumatic effects of vibration at work. PMID:26612239

  11. Nutritional factors associated with rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Zaman, M M; Yoshiike, N; Chowdhury, A H; Nakayama, T; Yokoyama, T; Faruque, G M; Rouf, M A; Haque, S; Tanaka, H

    1998-06-01

    The determinants for a child with group A beta-haemolytic streptococcal throat infection (BHS infection) to develop rheumatic fever (RF) remain unclear. In this case-control study, we deal with BHS infected children to examine whether nutritional factors are related to RF. In a RF hospital in Dhaka (Bangladesh) we examined 218 consecutive out-patients who had antecedent BHS infection. Sixty of them met the updated Jones criteria for RF (cases) while 104 did not (controls). Fifty-four possible RF patients were excluded. We used anthropometric measurements and a food frequency questionnaire to assess nutritional factors. Higher risk of RF was observed for low height for age (odds ratio 3.82, 95% confidence interval 1.73-8.42); low weight for age (2.41, 1.12-5.57); low upper arm circumference for age (3.76, 1.87-7.89); and low consumption of eggs (3.81, 1.95-7.63), milk (2.60, 1.36-5.08), chicken (2.62, 1.35-5.21), pulses (1.98, 1.03-3.84), fruits 2.29, 1.20-4.45), and ruti (home-made bread) (3.15, 1.61-6.34). Reduced risk was observed for soybean oil consumption (0.28, 0.12-0.62). The significant association of upper arm circumference and eggs persisted after adjustment for multiple sociodemographic confounders. The association of ruti and soybean oil appeared to be suggestive (0.05 < p < 0.1). Protein-energy malnutrition is likely to be associated with RF. The protective effect of moderate consumption of eggs and soybean oil may support other published work which suggests that the anti-inflammatory substance present in these food items may prevent maturation of the rheumatic process.

  12. Affective immunology: where emotions and the immune response converge.

    PubMed

    D'Acquisto, Fulvio

    2017-03-01

    Affect and emotion are defined as "an essential part of the process of an organism's interaction with stimuli." Similar to affect, the immune response is the "tool" the body uses to interact with the external environment. Thanks to the emotional and immunological response, we learn to distinguish between what we like and what we do not like, to counteract a broad range of challenges, and to adjust to the environment we are living in. Recent compelling evidence has shown that the emotional and immunological systems share more than a similarity of functions. This review article will discuss the crosstalk between these two systems and the need for a new scientific area of research called affective immunology. Research in this field will allow a better understanding and appreciation of the immunological basis of mental disorders and the emotional side of immune diseases.

  13. Immunology of leishmaniasis*

    PubMed Central

    Heyneman, D.

    1971-01-01

    Knowledge of the immunological basis of the leishmaniases and of the host's response is fragmentary and largely pragmatic. This paper reviews certain conceptual and clinical aspects of the immunology of these diseases. Consideration is given to man's natural resistance and his ability to acquire resistance from natural infections and from vaccination. The age-distribution of infection in different populations is discussed in relation to the effects that interaction between the parasite and its intermediate host may have on its infection characteristics and virulence. Studies in the USSR of differences in virulence among 30 human strains and 39 rodent strains are reported. The rodent strains showed a broader range of virulence than did the human isolates. Serological tests for determining species relationships among the leishmaniae are generally nonspecific, but work concerned with the development of the antiserum—culture test is reviewed. Species identification and the recognition of new forms, perhaps with different infection characteristics, is, nevertheless, of the utmost importance in the prevention and treatment of the disease. The review concludes with a discussion of functional immunity and hypotheses of the immune process in leishmaniasis. PMID:5316252

  14. Immunology of human schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Colley, D G; Secor, W E

    2014-01-01

    There is a wealth of immunologic studies that have been carried out in experimental and human schistosomiasis that can be classified into three main areas: immunopathogenesis, resistance to reinfection and diagnostics. It is clear that the bulk of, if not all, morbidity due to human schistosomiasis results from immune-response-based inflammation against eggs lodged in the body, either as regulated chronic inflammation or resulting in fibrotic lesions. However, the exact nature of these responses, the antigens to which they are mounted and the mechanisms of the critical regulatory responses are still being sorted out. It is also becoming apparent that protective immunity against schistosomula as they develop into adult worms develops slowly and is hastened by the dying of adult worms, either naturally or when they are killed by praziquantel. However, as with anti-egg responses, the responsible immune mechanisms and inducing antigens are not clearly established, nor are any potential regulatory responses known. Finally, a wide variety of immune markers, both cellular and humoral, can be used to demonstrate exposure to schistosomes, and immunologic measurement of schistosome antigens can be used to detect, and thus diagnose, active infections. All three areas contribute to the public health response to human schistosome infections. PMID:25142505

  15. Diets, dietary supplements, and nutritional therapies in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Henderson, C J; Panush, R S

    1999-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis and many other systemic rheumatic diseases remain illnesses of unknown cause for which current therapy is often inadequate. This leads patients to seek questionable remedies, prominent among which are dietary manipulations. Is there a role for dietary modifications in the routine therapy for patients with rheumatic diseases? This article discusses the relationships between diets, fasting, elemental nutrition, vitamins, minerals, and foods for rheumatic diseases. Known scientific-based evidence for the use, safety, and efficacy of diets and dietary-related practices subscribed by patients with rheumatic diseases are presented. Studies that link diet with arthritis offer the possibility of identifying new therapeutic approaches for selected patients and of developing new insights to disease pathogenesis. Dietary therapy for arthritis, however, is still being investigated.

  16. [Non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Cossermelli, W; Pastor, E H

    1995-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) comprise an important class of medicaments that reduced the symptoms of inflamation in rheumatic disease. This article emphasizes similarities and class characteristics of the NSAID, mechanisms of action, and drug-interactions.

  17. Streptococcal Infections, Rheumatic Fever and School Health Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowitz, Milton

    1979-01-01

    Because rheumatic fever is a potentially serious complication of a streptococcal sore throat which can lead to permanent heart disease, this article advocates the expansion of school health services in medically underserved areas. (JMF)

  18. [Pharmacotherapy in pregnancy and lactation in rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Anić, Branimir; Cikes, Nada

    2006-01-01

    The specific pharmacotherapy in pregnant women is of great importance in chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Before every potential pregnancy or afterwards the knowledge of pregnancy of women with inflammatory rheumatic disease, it is necessary to evaluate the pregnancy risk for patient and child. The purpose of this review is to give concise informations about the most frequent used drugs in rheumatology and their use in pregnancy and lactation.

  19. Frequency of rheumatic diseases in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Soy, Mehmet; Guldiken, Sibel; Arikan, Ender; Altun, Betul Ugur; Tugrul, Armagan

    2007-04-01

    We aimed to investigate the frequency of rheumatic diseases in patients suffering from autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATD). Sixty-five patients (56 F, 9 M), who were followed by diagnosis of ATD, were questioned and examined for the presence of rheumatic disease. Basic laboratory tests and antithyroid antibodies, antinuclear antibody and rheumatoid factor (RF) levels were also measured by appropriate methods. Various rheumatic diseases were detected in 40 (62%) of patients with ATD. The most frequent rheumatic conditions were fibromyalgia, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, osteoarthritis, keratoconjunctivitis sicca and xerostomia and carpal tunnel syndrome which were detected in 20 (31%), 13 (20%), 10 (15%), 9 (14%) and 8 (12%) of patients, respectively. Autoimmune diseases, except Sjogren's syndrome, which were detected in ten patients with ATD, are as follows-vitiligo: two; autoimmune hepatitis: two; oral lichen planus: one, ulcerative colitis: one, inflammatory arthritis in four patients (two of them had rheumatoid arthritis, one had psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis and one had mixed collagen tissue disease). RF was positive in two patients, one of them had rheumatoid arthritis and FANA was positive in six (9%) patients; all of them had hypothyroidism. The frequency of rheumatic diseases seems to be higher in patients suffering from ATD. Initial evaluation and a regular checking for rheumatic diseases in patients suffering from ATD were recommended.

  20. Immunologic Disorders of the Inner Ear.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, William C.; Hughes, Gordon B.

    1997-01-01

    Immune inner ear disease represents a series of immune system mediated problems that can present with hearing loss, dizziness, or both. The etiology, presentation, testing, and treatment of primary immune inner ear disease is discussed. A review of secondary immune inner ear disease is presented for comparison. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  1. Immunologic Disorders of the Inner Ear.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, William C.; Hughes, Gordon B.

    1997-01-01

    Immune inner ear disease represents a series of immune system mediated problems that can present with hearing loss, dizziness, or both. The etiology, presentation, testing, and treatment of primary immune inner ear disease is discussed. A review of secondary immune inner ear disease is presented for comparison. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  2. Lessons from reproductive immunology for other fields of immunology and clinical approaches.

    PubMed

    Markert, Udo R; Fitzgerald, Justine S; Seyfarth, Lydia; Heinzelmann, Joana; Varosi, Frauke; Voigt, Sandra; Schleussner, Ekkehard; Seewald, Hans-Joachim

    2005-01-01

    Reproduction is indispensable to evolution and, thus, life. Nonetheless, it overcomes common rules known to established life. Immunology of reproduction, and especially the tolerance of two genetically distinct organisms and their fruitful symbiosis, is one of the most imposing paradox of life. Mechanisms, which are physiologically used for induction of said tolerance, are frequently abused by pathogens or tumors intending to escape the host's immune response. Understanding the regulation of immune responses in pregnancy and the invasion of allogeneic fetus-derived trophoblast cells into the decidua may lead to new therapeutic concepts. In transplantation, knowledge concerning local physiological immunotolerance may be useful for the development of new therapies, which do not require a general immune suppression of the patient. In immunological disorders, such as autoimmune diseases or allergies, immune deviations occur which are either prevented during pregnancy or have parallels to pregnancy. Vice versa, lessons from other fields of immunology may also offer new notions for the comprehension of reproductive immunology and may lead to new therapies for the treatment of pregnancy-related problems.

  3. The Ambiguity in Immunology

    PubMed Central

    Barnaba, Vincenzo; Paroli, Marino; Piconese, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    In the present article, we discuss the various ambiguous aspects of the immune system that render this complex biological network so highly flexible and able to defend the host from different external invaders. This ambiguity stems mainly from the property of the immune system to be both protective and harmful. Immunity cannot be fully protective without producing a certain degree of damage (immunopathology) to the host. The balance between protection and tissue damage is, therefore, critical for the establishment of immune homeostasis and protection. In this review, we will consider as ambiguous, various immunological tactics including: (a) the opposing functions driving immune responses, immune-regulation, and contra-regulation, as well as (b) the phenomenon of chronic immune activation as a result of a continuous cross-presentation of apoptotic T cells by dendritic cells. All these plans participate principally to maintain a state of chronic low-level inflammation during persisting infections, and ultimately to favor the species survival. PMID:22566903

  4. Immunology in Africa.

    PubMed

    Cose, Stephen; Bagaya, Bernard; Nerima, Barbara; Joloba, Moses; Kambugu, Andrew; Tweyongyere, Robert; Dunne, David W; Mbidde, Edward; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Elliott, Alison M

    2015-12-01

    Africa is a continent with a large burden of both infectious and non-communicable diseases. If we are to move forward as a continent, we need to equip our growing cadre of exceptional young scientists with the skills needed to tackle the diseases endemic to this continent. For this, immunology is among the key disciplines. Africans should be empowered to study and understand the diseases that affect them, and to perform their cutting-edge research in their country of origin. This requires a multifaceted approach, with buy-in from funders, overseas partners and perhaps, most important of all, African governments themselves. © 2015 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The Rheumatic Fever and Rheumatic Heart Disease Control programme--Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Millard-Bullock, D

    2012-07-01

    Rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are significant causes of World Health Organization (WHO) and International Society and Federation of Cardiology (ISFC) initiated an International Programme for Prevention of RF/RHD in 16 developing countries, including Jamaica. The Jamaican RF/RHD National Control Programme began in July 1985. The Control Programme promotes the primary prevention of RF/RHD through the appropriate treatment of streptococcal throat infections. Secondary prevention has been the main focus of the Control Programme by administration of benzathine penicillin injections every four weeks to RF/RHD patients. Case finding activities have included two retrospective surveys of case records of RF/RHD patients admitted to the major hospitals in Kingston and St Andrew in the period 1975-1985 (Survey A) and 1989-1995 (Survey B). These surveys provided clinical and laboratory data on RF/RHD in Jamaican patients which were documented and analysed. Records of 1079 patients were reviewed in Survey A and records of 512 patients were reviewed in Survey B. Seventy-seven per cent of 524 patients were aged 5-15 years in initial attacks of RF in Survey A and in Survey B, 82% of 119 patients were between 5 and 15 years in initial attacks. There was no significant sex difference in RF in Survey A and Survey B. A diagnosis of RF had been made in 54% of records in Survey A and 55% of records in Survey B. Diagnosis conformed to the Modified Jones criteria. Carditis occurred in 41% and 70% of RF patients, respectively in survey A and B. Polyarthritis occurred in 73% in Survey A and 74% in Survey B. Chorea occurred in 3% of RF patients in both surveys. Erythema marginatum and subcutaneous nodules occurred rarely in both surveys. Evidence of recent streptococcal infections in RF was found in 74% and 64% in Survey A and B, respectively. Severe carditis occurred in 7% of initial attacks of RF in A and 26% in B. In RHD, mitral incompetence was the commonest

  6. [Felbinac gel for treatment of localized extra-articular rheumatic diseases--a multicenter, placebo controlled, randomized study].

    PubMed

    Bolten, W

    1991-01-01

    281 patients with extra-articular rheumatic disorders (enthesiopathy, bursitis, tendinosis, fibrositis) and moderate or severe localized pain during rest or movement in shoulder, neck, elbow or knee were randomized into groups and treated for 14 days in a double blind study with either 1 g Felbinac Gel 3% (biphenyl acetic acid) three times daily (N = 142) or with the gel formulation only (N = 139). In 50% of the patients treated with Felbinac Gel compared to 29% of the placebo treated patients (p = 0.001), the investigator assessed the global therapeutic success to be good or very good. The magnitude of complaints judged on the basis of a visual analogous scale by patients and doctor showed a significant improvement in pain reduction during rest or activity after 14 days of treatment in the Felbinac group. The rheumatic complaints diminished equally according to patient judgement in both treatment groups and the concomitant use of paracetamol was low in both groups. No significant side-effects or changes in laboratory parameters were observed during therapy. Felbinac Gel therefore is suitable for a low-risk topical therapy of soft tissue rheumatic disorders.

  7. Nutrition and chronic inflammatory rheumatic disease.

    PubMed

    Semerano, Luca; Julia, Chantal; Aitisha, Ouidade; Boissier, Marie-Christophe

    2016-11-30

    Nutrition is a major environmental influence on human health. Epidemiological and interventional studies suggest a pathophysiological or therapeutic role, respectively, for nutrition in inflammatory rheumatic diseases (IRDs). Nevertheless, the associations between nutrition and IRDs are often weak and inconsistent, and the available clinical trials on nutrition are methodologically flawed. Experimental evidence is accumulating that micronutrients in the diet may influence intestinal and systemic immune responses via complex interactions involving the gut microbiota. Micronutrients may, therefore, contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. No interventions targeting these interactions for diagnostic, prophylactic, or therapeutic purposes have been developed to date. Moreover, the relevance to human disease of experimental results obtained in animals or in vitro is unclear. Novel high-throughput technologies (-omics) may prove useful for a systems biology approach to these results that takes the complexity of the interactions into account. Concomitant cohort studies combining clinical and laboratory data collected over time may provide new impetus to research into the connections between nutrition and IRDs.

  8. [Neuroendocrine immune interactions in rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Straub, R H; Fassold, A

    2010-06-01

    Clinical observations in chronic inflammatory diseases have demonstrated the significant influence of neuroendocrine mechanisms on the immune system: (1) Amelioration of rheumatoid arthritis during pregnancy; (2) preponderance of women versus men with respect to autoimmune diseases; (3) negative effects of ovulation-inducing therapy, oral contraceptives, and hormone replacement therapy; (4) protective effect of hemiplegia; (5) influence of psychological stress on inflammation; and (6) influence of circadian rhythms on inflammatory symptoms.The effects of different hormones and neurotransmitters on the immune system are influenced by: (1) the immune stimulus (foreign antigens or autoantigens) and subsequent antigen-specific immune responses, (2) the cell types involved during different phases of the disease, (3) the target organ with its specific microenvironment, (4) the timing of hormone or neurotransmitter increase in relation to the disease course, (5) the concentration of hormones and neurotransmitters, (6) the variability in expression of receptors depending on the microenvironment and the cell type, and (7) the intra- and extracellular peripheral metabolism of hormones and neurotransmitters leading to important biologically active metabolites with quite different anti- and proinflammatory functions.The circadian rhythm of disease-related symptoms with a peak in the early morning hours confirms that the neuroendocrine system has a strong influence on these chronic immune/inflammatory diseases. The influence is transmitted by the circadian fluctuation in the activity of hormonal and neuronal pathways linking the brain to immune cell activation.These considerations could lead to novel therapeutic strategies for rheumatic diseases in the future.

  9. [Periodontal disease in pediatric rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Fabri, Gisele M C; Savioli, Cynthia; Siqueira, José T; Campos, Lucia M; Bonfá, Eloisa; Silva, Clovis A

    2014-01-01

    Gingivitis and periodontitis are immunoinflammatory periodontal diseases characterized by chronic localized infections usually associated with insidious inflammation This narrative review discusses periodontal diseases and mechanisms influencing the immune response and autoimmunity in pediatric rheumatic diseases (PRD), particularly juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (C-SLE) and juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). Gingivitis was more frequently observed in these diseases compared to health controls, whereas periodontitis was a rare finding. In JIA patients, gingivitis and periodontitis were related to mechanical factors, chronic arthritis with functional disability, dysregulation of the immunoinflammatory response, diet and drugs, mainly corticosteroids and cyclosporine. In C-SLE, gingivitis was associated with longer disease period, high doses of corticosteroids, B-cell hyperactivation and immunoglobulin G elevation. There are scarce data on periodontal diseases in JDM population, and a unique gingival pattern, characterized by gingival erythema, capillary dilation and bush-loop formation, was observed in active patients. In conclusion, gingivitis was the most common periodontal disease in PRD. The observed association with disease activity reinforces the need for future studies to determine if resolution of this complication will influence disease course or severity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. The second rheumatic heart disease forum report.

    PubMed

    Zühlke, Liesl J; Engel, Mark E; Remenyi, Bo; Wyber, Rosemary; Carapetis, Jonathan

    2013-09-01

    The second rheumatic heart disease (RHD) forum was held on February 18, 2013, at the Sixth World Congress of Pediatric Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery in Cape Town, South Africa, to focus attention on key areas in global RHD control, management, and prevention. Building on the foundation of the first RHD forum, over 150 interested participants met to discuss critical issues on the RHD landscape. Unique to this meeting was a mixture of diverse backgrounds and disciplines, all crucially important to the conversation around RHD control and prevention. Some clear priorities have emerged for RHD activities in the next era: the necessity for political intervention and policy change; increasing the health workforce by incorporating teaching, training, and task-shifting; revitalizing the research agenda by merging basic, clinical, and translational research; and obtaining universal access to high-quality penicillin. There was also an urgent request for new resources; for existing resources to be further developed, improved, and shared across platforms; and for resources to be supported in the nonmedical arena. Finally, the necessity of involving the patient community in the ongoing discussion was highlighted. The participants of both the first and second RHD forum represent a new, thriving, and growing community of RHD activists who should usher in a new era of significant improvements in RHD control and prevention. Copyright © 2013 World Heart Federation (Geneva). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Non-rheumatic `subvalvar' mitral regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Caves, P. K.; Paneth, M.

    1973-01-01

    Thirty-seven patients with non-rheumatic subvalvar mitral regurgitation are reported, representing 16% of all patients with mitral regurgitation submitted to open operation over a five-and-a-half-year period. In 22 older patients with `idiopathic' chordal lesions, the commonest finding was rupture of chordae to the posterior leaflet. The aortic leaflet chordae were most frequently involved following myocardial infarction (7 patients) or bacterial endocarditis (3 patients). Three other younger patients had ruptured chordae and two patients had rupture of the posteromedial papillary muscle following acute myocardial infarction. The mitral valve was repaired in 16 patients with ruptured chordae, of whom only eight obtained a satisfactory late result. In the other 21 patients the valve was replaced with a mounted aortic homograft or a Starr-Edwards prosthesis. It is concluded that mitral valve repair should be reserved for patients with symmetrical rupture of the chordae controlling the centre of the posterior leaflet, as regurgitation may reappear after other forms of repair due to progressive rupture of other abnormal chordae or breakdown of the repair. The early and late mortality in the patients with a definite antecedent myocardial infarction was much higher than in the other groups, and emergency valve replacement soon after rupture of the papillary muscle was unsuccessful in both patients. Images PMID:4731107

  12. [Operative differential therapy of rheumatic wrists].

