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Sample records for immunologic rheumatic disorders

  1. Cancer-associated rheumatic disorders: clues to occult neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Nashitz, J E; Rosner, I; Rozenbaum, M; Elias, N; Yeshurun, D

    1995-02-01

    Interest in the rheumatologic manifestations of cancer is related in part to practical considerations, ie, earlier cancer diagnosis is possible through enhanced awareness of cancer-associated rheumatic syndromes. The spectrum of rheumatic disorders associated with cancer includes over 30 conditions, including hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, polymyalgia rheumatica, palmar fasciitis with polyarthritis, most autoimmune connective tissue diseases, and the more recently described antiphospholipid syndrome. It is generally held that extensive search for occult malignancy in most rheumatologic disorders is not cost efficient and not recommended unless accompanied by specific findings suggestive of malignancy. The present article discusses the supplementary findings that may justify malignancy evaluation.

  2. Epidemiology of rheumatic musculoskeletal disorders in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Arvind; Abdel-Nasser, Ahmed

    2008-08-01

    The epidemiology of rheumatic musculoskeletal (MSK) disorders in the developing world is much less well known than it is in the developed world. We expect ethnicity, traditions, socioeconomics and lifestyles to have an impact, but overall data are sparse. This report focuses on the WHO-ILAR COPCORD (community-oriented programme for control of rheumatic diseases). COPCORD was designed to collect community data on pain and disability in the developing economies. Several countries in Asia-Pacific and Central South America have completed COPCORD surveys. Despite some limitations in methodology, COPCORD provides a fair estimate of the spectrum and extent of rheumatic MSK disorders. We digress from a general overview to highlight the scenario for rheumatoid arthritis, and draw a few parallels with known statistics from the developed world. Overall, the emerging spectrum and severity are not very different, but in the developing countries the burden of disease, worsened by dismal rheumatology services, is likely to be staggering. PMID:18783739

  3. Fibrositis: Misnomer for a Common Rheumatic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Robert M.

    1981-01-01

    Fibrositis is a misnomer for a very common form of nonarticular rheumatism. The name implies an inflammatory process in fibroconnective tissue which has never been verified. The symptoms of fibrositis are ill-defined musculoskeletal pain made worse by stress, cold, noise and unaccustomed exercise; there is usually a significant element of depression, nonrestorative sleep, chronic fatigue and early morning stiffness. Results of physical examination are strikingly normal, apart from painful tender spots which are remarkably consistent in location from patient to patient. It is important to realize that fibrositis can complicate diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus, where its prompt recognition is essential in averting inappropriate medication. Drug therapy alone is seldom effective in alleviating symptoms; a carefully planned education program is necessary to readjust both psyche and soma. PMID:6167073

  4. [Immunological aspects of depressive disorders].

    PubMed

    Müller, N; Schwarz, M J

    2007-11-01

    Beside the monoaminergic deficiency concept as a pathophysiological correlate of depressive disorder, the role of increased glutamatergic neurotransmission is increasingly being discussed. Causes and interactions of these neurotransmitter disturbances are not fully understood to date. This review presents a concept integrating actual findings of the neurotransmitter dysregulations with immunological and morphological findings in depressive disorder. Several intertwined mechanisms seem to be important: The common cause of serotonin deficiency and increased glutamatergic neurotransmission seems to be the increase of proinflammatory cytokines. Immune activation with increased production of proinflammatory cytokines activate the tryptophan- and serotonin-degradating enzyme indolamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). The increased consumption of serotonin and its precursor tryptophan due to IDO activation may explain the reduced availability of serotonin in depression. In inflammatory somatic disorders, depressive mood is associated with an increase of proinflammatory cytokines and increased consumption of tryptophan. This activation of IDO by proinflammatory cytokines leads to the production of glutamatergic agonists. In the CNS, IDO is activated during inflammatory processes primarily in microglial cells. Therefore the astrocyte:microglial balance in depression is important. The observed decrease of astrocytes in the CNS of depressive patients may contribute to a regulatory fault in the activity of IDO in microglial cells but also can cause an alteration of the glutamatergic neurotransmission. By this mechanism, the dysbalance of the immune response and the astrocyte:microglia dysbalance may contribute to serotonergic deficiency and glutamatergic overproduction in depression. The further search for new antidepressant therapeutic mechanisms should take into regard anti-inflammatory substances, e.g. cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2)-inhibitors. PMID:17928982

  5. Control of Pain in the Rheumatic Disorders*

    PubMed Central

    Hart, F. Dudley

    1968-01-01

    Pain may be attacked in the rheumatic diseases (1) centrally, with drugs ranging in efficiency from those which are potentially addictive and under the Dangerous Drugs Act (e.g., pethidine) and are therefore rarely used, down to simple analgesics such as paracetamol; (2) peripherally, by local action, whether it be by applications of heat or cold, by injections of local anaesthetics or anti-inflammatory agents, or by surgery; (3) peripherally, by anti-inflammatory non-analgesic agents taken systemically, such as the corticosteroids; and (4) peripherally, by anti-inflammatory-analgesic-antipyretic agents taken systemically, such as aspirin. The exact sites of action of the pyrazoles, indomethacin, the anthranilic compounds, and other anti-inflammatory-analgesic-antipyretic drugs are as yet uncertain, but along with these methods of attacking the pain-producing areas help must also be given to the distressed mind behind the joints. Faith in the future, cheerfulness, freedom from depression, and the development of a philosophy to deal with the uncertainties of the disease are essential. It has been said that you don't have to be a doctor to treat uncomplicated lobar pneumonia: anybody with a bottle of penicillin in his hands holds the cure. It is the incurable diseases that are really worth treating, and that make demands on the physician. To quote Tuker: “My last word is this. Whoever has the care of a sorely stricken arthritic must encourage him to fulfil himself intellectually and spiritually, and to achieve—no matter what, but to achieve, so that he may nightly lay himself down on his bed of pain looking forward happily to the morrow's task, mind centred upon it, no matter what it is; sticking in stamps, research into anything you like, dabbling with pastel or water colours, writing chatty letters to friends. Anything at all, but let it be for him the most pressing thing of the day, and let him believe that you think it is. Help him and let him live, live

  6. Arterial Distensibility in Chronic Inflammatory Rheumatic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Yildiz, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    The pulse wave velocity (PWV), as an indicator of arterial distensibility, may play an important role in the stratification of patients based on the cardiovascular risk. PWV inversely correlates with arterial distensibility and relative arterial compliance. Decreased arterial distensibility alters arterial blood pressure and flow dynamics, and disturbes coronary perfusion. Systemic immune and inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are associated with increased morbidity and mortality, predominantly due to adverse cardiovascular events. Systemic inflammation in these disorders may alter arterial compliance and arterial distensibility and, through this effect, lead to accelerated atherosclerosis. We have demonstrated an increase in the carotid-femoral (aortic) PWV that is a technique in which large artery elasticity is assessed from analysis of the peripheral arterial waveform, in patients with chronic inflammatory conditions such as RA, SLE, familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), Wegener’s granulomatosis (WG), sarcoidosis, psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis except Behçet’s disease (BD). In this review, the issue of arterial stiffness in RA, SLE, as well as WG, psoriasis, FMF, BD, sarcoidosis, systemic sclerosis (SS) and Takayasu's arteritis (TA) is overviewed. PMID:20461114

  7. B-cell survival factors in autoimmune rheumatic disorders.

    PubMed

    Morais, Sandra A; Vilas-Boas, Andreia; Isenberg, David A

    2015-08-01

    Autoimmune rheumatic disorders have complex etiopathogenetic mechanisms in which B cells play a central role. The importance of factors stimulating B cells, notably the B-cell activating factor (BAFF) and A proliferation inducing ligand (APRIL) axis is now recognized. BAFF and APRIL are cytokines essential for B-cell proliferation and survival from the immature stages to the development of plasma cells. Their levels are increased in some subsets of patients with autoimmune disorders. Several recent biologic drugs have been developed to block this axis, namely belimumab [already licensed for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) treatment], tabalumab, atacicept and blisibimod. Many clinical trials to evaluate the safety and efficacy of these drugs in several autoimmune disorders are ongoing, or have been completed recently. This review updates the information on the use of biologic agents blocking BAFF/APRIL for patients with SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren's syndrome and myositis. PMID:26288664

  8. B-cell survival factors in autoimmune rheumatic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Morais, Sandra A.; Vilas-Boas, Andreia

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune rheumatic disorders have complex etiopathogenetic mechanisms in which B cells play a central role. The importance of factors stimulating B cells, notably the B-cell activating factor (BAFF) and A proliferation inducing ligand (APRIL) axis is now recognized. BAFF and APRIL are cytokines essential for B-cell proliferation and survival from the immature stages to the development of plasma cells. Their levels are increased in some subsets of patients with autoimmune disorders. Several recent biologic drugs have been developed to block this axis, namely belimumab [already licensed for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) treatment], tabalumab, atacicept and blisibimod. Many clinical trials to evaluate the safety and efficacy of these drugs in several autoimmune disorders are ongoing, or have been completed recently. This review updates the information on the use of biologic agents blocking BAFF/APRIL for patients with SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren’s syndrome and myositis. PMID:26288664

  9. Eosinophilic alveolitis in immunologic interstitial lung disorders.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, D; Pesci, A; Bertorelli, G

    1990-01-01

    To analyze the role of eosinophils in alveolitis due to immunological interstitial lung disorders, 568 bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) from 537 patients affected by 13 types of interstitial lung disease involving immunologic mechanisms were considered. An arbitrary cut-off of 4% of eosinophils in BAL was assumed. In five (idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA), amiodarone-induced pneumonitis (AIP), chronic eosinophilic pneumonia (CEP), Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS)) out of the thirteen groups we took into consideration, the level of eosinophils was greater than 4%. In CEP and CSS in particular, the arbitrary cut-off of 4% was greatly exceeded (28.9% +/- 27.4, p less than 0.01 and 33.6% +/- 14.5, p less than 0.01, respectively). In the same two groups the increase of eosinophils in BAL was isolated with a direct correlation to the number of eosinophils in blood. By contrast, the increase of eosinophils in BAL of IPF, AIP and ABPA was of lesser extent (4.7% +/- 5.7 p less than 0.01, 5.0% +/- 3.0 p less than 0.01 and 6.1% +/- 10.4 p less than 0.01, respectively) and was accompanied by an increase of neutrophils in IPF, of lymphocytes in AIP and both in ABPA. These patterns are generally defined as "mixed alveolitis." On the basis of these data we conclude that the term "eosinophilic alveolitis" should be reserved for CEP and CSS.

  10. [Ultrasonography in chronic inflammatory rheumatic and connective tissue disorders].

    PubMed

    Mérot, O; Le Goff, B

    2014-08-01

    Musculoskeletal ultrasonography is now widely used by almost all rheumatologists thanks to an improvement in the quality of ultrasound unit and probe and to the systematic teaching of this imaging technique to the rheumatology fellows. Applications have broadened from the study of degenerative and mechanical diseases to inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Ultrasound is more sensitive than clinical examination. Power Doppler allows the direct visualisation of inflammation within the tissues. Finally, it is a prognostic tool helping the physician in the management of the disease. This review will focus on the value and applications of ultrasonography in the 2 most frequent rheumatic diseases: rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis. We will also give some recent data on the usefulness of this imaging technique in the study of musculoskeletal manifestations associated with connective tissue disease.

  11. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and rheumatic diseases in the indigenous Qom population of Rosario, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Rosana; Silvestre, Adriana M R; Goñi, Mario; García, Vanina; Mathern, Nora; Jorfen, Marisa; Miljevic, Julio; Dhair, Daniel; Laithe, Matias; Conti, Silvana; Midauar, Fadua; Martin, Maria Celeste; Barrios, Maria Cecilia; Nieto, Romina; Prigione, Cristina; Sanabria, Alvaro; Gervasoni, Viviana; Grabbe, Emilio; Gontero, Romina; Peláez-Ballestas, Ingris; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and rheumatic diseases among the indigenous Qom (Toba) population in the city of Rosario, Santa Fe, Argentina. An analytical cross-sectional study using methodology of the Community Oriented Program for the Control of Rheumatic Diseases (COPCORD) was performed. Subjects ≥18 years of age were interviewed by advanced students of medicine and nursing, bilingual translator-facilitators, and coordinators. Individuals with musculoskeletal pain (positive cases) were evaluated sequentially for 7 days by internists and rheumatologists for diagnosis and treatment. The study included 1656 individuals (77 % of the census population). Of these, 1020 (61.5 %) were female, with mean age of 35.3 (SD 13.9) years, and 1028 (62.0 %) were bilingual. The public health care system covers 87.1 % of the population. Musculoskeletal pain in the previous 7 days and/or at some time during their life was present in 890 subjects (53.7 %). Of those with pain in the last 7 days, 302 (64.1 %) subjects had an Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI) score ≥0.8. The most frequent pain sites were lumbar spine (19.3 %), knees (13.0 %), and hands (12.0 %). The prevalence of rheumatic diseases was as follows: mechanical back pain (20.1 %), rheumatic regional pain syndrome (2.9 %), osteoarthritis (4.0 %) rheumatoid arthritis (2.4 %), inflammatory back pain (0.2 %), systemic sclerosis (0.1 %), Sjögren syndrome (0.1 %), fibromyalgia (0.1 %), mixed connective tissue disease (0.06 %), and systemic lupus erythematosus (0.06 %). The prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders was 53.7 % and rheumatic diseases 29.6 %. Rheumatoid arthritis prevalence was 2.4 % using COPCORD methodology, one of the highest reported at present. PMID:26852314

  12. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and rheumatic diseases in the indigenous Qom population of Rosario, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Rosana; Silvestre, Adriana M R; Goñi, Mario; García, Vanina; Mathern, Nora; Jorfen, Marisa; Miljevic, Julio; Dhair, Daniel; Laithe, Matias; Conti, Silvana; Midauar, Fadua; Martin, Maria Celeste; Barrios, Maria Cecilia; Nieto, Romina; Prigione, Cristina; Sanabria, Alvaro; Gervasoni, Viviana; Grabbe, Emilio; Gontero, Romina; Peláez-Ballestas, Ingris; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and rheumatic diseases among the indigenous Qom (Toba) population in the city of Rosario, Santa Fe, Argentina. An analytical cross-sectional study using methodology of the Community Oriented Program for the Control of Rheumatic Diseases (COPCORD) was performed. Subjects ≥18 years of age were interviewed by advanced students of medicine and nursing, bilingual translator-facilitators, and coordinators. Individuals with musculoskeletal pain (positive cases) were evaluated sequentially for 7 days by internists and rheumatologists for diagnosis and treatment. The study included 1656 individuals (77 % of the census population). Of these, 1020 (61.5 %) were female, with mean age of 35.3 (SD 13.9) years, and 1028 (62.0 %) were bilingual. The public health care system covers 87.1 % of the population. Musculoskeletal pain in the previous 7 days and/or at some time during their life was present in 890 subjects (53.7 %). Of those with pain in the last 7 days, 302 (64.1 %) subjects had an Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI) score ≥0.8. The most frequent pain sites were lumbar spine (19.3 %), knees (13.0 %), and hands (12.0 %). The prevalence of rheumatic diseases was as follows: mechanical back pain (20.1 %), rheumatic regional pain syndrome (2.9 %), osteoarthritis (4.0 %) rheumatoid arthritis (2.4 %), inflammatory back pain (0.2 %), systemic sclerosis (0.1 %), Sjögren syndrome (0.1 %), fibromyalgia (0.1 %), mixed connective tissue disease (0.06 %), and systemic lupus erythematosus (0.06 %). The prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders was 53.7 % and rheumatic diseases 29.6 %. Rheumatoid arthritis prevalence was 2.4 % using COPCORD methodology, one of the highest reported at present.

  13. PTSD, a Disorder with an Immunological Component

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhewu; Young, M. Rita I.

    2016-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been associated with an inflammatory state. However, few studies have addressed the mechanisms underlying this immune imbalance that favors inflammation or how this imbalance contributes to PTSD. Whether the immune imbalance influences responsiveness or unresponsiveness of patients to PTSD treatments is currently not known. This review brings forward an immune emphasis to a mental health disorder that is unprecedented in its prevalence among combat Veterans of the ongoing conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan and which also afflicts civilians who have undergone extreme traumatic experiences, such as following natural disasters, serious accidents, or assaults. Included is an overview of the correlative associations in human subjects between PTSD and inflammation and studies in animal models of PTSD, demonstrating causal contributions of inflammation and immune dysregulation to PTSD-like behavior following stress exposure. PMID:27375619

  14. PTSD, a Disorder with an Immunological Component.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhewu; Young, M Rita I

    2016-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been associated with an inflammatory state. However, few studies have addressed the mechanisms underlying this immune imbalance that favors inflammation or how this imbalance contributes to PTSD. Whether the immune imbalance influences responsiveness or unresponsiveness of patients to PTSD treatments is currently not known. This review brings forward an immune emphasis to a mental health disorder that is unprecedented in its prevalence among combat Veterans of the ongoing conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan and which also afflicts civilians who have undergone extreme traumatic experiences, such as following natural disasters, serious accidents, or assaults. Included is an overview of the correlative associations in human subjects between PTSD and inflammation and studies in animal models of PTSD, demonstrating causal contributions of inflammation and immune dysregulation to PTSD-like behavior following stress exposure. PMID:27375619

  15. [Clinical and pathogenetic relationships between immuno-inflammatory rheumatic diseases and psychic disorders].

    PubMed

    Lisitsina, T A; Vel'tishchev, D Iu; Krasnov, V N; Nasonov, E L

    2014-01-01

    Literature data and original observations have been used to develop the rationale for the necessity of studying psychic disorders (PD) in patients with immuno-inflammatory rheumatic diseases (RD), such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Special attention is given to the high frequency of disturbances of the anxiety and depression profile (DADP) in patients having RA and SLE with reference to the common provoking stress and pathogenic factors, clinical manifestations, and RD. Great importance is attributed to the degree of depression associated with inflammatory activity, pain intensity, fatigue, sleep disorders, severe functional insufficiency and low quality of life in the patients with RA and SLE. Special emphasis is laid on the influence of depression and stress factors on the survival and morality of patients with these pathologies, the necessity of their combined treatment with the participation of rheumatologists, psychiatrists and medical psychologists for the improvement of clinical course and prognosis of RD.

  16. PANDAS: the search for environmental triggers of pediatric neuropsychiatric disorders. Lessons from rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Garvey, M A; Giedd, J; Swedo, S E

    1998-09-01

    Pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infection (PANDAS) is a relatively new diagnostic construct applied to children or adolescents who develop, and have repeated exacerbations of, tic disorders and/or obsessive-compulsive disorder following group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infections. The proposed pathophysiology is that the group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal bacteria trigger antibodies that cross-react with the basal ganglia of genetically susceptible hosts leading to obsessive-compulsive disorder and/or tics. This is similar to the etiologic mechanisms proposed for Sydenham's chorea, in which group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal antibodies cross-react with the basal ganglia and result in abnormal behavior and involuntary movements. When first proposed, there was much controversy about the idea that streptococcal infections were etiologically related to rheumatic fever. In a like manner, discussion has arisen about the concept of infection-triggered obsessive-compulsive disorder and tic disorders. We review the historical background to these controversies, give an update on the findings provided by research on PANDAS, and address areas of future study.

  17. Effectiveness and safety of Devil's Claw tablets in patients with general rheumatic disorders.

    PubMed

    Warnock, Mary; McBean, Douglas; Suter, Andreas; Tan, Jen; Whittaker, Patricia

    2007-12-01

    Arthritis and other rheumatic conditions (AORC) are the leading cause of disability, are associated with poor quality of life and incur considerable direct and indirect costs. It is considered that the instance of AORC will continue to increase. To assess the effectiveness, safety and tolerability of Harpagophytum (Bioforce) in the treatment of AORC, a single group open study of 8 weeks duration (259 patients) was performed in the United Kingdom. Effectiveness was assessed by numeric rating scales, the Western Ontario and McMasters Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) Index and the Algofunctional Hand Osteoarthritis Index. Tolerance was measured by a numeric rating scale and safety by self-reporting, blood analysis and liver function tests. Quality of life was measured by SF-12 questionnaire. There were statistically significant (p < 0.0001) improvements in patient assessment of global pain, stiffness and function. There were also statistically significant reductions in mean pain scores for hand, wrist, elbow, shoulder, hip, knee and back pain. Quality of life measurements (SF-12) were significantly increased from baseline and 60% patients either reduced or stopped concomitant pain medication. Harpagophytum is an effective and well-tolerated serious treatment option for mild to moderate degenerative rheumatic disorders providing improved quality of life measure. PMID:17886223

  18. Exhaled breath analysis in childhood rheumatic disorders--a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Hendel, N; Akmatov, M K; Hamel, J; Vogelberg, C; Pessler, F

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to evaluate the fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO50) and deaerated exhaled breath condensate pH (dEBCpH) as non-invasive markers of subclinical airway inflammation in pediatric patients with rheumatologic disorders. We determined FENO50 and dEBCpH in a prospective study spanning at least 12 months, comprising 85 pediatric patients with rheumatologic disorders, including juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA, n  =  63), chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO, n  =  6), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, n  =  3), juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM, n  =  1) and other rheumatic disorders (n  =  12). dEBCpH was determined once in a group of children without evidence of rheumatologic or pulmonary disease (controls, n  =  90). Findings were correlated with results of pulmonary function tests. Atopic sensitization was assessed by RAST or skin prick test in 76 patients. Atopic sensitization was detected in 34% (26/76) of patients. Neither FENO50 nor dEBCpH correlated with disease activity, but intermediately (20-35 ppb) or highly elevated (>35 ppb) levels were observed at least once in 26 patients (31%), 19 of whom had atopic sensitization. Median dEBCpH did not differ between cases and controls (8.05 versus 8.02; p  =  0.48). Median dEBCpH decreased slightly over the study period (p  =  0.02), whereas FENO50 values did not change significantly (p  =  0.89). There were several patients with significantly abnormal dEBCpH values that could not be readily explained by diagnosis, higher disease activity, medications, or atopic sensitization. Thus, there were no consistent abnormalities in FENO50 or dEBCpH in this cohort of Caucasian patients with relatively stable rheumatologic disorders, but there were some patients with abnormal values of unknown significance. PMID:27093271

  19. Immunological disorders associated with polychlorinated biphenyls and related halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noguchi, G.E.; Leatherland, J.F.; Woo, P.T.K.

    1998-01-01

    This review characterizes immunological disorders in fish associated with the widespread environmental contaminants, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and related halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (HAHs). Special attention is devoted to comparing the sensitivity of fish species, identifying sensitive immunological endpoints and postulating mechanisms of action.

  20. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and rheumatic diseases in an urban community in Monagas State, Venezuela: a COPCORD study.

    PubMed

    Granados, Ysabel; Cedeño, Ligia; Rosillo, Celenia; Berbin, Sol; Azocar, Miriam; Molina, María Elena; Lara, Onelia; Sanchez, Gloris; Peláez-Ballestas, Ingris

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and rheumatic diseases in an urban community in Venezuela. We conducted a cross-sectional, community-based study using the COPCORD (Community Oriented Program for Control of Rheumatic Diseases) methodology in subjects older than 18 years. Positive cases were evaluated by rheumatologists. We surveyed 3,973 individuals (1,606 males and 2,367 females), with a mean age of 43.7 years (standard deviation (SD) 17.6). Mean duration of education was 8.9 years (SD 3.7), 79.2 % had a monthly income of < US$569, and 46.4 % were working. Excluding trauma, the prevalence of pain in the 7 days prior to interview was 19.9 % (95 % confidence interval (CI) 18.7-21.2 %). Mean pain intensity on a visual analog scale was 6.3 (SD 2.2), and 30.1 % (95 % CI 28.7-31.6 %) had a history of pain. Respondents reported pain in the knees, back, hands, shoulders, and ankles in the last 7 days; 4.7 % described current functional limitation, with 16.5 % reporting limitations in the past. Regarding treatment, 23.9 % received medication, 6.4 % received physical therapy, and 2.6 % received alternative treatment. The main diagnoses were osteoarthritis in 15.0 % (95 % CI 13.9-16.1 %), rheumatic regional pain syndromes in 6.3 % (95 % CI 5.5-7.1 %), back pain in 2.8 % (95 % CI 2.3-3.4 %), rheumatoid arthritis in 0.4 % (95 % CI 0.2-0.6 %), crystal arthropathy in 0.3 % (95 % CI 0.1-0.5 %), fibromyalgia in 0.2 % (95 % CI 0.1-0.4 %), and systemic lupus erythematosus in 0.07 % (95 % CI 0.01-0.2 %). The prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders was 22.4 %, and the most prevalent disease was osteoarthritis. Pain, in which a patient is receiving treatment for musculoskeletal disorders, and physical disability were associated with the presence of a rheumatic disease.

  1. Membranous Nephropathy Associated With Immunological Disorder-Related Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dauvergne, Maxime; Moktefi, Anissa; Rabant, Marion; Vigneau, Cécile; Kofman, Tomek; Burtey, Stephane; Corpechot, Christophe; Stehlé, Thomas; Desvaux, Dominique; Rioux-Leclercq, Nathalie; Rouvier, Philippe; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Frouget, Thierry; Daugas, Eric; Jablonski, Mathieu; Dahan, Karine; Brocheriou, Isabelle; Remy, Philippe; Grimbert, Philippe; Lang, Philippe; Chazouilleres, Oliver; Sahali, Dil; Audard, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The association between membranous nephropathy (MN) and immunological disorder-related liver disease has not been extensively investigated, and the specific features of this uncommon association, if any, remain to be determined. We retrospectively identified 10 patients with this association. We aimed to describe the clinical, biological, and pathological characteristics of these patients and their therapeutic management. The possible involvement of the phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) in these apparent secondary forms of MN was assessed by immunohistochemistry with renal and liver biopsy specimens. The mean delay between MN and liver disease diagnoses was 3.9 years and the interval between the diagnosis of the glomerular and liver diseases was <1.5 years in 5 patients. MN was associated with a broad spectrum of liver diseases including primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). AIH whether isolated (n = 3) or associated with PBC (n = 2) or PSC (n = 2) was the most frequent autoimmune liver disease. Circulating PLA2R antibodies were detected in 4 out of 9 patients but the test was performed under specific immunosuppressive treatment in 3 out of 9 patients. Seven of the 9 patients with available renal tissue specimens displayed enhanced expression of PLA2R in glomeruli whereas PLA2R was not expressed in liver parenchyma from these patients or in normal liver tissue. The study of immunoglobulin (Ig) subclasses of deposits in glomeruli revealed that the most frequent pattern was the coexistence of IgG1 and IgG4 immune deposits with IgG4 predominating. Detection of PLA2R antibodies in glomeruli but not in liver parenchyma is a common finding in patients with MN associated with autoimmune liver disease, suggesting that these autoantibodies are not exclusively detected in idiopathic MN. PMID:26222864

  2. Incident vertebral fractures and risk factors in the first three years following glucocorticoid initiation among pediatric patients with rheumatic disorders

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Claire MA; Ma, Jinhui; Taljaard, Monica; Roth, Johannes; Scuccimarri, Rosie; Miettunen, Paivi; Lang, Bianca; Huber, Adam M; Houghton, Kristin; Jaremko, Jacob L; Ho, Josephine; Shenouda, Nazih; Matzinger, Mary Ann; Lentle, Brian; Stein, Robert; Sbrocchi, Anne Marie; Oen, Kiem; Rodd, Celia; Jurencak, Roman; Cummings, Elizabeth; Couch, Robert; Cabral, David A; Atkinson, Stephanie; Alos, Nathalie; Rauch, Frank; Siminoski, Kerry; Ward, Leanne M

    2015-01-01

    Vertebral fractures are an important yet under-recognized manifestation of osteoporosis in children with chronic, glucocorticoid-treated illnesses. Our goal was to determine the incidence and clinical predictors of vertebral fractures in the three years following glucocorticoid initiation among pediatric patients with rheumatic disorders. Incident vertebral fractures were evaluated according to the Genant semi-quantitative method on lateral radiographs at baseline and then annually in the 3 years following glucocorticoid initiation. Extended Cox models were used to assess the association between vertebral fractures and clinical risk predictors. A total of 134 children with rheumatic disorders were enrolled in the study (mean ± standard deviation (SD) age 9.9±4.4 years, 65% girls). The unadjusted vertebral fracture incidence rate was 4.4 per 100 person-years, with a three-year incidence proportion of 12.4%. The highest annual incidence occurred in the first year (6.0%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.9–11.7). Almost one-half of the patients with fractures were asymptomatic. Every 0.5 mg/kg increase in average daily glucocorticoid (prednisone equivalents) dose was associated with a 2.0-fold increased fracture risk (hazard ratio (HR) 2.0, 95% CI 1.1–3.5). Other predictors of increased vertebral fracture risk included: (1) Increases in disease severity scores between baseline and 12 months, (2) Increases in body mass index Z-scores in the first 6 of each 12-month period preceding the annual fracture assessment, and (3) Decreases in lumbar spine bone mineral density Z-scores in the first 6 months of glucocorticoid therapy. As such, we observed that a clinically significant number of children with rheumatic disorders developed incident vertebral fractures in the three years following glucocorticoid initiation. Almost half of the children were asymptomatic and thereby would have been undiagnosed in the absence of radiographic monitoring. In addition, discrete

  3. Measurement of the quality of life in rheumatic disorders using the EuroQol.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, F; Hawley, D J

    1997-07-01

    The EuroQol is a validated quality of life (QOL) scale that has been used in population and clinical studies, and has been reported in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It is short, simple to complete, and might be suitable for surveys of rheumatic disease patients. The properties of this instrument were investigated in a postal survey of 1372 rheumatic disease patients, including 537 with RA, 319 with osteoarthritis (OA) and 516 with fibromyalgia. In addition, simultaneous measurements of functional disability, pain, psychological status, global severity and demographic characteristics were made. EuroQol scores (0.57) were significantly lower than VAS health state scores (0.67) and arthritis-related global severity scores (0.62). QOL was similar in RA and OA, but lower in fibromyalgia, across all instruments. The distribution of EuroQol scores had many gaps and was not continuous. EuroQol did not reflect VAS QOL scores at EuroQol levels below 0.5, and the mean score difference between the instruments below that level was 0.43. Many patients with low EuroQol scores (including some with health states that were 'worse than death') had high VAS scores. These differences appear to have arisen because disability, pain and depression questions ask about mild or moderate problems, but not both, thereby forcing scale compression in the mid ranges. In addition, the 'severe' value is so extremely abnormal that few patients endorse it. Finally, penalty scores are applied to those with at least one maximally abnormal score. The scoring properties and distributional aspects of the EuroQol indicate substantial problems in its use in rheumatic disease patients.

  4. Prevalence and factors associated with musculoskeletal disorders and rheumatic diseases in indigenous Maya-Yucateco people: a cross-sectional community-based study.

    PubMed

    Peláez-Ballestas, I; Alvarez-Nemegyei, J; Loyola-Sánchez, A; Escudero, M L

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and rheumatic diseases in indigenous Maya-Yucateco communities using Community-Oriented Program for Control of Rheumatic Diseases (COPCORD) methodology. The study population comprised subjects aged ≥18 years from 11 communities in the municipality of Chankom, Yucatan. An analytical cross-sectional study was performed, and a census was used. Subjects positive for musculoskeletal (MSK) pain were examined by trained physicians. A total of 1523 community members were interviewed. The mean age was 45.2 years (standard deviation (SD) 17.9), and 917 (60.2 %) were women. Overall, 592 individuals (38.8 %; 95 % CI 36.3-41.3 %) had experienced MSK pain in the last 7 days. The pain intensity was reported as "strong" to "severe" in 43.4 %. The diagnoses were rheumatic regional pain syndromes in 165 (10.8 %; 95 % CI 9.4-12.5), low back pain in 153 (10.0 %; 95 % CI 8.5-11.6), osteoarthritis in 144 (9.4 %; 95 % CI 8.0-11.0), fibromyalgia in 35 (2.2 %; 95 % CI 1.6-3.1), rheumatoid arthritis in 17 (1.1 %; 95 % CI 0.6-1.7), undifferentiated arthritis in 8 (0.5 %; 95 % CI 0.2-0.8), and gout in 1 (0.06 %; 95 % CI 0.001-0.3). Older age, being female, disability, and physically demanding work were associated with a greater likelihood of having a rheumatic disease. In conclusion, MSK pain and rheumatic diseases were highly prevalent. The high impact of rheumatic diseases on daily activities in this indigenous population suggests the need to organize culturally-sensitive community interventions for the prevention of disabilities caused by MSK disorders and diseases.

  5. Ionization with diclofenac sodium in rheumatic disorders: a double-blind placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Vecchini, L; Grossi, E

    1984-01-01

    A double-blind randomized study was performed to compare ionization with diclofenac sodium (150 mg) and ionization with saline solution in two groups of patients with scapulo-humeral periarthritis or elbow epicondylitis. The subjects of both groups were treated with 20 ionization sessions each lasting 30 minutes during a 1-month period. There was a significantly greater improvement in pain at rest, pain on pressure, pain on movement and joint swelling in the eleven patients treated with diclofenac compared with the thirteen placebo-treated patients, but no significant differences between the two treatments as regards functional impairment. However, placebo treatment produced a slight but significant improvement in pain on pressure, pain on movement and functional impairment. Further studies are needed to assess the relative role of the current and of autosuggestion in saline ionization response since both have well-known therapeutic effects on chronic rheumatic pain.

  6. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and rheumatic diseases in Cuenca, Ecuador: a WHO-ILAR COPCORD study.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Pacheco, Sergio; Feicán-Alvarado, Astrid; Sanín, Luz Helena; Vintimilla-Ugalde, Jaime; Vintimilla-Moscoso, Fernando; Delgado-Pauta, Jorge; Lliguisaca-Segarra, Angelita; Dután-Erráez, Holger; Guevara-Mosquera, Daniel; Ochoa-Robles, Verónica; Cardiel, Mario H; Peláez-Ballestas, Ingris

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and rheumatic diseases in subjects over 18 years of age from the canton of Cuenca, Ecuador. Cross-sectional analytical community-based study was conducted in subjects over 18 years of age using the validated Community-Oriented Program for the Control of Rheumatic Diseases (COPCORD) questionnaire. Random sampling was used. The questionnaire was administered by standardized health workers. Subjects were visited house by house. Subjects positive for musculoskeletal (MSK) pain in the last 7 days and at some point in life were assessed by rheumatologists to confirm the diagnosis. A total of 4877 subjects participated, with an average age of 42.8 (SD 18.8) years of age; 59.7 % were women; 69.7 % lived in urban areas. 32.5 % reported MSK pain in the last 7 days and 45.7 % at some point in life. The prevalence of knee osteoarthritis was 7.4 %, hand osteoarthritis 5.3 %, low back pain 9.3 %, rheumatoid arthritis 0.8 %, fibromyalgia 2 %, gout 0.4 %, and lupus 0.06 %. Subjects from rural areas reported experiencing more MSK pain in the last 7 days and at some point in life, lower income, poorer health-care coverage, and increased physical activity involving repetitive tasks such as lifting weights or cooking with firewood. MSK pain prevalence was high. Osteoarthritis and low back pain were the most common diseases. Age, sex, physical activity, repetitive tasks, living in a rural area, and lack of health-care coverage were found to be associated with MSK pain.

  7. Attitudes of Israeli Rheumatologists to the Use of Medical Cannabis as Therapy for Rheumatic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ablin, Jacob N.; Elkayam, Ori; Fitzcharles, Mary-Ann

    2016-01-01

    Background While medical cannabis has been used for thousands of years in the treatment of pain and other symptoms, evidence-based use is limited and practitioners face multiple areas of uncertainty regarding the rational use of these compounds. Nonetheless, an increasing public interest and advocacy in favor of medical cannabis is causing the issue to be encountered ever more frequently by physicians in different fields of medicine and particularly in rheumatology. In view of this situation, we have surveyed the attitudes of Israeli rheumatologists to the use of medical cannabis. Objectives As rheumatologists are specialized in caring for patients presenting with musculoskeletal complaints, the confidence of rheumatologists’ knowledge of cannabinoids was surveyed. Methods All members of the Israeli Society of Rheumatology were surveyed by e-mail for their confidence and knowledge of cannabinoids and their perceived competence to prescribe herbal cannabis. Results A total of 23 out of 119 (19.3%) Israeli rheumatologists approached returned the questionnaire. Three-quarters of responders were not confident about their knowledge of cannabinoid molecules or ability to write a prescription for herbal cannabis, and 78% were not confident to write a prescription for herbal cannabis; 74% of responders held the opinion that there was some role for cannabinoids in the management of rheumatic disease. Conclusion Israeli rheumatologists lack confidence in their knowledge of cannabinoids in general, yet are open to the possibility of introducing this treatment. Additional data and guidance are necessary in order to allow rational utilization of cannabinoids for management of rheumatic pain. PMID:27101219

  8. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and rheumatic diseases in Cuenca, Ecuador: a WHO-ILAR COPCORD study.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Pacheco, Sergio; Feicán-Alvarado, Astrid; Sanín, Luz Helena; Vintimilla-Ugalde, Jaime; Vintimilla-Moscoso, Fernando; Delgado-Pauta, Jorge; Lliguisaca-Segarra, Angelita; Dután-Erráez, Holger; Guevara-Mosquera, Daniel; Ochoa-Robles, Verónica; Cardiel, Mario H; Peláez-Ballestas, Ingris

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and rheumatic diseases in subjects over 18 years of age from the canton of Cuenca, Ecuador. Cross-sectional analytical community-based study was conducted in subjects over 18 years of age using the validated Community-Oriented Program for the Control of Rheumatic Diseases (COPCORD) questionnaire. Random sampling was used. The questionnaire was administered by standardized health workers. Subjects were visited house by house. Subjects positive for musculoskeletal (MSK) pain in the last 7 days and at some point in life were assessed by rheumatologists to confirm the diagnosis. A total of 4877 subjects participated, with an average age of 42.8 (SD 18.8) years of age; 59.7 % were women; 69.7 % lived in urban areas. 32.5 % reported MSK pain in the last 7 days and 45.7 % at some point in life. The prevalence of knee osteoarthritis was 7.4 %, hand osteoarthritis 5.3 %, low back pain 9.3 %, rheumatoid arthritis 0.8 %, fibromyalgia 2 %, gout 0.4 %, and lupus 0.06 %. Subjects from rural areas reported experiencing more MSK pain in the last 7 days and at some point in life, lower income, poorer health-care coverage, and increased physical activity involving repetitive tasks such as lifting weights or cooking with firewood. MSK pain prevalence was high. Osteoarthritis and low back pain were the most common diseases. Age, sex, physical activity, repetitive tasks, living in a rural area, and lack of health-care coverage were found to be associated with MSK pain. PMID:27023004

  9. Rheumatic Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... always tell your doctor or dentist about your history of rheumatic fever before you have a surgical or dental procedure. Such procedures may cause bacteria to enter the bloodstream and infect your heart ...

  10. Rheumatic fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... an ASO test) Complete blood count (CBC) Electrocardiogram (EKG) Sedimentation rate (ESR -- a test that measures inflammation ... criteria include: Fever High ESR Joint pain Abnormal EKG You'll likely be diagnosed with rheumatic fever ...

  11. Understanding rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Pedro Ming; Pereira, Rosa Rodrigues; Guilherme, Luiza

    2012-05-01

    Through a comprehensive review of the recent findings on rheumatic fever, we intend to propose a new physiopathologic model for this disease. A Medline search was performed for all articles containing the terms rheumatic fever or rheumatic heart disease in title or abstract from 1970 to 2011. Best evidence qualitative technique was used to select the most relevant. The scientific interest on rheumatic fever has notably diminished throughout the twentieth century as evidenced by the comparison of the proportion of articles in which RF was a subject in 1950 (0.26%) and today (0.03%) [Pubmed]. However, RF remains a major medical and social problem in the developing world and in the so-called hotspots, where it still causes around 500.000 deaths each year, not too different from the pre-antibiotic era. The role of genetic factors in RF susceptibility is discussed. Familiar aggregation, similarity of disease patterns between siblings, identical twin, and HLA correlation studies are evidence for a genetic influence on RF susceptibility. The suspect-involved genes fall mainly into those capable of immunologic mediation. Molecular mimicry explains the triggering of RF, but an intense and sustained inflammation is needed to cause sequels. Also, RF patients vary greatly in terms of symptoms. It is likely that a genetic background directing immune response towards a predominantly Th1 or Th2 pattern contributes to these features. The recent findings on rheumatic fever provide important insight on its physiopathology that helps understanding this prototype post-infectious autoimmune disease giving insights on other autoimmune conditions. PMID:21953302

  12. [Ibuprofen in rheumatic, degenerative and traumatic disorders of the locomotor system. Local effects and tolerance].

    PubMed

    Pollter, J

    1983-10-27

    The clinical trials carried out on Dolgit Creme containing 5% of the nonsteroidal antirheumatic active principle ibuprofen were carried out by 12 clinical examiners. The experimental and clinical tests were carried out on a total of 464 patients and/or volunteers. It has been proved that the active principle ibuprofen of the tested creme penetrates throughout the skin without causing serum concentrations which could lead to the appearance of undesirable side effects. The metabolization of ibuprofen after topical administration coincides with that following oral administration. In comparative studies with nonsteroidal antirheumatic gel it has been possible to prove the efficacy of Dolgit Creme in the treatment of the different forms of rheumatic diseases and degenerative articular changes as well as in cases of accident and sports injuries. The efficacy of Dolgit Creme compared to Placebo in a double blind trial for the assessment of the onset of action, pain alleviation, decrease of swelling, improvement of motility was at the 1%-level significantly superior. The effective dosage assessed was three or more times daily to apply a 4-10 cm strip of the creme on the affected part of the tissue and massage. Undesirable side effects appeared in less than 4% of the cases in the form of allergic skin reactions.

  13. ANTI-RHEUMATIC FORMULATIONS FROM AYURVEDA

    PubMed Central

    Raut, A. A.; Joshi, A. D.; Antarkar, D. S.; Joshi, V. R.; Vaidya, A. B.

    1991-01-01

    Rheumatic disorders like Amavata, Sandhivata and Vatarakta are elaborately described in ayurvedic literature. Preliminary survey of literature shows that about 247 formulations are recommended for these rheumatic disorders. These formulations generally include guggulu compounds, compounds of plant powders, decoctions, medicated ghees, oils, electuaries etc. Therapeutic potential of ayurvedic concepts and a brief review of Ayurvedic formulations are also discussed. PMID:22556565

  14. Somatoform disorders and rheumatic diseases: from DSM-IV to DSM-V.

    PubMed

    Alciati, A; Atzeni, F; Sgiarovello, P; Sarzi-Puttini, P

    2014-06-06

    Medically unexplained symptoms are considered 'somatoform disorders' in the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV). The introduction of this nosographic category has been helpful in drawing attention to a previously neglected area, but has not been successful in promoting an understanding of the disorders' biological basis and treatment implications, probably because of a series of diagnostic shortcomings. The newly proposed DSM-V diagnostic criteria try to overcome the limitations of the DSM-IV definition, which was organised centrally around the concept of medically unexplained symptoms, by emphasising the extent to which a patient's thoughts, feelings and behaviours concerning their somatic symptoms are disproportionate or excessive. This change is supported by a growing body of evidence showing that psychological and behavioural features play a major role in causing patient disability and maintaining high level of health care use. Pain disorders is the sub-category of DSM-IV somatoform disorders that most closely resembles fibromyalgia. Regardless of the diagnostic changes recently brought about by DSM-V, neuroimaging studies have identified important components of the mental processes associated with a DSM- IV diagnosis of pain disorder.

  15. Genetic and immunologic aspects of sleep and sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Parish, James M

    2013-05-01

    The study of genetics is providing new and exciting insights into the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. Both normal sleep and several types of sleep disturbances have been found to have significant genetic influences, as have traits of normal sleep, such as those evident in EEG patterns and the circadian sleep-wake cycle. The circadian sleep-wake cycle is based on a complex feedback loop of genetic transcription over a 24-h cycle. Restless legs syndrome (RLS) and periodic limb movements in sleep (PLMS) have familial aggregation, and several genes have a strong association with them. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms linked to RLS/PLMS, although none has a definite functional correlation. Narcolepsy/cataplexy are associated with HLA DQB1*0602 and a T-cell receptor α locus, although functional correlations have not been evident. Obstructive sleep apnea is a complex disorder involving multiple traits, such as anatomy of the oropharynx, ventilatory control, and traits associated with obesity. Although there is clear evidence of familial aggregation in the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, no specific gene or locus has been identified for it. Angiotensin-converting enzyme has been proposed as a risk variant, but evidence is weak. Fatal familial insomnia and advanced sleep phase syndrome are sleep disorders with a definite genetic basis. PMID:23648914

  16. Specific Management of Post-Chikungunya Rheumatic Disorders: A Retrospective Study of 159 Cases in Reunion Island from 2006-2012

    PubMed Central

    Javelle, Emilie; Ribera, Anne; Degasne, Isabelle; Gaüzère, Bernard-Alex; Marimoutou, Catherine; Simon, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    Background Since 2003, the tropical arthritogenic chikungunya (CHIK) virus has become an increasingly medical and economic burden in affected areas as it can often result in long-term disabilities. The clinical spectrum of post-CHIK (pCHIK) rheumatic disorders is wide. Evidence-based recommendations are needed to help physicians manage the treatment of afflicted patients. Patients and methods We conducted a 6-year case series retrospective study in Reunion Island of patients referred to a rheumatologist due to continuous rheumatic or musculoskeletal pains that persisted following CHIK infection. These various disorders were documented in terms of their clinical and therapeutic courses. Post-CHIK de novo chronic inflammatory rheumatisms (CIRs) were identified according to validated criteria. Results We reviewed 159 patient medical files. Ninety-four patients (59%) who were free of any articular disorder prior to CHIK met the CIR criteria: rheumatoid arthritis (n=40), spondyloarthritis (n=33), undifferentiated polyarthritis (n=21). Bone lesions detectable by radiography occurred in half of the patients (median time: 3.5 years pCHIK). A positive therapeutic response was achieved in 54 out of the 72 patients (75%) who were treated with methotrexate (MTX). Twelve out of the 92 patients (13%) received immunomodulatory biologic agents due to failure of contra-indication of MTX treatment. Other patients mainly presented with mechanical shoulder or knee disorders, bilateral distal polyarthralgia that was frequently associated with oedema at the extremities and tunnel syndromes. These pCHIK musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) were managed with pain-killers, local and/or general anti-inflammatory drugs, and physiotherapy. Conclusion Rheumatologists in Reunion Island managed CHIK rheumatic disorders in a pragmatic manner following the outbreak in 2006. This retrospective study describes the common mechanical and inflammatory pCHIK disorders. We provide a diagnostic and

  17. [Advances of immunological pathogenesis research in HIV related neurocognitive disorder].

    PubMed

    Yongjia, J I; Hongzhou, L U

    2016-05-25

    With extended life of HIV-infected patients due to highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), the rate of HIV associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) remains high and attracts much attention. The evidence is clear that cytokines are elevated in the blood of patients with HIV infection, which contribute to elevating the permeability of blood-brain barrier. Benefiting from that, cells in the brain are infected with HIV that has accelerated through the blood-brain barrier both as cell-free virus and infected immune cells including monocytes and T cells. Upon migration into the central nervous system, HIV-infected monocytes and T cells not only infect brain resident cells but also produce proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF and IL-1ß, which further activate microglia and astrocytes. These activated brain glial cells and perivascular macrophages, which release inflammatory mediators, are the main contributors to neuroinflammation resulting in neuronal dysfunction. The pathogenesis of HAND is multifaceted, however, mounting evidence indicates that HIV related neuroinflammation plays a major role, which should be the focus of therapeutic research for HAND in future. PMID:27651188

  18. Factors associated with regional rheumatic pain disorders in a population of Puerto Ricans with diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Font, Yvonne M.; Castro-Santana, Lesliane E.; Nieves-Plaza, Mariely; Maldonado, Mirna; Mayor, Ángel M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence and factors associated with bursitis/tendonitis disorders in Puerto Ricans with diabetes mellitus (DM). A cross-sectional study was performed in 202 adult Puerto Ricans (100 DM patients and 102 non-diabetic subjects). For each participant, a complete medical history and a musculoskeletal exam were systematically performed. Socio-demographic parameters, health-related behaviors, comorbidities, and pharmacotherapy were determined for all subjects. For DM patients, disease duration, glycemic control, and DM long-term complications were also examined. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to determine the factors associated with bursitis/tendonitis disorders. The mean (SD) age for DM patients and non-diabetic controls were 53.3 (12.9) and 50.0 (13.1) years; 64.0 and 64.7 % of DM patients and controls were females, respectively. Overall, the prevalence of bursitis/tendonitis was higher in DM patients than among non-diabetics (59.0 % vs. 29.4 %, p<0.01). In multivariate analyses, DM patients had 2.47 (95 % CI 1.05, 5.84) the odds of having bursitis/tendonitis as compared to non-diabetics. Specifically, DM patients had a higher frequency of flexor tenosynovitis, De Quervain’s tenosynovitis, lateral epicondylitis, medial epicondylitis, trochanteric bursitis, and anserine bursitis than non-diabetic subjects (p<0.05). Among DM patients, multivariate analyses showed that those with bursitis/tendonitis were more likely to be female [OR (95 % CI) 4.55 (1.42, 14.55)] and have peripheral vascular disease [OR (95 % CI) 8.48 (1.71, 41.93)]. In conclusion, bursitis/tendonitis disorders were common in this population of Hispanics with DM. Among DM patients, bursitis/tendonitis disorders were more frequent in women and those with long-term complications such as peripheral vascular disease. PMID:24522480

  19. Factors associated with regional rheumatic pain disorders in a population of Puerto Ricans with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Font, Yvonne M; Castro-Santana, Lesliane E; Nieves-Plaza, Mariely; Maldonado, Mirna; Mayor, Angel M; Vilá, Luis M

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence and factors associated with bursitis/tendonitis disorders in Puerto Ricans with diabetes mellitus (DM). A cross-sectional study was performed in 202 adult Puerto Ricans (100 DM patients and 102 non-diabetic subjects). For each participant, a complete medical history and a musculoskeletal exam were systematically performed. Socio-demographic parameters, health-related behaviors, comorbidities, and pharmacotherapy were determined for all subjects. For DM patients, disease duration, glycemic control, and DM long-term complications were also examined. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to determine the factors associated with bursitis/tendonitis disorders. The mean (SD) age for DM patients and non-diabetic controls were 53.3 (12.9) and 50.0 (13.1) years; 64.0 and 64.7 % of DM patients and controls were females, respectively. Overall, the prevalence of bursitis/tendonitis was higher in DM patients than among non-diabetics (59.0 % vs. 29.4 %, p < 0.01). In multivariate analyses, DM patients had 2.47 (95 % CI 1.05, 5.84) the odds of having bursitis/tendonitis as compared to non-diabetics. Specifically, DM patients had a higher frequency of flexor tenosynovitis, De Quervain's tenosynovitis, lateral epicondylitis, medial epicondylitis, trochanteric bursitis, and anserine bursitis than non-diabetic subjects (p < 0.05). Among DM patients, multivariate analyses showed that those with bursitis/tendonitis were more likely to be female [OR (95 % CI) 4.55 (1.42, 14.55)] and have peripheral vascular disease [OR (95 % CI) 8.48 (1.71, 41.93)]. In conclusion, bursitis/tendonitis disorders were common in this population of Hispanics with DM. Among DM patients, bursitis/tendonitis disorders were more frequent in women and those with long-term complications such as peripheral vascular disease.

  20. [Rheumatic fever].

    PubMed

    Cherkashin, D V; Kumchin, A N; Shchulenin, S N; Svistov, A S

    2013-01-01

    This lecture-style paper highlights all major problems pertinent to rheumatic fever Definition of acute RF and chronic rheumatic heart disease is proposed and desirability of the use of these terms in clinical practice is explained. Present-day epidemiology of RF is described with reference to marked differences in its prevalence in developed and developing countries. Modern classification of acute RF is described as adopted by the Russian Association of Rheumatologists and recommended for the use in Russian medical facilities. Discussion of etiological issues is focused on such virulence factors as beta-hemolytic streptococcus A and genetic predisposition confirming hereditary nature of RE Its clinical features are described along with laboratory and instrumental methods applied for its diagnostics. Large and small diagnostic criteria of RF are considered. Special attention is given to the treatment of RF and its complications (antibiotic, pathogenetic, and drug therapy). Its primary and secondary prophylaxis is discussed in detail, preparations for the purpose are listed (with doses and duration of application). In conclusion, criteria for the efficacy of therapy are presented along with indications for hospitalization and emergency treatment. PMID:24437162

  1. Structural, Genetic, and Functional Signatures of Disordered Neuro-Immunological Development in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Vishal; Ramdas, Shweta; Ochoa, Courtney Rothrock; Wallace, David; Bhide, Pradeep; Kohane, Isaac

    2012-01-01

    Background Numerous linkage studies have been performed in pedigrees of Autism Spectrum Disorders, and these studies point to diverse loci and etiologies of autism in different pedigrees. The underlying pattern may be identified by an integrative approach, especially since ASD is a complex disorder manifested through many loci. Method Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) was studied through two different and independent genome-scale measurement modalities. We analyzed the results of copy number variation in autism and triangulated these with linkage studies. Results Consistently across both genome-scale measurements, the same two molecular themes emerged: immune/chemokine pathways and developmental pathways. Conclusion Linkage studies in aggregate do indeed share a thematic consistency, one which structural analyses recapitulate with high significance. These results also show for the first time that genomic profiling of pathways using a recombination distance metric can capture pathways that are consistent with those obtained from copy number variations (CNV). PMID:23239965

  2. Rheumatic disease and the Australian Aborigine

    PubMed Central

    Roberts-Thomson, R.; Roberts-Thomson, P

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To document the frequency and disease phenotype of various rheumatic diseases in the Australian Aborigine.
METHODS—A comprehensive review was performed of the archaeological, ethnohistorical, and contemporary literature relating to rheumatic diseases in these indigenous people.
RESULTS—No evidence was found to suggest that rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), or gout occurred in Aborigines before or during the early stages of white settlement of Australia. Part of the explanation for the absence of these disorders in this indigenous group may relate to the scarcity of predisposing genetic elements, for example, shared rheumatoid epitope for RA, B27 antigen for AS. In contrast, osteoarthritis appeared to be common particularly involving the temporomandibular joint, right elbow and knees and, most probably, was related to excessive joint loading in their hunter gatherer lifestyle. Since white settlement, high frequency rates for rheumatic fever, systemic lupus erythematosus, and pyogenic arthritis have been observed and there are now scanty reports of the emergence of RA and gout in these original Australians.
CONCLUSION—The occurrence and phenotype of various rheumatic disorders in Australian Aborigines is distinctive but with recent changes in diet, lifestyle, and continuing genetic admixture may be undergoing change. An examination of rheumatic diseases in Australian Aborigines and its changing phenotype may lead to a greater understanding of the aetiopathogenesis of these disorders.

