Science.gov

Sample records for impact ejecta meterorites

  1. Ejecta from Ocean Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyte, Frank T.

    2003-01-01

    Numerical simulations of deep-ocean impact provide some limits on the size of a projectile that will not mix with the ocean floor during a deep-ocean impact. For a vertical impact at asteroidal velocities (approx. 20 km/s), mixing is only likely when the projectile diameter is greater than 112 of the water depth. For oblique impacts, even larger projectiles will not mix with ocean floor silicates. Given the typical water depths of 4 to 5 km in deep-ocean basins, asteroidal projectiles with diameters as large as 2 or 3 km may commonly produce silicate ejecta that is composed only of meteoritic materials and seawater salts. However, the compressed water column beneath the projectile can still disrupt and shock metamorphose the ocean floor. Therefore, production of a separate, terrestrial ejecta component is not ruled out in the most extreme case. With increasing projectile size (or energy) relative to water depths, there must be a gradation between oceanic impacts and more conventional continental impacts. Given that 60% of the Earth's surface is covered by oceanic lithosphere and 500 m projectiles impact the Earth on 10(exp 5) y timescales, there must be hundreds of oceanic impact deposits in the sediment record awaiting discovery.

  2. Chicxulub Impact Ejecta From Albion Island, Belize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ocampo, A.; Pope, K.; Fischer, A.; Alvarez, W.; Fouke, B.; Webster, C.; Vega, F.; Smit, J.; Fritsche, A.; Claeys, P.

    1999-01-01

    Impact ejecta from the Albion Formation are exposed in northern Belize. The ejecta come from the outer portion of the continuous ejecta blanket of the Chicxulub crater, which is located 360 km to the northwest.

  3. Ejecta evolution during cone impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, Jeremy; Vakarelski, Ivan; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur

    2013-11-01

    We present results from an experimental study of the impact of conical shaped bodies into a pool of liquid. By varying the cone angle, impact speed and liquid physical properties, we examine a broad parameter space and seek to find conditions when self-similarity can be observed during this phenomena. We use high-speed imaging to capture the early-time motion of the liquid ejecta which emanates from the tip of the cone and travels up along the cone surface. Surprisingly, we find that the detachment of the ejecta can be simply described by air entrainment relationships derived from coating experiments.

  4. Chicxulub Impact Ejecta in Belize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ocampo, A.; Pope, K.; Fischer, A.; Alvarez, W.; Fouke, B.; Asaro, F.; Webster, C., Jr.; Vega, F.; Smith, J.; Fritsche, A. E.

    1997-01-01

    Chicxulub ejecta deposits in Belize provide the closest exposures of ejecta to the crater and the only exposures of proximal ejecta deposited in a terrestrial environment. A quarry on Albion Island in northern Belize exposes Late Cretaceous, possibly Maastrichtian, carbonate platform sediments that were folded, eroded, and subaerially weathered prior to the deposition of coarse ejecta from Chicxulub. These ejecta deposits are composed of a basal, about 1-m-thick clay and dolomite Spheroid Bed overlain by a about 15-m-thick coarse Diamictite Bed. Many and perhaps most of the clay spheroids are altered glass. Many dolomite spheroids have concentric layers and angular cores are probably of accretionary lapilli origin. A slight Ir concentration (111-152 ppt) was detected in the base of the Spheroid Bed. The Diamictite Bed contains about 10% altered glass, rare shocked quartz, 3-8 m diameter boulders and striated and polished cobbles, one with a penetrating rock chip that plastically deformed the cobble. Ejecta deposits extend to the surface at Albion and the maximum thickness in this area is not known. Ejecta deposits are exposed in several roadside quarries in the Cayo District of central Belize. The Late Cretaceous here is also represented by carbonate platform sediments. The upper surface of the carbonate platform is a highly irregular and extensively recrystallized horizon possibly representing deep karst weathering. Approximately 30 in of diamictite overlies this horizon with a texture similar to the Diamictite Bed at the Albion quarry, but with a more diverse lithology. In three locations the Cayo diamictites, contain red clay layers with abundant polished and striated limestone pebbles and cobbles called Pook's Pebbles, several of which have penetrating rock chips and ablated surfaces. We interpret the Albion Spheroid Bed as a deposit from the impact vapor plume and the Albion and Cayo diamictites as the result of a turbulent flow that contained debris derived

  5. Characterizing Secondary Debris Impact Ejecta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, W. P.

    1999-01-01

    All spacecraft in low-Earth orbit are subject to high-speed impacts by meteoroids and orbital debris particles. These impacts can damage flight-critical systems which can in turn lead to catastrophic failure of the spacecraft. Therefore, the design of a spacecraft for an Earth-orbiting mission must take into account the possibility of such impacts and their effects on the spacecraft structure and on all of its exposed subsystem components. In addition to threatening the operation of the spacecraft itself, on-orbit impacts also generate a significant amount of ricochet particles. These high-speed particles can destroy critical external spacecraft subsystem and also increase the contamination of the orbital environment. This report presents a summary of the work performed towards the development of an empirical model that characterizes the secondary ejecta created by a high-speed impacta on a typical aerospace structural surface.

  6. Impact ejecta on the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okeefe, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    The partitioning of energy and the distribution of the resultant ejecta on the moon is numerically modeled using a Eulerian finite difference grid. The impact of an iron meteoroid at 15 km/sec on a gabbroic anorthosite lunar crust is examined. The high speed impact induced flow is described over the entire hydrodynamic regime from a time where the peak pressures are 6 Mbar until the stresses everywhere in the flow are linearly elastic, and less than 5 kbar. Shock-induced polymorphic phase changes, (plagioclase and pyroxene to hollandite and perovskite), and the subsequent reversion to low pressure phases are demonstrated to enhance shock wave attenuation. A rate-dependent equation of state is used for describing the hysteretic effect of the phase change. Ballistic equations for a spherical planet are then applied to material with net velocity away from the moon.

  7. Mercurian impact ejecta: Meteorites and mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladman, B.; Coffey, J.

    2009-03-01

    We have examined the fate of impact ejecta liberated from the surface of Mercury due to impacts by comets or asteroids, in order to study 1) meteorite transfer to Earth, and 2) reaccumulation of an expelled mantle in giant-impact scenarios seeking to explain Mercury’s large core. In the context of meteorite transfer during the last 30 Myr, we note that Mercury’s impact ejecta leave the planet’s surface much faster (on average) than other planets in the solar system because it is the only planet where impact speeds routinely range from 5 to 20 times the planet’s escape speed; this causes impact ejecta to leave its surface moving many times faster than needed to escape its gravitational pull. Thus, a large fraction of Mercurian ejecta may reach heliocentric orbit with speeds sufficiently high for Earth-crossing orbits to exist immediately after impact, resulting in larger fractions of the ejecta reaching Earth as meteorites. We calculate the delivery rate to Earth on a time scale of 30 Myr (typical of stony meteorites from the asteroid belt) and show that several percent of the high-speed ejecta reach Earth (a factor of 2-3 less than typical launches from Mars); this is one to two orders of magnitude more efficient than previous estimates. Similar quantities of material reach Venus. These calculations also yield measurements of the re-accretion time scale of material ejected from Mercury in a putative giant impact (assuming gravity is dominant). For Mercurian ejecta escaping the gravitational reach of the planet with excess speeds equal to Mercury’s escape speed, about one third of ejecta reaccretes in as little as 2 Myr. Thus collisional stripping of a silicate proto-Mercurian mantle can only work effectively if the liberated mantle material remains in small enough particles that radiation forces can drag them into the Sun on time scale of a few million years, or Mercury would simply re-accrete the material.

  8. Chicxulub Ejecta Impact Trenches And Terminal Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, R. L.

    2013-05-01

    DISCOVERY During a Pacific voyage from E. Australia to the US on a small sailing research vessel what appears to be two Chicxulub impact trenches were discovered in the ocean floor at depths of 4,627m and 3,519m. DESCRIPTION Trench A begins at a depth of 4,627m, 704km from the Chicxulub impact and is 18km long, 5km wide and 225m deep. Trench B begins at a depth of 3,519m, 732km from the Chixculub impact and is 23km long, 7 km wide and 400m deep. At the end of Trench B is what appears to be a debris deposit 5km long. Their relationship to the Chicxulub impact seems confirmed by their central axis, which when extended intersect at the Chicxulub impact at N Lat 21.33, W Long 89.5. Down range 286km from the end of Trench B is what appears to be the terminal impact of the object that created the two trenches. This is in the form of several large boulders, small seamounts, and islands in shallower depths indicating breakup of the object 1040km from the Chicxulub impact. The trenches are in an area of the Caribbean where currents prevented them from being silted in, preserving their physical form on the ocean floor. The object that created the trenches could have been large ejecta from the impact or possibly part of the asteroid that separated before impact or upon impact and carried on 1000km down range. The trajectory of both trenches is an upward angle of about 3 degrees. This indicates that the trajectory of the object was at a low angle, very high velocity and was deflected slightly upward upon impact with the ocean floor 4,627 below sea level. RESEARCH The first two phases of 10 phases consisting of mapping, exploration, research, and documentation of the impacts have been completed. Phase 1 consisted of assembling available sea floor data of the area of the impacts. Phase 2 consisted of selecting aerial and under water images from Google Earth, preparing bathymetric mapping from a GEBCO_08. BODC raster analysis with 50m contour intervals of the impact area

  9. Jet ejecta mass upon oblique impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, W.; Ahrens, T. J.; Miller, G. H.; Petach, M. B.

    1991-01-01

    Theoretical models in the jetting regime for symmetric and asymmetric impact of thin plates predict the mass and velocity of jetted material upon oblique impact. However, experimental constraints on the amount of material which form jets upon oblique impact are not known. A series of preliminary experiments were conducted in which tungsten (W) flyer plates at speeds of 1.5 to 2.0 km/s were obliquely impacted into carbon targets at 30 deg in the regime of jetting, yielding radiation temperatures in the about 3200 K range. Both framing-camera and flash X-ray imaging were conducted. Broad cm-sized craters induced by jet ejecta on 2024 Al witness plates were used to infer jet mass. We infer, from measured witness plate crater volumes, that jet masses in the range of 0.01 to 0.06 g are produced by a 32 mm diameter, 6 mm thick W impactor. This is about one to two orders of magnitude less than those calculated from present theoretical models. In contrast, in refractory material experiments, the mass of gabbro ejecta trapped in styrofoam is 0.52 g, which is similar to that calculated.

  10. Oblique Impact and Its Ejecta: Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemieva, N.; Pierazzo, E.

    2003-01-01

    It is well known that impact events strike planetary surfaces at an angle from the surface. Assuming an isotropic flux of projectiles, probability theory indicates that the most likely angle of impact is 45 regardless of the body's gravitational field. While crater rims appear circular down to low impact angles, the distribution of ejecta around the crater is sensitive to the angle of impact and currently serves as the best guide to obliquity of impacts. A fair amount of numerical modeling of vertical impacts has been carried out from the early 60-s to the present time and references herein]. In vertical impacts, the axial symmetry of the process allows the simplification of the model to two dimensions (2D). Oblique impact modeling requires 3D hydro-codes and, hence, much more powerful computers. The first documented detailed oblique impact studies were carried out at Sandia National Labs' supercomputers less than 10 years ago to describe the 1994 collision of comet SL9 with Jupiter. Since then, substantial progress in computer science has made 3D modeling a reachable objective for the scientific community.

  11. Small Impact Craters with Dark Ejecta Deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    When a meteor impacts a planetary surface, it creates a blast very much like a bomb explosion. Shown here are two excellent examples of small impact craters on the martian surface. Each has a dark-toned deposit of material that was blown out of the crater (that is, ejected) during the impact. Materials comprising these deposits are called ejecta. The ejecta here is darker than the surrounding substrate because each crater-forming blast broke through the upper, brighter surface material and penetrated to a layer of darker material beneath. This darker material was then blown out onto the surface in the radial pattern seen here.

    The fact that impact craters can penetrate and expose material from beneath the upper surface of a planet is very useful for geologists trying to determine the nature and composition of the martian subsurface. The scene shown here is illuminated from the upper left and covers an area 1.1 km (0.7 mi) wide by 1.4 km (0.9 mi). The larger crater has a diameter of about 89 meters (97 yards), the smaller crater is about 36 meters (39 yards) across. The picture is located in Terra Meridiani and was taken by the Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera.

    Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  12. Trajectories of ballistic impact ejecta on a rotating Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, W.

    1994-01-01

    On an airless, slowly rotating planetary body like the Moon, ejecta particles from an impact follow simple ballistic trajectories. If gaseous interactions in the fireball are ignored, ejecta particles follow elliptical orbits with the center of the planetary body at one focus until they encounter the surface at the point of reimpact. The partial elliptical orbit of the ejecta particle lies in a plane in inertial (galactic) coordinates. Because of the slow rotation rate (for example, 360 degrees/28 days for the Moon), the intersection of the orbital plane and the surface remains nearly a great circle during the flight time of the ejecta. For this reason, lunar rays, representing concentrations of ejecta with the same azimuth but different velocities and/or ejecta angles, lie essentially along great circles. Ejecta from airless but more rapidly rotating bodies will follow more complicated, curving trajectories when plotted in the coordinate frame of the rotating planet or viewed as rays on the planetary surface. The curvature of trajectories of ejecta particles can be treated as a manifestation of the Coriolis effect, with the particles being accelerated by Coriolis pseudoforces. However, it is more straightforward to calculate the elliptical orbit in inertial space and then determine how far the planet rotates beneath the orbiting ejecta particle before reimpact. The Earth's eastward rotation affects ballistic ejecta in two ways: (1) the eastward velocity component increases the velocity of eastbound ejecta and reduces the velocity of westbound ejecta; and (2) the Earth turns underneath inflight ejecta, so that although the latitude of reimpact is not changed, the longitude is displaced westward, with the displacement increasing as a function of the time the ejecta remains aloft.

  13. The Acraman impact and its widespread ejecta, South Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gostin, V. A.; Keays, R. R.; Wallace, M. W.

    1992-01-01

    Discovery of a widespread horizon of shock-deformed volcaniclastic ejecta preserved in Late Proterozoic (approx. 600 Ma) shales in South Australia and its probable link to the Acraman impact structure in the Middle Proterozoic Gawler Range. Volcanics provide a rare opportunity to study the effects of a major terrestrial impact, including the sedimentology and distribution of an ejecta blanket and its precious-metal signature. The ejecta horizon occurs in the Bunyeroo Formation at many localities within the Adelaide Geosyncline, including the Wearing Hills, which are approx. 350 km northeast of the Acraman impact site. Following a search at the same stratigraphic level in other basins in South Australia, the ejecta has been located within the Lower Rodda beds of the Officer Basin, extending the limits of the ejecta to approx. 470 km northwest of the Acraman impact structure. The ejecta is therefore widely dispersed, and provides an important chronostratigraphic marker enabling precise correlation of Late Proterozoic sequences in southern Australia. In summary, the Bunyeroo ejecta is unique as the only known example of a widely dispersed, coarse-grained ejecta blanket that is, moreover, strongly linked to a known major impact structure. The marked Ir-PGE anomalies in the ejecta horizon provide support for the hypothesis that meteorite impact events can produce Ir anomalies interrestrial sediments. The findings also indicate that Ir can be mobilized and concentrated in sediments by low-temperature diagenetic processes. The identification of ejecta horizons in sedimentary rocks therefore should be based on the coincidence of shock-metamorphic features in the detritus and clear Ir anomalies.

  14. Ejecta Dynamics during Hypervelocity Impacts into Dry and Wet Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoerth, T.; Schäfer, F.; Thoma, K.; Poelchau, M.; Kenkmann, T.; Deutsch, A.

    2011-03-01

    Hypervelocity impact experiments into dry and water saturated porous Seeberger sandstone were conducted at the two-stage light gas accelerator at the Ernst-Mach-Institute (EMI) and the ejecta dynamics were analyzed.

  15. Modeling the detection of impact ejecta on the lunar surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanwei; Srama, Ralf; Wu, Yiyong; Grün, Eberhard

    2015-12-01

    The lunar surface is continuously exposed to the micrometeoroid environment. Hypervelocity impacts of interplanetary dust particles with speeds around 17 kms-1 generate secondary ejecta on the lunar surface. A dust detector placed on the moon is capable of characterizing the secondary ejecta population. The purpose of this paper is to study the speed and trajectory information of ejecta by impact simulations and its implications for the location of a dust sensor on the surface. AUTODYN15.0/2D software was used to simulate the velocity and angular distributions of ejecta created by the primary impacts of interplanetary dust particles. We considered projectiles with sizes of 10 μm spheres in diameter with speeds of 17 kms-1. We used impact angles of 15°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 75°, and 90° with respect to the surface. A significant percentage of the impact ejecta are created in the early-time stage of the impact process. This population can be captured by a sensor placed on the lunar surface (e.g. Lunar Ejecta and Meteorites (LEAM) experiment) or by a sensor mounted directly on a lander (e.g. Lunar Dust eXplorer (LDX)). The secondary ejecta population above the lunar surface is considered to explain the results of the LEAM experiment. A sensor directly placed on the surface like LEAM is not very well suited to measure the high-speed ejecta component - a sensor located at a few meters height (e.g. on top of a lunar lander) would measure higher fluxes.

  16. Impact ejecta dynamics in an atmosphere - Experimental results and extrapolations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, P. H.; Gault, D. E.

    1982-01-01

    It is noted that the impacts of 0.635-cm aluminum projectiles at 6 km/sec into fine pumice dust, at 1 atm, generate a ball of ionized gas behind an expanding curtain of upward moving ejecta. The gas ball forms a toroid which dissolves as it is driven along the interior of the ejecta curtain, by contrast to near-surface explosions in which a fireball envelops early-time crater growth. High frame rate Schlieren photographs show that the atmosphere at the base of the ejecta curtain is initially turbulent, but later forms a vortex. These experiments suggest that although small size ejecta may be decelerated by air drag, they are not simply lofted and suspended but become incorporated in an ejecta cloud that is controlled by air flow which is produced by the response of the atmosphere to the impact. The extrapolation of these results to large body impacts on the earth suggests such contrasts with laboratory experiments as a large quantity of impact-generated vapor, the supersonic advance of the ejecta curtain, the lessened effect of air drag due to the tenuous upper atmosphere, and the role of secondary cratering.

  17. Standardizing the nomenclature of Martian impact crater ejecta morphologies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barlow, Nadine G.; Boyce, Joseph M.; Costard, Francois M.; Craddock, Robert A.; Garvin, James B.; Sakimoto, Susan E.H.; Kuzmin, Ruslan O.; Roddy, David J.; Soderblom, Laurence A.

    2000-01-01

    The Mars Crater Morphology Consortium recommends the use of a standardized nomenclature system when discussing Martian impact crater ejecta morphologies. The system utilizes nongenetic descriptors to identify the various ejecta morphologies seen on Mars. This system is designed to facilitate communication and collaboration between researchers. Crater morphology databases will be archived through the U.S. Geological Survey in Flagstaff, where a comprehensive catalog of Martian crater morphologic information will be maintained.

  18. Martian impact craters: Continuing analysis of lobate ejecta sinuosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, Nadine G.

    1990-01-01

    The lobate ejecta morphology surrounding most fresh Martian impact craters can be quantitatively analyzed to determine variations in ejecta sinuosity with diameter, latitude, longitude, and terrain. The results of such studies provide another clue to the question of how these morphologies formed: are they the results of vaporization of subsurface volatiles or caused by ejecta entrainment in atmospheric gases. Kargel provided a simple expression to determine the degree of non-circularity of an ejecta blanket. This measure of sinuosity, called 'lobateness', is given by the ratio of the ejecta perimeter to the perimeter of a circle with the same area as that of the ejecta. The Kargel study of 538 rampart craters in selected areas of Mars led to the suggestion that lobateness increased with increasing diameter, decreased at higher latitude, and showed no dependence on elevation or geologic unit. Major problems with the Kargel analysis are the limited size and distribution of the data set and the lack of discrimination among the different types of lobate ejecta morphologies. Bridges and Barlow undertook a new lobateness study of 1582 single lobe (SL) and 251 double lobe (DL) craters. The results are summarized. These results agree with the finding of Kargel that lobateness increases with increasing diameter, but found no indication of a latitude dependence for SL craters. The Bridges and Barlow study has now been extended to multiple lobe (ML) craters. Three hundred and eighty ML craters located across the entire Martian surface were studied. ML craters provide more complications to lobateness studies than do SL and DL craters - in particular, the ejecta lobes surrounding the crater are often incomplete. Since the lobateness formula compares the perimeter of the ejecta lobe to that of a circle, the analysis was restricted only to complete lobes. The lobes are defined sequentially starting with the outermost lobe and moving inward.

  19. An Impact Ejecta Behavior Model for Small, Irregular Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, J. E.; Melosh, H. J.; Greenberg, R.

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, spacecraft observations of asteroids 951 Gaspra, 243 Ida, 253 Mathilde, and 433 Eros have shown the overriding dominance of impact processes with regard to the structure and surface morphology of these small, irregular bodies. In particular, impact ejecta play an important role in regolith formation, ranging from small particles to large blocks, as well as surface feature modification and obscuration. To investigate these processes, a numerical model has been developed based upon the impact ejecta scaling laws provided by Housen, Schmidt, and Holsapple, and modified to more properly simulate the late-stage ejection velocities and ejecta plume shape changes (ejection angle variations) shown in impact cratering experiments. A target strength parameter has also been added to allow the simulation of strength-dominated cratering events in addition to the more familiar gravity-dominated cratering events. The result is a dynamical simulation which models -- via tracer particles -- the ejecta plume behavior, ejecta blanket placement, and impact crater area resulting from a specified impact on an irregularly shaped target body, which is modeled in 3-dimensional polygon fashion. This target body can be placed in a simple rotation state about one of its principal axes, with the impact site and projectile/target parameters selected by the user. The gravitational force from the irregular target body (on each tracer particle) is determined using the polygonized surface (polyhedron) gravity technique developed by Werner.

  20. Orbital evolution of impact ejecta from Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetherill, G. W.

    1984-03-01

    The orbital evolution of material ejected from Mars into heliocentric orbits is investigated, with emphasis on the origin of the shergottite, nakhlite, and chassignite achondrites. Two models are considered. In the first, meteorite-size bodies are ejected directly from Mars. In the second, the ejecta are approximately 15 m diameter bodies, that are subsequently fragmented by collisions in space. In both cases about 35 percent of the objects that will ever reach earth do so within 10 m y. For the small body model, it is found that about 0.03 percent of the Mars crater ejecta must be accelerated to the Mars escape velocity; the large body model requires an efficiency of 0.4 percent. The results indicate that meteorites originating as small bodies should dominate the terrestrial flux of Mars ejecta. This is in general agreement with data from SNC meteorites. The yield of meteorites from Mercury is found to be at least a factor of 100 lower than from Mars.

  1. Petrography and geochemistry of ejecta from the Sudbury impact event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Matthew S.; McDonald, Iain; Koeberl, Christian

    2014-10-01

    Ejecta from the Connors Creek site in Michigan (500 km from the Sudbury Igneous Complex [SIC]), the Pine River site in western Ontario (650 km from the SIC), and the Coleraine site in Minnesota (980 km from the SIC) were petrographically and geochemically analyzed. Connors Creek was found to have approximately 2 m of ejecta, including shocked quartz, melt droplets, and accretionary lapilli; Pine River has similar deposits about 1 m in thickness, although with smaller lapilli; Coleraine contains only impact spherules in a 20 cm-thick layer (impact spherules being similar to microkrystites or microtektites). The ejecta transition from chaotic deposits of massively bedded impactoclastic material with locally derived detritus at Connors Creek to a deposit with apparently very little detrital material that is primarily composed of melt droplets at Pine River to a deposit that is almost entirely composed of melt spherules at Coleraine. The major and trace element compositions of the ejecta confirm the previously observed similarity of the ejecta deposits to the Onaping Formation in the SIC. Platinum-group element (PGE) concentrations from each of the sites were also measured, revealing significantly elevated PGE contents in the spherule samples compared with background values. PGE abundances in samples from the Pine River site can be reproduced by addition of approximately 0.2 wt% CI chondrite to the background composition of the underlying sediments in the core. PGE interelement ratios indicate that the Sudbury impact event was probably caused by a chondritic impactor.

  2. The Impact Ejecta Environment of Near Earth Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szalay, Jamey R.; Horányi, Mihály

    2016-10-01

    Impact ejecta production is a ubiquitous process that occurs on all airless bodies throughout the solar system. Unlike the Moon, which retains a large fraction of its ejecta, asteroids primarily shed their ejecta into the interplanetary dust population. These grains carry valuable information about the chemical compositions of their parent bodies that can be measured via in situ dust detection. Here, we use recent Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer/Lunar Dust Experiment measurements of the lunar dust cloud to calculate the dust ejecta distribution for any airless body near 1 au. We expect this dust distribution to be highly asymmetric, due to non-isotropic impacting fluxes. We predict that flybys near these asteroids would collect many times more dust impacts by transiting the apex side of the body compared to its anti-apex side. While these results are valid for bodies at 1 au, they can be used to qualitatively infer the ejecta environment for all solar-orbiting airless bodies.

  3. Crater-ray formation by impact-induced ejecta particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadono, T.; Suzuki, A. I.; Wada, K.; Mitani, N. K.; Yamamoto, S.; Arakawa, M.; Sugita, S.; Haruyama, J.; Nakamura, A. M.

    2015-04-01

    We performed impact experiments with granular targets to reveal the formation process of crater "rays", the non-uniform ejecta distributions around some fresh craters on the Moon and planets. We found mesh patterns, loosely woven with spaces like a net, as ejecta. A characteristic length of spaces between meshes was evaluated, and an angle, defined as the ratio of the characteristic length to the distance from the ejection point, was obtained as ∼a few degrees. These features are similar to the results of the analyses of the ray patterns around two lunar craters, Glushko and Kepler. Numerical simulations of granular material showed that clear mesh pattern appeared at lower coefficients of restitution between particles but was less clear at larger one, suggesting that the inelastic collisions between particles cause the clear mesh-pattern formation of impact ejecta.

  4. Impact and explosion crater ejecta, fragment size, and velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okeefe, J. D.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1983-01-01

    A model was developed for the mass distribution of fragments that are ejected at a given velocity for impact and explosion craters. The model is semi-empirical in nature and is derived from (1) numerical calculations of cratering and the resultant mass versus ejection velocity, (2) observed ejecta blanket particle size distributions, (3) an empirical relationship between maximum ejecta fragment size and crater diameter and an assumption on the functional form for the distribution of fragements ejected at a given velocity. This model implies that for planetary impacts into competent rock, the distribution of fragments ejected at a given velocity are nearly monodisperse, e.g., 20% of the mass of the ejecta at a given velocity contain fragments having a mass less than 0.1 times a mass of the largest fragment moving at that velocity. Using this model, the largest fragment that can be ejected from asteroids, the moon, Mars, and Earth is calculated as a function of crater diameter. In addition, the internal energy of ejecta versus ejecta velocity is found. The internal energy of fragments having velocities exceeding the escape velocity of the moon will exceed the energy required for incipient melting for solid silicates and thus, constrains the maximum ejected solid fragment size.

  5. Biomass preservation in impact melt ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Kieren Torres; Bailey, Melanie J.; Berhanu, Deborah; Bland, Phil A.; Cressey, Gordon; Howard, Lauren E.; Jeynes, Chris; Matthewman, Richard; Martins, Zita; Sephton, Mark A.; Stolojan, Vlad; Verchovsky, Sasha

    2013-12-01

    Meteorites can have played a role in the delivery of the building blocks of life to Earth only if organic compounds are able to survive the high pressures and temperatures of an impact event. Although experimental impact studies have reported the survival of organic compounds, there are uncertainties in scaling experimental conditions to those of a meteorite impact on Earth and organic matter has not been found in highly shocked impact materials in a natural setting. Impact glass linked to the 1.2-km-diameter Darwin crater in western Tasmania is strewn over an area exceeding 400km2 and is thought to have been ejected by a meteorite impact about 800kyr ago into terrain consisting of rainforest and swamp. Here we use pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to show that biomarkers representative of plant species in the local ecosystem--including cellulose, lignin, aliphatic biopolymer and protein remnants--survived the Darwin impact. We find that inside the impact glass the organic components are trapped in porous carbon spheres. We propose that the organic material was captured within impact melt and preserved when the melt quenched to glass, preventing organic decomposition since the impact. We suggest that organic material can survive capture and transport in products of extreme impact processing, at least for a Darwin-sized impact event.

  6. Experimental Investigation of the Distribution of Shock Effects in Regolith Impact Ejecta Using an Ejecta Recovery Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christoffersen, R.; Montes, R.; Cardenas, F.; Cintala, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Because the mass-flux of solar system meteoroids is concentrated in the approx. 200 microns size range, small-scale impacts play a key role in driving the space weathering of regoliths on airless bodies. Quantifying this role requires improved data linking the mass, density and velocity of the incoming impactors to the nature of the shock effects produced, with particular emphasis on effects, such as production of impact melt and vapor, that drive the optical changes seen in space weathered regoliths. Of particular importance with regard to space weathering is understanding not only the composition of the shock melt created in small-scale impacts, but also how it is partitioned volumetrically between the local impact site and more widely distributed ejecta. To improve the ability of hypervelocity impact experiments to obtain this type of information, we have developed an enclosed sample target chamber with multiple-geometry interior capture cells for in-situ retention of ejecta from granular targets. A key design objective was to select and test capture cell materials that could meet three requirements: 1) Capture ejecta fragments traveling at various trajectories and velocities away from the impact point, while inducing minimal additional damage relative to the primary shock effects; 2) facilitate follow-up characterization of the ejecta either on or in the cell material by analytical SEM, or ex-situ by microprobe, TEM and other methods; and 3) enable the trajectories of the captured and characterized ejecta to be reconstructed relative to the target.

  7. HCN production from impact ejecta on the early Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkos, Devon; Pikus, Aaron; Alexeenko, Alina; Melosh, H. J.

    2016-11-01

    Major impact events have drastically altered the evolution of life on Earth. The reentry of ejecta formed from these events can trigger widespread chemical changes to the atmosphere on a global scale. This mechanism was proposed as a source of HCN during the Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB), 4.1 to 3.8 billion years ago. Significant concentrations of HCN in surface water could directly lead to adenine formation, a precursor for RNA. This work uses the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method to examine the production of CN and HCN due to the reentry of impact ejecta. We use the Statistical Modeling in Low-Density Environment (SMILE) code, which utilizes the Total Collisional Energy (TCE) model for reactions. The collisions are described by the Variable Soft Sphere (VSS) and Larsen-Borgnakke (LB) models. We compare this nonequilibrium production to equilibrium concentrations from bulk atmospheric heating. The equilibrium HCN yield for a 1023 J impact is 7.0×104 moles, corresponding to a 2.5×1014 molecules per m2 surface deposition. We find that additional CN and HCN is produced under thermochemical nonequilibrium, particularly at higher altitudes. The total nonequilibrium yield for a 1023 J impact is 1.2×106 moles of HCN, a value 17 times the equilibrium result. This corresponds to a surface deposition of 1.4×1015 molecules per m2. This increase in production indicates that thermochemical nonequilibrium effects play a strong role in HCN from impact ejecta, and must be considered when investigating impacts as a plausible mechanism for significant adenine production during the LHB.

  8. Ejecta Production in Microgravity from Low Velocity Impacts in Regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colwell, J. E.; Dove, A.; Brisset, J.; Rascon, A. N.; Brightwell, K.

    2015-12-01

    We report on the results of the third PRIME (Physics of Regolith Impacts in Microgravity Experiment) campaign on-board the NASA C-9 airplane in August 2014. The objective of PRIME is to study low-velocity impacts of cm-scale particles into planetary regolith under reduced gravity and microgravity conditions, measuring how dust on the surfaces of planetary ring particles, planetesimals and asteroids dissipates energy in the collision and the mass-velocity distribution of any ejecta produced in the impact. PRIME can perform impacts into granular materials at speeds of ~5-50 cm/s in microgravity. Impacts are performed in vacuum and projectiles are spherical particles launched by a spring designed to provide the desired impact energy. The target materials studied are quartz sand and JSC-1 lunar regolith simulant, filled to a depth of 2 cm in the target tray. Projectile materials are quartz, brass, and stainless steel to provide a range of impact energies at constant impact velocity. Impacts are performed in isolated chambers and up to 8 experiments can be performed per flight. The data collected consists of video recordings of the impacts, taken with a high resolution video camera at 120 frames per second. The impacts observed during the PRIME-3 campaign resulted in 9 marble rebounds and 15 impacts with ejecta. Seven of these 15 were at accelerations of ~0.05 g while the remaining impacts were performed in free fall. For each rebound observed, the coefficient of restitution of the impact was measured and for each collision that produced ejecta, the ejected particles were tracked to determine their initial velocities. The PRIME-3 campaign successfully extended the region of the parameter field explored by investigating impacts at velocities lower than observed during previous campaigns while collecting new data on impacts at asteroid gravity levels. We present our new results and combine them with results from previous similar experiments and discuss applications to

  9. Oblique impact: Projectile richochet, concomitant ejecta and momentum transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gault, Donald E.; Schultz, Peter H.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental studies of oblique impact indicate that projectile richochet occurs for trajectory angles less than 30 deg and that the richocheted projectile, accompanied by some target material, are ejected at velocities that are a large fraction of the impact velocity. Because the probability of occurrence of oblique impact less than 30 deg on a planetary body is about one out of every four impact events, oblique impacts would seem to be a potential mechanism to provide a source of meteorites from even the largest atmosphere-free planetary bodies. Because the amount of richocheted target material cannot be determined from previous results, additional experiments in the Ames Vertical Gun laboratory were undertaken toward that purpose using pendulums; one to measure momentum of the richocheted projectile and concomitant target ejecta, and a second to measure the momentum transferred from projectile to target. These experiments are briefly discussed.

  10. Popigai Impact Structure Modeling: Morphology and Worldwide Ejecta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, B. A.; Artemieva, N. A.; Pierazzo, E.

    2004-01-01

    The approx. 100 km in diameter, 35.7 0.2 Ma old Popigai structure [1], northern Siberia (Russia), is the best-preserved of the large terrestrial complex crater structures containing a central-peak ring [2- 4]. Although remotely located, the excellent outcrops, large number of drill cores, and wealth of geochemical data make Popigai ideal for the general study of the cratering processes. It is most famous for its impact-diamonds [2,5]. Popigai is the best candidate for the source crater of the worldwide late Eocene ejecta [6,7].

  11. Distal Impact Ejecta from the Gulf of Carpentaria: Have We Found Cometary Fragments as Part of the Ejecta Suite?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, L. E.; Abbott, D. H.; Breger, D.

    2011-12-01

    Analysis using light microscopy, analytical scanning electron microscopy, and measurements of the magnetic susceptibility of five sediment cores (MD 28-MD 32) from the Gulf of Carpentaria have revealed that each has had an impact layer less than a centimeter (10s to 100s of micrometers) thick prior to bioturbation. The present stratigraphic thickness of the impact layer (result of bioturbation) within every core was determined based on whether or not we had observed at least one of the following impact ejecta: FeNiCrCl (a recent discovery), metallic spherules (some of which consisted of Fe and Ni), or chlorinated hydrocarbon; the highest peak of magnetic susceptibility correlated with the highest concentration of impact ejecta. We used modeling of the magnetic susceptibility of a hematite-calcium carbonate mixture to constrain the minimum thickness of the impact ejecta layer (prior to bioturbation). Until recently we had been unaware that the red, glassy, semi-spherules we found within the impact layer were in fact FeNiCrCl. Nickel is not abundant within the Earth's crust, thus it is highly likely that these fragments are cometary debris from an impact event within the Gulf of Carpentaria. Furthermore, SEM analysis has confirmed that the chlorinated hydrocarbon was not PVC contamination from the coring process; with such high levels of chlorine the results strongly suggest that the material was a by product of a marine water impact event. In addition, by using impact modeling we deduced that the observed impact ejecta layer could not have been transported via an impact generated tsunami. The model also predicts that the layer could have been produced by a cometary impact event (average velocity 51 km/s) that would have produced the 12 km crater at the site of the Tabban crater candidate.

  12. Impact Ejecta above an Unconformity in Hudson River Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, D. H.; Gogan, N.; Breger, D.

    2012-12-01

    We examined three Hudson River cores just above a step increase in density that we infer to be an erosional unconformity circa 2300 BP in age (Goodbred et al., 2006). Each core has a layer containing impact ejecta and marine microfossils that lies directly above the unconformity. As the river water is too fresh for marine organisms, there are no marine microfossils in the sediments above and below this unusual layer. The marine microfossils are pelagic and benthic foraminifera, radiolarians, and coccoliths. The impact ejecta include marine microfossils coated with Sn oxide, often in crystalline form. The Sn oxide coating contains quantitative levels of Ni as determined by microprobe analysis. Ni is a marker for extraterrestrial material. Sn oxide also appears as a coating on glauconite grains within the layer. Glauconite is highly unstable and only forms in a marine setting. Marine sediments on the continental shelf outside the mouth of the Hudson River contain abundant glauconite. We also found impact breccia containing flow-textured glass, shocked ilmenite, pyroxene, and K-feldspar. Some of the glass cemented impact breccias are enriched in pyrite. The layer above the unconformity increases in thickness towards the mouth of the Hudson. The water depth of the cores in some cases exceeds 10 meters. Because the flow depths of storm surges do not exceed 10 meters and are generally less than 3 meters, we can eliminate storm surge as a cause of the event. Alternatively, tsunamis can exhibit flow depths that exceed 10 meters, suggesting that the erosional event was produced by an impact-generated tsunami. The cores containing the unconformity are located between 27 and 41 km upstream from the mouth of the Hudson River.

  13. Distal ejecta from lunar impacts: Extensive regions of rocky deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandfield, Joshua L.; Cahill, Joshua T. S.; Carter, Lynn M.; Neish, Catherine D.; Patterson, G. Wesley; Williams, Jean-Pierre; Paige, David A.

    2017-02-01

    Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Diviner Radiometer, Mini-RF, and LRO Camera data were used to identify and characterize rocky lunar deposits that appear well separated from any potential source crater. Two regions are described: 1) A ∼18,000 km2 area with elevated rock abundance and extensive melt ponds and veneers near the antipode of Tycho crater (167.5°E, 42.5°N). This region has been identified previously, using radar and imaging data. 2) A much larger and more diffuse region, covering ∼730,000 km2, centered near 310°E, 35°S, containing elevated rock abundance and numerous granular flow deposits on crater walls. The rock distributions in both regions favor certain slope azimuths over others, indicating a directional component to the formation of these deposits. The spatial distribution of rocks is consistent with the arrival of ejecta from the west and northwest at low angles (∼10-30°) above the horizon in both regions. The derived age and slope orientations of the deposits indicate that the deposits likely originated as ejecta from the Tycho impact event. Despite their similar origin, the deposits in the two regions show significant differences in the datasets. The Tycho crater antipode deposit covers a smaller area, but the deposits are pervasive and appear to be dominated by impact melts. By contrast, the nearside deposits cover a much larger area and numerous granular flows were triggered. However, the features in this region are less prominent with no evidence for the presence of impact melts. The two regions appear to be surface expressions of a distant impact event that can modify surfaces across wide regions, resulting in a variety of surface morphologies. The Tycho impact event may only be the most recent manifestation of these processes, which likely have played a role in the development of the regolith throughout lunar history.

  14. Corvid meteoroids are not ejecta from the Giordano Bruno impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, A. W.

    1993-05-01

    The study points out three difficulties with the hypothesis of Hartung (1993) that the Corvid meteor system, observed only once in 1937, may be the return of the clump of ejecta from the formation of a lunar crater, specifically, an event recorded in the chronicles of Gervase of Canterbury on June 25, 1178, which Hartung (1976) previously suggested may be an eyewitness account of the formation of the lunar crater Giordano Bruno. On the basis of this, he predicts that another Corvid shower may be observed in 2003 or 2006. This hypothesis is rejected on the contention that it is implausible that a clump of ejecta could be launched into heliocentric orbit with a low enough dispersion in velocity among separate pieces that it would produce a meteor shower in just one year and not others. Subsequent perturbations by the earth on parts of the clump passing near the earth but not impacting would destroy the coherence of the clump on a time scale much shorter than the 759-yr interval proposed. There are so many orbits that could yield a shower after 759 yr that it is unlikely that a prediction of a return in a specific year would be correct.

  15. Corvid meteoroids are not ejecta from the Giordano Bruno impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, A. W.

    1993-01-01

    The study points out three difficulties with the hypothesis of Hartung (1993) that the Corvid meteor system, observed only once in 1937, may be the return of the clump of ejecta from the formation of a lunar crater, specifically, an event recorded in the chronicles of Gervase of Canterbury on June 25, 1178, which Hartung (1976) previously suggested may be an eyewitness account of the formation of the lunar crater Giordano Bruno. On the basis of this, he predicts that another Corvid shower may be observed in 2003 or 2006. This hypothesis is rejected on the contention that it is implausible that a clump of ejecta could be launched into heliocentric orbit with a low enough dispersion in velocity among separate pieces that it would produce a meteor shower in just one year and not others. Subsequent perturbations by the earth on parts of the clump passing near the earth but not impacting would destroy the coherence of the clump on a time scale much shorter than the 759-yr interval proposed. There are so many orbits that could yield a shower after 759 yr that it is unlikely that a prediction of a return in a specific year would be correct.

  16. Martian impact crater ejecta morphologies and their potential as indicators of subsurface volatile distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, Nadine G.

    1991-01-01

    Many martian impact craters ejecta morphologies suggestive of fluidization during ejecta emplacement. Impact into subsurface volatile reserviors (i.e., water, ice, CO2, etc.) is the mechanism favored by many scientists, although acceptance of this mechanism is not unanimous. In recent years, a number of studies were undertaken to better understand possible relationships between ejecta morphology and latitude, longitude, crater diameter, and terrain. These results suggest that subsurface volatiles do influence the formation of specific ejecta morphologies and may provide clues to the vertical and horizontal distribution of volatiles in more localized regions of Mars. The location of these volatile reservoirs will be important to humans exploring and settling Mars in the future. Qualitative descriptions of ejecta morphology and quantitative analyses of ejecta sinuosity and ejecta lobe areal extent from the basis of the studies. Ejecta morphology studies indicate that morphology is correlated with crater diameter and latitude, and, using depth-diameter relationships, these correlations strongly suggest that changes in morphology are related to transition among subsurface layers with varying amounts of volatiles. Ejecta sinuosity studies reveal correlations between degree of sinuosity (lobateness) and crater morphology, diameter, latitude, and terrain. Lobateness, together with variations in areal extent of the lobate ejecta blanket with morphology and latitude, probably depends most directly on the ejecta emplacement process. The physical parameters measured here can be compared with those predicted by existing ejecta emplacement models. Some of these parameters are best reproduced by models requiring incorporation of volatiles within the ejecta. However, inconsistencies between other parameters and the models indicate that more detailed modeling is necessary before the location of volatile reservoirs can be confidently predicted based on ejecta morphology studies

  17. Using Hydrocode Modelling to Track Ejecta from Oblique Hypervelocity Impacts onto Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, M. C.; Burchell, M.

    2012-03-01

    Hydrocode modelling has been implemented to track the ejecta from hypervelocity impacts of oblique impactors onto glass. This supports the ongoing Stardust ISPE as a method to aid discrimination between spacecraft secondary impacts and IDP/ISPs.

  18. Analysis of Regolith Simulant Ejecta Distributions from Normal Incident Hypervelocity Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David L.; Cooke, William; Suggs, Rob; Moser, Danielle E.

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has established the Constellation Program. The Constellation Program has defined one of its many goals as long-term lunar habitation. Critical to the design of a lunar habitat is an understanding of the lunar surface environment; of specific importance is the primary meteoroid and subsequent ejecta environment. The document, NASA SP-8013 'Meteoroid Environment Model Near Earth to Lunar Surface', was developed for the Apollo program in 1969 and contains the latest definition of the lunar ejecta environment. There is concern that NASA SP-8013 may over-estimate the lunar ejecta environment. NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) has initiated several tasks to improve the accuracy of our understanding of the lunar surface ejecta environment. This paper reports the results of experiments on projectile impact into powdered pumice and unconsolidated JSC-1A Lunar Mare Regolith simulant targets. Projectiles were accelerated to velocities between 2.45 and 5.18 km/s at normal incidence using the Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR). The ejected particles were detected by thin aluminum foil targets strategically placed around the impact site and angular ejecta distributions were determined. Assumptions were made to support the analysis which include; assuming ejecta spherical symmetry resulting from normal impact and all ejecta particles were of mean target particle size. This analysis produces a hemispherical flux density distribution of ejecta with sufficient velocity to penetrate the aluminum foil detectors.

  19. Mars impact ejecta in the regolith of Phobos: Bulk concentration and distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsley, Kenneth R.; Head, James W.

    2013-10-01

    The gravity of Mars and the observation of a thick Phobos regolith suggest that nearly all Phobos ejecta returns to Phobos and re-impacts on Phobos. Primary ejecta from Mars typically impacts Phobos at velocities of ~2-3 km/s and due to the low escape velocity from Phobos of ~4-10 m/s, ~95-99% of the secondary ejecta from Phobos is inserted into temporary orbits around Mars. Most Phobos ejecta fragments remain trapped in orbits around Mars for several days to several hundred years until they re-impact with Phobos and produce new generations of ejecta. Mars-orbiting Phobos ejecta fragments typically re-impact on opposite hemispheres of Phobos from their previous impact sites, and when combined with the typical conical dispersion pattern of impact ejecta, this suggests that just two or three generations of re-impacts on Phobos are sufficient to uniformly disperse Mars ejecta fragments globally across the geographic surface of Phobos. Due to the energy conversion inefficiencies of impact processes, subsequent re-impacts produce subsequent generations of ejecta with lower launch velocities, and a higher proportion of Phobos ejecta remains on Phobos. Once no new ejecta fragments are launched from Phobos at velocities that are greater than the local escape velocity from Phobos, no new Mars-orbiting ejecta are produced. While in orbit around Mars, particles of ejecta are perturbed by martian gravity and solar photon forces that combine to produce an increase in the orbital eccentricities, which preferentially alters the orbits of the smallest fragments. Dust fragments ≲300 µm are typically de-orbited to the atmosphere of Mars or to solar orbits within several years, whereas fragments ≳300 mm tend to remain in orbit until they re-impact with Phobos. The rapid removal of dust fragments ≲300 µm places a severe limit on their opportunities for a re-impact with Phobos and suggests a deficiency of dust grains ≲300 µm in the regolith of Phobos. For the present

  20. Energy and mass distributions of impact ejecta blankets on the moon and Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, T. J.; Okeefe, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    The paper applies previously calculated impact-induced flow fields (O'Keefe and Ahrens, 1977) resulting from interaction of 5-cm radius gabbroic anorthosite impactor with a half-space of the same material, at various velocities, to obtain mass and energy ejecta distributions. Whereas earlier results described the ejecta distribution from a 15 km/s impact of an iron object on the moon in terms of mass vs. distance, the present results describe, at a given distance from the impact, the energy content as a function of depth, i.e., the thermal structure of ejecta blankets. Pertinent computational methods are included, and several tables and plots supplement the text.

  1. NOx production and rainout from Chicxulub impact ejecta reentry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkos, Devon; Alexeenko, Alina; Kulakhmetov, Marat; Johnson, Brandon C.; Melosh, H. Jay

    2015-12-01

    The Chicxulub impact 66.0 Ma ago initiated the second biggest extinction in the Phanerozoic Eon. The cause of the concurrent oceanic nitrogen isotopic anomaly, however, remains elusive. The Chicxulub impactor struck the Yucatán peninsula, ejecting 2 × 1015 kg of molten and vaporized rock that reentered globally as approximately 1023 microscopic spherules. Here we report that modern techniques indicate that this ejecta generates 1.5 × 1014 moles of NOx, which is enough to cause the observed nitrogen enrichment of the basal layer. Additionally, reentry-based NO production would explain the anomalously heavy isotopic composition of the observed nitrogen. We include N, O, N2, O2, and NO species in simulations of nonequilibrium chemically reacting flow around a reentering spherule. We then determine the net production of NO from all the spherules and use turbulence models to determine how quickly this yield diffuses through the atmosphere. Upon reaching the stratosphere and troposphere, cloud moisture absorbs the NOx and forms nitric acid. We model this process and determine the acidity of the resulting precipitation, which peaks about 1 year after the impact. The precipitation ultimately reaches the upper ocean, where we assume that the well-mixed surface layer is 100 m deep. We then model the naturally occurring carbonate/bicarbonate buffer and determine the net pH. We find that insufficient NOx reaches the ocean to directly cause the observed end-Cretaceous oceanic extinction via acidification and buffer removal. However, the resulting nitrates are sufficient to explain the concurrent nitrogen isotopic anomaly and facilitate an end-Cretaceous algae bloom.

  2. Model calculations of the proximal and globally distributed distal ejecta from the Chicxulub impact crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durda, Daniel D.; Kring, David A.; Pierazzo, Elisabetta; Melosh, H. J.

    1997-03-01

    The origin of the K/T boundary sequence of impact ejecta of the Chicxulub impact crater has been reexamined by constructing a computer simulation of the launch and deposition of both low- and high-energy ejecta. The distribution of low- and high-energy ejecta following a vertical impact is illustrated based on 20,000 tracer particles. The distribution is also shown for a 25 deg oblique impact from the southeast. Most of the high-energy ejecta stays within 50,000 km of Earth, with several percent reaching 100,000 km or more before reentering the atmosphere. About 25 percent of the material reaccretes within 2 hrs, about 50 percent within 8 hrs, and about 75 percent within about 72 hrs. At least 20-30 percent of the ejected material escapes the Earth. The implications of these findings for the postimpact environment are considered.

  3. Properties of Ejecta Blanket Deposits Surrounding Morasko Meteorite Impact Craters (Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szokaluk, M.; Muszyński, A.; Jagodziński, R.; Szczuciński, W.

    2016-08-01

    Morasko impact craters are a record of the fall of a meteorite into the soft sediments. The presented results illustrate the geological structure of the area around the crater as well as providing evidence of the occurrence of ejecta blanket.

  4. Identification and Characterization of Well-Preserved Impact Ejecta Deposits Using THEMIS Global Infrared Mosaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, J. R.; Christensen, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) onboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft has been acquiring infrared observations of the Martian surface for nearly thirteen years. Daytime infrared images from the first twelve years of the mission have previously been used to generate a complete global mosaic, while nighttime infrared images have been used to generate a near-global mosaic between 60°N-60°S. A combined product has been generated by overlaying the daytime global mosaic with a colorized version of the nighttime global mosaic, resulting in a near-global map that can be used to more easily identify surface features with unique thermal characteristics.Well-preserved ejecta deposits associated with fresh impact craters are readily identifiable in the combined map by their characteristic nighttime temperature pattern, which is controlled by variations in the thermal inertia of the ejecta material. The pattern consists of relatively high thermal inertia material in and around the crater, an inner ejecta ring composed of intermediate thermal inertia material and an outer ejecta ring composed of low thermal inertia material.A near-global survey (60°N-60°S) of these well-preserved ejecta deposits has shown that the vast majority occur in a small region covering northern Terra Sirenum and eastern Daedalia Planum, with a smaller concentration present in Syria Planum. A comparison of THEMIS and Viking images has verified that the larger craters and ejecta deposits were present at the time of the Viking mission and are not the result of more recent impacts. The survey also identified similarly fresh impact craters across the planet that are lacking an outer ring of low thermal inertia ejecta material, possibly due to erosion of the original ejecta deposits. This suggests that local conditions in Terra Sirenum, Daedalia Planum and Syria Planum are favorable for the long-term preservation of the fine-grained component of fresh impact ejecta deposits.