    PubMed

    Dinges, H; Fürst, M; Rüther, H; Schill, S

    2007-09-01

    The wrists are affected in the long-term in 90% of people with rheumatism and are often (42%) the first manifestation of a destructive disease. The functionality of the wrist and the whole hand is of great importance because in many cases loss of function of the wrists leads to severe limitations. Local and operative treatment of the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of the main duties in rheuma-orthopaedics. For operative treatment there is a finely tuned differential therapeutic spectrum available. The diagnostic indications take the local and total pattern of affection, the current systemic therapy as well as patient wishes and patient compliance into consideration. In the early stages according to LDE (Larsen, Dale, Eek), soft tissues operations such as articulo-tenosynovectomy (ATS) are most commonly carried out. In further advanced stages osseus stabilisation must often be performed. At this point a smooth transition from partial arthrodesis to complete fixation is possible. After initial euphoria, arthroplasty of the wrist is being increasingly less used for operative treatment due to the unconvincing long-term results and high complication rate. With reference to the good long-term results of all operative procedures, in particular early ATS with respect to pain, function and protection of tendons, after failure of medicinal treatment and persistence of inflammatory activity in the wrist, patients should be transferred to an experienced rheuma-orthopaedic surgeon.

  13. Aquatic therapy for patients with rheumatic disease.

    PubMed

    McNeal, R L

    1990-11-01

    Aquatic therapy is justifiably a rapidly expanding, beneficial form of patient treatment. The goals established at the initial and subsequent evaluations usually are met as quickly and as sensibly as possible. Understanding the theory of water techniques is essential in implementing an aquatic therapy program. The success of the program, however, will always depend on the pleasure and benefits achieved by the patients. Remember, rheumatic patients most likely will need to modify their previous daily functioning. Patients need to be aware of the long-term ramifications of the disease process and understand how treatment and care may be altered during various stages of exacerbation and remission. Patient education is critical in ensuring individual responsibility for the changes that must be made when not supervised by a professional. Aquatic therapy is a step in molding a positive lifestyle change for the patient. The patient can be encouraged to be fitness oriented and, at the same time, exercise in a manner that is safe, effective, and biomechanically and physiologically sound. The environment, hopefully, also will be conductive to family and social interaction that ultimately encourages the compliance of long-term exercise programs.

  14. HLA class II associations with rheumatic heart disease among clinically homogeneous patients in children in Latvia

    PubMed Central

    Stanevicha, Valda; Eglite, Jelena; Sochnevs, Arturs; Gardovska, Dace; Zavadska, Dace; Shantere, Ruta

    2003-01-01

    Genetic control of immune reactions has a major role in the development of rheumatic heart disease (RHD) and differs between patients with rheumatic fever (RF). Some authors think the risk of acquiring RHD is associated with the HLA class II DR and DQ loci, but other views exist, due to the various HLA-typing methods and ways of grouping cases. Our goal was to determine the relations between HLA class II alleles and risk of or protection from RF in patients with relatively homogeneous clinical manifestations. A total of 70 RF patients under the age of 18 years were surveyed in Latvia. HLA genotyping of DRB1*01 to DRB1*18 and DQB1*0201-202, *0301-305, *0401-402, *0501-504, and *0601-608 was performed using polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific primers. Data for a control group of 100 healthy individuals typed for HLA by the same method were available from the databank of the Immunology Institute of Latvia. Of the RF patients, 47 had RHD and 8 had Sydenham's chorea. We concluded that HLA class II DRB1*07-DQB1*0401-2 and DRB1*07-DQB1*0302 could be the risk alleles and HLA class II DRB1*06 and DQB1*0602-8, the protective ones. Patients with mitral valve regurgitation more often had DRB1*07 and DQB1*0401-2, and patients with multivalvular lesions more often had DRB1*07 and DQB1*0302. In Sydenham's chorea patients, the DQB1*0401-2 allele was more frequent. Genotyping control showed a high risk of RF and RHD in patients with DRB1*01-DQB1*0301-DRB1*07-DQB1*0302 and DRB1*15-DQB1*0302-DRB1*07-DQB1*0303. PMID:14680508

  15. Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in rural South Indian children*

    PubMed Central

    Koshi, Grace; Benjamin, V.; Cherian, George

    1981-01-01

    A preliminary pilot study of streptococcal infection and sequelae was initiated in 23 villages in 1973 using trained field workers for case detection. Part of the pilot programme, in 1974-75, involved 374 rural and 664 urban schoolchildren, and revealed that 14.9% of them had streptococcal pyoderma while pharyngitis was seen in 4.2%. The pilot study also revealed a high prevalence of rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) in both rural (5.4/1000) and urban (6.0/1000) pupils. A long-term surveillance study was then undertaken in 3890 pupils attending 15 rural schools, from July 1975 to December 1978, when the prevalence of RF was found to be 0.5/1000 and of RHD, 4.4/1000, giving an overall rate of 4.9/1000. The incidence rate was found to be 1.7/1000 per year in 1976, 1.6/1000 per year in 1977, and 0 in 1978. The rate of compliance with primary prophylaxis was 90-100%, and with secondary prophylaxis was 92-93% of the 27 cases. PMID:7032733

  16. Association of MASP2 polymorphisms and protein levels with rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Catarino, Sandra Jeremias dos Santos; Boldt, Angelica Beate Winter; Beltrame, Marcia Holsbach; Nisihara, Renato Mitsunori; Schafranski, Marcelo Derbli; de Messias-Reason, Iara Jose

    2014-12-01

    MASP-2 is a key protein of the lectin pathway of complement system. Several MASP2 polymorphisms were associated with MASP-2 serum levels or functional activity. Here we investigated a possible association between MASP2 polymorphisms and MASP-2 serum levels with the susceptibility to rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD). We haplotyped 11 MASP2 polymorphisms with multiplex sequence-specific PCR in 145 patients with history of RF from south Brazil (103 with RHD and 42 without cardiac lesion [RFo]) and 342 healthy controls. MASP-2 levels were determined by ELISA. The low MASP-2 producing p.377A and p.439H variants were negatively associated with RF (P=0.02, OR=0.36) and RHD (P=0.01, OR=0.25). In contrast, haplotypes that share the intron 9 - exon 12 g.1961795C, p.371D, p.377V and p.439R polymorphisms increased the susceptibility to RHD (P=0.02, OR=4.9). MASP-2 levels were associated with MASP2 haplotypes and were lower in patients (P<0.0001), which may reflect protein consumption due to complement activation. MASP2 gene polymorphisms and protein levels seem to play an important role in the development of RF and establishment of RHD.

  17. A vaccine against Streptococcus pyogenes: the potential to prevent rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Guilherme, Luiza; Ferreira, Frederico Moraes; Köhler, Karen Francine; Postol, Edilberto; Kalil, Jorge

    2013-02-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes causes severe, invasive infections such as the sequelae associated with acute rheumatic fever, rheumatic heart disease, acute glomerulonephritis, uncomplicated pharyngitis, and pyoderma. Efforts to produce a vaccine against S. pyogenes began several decades ago, and different models have been proposed. We have developed a vaccine candidate peptide, StreptInCor, comprising 55 amino acid residues of the C-terminal portion of the M protein and encompassing both the T- and B-cell protective epitopes. The present article summarizes data from the previous 5 years during which we tested the immunogenicity and safety of StreptInCor in different animal models. We showed that StreptInCor overlapping peptides induced cellular and humoral immune responses of individuals bearing different HLA class II molecules. These results are consistent with peptides that have a universal vaccine epitope. The tridimensional molecular structure of StreptInCor was elucidated by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which showed that its structure is composed of two microdomains linked by an 18-residue α-helix. Additionally, we comprehensively evaluated the structural stability of the StreptInCor peptide in different physicochemical conditions using circular dichroism. Additional experiments were performed with inbred, outbred, and HLA class II transgenic mice. Analysis of several organs of these mice showed neither deleterious nor autoimmune reactions even after a long period of vaccination, indicating that the StreptInCor candidate peptide could be considered as an immunogenic and safe vaccine.

  18. Interleukin-10: Role in increasing susceptibility and pathogenesis of rheumatic fever/rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Neha; Toor, Devinder

    2017-02-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus) causes rheumatic fever (RF) which later progresses towards rheumatic heart disease (RHD) in the susceptible individuals. RF and RHD both contribute towards increasing global burden of disease, especially in developing countries. RHD is one of the most common acquired heart diseases causing permanent damage to heart valves which ultimately leads to heart failure. In RHD, heart valve lesions are formed which are mediated by autoimmune reaction between streptococcal antigens (M protein and group A carbohydrate epitope GlcNAc) and heart tissues. On the other hand, inflammatory response generated by cytokines promotes chronicity of the disease. Varying concentrations of interleukin-10 (IL-10) in patients and controls are reported and are also found to be associated with IL-10 gene polymorphism in RF/RHD patients. Although the effect of IL-10 gene polymorphism on the functionality of IL-10 is unknown, many investigations suggest an important role of IL-10 and its polymorphism in immune regulation and progression of disease in RF/RHD. This review summarizes the studies based on association of interleukin-10 with RHD in different populations to understand the role of IL-10 in susceptibility and pathogenesis of the disease.

  19. Citizens unite for computational immunology!

    PubMed Central

    Belden, Orrin S.; Baker, Sarah Catherine; Baker, Brian M.

    2016-01-01

    Crowdsourcing by recruiting volunteers who can provide computational time, programming expertise, or puzzle-solving talent has emerged as a powerful tool for biomedical research. Recent projects demonstrate the potential for crowdsourcing in immunology. Tools for developing applications, new funding, and an eager public make crowdsourcing a serious option for creative solutions for computationally-challenging immunological problems. Expanded uses of crowdsourcing in immunology will allow for more efficient large-scale data collection and analysis. It will also involve, inspire, educate, and engage the public in a variety of meaningful ways. The benefits are real – it’s time to jump in! PMID:26139599

  20. IMMUNOLOGIC STUDIES OF HEART TISSUE

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Melvin H.; Meyeserian, Mary; Kushner, Irving

    1961-01-01

    Reactions of normal and pathologic sera with heart tissue have been investigated by the immunofluorescent method, with particular reference to presumptive autoantibodies to heart and their differentiation from blood group isoantibodies and Wassermann antibody. In the heart, blood group substances A and B were found distributed in capillary walls, vascular endothelium, and interstitial connective tissue. In surveys of randomly selected sera, isoimmune reactions against tissue blood group substances A and B were noted infrequently. This finding was considered related to the limited sensitivity of fluorescent antibody methods. Heart tissue from blood group O individuals was used for screening of pathologic sera for presence of tissue-reactive factors. Wassermann antibody was found reactive with constituents of myocardial sarcoplasm, of which the major reactant was cardiolipin. Wassermann-positive sera absorbed with beef cardiolipin gave evidence of reaction with other constituents of myofiber sarcoplasm. Sera of patients with rheumatic fever, rheumatic heart disease, rheumatoid arthritis, disseminated lupus, and liver disease frequently showed a marked reactivity with constituents of myofiber sarcoplasm. These serum factors were differentiated from Wassermann antibody. At least three patterns of immunofluorescent staining could be differentiated by the distribution of reactants in the myofiber sarcoplasm. These reactants were extractable with ethanol and methanol but not by acetone. Sera found reactive by immunofluorescence frequently gave positive flocculation and complement-fixation tests with alcohol extracts of human heart. Immunofluorescent tests were best correlated with flocculation reactions. Sarcoplasmic-reactive factors were associated in some sera with 19S gamma globulin as demonstrated by the use of fluorescent anti-19S gamma globulin. Serologic reactions with homologous or autologous heart were observed particularly frequently with sera from rheumatic

  1. [Immunology of contact allergy].

    PubMed

    Martin, S F

    2011-10-01

    Contact allergy is a skin disease that is caused by the reaction of the immune system to low molecular weight chemicals. A hallmark of contact allergens is their chemical reactivity, which is not exhibited by toxic irritants. Covalent binding of contact allergens to or complex formation with proteins is essential for the activation of the immune system. As a consequence antigenic epitopes are formed, which are recognized by contact allergen-specific T cells. The generation of effector and memory T cells causes the high antigen specificity and the repeated antigen-specific skin reaction of contact allergy. New findings reveal that the less specific reaction of the innate immune system to contact allergens closely resembles the reaction to an infection. Therefore, contact allergy can be viewed as an immunologic misunderstanding since the skin contact with chemical allergens is interpreted as an infection. The growing understanding of the molecular and cellular pathologic mechanisms of contact allergy can aid the development of specific therapies and of in vitro alternatives to animal testing for the identification of contact allergens.

  2. Immunology for physicists

    SciTech Connect

    Perelson, A.S.; Weisbuch, G.

    1997-10-01

    The immune system is a complex system of cells and molecules that can provide us with a basic defense against pathogenic organisms. Like the nervous system, the immune system performs pattern recognition tasks, learns, and retains a memory of the antigens that it has fought. The immune system contains more than 10{sup 7} different clones of cells that communicate via cell-cell contact and the secretion of molecules. Performing complex tasks such as learning and memory involves cooperation among large numbers of components of the immune system and hence there is interest in using methods and concepts from statistical physics. Furthermore, the immune response develops in time and the description of its time evolution is an interesting problem in dynamical systems. In this paper, the authors provide a brief introduction to the biology of the immune system and discuss a number of immunological problems in which the use of physical concepts and mathematical methods has increased our understanding. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Immunological Aspects of Bagassosis

    PubMed Central

    Hearn, C. E. D.; Holford-Strevens, Valerie

    1968-01-01

    Immunological investigations of 37 patients with bagassosis, 92 unaffected bagasse workers, and 150 non-exposed controls showed that precipitins against extracts of bagasse could be demonstrated just as frequently in the unaffected and the non-exposed as in the affected. However, there was a general tendency for the precipitin levels of patients with bagassosis to fall slightly with increasing time after recovery from the clinical episode. The presence of the precipitins so far demonstrated in the sera of bagasse workers therefore appears to be of no clinical significance. Inhalation tests with an extract of bagasse, in a group of 16 patients who had had bagassosis, produced late, systemic reactions in 15 similar to those described in farmer's lung and bird fancier's lung, so supporting the hypothesis that a similar type of hypersensitivity is the cause of bagassosis. Inhalation of extracts of Thermoactinomyces vulgaris also produced typical, late reactions in 12 out of 15 subjects, whereas extracts of Micropolyspora faeni failed to produce reactions in any of 16 subjects. The specific reactions to inhalation tests with Thermoactinomyces vulgaris were typical of a precipitin-mediated type of hypersensitivity reaction and support the view that this actinomycete may be important in the aetiology of bagassosis. PMID:4972748

  4. Introduction. Ecological immunology

    PubMed Central

    Schulenburg, Hinrich; Kurtz, Joachim; Moret, Yannick; Siva-Jothy, Michael T.

    2008-01-01

    An organism's fitness is critically reliant on its immune system to provide protection against parasites and pathogens. The structure of even simple immune systems is surprisingly complex and clearly will have been moulded by the organism's ecology. The aim of this review and the theme issue is to examine the role of different ecological factors on the evolution of immunity. Here, we will provide a general framework of the field by contextualizing the main ecological factors, including interactions with parasites, other types of biotic as well as abiotic interactions, intraspecific selective constraints (life-history trade-offs, sexual selection) and population genetic processes. We then elaborate the resulting immunological consequences such as the diversity of defence mechanisms (e.g. avoidance behaviour, resistance, tolerance), redundancy and protection against immunopathology, life-history integration of the immune response and shared immunity within a community (e.g. social immunity and microbiota-mediated protection). Our review summarizes the concepts of current importance and directs the reader to promising future research avenues that will deepen our understanding of the defence against parasites and pathogens. PMID:18926970

  5. Immunology and cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Smith, Benjamin; Sigal, Ian R; Grande, Daniel A

    2015-12-01

    The intrinsic regenerative capacity of avascular cartilage is limited. Cartilage injuries result in chronic, non-healing lesions requiring surgical management. Frequently, these surgical techniques make use of allogeneic cells and tissues. This review discusses the immune status of these materials. Cartilage allografts, often used in orthopedic and plastic surgeries, have rarely provoked a significant immune response. In whole cartilage transplants, the dense matrix produced by chondrocytes inhibits lymphocyte migration, preventing immune detection rendering them "antigen sequestered." It is unclear whether isolated chondrocytes are immune-privileged; chondrocytes express immune inhibitory B7 molecules, indicating that they have some ability to modulate immune reactions. Allogeneic cartilage grafts often involve a bony portion often retaining immunogenic cells and proteins-to facilitate good surgical attachment and concern that this may enhance inflammation and immune rejection. However, studies of failed cartilage grafts have not found immune responses to be a contributing factor. Meniscus allografts, which also retain a bony portion, raise similar concerns as cartilage allografts. Despite this, the plugs improved patient outcomes, indicating that the immunological effects were not clinically significant. Finally, allogeneic mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) also are being investigated as a treatment for cartilage damage. MSCs have been demonstrated to have unique immunomodulatory properties including their ability to reduce immune cell infiltration and to modulate inflammation. In summary, the immunogenic properties of cartilage vary with the type of allograft used: Cartilage allografts demonstrate active immune-suppressive mechanisms as evidenced by lack of allograft rejection, while MSC allografts appear to be safe for transplantation.

  6. Immunology of schistosomiasis*

    PubMed Central

    1974-01-01

    This Memorandum, after summarizing the life cycle of the different species of human schistosome, reviews the present knowledge of the immunology of schistosomiasis. Each stage of the parasite contains antigen that may stimulate an immune response. However, at the moment there are no accepted serological in vitro tests that correlate with protection; this develops only after the host has experienced a living infection, which suggests that the stimulation of immunity is due to some metabolic process involving the release of protective antigen. The adult worm, however, seems to be able to escape the immune mechanism of the host. Specific antigens are also released by the eggs, and the immune response against these antigens seems to cause granuloma formation around the egg itself. The granuloma is the main lesion found in schistosomiasis. Evidence for protective immunity in experimental animals and man is reviewed, together with the possible mechanism by which the adult worm escapes the immune response of the host. A review of methods used for the diagnosis of schistosomiasis and a list of recommendations for further research are also included. PMID:4219757

  7. Gene therapy for childhood immunological diseases.

    PubMed

    Kohn, D B

    2008-01-01

    Gene therapy using autologous hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) that are corrected with the normal gene may have a beneficial effect on blood cell production or function, without the immunologic complications of allogeneic HSC transplantation. Childhood immunological diseases are highly favorable candidates for responses to gene therapy using HSC. Hemoglobinopathies, lysosomal and metabolic disorders and defects of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells should also be ameliorated by gene therapy using autologous HSC. At present, gene therapy has been beneficial for patients with XSCID, ADA-deficient SCID and chronic granulomatous disease. The principle that partial marrow conditioning increases engraftment of gene-corrected HSC has been demonstrated. Clinical trials are being developed in Europe and the United States to treat several other genetic blood cell disorders. This progress is tempered by the serious complication observed in XSCID patients developing T lymphoproliferative disease. New methods for gene transfer (lentiviral and foamy viral vectors, semi-viral systems and gene correction) may retain or further increase the efficacy and decrease the risks from gene therapy using HSC. Ultimately, the relative benefits and risks of autologous gene therapy will be weighed against other available options (for example, allogeneic HSCT) to determine the treatment of choice.

  8. Rheumatic heart disease in indigenous populations--New Zealand experience.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Nigel

    2010-01-01

    Rheumatic fever continues unabated among the indigenous Māori and Pacific Island New Zealanders. Ethnic disparities have increased in the past decade. The major success story for disease control has been secondary penicillin prophylaxis with 28-day intramuscular benzathine penicillin with high penicillin delivery rates and low recurrence rates. A landmark study for primary prevention of acute rheumatic fever for group A streptococcal pharyngitis was published in 2009. New Zealand has helped establish the role of echocardiography in acute rheumatic fever, with subclinical carditis incorporated into guidelines as a major criterion of rheumatic fever in high prevalence regions. The rates of mitral valve repair for rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are currently greater than 90% in the children's cardiac unit but remain low in adult cardiac units in New Zealand. This is particularly relevant to women of child bearing age where New Zealand data has shown that pregnancy outcomes for mothers with prosthetic valves on warfarin are poor. There are new initiatives to prevent severe RHD using portable echocardiography by screening school aged children. The prevalence of definite RHD was 2.4% in a large cohort of socially disadvantaged children in South Auckland studied in 2007-2008. Cost benefit models of screening need to be developed. Ongoing research involves international consensus standardisation of RHD patterns, and the need to define the natural history of subclinical RHD.

  9. Protecting Bone Health in Pediatric Rheumatic Diseases: Pharmacological Considerations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yujuan; Milojevic, Diana

    2017-06-01

    Bone health in children with rheumatic conditions may be compromised due to several factors related to the inflammatory disease state, delayed puberty, altered life style, including decreased physical activities, sun avoidance, suboptimal calcium and vitamin D intake, and medical treatments, mainly glucocorticoids and possibly some disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. Low bone density or even fragility fractures could be asymptomatic; therefore, children with diseases of high inflammatory load, such as systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, juvenile dermatomyositis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and those requiring chronic glucocorticoids may benefit from routine screening of bone health. Most commonly used assessment tools are laboratory testing including serum 25-OH-vitamin D measurement and bone mineral density measurement by a variety of methods, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry as the most widely used. Early disease control, use of steroid-sparing medications such as disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs and biologics, supplemental vitamin D and calcium, and promotion of weight-bearing physical activities can help optimize bone health. Additional treatment options for osteoporosis such as bisphosphonates are still controversial in children with chronic rheumatic diseases, especially those with decreased bone density without fragility fractures. This article reviews common risk factors leading to compromised bone health in children with chronic rheumatic diseases and discusses the general approach to prevention and treatment of bone fragility.