 PMID:10225809

  3. The clinical potential of influencing Nrf2 signaling in degenerative and immunological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Bifeng; Doan, An; Hybertson, Brooks M

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2; encoded in humans by the NFE2L2 gene) is a transcription factor that regulates the gene expression of a wide variety of cytoprotective phase II detoxification and antioxidant enzymes through a promoter sequence known as the antioxidant-responsive element (ARE). The ARE is a promoter element found in many cytoprotective genes; therefore, Nrf2 plays a pivotal role in the ARE-driven cellular defense system against environmental stresses. Agents that target the ARE/Nrf2 pathway have been tested in a wide variety of disorders, with at least one new Nrf2-activating drug now approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Examination of in vitro and in vivo experimental results, and taking into account recent human clinical trial results, has led to an opinion that Nrf2-activating strategies – which can include drugs, foods, dietary supplements, and exercise – are likely best targeted at disease prevention, disease recurrence prevention, or slowing of disease progression in early stage illnesses; they may also be useful as an interventional strategy. However, this rubric may be viewed even more conservatively in the pathophysiology of cancer. The activation of the Nrf2 pathway has been widely accepted as offering chemoprevention benefit, but it may be unhelpful or even harmful in the setting of established cancers. For example, Nrf2 activation might interfere with chemotherapies or radiotherapies or otherwise give tumor cells additional growth and survival advantages, unless they already possess mutations that fully activate their Nrf2 pathway constitutively. With all this in mind, the ARE/Nrf2 pathway remains of great interest as a possible target for the pharmacological control of degenerative and immunological diseases, both by activation and by inhibition, and its regulation remains a promising biological target for the development of new therapies. PMID:24520207

  4. Membranous Nephropathy Associated With Immunological Disorder-Related Liver Disease: A Retrospective Study of 10 Cases.

    PubMed

    Dauvergne, Maxime; Moktefi, Anissa; Rabant, Marion; Vigneau, Cécile; Kofman, Tomek; Burtey, Stephane; Corpechot, Christophe; Stehlé, Thomas; Desvaux, Dominique; Rioux-Leclercq, Nathalie; Rouvier, Philippe; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Frouget, Thierry; Daugas, Eric; Jablonski, Mathieu; Dahan, Karine; Brocheriou, Isabelle; Remy, Philippe; Grimbert, Philippe; Lang, Philippe; Chazouilleres, Oliver; Sahali, Dil; Audard, Vincent

    2015-07-01

    The association between membranous nephropathy (MN) and immunological disorder-related liver disease has not been extensively investigated, and the specific features of this uncommon association, if any, remain to be determined.We retrospectively identified 10 patients with this association. We aimed to describe the clinical, biological, and pathological characteristics of these patients and their therapeutic management. The possible involvement of the phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) in these apparent secondary forms of MN was assessed by immunohistochemistry with renal and liver biopsy specimens.The mean delay between MN and liver disease diagnoses was 3.9 years and the interval between the diagnosis of the glomerular and liver diseases was <1.5 years in 5 patients. MN was associated with a broad spectrum of liver diseases including primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). AIH whether isolated (n = 3) or associated with PBC (n = 2) or PSC (n = 2) was the most frequent autoimmune liver disease. Circulating PLA2R antibodies were detected in 4 out of 9 patients but the test was performed under specific immunosuppressive treatment in 3 out of 9 patients. Seven of the 9 patients with available renal tissue specimens displayed enhanced expression of PLA2R in glomeruli whereas PLA2R was not expressed in liver parenchyma from these patients or in normal liver tissue. The study of immunoglobulin (Ig) subclasses of deposits in glomeruli revealed that the most frequent pattern was the coexistence of IgG1 and IgG4 immune deposits with IgG4 predominating.Detection of PLA2R antibodies in glomeruli but not in liver parenchyma is a common finding in patients with MN associated with autoimmune liver disease, suggesting that these autoantibodies are not exclusively detected in idiopathic MN.

  5. Immunologic stimulation of T lymphocytes by silica after use of silicone mammary implants.

    PubMed

    Smalley, D L; Shanklin, D R; Hall, M F; Stevens, M V; Hanissian, A

    1995-03-01

    Difficulties in showing the biologic activity of silicones in vitro have contributed to the controversy over effects of silicone mammary implants in vivo. We adapted a standard lymphocyte stimulation test to detect evidence of cellular immunity in patients with silicone gel implants. Initially, lymphocytes were harvested from 70 implant patients, 76 normal controls without implants or symptoms, and 18 patients with classic rheumatic disorders and without a history of silicone implants. The harvested lymphocytes were stimulated with PWM, PHA, Con A, and pharmaceutical grade colloidal silicon dioxide (silica). Implant patients showed increased SI compared to controls and those with rheumatic disorders. The mean SI of implant patients was 195.0 +/- 19.3, 18-fold that of normal controls (< 0.0001). Patients with rheumatic disease showed the same SI as controls (P = 0.3577). A follow-up study included 220 normal controls without implants, 942 silicone gel implant patients with demonstrable rheumatic symptoms, and 34 implant patients without symptoms at the time of the study. The average SI for the 220 normal controls was 10.0 +/- 0.41. Among the symptomatic implant women, 860 (91.3%) had SI significantly above those of the normal controls. Of these, 171 (18.2%) had SI between 25 and 50, 316 (33.5%) had SI between 50 and 100, and 373 (39.6%) had SI over 100. The data presented confirms that silicone implant patients respond immunologically to the silicon dioxide contained in mammary prostheses.

  6. Rheumatic Diseases and Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    BOJINCA, Violeta; JANTA, Iustina

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT There are many studies which demonstrate a higher risk for malignancy in patients with rheumatic diseases. There have been a number of possible explanations for the differences in the risk of certain malignancies in patients with rheumatic disease, compared with general population, but a clear mechanism is difficult to identify. Rheumatoid syndromes may be associated with malignancy as paraneoplastic conditions, which can antedate the neoplasm diagnosis. On the other hand, autoimmune rheumatic diseases have a higher risk of malignancy by themselves or because of the immunosuppressant treatments. PMID:23482881

  7. Acute rheumatic fever

    PubMed Central

    Cumming, Gordon R.

    1974-01-01

    While rheumatic fever is relatively uncommon except where there are poor and crowded living conditions, sporadic acute attacks continue to occur in a family or pediatric medical practice. The physician's role in management of the sore throat in the diagnosis of suspected cases of rheumatic fever and in follow-up for continued prophylaxis is discussed. The frequency of admissions and presenting features of 159 patients with acute rheumatic fever is reviewed. Continued surveillance is required if we are to achieve a further reduction in attack rate and complications. PMID:4419123

  8. Biologics-induced autoimmune renal disorders in chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases: systematic literature review and analysis of a monocentric cohort.

    PubMed

    Piga, Matteo; Chessa, Elisabetta; Ibba, Valentina; Mura, Valentina; Floris, Alberto; Cauli, Alberto; Mathieu, Alessandro

    2014-08-01

    The use of biologic drugs has been linked with the paradoxical development of systemic and organ specific autoimmune processes. The aim of this study was to describe the features of biologics-induced autoimmune renal disorders (AIRD) through a systematic review and a cohort study of 707 adult patients affected with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), Ankylosing Spondylitis (SA) and Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA). The literature search identified 2687 articles of which 21 were considered relevant for the present study, accounting for 26 case reports. The cohort analysis retrieved 3 cases. According to clinical manifestations and kidney histology the identified AIRD cases were classified as: a) glomerulonephritis associated with systemic vasculitis (GNSV), b) glomerulonephritis in lupus-like syndrome (GNLS), c) isolated autoimmune renal disorders (IARD). Twenty-two out of 29 cases with AIRD were reported in patients affected by RA, 5 in AS and 2 in PsA. The biologic drug most frequently associated with development of AIRD was Etanercept (15 cases, 51.7%), followed by Adalimumab (9 cases, 31.0%) and Infliximab (3 cases, 10.3%) while Tocilizumab and Abatacept were reported in 1 case (3.4%) for each. Thirteen out of 29 (44.8%) cases were classified as affected by IARD, 12 (41.3%) as GNSV and 4 (13.9%) as GNLS. Worse prognosis was associated with GNSV and lack of biologic withdrawal. Although rare, AIRD may be life-threatening and may lead to renal failure and death. If AIRD occurs, biologic drugs must be stopped and patient should be treated according to clinical manifestations and kidney biopsy findings.

  9. Outcome measures in inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory rheumatic diseases are generally multifaceted disorders and, therefore, measurement of multiple outcomes is relevant to most of these diseases. Developments in outcome measures in the rheumatic diseases are promoted by the development of successful treatments. Outcome measurement will increasingly deal with measurement of low levels of disease activity and avoidance of disease consequences. It is an advantage for patient management and knowledge transfer if the same outcomes are used in practice and in trials. Continuous measures of change are generally the most powerful and, therefore, are preferred as primary outcomes in trials. For daily clinical practice, outcome measures should reflect the patients' state and have to be easily derivable. The objective of this review is to describe recent developments in outcome measures for inflammatory rheumatic diseases for trials and clinical practice, with an emphasis on rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:19849821

  10. Tai Chi and Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chenchen

    2011-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Many patients with chronic rheumatic diseases such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and fibromyalgia experience high levels of pain, psychological distress and negative emotions and have limited therapeutic options. Tai Chi is a complex multi-component mind-body exercise that increasing numbers of Americans are practicing, particularly those with musculoskeletal conditions. Clinical trials and observational studies have provided encouraging evidence that Tai Chi, both short and long-term, has benefits for patients with a variety of chronic disorders. As a form of physical exercise, Tai Chi enhances cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength, balance, and physical function. It also appears to be associated with reduced stress, anxiety and depression as well as improved quality of life. Thus, despite the noted limitations in the evidence, and the need for further methodologically rigorous studies, Tai Chi can be safely recommended to patients with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and fibromyalgia as a complementary and alternative medical approach to affect patient well-being. This overview synthesizes the current body of knowledge about this ancient Chinese mind-body medicine to better inform clinical decision-making for our rheumatic patients. PMID:21220083

  11. [Recommendations from the Brazilian Society of Rheumatology on the diagnosis and treatment of intestinal parasitic infections in patients with autoimmune rheumatic disorders].

    PubMed

    Braz, Alessandra Sousa; de Andrade, Carlos Augusto Ferreira; da Mota, Licia Maria Henrique; Lima, Caliandra Maria Bezerra Luna

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal parasites - helminths and protozoa - are cosmopolitan diseases which are most prevalent in tropical regions. Patients with diagnoses of autoimmune rheumatic diseases have, due to the underlying disease or its treatment, an increased risk of occurrence of severe manifestations of intestinal parasites. Although the prevalence of these parasitic infections is very high in our environment, not always is the rheumatologist attentive to the need for investigation and treatment of helminthiasis and protozooses before the use of immunomodulatory, immunosuppressive therapies, and of biological drugs that are modifiers of the course of the disease. In this document, the Brazilian Society of Rheumatology establishes general recommendations on the diagnosis and treatment of intestinal parasitic infections in Brazil in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases, highlighting rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and spondyloarthritis.

  12. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Carapetis, Jonathan R; Beaton, Andrea; Cunningham, Madeleine W; Guilherme, Luiza; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Mayosi, Bongani M; Sable, Craig; Steer, Andrew; Wilson, Nigel; Wyber, Rosemary; Zühlke, Liesl

    2016-01-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) is the result of an autoimmune response to pharyngitis caused by infection with group A Streptococcus. The long-term damage to cardiac valves caused by ARF, which can result from a single severe episode or from multiple recurrent episodes of the illness, is known as rheumatic heart disease (RHD) and is a notable cause of morbidity and mortality in resource-poor settings around the world. Although our understanding of disease pathogenesis has advanced in recent years, this has not led to dramatic improvements in diagnostic approaches, which are still reliant on clinical features using the Jones Criteria, or treatment practices. Indeed, penicillin has been the mainstay of treatment for decades and there is no other treatment that has been proven to alter the likelihood or the severity of RHD after an episode of ARF. Recent advances - including the use of echocardiographic diagnosis in those with ARF and in screening for early detection of RHD, progress in developing group A streptococcal vaccines and an increased focus on the lived experience of those with RHD and the need to improve quality of life - give cause for optimism that progress will be made in coming years against this neglected disease that affects populations around the world, but is a particular issue for those living in poverty. PMID:27188830

  13. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Carapetis, Jonathan R; Beaton, Andrea; Cunningham, Madeleine W; Guilherme, Luiza; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Mayosi, Bongani M; Sable, Craig; Steer, Andrew; Wilson, Nigel; Wyber, Rosemary; Zühlke, Liesl

    2016-01-14

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) is the result of an autoimmune response to pharyngitis caused by infection with group A Streptococcus. The long-term damage to cardiac valves caused by ARF, which can result from a single severe episode or from multiple recurrent episodes of the illness, is known as rheumatic heart disease (RHD) and is a notable cause of morbidity and mortality in resource-poor settings around the world. Although our understanding of disease pathogenesis has advanced in recent years, this has not led to dramatic improvements in diagnostic approaches, which are still reliant on clinical features using the Jones Criteria, or treatment practices. Indeed, penicillin has been the mainstay of treatment for decades and there is no other treatment that has been proven to alter the likelihood or the severity of RHD after an episode of ARF. Recent advances - including the use of echocardiographic diagnosis in those with ARF and in screening for early detection of RHD, progress in developing group A streptococcal vaccines and an increased focus on the lived experience of those with RHD and the need to improve quality of life - give cause for optimism that progress will be made in coming years against this neglected disease that affects populations around the world, but is a particular issue for those living in poverty.

  14. Radiological imaging in pediatric rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Matuszewska, Genowefa; Zaniewicz-Kaniewska, Katarzyna; Włodkowska-Korytkowska, Monika; Smorawińska, Patrycja; Saied, Fadhil; Kunisz, Wojciech; Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona

    2014-01-01

    Summary Radiological imaging plays a fundamental role in the diagnosis and monitoring of rheumatic diseases. The basic method of imaging is a classic X-ray picture, which for many years has been used as a single method for the recognition and evaluation of the effects of disease management. In today’s modern day treatment of rheumatic diseases, ultrasonography and magnetic resonance are more commonly performed for early detection of inflammatory changes in the region of soft tissue, subchondral bone and bone marrow. In spite of their usefulness and fundamental role in the diagnosis, X-ray still remains an essential tool in the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis in children and is complementary to today’s methods of imaging diagnostics. In clinical practice, X-ray imaging is still an important examination performed not only to recognize the disorders, but also to provide a differential diagnosis. It helps estimate disease progression and is used to monitor the effects of treatment and the development of possible complications. Differential diagnosis of rheumatic diseases is performed on the basis of localization and type of radiographic changes. The surrounding periarticular soft tissues, bone structures, joint space, with special attention to articular bone surfaces and epiphyses, are analyzed. The aim of this work is to describe characteristic inflammatory changes present on X-ray imaging typical for the most commonly diagnosed rheumatic diseases in children, such as juvenile idiopathic arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic scleroderma, mixed connective tissue disease, juvenile dermatomyositis, juvenile spondyloarthropathy and systemic vascular disease. PMID:24669280

  15. Radiologic atlas of rheumatic diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Dihlmann, W.

    1986-01-01

    This book is an ''atlas of rheumatic joint disease'' selected from 20 years of personal experience by the author. The author sets a goal of demonstrating the value of soft-tissue imaging in the diagnosis of early joint disease. This goal is achieved with high quality reproductions, many of which are presented in duplicate to illustrate bone and soft-tissue changes. The contents include an introductory overview of the ''Mosaic of Arthritis'' followed by sections on adult rheumatoid arthritis, seronegative spondyloarthropathies, classic collagen disease, enthesiopathies, and lastly a section on gout and psuedogout. The subject index is specific and indexes figures with boldface type. Each section is introduced by a brief outline or overview of the radiographic spectrum of the joint disorder to be illustrated.

  16. Insights into the Immunological Properties of Intrinsically Disordered Malaria Proteins Using Proteome Scale Predictions

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Andrew J.; Irani, Vashti; MacRaild, Christopher A.; Anders, Robin F.; Norton, Raymond S.; Beeson, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Malaria remains a significant global health burden. The development of an effective malaria vaccine remains as a major challenge with the potential to significantly reduce morbidity and mortality. While Plasmodium spp. have been shown to contain a large number of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) or disordered protein regions, the relationship of protein structure to subcellular localisation and adaptive immune responses remains unclear. In this study, we employed several computational prediction algorithms to identify IDPs at the proteome level of six Plasmodium spp. and to investigate the potential impact of protein disorder on adaptive immunity against P. falciparum parasites. IDPs were shown to be particularly enriched within nuclear proteins, apical proteins, exported proteins and proteins localised to the parasitophorous vacuole. Furthermore, several leading vaccine candidates, and proteins with known roles in host-cell invasion, have extensive regions of disorder. Presentation of peptides by MHC molecules plays an important role in adaptive immune responses, and we show that IDP regions are predicted to contain relatively few MHC class I and II binding peptides owing to inherent differences in amino acid composition compared to structured domains. In contrast, linear B-cell epitopes were predicted to be enriched in IDPs. Tandem repeat regions and non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms were found to be strongly associated with regions of disorder. In summary, immune responses against IDPs appear to have characteristics distinct from those against structured protein domains, with increased antibody recognition of linear epitopes but some constraints for MHC presentation and issues of polymorphisms. These findings have major implications for vaccine design, and understanding immunity to malaria. PMID:26513658

  17. Whole-exome sequencing in obsessive-compulsive disorder identifies rare mutations in immunological and neurodevelopmental pathways

    PubMed Central

    Cappi, C; Brentani, H; Lima, L; Sanders, S J; Zai, G; Diniz, B J; Reis, V N S; Hounie, A G; Conceição do Rosário, M; Mariani, D; Requena, G L; Puga, R; Souza-Duran, F L; Shavitt, R G; Pauls, D L; Miguel, E C; Fernandez, T V

    2016-01-01

    Studies of rare genetic variation have identified molecular pathways conferring risk for developmental neuropsychiatric disorders. To date, no published whole-exome sequencing studies have been reported in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). We sequenced all the genome coding regions in 20 sporadic OCD cases and their unaffected parents to identify rare de novo (DN) single-nucleotide variants (SNVs). The primary aim of this pilot study was to determine whether DN variation contributes to OCD risk. To this aim, we evaluated whether there is an elevated rate of DN mutations in OCD, which would justify this approach toward gene discovery in larger studies of the disorder. Furthermore, to explore functional molecular correlations among genes with nonsynonymous DN SNVs in OCD probands, a protein–protein interaction (PPI) network was generated based on databases of direct molecular interactions. We applied Degree-Aware Disease Gene Prioritization (DADA) to rank the PPI network genes based on their relatedness to a set of OCD candidate genes from two OCD genome-wide association studies (Stewart et al., 2013; Mattheisen et al., 2014). In addition, we performed a pathway analysis with genes from the PPI network. The rate of DN SNVs in OCD was 2.51 × 10−8 per base per generation, significantly higher than a previous estimated rate in unaffected subjects using the same sequencing platform and analytic pipeline. Several genes harboring DN SNVs in OCD were highly interconnected in the PPI network and ranked high in the DADA analysis. Nearly all the DN SNVs in this study are in genes expressed in the human brain, and a pathway analysis revealed enrichment in immunological and central nervous system functioning and development. The results of this pilot study indicate that further investigation of DN variation in larger OCD cohorts is warranted to identify specific risk genes and to confirm our preliminary finding with regard to PPI network enrichment for particular

  18. Whole-exome sequencing in obsessive-compulsive disorder identifies rare mutations in immunological and neurodevelopmental pathways.

    PubMed

    Cappi, C; Brentani, H; Lima, L; Sanders, S J; Zai, G; Diniz, B J; Reis, V N S; Hounie, A G; Conceição do Rosário, M; Mariani, D; Requena, G L; Puga, R; Souza-Duran, F L; Shavitt, R G; Pauls, D L; Miguel, E C; Fernandez, T V

    2016-01-01

    Studies of rare genetic variation have identified molecular pathways conferring risk for developmental neuropsychiatric disorders. To date, no published whole-exome sequencing studies have been reported in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). We sequenced all the genome coding regions in 20 sporadic OCD cases and their unaffected parents to identify rare de novo (DN) single-nucleotide variants (SNVs). The primary aim of this pilot study was to determine whether DN variation contributes to OCD risk. To this aim, we evaluated whether there is an elevated rate of DN mutations in OCD, which would justify this approach toward gene discovery in larger studies of the disorder. Furthermore, to explore functional molecular correlations among genes with nonsynonymous DN SNVs in OCD probands, a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was generated based on databases of direct molecular interactions. We applied Degree-Aware Disease Gene Prioritization (DADA) to rank the PPI network genes based on their relatedness to a set of OCD candidate genes from two OCD genome-wide association studies (Stewart et al., 2013; Mattheisen et al., 2014). In addition, we performed a pathway analysis with genes from the PPI network. The rate of DN SNVs in OCD was 2.51 × 10(-8) per base per generation, significantly higher than a previous estimated rate in unaffected subjects using the same sequencing platform and analytic pipeline. Several genes harboring DN SNVs in OCD were highly interconnected in the PPI network and ranked high in the DADA analysis. Nearly all the DN SNVs in this study are in genes expressed in the human brain, and a pathway analysis revealed enrichment in immunological and central nervous system functioning and development. The results of this pilot study indicate that further investigation of DN variation in larger OCD cohorts is warranted to identify specific risk genes and to confirm our preliminary finding with regard to PPI network enrichment for particular

  19. Evaluation of Immunological Disorders of T Lymphocytes and Endocrinological Disorders as Pathogen Factors in Patients With Metaplasia of Urinary Bladder

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-19

    The Follow-up Duration Was 1-8 Years.; The Main Reasons Behind Visiting the Hospital Were Recurrent Urinary Tract Infection,; Urinary Urgencies, Pollakiuria, Difficulty in Initiating Micturition, Pain in Hypogastrium,; Night Wetting and Day Wetting, Menstruation's Disorders, Urolithiasis, Defects of Urinary; System and Hematuria.

  20. [Paraneoplastic rheumatic syndromes].

    PubMed

    Gracia-Ramos, Abraham Edgar; Vera-Lastra, Olga Lidia

    2012-01-01

    Paraneoplastic rheumatic syndromes are defined as those events associated with cancer that occur away from the primary tumor or its metastases and are induced by the presence of the tumor through biological products like hormones, peptides, autocrine or paracrine mediators, antibodies or cytotoxic lymphocytes. Of these, hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, carcinomatous polyarthritis, dermatomyositis/polymyositis, and paraneoplastic vasculitis are the most frequently recognized. Other less known associations are based upon a smaller number of case reports, and include palmar fasciitis, panniculitis, erythema nodosum, Raynaud¥s phenomenon, erythromelalgia and Lupus-like syndrome. Usually the clinical course of rheumatic paraneoplastic syndrome and cancer parallels the resolution of the tumor usually leads to resolution of this syndrome. It is difficult make the distinction between idiopathic rheumatic syndromes from those that result from cancer. Still, there are several clinical data that can guide us to the presence of an occult malignancy, and should be identified as the detection of cancer can lead to early treatment and better prognosis.

  1. Soft-tissue rheumatism: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Reveille, J D

    1997-01-27

    Soft tissue rheumatism is one of the most common and most misunderstood categories of disorders facing the primary care physician. Among the more common types are subacromial bursitis, epicondylitis, trochanteric bursitis, anserine bursitis, and fibromyalgia. The keys to the diagnosis of soft-tissue rheumatism are the history and, more importantly, the physical examination. Extensive laboratory testing and radiographs are not as helpful in evaluating patients with these complaints. Treatment consists of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and nonnarcotic analgesics. Especially in patients with localized disorders, intralesional injections of corticosteroids are particularly effective and safe and should be part of the armamentarium of the primary care practitioner. Fibromyalgia is a particularly challenging form of nonarticular rheumatism. The clinical presentation is rather characteristic, with the patient typically being a woman 30-60 years of age who presents with diffuse somatic pain. Patients often give a history of sleep disturbance, may be depressed, and show characteristic tender areas, or trigger points. Laboratory findings are normal. Management includes reassurance, correction of the underlying sleep disturbance with low doses of a tricyclic antidepressant, treatment with muscle relaxants and nonnarcotic analgesics or NSAIDs, and an exercise program with a strong aerobic component.

  2. Role of adipokines in atherosclerosis: interferences with cardiovascular complications in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Scotece, Morena; Conde, Javier; Gómez, Rodolfo; López, Verónica; Pino, Jesús; González, Antonio; Lago, Francisca; Gómez-Reino, Juan J; Gualillo, Oreste

    2012-01-01

    Patients with rheumatic diseases have an increased risk of mortality by cardiovascular events. In fact, several rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and ankylosing spondylitis are associated with a higher prevalence of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Although traditional cardiovascular risk factors have been involved in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases in rheumatic patients, these alterations do not completely explain the enhanced cardiovascular risk in this population. Obesity and its pathologic alteration of fat mass and dysfunction, due to an altered pattern of secretion of proinflammatory adipokines, could be one of the links between cardiovascular and rheumatic diseases. Indeed, the incidence of CVDs is augmented in obese individuals with rheumatic disorders. Thus, in this paper we explore in detail the relationships among adipokines, rheumatic diseases, and cardiovascular complications by giving to the reader a holistic vision and several suggestions for future perspectives and potential clinical implications.

  3. Immunology of stiff person syndrome and other GAD-associated neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Alexopoulos, Harry; Dalakas, Marinos C

    2013-11-01

    Antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the rate-limiting enzyme for the synthesis of GABA, are associated with an array of distinct, mostly autoimmune, neurological conditions. In all associated syndromes, namely stiff person syndrome, cerebellar ataxia, epilepsy, limbic encephalitis or abnormal eye movements, anti-GAD antibodies are detected at high titers and play a fundamental role in diagnosis, but do not correlate with disease severity, diversity of symptomatology or response to therapies. Despite considerable efforts, including in vitro (enzymatic assays) and in vivo (animal models) systems, the pathogenicity of anti-GAD antibodies has not been unequivocally proven for any specific condition. The search for the responsible autoantigen has revealed a few other antigenic targets, particularly for SPS, localized in the pre- or post-synaptic inhibitory neuronal synapses. Cumulative clinical and laboratory evidence indicates that anti-GAD and related antibodies define a novel group of syndromes, collectively known as 'hyperexcitability disorders'.

  4. Approaches to Managing Autoimmune Cytopenias in Novel Immunological Disorders with Genetic Underpinnings Like Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rao, V. Koneti

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a rare disorder of apoptosis. It is frequently caused by mutations in FAS (TNFRSF6) gene. Unlike most of the self-limiting autoimmune cytopenias sporadically seen in childhood, multi lineage cytopenias due to ALPS are often refractory, as their inherited genetic defect is not going to go away. Historically, more ALPS patients have died due to overwhelming sepsis following splenectomy to manage their chronic cytopenias than due to any other cause, including malignancies. Hence, current recommendations underscore the importance of avoiding splenectomy in ALPS, by long-term use of corticosteroid-sparing immunosuppressive agents like mycophenolate mofetil and sirolimus. Paradigms learnt from managing ALPS patients in recent years is highlighted here and can be extrapolated to manage refractory cytopenias in patients with as yet undetermined genetic bases for their ailments. It is also desirable to develop international registries for children with rare and complex immune problems associated with chronic multilineage cytopenias in order to elucidate their natural history and long-term comorbidities due to the disease and its treatments. PMID:26258116

  5. [Soft tissue rheumatism in erderly].

    PubMed

    Szczepański, Leszek

    2008-01-01

    Disorders of soft, peri-articular tissues are a common cause of musculoskeletal pain in elderly patients. Nevertheless, most physicians underestimate the role of soft tissue rheumatism in the pathomechanism of the pain. The impairments of soft tissue can not be diagnosed by X-rays examinations, whereas degenerative lesions of joints are easy diagnosed using this method even despite of their uncertain role in producing the symptoms. The incidence of pain syndromes originated from soft tissues differ regarding to the age of patients. In young subjects the incidence of all of them is generally low. Syndromes provoked by overloading during work: repetitive strain syndrome, canal tunnel syndrome, tennis elbow, golfers elbow, shoulder tendon coin disorders and myofascial pain syndrome are common in middle-aged patients. The morbidity of fibromialgia syndrome is also lower in old people probably as the result of diminished numbers and degenerative changes in nociceptive fibers. The syndromes prevailing in elderly patients include trochanteric syndrome and the pain syndromes provoked by muscle spasm depended on posture abnormalities. In the soft tissue pain syndrome prevention adapted to old age kinesitherapy and avoiding muscle overloading are recommended. Soft tissue pain syndromes are usually treated with non steroidal anti inflammatory drugs. In local pain syndromes better results can be obtained by local treatment. Local injections of glikocorticosteroids are usually very effective and safe.

  6. Fibroblastic rheumatism: an addition to fibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Ji, Lanlan; Geng, Yan; Hao, Yanjie; Zhang, Zhuoli

    2011-10-01

    Fibroblastic rheumatism (FR) is a rare rheumatologic entity of unknown etiology. It is characterized by symmetrical polyarthritis associated with multiple cutaneous nodules. Bone erosion can occur as the disease progresses and destructive arthropathy is not rare. We report on an 18-year-old man with FR who presented a 6-year history of cutaneous nodules localized at para-articular sites with only minimal oligoarthralgia on exertion. There was no visceral involvement, and all the routine and immunological tests were normal. The diagnosis of FR was confirmed by histological examination of a nodule, which composed of myofibroblastic proliferation and thickened collagen fibers. Most skin lesions resolved after treated with IFN-α, however there was sequelae of permanent disability due to the progressive bone erosion despite weekly methotrexate treatment. PMID:21549631

  7. Environmental factors and human health: fibrous and particulate substance-induced immunological disorders and construction of a health-promoting living environment.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Takemi; Matsuzaki, Hidenori; Lee, Suni; Kumagai-Takei, Naoko; Yamamoto, Shoko; Hatayama, Tamayo; Yoshitome, Kei; Nishimura, Yasumitsu

    2016-03-01

    Among the various scientific fields covered in the area of hygiene such as environmental medicine, epidemiology, public health and preventive medicine, we are investigating the immunological effects of fibrous and particulate substances in the environment and work surroundings, such as asbestos fibers and silica particles. In addition to these studies, we have attempted to construct health-promoting living conditions. Thus, in this review we will summarize our investigations regarding the (1) immunological effects of asbestos fibers, (2) immunological effects of silica particles, and (3) construction of a health-promoting living environment. This review article summarizes the 2014 Japanese Society for Hygiene (JSH) Award Lecture of the 85th Annual Meeting of the JSH entitled "Environmental health effects: immunological effects of fibrous and particulate matter and establishment of health-promoting environments" presented by the first author of this manuscript, Prof. Otsuki, Department of Hygiene, Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, Japan, the recipient of the 2014 JSH award. The results of our experiments can be summarized as follows: (1) asbestos fibers reduce anti-tumor immunity, (2) silica particles chronically activate responder and regulatory T cells causing an unbalance of these two populations of T helper cells, which may contribute to the development of autoimmune disorders frequently complicating silicosis, and (3) living conditions to enhance natural killer cell activity were developed, which may promote the prevention of cancers and diminish symptoms of virus infections.

  8. [Morphological points of departure for the therapy of rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Fassbender, H G

    1975-01-01

    Pathogenic mechanisms of several rheumatic diseases are reported. Besides signs of nonspecific inflammation there are characteristic features in some rheumatic disorders: in rheumatoid arthritis one can find mesenchymoid proliferation and - in seropositive cases only - necrosis ot tissue. In ankylosing spondylitis osseous metaplasia of the intervertebral discs, in psoriatic arthritis, osteoclastic and in osteoblastic changes without inflammation. In fibrositis syndrome, however, there was no evidence of inflammation, but one may detect local muscular lesions and proliferation of fibroblasts. Pain in osteoarthritis is always caused by secondary inflammation. Due to this data, the possibilities of treatment are discussed, especially those of nonsteroidal drugs.

  9. [Immune system and rheumatic diseases in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Schirmer, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Impairments of the immune system play an important role in all immun-mediated rheumatic diseases. Recently, the following news were reported: · Early aging of the immune system with thymus insufficiency has now been reported for both patients with rheumatoid arthritis and axial spondyloarthritis, without prethymic lack of progenitors at least in rheumatoid arthritis.. · For giant cell arteritis, the most frequent vasculitis in the elderly, an increased expression of IL-17A in temporal artery biopsies coincides with good prognosis and reponse to glucocorticoids.. · Concerning immunosenescence in systemic lupus erythematosus, BAFF appears to have an important role for relapses after B-cell depletion.. For the future it can be anticipated that the use of unified classification criteria for rheumatic diseases (as with the new 2012 EULAR / ACR classification criteria for polymyalgia rheumatica) will ensure better comparability of immunological studies also in the elderly. PMID:27254630

  10. Rheumatic manifestations of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Lebiedz-Odrobina, Dorota; Kay, Jonathan

    2010-11-01

    DM is associated with various musculoskeletal manifestations. The strength of this relationship varies among the various musculoskeletal disorders; the associations are based mostly on epidemiologic data. For most of these conditions, definitive pathophysiologic correlates are lacking.Hand and shoulder disorders occur more frequently than other musculoskeletal manifestations of DM. Recognition of the association between DM and shoulder adhesive capsulitis, DD, and stenosing flexor tenosynovitis facilitates their correct diagnosis in the setting of DM and prompt initiation of appropriate treatment, which may include optimizing glycemic control. Conversely, awareness and identification of the characteristic musculoskeletal manifestations of DM may facilitate earlier diagnosis of DM and initiation of glucose-lowering therapy to retard the development of diabetic complications.Much less has been published about the musculoskeletal complications of DM than about its micro- and macrovascular complications. Prospective case-control cohort studies are needed to establish the true prevalence of musculoskeletal complications of DM and the metabolic syndrome, especially in this era of tighter glycemic control.The potential relationship between DM and the development of OA needs to be clarified in large, prospective, case-control cohort studies. The effect on musculoskeletal manifestations of various therapeutic regimens to manage DM should be studied prospectively. Treatment regimens for some musculoskeletal conditions associated with DM, such as DISH, should be studied in larger prospective, randomized,controlled clinical trials.At the molecular level, further studies are warranted to clarify the potential contribution of AGEs and adipokines to the development of OA and diabetic musculoskeletal syndromes, such as shoulder adhesive capsulitis, DD, stenosing flexor tenosynovitis, and LJM. Identification of such molecular targets for therapy would promote the development of

  11. Rheumatism in industry: a review

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, J. A. D.

    1971-01-01

    Anderson, J. A. D. (1971).Brit. J. industr. Med.,28, 103-121. Rheumatism in industry: a review. Information about causes, effects, and prevention of rheumatic disease among industrial workers lacks standardization, as shown by the literature in this field; one reason for this is that there are discrepancies about the range of diseases and syndromes which should be included under this heading. The Industrial Survey Unit of the Arthritis and Rheumatism Council defined a rheumatic complaint as musculo-skeletal pain not related to recent (i.e., within six weeks) trauma. A study by the Unit of the social and economic effects of rheumatism among 2 684 male employees from a range of manual occupations is considered in relation to the observations made by other investigators. Sickness absence (at present estimated to be about 29·8 million working days per annum in Britain) and premature retirement can be shown to result directly from rheumatic complaints, especially rheumatoid arthritis and disc disease; furthermore, there seems to be general agreement that sickness absence is more marked in heavy manual occupations than in light ones. However, the extent to which job changes ascribed to rheumatic complaints are in fact caused by them is more doubtful. Evidence supporting the view that occupational factors are related to the aetiology of some chronic rheumatic diseases is fairly strong. Chronic tenosynovitis, bursitis, osteoarthrosis, and, to a lesser extent, disc disease are among those in which such a relationship can be demonstrated; however, the reason why some men are more prone to develop these conditions than others working in similar jobs is still in doubt, suggesting that the aetiology is multifactorial. In other rheumatic diseases, notably rheumatoid arthritis, a fairly extensive study of the literature does not indicate any clear correlation between occupation and aetiology. A system of job analysis for individual workers based on effort, posture, and climatic

  12. Physical Therapy For Rheumatic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Godfrey, C. M.

    1971-01-01

    Physical therapy remains an important tool in rheumatic disease treatment even though great strides have been made with chemotherapy. Much physical therapy is misused, however, and physicians should ensure that the exercises ordered for a patient do not contribute to joint deformity. Underwater exercise, heat therapy, traction, massage and splinting as well as a warm and sympathetic staff are all good aids in rehabilitating the rheumatic patient, but careful supervision is needed for maximum benefit. PMID:20468607

  13. Endocrine origins of rheumatic disease. Diagnostic clues to interrelated syndromes.

    PubMed

    Lockshin, Michael D

    2002-04-01

    Heightened awareness of endocrine abnormalities is important in evaluation of patients presenting with musculoskeletal symptoms. Endocrine disorders such as diabetes, hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, hyperparathyroidism, hypoparathyroidism, hyperadrenocorticism, and acromegaly cause a unique array of rheumatic manifestations. Such conditions include Dupuytren's contracture, carpal tunnel syndrome, chondrocalcinosis, pseudogout, scleredema, and osteoporosis. Characteristic changes on radiologic evaluation and serum enzyme testing are additional clues to these atypical presentations. Consideration of a possible endocrine cause early in the evaluation may improve management in patients with such an underlying disorder.

  14. Immunological sterility.

    PubMed

    Diniz Pereira de Carvalho, W

    1980-01-01

    The author presents the fundamental principles of the immunological process, and describes the constitution, origin, classification and action of antibodies and antigens. He identifies the 5 types of antibodies. He then comments on the classical mechanism of the immunological response. The immunological process is then related to a couple's infertility. After a short history the author calls attention to immunological problems of semen and describes a test he created to detect agglutination and/or immobilization of spermatozoa in non-diluted female blood serum. It is a test to be used as a first step in the research of infertility without an apparent cause (ESCA) in office practice. The author also presents the results of 182 cases studied and in his commentary he shows the advantages and deficiencies of the test.

  15. Update on acute rheumatic fever

    PubMed Central

    Madden, Sharen; Kelly, Len

    2009-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To remind physicians who work with aboriginal populations of the ongoing prevalence of acute rheumatic fever and to review the recent evidence on presentation, treatment, and secondary prophylaxis. SOURCES OF INFORMATION The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, MEDLINE, and EMBASE were searched from 1996 to 2007 with a focus on prevention, epidemiology, and disease management. Case series data from medical records at the Sioux Lookout Meno Ya Win Health Centre in Ontario were also used. MAIN MESSAGE Acute rheumatic fever is still a clinical entity in aboriginal communities in northwest Ontario. Identification, treatment, and secondary prophylaxis are necessary. CONCLUSION Acute rheumatic fever is not a forgotten disease and still exists in remote areas of Canada. PMID:19439697

  16. Weather conditions can influence rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Vergés, Josep; Montell, Eulàlia; Tomàs, Elena; Cumelles, Gemma; Castañeda, Guido; Marti, Núria; Möller, Ingrid

    2004-01-01

    In daily clinical practice, many patients attribute joint pain to weather conditions. There is little information published on this subject and most of it is contradictory. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of climatic conditions in rheumatic patients. The present work was carried out with patients attending the Instituto Poal de Reumatologia of Barcelona and the data were analyzed by Bioibérica Farma (Spain). It was a prospective, double-blind study including 92 patients with rheumatic disorders (80 with osteoarthritis, 12 with rheumatoid arthritis) compared to a control group of 42 subjects. The evaluation of pain (Huskisson VAS) and functional capacity (Health Assessment Questionnaire, HAQ) were determined daily during one month. The climatic variables studied were temperature, humidity and barometric pressure. The results obtained have been subject to binary regression analysis. Our data demonstrate that osteoarthritic patients experience increased joint pain in response to a decrease in pressure, indicating that low atmospheric pressure conditions exacerbate joint pain in these patients. Our work also suggests that some meteorological variables affect the occurrence of pain in rheumatoid arthritis, since we have found that low temperature increases the risk of joint pain. Therefore, these data suggest that in the future it may be possible to modulate pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments for some osteoarthritic patients depending on the predictable weather conditions in order to avoid, as much as possible, the disease-associated joint pain and functional incapacity, thus improving patients' quality of life.

  17. Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in Bangladesh: A review.

    PubMed

    Islam, A K M Monwarul; Majumder, A A S

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are the most-common cardiovascular disease in young people aged <25 years, globally. They are important contributors to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in Bangladesh. Classical risk factors, i.e. poverty, overcrowding, ignorance, and insufficient health care services were responsible for the high incidence and prevalence of these diseases over the last century. In concert with the progresses in socioeconomic indicators, advances in health sectors, improved public awareness, and antibiotic prophylaxis, acute RF came into control. However, chronic RHD continues to be prevalent, and the actual disease burden may be much higher. RHD predominantly affects the young adults, seriously incapacitates them, follows a protracted course, gets complicated because of delayed diagnosis and is sometimes maltreated. The treatment is often palliative and expensive. Large-scale epidemiological and clinical researches are needed to formulate evidence-based national policy to tackle this important public health issue in future. PMID:26896274

  18. The endocrine system and connective tissue disorders.

    PubMed

    McGuire, J L

    1990-01-01

    The face of many endocrine diseases is rapidly changing as early detection and intervention is achieved. Nevertheless, certain musculoskeletal symptoms can suggest a possible endocrinopathy. The clinician can expect the appearance of particular rheumatic problems during the course of a chronic endocrine disorder. This is especially germaine for diabetes and acromegaly, in which the disorder is controlled but not cured. Clearly hormones play a critical role in the development and expression of immunologic disease. Sex hormones and calcitriol have a direct effect on basic immunobiology (3). The rheumatoid synovium responds to parathyroid hormone and calcitriol in concert with local signals such as prostaglandins, interleukins, and interferon (2,77). Finally, the immune system plays a central role in the pathogenesis of several endocrine diseases. The thyroid diseases, Graves' disease and Hashimoto's disease are best studied. The mechanisms of Ia expression leading to immune destruction and lymphocytic infiltration of the gland will be applied to other endocrine disorders.

  19. The macrophages in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Laria, Antonella; Lurati, Alfredomaria; Marrazza, Mariagrazia; Mazzocchi, Daniela; Re, Katia Angela; Scarpellini, Magda

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages belong to the innate immune system giving us protection against pathogens. However it is known that they are also involved in rheumatic diseases. Activated macrophages have two different phenotypes related to different stimuli: M1 (classically activated) and M2 (alternatively activated). M1 macrophages release high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, reactive nitrogen and oxygen intermediates killing microorganisms and tumor cells; while M2 macrophages are involved in resolution of inflammation through phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils, reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and increased synthesis of mediators important in tissue remodeling, angiogenesis, and wound repair. The role of macrophages in the different rheumatic diseases is different according to their M1/M2 macrophages phenotype. PMID:26929657

  20. Fatigue in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sandıkçı, Sevinç Can; Özbalkan, Zeynep

    2015-01-01

    Fatigue is a common and important problem in many diseases including rheumatologic illnesses, and it has a negative impact on health-related quality of life. Fatigue is described as having an impact on multiple aspects of a patient’s life. There is a need for knowledge about causes of and treatments for fatigue to ensure that patient outcomes are improved. There are several effective treatment strategies available for fatigue including pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies. We aim to provide an overview of fatigue in rheumatologic disorders and some recommendations on its optimal management. PMID:27708942

  1. [The hand and rheumatism].

    PubMed

    Lioté, F; Chicheportiche, V

    1997-01-01

    The hand is a major site of musculoskeletal disorders. Clinical features to be studied include the patient's age and sex, pain, stiffness, range of motion of the various joints of the wrists and hands, soft tissue swelling (particularly tendons sheaths), bone excrescences, skin changes. Radiological abnormalities in the hands, if any, may confirm the clinical diagnosis. The main features of rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, psoriatic arthritis, erosive degenerative changes, Südeck syndrome, calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease, etc., are reviewed. PMID:9810076

  2. [Oral infection and rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Procházková, Leona; Souček, Miroslav

    2014-02-01

    Periodontitis (PD) is one of the most common infectious diseases of dental attachment. From epidemiological studies there is known association of periodontitis with chronic diseases as for example diabetes mellitus, cardiovacular diseases, atherosclerosis or Crohn disease. In last decade there is an increasing evidence for association of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontitis also. RA and PD have some common genetic, environmental and immunopathological characters. Important aspect of reciprocal relationship is also ability to citrullination, which is innate to one of most important oral patogen - Porphyromonas gingivalis. Citrullination and production of autoantibodies against this modified proteins is one the important pathophysiological actions in course of RA. Recently, there has been published papers drawing attention to potential influence of periodontitis therapy to course and activity of RA. Furthermore there appear some information pointing to possible association between PD and other rheumatic diseases as for exam-ple spondyloarthritis. Interrelationship between PD and rheumatic diseases thus stay important and still open question in research of pathophysiology, course and therapeutic possibilities of rheumatic diseases. PMID:24754417

  3. Mucosal immunology

    PubMed Central

    Bienenstock, J.; Befus, A. D.

    1980-01-01

    In this review, we shall highlight some recent advances in mucosal immunology and also those concepts which seem to us to merit more attention than they normally receive. Since we cannot hope to be all inclusive, we recommend the following articles and books to the reader (Tomasi & Bienenstock, 1968; Tomasi & Grey, 1972; Bienenstock, 1974; Heremans, 1974; Mestecky & Lawton, 1974; Lamm, 1976; Tomasi, 1976; Waksman & Ozer, 1976; Porter & Knight, 1977; McGhee, Mestecky & Babb, 1978; Ogra & Dayton, 1979; Befus & Bienenstock, 1980). PMID:7002769

  4. Acupuncture in the Treatment of Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Amezaga Urruela, Matxalen; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E.

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture has been used for millennia in traditional Chinese medicine as a technique believed to restore the balance of energy in the body caused by disease through the use of needles inserted into specific points or energy channels. This energy is called the De qi. The use of acupuncture for the treatment of pain in musculoskeletal disorders is increasing. Some patients seek alternative therapies because of lack of improvement with conventional treatments. The potential physiological effects of acupuncture on pain relief have been attributed to biochemical processes such as the release of endorphins into the limbic structures, subcortical areas and brain stem, mechanisms that are also present in placebo-induced analgesia. In addition, pain relief with acupuncture is also associated with patient expectations, beliefs and interactions with their acupuncturists. In this review, we summarize the latest evidence on the treatment of musculoskeletal conditions including rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, neck pain, shoulder pain, low back pain and knee pain with traditional Chinese acupuncture (TCA), electroacupuncture (EA), and the use of moxibustion. Acupuncture is relatively safe but there are still reports of serious and fatal side effects that must be taken into account when recommending this therapy. Many of the latest trials assessing the benefits of acupuncture in rheumatic diseases found that acupuncture was not better than sham acupuncture implying that the analgesic effects observed are related to a strong placebo response. While the literature on this topic is extensive, many of the studies lack methodological rigor, and additional large, well-controlled, high quality trials are still needed to determine if acupuncture might be useful in the treatment of chronic rheumatic diseases. PMID:23055010

  5. Lyme disease: a unique human model for an infectious etiology of rheumatic disease.

    PubMed Central

    Malawista, S. E.; Steere, A. C.; Hardin, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Lyme disease is a complex immune-mediated multi-system disorder that is infectious in origin and inflammatory or "rheumatic" in expression. Through its epidemiologic characteristics, large numbers of a seasonally synchronized patient population are readily available for prospective study. Lyme disease has a known clinical onset ("zero time"), marked by the characteristic expanding skin lesion, erythema chronicum migrans, and a clearly defined pre-articular phase. At least some manifestations of the disorder are responsive to antibiotics, and the causative agent--a spirochete--is now known. These advantages make Lyme disease unique as a human model for an infectious etiology of rheumatic disease. PMID:6516449

  6. Global research priorities in rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Carapetis, Jonathan R; Zühlke, Liesl J

    2011-01-01

    We now stand at a critical juncture for rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) control. In recent years, we have seen a surge of interest in these diseases in regions of the world where RF/RHD mostly occur. This brings real opportunities to make dramatic progress in the next few years, but also real risks if we miss these opportunities. Most public health and clinical approaches in RF/RHD arose directly from programmes of research. Many unanswered questions remain, including those around how to implement what we know will work, so research will continue to be essential in our efforts to bring a global solution to this disease. Here we outline our proposed research priorities in RF/RHD for the coming decade, grouped under the following four challenges: Translating what we know already into practical RHD control; How to identify people with RHD earlier, so that preventive measures have a higher chance of success; Better understanding of disease pathogenesis, with a view to improved diagnosis and treatment of ARF and RHD; and Finding an effective approach to primary prevention. We propose a mixture of basic, applied, and implementation science. With concerted efforts, strong links to clinical and public health infrastructure, and advocacy and funding support from the international community, there are good prospects for controlling these RF and RHD over the next decade.

  7. Rheumatic manifestations in diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Serban, AL; Udrea, GF

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM), a worldwide high prevalence disease, is associated with a large variety of rheumatic manifestations. For most of these affections, pathophysiologic correlations are not well established. Some of them, such as diabetic cheiroarthropathy, neuropathic arthritis, diabetic amyotrophy, diabetic muscle infraction, are considered intrinsic complications of DM. For others, like diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis or reflex sympathetic dystrophy, DM is considered a predisposing condition. In most cases, these affections cause pain and disability, affecting the quality of life of diabetic patients, but once correctly diagnosed, they often respond to the treatment, that generally requires a multidisciplinary team. This article reviews some epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of these conditions. PMID:23049626

  8. The problem of compliance in rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Walker, K G; Human, D G; De Moor, M M; Sprenger, K J

    1987-12-01

    During a 12-month period 115 patients defaulted from a rheumatic fever clinic, so a study was undertaken to identify factors related to non-compliance by comparing defaulters with a group of 50 regular attenders. Those defaulting were significantly more likely to be coloured, male, and over 12 years old. They lived 10-99 km from the hospital, were on several drugs and despite more frequent appointments, usually had a record of poor attendance. The severity of the underlying heart disease and use of parenteral penicillin did not affect compliance. Since the use of regular penicillin prophylaxis for the secondary prevention of rheumatic fever is an essential step in reducing the prevalence of rheumatic heart disease, rheumatic fever clinics should be structured to address the needs of adolescents. Furthermore, the use of neighbourhood clinics for routine therapy between visits to a rheumatic fever clinic is essential to improve compliance.

  9. [Immunomorphological characteristics of the synovial membrane in rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Radenska-Lopovok, S G

    2016-01-01

    The synovial membrane is frequently a target in rheumatic diseases. A search for diagnostic criteria and determination of changes in the pathological process necessitate standardized biopsy diagnostic techniques and quantification of morphological changes using digital imaging methods. The paper considers main methods for obtaining synovial membrane samples. It presents major morphological and immunohistochemical variations in synovitis in the presence of rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and osteoarthrosis. It shows different immunological and autoinflammatory mechanisms of these diseases. Synovial membrane inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and osteoarthrosis is characterized by different components of morphogenesis, which is proven by the expression of different cell markers. Rheumatoid synovitis is an autoinflammatory process; synovitis in ankylosing spondylitis is characterized by autoinflammatory processes; biomechanical factors as joint inflammation triggers are leading in osteoarthrosis. PMID:27600785

  10. [Rheumatic expression of secondary syphilis].

    PubMed

    Roque, R; Vinagre, F; Cordeiro, I; Gonçalves, P; Bartolo, E; Canas da Silva, J; Santos, M J

    2012-01-01

    Syphilis is a disease caused by Treponema pallidum infection with protean clinical manifestations. Musculoskeletal complaints are however uncommon and most of the time mild. Occasionally they can dominate the clinical picture and simulate a variety of rheumatic diseases. The authors present the clinical case of a 33-year-old woman who developed a lupus-like syndrome in the postpartum, characterized by polyarthritis, elevated acute phase reactants and positive antinuclear antibodies (ANA). Physical examination revealed a macular non-pruriginous skin rash involving the trunk, upper limbs and palms. The Rapid Plasma Reagin (RPR) and Treponema Pallidum Hemaglutination (TPHA) tests gave a positive result and the patient was diagnosed as secondary syphilis and medicated with 2.4 MU of benzathine penicillin intramuscular weekly for 3 weeks, with complete resolution of clinical signs and ANA negativation. The association of rash and arthritis may occur in several rheumatic diseases but in the presence of palmoplantar involvement, the possibility of syphilis infection should not be overlooked. PMID:23149640

  11. [Immunological markers of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Matuszewska, Agnieszka; Madej, Marta; Wiland, Piotr

    2016-03-25

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common connective tissue disease of autoimmune origin. The disease is characterized by chronic inflammation leading to bone erosions and organ involvement. RA is a progressive disease. It affects the quality of life, leading to disability and death mainly due to premature cardiovascular disease. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are essential for prognosis and quality of life improvement. In 2010 the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) established new RA classification criteria. Besides clinical symptoms it includes two immunologic criteria: rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (anti-CCP antibodies). RF is the first well-known RA immunologic marker. It is observed in 80-85% of patients with RA. Elevated serum level of RF has been associated with increased disease activity, radiographic progression, and the presence of extraarticular manifestations. The sensitivity of RF is 50-90%, and specificity is 50-95%. Anti-CCP antibodies appear to be a more specific marker than RF. They are often present at the very beginning of the disease, or even years before the first symptoms. The prognostic value of anti-CCP antibodies is well established. High serum level of anti-CCP correlates with poor prognosis and early erosions of the joints. The sensitivity of anti-CCP2 is 48-80%, and specificity is 96-98%. New immunologic markers include anti-carbamylated protein antibodies (anti-CarP) and antibodies against heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (anti-hnRNP A2/B1, RA33). Scientists aim to identify a highly sensitive and specific biomarker of the disease that not only has diagnostic and prognostic value but also may predict the response to treatment.

  12. 21 CFR 866.5240 - Complement components immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... tissues. Complement is a group of serum proteins which destroy infectious agents. Measurements of these proteins aids in the diagnosis of immunologic disorders, especially those associated with deficiencies...

  13. 21 CFR 866.5240 - Complement components immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... tissues. Complement is a group of serum proteins which destroy infectious agents. Measurements of these proteins aids in the diagnosis of immunologic disorders, especially those associated with deficiencies...

  14. Rheumatic fever & rheumatic heart disease: The last 50 years

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, R. Krishna; Tandon, R.