  5. Corvid meteoroids are ejecta from the Giordano Bruno impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartung, J. B.

    1993-05-01

    Attention is given to Corvid meteoroids, with reference to a Corvid meteor shower observed in late June of 1937. On June 18, 1178, the upper horn of a crescent moon was reported to have split, with fire and sparks emanating from the division point. This report was interpreted to be a description of events related to the formation of the lunar crater Giordano Bruno. Corvid meteoroids are judged to be Giordano Bruno ejecta fragments based on similarities in their heliocentric positions, directions of motion, and speeds. Commensurability relationships between meteoroid/ejecta and earth-moon system orbital periods enable definitive predictions of Corvid showers in the years 2003 and/or 2006.

  6. Constraining planetary atmospheric density: application of heuristic search algorithms to aerodynamic modeling of impact ejecta trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. Y. C.; Shirzaei, M.

    2015-12-01

    Impact craters on the terrestrial planets are typically surrounded by a continuous ejecta blanket that the initial emplacement is via ballistic sedimentation. Following an impact event, a significant volume of material is ejected and falling debris surrounds the crater. Aerodynamics rule governs the flight path and determines the spatial distribution of these ejecta. Thus, for the planets with atmosphere, the preserved ejecta deposit directly recorded the interaction of ejecta and atmosphere at the time of impact. In this study, we develop a new framework to establish links between distribution of the ejecta, age of the impact and the properties of local atmosphere. Given the radial distance of the continuous ejecta extent from crater, an inverse aerodynamic modeling approach is employed to estimate the local atmospheric drags and density as well as the lift forces at the time of impact. Based on earlier studies, we incorporate reasonable value ranges for ejection angle, initial velocity, aerodynamic drag, and lift in the model. In order to solve the trajectory differential equations, obtain the best estimate of atmospheric density, and the associated uncertainties, genetic algorithm is applied. The method is validated using synthetic data sets as well as detailed maps of impact ejecta associated with five fresh martian and two lunar impact craters, with diameter of 20-50 m, 10-20 m, respectively. The estimated air density for martian carters range 0.014-0.028 kg/m3, consistent with the recent surface atmospheric density measurement of 0.015-0.020 kg/m3. This constancy indicates the robustness of the presented methodology. In the following, the inversion results for the lunar craters yield air density of 0.003-0.008 kg/m3, which suggest the inversion results are accurate to the second decimal place. This framework will be applied to older martian craters with preserved ejecta blankets, which expect to constrain the long-term evolution of martian atmosphere.

  7. Asteroid Impact Deflection and Assessment (AIDA) mission - Properties of Impact Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.; Fahnestock, Eugene G.; Schwartz, Stephen R.; Murdoch, Naomi; Asphaug, Erik; Cheng, Andrew F.; Housen, Kevin R.; Michel, Patrick; Miller, Paul L.; Stickle, Angela; Tancredi, Gonzalo; Vincent, Jean-Baptiste; Wuennemann, Kai; Yu, Yang; AIDA Impact Simulation Working Group

    2016-10-01

    The Asteroid Impact Deflection and Assessment (AIDA) mission is composed of NASA's Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) mission and ESA's Asteroid Impact Monitor (AIM) rendezvous mission. The DART spacecraft is designed to impact the small satellite of near-Earth asteroid 65803 Didymos in October 2022, while the in-situ AIM spacecraft observes. AIDA's Modeling and Simulation of Impact Outcomes Working Group is tasked with investigating properties of the debris ejected from the impact. The orbital evolution of this ejecta has important implications for observations that the AIM spacecraft will take as well as for the safety of the spacecraft itself. Ejecta properties including particle sizes, bulk densities, and velocities all depend on the poorly-known physical properties of Didymos' moon. The moon's density, internal strength, and especially its porosity have a strong effect on all ejecta properties. Making a range of assumptions, we perform a suite of numerical simulations to determine the fate of the ejected material; we will use simulation predictions to optimize AIM observations and safety. Ultimately, combining AIM's observations of the ejecta with detailed numerical simulations will help constrain key satellite parameters.We use distinct types of numerical tools to explore ejecta properties based on additional target parameters (different forms of friction, cohesion), e.g., the shock physics code iSALE, smoothed particle hydrodynamics codes, and the granular code PKDGRAV. Given the large discrepancy between the 6 km/s impact speed of DART and the moon's 6 cm/s escape speed, a great challenge will be to determine properties of the low-speed ejecta. Very low-speed material relevant to the safety of the AIM spacecraft and its ability to conduct its observations may loft from the crater at late stages of the impact process, or from other locations far from the impact site due to seismic energy propagation. The manner in which seismic waves manifests in

  8. Ejecta from experimental impact craters: Particle size distribution and fragmentation energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhl, Elmar; Sommer, Frank; Poelchau, Michael H.; Dresen, Georg; Kenkmann, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    The particle size distribution (PSD) of impact crater ejecta is an important parameter that is useful for understanding the formation of natural craters, the distribution of space debris, the influence of impact events on climate and energy partitioning in impact events. 11 impact experiments into dry and water-saturated sandstone were performed and analyzed. The experiments span a range of impact velocities from 2.5 to 5.3 km s-1 using projectile sizes from 2.5 to 12 mm. Kinetic impact energies between 874 and 80,338 J were achieved. Ejecta of these experiments was collected and the PSD was measured and quantified with power law fits. The resulting power law exponents lie between 2.54 and 2.74. Our results do not show an influence of impact energy or impact velocity on the PSD of impact ejecta. A significant increase in the PSD values was found from dry to water-saturated sandstone targets. We suggest that water saturation of the target has multiple effects on ejecta fragmentation. A comparison of our experimental data with data from the literature shows no correlation between the target material lithology and the ejecta PSD. Interestingly, literature data for disruption experiments revealed a strong influence imparted energy density on the D-values. PSD values were used to calculate the energy spent for target fragmentation and show that the fraction of impact energy used for comminution is in the lower single-digit percentage.

  9. Simulated meteorite impacts and volcanic explosions: Ejecta analyses and planetary implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gratz, A. J.; Nellis, W. J.

    1992-01-01

    Past cratering studies have focused primarily on crater morphology. However, important questions remain about the nature of crater deposits. Phenomena that need to be studied include the distribution of shock effects in crater deposits and crater walls; the origin of mono- and polymict breccia; differences between local and distal ejecta; deformation induced by explosive volcanism; and the production of unshocked, high-speed ejecta that could form the lunar and martian meteorites found on the Earth. To study these phenomena, one must characterize ejecta and crater wall materials from impacts produced under controlled conditions. New efforts at LLNL simulate impacts and volcanism and study resultant deformation. All experiments use the two-stage light-gas gun facility at LLNL to accelerate projectiles to velocities of 0.2 to 4.3 km/s, including shock pressures of 0.9 to 50 GPa. We use granite targets and novel experimental geometries to unravel cratering processes in crystalline rocks. We have thus far conducted three types of simulations: soft recovery of ejecta, 'frozen crater' experiments, and an 'artificial volcano. Our ejecta recovery experiments produced a useful separation of impactites. Material originally below the projectile remained trapped there, embedded in the soft metal of the flyer plate. In contrast, material directly adjacent to the projectile was jetted away from the impact, producing an ejecta cone that was trapped in the foam recovery fixture. We find that a significant component of crater ejecta shows no signs of strong shock; this material comes from the near-surface 'interference zone' surrounding the impact site. This phenomenon explains the existence of unshocked meteorites on the Earth of lunar and martian origin. Impact of a large bolide on neighboring planets will produce high-speed, weakly shocked ejecta, which may be trapped by the Earth's gravitational field. 'Frozen crater' experiments show that the interference zone is highly

  10. Inferences on the Emplacement Dynamics of Martian Impact Crater Ejecta: Constraints from Mola Topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvin, J. B.; Baloga, S. M.

    1998-01-01

    Lobate ejecta deposits surround many of the younger impact craters on Mars. Viking Orbiter images indicate the distal parts of the ejecta blankets of these lobate craters are characterized by ramparts. In the absence of detailed topographic data for characterizing the topology of these apparently fluidized ejecta deposits, physical models have relied upon their morphologic characteristics. The most widely accepted model for the formation of such rampart ejecta deposits on Mars invokes fluidization of the ejecta to produce one or more viscous flow lobes. The availability of high-precision topographic data from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter [4,51 facilitates a more quantitative examination of the physical processes involved in the formation of rampart ejecta deposits on Mars. Here we investigate the emplacement constraints that can be developed from the dimensions, topography, and morphology of martian rampart craters. The primary assumptions we have adopted are: (1) the ejecta blanket is emplaced as a continuum flow over the martian surface, rather than an airfall deposit, and (2) that the observable dimensions of the deposits are indicative of flow dimensions during emplacement.

  11. Comparison of Ejecta Distributions from Normal Incident Hypervelocity Impact on Lunar Regolith Simulant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David L.; Cooke, William; Scruggs, Rob; Moser, Danielle E.

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is progressing toward long-term lunar habitation. Critical to the design of a lunar habitat is an understanding of the lunar surface environment; of specific importance is the primary meteoroid and subsequent ejecta environment. The document, NASA SP-8013, was developed for the Apollo program and is the latest definition of the ejecta environment. There is concern that NASA SP-8013 may over-estimate the lunar ejecta environment. NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) has initiated several tasks to improve the accuracy of our understanding of the lunar surface ejecta environment. This paper reports the results of experiments on projectile impact into powered pumice and unconsolidated JSC-1A Lunar Mare Regolith stimulant (JSC-1A) targets. The Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR) was used to accelerate projectiles to velocities in excess of 5 km/s and impact the targets at normal incidence. The ejected particles were detected by thin aluminum foil targets placed around the impact site and angular distributions were determined for ejecta. Comparison of ejecta angular distribution with previous works will be presented. A simplistic technique to characterize the ejected particles was formulated and improvements to this technique will be discussed for implementation in future tests.

  12. Transfer of Impact Ejecta Material from the Surface of Mars to Phobos and Deimos

    PubMed Central

    Melosh, Henry J.; Vaquero, Mar; Howell, Kathleen C.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The Russian Phobos-Grunt spacecraft originally planned to return a 200 g sample of surface material from Phobos to Earth. Although it was anticipated that this material would mainly be from the body of Phobos, there is a possibility that such a sample may also contain material ejected from the surface of Mars by large impacts. An analysis of this possibility is completed by using current knowledge of aspects of impact cratering on the surface of Mars and the production of high-speed ejecta that might reach Phobos or Deimos. Key Words: Impact cratering—Ejecta transfer—Phobos. Astrobiology 13, 963–980. PMID:24131246

  13. Modeling the Ballistic Behavior of Solid Ejecta from the Deep Impact Cratering Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, J. E.; Melosh, H. J.

    2006-03-01

    We describe results from a forward model of the first-order, solid ejecta particle behavior from the impact produced by the Deep Impact mission. The expansion rate of the plume places constraints on the gravity field, mass, and density of Tempel 1.

  14. A new look at lunar impact craters provides insights into ejecta and melt emplacement on the terrestrial planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osinski, G. R.; Grieve, R. A.; Tornabene, L. L.

    2011-12-01

    Impact cratering is one of the most fundamental processes responsible for shaping the surfaces of solid planetary bodies. Even on Earth, where the impact record is sparse, it is now apparent that impact events also have played an important role throughout Earth's history, shaping the geological landscape, affecting the evolution of life and producing economic benefits. It is widely acknowledged that the Moon provides a unique natural laboratory for studying the impact processes on planetary scales. One of the most important, but least understood aspects of impact cratering is the generation and emplacement of impact ejecta. In this contribution, we utilize new high-resolution imagery of lunar craters in addition to observations of terrestrial impact structures. Current models of ejecta emplacement do not account for several important observations of ejecta deposits on the terrestrial planets, in particular, the presence of more than one layer of ejecta. On the Moon, this addional ejecta layer takes the form of impact melt ponds on the rim terraces of complex lunar craters and overlying parts of the continuous ejecta blanket. It is also notable that there is also no universal model for the origin and emplacement of ejecta on different planetary bodies. We present a unifying working hypothesis for the origin and emplacement of ejecta on the terrestrial planets, in which the ejecta are emplaced in a multi-stage process. The generation of the continuous ejecta blanket occurs during the excavation stage of cratering, via the conventional ballistic sedimentation and radial flow model. This is followed by the emplacement of more melt-rich, ground-hugging flows - the "surface melt flow" phase - during the terminal stages of crater excavation and the modification stage of crater formation. Minor fallback occurs during the final stages of crater formation. Several factors will affect the final morphology and character of ejecta deposits. The volatile content and cohesiveness

  15. Upper Eocene tektite and impact ejecta layer on the Continental Slope off New Jersey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, B. P.; Koeberl, C.; Blum, J. D.; McHugh, C. M. G.

    1998-03-01

    During Leg 150 of the Ocean Drilling Project (ODP) two sites (903C and 904A) were cored which have sediments of the same biostratigraphic age as the upper Eocene tektite-bearing ejecta layer at Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Site 612. Core 45X from ODP Site 904A (~ 4 km north of Site 612) contains a 5-cm-thick tektite-bearing ejecta layer and Core 56 from Site 903C (~ 8 km north-northwest of Site 904) contains a 2-cm-thick layer of impact ejecta without any tektite or impact glass. Shocked quartz and feldspar grains, with multiple sets of planar deformation features, and abundant coesite-bearing grains are present at both sites. The major oxide contents, trace element compositions, and rare earth element patterns of the Site 904 tektites are similar to those of the Site 612 tektites and to North American tektites (especially bediasites). The Sr and Nd values for one composite tektite sample from Site 904 fall within the range previously obtained for the Site 612 tektites, which defines a linear trend that, if extrapolated, would intersect the values obtained for North American tektites. The water contents of eight tektite fragments from Site 904 range from 0.017 to 0.098 wt. %, and, thus, are somewhat higher than is typical for tektites. The heavy mineral assemblages of the 63 - 125 m size fractions from the ejecta layers at Sites 612, 903, and 904 are all similar. Therefore, we conclude that the ejecta layer at all three sites are from the same impact event and that the tektites at Sites 904 and 612 belong to the North American tektite strewn field. Clinopyroxene-bearing (cpx) spherules occur below, or in the lower part of, the main ejecta layer at all three sites. At all three sites the cpx spherules have been partly or completely replaced with pyrite which preserved the original crystalline textures. Site 612, 903, and 904 cpx spherules are similar to those found in the Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, central equatorial Pacific, western equatorial Pacific, and

  16. Exploring hotspots of pneumococcal pneumonia and potential impacts of ejecta dust exposure following the Christchurch earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Amber L; Kingham, Simon; Mitchell, Peter; Apparicio, Philippe

    2013-12-01

    The etiology of pneumococcal pneumonia (PP) is well-known. Yet, some events may increase its incidence. Natural disasters may worsen air quality, a risk factor for PP. We investigated spatial/spatio-temporal clustering of PP pre- and post-earthquakes in Christchurch, New Zealand. The earthquakes resulted in deaths, widespread damage and liquefaction ejecta (a source of air-borne dust). We tested for clusters and associations with ejecta, using 97 cases (diagnosed 10/2008-12/2011), adjusted for age and area-level deprivation. The strongest evidence to support the potential role of ejecta in clusters of PP cases was the: (1) geographic shift in the spatio-temporal cluster after deprivation adjustment to match the post-earthquake clusters and; (2) increased relative risk in the fully-adjusted post-earthquake compared to the pre-earthquake cluster. The application of spatial statistics to study PP and ejecta are novel. Further studies to assess the long-term impacts of ejecta inhalation are recommended particularly in Christchurch, where seismic activity continues.

  17. Microtektites on Mars: Volume and Texture of Distal Impact Ejecta Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    2000-04-01

    Microtektites, small blobs of ejecta formed in the shock melt and vapor plume of an impact, can be dispersed far from the source crater only if the impact is violent enough for the ejecta plume to pierce the atmosphere; they are therefore formed in far smaller (and more numerous) impact events on Mars than on Venus and Earth, which have thicker atmospheres. Microtektite abundances from the Chicxulub and Bosumtwi craters on Earth suggest that the volume of this material is ˜5 × 10 -5Dc3.74 km 3, with Dc the crater diameter in kilometers, similar to the observed volumes of the dark parabolic ejecta deposits on Venus. Corresponding volumes on Mars are ˜2.5 × smaller, but even so this result implies that even only a 15-km crater can produce a layer of microtektites with a global average thickness on Mars of 40 microtektites per square centimeter. I use a trajectory code and a thermal model to show that these particles are easily dispersed globally on Mars and that micrometeoroids of the same size will be unmelted by reentry heating. The uniform size and glassy texture of microtektites may allow such ejecta layers to be identified by the remote arm cameras on Mars landers, particularly in the polar layered terrain where they may be preserved against abrasion.

  18. Highly comminuted lunar impact ejecta: Earth-based radar and LRO DIVINER observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghent, R. R.; Campbell, B. A.; Pithawala, T.

    2008-09-01

    Introduction Recent work [1-3] using Earth-based radar measurements has shown that large impacts on the Moon produce a distinct facies of highly comminuted ejecta depleted in fragments >10 cm in diameter, forming concentric radar-dark haloes around the source craters and representing a mantling layer on the order of 10m thick. We have also recently observed similar haloes of fine ejecta surrounding Martian craters >5 km in diameter, characterized by micron- to mm-sized particles. Preliminary measurements suggest that the lunar and Martian fine ejecta haloes are geometrically similar: that is, they scale in much the same way with respect to their source craters. This implies that a) the comminution process and emplacement of ejecta on the two planets occur in similar ways; and b) like the Martian case, the lunar crater haloes also have a thin mantling layer of very fine particles, which cannot be detected using Earth-based radar. Because of their extensive spatial coverage and high resolution, LRO DIVINER measurements will provide the first opportunity to bridge this gap and to more completely characterize the rock size distribution represented in lunar continuous ejecta. Radar remote sensing of fine-grained ejecta haloes Fine-grained lunar ejecta haloes were first observed [4], and later studied in detail [1-3], using Earth-based delay-Doppler radar imagery at 70-cm wavelength. Recent observations in two circular polarizations have been made using the Arecibo telescope in Puerto Rico and the Greenbank telescope in West Virginia in a bistatic geometry [5; Campbell et al., IEEE]. In general, the radar backscatter of the lunar regolith is comprised of echoes from the surface, rocks suspended within the fine-grained matrix, and a possible basal regolith interface. The relative importance of each of these components varies with radar wavelength and is a function of surface roughness, surface and volume rock populations, the depth and dielectric properties of the matrix

  19. Ejecta Pattern of the Impact of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pankine, Alexey A.; Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    1999-01-01

    The collision of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 (SL 9) with Jupiter created crescent-shaped ejecta patterns around impact sites. Although the observed impact plumes rose through a similar height of approx.3000 km, the radii of the created ejects patterns differ from impact to impact and generally are larger for larger impacts. The azimuthal angle of the symmetry axis of the ejects pattern is larger than that predicted by the models of oblique impacts, due to the action of the Coriolis force that rotates ejecta patterns counterclockwise from the south. We study the formation of ejects patterns using a simple model of ballistic plume above a rotating plane. The ejected particles follow ballistic trajectories and slide horizontally for about an hour after reentry into the jovian atmosphere. The lateral expansion of the plume is stopped by the friction force, which is assumed to be proportional to the square of the horizontal velocity. Two different mass-velocity distributions used in the simulations produce qualitatively similar results. The simulated ejecta patterns fit very well the "crescents" observed at the impact sites. The sizes and azimuthal angles of symmetry axis of ejects patterns depend on a parameter L, which has dimension of length and is related to the mass of the fragment. Thus more massive impacts produce larger ejects patterns that are rotated through a wider angle.

  20. Measurement of Primary Ejecta From Normal Incident Hypervelocity Impact on Lunar Regolith Simulant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David L.; Cooke, William; Moser, Danielle; Swift, Wesley

    2007-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) continues to make progress toward long-term lunar habitation. Critical to the design of a lunar habitat is an understanding of the lunar surface environment. A subject for further definition is the lunar primary ejecta environment. The document NASA SP-8013 was developed for the Apollo program and is the latest definition of the primary ejecta environment. There is concern that NASA SP-8013 may over-estimate the lunar primary ejecta environment. NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) has initiated several tasks to improve the accuracy of our understanding of the lunar surface primary ejecta environment. This paper reports the results of experiments on projectile impact into pumice targets, simulating lunar regolith. The Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR) was used to accelerate spherical Pyrex projectiles of 0.29g to velocities ranging between 2.5 km/s and 5.18 km/s. Impact on the pumice target occurred at normal incidence. The ejected particles were detected by thin aluminum foil targets placed around the pumice target in a 0.5 Torr vacuum. A simplistic technique to characterize the ejected particles was formulated. Improvements to this technique will be discussed for implementation in future tests.

  1. Impact ejecta-induced melting of surface ice deposits on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, David K.; Head, James W.

    2016-12-01

    Fluvial features present around impact craters on Mars can offer insight into the ancient martian climate and its relationship to the impact cratering process. The widespread spatial and temporal distribution of surface ice on Mars suggests that the interaction between impact cratering and surface ice could have been a relatively frequent occurrence. We explore the thermal and melting effects on regional surface ice sheets in this case, where an impact event occurs in regional surface ice deposits overlying a regolith/bedrock target. We provide an estimate for the post-impact temperature of martian ejecta as a function of crater diameter, and conduct thermal modeling to assess the degree to which contact melting of hot ejecta superposed on surface ice deposits can produce meltwater and carve fluvial features. We also evaluate whether fluvial features could form as a result of basal melting of the ice deposits in response to the thermal insulation provided by the overlying impact ejecta. Contact melting is predicted to occur immediately following ejecta emplacement over the course of hundreds of years to tens of kyr. Basal melting initiates when the 273 K isotherm rises through the crust and reaches the base of the ice sheet ∼0.1 to ∼1 Myr following the impact. We assess the range of crater diameters predicted to produce contact and basal melting of surface ice sheets, as well as the melt fluxes, volumes, timescales, predicted locations of melting (relative to the crater), and the associated hydraulic and hydrologic consequences. We find that the heat flux and surface temperature conditions required to produce contact melting are met throughout martian history, whereas the heat flux and surface temperature conditions to produce basal melting are met only under currently understood ancient martian thermal conditions. For an impact into a regional ice sheet, the contact and basal melting mechanisms are predicted to generate melt volumes between ∼10-1 and 105 km3

  2. Meteorite impact ejecta: dependence of mass and energy lost on planetary escape velocity.

    PubMed

    O'keefe, J D; Ahrens, T J

    1977-12-23

    The calculated energy efficiency of mass ejection for iron and anorthosite objects striking an anorthosite planet at speeds of 5 to 45 kilometers per second decreases with increasing impact velocity at low escape velocities. At escape velocities of >10(5) and >2 x 10(4) centimeters per second, respectively, the slower impactors produce relatively less ejecta for a given impact energy. The impact velocities at which ejecta losses equal meteorite mass gains are found to be approximately 20, 35, and 45 kilometers per second for anorthosite objects and approximately 25, 35, and 40 kilometers per second for iron objects striking anorthosite surfaces for the gravity fields of the moon, Mercury, and Mars.

  3. Impact ejecta and carbonate sequence in the eastern sector of the Chicxulub crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, Jaime; Chavez-Aguirre, Jose Maria; Pérez-Cruz, Ligia; De la Rosa, Jose Luis

    2008-12-01

    The Chicxulub 200 km diameter crater located in the Yucatan platform of the Gulf of Mexico formed 65 Myr ago and has since been covered by Tertiary post-impact carbonates. The sediment cover and absence of significant volcanic and tectonic activity in the carbonate platform have protected the crater from erosion and deformation, making Chicxulub the only large multi-ring crater in which ejecta is well preserved. Ejecta deposits have been studied by drilling/coring in the southern crater sector and at outcrops in Belize, Quintana Roo and Campeche; little information is available from other sectors. Here, we report on the drilling/coring of a section of ˜34 m of carbonate breccias at 250 m depth in the Valladolid area (120 km away from crater center), which are interpreted as Chicxulub proximal ejecta deposits. The Valladolid breccias correlate with the carbonate breccias cored in the Peto and Tekax boreholes to the south and at similar radial distance. This constitutes the first report of breccias in the eastern sector close to the crater rim. Thickness of the Valladolid breccias is less than that at the other sites, which may indicate erosion of the ejecta deposits before reestablishment of carbonate deposition. The region east of the crater rim appears different from regions to the south and west, characterized by high density and scattered distribution of sinkholes.

  4. Observations of ejecta clouds produced by impacts onto Saturn's rings.

    PubMed

    Tiscareno, Matthew S; Mitchell, Colin J; Murray, Carl D; Di Nino, Daiana; Hedman, Matthew M; Schmidt, Jürgen; Burns, Joseph A; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N; Porco, Carolyn C; Beurle, Kevin; Evans, Michael W

    2013-04-26

    We report observations of dusty clouds in Saturn's rings, which we interpret as resulting from impacts onto the rings that occurred between 1 and 50 hours before the clouds were observed. The largest of these clouds was observed twice; its brightness and cant angle evolved in a manner consistent with this hypothesis. Several arguments suggest that these clouds cannot be due to the primary impact of one solid meteoroid onto the rings, but rather are due to the impact of a compact stream of Saturn-orbiting material derived from previous breakup of a meteoroid. The responsible interplanetary meteoroids were initially between 1 centimeter and several meters in size, and their influx rate is consistent with the sparse prior knowledge of smaller meteoroids in the outer solar system.

  5. Impact ejecta at the Paleocene-Eocene boundary.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Morgan F; Fung, Megan K; Wright, James D; Katz, Miriam E; Kent, Dennis V

    2016-10-14

    Extraterrestrial impacts have left a substantial imprint on the climate and evolutionary history of Earth. A rapid carbon cycle perturbation and global warming event about 56 million years ago at the Paleocene-Eocene (P-E) boundary (the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum) was accompanied by rapid expansions of mammals and terrestrial plants and extinctions of deep-sea benthic organisms. Here, we report the discovery of silicate glass spherules in a discrete stratigraphic layer from three marine P-E boundary sections on the Atlantic margin. Distinct characteristics identify the spherules as microtektites and microkrystites, indicating that an extraterrestrial impact occurred during the carbon isotope excursion at the P-E boundary.

  6. Impact ejecta at the Paleocene-Eocene boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, Morgan F.; Fung, Megan K.; Wright, James D.; Katz, Miriam E.; Kent, Dennis V.

    2016-10-01

    Extraterrestrial impacts have left a substantial imprint on the climate and evolutionary history of Earth. A rapid carbon cycle perturbation and global warming event about 56 million years ago at the Paleocene-Eocene (P-E) boundary (the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum) was accompanied by rapid expansions of mammals and terrestrial plants and extinctions of deep-sea benthic organisms. Here, we report the discovery of silicate glass spherules in a discrete stratigraphic layer from three marine P-E boundary sections on the Atlantic margin. Distinct characteristics identify the spherules as microtektites and microkrystites, indicating that an extraterrestrial impact occurred during the carbon isotope excursion at the P-E boundary.

  7. Geochemistry and Stratigraphy of the Cretaceous/tertiary Boundary Impact Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrand, Alan Russell

    1992-01-01

    An array of stratigraphic, chemical, isotopic, and mineralogical evidence indicates that an impact terminated the Cretaceous Period. The 180-km-diameter Chicxulub crater, which now lies buried on the Yucatan peninsula of Mexico, was probably formed by the impact. The impactor was probably a long-period comet. Shock devolatization of the thick carbonate/evaporite sequence impacted at Chicxulub probably led to a severe and long-lasting greenhouse warming and a prompt pulse of sulfuric acid rain. The fallout of crater ejecta formed two layers: a lower layer which varies in thickness following a power -law relation based on distance from the Chicxulub crater and an upper, globally-distributed, uniformly ~3-mm-thick layer. The upper layer probably represents the fallout of condensates and entrained solid and liquid particles which were distributed globally by the impact fireball. The lower layer consists of brecciated rock and impact melt near the crater and largely altered tektites far from the crater. The clasts of this layer were probably ballistically transported. The Raton, New Mexico K/T boundary section preserves the fireball and ejecta layers in a coal-free nonmarine environment. Siderophile, chalcophile, and lithophile trace element anomalies occur similar to those found at marine K/T boundary localities. Soot occurs peaking in the 3-mm-thick fireball layer and the immediately overlying 3 mm of sediment, implying prompt burning of the Cretaceous forests. The Brazos River, Texas continental-shelf K/T sections preserve coarse boundary sediments which were probably produced by impact waves. Siderophile and chalcophile trace-element anomalies occur suggesting that the fireball layer and possibly part of the ejecta layer are interbedded with the coarse boundary sediments. The Beloc, Haiti deep-sea K/T sections preserve a thick ejecta sequence including altered and unaltered tektites and shocked minerals capped by the fireball layer. The thick K/T ejecta preserved at

  8. Experimental hypervelocity impact into quartz sand - Distribution and shock metamorphism of ejecta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeffler, D.; Gault, D. E.; Wedekind, J.; Polkowski, G.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented for vertical impacts of 0.3-g cylindrical plastic projectiles into noncohesive quartz sand in which vertical and horizontal reference strate were employed by using layers of colored sand. The impacts were performed at velocities of 5.9-6.9 km/sec with a vertical gun ballistic range. The craters, 30-33 cm in diameter, reveal a radial decay of the ejecta mass per unit area with a power of -2.8 to -3.5. Material displaced from the upper 15% of the crater depth d is represented within the whole ejecta blanked, material from deeper than 28% of d is deposited inside 2 crater radii, and no material from deeper than 33% of d was ejected beyond the crater rim. Shock-metamorphosed particles (glassy agglutinates, cataclastic breccias, and comminuted quartz) amount to some 4% of the total displaced mass and indicate progressive zones of decay of shock intensity from a peak pressure of 300 kbar. The shock-metamorphosed particles and the shock-induced change in the grain size distribution of ejected samples have close analogies to the basic characteristics of the lunar regolith. Possible applications to regolith formation and to ejecta formations of large-scale impact craters are discussed.

  9. Initial Observations of Lunar Impact Melts and Ejecta Flows with the Mini-RF Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Lynn M.; Neish, Catherine D.; Bussey, D. B. J.; Spudis, Paul D.; Patterson, G. Wesley; Cahill, Joshua T.; Raney, R. Keith

    2011-01-01

    The Mini-RF radar on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter's spacecraft has revealed a great variety of crater ejecta flow and impact melt deposits, some of which were not observed in prior radar imaging. The craters Tycho and Glushko have long melt flows that exhibit variations in radar backscatter and circular polarization ratio along the flow. Comparison with optical imaging reveals that these changes are caused by features commonly seen in terrestrial lava flows, such as rafted plates, pressure ridges, and ponding. Small (less than 20 km) sized craters also show a large variety of features, including melt flows and ponds. Two craters have flow features that may be ejecta flows caused by entrained debris flowing across the surface rather than by melted rock. The circular polarization ratios (CPRs) of the impact melt flows are typically very high; even ponded areas have CPR values between 0.7-1.0. This high CPR suggests that deposits that appear smooth in optical imagery may be rough at centimeter- and decimeter- scales. In some places, ponds and flows are visible with no easily discernable source crater. These melt deposits may have come from oblique impacts that are capable of ejecting melted material farther downrange. They may also be associated with older, nearby craters that no longer have a radar-bright proximal ejecta blanket. The observed morphology of the lunar crater flows has implications for similar features observed on Venus. In particular, changes in backscatter along many of the ejecta flows are probably caused by features typical of lava flows.

  10. Meteoroid Impact Ejecta Detection by Nanosatellites for Asteroid Surface Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, N.; Close, S.; Goel, A.

    2015-12-01

    Asteroids are constantly bombarded by much smaller meteoroids at extremely high speeds, which results in erosion of the material on the asteroid surface. Some of this material is vaporized and ionized, forming a plasma that is ejected into the environment around the asteroid where it can be detected by a constellation of closely orbiting nanosatellites. We present a concept to leverage this natural phenomenon and to analyze this excavated material using low-power plasma sensors on nanosatellites in order to determine the composition of the asteroid surface. This concept would enable a constellation of nanosatellites to provide useful data complementing existing techniques such as spectroscopy, which require larger and more power-hungry sensors. Possible mission architectures include precursor exploratory missions using nanosatellites to survey and identify asteroid candidates worthy of further study by a large spacecraft, or simultaneous exploration by a nanosatellite constellation with a larger parent spacecraft to decrease the time required to cover the entire asteroid surface. The use of meteoroid impact plasma to analyze the surface composition of asteroids will not only produce measurements that have not been previously obtained, including the molecular composition of the surface, but will also yield a better measurement of the meteoroid flux in the vicinity of the asteroid. Current meteoroid models are poorly constrained beyond the orbit of Mars, due to scarcity of data. If this technology is used to survey asteroids in the main belt, it will offer a dramatic increase in the availability of meteoroid flux measurements in deep space, identifying previously unknown meteoroid streams and providing additional data to support models of solar system dust dynamics.

  11. Scenario Of The 4 kyr Extraterrestrial Impact : Crater Location, Ejecta-Dispersion and Consequences.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courty, M.; Abbott, D. H.; Cortese, G.; Crisci, A.; Crosta, X.; de Wever, P.; Fedoroff, M.; Greenwood, P.; Grice, K.; Mermoux, M.; Scharer, U.; Smith, D. C.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2006-12-01

    The 4 kyr BP impact event has been identified from deep-sea, soil and archaeological records as the worldwide pulverisation of a volatile-rich debris jet(1). High resolution sequences show two stages of ejecta fallout linked to the impact-triggered doublet gaseous regime(2): scattered solid debris at the ground surface and spray of the vaporized hot fireball with thermal blast and local ignition. Ejecta debris consist of flow- textured impact glass, impact breccia and incompletely melted marine clasts: volcano-clastic sandy mudstone, calcareous mud, granite-gneiss, schists, volcanic breccia, kerogen and algal mud. Marine microfossils, organo-mineral markers, and the debris-fallout spatial pattern indicate two potential impact craters: an Antarctic source with an admixture of volcanic glass and ice rafted debris, from the vicinity of Heard Island and the Kerguelen plateau; a low latitude, shallow water one with hydrocarbons possibly from the Gulf of Mexico. Fine mixing of target materials from far distant source craters emphasizes a unique impact-ejecta. This matches the theoretical view of a debris jet channelled along the corridor cut through the atmosphere by the incoming projectile, raised upward, and dispersed widely(3). The isotopic anomaly of the sulphur phase in the kerogen volatile-component, indicating mass independent fractionation due to photolytic transformation, suggests launching at great heights, beyond the O2-O3 UV shield, responsible for climate disturbances. The incomplete melting of target rocks and global dispersion of impact breccia out of the craters would result from splash of small-sized projectile at rather great water depth and a low angle impact (10-15 degrees) into porous, highly compressible marine sediments. The spatially variable distribution of the organo-mineral and melt components, and the wide range of phase transformation reflect nonequilibrium shock-melting and micro-scale thermal processes in the heterogeneous vapor plume

  12. Transfer of impact ejecta material from the surface of Mars to Phobos and Deimos.

    PubMed

    Chappaz, Loïc; Melosh, Henry J; Vaquero, Mar; Howell, Kathleen C

    2013-10-01

    The Russian Phobos-Grunt spacecraft originally planned to return a 200 g sample of surface material from Phobos to Earth. Although it was anticipated that this material would mainly be from the body of Phobos, there is a possibility that such a sample may also contain material ejected from the surface of Mars by large impacts. An analysis of this possibility is completed by using current knowledge of aspects of impact cratering on the surface of Mars and the production of high-speed ejecta that might reach Phobos or Deimos.

  13. The acraman impact structure: source of ejecta in late precambrian shales, South australia.

    PubMed

    Williams, G E

    1986-07-11

    A major probable impact structure occurs in middle Proterozoic dacitic volcanics in the Gawler Ranges, central South Australia. The structure has an inner depressed area about 30 kilometers in diameter that contains the Lake Acraman salina, an intermediate depression or ring about 90 kilometers in diameter, and a possible outer ring approximately 160 kilometers in diameter. Outcrops of dacite in Lake Acraman are intensely shattered and contain shatter cones and multiple sets of shock lamellac in quartz grains. The Acraman structure is the largest probable impact structure known in Australia and is the likely source of dacitic ejecta found in late Precambrian marine shales some 300 kilometers to the east.

  14. Striations, Polish, and Related Features from Clasts in Impact-Ejecta Deposits and the "Tillite Problem"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampino, M. R.; Ernstson, K.; Anguita, F.; Claudin F.

    1997-01-01

    Proximal ejecta deposits related to three large terrestrial impacts, the 14.8-Ma Ries impact structure in Germany (the Bunte Breccia), the 65-Ma Chicxulub impact structure in the Yucatan (the Albion and Pook's Hill Diamictites in Belize) and the mid-Tertiary Azuara impact structure in Spain (the Pelarda Fm.) occur in the form of widespread debris-flow deposits most likely originating from ballistic processes. These impact-related diamictites typically are poorly sorted, containing grain sizes from clay to large boulders and blocks, and commonly display evidence of mass flow, including preferred orientation of long axes of clasts, class imbrication, flow noses, plugs and pods of coarse debris, and internal shear planes. Clasts of various lithologies show faceting, various degrees of rounding, striations (including nailhead striae), crescentic chattermarks, mirror-like polish, percussion marks, pitting, and penetration features. Considering the impact history of the Earth, it is surprising that so few ballistic ejecta, deposits have been discovered, unless the preservation potential is extremely low, or such materials exist but have been overlooked or misidentified as other types of geologic deposits . Debris-flow diamictites of various kinds have been reported in the geologic record, but these are commonly attributed to glaciation based on the coarse and poorly sorted nature of the deposits and, in many cases, on the presence of clasts showing features considered diagnostic of glacial action, including striations of various kinds, polish, and pitting. These diamictites are the primary evidence for ancient ice ages. We present evidence of the surface features on clasts from known proximal ejecta debris-flow deposits and compare these features with those reported in diamictites. interpreted as ancient glacial deposits (tillites). Our purpose is to document the types of features seen on clasts in diamictites of ejecta origin in order to help in the interpretation of

  15. Meteorite impact ejecta - Dependence of mass and energy lost on planetary escape velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okeefe, J. D.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1977-01-01

    The amounts of material and energy which escape a planet in a meteorite impact event is calculated as functions of impact and escape velocities. Results are obtained from the computed flow induced by the impact of iron and gabbroic anorthosite spheres onto a half-space of anorthosite at impact velocities of 5 to 45 km/sec. The impact-induced flows were determined by a numerical method using the mass, momentum, and energy conservation relations in finite-difference approximation, within an Eulerian computational grid. The impact velocities at which ejecta losses equal meteorite mass gains are found to be approximately 20, 35, and 45 km/sec for anorthosite objects and approximately 25, 35, and 40 km/sec for iron objects striking anorthosite surfaces for the gravity fields of the moon, Mercury and Mars.

  16. Iridium Concentrations and Abundances of Meteoritic Ejecta from the Eltanin Impact in Sediment Cores from Polarstern Expedition ANT XII/4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyte, Frank T.

    2002-01-01

    The abundances of meteoritic ejecta from the Eltanin asteroid impact have been examined in several sediment cores recovered by the FS Polarstern during expedition ANT XII/4 using elemental concentrations of iridium and weights of coarse ejecta debris. Three cores with well-preserved impact deposits, PS204-1, PS2708-1, and PS2709-1, each contain Ir and ejecta fluences similar to those found in USNS Eltanin core E13-4. Small Ir anomalies and traces of ejecta were found in cores PS2706-1 and PS2710-1, but since these cores lack well-defined deposits, these are considered to be reworked and not representative of the fallout. No evidence of ejecta was found in cores PS2802-1 and PS2705-1. These results confirm earlier speculation that the Eltanin impact resulted in deposits of ejecta with up to 1 gram/sq centimeter of depris over a wide area of the ocean floor. However, there are sill large uncertainties over the actual regional or global extent of this unique sediment deposit.

  17. An Impact Sensor System for the Characterization of the Micrometeoroid and Lunar Secondary Ejecta Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J.-C.; Burchell, M.; Corsaro, R.; Giovane, F.; Stansbery, E.; Blum, Jurgen; Cooke, William; Pisacane, V.

    2009-01-01

    The Impact Sensor for Micrometeoroid and Lunar Secondary Ejecta (IMMUSE) project aims to apply and integrate previously demonstrated impact sensing subsystems to characterize the micrometeoroid and lunar secondary (MMSE) environment on the surface of the Moon. Once deployed, data returned from IMMUSE will benefit: (1) Fundamental Lunar Science: providing data to improve the understanding of lunar cratering processes and dynamics of the lunar regolith. (2) Lunar Exploration Applied Science: providing an accurate MMSE environment definition for reliable impact risk assessments, cost-effective shielding designs, and mitigation measures for long-term lunar exploration activities. (3) Planetary Science: providing micrometeoroid data to aid the understanding of asteroidal collisions and the evolution of comets. A well-established link between micrometeoroid impacts and lunar regolith is also key to understanding other regolith-covered bodies from remote-sensing data. The IMMUSE system includes two components: (1) a large area (greater than or equal to 1 m2) micrometeoroid detector based on acoustic impact and fiber optic displacement sensors and (2) a 100 cm2 lunar secondary ejecta detector consisting of dual-layer laser curtain and acoustic impact sensors. The combinations of different detection mechanisms will allow for a better characterization of the MMSE environment, including flux, particle size/mass, and impact velocity. IMMUSE is funded by the NASA LASER Program through 2012. The project fs goal is to reach a Technical Readiness Level of 4 in preparation for a more advanced development beyond 2012. Several prototype subsystems have been constructed and subjected to low impact and hypervelocity impact tests. The presentation will include a status review and preliminary test results.

  18. Shared origin for seven of Mars Trojans - impact ejecta from Mars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polishook, David; Jacobson, Seth A.; Aharonson, Oded

    2016-10-01

    Seven out of nine Mars Trojans belong to an orbital grouping that started to spread about 109 years ago (Cuk et al. 2015). We spectrally observed two of them (311999 and 385250) using the IRTF telescope and found that both present an identical olivine-rich reflectance spectrum, that is similar to the reflectance spectrum of (5261) Eureka, the largest of these seven Trojans (Rivkin et al. 2007). These measurements confirm the shared origin of the seven. Moreover, olivine-rich reflectance spectra is rare within asteroids, but is visible in numerous locations on Mars and is found within SNC meteorites that are argued to originate from Mars (Chassigny, ALHA77005; McSween 1985). This spectral resemblance encourages us to suggest that the seven Trojans are impact ejecta from Mars' plutonic rock. We will present dynamical calculations showing how the impact ejecta could have been caught in L5 and that there are enough size-relevant craters on Mars surface to produce these seven Trojans.

  19. Search for, and study of, paleozoic impact ejecta: Progress made during the past year

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Read, William F.

    1987-01-01

    Nodule-like objects which the author believes to be impact bombs had been found in Middle Ordovician rocks of southeastern Wisconsin and northern Illinois. In northern Illinois, rock fragments containing oolith-like spherules, which the author believes to be solidified impact droplets, and numerous large bubble-holes, had been found at the same stratigraphic level. The discovery of bomb-like nodules in Lower Ordovician rocks of southeastern Wisconsin was reported. Bomb-type nodules associated with droplet-type spherules have been found in Lower Ordovician rocks of central Pennsylvania. These discoveries, in the authors opinion, suffice to show that impact ejecta are widespread in marine sediments of Ordovician age and are likely to be widespread also in marine sediments of other ages. Unfortunately, according to the author, there is little indication so far that this evidence has been accepted as valid by the concerned scientific community.

  20. Modification of Mercury's Bulk Mantle Composition by Reaccumulation of Condensed Ejecta from a Formative Giant Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, Sean; Stevenson, D. J.; Elkins-Tanton, L.

    2010-10-01

    Difficulties encountered in reproducing Mercury's compositional attributes through modeling of formational processes have bolstered support for the hypothesis that one or more giant impacts stripped away a significant proportion of proto-Mercury's silicate mantle. Previous investigations demonstrate sufficient removal of mantle material to account for the planet's unusually high mean density, but do not consider the effects of multiple silicate and oxide phases. In this study we extend the present theory by investigating the consequences of a more realistic chemical model on the evolution of the ejected material. We suggest that the majority of condensation within the expanding vapor plume can be modeled as an equilibrium process following homogeneous nucleation of refractory phases leading to larger particle sizes than previously estimated. We use a thermodynamic model focused on major element composition of ejected material to analyze the effect of differential condensation on the expansion and final state of ejecta. For ejecta of sufficiently high specific entropy, our simplified chemical models indicate that energy released during condensation of MgO-rich phases buffers the temperature, delaying or preventing onset of FeO condensation. If sufficient spatial separation between condensates and vapor arises or if significant amounts of uncondensed FeO vapor remain uncondensed, reaccumulated ejecta would be enriched in MgO and refractory phases. This is compatible with an FeO depletion of Mercury's surface relative to other terrestrial bodies as spectroscopic data suggest (McClintock, Science, 2008). Despite conflicts in the data and the necessity for further relating it to bulk mantle composition, we describe potential tests of our model. Concentration of incompatible elements in the crust formed by a magma ocean would intensify FeO loss. The proposed process leads to a greater depletion in FeO and a lesser depletion in refractory, incompatible elements (Al2O3, Ca

  1. The origin of Phobos grooves from ejecta launched from impact craters on Mars: Tests of the hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsley, Kenneth R.; Head, James W.

    2013-01-01

    The surface of the martian moon Phobos is characterized by parallel and intersecting grooves that bear resemblance to secondary crater chains observed on planetary surfaces. Murray (2011) has hypothesized that the main groove-forming process on Phobos is the intersection of Phobos with ejecta from primary impact events on Mars to produce chains of secondary craters. The hypothesis infers a pattern of parallel jets of ejecta, either fluidized or solidified, that break into equally-spaced fragments and disperse uniformly along-trajectory during the flight from Mars to Phobos. At the moment of impact with Phobos the dispersed fragments emplace secondary craters that are aligned along strike corresponding to the flight pattern of ejecta along trajectory. The aspects of the characteristics of grooves on Phobos cited by this hypothesis that might be explained by secondary ejecta include: their observed linearity, parallelism, planar alignment, pitted nature, change in character along strike, and a "zone of avoidance" where ejecta from Mars is predicted not to impact (Murray, 2011). To test the hypothesis we plot precise Keplerian orbits for ejecta from Mars (elliptical and hyperbolic with periapsis located below the surface of Mars). From these trajectories we: (1) set the fragment dispersion limits of ejecta patterns required to emplace the more typically well-organized parallel grooves observed in returned images from Phobos; (2) plot ranges of the ejecta flight durations from Mars to Phobos and map regions of exposure; (3) utilize the same exposure map to observe trajectory-defined ejecta exposure shadows; (4) observe hemispheric exposure in response to shorter and longer durations of ejecta flight; (5) assess the viability of ejecta emplacing the large family of grooves covering most of the northern hemisphere of Phobos; and (6) plot the arrival of parallel lines of ejecta emplacing chains of craters at oblique incident angles. We also assess the bulk volume of

  2. Asteroid Impact Deflection and Assessment (AIDA) mission - Full-Scale Modeling and Simulation of Ejecta Evolution and Fates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahnestock, Eugene G.; Yu, Yang; Hamilton, Douglas P.; Schwartz, Stephen; Stickle, Angela; Miller, Paul L.; Cheng, Andy F.; Michel, Patrick; AIDA Impact Simulation Working Group

    2016-10-01

    The proposed Asteroid Impact Deflection and Assessment (AIDA) mission includes NASA's Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART), whose impact with the secondary of near-Earth binary asteroid 65803 Didymos is expected to liberate large amounts of ejecta. We present efforts within the AIDA Impact Simulation Working Group to comprehensively simulate the behavior of this impact ejecta as it moves through and exits the system. Group members at JPL, OCA, and UMD have been working largely independently, developing their own strategies and methodologies. Ejecta initial conditions may be imported from output of hydrocode impact simulations or generated from crater scaling laws derived from point-source explosion models. We started with the latter approach, using reasonable assumptions for the secondary's density, porosity, surface cohesive strength, and vanishingly small net gravitational/rotational surface acceleration. We adopted DART's planned size, mass, closing velocity, and impact geometry for the cratering event. Using independent N-Body codes, we performed Monte Carlo integration of ejecta particles sampled over reasonable particle size ranges, and over launch locations within the crater footprint. In some cases we scaled the number of integrated particles in various size bins to the estimated number of particles consistent with a realistic size-frequency distribution. Dynamical models used for the particle integration varied, but all included full gravity potential of both primary and secondary, the solar tide, and solar radiation pressure (accounting for shadowing). We present results for the proportions of ejecta reaching ultimate fates of escape, return impact on the secondary, and transfer impact onto the primary. We also present the time history of reaching those outcomes, i.e., ejecta clearing timescales, and the size-frequency distribution of remaining ejecta at given post-impact durations. We find large numbers of particles remain in the system for several

  3. Investigating Atmospheric Effects on Impact Ejecta Morphology: Possible Tool for Determining Past Climate Conditions on Mars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, John F.; Barnouin-Jha, Oliver S.; Cheng, Andrew F.

    1999-01-01

    The combined use of impact crater morphology and mechanics provides important information on the physical conditions of both planetary atmospheres and planetary and asteroid surfaces present during crater formation, while an understanding of the rate of crater production on the surface of asteroids provides information of their surface and spin rate evolution. The research performed with support from this project improves our understanding of (1) the mechanics of impact cratering in order to gain insights on the evolution of these physical surface conditions on planets with atmospheres and asteroids, and (2) how impact flux across an asteroid surface may vary due to anisotropic distribution of impactors in the solar system. As part of this project, we have undertaken three studies. In the first study, we investigate atmospheric effects on the morphology of ejecta excavated during a cratering event in order to determine the atmospheric and target conditions from observed crater morphologies. In the second study, we use the physical and morphological consequences of oblique impacts on an asteroid to understand how the asteroid Mathilde (recently imaged by the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous - NEAR- spacecraft) could have survived the formation of five giant craters. In a third study, we use a Monte Carlo method to calculate the impact flux on an asteroid given a distribution of impactors on elliptical orbits. In the following section, we present the result obtained from all three studies.

  4. Impacts into quartz sand: Crater formation, shock metamorphism, and ejecta distribution in laboratory experiments and numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wünnemann, Kai; Zhu, Meng-Hua; Stöffler, Dieter

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the ejection mechanics by a complementary approach of cratering experiments, including the microscopic analysis of material sampled from these experiments, and 2-D numerical modeling of vertical impacts. The study is based on cratering experiments in quartz sand targets performed at the NASA Ames Vertical Gun Range. In these experiments, the preimpact location in the target and the final position of ejecta was determined by using color-coded sand and a catcher system for the ejecta. The results were compared with numerical simulations of the cratering and ejection process to validate the iSALE shock physics code. In turn the models provide further details on the ejection velocities and angles. We quantify the general assumption that ejecta thickness decreases with distance according to a power-law and that the relative proportion of shocked material in the ejecta increase with distance. We distinguish three types of shock metamorphic particles (1) melt particles, (2) shock lithified aggregates, and (3) shock-comminuted grains. The agreement between experiment and model was excellent, which provides confidence that the models can predict ejection angles, velocities, and the degree of shock loading of material expelled from a crater accurately if impact parameters such as impact velocity, impactor size, and gravity are varied beyond the experimental limitations. This study is relevant for a quantitative assessment of impact gardening on planetary surfaces and the evolution of regolith layers on atmosphereless bodies.