  10. Tactile sensitivity on the hands skin in rheumatic patients.

    PubMed

    Kaluga, Elżbieta; Kostiukow, Anna; Samborski, Włodzimierz; Rostkowska, Elżbieta

    2014-06-01

    Clinical symptoms of rheumatic diseases can cause changes in the level of skin tactile sensitivity. To determine the tactile threshold of the hands in female patients with rheumatic diseases. It also attempted to determine correlations between rheumatic patients' tactile sensitivity and the degree of articular movement limitations, the Barthel Index (BI) and Edinburgh Handedness Inventory (EHI) results, the level of disability of the right hand and the left hand as well as age, education and eyesight. Ninety-nine female rheumatic patients aged 19-87 years took part in the study. The control group comprised 45 healthy women aged 23-80 years. The measurement of the tactile threshold was performed using the Touch-Test™ Sensory Evaluators (Semmes-Weinstein Monofilaments Test). The tactile threshold was measured at three sites on the hand: the little finger, the index finger and the metacarpus. The patients' tactile sensitivity ranges were classified as normal, diminished light touch and diminished protective touch. The degree of their disability was correlated with tactile sensitivity. The patients' tactile sensitivity worsens with age, but it is not correlated with the level of education. The lateralization was similar to that of the control group and was not correlated with tactile sensitivity. The worsening eyesight, independent of rheumatic disease, corresponds, however, with decreasing tactile sensitivity. The patients represented a group with a medium level of functional disability and lower tactile sensitivity.

  11. Rheumatic chorea in northern Australia: a clinical and epidemiological study

    PubMed Central

    Carapetis, J.; Currie, B.

    1999-01-01

    To describe the epidemiology and clinical features of Sydenham's chorea in the Aboriginal population of northern Australia a review was conducted of 158 episodes in 108 people: 106 were Aborigines, 79 were female, and the mean age was 10.9 years at first episode. Chorea occurred in 28% of cases of acute rheumatic fever, carditis occurred in 25% of episodes of chorea, and arthritis in 8%. Patients with carditis or arthritis tended to have raised acute phase reactants and streptococcal serology. Two episodes lasted at least 30 months. Mean time to first recurrence of chorea was 2.1 years compared with 1.2 years to second recurrence. Established rheumatic heart disease developed in 58% of cases and was more likely in those presenting with acute carditis, although most people who developed rheumatic heart disease did not have evidence of acute carditis with chorea. Differences in the patterns of chorea and other manifestations of acute rheumatic fever in different populations may hold clues to its pathogenesis. Long term adherence to secondary prophylaxis is crucial following all episodes of acute rheumatic fever, including chorea, to prevent recurrence.

 PMID:10086943

  12. Clinical and Immunological Responses in Ocular Demodecosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Hoon; Chun, Yeoun Sook

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical and immunological responses to Demodex on the ocular surface. Thirteen eyes in 10 patients with Demodex blepharitis and chronic ocular surface disorders were included in this study and treated by lid scrubbing with tea tree oil for the eradication of Demodex. We evaluated ocular surface manifestations and Demodex counts, and analyzed IL-1β, IL-5, IL-7, IL-12, IL-13, IL-17, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and macrophage inflammatory protein-1β in tear samples before and after the treatment. All patients exhibited ocular surface manifestations including corneal nodular opacity, peripheral corneal vascularization, refractory corneal erosion and infiltration, or chronic conjunctival inflammatory signs before treatment. After treatment, Demodex was nearly eradicated, tear concentrations of IL-1β and IL-17 were significantly reduced and substantial clinical improvement was observed in all patients. In conclusion, we believe that Demodex plays an aggravating role in inflammatory ocular surface disorders. PMID:21935281

  13. Clinical and immunological responses in ocular demodecosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Hoon; Chun, Yeoun Sook; Kim, Jae Chan

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical and immunological responses to Demodex on the ocular surface. Thirteen eyes in 10 patients with Demodex blepharitis and chronic ocular surface disorders were included in this study and treated by lid scrubbing with tea tree oil for the eradication of Demodex. We evaluated ocular surface manifestations and Demodex counts, and analyzed IL-1β, IL-5, IL-7, IL-12, IL-13, IL-17, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and macrophage inflammatory protein-1β in tear samples before and after the treatment. All patients exhibited ocular surface manifestations including corneal nodular opacity, peripheral corneal vascularization, refractory corneal erosion and infiltration, or chronic conjunctival inflammatory signs before treatment. After treatment, Demodex was nearly eradicated, tear concentrations of IL-1β and IL-17 were significantly reduced and substantial clinical improvement was observed in all patients. In conclusion, we believe that Demodex plays an aggravating role in inflammatory ocular surface disorders.

  14. Antibodies against proteins of streptococcal hyaluronate synthase bind to human fibroblasts and are present in patients with rheumatic fever.

    PubMed Central

    Prehm, S; Herrington, C; Nickel, V; Völker, W; Briko, N I; Blinnikova, E I; Schmiedel, A; Prehm, P

    1995-01-01

    Antibodies directed against the streptococcal 42 kDa hyaluronate synthase and a 56 kDa auxiliary protein bound to the surface of intact human fibroblasts in vitro. Staining was most prominent during the detachment phase of mitosis. In eukaryotic plasma membranes a 52 kDa protein was recognized by the antiserum against the 56 kDa streptococcal protein. Since the cross-reacting proteins could be involved in immunological mimicry between streptococcal and human antigens leading to heart cell necrosis, the reactivity of sera from patients with rheumatic fever was compared with that of sera from healthy or streptococcal infected persons. The sera from patients with rheumatic fever showed a higher reactivity against the 56 kDa protein than those from healthy persons or from patients with an antibiotic treated streptococcal infection. This difference was not observed for the 42 kDa protein. These sera were able to lead to cell lysis in the presence of complement. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7591991

  15. Revisiting the pathogenesis of rheumatic fever and carditis.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Rajendra; Sharma, Meenakshi; Chandrashekhar, Y; Kotb, Malak; Yacoub, Magdi H; Narula, Jagat

    2013-03-01

    Rheumatic fever is one of the most-neglected ailments, and its pathogenesis remains poorly understood. The major thrust of research has been directed towards cross-reactivity between streptococcal M protein and myocardial α-helical coiled-coil proteins. M protein has also been the focus of vaccine development. The characteristic pathological findings suggest that the primary site of rheumatic-fever-related damage is subendothelial and perivascular connective tissue matrix and overlying endothelium. Over the past 5 years, a streptococcal M protein N-terminus domain has been shown to bind to the CB3 region in collagen type IV. This binding seems to initiate an antibody response to the collagen and result in ground substance inflammation. These antibodies do not cross-react with M proteins, and we believe that no failure of immune system and, possibly, no molecular mimicry occur in rheumatic fever. This alternative hypothesis shares similarity with collagen involvement in both Goodpasture syndrome and Alport syndrome.

  16. Acute Rheumatic Fever: Global Persistence of a Preventable Disease.

    PubMed

    Bono-Neri, Francine

    2016-10-21

    The persistence of acute rheumatic fever continues to be seen globally. Once thought to be eradicated in various parts of the world, the disease came back with a vengeance secondary to a lack of diligence on the part of providers. Today, the global burden of group A streptococcal infection, the culprit of the numerous sequelae manifested in acute rheumatic fever, is considerable. Although a completely preventable disease, rheumatic fever continues to exist. It is a devastating disease that involves long-term, multisystem treatment and monitoring for patients who were unsuccessful at eradicating the precipitating group A streptococcal infection. Prevention is the key to resolving the dilemma of the disease's global burden, yet the method to yield its prevention still remains unknown. Thus, meticulous attention to implementing proper treatment is the mainstay and remains a top priority.

  17. Disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs in people with cystic fibrosis-related arthritis.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Judith; Rangaraj, Satyapal

    2012-09-12

    Arthritis remains a relatively infrequent complication of cystic fibrosis, but is a cause of significant morbidity when it does occur. Two distinct types of arthritis are described in cystic fibrosis: cystic fibrosis-related arthropathy and hypertrophic osteoarthropathy. Management of arthritis in people with cystic fibrosis is uncertain and complex because of the underlying disease and its treatment. To review the effectiveness and safety of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs for the management of arthritis related to cystic fibrosis in adults and children. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database handsearches of relevant journal and abstract books of conference proceedings.Date of most recent search: 10 July 2012. Randomised controlled trials which compared the efficacy and safety of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (e.g. methotrexate, gold, sulfasalazine, penicillamine, leflunomide, hydroxychloroquine and newer agents such as biologic disease modifying agents and monoclonal antibodies) with each other, with no treatment or with placebo for cystic fibrosis-related arthropathy or hypertrophic osteoarthropathy. No relevant studies were identified. No studies were included in this review. Although it is generally recognised that cystic fibrosis-related arthritis can be episodic and resolve spontaneously, treatment with analgesics and anti-inflammatory agents may be needed. But when episodic symptoms progress to persistent disease, disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs may be needed to limit the course of the disease. It is disappointing that no randomised controlled trials to rigorously evaluate these drugs could be found. This systematic review has identified the need for a well-designed adequately powered randomised controlled trial to assess the efficacy and safety of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs for the

  18. 21 CFR 866.5590 - Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system. 866.5590... Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system. (a) Identification. A lipoprotein X immunological test system is a device that consists of the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques lipoprotein X (a...

  19. 21 CFR 866.5590 - Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system. 866.5590... Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system. (a) Identification. A lipoprotein X immunological test system is a device that consists of the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques lipoprotein X (a...

  20. [Pathogenesis of parodontitis in rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Detert, J; Pischon, N; Burmester, G-R; Buttgereit, F

    2010-03-01

    Inflammatory periodontal disease (PD) is a common disease worldwide that has a primarily bacterial aetiology and is characterized by dysregulation of the host inflammatory response. The degree of inflammation varies among individuals with PD independently of the degree of bacterial infection, suggesting that alteration of the immune function may substantially contribute to its extent. Factors such as smoking, education, and body mass index (BMI) are discussed as potential risk factors for PD. Most PD patients respond to bacterial invaders by mobilizing their defensive cells and releasing cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1beta, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, and IL-6, which ultimately causes tissue destruction by stimulating the production of collagenolytic enzymes, such matrix metalloproteinases. Recently, there has been growing evidence suggesting an association between PD and the increased risk of systemic diseases, such ateriosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, stroke, and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). PD and rheumatologic diseases such as RA share many pathological aspects and immunological findings.

  1. Value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound in rheumatic disease.

    PubMed

    Klauser, Andrea Sabine

    2005-12-01

    Ultrasound (US) is a useful tool in the assessment of rheumatic disease. It permits assessment of early erosive changes and vascularity detection in synovial proliferation, caused by inflammatory activity by using colour/power Doppler US (CDUS/PDUS). In the detection of slow flow and flow in small vessels, the CDUS/PDUS technique is limited. Contrast enhanced US can improve the detection of inflammatory vascularity but is not yet included in routine diagnosis of this condition. However, contrast enhanced US shows promising results in diagnosis, assessment of disease activity and follow up of inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

  2. The ying and yang of fever in rheumatic disease.

    PubMed

    Galloway, James; Cope, Andrew P

    2015-06-01

    Fevers are relatively common in rheumatic disease, largely due to the fact that the inflammatory process is driven by inflammatory mediators that function as endogenous pyrogens. Since the immune system's sensors cannot accurately distinguish between endogenous and exogenous (pathogen-derived) pyrogens a major challenge for physicians and rheumatologists has been to decipher patterns of clinical signs and symptoms to inform clinical decision making. Here we describe some of the common pitfalls and clinical challenges, and highlight the importance of a systematic approach to investigating the rheumatic disease patient presenting with fever.

  3. Outcomes in mothers with rheumatic diseases and their offspring workshop

    PubMed Central

    Neville, Autumn; Bernatsky, Sasha; Kuriya, Bindee; Bujold, Emmanuel; Chakravarty, Eliza; Platt, Robert W; Bérard, Anick; Vinet, Évelyne

    2017-01-01

    This conference report describes six presentations that were given during a Canadian Institutes for Health Research-funded workshop. The goal of the workshop was to discuss key knowledge gaps in the study of outcomes in mothers with rheumatic diseases and their offspring. Presentations focused on epidemiological and methodological issues associated with the reproductive and perinatal health of women with rheumatic diseases. Discussions of relevant recent research allowed for discovery of potential data sources that could facilitate interdisciplinary research and created the opportunity for future collaborations.

  4. Population Genetics and Natural Selection in Rheumatic Disease.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Paula S

    2017-08-01

    Human genetic diversity is the result of population genetic forces. This genetic variation influences disease risk and contributes to health disparities. Natural selection is an important influence on human genetic variation. Because immune and inflammatory function genes are enriched for signals of positive selection, the prevalence of rheumatic disease-risk alleles seen in different populations is partially the result of differing selective pressures (eg, due to pathogens). This review summarizes the genetic regions associated with susceptibility to different rheumatic diseases and concomitant evidence for natural selection, including known agents of selection exerting selective pressure in these regions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The National Data Bank for Rheumatic Diseases (NDB).

    PubMed

    Michaud, Kaleb

    2016-01-01

    The National Data Bank for Rheumatic Diseases (NDB) is a longitudinal observational patient-driven database, founded as a non-profit research organization in 1998 by Dr. Frederick Wolfe. Patients are sent a primary questionnaire twice a year. More than 50,000 patients with more than 100 various rheumatic diseases under the care of more than 1,500 rheumatologists have completed at least one 6-month questionnaire. Many important publications concerning rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, fibromyalgia, and pharmaco-epidemiology have resulted from NDB research.

  6. Value of serum IgG4 in the diagnosis of IgG4-related disease and in differentiation from rheumatic diseases and other diseases.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Motohisa; Tabeya, Tetsuya; Naishiro, Yasuyoshi; Yajima, Hidetaka; Ishigami, Keisuke; Shimizu, Yui; Obara, Mikiko; Suzuki, Chisako; Yamashita, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Toshiaki; Sasaki, Shigeru; Sugaya, Toshiaki; Ishida, Tadao; Takano, Ken-Ichi; Himi, Tetsuo; Suzuki, Yasuo; Nishimoto, Norihiro; Honda, Saho; Takahashi, Hiroki; Imai, Kohzoh; Shinomura, Yasuhisa

    2012-06-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a novel disease entity that includes Mikulicz's disease, autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP), and many other conditions. It is characterized by elevated serum IgG4 levels and abundant IgG4-bearing plasmacyte infiltration of involved organs. We postulated that high levels of serum IgG4 would comprise a useful diagnostic tool, but little information is available about IgG4 in conditions other than IgG4-RD, including rheumatic diseases. Several reports have described cutoff values for serum IgG4 when diagnosing IgG4-RD, but these studies mostly used 135 mg/dL in AIP to differentiate from pancreatic cancer instead of rheumatic and other common diseases. There is no evidence for a cutoff serum IgG4 level of 135 mg/dL for rheumatic diseases and common diseases that are often complicated with rheumatic diseases. The aim of this work was to re-evaluate the usual cutoff serum IgG4 value in AIP (135 mg/dL) that is used to diagnose whole IgG4-RD in the setting of a rheumatic clinic by measuring serum IgG4 levels in IgG4-RD and various disorders. We therefore constructed ROC curves of serum IgG4 levels in 418 patients who attended Sapporo Medical University Hospital due to IgG4-RD and various rheumatic and common disorders. The optimal cut-off value of serum IgG4 for a diagnosis of IgG4-RD was 144 mg/dL, and the sensitivity and specificity were 95.10 and 90.76%, respectively. Levels of serum IgG4 were elevated in IgG4-RD, Churg-Strauss syndrome, multicentric Castleman's disease, eosinophilic disorders, and in some patients with rheumatoid arthritis, systemic sclerosis, chronic hepatitis, and liver cirrhosis. The usual cut-off value of 135 mg/dL in AIP is useful for diagnosing whole IgG4-RD, but high levels of serum IgG4 are sometimes observed in not only IgG4-RD but also other rheumatic and common diseases.

  7. Doppler US in rheumatic diseases with special emphasis on rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Toprak, Hüseyin; Kılıç, Erkan; Serter, Aslı; Kocakoç, Ercan; Özgöçmen, Salih

    2014-01-01

    Developments in digital ultrasonography (US) technology and the use of high-frequency broadband transducers have increased the quality of US imaging, particularly of superficial tissues. Thus, US, particularly color US or power Doppler US, in which high-resolution transducers are used, has become an important imaging modality in the assessment of rheumatic diseases. Furthermore, therapeutic interventions and biopsies can be performed under US guidance during the assessment of lesions. In this era of effective treatments, such as biologics, improvements in synovial inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis as well as changes in enthesitis in spondyloarthropathies, including ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, can be monitored effectively using gray-scale and/or power Doppler US. US is also a good imaging modality for crystal arthropathies, including gout and pseudogout, in which synovitis, erosions, tophi, and crystal deposition within or around the joint can be visualized readily. Vascular and tenosynovial structures, as well as the salivary glands, can be assessed with US in vasculitis and connective tissue disorders, including systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren's syndrome. Current research is focused on improving the sensitivity, specificity, validity, and reproducibility of US findings. In this review, we summarized the role of US, particularly power Doppler US, in rheumatic diseases and inflammation in superficial tissues.

  8. Geoepidemiological hints about Streptococcus pyogenes strains in relationship with acute rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Bianchini, Sonia; Fastiggi, Michele; Fumagalli, Monica; Andreozzi, Laura; Rigante, Donato

    2015-07-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) strains are lately classified on the basis of sequence variations in the emm gene encoding the M protein, but despite the high number of distinct emm genotypes, the spectrum of phenotypes varying from invasive suppurative to non-suppurative GAS-related disorders has still to be defined. The relationship of GAS types with the uprising of acute rheumatic fever (ARF), a multisystemic disease caused by misdirected anti-GAS response in predisposed people, is also obscure. Studies published over the last 15 years were retrieved from PubMed using the keywords: "Streptococcus pyogenes" or "group A Streptococcus" and "acute rheumatic fever": the prevalence of peculiar emm types across different countries of the world is highly variable, depending on research designs, year of observation, country involved, patients' age, and gender. Most studies revealed that a relatively small number of specific emm/M protein types can be considered "rheumatogenic", as potentially characterized by the possibility of inducing ARF, with remarkable differences between developing and developed countries. The association between emm types and post-streptococcal manifestations is challenging, however surveillance of disease-causing variants in a specific community with high rate of ARF should be reinforced with the final goal of developing a potential primary prophylaxis against GAS infections.

  9. Doppler US in rheumatic diseases with special emphasis on rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Toprak, Hüseyin; Kılıç, Erkan; Serter, Aslı; Kocakoç, Ercan; Özgöçmen, Salih

    2014-01-01

    Developments in digital ultrasonography (US) technology and the use of high-frequency broadband transducers have increased the quality of US imaging, particularly of superficial tissues. Thus, US, particularly color US or power Doppler US, in which high-resolution transducers are used, has become an important imaging modality in the assessment of rheumatic diseases. Furthermore, therapeutic interventions and biopsies can be performed under US guidance during the assessment of lesions. In this era of effective treatments, such as biologics, improvements in synovial inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis as well as changes in enthesitis in spondyloarthropathies, including ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, can be monitored effectively using gray-scale and/or power Doppler US. US is also a good imaging modality for crystal arthropathies, including gout and pseudogout, in which synovitis, erosions, tophi, and crystal deposition within or around the joint can be visualized readily. Vascular and tenosynovial structures, as well as the salivary glands, can be assessed with US in vasculitis and connective tissue disorders, including systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren’s syndrome. Current research is focused on improving the sensitivity, specificity, validity, and reproducibility of US findings. In this review, we summarized the role of US, particularly power Doppler US, in rheumatic diseases and inflammation in superficial tissues. PMID:23996840

  10. [Comparison of hospital prevalence of rheumatic heart diseases and acute rheumatic arthritis in France and Africa].