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) continue to be a major health hazard in most developing countries as well as sporadically in developed economies. Despite reservations about the utility, echocardiographic and Doppler (E&D) studies have identified a massive burden of RHD suggesting the inadequacy of the Jones’ criteria updated by the American Heart Association in 1992. Subclinical carditis has been recognized by E&D in patients with acute RF without clinical carditis as well as by follow up of RHD patients presenting as isolated chorea or those without clinical evidence of carditis. Over the years, the medical management of RF has not changed. Paediatric and juvenile mitral stenosis (MS), upto the age of 12 and 20 yr respectively, severe enough to require operative treatement was documented. These negate the belief that patients of RHD become symptomatic ≥20 years after RF as well as the fact that congestive cardiac failure in childhood indicates active carditis and RF. Non-surgical balloon mitral valvotomy for MS has been initiated. Mitral and/or aortic valve replacement during active RF in patients not responding to medical treatment has been found to be life saving as well as confirming that congestive heart failure in acute RF is due to an acute haemodynamic overload. Pathogenesis as well as susceptibility to RF continue to be elusive. Prevention of RF morbidity depends on secondary prophylaxis which cannot reduce the burden of diseases. Primary prophylaxis is not feasible in the absence of a suitable vaccine. Attempts to design an antistreptococcal vaccine utilizing the M-protein has not succeeded in the last 40 years. Besides pathogenesis many other questions remain unanswered. PMID:23703332

  15. The emergency room in systemic rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Slobodin, G; Hussein, A; Rozenbaum, M; Rosner, I

    2006-01-01

    Complications of systemic rheumatic diseases frequently have protean manifestations and may present a diagnostic problem. Patients with connective tissue diseases and vasculitides may have dangerous or life threatening conditions, which must be recognised and treated promptly to prevent rapidly evolving morbidity and mortality. Knowledge of possible emergencies in the context of a defined rheumatic disease may aid in promoting a high index of suspicion and contribute significantly to the timely diagnosis of many potentially dangerous conditions. This review is written for the emergency room physician and discusses the early recognition of selected emergencies in the context of a defined rheumatic disease. PMID:16921075

  16. [Cardiovascular disease in rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Nasonov, E L; Popkova, T V; Novikova, D S

    2016-01-01

    The representatives of immunoinflammatory diseases are rheumatic ones, such as primarily rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, spondyloarthritis, psoriatic arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and other systemic connective diseases, which are characterized by a high risk for untimely death. The high risk of untimely death in these diseases has been found to be associated with the severity of an immunoinflammatory process that gives rise to severe irreversible damage to vital organs and systems and with the development of a wide spectrum of comorbidities (infections, interstitial lung disease, malignant tumors, osteoporotic fractures, etc.). Among them, diseases of the cardiovascular system, which are most commonly caused by the early development and.accelerated progression of atherosclerotic coronary lesions, hold a central.position. The paper gives the data available in the recent literature on the impact.of antirheumatic therapy (disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and biological agents) on' the cardiovascular system. PMID:27458622

  17. Reproductive immunology.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Ole B

    2013-08-01

    Much research has been done to investigate why the fetus in most pregnancies, in spite of being semi-allogenic, is not rejected by the immune system. Experiments in transgenic mice have suggested that dysfunctions in both the innate immune system (NK cells) and the adaptive immune system (T-cells and T regulatory cells) result in increased fetal loss rate. Many studies have suggested that women with pathological pregnancies such as recurrent miscarriages have signs of generally exaggerated inflammatory immune responses both before and during pregnancy and signs of breakage of tolerance to autoantigens and fetal antigens. In addition, several abnormalities of innate immune responses seem to characterize women with pathological pregnancies. These abnormalities involve disadvantageous interactions between uterine NK cells and HLA-G and HLA-C on the trophoblast that may have pro-inflammatory effects. Also, humoral factors belonging to the innate immune system such as mannose-binding lectin seem to be associated with pregnancy outcome probably by modifying the level of inflammation at the feto-maternal interface. The pro-inflammatory conditions at the feto-maternal interface characterizing pathological pregnancy are suggested to predispose to adaptive immunological processes against alloantigens on the trophoblast that may further increase the risk of pathological pregnancy outcome. The best documented adaptive immune reaction against fetal alloantigens is directed against male-specific minor histocompatibility (HY) antigens. Anti-HY immunity seems to play a role especially in women with secondary recurrent miscarriage.

  18. Social implications of rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Kłak, Anna; Raciborski, Filip; Samel-Kowalik, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Social consequences of a disease constitute limitations in performing roles relating to working life as well as family and social life caused by the disease, mainly chronic. The aim of the study was to analyze the social consequences of rheumatic diseases in the aspect of disability pensions with respect to incapacity for work and quality of life. The occurrence of rheumatic diseases is related not only to increased risk of different types of organic changes, but above all disability. In Europe almost 50% of persons suffering from diseases of the musculoskeletal system who are currently unemployed were breadwinners. Nearly 60% of them received legal disability status. The loss of work ability is, among other things, the consequence of progressive disability. In Europe 40% of persons suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) had to stop working due to the disease. Most of the persons diagnosed with RA were of working age. It results in the decrease in the quality of life as well as economic difficulties (decreased incomes and increased disease-related costs). In Poland the results of the analysis of the Social Insurance Institution (ZUS) of first-time disability recognition issued for the purpose of disability pensions in 2014 showed that the incapacity for work was caused by diseases relating to general health condition (65.5%). Diseases of the musculoskeletal system were the cause of partial inability to work of 21.6% of persons who received a disability pension for the first time (as many as 5,349 certificates were issued). Early diagnosis and implementation of effective treatment are the necessary conditions for a patient to sustain activity, both professional and social, which is of crucial importance to reduce the negative effects of the disease. PMID:27407283

  19. Social implications of rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Raciborski, Filip; Samel-Kowalik, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Social consequences of a disease constitute limitations in performing roles relating to working life as well as family and social life caused by the disease, mainly chronic. The aim of the study was to analyze the social consequences of rheumatic diseases in the aspect of disability pensions with respect to incapacity for work and quality of life. The occurrence of rheumatic diseases is related not only to increased risk of different types of organic changes, but above all disability. In Europe almost 50% of persons suffering from diseases of the musculoskeletal system who are currently unemployed were breadwinners. Nearly 60% of them received legal disability status. The loss of work ability is, among other things, the consequence of progressive disability. In Europe 40% of persons suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) had to stop working due to the disease. Most of the persons diagnosed with RA were of working age. It results in the decrease in the quality of life as well as economic difficulties (decreased incomes and increased disease-related costs). In Poland the results of the analysis of the Social Insurance Institution (ZUS) of first-time disability recognition issued for the purpose of disability pensions in 2014 showed that the incapacity for work was caused by diseases relating to general health condition (65.5%). Diseases of the musculoskeletal system were the cause of partial inability to work of 21.6% of persons who received a disability pension for the first time (as many as 5,349 certificates were issued). Early diagnosis and implementation of effective treatment are the necessary conditions for a patient to sustain activity, both professional and social, which is of crucial importance to reduce the negative effects of the disease. PMID:27407283

  20. Social implications of rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Kłak, Anna; Raciborski, Filip; Samel-Kowalik, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Social consequences of a disease constitute limitations in performing roles relating to working life as well as family and social life caused by the disease, mainly chronic. The aim of the study was to analyze the social consequences of rheumatic diseases in the aspect of disability pensions with respect to incapacity for work and quality of life. The occurrence of rheumatic diseases is related not only to increased risk of different types of organic changes, but above all disability. In Europe almost 50% of persons suffering from diseases of the musculoskeletal system who are currently unemployed were breadwinners. Nearly 60% of them received legal disability status. The loss of work ability is, among other things, the consequence of progressive disability. In Europe 40% of persons suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) had to stop working due to the disease. Most of the persons diagnosed with RA were of working age. It results in the decrease in the quality of life as well as economic difficulties (decreased incomes and increased disease-related costs). In Poland the results of the analysis of the Social Insurance Institution (ZUS) of first-time disability recognition issued for the purpose of disability pensions in 2014 showed that the incapacity for work was caused by diseases relating to general health condition (65.5%). Diseases of the musculoskeletal system were the cause of partial inability to work of 21.6% of persons who received a disability pension for the first time (as many as 5,349 certificates were issued). Early diagnosis and implementation of effective treatment are the necessary conditions for a patient to sustain activity, both professional and social, which is of crucial importance to reduce the negative effects of the disease.

  1. Enhancing the care of women with rheumatic diseases during pregnancy: challenges and unmet needs in the Middle East.

    PubMed

    Al-Emadi, S; Abutiban, F; El Zorkany, B; Ziade, N; Al-Herz, A; Al-Maini, M; Khan, B; Ghanem, A; Al Rayes, H; Al Saleh, J; Al-Osaimi, H; Østensen, M

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy in women with rheumatic disorders is known to be associated with risks for both the mother and fetus; however, these risks can be minimized with proper planning and careful management of the disease. In the Middle East, there are specific cultural challenges that may have a negative impact on the care that women with rheumatic disorders receive. There is a need for cross-collaboration between specialist physicians, improved awareness of rheumatic disorders among the general public and more open discussion with patients about the potential complications of pregnancy. Women in the region are often unwilling to discuss their disease with their partner and are even less likely to seek advice regarding family planning from their physician. The objective of this review is to highlight the specific challenges of pregnancy management and to discuss why establishing specialist pregnancy clinics for women with rheumatic disorders could be an effective solution. Such clinics can provide high quality care before, during and after pregnancy as shown in several European and US centers. Additionally, such clinics could be useful for the collection of pregnancy outcomes data from the Middle East, which may currently be lacking in the region, in order to highlight where further improvements can be made. With specialist care and analysis of pregnancy outcomes, the standard of care for women with rheumatic disorders in this area could be significantly improved.

  2. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin as a novel mediator amplifying immunopathology in rheumatic disease.

    PubMed

    Hillen, Maarten R; Radstake, Timothy R D J; Hack, Cornelis E; van Roon, Joel A G

    2015-10-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is an IL-7-related cytokine that has been studied extensively in atopic diseases and more recently in various rheumatic disorders. It is involved in T cell development in the thymus and promotes homeostatic T cell expansion by classical dendritic cells. However, deregulated TSLP expression in various rheumatic diseases has implicated this cytokine as a strong mediator in immunopathology. Overexpressed TSLP induces strong T cell activation and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in human cells and animal models for RA, SSc and LN, underscoring the therapeutic potential of targeting the TSLP-TSLP receptor axis.

  3. Rheumatic manifestations of hepatitis C virus chronic infection: Indications for a correct diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Palazzi, Carlo; D’Amico, Emilio; D’Angelo, Salvatore; Gilio, Michele; Olivieri, Ignazio

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a hepato- and lymphotropic agent that is able to induce several autoimmune rheumatic disorders: vasculitis, sicca syndrome, arthralgias/arthritis and fibromyalgia. The severity of clinical manifestations is variable and sometimes life-threatening. HCV infection can mimic many primitive rheumatic diseases, therefore, it is mandatory to distinguish HCV-related manifestations from primitive ones because the prognosis and therapeutic strategies can be fairly dissimilar. The new direct-acting antivirals drugs can help to avoid the well-known risks of worsening or new onset of autoimmune diseases during the traditional interferon-based therapies. PMID:26819509

  4. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin as a novel mediator amplifying immunopathology in rheumatic disease.

    PubMed

    Hillen, Maarten R; Radstake, Timothy R D J; Hack, Cornelis E; van Roon, Joel A G

    2015-10-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is an IL-7-related cytokine that has been studied extensively in atopic diseases and more recently in various rheumatic disorders. It is involved in T cell development in the thymus and promotes homeostatic T cell expansion by classical dendritic cells. However, deregulated TSLP expression in various rheumatic diseases has implicated this cytokine as a strong mediator in immunopathology. Overexpressed TSLP induces strong T cell activation and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in human cells and animal models for RA, SSc and LN, underscoring the therapeutic potential of targeting the TSLP-TSLP receptor axis. PMID:26163286

  5. Th9 lymphocytes: A recent history from IL-9 to its potential role in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Zuleta, Wilmer Gerardo; Vásquez, Gloria

    2016-07-01

    Various subtypes of effector T cells have been described up to date, and each one has its specific immunological function and a defined cytokine secretion profile. Th9 lymphocytes, recently described, are characterized by a high IL-9 expression. Their differentiation requires the integration of IL-4 and TGF-β signaling pathways and the coordinated participation of multiple transcription factors. Their role has been mainly found in immunity against parasites and in allergic inflammatory processes. Nevertheless, they have been implicated in processes as autoimmunity, cancer and recently in rheumatic diseases. The objective of this review is to describe the discovery of this cellular subtype, its differentiation, expression regulation and its potential role in rheumatic diseases.

  6. X-ray atlas of rheumatic diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Dihlmann, W.

    1986-01-01

    This atlas comprises instructive X-rays of the various inflammatory rheumatic joint diseases in all stages at the extremities and the spinal column. In addition, the complex pattern of the wide range of arthroses, also known as degenerative rheumatic disease is included. Besides the instructive pointers to X-ray diagnosis, the book is also a guide to differential diagnosis. Hence, this book is actually an X-ray atlas of joint diseases in general. Selected Contents: Introduction: What Does ''Rheumatism'' Actually Mean./Radiographic Methodology in Rheumatic Diseases of the Locomotor System/The Mosaic of Arthritis/Adult Rheumatoid Arthritis/Seronegative Spondylarthritis/Classic Collagen Diseases/Enthesiopathies/Gout-Pseudogout

  7. Endothelial progenitor cell dysfunction in rheumatic disease.

    PubMed

    Westerweel, Peter E; Verhaar, Marianne C

    2009-06-01

    Rheumatic disease is characterized by inflammation and endothelial dysfunction, which contribute to accelerated atherosclerosis. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) can restore dysfunctional endothelium and thereby protect against atherosclerotic vascular disease. The number and function of EPCs are, however, affected in rheumatic diseases such as psoriatic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated vasculitis. rheumatic disease is often characterized by decreased numbers, and impaired function, of EPCs, although numbers of these cells might increase during the initial years of systemic sclerosis. Pioneering studies show that EPC dysfunction might be improved with pharmacological treatment. How best to restore EPC function, and whether achieving this aim can prevent long-term cardiovascular complications in rheumatic disease, remain to be established.

  8. A history of pediatric immunology.

    PubMed

    Stiehm, E Richard; Johnston, Richard B

    2005-03-01

    Immunology has played a prominent role in the history of medicine. Pediatric immunologists have focused on immune aberrations in pediatric disorders, particularly those involving host defense mechanisms. These efforts have paid rich dividends in terms of fundamental knowledge of the immune system and major therapeutic advances, including 1) i.v. immunoglobulin therapy, 2) hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and 3) gene therapy. Pediatric immunology as an organized discipline emerged in the early 1950s, when pediatricians and their basic scientist colleagues began to focus on clinical and basic research related to immunodeficiency. Since then, key organizations and infrastructure have been developed to support this research and the clinical care of immunodeficient patients. We review here the evolution of contemporary pediatric immunology, particularly in North America, from its roots in 19th-century Europe to its current expression as one of the fundamental scientific and clinical disciplines of pediatrics.

  9. Sarcoidosis: Immunopathogenesis and Immunological Markers

    PubMed Central

    Loke, Wei Sheng Joshua; Herbert, Cristan; Thomas, Paul S.

    2013-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disorder invariably affecting the lungs. It is a disease with noteworthy variations in clinical manifestation and disease outcome and has been described as an “immune paradox” with peripheral anergy despite exaggerated inflammation at disease sites. Despite extensive research, sarcoidosis remains a disease with undetermined aetiology. Current evidence supports the notion that the immune response in sarcoidosis is driven by a putative antigen in a genetically susceptible individual. Unfortunately, there currently exists no reliable biomarker to delineate the disease severity and prognosis. As such, the diagnosis of sarcoidosis remains a vexing clinical challenge. In this review, we outline the immunological features of sarcoidosis, discuss the evidence for and against various candidate etiological agents (infective and noninfective), describe the exhaled breath condensate, a novel method of identifying immunological biomarkers, and suggest other possible immunological biomarkers to better characterise the immunopathogenesis of sarcoidosis. PMID:26464848

  10. [Music for rheumatism--a historical overview].

    PubMed

    Evers, S

    1990-01-01

    The history of the use of music to lessen the pain of rheumatism is seen in the use of musical therapy in medicine as a whole. Sources citing the use of music specifically in rheumatism are rare; often, rather than rheumatism, terms like "gout (podagra)" or "joint-pain" are mentioned. This is connected with the obscure and pathognomic perceptions of rheumatism. In the archeo-medicine and for primitive cultures the considered potency of music was primarily dominated by animistic thinking. In antiquity humoral pathology developed a philosophy that tried to explain the benefits of music, even for rheumatism, but found little acceptance. In the Middle Ages and in the Baroque period iatromechanistic conceptions determined music as useful in fight against pain. In the Romantic period there was speculation about music as a causal therapy, but it was shortlived. In the 20th century music is applied as an active therapy in the care of persons suffering from rheumatism; its empiric success as a remedy in rehabilitative and palliative therapy is recognized. PMID:2198738

  11. The interplay of nature versus nurture in predisposition to the rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Reveille, J D

    1993-02-01

    The revolution in microbiology and genetics that has transpired in the past few years has brought fresh debate in the question of the relative contributions of nature and nurture in susceptibility to the rheumatic diseases. For nature, a variety of immunologically relevant genes have been identified whose presence has been shown to be associated either with an increased risk for certain diseases or for complications or subsets thereof. For nurture, the role of infectious agents in disease triggering and modification has been found. PMID:8356249

  12. Virtual Immunology: Software for Teaching Basic Immunology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berçot, Filipe Faria; Fidalgo-Neto, Antônio Augusto; Lopes, Renato Matos; Faggioni, Thais; Alves, Luiz Anastácio

    2013-01-01

    As immunology continues to evolve, many educational methods have found difficulty in conveying the degree of complexity inherent in its basic principles. Today, the teaching-learning process in such areas has been improved with tools such as educational software. This article introduces "Virtual Immunology," a software program available…

  13. Exercise as an anti-inflammatory therapy for rheumatic diseases-myokine regulation.

    PubMed

    Benatti, Fabiana B; Pedersen, Bente K

    2015-02-01

    Persistent systemic inflammation, a typical feature of inflammatory rheumatic diseases, is associated with a high cardiovascular risk and predisposes to metabolic disorders and muscle wasting. These disorders can lead to disability and decreased physical activity, exacerbating inflammation and the development of a network of chronic diseases, thus establishing a 'vicious cycle' of chronic inflammation. During the past two decades, advances in research have shed light on the role of exercise as a therapy for rheumatic diseases. One of the most important of these advances is the discovery that skeletal muscle communicates with other organs by secreting proteins called myokines. Some myokines are thought to induce anti-inflammatory responses with each bout of exercise and mediate long-term exercise-induced improvements in cardiovascular risk factors, having an indirect anti-inflammatory effect. Therefore, contrary to fears that physical activity might aggravate inflammatory pathways, exercise is now believed to be a potential treatment for patients with rheumatic diseases. In this Review, we discuss how exercise disrupts the vicious cycle of chronic inflammation directly, after each bout of exercise, and indirectly, by improving comorbidities and cardiovascular risk factors. We also discuss the mechanisms by which some myokines have anti-inflammatory functions in inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

  14. Immune System and Its Link to Rheumatic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Immune System & Its Link to Rheumatic Disease The Immune System and Its Link to Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts ... of a vessel of the body). What’s the immune system? The immune system allows us to identify and ...

  15. Immunology of malignant diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Byers, V.S.; Baldwin, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Immunoscintigraphy: tumor detection with radiolabelled antitumor monoclonal antibodies; Bone marrow transplantation; Immunomodulating agents; Immunology in bowel cancer; Melanoma; and Immunological features of human bladder cancer.

  16. Acute Rheumatic Fever in Los Angeles County

    PubMed Central

    Propp, Richard P.

    1965-01-01

    There was a general downward trend in the reported incidence of acute rheumatic fever in Los Angeles County during the years 1954-1963. A survey of hospital records in five large hospitals in 1962 revealed 100 cases diagnosed, 39 of which were reported. Diagnoses in the charts reviewed conformed to the Modified Jones Criteria. Most of the patients were born in Los Angeles County. Mortality rates for acute rheumatic fever during the same period were greatly in excess of those expected from the reported morbidity. The mean crude mortality rate for the period concerned was higher than for New York City, although not as high as for Boston. Acute rheumatic fever appears to constitute a health problem in need of review in Los Angeles County. PMID:5834286

  17. Neoplastic associations of rheumatic diseases and rheumatic manifestations of cancer.

    PubMed

    Benedek, T G

    1988-05-01

    Associations between rheumatic diseases and malignant neoplasms are still inferential and based largely on epidemiologic data. Rheumatoid arthritis predisposes weakly to the occurrence of lymphoreticular neoplasms. This is more clearly true of Sjögren's disease, whether or not it is associated with RA. A subset of DM/PM which becomes manifest in close temporal proximity to a neoplasm may be a paraneoplastic reaction, but DM/PM, in general, does not predispose to neoplasia. Scleroderma in its early phase is associated with the development of breast cancer in women, and after a decade or longer, if pulmonary fibrosis has developed, with lung cancer. Of the drugs that have been used to treat these diseases, cyclophosphamide is most strongly implicated as a carcinogenic agent, particularly inducing lymphoreticular neoplasms and carcinoma of the bladder. Musculoskeletal symptoms that may be clues to the existence of cancer may either be caused by invasion of the neoplasm or be mediated by unidentified neurohumoral mechanisms. Except for multiple myeloma, primary neoplasms of skeletal tissues tend to occur under the age of 50 years. Metastatic disease occurs congruently with the age incidence of the primary neoplasm. Metastases may mimic mono- or oligoarticular arthritis if they happen to be periarticular or synovial. These metastases result most often from carcinoma of the lung or, in women, carcinoma of the breast. Hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy usually is due to carcinomas of the lung other than the small cell variety, and infrequently from other intrathoracic primary or secondary neoplasms. RA may be mimicked. Both skeletal metastases and HPOA are detected with greater sensitivity, but not specificity, by isotopic scanning techniques than by radiography. Of the other paraneoplastic musculoskeletal syndromes, neuromyopathy is the most frequent. It must be distinguished from cachexia, polymyositis, polymyalgia rheumatica, and the myasthenic syndrome. Both

  18. Air pollution in autoimmune rheumatic diseases: a review.

    PubMed

    Farhat, Sylvia C L; Silva, Clovis A; Orione, Maria Angelica M; Campos, Lucia M A; Sallum, Adriana M E; Braga, Alfésio L F

    2011-11-01

    Air pollution consists of a heterogeneous mixture of gasses and particles that include carbon monoxide, nitrates, sulfur dioxide, ozone, lead, toxic by-product of tobacco smoke and particulate matter. Oxidative stress and inflammation induced by inhaled pollutants may result in acute and chronic disorders in the respiratory system, as well as contribute to a state of systemic inflammation and autoimmunity. This paper reviews the mechanisms of air contaminants influencing the immune response and autoimmunity, and it focuses on studies of inhaled pollutants triggering and/or exacerbating rheumatic diseases in cities around the world. Remarkably, environmental factors contribute to the onset of autoimmune diseases, especially smoking and occupational exposure to silica in rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Other diseases such as scleroderma may be triggered by the inhalation of chemical solvents, herbicides and silica. Likewise, primary vasculitis associated with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) may be triggered by silica exposure. Only few studies showed that air pollutants could trigger or exacerbate juvenile idiopathic arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. In contrast, no studies of tropospheric pollution triggering inflammatory myopathies and spondyloarthropathies were carried out. In conclusion, air pollution is one of the environmental factors involved in systemic inflammation and autoimmunity. Further studies are needed in order to evaluate air pollutants and their potentially serious effects on autoimmune rheumatic diseases and the mechanisms involved in the onset and the exacerbation of these diseases.

  19. Antinuclear antibodies in rheumatic disease: a proposal for a function-based classification.

    PubMed

    Pisetsky, D S

    2012-09-01

    Antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) are a diverse group of autoantibodies that bind macromolecular components of the cell nucleus. While some ANAs occur in normal individuals, others are expressed almost exclusively in patients with rheumatic disease and serve as markers for diagnosis and prognosis. Despite the clinical associations of ANAs, the relationship of these antibodies to specific disease manifestations is often unknown because the target antigens are intracellular molecules that are ubiquitously expressed. In systemic lupus erythematosus, the role of ANAs in disease manifestations is better understood, especially for antibodies to DNA and related nucleosomal antigens. These antibodies can promote nephritis by the formation of immune complexes that are deposited in the kidney. In addition, anti-DNA, along with antibodies to RNA-binding proteins such as anti-Sm, can induce non-specific immune abnormalities based on the induction of type interferon 1 by plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Despite ANA expression in rheumatic disease, studies in animal models of inflammation and tissue injury indicate that antibodies to certain nuclear molecules such as HMGB1 have protective effects. Together, these considerations suggest a function-based classification of ANAs based on their expression in normal and autoimmune individuals as well as their capacity to induce or attenuate immunological disturbances. This classification provides a framework to elucidate the serological features of rheumatic disease and the often uncertain relationship between ANA expression and disease manifestations.

  20. Osteopathic treatment considerations for rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Tettambel, M A

    2001-04-01

    Patients who receive medical care for musculoskeletal pain of rheumatic diseases often benefit from additional osteopathic manipulative treatment. This article offers a brief description of commonly used treatment modalities. It also includes discussion of indications as well as contraindications of operator-director versus operator-monitored techniques.

  1. Virtual immunology: software for teaching basic immunology.

    PubMed

    Berçot, Filipe Faria; Fidalgo-Neto, Antônio Augusto; Lopes, Renato Matos; Faggioni, Thais; Alves, Luiz Anastácio

    2013-01-01

    As immunology continues to evolve, many educational methods have found difficulty in conveying the degree of complexity inherent in its basic principles. Today, the teaching-learning process in such areas has been improved with tools such as educational software. This article introduces "Virtual Immunology," a software program available free of charge in Portuguese and English, which can be used by teachers and students in physiology, immunology, and cellular biology classes. We discuss the development of the initial two modules: "Organs and Lymphoid Tissues" and "Inflammation" and the use of interactive activities to provide microscopic and macroscopic understanding in immunology. Students, both graduate and undergraduate, were questioned along with university level professors about the quality of the software and intuitiveness of use, facility of navigation, and aesthetic organization using a Likert scale. An overwhelmingly satisfactory result was obtained with both students and immunology teachers. Programs such as "Virtual Immunology" are offering more interactive, multimedia approaches to complex scientific principles that increase student motivation, interest, and comprehension.

  2. Birth of the science of immunology.

    PubMed

    Schmalstieg, Frank C; Goldman, Armond S

    2010-05-01

    The science of immunology emerged in the last of the 19th and the first of the 20th century. Substantial progress in physics, chemistry and microbiology was essential for its development. Indeed, microorganisms became one of the principal investigative tools of the major founders of that science - Louis Pasteur, Robert Koch, Ilya Ilich Metchnikoff, Paul Ehrlich and Jules Bordet. It is pertinent that these pioneering scientists were born when questioning and exploration were encouraged because of the legacies of the previous century of enlightenment. Mentors greatly aided their development. Their discoveries were shaped by their individual personalities. In turn they developed other contributors to the nascent field. Their discoveries included the types of leukocytes, the roles of neutrophils in inflammation and defence, cellular lysis due to complement, the principles of humoral and cellular immunology, passive and active immunization, tissue antigens, anaphylaxis, anaphylactoid reactions and autoimmunity. Their work formed the basis of modern immunology that developed many decades later. Immunology has enormously impacted our understanding of the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of infections, immune-mediated disorders and inflammation. Burgeoning advances forecast further important clinical applications of immunology. Yet, their applications will be problematic because few physicians sufficiently understand the science. We propose that understanding modern immunology requires a grasp of how that science developed - who made the discoveries, how they were made, their successes and failures, their interactions and debates all reveal the foundation of modern immunology.

  3. Ocular diseases: immunological and molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jing; Huang, Yi-Fei; Zhang, Wen-Jing; Chen, Xiao-Fei; Guo, Yu-Mian

    2016-01-01

    Many factors, such as environmental, microbial and endogenous stress, antigen localization, can trigger the immunological events that affect the ending of the diverse spectrum of ocular disorders. Significant advances in understanding of immunological and molecular mechanisms have been researched to improve the diagnosis and therapy for patients with ocular inflammatory diseases. Some kinds of ocular diseases are inadequately responsive to current medications; therefore, immunotherapy may be a potential choice as an alternative or adjunctive treatment, even in the prophylactic setting. This article first provides an overview of the immunological and molecular mechanisms concerning several typical and common ocular diseases; second, the functions of immunological roles in some of systemic autoimmunity will be discussed; third, we will provide a summary of the mechanisms that dictate immune cell trafficking to ocular local microenvironment in response to inflammation. PMID:27275439

  4. Bioboosters in the treatment of rheumatic diseases: a comprehensive review of currently available biologics in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cantini, Fabrizio; Nannini, Carlotta; Niccoli, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Immunologic research has clarified many aspects of the pathogenesis of inflammatory rheumatic disorders. Biologic drugs acting on different steps of the immune response, including cytokines, B- and T-cell lymphocytes, have been marketed over the past 10 years for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of anti-cytokine agents in RA (including the anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) drugs infliximab, etanercept, adalimumab, golimumab, certolizumab, anti-interleukin (IL)-1 anakinra, and anti-IL-6 tocilizumab) demonstrated a significant efficacy compared to traditional therapies, if combined with methotrexate (MTX), as measured by ACR 20, 50 and 70 response criteria. The new therapies have also been demonstrated to be superior to MTX in slowing or halting articular damage. RCTs have shown the efficacy of anti-TNFα in AS patients through significant improvement of symptoms and function. Trials of anti-TNFα in PsA patients showed marked improvement of articular symptoms for psoriasis and radiological disease progression. More recent studies have demonstrated the efficacy of B-cell depletion with rituximab, and T-cell inactivation with abatacept. All these drugs have a satisfactory safety profile. This paper reviews the different aspects of efficacy and tolerability of biologics in the therapy of RA, AS, and PsA.

  5. Introduction to immunology and autoimmunity.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D A; Germolec, D R

    1999-01-01

    Autoimmune disease occurs when the immune system attacks self-molecules as a result of a breakdown of immunologic tolerance to autoreactive immune cells. Many autoimmune disorders have been strongly associated with genetic, infectious, and/or environmental predisposing factors. Comprising multiple disorders and symptoms ranging from organ-specific to systemic, autoimmune diseases include insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, thyroiditis, and multiple sclerosis. There are also implications of autoimmune pathology in such common health problems as arteriosclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, schizophrenia, and certain types of infertility. Largely of unknown etiology, autoimmune disorders affect approximately 3% of the North American and European populations, > 75% of those affected being women. This discussion provides a brief introduction to the immune system and tolerance maintenance, an overview of selected autoimmune diseases and possible mechanisms of immune autoreactivity, and a review of experimental autoimmune models. PMID:10502528

  6. Movement and Other Neurodegenerative Syndromes in Patients with Systemic Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Menezes, Rikitha; Pantelyat, Alexander; Izbudak, Izlem; Birnbaum, Julius

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Patients with rheumatic diseases can present with movement and other neurodegenerative disorders. It may be underappreciated that movement and other neurodegenerative disorders can encompass a wide variety of disease entities. Such disorders are strikingly heterogeneous and lead to a wider spectrum of clinical injury than seen in Parkinson's disease. Therefore, we sought to stringently phenotype movement and other neurodegenerative disorders presenting in a case series of rheumatic disease patients. We integrated our findings with a review of the literature to understand mechanisms which may account for such a ubiquitous pattern of clinical injury. Seven rheumatic disease patients (5 Sjögren's syndrome patients, 2 undifferentiated connective tissue disease patients) were referred and could be misdiagnosed as having Parkinson's disease. However, all of these patients were ultimately diagnosed as having other movement or neurodegenerative disorders. Findings inconsistent with and more expansive than Parkinson's disease included cerebellar degeneration, dystonia with an alien-limb phenomenon, and nonfluent aphasias. A notable finding was that individual patients could be affected by cooccurring movement and other neurodegenerative disorders, each of which could be exceptionally rare (ie, prevalence of ∼1:1000), and therefore with the collective probability that such disorders were merely coincidental and causally unrelated being as low as ∼1-per-billion. Whereas our review of the literature revealed that ubiquitous patterns of clinical injury were frequently associated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings suggestive of a widespread vasculopathy, our patients did not have such neuroimaging findings. Instead, our patients could have syndromes which phenotypically resembled paraneoplastic and other inflammatory disorders which are known to be associated with antineuronal antibodies. We similarly identified immune-mediated and inflammatory markers

  7. [Acute rheumatic fever: problems and outlooks].

    PubMed

    Belov, B S

    2003-01-01

    The issue related with acute rheumatic fever still remains to be topical at the present stage, which is accentuated by a high prevalence of rheumatic heart diseases. The results of multiple studies point out at the presence of "rheumatogenetic" A-streptococcal strains possessing certain biological properties. Although there were no changes in the disease semiotics, the intensity degree of clinical signs went down, due to which an early diagnosis of the disease became more complicated. The issues related with the nosological classification of post-streptococcal reactive arthritis and with PANDAS syndrome need to be solved. There is also an urgent necessity in creating high-technological domestic benzathine-penicillins intended for secondary prevention of the disease.

  8. The New Cellular Immunology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claman, Henry N.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the nature of the immune response and traces many of the discoveries that have led to the present state of knowledge in immunology. The new cellular immunology is directing its efforts toward improving health by proper manipulation of the immune mechanisms of the body. (JR)

  9. Rheumatic heart disease and its control in the Pacific.

    PubMed

    Colquhoun, Samantha M; Carapetis, Jonathan R; Kado, Joseph H; Steer, Andrew C

    2009-12-01

    Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease continue to be a huge public-health burden on many Pacific Island countries. Prevalence reported in some nations are some of the highest seen globally, yet many countries in the region do not have national disease registers. Despite the will of many Pacific Island countries, there are a number of barriers to the implementation and sustainability of effective coordinated prevention programs, including limited funding and competing health priorities. In promising recent developments, a number of countries in the region have been able to develop or strengthen national rheumatic heart disease registers. These registers allow for more effective delivery of secondary prophylaxis, the mainstay of disease control in the Pacific. Primary prevention of rheumatic fever and screening for rheumatic heart disease are important adjunctive strategies. Recent advances in screening methods, focusing on portable echocardiography, may allow for the early detection of rheumatic heart disease in the community.

  10. [Bloodletting and rheumatism.: a retrospective view].

    PubMed

    Kaiser, H

    2011-04-01

    Bloodletting was widely used in antiquity in the setting of a humoral-pathological concept as a general treatment for all ailments, as well as during the middle ages primarily as a remedy for the treatment of inflammatory and infectious diseases. The general population was convinced of the efficacy of this treatment for centuries, even requesting it on occasion on a prophylactic basis. Although questioned early in history, the number of sceptical voices increased in the 17th and 18th centuries. In 1835, P. Louis introduced statistics to medicine in Paris, thereby proving the inefficacy of bloodletting in inflammatory diseases. Today, bloodletting is used in scientific medicine in only a few rare disease.As long as rheumatic diseases remained undifferentiated, all cases were treated with bloodletting. After acute articular rheumatism 1591 was recognised as an independent disease entity, bloodletting remained the treatment of choice for most doctors right up to the end of the 19th century. Bloodletting was also the standard treatment for gout from antiquity up to the beginning of the 19th century. Following its differentiation in 1800, chronic articular rheumatism was no longer treated with venae sectio. Today, there is no indication for bloodletting therapy in rheumatology.

  11. Rheumatic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Reyna, Tatiana Sofía; Martínez-Reyes, Cynthia; Yamamoto-Furusho, Jesús Kazúo

    2009-11-28

    This article reviews the literature concerning rheumatic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including common immune-mediated pathways, frequency, clinical course and therapy. Musculoskeletal complications are frequent and well-recognized manifestations in IBD, and affect up to 33% of patients with IBD. The strong link between the bowel and the osteo-articular system is suggested by many clinical and experimental observations, notably in HLA-B27 transgenic rats. The autoimmune pathogenic mechanisms shared by IBD and spondyloarthropathies include genetic susceptibility to abnormal antigen presentation, aberrant recognition of self, the presence of autoantibodies against specific antigens shared by the colon and other extra-colonic tissues, and increased intestinal permeability. The response against microorganisms may have an important role through molecular mimicry and other mechanisms. Rheumatic manifestations of IBD have been divided into peripheral arthritis, and axial involvement, including sacroiliitis, with or without spondylitis, similar to idiopathic ankylosing spondylitis. Other periarticular features can occur, including enthesopathy, tendonitis, clubbing, periostitis, and granulomatous lesions of joints and bones. Osteoporosis and osteomalacia secondary to IBD and iatrogenic complications can also occur. The management of the rheumatic manifestations of IBD consists of physical therapy in combination with local injection of corticosteroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; caution is in order however, because of their possible harmful effects on intestinal integrity, permeability, and even on gut inflammation. Sulfasalazine, methotrexate, azathioprine, cyclosporine and leflunomide should be used for selected indications. In some cases, tumor necrosis factor-alpha blocking agents should be considered as first-line therapy.

  12. Autophagy: controlling cell fate in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Rockel, Jason S; Kapoor, Mohit

    2016-09-01

    Autophagy, an endogenous process necessary for the turnover of organelles, maintains cellular homeostasis and directs cell fate. Alterations to the regulation of autophagy contribute to the progression of various rheumatic diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthritis (OA) and systemic sclerosis (SSc). Implicit in the progression of these diseases are cell-type-specific responses to surrounding factors that alter autophagy: chondrocytes within articular cartilage show decreased autophagy in OA, leading to rapid cell death and cartilage degeneration; fibroblasts from patients with SSc have restricted autophagy, similar to that seen in aged dermal fibroblasts; fibroblast-like synoviocytes from RA joints show altered autophagy, which contributes to synovial hyperplasia; and dysregulation of autophagy in haematopoietic lineage cells alters their function and maturation in SLE. Various upstream mechanisms also contribute to these diseases by regulating autophagy as part of their signalling cascades. In this Review, we discuss the links between autophagy, immune responses, fibrosis and cellular fates as they relate to pathologies associated with rheumatic diseases. Therapies in clinical use, and in preclinical or clinical development, are also discussed in relation to their effects on autophagy in rheumatic diseases. PMID:27334205

  13. 2016 National Rheumatic Fever Week: The status of rheumatic heart disease in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Mayosi, Bongani M

    2016-08-01

    There is evidence of early progress in the efforts to eliminate acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and control rheumatic heart disease (RHD) in South Africa. The caseload of ARF and RHD in paediatric units appears to be falling in some provinces such as Gauteng, and the mortality attributed to rheumatic heart disease at a population level has fallen from 1.3/100 000 in 2001 to 0.7/100 000 in 2012. However, the incidence of congestive heart failure due to RHD in adults remains high (~25/100 000/year) in Gauteng Province, and is associated with a high case fatality rate of up to 35% in 6 months. There is a need to intensify the application of comprehensive interventions to enhance the primary and secondary prevention and treatment of ARF/RHD in a registry-based national programme. PMID:27499394

  14. Pediatric allergy and immunology in Israel.

    PubMed

    Geller-Bernstein, Carmi; Etzioni, Amos

    2013-03-01

    After the geographic and sociodemographic settings as well as the health care in Israel are briefly described, the scope of pediatric allergy and immunology in Israel is presented. This includes specific disorders commonly encountered, the environment that induces symptoms, the specialists who treat them, and the common challenges of patients, parents, doctors, and allied health personnel who collaborate to manage the maladies and patient care. Allergies usually affect some overall 15-20% of the pediatric population. The main allergens are inhaled, ingested, or injected (insects stings). Generally, the incidence of the various allergens affecting children in Israel, is similar to other parts of the Western world. Owing to the high consanguinity rate in the Israeli population, the prevalence of the various immunodeficiency conditions (in the adaptive as well as the innate system) is higher than that reported worldwide. Pediatric allergists/immunologists also treat autoimmune disorders affecting the pediatric group. Pediatric allergy and clinical immunology are not separate specialties. The 25 specialists who treat children with allergic/immunologic diseases have undergone a basic training in Pediatrics. They also received an additional 2-yr training in allergy and clinical immunology and then have to pass the board examinations. They work mainly in pediatric allergy units, in several hospitals that are affiliated to the five medical schools in the country. Aside from clinical work, most of the centers are also heavily involved in clinical and basic research in allergy and immunology.

  15. Use of Biologic Agents in Ocular Manifestations of Rheumatic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Courtney L.; Culican, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    Biologic agents have dramatically shifted the treatment paradigm for rheumatic disease. Use of these agents can decrease disease burden, allow the patient to be weaned from corticosteroids, and reduce the likelihood of relapse. Eye disease associated with rheumatic conditions may present with a wide range of signs and symptoms. This coexisting pathology should not be overlooked and should be considered a reason for initiation or continuation of biologic therapy. Additionally, many of the ocular manifestations of rheumatic disease respond preferentially to specific targeting molecules. This paper summarizes the available studies on the use, efficacy, and safety of biologic agents in the treatment of ocular manifestations of rheumatic disease. PMID:22229035

  16. Renal co-morbidity in patients with rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Renal co-morbidity is common in patients with rheumatic disease based on regular assessment of serum and urine parameters of renal function. When patients present with both arthritis and renal abnormalities the following questions have to be addressed. Is kidney disease a complication of rheumatic disease or its management, or are they both manifestations of a single systemic autoimmune disease? Is rheumatic disease a complication of kidney disease and its management? How do rheumatic disease and kidney disease affect each other even when they are unrelated? The present review provides an overview of how to address these questions in daily practice. PMID:21722341

  17. Effects of biological and non-biological immunomodulatory therapies on the immunogenicity of vaccines in patients with rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    McMahan, Zsuzsanna H; Bingham, Clifton O

    2014-12-23

    Vaccinations are administered to patients to induce a protective immune response, resulting in immunological memory. Preventing infection through the use of vaccines is particularly important in immunocompromised and immunosuppressed individuals given their increased frequency and severity of infections relative to healthy individuals. Recent surveys show that the vaccination rate is still alarmingly low in patients with rheumatic disease. In this review we briefly discuss the different types of vaccines and then critically examine evidence related to vaccination efficacy in patients with autoimmune disease and the effects of immunomodulatory therapy, with an aim to provide guidance and optimize the administration of vaccines in such individuals.

  18. Rheumatic manifestations of pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Stavrou, S; Kleinberg, D L

    2001-10-01

    Pituitary tumors may cause rheumatologic problems as a result of under production or overproduction of one pituitary hormone. Excessive growth hormone causes destruction of cartilage by a direct action. Facial and acral changes and arthralgias may be some of the first symptoms of acromegaly. The arthritis associated with acromegaly is often devastating. Carpal tunnel syndrome is very common in patients with acromegaly. Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) has indirect effects via the action of glucocorticoid on bones, muscles, and the immune system. Proximal muscle weakness is a characteristic feature of Cushing's syndrome. Patients with Cushing's syndrome commonly have osteopenia and osteoporosis that lead to an increase in bone fractures. Avascular necrosis is associated with exogenous steroid administration. The effects of too much glucocorticoid or too rapid withdrawal can be severe. Gonadotropins act via the gonadal steroids and protect bone mass from loss. Prolactin is less involved in rheumatologic disease; the data for which are limited in humans. Pituitary tumors can have manifestations similar to rheumatologic disorders and should be included in the differential diagnosis of these diseases.

  19. Synthetic immunology: modulating the human immune system.

    PubMed

    Geering, Barbara; Fussenegger, Martin

    2015-02-01

    Humans have manipulated the immune system to dampen or boost the immune response for thousands of years. As our understanding of fundamental immunology and biotechnological methodology accumulates, we can capitalize on this combined knowledge to engineer biological devices with the aim of rationally manipulating the immune response. We address therapeutic approaches based on the principles of synthetic immunology that either ameliorate disorders of the immune system by interfering with the immune response, or improve diverse pathogenic conditions by exploiting immune cell effector functions. We specifically highlight synthetic proteins investigated in preclinical and clinical trials, summarize studies that have used engineered immune cells, and finish with a discussion of possible future therapeutic concepts.

  20. Immunologic manifestations of autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Deretic, Vojo; Kimura, Tomonori; Timmins, Graham; Moseley, Pope; Chauhan, Santosh; Mandell, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The broad immunologic roles of autophagy span innate and adaptive immunity and are often manifested in inflammatory diseases. The immune effects of autophagy partially overlap with its roles in metabolism and cytoplasmic quality control but typically expand further afield to encompass unique immunologic adaptations. One of the best-appreciated manifestations of autophagy is protection against microbial invasion, but this is by no means limited to direct elimination of intracellular pathogens and includes a stratified array of nearly all principal immunologic processes. This Review summarizes the broad immunologic roles of autophagy. Furthermore, it uses the autophagic control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a paradigm to illustrate the breadth and complexity of the immune effects of autophagy. PMID:25654553

  1. Rheumatic Fever in the Adult: A Forgotten Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Brian; Swanson, Richard; Smith, Stanley

    1987-01-01

    The authors of this article present a case of acute rheumatic fever in an adult and review the diagnostic criteria for this illness. They emphasize the prevention of acute rheumatic fever by the adequate treatment of streptococcal pharyngitis with penicillin. PMID:21263778

  2. Herbal medicine in the treatment of rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Edzard

    2011-02-01

    Herbal medicines are popular, self-prescribed treatments for rheumatic conditions. A recent US survey suggested that approximately 90% of arthritic patients use alternative therapies such as herbal medicines. This article provides a brief overview of the evidence on herbal medicines for 4 common rheumatic conditions: back pain, fibromyalgia, osteoarthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis.

  3. Antibodies to ribosomal ribonucleoprotein. Prevalence in systemic rheumatic diseases and partial characterization of the antigen.

    PubMed

    Cortés, J J; Mendoza, F; Reyes, P A

    1987-08-01

    The prevalence of antibodies to ribosomal ribonucleoproteins (rRNP) was studied in patients with rheumatic diseases. Seven patients had precipitating antibodies against rRNP, 6 had systemic lupus erythematosus, one had primary Sjögren's syndrome. Anti-rRNP was not present in mixed connective tissue disease, rheumatoid arthritis, progressive systemic sclerosis, CREST, primary Raynaud's or normal control sera. A partial immunological identity precipitin line was present between (U1) nRNP and rRNP, but these were distinct in physicochemical properties. Western blot analysis of ribosomal extract using anti-rRNP IgG revealed 2 polypeptides called rA and rB which appear to be the important antigenic determinants.

  4. Immunological findings in autism.

    PubMed

    Cohly, Hari Har Parshad; Panja, Asit

    2005-01-01

    elevated in autistic brains. In measles virus infection, it has been postulated that there is immune suppression by inhibiting T-cell proliferation and maturation and downregulation MHC class II expression. Cytokine alteration of TNF-alpha is increased in autistic populations. Toll-like-receptors are also involved in autistic development. High NO levels are associated with autism. Maternal antibodies may trigger autism as a mechanism of autoimmunity. MMR vaccination may increase risk for autism via an autoimmune mechanism in autism. MMR antibodies are significantly higher in autistic children as compared to normal children, supporting a role of MMR in autism. Autoantibodies (IgG isotype) to neuron-axon filament protein (NAFP) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) are significantly increased in autistic patients (Singh et al., 1997). Increase in Th2 may explain the increased autoimmunity, such as the findings of antibodies to MBP and neuronal axonal filaments in the brain. There is further evidence that there are other participants in the autoimmune phenomenon. (Kozlovskaia et al., 2000). The possibility of its involvement in autism cannot be ruled out. Further investigations at immunological, cellular, molecular, and genetic levels will allow researchers to continue to unravel the immunopathogenic mechanisms' associated with autistic processes in the developing brain. This may open up new avenues for prevention and/or cure of this devastating neurodevelopmental disorder.

  5. Immunological memory is associative

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.J.; Forrest, S.; Perelson, A.S.

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to show that immunological memory is an associative and robust memory that belongs to the class of sparse distributed memories. This class of memories derives its associative and robust nature by sparsely sampling the input space and distributing the data among many independent agents. Other members of this class include a model of the cerebellar cortex and Sparse Distributed Memory (SDM). First we present a simplified account of the immune response and immunological memory. Next we present SDM, and then we show the correlations between immunological memory and SDM. Finally, we show how associative recall in the immune response can be both beneficial and detrimental to the fitness of an individual.

  6. Autoimmune vitiligo in rheumatic disease in the mestizo Mexican population

    PubMed Central

    Avalos-Díaz, Esperanza; Pérez-Pérez, Elena; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Mayra; Pacheco-Tovar, María-Guadalupe; Herrera-Esparza, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is a chronic disease characterized by the dysfunction or destruction of melanocytes with secondary depigmentation. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of vitiligo associated with autoimmune rheumatic diseases. The clinical records from a 10-year database of patients with rheumatic diseases and associated vitiligo was analysed, with one group of patients having autoimmune rheumatic disease and another non-autoimmune rheumatic disease. Available serum samples were used to assess the anti-melanocyte antibodies. A total of 5,251 individual clinical files were archived in the last 10 years, and these patients underwent multiple rheumatology consultations, with 0.3% of the group presenting with vitiligo. The prevalence of vitiligo in the autoimmune rheumatic disease group was 0.672%, which was mainly associated with lupus and arthritis. However, patients with more than one autoimmune disease had an increased relative risk to develop vitiligo, and anti-melanocyte antibodies were positive in 92% of these patients. By contrast, the prevalence was 0.082% in the group that lacked autoimmune rheumatic disease and had negative autoantibodies. In conclusion, the association between vitiligo and autoimmune rheumatic diseases was relatively low. However, the relative risk increased when there were other autoimmune comorbidities, such as thyroiditis or celiac disease. Therefore, the presence of multiple autoimmune syndromes should be suspected. PMID:27446537

  7. Medical immunology: two-way bridge connecting bench and bedside.

    PubMed

    Rijkers, Ger T; Damoiseaux, Jan G M C; Hooijkaas, Herbert

    2014-12-01

    Medical immunology in The Netherlands is a laboratory specialism dealing with immunological analyses as well as pre- and post-analytical consultation to clinicians (clinical immunologists and other specialists) involved in patients with immune mediated diseases. The scope of medical immunology includes immunodeficiencies, autoimmune diseases, allergy, transfusion and transplantation immunology, and lymphoproliferative disorders plus the monitoring of these patients. The training, professional criteria, quality control of procedures and laboratories is well organized. As examples of the bridge function of medical immunology between laboratory (bench) and patient (bedside) the contribution of medical immunologists to diagnosis and treatment of primary immunodeficiency diseases (in particular: humoral immunodeficiencies) as well as autoantibodies (anti-citrullinated proteins in rheumatoid arthritis) are given.

  8. Serotonin content of platelets in inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Correlation with clinical activity.

    PubMed

    Zeller, J; Weissbarth, E; Baruth, B; Mielke, H; Deicher, H

    1983-04-01

    Significantly decreased platelet serotonin contents were measured in rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), progressive systemic sclerosis, and mixed connective tissue disease. An inverse relationship between platelet serotonin levels and clinical disease activity was observed in both rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. SLE patients with multiple organ involvement showed the lowest platelet serotonin values. No correlation was observed between platelet serotonin contents and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug treatment, presence of circulating platelet reactive IgG, or the amount of circulating immune complexes. The results are interpreted as indicating platelet release occurring in vivo during inflammatory episodes of the rheumatic disorders investigated. PMID:6838676

  9. Ethnic differences in mortality from acute rheumatic fever and chronic rheumatic heart disease in New Mexico, 1958-1982.

    PubMed Central

    Becker, T M; Wiggins, C L; Key, C R; Samet, J M

    1989-01-01

    To examine time trends and differences in mortality rates from acute rheumatic fever and chronic rheumatic heart disease in New Mexico's Hispanic, American Indian, and non-Hispanic white populations, we analyzed vital records data for 1958 through 1982. Age-adjusted mortality rates for acute rheumatic fever were low and showed no consistent temporal trends among the three ethnic groups over the study period. Age-adjusted and age-specific mortality rates for chronic rheumatic heart disease in Hispanic and non-Hispanic whites decreased over the 25-year period, although rates were higher among Hispanics than among non-Hispanics during most of the time period. In American Indians, age-adjusted mortality rates for chronic rheumatic heart disease increased between 1968 and 1977 to twice the non-Indian mortality rates during the same period. Despite this increase in mortality from chronic rheumatic heart disease among New Mexico's American Indians from 1968 to 1977, the New Mexico data generally reflect national trends of decreasing mortality from chronic rheumatic heart disease. PMID:2735024

  10. Metabolomics in rheumatic diseases: desperately seeking biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Guma, Monica; Tiziani, Stefano; Firestein, Gary S.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics enables the profiling of large numbers of small molecules in cells, tissues and biological fluids. These molecules, which include amino acids, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleotides and their metabolites, can be detected quantitatively. Metabolomic methods, often focused on the information-rich analytical techniques of NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry, have potential for early diagnosis, monitoring therapy and defining disease pathogenesis in many therapeutic areas, including rheumatic diseases. By performing global metabolite profiling, also known as untargeted metabolomics, new discoveries linking cellular pathways to biological mechanisms are being revealed and are shaping our understanding of cell biology, physiology and medicine. These pathways can potentially be targeted to diagnose and treat patients with immune-mediated diseases. PMID:26935283

  11. Disease Activity Measures in Paediatric Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Luca, Nadia J.; Feldman, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    Disease activity refers to potentially reversible aspects of a disease. Measurement of disease activity in paediatric rheumatic diseases is a critical component of patient care and clinical research. Disease activity measures are developed systematically, often involving consensus methods. To be useful, a disease activity measure must be feasible, valid, and interpretable. There are several challenges in quantifying disease activity in paediatric rheumatology; namely, the conditions are multidimensional, the level of activity must be valuated in the context of treatment being received, there is no gold standard for disease activity, and it is often difficult to incorporate the patient's perspective of their disease activity. To date, core sets of response variables are defined for juvenile idiopathic arthritis, juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus, and juvenile dermatomyositis, as well as definitions for improvement in response to therapy. Several specific absolute disease activity measures also exist for each condition. Further work is required to determine the optimal disease activity measures in paediatric rheumatology. PMID:24089617

  12. Rheumatic effects of vibration at work

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Keith T; Bovenzi, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Occupational exposures to vibration come in many guises and are very common at a population level. It follows that an important minority of working-aged patients seen by medical services will have been exposed to this hazard of employment. Vibration can cause human health effects which may manifest in the patients that rheumatologists see. In this chapter we identify the health effects of relevance to them, and review their epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, and vocational and clinical management. On either side of this, we describe the nature and assessment of the hazard, the scale and common patterns of exposure to vibration in the community, and the legal basis for controlling health risks, and comment on the role of health surveillance in detecting early adverse effects and what can be done to prevent the rheumatic effects of vibration at work. PMID:26612239

  13. Rheumatic effects of vibration at work.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Keith T; Bovenzi, Massimo

    2015-06-01

    Occupational exposures to vibration come in many guises, and they are very common at a population level. It follows that an important minority of working-aged patients seen by medical services will have been exposed to this hazard of employment. Vibration can cause human health effects, which may manifest in the patients that rheumatologists see. In this chapter, we identify the health effects of relevance to them, and review their epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, differential diagnosis and vocational and clinical management. On either side of this, we describe the nature and assessment of the hazard, the scale and common patterns of exposure to vibration in the community and the legal basis for controlling health risks, and we comment on the role of health surveillance in detecting early adverse effects and what can be done to prevent the rheumatic effects of vibration at work.

  14. Tissue engineering in the rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ringe, Jochen; Sittinger, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Diseases such as degenerative or rheumatoid arthritis are accompanied by joint destruction. Clinically applied tissue engineering technologies like autologous chondrocyte implantation, matrix-assisted chondrocyte implantation, or in situ recruitment of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells target the treatment of traumatic defects or of early osteoarthritis. Inflammatory conditions in the joint hamper the application of tissue engineering during chronic joint diseases. Here, most likely, cartilage formation is impaired and engineered neocartilage will be degraded. Based on the observations that mesenchymal stem cells (a) develop into joint tissues and (b) in vitro and in vivo show immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory qualities indicating a transplant-protecting activity, these cells are prominent candidates for future tissue engineering approaches for the treatment of rheumatic diseases. Tissue engineering also provides highly organized three-dimensional in vitro culture models of human cells and their extracellular matrix for arthritis research. PMID:19232063

  15. [Systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases competence network].

    PubMed

    Rufenach, C; Burmester, G-R; Zeidler, H; Radbruch, A

    2004-04-01

    The foundation of the competence network for rheumatology, which is funded by the "Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung" (BMBF) since 1999, succeeded to create a unique research structure in Germany: medical doctors and scientists from six university rheumatology centres (Berlin, Düsseldorf, Erlangen, Freiburg, Hannover und Lübeck/Bad Bramstedt) work closely together with scientists doing basic research at the Deutsches Rheuma-Forschungszentrum (DRFZ), with rheumatological hospitals, reha-clinics, and rheumatologists. Jointly they are searching for causes of systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases and try to improve therapies-nationwide and with an interdisciplinary approach. The primary objective of this collaboration is to transfer new scientific insights more rapidly in order to improve methods for diagnosis and patients treatment.