  5. Dating a Small Impact Crater: An Age of Kaali Crater (Estonia) Based on Charcoal Emplaced Within Proximal Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losiak, A.; Wild, E. M.; Geppert, W. D.; Huber, M. S.; Jõeleht, A.; Kriiska, A.; Kulkov, A.; Paavel, K.; Pirkovic, I.; Plado, J.; Steier, P.; Välja, R.; Wilk, J.; Wisniowski, T.; Zanetti, M.

    2015-09-01

    The Kaali crater was formed shortly after (tpq) 1530-1455 BC (3237 ± 10 14C yr BP). This age is based on dating charcoal within the ejecta blanket that makes it directly related to the impact, and not susceptible to potential reservoir effects.

  6. Generation and emplacement of fine-grained ejecta in planetary impacts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ghent, R.R.; Gupta, V.; Campbell, B.A.; Ferguson, S.A.; Brown, J.C.W.; Fergason, R.L.; Carter, L.M.

    2010-01-01

    We report here on a survey of distal fine-grained ejecta deposits on the Moon, Mars, and Venus. On all three planets, fine-grained ejecta form circular haloes that extend beyond the continuous ejecta and other types of distal deposits such as run-out lobes or ramparts. Using Earth-based radar images, we find that lunar fine-grained ejecta haloes represent meters-thick deposits with abrupt margins, and are depleted in rocks 1cm in diameter. Martian haloes show low nighttime thermal IR temperatures and thermal inertia, indicating the presence of fine particles estimated to range from ???10??m to 10mm. Using the large sample sizes afforded by global datasets for Venus and Mars, and a complete nearside radar map for the Moon, we establish statistically robust scaling relationships between crater radius R and fine-grained ejecta run-out r for all three planets. On the Moon, ???R-0.18 for craters 5-640km in diameter. For Venus, radar-dark haloes are larger than those on the Moon, but scale as ???R-0.49, consistent with ejecta entrainment in Venus' dense atmosphere. On Mars, fine-ejecta haloes are larger than lunar haloes for a given crater size, indicating entrainment of ejecta by the atmosphere or vaporized subsurface volatiles, but scale as R-0.13, similar to the ballistic lunar scaling. Ejecta suspension in vortices generated by passage of the ejecta curtain is predicted to result in ejecta run-out that scales with crater size as R1/2, and the wind speeds so generated may be insufficient to transport particles at the larger end of the calculated range. The observed scaling and morphology of the low-temperature haloes leads us rather to favor winds generated by early-stage vapor plume expansion as the emplacement mechanism for low-temperature halo materials. ?? 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  7. Generation and emplacement of fine-grained ejecta in planetary impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghent, Rebecca R.; Gupta, V.; Campbell, B. A.; Ferguson, S. A.; Brown, J. C. W.; Fergason, R. L.; Carter, L. M.

    2010-10-01

    We report here on a survey of distal fine-grained ejecta deposits on the Moon, Mars, and Venus. On all three planets, fine-grained ejecta form circular haloes that extend beyond the continuous ejecta and other types of distal deposits such as run-out lobes or ramparts. Using Earth-based radar images, we find that lunar fine-grained ejecta haloes represent meters-thick deposits with abrupt margins, and are depleted in rocks ⩾1 cm in diameter. Martian haloes show low nighttime thermal IR temperatures and thermal inertia, indicating the presence of fine particles estimated to range from ˜10 μm to 10 mm. Using the large sample sizes afforded by global datasets for Venus and Mars, and a complete nearside radar map for the Moon, we establish statistically robust scaling relationships between crater radius R and fine-grained ejecta run-out r* for all three planets. On the Moon, r* ˜ R-0.18 for craters 5-640 km in diameter. For Venus, radar-dark haloes are larger than those on the Moon, but scale as r* ˜ R-0.49, consistent with ejecta entrainment in Venus' dense atmosphere. On Mars, fine-ejecta haloes are larger than lunar haloes for a given crater size, indicating entrainment of ejecta by the atmosphere or vaporized subsurface volatiles, but scale as R-0.13, similar to the ballistic lunar scaling. Ejecta suspension in vortices generated by passage of the ejecta curtain is predicted to result in ejecta run-out that scales with crater size as R1/2, and the wind speeds so generated may be insufficient to transport particles at the larger end of the calculated range. The observed scaling and morphology of the low-temperature haloes leads us rather to favor winds generated by early-stage vapor plume expansion as the emplacement mechanism for low-temperature halo materials.

  8. A rock magnetic profile through the ejecta flap of the Lockne impact crater (central Sweden) and implications for the impact excavation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melero-Asensio, Irene; Martín-Hernández, Fátima; Ormö, Jens

    2015-01-01

    The well-documented, well-preserved, and well-exposed Lockne crater is a reference crater for marine-target impacts on Earth. The large amount of data allows detailed analysis of the cratering and modification processes. A unique feature of Lockne as compared with other similar craters is its pristine ejecta layer. Here, we provide the first complete lithological description coupled with an analysis of the rock magnetic properties of the Lockne-9 core drilled through the ejecta flap. Low-field bulk magnetic susceptibility, magnetic hysteresis, isothermal remanent magnetization curves (IRM), and the corresponding model of the coercivity spectra, backfield IRM, and thermomagnetic curves are used to fully characterize the magnetic mineralogy (i.e., pseudo-single domain (PSD) magnetite and pyrite). Variation of the magnetic properties with depth reveals a characteristic maximum in the magnetic susceptibility and magnetization within the crystalline ejecta. The magnetic properties of rocks affected by the impact show a slight weakening in the coercivity of magnetic minerals in comparison with rocks not affected by the impact. Altogether, this suggests to us that the high magnetization zone already existed before the impact event took place. Therefore, it can be inferred that during the cratering process, the Lockne ejecta was repositioned en masse from the central part of the crater in the form of an ejecta flap. This stands in contrast to the standard ballistic emplacement model wherein individual particles move in an ejecta curtain.

  9. Spectrophotometry of the Deep Impact Ejecta of Comet 9P/Tempel 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodapp, K. W.; Aldering, G.; Meech, K. J.; Cochran, A.

    We have obtained optical spectrophotometry of the evolution of comet 9P/Tempel 1 after the impact of the Deep Impact spacecraft [1], using the SNIFS Supernova Integral Field Spectrograph at the UH 2.2 m telescope. From the data-cubes, we extracted both continuum flux distributions as well as emission line fluxes of the violet CN system and of [OI].We found that the continuum brightness of the comet, i.e., scattered sunlight, started rising immediately after the impact, but that the ejecta were slightly bluer in color than the material normally released by the comet.The emission of [OI] at 630 nm, which is a tracer of water, rose similar to the scattered continuum light, but then remained nearly constant for several hours after impact.We found that CN emission at 388 nm centered on the nucleus was delayed compared to the rise of dust-scattered sunlight. This CN emission also expanded faster spatially than the cloud of scattering dust.

  10. Ejecta cloud from the AIDA space project kinetic impact on the secondary of a binary asteroid: I. mechanical environment and dynamical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yang; Michel, Patrick; Schwartz, Stephen R.; Naidu, Shantanu P.; Benner, Lance A. M.

    2017-01-01

    An understanding of the post-impact dynamics of ejecta clouds are crucial to the planning of a kinetic impact mission to an asteroid, and also has great implications for the history of planetary formation. The purpose of this article is to track the evolution of ejecta produced by AIDA mission, which targets for kinetic impact the secondary of near-Earth binary asteroid (65803) Didymos on 2022, and to feedback essential informations to AIDA's ongoing phase-A study. We present a detailed dynamic model for the simulation of an ejecta cloud from a binary asteroid that synthesizes all relevant forces based on a previous analysis of the mechanical environment. We apply our method to gain insight into the expected response of Didymos to the AIDA impact, including the subsequent evolution of debris and dust. The crater scaling relations from laboratory experiments are employed to approximate the distributions of ejecta mass and launching speed. The size distribution of fragments is modeled with a power law fitted from observations of real asteroid surface. A full-scale demonstration is simulated using parameters specified by the mission. We report the results of the simulation, which include the computed spread of the ejecta cloud and the recorded history of ejecta accretion and escape. The violent period of the ejecta evolution is found to be short, and is followed by a stage where the remaining ejecta is gradually cleared. Solar radiation pressure proves to be efficient in cleaning dust-size ejecta, and the simulation results after two weeks shows that large debris on polar orbits (perpendicular to the binary orbital plane) has a survival advantage over smaller ejecta and ejecta that keeps to low latitudes.

  11. Multiple (immiscible) melt phases of mafic composition in Chicxulub impact ejecta from northeastern Mexico: New constraints on target lithologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, P.; Stinnesbeck, W.; Kontny, A.; Stüben, D.; Kramar, U.; Harting, M.

    2002-12-01

    Proximal ejecta deposits in sections from NE Mexico (Rancho Nuevo, La Sierrita, El Peñon, El Mimbral) have been investigated by backscattered electron imaging, wave-length dispersive electron microprobe analyses, and cathodoluminiscence, in order to characterize target lithologies, and ejecta mixing, fractionation, and distribution mechanisms. Additional investigations included magnetic properties (Kontny et al, this meeting) and trace element analyses (Harting et al, this meeting). Petrological features of these ejecta deposits are extraordinarily well preserved. They consist of mm-cm sized vesiculated spherical to drop-shaped spherules and angular to filamentous (ejecta-) fragments, as well as carbonate clasts, marl clasts, and rare benthic foraminifera floating in a carbonaceous matrix. Occasionally, spherules and fragments show welding-amalgamation features and enclose other components, thus resulting in a foam-like texture. An origin from the Chicxulub impact is suggested by geographical proximity and morphologically similarity to spherules found in other K-T sites in North to Central America and the Atlantic. The far distribution of such coarse-grained, foamy, and fragile ejecta-clasts as well as welding features suggest ignimbrite-like transport mechanisms or nearby secondary impacts. Several silicic ejecta phases have been observed that occur as distinct phases, even within one ejecta particle with textures indicative of liquid immiscibility: (1) Fe- (25-35 wt%), Mg- (10-15 wt%) rich phases with <25 wt% SiO2, altered to chlorite, (2) K- (5-8 wt.%) and Al- (25-30 wt%) rich hydrated glass with 45-50 wt% SiO2, and (3) rare SiO2- (>60 wt%) rich andesitic glasses. In addition to these silicic phases, abundant carbonate characterizes all studied ejecta deposits. It occurs within spherules and fragments and as clasts and globules, and shows textures indicative of either liquid immiscibility and/or quenching (`feathery calcite'). Quenched carbonates are enriched

  12. Impact melt- and projectile-bearing ejecta at Barringer Crater, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osinski, Gordon R.; Bunch, Ted E.; Flemming, Roberta L.; Buitenhuis, Eric; Wittke, James H.

    2015-12-01

    Our understanding of the impact cratering process continues to evolve and, even at well-known and well-studied structures, there is still much to be learned. Here, we present the results of a study on impact-generated melt phases within ejecta at Barringer Crater, Arizona, one of the first impact craters on Earth to be recognized and arguably the most famous. We report on previously unknown impact melt-bearing breccias that contain dispersed fragments of the projectile as well as impact glasses that contain a high proportion of projectile material - higher than any other glasses previously reported from this site. These glasses are distinctly different from so-called ;melt beads; that are found as a lag deposit on the present-day erosion surface and that we also study. It is proposed that the melts in these impact breccias were derived from a more constrained sub-region of the melt zone that was very shallow and that also had a larger projectile contribution. In addition to low- and high-Fe melt beads documented previously, we document Ca-Mg-rich glasses and calcite globules within silicate glass that provide definitive evidence that carbonates underwent melting during the formation of Barringer Crater. We propose that the melting of dolomite produces Ca-Mg-rich melts from which calcite is the dominant liquidus phase. This explains the perhaps surprising finding that despite dolomite being the dominant rock type at many impact sites, including Barringer Crater, calcite is the dominant melt product. When taken together with our estimate for the amount of impact melt products dispersed on, and just below, the present-day erosional surface, it is clear that the amount of melt produced at Barringer Crater is higher than previously estimated and is more consistent with recent numerical modeling studies. This work adds to the growing recognition that sedimentary rocks melt during hypervelocity impact and do not just decompose and/or devolatilize as was previously thought

  13. Ground Penetrating Radar Field Studies of Planetary Analog Geologic Settings: Impact Ejecta, Volcanics, and Fluvial Terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, P. S.; Grant, J. A.; Carter, L. M.; Garry, W.; Williams, K. K.; Morgan, G. A.; Daubar, I.; Bussey, B.

    2012-12-01

    Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR) data from terrestrial analog environments can help constrain models for evolution of the lunar and martian surfaces, aid in interpretation of orbital SAR data, and help predict what might be encountered in the subsurface during future landed scientific or engineering operations. Results and interpretations presented here from impact ejecta (Barringer Meteorite Crater), volcanic deposits (Northern Arizona cinders overlying lavas, columnar-jointed Columbia River flood basalts, Hawaii lava flows), and terrains influenced by fluvial-related activity (channeled scablands megaflood bar, Mauna Kea glacio-fluvial deposits) focus on defining the radar "fingerprint" of geologic materials and settings that may be analogous to those found on the Moon and Mars. The challenge in using GPR in geologic investigations is the degree to which different geologic features and processes can be uniquely identified and distinguished in the data. Our approach to constraining this is to qualitatively and quantitatively characterize GPR signatures of different geological environments and to compare them with "ground-truth" observations of subsurface exposures immediately adjacent or subjacent to our GPR transects. Several sites were chosen in each field area based on accessibility, visual access to the subsurface, and presence of particular geologic features of interest. The interpreted distribution of blocks in impact ejecta at Meteor Crater, using a 400 MHz antenna (wavelength of 75 cm) is 1.5-3 blocks per m^3 in the upper 1 m (and 0.5-1 blocks per m^3 in the upper two meters), which is close to the in situ measured block distribution of 2-3 blocks larger than 0.25-0.30 m per m^3. This is roughly the detection limit to be expected from the λ/3 resolution approximation of radar wavelength and indicates that the 400 MHz GPR is characterizing the block population in ejecta. While megaflood bar deposits are also reflector-rich, individual reflectors are in

  14. Computer modeling of large asteroid impacts into continental and oceanic sites: Atmospheric, cratering, and ejecta dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roddy, D. J.; Schuster, S. H.; Rosenblatt, M.; Grant, L. B.; Hassig, P. J.; Kreyenhagen, K. N.

    1988-01-01

    Numerous impact cratering events have occurred on the Earth during the last several billion years that have seriously affected our planet and its atmosphere. The largest cratering events, which were caused by asteroids and comets with kinetic energies equivalent to tens of millions of megatons of TNT, have distributed substantial quantities of terrestrial and extraterrestrial material over much or all of the Earth. In order to study a large-scale impact event in detail, computer simulations were completed that model the passage of a 10 km-diameter asteroid through the Earth's atmosphere and the subsequent cratering and ejecta dynamics associated with impact of the asteroid into two different targets, i.e., an oceanic site and a continental site. The calcuations were designed to broadly represent giant impact events that have occurred on the Earth since its formation and specifically represent an impact cratering event proposed to have occurred at the end of Cretaceous time. Calculation of the passage of the asteroid through a U.S. Standard Atmosphere showed development of a strong bow shock that expanded radially outward. Behind the shock front was a region of highly shock compressed and intensely heated air. Behind the asteroid, rapid expansion of this shocked air created a large region of very low density that also expanded away from the impact area. Calculations of the cratering events in both the continental and oceanic targets were carried to 120 s. Despite geologic differences, impacts in both targets developed comparable dynamic flow fields, and by approx. 29 s similar-sized transient craters approx. 39 km deep and approx. 62 km across had formed. For all practical purposes, the atmosphere was nearly completely removed from the impact area for tens of seconds, i.e., air pressures were less than fractions of a bar out to ranges of over 50 km. Consequently, much of the asteroid and target materials were ejected upward into a near vacuum. Effects of secondary

  15. Digital Elevation Models Aid the Analysis of Double Layered Ejecta (DLE) Impact Craters on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouginis-Mark, P. J.; Boyce, J. M.; Garbeil, H.

    2014-12-01

    Considerable debate has recently taken place concerning the origin of the inner and outer ejecta layers of double layered ejecta (DLE) craters on Mars. For craters in the diameter range ~10 to ~25 km, the inner ejecta layer of DLE craters displays characteristic grooves extending from the rim crest, and has led investigators to propose three hypotheses for their formation: (1) deposition of the primary ejecta and subsequent surface scouring by either atmospheric vortices or a base surge; (2) emplacement through a landslide of the near-rim crest ejecta; and (3) instabilities (similar to Gortler vortices) generated by high flow-rate, and high granular temperatures. Critical to resolving between these models is the topographic expression of both the ejecta layer and the groove geometry. To address this problem, we have made several digital elevation models (DEMs) from CTX and HiRISE stereo pairs using the Ames Stereo Pipeline at scales of 24 m/pixel and 1 m/pixel, respectively. These DEMs allow several key observations to be made that bear directly upon the origin of the grooves associated with DLE craters: (1) Grooves formed on the sloping ejecta layer surfaces right up to the preserved crater rim; (2) There is clear evidence that grooves traverse the topographic boundary between the inner and outer ejecta layers; and (3) There are at least two different sets of radial grooves, with smaller grooves imprinted upon the larger grooves. There are "deep-wide" grooves that have a width of ~200 m and a depth of ~10 m, and there are "shallow-narrow" grooves with a width of <50 m and depth <5 m. These two scales of grooves are not consistent with their formation analogous to a landslide. Two different sets of grooves would imply that, simultaneously, two different depths to the flow would have to exist if the grooves were formed by shear within the flow, something that is not physically possible. All three observations can only be consistent with a model of groove formation

  16. Experimental study on the ejecta-velocity distributions caused by low-velocity impacts on quartz sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujido, S.; Arakawa, M.; Suzuki, A. I.; Yasui, M.

    2014-07-01

    Introduction: Regolith formation on asteroids is caused by successive impacts of small bodies. The ejecta velocity distribution during the crater formation process is one of the most important physical properties related to the surface-evolution process, and the distribution is also necessary to reconstruct the planetary-accretion process among planetesimals. The surface of small bodies, such as asteroids and planetesimals in the solar system, could have varying porosity, strength, and density, and the impact velocity could vary across a wide range from a few tens of m/s to several km/s. Therefore, it is necessary to conduct impact experiments by changing the physical properties of the target and the projectile in a wide velocity range in order to constrain the crater-formation process applicable to the small bodies in the solar system. Housen and Holsapple (2011) compiled the data of ejecta velocity distribution with various impact velocities, porosities, grain sizes, grain shapes, and strengths of the targets, and they improved their ejecta scaling law. But the ejecta velocity data is not enough for varying projectile densities and for impact velocities less than 1 km/s. In this study, to investigate the projectile density dependence of the ejecta velocity distribution at a low velocity region, we conducted impact experiments with projectile densities from 1.1 to 11.3 g/cm^3. Then, we try to determine the effect of projectile density on the ejecta velocity distribution by means of the observation of each individual ejecta grain. Experimental methods: We made impact cratering experiments by using a vertical-type one-stage light-gas gun (V-LGG) set at Kobe University. Targets were quartz sand (irregular shape) and glass beads (spherical shape) with the grain size of 500 μ m (porosity 44.7 %). The target container with the size of 30 cm was set in a large vacuum chamber with air pressure less than 10^3 Pa. The projectile materials that we used were lead, copper

  17. Crater Ejecta Deposition on Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmedemann, Nico; Otto, Katharina; Schulzeck, Franziska; Krohn, Katrin; Gathen, Isabell v. d.; Kneissl, Thomas; Neesemann, Adrian; Jaumann, Ralf; Raymond, Carol; Russell, Christopher T.

    2016-10-01

    Since March 6 2015 the Dawn spacecraft (Russell et al., 2012) is orbiting the dwarf planet Ceres inside the asteroid main belt. Color ratio data of the Framing Camera instrument show distinct bluish characteristics of recently exposed materials such as impact ejecta of young craters. Besides the common radial pattern of proximal ejecta, the distribution of remote ejecta is heavily affected by the relatively fast rotation of Ceres. We compare results from n-body simulations of impact ejecta with specific patterns in the color ratio data of the Dawn Framing Camera. Results of this work can also be used in order to predict prominent regions and patterns of secondary cratering.

  18. The disposition of impact ejecta resulting from the AIDA-DART mission to binary asteroid 65803 Didymos: an independent investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, James E.; O'Brien, David P.

    2016-10-01

    If all goes as planned, in the year 2020 a joint ESA and NASA mission will be launched that will rendezvous with the near-Earth binary asteroid system 65803 Didymos in the fall of 2022. The European component, the Asteroid Impact & Deflection Assessment (AIDA) spacecraft will arrive first and characterize the system, which consists of a ~800 m diameter primary and a ~160 m diameter secondary, orbiting a common center of mass at a semi-major axis distance of ~1200 m with a orbital period of 11.9 hr. Following system characterization, the AIDA spacecraft will remove to a safe distance while the NASA component, the 300 kg Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) spacecraft collides with the trailing edge of the secondary body (with respect to the binary's retrograde mutual orbit). Meanwhile, the AIDA spacecraft will conduct observations of this impact and its aftermath, specifically looking for changes made to the primary, the secondary, and their mutual orbit as a result of the DART collision. Of particular interest is the ballistic flight and final disposition of the ejecta produced by the impact cratering process, not just from the standpoint of scientific study, but also from the standpoint of AIDA spacecraft safety.In this study, we investigate a series of hypothetical DART impacts utilizing a semi-empirical, numerical impact ejecta plume model originally developed for the Deep Impact mission and designed specifically with impacts on small bodies in mind. The resulting excavated mass is discretized into 7200 individual tracer particles, each representing a unique combination of speed, mass, and ejected direction. The trajectory of each tracer is computed numerically under the gravitational influence of both primary and secondary, along with the effects of solar radiation pressure. Each tracer is followed until it either impacts a body or escapes the system, whereupon tracking is continued in the heliocentric frame using an N-body integrator. Various impact

  19. Fingerprinting the K/T impact site and determining the time of impact by UPb dating of single shocked zircons from distal ejecta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krogh, T.E.; Kamo, S.L.; Bohor, B.F.

    1993-01-01

    UPb isotopic dating of single 1-3 ??g zircons from K/T distal ejecta from a site in the Raton Basin, Colorado provides a powerful new tool with which to determine both the time of the impact event and the age of the basement at the impact site. Data for the least shocked zircons are slightly displaced from the 544 ?? 5 Ma primary age for a component of the target site, white those for highly shocked and granular grains are strongly displaced towards the time of impact at 65.5 ?? 3.0 Ma. Such shocked and granular zircons have never been reported from any source, including explosive volcanic rocks. Zircon is refractory and has one of the highest thermal blocking temperatures; hence, it can record both shock features and primary and secondary ages without modification by post-crystallization processes. Unlike shocked quartz, which can come from almost anywhere on the Earth's crust, shocked zircons can be shown to come from a specific site because basement ages vary on the scale of meters to kilometers. With UPb zircon dating, it is now possible to correlate ejecta layers derived from the same target site, test the single versus multiple impact hypothesis, and identify the target source of impact ejecta. The ages obtained in this study indicate that the Manson impact site, Iowa, which has basement rocks that are mid-Proterozoic in age, cannot be the source of K/T distal ejecta. The K/T distal ejecta probably originated from a single impact site because most grains have the same primary age. ?? 1993.

  20. Fingerprinting the K/T impact site and determining the time of impact by U-Pb dating of single shocked zircons from distal ejecta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krogh, T. E.; Kamo, S. L.; Bohor, B. F.

    1993-01-01

    U-Pb isotopic dating of single 1 - 3 micrograms zircons from K/T distal ejecta from a site in the Raton Basin, Colorado provides a powerful new tool with which to determine both the time of the impact event and the age of the basement at the impact site. Data for the least shocked zircons are slightly displaced from the 544 +/- 5 Ma primary age for a component of the target site, while those for highly shocked and granular grains are strongly displaced towards the time of impact at 65.5 +/- 3.0 Ma. Such shocked and granular zircons have never been reported from any source, including explosive volcanic rocks. Zircon is refractory and has one of the highest thermal blocking temperatures; hence, it can record both shock features and primary and secondary ages without modification by post-crystallization processes. Unlike shocked quartz, which can come from almost anywhere on the Earth's crust, shocked zircons can be shown to come from a specific site because basement ages vary on the scale of meters to kilometers. With U-Pb zircon dating, it is now possible to correlate ejecta layers derived from the same target site, test the single versus multiple impact hypothesis, and identify the target source of impact ejecta. The ages obtained in this study indicate that the Manson impact site, Iowa, which has basement rocks that are mid-Proterozoic in age, cannot be the source of K/T distal ejecta. The K/T distal ejecta probably originated from a single impact site because most grains have the same primary age.

  1. Noachian Impact Ejecta on Murray Ridge and Pre-impact Rocks on Wdowiak Ridge, Endeavour Crater, Mars: Opportunity Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Gellert, R.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Schroeder, C.; Yen, A. S.; Farrand, W. H.; Arvidson, R. E.; Franklin, B. J.; Grant, J. A.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Jolliff, B. J.

    2015-01-01

    Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has been exploring Meridiani Planum since January 2004, and has completed 4227% of its primary mission. Opportunity has been investigating the geology of the rim of 22 km diameter Endeavour crater, first on the Cape York segment and now on Cape Tribulation. The outcrops are divided York; (ii) the Shoemaker fm, impact breccias representing ejecta from the crater; into three formations: (i) the lower Matijevic fm, a pre-impact lithology on Cape and (iii) the upper Grasberg fm, a post-impact deposit that drapes the lower portions of the eroded rim segments. On the Cape Tribulation segment Opportunity has been studying the rocks on Murray Ridge, with a brief sojourn to Wdowiak Ridge west of the rim segment. team member Thomas Wdowiak, who died in 2013.) One region of Murray Ridge has distinctive CRISM spectral characteristics indicating the presence of a small concentration of aluminous smectite based on a 2.2 micron Al-OH combination band (hereafter, the Al-OH region).

  2. Radioactivity and Thermalization in the Ejecta of Compact Object Mergers and Their Impact on Kilonova Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Jennifer; Kasen, Daniel; Wu, Meng-Ru; Martínez-Pinedo, Gabriel

    2016-10-01

    One promising electromagnetic signature of compact object mergers are kilonovae: approximately isotropic radioactively powered transients that peak days to weeks post-merger. Key uncertainties in kilonova modeling include the emission profiles of the radioactive decay products—non-thermal β -particles, α -particles, fission fragments, and γ -rays—and the efficiency with which their kinetic energy is absorbed by the ejecta. The radioactive energy emitted, along with its thermalization efficiency, sets the luminosity budget and is therefore crucial for predicting kilonova light curves. We outline uncertainties in the radioactivity, describe the processes by which the decay products transfer energy to the ejecta, and calculate time-dependent thermalization efficiencies for each particle type. We determine the net thermalization efficiency and explore its dependence on r-process yields—in particular, the production of α -decaying translead nuclei—and on ejecta mass, velocity, and magnetic fields. We incorporate our results into detailed radiation transport simulations, and calculate updated kilonova light curve predictions. Thermalization effects reduce kilonova luminosities by a factor of roughly 2 at peak, and by an order of magnitude at later times (15 days or more after explosion). We present analytic fits to time-dependent thermalization efficiencies, which can be used to improve light curve models. We revisit the putative kilonova that accompanied gamma-ray burst 130603B, and estimate the mass ejected in that event. We find later time kilonova light curves can be significantly impacted by α -decay from translead isotopes; data at these times may therefore be diagnostic of ejecta abundances.

  3. The Ries impact crater described as an analogue for a Martian double-layered ejecta crater on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, Sebastian; Wulf, Gerwin; Jung, Dietmar; Kenkmann, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The Ries impact crater (~26 km-diameter) is described as a relatively pristine, complex impact crater in southern Germany. The oblique impact occurred during the Miocene (14.9 Ma) and hit into a two-layered target material that consists of ~650 m partly water-saturated and subhorizontally layered sediments (limestones, sandstones, shales) of Triassic to Tertiary ages underlain by crystalline basement rocks (mainly gneisses, granites and amphibolites) [1, 2, 3, 4]. The continuous and well-preserved ejecta blanket reaches up to a distance of 45 km from the crater center. It is built up by so called Bunte Breccia material that is described as a polymict lithic breccia. Bunte Breccia mainly consists of unshocked to weakly shocked sedimentary target clasts including a minority of crystalline basement clasts and reworked surfical sediments (e.g., Upper Freshwater Molasses or Upper Seawater Molasses) [5, 6]. Here we present our final interpolation results of the morphology of the paleo-surface and the thickness variations of the continuous ejecta blanket (Bunte Breccia) with radial range outside of the Ries impact crater. Our results were then compared with ejecta distribution characteristics of Martian complex double-layered ejecta craters (DLE) [7]. We combined digital elevation data (ASTER DEM) and geologic information of the recent geologic map [8], in addition with nine NASA Drillings [6], and up to 40 Bavarian Environment Agency drillings in ArcGIS (ESRI) and RockWorks14 (RockWare) to interpolate the elevation of the lower contact plane ("paleo-surface") and the contact between the Bunte breccia and the overlain Suevite deposits to reconstruct the Bunte Breccia thickness variation outside of the Ries impact crater [7]. Our final interpolation results of the paleo-surface and Bunte Breccia top surface provide an increasing Bunte breccia thickness with increasing distance from the crater center. The ejecta thickness distribution clearly deviates from a steady decrease

  4. Ejecta velocity distribution of impact craters formed on quartz sand: Effect of projectile density on crater scaling law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujido, Sayaka; Arakawa, Masahiko; Suzuki, Ayako I.; Yasui, Minami

    2015-12-01

    In order to clarify the effects of projectile density on ejecta velocity distributions for a granular target, impact cratering experiments on a quartz sand target were conducted by using eight types of projectiles with different densities ranging from 11 g cm-3 to 1.1 g cm-3, which were launched at about 200 m s-1 from a vertical gas gun at Kobe University. The scaling law of crater size, the ejection angle of ejecta grains, and the angle of the ejecta curtain were also investigated. The ejecta velocity distribution obtained from each projectile was well described by the π-scaling theory of v0/√{gR} =k2(x0/R)-1/μ , where v0, g, R and x0 are the ejection velocity, gravitational acceleration, crater radius and ejection position, respectively, and k2 and μ are constants mostly depending on target material properties (Housen, K.R., Holsapple, K.A. [2011]. Icarus 211, 856-875). The value of k2 was found to be almost constant at 0.7 for all projectiles except for the nylon projectile, while μ increased with the projectile density, from 0.43 for the low-density projectile to 0.6-0.7 for the high-density projectile. On the other hand, the π-scaling theory for crater size gave a μ value of 0.57, which was close to the average of the μ values obtained from ejecta velocity distributions. The ejection angle, θ, of each grain decreased slightly with distance, from higher than 45° near the impact point to 30-40° at 0.6 R. The ejecta curtain angle is controlled by the two elementary processes of ejecta velocity distribution and ejection angle; it gradually increased from 52° to 63° with the increase of the projectile density. The comparison of our experimental results with the theoretical model of the crater excavation flow known as the Z-model revealed that the relationship between μ and θ obtained by our experiments could not be described by the Z-model (Maxwell, D.E. [1977]. In: Roddy, D.J., Pepin, R.O., Merrill, R.B. (Eds.), Impact and Explosion Cratering

  5. Evidence for Multiple Holocene Marine Impact Events: Ejecta in a Bog Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, D. H.; Courty, M.; Breger, D.; Costa, S.; Gerard-Little, P.; Burckle, L.; Pekar, S.

    2006-12-01

    In a core from Tamarack Pond (a former bog) in the Hudson Highlands of New York, we found two layers containing marine microfossils. Because carbon rich sediments can be bioturbated over 20 cm depths, we give the layer thicknesses as 20 cm. The first layer is at 332-354 cm depth. It contains a radiolarian with a splashed on coating of Fe-Cr-Ni metal. It also contains a benthonic foraminiferal fossil. The second layer is at 432-454 cm depth. The second layer contains a degraded radiolarian fossil, a silicate with a splashed on coating of Fe-Cr-Ni metal, a carbon rich spherule containing Fe-Cr-Ni metal, and a grain of titanomagnetite with multiple craters. It also contains organic matter with Sn in it. As Tamarack Pond is quite far from the ocean, the marine fossils in the cores are unlikely to be windblown debris of Holocene age. A benthonic foraminifera is particularly unlikely to be blown by the wind. This conclusion is strengthened by the observation that the splashed on coating of Fe-Cr-Ni metal occurs in chondritic relative abundances with Fe>Cr>Ni. In grains with a thick layer of splashed metal, the Ni is sufficiently abundant to produce 3 distinct Ni peaks in the X-ray analysis. Such a high abundance of Ni coupled with chondritic relative abundances suggests that the Fe-Cr- Ni splash is derived from the vaporization of an extraterrestrial impactor. If we assume that the sedimentation rate of the Tamarack Pond core is the same as that of a previously dated core from nearby Sutherland Pond, the two layers have an uncorrected C-14 age of around 900-1200 B.C. for the layer at 332-354 cm and 2100 to 2400 B.C. for the layer at 432-454 cm. Both ages have a rough correspondence with times of climate downturn recorded in tree ring data (1159 and 2354 B.C.). These climate downturns cannot be explained by volcanic eruptions and are proposed to be cosmogenic in origin[1]. The older layer also corresponds in components to a previously studied circa 2350 B.C. impact ejecta

  6. Recent research on the Chesapeake Bay impact structure, USA - Impact debris and reworked ejecta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horton, J.W.; Aleinikoff, J.N.; Kunk, M.J.; Gohn, G.S.; Edwards, L.E.; ,; Powars, D.S.; Izett, G.A.

    2005-01-01

    Four new coreholes in the western annular trough of the buried, late Eocene Chesapeake Bay impact structure provide samples of shocked minerals, cataclastic rocks, possible impact melt, mixed sediments, and damaged microfossils. Parautochthonous Cretaceous sediments show an upward increase in collapse, sand fluidization, and mixed sediment injections. These impact-modifi ed sediments are scoured and covered by the upper Eocene Exmore beds, which consist of highly mixed Cretaceous to Eocene sediment clasts and minor crystalline-rock clasts in a muddy quartz-glauconite sand matrix. The Exmore beds are interpreted as seawater-resurge debris flows. Shocked quartz is found as sparse grains and in rock fragments at all four sites in the Exmore, where these fallback remnants are mixed into the resurge deposit. Crystalline-rock clasts that exhibit shocked quartz or cataclastic fabrics include felsites, granitoids, and other plutonic rocks. Felsite from a monomict cataclasite boulder has a sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe U-Pb zircon age of 613 ?? 4 Ma. Leucogranite from a polymict cataclasite boulder has a similar Neoproterozoic age based on muscovite 40Ar/39Ar data. Potassium-feldspar 40Ar/39Ar ages from this leucogranite show cooling through closure (???150 ??C) at ca. 261 Ma without discernible impact heating. Spherulitic felsite is under investigation as a possible impact melt. Types of crystalline clasts, and exotic sediment clasts and grains, in the Exmore vary according to location, which suggests different provenances across the structure. Fractured calcareous nannofossils and fused, bubbled, and curled dinofl agellate cysts coexist with shocked quartz in the Exmore, and this damage may record conditions of heat, pressure, and abrasion due to impact in a shallow-marine environment. ?? 2005 Geological Society of America.

  7. Fluidized Crater Ejecta Deposit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    the main, fluidized ejecta deposit.

    Fluidized or 'rampart' ejecta deposits have long been thought by many Mars scientists to result from an impact into a surface that contains water. The water would have been underground, and could have been frozen or liquid. According to the prevailing model, when the meteor hit, this water was released--along with tons of rock and debris--and the ejecta flowed like mud. Images with resolutions higher than those presently attainable from the 11.6 hr elliptical orbit are needed to see the specific features (such as large boulders 'rafted' by the dense mud) that would confirm or refute this model. Such images may be acquired once MGS is in its mapping orbit.

    MOC image 47903 was received and processed by the MOC team at Malin Space Science Systems on Monday afternoon (PDT), August 10, 1998. The image center is located at 27.92oN latitude and 184.66oW longitude, in the northern Tartarus Montes region.

  8. Styles of ejecta emplacement under atmospheric conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, P. H.

    1991-01-01

    Laboratory experiments provide essential first-order constraints on processes affecting ballistic ejecta and styles of ejecta emplacement under different atmospheric environments at planetary scales. The NASA-Ames Vertical Gun allows impacting different fine-grained particulate targets under varying atmospheric pressure and density, thereby helping to isolate controlling variables. Further analysis now permits characterizing distinct modes of emplacement that reflect the degree of ejecta entrainment within a turbidity flow created by ejecta curtain movement through the atmosphere.

  9. Computer simulations of large asteroid impacts into oceanic and continental sites--preliminary results on atmospheric, cratering and ejecta dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roddy, D.J.; Schuster, S.H.; Rosenblatt, M.; Grant, L.B.; Hassig, P.J.; Kreyenhagen, K.N.

    1987-01-01

    Computer simulations have been completed that describe passage of a 10-km-diameter asteroid through the Earth's atmosphere and the subsequent cratering and ejecta dynamics caused by impact of the asteroid into both oceanic and continental sites. The asteroid was modeled as a spherical body moving vertically at 20 km/s with a kinetic energy of 2.6 ?? 1030 ergs (6.2 ?? 107 Mt ). Detailed material modeling of the asteroid, ocean, crustal units, sedimentary unit, and mantle included effects of strength and fracturing, generic asteroid and rock properties, porosity, saturation, lithostatic stresses, and geothermal contributions, each selected to simulate impact and geologic conditions that were as realistic as possible. Calculation of the passage of the asteroid through a U.S. Standard Atmosphere showed development of a strong bow shock wave followed by a highly shock compressed and heated air mass. Rapid expansion of this shocked air created a large low-density region that also expanded away from the impact area. Shock temperatures in air reached ???20,000 K near the surface of the uplifting crater rim and were as high as ???2000 K at more than 30 km range and 10 km altitude. Calculations to 30 s showed that the shock fronts in the air and in most of the expanding shocked air mass preceded the formation of the crater, ejecta, and rim uplift and did not interact with them. As cratering developed, uplifted rim and target material were ejected into the very low density, shock-heated air immediately above the forming crater, and complex interactions could be expected. Calculations of the impact events showed equally dramatic effects on the oceanic and continental targets through an interval of 120 s. Despite geologic differences in the targets, both cratering events developed comparable dynamic flow fields and by ???29 s had formed similar-sized transient craters ???39 km deep and ???62 km across. Transient-rim uplift of ocean and crust reached a maximum altitude of nearly

  10. Proximal ejecta deposits of the K-Pg Chixulub impact: The case for carbonate impact melt spherules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deutsch, Alex; Schulte, Peter

    2010-05-01

    When 65.5 million yrs. ago an about ~10 km-sized asteroid hit Earth (Chicxulub impact event), ejecta was distributed world-wide to form the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) event bed. Continuous sections across this K-Pg boundary document unambiguously that the 'K-T' mass extinction was triggered by the Chicxulub event, not only because of the projectile's size but particularly by the specific composition of the target, namely a 3-km- (in the West) to about 4.5-km-thick (in the Gulf area) layer of volatile-rich carbonate and sulfate platform sediments on top of the crystalline basement (Schulte et al., 2010). Modeling, petrographic and geochemical studies on natural samples as well as experimental results show that shock pressure and high post-shock temperatures yield irreversible deformations and transformations on carbonate and sulfate target lithologies which are also expected to occur in the context of the Chicxulub event. Twofold devastating effects on life are predicted (i) dissociation of carbonates and sulfates with nearly instantaneous release of vast quantities of CO2, and of about 100 to 500 Gt sulfur triggering severe climate effects, and (ii) deposition of carbonate and sulfate melts together with silicate melts, causing short-term disruption of the thermal conditions proximal to the crater. Silicate impact glasses with high CaO contents occur, for example, as spherules in the K-Pg event bed at Haiti and in melt lithologies from drill cores (e.g., Yucatan-6, Chicxulub-1, Yaxcopoil-1). Carbonate melt glasses have not been reported so far in K-Pg event beds. Hence, the following question was answered so far: Where are the huge amounts of carbonates that suffered impact metamorphism and were ejected in the Chicxulub event? The Chicxulub ejecta deposits in the Gulf of Mexico area contain up to 80 wt% carbonates which, however, have been interpreted as precipitation product during diagenesis. In consequence, the abundant mm-sized ejecta spherules consisting of a

  11. Effects of the Core-collapse Supernova Ejecta Impact on a Rapidly Rotating Massive Companion Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chunhua; Lü, Guoliang; Wang, Zhaojun

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the effects of the core-collapse supernova (CCSN) ejecta on a rapidly rotating and massive companion star. We show that the stripped mass is twice as high as that of a massive but nonrotating companion star. In close binaries with orbital periods of about 1 day, the stripped masses reach up to ∼ 1 {M}ȯ . By simulating the evolutions of the rotational velocities of the massive companion stars based on different stripped masses, we find that the rotational velocity decreases greatly for a stripped mass higher than about 1 {M}ȯ . Of all the known high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), Cygnus X-3 and 1WGA J0648.024418 have the shortest orbital periods, 0.2 and 1.55 days, respectively. The optical counterpart of the former is a Wolf-Rayet star, whereas it is a hot subdwarf for the latter. Applying our model to the two HMXBs, we suggest that the hydrogen-rich envelopes of their optical counterparts may have been stripped by CCSN ejecta.

  12. Impact melt-bearing breccias of the Mistastin Lake impact structure: A unique planetary analogue for ground-truthing proximal ejecta emplacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, M. M.; Osinski, G. R.

    2013-12-01

    Impact craters are the dominant geological landform on rocky planetary surfaces; however, relationships between specific craters and their ejecta are typically poorly constrained. With limited planetary samples, scientists look to terrestrial craters as analogues. Impact ejecta is defined here as any target material, regardless of its physical state, that is transported beyond the rim of the transient cavity [1]. The original transient cavity reaches its maximum size during the excavation stage of crater formation, before rim collapse begins in the modification stage [2]. In complex craters, during the modification stage, rocks around the periphery of the bowl-shaped transient crater collapse downward and inward to form a series of terraces along the outer margin of the crater structure [3]. Proximal impact ejecta, can therefore be found on the terraces of the modified rim of a complex crater, interior to the final crater rim [1]. Although typically poorly preserved on Earth due to post-impact erosional processes, impact ejecta have been identified in the terraced rim region of the Mistastin Lake impact structure, located in northern Labrador, Canada (55°53'N; 63°18'W) [4]. The Mistastin Lake impact structure is an intermediate-size, complex crater (28 km apparent crater diameter) formed by a meteorite impact ~36 Ma in crystalline target rocks. The original crater has been differentially eroded; however, a terraced rim and distinct central uplift are still observed [5]. The inner portion of the structure is covered by the Mistastin Lake and the surrounding area is locally covered by soil/glacial deposits and vegetation. Locally, allochthonous impactites overlying fractured target rocks are exposed along the lakeshore and along banks of radially cutting streams. They define a consistent stratigraphy, including, from bottom to top: monomict, lithic breccias, allochthonous polymict lithic breccias, and allochthonous impact melt rocks. Mistastin impact breccias range

  13. Dating a small impact crater: An age of Kaali crater (Estonia) based on charcoal emplaced within proximal ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losiak, A.; Wild, E. M.; Geppert, W. D.; Huber, M. S.; Jõeleht, A.; Kriiska, A.; Kulkov, A.; Paavel, K.; Pirkovic, I.; Plado, J.; Steier, P.; VäLja, R.; Wilk, J.; Wisniowski, T.; Zanetti, M.

    2016-04-01

    The estimates of the age of the Kaali impact structure (Saaremaa Island, Estonia) provided by different authors vary by as much as 6000 years, ranging from ~6400 to ~400 before current era (BCE). In this study, a new age is obtained based on 14C dating charred plant material within the proximal ejecta blanket, which makes it directly related to the impact structure, and not susceptible to potential reservoir effects. Our results show that the Kaali crater was most probably formed shortly after 1530-1450 BCE (3237 ± 10 14C yr BP). Saaremaa was already inhabited when the bolide hit the Earth, thus, the crater-forming event was probably witnessed by humans. There is, however, no evidence that this event caused significant change in the material culture (e.g., known archeological artifacts) or patterns of human habitation on Saaremaa.

  14. Geochemistry and shock petrography of the Crow Creek Member, South Dakota, USA: Ejecta from the 74-Ma Manson impact structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Katongo, C.; Koeberl, C.; Witzke, B.J.; Hammond, R.H.; Anderson, R.R.

    2004-01-01

    The Crow Creek Member is one of several marl units recognized within the Upper Cretaceous Pierre Shale Formation of eastern South Dakota and northeastern Nebraska, but it is the only unit that contains shock-metamorphosed minerals. The shocked minerals represent impact ejecta from the 74-Ma Manson impact structure (MIS). This study was aimed at determining the bulk chemical compositions and analysis of planar deformation features (PDFs) of shocked quartz; for the basal and marly units of the Crow Creek Member. We studied samples from the Gregory 84-21 core, Iroquois core and Wakonda lime quarry. Contents of siderophile elements are generally high, but due to uncertainties in the determination of Ir and uncertainties in compositional sources for Cr, Co, and Ni, we could not confirm an extraterrestrial component in the Crow Creek Member. We recovered several shocked quartz grains from basal-unit samples, mainly from the Gregory 84-21 core, and results of PDF measurements indicate shock pressures of at least 15 GPa. All the samples are composed chiefly of SiO2, (29-58 wt%), Al2O3 (6-14 wt%), and CaO (7-30 wt%). When compared to the composition of North American Shale Composite, the samples are significantly enriched in CaO, P2O5, Mn, Sr, Y, U, Cr, and Ni. The contents of rare earth elements (REE), high field strength elements (HFSE), Cr, Co, Sc, and their ratios and chemical weathering trends, reflect both felsic and basic sources for the Crow Creek Member, an inference, which is consistent with the lithological compositions in the environs of the MIS. The high chemical indices of alteration and weathering (CIA' and CIW': 75-99), coupled with the Al2O3-(CaO*,+Na2O -K2O (A-CN'-K) ratios, indicate that the Crow Creek Member and source rocks had undergone high degrees of chemical weathering. The expected ejecta thicknesses at the sampled locations (409 to 219 km from Manson) were calculated to range from about 1.9 to 12.2 cm (for the present-day crater radius of Manson

  15. Impact spallation processes on the Moon: A case study from the size and shape analysis of ejecta boulders and secondary craters of Censorinus crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, N.; Kumar, P. Senthil

    2016-01-01

    Impact spallation is a fundamental process responsible for formation of ejecta boulders from impact craters. Although theoretical spallation models were developed about three decades ago, only limited geological observations have been made so far to test these models. The 3.8 km Censorinus crater on the Moon provides an excellent opportunity for studying the impact spallation processes associated with a fresh simple crater formed by oblique impact. Using the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Narrow Angle Camera images, we prepared the ejecta boulder distribution map of Censorinus crater and measured the boulder sizes and shapes. Mapping of about 242,000 ejecta boulders enabled us to document the size distribution of boulders both radial and concentric to the impact crater. Larger size boulders dominate the crater rim areas, while they become smaller away from the crater. The boulder distribution exhibits a radial asymmetry suggesting Censorinus is a oblique impact, in which the uprange ejecta have smaller ranges with larger concentration of boulders near the southwestern crater rim, while the downrange ejecta are in general characterized by smaller boulders with high spatial dispersion. The cumulative size-frequency distribution (CSFD) of boulders shows a highly variable fragmentation history in which the uprange boulders suffered more complex fragmentation. The ejecta boulders also exhibit a variety of shapes that are gleaned from their axial ratios and edge angle characteristics. There is a general decrease of axial ratios away from the crater rim. Rectangular boulders dominate the crater rim and they become more equant away from the crater. In addition to the boulder sizes, the boulder shape distribution also exhibits a mild asymmetry in response to the oblique impact. Small size fresh impact craters (84,000 craters) are abundant on the Censorinus ejecta and post-date Censorinus. These craters are found in two morphologic types in which a large majority of craters

  16. Studying the nucleus of comet 9P/Tempel 1 using the structure of the Deep Impact ejecta cloud at the early stages of its development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolokolova, Ludmilla; Nagdimunov, Lev; A'Hearn, Michael; King, Ashley; Wolff, Michael

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents an attempt to extract information about the comet 9P/Tempel 1 nucleus from the characteristics of the ejecta cloud produced by the impactor of the Deep Impact mission. For this purpose we use two techniques. We first study the shadow cast on the nucleus surface by the ejecta cloud and investigate how areas of different brightness are related to the varying optical thickness or albedo of the ejecta cloud. The shadow was seen during the first 2.0 s after the impact (afterward it became obscured by the ejecta cloud). We have found that all brightness variations in the shadow are the result of the surface inhomogeneities, indicating that during first 2.0 s the ejecta cloud was homogeneous within the MRI spatial resolution. Our second technique is to study the obscuration of the nucleus limb by the ejecta. This study covers the period 0.76-68.8 s after impact and is based on comparison of the ejecta cloud brightness on the limb and just beyond the limb. At this stage we do see inhomogeneities in the ejecta cloud that relate to the albedo and optical thickness variations in the ejected dust. Specifically, we have found two distinct bands of low optical thickness and one band of a high optical thickness. Based on crater formation ideas we estimate the depth of excavation of the ejected material for the found inhomogeneities and, thus, define a potential layering structure for the comet nucleus, Our estimates suggest that the low-optical thickness material was excavated from a depth of 15-18 and 30-32 m in the case the porous nucleus material and 37-46 and 87-93 m in the case of a non-porous nucleus material, and a layer of high optical thickness originated from the depth 9-11 m for porous material or 20-23 m for non-porous material. Based on the crater diameter estimates, we expect that the real depth of the layers is between these two cases. The rest of the ejecta do not show any signs of layering but have significant azimuthal inhomogeneity with

  17. Visible and near-infrared spectrophotometry of the Deep Impact ejecta of Comet 9P/Tempel 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodapp, Klaus W.; Aldering, Greg; Meech, Karen J.; Cochran, Anita L.; Antilogus, Pierre; Pécontal, Emmanuel; Chickering, William; Blanc, Nathalie; Copin, Yannick; Lynch, David K.; Rudy, Richard J.; Mazuk, S.; Venturini, Catherine C.; Puetter, Richard C.; Perry, Raleigh B.

    2007-03-01

    We have obtained optical spectrophotometry of the evolution of Comet 9P/Tempel 1 after the impact of the Deep Impact probe, using the Supernova Integral Field Spectrograph (SNIFS) at the UH 2.2-m telescope, as well as simultaneous optical and infrared spectra using the Lick Visible-to-Near-Infrared Imaging Spectrograph (VNIRIS). The spatial distribution and temporal evolution of the "violet band" CN (0-0) emission and of the 630 nm [OI] emission was studied. We found that CN emission centered on the nucleus increased in the 2 h after impact, but that this CN emission was delayed compared to the light curve of dust-scattered sunlight. The CN emission also expanded faster than the cloud of scattering dust. The emission of [OI] at 630 nm rose similarly to the scattered light, but then remained nearly constant for several hours after impact. On the day following the impact, both CN and [OI] emission concentrated on the comet nucleus had returned nearly to pre-impact levels. We have also searched for differences in the scattering properties of the dust ejected by the impact compared to the dust released under normal conditions. Compared to the pre-impact state of the comet, we find evidence that the color of the comet was slightly bluer during the post-impact rise in brightness. Long after the impact, in the following nights, the comet colors returned to their pre-impact values. This can be explained by postulating a change to a smaller particle size distribution in the ejecta cloud, in agreement with the findings from mid-infrared observations, or by postulating a large fraction of clean ice particles, or by a combination of these two.