    PubMed

    Bertrand, E; Gérard, R

    1993-03-01

    This study reports the results of a multicentre enquiry performed in France in 1990 which included 41,242 adults hospitalised in Cardiology Units, 33,907 children hospitalised in Pediatric departments and 8,868 soldiers. A comparative enquiry was also carried out in North Africa (Tunis) and West Africa (Abidjan, Ouagadougou). The results of the French arm of the enquiry showed that rheumatic heart disease (RHD) has become very rare in adults (3.1% of all cardiac disease) and that it tends to occur in older subjects (average 54.4 years of age). There is practically no RHD in young adults. This decreased prevalence of RHD is confirmed in children in whom this diagnosis represents only 0.04% of cases of all cardiac disease--of which 87.5% are of extra-European origin. In contrast, there is a high frequency of RHD in Tunisia (29.3%) and West Africa (13.2% in Abidjan and 13% in Ouagadougou). The disease remains active as is shown by the age of affected adults in Africa (average 21 and 27 years of age). The results also show a reduction to a very low prevalence of acute rheumatic fever in French pediatric departments (0.005%). The authors discuss the reasons for the persistence of endemic infection in Africa: virulence of the streptococcus, predisposing factors (HLA group?), geographic factors and, above all, socioeconomic factors and difficulties in obtaining treatment and prophylaxis. A movement of international cooperation is suggested in order to combat RHD in Africa, especially with regards to its prevention in childhood.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Long-Term Outcomes From Acute Rheumatic Fever and Rheumatic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    He, Vincent Y.F.; Condon, John R.; Zhao, Yuejen; Roberts, Kathryn; de Dassel, Jessica L.; Currie, Bart J.; Fittock, Marea; Edwards, Keith N.; Carapetis, Jonathan R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: We investigated adverse outcomes for people with acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) and the effect of comorbidities and demographic factors on these outcomes. Methods: Using linked data (RHD register, hospital, and mortality data) for residents of the Northern Territory of Australia, we calculated ARF recurrence rates, rates of progression from ARF to RHD to severe RHD, RHD complication rates (heart failure, endocarditis, stroke, and atrial fibrillation), and mortality rates for 572 individuals diagnosed with ARF and 1248 with RHD in 1997 to 2013 (94.9% Indigenous). Results: ARF recurrence was highest (incidence, 3.7 per 100 person-years) in the first year after the initial ARF episode, but low-level risk persisted for >10 years. Progression to RHD was also highest (incidence, 35.9) in the first year, almost 10 times higher than ARF recurrence. The median age at RHD diagnosis in Indigenous people was young, especially among males (17 years). The development of complications was highest in the first year after RHD diagnosis: heart failure incidence rate per 100 person-years, 9.09; atrial fibrillation, 4.70; endocarditis, 1.00; and stroke, 0.58. Mortality was higher among Indigenous than non-Indigenous RHD patients (hazard ratio, 6.55; 95% confidence interval, 2.45–17.51), of which 28% was explained by comorbid renal failure and hazardous alcohol use. RHD complications and mortality rates were higher for urban than for remote residents. Conclusions: This study provides important new prognostic information for ARF/RHD. The residual Indigenous survival disparity in RHD patients, which persisted after accounting for comorbidities, suggests that other factors contribute to mortality, warranting further research. PMID:27407071

  12. Immunologic insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Davidson, J K; DeBra, D W

    1978-03-01

    The efficacy of sulfated beef insulin for plasma glucose control in 35 patients with immunologic insulin resistance was studied. Patients were on a mean dose of 550 U./day (range 200--2,000) of U-500 regular beef insulin. Mean maximum 125I-insulin-binding capacity was 191 mU./ml. serum (range 13--1,080). Mean in vivo half-life (T 1/2) of 125I-regular beef insulin was 614 minutes (range 114--1,300), as against a mean T 1/2 of 13.9 minutes (range 11.8--16.5) in normal controls. Treatment was successful in 34 patients and unsuccessful in one with lipoatrophic diabetes. The mean initial dose of sulfated insulin was 89 U./day (range 15--400) and at three months was 66 U./day (range 20--400). Twenty-eight patients who responded and survived have been on sulfated insulin for a mean of 39 months (range 2-66) and are on a mean dose of 25 U./day (range 0--100). The mean maximum binding capacity fell to 9 mU./ml. (range 0--34) during therapy (p less than 0.01). Mean 125I-insulin T 1/2 fell from 614 to 249 minutes after sulfated insulin therapy (p less than 0.001). A comparative study of 15 patients on consecutive days showed a 35 sulfated insulin T 1/2 of 60 minutes (range 15--94) and a mean 125I-regular insulin T 1/2 of 246 minutes (range 62--560, p less than 0.001). These results indicate that sulfated insulin is less antigenic than regular beef insulin and combines less avidly with human antibodies to regular beef insulin. The response to sulfated insulin therapy was significantly better than the response reported by other investigators to pork insulin or to steroid therapy in similar patients.

  13. Epidemiology of the rheumatic diseases in Mexico. A study of 5 regions based on the COPCORD methodology.

    PubMed

    Peláez-Ballestas, Ingris; Sanin, Luz Helena; Moreno-Montoya, José; Alvarez-Nemegyei, José; Burgos-Vargas, Rubén; Garza-Elizondo, Mario; Rodríguez-Amado, Jacqueline; Goycochea-Robles, Maria-Victoria; Madariaga, Marco; Zamudio, Jorge; Santana, Natalia; Cardiel, Mario H

    2011-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence of musculoskeletal (MSK) disorders and to describe predicting variables associated with rheumatic diseases in 5 regions of México. This was a cross-sectional, community-based study performed in 5 regions in México. The methodology followed the guidelines proposed by the Community Oriented Program for the Control of the Rheumatic Diseases (COPCORD). A standardized methodology was used at all sites, with trained personnel following a common protocol of interviewing adult subjects in their household. A "positive case" was defined as an individual with nontraumatic MSK pain of > 1 on a visual analog pain scale (0 to 10) during the last 7 days. All positive cases were referred to internists or rheumatologists for further clinical evaluation, diagnosis, and proper treatment. The study included 19,213 individuals; 11,602 (68.8%) were female, and their mean age was 42.8 (SD 17.9) years. The prevalence of MSK pain was 25.5%, but significant variations (7.1% to 43.5%) across geographical regions occurred. The prevalence of osteoarthritis was 10.5%, back pain 5.8%, rheumatic regional pain syndromes 3.8%, rheumatoid arthritis 1.6%, fibromyalgia 0.7%, and gout 0.3%. The prevalence of MSK manifestations was associated with older age and female gender. The prevalence of MSK pain in our study was 25.5%. Geographic variations in the prevalence of MSK pain and specific diagnoses suggested a role for geographic factors in the prevalence of rheumatic diseases.

  14. Immunological techniques in viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Rehermann, Barbara; Naoumov, Nikolai V

    2007-03-01

    The need to quantitate and monitor immune responses of large patient cohorts with standardized techniques is increasing due to the growing range of treatment options for hepatitis B and hepatitis C, the development of combination therapies, and candidate experimental vaccines for HCV. In addition, advances in immunological techniques have provided new tools for detailed phenotypic and functional analysis of cellular immune responses. At present, there is substantial variation in laboratory protocols, reagents, controls and analysis and presentation of results. Standardization of immunological assays would therefore allow better comparison of results amongst individual laboratories and patient cohorts. The EASL-sponsored and AASLD-endorsed Monothematic Conference on Clinical Immunology in Viral Hepatitis was held at the University College London, United Kingdom, Oct 7-8, 2006 to bring together investigators with research experience in clinical immunology of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections for in-depth discussion, critical evaluation and standardization of immunological assays. This report summarizes the information presented and discussed at the conference, but is not intended to represent a consensus statement. Our aim is to highlight topics and issues that were supported by general agreement and those that were controversial, as well as to provide suggestions for future work.

  15. Peripheral blood T and B lymphocytes during acute rheumatic fever.

    PubMed Central

    Lueker, R D; Abdin, Z H; Williams, R C

    1975-01-01

    Proportions and total numbers of thymus-derived (T) and bone marrow-derived (B) peripheral blood lymphocytes were studied in 53 patients with acute rheumatic fever, diagnosed on the basis of modifified Jones criteria. An elevation in both proportions and absolute numbers of cells bearing surface Ig was found in most patients, particularly during the first 7 days after onset. Conversely, T-cell proportions and numbers were often found to be depressed early in the acue phases of rheumatic fever. Proportions of cells bearing surface Ig did not correlate with another B-cell marker, the aggregated gamma globulin receptor, suggesting that such cells bearing surface Ig were not all B lymphocytes. Incuvation for 20 h at 37 per cent C of cells showing high proportions of surface Ig-bearing surface Ig in both normal and rheumatic fever subjects, although there was no appreciable increment in proportions of lymphocytes expressing T-cell markers. Patients with initial attacks showed higher percentages and total numbers of Ig-bearing lymphocytes (P smaller than 0.01) than did those with rneumatic fever recurrences. Elevations in numbers and proportions of peripheral blood lymphocytes bearing Ig appeared to correlate with the relative acute nature of the rheumatic fever attack. PMID:1091658

  16. Once weekly azithromycin in secondary prevention of rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Rakesh; Harikrishnan, S; Sivasankaran, S; Ajithkumar, V K; Titus, T; Tharakan, J M

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are still important problems in developing countries. Secondary prophylaxis which is the most cost-effective method in preventing recurrences of rheumatic fever is fraught with problems of drug compliance. The utility of 500 mg once weekly azithromycin (AZT), an orally effective long-acting antibiotic was evaluated against oral penicillin (phenoxy methyl penicillin 250 mg twice daily) in this study. Forty-eight consecutive patients (44% males, mean age 29.4 years) with established RHD were randomised into two groups-26 patients received AZT and 22 received oral penicillin. Patients were evaluated at randomisation, at 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months, clinically, serologically and by throat swab culture. End points were absence of streptococcal colonisation, infection or fever at the end of 6 months. During the study, 4 patients (15.4%) in the AZT group developed sore throat and fever, had positive throat culture and positive serology indicating streptococcal infection. None satisfied the criteria for rheumatic fever reactivation. None in the oral penicillin group developed streptococcal infection. In conclusion, weekly 500 mg of AZT is not effective in the prevention of streptococcal throat infection compared to oral penicillin therapy in adult patients with established RHD.

  17. Improving Care Delivery and Outcomes in Pediatric Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Julia G.; Bingham, Catherine A.; Morgan, Esi M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review To highlight efforts in pediatric rheumatology related to optimizing the care provided to patients with pediatric rheumatic diseases and describe various approaches to improve health outcomes. Recent findings Recent studies report low rates of remission, frequent occurrence of comorbidities, disease damage, and decreased health-related quality of life in pediatric rheumatic diseases. Pediatric Rheumatology Care and Outcomes Improvement Network is a quality improvement learning network that has demonstrated improvement in process of care measures through use of a centralized patient registry, and interventions including pre-visit planning, population management, shared decision making, and patient/parent engagement. A pediatric rheumatology patient-powered research network was established to enable patient and caregiver participation in setting research priorities and to facilitate data sharing to answer research questions. Quality measure development and benchmarking is proceeding in multiple pediatric rheumatic diseases. Summary This review summarizes the current efforts to improve care delivery and outcomes in pediatric rheumatic diseases through a learning health system approach that harnesses knowledge from the clinical encounter to serve quality improvement, research and discovery. Incorporating standard approaches to medication treatment plans may reduce variation in care. Including the patient voice to design of research studies brings focus on more patient relevant outcomes. (See Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1). PMID:26780426

  18. New insights into the epigenetics of inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Ballestar, Esteban; Li, Tianlu

    2017-10-01

    Over the past decade, awareness of the importance of epigenetic alterations in the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases has grown in parallel with a general recognition of the fundamental role of epigenetics in the regulation of gene expression. Large-scale efforts to generate genome-wide maps of epigenetic modifications in different cell types, as well as in physiological and pathological contexts, illustrate the increasing recognition of the relevance of epigenetics. To date, although several reports have demonstrated the occurrence of epigenetic alterations in a wide range of inflammatory rheumatic conditions, epigenomic information is rarely used in a clinical setting. By contrast, several epigenetic biomarkers and treatments are currently in use for personalized therapies in patients with cancer. This Review highlights advances from the past 5 years in the field of epigenetics and their application to inflammatory rheumatic diseases, delineating the future lines of development for a rational use of epigenetic information in clinical settings and in personalized medicine. These advances include the identification of epipolymorphisms associated with clinical outcomes, DNA methylation as a contributor to disease susceptibility in rheumatic conditions, the discovery of novel epigenetic mechanisms that modulate disease susceptibility and the development of new epigenetic therapies.

  19. MMPI Profiles of Rheumatic Fever Adolescents and Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stehbens, James A.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Showed that Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) scores for adolescent and adult victims of rheumatic fever (N=162) were generally lower than Mayo Clinic norms. Significant age effects confirm findings that adolescents score higher on the MMPI. Found patients without carditis scored higher than carditis patients, contrary to…

  20. Osteoarthrosis and nonarticular rheumatism treated by low laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipa, Ciprian; Moldovan, Corneliu I.; Crangulescu, Nicolae; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.; Vasiliu, Virgil V.

    1995-03-01

    557 patients with various noninflammatory rheumatism (osteoarthrosis and nonarticular) were treated in four different ways: with GaAs laser, 1 - 2 mW output power alone, with HeNe laser, 2 mW alone, with GaAs and HeNe together and with classical antiflammatory therapy.

  1. [Rheumatic cardiopathy in children younger than 6 years of age].

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Antona, C; Calderón-Colmenero, J; Attié, F; Zabal, C; Buendía-Hernández, A; Díaz-Medina, L H; Bialkowski, J; García Arenal, F

    1991-01-01

    Most of the published papers on Rheumatic Fever (RF) have not included the younger population. We selected 211 cases of children with RF younger than 6 years of age from 9,471 clinical files from 1944 to 1982. These were followed retrospectively to identify the presence of rheumatic activity, subsequent attacks and penicillin profilaxis. From de 211 cases, 209 had carditis; 57% of them were girls and 43% boys. There were no previous infections of the upper respiratory tract in 36% of the patients. The number of cases with RF increased abruptly after 3 years of age and continued increasing until 5 years of age when 70.5% of the population had there first clinically recognized attack. Lesions were present in the mitral valve in 80% of the cases, in the aortic valve in 12%, in the tricuspid in 5% and in the pulmonary valve in 3%. The death rate during the first attack was 20% being refractory heart failure the main cause of death. Thirteen cases suffered rheumatic pneumonia, 9 of whom died (69.2%). 1) The incidence of acute rheumatic fever in children under 6 years of age has decreased with time. 2) The death rate as well as the valvular damage decreased with the parents cooperation with the treatment. 3) The changes in the clinical picture and the severity of valve sequelea may be due to penicillin profilaxis and the better understanding of the disease.

  2. [Treatment of peptic ulcer related to rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Imaeda, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Hiromasa; Goto, Makoto

    2002-08-01

    Rheumatic diseases often have gastrointestinal(GI) manifestations, and may present as GI bleeding and perforation due to peptic ulcer associated with high mortality. Major causes of peptic ulcer related to rheumatic diseases are drugs such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug(NSAID) and corticosteroid, and vasculitis. The analgesic effects of NSAID often mask abdominal pain until they cause GI bleeding and perforation. Therefore, it is important to make early diagnosis of peptic ulcer with upper gastrointestinal endoscope. Fundamental treatment of NSAID induced peptic ulcer is to quit it, however it is difficult because of activity of rheumatic diseases. Also, most NSAID induced peptic ulcers heal by administration of proton pump inhibitor or misoprostol. Corticosteroid pulse therapy or administration of immunosuppressant agents is effective for vasculitis induced peptic ulcer, however it is difficult to make diagnosis of it. Development of NSAID with less side effects such as cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitors and establishment of diagnosis and treatment of peptic ulcer related to rheumatic diseases are expected.

  3. [Immunity against mycobacterium tuberculosis and risk of biological anti-rheumatic agents].

    PubMed

    Yasui, Kozo

    2014-01-01

    A third of world's population is invaded with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, about 9.0 million people developed tuberculosis (TB) illness and 1.3 million people died from the disease every year. Acquired immunity (cytotoxic CD8(+) T cell, Th1 CD4(+) helper T cell) and macrophage play important role for TB infection. Recently, natural immunity also play a very attractive role for the development TB immunity, with several cytokines, microbicidal proteins and Toll-like receptors. The introduction and uptake of biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs has dramatically advanced and improved the standard care and the prognosis of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, as clinical experience with these drugs has grown, risk of granulomatous infections - especially disseminated tuberculosis in adult RA - and reactivation of hepatitis B virus (HBV) are focused. This year marks the tenth anniversary of the approvals of the first tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha antagonist for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in Japan. Our understanding of this subject and the knowledge of basic immunology has also advanced during ten years. This review especially focuses on the pathologic action of the TNF blockers in the development of secondary (disseminated) tuberculosis.

  4. Immunological studies in oral submucous fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Shah, N; Kumar, R; Shah, M K

    1994-01-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) is a high risk precancerous condition. The possible role of immunological factors in the pathogenesis of this condition was evaluated in 113 cases and 25 controls. The male/female ratio was 1.5/1. The mean age of males was significantly lower than that of females. The mean ESR levels were within normal limits, but for a higher than 20 mm fall per hr. in 40% of the cases. The serum IgA, IgG, and IgM levels were elevated significantly as compared to the controls. Circulating auto-antibodies and tissue-deposited antibodies were also found in 33% and 40% of the cases, respectively. From the analysis of the results, it is difficult to ascribe an auto-immune basis for the causation of OSMF. The female bias and elder age group, the factors generally considered in favour of an immune disorder, was not found in our study. However, raised ESR in 40% and serum globulin levels in 47% of the patients, distinctly higher levels of serum immunoglobulins, and positivity for circulating and tissue deposited antibodies in 33% and 34% of the cases respectively, do indicate an immunological basis. Therefore, further studies are required to ascertain the role of cellular immune mechanism and genetic parameters to explain the etiopathogenesis of this complex clinical entity.

  5. IMMUNOLOGIC STUDIES OF HEART TISSUE

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Melvin H.; Dallenbach, Frederick D.

    1961-01-01

    Using fluorescent antibody methods, deposits of bound gamma globulin, as determined in unfixed washed sections of auricular appendages from rheumatic hearts, were noted in a significant number (18 per cent) of 100 specimens studied. Such deposits were observed in myofibers, sarcolemma, interstitial connective tissue, and vessel walls. Albumin and fibrin were generally found absent from these sites. Control hearts from normal and pathologic material, including postmortem and biopsied specimens, in general, did not reveal such deposits. These various tissue sites which contained bound gamma globulin frequently exhibited evidence of alteration as indicated both by enhanced affinity for eosin and by strongly positive reaction with the periodic acid-Schiff reagent, and appeared comparable in some cases to "fibrinoid." Bound gamma globulin was not observed in cellular or stromal components of Aschoff lesions, nor was the occurrence of Aschoff lesions correlated with presence of bound gamma globulin. It is suggested that deposition of gamma globulin and the eosinophilic alteration associated with such deposition are related to certain of the pathologic changes of rheumatic heart disease. The nature of such deposits of gamma globulin was considered from immune and non-immune points of view. PMID:13751306

  6. Regulation of immunological and inflammatory functions by biotin.

    PubMed

    Kuroishi, Toshinobu

    2015-12-01

    Biotin is a water-soluble B-complex vitamin and is well-known as a co-factor for 5 indispensable carboxylases. Holocarboxylase synthetase (HLCS) catalyzes the biotinylation of carboxylases and other proteins, whereas biotinidase catalyzes the release of biotin from biotinylated peptides. Previous studies have reported that nutritional biotin deficiency and genetic defects in either HLCS or biotinidase induces cutaneous inflammation and immunological disorders. Since biotin-dependent carboxylases involve various cellular metabolic pathways including gluconeogenesis, fatty acid synthesis, and the metabolism of branched-chain amino acids and odd-chain fatty acids, metabolic abnormalities may play important roles in immunological and inflammatory disorders caused by biotin deficiency. Transcriptional factors, including NF-κB and Sp1/3, are also affected by the status of biotin, indicating that biotin regulates immunological and inflammatory functions independently of biotin-dependent carboxylases. An in-vivo analysis with a murine model revealed the therapeutic effects of biotin supplementation on metal allergies. The novel roles of biotinylated proteins and their related enzymes have recently been reported. Non-carboxylase biotinylated proteins induce chemokine production. HLCS is a nuclear protein involved in epigenetic and chromatin regulation. In this review, comprehensive knowledge on the regulation of immunological and inflammatory functions by biotin and its potential as a therapeutic agent is discussed.

  7. Bone disease in pediatric rheumatologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Burnham, Jon M; Leonard, Mary B

    2004-02-01

    Children with rheumatic disorders have multiple risk factors for impaired bone health, including delayed growth and development, malnutrition, decreased weight-bearing activity, inflammation, and glucocorticoid therapy. The impact of rheumatic disease during childhood may be immediate, resulting in fragility fractures, or delayed, because of suboptimal peak bone mass accrual. Recent years have seen increased interest in the effects of pediatric rheumatic disorders on bone mineralization, such as juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and juvenile dermatomyositis. This review outlines the expected gains in bone size and mass during childhood and adolescence, and summarizes the advantages and disadvantages of available technologies for the assessment of skeletal growth and fragility in children. The varied threats to bone health in pediatric rheumatic disorders are reviewed, with emphasis on recent insights into the molecular mechanisms of inflammation-induced bone resorption. The literature assessing bone deficits and risk factors for impaired bone health in pediatric rheumatic disorders is reviewed, with consideration of the strengths and limitations of prior studies. Finally, future research directions are proposed.

  8. Immunizations, immunology, and autism.

    PubMed

    Chez, Michael G; Chin, Kathleen; Hung, Paul C

    2004-09-01

    Public fears of rising rates of children being diagnosed with autistic spectrum disorders has led to a fear that immunizations, specifically the measles-mumps-varicella vaccine (MMR), may trigger autism. This article reviews theories of immunization as a risk factor for autism, including thimerosal exposure. We also review theories of autoimmunity as a predisposing genetic risk in autistic patients. We summarize from multiple population-based studies and extensive review committee reports that neither immunization nor thimerosal exposure has been conclusively linked to autism. Current treatments for autoimmunity in autism are reviewed and summarized as being only anecdotally effective, with no controlled studies to conclusively determine effectiveness. The goal of this article is to allow child neurologists to effectively counsel parents of autistic patients about vaccination risks and treatment options in presumed cases of autoimmune dysfunction.

  9. Citizens unite for computational immunology!

    PubMed

    Belden, Orrin S; Baker, Sarah Catherine; Baker, Brian M

    2015-07-01

    Recruiting volunteers who can provide computational time, programming expertise, or puzzle-solving talent has emerged as a powerful tool for biomedical research. Recent projects demonstrate the potential for such 'crowdsourcing' efforts in immunology. Tools for developing applications, new funding opportunities, and an eager public make crowdsourcing a serious option for creative solutions for computationally-challenging problems. Expanded uses of crowdsourcing in immunology will allow for more efficient large-scale data collection and analysis. It will also involve, inspire, educate, and engage the public in a variety of meaningful ways. The benefits are real - it is time to jump in! Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Immunological diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumonias].