  16. Immunological Treatments for Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, Sudhir

    2000-01-01

    This article discusses research findings that indicate immunological abnormalities in children with autism, including the dysregulation of the immune system, and concludes that there are sufficient data to suggest a role of the immune system in the pathogenesis of autism. Various biological therapies are analyzed, including intravenous…

  17. Basic and clinical immunology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinen, Javier; Shearer, William T.

    2003-01-01

    Progress in immunology continues to grow exponentially every year. New applications of this knowledge are being developed for a broad range of clinical conditions. Conversely, the study of primary and secondary immunodeficiencies is helping to elucidate the intricate mechanisms of the immune system. We have selected a few of the most significant contributions to the fields of basic and clinical immunology published between October 2001 and October 2002. Our choice of topics in basic immunology included the description of T-bet as a determinant factor for T(H)1 differentiation, the role of the activation-induced cytosine deaminase gene in B-cell development, the characterization of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells, and the use of dynamic imaging to study MHC class II transport and T-cell and dendritic cell membrane interactions. Articles related to clinical immunology that were selected for review include the description of immunodeficiency caused by caspase 8 deficiency; a case series report on X-linked agammaglobulinemia; the mechanism of action, efficacy, and complications of intravenous immunoglobulin; mechanisms of autoimmunity diseases; and advances in HIV pathogenesis and vaccine development. We also reviewed two articles that explore the possible alterations of the immune system caused by spaceflights, a new field with increasing importance as human space expeditions become a reality in the 21st century.

  18. Immunology & Human Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Jeffrey R.; And Others

    This monograph was designed for the high school biology curriculum. The first section reviews the major areas of importance in immunology. Section three contains six instructional activities for the high school classroom and the second section contains teacher's materials for those activities. The activities address for students some of the major…

  19. Immunology's theories of cognition.

    PubMed

    Tauber, Alfred I

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary immunology has established its fundamental theory as a biological expression of personal identity, wherein the "immune self" is defended by the immune system. Protection of this agent putatively requires a cognitive capacity by which the self and the foreign are perceived and thereby discriminated; from such information, discernment of the environment is achieved and activation of pathways leading to an immune response may be initiated. This so-called cognitive paradigm embeds such functions as "perception," "recognition," "learning," and "memory" to characterize immune processes, but the conceptual character of such functions has meanings that vary with the particular theory adopted. When different formulations of cognition are considered, immunology's conceptual infrastructure shifts: Extensions of conventional psychological understanding of representational cognition based on a subject-object dichotomy support notions of immune agency; alternatively, formulations of perception that dispense with representations and attendant notions of agency reconfigure the predicate epistemology dominating current immune theory. Reviewing immunological literature of the past five decades, these two understandings of perception--representational and non-representational (considered here from ecological, enactivist, and autopoietic perspectives)--offer competing views of immune cognitive functions. These, in turn, provide competing philosophical understandings of immunology's conceptual foundations, which reflect parallel controversies dominating current debates in philosophy of mind and attendant discussions about personal identity.

  20. HIV Molecular Immunology 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Yusim, Karina; Korber, Bette Tina Marie; Barouch, Dan; Koup, Richard; de Boer, Rob; Moore, John P.; Brander, Christian; Haynes, Barton F.; Walker, Bruce D.

    2015-02-03

    HIV Molecular Immunology is a companion volume to HIV Sequence Compendium. This publication, the 2014 edition, is the PDF version of the web-based HIV Immunology Database (http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/content/immunology/). The web interface for this relational database has many search options, as well as interactive tools to help immunologists design reagents and interpret their results. In the HIV Immunology Database, HIV-specific B-cell and T-cell responses are summarized and annotated. Immunological responses are divided into three parts, CTL, T helper, and antibody. Within these parts, defined epitopes are organized by protein and binding sites within each protein, moving from left to right through the coding regions spanning the HIV genome. We include human responses to natural HIV infections, as well as vaccine studies in a range of animal models and human trials. Responses that are not specifically defined, such as responses to whole proteins or monoclonal antibody responses to discontinuous epitopes, are summarized at the end of each protein section. Studies describing general HIV responses to the virus, but not to any specific protein, are included at the end of each part. The annotation includes information such as crossreactivity, escape mutations, antibody sequence, TCR usage, functional domains that overlap with an epitope, immune response associations with rates of progression and therapy, and how specific epitopes were experimentally defined. Basic information such as HLA specificities for T-cell epitopes, isotypes of monoclonal antibodies, and epitope sequences are included whenever possible. All studies that we can find that incorporate the use of a specific monoclonal antibody are included in the entry for that antibody. A single T-cell epitope can have multiple entries, generally one entry per study. Finally, maps of all defined linear epitopes relative to the HXB2 reference proteins are provided.

  1. Streptococcal Infections, Rheumatic Fever and School Health Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowitz, Milton

    1979-01-01

    Because rheumatic fever is a potentially serious complication of a streptococcal sore throat which can lead to permanent heart disease, this article advocates the expansion of school health services in medically underserved areas. (JMF)

  2. Infections as a cause of autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Sakkas, Lazaros I; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P

    2016-12-01

    Exogenous and endogenous environmental exposures and particularly infections may participate in the breakage of tolerance and the induction of autoimmunity in rheumatic diseases. Response to infections apparently occurs years before clinical manifestations and features of autoimmunity, such as autoantibodies, are detected years before clinical manifestations in autoimmune rheumatic diseases. In this review, we summarize the current evidence for a potential causal link between infectious agents and rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, Sjogren's syndrome and ANCA-associated vasculitis. PMID:27629582

  3. Hematology and immunology studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimzey, S. L.; Fischer, C. L.; Johnson, P. C.; Ritzmann, S. E.; Mengel, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    The hematology and immunology program conducted in support of the Apollo missions was designed to acquire specific laboratory data relative to the assessment of the health status of the astronauts prior to their commitment to space flight. A second objective was to detect and identify any alterations in the normal functions of the immunohematologic systems which could be attributed to space flight exposure, and to evaluate the significance of these changes relative to man's continuing participation in space flight missions. Specific changes observed during the Gemini Program formed the basis for the major portion of the hematology-immunology test schedule. Additional measurements were included when their contribution to the overall interpretation of the flight data base became apparent.

  4. Cosmos-1989 immunology studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1991-01-01

    Evidence from both human and rodent studies has indicated that alterations in immunological parameters occur after space flight. The number of flight experiments has been small, and the full breadth of immunological alterations occurring after space flight remains to be established. Among the major effects on immune responses after space flight that have been reported are: alterations in lymphocyte blastogenesis and natural killer cell activity, alterations in production of cytokines, changes in leukocyte sub-population distribution, and decreases in the ability in the ability of bone marrow cells to respond to colony stimulating factors. Changes have been reported in immunological parameters of both humans and rodents. The significance of these alterations in relation to resistance to infection remains to be established. The current study involved a determination of the effects of flight on Cosmos mission 2044 on leukocyte subset distribution and the sensitivity of bone marrow cells to colony stimulating factor-GM. A parallel study with antiorthostatic suspension was also carried out. The study involved repetition and expansion of studies carried out on Cosmos 1887.

  5. On immunological memory.

    PubMed Central

    Zinkernagel, R M

    2000-01-01

    Immunological memory may not represent a special characteristic of lymphocytes but simply reflect low-level responses driven by antigen that is re-encountered or persists within the host. T-cell memory is important to control persistent infections within the individual host and cannot be transmitted to offspring because of MHC polymorphism and MHC-restricted T-cell recognition. In contrast, antibody memory is transmissible from mother to offspring and may function essentially to protect offspring during the phase of physiological immuno-incompetence before, at and shortly after birth. This physiological immuno-incompetence is a result of MHC polymorphism and the dangers of the graft-versus-host and host-versus-graft reaction between mother and embryo, which necessitate immunosuppression of the mother and immuno-incompetence of the offspring. One may argue therefore that immunological memory of transmissible immunological experience is the basis on which MHC-restricted T-cell recognition could develop or coevolve. PMID:10794057

  6. 21 CFR 866.5220 - Cohn fraction II immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5220 Cohn fraction II immunolog-ical test system. (a) Identification. A Cohn fraction II immunological... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cohn fraction II immunolog-ical test system....

  7. Immunologic regulation in pregnancy: from mechanism to therapeutic strategy for immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shyi-Jou; Liu, Yung-Liang; Sytwu, Huey-Kang

    2012-01-01

    The immunologic interaction between the fetus and the mother is a paradoxical communication that is regulated by fetal antigen presentation and/or by recognition of and reaction to these antigens by the maternal immune system. There have been significant advances in understanding of abnormalities in the maternal-fetal immunologic relationship in the placental bed that can lead to pregnancy disorders. Moreover, immunologic recognition of pregnancy is vital for the maintenance of gestation, and inadequate recognition of fetal antigens may cause abortion. In this paper, we illustrate the complex immunologic aspects of human reproduction in terms of the role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA), immune cells, cytokines and chemokines, and the balance of immunity in pregnancy. In addition, we review the immunologic processes of human reproduction and the current immunologic therapeutic strategies for pathological disorders of pregnancy. PMID:22110530

  8. Immunologic and Neurodevelopmental Susceptibilities of Autism

    PubMed Central

    Pessah, Isaac N.; Seegal, Richard F.; Lein, Pamela J.; LaSalle, Janine; Yee, Benjamin K.; Van De Water, Judy; Berman, Robert F.

    2008-01-01

    Symposium 5 focused on research approaches that are aimed at understanding common patterns of immunological and neurological dysfunction contributing to neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism and ADHD. The session focused on genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors that might act in concert to influence autism risk, severity and co-morbidities, and immunological and neurobiological targets as etiologic contributors. The immune system of children at risk of autism may be therefore especially susceptible to psychological stressors, exposure to chemical triggers, and infectious agents. Identifying early biomarkers of risk provides tangible approaches toward designing studies in animals and humans that yield a better understanding of environmental risk factors, and can help identify rational intervention strategies to mitigate these risks. PMID:18394707

  9. T cell receptor usage in rheumatic disease.

    PubMed

    Richardson, B C

    1992-01-01

    Protection against microbial attack or invasion is a fundamental function of the immune system. Crucial to this function is the ability to distinguish "self" from the invading organism, and tolerate "self" while removing "non-self". The ability to distinguish self from non-self is not inherent in the immune system, but rather is acquired and continuously maintained. Unfortunately, the mechanisms maintaining self-tolerance are not perfect, and at times break down. In these instances an autoimmune disease results. T cells initiate normal immune responses, and it is now clear that T cells can also initiate pathologic immune responses. In animal models, T cells produce diseases resembling rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (1-3), systemic lupus erythematosus (4-6) and progressive systemic sclerosis (7,8). It is likely that T cells participate in human autoimmune diseases as well. The molecular basis of T cell antigen recognition has been clarified over the past decade. These advances now allow direct examination of the T cell receptor (TCR) molecules participating in autoimmune responses, and raise the exciting possibility that the cells inducing autoimmune responses may finally be identified. Selective agents might then be developed which would interfere with or inhibit the cells. Understanding these developments requires detailed knowledge of how T cells recognize antigen, and of the receptors involved in autoimmune diseases. This article reviews the current literature on T cell receptor structure, and summarizes what is currently known about the usage of specific T cell receptors in autoimmune rheumatic disease. PMID:1582073

  10. [Periodontal disease in pediatric rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Fabri, Gisele M C; Savioli, Cynthia; Siqueira, José T; Campos, Lucia M; Bonfá, Eloisa; Silva, Clovis A

    2014-01-01

    Gingivitis and periodontitis are immunoinflammatory periodontal diseases characterized by chronic localized infections usually associated with insidious inflammation This narrative review discusses periodontal diseases and mechanisms influencing the immune response and autoimmunity in pediatric rheumatic diseases (PRD), particularly juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (C-SLE) and juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). Gingivitis was more frequently observed in these diseases compared to health controls, whereas periodontitis was a rare finding. In JIA patients, gingivitis and periodontitis were related to mechanical factors, chronic arthritis with functional disability, dysregulation of the immunoinflammatory response, diet and drugs, mainly corticosteroids and cyclosporine. In C-SLE, gingivitis was associated with longer disease period, high doses of corticosteroids, B-cell hyperactivation and immunoglobulin G elevation. There are scarce data on periodontal diseases in JDM population, and a unique gingival pattern, characterized by gingival erythema, capillary dilation and bush-loop formation, was observed in active patients. In conclusion, gingivitis was the most common periodontal disease in PRD. The observed association with disease activity reinforces the need for future studies to determine if resolution of this complication will influence disease course or severity.

  11. Immunologic Disorders of the Inner Ear.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, William C.; Hughes, Gordon B.

    1997-01-01

    Immune inner ear disease represents a series of immune system mediated problems that can present with hearing loss, dizziness, or both. The etiology, presentation, testing, and treatment of primary immune inner ear disease is discussed. A review of secondary immune inner ear disease is presented for comparison. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  12. Hematology and immunology studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimzey, S. L.

    1977-01-01

    A coordinated series of experiments were conducted to evaluate immunologic and hemotologic system responses of Skylab crewmen to prolonged space flights. A reduced PHA responsiveness was observed on recovery, together with a reduced number of T-cells, with both values returning to normal 3 to 5 days postflight. Subnormal red cell count, hemoglobin concentration, and hematocrit values also returned gradually to preflight limits. Most pronounced changes were found in the shape of red blood cells during extended space missions with a rapid reversal of these changes upon reentry into a normal gravitational environment.

  13. Mathematics in modern immunology

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Mario; Lythe, Grant; Molina-París, Carmen; Ribeiro, Ruy M.

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical and statistical methods enable multidisciplinary approaches that catalyse discovery. Together with experimental methods, they identify key hypotheses, define measurable observables and reconcile disparate results. We collect a representative sample of studies in T-cell biology that illustrate the benefits of modelling–experimental collaborations and that have proven valuable or even groundbreaking. We conclude that it is possible to find excellent examples of synergy between mathematical modelling and experiment in immunology, which have brought significant insight that would not be available without these collaborations, but that much remains to be discovered. PMID:27051512

  14. Immunology in Africa.

    PubMed

    Cose, Stephen; Bagaya, Bernard; Nerima, Barbara; Joloba, Moses; Kambugu, Andrew; Tweyongyere, Robert; Dunne, David W; Mbidde, Edward; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Elliott, Alison M

    2015-12-01

    Africa is a continent with a large burden of both infectious and non-communicable diseases. If we are to move forward as a continent, we need to equip our growing cadre of exceptional young scientists with the skills needed to tackle the diseases endemic to this continent. For this, immunology is among the key disciplines. Africans should be empowered to study and understand the diseases that affect them, and to perform their cutting-edge research in their country of origin. This requires a multifaceted approach, with buy-in from funders, overseas partners and perhaps, most important of all, African governments themselves.

  15. Mathematics in modern immunology.

    PubMed

    Castro, Mario; Lythe, Grant; Molina-París, Carmen; Ribeiro, Ruy M

    2016-04-01

    Mathematical and statistical methods enable multidisciplinary approaches that catalyse discovery. Together with experimental methods, they identify key hypotheses, define measurable observables and reconcile disparate results. We collect a representative sample of studies in T-cell biology that illustrate the benefits of modelling-experimental collaborations and that have proven valuable or even groundbreaking. We conclude that it is possible to find excellent examples of synergy between mathematical modelling and experiment in immunology, which have brought significant insight that would not be available without these collaborations, but that much remains to be discovered.

  16. [Psychological pain treatment in rheumatic patients.].

    PubMed

    Basler, H D

    1991-03-01

    spondylitis. Subjects with inflammatory rheumatic diseases showed some improvement in self-reported physical complaints and in their feelings of well-being.

  17. Immunology of leishmaniasis*

    PubMed Central

    Heyneman, D.

    1971-01-01

    Knowledge of the immunological basis of the leishmaniases and of the host's response is fragmentary and largely pragmatic. This paper reviews certain conceptual and clinical aspects of the immunology of these diseases. Consideration is given to man's natural resistance and his ability to acquire resistance from natural infections and from vaccination. The age-distribution of infection in different populations is discussed in relation to the effects that interaction between the parasite and its intermediate host may have on its infection characteristics and virulence. Studies in the USSR of differences in virulence among 30 human strains and 39 rodent strains are reported. The rodent strains showed a broader range of virulence than did the human isolates. Serological tests for determining species relationships among the leishmaniae are generally nonspecific, but work concerned with the development of the antiserum—culture test is reviewed. Species identification and the recognition of new forms, perhaps with different infection characteristics, is, nevertheless, of the utmost importance in the prevention and treatment of the disease. The review concludes with a discussion of functional immunity and hypotheses of the immune process in leishmaniasis. PMID:5316252

  18. Immunology of human schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Colley, D G; Secor, W E

    2014-01-01

    There is a wealth of immunologic studies that have been carried out in experimental and human schistosomiasis that can be classified into three main areas: immunopathogenesis, resistance to reinfection and diagnostics. It is clear that the bulk of, if not all, morbidity due to human schistosomiasis results from immune-response-based inflammation against eggs lodged in the body, either as regulated chronic inflammation or resulting in fibrotic lesions. However, the exact nature of these responses, the antigens to which they are mounted and the mechanisms of the critical regulatory responses are still being sorted out. It is also becoming apparent that protective immunity against schistosomula as they develop into adult worms develops slowly and is hastened by the dying of adult worms, either naturally or when they are killed by praziquantel. However, as with anti-egg responses, the responsible immune mechanisms and inducing antigens are not clearly established, nor are any potential regulatory responses known. Finally, a wide variety of immune markers, both cellular and humoral, can be used to demonstrate exposure to schistosomes, and immunologic measurement of schistosome antigens can be used to detect, and thus diagnose, active infections. All three areas contribute to the public health response to human schistosome infections. PMID:25142505

  19. Various rheumatic syndromes in adult patients associated with high antistreptolysin O titres and their differential diagnosis with rheumatic fever.

    PubMed Central

    Valtonen, J M; Koskimies, S; Miettinen, A; Valtonen, V V

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--The purpose of this study was to analyse retrospectively adult patients with acute joint or muscle symptoms and a high antistreptolysin O (ASO) titre to find out which syndromes of clinical arthritis are associated with serological evidence of streptococcal infection. METHODS--Seventy six adult patients with an acute arthritis syndrome or an exacerbation in their chronic rheumatic disease and simultaneously a high ASO titre (> or = 500 Todd units) were examined in two time periods in the 1980s. RESULTS--Twenty six patients had arthritis associated with a known rheumatic disease, 25 had non-specific arthralgia/myalgia, 20 had reactive arthritis, and five had septic arthritis. No case of classic rheumatic fever classified by two major criteria was found. Six patients fulfilled one major and at least two minor criteria. The frequency of HLA-B27 was significantly higher in the whole patient group than in the healthy Finnish population (30 v 14%). CONCLUSIONS--It is concluded that classic rheumatic fever is now rare, even in patients with arthritis with a high ASO titre. These results support the suggestion that beta haemolytic streptococci may trigger reactive arthritis as well as rheumatic fever. PMID:8346980

  20. Vaccination recommendations for adult patients with rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tanrıöver, Mine Durusu; Akar, Servet; Türkçapar, Nuran; Karadağ, Ömer; Ertenli, İhsan; Kiraz, Sedat

    2016-01-01

    Infectious diseases in any age group can be successfully prevented through immunization. Protection provided through immunization in childhood decreases over the years. Immunization in adulthood is important because of the growing elderly population, chronic diseases, and globalization. Recommendations on this subject are being constantly updated through scientific guidelines. Immunization in adulthood is also important in rheumatology. There is an increased risk not only of infection in rheumatic diseases but also of infections being more severe. Most infections, and their frequently observed complications, are among those diseases that can be prevented through immunization. The type of immunization, immunosuppressive/immunomodulatory therapy received by the patient, disease activity, and presence of chronic diseases affect the immunization process in patients with rheumatic diseases. This review will consider the immunization process followed in rheumatic diseases and also refer to its application.

  1. New insights into sexual functioning and fertility in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Østensen, Monika

    2004-04-01

    Sexuality is an often neglected area of quality of life in patients with rheumatic disease. Manifestations and symptoms of disease can impair sexual functioning, but this can be much improved by adequate intervention and counseling. Fertility is in general not reduced in rheumatic diseases, however, the time taken to achieve a pregnancy is often increased. An increased rate of pregnancy loss is observed in systemic lupus erythematosus and the antiphospholipid syndrome contributing to a reduced family size. Autoantibodies are present in most of the rheumatic diseases and can interfere with fertilization, implantation, embryonic development and placental function. Active disease disturbs the hypothalamic-pituitary-axis, giving rise to periods of gonadal dysfunction. Toxic effects of immunosuppressive drugs can induce transient or permanent gonadal failure in women and men.

  2. Role of vaccinations and prophylaxis in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Despoina; Tsoulas, Christos; Tragiannidis, Athanassios; Sipsas, Nikolaos V

    2015-04-01

    Targeted strategies for reducing the increased risk of infection in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases include vaccinations as well as antibiotic prophylaxis in selected patients. However, there are still issues under debate: Is vaccination in patients with rheumatic diseases immunogenic? Is it safe? What is the impact of immunosuppressive drugs on vaccine immunogenicity and safety? Does vaccination cause disease flares? In which cases is prophylaxis against Pneumocystis jirovecii required? This review addresses these important questions to which clinicians and researchers still do not have definite answers. The first part includes immunization recommendations and reviews current data on vaccine efficacy and safety in patients with rheumatic diseases. The second part discusses prophylaxis for Pneumocystis pneumonia.

  3. Associations of MICA Polymorphisms with Inflammatory Rheumatic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingwen; Zhou, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory rheumatic diseases are characterized by inflammation resulting from the immune dysregulation that usually attacks joints, skin and internal organs. Many of them are considered as complex disease that may be predisposed by multiple genes and/or genetic loci, and triggered by environmental factors such as microbiome and cellular stress. The major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (MICA) is a highly polymorphic gene that encodes protein variants expressed under cellular stress conditions, and these MICA variants play important roles in immune activation and surveillance. Recently, accumulating evidences from both genetic and functional studies have suggested that MICA polymorphisms may be associated with various rheumatic diseases, and the expression of MICA variants may attribute to the altered immune responses in the diseases. The objective of this review is to discuss potential genetic associations and pathological relevance of MICA in inflammatory rheumatic diseases that may help us to understand pathogenesis contributing to the development of these diseases.

  4. Emergence of rheumatic fever in the nineteenth century.

    PubMed

    English, P C

    1989-01-01

    How do we make sense of the process of disease definition when the tools for "framing" a pathophysiologic reality and the reality to be framed may have both been changing? The sudden emergence of rheumatic fever at the end of the eighteenth century was the result of distinct biological changes that led to cardiac damage. But the identification of the disease also depended on the ability of clinicians to diagnose it in the absence of easily observable cardiac symptoms. Clinicians were able to appreciate the alteration of rheumatism into rheumatic fever through assimilation of technological changes (the stethoscope and autopsy), refinements in clinical thinking (the "typical case"), and the concentration of patients in hospitals where they were treated by physicians who were medical leaders and educators.

  5. [Vaccination prior to travelling for patients with rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Ehrenstein, B

    2011-06-01

    Rheumatologists increasingly face patient questions about the need, the safety and the effectiveness of travel-related vaccinations. Currently, there are no guidelines on travel vaccinations for patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases. The use of live attenuated vaccines remains contraindicated in patients receiving relevant immunosuppressive therapy despite some encouraging results from initial pilot studies. However, many inactivated travel vaccines can safely be used for patients with rheumatic diseases. Furthermore, rheumatologists should be vigilant in identifying and closing gaps in the routine vaccinations for patients.

  6. Immunological aspects of pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Redman, C W

    1992-09-01

    The first pregnancy preponderance and apparent partner specificity of pre-eclampsia suggest that it might have an immune aetiology. The pathogenesis of pre-eclampsia is undefined although it is clear that it is a placental disorder. The maternal syndrome appears to be mediated by placental ischaemia secondary to spiral artery insufficiency. This leads to a hypothesis that pre-eclampsia is a two-stage disease. The first comprises processes that limit the size of the spiral arteries (poor placentation) or obstruct them (acute atherosis). Either or both may have immunological causes although there is no direct evidence. Factors limiting placentation could involve maternal immune intolerance of the fetal allograft, which in their most extreme expression could lead to immunologically mediated abortion. Thus pre-eclampsia may be part of a wider spectrum of pregnancy loss secondary to poor maternal immune accommodation of her genetically disparate fetus. The second stage involves the consequences of the ensuing placental ischaemia. The syndrome is currently tentatively ascribed to diffuse maternal endothelial dysfunction. There is less reason to invoke immunological mechanisms in the second stage although neutrophil activation could explain generalized endothelial damage. It should be clear that these conclusions are provisional and that the greatest need is for more investigation to eliminate the uncertainty which clouds our concepts.

  7. [Pathogenesis of parodontitis in rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Detert, J; Pischon, N; Burmester, G-R; Buttgereit, F

    2010-03-01

    Inflammatory periodontal disease (PD) is a common disease worldwide that has a primarily bacterial aetiology and is characterized by dysregulation of the host inflammatory response. The degree of inflammation varies among individuals with PD independently of the degree of bacterial infection, suggesting that alteration of the immune function may substantially contribute to its extent. Factors such as smoking, education, and body mass index (BMI) are discussed as potential risk factors for PD. Most PD patients respond to bacterial invaders by mobilizing their defensive cells and releasing cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1beta, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, and IL-6, which ultimately causes tissue destruction by stimulating the production of collagenolytic enzymes, such matrix metalloproteinases. Recently, there has been growing evidence suggesting an association between PD and the increased risk of systemic diseases, such ateriosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, stroke, and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). PD and rheumatologic diseases such as RA share many pathological aspects and immunological findings. PMID:20107818

  8. Long-Term Outcomes From Acute Rheumatic Fever and Rheumatic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    He, Vincent Y.F.; Condon, John R.; Zhao, Yuejen; Roberts, Kathryn; de Dassel, Jessica L.; Currie, Bart J.; Fittock, Marea; Edwards, Keith N.; Carapetis, Jonathan R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: We investigated adverse outcomes for people with acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) and the effect of comorbidities and demographic factors on these outcomes. Methods: Using linked data (RHD register, hospital, and mortality data) for residents of the Northern Territory of Australia, we calculated ARF recurrence rates, rates of progression from ARF to RHD to severe RHD, RHD complication rates (heart failure, endocarditis, stroke, and atrial fibrillation), and mortality rates for 572 individuals diagnosed with ARF and 1248 with RHD in 1997 to 2013 (94.9% Indigenous). Results: ARF recurrence was highest (incidence, 3.7 per 100 person-years) in the first year after the initial ARF episode, but low-level risk persisted for >10 years. Progression to RHD was also highest (incidence, 35.9) in the first year, almost 10 times higher than ARF recurrence. The median age at RHD diagnosis in Indigenous people was young, especially among males (17 years). The development of complications was highest in the first year after RHD diagnosis: heart failure incidence rate per 100 person-years, 9.09; atrial fibrillation, 4.70; endocarditis, 1.00; and stroke, 0.58. Mortality was higher among Indigenous than non-Indigenous RHD patients (hazard ratio, 6.55; 95% confidence interval, 2.45–17.51), of which 28% was explained by comorbid renal failure and hazardous alcohol use. RHD complications and mortality rates were higher for urban than for remote residents. Conclusions: This study provides important new prognostic information for ARF/RHD. The residual Indigenous survival disparity in RHD patients, which persisted after accounting for comorbidities, suggests that other factors contribute to mortality, warranting further research. PMID:27407071

  9. An Australian guideline for rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease: an abridged outline.

    PubMed

    Carapetis, Jonathan R; Brown, Alex; Wilson, Nigel J; Edwards, Keith N

    2007-06-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are diseases of poverty. They occur at world-record rates in Indigenous Australians, yet individual cases are often poorly managed, and most jurisdictions with high rates of these diseases do not have formal control strategies in place. New Australian guidelines formulated in 2005 by the National Heart Foundation of Australia and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand for diagnosis and management of ARF and RHD are a valuable resource for clinicians and policymakers. Key recommendations of the guidelines include: New diagnostic criteria for ARF in high-risk populations, including Indigenous Australians, which include echocardiographic evidence of subclinical valvular disease, and polyarthralgia or aseptic monoarthritis as major manifestations. Clear guidance about treatment of ARF. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs should be withheld until the diagnosis is confirmed, and corticosteroids may be an option in severe acute carditis. Most cases of chorea do not require medication, but use of carbamazepine or sodium valproate is recommended if medication is needed. Clear guidance about dose, dosing frequency and duration of secondary prophylaxis. Benzathine penicillin G is the preferred medication for this purpose. Establishment of a coordinated control program for all regions of Australia where there are populations with high prevalence of ARF and RHD. Key elements and indicators for evaluation are recommended. Active screening and legislated notification of ARF and RHD, where possible. Development of a structured care plan for all patients with a history of ARF or with established RHD, to be recorded in the patient's primary health care record.

  10. Varieties of combat stress reaction. An immunological metaphor.

    PubMed

    Garb, R; Kutz, I; Bleich, A; Solomon, Z

    1987-08-01

    The use of an immunological metaphor allows the incorporation of established theoretical ideas about trauma and stress in an integrative way which enables delineation and illustration of several varieties of combat stress reaction, including subtle forms of that condition which do not often appear in post-traumatic stress disorder literature. PMID:3690116

  11. The Ambiguity in Immunology

    PubMed Central

    Barnaba, Vincenzo; Paroli, Marino; Piconese, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    In the present article, we discuss the various ambiguous aspects of the immune system that render this complex biological network so highly flexible and able to defend the host from different external invaders. This ambiguity stems mainly from the property of the immune system to be both protective and harmful. Immunity cannot be fully protective without producing a certain degree of damage (immunopathology) to the host. The balance between protection and tissue damage is, therefore, critical for the establishment of immune homeostasis and protection. In this review, we will consider as ambiguous, various immunological tactics including: (a) the opposing functions driving immune responses, immune-regulation, and contra-regulation, as well as (b) the phenomenon of chronic immune activation as a result of a continuous cross-presentation of apoptotic T cells by dendritic cells. All these plans participate principally to maintain a state of chronic low-level inflammation during persisting infections, and ultimately to favor the species survival. PMID:22566903

  12. Immunology of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Beverley, P C L

    2002-01-01

    An ideal vaccine is relatively easy to define, but few real vaccines approach the ideal and no vaccines exist for many organisms, for which a vaccine is the only realistic protective strategy in the foreseeable future. Many difficulties account for the failure to produce these vaccines. All micro-organisms deploy evasion mechanisms that interfere with effective immune responses and, for many organisms, it is not clear which immune responses provide effective protection. However, recent advances in methods for studying immune response to pathogens have provided a better understanding of immune mechanisms, including immunological memory, and led to the realisation that the initiation of immune responses is a key event requiring triggering through 'danger' signals. Based on these findings, the development of novel adjuvants, vectors and vaccine formulations allowing stimulation of optimal and prolonged protective immunity should lead to the introduction of vaccines for previously resistant organisms. PMID:12176847

  13. PEYER'S PATCHES: IMMUNOLOGIC STUDIES

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Claudia; Faulk, W. Page; Kuhn, Lotte; Yoffey, J. M.; Fudenberg, H. Hugh

    1970-01-01

    The immune capabilities of the Peyer's patches have been investigated by the use of an in vitro system. Despite our failure to stimulate Peyer's patch lymphocytes in vivo it appears that Peyer's patches behave immunologically as peripheral lymphoid tissues. Cultures prepared from the dissociated Peyer's patches of normal rabbits respond to sheep erythrocytes. The response is comparable to that obtained with spleen cultures from the same animals and is not dependent on the presence of the epithelial cells which line the lumen. Similar thymic cultures do not respond. Our experiments with cultures prepared from rabbits which have received one or two injections of SRC show that the Peyer's patches contain both IgM and IgG "memory" cells which have migrated from the spleen. The concentration of these cells in the spleen remains several hundredfold higher. PMID:5463217

  14. Costs of drugs for treatment of rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Westhovens, Rene; Annemans, Lieven

    2016-01-01

    The cost of drugs is becoming an issue worldwide, in particular for inflammatory rheumatic diseases. In the current review, an overview of the scene is given with a specific emphasis on accessibility for those patients in real need of the available expensive treatments. The authors propose 7 principles for discussion that need to be addressed and are a responsibility for all stakeholders in rheumatology.

  15. Rheumatic heart disease in childhood: comparative study between Japan and Thailand.

    PubMed

    Mori, C; Okuda, R; Nishioka, K; Ueda, C; Phornphvtkul, C

    1979-05-01

    This report showed the comparative study of the rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in Japan and Thailand. At first, there is remarkable difference about the incidence of the rheumatic heart disease. The incidence of the rheumatic heart disease in Thailand was one hundred times that in Japan. Secondly, there is particular difference about the course of mitral stenosis in childhood. In Japan common pattern of rheumatic heart disease was slight mitral insufficiency and mitral stenosis was seldom. In Thailand mitral stenosis was observed in 5% on rheumatic heart disease, and mitral stenosis developed early following an attack of rheumatic fever. These differences were supposed due to the socio-economic state in each country.

  16. [Acute rheumatic fever and infectious-inflammatory diseases of the pharynx: the relationship, treatment, and prophylaxis].

    PubMed

    Belov, B S

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between pharyngeal infections, such as tonsillitis and pharyngitis, caused by group A beta-hemolytic streptococci (BHSA) and acute rheumatic fever (ARF) is a well-established fact confirmed by numerous studies carried out along the following lines: epidemiological, immunological, therapeutic, and prophylactic. The currently available data provide an opportunity to discuss the existence of «rheumatogenic» BHSA strains exhibiting a number of characteristic clinical and morphological properties. According to the current recommendations penicillins remain the means of first-line therapy for the treatment of acute forms of BHSA-induced tonsillitis and pharyngitis, whereas the macrolides should be applied only as the alternative medications in the patients with intolerance to beta-lactam antibiotics. This article contains characteristics of BHSA-carrier state and the principal indications for the prescription of antibiotics to the patients with these conditions. The key principle of secondary medicamental prophylaxis of acute respiratory infections are expounded along with the main fines of future research on the problems associated with BHSA-induced pharyngeal infections. PMID:26870861

  17. Coconut Atrium in Long-Standing Rheumatic Valvular Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Takahisa; Idei, Yuka; Otsui, Kazunori; Iwata, Sachiyo; Suzuki, Atsushi; Ozawa, Toru; Domoto, Koji; Takei, Asumi; Inamoto, Shinya; Inoue, Nobutaka

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 76 Final Diagnosis: Rheumatic valvular heart disease Symptoms: Breathlessness and leg edema Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Medical treatment for heart failure Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Rare disease Background: Complete calcification of the left atrium (LA) is called “coconut atrium”, which decreases the compliance of LA, leading to the elevation of LA pressure that is transmitted to the right-side of the heart. The pathogenesis of LA calcification in patients with rheumatic heart disease is unknown; however, possible mechanisms include chronic strain force in the atrial wall and inflammation. We report here a patient with long-standing rheumatic valvular heart disease with coconut atrium. Case Report: A 76-year-old man presented with breathlessness and leg edema due to right-sided heart failure. He was diagnosed with rheumatic fever at 8 years of age. Mitral commissurotomy and the mitral and aortic valve replacement were previously performed to treat mitral and aortic valvular stenosis. The profile view of the chest X-ray indicated a diffuse calcified outline of the LA wall. A transthoracic echocardiogram revealed pulmonary hyper-tension and dilatation of both atria. Moreover, computed tomography showed nearly circumferential calcification of the LA wall. Despite intense medical treatment, he succumbed to heart failure. An autopsy demonstrated that the LA was markedly dilated, its wall was calcified, and its appearance was similar to the surface of an atherosclerotic aorta. Microscopic examination revealed intensive calcification in the endocardium. Minimal accumulation of inflammatory cells was noted. Although slight fibrosis was observed, the cardiac musculature was preserved. Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that identifies the histological changes of LA calcification associated with long-standing rheumatic valvular heart disease. PMID:25819539

  18. Hepatitis B Serology in Patients with Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Feuchtenberger, Martin; Schäfer, Arne; Philipp Nigg, Axel; Rupert Kraus, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background: Only limited data are available on the prevalence of hepatitis B in patients with proven rheumatic diseases and thus the risk of reactivation under immunosuppressive therapy. Objective: To analyse hepatitis B serology in patients with rheumatic diseases prior to therapy. Method: In total, 1,338 patient records were analysed for HBsAg, HBsAb and HBcAb in a cross-sectional, single-centre study between 2011 and 2015 at first presentation. Data acquisition was realized using electronic patient files created during routine care. The main variables considered as predictors for HBV reactivation included (i) the exact type of rheumatic disease and (ii) the therapeutically induced immunosuppression. Results: Overall, 5.9% of patients (n=79) had proven contact with hepatitis B (HBcAb positive), and HBsAb were not detected in 1.3% (n=18). The rate of vaccinated subjects was 7.8%. HBsAg was detected in 3 patients (0.2%). In addition, 70.3% of patients were treated during the course of rheumatologic disease previously or currently with glucocorticoids, 85.2% with disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and 20.1% with a biologic agent (e.g., anti-IL-6, anti-TNFalpha, anti-CD20, CTLA4Ig or anti-IL-12/23). Conclusion: Prevalence of hepatitis B serostatus in the analysed rheumatic patients regarding HBs-Ag and HBcAb with or without HBsAb prior to therapy does not differ from the data published for the general population in Germany. However, the rate of hepatitis B vaccinated patients was lower. In general, a significant portion of patients (5.9%) has been exposed to HBV and therefore exhibited an increased risk of reactivation of hepatitis B when undergoing immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:27708728

  19. Citizens unite for computational immunology!

    PubMed Central

    Belden, Orrin S.; Baker, Sarah Catherine; Baker, Brian M.

    2016-01-01

    Crowdsourcing by recruiting volunteers who can provide computational time, programming expertise, or puzzle-solving talent has emerged as a powerful tool for biomedical research. Recent projects demonstrate the potential for crowdsourcing in immunology. Tools for developing applications, new funding, and an eager public make crowdsourcing a serious option for creative solutions for computationally-challenging immunological problems. Expanded uses of crowdsourcing in immunology will allow for more efficient large-scale data collection and analysis. It will also involve, inspire, educate, and engage the public in a variety of meaningful ways. The benefits are real – it’s time to jump in! PMID:26139599

  20. Vitamin D endocrine system and the immune response in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Plebani, M; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Adorini, Luciano; Tincani, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicates a significant association between vitamin D deficiency and an increased incidence of autoimmune diseases. The presence of vitamin D receptors (VDRs) in the cells of the immune system and the fact that several of these cells produce the vitamin D hormone suggested that vitamin D could have immunoregulatory properties, and now potent immunomodulatory activities on dendritic cells, Th1 and Th17 cells, as well as B cells have been confirmed. Serum levels of vitamin D have been found to be significantly lower in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, undifferentiated connective tissue disease, and type-1 diabetes mellitus than in the healthy population. In addition, it was also found that lower levels of vitamin D were associated with higher disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis. Promising clinical results together with evidence for the regulation of multiple immunomodulatory mechanisms by VDR agonists represent a sound basis for further exploration of their potential in the treatment of rheumatic autoimmune disorders. PMID:21419278

  1. Obesity as a Risk and Severity Factor in Rheumatic Diseases (Autoimmune Chronic Inflammatory Diseases)

    PubMed Central

    Gremese, Elisa; Tolusso, Barbara; Gigante, Maria Rita; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco

    2014-01-01

    The growing body of evidence recognizing the adipose tissue (AT) as an active endocrine organ secreting bioactive mediators involved in metabolic and inflammatory disorders, together with the global epidemic of overweight and obesity, rise obesity as a hot topic of current research. The chronic state of low-grade inflammation present in the obese condition and the multiple pleiotropic effects of adipokines on the immune system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory conditions including rheumatic autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. We will discuss the main relevant evidences on the role of the AT on immune and inflammatory networks and the more recent evidences regarding the effects of obesity on the incidence and outcomes of the major autoimmune chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:25426122

  2. Vitamin D endocrine system and the immune response in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Plebani, M; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Adorini, Luciano; Tincani, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicates a significant association between vitamin D deficiency and an increased incidence of autoimmune diseases. The presence of vitamin D receptors (VDRs) in the cells of the immune system and the fact that several of these cells produce the vitamin D hormone suggested that vitamin D could have immunoregulatory properties, and now potent immunomodulatory activities on dendritic cells, Th1 and Th17 cells, as well as B cells have been confirmed. Serum levels of vitamin D have been found to be significantly lower in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, undifferentiated connective tissue disease, and type-1 diabetes mellitus than in the healthy population. In addition, it was also found that lower levels of vitamin D were associated with higher disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis. Promising clinical results together with evidence for the regulation of multiple immunomodulatory mechanisms by VDR agonists represent a sound basis for further exploration of their potential in the treatment of rheumatic autoimmune disorders.

  3. Translating outcomes measurement in experimental therapeutics of systemic rheumatic disease to patient care.

    PubMed

    Liang, Matthew H

    2006-02-01

    This article discusses the clinimetrics of disease activity and organ damage, and response criteria using systemic lupus erythematosus as a paradigm. Similar considerations apply to the other systemic rheumatic illnesses. Clinically relevant and psychometrically tested measures of disease states aid the conduct of clinical studies and trials that are more rigorous, efficient, and relevant to patients' concerns. These same measures used in clinical trials will likely improve clinical outcomes if they are used in the monitoring and titration of therapy in patients who have these disorders. For this use to really occur, clinical trials will have to demonstrate treatments that alter these therapies in a meaningful way and the measures or modifications of them will need to meet the desiderata of techniques that can be used in practice.

  4. Immunological Aspects of Bagassosis

    PubMed Central

    Hearn, C. E. D.; Holford-Strevens, Valerie

    1968-01-01

    Immunological investigations of 37 patients with bagassosis, 92 unaffected bagasse workers, and 150 non-exposed controls showed that precipitins against extracts of bagasse could be demonstrated just as frequently in the unaffected and the non-exposed as in the affected. However, there was a general tendency for the precipitin levels of patients with bagassosis to fall slightly with increasing time after recovery from the clinical episode. The presence of the precipitins so far demonstrated in the sera of bagasse workers therefore appears to be of no clinical significance. Inhalation tests with an extract of bagasse, in a group of 16 patients who had had bagassosis, produced late, systemic reactions in 15 similar to those described in farmer's lung and bird fancier's lung, so supporting the hypothesis that a similar type of hypersensitivity is the cause of bagassosis. Inhalation of extracts of Thermoactinomyces vulgaris also produced typical, late reactions in 12 out of 15 subjects, whereas extracts of Micropolyspora faeni failed to produce reactions in any of 16 subjects. The specific reactions to inhalation tests with Thermoactinomyces vulgaris were typical of a precipitin-mediated type of hypersensitivity reaction and support the view that this actinomycete may be important in the aetiology of bagassosis. PMID:4972748

  5. Mucosal immunology and probiotics.

    PubMed

    Dongarrà, Maria Luisa; Rizzello, Valeria; Muccio, Letizia; Fries, Walter; Cascio, Antonio; Bonaccorsi, Irene; Ferlazzo, Guido

    2013-02-01

    The cross-talk between the mucosa-associated immune system and microbiota is critical in mucosal tissue homeostasis as well as in protection against infectious and inflammatory diseases occurring at mucosal sites. This recent evidence has paved the way to therapeutic approaches aimed at modulating the mucosa-associated immune system using probiotics. Different strains of probiotics possess the ability to finely regulate dendritic cell (DC) activation, polarizing the subsequent T cell activity toward Th1 (e.g. Lactobacillus (Lb) acidophilus), Th2 (Lb.reuteri and Bifidobacterium bifidum) or, as more recently demonstrated, Th17 responses induced by specific strains such as Lb.rhamnosus GG and Lac23a, the latter isolated in our laboratory. Here, we review some recent advances in our understanding of probiotics effects on mucosal immunology, particularly on cells of the innate immunity such as DCs. We also highlight our own experiences in modulating DC functions by commensal bacteria and discuss the relevance of probiotics administration in the treatment of human immunopathologies.

  6. Immunology of schistosomiasis*

    PubMed Central

    1974-01-01

    This Memorandum, after summarizing the life cycle of the different species of human schistosome, reviews the present knowledge of the immunology of schistosomiasis. Each stage of the parasite contains antigen that may stimulate an immune response. However, at the moment there are no accepted serological in vitro tests that correlate with protection; this develops only after the host has experienced a living infection, which suggests that the stimulation of immunity is due to some metabolic process involving the release of protective antigen. The adult worm, however, seems to be able to escape the immune mechanism of the host. Specific antigens are also released by the eggs, and the immune response against these antigens seems to cause granuloma formation around the egg itself. The granuloma is the main lesion found in schistosomiasis. Evidence for protective immunity in experimental animals and man is reviewed, together with the possible mechanism by which the adult worm escapes the immune response of the host. A review of methods used for the diagnosis of schistosomiasis and a list of recommendations for further research are also included. PMID:4219757

  7. Introduction. Ecological immunology

    PubMed Central

    Schulenburg, Hinrich; Kurtz, Joachim; Moret, Yannick; Siva-Jothy, Michael T.

    2008-01-01

    An organism's fitness is critically reliant on its immune system to provide protection against parasites and pathogens. The structure of even simple immune systems is surprisingly complex and clearly will have been moulded by the organism's ecology. The aim of this review and the theme issue is to examine the role of different ecological factors on the evolution of immunity. Here, we will provide a general framework of the field by contextualizing the main ecological factors, including interactions with parasites, other types of biotic as well as abiotic interactions, intraspecific selective constraints (life-history trade-offs, sexual selection) and population genetic processes. We then elaborate the resulting immunological consequences such as the diversity of defence mechanisms (e.g. avoidance behaviour, resistance, tolerance), redundancy and protection against immunopathology, life-history integration of the immune response and shared immunity within a community (e.g. social immunity and microbiota-mediated protection). Our review summarizes the concepts of current importance and directs the reader to promising future research avenues that will deepen our understanding of the defence against parasites and pathogens. PMID:18926970

  8. Immunology of lymphatic filariasis.

    PubMed

    Babu, S; Nutman, T B

    2014-08-01

    The immune responses to filarial parasites encompass a complex network of innate and adaptive cells whose interaction with the parasite underlies a spectrum of clinical manifestations. The predominant immunological feature of lymphatic filariasis is an antigen-specific Th2 response and an expansion of IL-10 producing CD4(+) T cells that is accompanied by a muted Th1 response. This antigen-specific T-cell hyporesponsiveness appears to be crucial for the maintenance of the sustained, long-standing infection often with high parasite densities. While the correlates of protective immunity to lymphatic filariasis are still incompletely understood, primarily due to the lack of suitable animal models to study susceptibility, it is clear that T cells and to a certain extent B cells are required for protective immunity. Host immune responses, especially CD4(+) T-cell responses clearly play a role in mediating pathological manifestations of LF, including lymphedema, hydrocele and elephantiasis. The main underlying defect in the development of clinical pathology appears to be a failure to induce T-cell hyporesponsiveness in the face of antigenic stimulation. Finally, another intriguing feature of filarial infections is their propensity to induce bystander effects on a variety of immune responses, including responses to vaccinations, allergens and to other infectious agents. The complexity of the immune response to filarial infection therefore provides an important gateway to understanding the regulation of immune responses to chronic infections, in general.

  9. Immunology of lymphatic filariasis

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Subash; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    The immune responses to filarial parasites encompass a complex network of innate and adaptive cells whose interaction with the parasite underlies a spectrum of clinical manifestations. The predominant immunological feature of lymphatic filariasis is an antigen - specific Th2 response and an expansion of IL-10 producing CD4+ T cells that is accompanied by a muted Th1 response. This antigen specific T cell hypo-responsiveness appears to be crucial for the maintenance of the sustained, long-standing infection often with high parasite densities. While the correlates of protective immunity to lymphatic filariasis are still incompletely understood, primarily due to the lack of suitable animal models to study susceptibility, it is clear that T cells and to a certain extent B cells are required for protective immunity. Host immune responses, especially CD4+ T cell responses clearly play a role in mediating pathological manifestations of LF, including lymphedema, hydrocele and elephantiasis. The main underlying defect in the development of clinical pathology appears to be a failure to induce T cell hypo-responsiveness in the face of antigenic stimulation. Finally, another intriguing feature of filarial infections is their propensity to induce bystander effects on a variety of immune responses, including responses to vaccinations, allergens and to other infectious agents. The complexity of the immune response to filarial infection therefore provides an important gateway to understanding the regulation of immune responses to chronic infections, in general. PMID:24134686

  10. The Relationship Between Genetics and Environment in the Pathogenesis of Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Calin, Andrei

    1979-01-01

    Major developments have taken place to further our understanding of the relationship between genetics and the environment in the pathogenesis of rheumatic disorders. The association between HLA markers and human disease is becoming clearer. For instance, HLA-DRW4 frequently occurs in patients with rheumatoid disease, and penicillamine and gold toxicity are seen most often in patients with HLA-DRW2 or DRW3. Antisera to B alloantigens help define the genetic differences between systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. As yet, the most dramatic link is that between HLA-B27 and primary ankylosing spondylitis. This same antigen is related, to varying degrees, with other members of the seronegative spondylarthritides and there is strong evidence that this association is related to HLA-B27, itself, rather than an associated disease gene. Nevertheless, some data refute a single gene theory. We are just beginning to learn more about interactions between different genes on the sixth chromosome and genes on other chromosomes. The sex ratio of the spondylarthritides is now better defined. Sacroiliitis may have a comparable sex distribution although females have more peripheral joint disease and males have greater spinal involvement. Unfortunately, the explanation for these differences remains elusive. The specific infective agents related to the development of rheumatic disorders are becoming clarified. Chlamydia, Salmonella, Yersinia and Shigella flexneri types 1b and 2a are arthritogenic, while Shigella sonnei appears not to cause disease. Although the Reiter syndrome is now considered a chronic disease, the reason for remissions and relapses remains unclear. PMID:18748470

  11. Immunological memory to viral infection.

    PubMed

    Slifka, Mark K

    2004-08-01

    Immunological memory is defined by the ability of a host to remember a past encounter with a specific pathogen and to respond to it in an effective manner upon re-exposure. How long immunological memory can be maintained in the absence of re-infection continues to be a subject of great controversy. Recent studies on immunity following smallpox vaccination demonstrate that T-cell memory declines steadily with a half-life of 8-15 years, whereas antiviral antibody responses are maintained for up to 75 years without appreciable decline. By combining recent advances in quantitative immunology with historical accounts of protection against smallpox dating back to the time of Edward Jenner, we are gaining a better understanding of the duration and magnitude of immunological memory and how it relates to protective immunity. PMID:15245737

  12. Update on diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever: 2015 Jones criteria

    PubMed Central

    Eroğlu, Ayşe Güler

    2016-01-01

    In the final Jones criteria, different diagnostic criteria were established for the diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever for low risk and moderate-high risk populations. Turkey was found to be compatible with moderate-high risk populations as a result of regional screenings performed in terms of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease. The changes in the diagnostic criteria for low-risk populations include subclinical carditis found on echocardiogram as a major criterion in addition to carditis found clinically and a body temperature of 38.5°C and above as a minor criterion. In moderate-high risk populations including Turkey, subclinical carditis found on echocardiogram in addition to clinical carditis is used as a major criterion as a new amendment. In addition, aseptic monoarthritis and polyarthralgia are used as major criteria in addition to migratory arthritis and monoarhtralgia is used as a minor criterion among joint findings. However, differentiation of subclinical carditis from physiological valve regurgitation found in healthy individuals and exclusion of other diseases involving joints when aseptic monoarthritis and polyarthralgia are used as major criteria are very important. In addition, a body temperature of 38°C and above and an erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 30 mm/h and above have been accepted as minor criteria. The diagnostic criteria for the first attack have not been changed; three minor findings have been accepted in presence of previous sterptococcal infection in addition to the old cirteria for recurrent attacks. In the final Jones criteria, it has been recommended that patients who do not fully meet the diagnostic criteria of acute rheumatic fever should be treated as acute rheumatic fever if another diagnosis is not considered and should be followed up with benzathine penicilin prophylaxis for 12 months. It has been decided that these patients be evaluated 12 months later and a decision for continuation or discontinuation of

  13. [Indifferentiated rheumatism and/or epileptic flatulence].

    PubMed

    Veiga Cabello, R; Toral Revuelta, J R; Sánchez Sánchez, E; Fernández Alvaro, J; Sáez Garrido, J de D

    2003-07-01

    A clinical case study of a 50 year-old woman brought to the Rhematology Department is presented, who showed clinical dry syndrome with immune disorders (not currently defined) and developed tumors (benign at present) and analytical autoimmunity with positive antitopoisomerase type I (formerly Scl70) confirmed. The clinical case is commented and the metheorism causes are discussed, among it, a possible variation of abdominal epilepsy as ictal flatulence, secondary to a meningioma of the right brain convexity. PMID:12892555

  14. The human microbiome in rheumatic autoimmune diseases: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Coit, Patrick; Sawalha, Amr H

    2016-09-01

    The human microbiome consists of the total diversity of microbiota and their genes. High-throughput sequencing has allowed for inexpensive and rapid evaluation of taxonomic representation and functional capability of the microbiomes of human body sites. Autoimmune and inflammatory rheumatic diseases are characterized by dysbiosis of the microbiome. Microbiome dysbiosis can be influenced by host genetics and environmental factors. Dysbiosis is also associated with shifts in certain functional pathways. The goal of this article is to provide a current and comprehensive review of the unique characteristics of the microbiome of patients with autoimmune and inflammatory rheumatic diseases, measured using high-throughput sequencing. We also highlight the need for broader studies utilizing a longitudinal approach to better understand how the human microbiome contributes to disease susceptibility, and to characterize the role of the interaction between host genetics and microbial diversity in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, disease manifestations, and progression. PMID:27493014

  15. Oral health of patients with severe rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Maharaj, Breminand; Vayej, Ahmed C

    2012-07-01

    In order to determine whether adequate attention is paid to the maintenance of good oral health in patients at risk of developing infective endocarditis, we studied 44 black patients with severe rheumatic heart disease before they had cardiac surgery. Plaque and gingival index scores were calculated and panoramic radiographs were done in all patients. There were 17 males and 27 females (mean age: 30.6 years). The plaque and gingival index scores were classified as poor in 31.8 and 54.6% of patients, respectively. Panoramic radiographic findings included caries in 56.8% of patients, peri-apical pathology in 18.1% and retained roots in 22.7% of patients. This study demonstrates that inadequate attention is paid to the maintenance of good oral health in patients with severe rheumatic heart disease. The oral and dental care of patients at risk of developing infective endocarditis needs to be improved. PMID:22836156

  16. [Guidelines for the laboratory diagnosis of rheumatic diseases (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Harter, F

    1977-06-01

    The methods for laboratory diagnosis of rheumatic diseases are subdivided into 10 groups according to their informative value. The following aspects are taken into consideration: general diagnosis of inflammation, infective processes with hemolytic streptococci and staphylococci, streptococcal agglutinations, rheumatoid factor tests in the strictest sense, detection of autoantibodies, the HLA-system, investigations in metabolic diseases and generalized skeletal diseases, bacteriological and serological investigations in joint infections and tests in symptomatic diseases of joints and muscles. In the evaluation of the individual methods and the discussion of their application in various types of disease, the following provisional diagnoses are gone into: streptococcal rheumatism, rheumatoid arthritis, monarthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, Reiter's syndrome and psoriatic arthritis, myositis and polymyositis.