  18. Visible and near-infrared spectrophotometry of the Deep Impact ejecta of Comet 9P/Tempel 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodapp, Klaus W.; Aldering, Greg; Meech, Karen J.; Cochran, Anita L.; Antilogus, Pierre; Pécontal, Emmanuel; Chickering, William; Blanc, Nathalie; Copin, Yannick; Lynch, David K.; Rudy, Richard J.; Mazuk, S.; Venturini, Catherine C.; Puetter, Richard C.; Perry, Raleigh B.

    We have obtained optical spectrophotometry of the evolution of Comet 9P/Tempel 1 after the impact of the Deep Impact probe, using the Supernova Integral Field Spectrograph (SNIFS) at the UH 2.2-m telescope, as well as simultaneous optical and infrared spectra using the Lick Visible-to-Near-Infrared Imaging Spectrograph (VNIRIS). The spatial distribution and temporal evolution of the “violet band” CN (0 0) emission and of the 630 nm [OI] emission was studied. We found that CN emission centered on the nucleus increased in the 2 h after impact, but that this CN emission was delayed compared to the light curve of dust-scattered sunlight. The CN emission also expanded faster than the cloud of scattering dust. The emission of [OI] at 630 nm rose similarly to the scattered light, but then remained nearly constant for several hours after impact. On the day following the impact, both CN and [OI] emission concentrated on the comet nucleus had returned nearly to pre-impact levels. We have also searched for differences in the scattering properties of the dust ejected by the impact compared to the dust released under normal conditions. Compared to the pre-impact state of the comet, we find evidence that the color of the comet was slightly bluer during the post-impact rise in brightness. Long after the impact, in the following nights, the comet colors returned to their pre-impact values. This can be explained by postulating a change to a smaller particle size distribution in the ejecta cloud, in agreement with the findings from mid-infrared observations, or by postulating a large fraction of clean ice particles, or by a combination of these two.

  19. The Manson impact crater: Estimation of the energy of formation, possible size of the impacting asteroid or comet, and ejecta volume and mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roddy, D. J.; Shoemaker, E. M.; Anderson, R. R.

    1993-01-01

    A research program on the Manson impact structure has substantially improved our knowledge of the detailed features of this eroded crater. As part of our structural studies, we have derived a value of 21 km for the diameter of the final transient cavity formed during crater excavation. With this information, we can estimate the energy of formation of the Manson crater and the possible size of the impacting asteroid or comet. In addition, we have estimated the near- and far-field ejecta volumes and masses.

  20. Magnetic properties of the ejecta blanket from the Chicxulub impact crater: Analog for robotic exploration of similar deposits on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kletetschka, G.; Wasilewski, P. J.; Ocampo, A.; Pope, K.

    2001-05-01

    A major focus in the search for fossil life on Mars is on recognition of the proper material on the surface. Heavily cratered surface suggests high concentration of fluidized ejecta deposits. Because magnetism of rocks is an easy measure for remote robotic tools we collected samples of ejecta blanket deposits in southern Mexico and throughout Belize as a Martian analog. The ejecta layer (spheroid bed) that blankets the preexisting Cretaceous dolomite units consists of green glassy fragments, pink and white spheroids (accretionary lapilli) and darker fragments of limestone. The spheroid bed is overlain by a coarse unit of pebbles, cobbles, and boulders, which in more distal locations is composed of a pebble conglomerate. Clasts in the conglomerate (Pooks Pebbles) have striated features consistent with hypervelocity collisions during impact. We examined the magnetic properties of individual fragments within the spheroid bed. Green glassy fragments are highly paramagnetic (0.2 to 0.3 Am2kg-1 at 2 Tesla field) with no ferromagnetic component detected. Pink spheroids are slightly paramagnetic (0.001 to 0.04 Am2kg-1 at 2 Tesla field) and commonly contain soft ferromagnetic component (saturation magnetization (Ms) = 0.02 to 0.03 Am2kg-1). White spheroids have more or less equal amount of paramagnetic and diamagnetic components (-0.08 to 0.03 Am2kg-1 at 2 Tesla field) and no apparent ferromagnetism. Darker fragments are diamagnetic (-0.05 to -0.02 Am2kg-1 at 2 Tesla field) with absence of ferromagnetism. Intense paramagnetic properties of the glass allow easy distinction of glass containing samples. Pink spheroids appear to contain the largest amount of ferromagnetic particles. Diamagnetic dark grains are most likely fragments of limestone. Pebbles from the conglomerate unit are dolomite and consequently diamagnetic. The diamagnetism was established with field magnetic susceptibility measurements. Pebbles have very small natural remanent magnetization (NRM). Thermal

  1. The Cretaceous-Paleogene transition and Chicxulub impact ejecta in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico: Paleoenvironments, sequence stratigraphic setting and target lithologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, Peter

    2003-07-01

    The Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-P) transition is characterized by a period of mass extinctions, the Chicxulub impact event, sea-level changes, and considerable climate changes (e.g., cooling). The Gulf of Mexico region is a key area for addressing these issues, specifically because of the proximity to the large Chicxulub impact structure in southern Mexico, and because of its shallow shelf areas throughout the Maastrichtian to Danian period. This study presents the results of a multidisciplinary investigation of Chicxulub impact ejecta and marine sediments from the K-P transition in the western Gulf of Mexico. Sedimentological, mineralogical, and geochemical aspects of K-P sections and cores from northeastern Mexico, Texas, and Alabama have been by studied with focus on Chicxulub ejecta, long- or short-term facies change, and sequence stratigraphic setting. CHICXULUB EJECTA: The Chicxulub ejecta (or impact spherule) deposits from northeastern Mexico and Texas revealed an unexpected complex and localized ejecta composition. Fe-Mg-rich chlorite- as well as Si-Al-K-rich glass-spherules are the predominant silicic ejecta components in northeastern Mexico, whereas in Texas, spherules of Mg-rich smectite compositions were encountered. Spherules contain Fe-Ti-K-rich schlieren, Fe-Mg-rich globules, and rare µm-sized metallic and sulfidic Ni-Co-(Ir-?) rich inclusions. This composition provides evidence for a distinct range of target rocks of mafic to intermediate composition, presumably situated in the northwestern sector of the Chicxulub impact structure, in addition to the possibility of contamination by meteoritic material. The absence of spinels and the ubiquitous presence of hematite and goethite points to high oxygen fugacity during the impact process. Besides these silicic phases, the most prominent ejecta component is carbonate.! Carbonate is found in ejecta deposits as unshocked clasts, accretionary lapilli-like grains, melt globules (often with quenching textures

  2. Mapping of a Widespread Olivine-Rich Layer on Mars: Identification of a Global Impact Ejecta Deposit?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, C. S.; Christensen, P. R.

    2011-12-01

    Exposures of the most ancient materials on Mars, much like on Earth, have the possibility to illuminate a period of planetary surface evolution that is difficult to constrain. However, these exposures on planetary surfaces are rare and often difficult to positively identify without in situ measurements. Identification of these materials is especially difficult on Mars, as it is a largely volcanic planet dominated by basaltic magmatism and the ability to distinguish ancient materials from more recent deposits is primarily reliant on convincing stratigraphic relationships. Important but relatively minor variations in the basaltic composition of the planet are observed on the global scale; however, the majority of the planet's mineralogical variability and diversity occurs at small scales, for example the identification of in place phyllosilicates, carbonates, olivine-rich basalts, sulfate deposits, and opaline silica. It is these local-scale deposits that have fundamentally refined and shaped our current understanding of the evolutionary history and geology of Mars. Olivine-rich basalts have been characterized and mapped extensively, both globally and locally. These units have been associated with a variety of formation mechanisms, including volcanism, impact ejecta material, and lag deposits. Following the work of Edwards et al. (2008), we have mapped and characterized a compositionally distinct olivine-rich layer using TES, THEMIS, and CRISM spectral data. This thin and flat lying (~200m thick), continuous, rocky (TI >600-800 J K-1m-2s-1/2), olivine-rich (>15% areal abundance of ~Fo58-Fo74) basalt layer extends for a minimum of thousands of kilometers and may be global in scale. Additionally, the composition of this material is consistent with the crystallization of a melt derived from the martian mantle that underwent little fractional crystallization. The stratigraphic location of this layer, which was first identified in the walls of Valles Marineris in Ganges

  3. Butterfly Ejecta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 4 September 2003

    In the heavily cratered southern highlands of Mars, the type of crater seen in this THEMIS visible image is relatively rare. Elliptical craters with 'butterfly' ejecta patterns make up roughly 5% of the total crater population of Mars. They are caused by impactors which hit the surface at oblique, or very shallow angles. Similar craters are also seen in about the same abundance on the Moon and Venus.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -24.6, Longitude 41 East (319 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  4. The Stickney Crater ejecta secondary impact crater spike on Phobos: Implications for the age of Stickney and the surface of Phobos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsley, Kenneth R.; Head, James W.

    2017-04-01

    A global and uniformly distributed spike of secondary impact craters on Phobos with diameters (D) <0.6 km and a portion of craters up to D 2 km were produced by Stickney Crater ejecta, including secondary craters within the surface area of Stickney Crater. The global exposure of Phobos to Stickney secondary impacts was facilitated by the desynchronized orbital/rotational period of Phobos that was produced by the impulse of the Stickney impact event. In our model we apply the Tsiolkovsky rocket equation to calculate the total available Stickney impact acceleration impulse delta-v (Δv) and further calculate the effective impulse by incorporating the energy conversion inefficiencies of the crater formation process. We also calculate the pre- and post-impact Phobos moment of inertia that further contributes to the desynchronizing effect. The majority of the Stickney ejecta that exited from Phobos was trapped in orbits around Mars until it later accumulated back onto Phobos over a period of <1000 years. However, Phobos de-spun back to a synchronous rotation after a much longer period of at least 5000 years. Therefore, a sufficient period of desynchronized rotation exposed the entire surface of Phobos to ejecta that returned from martian orbits. In view of how all or most craters observed inside Stickney Crater approximate the size/frequency distribution (SFD) of Stickney secondary impacts, it is infeasible to derive an age for Stickney Crater based on an assumption of background impacts ( 2.8-4.2 Ga according to Schmedemann et al. (2014)). In view of how crater-counting is unworkable for age-dating Stickney Crater we conclude an alternate age for Stickney Crater of 0.1-0.5 Ga that is constrained instead by the boulder evidence of Thomas et al. (2000), the boulder destruction rate analysis of Basilevsky et al. (2013, 2015), and the observed space weathering of Phobos regolith (Cipriani et al., 2011; Pieters et al., 2014). Assessing several implications of our model we 1

  5. Impact ejecta layer from the mid-Devonian: possible connection to global mass extinctions.

    PubMed

    Ellwood, Brooks B; Benoist, Stephen L; El Hassani, Ahmed; Wheeler, Christopher; Crick, Rex E

    2003-06-13

    We have found evidence for a bolide impacting Earth in the mid-Devonian ( approximately 380 million years ago), including high concentrations of shocked quartz, Ni, Cr, As, V, and Co anomalies; a large negative carbon isotope shift (-9 per mil); and microspherules and microcrysts at Jebel Mech Irdane in the Anti Atlas desert near Rissani, Morocco. This impact is important because it is coincident with a major global extinction event (Kacák/otomari event), suggesting a possible cause-and-effect relation between the impact and the extinction. The result may represent the extinction of as many as 40% of all living marine animal genera.

  6. Ejecta- and Size-Scaling Considerations from Impacts of Glass Projectiles into Sand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson J. L. B.; Cintala, M. J.; Siebenaler, S. A.; Barnouin-Jha, O. S.

    2007-01-01

    One of the most promising means of learning how initial impact conditions are related to the processes leading to the formation of a planetary-scale crater is through scaling relationships.1,2,3 The first phase of deriving such relationships has led to great insight into the cratering process and has yielded predictive capabilities that are mathematically rigorous and internally consistent. Such derivations typically have treated targets as continuous media; in many, cases, however, planetary materials represent irregular and discontinuous targets, the effects of which on the scaling relationships are still poorly understood.4,5 We continue to examine the effects of varying impact conditions on the excavation and final dimensions of craters formed in sand. Along with the more commonly treated variables such as impact speed, projectile size and material, and impact angle,6 such experiments also permit the study of changing granularity and friction angle of the target materials. This contribution presents some of the data collected during and after the impact of glass spheres into a medium-grained sand.

  7. The Acraman impact structure: Estimation of the diameter by the ejecta layer thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurov, E. P.

    1993-01-01

    The big role of gigantic craters formation in geological history of the Earth was established by the example of the K/T boundary event. The discovery of the iridium anomaly in the sedimentary rocks of Vendian in the western part of Ukrainian shield allows to suppose its origin in connection with the great impact of that time. The only big impact structure of that age is the Acraman Crater in south-eastern part of Australia. The Acraman Crater is presented by deeply eroded structure, original diameter of which it is difficult to determine. By geological and morphological data the Acraman Crater is presented by an inner ring 30 km in diameter, an intermediate ring 90 km in diameter, and an outer ring about 150-160 km in diameter.

  8. Impact ejecta horizon within late precambrian shales, adelaide geosyncline, South australia.

    PubMed

    Gostin, V A; Haines, P W; Jenkins, R J; Compston, W; Williams, I S

    1986-07-11

    A solitary layer of shattered crustal rock fragments has been traced over a distance of 260 kilometers within folded 600-million-year-old Precambrian marine shales of the Adelaide Geosyncline, South Australia. The fragments consist entirely of acid to intermediate volcanics (approximately 1575 million years old) displaying shattered mineral grains, shock lamellae in quartz, and small shatter cones. Fragments reach 30 centimeters in diameter and show evidence of vertical fall emplacement. Available evidence points to derivation of the rock fragments from a distant hypervelocity impact into the Gawler Range Volcanics at Lake Acraman, approximately 300 kilometers west of the Adelaide Geosyncline.

  9. Parabolic Ejecta Features on Titan? Probably Not

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, R. D.; Melosh, H. J.

    1996-03-01

    Radar mapping of Venus by Magellan indicated a number of dark parabolic features, associated with impact craters. A suggested mechanism for generating such features is that ejecta from the impact event is 'winnowed' by the zonal wind field, with smaller ejecta particles falling out of the atmosphere more slowly, and hence drifting further. What discriminates such features from simple wind streaks is the 'stingray' or parabolic shape. This is due to the ejecta's spatial distribution prior to being winnowed during fallout, and this distribution is generated by the explosion plume of the impact piercing the atmosphere, allowing the ejecta to disperse pseudoballistically before re-entering the atmosphere, decelerating to terminal velocity and then being winnowed. Here we apply this model to Titan, which has a zonal wind field similar to that of Venus. We find that Cassini will probably not find parabolic features, as the winds stretch the deposition so far that ejecta will form streaks or bands instead.

  10. 22Ne and 23Na ejecta from intermediate-mass stars: the impact of the new LUNA rate for 22Ne(p, γ)23Na

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slemer, A.; Marigo, P.; Piatti, D.; Aliotta, M.; Bemmerer, D.; Best, A.; Boeltzig, A.; Bressan, A.; Broggini, C.; Bruno, C. G.; Caciolli, A.; Cavanna, F.; Ciani, G. F.; Corvisiero, P.; Davinson, T.; Depalo, R.; Di Leva, A.; Elekes, Z.; Ferraro, F.; Formicola, A.; Fülöp, Zs.; Gervino, G.; Guglielmetti, A.; Gustavino, C.; Gyürky, G.; Imbriani, G.; Junker, M.; Menegazzo, R.; Mossa, V.; Pantaleo, F. R.; Prati, P.; Straniero, O.; Szücs, T.; Takács, M. P.; Trezzi, D.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the impact of the new LUNA rate for the nuclear reaction 22Ne(p, γ)23Na on the chemical ejecta of intermediate-mass stars, with particular focus on the thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) stars that experience hot-bottom burning. To this aim, we use the PARSEC and COLIBRI codes to compute the complete evolution, from the pre-main sequence up to the termination of the TP-AGB phase, of a set of stellar models with initial masses in the range 3.0-6.0 M⊙ and metallicities Zi = 0.0005, 0.006 and 0.014. We find that the new LUNA measures have much reduced the nuclear uncertainties of the 22Ne and 23Na AGB ejecta that drop from factors of ≃10 to only a factor of few for the lowest metallicity models. Relying on the most recent estimations for the destruction rate of 23Na, the uncertainties that still affect the 22Ne and 23Na AGB ejecta are mainly dominated by the evolutionary aspects (efficiency of mass-loss, third dredge-up, convection). Finally, we discuss how the LUNA results impact on the hypothesis that invokes massive AGB stars as the main agents of the observed O-Na anticorrelation in Galactic globular clusters. We derive quantitative indications on the efficiencies of key physical processes (mass-loss, third dredge-up, sodium destruction) in order to simultaneously reproduce both the Na-rich, O-poor extreme of the anticorrelation and the observational constraints on the CNO abundance. Results for the corresponding chemical ejecta are made publicly available.

  11. Stratigraphies of Apollo and Luna Highland Landing Sites and Provenances of Materials from the Perspective of Basin Impact Ejecta Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskin, Larry A.; Korotev, Randy L.; Gillis, Jeffrey J.; Jolliff, Bradley L.

    2002-01-01

    What are the provenances of the non-mare materials collected at the Apollo and Luna sampling sites? Results from basin ejecta modeling suggest that much of it came from distant basins. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. Contribution of secondary ejecta to the debris population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandeville, J.-C.; Bariteau, M.

    2004-01-01

    When a micro-debris or a micrometeoroid impacts a spacecraft surface, secondary particles, called ejecta, are produced. These ejecta can contribute to a modification of the debris environment: either locally by the occurrence of secondary impacts on the components of complex and large space structures, or at great distances by the formation of a population of small orbital debris. This paper describes the ejecta production mechanism, and shows their orbital evolution. Then, the distribution of ejecta in low earth orbits is given. Some results are presented describing the number of ejecta as a function of size and altitude.

  13. A modelling of ejecta as a space debris source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bariteau, Muriel; Mandeville, Jean-Claude

    2001-10-01

    When a micro-debris or a micrometeoroid impacts a spacecraft surface, secondary particles, called ejecta, are produced. These ejecta can contributes to a modification of the debris environment: either locally by the occurrence of secondary impacts on the components of complex and large space structures, or at great distances by the formation of a population of small orbital debris. This paper describes, firstly, the ejecta production, and secondly, their lifetime and orbit propagation. Then, the repartition of ejecta in LEO is given. Results describing the ejecta number as a function of size and altitude are presented.

  14. Sinuosity of Martian rampart ejecta deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, Nadine G.

    1994-01-01

    The sinuosities of 2213 Martian rampart ejecta craters are quantified through measurement of the ejecta flow front perimeter and ejecta area. This quantity, called lobateness, was computed for each complete lobe of the 1582 single lobe (SL), 251 double lobe (DL), and 380 multiple lobe (ML) craters included in this study. A lobateness value of 1 indicates a circular ejecta blanket, whereas more sinuous ejecta perimeters have lobateness values greater than 1. Although resolution does have an effect on the absolute values of lobateness, the general relationships between lobateness and morphology exist regardless of resolution. Evaluation of the lobateness values reveals that the outer lobes of DL and ML craters have higher median lobateness values (i.e., are more sinuous) than the inner lobes. The outermost lobe of ML craters displays higher lobateness values than the outer lobe of DL craters or the single lobe of SL craters. Previous reports of lobateness-diameter, lobateness-latitude, and lobateness-terrain relationships for rampart craters are not supported by this study. Many of the differences between the results of this study and the previous lobateness analyses can be attributed to the inclusion of resolution effects and the distinction between different ejecta morphologies in this study. The results of this study taken together with a previous analysis of the distribution and diameter dependence of different ejecta morphologies are most consistent with the theory that Martian lobate ejecta morphologies form from impact into subsurface volatiles.

  15. Crater ejecta scaling laws - Fundamental forms based on dimensional analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housen, K. R.; Schmidt, R. M.; Holsapple, K. A.

    1983-01-01

    Self-consistent scaling laws are developed for meteoroid impact crater ejecta. Attention is given to the ejection velocity of material as a function of the impact point, the volume of ejecta with a threshold velocity, and the thickness of ejecta deposit in terms of the distance from the impact. Use is made of recently developed equations for energy and momentum coupling in cratering events. Consideration is given to scaling of laboratory trials up to real-world events and formulations are developed for calculating the ejection velocities and ejecta blanket profiles in the gravity and strength regimes of crater formation. It is concluded that, in the gravity regime, the thickness of an ejecta blanket is the same in all directions if the thickness and range are expressed in terms of the crater radius. In the strength regime, however, the ejecta velocities are independent of crater size, thereby allowing for asymmetric ejecta blankets. Controlled experiments are recommended for the gravity/strength transition.

  16. Double-layered ejecta craters on Mars: morphology, formation, and a comparison with the Ries ejecta blanket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenkmann, Thomas; Wulf, Gerwin; Sturm, Sebastian; Pietrek, Alexa

    2015-04-01

    The ejecta blankets of impact craters in volatile-rich environments often show characteristic layered ejecta morphologies. The so-called double-layer ejecta (DLE) craters are probably the most confusing crater types showing two ejecta layers with distinct morphologies. A phenomenological ejecta excavation and emplacement model for DLE craters is proposed based on a detailed case study of the Martian crater Steinheim - a textbook like, pristine DLE crater - and studies of other DLE craters [1]. The observations show that DLE craters on Mars are the result of an impact event into a rock/ice mixture that produces large amounts of shock-induced vaporization and melting of ground ice. The deposits of the ejecta curtain are wet in the distal part and dryer in composition in the proximal part. As a result, the outer ejecta layer is emplaced as medial and distal ejecta that propagate outwards in a fluid saturated debris flow mode after landing overrunning previously formed secondary craters. In contrast, the inner ejecta layer is formed by a translational slide of the proximal ejecta deposits. This slide overruns and superimposes parts of the outer ejecta layer. Basal melting of the ice components of the ejecta volumes at the transient crater rim is induced by frictional heating and the enhanced pressure at depth. The results indicate similar processes also for other planetary bodies with volatile-rich environments, such as Ganymede, Europa or the Earth. The Ries crater on Earth has a similar ejecta thickness distribution as DLE craters on Mars [2]. Here basal sliding and fluidization of the ejecta increases outward by the entrainment of locally derived Tertiary sands and clays, that are saturated with groundwater. References: [1] Wulf, G. & Kenkmann, T. (2015) Met. Planet. Sci. (in press); [2] Sturm, S., Wulf. G., Jung, D. & Kenkmann, T. (2013) Geology 41, 531-534.

  17. Paleomagnetism of Triassic bedded chert from Japan for determining the age of an impact ejecta layer deposited on peri-equatorial latitudes of the paleo-Pacific Ocean: A preliminary analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Koji; Yamashita, Daisuke; Onoue, Tetsuji; Uehara, Daiki

    2015-12-01

    Bedded chert samples from the Norian (Upper Triassic) Sakahogi section of the Mino Terrane in the Inuyama area, southwest Japan, have been collected for paleomagnetic study in order to determine the age of an impact ejecta layer interbedded within it and the paleolatitude of its deposition. Thermal demagnetization of the bedded chert samples revealed four distinct remanent magnetization components. The last demagnetized component with both polarities is interpreted to be the primary magnetization, which produced the first magnetostratigraphic data of the middle to upper Norian from Panthalassa, consistent with Tethyan magnetostratigraphic sections. Tie points were derived from paleomagnetic and paleontological data, from which the stratigraphic position of the ejecta layer was compared with the astronomically tuned geomagnetic polarity time scale (APTS). The age of ejecta layer is estimated to be about 212 Ma. This magnetostratigraphic age is consistent with the radiometric age of the Manicouagan impact that formed the second largest known crater in the Phanerozoic at Quebec, Canada. The results of this study, as well as previous studies, suggest that the chert section, which includes the ejecta layer, was deposited within a paleolatitude range of 0.3-14.4°N. This indicates that the material ejected by the Manicouagan impact event reached near the equatorial region of the paleo-Pacific Ocean.

  18. Research on the Statistical Property of the Ejecta Population Derivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Fangfei; Xiao, Weike; Pang, Baojun

    2013-08-01

    During the debris population derivation in current versions of the orbital debris engineering model, NASA's ORDEM2010 and ESA's MASTER-2009, the ejecta model is simplified in some degree so as to link the populations with data. As a requirement for more accurate space debris environment model, researches on the statistical inference of population derivation of the ejecta model are essential. We simulate single particle impacts in various relative velocity directions in space with current ejecta model, in order to figure out features in ejecta orbital evolution such as orbital lifetime. In view of the nearly continuous generation of this secondary source, information of the on-orbit spacecraft area especially the debris flux is also taken into account. The simulation results show that by assuming the ejecta model is precise, these features which make the ejecta model distinct could increase the debris population accuracy before being linked to the observed data.

  19. Ejecta of the Ries Crater, Germany

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horz, F.

    1982-01-01

    Attention is given to the light which may be shed by the ejecta surrounding the 26-km diameter Ries Crater in West Germany on the Cretaceous-Tertiary Boundary Event. Moldavites represent early high speed ejecta originating at the projectile-target interface. Bunte breccia reflects the major excavation and ejection phase, comprising more than 90 percent of all ejecta beyond the rim crest. Suevite is deposited last, and is derived from the deepest target stratum. Using various scaling laws that relate the bolide's kinetic energy to crater geometry or volume, and assuming a 25 km/sec impact velocity, a 1-2 km projectile diameter is obtained for a stony object. Geochemical studies reveal that projectile dissemination is heterogeneous, and that maximum extraterrestrial contamination modeled as a C1 chondrite is 0.004 wt pct. Observations from this and other terrestrial craters show that tektites and microtectites provide the sole evidence for widespread impact deposits.

  20. Chicxulub High-Altitude Ballistic Ejecta from Central Belize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, K. O.; Ocampo, A. C.

    2000-01-01

    Chicxulub ejecta are found in central Belize, 475 km southeast of the impact crater center. These deposits are ballistic ejecta launched along high-altitude trajectories above the atmosphere and deposited as a discontinuous sheet on the terminal Cretaceous land surface.

  1. Scientific Objectives of Small Carry-on Impactor (SCI) and Deployable Camera 3 Digital (DCAM3-D): Observation of an Ejecta Curtain and a Crater Formed on the Surface of Ryugu by an Artificial High-Velocity Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, M.; Wada, K.; Saiki, T.; Kadono, T.; Takagi, Y.; Shirai, K.; Okamoto, C.; Yano, H.; Hayakawa, M.; Nakazawa, S.; Hirata, N.; Kobayashi, M.; Michel, P.; Jutzi, M.; Imamura, H.; Ogawa, K.; Sakatani, N.; Iijima, Y.; Honda, R.; Ishibashi, K.; Hayakawa, H.; Sawada, H.

    2016-10-01

    The Small Carry-on Impactor (SCI) equipped on Hayabusa2 was developed to produce an artificial impact crater on the primitive Near-Earth Asteroid (NEA) 162173 Ryugu (Ryugu) in order to explore the asteroid subsurface material unaffected by space weathering and thermal alteration by solar radiation. An exposed fresh surface by the impactor and/or the ejecta deposit excavated from the crater will be observed by remote sensing instruments, and a subsurface fresh sample of the asteroid will be collected there. The SCI impact experiment will be observed by a Deployable CAMera 3-D (DCAM3-D) at a distance of ˜1 km from the impact point, and the time evolution of the ejecta curtain will be observed by this camera to confirm the impact point on the asteroid surface. As a result of the observation of the ejecta curtain by DCAM3-D and the crater morphology by onboard cameras, the subsurface structure and the physical properties of the constituting materials will be derived from crater scaling laws. Moreover, the SCI experiment on Ryugu gives us a precious opportunity to clarify effects of microgravity on the cratering process and to validate numerical simulations and models of the cratering process.

  2. Modeling the Provenance of Crater Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ya-Huei; Minton, David A.

    2014-11-01

    The cratering history of the Moon provides a way to study the violent early history of our early solar system. Nevertheless, we are still limited in our ability to interpret the lunar cratering history because the complex process of generation and subsequent transportation and destruction of impact melt products is relatively poorly understood. Here we describe a preliminary model for the transport of datable impact melt products by craters over Gy timescales on the lunar surface. We use a numerical model based on the Maxwell Z-model to model the exhumation and transport of ejecta material from within the excavation flow of a transient crater. We describe our algorithm for rapidly estimating the provenance of ejecta material for use in a Monte Carlo cratering code capable of simulating lunar cratering over Gy timescales.

  3. Ejecta emplacement: from distal to proximal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemieva, N.

    2008-09-01

    Introduction Most part of impact ejecta is deposited ballistically at some distance from a crater, defined by ejection velocity V and ejection angle α: d=v2sinα/g. In case of giant impacts, planetary curvature should be taken into account [1]. Combined with ejecta scaling [2], these relations allow to define ejecta thickness as a function of distance. Ejecta from large craters are deposited at velocity high enough to mobilize substrate material and to thicken ejecta deposits [3]. Ballistic approximation is valid for airless bodies (if impact vaporization is not vast) or for proximal ejecta of large impact craters, where ejecta mass per unit area is substantially greater than the mass of involved vapor/atmosphere (M-ratio). Deposition of distal ejecta, in which ejecta mass is negligible compared to the atmosphere, may be also treated in a simplified manner, i.e. as 1) passive motion of ejected particles within an impact plume and 2) later, as sedimentation of particles in undisturbed atmosphere (equilibrium between gravity and drag). In all intermediate M-ratio values, impact ejecta move like a surge, i.e. dilute suspension current in which particles are carried in turbulent flows under the influence of gravity. Surges are well-known for near-surface explosive tests, described in detail for volcanic explosions (Plinian column collapse, phreato-magmatic eruption, lateral blast), and found in ejecta from the Chicxulub [4] and the Ries [5]. Important aspects of surge transport include its ability to deposit ejecta over a larger area than that typical of continuous ballistic ejecta and to create multiple ejecta layers. Numerical model Two-phase hydrodynamics. Surges should be modeled in the frame of two-phase hydrodynamics, i.e. interaction between solid/molten particles and atmospheric gas/impact vapor should be taken into account. There are two techniques of solving equations for dust particle motion in a gas flow. The first one describes solid/molten particles as a

  4. Thicknesses of and Primary Ejecta Fractions in Basin Ejecta Deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskin, Larry A.; McKinnon, William B.

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a model for production of ba-sin ejecta deposits to address provenances of materials collected at the Apollo and Luna landing sites and for consideration in interpreting remote sensing data.

  5. Thicknesses of and Primary Ejecta Fractions in Basin Ejecta Deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskin, Larry A.; McKinnon, William B.

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a model for production of basin ejecta deposits to address provenances of materials collected at the Apollo and Luna landing sites and for consideration in interpreting remote sensing data.

  6. Influence of shockwave profile on ejecta

    SciTech Connect

    Zellner, Michael B; Dimonte, Guy; Germann, Tim C; Hammerberg, James E; Rigg, Paulo A; Buttler, William T; Stevens, Gerald D; Turley, William D

    2009-01-01

    This effort investigates the relation between shock-pulse shape and the amount of micron-scale fragments ejected (ejecta) upon shock release at the metal/vacuum interface of shocked Sn targets. Two shock-pulse shapes are considered: a supported shock created by impacting a Sn target with a sabot that was accelerated using a powder gun; and an unsupported or Taylor shockwave, created by detonation of high explosive that was press-fit to the front-side of the Sn target. Ejecta production at the back-side or free-side of the Sn coupons were characterized through use of piezoelectric pins. Assay foils, optical shadowgraphy, and x-ray attenuation.

  7. Structure of Solar Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, G.; Cantó, J.; Lara, A.; González, R.; Schwenn, R.

    Solar Ejecta (SE) have been of interest in the last years, especially those which may reach Earth environment. It is possible to observe the SE early evolution, when they are in the field of view of coronagraphs. There are few indirect observations, as the case of interplanetary scintillation, of SEs in the interplanetary medium. Finally, we observe SEs in situ when they arrive at 1 AU.The SEs structure and evolution are important to understand the origin of these phenomena but to predict the possible effects in the space weather. It is of general acceptance that SEs are "Erupting Flux Ropes" traveling trough the Solar Wind. The "shapes" have been modeled as cylinders or as "ice cream cones" in order to represent the many different projections observed on Coronagraphs.We present a model of the SE evolution based on purely Hydrodynamic considerations. This model reproduces in good approximation some of the features observed in the images and in the measures of the shocks near Earth.

  8. Morphology and Scaling of Ejecta Deposits on Icy Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenk, Paul M.; Ridolfi, Francis J.; Bredekamp, Joe (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Continuous ejecta deposits on Ganymede consist of two major units, or facies: a thick inner hummocky pedestal facies, and a relatively thin outer radially scoured facies defined also by the inner limit of the secondary crater field. Both ejecta facies have a well-defined power-law relationship to crater diameter for craters ranging from 15 to approx. 600 km across. This relationship can be used to estimate the nominal crater diameter for impact features on icy satellites (such as palimpsests and multiring basins) for which the crater rim is no longer recognizable. Ejecta deposits have also been mapped on 4 other icy satellites. Although morphologically similar to eject deposits on the Moon, ejecta deposits for smaller craters are generally significantly broader in extent on the icy satellites, in apparent defiance of predictions of self-similarity. A greater degree of rim collapse and enlargement on the Moon may explain the observed difference.

  9. Asteroid mega-impacts and Precambrian banded iron formations: 2.63 Ga and 2.56 Ga impact ejecta/fallout at the base of BIF/argillite units, Hamersley Basin, Pilbara Craton, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glikson, Andrew; Vickers, John

    2007-02-01

    The temporal association between late Archaean to earliest Proterozoic asteroid impact ejecta/fallout units and overlying banded iron formations suggests that, in some instances, these impacts were closely followed by significant transformation in the nature of source terrains of the sediments. The Jeerinah Impact Layer (JIL) [B.M. Simonson, D. Davies, S.W. Hassler, Discovery of a layer of probable impact melt spherules in the late Archean Jeerinah Formation, Fortescue Group, Western Australia. Aust. J. Earth Sci. 47 (2000) 315-325; B.M. Simonson, S.W. Hassler, Revised correlations in the early Precambrian Hamersley Basin based on a horizon of resedimented impact spherules. Aust. J. Earth Sci. 44 (1997) 37-48; B.M. Simonson, B.P. Glass, Spherule layers - records of ancient impacts. Ann. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci. 32 (2004) 329-361; A.Y. Glikson, Early Precambrian asteroid impact-triggered tsunami: excavated seabed, debris flows, exotic boulders, and turbulence features associated with 3.47-2.47 Ga-old asteroid impact fallout units, Pilbara Craton, Western Australia. Astrobiology 4 (2001) 19-50; S.W. Hassler, B.M. Simonson, D.Y. Sumner, D. Murphy, Neoarchaean impact spherule layers in the Fortescue and Hamersley Groups, Western Australia: stratigraphic and depositional implications of re-correlation. Aust. J. Earth Sci. 52 (2005) 759-772; B. Rasmussen, C. Koeberl, Iridium anomalies and shocked quartz in a late Archean spherule layer from the Pilbara Craton: new evidence for a major asteroid impact at 2.63 Ga. Geology 32 (2004) 1029-1032; B. Rasmussen, T.S. Blake, I.R. Fletcher, U-Pb zircon age constraints on the Hamersley spherule beds: Evidence for a single 2.63 Ga Jeerinah-Carawine impact ejecta layer. Geology, 33 (2005) 725-728.] overlies an argillite-dominated unit (Jeerinah Formation, 2684 ± 6 Ma [A.F. Trendall, W. Compston, D.R. Nelson, J.R. deLaeter, V.C. Bennett, SHRIMP zircon ages constraining the depositional chronology of the Hamersley Group, Western

  10. Fates of satellite ejecta in the Saturn system, II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarellos, José Luis; Dobrovolskis, Anthony R.; Zahnle, Kevin J.; Hamill, Patrick; Dones, Luke; Robbins, Stuart

    2017-03-01

    We assess the fates of ejecta from the large craters Aeneas on Dione and Ali Baba on Enceladus (161 and 39 km in diameter, respectively), as well as that from Herschel (130 km in diameter) on Mimas. The ejecta are treated either as 'spalls' launched from hard surfaces, or as 'rubble' launched from a weak rubble pile regolith. Once in orbit we consider the ejecta as massless test particles subject to the gravity of Saturn and its classical satellites. The great majority of escaped ejecta get swept up by the source moons. The best fit to the ejecta population decay is a stretched exponential with exponent near 1/2 (Dobrovolskis et al., Icarus 188, 481-505, 2007). We bracket the characteristic ejecta sizes corresponding to Grady-Kipp fragments and spalls. Based on this and computed impact velocities and incidence angles, the resulting sesquinary craters, if they exist, should have diameters on the order of a few meters to a few km. The observed longitude distribution of small craters on Mimas along with the findings of Bierhaus et al. that small moons should not have a secondary crater population (Icarus 218, 602-621, 2012) suggest that the most likely place to find sesquinary craters in the Saturn system is the antapex of Mimas.

  11. Eltanin: Ground Truth for Kilometer-Sized Deep-Ocean Impacts (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyte, F. T.; Gersonde, R.; Kuhn, G.

    2009-12-01

    Deposits of the late Pliocene (2.5 Ma) Eltanin impact are unique in the known geological record. The only known example of a km-sized asteroid to impact a deep-ocean (5 km) basin, is the most meterorite-rich locality known on Earth. This was discovered as an Ir anomaly in sediments from three cores collected in the SE Pacific in 1965 by the USNS Eltanin. Subsequently, two expeditions of the R/V Polarstern in 1995 and 2001 have conducted geological and geophysical investigations in the impact region. An area of ~80,000 km2 has been mapped in some detail, and deposits from the impact are found in 23 cores spanning a region extending 660 (E-W) by 250 km (N-S). We find a central region 50 to 100 km across, near the Freeden Seamounts (57.3S, 90.5W), where sediments as old as Eocene have been ripped up (perhaps to basement) and redeposited by the impact into a chaotic mix of pebble to boulder-sized fragments. This is overlain by a fining upward sequence of sediments with laminations and some cross-bedding consistent with deposition in a high-energy flow regime. Near the top of this impact deposit, sub mm- to cm-sized meteoritic ejecta is mixed into the disturbed sediment. This ejecta is composed of 90% shock-melted asteroid and 10% unmelted meteorite fragments from the lo-metal mesosiderite asteroid. The amount of meteoritic ejecta in 13 cores from the central region record deposition of 3 to 50 kg of asteroid material per square meter. Km-sized impacts are fairly common on geological timescales, occurring a few times per m.y., so one or two other similar-sized, and several smaller projectiles likely hit the Pacific basin since the Late Pliocene. Undoubtedly, this is not the only such impact collected in deep-sea cores; it is unique only in that it has been recognized. Eltanin thus serves as type section for identifying ocean-impact deposits at other localities. Projectiles of this size cannot penetrate to the ocean floor and indeed there is no chemical evidence in the

  12. Venusian extended ejecta deposits as time-stratigraphic markers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenberg, Noam R.

    1992-01-01

    Use of impact crater ejects at time-stratigraphic markers was established during lunar geologic mapping efforts. The basic premise is that the deposition of impact ejecta, either by itself or mixed with impact-excavated material, is superimposed on a surface. The deposit becomes an observable, mappable unit produced in a single instant in geologic time. Up to two-thirds of Venus craters exhibit extended ejecta deposits. A reconnaissance survey of 336 craters (about 40 percent of the total population) was conducted. About half the craters examined were located in and around the Beta-Atla-Themis region, and half were spread over the western hemisphere of the planet. The survey was conducted using primarily C1-MIDR images. The preliminary survey shows: (1) of the 336 craters, 223 were found to have extended ejecta deposits. This proportion is higher than that found in other Venus crater databases by up to a factor of 2. (2) 53 percent of all extended ejecta craters were unambiguously superimposed on all volcanic and tectonic units. Crater Annia Faustina's associated parabolic ejecta deposit is clearly superimposed on volcanic flows coming from Gula Mons to the west. Parabola material from Faustina has covered the lava flows, smoothing the surface and reducing its specific backscatter cross section. The stratigraphy implies that the parabola material is the youngest observable unit in the region. (3) 12 percent of extended ejecta deposits are superimposed by volcanic materials. Crater Hwangcini has extended ejecta that has been covered by volcanic flows from a dome field to the northwest, implying that the volcanic units were emplaced subsequent to the ejecta deposit and are the youngest units in the locality. (4) It is difficult to determine the stratigraphic relationships of the remaining extended ejecta deposits in SAR at C1-MIDR resolution. Examination of higher resolution images and application of the other Magellan datasets in systematic manner should resolve

  13. Venusian extended ejecta deposits as time-stratigraphic markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izenberg, Noam R.

    1992-12-01

    Use of impact crater ejects at time-stratigraphic markers was established during lunar geologic mapping efforts. The basic premise is that the deposition of impact ejecta, either by itself or mixed with impact-excavated material, is superimposed on a surface. The deposit becomes an observable, mappable unit produced in a single instant in geologic time. Up to two-thirds of Venus craters exhibit extended ejecta deposits. A reconnaissance survey of 336 craters (about 40 percent of the total population) was conducted. About half the craters examined were located in and around the Beta-Atla-Themis region, and half were spread over the western hemisphere of the planet. The survey was conducted using primarily C1-MIDR images. The preliminary survey shows: (1) of the 336 craters, 223 were found to have extended ejecta deposits. This proportion is higher than that found in other Venus crater databases by up to a factor of 2. (2) 53 percent of all extended ejecta craters were unambiguously superimposed on all volcanic and tectonic units. Crater Annia Faustina's associated parabolic ejecta deposit is clearly superimposed on volcanic flows coming from Gula Mons to the west. Parabola material from Faustina has covered the lava flows, smoothing the surface and reducing its specific backscatter cross section. The stratigraphy implies that the parabola material is the youngest observable unit in the region. (3) 12 percent of extended ejecta deposits are superimposed by volcanic materials. Crater Hwangcini has extended ejecta that has been covered by volcanic flows from a dome field to the northwest, implying that the volcanic units were emplaced subsequent to the ejecta deposit and are the youngest units in the locality. (4) It is difficult to determine the stratigraphic relationships of the remaining extended ejecta deposits in SAR at C1-MIDR resolution. Examination of higher resolution images and application of the other Magellan datasets in systematic manner should resolve

  14. Summary of Results from Analyses of Deposits of the Deep-Ocean Impact of the Eltanin Asteroid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyte, Frank T.; Kuhn, Gerhard; Gersonde, Rainer

    2005-01-01

    Deposits of the late Pliocene (2.5 Ma) Eltanin impact are unique in the known geological record. The only known example of a km-sized asteroid to impact a deep-ocean (5 km) basin, is the most meterorite-rich locality known. This was discovered as an Ir anomaly in sediments from three cores collected in 1965 by the USNS Eltanin. These cores contained mm-sized shock-melted asteroid materials and unmelted meteorite fragments. Mineral chemistry of meteorite fragments, and siderophole concentrations in melt rocks, indicate that the parent asteroid was a low-metal (4\\%) mesosiderite. A geological exploration of the impact in 1995 by Polarstern expedition ANT-XIV4 was near the Freeden Seamounts (57.3S, 90.5 W), and successfully collected three cores with impact deposits. Analyses showed that sediments as old as Eocene were eroded by the impact disturbance and redeposited in three distinct units. The lowermost is a chaotic assemblage of sediment fragments up to 50 cm in size. Above this is a laminated sand-rich unit that deposited as a turbulent flow, and this is overlain by a more fine-grained deposit of silts and clays that settled from a cloud of sediment suspended in the water column. Meteoritic ejecta particles were concentrated near the base of the uppermost unit, where coarse ejecta caught up with the disturbed sediment. Here we will present results from a new suite of cores collected on Polarstern expedition ANT-XVIIU5a. In 2001, the Polarstern returned to the impact area and explored a region of 80,000 sq-km., collecting at least 16 sediment cores with meteoritic ejecta. The known strewn field extends over a region 660 by 200 km. The meteoritic ejecta is most concentrated in cores on the Freeden seamounts, and in the basins to the north, where the amount of meteoritic material deposited on the ocean floor was as much as 3 g/sq-cm. These concentrations drop off to the north and the east to levels as low as approximately 0.1 g/sq-cm. We were unable to sample the

  15. Ejecta production mechanisms on painted surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bariteau, Muriel; Mandeville, Jean-Claude; Schäfer, Frank

    2001-10-01

    Painted surfaces are frequently used on space vehicles, whether on satellites or on rocket bodies. A bibliographic research allows us to evaluate the painted surfaces in orbit at about 63000 m2. The observation of impacts on painted surfaces of the LDEF satellite shows that the total ejected mass is large. However, no description of hypervelocity impact tests on painted surfaces has been found in the literature. An ejecta model has been previously developed at ONERA/DESP. This model is applicable for hypervelocity impacts on homogeneous ductile targets, homogeneous brittle targets and solar cells. The objective of this work is to extend this model to the case of painted surfaces. Consequently, impact pictures on painted surfaces of LDEF were analysed and some laboratory impact tests were performed at the Ernst-Mach-Institut, in Freiburg, under an ESA contract.

  16. Volatile Abundance and Distribution in the Tempel 1 Ejecta Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretto, Mark J.; Feaga, Lori M.; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Protopapa, Silvia; Sunshine, Jessica M.; Farnham, Tony L.

    2015-11-01

    On 4 Jul 2005 the Deep Impact Impactor Spacecraft collided with comet Tempel 1, creating an ejecta cloud that was observed by the Deep Impact Flyby Spacecraft (DIF) as well as Earth and space based observatories. The High Resolution Instrument Infrared Spectrometer (HRI-IR) onboard DIF acquired several spectral scans of this ejecta cloud in the minutes immediately after impact. HRI-IR has a spectral range of 1.05 to 4.85 microns. This spectral range allows for water vapor, water ice, organics, CO2 and CO to be detected simultaneously, if each species is sufficiently abundant.We present an analysis of the quantity and spatial distribution of water, organics and CO2 in the Tempel 1 ejecta cloud. Variation in abundance, either absolute or relative, will be compared to morphological features in the ejecta cloud present in visible images acquired by the Medium and High Resolution Imagers onboard DIF. The composition of the ejecta cloud will also be compared with that of the 2 Jul 2005 natural outburst and quiescent activity levels at Tempel 1.

  17. Designing global climate and atmospheric chemistry simulations for 1 and 10 km diameter asteroid impacts using the properties of ejecta from the K-Pg impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Bardeen, Charles; Garcia, Rolando

    2016-10-01

    About 66 million years ago, an asteroid about 10 km in diameter struck the Yucatan Peninsula creating the Chicxulub crater. The crater has been dated and found to be coincident with the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) mass extinction event, one of six great mass extinctions in the last 600 million years. This event precipitated one of the largest episodes of rapid climate change in Earth's history, yet no modern three-dimensional climate calculations have simulated the event. Similarly, while there is an ongoing effort to detect asteroids that might hit Earth and to develop methods to stop them, there have been no modern calculations of the sizes of asteroids whose impacts on land would cause devastating effects on Earth. Here, we provide the information needed to initialize such calculations for the K-Pg impactor and for a 1 km diameter impactor. There is considerable controversy about the details of the events that followed the Chicxulub impact. We proceed through the data record in the order of confidence that a climatically important material was present in the atmosphere. The climatic importance is roughly proportional to the optical depth of the material. Spherules with diameters of several hundred microns are found globally in an abundance that would have produced an atmospheric layer with an optical depth around 20, yet their large sizes would only allow them to stay airborne for a few days. They were likely important for triggering global wildfires. Soot, probably from global or near-global wildfires, is found globally in an abundance that would have produced an optical depth near 100, which would effectively prevent sunlight from reaching the surface. Nanometer-sized iron particles are also present globally. Theory suggests these particles might be remnants of the vaporized asteroid and target that initially remained as vapor rather than condensing on the hundred-micron spherules when they entered the atmosphere. If present in the greatest abundance allowed

  18. Ejecta experiments at the Pegasus Pulsed Power facility

    SciTech Connect

    Sorenson, D.S.; Carpenter, B.; King, N.S.P.

    1997-08-01

    When a shock wave interacts at the surface of a metal target, target material can be emitted from the surface called ejecta. The mass, size, shape, and velocity of ejecta varies depending on the initial shock conditions, and target material properties. In order to understand this phenomena, diagnostics have been developed and implemented at the Pegasus Pulsed Power facility located at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The facility provides both radial and axial access for making measurements. There exist optical, laser, and x-ray paths for performing measurements on the target assembly located near the center of the machine. The facility can provide many mega amps of current which is transported to a 5.0 cm diameter, 2.0 cm high aluminum cylinder. The current and associated magnetic field set up forces which implode the aluminum cylinder radially inward. As the aluminum cylinder reaches the appropriate velocity it impacts a target cylinder. Due to this impact, a shock wave is set up in the target and eventually interacts at the inner surface of the target cylinder where ejecta are produced. A 1.5 cm diameter collimator cylinder located inside the target cylinder is used to control the number of ejecta particles that arrive at the center region where ejecta measurements are made. Diagnostics have been developed including in-line Fraunhofer holography and visible shadowgraph. Details of these diagnostics are described.

  19. Dynamics of Supernova Remnants with Ejecta and Circumstellar Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blondin, M. J.; Featherstone, N.; Borkowski, J. K.; Reynolds, P. S.

    2001-09-01

    Progenitors of core-collapse supernovae (SNe) blow bubbles in the ambient medium and sweep it into shells with their powerful stellar winds. After the explosion, SN ejecta initially collide with the stellar wind, then with the wind-blown bubble, and finally with a dense wind-swept shell. This collision is particularly energetic for SNe whose progenitors lost most of their outer envelopes just prior to explosion: the brightest galactic supernova remnant (SNR), Cas A, is a prime example of such an interaction with the circumstellar medium (CSM). The SN ejecta are far from being smooth for such remnants, because of vigorous turbulence and mixing of heavy-element ejecta immediately after the explosion and subsequent growth of Ni-Fe bubbles powered by the radioactive decay. We study the interaction of ``bubbly'' SN ejecta with a CSM bubble and a swept CSM shell, using hydrodynamical simulations in 2 and 3 dimensions with the VH-1 hydrocode. We compare our simulations with analytic self-similar (Chevalier & Liang 1989) solutions and with our previous simulations of interaction of bubbly ejecta with a uniform ambient medium. When compared with these simulations, the impact of bubbly ejecta with the shell results in a more vigorous turbulence and mixing. Dense and cool ejecta at the boundaries of adjacent bubbles may penetrate the shell, leading to plume-like and ring-like features. We examine whether such an interaction is responsible for the observed morphology of Cas A as seen by the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Hubble Space Telescope, and for the different expansion rates seen at X-ray and radio wavelengths.

  20. Performance of Hayabusa2 DCAM3-D Camera for Short-Range Imaging of SCI and Ejecta Curtain Generated from the Artificial Impact Crater Formed on Asteroid 162137 Ryugu (1999 JU3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, K.; Shirai, K.; Ogawa, K.; Wada, K.; Honda, R.; Arakawa, M.; Sakatani, N.; Ikeda, Y.

    2016-11-01

    Deployable Camera 3-D (DCAM3-D) is a small high-resolution camera equipped on Deployable Camera 3 (DCAM3), one of the Hayabusa2 instruments. Hayabusa2 will explore asteroid 162137 Ryugu (1999 JU3) and conduct an impact experiment using a liner shooting device called Small Carry-on Impactor (SCI). DCAM3 will be detached from the Hayabusa2 spacecraft and observe the impact experiment. The purposes of the observation are to know the impact conditions, to estimate the surface structure of asteroid Ryugu, and to understand the physics of impact phenomena on low-gravity bodies. DCAM3-D requires high imaging performance because it has to image and detect multiple targets of different scale and radiance, i.e., the faint SCI before the shot from 1-km distance, the bright ejecta generated by the impact, and the asteroid. In this paper we report the evaluation of the performance of the CMOS imaging sensor and the optical system of DCAM3-D. We also describe the calibration of DCAM3-D. We confirmed that the imaging performance of DCAM3-D satisfies the required values to achieve the purposes of the observation.