    PubMed

    Baĭzhomartov, M S; Prozorovskiĭ, S V; Vasil'eva, V I; Efremova, I I; Furman, M A

    1979-05-01

    A complex of immunological cell tests with M. pneumoniae antigen (the lymphocyte blast-cell transformation test, the allergic neutrophil alteration test) was carried out in order to establish the correlation between the results of positive seroconversion and the sepcific immunological reactivity of lymphoid cells in pneumonia patients. Mycoplasmic cutireactive allergen, when used for the accelerated diagnosis of mycoplasmic pneumonia in humans, was shown to be specific and safe. Cuti-allergic tests with mycoplasmic allergen allowed to diagnose mycoplasmic pneumonia at early stages (beginning from days 5--7), which ensures the possibility of indicating etiotropic treatment to patients in due time.

  11. Applications of nanotechnology for immunology.

    PubMed

    Smith, Douglas M; Simon, Jakub K; Baker, James R

    2013-08-01

    Nanotechnology uses the unique properties of objects that function as a unit within the overall size range of 1-1,000 nanometres. The engineering of nanostructure materials, including nanoparticles, nanoemulsions or nanotubules, holds great promise for the development of new immunomodulatory agents, as such nanostructures can be used to more effectively manipulate or deliver immunologically active components to target sites. Successful applications of nanotechnology in the field of immunology will enable new generations of vaccines, adjuvants and immunomodulatory drugs that aim to improve clinical outcomes in response to a range of infectious and non-infectious diseases.

  12. Hypogonadism and the risk of rheumatic autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Baillargeon, Jacques; Al Snih, Soham; Raji, Mukaila A; Urban, Randall J; Sharma, Gulshan; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda; Lopez, David S; Baillargeon, Gwen; Kuo, Yong-Fang

    2016-12-01

    Testosterone deficiency has been linked with autoimmune disease and an increase in inflammatory markers, such as C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor, and interleukin-6 (IL-6). However, no large-scale longitudinal studies have examined this association. We examined whether untreated hypogonadism was associated with an increased risk of rheumatic autoimmune disease in a large nationally representative cohort. Using one of the nation's largest commercial insurance databases, we conducted a retrospective cohort study in which we identified 123,460 men diagnosed with hypogonadism between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2014 and with no prior history of rheumatic autoimmune disease. We matched this cohort to 370,380 men without hypogonadism, at a 1 to 3 ratio, on age and index/diagnosis date. All patients were followed until December 31, 2014 or until they lost insurance coverage or were diagnosed with a rheumatic autoimmune disease. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to calculate adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs). Untreated hypogonadism was associated with an increased risk of developing any rheumatic autoimmune disease (HR = 1.33, 95 % CI = 1.28, 1.38), rheumatoid arthritis (HR = 1.31, 95 % CI = 1.22, 1.44), and lupus (HR = 1.58, 95 % CI = 1.28, 1.94). These findings persisted using latency periods of 1 and 2 years. Hypogonadism was not associated with the control outcome, epilepsy (HR = 1.04, 95 % CI = 0.96, 1.15). Patients diagnosed with hypogonadism who were not treated with testosterone had an increased risk of developing any rheumatic autoimmune disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and lupus. Future research should further examine this association, with particular attention to underlying mechanisms.

  13. Coconut Atrium in Long-Standing Rheumatic Valvular Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Takahisa; Idei, Yuka; Otsui, Kazunori; Iwata, Sachiyo; Suzuki, Atsushi; Ozawa, Toru; Domoto, Koji; Takei, Asumi; Inamoto, Shinya; Inoue, Nobutaka

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 76 Final Diagnosis: Rheumatic valvular heart disease Symptoms: Breathlessness and leg edema Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Medical treatment for heart failure Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Rare disease Background: Complete calcification of the left atrium (LA) is called “coconut atrium”, which decreases the compliance of LA, leading to the elevation of LA pressure that is transmitted to the right-side of the heart. The pathogenesis of LA calcification in patients with rheumatic heart disease is unknown; however, possible mechanisms include chronic strain force in the atrial wall and inflammation. We report here a patient with long-standing rheumatic valvular heart disease with coconut atrium. Case Report: A 76-year-old man presented with breathlessness and leg edema due to right-sided heart failure. He was diagnosed with rheumatic fever at 8 years of age. Mitral commissurotomy and the mitral and aortic valve replacement were previously performed to treat mitral and aortic valvular stenosis. The profile view of the chest X-ray indicated a diffuse calcified outline of the LA wall. A transthoracic echocardiogram revealed pulmonary hyper-tension and dilatation of both atria. Moreover, computed tomography showed nearly circumferential calcification of the LA wall. Despite intense medical treatment, he succumbed to heart failure. An autopsy demonstrated that the LA was markedly dilated, its wall was calcified, and its appearance was similar to the surface of an atherosclerotic aorta. Microscopic examination revealed intensive calcification in the endocardium. Minimal accumulation of inflammatory cells was noted. Although slight fibrosis was observed, the cardiac musculature was preserved. Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that identifies the histological changes of LA calcification associated with long-standing rheumatic valvular heart disease. PMID:25819539

  14. Hepatitis B Serology in Patients with Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Feuchtenberger, Martin; Schäfer, Arne; Philipp Nigg, Axel; Rupert Kraus, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background: Only limited data are available on the prevalence of hepatitis B in patients with proven rheumatic diseases and thus the risk of reactivation under immunosuppressive therapy. Objective: To analyse hepatitis B serology in patients with rheumatic diseases prior to therapy. Method: In total, 1,338 patient records were analysed for HBsAg, HBsAb and HBcAb in a cross-sectional, single-centre study between 2011 and 2015 at first presentation. Data acquisition was realized using electronic patient files created during routine care. The main variables considered as predictors for HBV reactivation included (i) the exact type of rheumatic disease and (ii) the therapeutically induced immunosuppression. Results: Overall, 5.9% of patients (n=79) had proven contact with hepatitis B (HBcAb positive), and HBsAb were not detected in 1.3% (n=18). The rate of vaccinated subjects was 7.8%. HBsAg was detected in 3 patients (0.2%). In addition, 70.3% of patients were treated during the course of rheumatologic disease previously or currently with glucocorticoids, 85.2% with disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and 20.1% with a biologic agent (e.g., anti-IL-6, anti-TNFalpha, anti-CD20, CTLA4Ig or anti-IL-12/23). Conclusion: Prevalence of hepatitis B serostatus in the analysed rheumatic patients regarding HBs-Ag and HBcAb with or without HBsAb prior to therapy does not differ from the data published for the general population in Germany. However, the rate of hepatitis B vaccinated patients was lower. In general, a significant portion of patients (5.9%) has been exposed to HBV and therefore exhibited an increased risk of reactivation of hepatitis B when undergoing immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:27708728

  15. Evaluation of physicians' knowledge about prevention of rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease before and after a teaching session.

    PubMed

    Osman, Gehan M; Abdelrahman, Sirageldin M K; Ali, Sulafa K M

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease RHD remain as one of the major cardiovascular problems in Sudanese children. The cornerstones for control of RF and RHD are primary and secondary preventions as adopted by Sudan's programme. This study aimed to describe and raise the paediatric doctors' awareness about prevention of RF and RHD using lectures. It was a prospective, cross-sectional, hospital based study, conducted in Khartoum. The study populations were paediatric doctors including house officers, medical officers and registrars. Data were collected through self-administered questionnaire, which was constructed to assess the doctor's awareness about RF and RHD prevention before and after attending lectures. Eighty seven doctors participated in the study. The results showed that the overall doctors' awareness about prevention of rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease was at average level. It was raised by intervention through lectures to good level. It is recommended to introduce training programs for physicians in order to improve doctors' awareness about prevention of RF and RHD. Such activities need to be conducted at regular intervals.

  16. Obesity as a Risk and Severity Factor in Rheumatic Diseases (Autoimmune Chronic Inflammatory Diseases)

    PubMed Central

    Gremese, Elisa; Tolusso, Barbara; Gigante, Maria Rita; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco

    2014-01-01

    The growing body of evidence recognizing the adipose tissue (AT) as an active endocrine organ secreting bioactive mediators involved in metabolic and inflammatory disorders, together with the global epidemic of overweight and obesity, rise obesity as a hot topic of current research. The chronic state of low-grade inflammation present in the obese condition and the multiple pleiotropic effects of adipokines on the immune system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory conditions including rheumatic autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. We will discuss the main relevant evidences on the role of the AT on immune and inflammatory networks and the more recent evidences regarding the effects of obesity on the incidence and outcomes of the major autoimmune chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:25426122

  17. Correlation between erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein level in patients with rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kotulska, Anna; Kopeć-Mędrek, Magdalena; Grosicka, Anida; Kubicka, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and serum level of C-reactive protein (CRP) are the acute phase reactants most commonly determined in patients with rheumatic diseases. The indices are affected by different factors, but both of them are applied for evaluation of the disease activity in patients with inflammatory disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Material and methods The authors compared the results of ESR and CRP, which were carried out during routine diagnosis in 200 patients admitted to the Department of Rheumatology. Results A significant correlation between ESR and CRP was found (ESR after 1 h/CRP: correlation coefficient 0.6944, ESR after 2 h/CRP: correlation coefficient 0.6126). There was no difference in ESR or CRP between male and female patients, and patients older than 40 years had higher ESR and CRP. Conclusions The obtained results support the usefulness of both indices in the clinical practice of rheumatologists. PMID:27407254

  18. Myasthenia gravis: a clinical-immunological update.

    PubMed

    Binks, Sophie; Vincent, Angela; Palace, Jacqueline

    2016-04-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is the archetypic disorder of both the neuromuscular junction and autoantibody-mediated disease. In most patients, IgG1-dominant antibodies to acetylcholine receptors cause fatigable weakness of skeletal muscles. In the rest, a variable proportion possesses antibodies to muscle-specific tyrosine kinase while the remainder of seronegative MG is being explained through cell-based assays using a receptor-clustering technique and, to a lesser extent, proposed new antigenic targets. The incidence and prevalence of MG are increasing, particularly in the elderly. New treatments are being developed, and results from the randomised controlled trial of thymectomy in non-thymomatous MG, due for release in early 2016, will be of particular clinical value. To help navigate an evidence base of varying quality, practising clinicians may consult new MG guidelines in the fields of pregnancy, ocular and generalised MG (GMG). This review focuses on updates in epidemiology, immunology, therapeutic and clinical aspects of GMG in adults.

  19. Immunological and neuroimaging biomarkers of complicated grief.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Mary-Frances

    2012-06-01

    Complicated grief (CG) is a disorder marked by intense and persistent yearning for the deceased, in addition to other criteria. The present article reviews what is known about the immunologic and neuroimaging biomarkers of both acute grief and CG, Attachment theory and cognitive stress theory are reviewed as they pertain to bereavement, as is the biopsychosocial model of CG. Reduced immune cell function has been replicated in a variety of bereaved populations. The regional brain activation to grief cues frequently includes the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and insula, and also the posterior cingulate cortex. Using theory to point to future research directions, we may eventually learn which biomarkers are helpful in predicting CG, and its treatment.

  20. Advances in mechanisms of asthma, allergy, and immunology in 2010.

    PubMed

    Broide, David H; Finkelman, Fred; Bochner, Bruce S; Rothenberg, Marc E

    2011-03-01

    2010 was marked by rapid progress in our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation and asthma. Studies published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology described advances in our knowledge of cells associated with allergic inflammation (mast cells, eosinophils, dendritic cells, and T cells), as well as IgE, cytokines, receptors, signaling molecules, and pathways. Studies used animal models, as well as human cells and tissues, to advance our understanding of mechanisms of asthma, eosinophilic esophagitis, food allergy, anaphylaxis and immediate hypersensitivity, mast cells and their disorders, atopic dermatitis, nasal polyposis, and hypereosinophilic syndromes. Additional studies provided novel information about the induction and regulation of allergic inflammation and the genetic contribution to allergic inflammation. Critical features of these studies and their potential effects on human atopic disorders are summarized here. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Immunological impact of Taekwondo competitions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y W; Shin, K W; Paik, I-Y; Jung, W M; Cho, S-Y; Choi, S T; Kim, H D; Kim, J Y

    2012-01-01

    Immunological changes in elite adolescent female athletes during Taekwondo competitions were investigated on-field. 6 female athletes (16.7 ± 0.8 year-old) volunteered and performed 5 bouts of demonstration Taekwondo competitions simulating real tournaments in intensity, duration, and break-time intervals on the same day. Blood samples were taken before, after the competitions and during the recovery, respectively. Immunological changes and oxidative stress in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were evaluated by flow-cytometry. During the competitions, exercise intensity was 92.2 ± 3.8% (86.1~95.7) of the maximal heart rate. Blood lactate increased immediately after the competitions (p=0.0165) and decreased to baseline during recovery. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the peripheral blood increased continuously during recovery (p<0.05, respectively). Natural killer cells increased immediately after the competitions (p=0.0006), and decreased during recovery. B and T cells increased immediately after the competitions and remained elevated throughout recovery (p<0.05, respectively). CD4/CD8 ratio after the competitions was decreased (p=0.0091) and returned to baseline during recovery. These results suggest that the immunological function of the elite female adolescent athletes could be attenuated after Taekwondo competitions. Further large-scaled Taekwondo studies on immunologic and apoptotic changes related to oxidative stress should be performed for improving and protecting the health of adolescent athletes.

  2. The double helix and immunology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nossal, Gustav J. V.

    2003-01-01

    The immune system can recognize and produce antibodies to virtually any molecule in the Universe. This enormous diversity arises from the ingenious reshuffling of DNA sequences encoding components of the immune system. Immunology is an example of a field completely transformed during the past 50 years by the discovery of the structure of DNA and the emergence of DNA technologies that followed.

  3. Intensive educational course in allergy and immunology.

    PubMed

    Elizalde, A; Perez, E E; Sriaroon, P; Nguyen, D; Lockey, R F; Dorsey, M J

    2012-09-01

    A one-day intensive educational course on allergy and immunology theory and diagnostic procedure significantly increased the competency of allergy and immunology fellows-in-training. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Immunological considerations in in utero hematopoetic stem cell transplantation (IUHCT)

    PubMed Central

    Loewendorf, Andrea I.; Csete, Marie; Flake, Alan

    2014-01-01

    In utero hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (IUHCT) is an attractive approach and a potentially curative surgery for several congenital hematopoietic diseases. In practice, this application has succeeded only in the context of Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Disorders. Here, we review potential immunological hurdles for the long-term establishment of chimerism and discuss relevant models and findings from both postnatal hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and IUHCT. PMID:25610396

  5. Update on diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever: 2015 Jones criteria.

    PubMed

    Eroğlu, Ayşe Güler

    2016-03-01

    In the final Jones criteria, different diagnostic criteria were established for the diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever for low risk and moderate-high risk populations. Turkey was found to be compatible with moderate-high risk populations as a result of regional screenings performed in terms of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease. The changes in the diagnostic criteria for low-risk populations include subclinical carditis found on echocardiogram as a major criterion in addition to carditis found clinically and a body temperature of 38.5°C and above as a minor criterion. In moderate-high risk populations including Turkey, subclinical carditis found on echocardiogram in addition to clinical carditis is used as a major criterion as a new amendment. In addition, aseptic monoarthritis and polyarthralgia are used as major criteria in addition to migratory arthritis and monoarhtralgia is used as a minor criterion among joint findings. However, differentiation of subclinical carditis from physiological valve regurgitation found in healthy individuals and exclusion of other diseases involving joints when aseptic monoarthritis and polyarthralgia are used as major criteria are very important. In addition, a body temperature of 38°C and above and an erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 30 mm/h and above have been accepted as minor criteria. The diagnostic criteria for the first attack have not been changed; three minor findings have been accepted in presence of previous sterptococcal infection in addition to the old cirteria for recurrent attacks. In the final Jones criteria, it has been recommended that patients who do not fully meet the diagnostic criteria of acute rheumatic fever should be treated as acute rheumatic fever if another diagnosis is not considered and should be followed up with benzathine penicilin prophylaxis for 12 months. It has been decided that these patients be evaluated 12 months later and a decision for continuation or discontinuation of

  6. Update on diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever: 2015 Jones criteria

    PubMed Central

    Eroğlu, Ayşe Güler

    2016-01-01

    In the final Jones criteria, different diagnostic criteria were established for the diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever for low risk and moderate-high risk populations. Turkey was found to be compatible with moderate-high risk populations as a result of regional screenings performed in terms of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease. The changes in the diagnostic criteria for low-risk populations include subclinical carditis found on echocardiogram as a major criterion in addition to carditis found clinically and a body temperature of 38.5°C and above as a minor criterion. In moderate-high risk populations including Turkey, subclinical carditis found on echocardiogram in addition to clinical carditis is used as a major criterion as a new amendment. In addition, aseptic monoarthritis and polyarthralgia are used as major criteria in addition to migratory arthritis and monoarhtralgia is used as a minor criterion among joint findings. However, differentiation of subclinical carditis from physiological valve regurgitation found in healthy individuals and exclusion of other diseases involving joints when aseptic monoarthritis and polyarthralgia are used as major criteria are very important. In addition, a body temperature of 38°C and above and an erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 30 mm/h and above have been accepted as minor criteria. The diagnostic criteria for the first attack have not been changed; three minor findings have been accepted in presence of previous sterptococcal infection in addition to the old cirteria for recurrent attacks. In the final Jones criteria, it has been recommended that patients who do not fully meet the diagnostic criteria of acute rheumatic fever should be treated as acute rheumatic fever if another diagnosis is not considered and should be followed up with benzathine penicilin prophylaxis for 12 months. It has been decided that these patients be evaluated 12 months later and a decision for continuation or discontinuation of

  7. Genetic diseases with rheumatic manifestations in children.

    PubMed

    Prahalad, S; Colbert, R A

    1998-09-01

    Many nonrheumatic diseases of childhood present with musculoskeletal abnormalities. A significant proportion of these disorders have a genetic basis, many involving defects in structural proteins of the connective tissue. Chief among these are collagen mutations resulting in spondyloepiphyseal dysplasias and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, as well as fibrillin defects associated with Marfan's syndrome. A variety of other chromosomal anomalies are associated with musculoskeletal abnormalities, and may result from as yet unidentified connective tissue defects. In addition, metabolic diseases may result in findings of hyper- or hypomobility, or carpal tunnel syndrome. Helpful clinical clues to identify nonrheumatologic musculoskeletal disease, as well as recent advances in our understanding of the genetic basis of several of these disorders, are reviewed here.

  8. [Indifferentiated rheumatism and/or epileptic flatulence].

    PubMed

    Veiga Cabello, R; Toral Revuelta, J R; Sánchez Sánchez, E; Fernández Alvaro, J; Sáez Garrido, J de D

    2003-07-01

    A clinical case study of a 50 year-old woman brought to the Rhematology Department is presented, who showed clinical dry syndrome with immune disorders (not currently defined) and developed tumors (benign at present) and analytical autoimmunity with positive antitopoisomerase type I (formerly Scl70) confirmed. The clinical case is commented and the metheorism causes are discussed, among it, a possible variation of abdominal epilepsy as ictal flatulence, secondary to a meningioma of the right brain convexity.

  9. 21 CFR 866.5210 - Ceruloplasmin immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ceruloplasmin immunolog-ical test system. 866.5210 Section 866.5210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  10. 21 CFR 866.5210 - Ceruloplasmin immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ceruloplasmin immunolog-ical test system. 866.5210 Section 866.5210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  11. 21 CFR 866.5160 - Beta-globulin immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Beta-globulin immunolog-ical test system. 866.5160 Section 866.5160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5160...

  12. 21 CFR 866.5590 - Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system. 866.5590 Section 866.5590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  13. 21 CFR 866.5210 - Ceruloplasmin immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ceruloplasmin immunolog-ical test system. 866.5210 Section 866.5210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  14. 21 CFR 866.5160 - Beta-globulin immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Beta-globulin immunolog-ical test system. 866.5160 Section 866.5160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5160...

  15. 21 CFR 866.5210 - Ceruloplasmin immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ceruloplasmin immunolog-ical test system. 866.5210 Section 866.5210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  16. 21 CFR 866.5590 - Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system. 866.5590 Section 866.5590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  17. 42 CFR 493.921 - Diagnostic immunology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Diagnostic immunology. 493.921 Section 493.921... Testing Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.921 Diagnostic immunology. The subspecialties under the specialty of immunology for which a program may offer proficiency testing are syphilis...

  18. 42 CFR 493.921 - Diagnostic immunology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Diagnostic immunology. 493.921 Section 493.921... Testing Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.921 Diagnostic immunology. The subspecialties under the specialty of immunology for which a program may offer proficiency testing are syphilis...

  19. 42 CFR 493.921 - Diagnostic immunology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Diagnostic immunology. 493.921 Section 493.921... Testing Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.921 Diagnostic immunology. The subspecialties under the specialty of immunology for which a program may offer proficiency testing are syphilis...

  20. 42 CFR 493.921 - Diagnostic immunology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Diagnostic immunology. 493.921 Section 493.921... Testing Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.921 Diagnostic immunology. The subspecialties under the specialty of immunology for which a program may offer proficiency testing are syphilis...

  1. 42 CFR 493.921 - Diagnostic immunology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Diagnostic immunology. 493.921 Section 493.921... Testing Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.921 Diagnostic immunology. The subspecialties under the specialty of immunology for which a program may offer proficiency testing are syphilis...

  2. Epidemiology of rheumatic diseases in Mixtec and Chontal indigenous communities in Mexico: a cross-sectional community-based study.