  17. Acute rheumatic fever: the danger for our children.

    PubMed

    Casey, Georgina

    2013-06-01

    THE NEW Zealand Government's allocation of $21 million in the 2013 Budget for treatment and prevention of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) highlights the impact this disease has on the long-term health of New Zealand's marginalised communities. ARF is a disease confined largely to developing nations and is regarded in the developed world as a disease of deprivation and poverty, yet New Zealand has a high incidence, Largely within Maori and Pacific populations. ARF arises from an often mild throat infection caused by streptococcal bacteria. The mechanisms by which this microorganism triggers rheumatic fever and its cardiac sequelae are complex. Awareness of these mechanisms can help health professionals understand prevention and treatment strategies designed to reduce the burden of ARF in vulnerable communities. PMID:23914448

  18. Preliminary consultation on preferred product characteristics of benzathine penicillin G for secondary prophylaxis of rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Wyber, Rosemary; Boyd, Ben J; Colquhoun, Samantha; Currie, Bart J; Engel, Mark; Kado, Joseph; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Sullivan, Mark; Saxena, Anita; Sheel, Meru; Steer, Andrew; Mucumbitsi, Joseph; Zühlke, Liesl; Carapetis, Jonathan

    2016-10-01

    Rheumatic fever is caused by an abnormal immune reaction to group A streptococcal infection. Secondary prophylaxis with antibiotics is recommended for people after their initial episode of rheumatic fever to prevent recurrent group A streptococcal infections, recurrences of rheumatic fever and progression to rheumatic heart disease. This secondary prophylaxis must be maintained for at least a decade after the last episode of rheumatic fever. Benzathine penicillin G is the first line antibiotic for secondary prophylaxis, delivered intramuscularly every 2 to 4 weeks. However, adherence to recommended secondary prophylaxis regimens is a global challenge. This paper outlines a consultation with global experts in rheumatic heart disease on the characteristics of benzathine penicillin G formulations which could be changed to improve adherence with secondary prophylaxis. Characteristics included dose interval, pain, administration mechanism, cold chain independence and cost. A sample target product profile for reformulated benzathine penicillin G is presented. PMID:27465618

  19. Preliminary consultation on preferred product characteristics of benzathine penicillin G for secondary prophylaxis of rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Wyber, Rosemary; Boyd, Ben J; Colquhoun, Samantha; Currie, Bart J; Engel, Mark; Kado, Joseph; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Sullivan, Mark; Saxena, Anita; Sheel, Meru; Steer, Andrew; Mucumbitsi, Joseph; Zühlke, Liesl; Carapetis, Jonathan

    2016-10-01

    Rheumatic fever is caused by an abnormal immune reaction to group A streptococcal infection. Secondary prophylaxis with antibiotics is recommended for people after their initial episode of rheumatic fever to prevent recurrent group A streptococcal infections, recurrences of rheumatic fever and progression to rheumatic heart disease. This secondary prophylaxis must be maintained for at least a decade after the last episode of rheumatic fever. Benzathine penicillin G is the first line antibiotic for secondary prophylaxis, delivered intramuscularly every 2 to 4 weeks. However, adherence to recommended secondary prophylaxis regimens is a global challenge. This paper outlines a consultation with global experts in rheumatic heart disease on the characteristics of benzathine penicillin G formulations which could be changed to improve adherence with secondary prophylaxis. Characteristics included dose interval, pain, administration mechanism, cold chain independence and cost. A sample target product profile for reformulated benzathine penicillin G is presented.

  20. Costs of drugs for treatment of rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Westhovens, Rene; Annemans, Lieven

    2016-01-01

    The cost of drugs is becoming an issue worldwide, in particular for inflammatory rheumatic diseases. In the current review, an overview of the scene is given with a specific emphasis on accessibility for those patients in real need of the available expensive treatments. The authors propose 7 principles for discussion that need to be addressed and are a responsibility for all stakeholders in rheumatology. PMID:27651923

  1. Costs of drugs for treatment of rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Westhovens, Rene; Annemans, Lieven

    2016-01-01

    The cost of drugs is becoming an issue worldwide, in particular for inflammatory rheumatic diseases. In the current review, an overview of the scene is given with a specific emphasis on accessibility for those patients in real need of the available expensive treatments. The authors propose 7 principles for discussion that need to be addressed and are a responsibility for all stakeholders in rheumatology. PMID:27651923

  2. Is pregnancy a risk factor for rheumatic autoimmune diseases?

    PubMed Central

    Marder, Wendy; Somers, Emily C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review To review the association of pregnancy with the risk of subsequent development of rheumatic autoimmune diseases in women, including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and scleroderma. Recent findings There is a small but growing literature related to the risk of autoimmune rheumatic disease in association with pregnancy history. However, results conflict both in terms of the direction and magnitude of risk of disease in relationship to prior pregnancy history. Although anecdotal evidence tends to favor the premise that pregnancy is protective against certain diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, the heterogeneity of results precludes the ability to confirm an association in either direction. There is indication that time elapsed since pregnancy may influence risk, with the postpartum year being of particular relevance. Summary To date, a clear pattern has not emerged regarding pregnancy and the future risk of autoimmune rheumatic diseases. This topic requires greater study, and given the strong female preponderance of these diseases, future research efforts should seek to resolve this important issue. PMID:24646947

  3. Acute rheumatic fever in First Nations communities in northwestern Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Janet; Kirlew, Mike; Schreiber, Yoko; Saginur, Raphael; Bocking, Natalie; Blakelock, Brittany; Haavaldsrud, Michelle; Kennedy, Christine; Farrell, Terri; Douglas, Lloyd; Kelly, Len

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To document a case series of 8 young First Nations patients diagnosed with acute rheumatic fever (ARF), a preventable disease that resulted in the death of 2 patients, in northwestern Ontario in the context of late diagnosis, overcrowded housing, and inadequate public health response. Design Retrospective case series over an 18-month period. Setting Remote First Nations communities in northwestern Ontario. Participants Eight patients with ARF. Main outcome measures Incidence, mortality, residual rheumatic heart disease, time to diagnosis, barriers to diagnosis and treatment, housing situation of patients, patient demographic characteristics (age, sex), and investigation results. Results The incidence of ARF in this population was 21.3 per 100 000, which is 75 times greater than the overall Canadian estimated incidence. The average patient age was 9.4 years. Most cases developed joint findings, and 5 of the surviving patients had rheumatic heart disease when they received echocardiography. The average time to diagnosis was 88 days. Two 4-year-old children died from ARF. Most patients lived in inadequate and crowded housing. Conclusion This rare disease still exists in remote First Nations communities. These communities demonstrate an incidence equal to that in aboriginal communities in Australia and New Zealand, which have among the highest international incidence of ARF. Primordial prevention, including improved on-reserve housing, is urgently needed. Case detection and ongoing surveillance for primary and secondary prophylaxis requires a well resourced regional strategy. PMID:26759842

  4. [Special features of physical therapy for elderly rheumatic patients].

    PubMed

    Hardt, R

    2012-07-01

    The demographic shift is leading to a rapid rise in the number of elderly citizens. Accordingly, the number of geriatric problems is also increasing within the population of rheumatic patients. Geriatric patients are characterized through the triad of high age, multimorbidity and functional deficits. Almost all will show signs of arthritis and other degenerative musculoskeletal illnesses. Inflammatory rheumatic diseases within the geriatric population are found to be mostly in the chronic stage or with defective conditions. Problems typical of this population, such as comorbidities especially in the cardiovascular sector, must be assessed prior to the application of therapeutic concepts. The focus is on activating therapies, such as physiotherapy and occupational therapy, where the functional usefulness is proven. The use of thermal therapy, especially applied in the form of heat, as well as electrotherapy and high frequency therapy are also useful when indicated. Balneotherapy and hydrotherapy, as well as massage therapy and lymphatic drainage, must be adapted to the cardiovascular function of geriatric patients; this applies especially to heart failure patients. Physical therapy concepts in elderly rheumatic patients should preferably be implemented and managed by a multidisciplinary geriatric team.

  5. Regulation of immunological and inflammatory functions by biotin.

    PubMed

    Kuroishi, Toshinobu

    2015-12-01

    Biotin is a water-soluble B-complex vitamin and is well-known as a co-factor for 5 indispensable carboxylases. Holocarboxylase synthetase (HLCS) catalyzes the biotinylation of carboxylases and other proteins, whereas biotinidase catalyzes the release of biotin from biotinylated peptides. Previous studies have reported that nutritional biotin deficiency and genetic defects in either HLCS or biotinidase induces cutaneous inflammation and immunological disorders. Since biotin-dependent carboxylases involve various cellular metabolic pathways including gluconeogenesis, fatty acid synthesis, and the metabolism of branched-chain amino acids and odd-chain fatty acids, metabolic abnormalities may play important roles in immunological and inflammatory disorders caused by biotin deficiency. Transcriptional factors, including NF-κB and Sp1/3, are also affected by the status of biotin, indicating that biotin regulates immunological and inflammatory functions independently of biotin-dependent carboxylases. An in-vivo analysis with a murine model revealed the therapeutic effects of biotin supplementation on metal allergies. The novel roles of biotinylated proteins and their related enzymes have recently been reported. Non-carboxylase biotinylated proteins induce chemokine production. HLCS is a nuclear protein involved in epigenetic and chromatin regulation. In this review, comprehensive knowledge on the regulation of immunological and inflammatory functions by biotin and its potential as a therapeutic agent is discussed. PMID:26168302

  6. Advances in potential M-protein peptide-based vaccines for preventing rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Batzloff, Michael R; Pandey, Manisha; Olive, Colleen; Good, Michael F

    2006-01-01

    Rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are postinfectious complications of an infection (or repeated infection) with the Gram-positive bacterium, Streptococcus pyogenes (also known as group A streptococcus, GAS). RF and RHD are global problems and affect many indigenous populations of developed countries and many developing countries. However, RF and RHD are only part of a larger spectrum of diseases caused by this organism. The development of a vaccine against GAS has primarily targeted the abundant cell-surface protein called the M-protein. This review focuses on different M-protein-based-subunit vaccine approaches and the different delivery technologies used to administer these vaccine candidates in preclinical studies. PMID:17172649

  7. Immunology of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Müller, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Increased proinflammatory markers like cytokines have been described in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid of patients suffering from schizophrenia. Animal models have shown that a hit in early life to the immune system might trigger a lifelong increased immune reactivity. Many epidemiological and clinical studies show the role of various infectious agents as risk factors for schizophrenia with overlap to other psychoses. The first large-scale epidemiological study in psychiatry from Denmark clearly demonstrates severe infections and autoimmune disorders during lifetime to be risk factors for schizophrenia. Genetic studies have shown the strongest signal for schizophrenia on chromosome 6p22.1, in a region related to the major histocompatibility complex and other immune functions. The vulnerability-stress-inflammation model is important as stress may increase proinflammatory cytokines and even contribute to a lasting proinflammatory state. The immune system itself is considered an important further piece in the puzzle, as in autoimmune disorders in general, which are always linked to three factors: genes, the environment and the immune system. Alterations of dopaminergic, serotonergic, noradrenergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission have been shown with low-level neuroinflammation and may directly be involved in the generation of schizophrenic symptoms. Loss of central nervous system volume and microglial activation has been demonstrated in schizophrenia in neuroimaging studies, which supports the assumption of a low-level neuroinflammatory process. Further support comes from the therapeutic benefit of anti-inflammatory medications in specific studies and the anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory intrinsic effects of antipsychotics.

  8. Noncoding RNAs in Cancer Immunology.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Liu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer immunology is the study of interaction between cancer cells and immune system by the application of immunology principle and theory. With the recent approval of several new drugs targeting immune checkpoints in cancer, cancer immunology has become a very attractive field of research and is thought to be the new hope to conquer cancer. This chapter introduces the aberrant expression and function of noncoding RNAs, mainly microRNAs and long noncoding RNAs, in tumor-infiltrating immune cells, and their significance in tumor immunity. It also illustrates how noncoding RNAs are shuttled between tumor cells and immune cells in tumor microenvironments via exosomes or other microvesicles to modulate tumor immunity. PMID:27376738

  9. Citizens unite for computational immunology!

    PubMed

    Belden, Orrin S; Baker, Sarah Catherine; Baker, Brian M

    2015-07-01

    Recruiting volunteers who can provide computational time, programming expertise, or puzzle-solving talent has emerged as a powerful tool for biomedical research. Recent projects demonstrate the potential for such 'crowdsourcing' efforts in immunology. Tools for developing applications, new funding opportunities, and an eager public make crowdsourcing a serious option for creative solutions for computationally-challenging problems. Expanded uses of crowdsourcing in immunology will allow for more efficient large-scale data collection and analysis. It will also involve, inspire, educate, and engage the public in a variety of meaningful ways. The benefits are real - it is time to jump in!

  10. Citizens unite for computational immunology!

    PubMed

    Belden, Orrin S; Baker, Sarah Catherine; Baker, Brian M

    2015-07-01

    Recruiting volunteers who can provide computational time, programming expertise, or puzzle-solving talent has emerged as a powerful tool for biomedical research. Recent projects demonstrate the potential for such 'crowdsourcing' efforts in immunology. Tools for developing applications, new funding opportunities, and an eager public make crowdsourcing a serious option for creative solutions for computationally-challenging problems. Expanded uses of crowdsourcing in immunology will allow for more efficient large-scale data collection and analysis. It will also involve, inspire, educate, and engage the public in a variety of meaningful ways. The benefits are real - it is time to jump in! PMID:26139599

  11. Immunologic effects of yogurt.

    PubMed

    Meydani, S N; Ha, W K

    2000-04-01

    Many investigators have studied the therapeutic and preventive effects of yogurt and lactic acid bacteria, which are commonly used in yogurt production, on diseases such as cancer, infection, gastrointestinal disorders, and asthma. Because the immune system is an important contributor to all of these diseases, an immunostimulatory effect of yogurt has been proposed and investigated by using mainly animal models and, occasionally, human subjects. Although the results of these studies, in general, support the notion that yogurt has immunostimulatory effects, problems with study design, lack of appropriate controls, inappropriate route of administration, sole use of in vitro indicators of the immune response, and short duration of most of the studies limit the interpretation of the results and the conclusions drawn from them. Nevertheless, these studies in toto provide a strong rationale for the hypothesis that increased yogurt consumption, particularly in immunocompromised populations such as the elderly, may enhance the immune response, which would in turn increase resistance to immune-related diseases. This hypothesis, however, needs to be substantiated by well-designed randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled human studies of an adequate duration in which several in vivo and in vitro indexes of peripheral and gut-associated immune response are tested.

  12. Immunological impact of Taekwondo competitions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y W; Shin, K W; Paik, I-Y; Jung, W M; Cho, S-Y; Choi, S T; Kim, H D; Kim, J Y

    2012-01-01

    Immunological changes in elite adolescent female athletes during Taekwondo competitions were investigated on-field. 6 female athletes (16.7 ± 0.8 year-old) volunteered and performed 5 bouts of demonstration Taekwondo competitions simulating real tournaments in intensity, duration, and break-time intervals on the same day. Blood samples were taken before, after the competitions and during the recovery, respectively. Immunological changes and oxidative stress in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were evaluated by flow-cytometry. During the competitions, exercise intensity was 92.2 ± 3.8% (86.1~95.7) of the maximal heart rate. Blood lactate increased immediately after the competitions (p=0.0165) and decreased to baseline during recovery. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the peripheral blood increased continuously during recovery (p<0.05, respectively). Natural killer cells increased immediately after the competitions (p=0.0006), and decreased during recovery. B and T cells increased immediately after the competitions and remained elevated throughout recovery (p<0.05, respectively). CD4/CD8 ratio after the competitions was decreased (p=0.0091) and returned to baseline during recovery. These results suggest that the immunological function of the elite female adolescent athletes could be attenuated after Taekwondo competitions. Further large-scaled Taekwondo studies on immunologic and apoptotic changes related to oxidative stress should be performed for improving and protecting the health of adolescent athletes.

  13. The double helix and immunology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nossal, Gustav J. V.

    2003-01-01

    The immune system can recognize and produce antibodies to virtually any molecule in the Universe. This enormous diversity arises from the ingenious reshuffling of DNA sequences encoding components of the immune system. Immunology is an example of a field completely transformed during the past 50 years by the discovery of the structure of DNA and the emergence of DNA technologies that followed.

  14. American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

    MedlinePlus

    ... an Allergist American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology Seeking Relief? Find an Allergist ACAAI Members Members ... Find an Allergist American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology © 2014 Contact US

  15. Antiinflammatory, antioxidant, and immunological effects of Carum copticum L. and some of its constituents.

    PubMed

    Alavinezhad, Azam; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein

    2014-12-01

    Carum copticum L. has been used traditionally for its various therapeutic effects. The plant contains various components such as thymol and carvacrol. Different therapeutic effects such as antifungal, antioxidant, antibacterial, antiparasitic, and antilipidemic were described for the plant and its constituents. Therefore, antiinflammatory, antioxidant, and immunological effects of C. copticum and its constituents, thymol and carvacrol, were discussed in the present review. Previous studies have shown potent antiinflammatory, antioxidant, and immunological effects for C. copticum and its constituents, thymol and carvacrol. Therefore, the plant and its constituents have therapeutic values in several inflammatory and immunological disorders as well as in the oxidative stress conditions.

  16. Antiinflammatory, antioxidant, and immunological effects of Carum copticum L. and some of its constituents.

    PubMed

    Alavinezhad, Azam; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein

    2014-12-01

    Carum copticum L. has been used traditionally for its various therapeutic effects. The plant contains various components such as thymol and carvacrol. Different therapeutic effects such as antifungal, antioxidant, antibacterial, antiparasitic, and antilipidemic were described for the plant and its constituents. Therefore, antiinflammatory, antioxidant, and immunological effects of C. copticum and its constituents, thymol and carvacrol, were discussed in the present review. Previous studies have shown potent antiinflammatory, antioxidant, and immunological effects for C. copticum and its constituents, thymol and carvacrol. Therefore, the plant and its constituents have therapeutic values in several inflammatory and immunological disorders as well as in the oxidative stress conditions. PMID:25044318

  17. 21 CFR 866.5590 - Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system. 866.5590 Section 866.5590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  18. 21 CFR 866.5160 - Beta-globulin immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Beta-globulin immunolog-ical test system. 866.5160 Section 866.5160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5160...

  19. 21 CFR 866.5210 - Ceruloplasmin immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ceruloplasmin immunolog-ical test system. 866.5210 Section 866.5210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  20. 21 CFR 866.5590 - Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system. 866.5590 Section 866.5590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  1. 21 CFR 866.5210 - Ceruloplasmin immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ceruloplasmin immunolog-ical test system. 866.5210 Section 866.5210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  2. 21 CFR 866.5210 - Ceruloplasmin immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ceruloplasmin immunolog-ical test system. 866.5210 Section 866.5210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  3. 21 CFR 866.5160 - Beta-globulin immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Beta-globulin immunolog-ical test system. 866.5160 Section 866.5160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5160...

  4. 21 CFR 866.5590 - Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system. 866.5590 Section 866.5590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  5. 21 CFR 866.5160 - Beta-globulin immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Beta-globulin immunolog-ical test system. 866.5160 Section 866.5160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5160...

  6. 21 CFR 866.5210 - Ceruloplasmin immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ceruloplasmin immunolog-ical test system. 866.5210 Section 866.5210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  7. 42 CFR 493.927 - General immunology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false General immunology. 493.927 Section 493.927 Public... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.927 General immunology. (a) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing for immunology, the annual...

  8. 42 CFR 493.921 - Diagnostic immunology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Diagnostic immunology. 493.921 Section 493.921... Testing Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.921 Diagnostic immunology. The subspecialties under the specialty of immunology for which a program may offer proficiency testing are...

  9. 42 CFR 493.927 - General immunology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false General immunology. 493.927 Section 493.927 Public... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.927 General immunology. (a) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing for immunology, the annual...

  10. 42 CFR 493.921 - Diagnostic immunology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Diagnostic immunology. 493.921 Section 493.921... Testing Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.921 Diagnostic immunology. The subspecialties under the specialty of immunology for which a program may offer proficiency testing are...

  11. 42 CFR 493.921 - Diagnostic immunology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Diagnostic immunology. 493.921 Section 493.921... Testing Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.921 Diagnostic immunology. The subspecialties under the specialty of immunology for which a program may offer proficiency testing are...

  12. 42 CFR 493.921 - Diagnostic immunology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Diagnostic immunology. 493.921 Section 493.921... Testing Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.921 Diagnostic immunology. The subspecialties under the specialty of immunology for which a program may offer proficiency testing are...

  13. 42 CFR 493.927 - General immunology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false General immunology. 493.927 Section 493.927 Public... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.927 General immunology. (a) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing for immunology, the annual...

  14. 42 CFR 493.927 - General immunology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false General immunology. 493.927 Section 493.927 Public... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.927 General immunology. (a) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing for immunology, the annual...

  15. 42 CFR 493.921 - Diagnostic immunology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Diagnostic immunology. 493.921 Section 493.921... Testing Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.921 Diagnostic immunology. The subspecialties under the specialty of immunology for which a program may offer proficiency testing are...

  16. 42 CFR 493.927 - General immunology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false General immunology. 493.927 Section 493.927 Public... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.927 General immunology. (a) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing for immunology, the annual...

  17. Assessing quality of life of self-reported rheumatic patients.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Pedro L; Gonçalves, Sónia P; Ferreira, Lara N; Pereira, Luis N; Antunes, Patrícia; Gouveia, Nélia; Rodrigues, Ana; Canhão, Helena; Branco, Jaime

    2016-09-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with self-reported rheumatic diseases (RD), to classify self-reported rheumatic patients in groups according to their health state and to explore the associations between health status and sociodemographic variables. Data came from the Portuguese Epidemiologic study of the RD. A sample of the Portuguese population aged 18 or more (n = 10,661) stratified by region and locality dimension was interviewed by trained interviewers and answered a standardized questionnaire that included the SF-36v1, the EQ-5D-3L, medical history, identification of potential rheumatic diseases, sociodemographic characteristics, among others. Descriptive statistics and parametric tests were used to compare HRQoL of respondents with and without RD. Comparisons with normative data from the Portuguese population were also carried out. A cluster analysis was used to classify respondents into homogeneous groups. Regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with HRQoL. Respondents with self-reported RD assigned a lower self-perception to their health status. The burden of disease was observed mainly in physical function, role physical and bodily pain. The EQ-5D-3L dimensions show similar results: the intensity of problems is significantly more evident in respondents with self-reported RD. HRQoL of respondents with self-reported RD is related to sociodemographic variables and is significantly lower when compared with the Portuguese population. Four clusters of homogeneous respondents with self-reported RD were formed and characterized according to a number of variables. Factors associated with HRQoL were identified. In conclusion, suffering from a self-reported RD has a significant impact on self-perceived health status and on the quality of life. PMID:27378230

  18. Male fertility potential alteration in rheumatic diseases: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Tiseo, Bruno Camargo; Cocuzza, Marcello; Bonfá, Eloisa; Srougi, Miguel; Clovis, A

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Improved targeted therapies for rheumatic diseases were developed recently resulting in a better prognosis for affected patients. Nowadays, patients are living longer and with improved quality of life, including fertility potential. These patients are affected by impaired reproductive function and the causes are often multifactorial related to particularities of each disease. This review highlights how rheumatic diseases and their management affect testicular function and male fertility. Materials and Methods A systematic review of literature of all published data after 1970 was conducted. Data was collected about fertility abnormalities in male patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, dermatomyositis, ankylosing spondylitis, Behçet disease and gout. Two independent researchers carried out the search in online databases. Results A total of 19 articles were included addressing the following diseases: 7 systemic lupus erythematosus, 6 Behçet disease, 4 ankylosing spondylitis, 2 rheumatoid arthritis, 2 dermatomyositis and one gout. Systemic lupus erythematosus clearly affects gonadal function impairing spermatogenesis mainly due to antisperm antibodies and cyclophosphamide therapy. Behçet disease, gout and ankylosing spondylitis patients, including those under anti-TNF therapy in the latter disease, do not seem to have reduced fertility whereas in dermatomyositis, the fertility potential is hampered by disease activity and by alkylating agents. Data regarding rheumatoid arthritis is scarce, gonadal dysfunction observed as consequence of disease activity and antisperm antibodies. Conclusions Reduced fertility potential is not uncommon. Its frequency and severity vary among the different rheumatic diseases. Permanent infertility is rare and often associated with alkylating agent therapy. PMID:27120778

  19. Assessing quality of life of self-reported rheumatic patients.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Pedro L; Gonçalves, Sónia P; Ferreira, Lara N; Pereira, Luis N; Antunes, Patrícia; Gouveia, Nélia; Rodrigues, Ana; Canhão, Helena; Branco, Jaime

    2016-09-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with self-reported rheumatic diseases (RD), to classify self-reported rheumatic patients in groups according to their health state and to explore the associations between health status and sociodemographic variables. Data came from the Portuguese Epidemiologic study of the RD. A sample of the Portuguese population aged 18 or more (n = 10,661) stratified by region and locality dimension was interviewed by trained interviewers and answered a standardized questionnaire that included the SF-36v1, the EQ-5D-3L, medical history, identification of potential rheumatic diseases, sociodemographic characteristics, among others. Descriptive statistics and parametric tests were used to compare HRQoL of respondents with and without RD. Comparisons with normative data from the Portuguese population were also carried out. A cluster analysis was used to classify respondents into homogeneous groups. Regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with HRQoL. Respondents with self-reported RD assigned a lower self-perception to their health status. The burden of disease was observed mainly in physical function, role physical and bodily pain. The EQ-5D-3L dimensions show similar results: the intensity of problems is significantly more evident in respondents with self-reported RD. HRQoL of respondents with self-reported RD is related to sociodemographic variables and is significantly lower when compared with the Portuguese population. Four clusters of homogeneous respondents with self-reported RD were formed and characterized according to a number of variables. Factors associated with HRQoL were identified. In conclusion, suffering from a self-reported RD has a significant impact on self-perceived health status and on the quality of life.

  20. Influence of atmospheric factors on the rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Latman, N S

    1987-01-15

    There appears to be ample evidence to conclude that various meteorological factors do exert a significant impact on some people with various rheumatic diseases. The data is, however, crude relative to our general understanding. Most of this research on RA has dealt with the primary signs and symptoms of inflammation. We know, however, many of the chemical mediators of inflammation. It seems like a logical progression of research to determine the effects of the meteorological/atmospheric factors of concern on these specific intrinsic mediators of inflammation. In general, gout can be very well controlled through medication. The evidence suggests, however, that we may gain a much better understanding of how atmospheric factors such as temperature can effect the body through changes in its physico-chemical processes by using Gout as a model. The work with SLE has already yielded useful applications. Sun screening pharmaceuticals have been quite successful in reducing exacerbations of symptoms. But we don't know why only some people are photosensitive. The previous research on the effects of atmospheric factors on the rheumatic diseases has illustrated key issues in methodology: large sample sizes are critical, objective and quantifiable disease variables are important, the variables measured must be specific to the questions investigated, the diseases investigated must be as specifically and accurately defined as possible, and the various aspects of 'weather' to be investigated must be specifically defined and quantified. It is apparent that there is much more important and useful work to be performed before we can understand the effects of atmospheric factors on the rheumatic diseases.

  1. Fibroblastic rheumatism: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joyce M; Sundel, Robert P; Liang, Marilyn G

    2002-01-01

    A previously healthy 7-year-old boy presented with polyarthritis and skin lesions. Multiple, skin- to pink-colored, firm papules were noted on the periungual areas, hands, feet, and nose. There was swelling of the proximal interphalangeal joints, wrists, elbows, ankles, and knees. A skin biopsy specimen revealed dermal fibrosis and interspersed histiocytes and lymphocytes. These findings were consistent with fibroblastic rheumatism, a condition characterized by cutaneous nodules and a symmetric polyarthritis. He was treated with methotrexate and corticosteroids with improvement in the symptoms of his arthritis and skin lesions. This early treatment was beneficial in our patient.

  2. Problems for rheumatic patients in opening dispensed drug containers.

    PubMed

    Lisberg, R B; Higham, C; Jayson, M I

    1983-05-01

    The ability of 50 rheumatoid arthritis patients with hand involvement and 50 normal control subjects to open a range of reclosable tablet containers and unit dose packs was tested. Child-resistant containers, particularly the clic-loc type, proved the most difficult for patients and control subjects to open. Smaller containers were less easy to open than comparable ones of a larger size. Only 54% patients were able to remove a suppository from its wrapping. Blister packs and conventional screw-capped tablet bottles were easiest to open. Dispensing of drugs for rheumatic patients in child-resistant containers should be limited to those without hand involvement. PMID:6850197

  3. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Updates and Therapeutic Outlook in Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pers, Yves-Marie; Jorgensen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells exhibiting functional properties that have opened the way for cell-based clinical therapies. MSCs have been reported to exhibit immunosuppressive as well as healing properties, improving angiogenesis and preventing apoptosis or fibrosis through the secretion of paracrine mediators. This review summarizes recent progress on the clinical application of stem cells therapy in some inflammatory and degenerative rheumatic diseases. To date, most of the available data have been obtained in preclinical models and clinical efficacy needs to be evaluated through controlled randomized double-blind trials. PMID:26237144

  4. The Kraepelinian Dichotomy From the Perspective of Prenatal Infectious and Immunologic Insults.

    PubMed

    Brown, Alan S

    2015-07-01

    The "Kraepelinian dichotomy" between schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) has been a dominant force in our thinking on the classification of these mental disorders. Emerging evidence indicates that these 2 disorders overlap significantly with regard to epidemiology, clinical presentation, genetic susceptibility, structural neuroanatomy, and treatment. Prenatal infection and immunologic dysfunction appear to be risk factors for both SZ and BD; some of these gestational exposures are present in both disorders while others may be specific to 1 or the other of the 2 syndromes. In this paper, we shall review prior studies of prenatal infections and immunologic insults in schizophrenia and BD, including exposures which overlap and which differ between these disorders, discuss the potential utility of maternal infection as one strategy toward developing a more biologically meaningful diagnostic classification system, and propose new recommendations for future research aimed at dissecting these 2 disorders from one another at the etiologic level.

  5. Pediatric allergy and immunology in Spain.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Antonio; Mazon, Angel; Martin-Mateos, Maria Anunciacion; Plaza, Ana-Maria; Garde, Jesus; Alonso, Elena; Martorell, Antonio; Boquete, Manuel; Lorente, Felix; Ibero, Marcel; Bone, Javier; Pamies, Rafael; Garcia, Juan Miguel; Echeverria, Luis; Nevot, Santiago; Martinez-Cañavate, Ana; Fernandez-Benitez, Margarita; Garcia-Marcos, Luis

    2011-11-01

    The data of the ISAAC project in Spain show a prevalence of childhood asthma ranging from 7.1% to 15.3%, with regional differences; a higher prevalence, 22.6% to 35.8%, is described for rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis is found in 4.1% to 7.6% of children. The prevalence of food allergy is 3%. All children in Spain have the right to be visited in the National Health System. The medical care at the primary level is provided by pediatricians, who have obtained their titles through a 4-yr medical residency training program. The education on pediatric allergy during that period is not compulsory and thus very variable. There are currently 112 certified European pediatric allergists in Spain, who have obtained the accreditation of the European Union of Medical Specialist for proven skills and experience in pediatric allergy. Future specialists in pediatric allergy should obtain their titles through a specific education program to be developed in one of the four accredited training units on pediatric allergy, after obtaining the title on pediatrics. The Spanish Society of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology (SEICAP) gathers over 350 pediatric allergists and pediatricians working in this field. SEICAP has a growing activity including yearly congresses, continued education courses, elaboration of technical clinical documents and protocols, education of patients, and collaboration with other scientific societies and associations of patients. The official journal of SEICAP is Allergologia et Immunophatologia, published every 2 months since 1972. The web site of SEICAP, http://www.seicap.es, open since 2004, offers information for professionals and extensive information on pediatric allergic and immunologic disorders for the lay public; the web site is receiving 750 daily visits during 2011. The pediatric allergy units are very active in clinical work, procedures as immunotherapy or induction of oral tolerance in food allergy, contribution to scientific literature, and

  6. [Trends in rehabilitation of patients with rheumatic diseases in Germany].

    PubMed

    Mau, W; Beyer, W; Ehlebracht-König, I; Engel, J-M; Genth, E; Jäckel, W H; Lange, U; Thiele, K

    2014-03-01

    Recent Deutsche Gesellschaft für Rheumatologie (DGRh, German Society of Rheumatology) guidelines emphasized the significance of coordinated multidisciplinary care and rehabilitation of patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Nationwide data from the German pension insurance funds showed that inpatient rehabilitation due to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) varied by a factor of 2.6 between the different German states. From 2000 to 2012 rehabilitation measures were reduced by one third, most significantly in men with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Rehabilitation measures because of RA or AS were provided up to 14 times more frequently by the German statutory pension insurance scheme compared with a large compulsory health insurance which is responsible for rehabilitation measures after retirement. In rehabilitation centers with high numbers of patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases, higher structural and process quality were demonstrated. In 2011 a total of 40 % of RA patients in the national database of the collaborative arthritis centers showed medium or severe functional limitations. Among these disabled RA patients inpatient rehabilitation was reduced by about 50 % between 1995 and 2011. Out of all RA patients from outpatient rheumatology care with severe functional limitations 38 % had no functional restoration therapy within the previous 12 months with a high variation between rheumatologists. Experiences from other European countries may inspire German rheumatologists and other involved health professionals to initiate a wider range of rehabilitative interventions in the future.

  7. [Anti-rheumatic effect of JAK-inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Kunihiro; Maeshima, Keisuke; Kubo, Satoshi; Sonomoto, Koshiro; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has dramatically developed with the use of biologics targeting inflammatory cytokines. However, expense and parenteral use can cause issues in the initiation and continuation of the treatment. Therefore a new orally available anti-rheumatic drug has been long-awaited. Recently, small-molecule compounds targeting Janus kinase (JAK) has shown clinical efficacy similar to biologics in clinical trials for active RA. Among the JAK-inhibitors, new drug application for tofacitinib is concurrently under review in western and asian countries and is highly expected to become a new anti-rheumatic drug in the near future. In order to evaluate the mode of action, we utilized peripheral blood and synovium from RA patients. Proliferation and cytokine production of CD4+ T cell was prominently reduced and subsequently inhibited cartilage destruction by the synovium. Our result is in line with the inhibitory effect of tofacitinib on joint destruction in RA patients those who were treated with tofacitinib. Therefore, further clinical efficacy is expected in the in the long-term treatment with tofacitinib. PMID:22576568

  8. The evolving therapy of rheumatic diseases, the future is now.

    PubMed

    El-Miedany, Yasser

    2002-04-01

    There are two main ways in which physicians will be urged to improve the outcome for their patients suffering from rheumatic diseases in the coming era, these are, early diagnosis and timely effective therapy. Current reserch suggests that in rheumatoid arthritis joint damage occurs early, often within the first 2 years and even in the absence of associating severe symptoms, is a call for action for primary care physicians as well as rheumatologists. Similarly in SLE patients, sometimes the treatments are ineffective or too toxic with sepsis or opportunistic infections often limiting their use or resulting in the death of the patient. As primary care physicians are the clinicians most frequently visited by patients with initial symptoms of the disease, they first need to learn when to suspect it as well as its complications, and when to refer the patient appropriately. Rheumatologists need to determine when and how to prescribe the most appropriate treatment, as well as how to incorporate the new drugs which are emerging on the scene. At the same time, earlier initiation of combination therapy with the disease modifying anti-rheumatic therapy holds an area of continued exploration. This new information has modified our approach to patients' management. The age of "wait and see" is over.

  9. Rheumatic Heart Disease in the Twenty-First Century.

    PubMed

    Woldu, Bethel; Bloomfield, Gerald S

    2016-10-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is a chronic valvular disease resulting after severe or repetitive episodes of acute rheumatic fever (ARF), an autoimmune response to group A Streptococcus infection. RHD has been almost eliminated with improved social and health infrastructure in affluent countries while it remains a neglected disease with major cause of morbidity and mortality in many low- and middle-income countries, and resource-limited regions of high-income countries. Despite our evolving understanding of the pathogenesis of RHD, there have not been any significant advances to prevent or halt progression of disease in recent history. Long-term penicillin-based treatment and surgery remain the backbone of a RHD control program in the absence of an effective vaccine. The advent of echocardiographic screening algorithms has improved the accuracy of diagnosing RHD and has shed light on the enormous burden of disease. Encouragingly, this has led to a rekindled commitment from researchers in the most affected countries to advocate and take bold actions to end this disease of social inequality. PMID:27566329

  10. The inflammatory role of phagocyte apoptotic pathways in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Cuda, Carla M; Pope, Richard M; Perlman, Harris

    2016-08-23

    Rheumatoid arthritis affects nearly 1% of the world's population and is a debilitating autoimmune condition that can result in joint destruction. During the past decade, inflammatory functions have been described for signalling molecules classically involved in apoptotic and non-apoptotic death pathways, including, but not limited to, Toll-like receptor signalling, inflammasome activation, cytokine production, macrophage polarization and antigen citrullination. In light of these remarkable advances in the understanding of inflammatory mechanisms of the death machinery, this Review provides a snapshot of the available evidence implicating death pathways, especially within the phagocyte populations of the innate immune system, in the perpetuation of rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatic diseases. Elevated levels of signalling mediators of both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis, as well as the autophagy, are observed in the joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Furthermore, risk polymorphisms are present in signalling molecules of the extrinsic apoptotic and autophagy death pathways. Although research into the mechanisms underlying these pathways has made considerable progress, this Review highlights areas where further investigation is particularly needed. This exploration is critical, as new discoveries in this field could lead to the development of novel therapies for rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatic diseases. PMID:27549026

  11. Noxa in rheumatic diseases: present understanding and future impact

    PubMed Central

    Cottier, Karissa E.; Fogle, Elise M.; Fox, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Impaired programmed cell death is an important contributing mechanism in the development of chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Overexpression of Bcl-2 family proteins in such diseases has led to the concept of targeted suppression of these proteins as a primary therapeutic strategy. However, limited success with this approach has prompted pharmacologists to look at the other side of the coin, with the aim of reactivating jeopardized pro-apoptotic proteins that may neutralize Bcl-2 or other anti-apoptotic molecules. In this effort, BH3-only proteins have gained recent attention as endogenous molecules for the sensitization of resistant cells to undergo apoptosis. Among the BH3-only family, Noxa stands out as exceptional for its specificity to bind Mcl-1 and Bcl-2 and blunt their biological properties. Noxa is now being tested as a promising therapeutic target in cancer biology. Nonetheless, its role and clinical application still lack validation in autoimmune diseases, including rheumatic conditions. This is partly attributed to the significant gap in our understanding of its regulatory role and how either overexpression of Noxa or delivery of BH3 mimetics could be therapeutically exploited. In this review we highlight some recent studies in RA, OA, SLE and SS suggesting that Noxa may be used as a potential therapeutic target to circumvent invasive and tissue destructive processes in these rheumatic diseases. PMID:24352336

  12. Commented glossary for rheumatic spinal diseases, based on pathology.

    PubMed Central

    François, R J; Eulderink, F; Bywaters, E G

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To redefine and comment on terms on a pathological basis, in order to avoid the confusion due to the use of terms with different meanings, to standardise usage among clinicians, radiologists and pathologists, and to facilitate literature searches. METHODS--Within the Committee of Pathology of the European League against Rheumatism, a study group was set up to analyse the medical literature and common practice concerning the nomenclature of rheumatic spinal diseases. The group tried to amalgamate the main trends in the field, to reconcile etymology, historical background, morphology, and common practice. RESULTS--The group warns against use of the terms 'acquired hyperostosis syndrome', '(von) Bechterew's disease', 'Kümmel's disease', 'pseudospondylolisthesis', 'rheumatoid spondylitis', 'spondylarthropathy' in the sense of spondarthritis, and 'spondylosis'. It recommends intercorporal or interapophyseal rather than intervertebral (osteo) chondrosis, zygapophyseal diverticulum rather than cyst, disc hernia rather than prolapse, spondyloarthritis rather than spondyloarthropathy, marginal rather than anterior spondylitis, and discarthrosis. It proposes 'zygarthrosis' to designate zygapophyseal osteoarthrosis. CONCLUSIONS--Knowledge of the pathological basis of diseases and an understanding of the original definitions given by those who coined new terms make it possible to avoid most of the confusion arising from improper use of spinal terms. PMID:7677436

  13. Cancer immunotherapy and immunological memory.

    PubMed

    Murata, Kenji; Tsukahara, Tomohide; Torigoe, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

      Human immunological memory is the key distinguishing hallmark of the adaptive immune system and plays an important role in the prevention of morbidity and the severity of infection. The differentiation system of T cell memory has been clarified using mouse models. However, the human T cell memory system has great diversity induced by natural antigens derived from many pathogens and tumor cells throughout life, and profoundly differs from the mouse memory system constructed using artificial antigens and transgenic T cells. We believe that only human studies can elucidate the human immune system. The importance of immunological memory in cancer immunotherapy has been pointed out, and the trafficking properties and long-lasting anti-tumor capacity of memory T cells play a crucial role in the control of malignant tumors. Adoptive cell transfer of less differentiated T cells has consistently demonstrated superior anti-tumor capacity relative to more differentiated T cells. Therefore, a human T cell population with the characteristics of stem cell memory is thought to be attractive for peptide vaccination and adoptive cell transfer. A novel human memory T cell population that we have identified is closer to the naive state than previous memory T cells in the T cell differentiation lineage, and has the characteristics of stem-like chemoresistance. Here we introduce this novel population and describe the fundamentals of immunological memory in cancer immunotherapy.

  14. Cancer immunotherapy and immunological memory.

    PubMed

    Murata, Kenji; Tsukahara, Tomohide; Torigoe, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

      Human immunological memory is the key distinguishing hallmark of the adaptive immune system and plays an important role in the prevention of morbidity and the severity of infection. The differentiation system of T cell memory has been clarified using mouse models. However, the human T cell memory system has great diversity induced by natural antigens derived from many pathogens and tumor cells throughout life, and profoundly differs from the mouse memory system constructed using artificial antigens and transgenic T cells. We believe that only human studies can elucidate the human immune system. The importance of immunological memory in cancer immunotherapy has been pointed out, and the trafficking properties and long-lasting anti-tumor capacity of memory T cells play a crucial role in the control of malignant tumors. Adoptive cell transfer of less differentiated T cells has consistently demonstrated superior anti-tumor capacity relative to more differentiated T cells. Therefore, a human T cell population with the characteristics of stem cell memory is thought to be attractive for peptide vaccination and adoptive cell transfer. A novel human memory T cell population that we have identified is closer to the naive state than previous memory T cells in the T cell differentiation lineage, and has the characteristics of stem-like chemoresistance. Here we introduce this novel population and describe the fundamentals of immunological memory in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27181230

  15. Immunology of Gut Mucosal Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Pasetti, Marcela F.; Simon, Jakub K.; Sztein, Marcelo B.; Levine, Myron M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Understanding the mechanisms underlying the induction of immunity in the gastrointestinal mucosa following oral immunization and the cross-talk between mucosal and systemic immunity should expedite the development of vaccines to diminish the global burden caused by enteric pathogens. Identifying an immunological correlate of protection in the course of field trials of efficacy, animal models (when available), or human challenge studies is also invaluable. In industrialized country populations, live attenuated vaccines (e.g. polio, typhoid, and rotavirus) mimic natural infection and generate robust protective immune responses. In contrast, a major challenge is to understand and overcome the barriers responsible for the diminished immunogenicity and efficacy of the same enteric vaccines in underprivileged populations in developing countries. Success in developing vaccines against some enteric pathogens has heretofore been elusive (e.g. Shigella). Different types of oral vaccines can selectively or inclusively elicit mucosal secretory immunoglobulin A and serum immunoglobulin G antibodies and a variety of cell-mediated immune responses. Areas of research that require acceleration include interaction between the gut innate immune system and the stimulation of adaptive immunity, development of safe yet effective mucosal adjuvants, better understanding of homing to the mucosa of immunologically relevant cells, and elicitation of mucosal immunologic memory. This review dissects the immune responses elicited in humans by enteric vaccines. PMID:21198669

  16. Immunology taught by human genetics.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Abel, Laurent; Quintana-Murci, Lluis

    2013-01-01

    Human genetic studies are rarely conducted for immunological purposes. Instead, they are typically driven by medical and evolutionary goals, such as understanding the predisposition or resistance to infectious or inflammatory diseases, the pathogenesis of such diseases, and human evolution in the context of the long-standing relationships between humans and their commensal and environmental microbes. However, the dissection of these experiments of Nature has also led to major immunological advances. In this review, we draw on some of the immunological lessons learned in the three branches of human molecular genetics most relevant to immunology: clinical genetics, epidemiological genetics, and evolutionary genetics. We argue that human genetics has become a new frontier not only for timely studies of specific features of human immunity, but also for defining general principles of immunity. These studies teach us about immunity as it occurs under "natural" conditions, through the transition from the almost complete wilderness that existed worldwide until about a century ago to the current unevenly distributed medically shaped environment. Hygiene, vaccines, antibiotics, and surgery have considerably decreased the burden of infection, but these interventions have been available only recently, so have yet to have a major impact on patterns of genomic diversity, making it possible to carry out unbiased evolutionary studies at the population level. Clinical genetic studies of childhood phenotypes have not been blurred by modern medicine either. Instead, medical advances have actually facilitated such studies, by making it possible for children with life-threatening infections to survive. In addition, the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases have increased life expectancy at birth from ∼20 yr to ∼80 yr, providing unique opportunities to study the genetic basis of immunological phenomena against which there is no natural counterselection, such as

  17. 50 years of pediatric immunology: progress and future, a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surjit; Gupta, Anju; Rawat, Amit

    2013-01-01

    Rapidly evolving advances in the field of immunology over the last few decades have impacted the practice of clinical medicine in many ways. In fact, understanding the immunological basis of disease has been pivotal in deciphering the pathogenesis of several disease processes, infective or otherwise. As of today, there is hardly any specialty of medicine which is not influenced by immunology. Pediatric rheumatological disorders, vasculitides, Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection, Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases (PIDs) and autoimmune disorders fall under the domain of clinical immunology. This specialty is poised to emerge as a major clinical specialty in our country. The gulf between bench and bedside is narrowing down as our understanding of the complex immunological mechanisms gets better. However, a lot still needs to be done in this field as the morbidity and mortality of some of these conditions is unacceptably high in the Indian setup. A number of medical schools and institutes in the country now have the resources and the wherewithal to develop into specialized centres of clinical immunology. We need to concentrate on training more physicians and pediatricians in this field. The future is bright and the prospects exciting.

  18. Pediatric allergy and immunology in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ebisawa, Motohiro; Nishima, Sankei; Ohnishi, Hidenori; Kondo, Naomi

    2013-11-01

    The Japanese Society of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology (JSPACI) was started in 1966 and currently has 3613 members as of August 1, 2012. The number of pediatricians specializing in allergies who have been certified by the Japanese Society of Allergology is 817. Among these, there are 125 training directors and training facilities for allergy and clinical immunology. The JSPACI first published an asthma guideline specific for children in 2000, and this has been revised every 3 yrs, contributing to better control of pediatric asthma. Food allergy management guidelines were first developed in 2005, which have helped to improve the care of food allergy patients. Among 514 pediatric training programs by the Japanese Society of Pediatrics, there are 312 facilities routinely performing oral food challenges. Among these, there were already 53 facilities performing oral immunotherapy at the end of 2011, treating 1400 cases of food allergy. The prevalence of pediatric allergic diseases has increased in Japan over the past 50 yrs. A number of International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood surveys have been conducted in the past at specific times. The prevalence of wheezing among children aged 13-14 yrs in 2002 was 13.0%. Multi-year surveys found a 1.5- to 2-fold increase every 10 yrs until 2002. However, according to the latest data in 2012, asthma prevalence seems to have slightly decreased in Japan. Food allergy mainly associated with infantile atopic eczema among infants younger than 1 yr of age is the most common form as with other developed countries. The estimated food allergy prevalence based on data from several surveys is 5-10% among infants (0-6 yrs) and 1-2% among schoolchildren (6-15 yrs). A variety of patients suffering from primary deficiency syndrome have been actively analyzed. Previously, antibody defects and well-defined syndromes with immunodeficiency were analyzed, but recent research is focusing on not only acquired immune

  19. [Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis and rheumatic diseases. Pathogenesis, prevention and treatment].

    PubMed

    Di Munno, Ombretta; Delle Sedie, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are diffusely used to treat a wide variety of inflammatory and autoimmune disorders, including rheumatic diseases. GC-induced osteoporosis (GIO) is the most common and serious side-effect for patients receiving GC. Loss of bone mineral density (BMD) is greatest in the first few months of GC use; fracture (Fx) risk is significantly increased at the spine and hip on doses even as low as 2.5 mg of prednisolone daily; Fx risk increases rapidly from the onset of therapy and, for a given BMD, is higher in GIO than in postmenopausal OP. General measures to reduce bone loss include use of the lowest effective dose; consideration of alternative routes of administration; adequate calcium and vitamin D supplementation. Today, results from large randomised controlled clinical trials provide evidence that bone loss and Fx may be prevented through the use of bone sparing agents (hormone therapy, bisphosphonates, PTH 1-34). Bisphosphonates (alendronate, risedronate) are first-choice therapy for the prevention and treatment of GIO; patients at high risk for Fx, for example those in post-menopausal status or aged > or =65 years and those with a prior fragility Fx, should be advised to start bone-protective therapy at the time of starting GC. Due to the prevalence of GC use, it is imperative that there be a greater awareness of GIO and of therapies that may be offered to patients both for prevention and treatment.

  20. Genetics, environment, and gene-environment interactions in the development of systemic rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Jeffrey A; Costenbader, Karen H

    2014-11-01

    Rheumatic diseases offer distinct challenges to researchers because of heterogeneity in disease phenotypes, low disease incidence, and geographic variation in genetic and environmental factors. Emerging research areas, including epigenetics, metabolomics, and the microbiome, may provide additional links between genetic and environmental risk factors in the pathogenesis of rheumatic disease. This article reviews the methods used to establish genetic and environmental risk factors and studies gene-environment interactions in rheumatic diseases, and provides specific examples of successes and challenges in identifying gene-environment interactions in rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and ankylosing spondylitis. Emerging research strategies and future challenges are discussed.

  1. The Changing Pattern of Rheumatic Fever in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, Ian I.; Fowler, Rodney S.

    1966-01-01

    The manifestations of acute rheumatic fever were compared in 231 children admitted to hospital from 1937 to 1940 with those in 252 children admitted from 1957 to 1960. Of the 178 in the early group seen during an initial attack, 82 had cardiac involvement; of these, 12 died early. Of the 218 patients in the later group with an initial attack, 96 had cardiac involvement; of these, two died early. Despite this decrease in early mortality, the incidence of isolated mitral value involvement (73% in the early group and 62% in the later group) and the incidence of congestive failure (20% and 13%) were similar. This reduction in the number of early deaths may be due to lowered virulence of the streptococcus, improved socioeconomic conditions, or therapy with penicillin and corticosteroids. The incidence of chorea and the frequency of recurrences were also less in the later group. PMID:5942656

  2. Cost-effectiveness analysis of rheumatic heart disease prevention strategies.

    PubMed

    Manji, Rizwan A; Witt, Julia; Tappia, Paramjit S; Jung, Young; Menkis, Alan H; Ramjiawan, Bram

    2013-12-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD), secondary to group A streptococcal infection is endemic in the developing as well as parts of the developed world with significant costs to the patient, and to the healthcare system. We briefly review the prevalence and cost of RHD in developed and developing nations. We subsequently develop a Markov model to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of three strategies (vs standard no prevention) for preventing RHD in a developing world country: primary prophylaxis (throat swab to detect and subsequently treat group A streptococci as needed); primary prophylaxis (antibiotic prophylaxis for all) with benzathine penicillin G once monthly to all patients (ages 5-21 years) regardless of evidence of infection; and secondary prophylaxis with monthly only to those with echocardiographic evidence of early RHD. Our model suggests that echocardiographic screening and secondary prophylaxis is the best strategy although the strategies change depending on parameters used.

  3. Prevalence of rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in school children in a rural community of the hill region of Nepal.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, U K; Bhattarai, T N; Pandey, M R

    1991-01-01

    A survey of school children aged 5 to 16 years living in a rural community of the hill region of Nepal, situated about 15-22 km outside Kathmandu city, was conducted to determine the prevalence of rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD). Of the 4,816 eligible children enrolled in the selected schools, 4,452 (92.4%) were examined. WHO expert committee criteria (1966) was used for the diagnosis and classification of rheumatic fever. Chest x-ray, electro-cardiography, echocardiography and Doppler study were done in all suspected cases of rheumatic heart disease. Six cases of RHD (1 pure mitral stenosis, 3 mitral regurgitation and 2 combined mitral stenosis and regurgitation) were identified giving overall prevalence rate of 1.35 per thousand. No case with active rheumatic fever could be identified. This is the first study on prevalence of RF/RHD in Nepal. The prevalence rate is lower than that reported from neighbouring countries. PMID:1894300

  4. Using Registries to Identify Adverse Events in Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lionetti, Geraldina; Kimura, Yukiko; Schanberg, Laura E.; Beukelman, Timothy; Wallace, Carol A.; Ilowite, Norman T.; Winsor, Jane; Fox, Kathleen; Natter, Marc; Sundy, John S.; Brodsky, Eric; Curtis, Jeffrey R.; Del Gaizo, Vincent; Iyasu, Solomon; Jahreis, Angelika; Meeker-O’Connell, Ann; Mittleman, Barbara B.; Murphy, Bernard M.; Peterson, Eric D.; Raymond, Sandra C.; Setoguchi, Soko; Siegel, Jeffrey N.; Sobel, Rachel E.; Solomon, Daniel; Southwood, Taunton R.; Vesely, Richard; White, Patience H.; Wulffraat, Nico M.; Sandborg, Christy I.