  1. Martian craters viewed by the Thermal Emission Imaging System instrument: Double-layered ejecta craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyce, Joseph M.; Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.

    2006-10-01

    The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) visible (VIS) images provide new insight into the nature and development of the unique ejecta deposits of Martian craters. This study focuses on double-layered ejecta (DLE) craters. To date, over 100 DLE craters have been examined using mainly THEMIS VIS data. Our observations suggest that emplacement of DLE crater ejecta occurred in two stages, with the inner ejecta layer emplaced similar to single-layered ejecta (SLE) crater ejecta. This may have involved both ballistic and flow processes. In contrast, the outer ejecta layer of DLE craters appears to have been emplaced through the high-velocity outflow of materials from tornadic winds generated by the advancing ejecta curtain or base surge. Remarkably, DLE craters lack secondary craters, which suggests that the large ejecta blocks that normally produce such craters may have either been entrained and/or crushed by these winds or fragmented as a result of the presence of water in the target materials. These observations suggest that volatiles (either trapped in the subsurface or in the atmosphere) have played a key role in the emplacement of the ejecta of DLE craters and leaves open the question as to what role volatiles play in the emplacement of ejecta of other types of fluidized ejecta craters (i.e., SLE and MLE craters). Because DLE craters are found in many different regions of Mars, often in close proximity to other types of craters, conditions (e.g., atmospheric density) that produce DLE craters must fluctuate or the Martian crust must be unexpectedly heterogeneous (laterally and vertically). While the degree of heterogeneity has yet to be recognized, recent suggestions about possible Martian climate change raises the possibility of impact into target materials that are periodically wet or that a significantly higher atmospheric pressure may be periodically present.

  2. Geomorphology and Geology of the Southwestern Margaritifer Sinus and Argyre Regions of Mars. Part 4: Flow Ejecta Crater Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, T. J.; Pieri, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    Flow ejecta craters - craters surrounded by lobate ejecta blankets - are found throughout the study area. The ratio of the crater's diameter to that of the flow ejecta in this region is approximately 40 to 45%. Flow ejecta craters are dominantly sharply defined craters, with slightly degraded craters being somewhat less common. This is probably indicative of the ejecta's relatively low resistence to weathering and susceptibility to burial. Flow ejecta craters here seem to occur within a narrow range of crater sizes - the smallest being about 4km in diameter and the largest being about 27km in diameter. Ejecta blankets of craters at 4km are easily seen and those of smaller craters are simply not seen even in images with better than average resolution for the region. This may be due to the depth of excavation of small impacting bodies being insufficient to reach volatile-rich material. Flow ejecta craters above 24km are rare, and those craters above 27km do not display flow ejecta blankets. This may be a result of an excavation depth so great that the volatile content of the ejecta is insufficient to form a fluid ejecta blanket. The geomorphic/geologic unit appears also to play an important role in the formation of flow ejecta craters. Given the typical size range for the occurrence of flow ejecta craters for most units, it can be seen that the percentage of flow ejecta craters to the total number of craters within this size range varies significantly from one unit to the next. The wide variance in flow ejecta crater density over this relatively small geographical area argues strongly for a lithologic control of their distribution.

  3. Planet Earth Set to Broil: Thermal Radiation from Chicxulub Ejecta Reentry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldin, T. J.; Melosh, H. J.

    2009-03-01

    We model the thermal radiation transfer due to the atmospheric reentry of hypervelocity Chicxulub impact ejecta. Self-shielding of downward radiation by the spherules limits the magnitude and duration of the thermal pulse at the Earth’s surface.

  4. A possible formation mechanism of rampart-like ejecta pattern in a laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, A.; Kadono, T.; Nakamura, A. M.; Arakawa, M.; Wada, K.; Yamamoto, S.

    2011-12-01

    The ejecta morphologies around impact craters represent highly diverse appearance on the surface of solid bodies in our Solar System. It is considered that the varied ejecta morphologies result from the environments such as the atmospheric pressure, the volatile content in the subsurface, because they affect the emplacement process of the ejecta. Clarifying the relationships between the ejecta morphologies and the formation processes and environments could constrain the ancient surface environment and the evolution of the planets. We have investigated the ejecta patterns around the impact craters which formed on a glass beads layer in a laboratory, and found that the patterns depend on impact velocity, atmospheric pressure, and initial state of packing of the target [Suzuki et al., 2010, JpGU abstract]. Now, we focus on one of the ejecta patterns which has a petal-like (or sometimes concentric) ridges on the distal edge of the continuous ejecta. This ejecta pattern looks very similar to the rampart ejecta morphology observed around Martian impact craters [e.g. Barlow et al., 2000]. The experiments are conducted with the small light gas gun placed in Kobe University, Japan. The projectile is a cylinder with a diameter of 10 mm and a height of 10 mm, and is made of aluminum, nylon, or stainless. The target is a layer of glass beads (nearly uniform diameter) in a tub with ~28 cm in diameter. The bulk density is about 1.7 g/cm^3. The following three parameters are varied: 1) the diameter of the target glass beads (50, 100, 420 microns), 2) the ambient atmospheric pressure in the chamber (from ~500 Pa to atmospheric pressure), 3) the impact velocity of the projectile (from a few to ~120 m/s). In our experiments, the rampart-like ridged patterns are observed within the following conditions: 1) the diameter of the target glass beads is 50 and 100 microns, 2) the ambient pressure in the chamber is higher than ~10^4 Pa, and 3) the impact velocity is higher than 16 m

  5. Investigations of primary and secondary impact structures on the moon and laboratory experiments to study the ejecta of secondary particles. Ph.D. Thesis - Ruprecht Karl Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, B.

    1977-01-01

    Young lunar impact structures were investigated by using lunar orbiter, Apollo Metric and panorama photographs. Measurements on particularly homogeneous areas low in secondary craters made possible an expansion of primary crater distribution to small diameters. This is now sure for a range between 20m or = D or = 20km and this indicates that the size and velocity distribution of the impacting bodies in the last 3 billion years has been constant. A numerical approximation in the form of a 7th degree polynomial was obtained for the distribution.

  6. Using martian single and double layered ejecta craters to probe subsurface stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Eriita; Osinski, Gordon R.

    2015-02-01

    Martian craters with fluidized ejecta - including single-layered, double-layered and multiple-layered craters - have been studied extensively, with their formation generally suggested to require some presence of volatiles in the subsurface. However, experimental reproduction of these morphologies, impact modelling, and the occurrence of layered ejecta in putative volatile poor regions suggests that other factors may also play important roles. A recent extensive catalogue of martian impact craters (Robbins, S.J., Hynek, B.M. [2012a]. J. Geophys. Res. 117, E05004) classifies crater ejecta along with their location, diameters and ejecta extents, potentially providing new information on the links between these morphologies and the subsurface. We utilise this catalogue to examine the regional variation in ejecta mobility, onset diameter and the correlation between ejecta mobility and diameter for single- and double-layered ejecta craters on Mars. A simple regional stratigraphic model is developed to explain the observed trends through the viscosity of the layers within the target. Using this model, the potential relative thickness and burial depths of low viscosity layers in the martian subsurface are hypothesised, and compared to other observations and models of subsurface volatiles and how they have varied throughout time.

  7. Computer simulations of 10-km-diameter asteroid impacts into oceanic and continental sites: Preliminary results on atmospheric passage, cratering and ejecta dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roddy, D. J.; Schuster, S. H.; Rosenblatt, Martin; Grant, L. B.; Hassig, P. J.; Kreyenhagen, K. N.

    1987-01-01

    A series of analytical calculations of large scale cratering events for both oceanic and continental sites were made in order to examine their effects on the target media and atmosphere. The first analytical studies that were completed consists of computer simulations of the dynamics of: (1) the passage of a 10 km diameter asteroid moving at 20 km/sec through the Earth's atmosphere, and (2) the impact cratering events in both oceanic and continental environments. Calculation of the dynamics associated with the passage of the asteroid through the atmosphere showed strong effects on the surrounding air mass. The calculations of the impact cratering events showed equally dramatic effects on the oceanic and continental environments. These effects are briefly discussed.

  8. High-resolution studies of double-layered ejecta craters: Morphology, inherent structure, and a phenomenological formation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulf, Gerwin; Kenkmann, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    The ejecta blankets of impact craters in volatile-rich environments often possess characteristic layered ejecta morphologies. The so-called double-layered ejecta (DLE) craters are characterized by two ejecta layers with distinct morphologies. The analysis of high-resolution image data, especially HiRISE and CTX, provides new insights into the formation of DLE craters. A new phenomenological excavation and ejecta emplacement model for DLE craters is proposed based on a detailed case study of the Martian crater Steinheim—a well-preserved DLE crater—and studies of other DLE craters. The observations show that the outer ejecta layer is emplaced as medial and distal ejecta that propagate outwards in a debris avalanche or (if saturated with water) a debris flow mode after landing, overrunning previously formed secondary craters. In contrast, the inner ejecta layer is formed by a translational slide of the proximal ejecta deposits during the emplacement stage that overrun and superimpose parts of the outer ejecta layer. Based on our model, DLE craters on Mars are the result of an impact event into a rock/ice mixture that produces large amounts of shock-induced vaporization and melting of ground ice, leading to high ejection angles, proximal landing positions, and an ejecta curtain with relatively wet (in terms of water in liquid form) composition in the distal part versus dryer composition in the proximal part. As a consequence, basal melting of ice components in the ejecta at the transient crater rim, which is induced by frictional heating and the enhanced pressure at depth, initiates an outwards directed collapse of crater rim material in a translational slide mode. Our results indicate that similar processes may also be applicable for other planetary bodies with volatile-rich environments, such as Ganymede, Europa, and the Earth.

  9. The Unique Characteristics of Double Layered Ejecta Craters on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouginis-Mark, P. J.; Boyce, J. M.

    2004-12-01

    THEMIS VIS images reveal several unique characteristics of double layered ejecta (DLE) craters on Mars that suggest a strikingly different mode of formation from single layered ejecta (SLE) or multi-layered ejecta (MLE) craters. DLE craters are typically 15 to 25 km in diameter and differ from the other types of Martian craters in the following ways: (1) DLE craters lack secondary craters; (2) ejecta layers of DLE craters lack distal ramparts; (3) flow features within the outer layer of DLE craters suggest a very low emplacement velocity; and (4) radial striations exist only within DLE ejecta, and that these striations cross both the inner and outer ejecta layers. The interior morphology of DLE is also less complex than SLE or MLE layered ejecta craters; DLE craters lack wall terraces and, where present, have only simple central peaks. Previous morphologic analyses of DLE craters proposed that they might have formed in the volatile-rich sediments that are believed to infill areas such as Utopia, Arcadia and Acidalia Planitiae. But our inspection of the THEMIS VIS data set confirms the Viking-based results of Barlow and Perez (JGR-Planets, vol. 108 (E8), doi 10.1029/2002JE002036, 2003) that DLE craters are not uniquely located in the northern plains. We find that DLE craters with nearly identical morphologies also occur within the highlands of Mars, including Hesperia Planum, Icaria Planum, Arabia Terra, Noachis Terra, and Terra Sirenum. A few examples of DLE craters are found at a range of elevations between -5.8 km to +2.7 km relative to the MOLA datum, and within two latitudes belts between 23° to 52° N, and between 29° to 46° S. Thus some other mode of formation apart from impact into volatile-rich sediments of the northern plains needs to be identified. Through our on-going characterization of DLE craters with THEMIS VIS data, we hope to identify the attributes of these craters to help identify their unique mode of formation.

  10. Large ejecta fragments from asteroids. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asphaug, E.

    1994-01-01

    The asteroid 4 Vesta, with its unique basaltic crust, remains a key mystery of planetary evolution. A localized olivine feature suggests excavation of subcrustal material in a crater or impact basin comparable in size to the planetary radius (R(sub vesta) is approximately = 280 km). Furthermore, a 'clan' of small asteroids associated with Vesta (by spectral and orbital similarities) may be ejecta from this impact 151 and direct parents of the basaltic achondrites. To escape, these smaller (about 4-7 km) asteroids had to be ejected at speeds greater than the escape velocity, v(sub esc) is approximately = 350 m/s. This evidence that large fragments were ejected at high speed from Vesta has not been reconciled with the present understanding of impact physics. Analytical spallation models predict that an impactor capable of ejecting these 'chips off Vesta' would be almost the size of Vesta! Such an impact would lead to the catastrophic disruption of both bodies. A simpler analysis is outlined, based on comparison with cratering on Mars, and it is shown that Vesta could survive an impact capable of ejecting kilometer-scale fragments at sufficient speed. To what extent does Vesta survive the formation of such a large crater? This is best addressed using a hydrocode such as SALE 2D with centroidal gravity to predict velocities subsequent to impact. The fragmentation outcome and velocity subsequent to the impact described to demonstrate that Vesta survives without large-scale disassembly or overturning of the crust. Vesta and its clan represent a valuable dataset for testing fragmentation hydrocodes such as SALE 2D and SPH 3D at planetary scales. Resolution required to directly model spallation 'chips' on a body 100 times as large is now marginally possible on modern workstations. These boundaries are important in near-surface ejection processes and in large-scale disruption leading to asteroid families and stripped cores.

  11. Small Rayed Crater Ejecta Retention Age Calculated from Current Crater Production Rates on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calef, F. J. III; Herrick, R. R.; Sharpton, V. L.

    2011-01-01

    Ejecta from impact craters, while extant, records erosive and depositional processes on their surfaces. Estimating ejecta retention age (Eret), the time span when ejecta remains recognizable around a crater, can be applied to estimate the timescale that surface processes operate on, thereby obtaining a history of geologic activity. However, the abundance of sub-kilometer diameter (D) craters identifiable in high resolution Mars imagery has led to questions of accuracy in absolute crater dating and hence ejecta retention ages (Eret). This research calculates the maximum Eret for small rayed impact craters (SRC) on Mars using estimates of the Martian impactor flux adjusted for meteorite ablation losses in the atmosphere. In addition, we utilize the diameter-distance relationship of secondary cratering to adjust crater counts in the vicinity of the large primary crater Zunil.

  12. Platinum group elements and 187Os/ 188Os in a purported impact ejecta layer near the Eifelian-Givetian stage boundary, Middle Devonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Birger; Ellwood, Brooks B.; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, Bernhard; El Hassani, Ahmed; Bultynck, Pierre

    2006-09-01

    A global faunal crisis close to the Eifelian-Givetian stage boundary in the mid-Devonian has been purported to be related to the impact of one or two major extraterrestrial bodies. This was based on unusual mineralogical and chemical features within a distinct composite marl bed, at a level c. 40 cm below the Global Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP) for the Eifelian-Givetian boundary at Jebel Mech Irdane in Morocco. The impact relation has been challenged based partly on the absence of platinum group element data. We present here detailed Ir, Os, Pd and Pt as well as Os isotopic data across the bed at Mech Irdane and from a correlated 10 cm bed at a nearby site, Rich Haroun. Iridium concentrations of 0.13-0.28 ng/g in the beds represent a small enrichment compared to average shale, but Ir/Al ratios are only a factor 1.5-2 higher than background at respective site. Such small enrichments can readily be explained by terrestrial diagenetic processes, and do not require the presence of an extraterrestrial component. On an Al-normalized basis Pd and Pt show weak enrichments, typically a factor 2-4 higher than background. High 187Os/ 188Os ratios, 1.1-3.8, reflect ingrowth of radiogenic Os from Re, which is also evident from Os concentrations of up to 3 ng/g. The platinum group inter-element ratios are clearly non-chondritic. The overall platinum group and trace element (e.g. Co, Ni, As, V) patterns indicate that diagenetic processes at redox fronts have played a crucial role in shaping most element enrichments. If an excess siderophile-rich extraterrestrial component exists in these beds it represents less than 0.2‰ by weight.

  13. Erosion and Ejecta Reaccretion on 243 Ida and Its Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissler, Paul; Petit, Jean-Marc; Durda, Daniel D.; Greenberg, Richard; Bottke, William; Nolan, Michael; Moore, Jeffrey

    1996-03-01

    Galileo images of Asteroid 243 Ida and its satellite Dactyl show surfaces which are dominantly shaped by impact cratering. A number of observations suggest that ejecta from hypervelocity impacts on Ida can be distributed far and wide across the Ida system, following trajectories substantially affected by the low gravity, nonspherical shape, and rapid rotation of the asteroid. We explore the processes of reaccretion and escape of ejecta on Ida and Dactyl using three-dimensional numerical simulations which allow us to compare the theoretical effects of orbital dynamics with observations of surface morphology. The effects of rotation, launch location, and initial launch speed are first examined for the case of an ideal triaxial ellipsoid with Ida's approximate shape and density. Ejecta launched at low speeds (V≪Vesc) reimpact near the source craters, forming well-defined ejecta blankets which are asymmetric in morphology between leading and trailing rotational surfaces. The net effect of cratering at low ejecta launch velocities is to produce a thick regolith which is evenly distributed across the surface of the asteroid. In contrast, no clearly defined ejecta blankets are formed when ejecta is launched at higher initial velocities (V∼Vesc). Most of the ejecta escapes, while that which is retained is preferentially derived from the rotational trailing surfaces. These particles spend a significant time in temporary orbit around the asteroid, in comparison to the asteroid's rotation period, and tend to be swept up onto rotational leading surfaces upon reimpact. The net effect of impact cratering with high ejecta launch velocities is to produce a thinner and less uniform soil cover, with concentrations on the asteroids' rotational leading surfaces. Using a realistic model for the shape of Ida (P. Thomas, J. Veverka, B. Carcich, M. J. S. Belton, R. Sullivan, and M. Davies 1996,Icarus120, 000-000), we find that an extensive color/albedo unit which dominates the

  14. Contribution of Secondary Ejecta to the Debris Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandeville, J.; Bariteau, M.

    When a micro-debris or a micrometeoroid impacts a spacecraft surface, a large number of secondary particles, called ejecta, are produced. These particles can contribute to a modification of the debris environment : either locally by the occurrence of secondary impacts on the components of complex and large space structures, or at great distance by the formation of a population of small orbital debris. This paper describes the ejecta overall production, the lifetime and the orbital evolution of the particles. Finally the repartition of ejecta in LEO and GEO is computed. By an extensive use of the spacecraft database DISCOS, satellites and rocket bodies currently in orbit have been identified. The surface area of solar arrays and painted surfaces currently in orbit is estimated, and the primary flux received is computed using the ORDEM 96 model for debris and the Grün model for meteoroids. Afterward, for each representative particle, its orbital evolution is computed. The ejecta are considered to be produced since 1960, and their spatial density is computed in 2000. It is assumed that the area of the primary surfaces increases at a rate of 2% a year. Small particles are ejected with a high velocity, so their initial orbit is very different from the one of the parent object and about 23% of them are ejected on a re-entering or a hyperbolic trajectory. On the other hand, spall and large particles are ejected with low velocity and their initial orbit is close to the parent body. The spatial density of ejected particles is maximum between 800 km and 1400 km of altitude. Below 800 km altitude, the spatial density decreases because of the increase of the atmospheric drag. Above, the spatial density diminishes, because primary surfaces are less numerous. The number of ejecta, in the millimetre size range, reaches 5% of the total debris density at 800 km altitude and about 1 % in GEO. To allows a faster computation, the ejecta number as a function of size, altitude and

  15. Chromium isotope evidence in ejecta deposits for the nature of Paleoproterozoic impactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mougel, Bérengère; Moynier, Frédéric; Göpel, Christa; Koeberl, Christian

    2017-02-01

    Non-mass dependent chromium isotopic signatures have been successfully used to determine the presence and identification of extra-terrestrial materials in terrestrial impact rocks. Paleoproterozoic spherule layers from Greenland (Grænsesø) and Russia (Zaonega), as well as some distal ejecta deposits (Lake Superior region) from the Sudbury impact (1849 ± 0.3 Ma) event, have been analyzed for their Cr isotope compositions. Our results suggest that 1) these distal ejecta deposits are all of impact origin, 2) the Grænsesø and Zaonega spherule layers contain a distinct carbonaceous chondrite component, and are possibly related to the same impact event, which could be Vredefort (2023 ± 4 Ma) or another not yet identified large impact event from that of similar age, and 3) the Sudbury ejecta record a complex meteoritic signature, which is different from the Grænsesø and Zaonega spherule layers, and could indicate the impact of a heterogeneous chondritic body.

  16. CME dynamics using coronagraph and interplanetary ejecta observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Lago, Alisson; Demítrio Gonzalez Alarcon, Walter; da Silva, Marlos; de Lucas, Aline; Braga, Carlos Roberto; Ramos Vieira, Lucas

    One of the key issues of Space Weather is the dynamics of coronal mass ejections, from their release from the Sun, their propagation throughout the interplanetary space, eventually im-pacting the earth and other planets. These impacts of CMEs are the most important drivers of space weather phenomena. A number of empirical and analytical studies have addressed this point so far, using observations from coronagraphs and interplanetary monitors, in order to correlate CMEs observed near the Sun and in situ (e.g. earth vincity). However, results are far from conclusive. Error bars in CME travel time predictions from the Sun to earth, are of the order of 1 day, which is considerably big for the typical time scale of 1 to 3 days of their travel time. After many years of intensive investigations of CMEs observed with the Large An-gle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO), abord the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), we found that the subset of interplanetary counterparts of CMEs, the ICMEs, with a well defined ejecta structure are those with best predictable behaviour. The prediction of these interplanetary ejecta travel time to earth, using coronagraph observations is the one with lowest error bar among other sets of events, such as interplanetary shock. We present a statistic study of all the CME-ejecta events observed by SOHO and by the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite since 1997.

  17. In plain sight: the Chesapeake Bay crater ejecta blanket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griscom, D. L.

    2012-02-01

    The discovery nearly two decades ago of a 90 km-diameter impact crater below the lower Chesapeake Bay has gone unnoted by the general public because to date all published literature on the subject has described it as "buried". To the contrary, evidence is presented here that the so-called "upland deposits" that blanket ∼5000 km2 of the U.S. Middle-Atlantic Coastal Plain (M-ACP) display morphologic, lithologic, and stratigraphic features consistent with their being ejecta from the 35.4 Ma Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure (CBIS) and absolutely inconsistent with the prevailing belief that they are of fluvial origin. Specifically supporting impact origin are the facts that (i) a 95 %-pure iron ore endemic to the upland deposits of southern Maryland, eastern Virginia, and the District of Columbia has previously been proven to be impactoclastic in origin, (ii) this iron ore welds together a small percentage of well-rounded quartzite pebbles and cobbles of the upland deposits into brittle sheets interpretable as "spall plates" created in the interference-zone of the CBIS impact, (iii) the predominantly non-welded upland gravels have long ago been shown to be size sorted with an extreme crater-centric gradient far too large to have been the work of rivers, but well explained as atmospheric size-sorted interference-zone ejecta, (iv) new evidence is provided here that ~60 % of the non-welded quartzite pebbles and cobbles of the (lower lying) gravel member of the upland deposits display planar fractures attributable to interference-zone tensile waves, (v) the (overlying) loam member of the upland deposits is attributable to base-surge-type deposition, (vi) several exotic clasts found in a debris flow topographically below the upland deposits can only be explained as jetting-phase crater ejecta, and (vii) an allogenic granite boulder found among the upland deposits is deduced to have been launched into space and sculpted by hypervelocity air friction during reentry. An

  18. Phase Doppler anemometry as an ejecta diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, D. J.; Chapman, D. J.

    2017-01-01

    When a shock wave is incident on a free surface, micron sized pieces of the material can be ejected from that surface. Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) is being developed to simultaneously measure the sizes and velocities of the individual shock induced ejecta particles; providing an important insight into ejecta phenomena. The results from experiments performed on the 13 mm bore light gas gun at the Institute of Shock Physics, Imperial College London are presented. Specially grooved tin targets were shocked at pressures of up to 14 GPa, below the melt on release pressure, to generate ejecta particles. These experiments are the first time that PDA has been successfully fielded on dynamic ejecta experiments. The results and current state of the art of the technique are discussed along with the future improvements required to optimise performance and increase usability.

  19. Ejecta particle size distributions for shock loaded Sn and Al metals.

    SciTech Connect

    Sorenson, D. S.; Minich, R. W.; Romero, J. L.; Tunnell, T. W.; Malone, R. M.

    2001-01-01

    When a shock wave interacts at the surface of a metal sample 'ejected matter' (ejecta) can be emitted from the surface. The mass, size, shape, and velocity of the ejecta varies depending on the initial shock conditions and the material properties of the target. To understand this phenomena, experiments have been conducted at the Pegasus Pulsed Power Facility (PPPF) located at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The facility is used to implode cylinders to velocities of many mm/{micro}sec. The driving cylinder impacts a smaller target cylinder where shock waves of a few hundreds of kilobars can be reached and ejecta formation proceeds. The ejecta particle sizes are measured for shock loaded Sn and Al metal samples using an in-line Fraunhofer holography technique. The distributions will be compared to calculations from 3 and 2 dimensional percolation theory.

  20. Ejecta emplacement and modes of formation of Martian fluidized ejecta craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouginis-Mark, P. J.

    1981-01-01

    From an analysis of 1173 craters possessing single (type 1) and double (type 2) concentric ejecta deposits, type 2 craters are found to occur most frequently in areas that have also been described as possessing periglacial features. The frequency of occurrence of central peaks and wall failure (terraces plus scallops) within the craters indicates that, by analogy with previous analyses, type 1 craters form in more fragmental targets than type 2 craters. The maximum range of the outer ejecta deposits of type 2 craters, however, consistently extends about 0.8 crater radii further than ejecta deposits of type 1 craters, suggesting a greater degree of ejecta fluidization for the twin-lobed type 2 craters. Numerous characteristics of Ries Crater, West Germany, show similarities to craters on Mars, indicating that Martian fluidized ejecta craters may be closer analogs to this terrestrial crater than are lunar craters.

  1. The interaction of core-collapse supernova ejecta with a companion star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zheng-Wei; Tauris, T. M.; Röpke, F. K.; Moriya, T. J.; Kruckow, M.; Stancliffe, R. J.; Izzard, R. G.

    2015-12-01

    Context. The progenitors of many core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) are expected to be in binary systems. After the SN explosion in a binary, the companion star may suffer from mass stripping and be shock heated as a result of the impact of the SN ejecta. If the binary system is disrupted by the SN explosion, the companion star is ejected as a runaway star, and in some cases as a hypervelocity star. Aims: By performing a series of three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamical simulations of the collision of SN ejecta with the companion star, we investigate how CCSN explosions affect their binary companion. Methods: We use the BEC stellar evolution code to construct the detailed companion structure at the moment of SN explosion. The impact of the SN blast wave on the companion star is followed by means of 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations using the Stellar GADGET code. Results: For main-sequence (MS) companion stars, we find that the amount of removed stellar mass, the resulting impact velocity, and the chemical contamination of the companion that results from the impact of the SN ejecta strongly increases with decreasing binary separation and increasing explosion energy. Their relationship can be approximately fitted by power laws, which is consistent with the results obtained from impact simulations of Type Ia SNe. However, we find that the impact velocity is sensitive to the momentum profile of the outer SN ejecta and, in fact, may decrease with increasing ejecta mass, depending on the modeling of the ejecta. Because most companion stars to Type Ib/c CCSNe are in their MS phase at the moment of the explosion, combined with the strongly decaying impact effects with increasing binary separation, we argue that the majority of these SNe lead to inefficient mass stripping and shock heating of the companion star following the impact of the ejecta. Conclusions: Our simulations show that the impact effects of Type Ib/c SN ejecta on the structure of MS companion

  2. Thermally distinct ejecta blankets from Martian craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betts, B. H.; Murray, B. C.

    1993-06-01

    A study of Martian ejecta blankets is carried out using the high-resolution thermal IR/visible data from the Termoskan instrument aboard Phobos '88 mission. It is found that approximately 100 craters within the Termoskan data have an ejecta blanket distinct in the thermal infrared (EDITH). These features are examined by (1) a systematic examination of all Termoskan data using high-resolution image processing; (2) a study of the systematics of the data by compiling and analyzing a data base consisting of geographic, geologic, and mormphologic parameters for a significant fraction of the EDITH and nearby non-EDITH; and (3) qualitative and quantitative analyses of localized regions of interest. It is noted that thermally distinct ejecta blankets are excellent locations for future landers and remote sensing because of relatively dust-free surface exposures of material excavated from depth.

  3. Carbonate Condensates in the Chicxulub Ejecta Deposits from Belize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, K. O.; Ocampo, A. C.; Fischer, A. G.; Morrison, J.; Sharp, Z.

    1996-03-01

    It has long been proposed that large amounts of CO2 released to the atmosphere by impact vaporization of carbonates could trigger greenhouse warming. Recent studies of the Cretaceous/Tertiary Chicxulub impact indicate that large amounts of both carbonate and sulfate were vaporized, although sulfates had a much more dramatic effect on climate in part due to the relatively small ambient sulfate reservoir of the Earth's atmosphere compared to the huge ambient reservoir of CO2. One process that could mitigate the climatic effects of these volatiles is the back reaction of impact generated oxides (CaO and MgO) with CO2 and SO2-SO3 in the vapor plume. Analyses of Chicxulub ejecta deposits from Belize confirm that the proximal ejecta in this locality are dominated by carbonate lithologies and sulfates are extremely rare. Much of the carbonate is in the form of dolomite and calcite spheroids and euhedral dolomite silt matrix. These spheroids and fine-grained matrix may have formed through condensation in the vapor plume, thus sequestering large amounts of impact generated CO2.

  4. Condensation of dust in supernova ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarangi, A.; Cherchneff, I.

    Observations in the infrared and submm indicate the presence of molecules and dust in the ejecta of type II-P supernovae. The mass of dust formed in the ejecta of supernovae is still uncertain and highly debated: Infrared observations indicate smaller dust masses (10-5 to 10-3 M ) before 500 days post-explosion, compared to submm observations with Herschel revealing supernova remnants as large reservoirs of cool dust (10-2 to 0.7 M ). We study the ejecta of a typical type II-P supernova with a chemical kinetic approach considering a 15 M progenitor as a benchmark. The synthesis of molecules (e.g., CO, SiO, O2, AlO, SiS, FeS, SiC, SO) and small clusters (e.g., silicates, carbon, metal oxides, metallic clusters etc.) in the gas phase is considered. The clusters form gradually over time in different ejecta zones, small dust masses form in the first 600 days (˜ 10-4 M ), that gradually increase up to ˜ 0.1 M at 1500 days post-explosion. The small clusters condense to form dust grains in the gas phase. The size distributions of different dust components are derived from the study.

  5. Dynamical Behavior of Ejecta Produced by the Proposed ISIS Kinetic Impactor Demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahnestock, Eugene G.; Chesley, Steven R.; Farnocchia, Davide

    2014-05-01

    Impactor for Surface and Interior Science (ISIS) is a proposed mission of opportunity that would demonstrate and test kinetic impact (KI) for orbit modification of a hypothetical NEO to reduce its Earth impact probability. Unlike Deep Impact, this test entails measuring ΔV imparted to a far smaller asteroidal target body (Bennu) using another spacecraft in rendezvous with that body both before and after the KI event (OSIRIX-REx). To quantify any hazard to OSIRIS-REx from collision with liberated ejecta, we perform detailed study of the ejecta's dynamical behavior. For KI event energy matching a 440 kg impactor at 13.43 km/s closing velocity, we model crater formation and ejecta generation consistent with the small net surface acceleration in the targeted equatorial region of the sunlit hemisphere at the February 2021 impact epoch, and reasonable material strength for such a low-density rubble-pile. A crater ≈25 m in diameter is excavated over several minutes, liberating several thousand metric tons of material, with maximum velocity ≈34 m/s. We propagate ejecta under all relevant dynamical effects, including shape-model-derived full body gravity, differential solar tide acceleration, and solar radiation pressure (SRP) accounting for realistic particle size-frequency distribution, optical properties, and shadowing. We present the proportion of particles reaching the dynamical fates of return impact or exit from the region of importance to OSIRIS-REx operations, vs. time. We show where the re-accreted ejecta deposits on the surface, and the size-frequency distribution of the population remaining at 1, 5, 10, etc. days post-impact. We find clearing times from the system are nonlinearly dependent on particle size as expected, especially for low-velocity ejecta which stream away anti-sunward under the action of SRP within a paraboloid zone. Higher-velocity ejecta persist for longer durations within a sunward extension of the original ejecta cone. We visualize

  6. Properties of Ejecta Generated at High-Velocity Perforation of Thin Bumpers made from Different Constructional Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myagkov, N. N.; Shumikhin, T. A.; Bezrukov, L. N.

    2013-08-01

    The series of impact experiments were performed to study the properties of ejecta generated at high-velocity perforation of thin bumpers. The bumpers were aluminum plates, fiber-glass plastic plates, and meshes weaved of steel wire. The projectiles were 6.35 mm diameter aluminum spheres. The impact velocities ranged from 1.95 to 3.52 km/s. In the experiments the ejecta particles were captured with low-density foam collectors or registered with the use of aluminum foils. The processing of the experimental results allowed us to estimate the total masses, spatial and size distributions, and perforating abilities of the ejecta produced from these different bumpers. As applied to the problem of reducing the near-Earth space pollution caused by the ejecta, the results obtained argue against the use of aluminum plates as first (outer) bumper in spacecraft shield protection.

  7. Lunar crater ejecta: Physical properties revealed by radar and thermal infrared observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghent, R. R.; Carter, L. M.; Bandfield, J. L.; Tai Udovicic, C. J.; Campbell, B. A.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the physical properties, and changes through time, of lunar impact ejecta using radar and thermal infrared data. We use data from two instruments on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) - the Diviner thermal radiometer and the Miniature Radio Frequency (Mini-RF) radar instrument - together with Earth-based radar observations. We use this multiwavelength intercomparison to constrain block sizes and to distinguish surface from buried rocks in proximal ejecta deposits. We find that radar-detectable rocks buried within the upper meter of regolith can remain undisturbed by surface processes such as micrometeorite bombardment for >3 Gyr. We also investigate the thermophysical properties of radar-dark haloes, comprised of fine-grained, rock-poor ejecta distal to the blocky proximal ejecta. Using Diviner data, we confirm that the halo material is depleted in surface rocks, but show that it is otherwise thermophysically indistinct from background regolith. We also find that radar-dark haloes, like the blocky ejecta, remain visible in radar observations for craters with ages >3 Ga, indicating that regolith overturn processes cannot replenish their block populations on that timescale.

  8. Sesquinary catenae on the Martian satellite Phobos from reaccretion of escaping ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, M.; Asphaug, E.

    2016-08-01

    The Martian satellite Phobos is criss-crossed by linear grooves and crater chains whose origin is unexplained. Anomalous grooves are relatively young, and crosscut tidally predicted stress fields as Phobos spirals towards Mars. Here we report strong correspondence between these anomalous features and reaccretion patterns of sesquinary ejecta from impacts on Phobos. Escaping ejecta persistently imprint Phobos with linear, low-velocity crater chains (catenae) that match the geometry and morphology of prominent features that do not fit the tidal model. We prove that these cannot be older than Phobos' current orbit inside Mars' Roche limit. Distinctive reimpact patterns allow sesquinary craters to be traced back to their source, for the first time across any planetary body, creating a novel way to probe planetary surface characteristics. For example, we show that catena-producing craters likely formed in the gravity regime, providing constraints on the ejecta velocity field and knowledge of source crater material properties.

  9. Sesquinary catenae on the Martian satellite Phobos from reaccretion of escaping ejecta.

    PubMed

    Nayak, M; Asphaug, E

    2016-08-30

    The Martian satellite Phobos is criss-crossed by linear grooves and crater chains whose origin is unexplained. Anomalous grooves are relatively young, and crosscut tidally predicted stress fields as Phobos spirals towards Mars. Here we report strong correspondence between these anomalous features and reaccretion patterns of sesquinary ejecta from impacts on Phobos. Escaping ejecta persistently imprint Phobos with linear, low-velocity crater chains (catenae) that match the geometry and morphology of prominent features that do not fit the tidal model. We prove that these cannot be older than Phobos' current orbit inside Mars' Roche limit. Distinctive reimpact patterns allow sesquinary craters to be traced back to their source, for the first time across any planetary body, creating a novel way to probe planetary surface characteristics. For example, we show that catena-producing craters likely formed in the gravity regime, providing constraints on the ejecta velocity field and knowledge of source crater material properties.

  10. Sesquinary catenae on the Martian satellite Phobos from reaccretion of escaping ejecta

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, M.; Asphaug, E.

    2016-01-01

    The Martian satellite Phobos is criss-crossed by linear grooves and crater chains whose origin is unexplained. Anomalous grooves are relatively young, and crosscut tidally predicted stress fields as Phobos spirals towards Mars. Here we report strong correspondence between these anomalous features and reaccretion patterns of sesquinary ejecta from impacts on Phobos. Escaping ejecta persistently imprint Phobos with linear, low-velocity crater chains (catenae) that match the geometry and morphology of prominent features that do not fit the tidal model. We prove that these cannot be older than Phobos' current orbit inside Mars' Roche limit. Distinctive reimpact patterns allow sesquinary craters to be traced back to their source, for the first time across any planetary body, creating a novel way to probe planetary surface characteristics. For example, we show that catena-producing craters likely formed in the gravity regime, providing constraints on the ejecta velocity field and knowledge of source crater material properties. PMID:27575002

  11. (U-Th)/He Zircon Dating of Chesapeake Bay Ejecta; Ocean Drilling Program Site 1073A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biren, M. B.; van Soest, M. C.; Wartho, J.-A.; Hodges, K. V.; Glass, B. P.; Koeberl, C.; Hale, W.

    2014-09-01

    Results from our (U-Th)/He zircon dating of distal ejecta associated with the 40 km diameter Chesapeake Bay impact structure of Virginia, are in excellent agreement with previous K-Ar and Ar-Ar dating studies of the North American tektites.

  12. 40Ar/39Ar age of the Manson impact structure, Iowa, and correlative impact ejecta in the Crow Creek member of the Pierre Shale (Upper Cretaceous), South Dakota and Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izett, G.A.; Cobban, W.A.; Dalrymple, G.B.; Obradovich, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    A set of 34 laser total-fusion 40Ar/39Ar analyses of sanidine from a melt layer in crater-fill deposits of the Manson impact structure in Iowa has a weighted-mean age of 74.1 ?? 0.1 Ma. This age is about 9.0 m.y. older than 40Ar/39Ar ages of shocked microcline from the Manson impact structure reported previously by others. The 74.1 Ma age of the sanidine, which is a melt product of Precambrian microcline clasts, indicates that the Manson impact structure played no part in the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) mass extinction at 64.5 Ma. Moreover, incremental-heating 40Ar/39Ar ages of the sanidine show that it is essentially free of excess 40Ar and has not been influenced by postcrystallization heating or alteration. An age spectrum of the matrix of the melt layer shows effects of 39Ar recoil, including older ages in the low-temperature increments and younger ages in the high-temperature increments. At 17 places in eastern South Dakota and Nebraska, shocked quartz and feldspar grains are concentrated in the lower part of the Crow Creek Member of the Pierre Shale (Upper Cretaceous). The grains are largest (3.2 mm) in southeastern South Dakota and decrease in size (0.45 mm) to the northwest, consistent with the idea that the Manson impact structure was their source. The ubiquitous presence of shocked grains concentrated in a thin calcarenite at the base of the Crow Creek Member suggests it is an event bed recording an instant of geologic time. Ammonites below and above the Crow Creek Member limit its age to the zone of Didymoceras nebrascense of earliest late Campanian age. Plagioclase from a bentonite bed in this zone in Colorado has a 40Ar/39Ar age of 74.1 ?? 0.1 Ma commensurate with our sanidine age of 74.1 Ma for the Manson impact structure. 40Ar/39Ar ages of bentonite beds below and above the Crow Creek are consistent with our 74.1 ?? 0.1 Ma age for the Manson impact structure and limit its age to the interval ?? 74.5 0.1 to 73.8 ?? 0.1 Ma. Recently, two origins for the

  13. Fragment size-ejection speed correlation in impactor-ejecta processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachse, M.

    2014-04-01

    Ejecta created in high velocity impacts (v > 10 km s ) of micro-meteoroids on atmosphereless cosmic bodies is an efficient source for interplanetary dust. The impact erodes the target surface and releases material into space. The ejecta are typically micron-sized and populate a dust cloud whose number density decreases with increasing distance from the target. Unbound particles escape and add to the planetary dust environment. However, even mesoscopic particles (R > 100 μm) can severely damage manmade space hardware as they have high kinetic energies when they encounter spacecraft with high relative velocities. Here we investigate the influence of a correlation between the fragment size R and the ejection speed u in the form stating that larger fragments are (in average) launched with slower speeds as suggested by theoretical considerations and impact experiments (Melosh, 1984; Miljkovíc et al., 2012). We found that such a correlation constitutes a dynamical filter which removes large ejecta from high altitudes. For large moons they are always bound and restricted to regions close to the target surface. The effect is stronger for bigger ejecta and for more massive target bodies. Our results show that the risk to encounter dangerous particles during close flybys around large moons is lower than expected from the uncorrelated model of Krivov et al. (2003). Further changes due to strong planetary magnetic fields at the other end of the size range are discussed.

  14. Evolutionary signatures in complex ejecta and their driven shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrugia, C.; Berdichevsky, D.

    2004-10-01

    We examine interplanetary signatures of ejecta-ejecta interactions. To this end, two time intervals of inner-heliospheric (≤1AU) observations separated by 2 solar cycles are chosen where ejecta/magnetic clouds are in the process of interacting to form complex ejecta. At the Sun, both intervals are characterized by many coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and flares. In each case, a complement of observations from various instruments on two spacecraft are examined in order to bring out the in-situ signatures of ejecta-ejecta interactions and their relation to solar observations. In the first interval (April 1979), data are shown from Helios-2 and ISEE-3, separated by ~0.33AU in radial distance and 28° in heliographic longitude. In the second interval (March-April 2001), data from the SOHO and Wind probes are combined, relating effects at the Sun and their manifestations at 1AU on one of Wind's distant prograde orbits. At ~0.67AU, Helios-2 observes two individual ejecta which have merged by the time they are observed at 1AU by ISEE-3. In March 2001, two distinct Halo CMEs (H-CMEs) are observed on SOHO on 28-29 March approaching each other with a relative speed of 500kms-1 within 30 solar radii. In order to isolate signatures of ejecta-ejecta interactions, the two event intervals are compared with expectations for pristine (isolated) ejecta near the last solar minimum, extensive observations on which were given by Berdichevsky et al. (2002). The observations from these two event sequences are then intercompared. In both event sequences, coalescence/merging was accompanied by the following signatures: heating of the plasma, acceleration of the leading ejecta and deceleration of the trailing ejecta, compressed field and plasma in the leading ejecta, disappearance of shocks and the strengthening of shocks driven by the accelerated ejecta. A search for reconnection signatures at the interface between the two ejecta in the March 2001 event was inconclusive because the

  15. Evidence for hydrothermal alteration in the Hellas ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noe Dobrea, E. Z.; Swayze, G. A.

    2011-12-01

    We have analyzed data from MRO/CRISM, HiRISE, and CTX to study the massifs in the NW Hellas region. The Hellas basin is thought to have formed during the late heavy bombardment [Acuña et al. 1999] as a consequence of a massive impact. The impact not only excavated rocks from the deep stratigraphy, but it also deposited enough energy into the ejecta to support hydrothermal conditions [Newsom 1980]. Spectral observations of the mineralogy of the martian highlands north of Hellas suggest that the region was experiencing aqueous activity during that era [Pelkey et al. 2007]. Therefore, spectroscopic studies of the well-preserved massifs that form the rim and ejecta in northwest Hellas have the potential to reveal zones of hydrothermal alteration. Additionally, studies of the deep crustal rocks excavated as part of the ejecta are of particular relevance in light of recent discoveries of carbonate-bearing rocks exposed in complex craters on Mars [Michalski and Niles 2010; Wray et al. 2011]. Our analyses reveal outcrops in the massifs where evidence for products of hydrothermal alteration are observed. In particular, we find evidence for smectites, prehnite, chlorite, and illite exposed in these outcrops (Fig 1). The spectra of these altered units also exhibit a strong, broad concave-up absorption in the 1-1.5 μm region, consistent with the presence of Fe2+ in olivine, suggesting that only partial alteration has occurred. The mineralogy of hydrothermal alteration products is a function of the original composition of the host rock; the temperature, chemistry, and pH of the water; and the overburden pressure [DeRudder and. Beck 1963; Morris et al. 2001; 2003; Brown et al. 2010; Inoue et al. 2010]. On Earth, prehnite can form via low-grade metamorphism, where it occurs as part of the prehnite-pumpellyite metamorphic facies [Blatt and Tracy 1995], or as a product of the low-temperature (100-350°C) hydrothermal alteration of mafic rocks [Freedman et al. 2009; Marks et al

  16. A class of ejecta transport test problems

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerberg, James E; Buttler, William T; Oro, David M; Rousculp, Christopher L; Morris, Christopher; Mariam, Fesseha G

    2011-01-31

    Hydro code implementations of ejecta dynamics at shocked interfaces presume a source distribution function ofparticulate masses and velocities, f{sub 0}(m, v;t). Some of the properties of this source distribution function have been determined from extensive Taylor and supported wave experiments on shock loaded Sn interfaces of varying surface and subsurface morphology. Such experiments measure the mass moment of f{sub o} under vacuum conditions assuming weak particle-particle interaction and, usually, fully inelastic capture by piezo-electric diagnostic probes. Recently, planar Sn experiments in He, Ar, and Kr gas atmospheres have been carried out to provide transport data both for machined surfaces and for coated surfaces. A hydro code model of ejecta transport usually specifies a criterion for the instantaneous temporal appearance of ejecta with source distribution f{sub 0}(m, v;t{sub 0}). Under the further assumption of separability, f{sub 0}(m,v;t{sub 0}) = f{sub 1}(m)f{sub 2}(v), the motion of particles under the influence of gas dynamic forces is calculated. For the situation of non-interacting particulates, interacting with a gas via drag forces, with the assumption of separability and simplified approximations to the Reynolds number dependence of the drag coefficient, the dynamical equation for the time evolution of the distribution function, f(r,v,m;t), can be resolved as a one-dimensional integral which can be compared to a direct hydro simulation as a test problem. Such solutions can also be used for preliminary analysis of experimental data. We report solutions for several shape dependent drag coefficients and analyze the results of recent planar dsh experiments in Ar and Xe.

  17. Eta Carinae and Its Ejecta, the Homunculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore R.

    2014-01-01

    Eta Carinae (Eta Car), its interacting winds and historical ejecta provide an unique astrophysical laboratory that permits addressing a multitude of questions ranging from stellar evolution, colliding winds, chemical enrichment, nebular excitation to the formation of molecules and dust. Every 5.54 years, Eta Car changes from high excitation to several-months-long low excitation caused by modulation of the massive interacting winds due to a very eccentric binary orbit. The surrounding Homunculus (Figure 1) and Little Homunculus, thrown out in the 1840s Great Eruption and the 1890s Lesser Eruption, respond to the changing flux, providing clues to many physical phenomena of great interest to astrophysicists.

  18. Tyrrhena Terra: hydrated lobates ejecta and plains, as seen by OMEGA/MEx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loizeau, D.; Bouley, S.; Mangold, N.; Meresse, S.; Costard, F.; Poulet, F.; Ansan, V.; Le Mouelic, S.; Bibring, J.-P.; Gondet, B.

    2009-04-01

    networks located on the higher plateaus, or plains cut by valleys. Their typical size is 10 to 20 km x 50 to 100 km. Most of them are located be-tween 1 km and 1.5 km in altitude. Here also, pyroxene is identified with OMEGA on every hydrated plain, but OMEGA does not detect olivine on the same outcrops. These detections suggest a partial alteration of rocks in Tyrrhena Terra, or a spatial mixing of hydrated and unal-tered materials (for example a pyroxene-rich cap over a hydrated unit, or an intricate mixing of altered and unaltered materials). Two hypotheses can be drawn at this stage for the origin of the hydrated minerals restricted to the ejecta blan-kets: (1) formation of phyllosilicates and hydrated silicate minerals resulting from impact associated processes; (2) excavation of hydrated materials buried before the impact [3]. The study of hydrated minerals in ejecta can also be important concerning the implication of volatiles for the lo-bate ejecta. The studied region is located in Noachian terrains, but most craters are not of Noachian age. They are surrounded by fresh ejecta without high erosion and relative low density of craters. This shows that, if formed by hydrothermal alteration during the impact, the hydrated minerals would be recent, while an excavation would limit the age of the alteration to the age of the terrain, i.e. Noachian. In addition, the observed alteration is located on the ejecta blankets, while hydrothermal models due to the impact predict alteration in the crater center, but do not find alteration possible on distal ejecta. The observation of the hydrated minerals in alluvial plains suggests that this material was collected material from the highlands or formed in situ by weathering [9]. The observation at high spatial resolution of hydrated minerals inside the valley flanks, upstream from the alluvial plains, is crucial to understand the location and time of alteration, and would constrain the process of alteration of the ejecta blankets

  19. Particulate distribution function evolution for ejecta transport

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerberg, James Edward; Plohr, Bradley J

    2010-01-01

    The time evolution of the ejecta distribution function in a gas is discussed in the context of the recent experiments of W. Buttler and M. Zellner for well characterized Sn surfaces. Evolution equations are derived for the particulate distribution function when the dominant gas-particle interaction in is particulate drag. In the approximation of separability of the distribution function in velocity and size, the solution for the time dependent distribution function is a Fredholm integral equation of the first kind whose kernel is expressible in terms of the vacuum time dependent velocity distribution function measured with piezo probes or Asay foils. The solution of this equation in principle gives the size distribution function. We discuss the solution of this equation and the results of the Buttler - Zellner experiments. These suggest that correlations in velocity and size are necessary for a complete description of the transport dala. The solutions presented also represent an analytic test problem for the calculated distribution function in ejecta transport implementations.

  20. The Fate of Ejecta from Hyperion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Dobrovolskis, Anthony R.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Ejecta from Saturn's moon Hyperion is subject to powerful perturbations from nearby Titan, which control its ultimate fate. We have performed numerical integrations to simulate a simplified system consisting of Saturn (including oblateness), Tethys, Dione, Titan, Hyperion, Iapetus, and the Sun (treated simply as a massive satellite). In addition, 1050 massless particles were ejected from Hyperion at five different points in its orbit. These particles started more or less evenly distributed over latitude and longitude, 1 km above Hyperion's mean radius, and were ejected radially outward at speeds 10\\% faster than its escape speed. Only about 4\\% of the particles survived for the 100,000-year course of the integration, while $\\sim$8/% escaped from the Saturnian system. Titan accreted $\\sim$77\\% of all the particles, while Hyperion reaccreted only $\\sim$5\\%. This may help to account for Hyperion's rugged shape. Three particles hit Rhea and 2 hit Dione, but $\\sim$5\\% of the particles were removed when they penetrated within 150,000 km of Saturn. Most removals occurred within the first few thousand years. In general, ejecta from Hyperion are much more widely scattered than previously thought, and cross the orbits of all of the other classical satellites.

  1. A possible formation process of outer lobes of Double Layered Ejecta craters on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, A.; Baratoux, D.; Kurita, K.