    PubMed

    Julián-Santiago, Flor; García-García, Conrado; García-Olivera, Imelda; Goycochea-Robles, María Victoria; Pelaez-Ballestas, Ingris

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of musculoskeletal (MSK) disorders and rheumatic diseases in the Chontal and Mixtec indigenous communities in the state of Oaxaca, Mexico, using the Community-Oriented Program for the Control of Rheumatic Diseases (COPCORD) methodology. After cross-culturally validating the COPCORD questionnaire for these communities, we conducted a cross-sectional, analytical, community-based census study using a house-to-house method. Positive cases of MSK disorders were assessed by primary care physicians and rheumatologists. The study population included participants aged ≥18 years from the indigenous communities of San Antonio Huitepec and San Carlos Yautepec. A total of 1061 persons participated in the study. Mean age was 46.9 years (standard deviation 19.9; age range 18-97 years); 642 (60.5 %) were women; 483 participants (45.5; 42.4-48.5 %) had MSK pain in the previous 7 days. Diagnoses were back pain 170 (16.0 %; 95 % confidence interval [CI] 13.8-18.3); osteoarthritis 157 (14.7 %; 95 % CI 12.7-17.0); rheumatic regional pain syndrome 53 (4.9 %; 95 % CI 3.7-6.4); rheumatoid arthritis 4 (0.3 %; 95 % CI 0.1-0.9); dermatomyositis 1 (0.09 %; 95 % CI 0.0-0.5); ankylosing spondylitis 1 (0.09 %; 95 % CI 0.0-0.5); systemic lupus erythematosus 1 (0.09 %; 95 % CI 0.02-0.5); and gout 1 (0.09 %; 95 % CI 0.0-0.5). 53.2 % had not received medical treatment for their disease. The prevalence of MSK disorders in indigenous communities in the Mixtec and Chontal regions is very high. The most common rheumatic diseases found were back pain and osteoarthritis. A high percentage of participants had not received medical care.

  3. Antiinflammatory, antioxidant, and immunological effects of Carum copticum L. and some of its constituents.

    PubMed

    Alavinezhad, Azam; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein

    2014-12-01

    Carum copticum L. has been used traditionally for its various therapeutic effects. The plant contains various components such as thymol and carvacrol. Different therapeutic effects such as antifungal, antioxidant, antibacterial, antiparasitic, and antilipidemic were described for the plant and its constituents. Therefore, antiinflammatory, antioxidant, and immunological effects of C. copticum and its constituents, thymol and carvacrol, were discussed in the present review. Previous studies have shown potent antiinflammatory, antioxidant, and immunological effects for C. copticum and its constituents, thymol and carvacrol. Therefore, the plant and its constituents have therapeutic values in several inflammatory and immunological disorders as well as in the oxidative stress conditions.

  4. Detection of antinuclear antibodies by the Inno-Lia ANA update test in canine systemic rheumatic disease.

    PubMed

    Hansson-Hamlin, Helene; Rönnelid, Johan

    2010-06-01

    Certain systemic autoimmune diseases in dogs are characterized by high titers of circulating antinuclear antibodies (ANA), which can be demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF). In an earlier study of IIF-ANA-positive dogs, the Ouchterlony double immunodiffusion (DID) test was used to identify specific autoantibodies. The DID test has largely been replaced with line blot tests in human diagnostic settings. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the line blot assay Inno-Lia ANA update test is a useful tool in demonstrating ANA specificities in canine patients with previously diagnosed IIF-ANA-positive rheumatic disorders. Serum samples from 3 clinically healthy control dogs and 20 canine patients with clinical signs of systemic rheumatic disease and documented positive results for IIF-ANA and DID tests were included in the study. The Inno-Lia ANA update assay was performed with an anti-canine detection antibody. Six serum samples that had DID positivity with anti-spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNP) reactivity showed reactivity to multiple snRNP proteins in the Inno-Lia test. Samples from 2 dogs that had other types of DID positivity also had clear SmB reactivity and 1 had weak reactivity to RNP-70K. The other serum samples, including controls, were negative. Using the Inno-Lia ANA update test, multiple snRNP specificities were demonstrated in some canine patients with autoimmune rheumatic disorders. Other canine autoantibodies may exist that are not detected by this test. Further studies are necessary to characterize the target antigen(s) of these remaining autoantibodies in canine sera.

  5. Movement and Other Neurodegenerative Syndromes in Patients with Systemic Rheumatic Diseases: A Case Series of 8 Patients and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Rikitha; Pantelyat, Alexander; Izbudak, Izlem; Birnbaum, Julius

    2015-08-01

    Patients with rheumatic diseases can present with movement and other neurodegenerative disorders. It may be underappreciated that movement and other neurodegenerative disorders can encompass a wide variety of disease entities. Such disorders are strikingly heterogeneous and lead to a wider spectrum of clinical injury than seen in Parkinson's disease. Therefore, we sought to stringently phenotype movement and other neurodegenerative disorders presenting in a case series of rheumatic disease patients. We integrated our findings with a review of the literature to understand mechanisms which may account for such a ubiquitous pattern of clinical injury.Seven rheumatic disease patients (5 Sjögren's syndrome patients, 2 undifferentiated connective tissue disease patients) were referred and could be misdiagnosed as having Parkinson's disease. However, all of these patients were ultimately diagnosed as having other movement or neurodegenerative disorders. Findings inconsistent with and more expansive than Parkinson's disease included cerebellar degeneration, dystonia with an alien-limb phenomenon, and nonfluent aphasias.A notable finding was that individual patients could be affected by cooccurring movement and other neurodegenerative disorders, each of which could be exceptionally rare (ie, prevalence of ∼1:1000), and therefore with the collective probability that such disorders were merely coincidental and causally unrelated being as low as ∼1-per-billion. Whereas our review of the literature revealed that ubiquitous patterns of clinical injury were frequently associated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings suggestive of a widespread vasculopathy, our patients did not have such neuroimaging findings. Instead, our patients could have syndromes which phenotypically resembled paraneoplastic and other inflammatory disorders which are known to be associated with antineuronal antibodies. We similarly identified immune-mediated and inflammatory markers of injury

  6. The human microbiome in rheumatic autoimmune diseases: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Coit, Patrick; Sawalha, Amr H

    2016-09-01

    The human microbiome consists of the total diversity of microbiota and their genes. High-throughput sequencing has allowed for inexpensive and rapid evaluation of taxonomic representation and functional capability of the microbiomes of human body sites. Autoimmune and inflammatory rheumatic diseases are characterized by dysbiosis of the microbiome. Microbiome dysbiosis can be influenced by host genetics and environmental factors. Dysbiosis is also associated with shifts in certain functional pathways. The goal of this article is to provide a current and comprehensive review of the unique characteristics of the microbiome of patients with autoimmune and inflammatory rheumatic diseases, measured using high-throughput sequencing. We also highlight the need for broader studies utilizing a longitudinal approach to better understand how the human microbiome contributes to disease susceptibility, and to characterize the role of the interaction between host genetics and microbial diversity in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, disease manifestations, and progression.

  7. Pound the alarm: danger signals in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Steven

    2015-03-01

    Damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) are chemically heterogeneous endogenous host molecules rapidly released from damaged or dying cells that incite a sterile inflammatory response mediated via pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). The sources of DAMPs are dead or dying cells or the extracellular matrix and can signal through the PRRs, the Toll-like receptors or cytosolic Nod-like receptors, culminating in nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion. Together, these molecules are involved in sterile inflammation and many are associated with rheumatic autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythromatosus, psoriatic arthritis and systemic sclerosis. These diseases are associated with inflammation and many danger signals are found in sites of sterile inflammation and mediate inflammation. The present review examines the role of DAMPs in rheumatic conditions and suggests avenues for their therapeutic modulation.

  8. Dietary factors in rheumatic autoimmune diseases: a recipe for therapy?

    PubMed

    Dahan, Shani; Segal, Yahel; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2017-06-01

    Today, we are facing a new era of digitization in the health care system, and with increased access to health care information has come a growing demand for safe, cost-effective and easy to administer therapies. Dietary habits have a crucial influence on human health, affecting an individual's risk for hypertension, heart disease and stroke, as well as influencing the risk of developing of cancer. Moreover, an individual's lifestyle choices can greatly influence the progression and manifestation of chronic autoimmune rheumatic diseases. In light of these effects, it makes sense that the search for additional therapies to attenuate such diseases would include investigations into lifestyle modifications. When considering the complex web of factors that influence autoimmunity, it is not surprising to find that several dietary elements are involved in disease progression or prevention. In this Review, several common nutritional components of the human diet are presented, and the evidence for their effects on rheumatic diseases is discussed.

  9. [Biorheological contribution to the problem of rheumatic joint diseases].

    PubMed

    Ribitsch, V; Rainer, F; Ribitsch, G; Schurz, J; Klein, G

    1981-01-01

    The rheological properties of synovial fluids from patients with different rheumatic diseases are discussed. Viscosities of 73 samples were determined and are compared to a standard of "healthy" human synovial fluid p. m. and to bovine synovia. Typical differences between "healthy", degenerative and inflammatory synovial fluids could be discerned. These differences can be characterized with several rheological parameters. The mechanism of lubrication in joints and the role of synovial fluid as a lubricant are discussed. Rheological properties of polymere solutions which could serve as a substitute for sick synovial fluids are described and compared to the properties of healthy synovia. Several possibilities for molecular changes which could account for the deterioration of synovial fluids in patients with different rheumatic diseases are discussed.

  10. Risk of falls in the rheumatic patient at geriatric age.

    PubMed

    Prusinowska, Agnieszka; Komorowski, Arkadiusz; Sadura-Sieklucka, Teresa; Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2017-01-01

    Evaluating the risk of falling of a geriatric rheumatic patient plays an essential role not only in planning and carrying out the physiotherapeutic process. The consequences of falls may be different and, although they do not always result in serious repercussions such as fractures or injuries, it is sufficient that they generate the fear of falling and cause a significant reduction in physical activity. Assessing functional capacity to define the risk of falling is of utmost importance in the case of patients after joint arthroplasty surgeries. The specificity of rheumatic patient's falls is determined by numerous factors. It is not always possible to avoid them. However, it becomes vital to include fall prevention in the rehabilitation process as well as to prepare the house for the needs of an elderly person so that they are safe and as self-dependent as possible.

  11. Risk of falls in the rheumatic patient at geriatric age

    PubMed Central

    Komorowski, Arkadiusz; Sadura-Sieklucka, Teresa; Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2017-01-01

    Evaluating the risk of falling of a geriatric rheumatic patient plays an essential role not only in planning and carrying out the physiotherapeutic process. The consequences of falls may be different and, although they do not always result in serious repercussions such as fractures or injuries, it is sufficient that they generate the fear of falling and cause a significant reduction in physical activity. Assessing functional capacity to define the risk of falling is of utmost importance in the case of patients after joint arthroplasty surgeries. The specificity of rheumatic patient’s falls is determined by numerous factors. It is not always possible to avoid them. However, it becomes vital to include fall prevention in the rehabilitation process as well as to prepare the house for the needs of an elderly person so that they are safe and as self-dependent as possible. PMID:28539681

  12. Adapting Knowledge Translation Strategies for Rare Rheumatic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Cellucci, Tania; Lee, Shirley; Webster, Fiona

    2016-08-01

    Rare rheumatic diseases present unique challenges to knowledge translation (KT) researchers. There is often an urgent need to transfer knowledge from research findings into clinical practice to facilitate earlier diagnosis and better outcomes. However, existing KT frameworks have not addressed the specific considerations surrounding rare diseases for which gold standard evidence is not available. Several widely adopted models provide guidance for processes and problems associated with KT. However, they do not address issues surrounding creation or synthesis of knowledge for rare diseases. Additional problems relate to lack of awareness or experience in intended knowledge users, low motivation, and potential barriers to changing practice or policy. Strategies to address the challenges of KT for rare rheumatic diseases include considering different levels of evidence available, linking knowledge creation and transfer directly, incorporating patient and physician advocacy efforts to generate awareness of conditions, and selecting strategies to address barriers to practice or policy change.

  13. Rheumatic disease, heavy-metal pigments, and the Great Masters.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, L M; Permin, H

    1988-06-04

    The painters Rubens, Renoir, and Dufy suffered from rheumatoid arthritis and Klee from scleroderma. Analysis of the areas of various colours in randomly selected paintings by these four artists and by eight "controls" (contemporary painters without rheumatic disease) suggests that Rubens, Renoir, Dufy, and Klee used significantly more bright and clear colours based on toxic heavy metals and fewer earth colours containing harmless iron and carbon compounds. These four painters may have been heavily exposed to mercury sulphide, cadmium sulphide, arsenic sulphide, lead, antimony, tin, cobalt, manganese, and chromium, the metals of the bright and clear colours, and exposure to these metals may be of importance in the development of inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Artists today are not so exposed, but heavy metal contamination in food and drinking water exists and experience from the occupational exposure of old masters is still relevant.

  14. An overview of genetics of paediatric rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Patricia; Colbert, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    The evidence so far suggests that the paediatric inflammatory diseases encountered in rheumatology practice may be largely genetic in origin, where common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in multiple genes contribute to risk, with real but variable environmental components. As far as genetic susceptibility to common paediatric rheumatic diseases is concerned, only juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) has been investigated in any substantial way so far. This article discusses susceptibility for different types of JIA, the different methods used and their advantages and disadvantages. The genetic code is also modifiable by epigenetic mechanisms and examples of these in immunity and rheumatoid arthritis are given to indicate another area of research in the elucidation of the genetics of paediatric rheumatic diseases. PMID:19853825

  15. Gene Specific Impedimetric Bacterial DNA Sensor for Rheumatic Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Singh, Swati; Kaushal, Ankur; Gupta, Sunil; Kumar, Ashok

    2017-03-01

    An impedimetric mga gene specific DNA sensor was developed by immobilization of single stranded DNA probe onto the screen printed modified gold-dendrimer nanohybrid composite electrode for early and rapid detection of S. pyogenes in human throat swab samples causing rheumatic heart disease. Electrochemical impedance response was measured after hybridization with bacterial single stranded genomic DNA (ssG-DNA) with probe. The sensor was found highly specific to S. pyogenes and can detect as low as 0.01 ng ssDNA in 6 µL sample only in 30 min. The nanohybrid sensor was also tested with non-specific pathogens and characterized by FTIR. An early detection of the pathogen S. pyogenes in human can save damage of mitral and aortic heart valves (rheumatic heart disease) by proper medical care.

  16. Culturing the throat to protect the heart: Dr. Milton Markowitz and the prevention of rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Murray, T; Grey, M

    2000-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to briefly review how the understanding of rheumatic fever has evolved over the last 50 years. Particular emphasis is given to the identification of the Group A streptococcus as the causative agent of rheumatic fever and the use of antibiotics to treat and prevent rheumatic fever. Throughout his 50-year career, Dr. Milton Markowitz, former chairman of the department of pediatrics at the University of Connecticut School of Medicine, has been involved in these advances as an international expert on rheumatic fever prevention. Using archival materials, including some of the earliest literature descriptions of rheumatic fever, as well as an extended interview with Dr. Markowitz, the authors present a unique personal perspective both on the history of rheumatic fever and the context within which the scientific advances that have led to contemporary treatment and prevention strategies have evolved.

  17. Preliminary consultation on preferred product characteristics of benzathine penicillin G for secondary prophylaxis of rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Wyber, Rosemary; Boyd, Ben J; Colquhoun, Samantha; Currie, Bart J; Engel, Mark; Kado, Joseph; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Sullivan, Mark; Saxena, Anita; Sheel, Meru; Steer, Andrew; Mucumbitsi, Joseph; Zühlke, Liesl; Carapetis, Jonathan

    2016-10-01

    Rheumatic fever is caused by an abnormal immune reaction to group A streptococcal infection. Secondary prophylaxis with antibiotics is recommended for people after their initial episode of rheumatic fever to prevent recurrent group A streptococcal infections, recurrences of rheumatic fever and progression to rheumatic heart disease. This secondary prophylaxis must be maintained for at least a decade after the last episode of rheumatic fever. Benzathine penicillin G is the first line antibiotic for secondary prophylaxis, delivered intramuscularly every 2 to 4 weeks. However, adherence to recommended secondary prophylaxis regimens is a global challenge. This paper outlines a consultation with global experts in rheumatic heart disease on the characteristics of benzathine penicillin G formulations which could be changed to improve adherence with secondary prophylaxis. Characteristics included dose interval, pain, administration mechanism, cold chain independence and cost. A sample target product profile for reformulated benzathine penicillin G is presented.

  18. The role of gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Danli; Wu, Chanyuan; Zeng, Xiaofeng; Wang, Qian

    2017-09-15

    Rheumatic diseases refer to many diseases with a loss of immune self-tolerance, leading to a chronic inflammation, degeneration, or metabolic derangement in multiple organs or tissues. The cause of rheumatic diseases remains to be elucidated, though both environmental and genetic factors are required for the development of rheumatic diseases. Over the past decades, emerging studies suggested that alteration of intestinal microbiota, known as gut dysbiosis, contributed to the occurrence or development of a range of rheumatic diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, ankylosing spondylitis, systemic sclerosis, and Sjogren's syndrome, through profoundly affecting the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory immune responses. In this article, we discussed the role of gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases based on a large number of experimental and clinical materials, thereby providing a new insight for microbiota-targeted therapies to prevent or cure rheumatic diseases.

  19. Pregnancy in patients with rheumatic diseases: obstetric management and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Branch, D W

    2004-01-01

    The obstetric management of the pregnant rheumatic patient is largely dictated by the specific disease and the degree to which it is associated with recognizable and treatable adverse obstetric outcomes, maternal or fetal. This review will cover the obstetric management of women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic sclerosis (SSc). Most experts agree that a co-ordinated management effort on the part of obstetricians and rheumatologists will likely yield the optimal achievable results.

  20. Costs of drugs for treatment of rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Westhovens, Rene; Annemans, Lieven

    2016-01-01

    The cost of drugs is becoming an issue worldwide, in particular for inflammatory rheumatic diseases. In the current review, an overview of the scene is given with a specific emphasis on accessibility for those patients in real need of the available expensive treatments. The authors propose 7 principles for discussion that need to be addressed and are a responsibility for all stakeholders in rheumatology. PMID:27651923

  1. [Alternative treatment methods in rheumatic diseases; a literature review].

    PubMed

    Jacobs, J W; Rasker, J J; Van Riel, P L; Gribnau, F W; van de Putte, L B

    1991-02-23

    To evaluate the effectiveness of several types of complementary medicine in patients with rheumatic diseases, a literature search was performed. Clinical trials, blind or open, comparing the effectiveness of forms of complementary medicine with that of placebo or another control therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, soft tissue rheumatism and the fibromyalgia syndrome were selected until half of 1989, using electronic databases. Abstracts and summaries were excluded. The investigation was performed at the department of rheumatology of the Medisch Spectrum Twente hospital at Enschede in cooperation with the department of internal diseases of the Sint Radboud hospital at Nijmegen. For each type of complementary treatment, the results of all the clinical trials were summarized. Furthermore, the placebo-controlled trials were graded according to convincing trials or trials that seemed to be less valid and/or difficult to interpret. Data concerning acupuncture, balneotherapy, dietary measures, enzymic therapy, Seatone, homeopathy, manual therapy and fever few were found. Of these types of complementary medicine in rheumatic diseases, we found no convincing prove that they are more effective than the control or placebo treatment. A considerable number of the studies however can be criticized. It is necessary to perform further studies on the effect of frequently used types of complementary medicine in patients with rheumatic diseases, by or in cooperation with the physicians or paramedics who prescribe or perform these kinds of treatment. This is nearly always possible; directives are given to realize further studies of this kind. If a particular treatment proves to be no more effective than placebo treatment, its use should be discouraged.

  2. The Microbiome: a Revolution in Treatment for Rheumatic Diseases?

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, James T; Asquith, Mark J

    2016-10-01

    The microbiome is the term that describes the microbial ecosystem that cohabits an organism such as humans. The microbiome has been implicated in a long list of immune-mediated diseases which include rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and even gout. The mechanisms to account for this effect are multiple. The clinical implications from observations on the microbiome and disease are broad. A growing number of microbiota constituents such as Prevotella copri, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Collinsella have been correlated or causally related to rheumatic disease. The microbiome has a marked effect on the immune system. Our understanding of immune pathways modulated by the microbiota such as the induction of T helper 17 (Th17) cells and secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA) responses to segmented filamentous bacteria continues to expand. In addition to the gut microbiome, bacterial communities of other sites such as the mouth, lung, and skin have also been associated with the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases. Strategies to alter the microbiome or to alter the immune activation from the microbiome might play a role in the future therapy for rheumatic diseases.

  3. The emerging role of epigenetics in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Gay, Steffen; Wilson, Anthony G

    2014-03-01

    Epigenetics is a key mechanism regulating the expression of genes. There are three main and interrelated mechanisms: DNA methylation, post-translational modification of histone proteins and non-coding RNA. Gene activation is generally associated with lower levels of DNA methylation in promoters and with distinct histone marks such as acetylation of amino acids in histones. Unlike the genetic code, the epigenome is altered by endogenous (e.g. hormonal) and environmental (e.g. diet, exercise) factors and changes with age. Recent evidence implicates epigenetic mechanisms in the pathogenesis of common rheumatic disease, including RA, OA, SLE and scleroderma. Epigenetic drift has been implicated in age-related changes in the immune system that result in the development of a pro-inflammatory status termed inflammageing, potentially increasing the risk of age-related conditions such as polymyalgia rheumatica. Therapeutic targeting of the epigenome has shown promise in animal models of rheumatic diseases. Rapid advances in computational biology and DNA sequencing technology will lead to a more comprehensive understanding of the roles of epigenetics in the pathogenesis of common rheumatic diseases.