    2013-01-01

    The proven effectiveness of biologics and other immunomodulatory products in inflammatory rheumatic diseases has resulted in their widespread use as well as reports of potential short- and long-term complications such as infection and malignancy. These complications are especially worrisome in children who often have serial exposures to multiple immunomodulatory products. Post-marketing surveillance of immunomodulatory products in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus is currently based on product-specific registries and passive surveillance, which may not accurately reflect the safety risks for children owing to low numbers, poor long-term retention, and inadequate comparators. In collaboration with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), patient and family advocacy groups, biopharmaceutical industry representatives and other stakeholders, the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) and the Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI) have developed a novel pharmacosurveillance model (CARRA Consolidated Safety Registry [CoRe]) based on a multicenter longitudinal pediatric rheumatic diseases registry with over 8000 participants. The existing CARRA infrastructure provides access to much larger numbers of subjects than is feasible in single-product registries. Enrollment regardless of medication exposure allows more accurate detection and evaluation of safety signals. Flexibility built into the model allows the addition of specific data elements and safety outcomes, and designation of appropriate disease comparator groups relevant to each product, fulfilling post-marketing requirements and commitments. The proposed model can be applied to other pediatric and adult diseases, potentially transforming the paradigm of pharmacosurveillance in response to the growing public mandate for rigorous post-marketing safety monitoring. PMID:24144710

  5. Neuroimmunoendocrinology of the rheumatic diseases: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Wilder, Ronald L

    2002-06-01

    Adaptation to stressful stimuli, maintenance of homeostasis, and ultimately, survival require bidirectional feedback communication among components of the stress response and immune and endocrine systems. Substantial progress has been made in delineating molecular, cellular, and systemic physiologic mechanisms underlying this communication, particularly mechanisms that target the immune system. For example, our understanding of the immunomodulatory activities of numerous neuroendocrine mediators, such as cortisol, estrogen, testosterone, DHEA, catecholamines, corticotropin-releasing hormone, and adenosine, has advanced substantially. Substantial progress has also been made in defining how abnormalities involving these factors may contribute to the initiation, progression, and severity of autoimmune rheumatic diseases, particularly rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). For RA, the available data support the view that inflammatory and immune system inhibitory mechanisms, involving the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and sympathetic nervous system are deficient. Age, gender, and reproductive status acting, in part, through gonadal hormonal effects on disease susceptibility genes also appear likely to modulate the inhibitory stress response systems and immune function. Animal model data also have provided direct evidence that many autoimmune disease regulatory genes are gender influenced. For SLE, a growing body of recent data indicates that estrogens and androgens exert contrasting effects on B-lymphocytes (i.e., estrogens enhance and testosterone suppresses autoantibody production). These observations provide potential new insights into SLE pathogenesis and gender differences in prevalence. Continued investigation will refine our understanding of these observations and will uncover even more extensive interactions of the nervous, immune, and endocrine systems. Moreover, it is highly likely that improved understanding of these

  6. Atypical case of Sjögren's syndrome with psychiatric and peripheral neurological disorder.

    PubMed

    Paşcalău, Nicoleta Anamaria; Cioară, Felicia Liana; Roşca, Elena; MuŢiu, Gabriela; Pobirci, Liana Oana; Jinca, Cristian Marius; Georgescu, Laura Monica; Vicaş, Răzvan Marius

    2016-01-01

    Sjögren's syndrome is a rare disorder of the immune system characterized by the chronic lymphocytic infiltration of the organs with exocrine secretion (lachrymal, salivary glands), but also of other tissues of the body, that can be primary or secondary and can appear alone or in association with other systemic diseases: rheumatic arthritis, systemic erythematous lupus, scleroderma or polymyositis÷dermatomyositis. The case that we are presenting is that of a 40-year-old man, who came to the Department of Rheumatology with articular, muscular, ocular, psychological and neurological symptoms. After multiple biological, immunological, histological, neurological, psychiatric, ophthalmological, digestive investigations, it was reached the conclusion that the patient presents a rare autoimmune disease (primary Sjögren's syndrome) involving mainly peripheral neuromuscular and psychological (small frequency) and the patient was given specific immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and anti-depressive treatment, to which he responded well. Thus, after 18 months of investigation, severe depressive episodes and difficult collaboration of the patient with the medical team, it was possible to reach the definitive diagnosis and to perform the appropriate treatment. PMID:27151727

  7. Overview of spaceflight immunology studies.

    PubMed

    Taylor, G R

    1993-09-01

    The effects of spaceflight and analogues of spaceflight are discussed here and in nine accompanying articles. In this summary we present spaceflight studies with human subjects, animal subjects, and cell cultures and we review ground-based systems used to model the observed effects of spaceflight on the immune system. Human paradigms include bed rest, academic or psychological stress, physical stress, hypobaric or high altitude stress, and confinement. Animal models include antiorthostatic and orthostatic suspension, hypobarism, and confinement. The ten manuscripts in this collection were selected to provide a summary that should give the reader an overview of the various activities of spaceflight immunology researchers throughout the history of space travel. This manuscript identifies the major contributors to the study of spaceflight immunology, explains what types of studies have been conducted, and how they have changed over the years. Also presented is a discussion of the unusual limitations associated with spaceflight research and the efforts to develop appropriate ground-based surrogate model systems. Specific details, data, and mechanistic speculations will be held to a minimum, because they will be discussed in depth in the other articles in the collection.

  8. The immunology of smallpox vaccines.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Richard B; Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Jacobson, Robert M; Poland, Gregory A

    2009-06-01

    In spite of the eradication of smallpox over 30 years ago; orthopox viruses such as smallpox and monkeypox remain serious public health threats both through the possibility of bioterrorism and the intentional release of smallpox and through natural outbreaks of emerging infectious diseases such as monkeypox. The eradication effort was largely made possible by the availability of an effective vaccine based on the immunologically cross-protective vaccinia virus. Although the concept of vaccination dates back to the late 1800s with Edward Jenner, it is only in the past decade that modern immunologic tools have been applied toward deciphering poxvirus immunity. Smallpox vaccines containing vaccinia virus elicit strong humoral and cellular immune responses that confer cross-protective immunity against variola virus for decades after immunization. Recent studies have focused on: establishing the longevity of poxvirus-specific immunity, defining key immune epitopes targeted by T and B cells, developing subunit-based vaccines, and developing genotypic and phenotypic immune response profiles that predict either vaccine response or adverse events following immunization.

  9. Overview of spaceflight immunology studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, G. R.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of spaceflight and analogues of spaceflight are discussed here and in nine accompanying articles. In this summary we present spaceflight studies with human subjects, animal subjects, and cell cultures and we review ground-based systems used to model the observed effects of spaceflight on the immune system. Human paradigms include bed rest, academic or psychological stress, physical stress, hypobaric or high altitude stress, and confinement. Animal models include antiorthostatic and orthostatic suspension, hypobarism, and confinement. The ten manuscripts in this collection were selected to provide a summary that should give the reader an overview of the various activities of spaceflight immunology researchers throughout the history of space travel. This manuscript identifies the major contributors to the study of spaceflight immunology, explains what types of studies have been conducted, and how they have changed over the years. Also presented is a discussion of the unusual limitations associated with spaceflight research and the efforts to develop appropriate ground-based surrogate model systems. Specific details, data, and mechanistic speculations will be held to a minimum, because they will be discussed in depth in the other articles in the collection.

  10. The immunology of smallpox vaccines.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Richard B; Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Jacobson, Robert M; Poland, Gregory A

    2009-06-01

    In spite of the eradication of smallpox over 30 years ago; orthopox viruses such as smallpox and monkeypox remain serious public health threats both through the possibility of bioterrorism and the intentional release of smallpox and through natural outbreaks of emerging infectious diseases such as monkeypox. The eradication effort was largely made possible by the availability of an effective vaccine based on the immunologically cross-protective vaccinia virus. Although the concept of vaccination dates back to the late 1800s with Edward Jenner, it is only in the past decade that modern immunologic tools have been applied toward deciphering poxvirus immunity. Smallpox vaccines containing vaccinia virus elicit strong humoral and cellular immune responses that confer cross-protective immunity against variola virus for decades after immunization. Recent studies have focused on: establishing the longevity of poxvirus-specific immunity, defining key immune epitopes targeted by T and B cells, developing subunit-based vaccines, and developing genotypic and phenotypic immune response profiles that predict either vaccine response or adverse events following immunization. PMID:19524427

  11. Overview of spaceflight immunology studies.

    PubMed

    Taylor, G R

    1993-09-01

    The effects of spaceflight and analogues of spaceflight are discussed here and in nine accompanying articles. In this summary we present spaceflight studies with human subjects, animal subjects, and cell cultures and we review ground-based systems used to model the observed effects of spaceflight on the immune system. Human paradigms include bed rest, academic or psychological stress, physical stress, hypobaric or high altitude stress, and confinement. Animal models include antiorthostatic and orthostatic suspension, hypobarism, and confinement. The ten manuscripts in this collection were selected to provide a summary that should give the reader an overview of the various activities of spaceflight immunology researchers throughout the history of space travel. This manuscript identifies the major contributors to the study of spaceflight immunology, explains what types of studies have been conducted, and how they have changed over the years. Also presented is a discussion of the unusual limitations associated with spaceflight research and the efforts to develop appropriate ground-based surrogate model systems. Specific details, data, and mechanistic speculations will be held to a minimum, because they will be discussed in depth in the other articles in the collection. PMID:8371047

  12. [Vaccinations in patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases--EULAR recommendations for pediatric and adult patients].

    PubMed

    Müller-Ladner, Claudia; Müller-Ladner, Ulf

    2012-10-01

    Since patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases are prone to infectious complications--on one hand due to the rheumatic disease itself, on the other hand due to the immunosuppressive therapy--vaccination is an essential tool to prevent these infectious complications. Although there exist several recommendations for the vaccination of immunocompromised patients, many questions still remain for the distinct clinical situations of patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases. In addition, there are several questions concerning the safety and efficacy of various vaccinations, especially with regard to live-attenuated vaccines. Therefore, EULAR (European League Against Rheumatism) assembled two expert panels to clarify as much of these clinical problems as possible. After extensive literature review and evidence grading, the expert panels published recommendations for the vaccination of adult and pediatric patients, which are outlined in this review article.

  13. Rheumatic diseases induced by drugs and environmental factors: the state-of-the-art - part one.

    PubMed

    Niklas, Karolina; Niklas, Arkadiusz A; Majewski, Dominik; Puszczewicz, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    The majority of rheumatic diseases belong to the group of autoimmune diseases and are associated with autoantibody production. Their etiology is not fully understood. Certain medications and environmental factors may have an influence on the occurrence of rheumatic diseases. Establishing a cause-effect relationship between a certain factor and disease induction is not always simple. It is important to administer the drug continuously or monitor exposure to a given factor in the period preceding the onset of symptoms. The lack of previously diagnosed autoimmune disease, or finally the lack of symptoms within a few weeks/months after discontinuation of the drug/cessation of exposure, is also important. The most frequently mentioned rheumatic diseases caused by drugs and environmental factors include systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, systemic vasculitis, polymyositis, dermatomyositis, and Sjögren's syndrome. The objective of this study is to summarize current knowledge on rheumatic diseases induced by drugs and environmental factors. PMID:27504022

  14. Acute Rheumatic Fever: An Evidence-Based Approach To Diagnosis And Initial Management.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Kajal; Liu, Deborah R

    2016-08-01

    Acute rheumatic fever is an inflammatory reaction involving the joints, heart, and nervous system that occurs after a group A streptococcal infection. It typically presents as a febrile illness with clinical manifestations that could include arthritis, carditis, skin lesions, or abnormal movements. Of these, the cardiac manifestations of acute rheumatic fever are most concerning, as children may present in acute heart failure and may go on to develop valvular insufficiency or stenosis. Because this is a rare presentation to emergency departments in developed countries, it is crucial for clinicians to keep a broad differential when presented with clinical presentations suspicious for acute rheumatic fever. This issue focuses on the clinical evaluation and treatment of patients with acute rheumatic fever by offering a thorough review of the literature on diagnosis and recommendations on appropriate treatment. PMID:27462838

  15. Power Doppler ultrasonographic assessment of the ankle in patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takeshi

    2014-11-18

    Ankle involvement is frequent in patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases, but accurate evaluation by physical examination is often difficult because of the complex anatomical structures of the ankle. Over the last decade, ultrasound (US) has become a practical imaging tool for the assessment of articular and periarticular pathologies, including joint synovitis, tenosynovitis, and enthesitis in rheumatic diseases. Progress in power Doppler (PD) technology has enabled evaluation of the strength of ongoing inflammation. PDUS is very useful for identifying the location and kind of pathologies in rheumatic ankles as well as for distinguishing between inflammatory processes and degenerative changes or between active inflammation and residual damage. The aim of this paper is to illustrate the US assessment of ankle lesions in patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritis, and systemic lupus erythematosus, focusing on the utility of PDUS.

  16. Immunological characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Cíntia de Vasconcellos; Telles, Paloma Dias da Silva; Nascimento, Ivana Lucia Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Although bone marrow is the main source, mesenchymal stem cells have already been isolated from various other tissues, such as the liver, pancreas, adipose tissue, peripheral blood and dental pulp. These plastic adherent cells are morphologically similar to fibroblasts and have a high proliferative potential. This special group of cells possesses two essential characteristics: self-renewal and differentiation, with appropriate stimuli, into various cell types. Mesenchymal stem cells are considered immunologically privileged, since they do not express costimulatory molecules, required for complete T cell activation, on their surface. Several studies have shown that these cells exert an immunosuppressive effect on cells from both innate and acquired immunity systems. Mesenchymal stem cells can regulate the immune response in vitro by inhibiting the maturation of dendritic cells, as well as by suppressing the proliferation and function of T and B lymphocytes and natural killer cells. These special properties of mesenchymal stem cells make them a promising strategy in the treatment of immune mediated disorders, such as graft-versus-host disease and autoimmune diseases, as well as in regenerative medicine. The understanding of immune regulation mechanisms of mesenchymal stem cells, and also those involved in the differentiation of these cells in various lineages is primordial for their successful and safe application in different areas of medicine. PMID:23580887

  17. 21 CFR 866.5040 - Albumin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Albumin immunological test system. 866.5040... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5040 Albumin immunological test system. (a) Identification. An albumin immunological test system is a device that consists...

  18. 21 CFR 866.5170 - Breast milk immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Breast milk immunological test system. 866.5170... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5170 Breast milk immunological test system. (a) Identification. A breast milk immunological test system is a...

  19. The clinical value of intracellular autoantigens B-cell epitopes in systemic rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Routsias, John G; Tzioufas, Athanasios G; Moutsopoulos, Haralampos M

    2004-02-01

    A hallmark of autoimmune diseases is the production of autoantibodies against intracellular autoantigens. Although their pathogenetic and their etiologic relationship are not fully understood, these autoantibodies are important tools for establishing the diagnosis, classification and prognosis of autoimmune diseases. Systemic rheumatic diseases are among the most complex disorders because their clinical presentation and constellation of findings are in part reflected by the wide spectrum of autoantibodies found in the sera of patients suffering from these disorders. These autoantibodies usually target large complexes consisting of protein antigens noncovalently associated with (ribo)-nucleic acid(s), like the spliceosome or Ro/La-RNPs. In this review, we first address the main characteristics and the clinical value of several autoantibodies, with respect to their diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. Subsequently, we provide a brief overview of the antigenic determinant types that have been identified on the corresponding autoantigens. The antibody targets of autontigens include primary, secondary, tertiary and quarternary structure epitopes, as well as cryptotopes, neoepitopes and mimotopes. We next focus on antigenic structures corresponding to B-cell epitopes with high disease specificity and sensitivity for all the major autoantigens in systemic autoimmunity including the Ro/La and U1 ribonucleoprotein complexes and the Ku70/80, ribosomal P, DNA topoisomerase I, filaggrin, Jo-1 and PM/SCl-100 autoantigens. These epitopes, defined at the peptide level, can be chemically synthesized and engineered for the development of new inexpensive and easier to perform assays and the improvement of the methods for autoantibody detection. Specific examples of newly developed assays that incorporate (i) epitopes with high disease specificity and sensitivity, (ii) modified epitopes, (iii) conformational epitopes and (iv) complementary epitopes are discussed in detail. Finally

  20. Failure of oral penicillin as secondary prophylaxis for rheumatic heart disease: a lesson from a low-prevalence rheumatic fever region.

    PubMed

    McGlacken-Byrne, S M; Parry, H M; Currie, P F; Wilson, N J

    2015-11-03

    Our patient is an 18-year-old Caucasian woman from the UK who developed severe mitral stenosis on a history of childhood acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD). She had been reporting of her oral penicillin secondary prophylaxis regimen since diagnosis. At the age of 15 years, a new murmur was discovered during routine cardiac follow-up. An echocardiogram confirmed moderate-severe mitral stenosis. One year later, her exercise tolerance significantly deteriorated and she subsequently underwent balloon valvuloplasty of her mitral valve to good effect. Our case emphasises the evidence base supporting the use of monthly intramuscular penicillin injection to prevent ARF recurrence and RHD progression; it also emphasises the reduced efficacy of oral penicillin prophylaxis in this context. It particularly resonates with regions of low rheumatic fever endemicity. The long-term cardiac sequelae of ARF can be devastating; prescribing the most effective secondary prophylaxis regimen is essential.

  1. Failure of oral penicillin as secondary prophylaxis for rheumatic heart disease: a lesson from a low-prevalence rheumatic fever region.

    PubMed

    McGlacken-Byrne, S M; Parry, H M; Currie, P F; Wilson, N J

    2015-01-01

    Our patient is an 18-year-old Caucasian woman from the UK who developed severe mitral stenosis on a history of childhood acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD). She had been reporting of her oral penicillin secondary prophylaxis regimen since diagnosis. At the age of 15 years, a new murmur was discovered during routine cardiac follow-up. An echocardiogram confirmed moderate-severe mitral stenosis. One year later, her exercise tolerance significantly deteriorated and she subsequently underwent balloon valvuloplasty of her mitral valve to good effect. Our case emphasises the evidence base supporting the use of monthly intramuscular penicillin injection to prevent ARF recurrence and RHD progression; it also emphasises the reduced efficacy of oral penicillin prophylaxis in this context. It particularly resonates with regions of low rheumatic fever endemicity. The long-term cardiac sequelae of ARF can be devastating; prescribing the most effective secondary prophylaxis regimen is essential. PMID:26531741

  2. [HLA-DQA1 genes involved in genetic susceptibility to rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in southern Hans].

    PubMed

    Gu, J; Yu, B; Zhou, J

    1997-05-01

    The incidence of rheumatic fever (RF) or rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is high in southern China. We studied the genetic susceptibility of HLA-DQA1 alleles to RF or RHD with emphasis on the mechanisms 106 unrelated healthy individuals and 54 patients with RF or RHD of Chinese Han nationality in Guangdong were included. DNA extraction from various biological material using phenol/chloroform method and HLA-DQA1 genotyping by PCR-PAGE and then with silver dyeing was used to show the electrophoretic patterns. A total 6 alleles of HLA-DQA1 were found. Increased allele frequencies of DQA1*0101 (31.48%, RR = 2.89, P < 0.005, EF = 0.206) and decreased allele frequencies of DQA1*0102 (1.85%, RR = 0.106, P < 0.005, PF = 0.134) were observed. Two increased genotyping of HLA-DQA1 (DQA1*0101/0301, chi 2 = 8.84, P < 0.005 and DQA1*0101/0401, chi 2 = 6.23, P < 0.0025) and decreased genotyping of DQA1*0102/0301 (chi 2 = 11.98, P < 0.005) were also observed. These findings suggested that DQA1*0101 contribute to genetic susceptibility for RF or RHD in Guangdong hans while DQA1*0102 to its genetic resistance. Digesting the genotyping of HLA-DQA1 may provide scientific basis for finding susceptible individuals to RF or RHD. Using PCR-PAGE and silver dyeing technique, a new genotyping method for HLA-DQA1, which is simple sensitive and precise, was established and applied. PMID:10374271

  3. Rheumatic Disease among Oklahoma Tribal Populations: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Gaddy, Jasmine R.; Vista, Evan S.; Robertson, Julie M.; Dedeke, Amy B.; Roberts, Virginia C.; Klein, Wendy S.; Levin, Jeremy H.; Mota, Fabio H.; Cooper, Tina M.; Grim, Gloria A.; Khan, Sohail; James, Judith A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Rheumatic diseases cause significant morbidity within American Indian populations. Clinical disease presentations, as well as historically associated autoantibodies, are not always useful in making a rapid diagnosis or assessing prognosis. The purpose of this study is to identify autoantibody associations among Oklahoma tribal populations with rheumatic disease. Methods Oklahoma tribal members (110 rheumatic disease patients and 110 controls) were enrolled at tribal-based clinics. Rheumatic disease patients (suspected or confirmed diagnosis) were assessed by a rheumatologist for clinical features, disease criteria, and activity measures. Blood samples were collected and tested for common rheumatic disease autoantibodies (ANA, anti-CCP, anti-RF, anti-Ro, anti-La, anti-Sm, anti-nRNP, anti-Ribosomal P, anti-dsDNA, and anti-cardiolipins). Results In patients with suspected systemic rheumatic diseases, 72% satisfied ACR classification: 40 (36%) rheumatoid arthritis, 16 (15%) systemic lupus erythematosus, 8 (7%) scleroderma, 8 (7%) osteoarthritis, 4 (4%) fibromyalgia, 2 (2%) seronegative spondyloarthropathy, 1 Sjogrens syndrome, and 1 sarcoidosis. When compared to controls, RA patient sera were more likely to contain anti-CCP (55% vs 2%, p<0.001) or anti-RF IgM antibodies (57% vs 10%, p<0.001); however, the difference was greater for anti-CCP. Anti-CCP positivity conferred higher disease activity scores (DAS28 5.6 vs 4.45, p=0.021) while anti-RF positivity did not (DAS28 5.36 vs 4.64, p=0.15). Anticardiolipin antibodies (25% or rheumatic disease paitents vs 10% of contros,; p=0.0022) and ANA (63% vs 21%, p<0.0001) were more common in rheumatic disease patients. Conclusion Anti-CCP may serve as a better RA biomarker in AI patients, while the clinical significance of increased frequency of aCLs needs further evaluation. PMID:22896022

  4. [Cyclic nucleotides and enzymes of the synovial fluid in various rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Buneaux, J J; Djiane, F; Gounelle, J C; Galmiche, P

    1980-01-01

    The authors measured the activities of four enzymes (L.D.H., acid phosphatase, B glucuronidase, and lysozyme) and the contents of AMPc and GMPc in the synovial fluid in 35 patients with rheumatic disease. In those with various forms of inflammatory rheumatism, they found negative correlation between AMPc and the enzymes, whereas in rheumatoid arthritis they observed a positive correlation between GMPc and these enzymes. PMID:6968447

  5. Evolution and conservation of immunological activity.

    PubMed

    Vaz, N M

    2006-12-01

    Paraphrasing what Gregory Bateson says on evolution, we might say that: "Immunology has long been badly taught. In particular, students--and even professional immunologists--acquire theories of immunological activity without any deep understanding of what problems these theories attempt to solve." PMID:17160260

  6. Evolution and conservation of immunological activity.

    PubMed

    Vaz, N M

    2006-12-01

    Paraphrasing what Gregory Bateson says on evolution, we might say that: "Immunology has long been badly taught. In particular, students--and even professional immunologists--acquire theories of immunological activity without any deep understanding of what problems these theories attempt to solve."

  7. The ninth international veterinary immunology symposium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This Introduction to the special issue of Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology summarizes the Proceedings of the 9th International Veterinary Immunology Symposium (9th IVIS) held August, 2010, in Tokyo, Japan. Over 340 delegates from 30 countries discussed research progress analyzing the immune...

  8. The cognitive paradigm and the immunological homunculus.

    PubMed

    Cohen, I R

    1992-12-01

    In last month's issue of Immunology Today, Irun Cohen discussed the inadequacies of the clonal selection paradigm and proposed a cognitive paradigm in which preformed internal images guide and restrict the process of clonal activation. Here he clarifies the nature of these internal images, during on concrete examples from the image of infection and the image of self, the immunological homunculus.

  9. 21 CFR 866.5620 - Alpha-2-macroglobulin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alpha-2-macroglobulin immunological test system. 866.5620 Section 866.5620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... the diagnosis of blood-clotting or clot lysis disorders. (b) Classification. Class II...

  10. Commentary: Immunological Treatments for Autism: In Search of Reasons for Promising Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Andrew W.

    2000-01-01

    This commentary on research findings that indicate immunological abnormalities in children with autism, discusses the lack of evidence indicating autoantibodies specifically affect the vulnerable neuronal networks or synaptic functions of individuals with autism to account for the cognitive and behavioral symptoms of the disorder. (Contains…

  11. [Immunological changes in chronic osteomyelitis].

    PubMed

    Asensi Alvarez, V; Cartón Sánchez, J A; Maradona Hidalgo, J A; López-Larrea, C; Arribas Castrillo, J M

    1992-11-01

    We have studied several aspects of cellular and humoral immunity in 19 patients with chronic osteomyelitis (CO) compared with 11 healthy controls of similar characteristics. Patients with CO showed significantly higher values of GSR, reactive protein C (RPC), IgG and lymphocytes CD3+ and lower values of the CD4+/CD3+ ratio, as well as an hypoergic response to 7 antigens in the different cutaneous hypersensibility tests, compared with healthy controls. The rate of "in vitro" blastic stimulation by different lectins was significantly lower in the group of patients, compared with controls. These changes in the cellular immunity are not correlated with the extent, chronicity and prognosis of the disease, although we did not performed sequential studies of the immunitary condition. None of these immunological markers seem to be a better predictor of the bone infectious activity than the traditional GSR or RPC. PMID:1467399

  12. Split Immunological Tolerance to Trophoblast

    PubMed Central

    de Mestre, Amanda; Noronha, Leela; Wagner, Bettina; Antczak, Douglas F.

    2010-01-01

    Split immunological tolerance refers to states in which an individual is capable of mounting certain types of immune responses to a particular antigenic challenge, but is tolerant of the same antigen in other compartments of the immune system. This concept is applicable to the immunological relationship between mother and fetus, and particularly relevant in equine pregnancy. In pregnant mares, antibody responses to paternal foreign Major Histocompatibility Complex class I antigens are robust, while anti-paternal cytotoxic T cell responses are diminished compared to those mounted by non-pregnant mares. Here we compared the distribution of the major lymphocyte subsets, the percentage of lymphocytes expressing Interferon Gamma (IFNG) and Interleukin 4 (IL4) and the level of expression of the immunoregulatory transcription factor FOXP3 between pregnant and non-pregnant mares, and between peripheral blood and the endometrium during pregnancy. In a cohort of mares in which peripheral blood lymphocytes were tested during early pregnancy and in the non-pregnant state, there were only slight changes observed during pregnancy. In contrast, comparison of peripheral blood lymphocytes with lymphocytes isolated from the endometrial cups of pregnant mares revealed striking differences in lymphocyte sub-populations. The endometrial cups contained higher numbers of IFNG+ lymphocytes, and lower numbers of lymphocytes expressing IL4. The endometrial cup lymphocytes also had higher numbers of FOXP3+ cells compared to peripheral blood lymphocytes. Taken together, these results strengthen the evidence for a state of split tolerance to trophoblast, and furthermore define sharp differences in immune reactivity during equine pregnancy between peripheral blood lymphocytes and lymphocytes at the maternal-fetal interface. PMID:19876828

  13. Immunology of whales and dolphins.

    PubMed

    Beineke, Andreas; Siebert, Ursula; Wohlsein, Peter; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2010-02-15

    The increasing disease susceptibility in different whale and dolphin populations has led to speculation about a possible negative influence of environmental contaminants on the immune system and therefore on the health status of marine mammals. Despite current efforts in the immunology of marine mammals several aspects of immune functions in aquatic mammals remain unknown. However, assays for evaluating cellular immune responses, such as lymphocyte proliferation, respiratory burst as well as phagocytic and cytotoxic activity of leukocytes and humoral immune responses have been established for different cetacean species. Additionally, immunological and molecular techniques enable the detection and quantification of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in lymphoid cells during inflammation or immune responses, respectively. Different T and B cell subsets as well as antigen-presenting cells can be detected by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Despite great homologies between marine and terrestrial mammal lymphoid organs, some unique anatomical structures, particularly the complex lymphoepithelial laryngeal glands in cetaceans represent an adaptation to the marine environment. Additionally, physiological changes, such as age-related thymic atrophy and cystic degeneration of the "anal tonsil" of whales have to be taken into account when investigating these lymphoid structures. Systemic morbillivirus infections lead to fatalities in cetaceans associated with generalized lymphoid depletion. Similarly, chronic diseases and starvation are associated with a loss of functional lymphoid cells and decreased resistance against opportunistic infections. There is growing evidence for an immunotoxic effect of different environmental contaminants in whales and dolphins, as demonstrated in field studies. Furthermore, immunomodulatory properties of different persistent xenobiotics have been confirmed in cetacean lymphoid cells in vitro as well as in animal models in vivo

  14. Recommended immunization schedules for adults: Clinical practice guidelines by the Escmid Vaccine Study Group (EVASG), European Geriatric Medicine Society (EUGMS) and the World Association for Infectious Diseases and Immunological Disorders (WAidid).

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Bonanni, Paolo; Maggi, Stefania; Tan, Litjan; Ansaldi, Filippo; Lopalco, Pier Luigi; Dagan, Ron; Michel, Jean-Pierre; van Damme, Pierre; Gaillat, Jacques; Prymula, Roman; Vesikari, Timo; Mussini, Cristina; Frank, Uwe; Osterhaus, Albert; Celentano, Lucia Pastore; Rossi, Marta; Guercio, Valentina; Gavazzi, Gaetan

    2016-07-01

    Rapid population aging has become a major challenge in the industrialized world and progressive aging is a key reason for making improvement in vaccination a cornerstone of public health strategy. An increase in age-related disorders and conditions is likely to be seen in the near future, and these are risk factors for the occurrence of a number of vaccine-preventable diseases. An improvement in infectious diseases prevention specifically aimed at adults and the elderly can therefore also decrease the burden of these chronic conditions by reducing morbidity, disability, hospital admissions, health costs, mortality rates and, perhaps most importantly, by improving the quality of life. Among adults, it is necessary to identify groups at increased risk of vaccine-preventable diseases and highlight the epidemiological impact and benefits of vaccinations using an evidence-based approach. This document provides clinical practice guidance on immunization for adults in order to provide recommendations for decision makers and healthcare workers in Europe. Although immunization is considered one of the most impactful and cost-effective public health measures that can be undertaken, vaccination coverage rates among adults are largely lower than the stated goal of ≥ 95% among adults, and stronger efforts are needed to increase coverage in this population. Active surveillance of adult vaccine-preventable diseases, determining the effectiveness of the vaccines approved for marketing in the last 5 y, the efficacy and safety of vaccines in immunocompromised patients, as well as in pregnant women, represent the priorities for future research. PMID:27135390

  15. The relationship among smoking, sleep, and chronic rheumatic conditions commonly associated with pain in the National Health Interview Survey.

    PubMed

    Stipelman, Brooke A; Augustson, Erik; McNeel, Timothy

    2013-10-01

    Chronic rheumatic conditions are typically characterized by chronic pain and are uniquely associated with increased rates of cigarette smoking and poor sleep quality. However, no study has examined the possible additive or interactive effects of these two health behaviors in individuals diagnosed with a chronic rheumatic condition. The goal of this study is to examine the relationship between cigarette smoking and sleep in a population sample of individuals diagnosed with a chronic rheumatic condition and related functional impairment. Cross sectional survey data was obtained from the 2007 National Health Interview Survey. Individuals diagnosed with a chronic rheumatic condition were more likely to be a former or current smoker compared to non-diagnosed individuals. Individuals with a chronic rheumatic condition were more likely to report <6 h of sleep per night and endorsed significantly more insomnia and daytime sleepiness. There was no interaction between diagnosis of a chronic rheumatic condition and smoking status on any of the sleep outcomes assessed. Finally, an interaction was observed suggesting individuals with a chronic rheumatic condition who currently smoke are more likely to report averaging <6 h of sleep per night and frequent insomnia compared to individuals with a chronic rheumatic condition who never smoked. These results suggest both a unique and additive relationship between smoking and sleep in individuals with a chronic rheumatic condition. Findings can likely be generalized to other conditions commonly associated with chronic pain. PMID:22864597

  16. Effect of ethnic origin (Caucasians versus Turks) on the prevalence of rheumatic diseases: a WHO-ILAR COPCORD urban study in Iran.

    PubMed

    Davatchi, Fereydoun; Jamshidi, Ahmad-Reza; Tehrani Banihashemi, Arash; Gholami, Jaleh; Hossein Forouzanfar, Mohammad; Akhlaghi, Massoomeh; Barghamdi, Mojgan; Noorolahzadeh, Elham; Khabazi, Ali-Reza; Salesi, Mansour; Salari, Amir-Hossein; Karimifar, Mansoor; Essalat-Manesh, Kamal; Hajialiloo, Mehrzad; Soroosh, Mohsen; Farzad, Farhad; Moussavi, Hamid-Reza; Samadi, Farideh; Ghaznavi, Koorosh; Asgharifard, Homa; Zangiabadi, Amir-Hossein; Shahram, Farhad; Nadji, Abdolhadi; Akbarian, Mahmood; Gharibdoost, Farhad; Rasker, Johannes J

    2009-11-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the prevalence of musculoskeletal complaints and rheumatic disorders in Caucasians and Turks in an identical environment. Subjects were selected randomly for an interview from Tehran's 22 districts. The Community Oriented Program for Control of Rheumatic Diseases questionnaire was filled in, positive cases were examined, and if needed, laboratory or X-ray tests were performed. A total of 4,096 houses were visited, and 10,291 persons were interviewed. They were 71.4% Caucasians and 23.1% Turks with similar distribution of age and gender. Musculoskeletal complaints of the past 7 days were detected in 40.8% of Caucasians and 45.5% of Turks (p < 0.001). In Caucasians, the total of musculoskeletal complaints in men was 33.8% (95% CI, 31.4-36.2%) versus 48.3% in women (95% CI, 45.7-50.8%). In Turks, the total of musculoskeletal complaints in men was 36.6% (95% CI, 32.2-41.1%) versus 55.8% in women (95% CI, 55.8-60.6%). The data of Caucasians versus Turks were as follows: knee pain 20.2% (95% CI, 18.2-22.1) versus 24.1% (95% CI, 20.5-27.6), with p < 0.001; dorso-lumbar spine pain 15.1% (95% CI, 13.6-16.6) versus 18.4% (95% CI, 15.1-21.8), with p < 0.001; shoulder pain 10.7% (95% CI, 9.4-11.9) versus 12.3% (95% CI, 9.7-14.8), with p = 0.025; osteoarthritis 14.1% (95% CI, 12.8-15.2) versus 16.4% (95% CI, 14.3-18.6), p = 0.04; and knee osteoarthritis 12.3% (95% CI, 11.8-14.1) versus 15.3% (95% CI, 13.3-17.4), with p < 0.001). There were no significant differences regarding the prevalence of soft tissue rheumatism, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, Behcet's disease, fibromyalgia, and gout. Although musculoskeletal complaints were more frequent in Turks than in Caucasians, the prevalence of rheumatic disorders was rather similar except for knee osteoarthritis.

  17. Cancer and autoimmunity: autoimmune and rheumatic features in patients with malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Shakra, M; Buskila, D; Ehrenfeld, M; Conrad, K; Shoenfeld, Y

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To review the autoimmune and rheumatic manifestations of patients with malignancy.
METHODS—A Medline search of all published papers using keywords related to malignancies, autoimmunity, rheumatic diseases, and paraneoplastic syndromes.
RESULTS—Patients with malignant diseases may develop autoimmune phenomena and rheumatic diseases as a result of (a) generation of autoantibodies against various autoantigens, including oncoproteins (P185, 1-myc, c-myc, c-myb), tumour suppression genes (P53), proliferation associated antigens (cyclin A, B1, D1, E; CENP-F; CDK, U3-RNP), onconeural antigens (Hu, Yo, Ri, Tr), cancer/testis antigens (MAGE, GAGE, BAGE, SSX, ESO, SCP, CT7), and rheumatic disease associated antigens (RNP, Sm). The clinical significance of the various autoantibodies is not clear. Anti-oncoprotein and anti-tumour suppression gene antigens are detected before the diagnosis of the cancer or in the early stages of the malignant disease, suggesting a potential diagnostic or prognostic role. Anti-onconeural antibodies are pathogenic and are associated with specific clinical neurological syndromes (anti-Hu syndrome and others). (b) Paraneoplastic syndromes, a wide range of clinical syndromes, including classic autoimmune rheumatic diseases that develop among patients with cancer. (c) Rheumatism after chemotherapy, a clinical entity characterised by the development of musculoskeletal symptoms after combination chemotherapy for malignancy.
CONCLUSION—Autoimmune and rheumatic features are not rare among patients with malignancies. They are the result of various diverse mechanisms and occasionally they may be associated with serious clinical entities.

 PMID:11302861

  18. Serum immunoreactive prolyl hydroxylase in inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Kuutti-Savolainen, E R; Kivirikko, K I; Laitinen, O

    1980-01-01

    Serum immunoreactive prolyl hydroxylase protein (S-IRPH) was measured in 56 patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases, and the values were compared with those in 32 control subjects. S-IRPH was above the 95% confidence limit of the controls in about 70% of the patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, Reiter's syndrome, Sjögren's syndrome, polyarteritis nodosa, or polymyositis. Raised values were observed in about half of the patients with an erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) of 21-50 and in about 90% of those with ESR of over 50, whereas only about 10% of the patients with an inactive disease had an S-IRPH concentration exceeding this limit. Only 1 out of 8 patients with active ankylosing spondylitis had a raised S-IRPH value. The results support previous data indicating that significant changes in collagen metabolism occur in active connective tissue diseases. Assays of S-IRPH might be of some value in assessing the activity of these diseases and in monitoring the treatment provided. PMID:6251755

  19. [A short history of anti-rheumatic therapy. II. Aspirin].

    PubMed

    Pasero, G; Marson, P

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of aspirin, an antipyretic, anti-inflammatory and analgesic drug, undoubtedly represents a milestone in the history of medical therapy. Since ancient times the derivatives of willow (Salix alba) were used to treat a variety of fevers and pain syndromes, although the first report dates back to 1763 when the English Reverend Edward Stone described the effect of an extract of the bark willow in treating malaria. In the XIX century many apothecaries and chemists, including the Italian Raffaele Piria and Cesare Bertagnini, developed the biological processes of extraction and chemical synthesis of salicylates, and then analyzed their therapeutic properties and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics. In 1899 the Bayer Company, where Felix Hoffmann, Heinrich Dreser and Arthur Eichengrün worked, recorded acetyl-salicylic acid under the name "Aspirin". In the XX century, besides the definition of the correct applications of aspirin in the anti-rheumatic therapy being defined, Lawrence L. Crawen identified the property of this drug as an anti-platelet agent, thus opening the way for more widespread uses in cardiovascular diseases.

  20. MicroRNAs as biomarkers in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Alevizos, Ilias; Illei, Gabor G.

    2011-01-01

    Summary MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous, noncoding, single-stranded RNAs of 19–25 nucleotides in length. They regulate gene expression and are important in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes. MiRNAs are attractive as potential biomarkers because their expression pattern is reflective of the underlying pathophysiologic processes and they are specific to various disease states. Moreover, miRNAs can be detected in a variety of sources, including tissue, blood and body fluids; they are reasonably stable and appear to be resistant to differences in sample handling, which increases their appeal as practical biomarkers. The clinical utility of miRNAs as diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers has been demonstrated in various malignancies and a few nonmalignant diseases. There is accumulating evidence that miRNAs have an important role in systemic rheumatic diseases and that various diseases or different stages of the same disease are associated with distinct miRNA expression profiles. Preliminary data suggest that miRNAs are promising as candidate biomarkers of diagnosis, prognosis, disease activity and severity in autoimmune diseases. MiRNAs identified as potential biomarkers in pilot studies should be validated in larger studies specifically designed for biomarker validation. PMID:20517293

  1. Vitamin D endocrine system involvement in autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Pizzorni, Carmen; Sulli, Alberto

    2011-12-01

    Vitamin D is synthesized from cholesterol in the skin (80-90%) under the sunlight and then metabolized into an active D hormone in liver, kidney and peripheral immune/inflammatory cells. These endocrine-immune effects include also the coordinated activities of the vitamin D-activating enzyme, 1alpha-hydroxylase (CYP27B1), and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) on cells of the immune system in mediating intracrine and paracrine actions. Vitamin D is implicated in prevention and protection from chronic infections (i.e. tubercolosis), cancer (i.e. breast cancer) and autoimmune rheumatic diseases since regulates both innate and adaptive immunity potentiating the innate response (monocytes/macrophages with antimicrobial activity and antigen presentation), but suppressing the adaptive immunity (T and B lymphocyte functions). Vitamin D has modulatory effects on B lymphocytes and Ig production and recent reports have demonstrated that 1,25(OH)2D3 does indeed exert direct effects on B cell homeostasis. A circannual rhythm of trough vitamin D levels in winter and peaks in summer time showed negative correlation with clinical status at least in rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Recently, the onset of symptoms of early arthritis during winter or spring have been associated with greater radiographic evidence of disease progression at 12 months possibly are also related to seasonal lower vitamin D serum levels.

  2. Immune cell profiling to guide therapeutic decisions in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ermann, Joerg; Rao, Deepak A.; Teslovich, Nikola C.; Brenner, Michael B.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers are needed to guide treatment decisions for patients with rheumatic diseases. Although the phenotypic and functional analysis of immune cells is an appealing strategy for understanding immune-mediated disease processes, immune cell profiling currently has no role in clinical rheumatology. New technologies, including mass cytometry, gene expression profiling by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and multiplexed functional assays, enable the analysis of immune cell function with unprecedented detail and promise not only a deeper understanding of pathogenesis, but also the discovery of novel biomarkers. The large and complex data sets generated by these technologies—big data—require specialized approaches for analysis and visualization of results. Standardization of assays and definition of the range of normal values are additional challenges when translating these novel approaches into clinical practice. In this Review, we discuss technological advances in the high-dimensional analysis of immune cells and consider how these developments might support the discovery of predictive biomarkers to benefit the practice of rheumatology and improve patient care. PMID:26034835

  3. Screening for rheumatic heart disease: current approaches and controversies.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kathryn; Colquhoun, Samantha; Steer, Andrew; Reményi, Bo; Carapetis, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is a leading cause of cardiac disease among children in developing nations, and in indigenous populations of some industrialized countries. In endemic areas, RHD has long been a target of screening programmes that, historically, have relied on cardiac auscultation. The evolution of portable echocardiographic equipment has changed the face of screening for RHD over the past 5 years, with greatly improved sensitivity. However, concerns have been raised about the specificity of echocardiography, and the interpretation of minor abnormalities poses new challenges. The natural history of RHD in children with subclinical abnormalities detected by echocardiographic screening remains unknown, and long-term follow-up studies are needed to evaluate the significance of detecting these changes at an early stage. For a disease to be deemed suitable for screening from a public health perspective, it needs to fulfil a number of criteria. RHD meets some, but not all, of these criteria. If screening programmes are to identify additional cases of RHD, parallel improvements in the systems that deliver secondary prophylaxis are essential.

  4. The role of biosimilars in the treatment of rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Dörner, Thomas; Strand, Vibeke; Castañeda-Hernández, Gilberto; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; Isaacs, John D; Kvien, Tore K; Martin-Mola, Emilio; Mittendorf, Thomas; Smolen, Josef S; Burmester, Gerd R

    2013-03-01

    The first biological therapeutics in rheumatology are approaching patent expiration, encouraging development of 'follow-on' versions, known as 'biosimilars'. Biological agents range from simple replacement hormones to complex monoclonal antibodies and soluble receptors: large, intricate proteins with unique tertiary and quaternary structures that are inherently difficult to replicate. Post-translational modifications, such as glycosylation, may occur from changes in cell lines and/or manufacturing processes, resulting in products that are highly similar, but not identical, to approved 'reference' agents, hence, the term 'biosimilar', rather than 'bioidentical'. Even minor modifications in manufacturing processes, which iteratively occur with reference products due to improvements in efficiency, scale up to meet commercial demands or changes in manufacturing sites, may alter biological function and/or immunogenicity, potentially changing their safety and efficacy profile. As biosimilars are now in randomised controlled trials for treatment of rheumatic diseases, rheumatologists face decisions regarding equipoise and will need to consider their clinical use versus reference products. A clear understanding of the inherent differences between reference antibodies and biosimilars, their clinical implications and the processes governing regulation, approval and clinical use of biosimilars, is paramount. A panel of international experts in the field of rheumatology recently convened to evaluate and discuss these issues. PMID:23253920

  5. Advances in mechanisms of asthma, allergy, and immunology in 2010.

    PubMed

    Broide, David H; Finkelman, Fred; Bochner, Bruce S; Rothenberg, Marc E

    2011-03-01

    2010 was marked by rapid progress in our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation and asthma. Studies published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology described advances in our knowledge of cells associated with allergic inflammation (mast cells, eosinophils, dendritic cells, and T cells), as well as IgE, cytokines, receptors, signaling molecules, and pathways. Studies used animal models, as well as human cells and tissues, to advance our understanding of mechanisms of asthma, eosinophilic esophagitis, food allergy, anaphylaxis and immediate hypersensitivity, mast cells and their disorders, atopic dermatitis, nasal polyposis, and hypereosinophilic syndromes. Additional studies provided novel information about the induction and regulation of allergic inflammation and the genetic contribution to allergic inflammation. Critical features of these studies and their potential effects on human atopic disorders are summarized here.

  6. Pediatric allergy and immunology in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Celik, Gülfem; Bakirtas, Arzu; Sackesen, Cansin; Reisli, Ismail; Tuncer, Ayfer

    2011-06-01

    Allergic diseases constitute a significant health problem in Turkey. According to a recent multicenter study, which used the ISAAC questionnaire, the mean prevalence of wheezing, rhinoconjunctivitis, and eczema in 10-yr-old school children during the past year was 15.8%, 23.5%, and 8.1%, respectively. A healthcare level system, regulated by Ministry of Health, is available in Turkey. Pediatric allergists and pediatric immunologists provide patient care at the tertiary level. Currently, 48 centers deliver care for allergic and immunologic diseases in children. There are 136 pediatric and 61 adult allergists/immunologists. Although the number of allergy/clinical immunology specialists is limited, these centers are capable of delivering many of the procedures required for the proper management and diagnosis of allergy/immunology. Pediatric allergy and/or immunology is a subspecialty lasting 3 yr and follows a 4-yr pediatric specialist training. Fellow training involves gaining knowledge in basic and clinical allergy and immunology as well as the performance and interpretation of laboratory procedures in the field of allergy and clinical immunology. The Turkish National Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (TNSACI) was officially established in 1989 and currently has 356 members. The society organizes a national congress annually and winter schools for fellowship training as well as training courses for patients and their relatives. TNSACI also has a strong representation in European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) and European Society for Immunodeficiencies (ESID) through its participation in the executive committee, consensus reports, and initiatives in the diagnosis of allergic and immunologic diseases of children. The 30th Congress of the EAACI is also due to be held in Istanbul, Turkey, between June 11 and 15, 2011.

  7. The clinical utility of anti-chromatin antibodies as measured by BioPlex 2200 in the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus versus other rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Nilanjana; Wang, Xiaofeng; Gupta, Majula; Yao, Qingping

    2012-01-01

    Background The detection of autoantibodies is indispensable to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Bioplex 2200 ANA screen is a multiplex immunoassay system that allows simultaneous determination of autoantibodies to extractable nuclear antigens (ENA) including anti-chromatin antibodies (ACAs). However, the clinical significance of the ACAs by this new method in SLE patients has not been studied in comparison with other rheumatic disorders. We performed a retrospective study of patients with rheumatic diseases to assess the diagnostic value of the ACAs by Bioplex 2200 method in SLE. Methods Adult patients with rheumatic complaints seen by rheumatologists at the Cleveland Clinic between January 2008 and February 2010 were screened for positive anti-ENA antibodies by the Bioplex 2200. Patients with positive anti-ENA antibodies were classified into two populations based upon the presence and absence of the ACAs. We retrospectively studied the clinical and laboratory data of these patients. Results A total of 764 subjects with positive anti-ENA antibodies were screened, including 115 with positive ACAs. There were 93 SLE patients consisting of 58 with positive ACAs and 35 with negative ACAs. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of the ACAs in SLE were 62.4%, 91.5%, 50.4% and 94.6% respectively. Apart from SLE, positive ACAs were associated with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD)/undifferentiated CTD (UCTD) and other autoimmune diseases. No correlation was found between the ACAs and lupus glomerulonephritis or anti-dsDNA antibodies. Conclusions Measurement of the ACAs by the Bioplex 2200 is specific for diagnosing SLE but not useful for differentiating between SLE and MCTD/UCTD. PMID:22993651

  8. Facial Weakness, Otalgia, and Hemifacial Spasm: A Novel Neurological Syndrome in a Case-Series of 3 Patients With Rheumatic Disease.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, Julius

    2015-10-01

    Bell palsy occurs in different rheumatic diseases, causes hemifacial weakness, and targets the motor branch of the 7th cranial nerve. Severe, persistent, and refractory otalgia having features of neuropathic pain (ie, burning and allodynic) does not characteristically occur with Bell palsy. Whereas aberrant regeneration of the 7th cranial nerve occurring after a Bell palsy may lead to a variety of clinical findings, hemifacial spasm only rarely occurs. We identified in 3 rheumatic disease patients (2 with Sjögren syndrome, 1 with rheumatoid arthritis) a previously unreported neurological syndrome of facial weakness, otalgia with neuropathic pain features, and hemifacial spasm. We characterized symptoms, examination findings, and response to therapy. All 3 patients experienced vertigo, as well as severe otalgia which persisted after mild facial weakness had completely resolved within 1 to 4 weeks. The allodynic nature of otalgia was striking. Two patients were rendered homebound, as even the barest graze of outdoor breezes caused intolerable ear pain. Patients developed hemifacial spasm either at the time of or within 3 months of facial weakness. Two patients had a polyphasic course, with recurrent episodes of facial weakness and increased otalgia. In all cases, otalgia and hemifacial spasm were unresponsive to neuropathic pain regimens, but responded in 1 case to intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. No patients had vesicles or varicella zoster virus in spinal-fluid studies. We have defined a novel neurological syndrome in 3 rheumatic disease patients, characterized by facial weakness, otalgia, and hemifacial spasm. As described in infectious disorders, the combination of otalgia, facial weakness, and 8th cranial nerve deficits suggests damage to the geniculate ganglia (ie, the sensory ganglia of the 7th cranial nerve), with contiguous involvement of other cranial nerves causing facial weakness and vertigo. However, the relapsing nature and association with

  9. Facial Weakness, Otalgia, and Hemifacial Spasm: A Novel Neurological Syndrome in a Case-Series of 3 Patients With Rheumatic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Birnbaum, Julius

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bell palsy occurs in different rheumatic diseases, causes hemifacial weakness, and targets the motor branch of the 7th cranial nerve. Severe, persistent, and refractory otalgia having features of neuropathic pain (ie, burning and allodynic) does not characteristically occur with Bell palsy. Whereas aberrant regeneration of the 7th cranial nerve occurring after a Bell palsy may lead to a variety of clinical findings, hemifacial spasm only rarely occurs. We identified in 3 rheumatic disease patients (2 with Sjögren syndrome, 1 with rheumatoid arthritis) a previously unreported neurological syndrome of facial weakness, otalgia with neuropathic pain features, and hemifacial spasm. We characterized symptoms, examination findings, and response to therapy. All 3 patients experienced vertigo, as well as severe otalgia which persisted after mild facial weakness had completely resolved within 1 to 4 weeks. The allodynic nature of otalgia was striking. Two patients were rendered homebound, as even the barest graze of outdoor breezes caused intolerable ear pain. Patients developed hemifacial spasm either at the time of or within 3 months of facial weakness. Two patients had a polyphasic course, with recurrent episodes of facial weakness and increased otalgia. In all cases, otalgia and hemifacial spasm were unresponsive to neuropathic pain regimens, but responded in 1 case to intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. No patients had vesicles or varicella zoster virus in spinal-fluid studies. We have defined a novel neurological syndrome in 3 rheumatic disease patients, characterized by facial weakness, otalgia, and hemifacial spasm. As described in infectious disorders, the combination of otalgia, facial weakness, and 8th cranial nerve deficits suggests damage to the geniculate ganglia (ie, the sensory ganglia of the 7th cranial nerve), with contiguous involvement of other cranial nerves causing facial weakness and vertigo. However, the relapsing nature and association with

  10. Studies in cryo-immunology

    PubMed Central

    Yantorno, C.; Soanes, W. A.; Gonder, M. J.; Shulman, S.

    1967-01-01

    Experimental cryosurgery has been found to result in the formation of circulating antibodies, directed against antigenic material of the tissue frozen. These antibodies were detected by passive haemagglutination and immunodiffusion. The tissue that was subjected to destructive freezing by means of this surgical procedure was the coagulating gland and seminal vesicle of rabbit. A probe carrying liquid nitrogen and a thermocouple assembly for measuring temperature changes was utilized. Control rabbits were manipulated in the same way but with no freezing. A large number of rabbits subjected to tissue freezing exhibited the development of a rapid antibody response, achieving a maximum titre in 7–10 days, followed by a decline. This antibody response has been compared to that seen following isoimmunization by injection. As an additional comparison, several rabbits were autoimmunized by injection of homogenate from their own accessory tissue; these rabbits also produced antibodies. It was found that the time sequence in the antibody production was quite similar for auto- and isoimmunization, but was quite distinctive for cryo-stimulation. By several means of evaluation, it was shown that the antibody response to the freezing of tissue was an autoantibody. It was not, however, an antibody against serum γ-globulin. The consequences of the freezing of tissue are thus seen to simulate the effects of incorporating adjuvant. This method of producing autoantibodies and investigating the nature of the response has been termed cryo-immunology. ImagesFIG. 4 PMID:4960713

  11. The immunological barriers to xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Vadori, M; Cozzi, E

    2015-10-01

    The availability of cells, tissues and organs from a non-human species such as the pig could, at least in theory, meet the demand of organs necessary for clinical transplantation. At this stage, the important goal of getting over the first year of survival has been reported for both cellular and solid organ xenotransplantation in relevant preclinical primate models. In addition, xenotransplantation is already in the clinic as shown by the broad use of animal-derived medical devices, such as bioprosthetic heart valves and biological materials used for surgical tissue repair. At this stage, however, prior to starting a wide-scale clinical application of xenotransplantation of viable cells and organs, the important obstacle represented by the humoral immune response will need to be overcome. Likewise, the barriers posed by the activation of the innate immune system and coagulative pathway will have to be controlled. As far as xenogeneic nonviable xenografts, increasing evidence suggests that considerable immune reactions, mediated by both innate and adaptive immunity, take place and influence the long-term outcome of xenogeneic materials in patients, possibly precluding the use of bioprosthetic heart valves in young individuals. In this context, the present article provides an overview of current knowledge on the immune processes following xenotransplantation and on the possible therapeutic interventions to overcome the immunological drawbacks involved in xenotransplantation.

  12. The Immunological Functions of Saposins

    PubMed Central

    Darmoise, Alexandre; Maschmeyer, Patrick; Winau, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Saposins or sphingolipid activator proteins (SAPs) are small, nonenzymatic glycoproteins that are ubiquitously present in lysosomes. SAPs comprise the five molecules saposins A–D and the GM2 activator protein. Saposins are essential for sphingolipid degradation and membrane digestion. On the one hand, they bind the respective hydrolases required to catabolize sphingolipid molecules; on the other hand, saposins can interact with intralysosomal membrane structures to render lipids accessible to their degrading enzymes. Thus, saposins bridge the physicochemical gap between lipid substrate and hydrophilic hydrolases. Accordingly, defects in saposin function can lead to lysosomal lipid accumulation. In addition to their specific functions in sphingolipid metabolism, saposins have membrane-perturbing properties. At the low pH of lysosomes, saposins get protonated and exhibit a high binding affinity for anionic phospholipids. Based on their universal principle to interact with membrane bilayers, we present the immunological functions of saposins with regard to lipid antigen presentation to CD1-restricted T cells, processing of apoptotic bodies for antigen delivery and cross-priming, as well as their potential antimicrobial impact. PMID:20510729

  13. Immunological and Hematopoietic Biotechnology Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez-Botran, Rafael; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the work carried under this interchanges was to support the development of space flight biotechnology experiments in the areas of immunology and hematopoiesis to facilitate the commercial development of space. The studies involved the interaction and development of experiments with biotechnology companies for necessary ground-based studies to allow the development of flight studies. The thrust of the work was to develop experiments with the Chiron Corporation and Bioserve involving the use of interleukin-2 to modulate the effects of spaceflight on immune responses. Spaceflight has been shown to have multiple effects on immune responses (1). lnterleukin-2 is an immuno-regulator that could have potential to counter some of the alterations induced in immune responses by spaceflight (1). To test this possibility before flight, rats were suspended antiorthostatically (2) and treated with interleukin-2. Antiorthostatic suspension is a model for some of the effects of spaceflight on immune responses (2). The interleukin-2 was given to see if it could alter some of the effects of suspension. This was achieved. As a result of these studies, two flight experiments were developed and flown with the Chiron Corp. And Bioserve to determine if use of interleukin-2 could prevent or attenuate the effects of space flight on immune responses.