    2008-12-01

    Martian impact ejecta are famous for their morphologies suggesting ejecta would be formed by radial ground- hugging flows in the late stage of the impact. The atmosphere [Schultz, 1992] and/or the subsurface volatiles [Carr et al., 1977] have been suggested as causes of fluidization. Examining the process to generate and emplace the radial flow would allow us to understand the nature of the entrained fluid. Double Layered Ejecta (DLE), one of the major subclasses of martian ejecta, have many unique features. Most enigmatic is the presence of two distinct layers of ejecta: a thick inner lobe and a thin outer lobe. The striking differences between the two lobes suggest that two different processes occur independently during ejecta emplacement, a case implausible by a single ballistic trajectory. In this study, based on the hypothesis that an impact- induced vortex ring modifies surface materials in the late stage of the impact to produce the outer lobe, the volumes of displaced particles by the vortex ring were measured in laboratory experiments to compare the volumes of the outer lobes. We utilized the experimental situation of a vortex ring impacting on a particle layer. Two dimensionless numbers based on particle size (Shields' and Reynolds number) in lab fall within the same ranges as those on Mars [Suzuki et al., 2007], it is thus possible to compare the relationships between volumes and Γ, a parameter expressing the strength of a vortex ring. We fit the dependence of Vdisplaced on Gamma using a power law Vdisplaced = a Γb and we found b = 1.25 ± 0.17. The volumes of the outer lobes were measured, selecting 7 fresh craters larger than 5km in diameter in the survey area (0N-60N, 90E-150E). In the case of impact cratering, the vortex strength Γ can be scaled with the crater diameter [Barnouin-Jha and Schultz, 1998] as Γ ∝ D⅔. Using also a power law Vouter = c Γd, we obtained d = 1.42 ± 0.24 for the volume of outer lobes of DLE. As the power indices of

  2. Subsurface volatile content of martian double-layer ejecta (DLE) craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, Donna; McEwen, Alfred S.; Dundas, Colin M.; Byrne, Shane

    2017-03-01

    Excess ice is widespread throughout the martian mid-latitudes, particularly in Arcadia Planitia, where double-layer ejecta (DLE) craters also tend to be abundant. In this region, we observe the presence of thermokarstically-expanded secondary craters that likely form from impacts that destabilize a subsurface layer of excess ice, which subsequently sublimates. The presence of these expanded craters shows that excess ice is still preserved within the adjacent terrain. Here, we focus on a 15-km DLE crater that contains abundant superposed expanded craters in order to study the distribution of subsurface volatiles both at the time when the secondary craters formed and, by extension, remaining today. To do this, we measure the size distribution of the superposed expanded craters and use topographic data to calculate crater volumes as a proxy for the volumes of ice lost to sublimation during the expansion process. The inner ejecta layer contains craters that appear to have undergone more expansion, suggesting that excess ice was most abundant in that region. However, both of the ejecta layers had more expanded craters than the surrounding terrain. We extrapolate that the total volume of ice remaining within the entire ejecta deposit is as much as 74 km3 or more. The variation in ice content between the ejecta layers could be the result of (1) volatile preservation from the formation of the DLE crater, (2) post-impact deposition in the form of ice lenses; or (3) preferential accumulation or preservation of subsequent snowfall. We have ruled out (2) as the primary mode for ice deposition in this location based on inconsistencies with our observations, though it may operate in concert with other processes. Although none of the existing DLE formation hypotheses are completely consistent with our observations, which may merit a new or modified mechanism, we can conclude that DLE craters contain a significant quantity of excess ice today.

  3. A burst in a wind bubble and the impact on baryonic ejecta: high-energy gamma-ray flashes and afterglows from fast radio bursts and pulsar-driven supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murase, Kohta; Kashiyama, Kazumi; Mészáros, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Tenuous wind bubbles, which are formed by the spin-down activity of central compact remnants, are relevant in some models of fast radio bursts (FRBs) and superluminous supernovae (SNe). We study their high-energy signatures, focusing on the role of pair-enriched bubbles produced by young magnetars, rapidly rotating neutron stars, and magnetized white dwarfs. (i) First, we study the nebular properties and the conditions allowing for escape of high-energy gamma-rays and radio waves, showing that their escape is possible for nebulae with ages of ≳10-100 yr. In the rapidly rotating neutron star scenario, we find that radio emission from the quasi-steady nebula itself may be bright enough to be detected especially at sub-mm frequencies, which is relevant as a possible counterpart of pulsar-driven SNe and FRBs. (ii) Secondly, we consider the fate of bursting emission in the nebulae. We suggest that an impulsive burst may lead to a highly relativistic flow, which would interact with the nebula. If the shocked nebula is still relativistic, pre-existing non-thermal particles in the nebula can be significantly boosted by the forward shock, leading to short-duration (maybe millisecond or longer) high-energy gamma-ray flashes. Possible dissipation at the reverse shock may also lead to gamma-ray emission. (iii) After such flares, interactions with the baryonic ejecta may lead to afterglow emission with a duration of days to weeks. In the magnetar scenario, this burst-in-bubble model leads to the expectation that nearby (≲10-100 Mpc) high-energy gamma-ray flashes may be detected by the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory and the Cherenkov Telescope Array, and the subsequent afterglow emission may be seen by radio telescopes such as the Very Large Array. (iv) Finally, we discuss several implications specific to FRBs, including constraints on the emission regions and limits on soft gamma-ray counterparts.

  4. A steady-state model of the lunar ejecta cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christou, Apostolos

    2014-05-01

    Every airless body in the solar system is surrounded by a cloud of ejecta produced by the impact of interplanetary meteoroids on its surface [1]. Such ``dust exospheres'' have been observed around the Galilean satellites of Jupiter [2,3]. The prospect of long-term robotic and human operations on the Moon by the US and other countries has rekindled interest on the subject [4]. This interest has culminated with the - currently ongoing - investigation of the Moon's dust exosphere by the LADEE spacecraft [5]. Here a model is presented of a ballistic, collisionless, steady state population of ejecta launched vertically at randomly distributed times and velocities and moving under constant gravity. Assuming a uniform distribution of launch times I derive closed form solutions for the probability density functions (pdfs) of the height distribution of particles and the distribution of their speeds in a rest frame both at the surface and at altitude. The treatment is then extended to particle motion with respect to a moving platform such as an orbiting spacecraft. These expressions are compared with numerical simulations under lunar surface gravity where the underlying ejection speed distribution is (a) uniform (b) a power law. I discuss the predictions of the model, its limitations, and how it can be validated against near-surface and orbital measurements.[1] Gault, D. Shoemaker, E.M., Moore, H.J., 1963, NASA TN-D 1767. [2] Kruger, H., Krivov, A.V., Hamilton, D. P., Grun, E., 1999, Nature, 399, 558. [3] Kruger, H., Krivov, A.V., Sremcevic, M., Grun, E., 2003, Icarus, 164, 170. [4] Grun, E., Horanyi, M., Sternovsky, Z., 2011, Planetary and Space Science, 59, 1672. [5] Elphic, R.C., Hine, B., Delory, G.T., Salute, J.S., Noble, S., Colaprete, A., Horanyi, M., Mahaffy, P., and the LADEE Science Team, 2014, LPSC XLV, LPI Contr. 1777, 2677.

  5. Lunar Photometry and Composition of Ejecta Terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, V. V.; Pugacheva, S. G.; Pinet, P.; Chevrel, S.; Daydou, Y.

    One scientific goal of the AMIE experiment to fly onboard the SMART-1 mission is to investigate, at low polar orbit, the South Pole regions of the Moon. The AMIE camera will observe the surface in nadir direction within a large phase angle interval, thus providing photometric investigation of selected regions, in particular the South Pole- Aitken basin. The view is taken here that information retrieved from the local surface photometric behaviour of the Moon could be used for guiding the remote sensing anal- yses of specific geological targets. In a preliminary investigation, we have compared the Lunar Prospector thorium contents for some regions of the lunar near side with surface roughness estimated by means of the local photometric function. The aver- age structure of the lunar surface consists in a porous upper layer with various small fragments. Reflecting properties of this layer gives the uniform shape of photometric function. The average integrated lunar indicatrix was used as a background photomet- ric model. Taken as a reference, it permits to intercompare in a uniform system the shape of the phase function of different areas located at different longitude and lati- tude on the Moon. If the observed surface is represented by significant fields of ejecta materials, with many fragments of rocks, a shadow-hiding mechanism is involved, showing up at low phase angles. Thus, the fast decrease of the brightness in the phase function curve should reveal the presence of fragments on the surface. The Saari and Shorthill catalog data were used as observed phase functions. Both kinds of photo- metric functions were converted to symmetric form. Then, the difference between the modeled and observed phase functions for phase angle about 18 degree was used as a photometric parameter of the surface roughness. In the areas under study, this pa- rameter (which can vary between 0 and 1) varies from 0.05 (smooth mare surface) to 0.25 (crater Tycho and its ejecta

  6. Mineral-produced high-pressure striae and clay polish: Key evidence for nonballistic transport of ejecta from Ries crater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chao, E.C.T.

    1976-01-01

    Recently discovered mineral-produced, deeply incised striae and mirror-like polish on broken surfaces of limestone fragments from the sedimentary ejecta of the Ries impact crater of southern Germany are described. The striae and polish were produced under high confining pressures during high-velocity nonballistic transport of the ejecta mass within the time span of the cratering event (measured in terms of seconds). The striae on these fragments were produced by scouring by small mineral grains embedded in the surrounding clay matrix, and the polish was formed under the same condition, by movements of relatively fragment-free clay against the fragment surfaces. The occurrence of these striae and polish is key evidence for estimating the distribution and determining the relative importance of nonballistic and ballistic transport of ejecta from the shallow Ries stony meteorite impact crater.

  7. ASYMMETRIC EJECTA DISTRIBUTION IN SN 1006

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, Hiroyuki; Koyama, Katsuji; Yamaguchi, Hiroya

    2013-07-01

    We present the results from deep X-ray observations ({approx}400 ks in total) of SN 1006 with Suzaku. The thermal spectrum from the entire supernova remnant (SNR) exhibits prominent emission lines of O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ar, Ca, and Fe. The observed abundance pattern in the ejecta components is in good agreement with that predicted by a standard model of Type Ia supernovae (SNe). The spatially resolved analysis reveals that the distribution of the O-burning and incomplete Si-burning products (Si, S, and Ar) is asymmetric, while that of the C-burning products (O, Ne, and Mg) is relatively uniform in the SNR interior. The peak position of the former is clearly shifted by 5' ({approx}3.2 pc at the distance of 2.2 kpc) to the southeast (SE) from the SNR's geometric center. Using the SNR age of {approx}1000 yr, we constrain that the velocity asymmetry (in projection) of the ejecta is {approx}3100 km s{sup -1}. The Fe abundance is also significantly higher in the SE region than in the northwest. Given that the non-uniformity is observed only in the heavier elements (Si through Fe), we argue that SN 1006 originates from an asymmetric explosion, as is expected from recent multidimensional simulations of Type Ia SNe, although we cannot eliminate the possibility that inhomogeneous ambient medium had induced the apparent non-uniformity. Possible evidence for the Cr-K-shell line and line broadening in the Fe-K-shell emission is also found.

  8. SPECTROPOLARIMETRIC SIGNATURES OF CLUMPY SUPERNOVA EJECTA

    SciTech Connect

    Hole, K. T.; Nordsieck, K. H.; Kasen, D.

    2010-09-10

    Polarization has been detected at early times for all types of supernovae (SNe), indicating that all such systems result from or quickly develop some form of asymmetry. In addition, the detection of strong line polarization in SNe is suggestive of chemical inhomogeneities ('clumps') in the layers above the photosphere, which may reflect hydrodynamical instabilities during the explosion. We have developed a fast, flexible, approximate semi-analytic code for modeling polarized line radiative transfer within three-dimensional inhomogeneous rapidly expanding atmospheres. Given a range of model parameters, the code generates random sets of clumps in the expanding ejecta and calculates the emergent line profile and Stokes parameters for each configuration. The ensemble of these configurations represents the effects both of various host geometries and of different viewing angles. We present results for the first part of our survey of model geometries, specifically the effects of the number and size of clumps (and the related effect of filling factor) on the emergent spectrum and Stokes parameters. Our simulations show that random clumpiness can produce line polarization in the range observed in SNe Ia, as well as the Q-U loops that are frequently seen in all SNe. We have also developed a method to connect the results of our simulations to robust observational parameters such as maximum polarization and polarized equivalent width in the line. Our models, in connection with spectropolarimetric observations, can constrain the three-dimensional structure of SN ejecta and offer important insight into the SN explosion physics and the nature of their progenitor systems.

  9. Detailed Analysis of the Intra-Ejecta Dark Plains of Caloris Basin, Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buczkowski, D.; Seelos, K. D.

    2010-12-01

    be especially noted, to be incorporated into a new crater classification scheme that includes both degradation state and level and type of infilling. We will also distinguish between craters infilled with 1) lava, 2) impact melt and 3) ejecta, based on our interpretation of the MDIS images. We will then determine the crater size-frequency distribution of each geomorphic unit. We will analyze the crater density of the Caloris floor plains unit, the Odin Formation ejecta and the Odin Formation intra-ejecta dark plains. We will do a second count of Caloris floor craters that includes filled craters, to attempt to get a minimum age for the underlying dark basement. Crater counting on any additional geologic units will depend upon results of the geomorphic mapping. Finally, we will refine the stratigraphy of the Caloris basin units. We start in the region where MESSENGER data over-laps Mariner 10 images. By comparing the Caloris group formations mapped in the Tolstoj and Shakespeare quadrangles to the overlapping MDIS images, we determine the distinctive geomorphology of each of these units in the high resolution MESSENGER data. We will then use this as diagnostic criteria as we map the rest of the basin.

  10. Estimates of primary ejecta and local material for the Orientale basin: Implications for the formation and ballistic sedimentation of multi-ring basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Minggang; Zhu, Meng-Hua

    2016-04-01

    A clear understanding of thickness distributions of primary ejecta and local material is critical to interpreting the process of ballistic sedimentation, provenances of lunar samples, the evolution of the lunar surface, and the origin of multi-ring basins. The youngest lunar multi-ring basin, Orientale, provides the best preserved structure for determining the thicknesses of primary ejecta and local material. In general, the primary ejecta thickness was often estimated using crater morphometry. However, previous methods ignored either crater erosion, the crater interior geometry, or both. In addition, ejecta deposits were taken as mostly primary ejecta. And, as far as we know, the local material thickness had not been determined for the Orientale. In this work, we proposed a model based on matching measurements of partially filled pre-Orientale craters (PFPOCs) with the simulations of crater erosion to determine their thicknesses. We provided estimates of primary ejecta thickness distribution with the thickness of 0.85 km at Cordillera ring and a decay power law exponent of b = 2.8, the transient crater radius of 200 km, excavation volume of 2.3 ×106 km3, primary ejecta volume of 2.8 ×106 km3. These results suggest that previous works (e.g., Fassett et al., 2011; Moore et al., 1974) might overestimate the primary ejecta thicknesses of Orientale, and the primary ejecta thickness model of Pike (1974a) for multi-ring basins may give better estimates than the widely cited model of McGetchin et al. (1973) and the scaling law for impacts into Ottawa Sand (Housen et al., 1983). Structural uplift decays slower than previously thought, and rim relief is mostly rim uplift for Orientale. The main reason for rim uplift may be the fracturing and squeezing upward of the surrounding rocks. The proportion of local material to ejecta deposits increases with increasing radial distance from basin center, and the thickness of local material is larger than that of primary ejecta at

  11. Thermomagnetic analysis of meterorites. 4: Ureilites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowe, M. W.; Herndon, J. M.; Larson, E. E.; Watson, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    Samples of all available ureilites have been analyzed thermomagnetically. For three of the six (Dyalpur, Goalpara and Havero) evidence was found for only low-nickel metallic-iron as the magnetic component and the (saturation magnetization vs, temperature) curves were reversible. In the Novo Urei ureilite, magnetite in addition to low-nickel metallic-iron was indicated and again the Js-T curve was reversible. For the two badly weathered ureilites, Dingo Pup Donga and North Haig, indication was also found that both initial magnetite and low-nickel metallic-iron were present. However, the Js-T curves were somewhat irreversible and the final saturation magnetization was 20% and 50% greater than initially for North Haig and Dingo Pup Donga, respectively. This behavior is interpreted to be the result of magnetite production from a secondary iron oxide during the experiment.

  12. Overview of the Chicxulub impactite and proximal ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claeys, Ph

    2003-04-01

    Several types of impactites have now been recovered from the various wells drilled in the Chicxulub crater in Yucatan. The old Pemex wells (Yucatan 6 and Chicxulub 1) contain a highly heterogeneous and stratified suevite, which upper unit is unusually rich in carbonates, impact breccia and a possibly an impact melt at the very bottom of C1. They are located towards the crater center (C1), on the flank of the peak ring (Y6). The thickness of impactite in this zone exceeds 250 m. The UNAM wells just outside the crater rim reveal sedimentary breccia and a fall-out suevite richer in silicate melt and basement fragments, than its crater equivalent. There, the thickness of the impactite was probably several hundred meters, considering that its top might have been eroded. It can also be speculated that a cover of fall-back suevite extended over the ejecta blanket in Yucatan, all the way to Belize and perhaps even to the region of Tabasco, in Southern Mexico. The recently drilled Yaxcopoil contains about 100 m of impactites, which is currently under study. Preliminary data seem to show less variability than the material recovered from Y6. As in the UNAM well, the impactite is dominated by basement material, and shows alternating severely altered and better preserved horizons.

  13. Flow Ejecta and Slope Landslides in Small Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This high resolution picture of a moderately small impact crater on Mars was taken by the Mars Global Surveyor Orbiter Camera (MOC) on October 17, 1997 at 4:11:07 PM PST, during MGS orbit 22. The image covers an area 2.9 by 48.4 kilometers (1.8 by 30 miles) at 9.6 m (31.5 feet) per picture element, and is centered at 21.3 degrees N, 179.8 degrees W, near Orcus Patera. The MOC image is a factor of 15X better than pervious Viking views of this particular crater (left, Viking image 545A49).

    The unnamed crater is one of three closely adjacent impact features that display the ejecta pattern characteristic of one type of 'flow-ejecta' crater. Such patterns are considered evidence of fluidized movement of the materials ejected during the cratering event, and are believed to indicate the presence of subsurface ice or liquid water.

    Long, linear features of different brightness values can be seen on the on the steep slopes inside and outside the crater rim. This type of feature, first identified in Viking Orbiter images acquired over 20 years ago, are more clearly seen in this new view (about 3 times better than the best previous observations). Their most likely explanation is that small land or dirt slides, initiated by seismic or wind action, have flowed down the steep slopes. Initially dark because of the nature of the surface disturbance, these features get lighter with time as the ubiquitous fine, bright dust settles onto them from the martian atmosphere. Based on estimates of the dust fall-out rate, many of these features are probably only a few tens to hundreds of years old. Thus, they are evidence of a process that is active on Mars today.

    Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with

  14. Calculation of ejecta thickness and structural uplift for Lunar and Martian complex crater rims.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Tim; Sturm, Sebastian; Kenkmann, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Crater rims of simple and complex craters have an elevation that is formed during the excavation stage of crater formation. For simple crater rims it is believed that the elevation is due to the sum of two equal parts, the thickness of the most proximal impact ejecta blanket (overturned flap) plus the thickness that results from plastic deformation including injection [1, 2, 3]. We intend to measure and quantify the kinematics of mass movements, especially concerning the question why complex impact craters have elevated crater rims like simple craters and precisely constrain the ejecta thickness and structural uplift of Lunar and Martian crater rims to understand what the main contributor to the elevated rim is [4]. We investigated a pristine 16 km-diameter unnamed Martian complex crater (21.52°N, 184.35°) and the lunar complex craters Bessel (21.8°N, 17.9°E) 16 km in diameter and Euler (23.3°N, 29.2°W) 28 km in diameter [5, 6]. In the crater walls of these craters we found columnar lavas on Mars and basaltic layering on the Moon. We used the uppermost layers of these exposed outcrops along the crater wall to determine the dip of the target rocks (Mars) and to distinguish between the bedrock and the overlying ejecta. We precisely measured the structural uplift and ejecta thickness of these complex craters. The unnamed crater on Mars has a mean rim height of 375.75 m, with a structural uplift of 233.88 m (57.44%), exposed as columnar lavas and the superposing ejecta has a height of 141.87 m (43.56%). For the Lunar complex crater Euler the mean total rim height is 790 ± 100 m, with a minimal structural uplift of 475 ± 100 m (60 ± 10 %), exposed as basaltic layers [e.g., 7, 8] and a maximum ejecta thickness of 315 ± 100 m (40 ± 10%). The Lunar complex crater Bessel has a total rim height of 430 ± 15 m , with a minimal structural uplift of 290 ± 15 m (67 ± 3 %), exposed as basaltic layers and a maximum ejecta thickness of 140 ± 115 m (33 ± 3%). For the

  15. Target delamination by spallation and ejecta dragging: An example from the Ries crater's periphery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenkmann, Thomas; Ivanov, Boris A.

    2006-11-01

    Subhorizontal shear planes (detachments) are observed in bedded limestones in the periphery of the Ries impact crater, Germany. These detachments occur at 0.8-1.8 crater radii distance from the crater center beneath deposits of the continuous ejecta blanket. Striations on detachment planes and offsets of markers indicate top-outward shearing with radial slip vectors. Detachments were found at depths between a few meters and more than 50 m beneath the target surface. The displacements along these faults range from meters to decameters and decrease with increasing depth and distance from the crater center. With increasing crater distance, detachment horizons tend to climb to shallower levels. Cross-cutting relationships to faults associated with the crater collapse indicate that detachment faulting started prior to the collapse but continued during crater modification. Numerical modeling of the cratering process shows that near-surface deformation outside the transient crater is induced by two separate mechanisms: (i) weak spallation by interference of shock and release waves near the target surface and (ii) subsequent dragging by the deposition of the ejecta curtain. Spallation causes an upward and outward directed motion of target material that increases in magnitude toward the target surface. It leads to decoupling of the uppermost target layers in the early cratering stage without totally disintegrating the rock. The subsequent arrival of the oblique impact shower of the ejecta curtain at the target surface delivers a horizontal momentum to the uppermost target area and results in a second horizontal displacement increment by dragging. With increasing depth this effect vanishes rapidly. Spallation decoupling and subsequent ejecta dragging of near-surface rocks is probably a general cratering mechanism around craters in layered targets with weak interbeds.

  16. Comprehensive nucleosynthesis analysis for ejecta of compact binary mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Just, O.; Bauswein, A.; Pulpillo, R. Ardevol; Goriely, S.; Janka, H.-T.

    2015-03-01

    We present the first comprehensive study of r-process element nucleosynthesis in the ejecta of compact binary mergers (CBMs) and their relic black hole (BH)-torus systems. The evolution of the BH-accretion tori is simulated for seconds with a Newtonian hydrodynamics code including viscosity effects, pseudo-Newtonian gravity for rotating BHs, and an energy-dependent two-moment closure scheme for the transport of electron neutrinos and antineutrinos. The investigated cases are guided by relativistic double neutron star (NS-NS) and NS-BH merger models, producing ˜3-6 M⊙ BHs with rotation parameters of ABH ˜ 0.8 and tori of 0.03-0.3 M⊙. Our nucleosynthesis analysis includes the dynamical (prompt) ejecta expelled during the CBM phase and the neutrino and viscously driven outflows of the relic BH-torus systems. While typically ˜20-25 per cent of the initial accretion-torus mass are lost by viscously driven outflows, neutrino-powered winds contribute at most another ˜1 per cent, but neutrino heating enhances the viscous ejecta significantly. Since BH-torus ejecta possess a wide distribution of electron fractions (0.1-0.6) and entropies, they produce heavy elements from A ˜ 80 up to the actinides, with relative contributions of A ≳ 130 nuclei being subdominant and sensitively dependent on BH and torus masses and the exact treatment of shear viscosity. The combined ejecta of CBM and BH-torus phases can reproduce the solar abundances amazingly well for A ≳ 90. Varying contributions of the torus ejecta might account for observed variations of lighter elements with 40 ≤ Z ≤ 56 relative to heavier ones, and a considerable reduction of the prompt ejecta compared to the torus ejecta, e.g. in highly asymmetric NS-BH mergers, might explain the composition of heavy-element deficient stars.

  17. A Model for Properties of Basin Ejecta Deposits and Secondary Crater Densities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskin, L. A.; McKinnon, W. B.; Moss, B. E.

    2001-01-01

    Ejecta scaling relationships, ballistic sedimentation, and ejecta fragment size distributions are used to give estimates of thicknesses of basin ejecta deposits, proportions of primary ejecta, and secondary crater diameters and surface densities. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. Long-term dynamical evolution of dusty ejecta from Deimos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makuch, Martin; Krivov, Alexander V.; Spahn, Frank

    2005-04-01

    We re-assess expected properties of the presumed dust belt of Mars formed by impact ejecta from Deimos. Previous studies have shown that dynamics of Deimos particles are dominated by two perturbing forces: radiation pressure (RP) and Mars' oblateness (J2). At the same time, they have demonstrated that lifetimes of particles, especially of grains about ten of micrometers in size, may reach more than 104 years. On such timescales, the Poynting-Robertson drag (PR) becomes important. Here we provide a study of the dynamics under the combined action of all three perturbing forces. We show that a PR decay of the semimajor axes leads to an adiabatic decrease of amplitudes and periods of oscillations in orbital inclinations predicted in the framework of the underlying RP+J2 problem. Furthermore, we show that smallest of the long-lived Deimos grains (radius≈5- 10μm) may reach a chaotic regime, resulting in unpredictable and abrupt changes of their dynamics. The particles just above that size ( ≈10- 15μm) should be the most abundant in the Deimos torus. Our dynamical analysis, combined with a more accurate study of the particle lifetimes, provides corrections to earlier predictions about the dimensions and geometry of the Deimos torus. In addition to a population, appreciably inclined and shifted towards the Sun, the torus should contain a more contracted, less asymmetric, and less tilted component between the orbits of Phobos and Deimos.

  19. Condensation and mixing in supernova ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedkin, A. V.; Meyer, B. S.; Grossman, L.

    2010-06-01

    Low-density graphite spherules from the Murchison carbonaceous chondrite contain TiC grains and possess excess 28Si and 44Ca (from decay of short-lived 44Ti). These and other isotopic anomalies indicate that such grains formed by condensation from mixtures of ejecta from the interior of a core-collapse supernova with those from the exterior. Using homogenized chemical and isotopic model compositions of the eight main burning zones as end-members, Travaglio et al. (1999) attempted to find mixtures whose isotopic compositions match those observed in the graphite spherules, subject to the condition that the atomic C/O ratio = 1. They were partially successful, but this chemical condition does not guarantee condensation of TiC at a higher temperature than graphite, which is indicated by the spherule textures. In the present work, model compositions of relatively thin layers of ejecta within the main burning zones computed by Rauscher et al. (2002) for Type II supernovae of 15, 21 and 25 M ʘ are used to construct mixtures whose chemical compositions cause equilibrium condensation of TiC at a higher temperature than graphite in an attempt to match the textures and isotopic compositions of the spherules simultaneously. The variation of pressure with temperature and the change in elemental abundances with time due to radioactive decay were taken into account in the condensation calculations. Layers were found within the main Ni, O/Ne, He/C and He/N zones that, when mixed together, simultaneously match the carbon, nitrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions, 44Ti/ 48Ti ratios and inferred initial 26Al/ 27Al ratios of the low-density graphite spherules, even at subsolar 12C/ 13C ratios. Due to the relatively large proportion of material from the Ni zone and the relative amounts of the two layers of the Ni zone required to meet these conditions, predicted 28Si excesses are larger than observed in the low-density graphite spherules, and large negative δ46Ti/ 48Ti, δ47Ti/ 48Ti

  20. Simulating regolith ejecta due to gas impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Wesley Allen; Metzger, Philip; Dove, Adrienne; Britt, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    Space missions operating at or near the surface of a planet or small body must consider possible gas-regolith interactions, as they can cause hazardous effects or, conversely, be employed to accomplish mission goals. They are also directly related to a body's surface properties; thus understanding these interactions could provide an additional tool to analyze mission data. The Python Regolith Interaction Calculator (PyRIC), built upon a computational technique developed in the Apollo era, was used to assess interactions between rocket exhaust and an asteroid's surface. It focused specifically on threshold conditions for causing regolith ejecta. To improve this model, and learn more about the underlying physics, we have begun ground-based experiments studying the interaction between gas impingement and regolith simulant. Compressed air, initially standing in for rocket exhaust, is directed through a rocket nozzle at a bed of simulant. We assess the qualitative behavior of various simulants when subjected to a known maximum surface pressure, both in atmosphere and in a chamber initially at vacuum. These behaviors are compared to prior computational results, and possible flow patterns are inferred. Our future work will continue these experiments in microgravity through the use of a drop tower. These will use several simulant types and various pressure levels to observe the effects gas flow can have on target surfaces. Combining this with a characterization of the surface pressure distribution, tighter bounds can be set on the cohesive threshold necessary to maintain regolith integrity. This will aid the characterization of actual regolith distributions, as well as informing the surface operation phase of mission design.

  1. Numerical Modelling and Ejecta Distribution Analysis of a Martian Fresh Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchetti, A.; Cremonese, G.; Cambianica, P.; Daubar, I.; McEwen, A. S.; Re, C.

    2015-12-01

    Images taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter reveal fresh craters on Mars that are known to be recent as they are constrained by before and after images (Daubar et al., 2013). In particular, on Nov. 19, 2013 an image acquired by HiRISE, ESP_034285_1835, observed a 25 m diameter fresh crater located at 3.7° N, 53.4° E. This impact occurred between July 2010 and May 2012, as constrained by Context camera (CTX) images. Because the terrain where the crater formed is dusty, the fresh crater appears blue in the enhanced color of the HiRISE image, due to removal of the reddish dust in that area. We analyze this crater using the iSALE shock physics code (Amsden et al., 1980, Collins et al., 2004, Ivanov et al., 1997, Melosh et al., 1992, Wünnemann et al., 2006) to model the formation of this impact structure which is ~25 m in diameter and ~ 2.5 - 3 m in depth. These values are obtained from the DTM profile we have generated. We model the Martian surface considering different target compositions as regolith and fractured basalt rock and we based our simulations on a basalt projectile with a porosity of 10% (which is derived from the average of the meteorite types proposed by Britt et al., 2002) that hits the Martian surface with a beginning velocity equal to 7 km/s (Le Feuvre & Wieczorek, 2011) and an impact angle of 90°. The projectile size is around 1 m and it is estimated from the comparison between the DTM profile and the profiles obtained by numerical modelling. The primary objective of this analysis is the detailed study of the ejecta, in fact we will track the ejecta coming from the simulation and compare them to the ejecta distribution computed on the image (the ejecta reached a distance of more than 15 km). From the matching of the simulated ejecta with their real distribution, we will be able to understand the goodness of the simulation and also put constraints on the target material.

  2. Geologic Mapping of Ejecta Deposits in Oppia Quadrangle, Asteroid (4) Vesta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garry, W. Brent; Williams, David A.; Yingst, R. Aileen; Mest, Scott C.; Buczkowski, Debra L.; Tosi, Federico; Schafer, Michael; LeCorre, Lucille; Reddy, Vishnu; Jaumann, Ralf; Pieters, Carle M.; Russell, Christopher T.; Raymond, Carol A.

    2014-01-01

    Oppia Quadrangle Av-10 (288-360 deg E, +/- 22 deg) is a junction of key geologic features that preserve a rough history of Asteroid (4) Vesta and serves as a case study of using geologic mapping to define a relative geologic timescale. Clear filter images, stereo-derived topography, slope maps, and multispectral color-ratio images from the Framing Camera on NASA's Dawn spacecraft served as basemaps to create a geologic map and investigate the spatial and temporal relationships of the local stratigraphy. Geologic mapping reveals the oldest map unit within Av-10 is the cratered highlands terrain which possibly represents original crustal material on Vesta that was then excavated by one or more impacts to form the basin Feralia Planitia. Saturnalia Fossae and Divalia Fossae ridge and trough terrains intersect the wall of Feralia Planitia indicating that this impact basin is older than both the Veneneia and Rheasilvia impact structures, representing Pre-Veneneian crustal material. Two of the youngest geologic features in Av-10 are Lepida (approximately 45 km diameter) and Oppia (approximately 40 km diameter) impact craters that formed on the northern and southern wall of Feralia Planitia and each cross-cuts a trough terrain. The ejecta blanket of Oppia is mapped as 'dark mantle' material because it appears dark orange in the Framing Camera 'Clementine-type' colorratio image and has a diffuse, gradational contact distributed to the south across the rim of Rheasilvia. Mapping of surface material that appears light orange in color in the Framing Camera 'Clementine-type' color-ratio image as 'light mantle material' supports previous interpretations of an impact ejecta origin. Some light mantle deposits are easily traced to nearby source craters, but other deposits may represent distal ejecta deposits (emplaced greater than 5 crater radii away) in a microgravity environment.

  3. Radar scattering mechanisms within the meteor crater ejecta blanket: Geologic implications and relevance to Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvin, J. B.; Campbell, B. A.; Zisk, S. H.; Schaber, Gerald G.; Evans, C.

    1989-01-01

    Simple impact craters are known to occur on all of the terrestrial planets and the morphologic expression of their ejecta blankets is a reliable indicator of their relative ages on the Moon, Mars, Mercury, and most recently for Venus. It will be crucial for the interpretation of the geology of Venus to develop a reliable means of distinguishing smaller impact landforms from volcanic collapse and explosion craters, and further to use the observed SAR characteristics of crater ejecta blankets (CEB) as a means of relative age estimation. With these concepts in mind, a study was initiated of the quantitative SAR textural characteristics of the ejecta blanket preserved at Meteor Crater, Arizona, the well studied 1.2 km diameter simple crater that formed approx. 49,000 years ago from the impact of an octahedrite bolide. While Meteor Crater was formed as the result of an impact into wind and water lain sediments and has undergone recognizable water and wind related erosion, it nonetheless represents the only well studied simple impact crater on Earth with a reasonably preserved CEB. Whether the scattering behavior of the CEB can provide an independent perspective on its preservation state and style of erosion is explored. Finally, airborne laser altimeter profiles of the microtopography of the Meteor Crater CEB were used to further quantify the subradar pizel scale topographic slopes and RMS height variations for comparisons with the scattering mechanisms computed from SAR polarimetry. A preliminary assessment was summarized of the L-band radar scattering mechanisms within the Meteor Crater CEB as derived from a NASA/JPL DC-8 SAR Polarimetry dataset acquired in 1988, and the dominant scattering behavior was compared with microtopographic data (laser altimeter profiles and 1:10,000 scale topographic maps).

  4. Crater Ejecta by Day and Night

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 24 June 2004 This pair of images shows a crater and its ejecta.

    Day/Night Infrared Pairs

    The image pairs presented focus on a single surface feature as seen in both the daytime and nighttime by the infrared THEMIS camera. The nighttime image (right) has been rotated 180 degrees to place north at the top.

    Infrared image interpretation

    Daytime: Infrared images taken during the daytime exhibit both the morphological and thermophysical properties of the surface of Mars. Morphologic details are visible due to the effect of sun-facing slopes receiving more energy than antisun-facing slopes. This creates a warm (bright) slope and cool (dark) slope appearance that mimics the light and shadows of a visible wavelength image. Thermophysical properties are seen in that dust heats up more quickly than rocks. Thus dusty areas are bright and rocky areas are dark.

    Nighttime: Infrared images taken during the nighttime exhibit only the thermophysical properties of the surface of Mars. The effect of sun-facing versus non-sun-facing energy dissipates quickly at night. Thermophysical effects dominate as different surfaces cool at different rates through the nighttime hours. Rocks cool slowly, and are therefore relatively bright at night (remember that rocks are dark during the day). Dust and other fine grained materials cool very quickly and are dark in nighttime infrared images.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -9, Longitude 164.2 East (195.8 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through

  5. Characteristics and Origin of Martian Low-Aspect-Ratio Layered Ejecta (LARLE) Craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, Nadine G.; Boyce, J. M.

    2013-10-01

    An unusual crater morphology is found primarily at high latitudes on Mars. These craters display an extensive outer deposit beyond the normal layered ejecta blanket. This outer deposit extends up to 20 crater radii from the rim, terminates in a sinuous flame-like edge, and is extremely thin, leading to a low aspect ratio (A = thickness/length). These craters are thus called Low-Aspect-Ratio Layered Ejecta (LARLE) craters. We have conducted a survey of all LARLE craters 1-km-diameter and larger on Mars. We find 139 LARLE craters ranging in diameter from 1.0 to 12.2 km with a median of 2.8 km. Most (97%) are found poleward of 35N and 40S, with the remainder primarily found in the equatorial Medusae Fossae Formation. The surfaces of the freshest LARLE layers commonly exhibit radial, curvilinear ridges and dune-like landforms, and the LARLE deposit typically drapes over pre-existing terrain. We propose that the LARLE deposit is formed by a different mechanism than that responsible for the normal layered ejecta patterns. We suggest that impact into relatively-thick fine-grained ice-rich mantles enhances the formation of a base surge that is deposited after formation of the inner layered ejecta deposits. This base surge is similar to the density-driven, turbulent cloud of suspended fine-grained particles produced by impact erosion and mobilization of the surrounding surface material by ejecta from shallow-depth-of-burst nuclear and high-explosion craters. We have applied a base surge equation developed for terrestrial explosive events to two fresh LARLE craters. After adjustment of the equation for Martian conditions, it predicts runout distances that are within 99% of the observed values. All Martian craters likely produce a base surge during formation, but the presence of the obvious LARLE deposit is attributed to crater formation in thick, fine-grained, sedimentary deposits. These sediments are the source of the extra particulate debris incorporated into and deposited

  6. Interstellar and Ejecta Dust in the Cas A Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arendt, Richard G.; Dwek, Eli; Kober, Gladys; Rho, Jonghee; Hwang, Una

    2013-01-01

    The ejecta of the Cas A supernova remnant has a complex morphology, consisting of dense fast-moving line emitting knots and diffuse X-ray emitting regions that have encountered the reverse shock, as well as more slowly expanding, unshocked regions of the ejecta. Using the Spitzer 5-35 micron IRS data cube, and Herschel 70, 100, and 160 micron PACS data, we decompose the infrared emission from the remnant into distinct spectral components associated with the different regions of the ejecta. Such decomposition allows the association of different dust species with ejecta layers that underwent distinct nuclear burning histories, and determination of the dust heating mechanisms. Our decomposition identified three characteristic dust spectra. The first, most luminous one, exhibits strong emission features at approx. 9 and 21 micron, and a weaker 12 micron feature, and is closely associated with the ejecta knots that have strong [Ar II] 6.99 micron and [Ar III] 8.99 micron emission lines. The dust features can be reproduced by magnesium silicate grains with relatively low MgO-to-SiO2 ratios. A second, very different dust spectrum that has no indication of any silicate features, is best fit by Al2O3 dust and is found in association with ejecta having strong [Ne II] 12.8 micron and [Ne III] 15.6 micron emission lines. A third characteristic dust spectrum shows features that best matched by magnesium silicates with relatively high MgO-to-SiO2 ratio. This dust is primarily associated with the X-ray emitting shocked ejecta and the shocked interstellar/circumstellar material. All three spectral components include an additional featureless cold dust component of unknown composition. Colder dust of indeterminate composition is associated with [Si II] 34.8 micron emission from the interior of the SNR, where the reverse shock has not yet swept up and heated the ejecta. The dust mass giving rise to the warm dust component is about approx. 0.1solar M. However, most of the dust mass

  7. Characterization of Lunar Crater Ejecta Deposits Using Radar Data from the Mini-RF Instrument on LRO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, G. W.; Raney, R. K.; Cahill, J. T.; Bussey, B.

    2012-12-01

    Impact cratering is the dominant weathering process on the surface of the Moon and a primary means of distrib-uting material on the lunar surface [1]. Radar data provide unique information on both the horizontal and vertical distribution of impact deposits [2]. The Miniature Radio Frequency (Mini-RF) instrument flown on the Lunar Re-connaissance Orbiter (LRO) is a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) with an innovative hybrid dual-polarimetric archi-tecture, transmitting (quasi-) circular polarization, and receiving orthogonal linear polarizations and their relative phase [3]. The four Stokes parameters that characterize the observed backscattered EM field are calculated from the received data. These parameters can be used to derive a variety of child products that include the circular polariza-tion ratio (CPR) and the m-chi decomposition. The former provides an indication of surface roughness and the latter provides an indication of the scattering properties of the surface [4]. Using these products, we examine the crater Byrgius A and demonstrate the ability to differentiate materials within ejecta deposits and their relative thicknesses. Byrgius A is a 19 km diameter Copernican located in the lunar highlands east of the Orientale Basin and west of Mare Humorum. Visible image data of the region obtained by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera Wide An-gle Camera (LROC WAC) [5] at a resolution of 100 m/pixel show optically bright ejecta deposits associated with the crater that extend to radial distances of 100s of km, with near continuous deposits observed to an average radial distance of 70 km. Mini-RF CPR information derived from S-band (12.6 cm) data of the region show an increased roughness for Byrgius A and its ejecta deposits relative to the surrounding terrain. This is a commonly observed characteristic of young, fresh craters and indicates that the crater and its ejecta have a higher fraction of cm- to m-scale scatterers at the surface and/or buried to depths

  8. Ejecta model development at pRad (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Buttler, William T; Oro, David M; Dimonte, Guy; Terrones, Guillermo; Morris, Christopher; Bainbridge, J R; Hogan, Gary E.; Hollander, Brian J.; Holtkamp, David B.; Kwiathowski, Kris; Marr-Lyon, Mark; Mariam, Fesseha G.; Merrill, Frank E; Nedrow, Paul; Saunders, Alexander; Schwartz, C L; Stone, B; Tupa, Dale; Vogan-McNeil, Wendy S

    2010-02-09

    In July 2009 we fielded three explosively (HE) driven Richtmyer-Meshkov instability experiments at the LANSCE Proton Radiography Facility (pRad), and in August of 2009 we fielded one flyer plate experiment on the pRad 40 mm powder gun. One HE experiment was done in vacuum, and the other two within four atmospheres of noble gasses: Xe and Ne. These two gases were chosen to study the viscous effects on ejecta formation. It is unexpected, but the viscosity {eta} of Ne is twice that of Xe, and, due to the atomic mass difference between the two, the kinematic viscosity ({eta}/{rho}) of Ne is about ten times that of Xe. The results showed that ejecta formation is sensitively linked to the gas density, which implies that the Weber number is more important in ejecta formation than the Reynolds number.

  9. Interstellar and Ejecta Dust in the Cas A Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arendt, Richard G.; Dwek, Eli; Kober, Gladys; Rho, Jeonghee; Hwang, Una

    2014-05-01

    Infrared continuum observations provide a means of investigating the physical composition of the dust in the ejecta and swept up medium of the Cas A supernova remnant (SNR). Using low-resolution Spitzer IRS spectra (5-35 μm), and broad-band Herschel PACS imaging (70, 100, and 160 μm), we identify characteristic dust spectra, associated with ejecta layers that underwent distinct nuclear burning histories. The most luminous spectrum exhibits strong emission features at ~9 and 21 μm and is closely associated with ejecta knots with strong Ar emission lines. The dust features can be reproduced by magnesium silicate grains with relatively low Mg to Si ratios. Another dust spectrum is associated with ejecta having strong Ne emission lines. It has no indication of any silicate features and is best fit by Al2O3 dust. A third characteristic dust spectrum shows features that are best matched by magnesium silicates with a relatively high Mg to Si ratio. This dust is primarily associated with the X-ray-emitting shocked ejecta, but it is also evident in regions where shocked interstellar or circumstellar material is expected. However, the identification of dust composition is not unique, and each spectrum includes an additional featureless dust component of unknown composition. Colder dust of indeterminate composition is associated with emission from the interior of the SNR, where the reverse shock has not yet swept up and heated the ejecta. Most of the dust mass in Cas A is associated with this unidentified cold component, which is <~ 0.1 M ⊙. The mass of warmer dust is only ~0.04 M ⊙.

  10. Interstellar and ejecta dust in the cas a supernova remnant

    SciTech Connect

    Arendt, Richard G.; Dwek, Eli; Kober, Gladys; Rho, Jeonghee; Hwang, Una

    2014-05-01

    Infrared continuum observations provide a means of investigating the physical composition of the dust in the ejecta and swept up medium of the Cas A supernova remnant (SNR). Using low-resolution Spitzer IRS spectra (5-35 μm), and broad-band Herschel PACS imaging (70, 100, and 160 μm), we identify characteristic dust spectra, associated with ejecta layers that underwent distinct nuclear burning histories. The most luminous spectrum exhibits strong emission features at ∼9 and 21 μm and is closely associated with ejecta knots with strong Ar emission lines. The dust features can be reproduced by magnesium silicate grains with relatively low Mg to Si ratios. Another dust spectrum is associated with ejecta having strong Ne emission lines. It has no indication of any silicate features and is best fit by Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} dust. A third characteristic dust spectrum shows features that are best matched by magnesium silicates with a relatively high Mg to Si ratio. This dust is primarily associated with the X-ray-emitting shocked ejecta, but it is also evident in regions where shocked interstellar or circumstellar material is expected. However, the identification of dust composition is not unique, and each spectrum includes an additional featureless dust component of unknown composition. Colder dust of indeterminate composition is associated with emission from the interior of the SNR, where the reverse shock has not yet swept up and heated the ejecta. Most of the dust mass in Cas A is associated with this unidentified cold component, which is ≲ 0.1 M {sub ☉}. The mass of warmer dust is only ∼0.04 M {sub ☉}.

  11. MIXING OF CLUMPY SUPERNOVA EJECTA INTO MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Liubin; Desch, Steven J.; Scannapieco, Evan; Timmes, F. X.

    2012-09-01

    Several lines of evidence, from isotopic analyses of meteorites to studies of the Sun's elemental and isotopic composition, indicate that the solar system was contaminated early in its evolution by ejecta from a nearby supernova. Previous models have invoked supernova material being injected into an extant protoplanetary disk, or isotropically expanding ejecta sweeping over a distant (>10 pc) cloud core, simultaneously enriching it and triggering its collapse. Here, we consider a new astrophysical setting: the injection of clumpy supernova ejecta, as observed in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant, into the molecular gas at the periphery of an H II region created by the supernova's progenitor star. To track these interactions, we have conducted a suite of high-resolution (1500{sup 3} effective) three-dimensional numerical hydrodynamic simulations that follow the evolution of individual clumps as they move into molecular gas. Even at these high resolutions, our simulations do not quite achieve numerical convergence, due to the challenge of properly resolving the small-scale mixing of ejecta and molecular gas, although they do allow some robust conclusions to be drawn. Isotropically exploding ejecta do not penetrate into the molecular cloud or mix with it, but, if cooling is properly accounted for, clumpy ejecta penetrate to distances {approx}10{sup 18} cm and mix effectively with large regions of star-forming molecular gas. In fact, the {approx}2 M{sub Sun} of high-metallicity ejecta from a single core-collapse supernova is likely to mix with {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun} of molecular gas material as it is collapsing. Thus, all stars forming late ( Almost-Equal-To 5 Myr) in the evolution of an H II region may be contaminated by supernova ejecta at the level {approx}10{sup -4}. This level of contamination is consistent with the abundances of short-lived radionuclides and possibly some stable isotopic shifts in the early solar system and is

  12. Long-wave stratospheric transmission of Mount St. Helens ejecta

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, P.M.; Haughney, L.C.; Innis, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    The NASA/Ames Research C-141 aircraft underflew the Mount St. Helens ejecta plume in Utah three days after the eruption. Upward-looking 20--40-..mu..m on-board radiometry provided data resulting in a calculated long-wave transmission of 0.93. From this value, an optical depth of 0.073 is inferred. This value is compared with an accepted background, stratospheric infrared optical depth of 0.06. Assumptions on particle size, shortwave albedo, and thermal warming imply little surface temperature change caused by the ejecta on the third day immediately following the eruption.

  13. Long-wave stratospheric transmission of Mount St. Helens ejecta.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, P M; Haughney, L C; Innis, R C

    1981-01-01

    The NASA/Ames Research C-141 aircraft underflew the Mount St. Helens ejecta plume in Utah three days after the eruption. Upward-looking 20-40-microm on-board radiometry provided data resulting in a calculated long-wave transmission of 0.93. From this value, an optical depth of 0.073 is inferred. This value is compared with an accepted background, stratospheric infrared optical depth of 0.06. Assumptions on particle size, shortwave albedo, and thermal warming imply little surface temperature change caused by the ejecta on the third day immediately following the eruption.

  14. Clay mineralogy of the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary clay. [in search for asteroid ejecta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampino, M. R.; Reynolds, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary layer clay samples from four localities were subjected to analyses which imply that they are neither mineralogically exotic nor distinct from locally derived clays above and below the boundary. The anomalous iridium-rich ejecta component predicted by the asteroid impact scenario of Alvarez et al (1980) was not detected. It is proposed that volcanic material be considered as an explanation of the geochemical anomalies of the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary. A model which involves a period of intense volcanism at the end of the Cretaceous would generate a variety of climatic and biological effects consonant with the geologic history of that period.

  15. Geology of Lunar Landing Sites and Origin of Basin Ejecta from a Clementine Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolliff, Bradley L.; Haskin, Larry A.

    1998-01-01

    The goals of this research were to examine Clementine multispectral data covering the Apollo landing sites in order to: (1) provide ground truth for the remotely sensed observations, (2) extend our understanding of the Apollo landing sites to the surrounding regions using the empirically calibrated Clementine data, and (3) investigate the composition and distribution of impact-basin ejecta using constraints based upon the remotely sensed data and the Apollo samples. Our initial efforts (in collaboration with P. Lucey and coworkers) to use the Apollo soil compositions to "calibrate" information derived from the remotely sensed data resulted in two extremely useful algorithms for computing estimates of the concentrations of FeO and TiO2 from the UV-VIS 5-band data. In this effort, we used the average surface soil compositions from 37 individual Apollo and 3 Luna sample stations that could be resolved using the Clementine data. We followed this work with a detailed investigation of the Apollo 17 landing site, where the sampling traverses were extensive and the spectral and compositional contrast between different soils covers a wide range. We have begun to investigate the nature and composition of basin ejecta by comparing the thick deposits on the rim of Imbrium in the vicinity of the Apollo 15 site and those occurring southeast of the Serenitatis basin, in the Apollo 17 region. We continue this work under NAG5-6784, "Composition, Lithology, and Heterogeneity of the lunar crust using remote sensing of impact-basin uplift structures and ejecta as probes. The main results of our work are given in the following brief summaries of major tasks. Detailed accounts of these results are given in the attached papers, manuscripts, and extended abstracts.

  16. Condensation in Supernova Ejecta at High Spatial Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedkin, A. V.; Meyer, B. S.; Grossman, L.; Desch, S. J.

    2009-03-01

    ^44Ti-rich TiC condenses before graphite in SN ejecta only if thin sub-layers of the main burning zones mix together; such mixing is also needed to form Fe-olivine. High-T phases change from carbides to oxides along composition gradients within the He/N zone.

  17. The condensation of grains in the ejecta of supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, G.

    1986-03-01

    The condensation of grains around supernovae is considered. The mechanism by which grains could condense from supernovae ejecta to form a circumstellar dust shell is investigated. It is discovered that the depletion factor of grain forming material from the surrounding gas is important.

  18. The Links Between Target Properties and Layered Ejecta Craters in Acidalia and Utopia Planitiae Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, E.; Osinski, G. R.

    2013-08-01

    Layered ejecta craters on Mars may form from excavation into subsurface volatiles. We examine a new catalogue of martian craters to decipher differences between the single- and double-layered ejecta populations in Acidalia and Utopia.

  19. Unmelted Meteoritic Debris Collected from Eltanin Ejecta in Polarstern Cores from Expedition ANT XII/4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyte, Frank T.