  4. [Use of intravenous humana immunoglobulin in rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Mussano, Eduardo D; Onetti, Laura B; Cadile, Isaac I; Onetti, Carlos M

    2012-01-01

    Preparations of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) are used as treatment in different diseases such primary and secondary immunodeficiencies, autoimmune diseases, systemic inflammatory diseases, infectious diseases and allergic diseases among others. to present 13 of our cases with the use of IVIG in different rheumatic diseases. we retrospectively studied 13 patients (10 women and 3 men), mean age 29 years with different rheumatic diseases, that underwent conventional treatments without positive response. They received IVIG pulses, trying to improve or induce remission of their previous clinical situation. 6/13 patients met criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 2/13 had primary antiphospholipid syndrome (APL)one had polydermatomyositis (PDM), 1 juvenile arthritis, 1 panarteritis nodosa (cutaneous PAN), one Evans syndrome, and one with autoimmune uveitis. 7 of them had a positive response to therapy with IGEV evaluated by clinical and biochemical parameters. They remained with conventional treatments. One patient received a new IG EV pulse after 24 months, because of panniculitis reactivation. Clinical and biochemical response was poor in 4 of them, and 2 patients died. IVIg may be usefull in autoimmune rheumatic diseases when conventional therapies have failed. The therapeutic success is also limited. Only the 55 percent of our patients had a positive clinical response.

  5. [Special features of physical therapy for elderly rheumatic patients].

    PubMed

    Hardt, R

    2012-07-01

    The demographic shift is leading to a rapid rise in the number of elderly citizens. Accordingly, the number of geriatric problems is also increasing within the population of rheumatic patients. Geriatric patients are characterized through the triad of high age, multimorbidity and functional deficits. Almost all will show signs of arthritis and other degenerative musculoskeletal illnesses. Inflammatory rheumatic diseases within the geriatric population are found to be mostly in the chronic stage or with defective conditions. Problems typical of this population, such as comorbidities especially in the cardiovascular sector, must be assessed prior to the application of therapeutic concepts. The focus is on activating therapies, such as physiotherapy and occupational therapy, where the functional usefulness is proven. The use of thermal therapy, especially applied in the form of heat, as well as electrotherapy and high frequency therapy are also useful when indicated. Balneotherapy and hydrotherapy, as well as massage therapy and lymphatic drainage, must be adapted to the cardiovascular function of geriatric patients; this applies especially to heart failure patients. Physical therapy concepts in elderly rheumatic patients should preferably be implemented and managed by a multidisciplinary geriatric team.

  6. Th22 Cells Contribution in Immunopathogenesis of Rheumatic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Gholamreza; Simhag, Anita; El Rouby, Nadia M M; Mirshafiey, Abbas

    2015-06-01

    Newly identified T helper cell 22 (Th22) is a subset of CD4+T cells with specific properties apart from other known CD4+ T cell subsets with distinguished gene expression and function. Th22 cells are characterized by production of a distinct profile of effector cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-22, IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). The levels of Th22 and related cytokine IL-22 are increased in various autoimmune diseases and positively associated with some rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, behcet's disease, ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis. In summary, IL-22 and Th22 cells play a significant and complicated role in inflammatory and autoimmune rheumatic diseases, therefore, targeting IL-22 or Th22 have unique and attractive advantages due to the fact that Th22 subset is recently identified and its associated research is extremely limited. This review discusses the role of Th22 and its cytokine IL-22 in the immunopathogenesis of rheumatic disease.

  7. Acute rheumatic fever in First Nations communities in northwestern Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Janet; Kirlew, Mike; Schreiber, Yoko; Saginur, Raphael; Bocking, Natalie; Blakelock, Brittany; Haavaldsrud, Michelle; Kennedy, Christine; Farrell, Terri; Douglas, Lloyd; Kelly, Len

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To document a case series of 8 young First Nations patients diagnosed with acute rheumatic fever (ARF), a preventable disease that resulted in the death of 2 patients, in northwestern Ontario in the context of late diagnosis, overcrowded housing, and inadequate public health response. Design Retrospective case series over an 18-month period. Setting Remote First Nations communities in northwestern Ontario. Participants Eight patients with ARF. Main outcome measures Incidence, mortality, residual rheumatic heart disease, time to diagnosis, barriers to diagnosis and treatment, housing situation of patients, patient demographic characteristics (age, sex), and investigation results. Results The incidence of ARF in this population was 21.3 per 100 000, which is 75 times greater than the overall Canadian estimated incidence. The average patient age was 9.4 years. Most cases developed joint findings, and 5 of the surviving patients had rheumatic heart disease when they received echocardiography. The average time to diagnosis was 88 days. Two 4-year-old children died from ARF. Most patients lived in inadequate and crowded housing. Conclusion This rare disease still exists in remote First Nations communities. These communities demonstrate an incidence equal to that in aboriginal communities in Australia and New Zealand, which have among the highest international incidence of ARF. Primordial prevention, including improved on-reserve housing, is urgently needed. Case detection and ongoing surveillance for primary and secondary prophylaxis requires a well resourced regional strategy. PMID:26759842

  8. [Treatment of rheumatic diseases with intraarticular drug delivery systems].

    PubMed

    Szabó, Andrea; Zelkó, Romána; Antal, István

    2011-01-01

    Present work provides an overall study about the types and the medicinal treatment of the rheumatic diseases especially the intraarticular formulations. Due to the localized nature of the joint, intraarticular injections are very favourable drug delivery systems. It has a big advantage over the oral medication; the systemic side effects are kept away. The review shows two types of the rheumatic diseases on the example of the healthy joint: the joint damage (osteoarthritis) and the inflamed joint (rheumatoid arthritis). There are many active ingredients for the treatment of the rheumatic diseases but the number of the intraarticular products is limited. At present are only formulations with hyaluronic acid or glucocorticoid on the market. Several physiological and biopharmaceutical aspects must be considered for the design of intraarticular injections. During and after the production many quality requirements have to be complied. On the market the formulations in solution or in suspension are available, which provide a short-term effect. The aim of the developments is to achieve long-term effect based on nano- or microparticles.

  9. Clinical significance of markers of collagen metabolism in rheumatic mitral valve disease.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Tanima; Mukherjee, Somaditya; Ghosh, Sudip; Biswas, Monodeep; Dutta, Santanu; Pattari, Sanjib; Chatterjee, Shelly; Bandyopadhyay, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatic Heart Disease (RHD), a chronic acquired heart disorder results from Acute Rheumatic Fever. It is a major public health concern in developing countries. In RHD, mostly the valves get affected. The present study investigated whether extracellular matrix remodelling in rheumatic valve leads to altered levels of collagen metabolism markers and if such markers can be clinically used to diagnose or monitor disease progression. This is a case control study comprising 118 subjects. It included 77 cases and 41 healthy controls. Cases were classified into two groups- Mitral Stenosis (MS) and Mitral Regurgitation (MR). Carboxy-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PICP), amino-terminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP), total Matrix Metalloproteinase-1(MMP-1) and Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) were assessed. Histopathology studies were performed on excised mitral valve leaflets. A p value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Plasma PICP and PIIINP concentrations increased significantly (p<0.01) in MS and MR subjects compared to controls but decreased gradually over a one year period post mitral valve replacement (p<0.05). In MS, PICP level and MMP-1/TIMP-1 ratio strongly correlated with mitral valve area (r = -0.40; r = 0.49 respectively) and pulmonary artery systolic pressure (r = 0.49; r = -0.49 respectively); while in MR they correlated with left ventricular internal diastolic (r = 0.68; r = -0.48 respectively) and systolic diameters (r = 0.65; r = -0.55 respectively). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis established PICP as a better marker (AUC = 0.95; 95% CI = 0.91-0.99; p<0.0001). A cut-off >459 ng/mL for PICP provided 91% sensitivity, 90% specificity and a likelihood ratio of 9 in diagnosing RHD. Histopathology analysis revealed inflammation, scarring, neovascularisation and extensive leaflet fibrosis in diseased mitral valve. Levels of collagen metabolism markers

  10. Clinical Significance of Markers of Collagen Metabolism in Rheumatic Mitral Valve Disease

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Tanima; Mukherjee, Somaditya; Ghosh, Sudip; Biswas, Monodeep; Dutta, Santanu; Pattari, Sanjib; Chatterjee, Shelly; Bandyopadhyay, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Background Rheumatic Heart Disease (RHD), a chronic acquired heart disorder results from Acute Rheumatic Fever. It is a major public health concern in developing countries. In RHD, mostly the valves get affected. The present study investigated whether extracellular matrix remodelling in rheumatic valve leads to altered levels of collagen metabolism markers and if such markers can be clinically used to diagnose or monitor disease progression. Methodology This is a case control study comprising 118 subjects. It included 77 cases and 41 healthy controls. Cases were classified into two groups- Mitral Stenosis (MS) and Mitral Regurgitation (MR). Carboxy-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PICP), amino-terminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP), total Matrix Metalloproteinase-1(MMP-1) and Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) were assessed. Histopathology studies were performed on excised mitral valve leaflets. A p value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Plasma PICP and PIIINP concentrations increased significantly (p<0.01) in MS and MR subjects compared to controls but decreased gradually over a one year period post mitral valve replacement (p<0.05). In MS, PICP level and MMP-1/TIMP-1 ratio strongly correlated with mitral valve area (r = −0.40; r = 0.49 respectively) and pulmonary artery systolic pressure (r = 0.49; r = −0.49 respectively); while in MR they correlated with left ventricular internal diastolic (r = 0.68; r = −0.48 respectively) and systolic diameters (r = 0.65; r = −0.55 respectively). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis established PICP as a better marker (AUC = 0.95; 95% CI = 0.91−0.99; p<0.0001). A cut-off >459 ng/mL for PICP provided 91% sensitivity, 90% specificity and a likelihood ratio of 9 in diagnosing RHD. Histopathology analysis revealed inflammation, scarring, neovascularisation and extensive leaflet fibrosis in diseased mitral

  11. Immunological response in laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Smit, M J; Beelen, R H; Eijsbouts, Q A; Meijer, S; Cuesta, M A

    1996-01-01

    Immunological response to surgical trauma may be protected during laparoscopic surgery. A less surgical trauma, in comparison with conventional surgery, may explained these important advantages. Plasma and macrophages studies have demonstrated that laparoscopic cholecystectomy causes less depression of cell mediated immunity than open cholecystectomy. What will be the impact of this immunological protection in laparoscopic advanced and oncological surgery? Experimental studies have showed that laparoscopic techniques in advanced and oncological surgery may have important advantages concerning the "preservation of the immune status" of the patient. That will imply in the future a lower percentage of infections, local recurrence and even a lower percentage of distant metastases. On the other hand, the appearance of tumor implants in the port sites after laparoscopic resection for cancer is a significant drawback of this procedure. Proper investigations have to be carried out in order to find the cause and the solution of this dilemma.

  12. [Non-immunologic fetal hydrops].

    PubMed

    Stejskalová, S; Dolezal, Z; Nekvasil, R

    1993-07-01

    The authors demonstrate two cases of non-immunological foetal hydrops. In the first case the initial cause of foetal hydrops was hypoalbuminaemia (hypoproteinaemia), in the second case intrauterine cardiac failure resulting from supraventricular tachycardia of unknown aetiology. The authors explain the pathogenesis of the condition, its early diagnosis and therapy. They draw attention to possible intoxication of the neonate by digoxin administered to the mother during pregnancy.

  13. Historical overview of immunological tolerance.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Ronald H

    2012-04-01

    A fundamental property of the immune system is its ability to mediate self-defense with a minimal amount of collateral damage to the host. The system uses several different mechanisms to achieve this goal, which is collectively referred to as the "process of immunological tolerance." This article provides an introductory historical overview to these various mechanisms, which are discussed in greater detail throughout this collection, and then briefly describes what happens when this process fails, a state referred to as "autoimmunity."

  14. Role of Glucomannans in Immunology.

    PubMed

    Tester, Richard; Al-Ghazzewi, Farage H

    2017-01-01

    Glucomannans play a much broader role in human health then providing dietary fibre. They are biologically active molecules and can when added to the body imitate innate molecules found in different organs including surface carbohydrates on cells. This review considers the immunological role of exogenous glucomannans within animals and man. This article is open to POST-PUBLICATION REVIEW. Registered readers (see "For Readers") may comment by clicking on ABSTRACT on the issue's contents page.

  15. Immunological findings in hemp workers.

    PubMed

    Zuskin, E; Kanceljak, B; Schachter, E N; Witek, T J; Maayani, S; Goswami, S; Marom, Z; Rienzi, N

    1992-12-01

    Immunological status and its relation to respiratory findings were studied in 42 female textile workers occupationally exposed to hemp dust and in 49 female control workers. Skin prick tests with hemp or flax dust extracts from different parts of the mill in hemp workers demonstrated the following frequencies of positive tests to antigens: a mixture of hemp and flax extracts (64%), followed by flax extracts (48%), hemp from combing machines (41%), hemp from carding machines (38%), hemp from spinning and weaving machines (33%), and hemp from softening machines (20%). The prevalence of positive skin tests to hemp or flax allergens in control workers was consistently lower, ranging from 21 to 5%. Increased total serum IgE was recorded in 35.7% of hemp workers compared to only 5.0% of control workers (P < 0.05). Hemp workers with positive skin tests had significantly higher prevalences of chronic respiratory symptoms than those with negative skin tests. There were, however, no differences for acute symptoms between workers with positive and negative skin tests. Across-shift changes and baseline lung function were not different when compared by immunologic status. We showed additionally that a water-soluble extract of hemp dust causes a dose-related contraction of nonsensitized guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle when studied in vitro. Our results suggest that frequent immunologic abnormalities can be documented in hemp workers but, with the exception of chronic respiratory symptoms, in general, these do not correlate with respiratory findings.

  16. Immunology of Gut Mucosal Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Pasetti, Marcela F.; Simon, Jakub K.; Sztein, Marcelo B.; Levine, Myron M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Understanding the mechanisms underlying the induction of immunity in the gastrointestinal mucosa following oral immunization and the cross-talk between mucosal and systemic immunity should expedite the development of vaccines to diminish the global burden caused by enteric pathogens. Identifying an immunological correlate of protection in the course of field trials of efficacy, animal models (when available), or human challenge studies is also invaluable. In industrialized country populations, live attenuated vaccines (e.g. polio, typhoid, and rotavirus) mimic natural infection and generate robust protective immune responses. In contrast, a major challenge is to understand and overcome the barriers responsible for the diminished immunogenicity and efficacy of the same enteric vaccines in underprivileged populations in developing countries. Success in developing vaccines against some enteric pathogens has heretofore been elusive (e.g. Shigella). Different types of oral vaccines can selectively or inclusively elicit mucosal secretory immunoglobulin A and serum immunoglobulin G antibodies and a variety of cell-mediated immune responses. Areas of research that require acceleration include interaction between the gut innate immune system and the stimulation of adaptive immunity, development of safe yet effective mucosal adjuvants, better understanding of homing to the mucosa of immunologically relevant cells, and elicitation of mucosal immunologic memory. This review dissects the immune responses elicited in humans by enteric vaccines. PMID:21198669

  17. Advances in potential M-protein peptide-based vaccines for preventing rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Batzloff, Michael R; Pandey, Manisha; Olive, Colleen; Good, Michael F

    2006-01-01

    Rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are postinfectious complications of an infection (or repeated infection) with the Gram-positive bacterium, Streptococcus pyogenes (also known as group A streptococcus, GAS). RF and RHD are global problems and affect many indigenous populations of developed countries and many developing countries. However, RF and RHD are only part of a larger spectrum of diseases caused by this organism. The development of a vaccine against GAS has primarily targeted the abundant cell-surface protein called the M-protein. This review focuses on different M-protein-based-subunit vaccine approaches and the different delivery technologies used to administer these vaccine candidates in preclinical studies.

  18. Evaluation of an automated connective tissue disease screening assay in Korean patients with systemic rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seri; Yang, Heeyoung; Hwang, Hyunyong

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic utilities of the automated connective tissues disease screening assay, CTD screen, in patients with systemic rheumatic diseases. A total of 1093 serum samples were assayed using CTD screen and indirect immunofluorescent (IIF) methods. Among them, 162 were diagnosed with systemic rheumatic disease, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and mixed connective tissue disease (MCT). The remaining 931 with non-systemic rheumatic disease were assigned to the control group. The median ratios of CTD screen tests were significantly higher in the systemic rheumatic disease group than in the control group. The positive likelihood ratios of the CTD screen were higher than those of IIF in patients with total rheumatic diseases (4.1 vs. 1.6), including SLE (24.3 vs. 10.7). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC-AUCs) of the CTD screen for discriminating total rheumatic diseases, RA, SLE, and MCT from controls were 0.68, 0.56, 0.92 and 0.80, respectively. The ROC-AUCs of the combinations with IIF were significantly higher in patients with total rheumatic diseases (0.72) and MCT (0.85) than in those of the CTD screen alone. Multivariate analysis indicated that both the CTD screen and IIF were independent variables for predicting systemic rheumatic disease. CTD screen alone and in combination with IIF were a valuable diagnostic tool for predicting systemic rheumatic diseases, particularly for SLE.

  19. Evaluation of an automated connective tissue disease screening assay in Korean patients with systemic rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seri; Yang, Heeyoung; Hwang, Hyunyong

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic utilities of the automated connective tissues disease screening assay, CTD screen, in patients with systemic rheumatic diseases. A total of 1093 serum samples were assayed using CTD screen and indirect immunofluorescent (IIF) methods. Among them, 162 were diagnosed with systemic rheumatic disease, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and mixed connective tissue disease (MCT). The remaining 931 with non-systemic rheumatic disease were assigned to the control group. The median ratios of CTD screen tests were significantly higher in the systemic rheumatic disease group than in the control group. The positive likelihood ratios of the CTD screen were higher than those of IIF in patients with total rheumatic diseases (4.1 vs. 1.6), including SLE (24.3 vs. 10.7). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC-AUCs) of the CTD screen for discriminating total rheumatic diseases, RA, SLE, and MCT from controls were 0.68, 0.56, 0.92 and 0.80, respectively. The ROC-AUCs of the combinations with IIF were significantly higher in patients with total rheumatic diseases (0.72) and MCT (0.85) than in those of the CTD screen alone. Multivariate analysis indicated that both the CTD screen and IIF were independent variables for predicting systemic rheumatic disease. CTD screen alone and in combination with IIF were a valuable diagnostic tool for predicting systemic rheumatic diseases, particularly for SLE. PMID:28273146

  20. Pediatric allergy and immunology at Siriraj Hospital.

    PubMed

    Vichyanond, Pakit

    2002-08-01

    Like other parts of the world, prevalence of childhood allergic diseases in Thailand, particularly of asthma and allergic rhinitis, has risen sharply over the past decade. Epidemiologic studies in this country indicated that allergic sensitization (mainly to house dust mites, cockroaches and cat dander) is the major important risk factor for the development of asthma. House dust mites are the most important source of allergens causing sensitization among allergic Thai children. A nationwide survey indicated that house dust mites are ubiquitous in Thai homes. Despite the authors' earlier finding that mite allergen levels in Thailand (mean group-I allergen level of 11 mcg/g dust), exceeded the recommended international threshold level to induce asthmatic symptoms (10 mcg/g dust), mite allergen levels in homes within the Bangkok area are in the modest range (5 mcg/g dust). With mattresses in Thailand being commonly laid on hardwood surfaces, the authors demonstrated that only top-covering of these mattresses with locally produced mite-impermeable membrane, mite allergens could be substantially reduced. Other active research in pediatric allergy in Thailand include complete surveys of outdoor aeroallergens and research in pharmacologic managements of allergic diseases. The Thailand Registry of Primary Immune Deficiency has recently been established to collect data on patients with these disorders and to improve means for diagnosis and treatment for these unfortunate patients. Finally, with a recent approval for board certification in pediatric allergy and immunology, it is expected that the number of specialists in this field will increase to a sufficient level to provide adequate care for allergic/immunologic children in Thailand.