  14. Instructive selection and immunological theory.

    PubMed

    Lederberg, Joshua

    2002-07-01

    The turning point of modern immunological theory was the advent of the clonal selection theory (Burnet, Talmage - 1957). A useful heuristic in the classification of theoretical models was the contrast of 'instructive' with 'selective' models of the acquisition of information by biological systems. The neo-Darwinian synthesis of the 1940s had consolidated biologists' model of evolution based on prior random variation and natural selection, viz. differential fecundity. While evolution in the large was by then pretty well settled, controversy remained about examples of cellular adaptation to chemical challenges, like induced drug-resistance, enzyme formation and the antibody response. While instructive theories have been on the decline, some clear cut examples can be found of molecular imprinting in the abiotic world, leading, e.g. to the production of specific sorbents. Template-driven assembly, as in DNA synthesis, has remained a paradigm of instructive specification. Nevertheless, the classification may break down with more microscopic scrutiny of the processes of molecular fit of substrates with enzymes, of monomers to an elongating polymer chain, as the reactants often traverse a state space from with activated components are appropriately selected. The same process may be 'instructive' from a holistic, 'selective' from an atomic perspective.

  15. Loneliness in patients with rheumatic diseases: the significance of invalidation and lack of social support.

    PubMed

    Kool, Marianne B; Geenen, Rinie

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatic diseases affect about 20% of the population, leading to common symptoms such as joint problems, pain, fatigue, and stiffness. Loneliness is prevalent in individuals with rheumatic diseases. This could be due to not receiving social support and being stigmatized and invalidated, which might be most common in fibromyalgia, a rheumatic disease that lacks medical evidence. The aim of this study was to compare loneliness in distinct rheumatic diseases and to examine the association of loneliness with social support and invalidation. Participants were 927 patients with ankylosing spondylitis (n = 152), fibromyalgia (n = 341), osteoarthritis (n = 150), rheumatoid arthritis (n = 171), or systemic diseases (n = 113). They completed online questionnaires including an 11-point Likert scale assessing loneliness, the Illness Invalidation Inventory (3*1; Kool et al., 2010), and the Social Support Survey (SSS; De Boer, Wijker, Speelman, & De Haes, 1996; Sherbourne & Stewart, 1991). Patients with fibromyalgia experienced significantly more loneliness than patients with ankylosing spondylitis and patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Besides being younger, having lower education, and not working, in multiple regression analyses both lack of social support and invalidation were independently correlated with loneliness. This suggests that to decrease loneliness, therapeutic attention should be given to both increasing social support as well as decreasing invalidation in patients with rheumatic diseases, especially in patients with fibromyalgia. PMID:22303622

  16. Inflammatory Characteristics of Stenotic Aortic Valves: A Comparison between Rheumatic and Nonrheumatic Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Wallby, Lars; Steffensen, Thora; Jonasson, Lena; Broqvist, Mats

    2013-01-01

    Background. Although our comprehension of nonrheumatic aortic stenosis (NRAS) has increased substantially during the last decade, less is known about the histopathology of rheumatic aortic stenosis (RAS). The aim of this study was to investigate rheumatic aortic stenosis by means of analyses previously used in nonrheumatic stenosis. Material and Methods. Valve specimens were obtained from 39 patients referred to hospital due to significant aortic stenosis. According to established macroscopic criteria the valves were divided into two groups consisting of 29 NRAS and 10 RAS valves. Mononuclear inflammatory cells and apolipoproteins were investigated using immunohistochemical analyses. Results. The localisation of calcification differed in tricuspid nonrheumatic valves when compared to bicuspid nonrheumatic and rheumatic valves. The RAS valves revealed a lower degree of T lymphocyte infiltration compared with the NRAS valves. Infiltration of macrophages was seen in all valves and there were no differences regarding deposition of apolipoprotein. Conclusion. Rheumatic and nonrheumatic aortic stenotic valves show a similar and significant chronic inflammation. The similarities regarding the localisation of calcification indicate that the valve anomaly/morphology can influence the pathogenesis of aortic stenosis. Finally, our findings highlight the question of a postinflammatory valvular disease of other causes than rheumatic fever.

  17. Rheumatic disease presenting as septic arthritis: a report of 10 cases.

    PubMed

    Eberst-Ledoux, Julie; Tournadre, Anne; Makarawiez, Claudie; Le Quang, Catherine; Soubrier, Martin; Dubost, Jean-Jacques

    2013-08-01

    To determine the forms and characteristics of rheumatic diseases whose initial presentation mimics septic arthritis. Retrospective study of 398 patients hospitalized between 1979 and 2005 for arthritis diagnosed and treated as septic. In 10 cases, initial presentation of a rheumatic disease was highly suggestive of septic arthritis, and the patient was treated as such. Three had rheumatoid arthritis, 3 spondyloarthropathies, 2 unclassified rheumatic diseases, 1 Wegener granulomatosis and 1 cytosteatonecrosis. Mean time to diagnosis of rheumatic arthritis was 6 months. There were 7 males and 3 females aged from 15 to 77 years. Six had fever, and 3 had leucocytosis. Average ESR was 68 mm/1 h, and C-reactive protein was above 100 mg/l in 6 patients. Five patients had radiological signs suggestive of septic arthritis. Joint fluid count was above 100,000 WBCs/mm(3) in 2/5. Synovial biopsy suggested septic arthritis in 5 out of 6. These cases of pseudoseptic arthritis were indistinguishable from true septic arthritis. Follow-up is required in septic arthritis with negative culture findings to exclude rheumatic disease.

  18. The challenges of managing rheumatic disease of the mitral valve in Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Little, Sherard G

    2014-12-01

    Between January, 2009 and December, 2013, 84 patients were identified who underwent isolated mitral valve surgery in Jamaica at The University Hospital of the West Indies and The Bustamante Hospital for Children. The most common pathology requiring surgery was rheumatic heart disease, accounting for 84% of the procedures performed. The majority of patients had regurgitation of the mitral valve (67%), stenosis of the mitral valve (22%), and mixed mitral valve disease (11%). The most common procedure performed was replacement of the mitral valve (69%), followed by mitral valve repair (29%). Among the patients, one underwent closed mitral commissurotomy. The choice of procedure differed between age groups. In the paediatric population (<18 years of age), the majority of patients underwent repair of the mitral valve (89%). In the adult population (18 years and above), the majority of patients underwent mitral valve replacement (93%). Overall, of all the patients undergoing replacement of the mitral valve, 89% received a mechanical valve prosthesis, whereas 11% received a bioprosthetic valve prosthesis. Of the group of patients who underwent mitral valve repair for rheumatic heart disease, 19% required re-operation. The average time between initial surgery and re-operation was 1.2 years. Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease remain significant public health challenges in Jamaica and other developing countries. Focus must remain on primary and secondary prevention strategies in order to limit the burden of rheumatic valvulopathies. Attention should also be directed towards improving access to surgical treatment for young adults.

  19. Multiscale modelling in immunology: a review.

    PubMed

    Cappuccio, Antonio; Tieri, Paolo; Castiglione, Filippo

    2016-05-01

    One of the greatest challenges in biomedicine is to get a unified view of observations made from the molecular up to the organism scale. Towards this goal, multiscale models have been highly instrumental in contexts such as the cardiovascular field, angiogenesis, neurosciences and tumour biology. More recently, such models are becoming an increasingly important resource to address immunological questions as well. Systematic mining of the literature in multiscale modelling led us to identify three main fields of immunological applications: host-virus interactions, inflammatory diseases and their treatment and development of multiscale simulation platforms for immunological research and for educational purposes. Here, we review the current developments in these directions, which illustrate that multiscale models can consistently integrate immunological data generated at several scales, and can be used to describe and optimize therapeutic treatments of complex immune diseases.

  20. Pathogen evolution and the immunological niche

    PubMed Central

    Cobey, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Host immunity is a major driver of pathogen evolution and thus a major determinant of pathogen diversity. Explanations for pathogen diversity traditionally assume simple interactions between pathogens and the immune system, a view encapsulated by the susceptible–infected–recovered (SIR) model. However, there is growing evidence that the complexity of many host–pathogen interactions is dynamically important. This revised perspective requires broadening the definition of a pathogen's immunological phenotype, or what can be thought of as its immunological niche. After reviewing evidence that interactions between pathogens and host immunity drive much of pathogen evolution, I introduce the concept of a pathogen's immunological phenotype. Models that depart from the SIR paradigm demonstrate the utility of this perspective and show that it is particularly useful in understanding vaccine-induced evolution. This paper highlights questions in immunology, evolution, and ecology that must be answered to advance theories of pathogen diversity. PMID:25040161

  1. Modeling-Enabled Systems Nutritional Immunology

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Meghna; Hontecillas, Raquel; Abedi, Vida; Leber, Andrew; Tubau-Juni, Nuria; Philipson, Casandra; Carbo, Adria; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep

    2016-01-01

    This review highlights the fundamental role of nutrition in the maintenance of health, the immune response, and disease prevention. Emerging global mechanistic insights in the field of nutritional immunology cannot be gained through reductionist methods alone or by analyzing a single nutrient at a time. We propose to investigate nutritional immunology as a massively interacting system of interconnected multistage and multiscale networks that encompass hidden mechanisms by which nutrition, microbiome, metabolism, genetic predisposition, and the immune system interact to delineate health and disease. The review sets an unconventional path to apply complex science methodologies to nutritional immunology research, discovery, and development through “use cases” centered around the impact of nutrition on the gut microbiome and immune responses. Our systems nutritional immunology analyses, which include modeling and informatics methodologies in combination with pre-clinical and clinical studies, have the potential to discover emerging systems-wide properties at the interface of the immune system, nutrition, microbiome, and metabolism. PMID:26909350

  2. Communication, the centrosome and the immunological synapse

    PubMed Central

    Stinchcombe, Jane C.; Griffiths, Gillian M.

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings on the behaviour of the centrosome at the immunological synapse suggest a critical role for centrosome polarization in controlling the communication between immune cells required to generate an effective immune response. The features observed at the immunological synapse show parallels to centrosome (basal body) polarization seen in cilia and flagella, and the cellular communication that is now known to occur at all of these sites. PMID:25047617

  3. 21 CFR 866.5230 - Colostrum immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Colostrum immunological test system. 866.5230 Section 866.5230 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5230 Colostrum immunological test system....

  4. 21 CFR 866.5240 - Complement components immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5240 Complement components immunological test system. (a) Identification. A complement components... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Complement components immunological test...

  5. 21 CFR 866.5090 - Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5090 Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system. (a) Identification. An... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Antimitochondrial antibody immunological...

  6. 21 CFR 866.5750 - Radioallergosorbent (RAST) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5750 Radioallergosorbent (RAST) immunological test system. (a) Identification. A... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Radioallergosorbent (RAST) immunological...

  7. 21 CFR 866.5560 - Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5560 Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system. (a) Identification. A lactic dehydrogenase... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test...

  8. The economic burden of rheumatic heart disease in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hye-Young; Yoon, Seok-Jun; Kim, Eun-Jung; Oh, In-Hwan; Lee, Yo-Han; Kim, Young-Ae

    2013-06-01

    Understanding the impact of rheumatic heart disease (RHD) has become increasingly important among aging populations around the world, and Korea is no exception. This study was conducted to estimate total annual patient costs associated with RHD in Korea for 2008 using nationally representative data. The subjects were South Korean citizens with RHD (ICD-10 codes I01-I09). The primary information for this study was obtained from claims data compiled by the National Health Insurance Corporation of Korea. Direct medical care costs were estimated using expenses paid by insurers and patients for non-covered care and pharmaceutical costs. Direct non-medical costs were estimated using data on transportation costs for hospital visits and costs for caregivers. Indirect costs included the costs of productivity loss and premature death in RHD patients. The economic burden of RHD in 2008 was estimated at $67.25 million US dollars. The indirect costs amounted to 39.04 % (US $26.26 million) of the total RHD costs. When stratified by age, the costs incurred by the group of patients older than 60 years were US $31.63 million. The prevalence of the disease in the same age group was 791.07 cases per 100,000 people. This study confirms that the prevalence of RHD was highest in patients older than 60 years in 2008. Furthermore, the patterns of disease in South Korea were similar to patterns observed in other high-income countries. These findings indicate that secondary prevention strategies for the early detection of RHD are needed in South Korea.

  9. Neuroendocrine immune features of pediatric inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Chikanza, I C

    1999-06-22

    Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) and juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE) are the most common autoimmune rheumatic diseases in children associated with high levels of autoantibodies and immune reactivity. JRA and JSLE are more common in girls. Disease activity is worse in the morning, improves during the daytime and worsens at night suggesting that neuroendocrine immune mechanisms are involved in disease pathophysiology. Adult patients with RA and SLE have excessive levels of prolactin (PL) while cortisol (CS) production is down-regulated for the degree of ongoing inflammation. PL has potent proinflammatory properties. Normal to low levels of cortisol have been observed in children with active JRA despite the high serum levels of IL-6, IL-1 beta, and TNF-alpha, which activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA). The CS levels are in fact subnormal because inflammatory stress activates the HPA. Normal serum PL levels were seen in children with JRA, most of whom were not active with higher levels in those with active ANA +ve JRA complicated by uveitis. A trend toward high PL levels was seen in 33 children with JSLE. High serum PL levels are seen in patients with active juvenile ankylosing spondylitis (JAS) only. Growth retardation is a feature of JRA. Patients with JRA have low to normal levels of growth hormone (GH) and low levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). IGF-1 mediates the effects of GH. The observation of low IGF-1 in JRA raises the therapeutic possibility with IGF-1. Overall, high levels of follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone are found in children with JSLE while the levels in JRA tend to be normal. Testosterone levels are low in patients with JRA. No significant differences in estrogen levels have been found between patients with JRA and those with JSLE and matched controls. There is evidence that the autonomic nervous function is defective in patients with JRA.

  10. The Lectin Pathway of Complement and Rheumatic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Beltrame, Marcia Holsbach; Catarino, Sandra Jeremias; Goeldner, Isabela; Boldt, Angelica Beate Winter; de Messias-Reason, Iara José

    2014-01-01

    The innate immune system is the first line of host defense against infection and is comprised of humoral and cellular mechanisms that recognize potential pathogens within minutes or hours of entry. The effector components of innate immunity include epithelial barriers, phagocytes, and natural killer cells, as well as cytokines and the complement system. Complement plays an important role in the immediate response against microorganisms, including Streptococcus sp. The lectin pathway is one of three pathways by which the complement system can be activated. This pathway is initiated by the binding of mannose-binding lectin (MBL), collectin 11 (CL-K1), and ficolins (Ficolin-1, Ficolin-2, and Ficolin-3) to microbial surface oligosaccharides and acetylated residues, respectively. Upon binding to target molecules, MBL, CL-K1, and ficolins form complexes with MBL-associated serine proteases 1 and 2 (MASP-1 and MASP-2), which cleave C4 and C2 forming the C3 convertase (C4b2a). Subsequent activation of complement cascade leads to opsonization, phagocytosis, and lysis of target microorganisms through the formation of the membrane-attack complex. In addition, activation of complement may induce several inflammatory effects, such as expression of adhesion molecules, chemotaxis and activation of leukocytes, release of reactive oxygen species, and secretion of cytokines and chemokines. In this chapter, we review the general aspects of the structure, function, and genetic polymorphism of lectin-pathway components and discuss most recent understanding on the role of the lectin pathway in the predisposition and clinical progression of Rheumatic Fever. PMID:25654073

  11. Mental Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... disorders, including panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and phobias Bipolar disorder Depression Mood disorders Personality disorders Psychotic disorders, including schizophrenia ...

  12. Effectiveness of Percutaneous Balloon Mitral Valvuloplasty for Rheumatic Mitral Stenosis with Mild to Severe Mitral Regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, LinXiang; Hong, Lang; Fang, Jun; Chen, LiangLong

    2016-01-01

    This study is designed to test whether percutaneous balloon mitral valvuloplasty (PBMV) is effective for rheumatic mitral stenosis in Chinese patients with moderate to severe mitral regurgitation. Fifty-six patients with rheumatic mitral valve stenosis were divided into the mild, moderate, and severe regurgitation groups. Cardiac ultrasonography was measured before and 1 to 2 days after PBMV. Following PBMV, the mitral orifice was enlarged, and the left atrial diameter was reduced in the 3 patient groups. The enlargement of the mitral orifice in the mild regurgitation group was greater than that observed in the moderate and severe regurgitation groups. The size of the regurgitation area increased in the mild regurgitation group and decreased in the moderate and severe regurgitation groups, with the decrease in the severe regurgitation group being greater than that in the moderate regurgitation group. Therefore, PBMV is effective for treating rheumatic mitral stenosis in Chinese patients with mild to severe mitral regurgitation. PMID:27034933

  13. Exercise as a therapeutic tool to counteract inflammation and clinical symptoms in autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Perandini, Luiz Augusto; de Sá-Pinto, Ana Lúcia; Roschel, Hamilton; Benatti, Fabiana Braga; Lima, Fernanda Rodrigues; Bonfá, Eloisa; Gualano, Bruno

    2012-12-01

    Chronic inflammation is a common feature shared by several autoimmune rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, systemic sclerosis, and ankylosing spondylitis. Therefore, blocking or reducing inflammation is one of the major treatment strategies in these diseases. In this context, exercise training has emerged as a potential therapeutic tool in counteracting systemic inflammation, thereby leading to better clinical outcomes. The aims of this review are i) to provide a summary of the clinical effects of exercise training in selected autoimmune rheumatic diseases; and ii) to discuss the potential anti-inflammatory role of exercise training in autoimmune rheumatic diseases, stressing the gaps in literature and the clinical and scientific perspectives in the field.

  14. Effects of exercise on physical limitations and fatigue in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Musumeci, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity covers not just sports but also simple everyday movements such as housework, walking and playing. Regular exercise has a great importance in maintaining good health, indeed inactivity is a risk factor for different chronic diseases. Physical exercise can play a crucial role in the treatment of rheumatic diseases, optimizing both physical and mental health, enhancing energy, decreasing fatigue and improving sleep. An exercise program for patients with rheumatic diseases aims to preserve or restore a range of motion of the affected joints, to increase muscle strength and endurance, and to improve mood and decrease health risks associated with a sedentary lifestyle. In this editorial I describe the benefits of the exercise on physical limitations and fatigue in rheumatic diseases that seem to have a short and long-term effectiveness. A literature review was conducted on PubMed, Scopus and Google Scholar using appropriate keywords based on the present editorial. PMID:26601057

  15. Cancer immunotherapy-induced rheumatic diseases emerge as new clinical entities

    PubMed Central

    Cappelli, Laura C; Shah, Ami A; Bingham, Clifton O

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) are newly approved treatments for advanced malignancies that are increasing survival. The mechanism of these drugs, non-specifically activating T cells, also leads to immune-mediated damage of tissue or immune-related adverse events (IRAE). IRAEs with rheumatic phenotypes are increasingly being recognised. Inflammatory arthritis, sicca syndrome, inflammatory myopathy, vasculitis and lupus nephritis have been described as a result of ICIs. Use of ICIs will be expanding in the coming years for several reasons. ICIs will be used in earlier stage cancer, for more indications, and additional drugs will be approved. The rheumatologist plays a critical role in evaluating and treating these patients. The expertise of rheumatologists in evaluating rheumatic signs and symptoms and treating patients with immunosuppression are critical in ensuring the optimal outcomes for patients with rheumatic IRAE. Collaboration between oncology and rheumatology for clinical care and research will enhance understanding of these new disease entities. PMID:27752360

  16. The association between vibration and vascular injury in rheumatic diseases: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Jie; Huang, Xiao-Lei; Yan, Jun-Wei; Wan, Ya-Nan; Wang, Bing-Xiang; Tao, Jin-Hui; Chen, Bing; Li, Bao-Zhu; Yang, Guo-Jun; Wang, Jing

    2015-02-01

    Vascular manifestations can be seen early in the pathogenesis of inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Animal experiments, laboratory and clinical findings indicated that acute or long-term vibration exposure can induce vascular abnormalities. Recent years, in addition to Raynaud's phenomenon (RP), vibration as a risk factor for other rheumatic diseases has also received corresponding considered. This review is concentrated upon the role of vibration in the disease of systemic sclerosis (SSc). In this review, we are going to discuss the main mechanisms which are thought to be important in pathophysiology of vascular injury under the three broad headings of "vascular", "neural" and "intravascular". Aspects on the vibration and vascular inflammation are briefly discussed. And the epidemiological studies related to vibration studies in SSc and other rheumatic diseases are taken into account.

  17. Effects of exercise on physical limitations and fatigue in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, Giuseppe

    2015-11-18

    Physical activity covers not just sports but also simple everyday movements such as housework, walking and playing. Regular exercise has a great importance in maintaining good health, indeed inactivity is a risk factor for different chronic diseases. Physical exercise can play a crucial role in the treatment of rheumatic diseases, optimizing both physical and mental health, enhancing energy, decreasing fatigue and improving sleep. An exercise program for patients with rheumatic diseases aims to preserve or restore a range of motion of the affected joints, to increase muscle strength and endurance, and to improve mood and decrease health risks associated with a sedentary lifestyle. In this editorial I describe the benefits of the exercise on physical limitations and fatigue in rheumatic diseases that seem to have a short and long-term effectiveness. A literature review was conducted on PubMed, Scopus and Google Scholar using appropriate keywords based on the present editorial. PMID:26601057

  18. Immunological complications of blood transfusions.

    PubMed

    Brand, Anneke

    2016-01-01

    Most adverse blood transfusion (BT) events are immune-mediated and in the majority of severe reactions antibodies can be identified as causal factors. Alloimmunization not only causes symptomatic reactions, transfused cells can also be (silently) destroyed. Immunization by BT can contribute to hemolytic disease of the newborn as well as to allograft rejection after transplantation. Reversely, pregnancy and transplantation may evoke immunity hampering transfusion therapy. Besides causing mortality and morbidity, alloimmunization has a huge economic impact. Transfusion reactions prolong hospital stay, require diagnostic tests and complex donor selection procedures and create the need for typed donor registries. In the 1970s, Opeltz and colleagues described that pre-transplantation BT impaired rejection of renal transplants. Leukocytes were essential for this immunosuppressive BT effect that raised concern about negative effects on cancer growth and resistance against infections. Studies on the mechanism were however preliminary abandoned when calcineurin inhibitors for prevention of graft rejection became available and since all blood products underwent leukoreduction in most countries as precautionary measure against transmission of variant Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease. Whether current leukoreduced BT are immunosuppressive and for which patients or circumstances this may contribute to worse outcome, is unknown. The last decades of the previous century, leukoreduction of cellular blood products for leukemia patients significantly reduced the incidence of immunological platelet transfusion refractoriness. The first decade of this century the avoidance of plasma- and platelet-products from females, that may contain donor-derived leukocyte antibodies, decreased transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) by more than 30%. These were major achievements. Challenge for the near future is to further reduce alloimmunization in particular against red blood cells (RBC) as a

  19. Intestinal microsporidiosis: a hidden risk in rheumatic disease patients undergoing anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy combined with disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs?

    PubMed Central

    Aikawa, Nadia Emi; de Oliveira Twardowsky, Aline; de Carvalho, Jozélio Freire; Silva, Clovis A; Silva, Ivan Leonardo Avelino França e; de Medeiros Ribeiro, Ana Cristina; Saad, Carla Gonçalves Schain; Moraes, Julio César Bertacini; de Toledo, Roberto Acayaba; Bonfá, Eloísa

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Immunosuppressed patients are at risk of microsporidiosis, and this parasitosis has an increased rate of dissemination in this population. Our objective was to evaluate the presence of microsporidiosis and other intestinal parasites in rheumatic disease patients undergoing anti-tumor necrosis factor/disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug treatment. METHODS: Ninety-eight patients (47 with rheumatoid arthritis, 31 with ankylosing spondylitis and 11 with psoriatic arthritis) and 92 healthy control patients were enrolled in the study. Three stool samples and cultures were collected from each subject. RESULTS: The frequency of microsporidia was significantly higher in rheumatic disease patients than in control subjects (36 vs. 4%, respectively; p<0.0001), as well as in those with rheumatic diseases (32 vs. 4%, respectively; p<0.0001), ankylosing spondylitis (45 vs. 4%, respectively; p<0.0001) and psoriatic arthritis (40 vs. 4%, respectively; p<0.0001), despite a similar social-economic class distribution in both the patient and control groups (p = 0.1153). Of note, concomitant fecal leukocytes were observed in the majority of the microsporidia-positive patients (79.5%). Approximately 80% of the patients had gastrointestinal symptoms, such as diarrhea (26%), abdominal pain (31%) and weight loss (5%), although the frequencies of these symptoms were comparable in patients with and without this infection (p>0.05). Rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis disease activity parameters were comparable in both groups (p>0.05). The duration of anti-tumor necrosis factor/disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs and glucocorticoid use were also similar in both groups. CONCLUSION: We have documented that microsporidiosis with intestinal mucosa disruption is frequent in patients undergoing concomitant anti-tumor necrosis factor/disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug therapy. Impaired host defenses due to the combination of the underlying disease

  20. What epidemiology has told us about risk factors and aetiopathogenesis in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Jacqueline E; Silman, Alan J

    2009-01-01

    This article will review how epidemiological studies have advanced our knowledge of both genetic and environmental risk factors for rheumatic diseases over the past decade. The major rheumatic diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, osteoarthritis, gout, and fibromyalgia, and chronic widespread pain, will be covered. Advances discussed will include how a number of large prospective studies have improved our knowledge of risk factors, including diet, obesity, hormones, and smoking. The change from small-scale association studies to genome-wide association studies using gene chips to reveal new genetic risk factors will also be reviewed. PMID:19490599

  1. [A short history of anti-rheumatic therapy--VII. Biological agents].

    PubMed

    Pasero, G; Marson, P; Gatto, B

    2011-11-09

    The introduction of biological agents has been a major turning-point in the treatment of rheumatic diseases, particularly in rheumatoid arthritis. This review describes the principle milestones that have led, through the knowledge of the structure and functions of nucleic acids, to the development of production techniques of the three major families of biological agents: proteins, monoclonal antibodies and fusion proteins. A brief history has also been traced of the cytokines most involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory rheumatic diseases (IL-1 and TNF) and the steps which have led to the use of the main biological drugs in rheumatology: anakinra, infliximab, adalimumab, etanercept and rituximab.

  2. Vaccination against rheumatic heart disease: a review of current research strategies and challenges.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manisha; Batzloff, Michael R; Good, Michael F

    2012-08-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are major health problems in many developing countries and Indigenous populations of developed countries. ARF and RHD are sequelae resulting from an infection of Streptococcus pyogenes. Despite advances in health care practices and technology, these diseases still pose major challenges in the communities where Streptococcus pyogenes is often endemic. Here we review and discuss the dynamic epidemiology of streptococcal infection and its associated diseases (ARF and RHD), with a focus on disease burden in temperate versus tropical regions, the tissue tropism of the organism and the efforts towards vaccine development in relation to the available animal models. PMID:22729401

  3. The use of naproxen in the treatment of children with rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Uziel, Y; Hashkes, P J; Kassem, E; Padeh, S; Goldman, R; Wolach, B; Vollach, B

    2000-08-01

    We evaluated the efficacy and safety of naproxen (10-20 mg/kg/d) for the treatment of arthritis and fever related to rheumatic fever in 19 children. Fever and arthritis resolved within a median of 1 day of beginning treatment (range, 1-2 and 1-30 days, respectively). The sole patient with prolonged arthritis had small joint involvement. No gastrointestinal, dermatologic, liver, or renal side effects were observed. None of the patients developed carditis over the following 6 months. Naproxen appears to be effective for the treatment of arthritis and fever related to rheumatic fever and is well tolerated.

  4. [A short history of anti-rheumatic therapy. I. An introduction on traditional and drug treatments].

    PubMed

    Pasero, G; Marson, P

    2010-01-01

    The origins of anti-rheumatic therapy are very old and mainly related to the use of traditional, sometimes extravagant, treatments, as a part of folk medicine. Spa therapy has long been used for the treatment of rheumatic diseases, as well as, in later times, physical treatments, including electrotherapy. Drug treatment has developed beginning from substances of vegetable origin, such as willow and colchicum extracts. Then it has been spread out through the chemical synthesis of compounds with specific action and therefore more effective, owing to the great development of pharmaceutical industry. PMID:20390121

  5. 21 CFR 866.5210 - Ceruloplasmin immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ceruloplasmin immunolog-ical test system. 866.5210 Section 866.5210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... (copper-transporting serum protein) in serum, other body fluids, or tissues. Measurements of...

  6. 21 CFR 866.5160 - Beta-globulin immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Beta-globulin immunolog-ical test system. 866.5160 Section 866.5160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... protein) in serum and other body fluids. Beta-globulin proteins include beta-lipoprotein,...

  7. 21 CFR 866.5590 - Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system. 866.5590 Section 866.5590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...-density lipoprotein) in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of lipoprotein X aids in the diagnosis...

  8. Cancer Risk in Patients With Inflammatory Systemic Autoimmune Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Kuang-Hui; Kuo, Chang-Fu; Huang, Lu Hsiang; Huang, Wen-Kuan; See, Lai-Chu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to determine whether inflammation is related to cancer development, and whether the incidence of cancer is increased and occurs in a site-specific manner in patients with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARDs). This study included a nationwide dynamic cohort of patients with various newly diagnosed SARDs from 1997 to 2010 with follow-up until 2012. This study included 75,123 patients with SARDs. During 562,870 person-years of follow-up, 2844 patients developed cancer. Between 1997 and 2010, the highest number of newly diagnosed SARDs cases were rheumatoid arthritis (n = 35,182), followed by systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, n = 15,623), Sjögren syndrome (n = 11,998), Kawasaki disease (n = 3469), inflammatory bowel disease (n = 2853), scleroderma (n = 1814), Behçet disease (n = 1620), dermatomyositis (n = 1119), polymyositis (n = 811), and vasculitis other than Kawasaki disease (n = 644). A significant standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of overall cancer was observed for patients with SLE (1.41; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.28–1.56), Sjögren syndrome (1.19; 95% CI, 1.08–1.30), scleroderma (1.27; 95% CI, 1.02–1.59), dermatomyositis (4.79; 95% CI, 4.01–5.73), polymyositis (1.47; 95% CI, 1.05–2.06), vasculitis excluding Kawasaki disease (1.75; 95% CI, 1.20–2.55), and Kawasaki disease (2.88; 95% CI, 1.60–5.20). Overall, patients with most SARDs had a significantly higher risk of inflammation-associated site-specific cancers and hematologic malignancies. This study confirms that autoimmunity is associated with site-specific and hematological malignancies and provides clinical evidence of an association between inflammation and subsequent site-specific cancer development. These findings support the importance of inflammation in site-specific organ system carcinogenesis. PMID:27149461

  9. Long term effectiveness of antimalarial drugs in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Avina-Zubieta, J; Galindo-Rodriguez, G.; Newman, S.; Suarez-Almazor, M.; Russell, A.

    1998-01-01

    /possible retinopathy was found. Therefore, we propose a careful baseline ophthalmological evaluation by an expert and then one or every two years if proper doses are used.

 Keywords: antimalarial drugs; long term effectiveness; efficacy; toxicity; rheumatic diseases PMID:9893568

  10. An immunological insight into premature ovarian failure (POF).

    PubMed

    Dragojević-Dikić, Svetlana; Marisavljević, Dragomir; Mitrović, Ana; Dikić, Srdjan; Jovanović, Tomislav; Janković-Raznatović, Svetlana

    2010-09-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF), a serious life-changing condition that affects young women, remains an enigma and the researchers' challenge. The term POF generally describes a syndrome of gonadal failure before the age of 40, characterized by amenorrhea, sex steroid deficiency and elevated levels of gonadotropins. Infertility and psychological stress are common consequences of this entity the prevalence of which is 0.9-3%. The known cause of this condition includes: genetic aberrations, autoimmune ovarian damage, iatrogenic and environmental factors, although in majority of cases the underlying cause is not identified. For many women in whom the cause of ovarian failure is unknown, autoimmunity may be the pathogenic mechanism. There is currently evidence that some cases of POF are due to faulty recognition of self in the ovary by the immune system, possibly provoked by genetic or environmental factors initiating such immune response. Numerous evidence, including association with multiple autoimmune endocrine disorders, clinical reversibility, transitory estrogen deficiency, histological and immunological features and the demonstration of circulating ovarian antibodies in serum samples from women with POF, have suggested its immunological origin. We discuss the possible role of such an autoimmune process as a cause or consequence of POF including treatment strategies in POF patients.

  11. [Immunological surrogate endpoints to evaluate vaccine efficacy].

    PubMed

    Jin, Pengfei; Li, Jingxin; Zhou, Yang; Zhu, Fengcai

    2015-12-01

    An immunological surrogate endpoints is a vaccine-induced immune response (either humoral or cellular immune) that predicts protection against clinical endpoints (infection or disease), and can be used to evaluate vaccine efficacy in clinical vaccine trials. Compared with field efficacy trials observing clinical endpoints, immunological vaccine trials could reduce the sample size or shorten the duration of a trial, which promote the license and development of new candidate vaccines. For these reasons, establishing immunological surrogate endpoints is one of 14 Grand Challenges of Global Health of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. From two parts of definition and statistical methods for evaluation of surrogate endpoints, this review provides a more comprehensive description. PMID:26887309

  12. Immunological Challenges and Therapies in Xenotransplantation

    PubMed Central

    Vadori, Marta; Cozzi, Emanuele

    2014-01-01

    Xenotransplantation, or the transplantation of cells, tissues, or organs between different species, was proposed a long time ago as a possible solution to the worldwide shortage of human organs and tissues for transplantation. In this setting, the pig is currently seen as the most likely candidate species. In the last decade, progress in this field has been remarkable and includes a better insight into the immunological mechanisms underlying the rejection process. Several immunological hurdles nonetheless remain, such as the strong antibody-mediated and innate or adaptive cellular immune responses linked to coagulation derangements, precluding indefinite xenograft survival. This article reviews our current understanding of the immunological mechanisms involved in xenograft rejection and the potential strategies that may enable xenotransplantation to become a clinical reality in the not-too-distant future. PMID:24616201

  13. Rheumatic fever in Ireland: the role of Dr Monica Lea Wilson (1889-1971).

    PubMed

    Ward, O Conor

    2013-02-01

    In 1869 William Stokes pointed out that the severity of rheumatic fever in Dublin had declined over recent decades. Similar worldwide decline led to the closure of many internationally famous rheumatic fever centres. The discovery by Robert Collis that rheumatic fever was a sequel to haemolytic streptococcal infection and the subsequent discovery of penicillin accelerated the decline. St Gabriel's Hospital in Dublin opened in 1951 under the clinical direction of Dr Monica Lea Wilson. Contrary to contemporary medical opinion a regimen of very prolonged bed rest was enforced. From 1961 the family doctors became concerned at the adverse psychological effects of the unnecessarily prolonged hospital stay. Twenty-seven of the 56 inpatients were re-assessed. None of them showed any evidence of active rheumatic fever and their parents took them home. The hospital closed in 1968. Dr Lea Wilson distanced herself from mainstream medicine and she is best remembered for having presented an unrecognized Caravaggio painting to the Jesuit Order in recognition of their pastoral support at the time of the controversial assassination in 1920 of her husband Percival, an Inspector in the Royal Irish Constabulary.

  14. M-Protein Analysis of Streptococcus pyogenes Isolates Associated with Acute Rheumatic Fever in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Deborah A; Smeesters, Pierre R; Steer, Andrew C; Steemson, John D; Ng, Adrian C H; Proft, Thomas; Fraser, John D; Baker, Michael G; Morgan, Julie; Carter, Philip E; Moreland, Nicole J

    2015-11-01

    We applied an emm cluster typing system to group A Streptococcus strains in New Zealand, including those associated with acute rheumatic fever (ARF). We observed few so-called rheumatogenic emm types but found a high proportion of emm types previously associated with pyoderma, further suggesting a role for skin infection in ARF.

  15. Rheumatic fever in Ireland: the role of Dr Monica Lea Wilson (1889-1971).

    PubMed

    Ward, O Conor

    2013-02-01

    In 1869 William Stokes pointed out that the severity of rheumatic fever in Dublin had declined over recent decades. Similar worldwide decline led to the closure of many internationally famous rheumatic fever centres. The discovery by Robert Collis that rheumatic fever was a sequel to haemolytic streptococcal infection and the subsequent discovery of penicillin accelerated the decline. St Gabriel's Hospital in Dublin opened in 1951 under the clinical direction of Dr Monica Lea Wilson. Contrary to contemporary medical opinion a regimen of very prolonged bed rest was enforced. From 1961 the family doctors became concerned at the adverse psychological effects of the unnecessarily prolonged hospital stay. Twenty-seven of the 56 inpatients were re-assessed. None of them showed any evidence of active rheumatic fever and their parents took them home. The hospital closed in 1968. Dr Lea Wilson distanced herself from mainstream medicine and she is best remembered for having presented an unrecognized Caravaggio painting to the Jesuit Order in recognition of their pastoral support at the time of the controversial assassination in 1920 of her husband Percival, an Inspector in the Royal Irish Constabulary. PMID:23610223

  16. Recent advances in rheumatic fever control and future prospects: a WHO Memorandum*

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    The public health importance of rheumatic fever is not directly related to its prevalence but is a complex function of many factors, such as incidence, prevalence, mortality, disability, and cost to the community, all relative to the importance of other diseases. Although the prevalence is low and still decreasing in developed countries, rheumatic fever is the commonest form of heart disease in many developing countries. Advances in the bacterial and serological characterization of group A streptococci are reviewed in this Memorandum, with emphasis on the nature of the structural elements of the cell wall. Microbiological methods play an important role in the diagnosis and control of rheumatic fever and up-to-date information is given concerning methods of isolation and grouping and of typing. Methods of assessing streptococcal activity in the host, in particular the different antibody responses found in relation to different pathological conditions, are discussed, as are the improvements required in laboratory services to enable them to carry out these duties adequately. Current concepts concerning the pathogenesis of rheumatic fever are reviewed together with differences in the epidemiology related to the different sites of infection and the problems of carriership. The Memorandum is also concerned with the methods of prevention and treatment, including prevention of recurrences, control of the disease in communities, and strategies for nationwide control. PMID:310731

  17. Epigenetic Modulation as a Therapeutic Prospect for Treatment of Autoimmune Rheumatic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ciechomska, Marzena; O'Reilly, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases are considered as autoimmune diseases, meaning that the balance between recognition of pathogens and avoidance of self-attack is impaired and the immune system attacks and destroys its own healthy tissue. Treatment with conventional Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs (DMARDs) and/or Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) is often associated with various adverse reactions due to unspecific and toxic properties of those drugs. Although biologic drugs have largely improved the outcome in many patients, such drugs still pose significant problems and fail to provide a solution to all patients. Therefore, development of more effective treatments and improvements in early diagnosis of rheumatic diseases are badly needed in order to increase patient's functioning and quality of life. The reversible nature of epigenetic mechanisms offers a new class of drugs that modulate the immune system and inflammation. In fact, epigenetic drugs are already in use in some types of cancer or cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, epigenetic-based therapeutics that control autoimmunity and chronic inflammatory process have broad implications for the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of rheumatic diseases. This review summarises the latest information about potential therapeutic application of epigenetic modification in targeting immune abnormalities and inflammation of rheumatic diseases. PMID:27594771

  18. Epigenetic Modulation as a Therapeutic Prospect for Treatment of Autoimmune Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    O'Reilly, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases are considered as autoimmune diseases, meaning that the balance between recognition of pathogens and avoidance of self-attack is impaired and the immune system attacks and destroys its own healthy tissue. Treatment with conventional Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs (DMARDs) and/or Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) is often associated with various adverse reactions due to unspecific and toxic properties of those drugs. Although biologic drugs have largely improved the outcome in many patients, such drugs still pose significant problems and fail to provide a solution to all patients. Therefore, development of more effective treatments and improvements in early diagnosis of rheumatic diseases are badly needed in order to increase patient's functioning and quality of life. The reversible nature of epigenetic mechanisms offers a new class of drugs that modulate the immune system and inflammation. In fact, epigenetic drugs are already in use in some types of cancer or cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, epigenetic-based therapeutics that control autoimmunity and chronic inflammatory process have broad implications for the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of rheumatic diseases. This review summarises the latest information about potential therapeutic application of epigenetic modification in targeting immune abnormalities and inflammation of rheumatic diseases.

  19. Role of ultrasonography in the diagnosis of rheumatic diseases in light of ACR/EULAR guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Nowakowska-Płaza, Anna; Pracoń, Grzegorz; Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona

    2016-01-01

    In the past years, ultrasound imaging has become an integral element of the diagnostic process in rheumatic diseases. It enables the identification of a range of inflammatory changes in joint cavities, sheaths and bursae, and allows their activity to be assessed. In 2012, experts of the European Society of Musculoskeletal Radiology prepared recommendations concerning the role of ultrasonography in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal diseases. Ultrasound was considered the method of choice in imaging peripheral synovitis. Moreover, ultrasound imaging has been popularized thanks to the new classification criteria for rheumatoid arthritis issued by the American College of Rheumatology and European League Against Rheumatism in 2010. They underline the role of ultrasound imaging in the detection of articular inflammatory changes that are difficult to assess unambiguously in the clinical examination. These criteria have become the basis for recommendations prepared by experts from the European League Against Rheumatism concerning medical imaging in rheumatoid arthritis. Nine of ten recommendations concern ultrasonography which is relevant in detecting diseases, predicting their progression and treatment response, monitoring disease activity and identifying remission. In the new criteria concerning polymyalgia rheumatica from 2012, an ultrasound scan of the shoulder and pelvic girdle was considered an alternative to clinical assessment. Moreover, the relevance of ultrasonography in the diagnosis and monitoring of peripheral spondyloarthropathies was widely discussed in 2014 during the meeting of the European League Against Rheumatism in Paris. PMID:27104003

  20. Implications of Rheumatic Disease and Biological Response-Modifying Agents in Plastic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Tsai, David M; Borah, Gregory L

    2015-12-01

    The preoperative evaluation for any reconstructive or aesthetic procedure requires a detailed history of existing medical conditions and current home medications. The prevalence of rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, gout, and psoriasis is high, but the impact of these chronic illnesses on surgical outcome and the side effects of the powerful medications used for treatment are often underappreciated. In this review, the authors highlight key perioperative considerations specific to rheumatologic diseases and their associated pharmacologic therapies. In particular, the authors discuss the perioperative management of biological response-modifying agents, which have largely become the new standard of therapy for many rheumatic diseases. The literature reveals three key perioperative concerns with biological therapy for rheumatic disease: infection, wound healing delays, and disease flare. However, data on specific perioperative complications are lacking, and it remains controversial whether withholding biological therapy before surgery is of benefit. The risk of these adverse events is influenced by several factors: age, sex, class of biological agent, duration of exposure, dosage, onset and severity of disease, and type of surgical procedure. Overall, it remains best to develop an individualized plan. In younger patients with recent onset of biological therapy, it is reasonable to withhold therapy based on 3 to 5 half-lives of the specific agent. In older patients with a substantial history of rheumatic disease, the decision to discontinue therapy must be weighed and decided carefully in conjunction with the rheumatologist. PMID:26595025

  1. Epigenetic Modulation as a Therapeutic Prospect for Treatment of Autoimmune Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    O'Reilly, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases are considered as autoimmune diseases, meaning that the balance between recognition of pathogens and avoidance of self-attack is impaired and the immune system attacks and destroys its own healthy tissue. Treatment with conventional Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs (DMARDs) and/or Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) is often associated with various adverse reactions due to unspecific and toxic properties of those drugs. Although biologic drugs have largely improved the outcome in many patients, such drugs still pose significant problems and fail to provide a solution to all patients. Therefore, development of more effective treatments and improvements in early diagnosis of rheumatic diseases are badly needed in order to increase patient's functioning and quality of life. The reversible nature of epigenetic mechanisms offers a new class of drugs that modulate the immune system and inflammation. In fact, epigenetic drugs are already in use in some types of cancer or cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, epigenetic-based therapeutics that control autoimmunity and chronic inflammatory process have broad implications for the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of rheumatic diseases. This review summarises the latest information about potential therapeutic application of epigenetic modification in targeting immune abnormalities and inflammation of rheumatic diseases. PMID:27594771

  2. Myositis complicating benzathine penicillin-G injection in a case of rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Francis, Joshua R; Wyber, Rosemary; Remenyi, Bo; Croser, David; Carapetis, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    A 7-year old boy developed myositis secondary to intramuscular injection of benzathine penicillin-G in the context of secondary prophylaxis for rheumatic heart disease. Side effects of intramuscular delivery of benzathine penicillin-G are well described and include injection site pain and inflammation, but myositis, as depicted on magnetic resonance imaging in this case, has not previously been described.

  3. Difficulties in the differential diagnosis between Takayasu arteritis and rheumatic fever: case report.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Taciana Fernandes Araújo; Freire, Marlene; Teodoro, Reginaldo Botelho

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we present the case of a patient with heart failure with biological aortic valve prosthesis and multiple vascular changes consistent with Takayasu arteritis (TA) who was seen in our department receiving corticosteroids and secondary prevention of rheumatic fever (RF); it was not possible to exclude the association between both diseases.

  4. Low adherence to secondary prophylaxis among clients diagnosed with rheumatic fever, Jamaica

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Sheron Boswell; Brown, Cerese Hepburn; Edwards, Ann Marie; Lindo, Jascinth L M

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the level of adherence and possible barriers to secondary prophylaxis among clients with rheumatic fever in Kingston, Jamaica. Methods: Cross-sectional survey of 39 clients diagnosed with rheumatic fever, receiving penicillin prophylaxis for more than a year using a 22-item self-administered questionnaire on adherence to secondary prophylaxis and knowledge of rheumatic fever. The patients’ records were reviewed to determine the number of prophylaxis injections the patients received for the year 2010. Results: The majority of participants (74%) were females and 51% were adults. Only 48.7% had a high level of adherence. The majority (72%) had low knowledge levels regarding their illness, while only 5% had a high knowledge level score. Most clients (70%) strongly agreed that nurses and doctors encouraged them to take their prophylaxis. However, over 60% reported that they travelled long distances and or waited long periods to get their injections. One-third reported that they missed appointments because of fear of injections and having to take time off from work or school. Discussion: Clients attending the health centers studied had limited knowledge about rheumatic fever. Barriers to adherence included fear of the injections, long commutes, and long waiting periods at the facilities studied. PMID:25113585

  5. Maternal immunomodulation of the offspring's immunological system.

    PubMed

    Campos, Sylvia M N; de Oliveira, Vivian L; Lessa, Leonardo; Vita, Melissa; Conceição, Marcia; Andrade, Luiz Antonio Botelho; Teixeira, Gerlinde Agate Platais Brasil

    2014-11-01

    The mother's and the offspring's immunological system are closely related thus one can influence the other. This hypothesis drove our aim to study the impact of the mother's immunological status over the immunological response of their offspring. For this, female mice tolerant or allergic to peanuts were exposed or not to a challenge diet containing peanuts during the gestation-lactation period (TEP/AEP; TNEP/ANEP, respectively). After weaning the offspring was submitted to the peanut allergy or peanut tolerization protocol and then challenged with a peanut diet. Our results showed that when the offspring is submitted to the allergy induction protocol, they behave differently depending on their mother's immunological status. Offspring born to TEP mothers produced the lowest antibody titters while those born to AEP mothers produced the highest antibody titters compared to mice born to TNEP and ANEP. On the other hand when the offspring was submitted to the tolerization protocol all groups presented low antibody titers with no significant difference between groups, independent of the mothers immunological status and/or contact with peanuts during the gestation-lactation period. The analysis of the histological profile of the offspring correlates well to the serological response. In other words, offspring born to TEP mothers and submitted to the allergy induction protocol presented a normal histological profile, while the offspring born to AEP mothers produced the worst gut inflammation. These results indicate that mothers, exposed to the antigen (by the oral route) during gestation, actively influence the immune response of their offspring. This work sheds some light on the importance of the immunomodulation induced by dietary antigens during gestation and their influence on the immunological response of their offspring. However, more work is needed to elucidate the molecular and cellular components of this regulatory phenomenon.

  6. Immunologic abnormalities in two patients with pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma.

    PubMed

    Schlosnagle, D C; Check, I J; Sewell, C W; Plummer, A; York, R M; Hunter, R L

    1982-08-01

    Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma (PHG) is a disease of slowly enlarging pulmonary nodules made up of dense bundles of collagen accompanied by an infiltrate of chronic inflammatory cells. The etiology is unknown. Although it has been suggested that the lesions represent an exaggerated immune response to unidentified agents, results of a detailed immunologic work-up of these patients have not been published. This report presents the laboratory findings of two patients with biopsy-proven PHG who have been followed four and eighteen years. Autoantibodies were detected (antinuclear antibody, rheumatoid factor, and positive antiglobulin tests), although clinically there was no evidence of a specific collagen-vascular disorder. Both patients had elevated levels of circulating immune complexes. These data suggest that immune complex mechanisms may be important in the pathogenesis of PHG. PMID:7102822

  7. Dissecting the human immunologic memory for pathogens.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, Christina E; Corti, Davide; Mele, Federico; Pinto, Dora; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Sallusto, Federica

    2011-03-01

    Studies on immunologic memory in animal models and especially in the human system are instrumental to identify mechanisms and correlates of protection necessary for vaccine development. In this article, we provide an overview of the cellular basis of immunologic memory. We also describe experimental approaches based on high throughput cell cultures, which we have developed to interrogate human memory T cells, B cells, and plasma cells. We discuss how these approaches can provide new tools and information for vaccine design, in a process that we define as 'analytic vaccinology'.

  8. Translational research in immunology: Japanese perspectives.

    PubMed

    Triendl, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Japan has a formidable tradition in immunological research, starting with Shibasaburo Kitasato (1852-1931), who, after returning to Japan from his studies with Robert Koch, went on to build almost single-handedly a research tradition in investigative medical research, while engaging himself in the fight against infectious diseases. Over the past few decades, Japanese immunologists have been involved in many important discoveries at the forefront of immunological research, yet, when it comes to the translation of new discoveries into clinical innovations and new therapies, Japan's track record seems more modest.

  9. Embracing rejection: Immunologic trends in brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Farber, S Harrison; Tsvankin, Vadim; Narloch, Jessica L; Kim, Grace J; Salama, April K S; Vlahovic, Gordana; Blackwell, Kimberly L; Kirkpatrick, John P; Fecci, Peter E

    2016-07-01

    Brain metastases represent the most common type of brain tumor. These tumors offer a dismal prognosis and significantly impact quality of life for patients. Their capacity for central nervous system (CNS) invasion is dependent upon induced disruptions to the blood-brain barrier (BBB), alterations to the brain microenvironment, and mechanisms for escaping CNS immunosurveillance. In the emerging era of immunotherapy, understanding how metastases are influenced by the immunologic peculiarities of the CNS will be crucial to forging therapeutic advances. In this review, the immunology of brain metastasis is explored. PMID:27622023

  10. Proteus syndrome: evaluation of the immunological profile.

    PubMed

    Lougaris, Vassilios; Salpietro, Vincenzo; Cutrupi, Maricia; Baronio, Manuela; Moratto, Daniele; Pizzino, M R; Mankad, Kshitij; Briuglia, Silvana; Salpietro, Carmelo; Plebani, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Proteus syndrome (PS) is an extremely rare and complex disease characterized by malformations and overgrowth of different tissues. Prognosis of affected patients may be complicated by premature death, mostly due to pulmonary embolism and respiratory failure. To date, immunological data in Proteus syndrome are scarse.We report on the novel immunologic findings of a 15 years old girl affected with PS. Detailed T and B cell evaluation revealed maturational alterations for both subsets and functional hyperactivation for the latter. Such findings have not been reported previously in PS and may be the spy of more complex immune abnormalities in this syndrome. PMID:26758562

  11. What Can Vampires Teach Us about Immunology?

    PubMed

    Schneider, David S

    2016-04-01

    Speculative fiction examines the leading edge of science and can be used to introduce ideas into the classroom. For example, most students are already familiar with the fictional infectious diseases responsible for vampire and zombie outbreaks. The disease dynamics of these imaginary ailments follow the same rules we see for real diseases and can be used to remind students that they already understand the basic rules of disease ecology and immunology. By engaging writers of this sort of fiction in an effort to solve problems in immunology we may be able to perform a directed evolution experiment where we follow the evolution of plots rather than genetic traits.

  12. Clinical immunology--autoimmunity in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Tervaert, Jan Willem Cohen; Kallenberg, Cees G M

    2014-12-01

    Clinical immunology is in the Netherlands a separate clinical specialty within internal medicine and pediatrics. Clinical immunologists work closely together with nephrologists, rheumatologists and many other medical specialists. Apart from research and teaching, clinical immunologists are taking care of patients with immune-deficiencies, vasculitides and systemic auto-immune diseases. Clinical immunology in the Netherlands has always been an important contributor to basic and clinical science in the Netherlands. Major scientific contributions were made in the field of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and ANCA associated vasculitis. These Dutch contributions will be reviewed in this article.