    2002-01-01

    A total of 1.7g of unmelted meteorite particles have been recovered from FS Polarstern piston cores collected on expedition ANT XII/4 that contain ejecta from the Eltanin impact event. Most of the mass (1.2 g) is a large, single specimen that is a polymict breccia, similar in mineralogy and chemistry to howardites or the silicate fraction of mesosiderites. Most of the remaining mass is in several large individual pieces (20-75mg each) that are polymict breccias, fragments dominated by pyroxene, and an igneous rock fragment. The latter has highly fractionated REE, similar to those reported in mafic clasts from mesosiderites. Other types of specimens identified include fragments dominated by maskelynite or olivine. These pieces of the projectile probably survived impact by being blown off the back surface of the Eltanin asteroid during its impact into the Bellingshausen Sea.

  20. The Vakkejokk Breccia, Northernmost Sweden: A Cambrian Analogue to the Proximal Ejecta Layer and Resurge Deposits at the Ordovician Lockne Marine-Target Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormö, J.; Nielsen, A. T.; Alwmark, C.

    2016-08-01

    We propose the Cambrian Vakkejokk Breccia in the Scandinavian arctic to be a uniquely well-preserved and well-exposed proximal impact ejecta layer. The associated crater is likely 2-4 km in diameter and currently covered by Caledonian overthrusts.

  1. Nucleosynthesis in the ejecta of neutron star mergers

    SciTech Connect

    Wanajo, Shinya; Sekiguchi, Yuichiro; Kiuchi, Kenta; Shibata, Masaru; Nishimura, Nobuya; Kyutoku, Koutarou

    2014-05-02

    We present, for the first time, the result of nucleosynthesis calculations based on the fully general-relativistic simulation of a NS-NS merger with approximate neutrino transport taken into account. It is found that the bulk of the dynamical ejecta are appreciably shock-heated and neutrino-processed, resulting in a wide range of electron fraction, Y{sub e} ∼ 0.1-0.4. The mass-averaged abundance distribution of calculated nucleosynthesis yields is in remarkable agreement with the full-mass range (A ≈ 90-240) of the solar r-process curve. This implies, if our model is representative of such events, that the dynamical ejecta of NS-NS mergers can be the origin of the Galactic r-process nuclei.

  2. Extinction, ejecta masses, and radial velocities of novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Robert E.

    1994-01-01

    Interstellar reddening is determined for a number of recent novae based upon emission-line ratios which are generally observable using CCDs. Large values of extinction are found for most systems, possibly indicative of an intrinsic component of reddening in postoutburst novae. The unusual characteristics of the (O I) lines in novae, which are strong and optically thick, require a large population of very dense globules which are the likely sites of dust formation. These pyroclasts must be ejected from the white dwarf. The total mass of the neutral gas in the globules in some of the objects is substantially larger than the masses normally derived for the ionized ejecta of novae. The distribution of radial velocities of Galactic novae in the Tololo sample, although uncertain, shows an asymmetry in having predominantly negative values. Either high internal absorption in the expanding ejecta skews the emission lines to bluer wavelengths, or most of the novae are moving out from the center of the Galaxy.

  3. Piezoelectric characterization of ejecta from shocked tin surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogan, W. S.; Anderson, W. W.; Grover, M.; Hammerberg, J. E.; King, N. S. P.; Lamoreaux, S. K.; Macrum, G.; Morley, K. B.; Rigg, P. A.; Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D.; Veeser, L. R.; Buttler, W. T.

    2005-12-01

    Using piezoelectric diagnostics, we have measured densities and velocities of ejected particulate as well as "free-surface velocities" of bulk tin targets shock loaded with high explosive. The targets had finely grooved, machined finishes ranging from 10 to 250μin. Two types of piezoelectric sensor ("piezopins"), lithium niobate and lead zirconate titanate, were compared for durability and repeatability; in addition, some piezopins were "shielded" with foam and metal foil in order to mitigate premature failure of the pins in high ejecta regimes. These experiments address questions about ejecta production at a given shock pressure as a function of surface finish; piezopin results are compared with those from complementary diagnostics such as x-ray radiography and time-resolved optical transmission techniques. The mass ejection shows a marked dependence on groove characteristics and cannot be described by a groove defect theory alone.

  4. Nucleosynthesis in the ejecta of neutron star mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanajo, Shinya; Sekiguchi, Yuichiro; Nishimura, Nobuya; Kiuchi, Kenta; Kyutoku, Koutarou; Shibata, Masaru

    2014-05-01

    We present, for the first time, the result of nucleosynthesis calculations based on the fully general-relativistic simulation of a NS-NS merger with approximate neutrino transport taken into account. It is found that the bulk of the dynamical ejecta are appreciably shock-heated and neutrino-processed, resulting in a wide range of electron fraction, Ye ˜ 0.1-0.4. The mass-averaged abundance distribution of calculated nucleosynthesis yields is in remarkable agreement with the full-mass range (A ≈ 90-240) of the solar r-process curve. This implies, if our model is representative of such events, that the dynamical ejecta of NS-NS mergers can be the origin of the Galactic r-process nuclei.

  5. Deceleration of arbitrarily magnetized GRB ejecta: the complete evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimica, P.; Giannios, D.; Aloy, M. A.

    2009-02-01

    Context: The role of magnetic fields in gamma-ray burst (GRB) flows remains debated. If of sufficient strength, they can leave their signature on the initial phases of the afterglow by substantially changing the backreaction of the flow as a consequence of its interaction with the external medium. Aims: We attempt to understand quantitatively the dynamical effect and observational signatures of GRB ejecta magnetization on the onset of the afterglow. Methods: We perform ultrahigh-resolution, one-dimensional, relativistic MHD simulations of the interaction between a radially expanding, magnetized ejecta with the interstellar medium. We require ultrahigh numerical resolution because of the extreme jump conditions in the region of interaction between the ejecta and the circumburst medium. We study the complete evolution of an ultrarelativistic shell to the self-similar asymptotic phase. Results: Our simulations demonstrate that the complete evolution can be characterized in terms of two parameters, the ξ parameter introduced by Sari and Piran and the magnetization σ_0. We use this fact in producing numerical models in which the shell Lorentz factor γ0 is between 10 and 20 and rescaling the results to arbitrarily large values of γ_0. We find that the reverse shock is typically weak or absent for ejecta characterized by σ_0⪆ 1. The onset of the forward shock emission is strongly dependent on the magnetization. On the other hand, the magnetic energy of the shell is transferred into the external medium on a short timescale (of several times the duration of the burst). The later forward shock emission contains no information about the initial magnetization of the flow. The asymptotic evolution of strongly magnetized shells, after experiencing significant deceleration, resembles that of hydrodynamic shells, i.e. they enter fully into the Blandford-McKee self-similar regime.

  6. Hydrodynamical Interaction of Mildly Relativistic Ejecta with an Ambient Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Akihiro; Maeda, Keiichi; Shigeyama, Toshikazu

    2017-01-01

    The hydrodynamical interaction of spherical ejecta freely expanding at mildly relativistic speeds into an ambient cold medium is studied in semianalytical and numerical ways to investigate how ejecta produced in energetic stellar explosions dissipate their kinetic energy through the interaction with the surrounding medium. We especially focus on the case in which the circumstellar medium (CSM) is well represented by a steady wind at a constant mass-loss rate, having been ejected from the stellar surface prior to the explosion. As a result of the hydrodynamical interaction, the ejecta and CSM are swept by the reverse and forward shocks, leading to the formation of a geometrically thin shell. We present a semianalytical model describing the dynamical evolution of the shell and compare the results with numerical simulations. The shell can give rise to bright emission as it gradually becomes transparent to photons. We develop an emission model for the expected emission from the optically thick shell, in which photons in the shell gradually diffuse out to the interstellar space. Then we investigate the possibility that radiation powered by the hydrodynamical interaction is the origin of an underluminous class of gamma-ray bursts.

  7. Chicxulub ejecta plume: Influence of sedimentary target rock, volatiles and atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salge, T.

    Terrestrial impact structures provide evidence for cratering processes on planetary bodies with an atmosphere and volatiles in the target rocks. The target of the Chicxulub impact structure (˜180 km Ø) was composed of (1) a ˜3 km thick sedimentary and, thus, extremely volatile-rich target sequence, and (2) a crystalline silicate basement. The suevites of El Guayal ˜520 km SW from the crater centre and UNAM-7 near the crater rim recorded the distinct behaviour of sedimentary target rock, water and atmospheric interactions during ejecta emplacement. El Guayal: A ˜10 m thick suevite sequence contains shocked minerals, altered (to clay minerals) silicate melt and spherulitic carbonate melt particles. Fusion of silicate melt with carbonate induced calcite recrystallisation at >750°C. Release of CO2 is indicated by voids in silicate melt at the contact with calcite. Accretionary lapilli <2 cm in diameter occur at the base of an upper 2.5 m thick subunit. They accreted mainly <150 µm sized shocked and molten particles and were formed in a turbulent steam condensing environment. In the clay unit on top of the suevite, a PGE-enriched impactor component was deposited together with shocked quartz and spherulitic carbonate melt spheroids. This provides evidence linking the Chicxulub impact with the global K-P boundary. UNAM-7: At 307.85 m, altered silicate melt particles were deposited in the liquid state as shown by reaction rims against matrix. Seawater interaction is indicated by Br, Cl and Sr enrichment of silicate melt particles. In the underlying polymict silicate melt-poor breccia at 381.40 m polygonal to interlobate calcite spheroids were deposited in liquid state. The matrix is composed of microcrystalline calcite and anhydrite and larger, euhedral anhydrite. At anhydrite clasts degassing of calcite is indicated by thin schlieren of microcrystalline calcite associated with voids. These observations suggest matrix formation by exothermic reaction of decomposed

  8. Chemical Composition of Impact Glass and Suevite-Type Partial Melts of the Rab and Krk Islands and Their Relation with the Proposed Krk Impact Structure in Northern Adriatic, Croatia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čalogović, M.; Marjanac, T.; Fazinić, S.; Strmić-Palinkaš, S.; Tomša, A. M.; Marjanac, L.

    2015-09-01

    Chemical composition of Krk impact structure ejecta represented by incomplete melts and glasses indicate affinity with Pleistocene loess as target lithology, and suggests Pleistocene age of the impact.

  9. The Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary in the shallow northeastern Mexican foreland basins: Evidence for paleoseismic liquefaction, tsunami deposition, and Chicxulub ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, Peter; Smit, Jan; Deutsch, Alex; Friese, Andrea; Beichel, Kilian

    2010-05-01

    Understanding the depositional sequence and composition of impact ejecta is critical for the interpretation of timing and effects of the Chicxulub impact regarding the mass extinction at the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) boundary. Preliminary investigations have shown that the shallow La Popa and Parras foreland basins in northeastern Mexico both feature outstanding and continuous 3D exposures of the Chicxulub ejecta-rich, K-Pg boundary event deposit (Lawton et al., 2005). The m-thick sand-siltstone interval directly underlying the ejecta-rich mass flows shows evidence of slumping and liquefaction, locally leading to complete disorganization and disruption of the pre-impact late Cretaceous sedimentary sequence. The subsequent ejecta-rich sequence consists of an up to one m-thick basal carbonate-rich bed that discontinuously fills a valley-like topography. Besides abundant silicic and carbonate ejecta spherules (up to 50%) that are excellently preserved, this bed includes abundant mollusks and gastropod shells, as well as vertebrate bones and teeth. The conglomeratic bed is overlain by a series of alternating fine- to medium grained calcareous sandstones with shell debris and ejecta that were deposited by repeated currents / mass flow events incorporating varying source areas. Hummocky-cross-stratified strata that mark the return to a normal out-shelf depositional regime conformably overly these sandstones. We interpret this sequence as evidence for presumably seismic-induced sediment liquefaction followed by a series of impact-related tsunami deposits. The specific depositional sequence and Fe-Mg-rich ejecta composition as well as the petrography of the sandstones all closely link the K-Pg boundary sequence in the La Popa and Parras basin to the well-known deep-water K-Pg sites in the Gulf of Mexico (e.g. El Mimbral; Smit et al., 1996; Schulte and Kontny, 2005). Lawton, T.F., et al., 2005, Geology, v. 33, p. 81-84. Smit, J. et al., 1996, GSA Special Paper v. 307, p

  10. Reduction of ejecta from asperities on a metal surface upon shock breakout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georges, William; Loiseau, Jason; Higgins, Andrew; Tyler, Troy; Zimmermann, Joerg

    2017-01-01

    Ejecta can be produced when a shock breaks out of a metallic surface with imperfections. The amount of material ejected depends on the wave profile and the surface finish. This work focuses on techniques to reduce the amount of ejecta produced. As a baseline, a Taylor wave loading was produced by detonating a high explosive next to an aluminum target featuring V-grooves on the free surface. The ejecta and free surface velocities were monitored with photonic doppler velocimetry (PDV). In an attempt to suppress the ejecta, the shock pressure was reduced by the addition of an air gap. The effect of a vacuum gap was also investigated. PDV spectrograms show that significant ejecta traveling at roughly three times the free surface velocity was produced when explosives were in contact with the target. The placement of an air gap or a vacuum gap between explosive and target suppressed detectable ejecta.

  11. Neutron star kicks and their relationship to supernovae ejecta mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, J. C.; Eldridge, J. J.

    2016-10-01

    We propose a simple model to explain the velocity of young neutron stars. We attempt to confirm a relationship between the amount of mass ejected in the formation of the neutron star and the `kick' velocity imparted to the compact remnant resulting from the process. We assume that the velocity is given by vkick = α (Mejecta/Mremnant) + β . To test this simple relationship, we use the BPASS (Binary Population and Spectral Synthesis) code to create stellar population models from both single and binary star evolutionary pathways. We then use our Remnant Ejecta and Progenitor Explosion Relationship (REAPER) code to apply different α and β values, and three different `kick' orientations then record the resulting velocity probability distributions. We find that while a single star population provides a poor fit to the observational data, the binary population provides an excellent fit. Values of α = 70 km s-1 and β = 110 km s-1 reproduce the Hobbs et al. observed two-dimensional velocities, and α = 70 km s-1 and β = 120 km s-1 reproduce their inferred three-dimensional velocity distribution for nearby single neutron stars with ages less than 3 Myr. After testing isotropic, spin-axis aligned and orthogonal to spin-axis `kick' orientations, we find no statistical preference for a `kick' orientation. While ejecta mass cannot be the only factor that determines the velocity of supernova compact remnants, we suggest that it is a significant contributor and that the ejecta-based `kick' should replace the Maxwell-Boltzmann velocity distribution currently used in many population synthesis codes.

  12. EVOLUTION OF THE 1919 EJECTA OF V605 AQUILAE

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Montiel, Edward; Bond, Howard E.; Sparks, William B.; Meakes, M. G.; Long, Lindsey A.; Meyer, Paul I.; Sugerman, Ben E. K.; Chesneau, O.; De Marco, O. E-mail: emonti2@lsu.edu E-mail: sparks@stsci.edu E-mail: ben.sugerman@goucher.edu E-mail: orsola@science.mq.edu.au

    2013-07-10

    New imaging of V605 Aql, was obtained in 2009 with HST/WFPC2, which had a nova-like outburst in 1919, and is located at the center of the planetary nebula (PN), A58. This event has long been ascribed to a final helium shell flash, but it has been suggested recently that it may instead have been an ONe nova. The new images provide an 18 yr baseline for the expansion of the ejecta from the 1919 event. In addition, the central star has been directly detected in the visible for the first time since 1923, when it faded from sight due to obscuration by dust. The expansion of the ejecta has a velocity of {approx}200 km s{sup -1}, and an angular expansion rate of {approx}10 mas yr{sup -1}, consistent with a 1919 ejection. This implies a geometric distance of 4.6 kpc for V605 Aql, consistent with previous estimates. The gas mass in the central knot of ejecta was previously estimated to be 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} M{sub Sun }. It is estimated that warm dust associated with this gas has a mass of {approx}10{sup -5} M{sub Sun }. There is also evidence for a significant amount, 10{sup -3} M{sub Sun }, of cold (75 K) dust, which may be associated with its PN. The knot ejected in 1919 is asymmetrical and is approximately aligned with the asymmetry of the surrounding PN. Polarimetric imaging was obtained to investigate whether the 2001 spectrum of V605 Aql was obtained primarily in scattered light from dust in the central knot, but the signal-to-noise in the data was insufficient to measure the level of polarization.

  13. Stratified ejecta boulders as indicators of layered plutons on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Research Team, Kickapoo Lunar; Kramer, Georgiana

    2014-01-01

    High resolution images of stratified ejecta boulders on the lunar nearside reveal layers of alternating low and high albedo material. We measured the thickness and albedo of each alternating light and dark layer from 29 stratified boulders located in Aristarchus Crater and Mare Undarum. The results were used to test hypotheses to explain the origin of the observed strata in these impact ejected boulders. Morphologically, these boulders demonstrate cross-bedding, trough-shaped layering, tapered layering and cumulate enclaves. We interpret these characteristics to be evidence that these layers result from periodic disruption by convection or density currents within a cooling layered igneous intrusion. We demonstrate that the layering observed in these boulders cannot be the result of known processes occurring on the surface, but instead suggests a history of complex intrusive igneous processes within the lunar crust.

  14. Electrostatic dust transport and Apollo 17 LEAM experiment. [Lunar Ejecta And Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhee, J. W.; Berg, O. E.; Wolf, H.

    1977-01-01

    The Lunar Ejecta and Meteorite (LEAM) experiment has been in operation since December 1973 when it was deployed in the Taurus-Littrow region of the moon by the Apollo 17 crew. A specialized analysis based on more than twenty-two lunations of the impact data shows that all of the events recorded by the sensors during the terminator passages are essentially lunar surface microparticles carrying a high electrostatic charge. Charged lunar fines held in place by adhesive forces can be ejected into space if the electrostatic stress exceeds the adhesive strength. A simple laboratory test demonstrated that this soil transport can indeed take place at the lunar terminator and in the vicinity of it.

  15. Life near the Roche limit - Behavior of ejecta from satellites close to planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobrovolskis, A. R.; Burns, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    A study of the dynamics of nearby debris from impact craters was made to explain the distinctive features seen on Phobos, Deimis, and Amalthea. The planetary tides and satellite rotation were considered, and the usual pseudo-energy (Jacobi) integral was numerically calculated in the framework of a restricted body problem where satellites are modelled as triaxial ellipsoids rather than point masses. Iso-contours of this integral show that Deimos and Amalthea are entirely closed by Roche lobes, and the surfaces of their model ellipsoids lie nearly along equipotentials. Presently, the surface of Phobos overflows its Roche lobe, except for regions within a few km of the sub-Mars and anti-Mars points. The behavior of crater ejecta from the satellites of Mars were also examined by numerical integration of trajectories for particles leaving their surfaces in the equatorial plane.

  16. Lateral Translation of Explosion Crater Ejecta: A Working Model Based Upon Pellet Experiments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-08-19

    empiric-al ejecta studies to a variety of, telds and ,eologic-al settings, and (2) characteri-ing * the relative threat the total ejecta eavironment...inmqict cratering protesi . C-urrent thenrwie.s ies•t-•,. the cratering of impart crater frwmationt arn basedt primartly upon (1) small -cale imnpact expe...ial thrown farther travels faster so that the total ejecta deposit can reflect , variety of depositional processes ranging from the low velocity

  17. Spatial Distribution of Mg-rich Ejecta in LMC Supernova Remnant N49B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sangwook; Bhalerao, Jayant

    2017-01-01

    The supernova remnant (SNR) N49B in the Large Magellanic Cloud is a peculiar example of a core-collapse SNR that shows the shocked metal-rich ejecta enriched only in Mg without evidence for a similar overabundance in O and Ne. Based on archival Chandra data, we present results from our extensive spatially resolved spectral analysis of N49B. We find that the Mg-rich ejecta gas extends from the central regions of the SNR out to the southeastern outermost boundary of the SNR. This elongated feature shows an overabundance for Mg similar to that of the main ejecta region at the SNR center, and its electron temperature appears to be higher than the central main ejecta gas. We estimate that the Mg mass in this southeastern elongated ejecta feature is ∼10% of the total Mg ejecta mass. Our estimated lower limit of >0.1 M⊙ on the total mass of the Mg-rich ejecta confirms the previously suggested large mass for the progenitor star (M ≳ 25 M⊙). We entertain scenarios of an SNR expanding into a nonuniform medium and an energetic jet-driven supernova in an attempt to interpret these results. However, with the current results, the origins of the extended Mg-rich ejecta and the Mg-only-rich nature of the overall metal-rich ejecta in this SNR remain elusive.

  18. Dating Kaali Crater (Estonia) based on charcoal emplaced within proximal ejecta blanket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losiak, Anna; Wild, Eva Maria; Huber, Matthew S.; Wisniowski, Tomasz; Paavel, Kristiina; Jõeleht, Argo; Välja, Rudolf; Plado, Jüri; Kriiska, Aivar; Wilk, Jakob; Zanetti, Michael; Geppert, Wolf D.; Kulkov, Alexander; Steier, Peter; Pirkovic, Irena

    2015-04-01

    The Kaali impact field consists of nine identified craters located on the Saaremaa Island in Estonia. The largest crater is 110 m in diameter (centered around 58°22'21.94"N, 22°40'09.91" E). It was formed by impact of an IAB iron meteoroid into Silurian dolomite target rocks covered by up to a few meters of glacial till (Veski et al. 2007). The age of the Kaali impact structure is still a matter of debate, and the estimates provided by different authors vary considerably between ~6400 BC (Raukas et al. 1995, Moora et al. 2012) and ~400 BC (Rasmussen et al. 2000, Veski et al. 2001). These ages were derived by 14C dating of marker horizons, characterized by a slightly elevated iridium content within the nearby Piila bog yielding a calibrated age of 800-400 BC (Rasmussen et al. 2000, Veski et al. 2001) and occurrences of glassy siliceous material in the Piila bog (~6400 BC: Raukas et al. 1995) or iron microspherules in an organic-rich layer of the Reo gravel pit (6400 BC: Moora et al. 2012). However, the source of the foreign material within those layers was never unequivocally connected with the Kaali crater. 14C dating of material from post-impact organic sediments within Kaali impact craters yielded ages between 1800-1500 BC (Saarse et al. 1991, Veski et al. 2004) and 1450-400 BC (Aaloe et al. 1963). These dates underestimate the age of impact as organic sediments within the crater started to form at unknown period after the impact. On the other hand, Veski et al. (2004) suggested a reservoir effect that might have caused artificially "aging" of the organic matter because the crater was emplaced within Silurian dolomite which is rich in old carbon. The aim of this study is to determine the age of the Kaali crater by 14C dating of organic material covered by the continuous layer of proximal ejecta. This research was conducted in conjunction with a new structural investigation of Kaali Main (Zanetti et al. 2015). Ten samples collected from different locations

  19. NUCLEOSYNTHETIC LAYERS IN THE SHOCKED EJECTA OF CASSIOPEIA A

    SciTech Connect

    Isensee, Karl; Olmschenk, Greg; Rudnick, Lawrence; DeLaney, Tracey; Rho, Jeonghee; Smith, J. D.; Reach, William T.; Kozasa, Takashi; Gomez, Haley E-mail: larry@astro.umn.edu E-mail: jrho@sofia.usra.edu E-mail: reach@ipac.caltech.edu E-mail: haley.morgan@astro.cf.ac.uk

    2012-10-01

    We present a three-dimensional analysis of the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A using high-resolution spectra from the Spitzer Space Telescope. We observe supernova ejecta both immediately before and during the shock-ejecta interaction. We determine that the reverse shock of the remnant is spherical to within 7%, although the center of this sphere is offset from the geometric center of the remnant by 810 km s{sup -1}. We determine that the velocity width of the nucleosynthetic layers is {approx}1000 km s{sup -1} over 4000 arcsec{sup 2} regions, although the velocity width of a layer along any individual line of sight is <250 km s{sup -1}. Si and O, which come from different nucleosynthetic layers in the progenitor star, are observed to be coincident in velocity space in some directions, but segregated by up to {approx}500 km s{sup -1} in other directions. We compare these observations of the nucleosynthetic layers to predictions from supernova explosion models in an attempt to constrain such models. Finally, we observe small-scale, corrugated velocity structures that are likely caused during the supernova explosion itself, rather than hundreds of years later by dynamical instabilities at the remnant's reverse shock.

  20. CME dynamics using coronagraph and interplanetary ejecta data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Lago, Alisson; Gonzalez, Walter D.; De Lucas, Aline; Braga, Carlos Roberto; Vieira, Lucas Ramos; Stekel, Tardelli Ronan Coelho; Rockenbach, Marlos

    2013-05-01

    In this work, we present a study of the coronal mass ejection (CME) dynamics using LASCO coronagraph observations combined with in-situ ACE plasma and magnetic field data, covering a continuous period of time from January 1997 to April 2001, complemented by few extreme events observed in 2001 and 2003. We show, for the first time, that the CME expansion speed correlates very well with the travel time to 1 AU of the interplanetary ejecta (or ICMEs) associated with the CMEs, as well as with their preceding shocks. The events analyzed in this work are a subset of the events studied in Schwenn et al. (2005), from which only the CMEs associated with interplanetary ejecta (ICMEs) were selected. Three models to predict CME travel time to Earth, two proposed by Gopalswamy et al. (2001) and one by Schwenn et al. (2005), were used to characterize the dynamical behavior of this set of events. Extreme events occurred in 2001 and 2003 were used to test the prediction capability of the models regarding CMEs with very high LASCO C3 speeds.

  1. Mapping and Analysis of 'Dunes' in the Ejecta Blankets of Fresh Lunar Craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwood-Stone, Corwin; Bray, Veronica; McEwen, Alfred

    2014-11-01

    Lunar concentric ‘dunes’ are ridge-like features that appear in the ejecta blankets of fresh craters on the Moon. These ‘dunes’ are oriented roughly perpendicular to ejecta flow, and are found between ~1.2 to several crater radii. We have been mapping and measuring these features using the high-resolution images from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC). In our survey of the Moon we have so far found fifty-seven craters where the facies of the Lunar concentric ‘dunes’ can be seen, ranging in diameter from one to eleven kilometers, in both the mare and the highlands. We have created mosaics from high-resolution LROC Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) images for fourteen of these craters which allow us to examine the morphology of these dunes in detail. We note a general progression in dune morphology as distance from the crater increases (the following measurements are not standard from crater to crater and reflect the mapping results for crater Piton B): ‘dunes’ are most distinct between 1.5 to 3 crater radii from the crater center. Between 3 and 6 crater radii, dunes are commonly accompanied by a trough on the crater-facing side of the dune. As distance from the crater increases, dune morphology subsides and troughs become the most notable feature within the ejecta blanket. Using Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) data we are able to examine how the ‘dunes’ form in the context of local pre-existing slopes. These ‘dunes’ are known to form predominantly on level and crater facing slopes, however we have found at some highlands craters, like Stevinus A, that they can form on slopes facing away from the crater. We have observed a number of morphological features of the ‘dunes’ that do not seem to support the previously proposed ballistic impact sedimentation and erosion hypothesis for the formation of this facies. Thus we will need to formulate and test new hypotheses for how this interesting lunar facies forms.

  2. The role of ejecta in the small crater populations on the mid-sized saturnian satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierhaus, Edward B.; Dones, Luke; Alvarellos, José Luis; Zahnle, Kevin

    2012-03-01

    We find evidence, by both observation and analysis, that primary crater ejecta play an important role in the small crater (less than a few km) populations on the saturnian satellites, and more broadly, on cratered surfaces throughout the Solar System. We measure crater populations in Cassini images of Enceladus, Rhea, and Mimas, focusing on image data with scales less than 500 m/pixel. We use recent updates to crater scaling laws and their constants (Housen, K.R., Holsapple, K.A. [2011]. Icarus 211, 856-875) to estimate the amount of mass ejected in three different velocity ranges: (i) greater than escape velocity, (ii) less than escape velocity and faster than the minimum velocity required to make a secondary crater (vmin), and (iii) velocities less than vmin. Although the vast majority of mass on each satellite is ejected at speeds less than vmin, our calculations demonstrate that the differences in mass available in the other two categories should lead to observable differences in the small crater populations; the predictions are borne out by the measurements we have made to date. In particular, Rhea, Tethys, and Dione have sufficient surface gravities to retain ejecta moving fast enough to make secondary crater populations. The smaller satellites, such as Enceladus but especially Mimas, are expected to have little or no traditional secondary populations because their escape velocities are near the threshold velocity necessary to make a secondary crater. Our work clarifies why the Galilean satellites have extensive secondary crater populations relative to the saturnian satellites. The presence, extent, and sizes of sesquinary craters (craters formed by ejecta that escape into temporary orbits around Saturn before re-impacting the surface, see Dobrovolskis, A.R., Lissauer, J.J. [2004]. Icarus 169, 462-473; Alvarellos, J.L., Zahnle, K.J., Dobrovolskis, A.R., Hamill, P. [2005]. Icarus 178, 104-123; Zahnle, K., Alvarellos, J.L., Dobrovolskis, A.R., Hamill, P. [2008

  3. Molecules and Dust in the Humunculus: Ejecta of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, T.

    2007-01-01

    In the 18401s, Eta Carinae ejected massive amounts of nitrogen-rich, carbon- and oxygen-poor material which we see as the hourglass-shaped Homunculus. With the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph, we detected multiple shells in line of sight, the most massive and intriguing being at -513 km/s. Numerous lines of Fe I, Fe II, Ni II, Cr II, Sc II, Sr II, Ti II, V II, etc are identified as well as nearly a thousand H2 lines. The metals have energy level populations consistent with 760K and excited by photons < 8.5eV. We have now identified CH, CH+, OH, and NH at the same velocity, but at 60K, suggesting stratification in the outer ejecta. Analysis of the interior, photoionized emission hourglass structure, known as the Little Homunculus, indicates He, N overabundances and C, 0 underabundances (approximately 1/80 solar). A skirt of neutral and partially ionized gas lies between the lobes of the hourglasses. A portion is seen as the Strontium Filament, a metal- ionized, neutral hydrogen structure. Relative abundances of TiNi are 1/80 solar, CrNi are 1/20 solar. This complex of ejecta appears to have been ejected by a massive star(s) at the end of the hydrogen-burning phase when convection led to overproduction of nitrogen at the expense of carbon and oxygen. Given the underabundances of carbon and oxygen, the chemistry of this system is quite different to the normal ISM, leading to a nitrogen- dominated chemistry. What little C and 0 that is formed is immediately taken up by SiO and Al0 molecules leading to a very different gas/dust ratio than the normal ISM. Dust in this ejecta is abundance, but known to be very grey in character. Observations with HST/STIS and VLT/UVES will be presented along with simple physical models and CLOUD modeling. Insight by the participants will be solicited.

  4. Unburned Material in the Ejecta of Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folatelli, Gastón; Phillips, M. M.; Morrell, Nidia; Tanaka, Masaomi; Maeda, Keiichi; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Burns, Christopher R.; Hamuy, Mario; Mazzali, Paolo; Boldt, Luis; Campillay, Abdo; Contreras, Carlos; González, Sergio; Roth, Miguel; Salgado, Francisco; Freedman, W. L.; Madore, Barry F.; Persson, S. E.; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.

    2012-01-01

    The presence of unburned material in the ejecta of normal Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is investigated using early-time spectroscopy obtained by the Carnegie Supernova Project. The tell-tale signature of pristine material from a C+O white dwarf progenitor star is the presence of carbon, as oxygen is also a product of carbon burning. The most prominent carbon lines in optical spectra of SNe Ia are expected to arise from C II. We find that at least 30% of the objects in the sample show an absorption at ≈6300 Å which is attributed to C II λ6580. An alternative identification of this absorption as Hα is considered to be unlikely. These findings imply a larger incidence of carbon in SNe Ia ejecta than previously noted. We show how observational biases and physical conditions may hide the presence of weak C II lines, and account for the scarcity of previous carbon detections in the literature. This relatively large frequency of carbon detections has crucial implications on our understanding of the explosive process. Furthermore, the identification of the 6300 Å absorptions as carbon would imply that unburned material is present at very low expansion velocities, merely ≈1000 km s-1 above the bulk of Si II. Based on spectral modeling, it is found that the detections are consistent with a mass of carbon of 10-3 to 10-2 M ⊙. The presence of this material so deep in the ejecta would imply substantial mixing, which may be related to asymmetries of the flame propagation. Another possible explanation for the carbon absorptions may be the existence of clumps of unburned material along the line of sight. However, the uniformity of the relation between C II and Si II velocities is not consistent with such small-scale asymmetries. The spectroscopic and photometric properties of SNe Ia with and without carbon signatures are compared. A trend toward bluer color and lower luminosity at maximum light is found for objects which show carbon. This paper includes data gathered with

  5. Ejecta in SN 1006: The knotty issue. [supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesen, Robert A.; Hamilton, Andrew J. S.

    1988-01-01

    The 1988 IUE SWP observations of a faint sdOB star situated behind the remnant of the supernova of AD 1006 are presented. These spectra along with IUE spectra of the star taken between 1982 and 1986 provide a detailed look at the elemental composition and dynamical properties of the SN 1006 remnant. Over the 6 years there were no significant changes in the absorption features associated with the remnant at 1281, 1330, or 1420 A. While the lack of variability in these absorption lines makes it impossible to decide whether the ejecta is distributed smoothly or in knots, it is clear that the 1281 A feature is a blend, requiring either S II absorption redshifted at 6000 km/sec plus Si II 1260 at 5200 km/sec, or else 2 individual Si absorbing regions.

  6. Is the Ejecta of ETA Carinae Overabundant or Overexcited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore; Davidson, Kris; Johansson, Sveneric; Damineli, Augusto; Ishibashi, Kaxunori; Corcoran, Michael; Hartman, Henrick; Viera, Gladys; Nielsen, Krister

    2003-01-01

    The ejecta of Eta Carinae, revealed by HST/STIS, are in a large range of physical conditions. As Eta Carinae undergoes a 5.52 period, changes occur in nebular emission and nebular absorption. "Warm" neutral regions, partially ionized regions, and fully ionized regions undergo significant changes. Over 2000 emission lines, most of Fe-like elements, have been indentified in the Weigelt blobs B and D. Over 500 emission lines have been indentified in the Strontium Filament. An ionized Little Homunculus is nestled within the neutral-shelled Homunculus. In line of sight, over 500 nebular absorption lines have been identified with up to twenty velocity components. STIS is following changes in many nebular emission and absorption lines as Eta Carinae approaches the minimum, predicted to be in June/July 2003, during the General Assembly. Coordinated observations with HST, CHANDRA, RXTE, FUSE, UVES/VLT, Gemini and other observatories are following this minimum.

  7. Impact Crater Size and Evolution: Expectations for Deep Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, P. H.; Anderson, J. L. B.; Heineck, J. T.

    2002-01-01

    Deep Impact will involve a unique cratering experiment designed to probe below the surface of a comet. Laboratory experiments provide critical data for crater scaling and evolution of the ejecta curtain. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  8. Extensional Faulting of the Overturned Coconino Ejecta Layer and Emplacement of Fallback Breccia at Barringer Meteorite Crater (aka Meteor Crater)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kring, D. A.; Cole, S.; Craft, K.; Crites, S.; Gaither, T.; Jilly, C.; Lemelin, M.; Rosenburg, M.; Seward, L.; Song, E.; Snape, J. F.; Talpe, M.; Thaisen, K.; Veto, M.; Wielicki, M.; Williams, F.; Worsham, E.; Garber, J.

    2012-03-01

    New sections measured at Meteor Crater indicate the extension of the ejecta blanket was partly accommodated by a series of normal faults. Those normal faults also provided a means of "burying" and protecting fallback ejecta.

  9. Flow Ejecta and Slope Landslides in Small Crater - High Resolution Image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This high resolution picture of a moderately small impact crater on Mars was taken by the Mars Global Surveyor Orbiter Camera (MOC) on October 17, 1997 at 4:11:07 PM PST, during MGS orbit 22. The image covers an area 2.9 by 48.4 kilometers (1.8 by 30 miles) at 9.6 m (31.5 feet) per picture element, and is centered at 21.3 degrees N, 179.8 degrees W, near Orcus Patera. The MOC image is a factor of 15X better than pervious Viking views of this particular crater.

    The unnamed crater is one of three closely adjacent impact features that display the ejecta pattern characteristic of one type of 'flow-ejecta' crater. Such patterns are considered evidence of fluidized movement of the materials ejected during the cratering event, and are believed to indicate the presence of subsurface ice or liquid water.

    Long, linear features of different brightness values can be seen on the on the steep slopes inside and outside the crater rim. This type of feature, first identified in Viking Orbiter images acquired over 20 years ago, are more clearly seen in this new view (about 3 times better than the best previous observations). Their most likely explanation is that small land or dirt slides, initiated by seismic or wind action, have flowed down the steep slopes. Initially dark because of the nature of the surface disturbance, these features get lighter with time as the ubiquitous fine, bright dust settles onto them from the martian atmosphere. Based on estimates of the dust fall-out rate, many of these features are probably only a few tens to hundreds of years old. Thus, they are evidence of a process that is active on Mars today.

    Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner

  10. Geochemistry of K/T-boundary Chicxulub ejecta of NE-Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harting, M.; Deutsch, A.; Rickers, K.

    2003-12-01

    Many K/T sections all over the world contain impact spherules supposed related to the Chicxulub event. This study focus on ejecta layers in NE-Mexican profiles. We carried out systematic XRF and synchrotron radiation measurements on such spherules at the HASYLAB and ANKA facilities as well as microprobe analyses (CAMECA SX50). Area scans on tektite-like material of the Bochil section reveal a pronounced zonation in the inner part, dominated by Ba and Sr whereas secondary CaCO3 dominates in the altered margin. The composition of the spherules from the Mesa-Juan Perez section differ significantly from the Beloc (Haiti) and Bochil tektite glasses. At Mesa-Juan Perez, spherules are either extremely rich in Fe and Ca or consist of smectite, some of those carry carbonate inclusions. Yttrium, La and Ce are zoned within the smectite with concentrations below the detection limit and up to 20 æg/g The Ca-rich inclusions are enriched in Y (up to 35 æg/g) and La (18 æg/g) and, compared to the surrounding smectite, also in Ce (up to 34 æg/g). The Ce enrichment in spherules from the Mesa-Juan Perez section indicates impact-melted carbonates of the Yucatan carbonate platform as possible precursor rocks. Recent investigations focus on the chemistry of melt rock samples from the PEMEX wells Yucatan-6 and Chicxulub-1: Their average composition (mean of 250 data points in wt-percent ) is 61.6 for SiO2, 0.16 for TiO2, 18.07 for Al2O3, 0.01 for Cr2O3, 1.98 for Na2O, 1.5 for FeO, 0.05 for MnO, 0.01 for NiO, 0.31 for MgO, 9.14 for K2O, 3.44 for CaO, and 0.01 for SO2. These results are in some cases comparable to the geochemistry of ejecta glasses, e.g. from Beloc (Haiti).

  11. Analysis of ejecta fate from proposed man-made impactors into near-Earth objects --- a NEOShield study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, S.; Michel, P.; Jutzi, M.

    2014-07-01

    Asteroids measuring 100 meters across tend to impact the Earth once every 5,000 years on average [1]. Smaller bodies enter into the Earth's atmosphere more frequently, but may detonate before reaching the surface. Conversely, impacts from larger bodies are more rare [2], but can come with devastating global consequences to living species. In 2005, a United States Congressional mandate called for NASA to detect, by 2020, 90 percent of near-Earth objects (NEOs) having diameters of 140 meters or greater [3]. One year prior, ESA's Near-Earth Object Mission Advisory Panel (NEOMAP) recommended the study of a kinetic impactor mission as a priority in the framework of NEO risk assessment [4]. A ''Phase-A'' study of such a mission, Don Quixote, took place at ESA until 2007. In accordance with NEOMAP and with the Target NEO Global Community's recommendations in 2011 [5], the NEOShield Project is being funded for 3.5 years by the European Commission in its FP7 program. NEOShield began in 2012 and is primarily, but not exclusively, a European consortium of research institutions and engineering industries that aims to analyze promising mitigation options and provide solutions to the critical scientific and technical obstacles involved in confronting threats posed by the small bodies in the neighborhood of the Earth's orbit [6]. To further explore the NEO threat mitigation via the strategy of kinetic impact, building upon the Don Quixote study, the idea is to target a specific NEO for impact and attempt to quantify the response. How long do ejecta remain aloft and where do they end up? Fragments that are ejected at high speeds escape, but what about material moving at or near the escape speed of the NEO or that suffer energy-dissipating collisions after being ejected? Where would be a ''safe'' location for an observing spacecraft during and subsequent to the impact? Here, we outline the early phases of an ongoing numerical investigation of the fate of the material ejected from a

  12. Structural uplift and ejecta thickness of lunar mare craters: New insights into the formation of complex crater rims

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Tim; Kenkmann, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Most complex impact craters on solid planetary surfaces throughout the Solar System exhibit elevated crater rims similar to the elevated crater rims of simple craters. In principal the final elevation of the crater rim is due to the deposition of ejecta on the structurally uplifted bedrock of the pre-impact surface. For simple craters the elevated crater rim is due to two well understood factors: (i) Emplacement of the coherent proximal ejecta material at the transient cavity rim (overturned flap) [1]. (ii) Structural uplift of the pre-impact surface in the proximity of the transient cavity [1, 2]. The amount of structural uplift at the rim of simple craters is due to plastic thickening of the target rock, the emplacement of interthrust wedges and/or the injection of dike material in the underlying target [1, 2, 3, 4]. Both factors, (i) and (ii), are believed to equally contribute to the structural uplift of simple craters. Larger craters have complex morphologies and the crater's extent may considerably exceed that of the transient cavity due to gravity-driven adjustment movements. For instance, the Ries crater's final diameter is twice of its transient cavity size. It is expected that both ejecta thickness and structural uplift decrease with increasing distance from the rim of the transient crater. For lunar craters the continuous ejecta extends up to 2 crater radii from the crater center. The ejecta blanket thickness ET at the rim crest of the transient crater (which is inside the final crater) is a function of the distance r from the crater center, with RT as the radius of the transient crater [2, 6, 7] and is expressed by the following function: (1) ET = 0.033 RT (r/RT)^-3.0 for r ≥ RT [5, 6] The structural uplift is largest at the transient cavity rim and gets rapidly smaller with increasing distance to the crater center and disappears after 1.3 - 1.7 crater radii [1]. These circumstances raise the question, how elevated rims of complex craters form? Based

  13. Propagation Characteristics of CMEs Associated Magnetic Clouds and Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Roksoon; Gopalswamy, N.; Cho, K.; Moon, Y.; Yashiro, S.

    2012-05-01

    We have investigated the characteristics of magnetic cloud (MC) and ejecta (EJ) associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) based on the assumption that all CMEs have a flux rope structure. For this, we used 54 CMEs and their interplanetary counter parts (interplanetary CMEs: ICMEs) that constitute the list of events used by the NASA/LWS Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop (CDAW) on CME flux ropes. We considered the location, angular width, speed, and direction parameter, D, that quantifies the propagation direction of a CME. For the 54 CDAW events, we found several properties of the CMEs as follows: (1) the average value of D for the 23 MCs (0.62) is larger than that for the 31 EJs (0.49), which indicates that the MC-associated CMEs propagate more directly to the Earth than the EJ-associated CMEs; (2) comparison between the direction parameter and the source location shows that the majority of the MC-associated CMEs are ejected along the radial direction, while many of the EJ-associated CMEs are ejected non-radially; (3) the mean speed of MC-associated CMEs (946 km/s) is faster than that of EJ-associated CMEs (771 km/s). For seven very fast CMEs (> 1500 km/s), all CMEs with large D (> 0.4) are associated with MCs and the CMEs with small D are associated with EJs. On the basis of these results, we suggest that the CME trajectory essentially decides the observed ICME structure.

  14. Stratified Ejecta Boulders as Indicators of Layered Plutons on the Lunar Nearside

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kickapoo Lunar Research Team; Kramer, G. Y.

    2012-07-01

    We tested the leading formation hypotheses for the origin of the stratified ejecta boulders and assessed their plausibility based on our observations and measurements of layer thicknesses and albedos.

  15. X-Ray Heating of the Ejecta of Supernova 1987A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, George; Larsson, Josefin; Fransson, Claes; Kirshner, Robert; Challis, Peter; McCray, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of Hubble Space Telescope Band R band images from 1994 to 2009 show that the optical luminosity of SN 1987A has transitioned from being powered by radioactive decay of Ti-44 to energy deposited by X-rays produced as the ejecta interacts with the surrounding material (Larsson et al. 2011, Nature, 474, 484). The B and R band flux from the densest, central parts of the ejecta followed the expected exponential decline until 2001 (about day 5000) when the flux in these bands started increasing, more than doubling by the end of 2009. This increase is the result of heat deposited by X-rays from the shock interaction of the fast-moving outer ejecta with the inner circumstellar ring. In time, the X-rays will penetrate farther into the ejecta, enabling us to analyze the structure and chemistry of the vanished star.

  16. Phobos, Deimos, and the moon - Size and distribution of crater ejecta blocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. W.; Thomas, P.; Veverka, J.

    1986-01-01

    Ejecta block characteristics observed on Phobos, Deimos, and the moon are examined. The analyzed source craters on Deimos are 0.8-2.3 km in diameter, those on Phobos are 1.5-10 km, and the lunar craters are between 0.2-3.5 km in diameter. The size and radial distribution of the ejecta blocks for the three bodies are compared. It is observed that the size distribution of the ejecta blocks surrounding craters on the three objects are basically similar, and the radial distribution of the blocks for Phobos and the moon are the same (within 2 radii of the crater center); however, the ejecta on Deimos are more dispersed (greater than or equal to 2 radii from the crater center).

  17. Comprehensive investigation of the dynamics of micron and submicron lunar ejecta in heliocentric space

    SciTech Connect

    Hargrave, A.D.

    1984-01-01

    The forces which act on micron and submicron dust particles in interplanetary space are studied in detail. Particular attention is given to Mie scattering theory as it applies to the calculation of the force due to radiation pressure. All of the forces are integrated into a computer model to study the heliocentric orbits of lunar ejecta. It is shown that lunar ejecta contribute to a geocentric dust cloud, as well as to a heliocentric dust belt.

  18. Small Impact Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    22 June 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a small impact crater with a 'butterfly' ejecta pattern. The butterfly pattern results from an oblique impact. Not all oblique impacts result in an elliptical crater, but they can result in a non-radial pattern of ejecta distribution. The two-toned nature of the ejecta -- with dark material near the crater and brighter material further away -- might indicate the nature of subsurface materials. Below the surface, there may be a layer of lighter-toned material, underlain by a layer of darker material. The impact throws these materials out in a pattern that reflects the nature of the underlying layers.

    Location near: 3.7oN, 348.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  19. Preflow stresses in Martian rampart ejecta blankets - A means of estimating the water content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronow, A.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of extents of rampart ejecta deposits as a function of the size of the parent craters support models which, for craters larger than about 6 km diameter, constrain ejecta blankets to all have a similar maximum thickness regardless of the crater size. These volatile-rich ejecta blankets may have failed under their own weights, then flowed radially outward. Assuming this to be so, some of the physicomechanical properties of the ejecta deposits at the time of their emplacement can then be determined. Finite-element studies of the stress magnitudes, distributions, and directions in hypothetical Martian rampart ejecta blankets reveal that the material most likely failed when the shear stresses were less than 500 kPa and the angle of internal friction was between 26 and 36 deg. These figures imply that the ejecta has a water content between 16 and 72%. Whether the upper limit or the lower limit is more appropriate depends on the mode of failure which one presumes: namely, viscous flow of plastic deformation.

  20. Evaluation of Meterorite Amono Acid Analysis Data Using Multivariate Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonald, G.; Storrie-Lombardi, M.; Nealson, K.

    1999-01-01

    The amino acid distributions in the Murchison carbonaceous chondrite, Mars meteorite ALH84001, and ice from the Allan Hills region of Antarctica are shown, using a multivariate technique known as Principal Component Analysis (PCA), to be statistically distinct from the average amino acid compostion of 101 terrestrial protein superfamilies.

  1. Evidence for Crater Ejecta on Venus Tessera Terrain from Earth-Based Radar Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Bruce A.; Campbell, Donald B.; Morgan, Gareth A.; Carter, Lynn M.; Nolan, Michael C.; Chandler, John F.

    2014-01-01

    We combine Earth-based radar maps of Venus from the 1988 and 2012 inferior conjunctions, which had similar viewing geometries. Processing of both datasets with better image focusing and co-registration techniques, and summing over multiple looks, yields maps with 1-2 km spatial resolution and improved signal to noise ratio, especially in the weaker same-sense circular (SC) polarization. The SC maps are unique to Earth-based observations, and offer a different view of surface properties from orbital mapping using same-sense linear (HH or VV) polarization. Highland or tessera terrains on Venus, which may retain a record of crustal differentiation and processes occurring prior to the loss of water, are of great interest for future spacecraft landings. The Earth-based radar images reveal multiple examples of tessera mantling by impact ''parabolas'' or ''haloes'', and can extend mapping of locally thick material from Magellan data by revealing thinner deposits over much larger areas. Of particular interest is an ejecta deposit from Stuart crater that we infer to mantle much of eastern Alpha Regio. Some radar-dark tessera occurrences may indicate sediments that are trapped for longer periods than in the plains. We suggest that such radar information is important for interpretation of orbital infrared data and selection of future tessera landing sites.

  2. Propagation Characteristics of CMEs Associated with Magnetic Clouds and Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, R.-S.; Gopalswamy, N.; Cho, K.-S.; Moon, Y.-J.; Yashiro, S.

    2013-05-01

    We have investigated the characteristics of magnetic cloud (MC) and ejecta (EJ) associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) based on the assumption that all CMEs have a flux rope structure. For this, we used 54 CMEs and their interplanetary counterparts (interplanetary CMEs: ICMEs) that constitute the list of events used by the NASA/LWS Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop (CDAW) on CME flux ropes. We considered the location, angular width, and speed as well as the direction parameter, D. The direction parameter quantifies the degree of asymmetry of the CME shape in coronagraph images, and shows how closely the CME propagation is directed to Earth. For the 54 CDAW events, we found the following properties of the CMEs: i) the average value of D for the 23 MCs (0.62) is larger than that for the 31 EJs (0.49), which indicates that the MC-associated CMEs propagate more directly toward the Earth than the EJ-associated CMEs; ii) comparison between the direction parameter and the source location shows that the majority of the MC-associated CMEs are ejected along the radial direction, while many of the EJ-associated CMEs are ejected non-radially; iii) the mean speed of MC-associated CMEs (946 km s-1) is faster than that of EJ-associated CMEs (771 km s-1). For seven very fast CMEs (≥ 1500 km s-1), all CMEs with large D (≥ 0.4) are associated with MCs and the CMEs with small D are associated with EJs. From the statistical analysis of CME parameters, we found the superiority of the direction parameter. Based on these results, we suggest that the CME trajectory essentially determines the observed ICME structure.

  3. Nebular Hydrogen Absorption in the Ejecta of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore R.; Ishibashi, K.; Davidson, K.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) observations of Eta Carinae and immediate ejecta reveal narrow Balmer absorption lines in addition to the nebular-scattered broad P-Cygni absorptions. The narrow absorption correlates with apparent disk structure that separates the two Homunculus lobes. We trace these features about half way up the Northern lobe until the scattered stellar Balmer line doppler-shifts redward beyond the nebular absorption feature. Three-dimensional data cubes, made by mapping the Homunculus at Balmer alpha and Balmer beta with the 52 x 0.1 arcsecond aperture and about 5000 spectral resolving power, demonstrate that the absorption feature changes slowly in velocity with nebular position. We have monitored the stellar Balmer alpha line profile of the central source over the past four years. The equivalent width of the nebular absorption feature changes considerably between observations. The changes do not correlate with measured brightness of Eta Carinae. Likely clumps of neutral hydrogen with a scale size comparable to the stellar disk diameter are passing through the intervening light path on the timescales less than several months. The excitation mechanism involves Lyman alpha radiation (possibly the Lyman series plus Lyman continuum) and collisions leading to populating the 2S metastable state. Before the electron can jump to the ground state by two photon emission (lifetime about 1/8 second), a stellar Balmer photon is absorbed and the electron shifts to an NP level. We see the absorption feature in higher Balmer lines, and but not in Paschen lines. Indeed we see narrow nebular Paschen emission lines. At present, we do not completely understand the details of the absorption. Better understanding should lead to improved insight of the unique conditions around Eta Carinae that leads to these absorptions.