  1. Pediatric allergy and immunology in Spain.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Antonio; Mazon, Angel; Martin-Mateos, Maria Anunciacion; Plaza, Ana-Maria; Garde, Jesus; Alonso, Elena; Martorell, Antonio; Boquete, Manuel; Lorente, Felix; Ibero, Marcel; Bone, Javier; Pamies, Rafael; Garcia, Juan Miguel; Echeverria, Luis; Nevot, Santiago; Martinez-Cañavate, Ana; Fernandez-Benitez, Margarita; Garcia-Marcos, Luis

    2011-11-01

    The data of the ISAAC project in Spain show a prevalence of childhood asthma ranging from 7.1% to 15.3%, with regional differences; a higher prevalence, 22.6% to 35.8%, is described for rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis is found in 4.1% to 7.6% of children. The prevalence of food allergy is 3%. All children in Spain have the right to be visited in the National Health System. The medical care at the primary level is provided by pediatricians, who have obtained their titles through a 4-yr medical residency training program. The education on pediatric allergy during that period is not compulsory and thus very variable. There are currently 112 certified European pediatric allergists in Spain, who have obtained the accreditation of the European Union of Medical Specialist for proven skills and experience in pediatric allergy. Future specialists in pediatric allergy should obtain their titles through a specific education program to be developed in one of the four accredited training units on pediatric allergy, after obtaining the title on pediatrics. The Spanish Society of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology (SEICAP) gathers over 350 pediatric allergists and pediatricians working in this field. SEICAP has a growing activity including yearly congresses, continued education courses, elaboration of technical clinical documents and protocols, education of patients, and collaboration with other scientific societies and associations of patients. The official journal of SEICAP is Allergologia et Immunophatologia, published every 2 months since 1972. The web site of SEICAP, http://www.seicap.es, open since 2004, offers information for professionals and extensive information on pediatric allergic and immunologic disorders for the lay public; the web site is receiving 750 daily visits during 2011. The pediatric allergy units are very active in clinical work, procedures as immunotherapy or induction of oral tolerance in food allergy, contribution to scientific literature, and

  2. [Depression and inflammation in rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Buras, Aleksandra; Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Szulc, Agata

    2016-03-04

    It is known that the prevalence of depression in rheumatologic patients is higher than in the general population. Socioeconomic factors are not a sufficient explanation of mood disorder in these patients. Symptoms reported by patients with chronic inflammatory diseases resemble changes defined as "sickness behavior". Mood disorders among somatic patients could be explained by disturbances of the immune system according to the monoaminergic theory of depression. Inflammatory factors such as IL-1 (interleukin-1), IL-2 (interleukin-2), IL-6 (interleukin-6), TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor α), and IFN-γ (interferon-γ) act within the CNS (central nervous system). They get through from peripheral tissues as well as being synthesized de novo by neurons. This cytokine activity correlates positively with depression intensity as well as with genetic polymorphism of the serotonin (5-HT) transporter. The theory of glucocorticoid resistance-mediated depression (limbic-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal [LHPA] axis) is also connected with gained proinflammatory cytokines activity. It might assume the form of a vicious circle. Depressed mood is probably linked with depression in immune-mediated diseases. An elevated level of proinflammatory cytokines is able to activate IDO (indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase)--an enzyme catabolizing tryptophan (5-HT precursor). Those reactions probably play the main role at the biochemical level. IDO metabolites extensively disturb neurotransmission. 3-Hydroxykynurenine (3OH-KYN), quinolinic acid (Quin) and kynurenic acid (KYNA) are neurotoxic by releasing oxidative stress mediators. Moreover, they activate MAO (monoamine oxidase), which degrades neurotransmitters responsible for stable mood. Bidirectional communication between the neuroendocrine and immune systems is significant for depression treatment, as well as CNS protection against incremental neurodegeneration among seemingly diverse diseases.

  3. Immunology taught by human genetics.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Abel, Laurent; Quintana-Murci, Lluis

    2013-01-01

    Human genetic studies are rarely conducted for immunological purposes. Instead, they are typically driven by medical and evolutionary goals, such as understanding the predisposition or resistance to infectious or inflammatory diseases, the pathogenesis of such diseases, and human evolution in the context of the long-standing relationships between humans and their commensal and environmental microbes. However, the dissection of these experiments of Nature has also led to major immunological advances. In this review, we draw on some of the immunological lessons learned in the three branches of human molecular genetics most relevant to immunology: clinical genetics, epidemiological genetics, and evolutionary genetics. We argue that human genetics has become a new frontier not only for timely studies of specific features of human immunity, but also for defining general principles of immunity. These studies teach us about immunity as it occurs under "natural" conditions, through the transition from the almost complete wilderness that existed worldwide until about a century ago to the current unevenly distributed medically shaped environment. Hygiene, vaccines, antibiotics, and surgery have considerably decreased the burden of infection, but these interventions have been available only recently, so have yet to have a major impact on patterns of genomic diversity, making it possible to carry out unbiased evolutionary studies at the population level. Clinical genetic studies of childhood phenotypes have not been blurred by modern medicine either. Instead, medical advances have actually facilitated such studies, by making it possible for children with life-threatening infections to survive. In addition, the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases have increased life expectancy at birth from ∼20 yr to ∼80 yr, providing unique opportunities to study the genetic basis of immunological phenomena against which there is no natural counterselection, such as

  4. Inflammatory Rheumatologic disorders in patients with Myelodysplastic Syndromes: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Mobini, Maryam; Ali Mohammad Pour, Reza; Zakeri, Shahrzad

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and characteristics of rheumatologic manifestations associated with MDS. Methods: Eighty patients with MDS were evaluated by history and physical examination for inflammatory rheumatologic disorders from Jan 2013 to May 2014. Patients who had any signs or symptoms of rheumatologic disorders underwent evaluation by laboratory tests. Patients with and without inflammatory rheumatic disorders were compared for their characteristics. Results: Of 80 participants with MDS, 9 (11.3%) patients were diagnosed as having rheumatic disorders. MDS patients with or without rheumatologic disorder were similar in demographic and hematologic parameters, except age which was lower in patients with rheumatologic disorders. (p=0.016). In younger patients, refractory cytopenia and refractory cytopenia with multilinage dysplasia were more prevalent. Conclusion: The findings of this study indicate that rheumatologic manifestations may be present in MDS patients. Younger patients are more prone to the occurrence of MDS and rheumatic disorders. PMID:25802697

  5. Inflammatory Rheumatologic disorders in patients with Myelodysplastic Syndromes: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Mobini, Maryam; Shekarriz, Ramin; Ali Mohammad Pour, Reza; Zakeri, Shahrzad

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and characteristics of rheumatologic manifestations associated with MDS. Eighty patients with MDS were evaluated by history and physical examination for inflammatory rheumatologic disorders from Jan 2013 to May 2014. Patients who had any signs or symptoms of rheumatologic disorders underwent evaluation by laboratory tests. Patients with and without inflammatory rheumatic disorders were compared for their characteristics. Of 80 participants with MDS, 9 (11.3%) patients were diagnosed as having rheumatic disorders. MDS patients with or without rheumatologic disorder were similar in demographic and hematologic parameters, except age which was lower in patients with rheumatologic disorders. (p=0.016). In younger patients, refractory cytopenia and refractory cytopenia with multilinage dysplasia were more prevalent. The findings of this study indicate that rheumatologic manifestations may be present in MDS patients. Younger patients are more prone to the occurrence of MDS and rheumatic disorders.

  6. Group A streptococcal antibodies in subjects with or without rheumatic fever in areas with high or low incidences of rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Ayoub, Elia M; Nelson, Beverly; Shulman, Stanford T; Barrett, Douglas J; Campbell, J Douglas; Armstrong, George; Lovejoy, John; Angoff, Gerald H; Rockenmacher, Sol

    2003-09-01

    The levels of streptococcal antibody titers in populations with or without rheumatic fever from an area with a relatively high incidence of rheumatic fever and an area with a low incidence of this disease were compared. Streptococcal antibody titers were determined for two populations, each of which included children without rheumatic fever (nonrheumatic children) and rheumatic fever patients. The two populations were derived from two separate geographic areas, one with a high incidence of rheumatic fever (Grenada) and another with a low incidence of this disease (central Florida). The results revealed an absence of consistent differences in the geometric mean antibody titers between the nonrheumatic subjects and the rheumatic fever patients from Grenada. In the population from Grenada, the mean anti-streptolysin O and anti-DNase B titers were higher in the nonrheumatic controls (P of 0.085 and 0.029, respectively). However, the mean titer of the antibody to the group A streptococcal cell wall carbohydrate was higher in the rheumatic fever patients than in the nonrheumatic controls (P = 0.047). This finding contrasted with the finding that the means of all three streptococcal antibody titers in the patients with rheumatic fever were significantly higher than those in the nonrheumatic subjects from Florida (P = 0.01-<0.001). The reason for this paradoxical finding became evident when the streptococcal antibody titers of the nonrheumatic subjects from Grenada and Florida were compared, revealing significantly higher levels of all three antibodies in the nonrheumatic subjects from Grenada than in the nonrheumatic subjects from Florida (P < 0.001). These results suggest that nonrheumatic individuals in an area with a high incidence of rheumatic fever have inordinately elevated levels of streptococcal antibodies in serum. The presence of elevated streptococcal antibody titers in such a population, which probably reflects a high background prevalence of streptococcal

  7. Cardiac strain findings in children with latent rheumatic heart disease detected by echocardiographic screening.

    PubMed

    Beaton, Andrea; Richards, Hedda; Ploutz, Michelle; Gaur, Lasya; Aliku, Twalib; Lwabi, Peter; Ensing, Greg; Sable, Craig

    2017-08-01

    Identification of patients with latent rheumatic heart disease by echocardiography presents a unique opportunity to prevent disease progression. Myocardial strain is a more sensitive indicator of cardiac performance than traditional measures of systolic function. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that abnormalities in myocardial strain may be present in children with latent rheumatic heart disease. Standard echocardiography images with electrocardiogram gating were obtained from Ugandan children found to have latent rheumatic heart disease as well as control subjects. Traditional echocardiography measures of systolic function were obtained, and offline global longitudinal strain analysis was performed. Comparison between groups was performed using strain as a continuous (Mann-Whitney U-test) and categorical (cut-off 5th percentile for age) variable. Our study included 14 subjects with definite rheumatic heart disease, 13 with borderline rheumatic heart disease, and 112 control subjects. None of the subjects had abnormal left ventricular size or ejection fraction. Global longitudinal strain was lower than the 5th percentile in 44% of the subjects with any rheumatic heart disease (p=0.002 versus controls) and 57% of the subjects with definite rheumatic heart disease (p=0.03). The mean absolute strain values were significantly lower when comparing subjects with any rheumatic heart disease with controls (20.4±3.95 versus 22.4±4.35, p=0.025) and subjects with definite rheumatic heart disease with controls (19.9±4.25 versus 22.4±4.35, p=0.033). Global longitudinal strain is decreased in subjects with rheumatic heart disease in the absence of abnormal systolic function. Larger studies with longer-term follow-up are required to determine whether there is a role for strain to help better understand the pathophysiology of latent rheumatic heart disease.

  8. Prevalence of autoantibodies (ANA, anti ds-DNA, ENA, IMF) and rheumatic syndromes in patients with lymphoproliferative diseases.

    PubMed

    Chloraki-Bobota, A; Megalakaki, C; Repousis, P; Chalkiopoulou, Ir; Lalaki, I; Trafalis, D T; Athanassiou, A E; Mitsouli-Mentzikof, Chr

    2006-01-01

    In the development of rheumatic syndromes as well as of lymphoproliferative disorders it is probable that there are common genetic, environmental and immunoregulatory pathogenetic mechanisms. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of simultaneous presentation of both lymphoma or other lymphoproliferative diseases, and rheumatic syndromes. In this study included were all patients with lymphoproliferative diseases (1920 patients) followed at our hospital during the last 5 years. 312/1920 (16.2%) patients presented with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), 645/1920 (33.5%) had myeloma, 558/1920 (29%) had leukemia and miscellaneous other hematological malignancies (Hodgkin's lymphoma, cryoglogulinaemia etc) had 405/1920 patients (21%). Antinuclear antibodies (ANA), ribosome P and intermediate filament antibodies (IMF) were measured by immunofluorescence (IF). Anti-double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA) antibodies and extractable nuclear antigens (ENA: Sm, RNP, SSA, SSB, Scl70) were measured by ELISA and the rheumatoid factor (RF) by nephelometry. 388/1920 (4.6%) patients were ANA positive (antibody titres>1/160). On the other hand, clinical symptoms attributed autoimmune diseases (arthralgias, morning stiffness etc) plus autoantibodies other than ANA were present only in 8/312 (2.56%) patients with NHL, among them one with anti-cardiolipin antibodies. It is interesting that from these 8 patients, 3 had MALT lymphoma and 3 diffuse B-cell large cell lymphoma. Also, we detected anti-IMF and IgM and lgG anti-CMV antibodies in 2/312 (0.42%) patients with NHL. We conclude that the simultaneous presence of lymphoproliferative diseases and rheumatic syndromes are more frequent among lymphoma patients than in other lymphoproliferative diseases. Therefore, the screening of antibodies in NHL patients may be useful for the discovery and the treatment of an underlying autoimmune disease.

  9. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction in various rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Aceves-Avila, F J; Chávez-López, M; Chavira-González, J R; Ramos-Remus, C

    2013-07-24

    Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is an inclusive term in which those conditions disturbing the masticatory function are embraced. It has been estimated that 33% of the population have signs of TMD, but less than 5% of the population will require treatment. The objective of this study was to measure the frequency of TMD in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthrosis (OA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and systemic lupus erythematosus, and to define the limitations in everyday's life that patients perceive when present. A six-month survey of consecutive outpatients in a rheumatology clinic in a teaching hospital in Mexico was carried out. We defined TMD as: 1) the presence of pain; 2) difficulty on mouth opening, chewing or speaking; 3) the presence of non-harmonic movements of the temporomaxilar joints. All three characteristics had to be present. Z test was used to define differences between proportions. We present the results of 171 patients. Overall, 50 patients had TMD according to our operational definition (29.24%). Up to 76% of the sample had symptoms associated with the condition. TMD is more frequent in OA and in AS (29.24% vs 38% OA, P=0.009; 39% AS; P=0.005). We found no association between the severity of TMD and the request for specific attention for the discomfort produced by the condition. Only 8 of 50 (16%) patients with TMD had requested medical help for their symptoms, and they were not the most severe cases. TMD is more frequent in RA and OA. Although it may produce severe impairment, patients seem to adapt easily.

  10. Pediatric allergy and immunology in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ebisawa, Motohiro; Nishima, Sankei; Ohnishi, Hidenori; Kondo, Naomi

    2013-11-01

    The Japanese Society of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology (JSPACI) was started in 1966 and currently has 3613 members as of August 1, 2012. The number of pediatricians specializing in allergies who have been certified by the Japanese Society of Allergology is 817. Among these, there are 125 training directors and training facilities for allergy and clinical immunology. The JSPACI first published an asthma guideline specific for children in 2000, and this has been revised every 3 yrs, contributing to better control of pediatric asthma. Food allergy management guidelines were first developed in 2005, which have helped to improve the care of food allergy patients. Among 514 pediatric training programs by the Japanese Society of Pediatrics, there are 312 facilities routinely performing oral food challenges. Among these, there were already 53 facilities performing oral immunotherapy at the end of 2011, treating 1400 cases of food allergy. The prevalence of pediatric allergic diseases has increased in Japan over the past 50 yrs. A number of International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood surveys have been conducted in the past at specific times. The prevalence of wheezing among children aged 13-14 yrs in 2002 was 13.0%. Multi-year surveys found a 1.5- to 2-fold increase every 10 yrs until 2002. However, according to the latest data in 2012, asthma prevalence seems to have slightly decreased in Japan. Food allergy mainly associated with infantile atopic eczema among infants younger than 1 yr of age is the most common form as with other developed countries. The estimated food allergy prevalence based on data from several surveys is 5-10% among infants (0-6 yrs) and 1-2% among schoolchildren (6-15 yrs). A variety of patients suffering from primary deficiency syndrome have been actively analyzed. Previously, antibody defects and well-defined syndromes with immunodeficiency were analyzed, but recent research is focusing on not only acquired immune

  11. 50 years of pediatric immunology: progress and future, a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surjit; Gupta, Anju; Rawat, Amit

    2013-01-08

    Rapidly evolving advances in the field of immunology over the last few decades have impacted the practice of clinical medicine in many ways. In fact, understanding the immunological basis of disease has been pivotal in deciphering the pathogenesis of several disease processes, infective or otherwise. As of today, there is hardly any specialty of medicine which is not influenced by immunology. Pediatric rheumatological disorders, vasculitides, Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection, Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases (PIDs) and autoimmune disorders fall under the domain of clinical immunology. This specialty is poised to emerge as a major clinical specialty in our country. The gulf between bench and bedside is narrowing down as our understanding of the complex immunological mechanisms gets better. However, a lot still needs to be done in this field as the morbidity and mortality of some of these conditions is unacceptably high in the Indian setup. A number of medical schools and institutes in the country now have the resources and the wherewithal to develop into specialized centres of clinical immunology. We need to concentrate on training more physicians and pediatricians in this field. The future is bright and the prospects exciting.

  12. Cornea: Window to Ocular Immunology

    PubMed Central

    Niederkorn, Jerry Y.

    2011-01-01

    The ocular surface is continuously exposed to environmental agents such as allergens, pollutants, and microorganisms, which could provoke inflammation. However, an array of anatomical, physiological, and immunological features of the ocular surface conspire to limit corneal inflammation and endow the eye with immune privilege. A remarkable example of ocular immune privilege is the success of corneal allografts, which unlike all other forms of organ transplantation, survive without the use of systemic immunosuppressive drugs or MHC matching. This review describes the anatomical, physiological, and dynamic immunoregulatory processes that contribute to immune privilege. PMID:21789035

  13. Liver immunology and herbal treatment

    PubMed Central

    Balaban, Yasemin H; Aka, Ceylan; Koca-Caliskan, Ufuk

    2017-01-01

    Beyond the metabolic functions, the liver recently has been defined as an organ of immune system (IS), which have central regulatory role for innate and adaptive immunity. The liver keeps a delicate balance between hepatic screening of pathogenic antigens and immune tolerance to self-antigens. Herbal treatments with immunological effects have potential to alter this hepatic immune balance towards either therapeutic side or diseases side by inducing liver injury via hepatotoxicity or initiation of autoimmune diseases. Most commonly known herbal treatments, which have therapeutic effect on liver and IS, have proven via in vitro, in vivo, and/or clinical studies were summarized in this review. PMID:28660010

  14. Antifungal Immunological Defenses in Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Michalski, Christina; Kan, Bernard; Lavoie, Pascal M.

    2017-01-01

    Newborns are prone to fungal infections, largely due to Candida species. The immunological basis for this vulnerability is not yet fully understood. However, useful insights can be gained from the knowledge of the maturation of immune pathways during ontogeny, particularly when placed in context with how rare genetic mutations in humans predispose to fungal diseases. In this article, we review these most current data on immune functions in human newborns, highlighting pathways most relevant to the response to Candida. While discussing these data, we propose a framework of why deficiencies in these pathways make newborns particularly vulnerable to this opportunistic pathogen. PMID:28360910

  15. Immunological responses of `nude' mice

    PubMed Central

    Wortis, H. H.

    1971-01-01

    Mice homozygous for the mutation nude which lack a thymus, were found to have a marked lymphopenia. They had a marked granulocytosis following administration of B. pertussis, but only slight lymphocytosis. Unlike littermates they failed to develop an increased cellularity of lymph nodes draining a local injection of PHA. They had reduced levels of immunoglobulin but produced some antibody to sheep-RBC. They accepted allografts. Cell cooperation experiments suggest that the immunological deficits of nu/nu mice can be explained by the absence of a thymusderived cell population. ImagesFIG. 5 PMID:4929778

  16. Immunological aspects of cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zitvogel, Laurence; Apetoh, Lionel; Ghiringhelli, François; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that the innate and adaptive immune systems make a crucial contribution to the antitumour effects of conventional chemotherapy-based and radiotherapy-based cancer treatments. Moreover, the molecular and cellular bases of the immunogenicity of cell death that is induced by cytotoxic agents are being progressively unravelled, challenging the guidelines that currently govern the development of anticancer drugs. Here, we review the immunological aspects of conventional cancer treatments and propose that future successes in the fight against cancer will rely on the development and clinical application of combined chemo- and immunotherapies.

  17. Oxytocin-secreting system: A major part of the neuroendocrine center regulating immunologic activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Yang, Hai-Peng; Tian, Shujun; Wang, Liwei; Wang, Stephani C; Zhang, Fengmin; Wang, Yu-Feng

    2015-12-15

    Interactions between the nervous system and immune system have been studied extensively. However, the mechanisms underlying the neural regulation of immune activity, particularly the neuroendocrine regulation of immunologic functions, remain elusive. In this review, we provide a comprehensive examination of current evidence on interactions between the immune system and hypothalamic oxytocin-secreting system. We highlight the fact that oxytocin may have significant effects in the body, beyond its classical functions in lactation and parturition. Similar to the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis, the oxytocin-secreting system closely interacts with classical immune system, integrating both neurochemical and immunologic signals in the central nervous system and in turn affects immunologic defense, homeostasis, and surveillance. Lastly, this review explores therapeutic potentials of oxytocin in treating immunologic disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. [Acute courses of sarcoidosis which clinically appeared as rheumatic diseases (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Hüge, W

    1976-07-01

    After a short review on the manifold relations between rheumatic and pulmonary diseases this aspect is exemplified in detail by acute sarcoidosis. Report on 31 patients with Loefgren-Syndrome, admitted to the rheumatologic-cardiological clinic between 1968 to 1973, nearly all with the suspicion of rheumatic fever. Their symptoms, clinical findings as well as the diagnostic programme carried out is described.

  19. Successful balloon mitral valvotomy in a rare coexistence of Ebstein's anomaly and rheumatic mitral stenosis.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Navdeep Singh; Kondethimmanahally Rangaiah, Sunil Kumar; Ramesh, Dwarikaprasad; Manjunath, Cholenahally Nanjappa

    2016-05-05

    Co-existence of Ebstein's anomaly of the tricuspid valve with rheumatic mitral stenosis is a very rare occurrence. We report the case of a young man who presented with progressive dyspnoea and was found to have rheumatic mitral stenosis with pulmonary hypertension and Ebstein's anomaly of the tricuspid valve. The patient underwent successful balloon mitral valvotomy resulting in marked improvement of symptoms.

  20. No Evidence of Human Leukocyte Antigen Gene Association With Rheumatic Fever Among Children in Samoa.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Guliz; Seifried, Steven E

    2015-03-01

    Human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) have been implicated in rheumatic fever pathogenesis. This pilot whole genome association study compares genotypes of Samoan children with rheumatic fever to unaffected siblings and unrelated healthy controls. No risk-related genotypes were associated with HLA genes. Thirteen Regions of Interest were identified as candidates for further study.