  13. What Can Vampires Teach Us about Immunology?

    PubMed

    Schneider, David S

    2016-04-01

    Speculative fiction examines the leading edge of science and can be used to introduce ideas into the classroom. For example, most students are already familiar with the fictional infectious diseases responsible for vampire and zombie outbreaks. The disease dynamics of these imaginary ailments follow the same rules we see for real diseases and can be used to remind students that they already understand the basic rules of disease ecology and immunology. By engaging writers of this sort of fiction in an effort to solve problems in immunology we may be able to perform a directed evolution experiment where we follow the evolution of plots rather than genetic traits. PMID:26968492

  14. Epilepsy in systemic autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Ignacio

    2014-09-01

    Autoimmunity and inflammation have been implicated as causative factors of seizures and epilepsy. Autoimmune disorders can affect the central nervous system as an isolated syndrome or be part of a systemic disease. Examples of systemic autoimmune disorders include systemic lupus erythematosus, antiphospholipid syndrome, rheumatic arthritis, and Sjögren syndrome. Overall, there is a 5-fold increased risk of seizures and epilepsy in children with systemic autoimmune disorders. Various etiologic factors have been implicated in causing the seizures in these patients, including direct inflammation, effect on blood vessels (vasculitis), and production of autoantibodies. Potential treatments for this autoimmune injury include steroids, immunoglobulins, and other immune-modulatory therapies. A better understanding of the mechanisms of epileptogenesis in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases could lead to targeted treatments and better outcomes. PMID:25510945

  15. Which is the dominant factor for perception of rheumatic pain: meteorology or psychology?

    PubMed

    Cay, Hasan Fatih; Sezer, Ilhan; Firat, Mehmet Z; Kaçar, Cahit

    2011-03-01

    It is believed that there is an association between the weather and rheumatic symptoms. We aimed to investigate what kind of association is present and what are the factors which determine the nature of this association. Fifty-six subjects with rheumatic disease (31 RA, 15 SpA, 10 OA) who live in Antalya were followed between December 2005 and July 2006. Patients were asked to fill diaries which contain questions regarding the symptoms of their rheumatic diseases everyday. In every monthly visit, disease activity measurement, laboratory assessment and Beck depression inventory assessment were recorded. The symptomatic and psychological measurements were matched with the meteorological data of Antalya Regional Directorate of Meteorological Service of Turkish State. Correlation of symptoms with weather variables was investigated. Contributory effect of weather and of psychologic factors on symptom scores were evaluated by stepwise multiple regression analysis. Eighty-four percent of subjects belive in an association between weather and rheumatism, while 57% claimed to have ability to forecast weather. The maximum correlation coefficient between weather and arthritis symptoms was -0.451 and the maximum contribution of weather on symptoms was 17.1%. Arthritis symptoms were significantly contributed by Beck depression score. The belief about presence of weather-arthritis association was found to be stronger than its statistical power. Our results did not prove or rule out the presence of weather-rheumatism association. As long as the scientific attempts result in failure, the intuitive support in favour of the presence of weather-arthritis association will go on forever. PMID:20020141

  16. Coping mediates the influence of personality on life satisfaction in patients with rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Vollmann, Manja; Pukrop, Jörg; Salewski, Christel

    2016-04-01

    A rheumatic disease can severely impair a person's quality of life. The degree of impairment, however, is not closely related to objective indicators of disease severity. This study investigated the influence and the interplay of core psychological factors, i.e., personality and coping, on life satisfaction in patients with rheumatic diseases. Particularly, it was tested whether coping mediates the effects of personality on life satisfaction. In a cross-sectional design, 158 patients diagnosed with a rheumatic disease completed questionnaires assessing the Big 5 personality traits (BFI-10), several disease-related coping strategies (EFK) and life satisfaction (HSWBS). Data were analyzed using a complex multiple mediation analysis with the Big 5 personality traits as predictors, coping strategies as mediators and life satisfaction as outcome. All personality traits and seven of the nine coping strategies were associated with life satisfaction (rs > |0.16|, ps ≤ 0.05). The mediation analysis revealed that personality traits had no direct, but rather indirect effects on life satisfaction through coping. Neuroticism had a negative indirect effect on life satisfaction through less active problem solving and more depressive coping (indirect effects > -0.03, ps < 0.05). Extraversion, agreeableness, and conscientiousness had positive indirect effects on life satisfaction through more active problem solving, less depressive coping and/or a more active search for social support (indirect effects > 0.06, ps < 0.05). Personality and coping play a role in adjustment to rheumatic diseases. The interplay of these variables should be considered in psychological interventions for patients with rheumatic diseases. PMID:26898985

  17. Which is the dominant factor for perception of rheumatic pain: meteorology or psychology?

    PubMed

    Cay, Hasan Fatih; Sezer, Ilhan; Firat, Mehmet Z; Kaçar, Cahit

    2011-03-01

    It is believed that there is an association between the weather and rheumatic symptoms. We aimed to investigate what kind of association is present and what are the factors which determine the nature of this association. Fifty-six subjects with rheumatic disease (31 RA, 15 SpA, 10 OA) who live in Antalya were followed between December 2005 and July 2006. Patients were asked to fill diaries which contain questions regarding the symptoms of their rheumatic diseases everyday. In every monthly visit, disease activity measurement, laboratory assessment and Beck depression inventory assessment were recorded. The symptomatic and psychological measurements were matched with the meteorological data of Antalya Regional Directorate of Meteorological Service of Turkish State. Correlation of symptoms with weather variables was investigated. Contributory effect of weather and of psychologic factors on symptom scores were evaluated by stepwise multiple regression analysis. Eighty-four percent of subjects belive in an association between weather and rheumatism, while 57% claimed to have ability to forecast weather. The maximum correlation coefficient between weather and arthritis symptoms was -0.451 and the maximum contribution of weather on symptoms was 17.1%. Arthritis symptoms were significantly contributed by Beck depression score. The belief about presence of weather-arthritis association was found to be stronger than its statistical power. Our results did not prove or rule out the presence of weather-rheumatism association. As long as the scientific attempts result in failure, the intuitive support in favour of the presence of weather-arthritis association will go on forever.

  18. Coping mediates the influence of personality on life satisfaction in patients with rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Vollmann, Manja; Pukrop, Jörg; Salewski, Christel

    2016-04-01

    A rheumatic disease can severely impair a person's quality of life. The degree of impairment, however, is not closely related to objective indicators of disease severity. This study investigated the influence and the interplay of core psychological factors, i.e., personality and coping, on life satisfaction in patients with rheumatic diseases. Particularly, it was tested whether coping mediates the effects of personality on life satisfaction. In a cross-sectional design, 158 patients diagnosed with a rheumatic disease completed questionnaires assessing the Big 5 personality traits (BFI-10), several disease-related coping strategies (EFK) and life satisfaction (HSWBS). Data were analyzed using a complex multiple mediation analysis with the Big 5 personality traits as predictors, coping strategies as mediators and life satisfaction as outcome. All personality traits and seven of the nine coping strategies were associated with life satisfaction (rs > |0.16|, ps ≤ 0.05). The mediation analysis revealed that personality traits had no direct, but rather indirect effects on life satisfaction through coping. Neuroticism had a negative indirect effect on life satisfaction through less active problem solving and more depressive coping (indirect effects > -0.03, ps < 0.05). Extraversion, agreeableness, and conscientiousness had positive indirect effects on life satisfaction through more active problem solving, less depressive coping and/or a more active search for social support (indirect effects > 0.06, ps < 0.05). Personality and coping play a role in adjustment to rheumatic diseases. The interplay of these variables should be considered in psychological interventions for patients with rheumatic diseases.

  19. Differences in selected medical care parameters in rheumatic disease ward patients of different ages of life

    PubMed Central

    Pobrotyn, Piotr; Susło, Robert; Milczanowski, Piotr; Drobnik, Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rheumatic diseases are becoming more and more common in Poland with the ageing of the population. Nearly 18% of the total hospital admissions in Poland result from rheumatic diseases, which was equivalent to 350 thousand cases in the year 2008. These diseases tend to last for many decades, decreasing both the quality of life and income of the patients as well as increasing the medical institutions’ workload and society's financial burden. The aim of the study was to determine whether the medical care parameters in a rheumatic disease hospital ward show any significant differences among different patient age groups – especially such that would support taking them into account as a basis for adjusting the financial coverage level of medical services. Material and methods Data on hospitalizations at the Rheumatic Diseases Ward of Wroclaw University Hospital in Wroclaw in the years 2009–2015 were analyzed, taking into account the age groups, number of hospital admissions, their duration and causes. Relevant statistical data analysis was performed. Discussion The study revealed that the number of old patients hospitalized at the rheumatic diseases ward increased over the last 6 years and that such statistically significant differences do exist: on average the old patients not only tend to stay much longer at the hospital, but also suffer from a different and more diverse spectrum of diseases in comparison to their younger counterparts. Conclusions The detected differences in medical care parameters support the need for more individualized medical care and increased cost of the hospital stay in the case of older patients. Consequently, those factors justify the necessity to increase the value of medical services in the case of old patients, possibly also taking into account the variation between age subgroups. PMID:27407280

  20. BAFF and rheumatic autoimmune disorders: implications for disease management and therapy.

    PubMed

    Bosello, S; Pers, J-O; Rochas, C; Devauchelle, V; De Santis, M; Daridon, C; Saraux, A; Ferraccioli, G F; Youinou, P

    2007-01-01

    Interest in B-cells has been revived due to the description of new functions. Supporting a role for B-cells in the genesis of autoimmune diseases is the fact that the B-cell activating factor of the TNF ligand family (BAFF) is essential in their physiology. However, in each disease, this is restricted to a subgroup of patients. Based on experiments in mice, and validated in humans, this new cytokine has been highlighted. Excessive production of BAFF alters immune tolerance by rescuing self-binding B-cells. Overexpression in mice leads to autoimmune manifestation, and BAFF levels are elevated in the serum of autoimmune patients. Similar abnormalities occur in chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Recent works suggest that antagonizing the protein (or competing for its receptors) is relevant to the treatment. Advances in our understanding of the BAFF system offers the opportunity to improve our therapeutic approach.

  1. The role of adalimumab in rheumatic and autoimmune disorders: comparison with other biologic agents

    PubMed Central

    Reimold, Andreas M

    2012-01-01

    Adalimumab (ADA) is a biologic medication that dampens inflammatory pathways by binding to the cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha. The US Food and Drug Administration has approved ADA as a medication for use in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, Crohn’s disease, psoriasis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. This year marks 10 years of clinical experience with ADA. Long-term extension studies of some of the initial clinical trials, as well as data from large patient registries, are demonstrating ongoing benefit for responders. Potential side effects such as increased risk of infection, lymphoma, congestive heart failure, and demyelination continue to be examined, as the available data are not unanimous in showing an increase in incidence. In balancing both the advantages and the disadvantages of using ADA, the drug’s overall effectiveness and its availability for use in patients with hepatic or renal comorbidities are weighed against the high cost. ADA is expected to have a leading role in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory conditions for years to come. Future studies will need to address the optimal sequence of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and biologics to use, combinations of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and biologics, and head-to-head comparisons of biologics in clinical trials. For those who go into clinical remission on an anti-tumor necrosis factor medication, unanswered questions remain about identifying the patients who can maintain the remission off all drugs, or at least off injected medication. Given the cost of biologic drugs, even studies that increase the interval between drug doses in well-controlled patients could provide financial benefits.

  2. Percutaneous Mitral Valvotomy in a Case of Situs Inversus Totalis and Juvenile Rheumatic Critical Mitral Stenosis: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Santosh Kumar; Thakur, Ramesh; Jha, Mukesh Jitendra; Sayal, Karandeep Singh; Sachan, Mohit; Krishna, Vinay; Kumar, Ashutosh; Mishra, Vikas; Varma, Chandra Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Situs inversus totalis is a rare congenital disorder where the heart being a mirror image is situated on the right side of the body. Distorted cardiac anatomy makes fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous mitral valvotomy (PMV) technically challenging and there are only few reports of PMV in situs inversus totalis. Here we report a case where PMV was successfully done for situs inversus totalis with rare coincidence of juvenile rheumatic severe mitral stenosis in a 12-year-old boy with a few modifications of standard Inoue technique. He had exertional dyspnea of NYHA class III with initial mitral valve area (MVA) of 0.6 cm2 and severe pulmonary arterial hypertension with features suitable for PMV. Femoral vein was accessed from the left side to align the septal puncture needle and balloon to facilitate left ventricular entry. Septal descent and puncture by Brockenbrough needle was performed in the right anterior oblique view with the needle facing 5 o’clock position. Accura balloon was negotiated across mitral valve in left anterior oblique and procedure was successfully executed. Echocardiography showed a well-divided anterior commissure with an MVA of 2.0 cm2 and mild mitral regurgitation. In summary, PMV is safe and feasible in the rare patient with situs inversus totalis with few modifications of the Inoue technique. PMID:26985259

  3. [Management of heart diseases in pregnancy: rheumatic and congenital heart disease, myocardial infarction and post partum cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Westhoff-Bleck, M; Hilfiker-Kleiner, D; Günter, H H; Schieffer, E; Drexler, H

    2008-07-01

    Heart disease is present in 0.5-1% of all pregnancies. It is the leading non-obstetric cause of maternal mortality accounting for about 10-15% of all maternal death. Over the last decades the underlying cardiac disease has changed. Also new therapeutic options have been developed. In western industrial countries the incidence of acquired rheumatic heart disease has declined. In contrast, as a result of neonatal corrective or palliative surgery, congenital heart disease has become an increasing and challenging problem. Maternal older age and the increase in women's smoking habits amplify the likelihood of coronary artery disease. Multiple therapeutic options including percutaneous interventions are available and novel therapeutic concepts are emerging i.e. for peripartum cardiomyopathy. Management of pregnancy, labor and delivery requires accurate diagnosis of the underlying cardiac disorder. Hemodynamic changes physiologically occurring during pregnancy have a different impact depending on the type and severity of cardiac anomalies. Management of these patients requires teamwork of obstetricians, neonatologists, cardiologists, anesthetists and sometimes cardiac surgeons.

  4. Immunology of Paratuberculosis Infection and Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study of host immune responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is complicated by a number of factors, including the protracted nature of the disease and the stealthy nature of the pathogen. Improved tools for the measurement of immunologic responses in ruminant species, par...

  5. What's so special about chicken immunology?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    What’s so special about chickens? Firstly, chickens are not only an invaluable model for studying immunology, they also provide the world’s main source of meat and will be a key protein source needed to feed the growing human population into the future. Poultry meat production is highly efficient ...

  6. Origins and evolution of reproductive immunology: a personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Billington, W David

    2015-04-01

    This is a brief personal assessment of the origins and development of the field of reproductive immunology from the 19th century to the present day, with special reference to the founding of the Journal of Reproductive Immunology in 1979.

  7. 21 CFR 866.5170 - Breast milk immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Breast milk immunological test system. 866.5170... milk immunological test system. (a) Identification. A breast milk immunological test system is a device that consists of the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques the breast milk proteins....

  8. 21 CFR 866.5170 - Breast milk immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Breast milk immunological test system. 866.5170... milk immunological test system. (a) Identification. A breast milk immunological test system is a device that consists of the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques the breast milk proteins....

  9. 21 CFR 866.5170 - Breast milk immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Breast milk immunological test system. 866.5170... milk immunological test system. (a) Identification. A breast milk immunological test system is a device that consists of the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques the breast milk proteins....

  10. 42 CFR 493.833 - Condition: Diagnostic immunology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Diagnostic immunology. 493.833 Section..., Or Any Combination of These Tests § 493.833 Condition: Diagnostic immunology. The specialty of diagnostic immunology includes for purposes of proficiency testing the subspecialties of syphilis...

  11. 42 CFR 493.1208 - Condition: General immunology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: General immunology. 493.1208 Section 493....1208 Condition: General immunology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of General immunology, the laboratory must meet the requirements specified in §§ 493.1230 through 493.1256, and §§...

  12. 42 CFR 493.833 - Condition: Diagnostic immunology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition: Diagnostic immunology. 493.833 Section..., Or Any Combination of These Tests § 493.833 Condition: Diagnostic immunology. The specialty of diagnostic immunology includes for purposes of proficiency testing the subspecialties of syphilis...

  13. 42 CFR 493.833 - Condition: Diagnostic immunology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Condition: Diagnostic immunology. 493.833 Section..., Or Any Combination of These Tests § 493.833 Condition: Diagnostic immunology. The specialty of diagnostic immunology includes for purposes of proficiency testing the subspecialties of syphilis...

  14. 42 CFR 493.1208 - Condition: General immunology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition: General immunology. 493.1208 Section 493....1208 Condition: General immunology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of General immunology, the laboratory must meet the requirements specified in §§ 493.1230 through 493.1256, and §§...

  15. 42 CFR 493.1208 - Condition: General immunology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Condition: General immunology. 493.1208 Section 493....1208 Condition: General immunology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of General immunology, the laboratory must meet the requirements specified in §§ 493.1230 through 493.1256, and §§...

  16. 42 CFR 493.1208 - Condition: General immunology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Condition: General immunology. 493.1208 Section 493....1208 Condition: General immunology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of General immunology, the laboratory must meet the requirements specified in §§ 493.1230 through 493.1256, and §§...

  17. 42 CFR 493.833 - Condition: Diagnostic immunology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Condition: Diagnostic immunology. 493.833 Section..., Or Any Combination of These Tests § 493.833 Condition: Diagnostic immunology. The specialty of diagnostic immunology includes for purposes of proficiency testing the subspecialties of syphilis...

  18. 42 CFR 493.833 - Condition: Diagnostic immunology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Condition: Diagnostic immunology. 493.833 Section..., Or Any Combination of These Tests § 493.833 Condition: Diagnostic immunology. The specialty of diagnostic immunology includes for purposes of proficiency testing the subspecialties of syphilis...

  19. 42 CFR 493.1208 - Condition: General immunology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Condition: General immunology. 493.1208 Section 493....1208 Condition: General immunology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of General immunology, the laboratory must meet the requirements specified in §§ 493.1230 through 493.1256, and §§...

  20. 21 CFR 866.5090 - Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test... Systems § 866.5090 Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system. (a) Identification. An antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system is a device that consists of the reagents used to measure...

  1. 21 CFR 866.5470 - Hemoglobin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hemoglobin immunological test system. 866.5470... Hemoglobin immunological test system. (a) Indentification. A hemoglobin immunological test system is a device... hemoglobin (the oxygen-carrying pigment in red blood cells) in blood, urine, plasma, or other body...

  2. 21 CFR 866.5470 - Hemoglobin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hemoglobin immunological test system. 866.5470... Hemoglobin immunological test system. (a) Indentification. A hemoglobin immunological test system is a device... hemoglobin (the oxygen-carrying pigment in red blood cells) in blood, urine, plasma, or other body...

  3. 21 CFR 866.5570 - Lactoferrin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lactoferrin immunological test system. 866.5570 Section 866.5570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  4. 21 CFR 866.5460 - Haptoglobin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Haptoglobin immunological test system. 866.5460 Section 866.5460 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  5. 21 CFR 866.5230 - Colostrum immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Colostrum immunological test system. 866.5230 Section 866.5230 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  6. 21 CFR 866.5460 - Haptoglobin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Haptoglobin immunological test system. 866.5460 Section 866.5460 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  7. 21 CFR 866.5040 - Albumin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Albumin immunological test system. 866.5040 Section 866.5040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5040...

  8. 21 CFR 866.5490 - Hemopexin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hemopexin immunological test system. 866.5490 Section 866.5490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  9. 21 CFR 866.5230 - Colostrum immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Colostrum immunological test system. 866.5230 Section 866.5230 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  10. 21 CFR 866.5060 - Prealbumin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Prealbumin immunological test system. 866.5060 Section 866.5060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  11. 21 CFR 866.5230 - Colostrum immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Colostrum immunological test system. 866.5230 Section 866.5230 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  12. 21 CFR 866.5470 - Hemoglobin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hemoglobin immunological test system. 866.5470 Section 866.5470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  13. 21 CFR 866.5660 - Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system. 866.5660 Section 866.5660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  14. 21 CFR 866.5110 - Antiparietal antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Antiparietal antibody immunological test system. 866.5110 Section 866.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  15. 21 CFR 866.5680 - Myoglobin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Myoglobin immunological test system. 866.5680 Section 866.5680 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  16. 21 CFR 866.5660 - Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system. 866.5660 Section 866.5660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  17. 21 CFR 866.5340 - Ferritin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ferritin immunological test system. 866.5340 Section 866.5340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  18. 21 CFR 866.5660 - Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system. 866.5660 Section 866.5660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  19. 21 CFR 866.5715 - Plasminogen immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Plasminogen immunological test system. 866.5715 Section 866.5715 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  20. 21 CFR 866.5040 - Albumin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Albumin immunological test system. 866.5040 Section 866.5040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5040...

  1. 21 CFR 866.5110 - Antiparietal antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Antiparietal antibody immunological test system. 866.5110 Section 866.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  2. 21 CFR 866.5340 - Ferritin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferritin immunological test system. 866.5340 Section 866.5340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  3. 21 CFR 866.5680 - Myoglobin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Myoglobin immunological test system. 866.5680 Section 866.5680 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  4. 21 CFR 866.5090 - Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... system. 866.5090 Section 866.5090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5090 Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system. (a) Identification....

  5. 21 CFR 866.5340 - Ferritin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ferritin immunological test system. 866.5340 Section 866.5340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  6. 21 CFR 866.5110 - Antiparietal antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Antiparietal antibody immunological test system. 866.5110 Section 866.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  7. 21 CFR 866.5680 - Myoglobin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Myoglobin immunological test system. 866.5680 Section 866.5680 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  8. 21 CFR 866.5640 - Infectious mononucleosis immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Infectious mononucleosis immunological test system. 866.5640 Section 866.5640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  9. 21 CFR 866.5100 - Antinuclear antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Antinuclear antibody immunological test system. 866.5100 Section 866.5100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  10. 21 CFR 866.5060 - Prealbumin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Prealbumin immunological test system. 866.5060 Section 866.5060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  11. 21 CFR 866.5880 - Transferrin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Transferrin immunological test system. 866.5880 Section 866.5880 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  12. 21 CFR 866.5570 - Lactoferrin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lactoferrin immunological test system. 866.5570 Section 866.5570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  13. 21 CFR 866.5640 - Infectious mononucleosis immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Infectious mononucleosis immunological test system. 866.5640 Section 866.5640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  14. 21 CFR 866.5090 - Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... system. 866.5090 Section 866.5090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5090 Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system. (a) Identification....

  15. 21 CFR 866.5870 - Thyroid autoantibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Thyroid autoantibody immunological test system. 866.5870 Section 866.5870 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  16. 21 CFR 866.5640 - Infectious mononucleosis immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Infectious mononucleosis immunological test system. 866.5640 Section 866.5640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  17. 21 CFR 866.5240 - Complement components immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Complement components immunological test system. 866.5240 Section 866.5240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  18. 21 CFR 866.5340 - Ferritin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferritin immunological test system. 866.5340 Section 866.5340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  19. 21 CFR 866.5640 - Infectious mononucleosis immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Infectious mononucleosis immunological test system. 866.5640 Section 866.5640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  20. 21 CFR 866.5660 - Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system. 866.5660 Section 866.5660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  1. 21 CFR 866.5110 - Antiparietal antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Antiparietal antibody immunological test system. 866.5110 Section 866.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  2. 21 CFR 866.5090 - Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... system. 866.5090 Section 866.5090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5090 Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system. (a) Identification....

  3. 21 CFR 866.5680 - Myoglobin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Myoglobin immunological test system. 866.5680 Section 866.5680 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  4. 21 CFR 866.5240 - Complement components immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Complement components immunological test system. 866.5240 Section 866.5240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  5. 21 CFR 866.5040 - Albumin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Albumin immunological test system. 866.5040 Section 866.5040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5040...

  6. 21 CFR 866.5100 - Antinuclear antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Antinuclear antibody immunological test system. 866.5100 Section 866.5100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  7. 21 CFR 866.5060 - Prealbumin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Prealbumin immunological test system. 866.5060 Section 866.5060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  8. 21 CFR 866.5470 - Hemoglobin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hemoglobin immunological test system. 866.5470 Section 866.5470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  9. 21 CFR 866.5715 - Plasminogen immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Plasminogen immunological test system. 866.5715 Section 866.5715 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  10. 21 CFR 866.5880 - Transferrin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Transferrin immunological test system. 866.5880 Section 866.5880 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  11. 21 CFR 866.5870 - Thyroid autoantibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Thyroid autoantibody immunological test system. 866.5870 Section 866.5870 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  12. 21 CFR 866.5570 - Lactoferrin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lactoferrin immunological test system. 866.5570 Section 866.5570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  13. INDUCTION OF CARDIAC LESIONS, CLOSELY RESEMBLING THOSE OF RHEUMATIC FEVER, IN RABBITS FOLLOWING REPEATED SKIN INFECTIONS WITH GROUP A STREPTOCOCCI

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, George E.; Swift, Homer F.

    1949-01-01

    Cardiac lesions, closely resembling those found in rheumatic fever, have developed in rabbits that sickened following multiple, successive skin infections with several serological types of group A streptococci. PMID:18129867

  14. Rheumatic diseases induced by drugs and environmental factors: the state-of-the-art – part one

    PubMed Central

    Niklas, Arkadiusz A.; Majewski, Dominik; Puszczewicz, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    The majority of rheumatic diseases belong to the group of autoimmune diseases and are associated with autoantibody production. Their etiology is not fully understood. Certain medications and environmental factors may have an influence on the occurrence of rheumatic diseases. Establishing a cause-effect relationship between a certain factor and disease induction is not always simple. It is important to administer the drug continuously or monitor exposure to a given factor in the period preceding the onset of symptoms. The lack of previously diagnosed autoimmune disease, or finally the lack of symptoms within a few weeks/months after discontinuation of the drug/cessation of exposure, is also important. The most frequently mentioned rheumatic diseases caused by drugs and environmental factors include systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, systemic vasculitis, polymyositis, dermatomyositis, and Sjögren's syndrome. The objective of this study is to summarize current knowledge on rheumatic diseases induced by drugs and environmental factors. PMID:27504022

  15. Vitamin D deficiency in patients with either rheumatic diseases or inflammatory bowel diseases on biologic therapy.

    PubMed

    Bruzzese, Vincenzo; Zullo, Angelo; Piacchianti Diamanti, Andrea; Ridola, Lorenzo; Lorenzetti, Roberto; Marrese, Cinzia; Scolieri, Palma; De Francesco, Vincenzo; Hassan, Cesare; Migliore, Alberto; Laganà, Bruno

    2016-09-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has been reported in patients with chronic inflammatory conditions, such as rheumatic and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). We evaluated the role of biologic therapy on vitamin D, calcium and parathormone (PTH) levels. This cross-sectional study enrolled consecutive patients with either rheumatic diseases or IBD who underwent an ambulatory visit. Patients receiving vitamin D/calcium supplementation were excluded. Vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency was diagnosed when values were <20 ng/mL and 21-29 ng/ml, respectively. Patients were sub-grouped according to biologic therapy. A multivariate analysis was performed. Two-hundred patients, including 136 with a rheumatic disease (M/F 37/99; mean age 60.7 ± 12.9 years) and 64 with IBD (M/F 41/23; Mean age 49.6 ± 13.1 years) were enrolled. Vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency was detected in as many as 63.5 % patients, being 61.8 and 67.2 % in patients with either rheumatic diseases or IBD, respectively. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency was higher in those receiving biologics than other therapies (78.3 vs 43.2 %; p < 0.0001), in either rheumatic diseases (78.7 vs 41 %; p < 0.0001) or IBD (75 vs 50 %; p = 0.03) group. At multivariate analysis, only biologic therapy was independently associated with vitamin D deficit (OR 4.61; p = 0.001). Patients with vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency had hypocalcemia more frequently than controls (22.8 vs 10.9 %; p = 0.03), while PTH values did not differ significantly. This study finds that the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency was very high in patients with either rheumatic diseases or IBD receiving a biologic therapy.

  16. Culture-sensitive adaptation and validation of the community-oriented program for the control of rheumatic diseases methodology for rheumatic disease in Latin American indigenous populations.

    PubMed

    Peláez-Ballestas, Ingris; Granados, Ysabel; Silvestre, Adriana; Alvarez-Nemegyei, José; Valls, Evart; Quintana, Rosana; Figuera, Yemina; Santiago, Flor Julian; Goñi, Mario; González, Rosa; Santana, Natalia; Nieto, Romina; Brito, Irais; García, Imelda; Barrios, Maria Cecilia; Marcano, Manuel; Loyola-Sánchez, Adalberto; Stekman, Ivan; Jorfen, Marisa; Goycochea-Robles, Maria Victoria; Midauar, Fadua; Chacón, Rosa; Martin, Maria Celeste; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of the study is to validate a culturally sensitive adaptation of the community-oriented program for the control of rheumatic diseases (COPCORD) methodology in several Latin American indigenous populations. The COPCORD Spanish questionnaire was translated and back-translated into seven indigenous languages: Warao, Kariña and Chaima (Venezuela), Mixteco, Maya-Yucateco and Raramuri (Mexico) and Qom (Argentina). The questionnaire was administered to almost 100 subjects in each community with the assistance of bilingual translators. Individuals with pain, stiffness or swelling in any part of the body in the previous 7 days and/or at any point in life were evaluated by physicians to confirm a diagnosis according to criteria for rheumatic diseases. Overall, individuals did not understand the use of a 0-10 visual analog scale for pain intensity and severity grading and preferred a Likert scale comprising four items for pain intensity (no pain, minimal pain, strong pain, and intense pain). They were unable to discriminate between pain intensity and pain severity, so only pain intensity was included. For validation, 702 subjects (286 male, 416 female, mean age 42.7 ± 18.3 years) were interviewed in their own language. In the last 7 days, 198 (28.2 %) subjects reported having musculoskeletal pain, and 90 (45.4 %) of these had intense pain. Compared with the physician-confirmed diagnosis, the COPCORD questionnaire had 73.8 % sensitivity, 72.9 % specificity, a positive likelihood ratio of 2.7 and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.73. The COPCORD questionnaire is a valid screening tool for rheumatic diseases in indigenous Latin American populations.

  17. Culture-sensitive adaptation and validation of the community-oriented program for the control of rheumatic diseases methodology for rheumatic disease in Latin American indigenous populations.

    PubMed

    Peláez-Ballestas, Ingris; Granados, Ysabel; Silvestre, Adriana; Alvarez-Nemegyei, José; Valls, Evart; Quintana, Rosana; Figuera, Yemina; Santiago, Flor Julian; Goñi, Mario; González, Rosa; Santana, Natalia; Nieto, Romina; Brito, Irais; García, Imelda; Barrios, Maria Cecilia; Marcano, Manuel; Loyola-Sánchez, Adalberto; Stekman, Ivan; Jorfen, Marisa; Goycochea-Robles, Maria Victoria; Midauar, Fadua; Chacón, Rosa; Martin, Maria Celeste; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of the study is to validate a culturally sensitive adaptation of the community-oriented program for the control of rheumatic diseases (COPCORD) methodology in several Latin American indigenous populations. The COPCORD Spanish questionnaire was translated and back-translated into seven indigenous languages: Warao, Kariña and Chaima (Venezuela), Mixteco, Maya-Yucateco and Raramuri (Mexico) and Qom (Argentina). The questionnaire was administered to almost 100 subjects in each community with the assistance of bilingual translators. Individuals with pain, stiffness or swelling in any part of the body in the previous 7 days and/or at any point in life were evaluated by physicians to confirm a diagnosis according to criteria for rheumatic diseases. Overall, individuals did not understand the use of a 0-10 visual analog scale for pain intensity and severity grading and preferred a Likert scale comprising four items for pain intensity (no pain, minimal pain, strong pain, and intense pain). They were unable to discriminate between pain intensity and pain severity, so only pain intensity was included. For validation, 702 subjects (286 male, 416 female, mean age 42.7 ± 18.3 years) were interviewed in their own language. In the last 7 days, 198 (28.2 %) subjects reported having musculoskeletal pain, and 90 (45.4 %) of these had intense pain. Compared with the physician-confirmed diagnosis, the COPCORD questionnaire had 73.8 % sensitivity, 72.9 % specificity, a positive likelihood ratio of 2.7 and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.73. The COPCORD questionnaire is a valid screening tool for rheumatic diseases in indigenous Latin American populations. PMID:24682426

  18. [The value of quantitative analysis of procalcitonine in diagnostics of septic complications in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Lapin, S V; Maslianskiĭ, A L; Lazareva, N M; Vasil'eva, E Iu; Totolian, A A

    2013-01-01

    The infections very often complicate the course of autoimmune rheumatic diseases. In diagnostic of septic complications in rheumatic patients the new biomarkers of infections can have a decisive importance. The procalciotonine test is one of them. The issue was to evaluate the diagnostic informativity of this test. The sample included 93 patients. The examination was applied to 65 patients with rheumatic diseases. Among them, 13 patients had bacterial infections. The group consisted of 33 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 11 patients with systemic lupus erythematous, 6 patients with systemic angiitis, and 15 patients with other rheumatic diseases. The comparative group included 27 patients of cardio-therapeutic profile and 8 of these patients had bacterial infections. The procalcitonine test was applied with quantitative electrochemiluminescent technique. In patients with rheumatoid arthritis the mean levels of procalciotonine test consisted 0.10 +/- 0.13 ng/ml; with systemic lupus erythematous--0.08 +/- 0.06 ng/ml; with systemic angiitis--0.22 +/- 0.2 ng/ml; with other rheumatic diseases--0.12 +/- 0.15 ng/ml; of cardio-therapeutic profile without infections--0.08 +/- 0.06 ng/vl/ With threshold of procalcitonine test higher than 0.5/ml the sensitivity to diagnostic of infections consisted of 58%, specificity--94% in the group with rheumatic diseases. The procalciotonine test in case of no infection process with values higher than 0.5 ng/ml was detected in three patients. The evaluation of dependence of sensitivity and specificity for procalciotonine test and C-reactive protein the area under curve of procalcitonine test was larger in patients with rheumatic diseases (0.85 against 0.79) and in patients of cardio-therapeutic profile (0.92 against 0.90). The quantitative procalcitonine test is the best technique to detect septic complications in rheumatic patients. PMID:23807991

  19. A Diagnostic Approach to Autoimmune Disorders: Clinical Manifestations: Part 1.

    PubMed

    Sahai, Shashi; Adams, Matthew; Kamat, Deepak

    2016-06-01

    Autoimmune disorders are not commonly encountered in a general pediatric practice, but they may mimic many other disorders. Although they occur infrequently, it is always important to pause and consider an autoimmune disorder in the differential diagnosis. A detailed history and careful physical examination play an important role in guiding laboratory evaluation for these disorders. Many autoimmune disorders present with symptoms that involve multiple organ systems. The common symptoms that may make one consider a rheumatic disorder in the differential diagnosis are fever, fatigue, joint pain, rash, ulcers, and muscle weakness. The most common reason for referral to a pediatric rheumatologist is joint pain. A good joint examination may be performed by the use of the pediatric Gait, Arms, Legs, Spine screen, which is a validated screening tool. A small portion of children with fever of unknown origin may have an autoimmune disorder, with a majority of them having an infectious disease. Some patients with undiagnosed rheumatic disorders may present to the emergency. department. The characteristics of historic and clinical examination features of various autoimmune disorders are discussed in this article. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(6):e223-e229.]. PMID:27294498

  20. Pediatric allergy and immunology in Italy.

    PubMed

    Tozzi, Alberto E; Armenio, Lucio; Bernardini, Roberto; Boner, Attilio; Calvani, Mauro; Cardinale, Fabio; Cavagni, Giovanni; Dondi, Arianna; Duse, Marzia; Fiocchi, Alessandro; Marseglia, Gian L; del Giudice, Michele Miraglia; Muraro, Antonella; Pajno, Giovanni B; Paravati, Francesco; Peroni, Diego; Tripodi, Salvatore; Ugazio, Alberto G; Indinnimeo, Luciana

    2011-05-01

    In Italy, according to the International Study on Asthma and Allergies in Childhood study, the prevalence of current asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, and atopic eczema in 2006 was 7.9%, 6.5%, and 10.1% among children aged 6-7 and 8.4%, 15.5%, and 7.75% among children aged 13-14 yr. University education in this field is provided by the Postgraduate Schools of Pediatrics and those of Allergology and Clinical Immunology, as well as several annual Master courses. The Italian Society of Pediatric Allergology and Immunology (SIAIP) was founded in 1996 and counts about 1000 members. SIAIP promotes evidence-based management of allergic children and disseminates information to patients and their families through a quite innovative website and the National Journal 'Rivista Italiana di Allergologia Pediatrica'. In the last decade, four major regional, inter-regional, and national web-based networks have been created to link pediatric allergy centers and to share their clinical protocols and epidemiologic data. In addition, National Registers of Primary Immune-deficiencies and on Pediatric HIV link all clinical excellence centers. Research projects in the field of pediatric allergy and immunology are founded by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research (MIUR) and by the National Research Council (CNR), but the overall investments in this research area are quite low. Only a handful Italian excellence centers participate in European Projects on Pediatric Allergy and Immunology within the 7th Framework Program. The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology currently hosts two Italians in its Executive Committee (EC) and one in the EC of the Pediatric Section; moreover, major European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology meetings and courses in the area of pediatrics (e.g., PAAM, Venice, 2009) have been held in Italy in the last 3 yr. Italian hallmarks in the management of allergic diseases in childhood are a quite alive and spread interest in

  1. Metabolomics and its potential in diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zdrojewski, Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of metabolomics is to make a comprehensive study of metabolites, the intermediates of biochemical processes in living organisms. Any pathophysiological mechanism caused by disease will inevitably lead to related changes in the concentrations of specific metabolites. In line with this, metabolomics offers a promising laboratory tool for the analysis of potential diagnostic biomarkers that may be used to assess susceptibility to a disease and to evaluate the prognosis and therapeutic response to treatment. Recent data have shown that metabolomics analysis in rheumatoid arthritis has made possible more efficient diagnosis, discrimination between patients with regard to disease activity, prediction of the response to a particular treatment approach, differentiation between rheumatic disease subtypes and greater understanding of the pathophysiology of this disease. Here we characterize metabolomics as a comprehensive laboratory tool and review its potential in the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27407242

  2. The 4th annual European League Against Rheumatism congress in Lisbon: a personal perspective

    PubMed Central

    Wollheim, Frank A

    2004-01-01

    The 4th annual European League Against Rheumatism congress, held in Lisbon, 18–21 June 2003, had a record turnout of more than 8600 delegates and the abstract submissions increased to 2600. A heat wave and a somewhat substandard venue hampered some of the activities, notably the poster sessions. The scientific program was comprehensive and of a high class, and it was organized in 10–12 parallel sessions. The European League Against Rheumatism standing committees are expanding their activities and stimulating European cooperation (e.g. by creating databases and guidelines, and by starting research programs). The standing committees presented several areas where European cooperative work is in progress. Advances in drug therapy were a prominent theme and were well presented. Commercialism remains a problem for this meeting as for other similar large meetings, where satellite symposia surround the scientific program of the congress and often duplicate this. PMID:14979931

  3. [Morphogenesis of mitral valve calcification in rheumatism and the significance of the petrifications in surgical practice].

    PubMed

    Mozhina, A A; Krymskiĭ, L D; Chekareva, G A; Nestaĭko, G V

    1981-01-01

    Eighty-five calcified mitral valves were examined histologically and histochemically and 28 valves were examined in the scanning electron microscope. Different forms of calcification were discovered in rheumatic sclerosis of the mitral valve: dust-like, laminar petrifact, large-tuberous petrifact with protein apoplexy. The cardiac valve calcification in rheumatic fever is preceeded by local dystrophic changes of collagen fibers which undergo swelling, homogenization, and become picrinophilic. Qualitative changes in collagen predispose to calcium salts adsorption by collagen fibers. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the features of three-dimensional structure of petrifactions at various stages of their development. Dust-like petrifactions are microplates of lime with smooth surface, laminar petrifacts consist of accumulations of these microplates. The surface of large-tuberous petrifacts is irregular, ulcerated, covered with thrombotic masses.

  4. Why are women predisposed to autoimmune rheumatic diseases?

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The majority of autoimmune diseases predominate in females. In searching for an explanation for this female excess, most attention has focused on hormonal changes - both exogenous changes (for example, oral contraceptive pill) and fluctuations in endogenous hormone levels particularly related to menstruation and pregnancy history. Other reasons include genetic differences, both direct (influence of genes on sex chromosomes) and indirect (such as microchimerism), as well as gender differences in lifestyle factors. These will all be reviewed, focusing on the major autoimmune connective tissue disorders: rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and scleroderma. PMID:19863777

  5. Diametrical diseases reflect evolutionary-genetic tradeoffs: Evidence from psychiatry, neurology, rheumatology, oncology and immunology.

    PubMed

    Crespi, Bernard J; Go, Matthew C

    2015-01-01

    Tradeoffs centrally mediate the expression of human adaptations. We propose that tradeoffs also influence the prevalence and forms of human maladaptation manifest in disease. By this logic, increased risk for one set of diseases commonly engenders decreased risk for another, diametric, set of diseases. We describe evidence for such diametric sets of diseases from epidemiological, genetic and molecular studies in four clinical domains: (i) psychiatry (autism vs psychotic-affective conditions), (ii) rheumatology (osteoarthritis vs osteoporosis), (iii) oncology and neurology (cancer vs neurodegenerative disorders) and (iv) immunology (autoimmunity vs infectious disease). Diametric disorders are important to recognize because genotypes or environmental factors that increase risk for one set of disorders protect from opposite disorders, thereby providing novel and direct insights into disease causes, prevention and therapy. Ascertaining the mechanisms that underlie disease-related tradeoffs should also indicate means of circumventing or alleviating them, and thus reducing the incidence and impacts of human disease in a more general way. PMID:26354001

  6. Immunological aspects of some parasitic infections.

    PubMed

    Ruitenberg, E J; Buys, J

    1980-07-01

    Summary In this review article, some recent developments in the immunology of parasitic infections are presented. After an introduction in which the major human parasitic infectious diseases, including malaria, african and american trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, filariasis an schistosomiasis are mentioned, a description of the host / parasite relationship in malaria presented. The possibility for the development of vaccins against malaria are described. The close relation between the immunological responses and the inflammatory reactions present both in Schistosoma mansoni and Trichinella spiralis infections is stressed. Particularly the recently recognized direct anti-parasitic activity of eosinophils was emphasized. Next, ways of escape of parasites from the host defence were described, with special emphasis on the immunomodulating properties of parasitic infections. Finally, the development and improvement of new immunodiagnostic methods, including the detection of circulating antigens were discussed.

  7. Immunological aspects of some parasitic infections.

    PubMed

    Ruitenberg, E J; Buys, J

    1980-07-15

    In this review article, some recent developments in the immunology of parasitic infections are presented. After an introduction in which the major human parasitic infectious diseases, including malaria, african and american trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, filariasis an schistosomiasis are mentioned, a description of the host/parasite relationship in malaria presented. The possibility for the development of vaccins against malaria are described. The close relation between the immunological responses and the inflammatory reactions present both in Schistosoma mansoni and Trichinella spiralis infections is stressed. Particularly the recently recognized direct anti-parasitic activity of eosinophils was emphasized. Next, ways of escape of parasites from the host defence were described, with special emphasis on the immunomodulating properties of parasitic infections. Finally, the development and improvement of new immunodiagnostic methods, including the detection of circulating antigens were discussed.

  8. Engineering antigen-specific immunological tolerance.

    SciTech Connect

    Kontos, Stephan; Grimm, Alizee J.; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

    2015-05-01

    Unwanted immunity develops in response to many protein drugs, in autoimmunity, in allergy, and in transplantation. Approaches to induce immunological tolerance aim to either prevent these responses or reverse them after they have already taken place. We present here recent developments in approaches, based on engineered peptides, proteins and biomaterials, that harness mechanisms of peripheral tolerance both prophylactically and therapeutically to induce antigenspecific immunological tolerance. These mechanisms are based on responses of B and T lymphocytes to other cells in their immune environment that result in cellular deletion or ignorance to particular antigens, or in development of active immune regulatory responses. Several of these approaches are moving toward clinical development, and some are already in early stages of clinical testing.

  9. Immunological effects of ayahuasca in humans.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Rafael Guimarães

    2014-01-01

    Ayahuasca is a botanical hallucinogen traditionally used by indigenous groups of the northwest Amazon. In the last decade, the use of ayahuasca has spread from Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru to the U.S., Europe, Asia, and Africa. Despite acute and long-term evidence of good tolerability and safety for ayahuasca administered in the laboratory or ritually consumed in religious contexts, little is known about the immunological impact of ayahuasca on humans. Since ayahuasca is used by an increasing number of consumers, and considering its therapeutic potential, more information is needed regarding ayahuasca potential risks. This article presents a brief overview of the available data regarding the immunological impact of ayahuasca in humans. PMID:25364989

  10. Immunological Features Underlying Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers

    PubMed Central

    Messaoudi, Ilhem; Basler, Christopher F.

    2015-01-01

    Several enveloped RNA viruses of the arenavirus, bunyavirus, filovirus and flavivirus families are associated with a syndrome known as viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF). VHF is characterized by fever, vascular leakage, coagulation defects and multi organ system failure. VHF is currently viewed as a disease precipitated by viral suppression of innate immunity, which promotes systemic virus replication and excessive proinflammatory cytokine responses that trigger the manifestations of severe disease. However, the mechanisms by which immune dysregulation contributes to disease remain poorly understood. Infection of nonhuman primates closely recapitulates human VHF, notably Ebola and yellow fever, thereby providing excellent models to better define the immunological basis for this syndrome. Here we review the current state of our knowledge and suggest future directions that will better define the immunological mechanisms underlying VHF. PMID:26163194

  11. [Immunological background and pathomechanisms of food allergies].

    PubMed

    Schülke, Stefan; Scheurer, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in immunology have greatly improved our understanding of the pathomechanisms of food allergies. Food allergies are caused and maintained by complex interactions of the innate and adaptive immune system involving antigen-presenting cells (APC), T cells, group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2), epithelial cells (EC) and effectors cells. Additionally, epigenetic factors, the intestinal microbiome and nutritional factors modulating the gastrointestinal lymphatic tissue probably have a significant impact on allergy development. However, why certain individuals develop tolerance while others mount allergic responses, the factors defining the allergenicity of food proteins, as well as the immunological mechanisms triggering allergy development have yet to be analyzed in detail. PMID:27177897

  12. Immunological Profile of Silent Brain Infarction and Lacunar Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chiasserini, Davide; Eusebi, Paolo; Tantucci, Michela; Di Piero, Vittorio; Altieri, Marta; Marini, Carmine; Russo, Tommasina; Silvestrini, Mauro; Paolino, Isabella; Calabresi, Paolo; Parnetti, Lucilla

    2013-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is believed to be involved in the pathophysiological mechanisms of silent brain infarcts (SBI). However, the immunological profile of SBI has been scarcely investigated. In the context of a national research project named SILENCE, aimed at investigating clinical, biochemical and pathogenic features of SBI, we have measured the plasma profile of some inflammatory-related molecules in SBI patients (n = 21), patients with recent lacunar infarcts (LI, n = 28) and healthy controls (n = 31), consecutively enrolled in four Italian centres. A panel of chemokines (MIG, CTACK, IL16, SDF1a, MCP1), growth factors (SCF, SCGFb, HGF, IL3), immunoglobulin-type adhesion molecules (ICAM1, VCAM1), proinflammatory cytokines (IL18, INFa2, MIF, IL12p40), cell surface receptors on T-cells (IL2Ra), and inductors of apoptosis (TRAIL) was assessed in plasma samples by Luminex xMAP™ technology. Immunological parameters were compared using non-parametric statistics and performance to distinguish SBI and LI was evaluated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Plasma levels of ICAM1 were significantly higher in both SBI and LI patients as compared to controls (SBI≥LI>Ctrl). A different trend was observed for IL16 (SBI

  13. Ctrl), SCF (LICtrl) and SCGFb (SBI>LICtrl) and IL18 when compared to LI patients (Ctrl≤SBI>LI). All the other immunological markers did not significantly differ among groups. According to ROC analysis, the best predictor for SBI condition was the chemokine MIG (AUC = 0.84, sensitivity 86%, specificity 77%), while SCF had the best performance in distinguishing LI patients (AUC = 0.84, sensitivity 86%, specificity 68%). These results confirm the involvement of inflammatory processes in cerebrovascular disorders, particularly in SBI, a very common age-related condition. The differences in plasma profile of inflammatory

  14. Combined Uphill and Downhill Varices as a Consequence of Rheumatic Heart Disease: A Unique Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Harwani, Yogesh P.; Kumar, Ajit; Chaudhary, Akash; Kumar, Manoj; Choudeswari, Padmavathi R.; Kankanala, Vishnu V.; Joshi, Nayana; Kansagra, Chintan; Shah, Sandip; Tripathi, Abhisheka

    2014-01-01

    Hemorrhage from downhill varices is a rare manifestation. The etiology of downhill varices is due to superior vena cava obstruction while uphill varices are secondary to portal hypertension. We report a rare case of 55-year-old female with bleeding downhill varices not associated with obstruction or compression of superior vena cava, but was due to severe pulmonary artery hypertension secondary to chronic rheumatic heart disease. PMID:25755536

  15. Medical therapy for rheumatic heart disease: is it time to be proactive rather than reactive?

    PubMed

    Rajamannan, Nalini M; Antonini-Canterin, Francesco; Moura, Luis; Zamorano, Jose L; Rosenhek, Raphael A; Best, Patricia Jm; Lloyd, Margaret A; Rocha-Goncalves, F; Chandra, Sarat; Alfieri, Ottavio; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Tornos, Pilar; Baliga, Ragavendra R; Wang, Andrew; Bashore, Thomas; Ramakrishnan, S; Spargias, Konstantinos; Shuvy, Mony; Beeri, Ronen; Lotan, Chaim; Suwaidi, Jassim Al; Bahl, Vinay; Pierard, Luc A; Maurer, Gerald; Nicolosi, Gian Luigi; Rahimtoola, Shahbudin H; Chopra, K; Pandian, Natesa G

    2009-01-01

    Rheumatic Heart Disease (RHD) is well known to be an active inflammatory process which develops progressive calcification and leaflet thickening over time. The potential for statin therapy in slowing the progression of valvular heart disease is still controversial. Retrospective studies have shown that medical therapy is beneficial for patients with calcific aortic stenosis and recently for rheumatic valve disease. However, the prospective randomized clinical trials have been negative to date. This article discusses the epidemiologic risk factors, basic science, retrospective and prospective studies in valvular heart disease and a future clinical trial to target RHD with statin therapy to slow the progression of this disease. Recent epidemiological studies have revealed the risk factors associated with valvular disease include male gender, smoking, hypertension and elevated serum cholesterol and are similar to the risk factors for vascular atherosclerosis. An increasing number of models of experimental hypercholesterolemia demonstrate features of atherosclerosis in the aortic valve (AV), which are similar to the early stages of vascular atherosclerotic lesions. Calcification, the end stage process of the disease, must be understood as a prognostic indicator in the modification of this cellular process before it is too late. This is important in calcific aortic stenosis as well as in rheumatic valve disease. There are a growing number of studies that describe similar pathophysiologic molecular markers in the development of rheumatic valve disease as in calcific aortic stenosis. In summary, these findings suggest that medical therapies may have a potential role in patients in the early stages of this disease process to slow the progression of RHD affecting the valves. This review will summarize the potential for statin therapy for this patient population.

  16. Medical Therapy for Rheumatic Heart Disease: Is it time to be Proactive rather than Reactive?

    PubMed Central

    Rajamannan, Nalini M.; Antonini-Canterin, Francesco; Moura, Luis; Zamorano, José L.; Rosenhek, Raphael A.; Best, Patricia JM.; Lloyd, Margaret A.; Rocha-Gonçalves, F.; Chandra, Sarat; Alfieri, Ottavio; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Tornos, Pilar; Baliga, Ragavendra R; Wang, Andrew; Bashore, Thomas; Ramakrishnan, S; Spargias, Konstantinos; Shuvy, Mony; Beeri, Ronen; Lotan, Chaim; Suwaidi, Jassim Al; Bahl, Vinay; Pierard, Luc A.; Maurer, Gerald; Nicolosi, Gian Luigi; Rahimtoola, Shahbudin H.; Chopra, H. K.; Pandian, Natesa G.

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatic Heart Disease (RHD) is well known to be an active inflammatory process which develops progressive calcification and leaflet thickening over time. The potential for statin therapy in slowing the progression of valvular heart disease is still controversial. Retrospective studies have shown that medical therapy is beneficial for patients with calcific aortic stenosis and recently for rheumatic valve disease. However, the prospective randomized clinical trials have been negative to date. This article discusses the epidemiologic risk factors, basic science, retrospective and prospective studies in valvular heart disease and a future clinical trial to target RHD with statin therapy to slow the progression of this disease. Recent epidemiological studies have revealed the risk factors associated with valvular disease include male gender, smoking, hypertension and elevated serum cholesterol and are similar to the risk factors for vascular atherosclerosis. An increasing number of models of experimental hypercholesterolemia demonstrate features of atherosclerosis in the aortic valve (AV), which are similar to the early stages of vascular atherosclerotic lesions. Calcification, the end stage process of the disease, must be understood as a prognostic indicator in the modification of this cellular process before it is too late. This is important in calcific aortic stenosis as well as in rheumatic valve disease. There are a growing number of studies that describe similar pathophysiologic molecular markers in the development of rheumatic valve disease as in calcific aortic stenosis. In summary, these findings suggest that medical therapies may have a potential role in patients in the early stages of this disease process to slow the progression of RHD affecting the valves. This review will summarize the potential for statin therapy for this patient population. PMID:19729684

  17. Immunology of IgG4-related disease

    PubMed Central

    Della-Torre, E; Lanzillotta, M; Doglioni, C

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a fibroinflammatory condition that derives its name from the characteristic finding of abundant IgG4+ plasma cells in affected tissues, as well as the presence of elevated serum IgG4 concentrations in many patients. In contrast to fibrotic disorders, such as systemic sclerosis or idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis in which the tissues fibrosis has remained largely intractable to treatment, many IgG4-RD patients appear to have a condition in which the collagen deposition is reversible. The mechanisms underlying this peculiar feature remain unknown, but the remarkable efficacy of B cell depletion in these patients supports an important pathogenic role of B cell/T cell collaboration. In particular, aberrant T helper type 2 (Th2)/regulatory T cells sustained by putative autoreactive B cells have been proposed to drive collagen deposition through the production of profibrotic cytokines, but definitive demonstrations of this hypothesis are lacking. Indeed, a number of unsolved questions need to be addressed in order to fully understand the pathogenesis of IgG4-RD. These include the identification of an antigenic trigger(s), the implications (if any) of IgG4 antibodies for pathophysiology and the precise immunological mechanisms leading to fibrosis. Recent investigations have also raised the possibility that innate immunity might precede adaptive immunity, thus further complicating the pathological scenario. Here, we aim to review the most recent insights on the immunology of IgG4-RD, focusing on the relative contribution of innate and adaptive immune responses to the full pathological phenotype of this fibrotic condition. Clinical, histological and therapeutic features are also addressed. PMID:25865251

  18. Immunology of age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ambati, Jayakrishna; Atkinson, John P.; Gelfand, Bradley D.

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of blindness in aged individuals. Recent advances have highlighted the essential role of immune processes in the development, progression and treatment of AMD. In this Review we discuss recent discoveries related to the immunological aspects of AMD pathogenesis. We outline the diverse immune cell types, inflammatory activators and pathways that are involved. Finally, we discuss the future of inflammation-directed therapeutics to treat AMD in the growing aged population. PMID:23702979

  19. A survey of nutritional—immunological interactions*

    PubMed Central

    1972-01-01

    There is some evidence to show that the immune response is suppressed in malnutrition but the mechanism is not entirely clear. A more complete understanding of nutritional—immunological relationships is important, especially for child health in developing countries. This memorandum discusses a general approach to the problem and proposes specific methods for investigating the effects of malnutrition on the immune response. Several field studies incorporating these proposals are now in progress. PMID:4538197

  20. Cognitive-behavioural approaches to self-management in rheumatic disease.

    PubMed

    Dures, Emma; Hewlett, Sarah

    2012-09-01

    Patients with rheumatic disease must adjust psychosocially and behaviourally in order to manage the impact of symptoms and treatment on their daily lives, and the emotional consequences of the disease. However, patients can improve their well-being by taking a proactive role in self-management, for example by using coping strategies. Support for patient self-management from clinical teams usually comprises information and advice on disease management; however, this largely didactic approach often focuses on the biomedical aspects of rheumatic disease, without addressing how these aspects interact with psychosocial factors to influence health behaviours and thus outcomes. A cognitive-behavioural approach based on the biopsychosocial model of rheumatic disease can facilitate the identification of effective self-management strategies through collaboration between patients and clinicians. Most patients do not require intense cognitive-behavioural therapy from a clinical psychologist; rather, basic cognitive-behavioural techniques and tools could be used by rheumatology clinical teams to expand and enhance the support already offered to patients.

  21. Management of Chronic Pain in the Rheumatic Diseases with Insights for the Clinician

    PubMed Central

    Fitzcharles, Mary-Ann; Shir, Yoram

    2011-01-01

    Pain that accompanies musculoskeletal conditions should be regarded as an illness entity in its own right and deserves treatment in parallel with the management of the underlying condition. Recent understanding of the pathophysiology of rheumatic pain invokes interplay of the nociceptive mechanisms driven by local tissue factors and the neurogenic responses that sustain chronic pain. In line with other pain conditions, ideal treatment of rheumatic pain should be through a multimodal approach, integrating nonpharmacologic as well as pharmacologic treatments. In the light of this new concept of pain mechanisms, future pharmacologic treatment options may encompass a wider scope than the use of traditional analgesics and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. There is currently limited experience for use of pharmacologic treatments that act primarily on neurogenic mechanisms in rheumatic conditions. Drug combination studies are lacking, but this strategy seems clinically reasonable to allow for an approach to treating pain from different mechanistic perspectives. An added advantage would be the opportunity to use lower doses of individual drugs and thereby reduce the side effect profile. Ideal pain management must also include attention to the important co-associates of pain such as effects on sleep, mood and energy, which all have an impact on the global burden of suffering. Although complete relief of pain is still an unrealistic objective, reasonable outcome goals for symptom relief should be accompanied with an improvement in function. PMID:22870477