  4. Supernova ejecta with a relativistic wind from a central compact object: a unified picture for extraordinary supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Akihiro; Maeda, Keiichi

    2017-04-01

    The hydrodynamical interaction between freely expanding supernova ejecta and a relativistic wind injected from the central region is studied in analytic and numerical ways. As a result of the collision between the ejecta and the wind, a geometrically thin shell surrounding a hot bubble forms and expands in the ejecta. We use a self-similar solution to describe the early dynamical evolution of the shell and carry out a two-dimensional special relativistic hydrodynamic simulation to follow further evolution. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability inevitably develops at the contact surface separating the shocked wind and ejecta, leading to the complete destruction of the shell and the leakage of hot gas from the hot bubble. The leaking hot materials immediately catch up with the outermost layer of the supernova ejecta and thus different layers of the ejecta are mixed. We present the spatial profiles of hydrodynamical variables and the kinetic energy distributions of the ejecta. We stop the energy injection when a total energy of 1052 erg, which is 10 times larger than the initial kinetic energy of the supernova ejecta, is deposited into the ejecta and follow the subsequent evolution. From the results of our simulations, we consider expected emission from supernova ejecta powered by the energy injection at the centre and discuss the possibility that superluminous supernovae and broad-lined Ic supernovae could be produced by similar mechanisms.

  5. Data analysis to separate particles of different speed regimes and charges. [lunar ejecta and meteorite experiment and pioneer space probe data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, H.

    1977-01-01

    Although the instruments on the lunar ejecta and meteorite experiment (LEAM) and the Pioneer 8 and 9 space probes were essentially similar, a comparison of their results indicates that different sets of particles caused the different responses. On Pioneer, the events were caused by the impact of cosmic dust, the so-called beta particles expelled from the vicinity of the sun by solar radiation pressure, augmented by extremely high energy but definitely identifiable interstellar grains. On the moon, the events were due to the impact of slowly moving, highly charged lunar dust being propelled electrostatically across the terminator. Both theoretical analysis and experimental testing confirming these conclusions are discussed.

  6. Multiproxy Approach of the K-T and Chicxulub Ejecta Layers Along the Brazos River, Texas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adatte, T.; Keller, G.

    2006-05-01

    from the K-T boundary by at least 20 to cm of normal hemipelagic claystone showing calcite, phyllosilicates, TOC, isotope and granulometric values similar to the pre-event sediments and reflect therefore normal sedimentary conditions. The Chicxulub spherule ejecta in the glauconitic sand near the base of the storm beds is reworked from an older original ejecta layer, as indicated by abundant reworked fossil shells. This is similar to the reworked spherule layers at the base of the siliciclastic deposits throughout NE Mexico, where the original layer is within marls up to 5 m below (base of CF1) and predating the K-T by 300,000 years. The original ejecta layer in Cottonmouth Creek lies 60 cm below the basal unconformity of the storm beds and within claystones near the base of zone CF1. This layer consists of a prominent 3-4 cm thick yellow clay of pure and well-crystallized smectite (Cheto Mg-smectite) that possibly represents the alteration product of Chicxulub impact glass. Glass altered smectite spherules are commonly present and present the same geochemical composition as glass and spherules weathered to smectite from Haiti and NE-Mexico. Similar Cheto smectite layers have been documented from ejecta spherule deposits in Central America and the Caribbean. The Brazos results confirm that the Chicxulub impact predates the K-T boundary by about 300,000 years, as earlier observed based on impact glass spherule layers in northeastern Mexico and the suevite breccia from the Yaxcopoil-1 core in Yucatan.

  7. Micrometeoroid and Lunar Secondary Ejecta Flux Measurements: Comparison of Three Acoustic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corsaro, R. D.; Giovane, F.; Liou, Jer-Chyi; Burtchell, M.; Pisacane, V.; Lagakos, N.; Williams, E.; Stansbery, E.

    2010-01-01

    This report examines the inherent capability of three large-area acoustic sensor systems and their applicability for micrometeoroids (MM) and lunar secondary ejecta (SE) detection and characterization for future lunar exploration activities. Discussion is limited to instruments that can be fabricated and deployed with low resource requirements. Previously deployed impact detection probes typically have instrumented capture areas less than 0.2 square meters. Since the particle flux decreases rapidly with increased particle size, such small-area sensors rarely encounter particles in the size range above 50 microns, and even their sampling the population above 10 microns is typically limited. Characterizing the sparse dust population in the size range above 50 microns requires a very large-area capture instrument. However it is also important that such an instrument simultaneously measures the population of the smaller particles, so as to provide a complete instantaneous snapshot of the population. For lunar or planetary surface studies, the system constraints are significant. The instrument must be as large as possible to sample the population of the largest MM. This is needed to reliably assess the particle impact risks and to develop cost-effective shielding designs for habitats, astronauts, and critical instrument. The instrument should also have very high sensitivity to measure the flux of small and slow SE particles. is the SE environment is currently poorly characterized, and possess a contamination risk to machinery and personnel involved in exploration. Deployment also requires that the instrument add very little additional mass to the spacecraft. Three acoustic systems are being explored for this application.

  8. Far-infrared Study of High Velocity Ejecta Associated with Cold Dust in Young Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, Jeonghee

    2014-10-01

    Whether supernovae (SNe) are a significant source of dust has been a long-standing debate. Large quantities of dust observed in high-redshift galaxies raises a fundamental astrophysical question of the origin of dust in the Universe, since AGB stars, which are thought to produce most interstellar dust in the modern Milky Way, are too old to have evolved in high-redshift galaxies. In contrast, SNe, the end point of massive stars, can occur within millions of years after the onset of star formation. Our Spitzer observations of the young supernova remnant (YSNR) Cas A revealed that the ejecta maps show a remarkable similarity to the dust maps, confirming for the first time that significant quantities of dust forms in SN ejecta. The shape and composition of the dust continuum and type of dust is closely correlated with the nucleosynthetic layers of different heavy elements in the ejecta lines. Recent Herschel observations of YSNRs including Crab Nebula, Cas A, SN 1987A and G54.1+0.3 further confirmed that SNe are important dust factories. These results imply that SN dust could be responsible for the large dust masses detected in high redshift galaxies and in galaxies today, but only a handful of such observations exist, and it is not clear how much of this dust was formed in the previous stellar wind phase. Identifying SN ejecta and examining its physical conditions are the fundamental steps in developing an understanding of dust formation and dust evolution in ejecta. We searched for high velocity ejecta emission from ISO/LWS archival data, and identified four young SNRs which exhibit evidence for such emission in their spectra (G21.5-0.9, G54.1+0.3, MSH 11-54, and MSH15-52). These SNRs form a valuable sample for the study of cold dust emission from SNRs: in fact, we have studied such emission from these sources using Herschel archival imaging data, and so far two of these SNRs indeed feature a significant amount of dust in ejecta. The far-infrared ISO detected high

  9. Low-Energy Impacts onto Lunar Regolith Simulant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seward, Laura M.; Colwell, J.; Mellon, M.; Stemm, B.

    2012-10-01

    Low-Energy Impacts onto Lunar Regolith Simulant Laura M. Seward1, Joshua E. Colwell1, Michael T. Mellon2, and Bradley A. Stemm1, 1Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida, 2Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, Colorado. Impacts and cratering in space play important roles in the formation and evolution of planetary bodies. Low-velocity impacts and disturbances to planetary regolith are also a consequence of manned and robotic exploration of planetary bodies such as the Moon, Mars, and asteroids. We are conducting a program of laboratory experiments to study low-velocity impacts of 1 to 5 m/s into JSC-1 lunar regolith simulant, JSC-Mars-1 Martian regolith simulant, and silica targets under 1 g. We use direct measurement of ejecta mass and high-resolution video tracking of ejecta particle trajectories to derive ejecta mass velocity distributions. Additionally, we conduct similar experiments under microgravity conditions in a laboratory drop tower and on parabolic aircraft with velocities as low as 10 cm/s. We wish to characterize and understand the collision parameters that control the outcome of low-velocity impacts into regolith, including impact velocity, impactor mass, target shape and size distribution, regolith depth, target relative density, and crater depth, and to experimentally determine the functional dependencies of the outcomes of low-velocity collisions (ejecta mass and ejecta velocities) on the controlling parameters of the collision. We present results from our ongoing study showing the positive correlation between impact energy and ejecta mass. The total ejecta mass is also dependent on the packing density (porosity) of the regolith. We find that ejecta mass velocity fits a power-law or broken power-law distribution. Our goal is to understand the physics of ejecta production and regolith compaction in low-energy impacts and experimentally validate predictive models for dust flow and deposition. We will present our

  10. Spall strength and ejecta production of gold under explosively driven shock wave compression

    SciTech Connect

    La Lone, B. M.; Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D.; Veeser, L. R.; Holtkamp, D. B.

    2013-12-16

    Explosively driven shock wave experiments were conducted to characterize the spall strength and ejecta production of high-purity cast gold samples. The samples were from 0.75 to 1.84 mm thick and 30 mm in diameter. Peak stresses up to 44 GPa in gold were generated using PBX-9501 high explosive. Sample free surface and ejecta velocities were recorded using photonic Doppler velocimetry techniques. Lithium niobate pins were used to quantify the time dependence of the ejecta density and the total ejected mass. An optical framing camera for time-resolved imaging and a single-image x-ray radiograph were used for additional characterization. Free surface velocities exhibited a range of spall strengths from 1.7 to 2.4 GPa (mean: 2.0 ±0.3 GPa). The pullback signals were faint, minimal ringing was observed in the velocity records, and the spall layer continued to decelerate after first pull back. These results suggest finite tensile strength was present for some time after the initial void formation. Ejecta were observed for every sample with a roughened free surface, and the ejecta density increased with increased surface roughness, which was different in every experiment. The total ejected mass is consistent with the missing mass model.

  11. A Chandra X-Ray Survey of Ejecta in the Cassiopeia A Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Una; Laming, J. Martin

    2011-01-01

    We present a survey of the X-ray emitting ejecta in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant based on an extensive analysis of over 6000 spectral regions extracted on 2.5-10" angular scales using the Chandra 1 Ms observation. We interpret these results in the context of hydrodynamical models for the evolution of the remnant. The distributions of fitted temperature and ionization age are highly peaked and suggest that the ejecta were subjected to multiple secondary shocks. Based on the fitted emission measure and element abundances, and an estimate of the emitting volume, we derive masses for the X-ray emitting ejecta as well as showing the distribution of the mass of various elements over the remnant. The total shocked Fe mass appears to be roughly 0.14 Solar Mass, which accounts for nearly all of the mass expected in Fe ejecta. We find two populations of Fe ejecta, that associated with normal Si-burning and that associated with alpha-rich freeze-out, with a mass ratio of approximately 2:1. Surprisingly, essentially all of this Fe (both components) is well outside the central regions of the SNR, presumably having been ejected by hydrodynamic instabilities during the explosion. We discuss this, and its implications for the neutron star kick.

  12. Characterization of the K-T and Chicxulub Ejecta Layers along the Brazos River, Texas: Correlation with NE Mexico and Yucatan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thierry, A.; Gerta, K.

    2005-05-01

    We report the results of preliminary investigations of four K-T boundary sections, which are located in small tributaries (Cottonmouth and Darting Minnow creeks) of the Brazos River. The study is based on high-resolution sampling, sedimentological observations, biostratigraphy, bulk rock and clay mineralogy, geochemistry and granulometry. The Cottonmouth Creek exposure is characterized by Late Maastrichtian dark grey fossiliferous claystone, interrupted by laterally variable channel fill storm deposits, which previously have been erroneously interpreted as impact tsunami deposits. These deposits consist of a basal shell hash (10cm), followed by glauconitic sand with altered impact spherules (10cm), laminated sandstones, and 4 to 5 hummocky cross-bedded sandstone layers separated by burrowed erosion surfaces that mark repeated colonization of the ocean floor between storm events. Above and below these storm events are dark grey fossiliferous claystones of the late Maastrichtian zone CF1, which spans the last 300,000 years of the Cretaceous. The K-T boundary is 40 cm above the storm deposits. Granulometric analyses of this interval reveal no size grading due to suspension settling from storm or tsunami waves, but rather indicate normal hemipelagic sedimentation. The Chicxulub spherule ejecta in the glauconitic sand near the base of the storm beds is reworked from an older original ejecta layer, as indicated by abundant reworked fossil shells. This is similar to the reworked spherule layers at the base of the siliclastic deposits throughout NE Mexico, where the original layer is within marls up to 5 m below (base of CF1) and predating the K-T by 300,000 years. We may have discovered the original ejecta layer in Cottonmouth Creek 60 cm below the basal unconformity of the storm beds and within claystones near the base of zone CF1. This layer consists of a prominent 3-4 cm thick yellow clay of pure and well-crystallized smectite (Cheto Mg-smectite) that possibly

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic Effects in Propagating Relativistic Ejecta: Reverse Shock and Magnetic Acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizuno, Y.; Nishikawa, K.I.; Zhang, B.; Giacomazzo, B.; Hardee, P.E.; Nagataki, S.; Hartmann, D.H.

    2008-01-01

    We solve the Riemann problem for the deceleration of arbitrarily magnetized relativistic ejecta injected into a static unmagnetized medium. We find that for the same initial Lorentz factor, the reverse shock becomes progressively weaker with increasing magnetization s (the Poynting-to-kinetic energy flux ratio), and the shock becomes a rarefaction wave when s exceeds a critical value, sc, defined by the balance between the magnetic pressure in the ejecta and the thermal pressure in the forward shock. In the rarefaction wave regime, we find that the rarefied region is accelerated to a Lorentz factor that is significantly larger than the initial value. This acceleration mechanism is due to the strong magnetic pressure in the ejecta.

  14. Theoretical considerations for black hole formation in supernova ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Andrew Paul

    2012-01-01

    This work hypothesizes that supernovae and other extreme astrophysical phenomena, recently recognized as much more inhomogeneous and turbulent than previously supposed, give rise to and then eject substellar-mass or Dwarf Black Holes (DBHs), along with their other ejecta. Two independent methods for detecting regions within a data set from a simulation of a high energy astrophysical event, such as a supernova, that are unstable to gravitational collapse. These methods can be used where the resolution, spatial domain, time span, and/or treatment of general relativity of the simulation may not be sufficient to evolve the region to gravitational collapse natively. The first method seeks acoustic instability against gravitational collapse. That is, some hypothetical bodies exhibit perturbative eigenmodes that grow in amplitude, rather than oscillate, and Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar derived a theorem to prove whether such modes exist for a given distribution of matter. The Chandrasekhar (acoustic) stability theorem is adapted for use within a hot, dense medium. The accuracy of this method is demonstrated by applying it to various spherical mass distributions whose stability is known through other means. This method has already been used in the analysis of data sets from three simulations, with negative results. The adaptation is limited to DBHs of masses above a minimum threshold, however, prompting the division of DBH progenitors into Type I, the more massive subclass that can be treated fully within the acoustic stability framework, and Type II, which range in mass from the bottom of the Type I mass range down to arbitrarily small. The second method for detecting instability against gravitational collapse seeks gravitational collapse induced by inward-propagating, spherically symmetric shocks in the Groah and Temple [1, 2] (GST) theoretical prescription. Using the only extant general-relativistic shockwave simulator, written by Zeke Vogler, it is revealed that all

  15. The r-process and neutrino-heated supernova ejecta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woosley, S. E.; Wilson, J. R.; Mathews, G. J.; Hoffman, R. D.; Meyer, B. S.

    1994-01-01

    As a neutron star is formed by the collapse of the iron core of a massive star, its Kelvin-Helmholtz evolution is characterized by the release of gravitational binding energy as neutrinos. The interaction of these neutrinos with heated material above the neutron star generates a hot bubble in an atmosphere that is nearly in hydrostatic equilibrium and heated, after approximately 10 s, to an entropy of S/N(sub AS)k greater than or approximately = 400. The neutron-to-proton ratio for material moving outward through this bubble is set by the balance between neutrino and antineutrino capture on nucleons. Because the electron antineutrino spectrum at this time is hotter than the electron neutrino spectrum, the bubble is neutron-rich (0.38 less than or approximately = Y(sub e) less than or approximately = 0.47). Previous work using a schematic model has shown that these conditions are well suited to the production of heavy elements by the r-process. In this paper we have advanced the numerical modeling of a 20 solar mass 'delayed' supernova explosion to the point that we can follow the detailed evolution of material moving through the bubble at the late times appropiate to r-process nucleosynthesis. The supernova model predicts a final kinetic energy for the ejecta of 1.5 x 10(exp 51) ergs and leaves behind a remnant with a baryon mass of 1.50 solar mass (and a gravitational mass of 1.445 solar mass). We follow the thermodynamic and compositional evolution of 40 trajectories in rho(t), T(t), Y(sub e)(t) for a logarithmic grid of mass elements for the last approximately = 0.03 solar mass to be ejected by the proto-neutron star down to the last less than 10(exp -6) solar mass of material expelled at up to approximately = 18 s after core collapse. We find that an excellent fit to the solar r-process abundance distribution is obtained with no adjustable parameters in the nucleosynthesis calculations. Moreover, the abundances are produced in the quantities required to account

  16. NON-EQUIPARTITION OF ENERGY, MASSES OF NOVA EJECTA, AND TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Shara, Michael M.; Yaron, Ofer; Prialnik, Dina; Kovetz, Attay

    2010-04-01

    The total masses ejected during classical nova (CN) eruptions are needed to answer two questions with broad astrophysical implications: can accreting white dwarfs be 'pushed over' the Chandrasekhar mass limit to yield type Ia supernovae? Are ultra-luminous red variables a new kind of astrophysical phenomenon, or merely extreme classical novae? We review the methods used to determine nova ejecta masses. Except for the unique case of BT Mon (nova 1939), all nova ejecta mass determinations depend on untested assumptions and multi-parameter modeling. The remarkably simple assumption of equipartition between kinetic and radiated energy (E {sub kin} and E {sub rad}, respectively) in nova ejecta has been invoked as a way around this conundrum for the ultra-luminous red variable in M31. The deduced mass is far larger than that produced by any CN model. Our nova eruption simulations show that radiation and kinetic energy in nova ejecta are very far from being in energy equipartition, with variations of 4 orders of magnitude in the ratio E {sub kin}/E {sub rad} being commonplace. The assumption of equipartition must not be used to deduce nova ejecta masses; any such 'determinations' can be overestimates by a factor of up to 10,000. We data-mined our extensive series of nova simulations to search for correlations that could yield nova ejecta masses. Remarkably, the mass ejected during a nova eruption is dependent only on (and is directly proportional to) E {sub rad}. If we measure the distance to an erupting nova and its bolometric light curve, then E {sub rad} and hence the mass ejected can be directly measured.

  17. Martian meteorite launch: high-speed ejecta from small craters.

    PubMed

    Head, James N; Melosh, H Jay; Ivanov, Boris A

    2002-11-29

    We performed high-resolution computer simulations of impacts into homogeneous and layered martian terrain analogs to try to account for the ages and characteristics of the martian meteorite collection found on Earth. We found that craters as small as approximately 3 kilometers can eject approximately 10(7) decimeter-sized fragments from Mars, which is enough to expect those fragments to appear in the terrestrial collection. This minimum crater diameter is at least four times smaller than previous estimates and depends on the physical composition of the target material. Terrain covered by a weak layer such as an impact-generated regolith requires larger, therefore rarer, impacts to eject meteorites. Because older terrain is more likely to be mantled with such material, we estimate that the martian meteorites will be biased toward younger ages, which is consistent with the meteorite collection.

  18. Simulations and experiments of ejecta generation in twice-shocked metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karkhanis, Varad; Ramaprabhu, Praveen; Buttler, William; Hammerberg, James; Cherne, Frank; Andrews, Malcolm

    2016-11-01

    Using continuum hydrodynamics embedded in the FLASH code, we model ejecta generation in recent target experiments, where a metallic surface was loaded by two successive shock waves. The experimental data were obtained from a two-shockwave, high-explosive tool at Los Alamos National Laboratory, capable of generating ejecta from a shocked tin surface in to a vacuum. In both simulations and experiment, linear growth is observed following the first shock event, while the second shock strikes a finite-amplitude interface leading to nonlinear growth. The timing of the second incident shock was varied systematically in our simulations to realize a finite-amplitude re-initialization of the RM instability driving the ejecta. We find the shape of the interface at the event of second shock is critical in determining the amount of ejecta, and thus must be used as an initial condition to evaluate subsequent ejected mass using a source model. In particular, the agreement between simulations, experiments and the mass model is improved when shape effects associated with the interface at second shock are incorporated. This work was supported in part by the (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA2-5396.

  19. X-ray illumination of the ejecta of supernova 1987A.

    PubMed

    Larsson, J; Fransson, C; Ostlin, G; Gröningsson, P; Jerkstrand, A; Kozma, C; Sollerman, J; Challis, P; Kirshner, R P; Chevalier, R A; Heng, K; McCray, R; Suntzeff, N B; Bouchet, P; Crotts, A; Danziger, J; Dwek, E; France, K; Garnavich, P M; Lawrence, S S; Leibundgut, B; Lundqvist, P; Panagia, N; Pun, C S J; Smith, N; Sonneborn, G; Wang, L; Wheeler, J C

    2011-06-08

    When a massive star explodes as a supernova, substantial amounts of radioactive elements--primarily (56)Ni, (57)Ni and (44)Ti--are produced. After the initial flash of light from shock heating, the fading light emitted by the supernova is due to the decay of these elements. However, after decades, the energy powering a supernova remnant comes from the shock interaction between the ejecta and the surrounding medium. The transition to this phase has hitherto not been observed: supernovae occur too infrequently in the Milky Way to provide a young example, and extragalactic supernovae are generally too faint and too small. Here we report observations that show this transition in the supernova SN 1987A in the Large Magellanic Cloud. From 1994 to 2001, the ejecta faded owing to radioactive decay of (44)Ti as predicted. Then the flux started to increase, more than doubling by the end of 2009. We show that this increase is the result of heat deposited by X-rays produced as the ejecta interacts with the surrounding material. In time, the X-rays will penetrate farther into the ejecta, enabling us to analyse the structure and chemistry of the vanished star.

  20. Detailed Analysis of the Intra-Ejecta Dark Plains of Caloris Basin, Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buczkowski, Debra L.; Seelos, K. S.

    2010-01-01

    The Caloris basin on Mercury is floored by light-toned plains and surrounded by an annulus of dark-toned material interpreted to be ejecta blocks and smooth, dark, ridged plains. Strangely, preliminary crater counts indicate that these intra-ejecta dark plains are younger than the light-toned plains within the Caloris basin. This would imply a second, younger plains emplacement event, possibly involving lower albedo material volcanics, which resurfaced the original ejecta deposit. On the other hand, the dark plains may be pre-Caloris light plains covered by a thin layer of dark ejecta. Another alternative to the hypothesis of young, dark volcanism is the possibility that previous crater counts have not thoroughly distinguished between superposed craters (fresh) and partly-buried craters (old) and therefore have not accurately determined the ages of the Caloris units. This abstract outlines the tasks associated with a new mapping project of the Caloris basin, intended to improve our knowledge of the geology and geologic history of the basin, and thus facilitate an understanding of the thermal evolution of this region of Mercury.

  1. Protrusions Beyond the Blast Waves of Young Type Ia Supernova Remnants: Hydrodynamic Instabilities or Ejecta Bullets?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, Ashton; Blondin, J. M.; Reynolds, S. P.

    2014-01-01

    High resolution imaging of two young Type Ia supernova remnants (SNRs), Tycho and SN 1006, has revealed several morphological features which have resisted explanation with numerical simulations. One such feature is the presence of shocked ejecta blobs protruding beyond the mean forward shock radius. Two current theories explain the presence of such ejecta: highly dense ejecta shrapnel produced in the explosion penetrating the forward shock, or plumes generated by hydrodynamic instabilities long after the initial explosion. We investigate the shrapnel theory through hydrodynamic simulations in 2D and 3D of the evolution of dense ejecta clumps embedded in an exponential density profile, appropriate for Type Ia supernovae. We use high-resolution 2D simulations to identify relevant clump parameters which we investigate further in 3D. In contradiction to some former work, we find that sufficiently resolved clumps in 2D models shatter upon collision with the forward shock, yielding new protrusion features. In both 2D and 3D, shrapnel is capable of penetrating the forward shock, but the resultant protrusions in 3D simulations vary significantly from those in similar 2D runs, implying 2D simulations may not be an accurate method of investigating the shrapnel theory. We compare the our simulations with Chandra observations of projections seen in Tycho and SN 1006. This work was performed as part of NC State University's Undergraduate Research in Computational Astrophysics (URCA) program, an REU program supported by the National Science Foundation through award AST-1032736.

  2. Production of impact melt in craters on Venus, Earth, and the moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vickery, A. M.; Melosh, H. J.

    1991-06-01

    Impact craters imaged by Magellan clearly show large amounts of flow-like ejecta whose morphology suggests that the flows comprise low-viscosity material. It was suggested that this material may be either turbidity flows or very fine-grained ejecta, flows of ejecta plus magma, or impact melts. The last of these hypotheses is considered. If these flows are composed of impact melts, there is much more melt relative to the crater volume than is observed on the moon. The ANEOS equation of state program was used for dunite to estimate the shock pressures required for melting, with initial conditions appropriate for Venus, Earth, and the moon. A simple model was then developed, based on the Z-model for excavation flow and on crater scaling relations that allow to estimate the ratio of melt ejecta to total ejecta as a function of crater size on the three bodies.

  3. The Three-Dimensional Motions of the Ejecta of Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Brian J.; Coyle, Nina; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; DePasquale, Joseph M.; Hewitt, John W.; Blondin, John M.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Petre, Robert; Reynolds, Stephen P.

    2017-01-01

    We present the first three-dimensional measurements of the velocity of various ejecta knots in Tycho's supernova remnant, the remains of SN 1572, known to be a Type Ia explosion. When the ejecta knots pass through the reverse shock, they become heated to X-ray emitting temperatures, and Chandra's unmatched spatial resolution combined with the small age of this remnant allows us to watch it expand on measurable timescales. By combining a new epoch of 2015 Chandra X-ray observations with a previous 2003 epoch, we have a 12-year baseline over which we can measure proper motions from nearly 60 "tufts" of Si-rich ejecta, giving us the velocity in the plane of the sky. For the line of sight velocity, we use two different methods: a non-equilibrium ionization model fit to the strong Si and S lines in the 1.2-2.8 keV regime, and a fit consisting of a series of Gaussian lines. These methods give consistent results, and allow us to determine the red or blue shift of each of the knots, and thus, the third dimension of the velocity vector. Assuming a distance of 3.5 kpc, we find total velocities that range from roughly 2400 to 6600 km/s, with mean and median values of 4429 and 4450 km/s, respectively. In the plane of the sky, we find several regions where the ejecta knots have overtaken the forward shock. These regions have proper motions in excess of 6000 km/s. Some Type Ia supernova explosion models predict a velocity asymmetry in the ejecta, where the ejecta on one side of the remnant is moving faster than another side. We find no such velocity asymmetries in Tycho, and discuss our findings in light of various explosion models. Our previous work has shown an asymmetry in the velocity of the forward shock, with speeds in the southwest being significantly higher than those in the northeast. We have attributed this to a measured density gradient in the ISM, and not an asymmetry in the explosion. We compare our measurements with hydrodynamic simulations to show how the forward

  4. HST Images Flash Ionization of Old Ejecta by the 2011 Eruption of Recurrent Nova T Pyxidis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shara, Michael M.; Zurek, David; Schaefer, Bradley E.; Bond, Howard E.; Godon, Patrick; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Pagnotta, Ashley; Prialnik, Dina; Sion, Edward M.; Toraskar, Jayashree; Williams, Robert E.

    2015-06-01

    T Pyxidis is the only recurrent nova known to be surrounded by knots of material ejected in previous outbursts. Following the eruption that began on 2011 April 14.29, we obtained seven epochs (from 4 to 383 days after eruption) of Hubble Space Telescope narrowband Hα images of T Pyx. The ionizing flash of radiation from the nova event had no discernible effect on the surrounding ejecta until at least 55 days after the eruption began. Photoionization of hydrogen located north and south of the central star was seen 132 days after the beginning of the eruption. That photoionized hydrogen recombined in the following 51 days, allowing us to determine a hydrogen atom density of at least 7× {{10}5}\\c{{m}-3}—at least an order of magnitude denser than the previously detected, unresolved [N ii] knots surrounding T Pyx. Material to the northwest and southeast was photoionized, and became bright between 132 and 183 days after the eruption began. Ninety-nine days later that northwest and southeast hydrogen had recombined. Both then (282 days after outburst) and 101 days later, we detected almost no trace of hydrogen emission around T Pyx. We determine that there is a large reservoir of previously unseen, cold diffuse hydrogen overlapping the previously detected, [N ii]-emitting knots of T Pyx ejecta. The mass of this newly detected hydrogen is model-dependent, but is is probably an order of magnitude larger than that of the [N ii] knots. We also determine that there is no significant reservoir of undetected hydrogen-rich ejecta, with density comparable to the flash-ionized ejecta we have detected, from the outer boundaries of the previously detected ejecta out to about twice that distance. The lack of distant ejecta is consistent with the Schaefer et al. scenario for T Pyx, in which the star underwent its first eruption within five years of 1866 after many millennia of quiescence, followed by the six observed recurrent nova eruptions since 1890. The lack of distant ejecta

  5. The size distributions of fragments ejected at a given velocity from impact craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okeefe, J. D.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1986-01-01

    The mass distribution of fragments that are ejected at a given velocity for impact craters is modeled to allow extrapolation of laboratory, field, and numerical results to large scale planetary events. The model is semi-empirical in nature and is derived from: (1) numerical calculations of cratering and the resultant mass versus ejection velocity, (2) observed ejecta blanket particle size distributions, (3) an empirical relationship between maximum ejecta fragment size and crater diameter, (4) measurements and theory of maximum ejecta size versus ejecta velocity, and (5) an assumption on the functional form for the distribution of fragments ejected at a given velocity. This model implies that or planetary impacts into competent rock, the distribution of fragments ejected at a given velocity is broad, e.g., 68% of the mass of the ejecta at a given velocity contains fragments having a mass less than 0.1 times a mass of the largest fragment moving at that velocity. The broad distribution suggests that in impact processes, additional comminution of ejecta occurs after the upward initial shock has passed in the process of the ejecta velocity vector rotating from an initially downward orientation. This additional comminution produces the broader size distribution in impact ejecta as compared to that obtained in simple brittle failure experiments.

  6. The NASA Lunar Impact Monitoring Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suggs, Rob

    2008-01-01

    We have a fruitful observing program underway which has significantly increased the number of lunar impacts observed. We have done initial test shots at the Ames Vertical Gun Range obtained preliminary luminous efficiency values. More shots and better diagnostics are needed to determine ejecta properties. We are working to have a more accurate ejecta. environment definition to support lunar lander, habitat, and EVA design. Data also useful for validation of sporadic model at large size range.

  7. Supernova Ejecta in the Youngest Galactic Supernova Remnant G1.9+0.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Hwang, Una; Green, David A.; Petre, Robert; Krishnamurthy, Kalyani; Willett, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    G1.9+0.3 is the youngest known Galactic supernova remnant (SNR), with an estimated supernova (SN) explosion date of approximately 1900, and most likely located near the Galactic Center. Only the outermost ejecta layers with free-expansion velocities (is) approximately greater than 18,000 km s-1 have been shocked so far in this dynamically young, likely Type Ia SNR. A long (980 ks) Chandra observation in 2011 allowed spatially-resolved spectroscopy of heavy-element ejecta. We denoised Chandra data with the spatio-spectral method of Krishnamurthy et al., and used a wavelet based technique to spatially localize thermal emission produced by intermediate-mass elements (IMEs: Si and S) and iron. The spatial distribution of both IMEs and Fe is extremely asymmetric, with the strongest ejecta emission in the northern rim. Fe K alpha emission is particularly prominent there, and fits with thermal models indicate strongly oversolar Fe abundances. In a localized, outlying region in the northern rim, IMEs are less abundant than Fe, indicating that undiluted Fe-group elements (including 56Ni) with velocities greater than 18,000 km s-1 were ejected by this SN. But in the inner west rim, we find Si- and S-rich ejecta without any traces of Fe, so high-velocity products of O-burning were also ejected. G1.9+0.3 appears similar to energetic Type Ia SNe such as SN 2010jn where iron-group elements at such high free-expansion velocities have been recently detected. The pronounced asymmetry in the ejecta distribution and abundance inhomogeneities are best explained by a strongly asymmetric SN explosion, similar to those produced in some recent 3D delayed-detonation Type Ia models.

  8. Distribution of Ejecta in Analog Tephra Rings from Discrete Single and Multiple Subsurface Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graettinger, A. H.; Valentine, G. A.; Sonder, I.; Ross, P. S.; White, J. D. L.

    2015-12-01

    Buried-explosion experiments were used to investigate the spatial and volumetric distribution of extra-crater ejecta resulting from a range of explosion configurations with and without a crater present. Explosion configuration is defined in terms of scaled depth, the relationship between depth of burial and the cube root of explosion energy, where an optimal scaled depth explosion produces the largest crater diameter for a given energy. The multiple explosion experiments provide an analog for the formation of maar-diatreme ejecta deposits and the deposits of discrete explosions through existing conduits and hydrothermal systems. Experiments produced meter-sized craters with ejecta distributed between three major facies based on morphology and distance from the crater center. The proximal deposits form a constructional steep-sided ring that extends no more than two-times the crater radius away from center. The medial deposits form a low-angle continuous blanket that transitions with distance into the isolated clasts of the distal ejecta. Single explosion experiments produce a trend of increasing volume proportion of proximal ejecta as scaled depth increases (from 20-90% vol.). Multiple explosion experiments are dominated by proximal deposits (>90% vol.) for all but optimal scaled depth conditions (40-70% vol.). In addition to scaled depth, the presence of a crater influences jet shape and how the jet collapses, resulting in two end-member depositional mechanisms that produce distinctive facies. The experiments use one well-constrained explosion mechanism and, consequently, the variations in depositional facies and distribution are the result of conditions independent of that mechanism. Previous interpretations have invoked variations in fragmentation as the cause of this variability, but these experiments should help with a more complete reconstruction of the configuration and number of explosions that produce a tephra ring.

  9. The Density and Mass of Unshocked Ejecta in Cassiopeia A through Low Frequency Radio Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLaney, Tracey; Kassim, Namir E.; Rudnick, Lawrence; Perley, R. A.

    2014-04-01

    Characterizing the ejecta in young supernova remnants is a requisite step toward a better understanding of stellar evolution. In Cassiopeia A the density and total mass remaining in the unshocked ejecta are important parameters for modeling its explosion and subsequent evolution. Low frequency (<100 MHz) radio observations of sufficient angular resolution offer a unique probe of unshocked ejecta revealed via free-free absorption against the synchrotron emitting shell. We have used the Very Large Array plus Pie Town Link extension to probe this cool, ionized absorber at 9'' and 18.''5 resolution at 74 MHz. Together with higher frequency data we estimate an electron density of 4.2 cm-3 and a total mass of 0.39 M ⊙ with uncertainties of a factor of ~2. This is a significant improvement over the 100 cm-3 upper limit offered by infrared [S III] line ratios from the Spitzer Space Telescope. Our estimates are sensitive to a number of factors including temperature and geometry. However using reasonable values for each, our unshocked mass estimate agrees with predictions from dynamical models. We also consider the presence, or absence, of cold iron- and carbon-rich ejecta and how these affect our calculations. Finally we reconcile the intrinsic absorption from unshocked ejecta with the turnover in Cas A's integrated spectrum documented decades ago at much lower frequencies. These and other recent observations below 100 MHz confirm that spatially resolved thermal absorption, when extended to lower frequencies and higher resolution, will offer a powerful new tool for low frequency astrophysics.

  10. A Detailed Kinematic Map of Cassiopeia A's Optical Main Shell and Outer High-velocity Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milisavljevic, Dan; Fesen, Robert A.

    2013-08-01

    We present three-dimensional (3D) kinematic reconstructions of optically emitting material in the young Galactic supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (Cas A). These Doppler maps have the highest spectral and spatial resolutions of any previous survey of Cas A and represent the most complete catalog of its optically emitting material to date. We confirm that the bulk of Cas A's optically bright ejecta populate a torus-like geometry tilted approximately 30° with respect to the plane of the sky with a -4000 to +6000 km s-1 radial velocity asymmetry. Near-tangent viewing angle effects and an inhomogeneous surrounding circumstellar material/interstellar medium environment suggest that this geometry and velocity asymmetry may not be faithfully representative of the remnant's true 3D structure or the kinematic properties of the original explosion. The majority of the optical ejecta are arranged in several well-defined and nearly circular ring-like structures with diameters between approximately 30'' (0.5 pc) and 2' (2 pc). These ejecta rings appear to be a common phenomenon of young core-collapse remnants and may be associated with post-explosion input of energy from plumes of radioactive 56Ni-rich ejecta that rise, expand, and compress non-radioactive material. Our optical survey encompasses Cas A's faint outlying ejecta knots and exceptionally high-velocity NE and SW streams of S-rich debris often referred to as "jets." These outer knots, which exhibit a chemical make-up suggestive of an origin deep within the progenitor star, appear to be arranged in opposing and wide-angle outflows with opening half-angles of ≈40°.

  11. A DETAILED KINEMATIC MAP OF CASSIOPEIA A'S OPTICAL MAIN SHELL AND OUTER HIGH-VELOCITY EJECTA

    SciTech Connect

    Milisavljevic, Dan; Fesen, Robert A.

    2013-08-01

    We present three-dimensional (3D) kinematic reconstructions of optically emitting material in the young Galactic supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (Cas A). These Doppler maps have the highest spectral and spatial resolutions of any previous survey of Cas A and represent the most complete catalog of its optically emitting material to date. We confirm that the bulk of Cas A's optically bright ejecta populate a torus-like geometry tilted approximately 30 Degree-Sign with respect to the plane of the sky with a -4000 to +6000 km s{sup -1} radial velocity asymmetry. Near-tangent viewing angle effects and an inhomogeneous surrounding circumstellar material/interstellar medium environment suggest that this geometry and velocity asymmetry may not be faithfully representative of the remnant's true 3D structure or the kinematic properties of the original explosion. The majority of the optical ejecta are arranged in several well-defined and nearly circular ring-like structures with diameters between approximately 30'' (0.5 pc) and 2' (2 pc). These ejecta rings appear to be a common phenomenon of young core-collapse remnants and may be associated with post-explosion input of energy from plumes of radioactive {sup 56}Ni-rich ejecta that rise, expand, and compress non-radioactive material. Our optical survey encompasses Cas A's faint outlying ejecta knots and exceptionally high-velocity NE and SW streams of S-rich debris often referred to as ''jets''. These outer knots, which exhibit a chemical make-up suggestive of an origin deep within the progenitor star, appear to be arranged in opposing and wide-angle outflows with opening half-angles of Almost-Equal-To 40 Degree-Sign.

  12. Upland Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    24 March 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a relatively fresh crater with dark, rayed ejecta on an upland plain above one of the many depressions in the eastern Labyrinthus Noctis region. The presence of the dark rays emanating from the crater suggests that the impact was a relatively recent event compared to other craters of similar diameter in the scene. Over time, the dark ejecta will fade and blend in with its surroundings, owing to settling of dust from the atmosphere.

    Location near: 9.7oS, 94.8oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  13. X-RAY EJECTA KINEMATICS OF THE GALACTIC CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA REMNANT G292.0+1.8

    SciTech Connect

    Bhalerao, Jayant; Park, Sangwook; Dewey, Daniel; Hughes, John P.; Mori, Koji; Lee, Jae-Joon

    2015-02-10

    We report on the results from the analysis of our 114 ks Chandra High Energy Transmision Grating Spectrometer observation of the Galactic core-collapse supernova remnant G292.0+1.8. To probe the three-dimensional structure of the clumpy X-ray emitting ejecta material in this remnant, we measured Doppler shifts in emission lines from metal-rich ejecta knots projected at different radial distances from the expansion center. We estimate radial velocities of ejecta knots in the range of –2300 ≲ v{sub r}  ≲ 1400 km s{sup –1}. The distribution of ejecta knots in velocity versus projected-radius space suggests an expanding ejecta shell with a projected angular thickness of ∼90'' (corresponding to ∼3 pc at d = 6 kpc). Based on this geometrical distribution of the ejecta knots, we estimate the location of the reverse shock approximately at the distance of ∼4 pc from the center of the supernova remnant, putting it in close proximity to the outer boundary of the radio pulsar wind nebula. Based on our observed remnant dynamics and the standard explosion energy of 10{sup 51} erg, we estimate the total ejecta mass to be ≲8 M {sub ☉}, and we propose an upper limit of ≲35 M {sub ☉} on the progenitor's mass.

  14. X-Ray Ejecta Kinematics of the Galactic Core-Collapse Supernova Remnant G292.0+1.8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalerao, Jayant; Park, Sangwook; Dewey, Daniel; Hughes, John P.; Mori, Koji; Lee, Jae-Joon

    2015-02-01

    We report on the results from the analysis of our 114 ks Chandra High Energy Transmision Grating Spectrometer observation of the Galactic core-collapse supernova remnant G292.0+1.8. To probe the three-dimensional structure of the clumpy X-ray emitting ejecta material in this remnant, we measured Doppler shifts in emission lines from metal-rich ejecta knots projected at different radial distances from the expansion center. We estimate radial velocities of ejecta knots in the range of -2300 lsim vr lsim 1400 km s-1. The distribution of ejecta knots in velocity versus projected-radius space suggests an expanding ejecta shell with a projected angular thickness of ~90'' (corresponding to ~3 pc at d = 6 kpc). Based on this geometrical distribution of the ejecta knots, we estimate the location of the reverse shock approximately at the distance of ~4 pc from the center of the supernova remnant, putting it in close proximity to the outer boundary of the radio pulsar wind nebula. Based on our observed remnant dynamics and the standard explosion energy of 1051 erg, we estimate the total ejecta mass to be lsim8 M ⊙, and we propose an upper limit of lsim35 M ⊙ on the progenitor's mass.

  15. The influence of neutrinos on r-process nucleosynthesis in the ejecta of black hole-neutron star mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Luke F.; Lippuner, Jonas; Duez, Matthew D.; Faber, Joshua A.; Foucart, Francois; Lombardi, James C., Jr.; Ning, Sandra; Ott, Christian D.; Ponce, Marcelo

    2017-02-01

    During the merger of a black hole and a neutron star, baryonic mass can become unbound from the system. Because the ejected material is extremely neutron-rich, the r-process rapidly synthesizes heavy nuclides as the material expands and cools. In this work, we map general relativistic models of black hole-neutron star mergers into a Newtonian smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code and follow the evolution of the thermodynamics and morphology of the ejecta until the outflows become homologous. We investigate how the subsequent evolution depends on our mapping procedure and find that the results are robust. Using thermodynamic histories from the SPH particles, we then calculate the expected nucleosynthesis in these outflows while varying the level of neutrino irradiation coming from the post-merger accretion disc. We find that the ejected material robustly produces r-process nucleosynthesis even for unrealistically high neutrino luminosities, due to the rapid velocities of the outflow. None the less, we find that neutrinos can have an impact on the detailed pattern of the r-process nucleosynthesis. Electron neutrinos are captured by neutrons to produce protons while neutron capture is occurring. The produced protons rapidly form low-mass seed nuclei for the r-process. These low-mass seeds are eventually incorporated into the first r-process peak at A ˜ 78. We consider the mechanism of this process in detail and discuss if it can impact galactic chemical evolution of the first peak r-process nuclei.

  16. Condensation of dust in the ejecta of Type II-P supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarangi, Arkaprabha; Cherchneff, Isabelle

    2015-03-01

    Aims: We study the production of dust in Type II-P supernova ejecta by coupling the gas-phase chemistry to the dust nucleation and condensation phases. We consider two supernova progenitor masses with homogeneous and clumpy ejecta to assess the chemical type and quantity of dust that forms. Grain size distributions are derived for all dust components as a function of post-explosion time. Methods: The chemistry of the gas phase and the simultaneous formation of dust clusters are described by a chemical network that includes all possible processes that are efficient at high gas temperatures and densities. The formation of key bimolecular species (e.g., CO, SiO) and dust clusters of silicates, alumina, silica, metal carbides, metal sulphides, pure metals, and amorphous carbon is considered. A set of stiff, coupled, ordinary, differential equations is solved for the gas conditions pertaining to supernova explosions. These master equations are coupled to a dust condensation formalism based on Brownian coagulation. Results: We find that Type II-P supernovae produce dust grains of various chemical compositions and size distributions as a function of post-explosion time. The grain size distributions gain in complexity with time, are slewed towards large grains, and differ from the usual Mathis, Rumpl, & Nordsieck power-law distribution characterising interstellar dust. Gas density enhancements in the form of ejecta clumps strongly affect the chemical composition of dust and the grain size distributions. Some dust type, such as forsterite and pure metallic grains, are highly dependent on clumpiness. Specifically, a clumpy ejecta produces large grains over 0.1 μm, and the final dust mass for the 19 M⊙ progenitor reaches 0.14 M⊙. Clumps also favour the formation of specific molecules, such as CO2, in the oxygen-rich zones. Conversely, the carbon and alumina dust masses are primarily controlled by the mass yields of alumina and carbon in the ejecta zones where the dust is

  17. Ejecta of Eta Carinae: What We Learn about N-Rich Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore

    2006-01-01

    At least one member of the binary system, Eta Carinae, is in the late stages of CNO-cycle. At least ten solar masses of ejecta make up the Homunculus, a neutral bi-polar shell ejected in the 1840s and the Little Homunculus, an internal, ionized bi-polar shell ejected in the 1890s. HST/STIS and VLTAJVES high dispersion spectroscopy revealed absorptions of multiple elements and diatomic molecules in these shells, some, such as V II and Sr II have not been seen previously in the ISM. The skirt region between the bi-lobes includes the very bright Weigelt blobs, within 0.1 to 0.3" of the central source, and the more distant, unusual Strontium Filament, a neutral emission nebula photoexcited by Balmer continuum, but shielded by Fe II from Lyman radiation. The 600+ emission lines are due to metals usually tied up in dust, but underabundances of C and O prevent precipitation as oxides onto the dust grains. Indications are that Ti/Ni is 100X solar, likely due not to nuclear processing, but the very different photo-excitation environments coupled with N-rich, C-, O-poor chemistry. In the Homunculus, level populations of the molecules indicate 60K gas; the metal absorption lines, 760K; that of the Little Homunculus 6400K during the broad spectroscopic maximum, relaxing to 5000K for the few month long minimum. Lyman radiation, including both continuum and Lyman lines, is trapped across periastron. leading to temporary relaxation of the ejecta. These ejecta are a treasure trove of information on material thrown out of massive stars in the CNO-cycle, well before the helium burning phase. Curiously, spectra of three very recent SWIFT GRBs indicate the presence of warm, photoexcited ejecta in the vicinity of the protoGRBs, but obviously of very different abundances. However, the ejecta of Eta Carinae promise to be a nearby example of massive ejecta, the study of which should lead to increased insight of earlier, very distant massive stars.

  18. Dissecting a supernova impostor's circumstellar medium: MUSEing about the SHAPE of η Carinae's outer ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehner, A.; Steffen, W.; Groh, J. H.; Vogt, F. P. A.; Baade, D.; Boffin, H. M. J.; Davidson, K.; de Wit, W. J.; Humphreys, R. M.; Martayan, C.; Oudmaijer, R. D.; Rivinius, T.; Selman, F.

    2016-11-01

    Aims: The role of episodic mass loss is one of the outstanding questions in massive star evolution. The structural inhomogeneities and kinematics of their nebulae are tracers of their mass-loss history. We conduct a three-dimensional morpho-kinematic analysis of the ejecta of η Car outside its famous Homunculus nebula. Methods: We carried out the first large-scale integral field unit observations of η Car in the optical, covering a field of view of 1'× 1' centered on the star. Observations with the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) reveal the detailed three-dimensional structure of η Car's outer ejecta. Morpho-kinematic modeling of these ejecta is conducted with the code SHAPE. Results: The largest coherent structure in η Car's outer ejecta can be described as a bent cylinder with roughly the same symmetry axis as the Homunculus nebula. This large outer shell is interacting with the surrounding medium, creating soft X-ray emission. Doppler velocities of up to 3000 km s-1 are observed. We establish the shape and extent of the ghost shell in front of the southern Homunculus lobe and confirm that the NN condensation can best be modeled as a bowshock in the orbital/equatorial plane. Conclusions: The SHAPE modeling of the MUSE observations provides a significant gain in the study of the three-dimensional structure of η Car's outer ejecta. Our SHAPE modeling indicates that the kinematics of the outer ejecta measured with MUSE can be described by a spatially coherent structure, and that this structure also correlates with the extended soft X-ray emission associated with the outer debris field. The ghost shell immediately outside the southern Homunculus lobe hints at a sequence of eruptions within the time frame of the Great Eruption from 1837-1858 or possibly a later shock/reverse shock velocity separation. Our 3D morpho-kinematic modeling and the MUSE observations constitute an invaluable dataset to be confronted with future

  19. The Other Non-ice Material On Ganymede: Dark Ray Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibbitts, Charles A.; Hansen, G. B.

    2007-10-01

    Hydrated nonice material is ubiquitous on Ganymede [1]. Another non-ice material, associated with dark rays exists which may be due to impactor contamination [2,3]. Work using only a few NIMS observations showed that dark rays contain a less hydrated material spectrally similar to a C-type asteroid or to nonice material on Callisto [4]. We expand upon this work using all NIMS observations of dark rays and many other NIMS observations. Because every pixel of every NIMS observation contains effects of water-ice, we first derive the residual nonice material in each observation by removing (assuming areal mixing) the bi-directional reflectance of water-ice from the least icy spectrum. We then reproduced the spectrum of ganymede hydrate [1], derived the spectra of dark rays, and the spectra of other dark material. The spectra of dark rays are consistent with the presence of ganymede hydrate and several 10s % (areal mixture) of a single less hydrated material spectrally consistent with previous results. This second nonice material reduces the depth of the 1.5- and 2-um water-related bands and the contrast of the broad 3-um OH-related band. Kittu ejecta contains the greatest fraction of dessicated material, but is otherwise spectrally identical to other dark ray craters. Spectra of non-ray dark material are consistent with Ganymede hydrate, though a small amount (<10%) of dessicated material could be present. The correlation of the less-hydrated material with dark rays is consitent with impactor contamination but dessication of ganymede hydrate during impact may also be an explanation. Acknowlegements: This work has been supported by internal APL funds (Janney) and NASA OPR Grant NNX0GAD15G. References: [1] McCord et al., Science, 292, 1523-1525, 2001. [2] Conca et al., LPSC XII, 172-174, 1981. [3] Schenk, P. and W.B. McKinnon, Icarus, 89, 318-346, 1991. [4] Hibbitts et al., Bull. Amer. Astron. Soc., EAE03-A-07806, 2003.

  20. Impact Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Today marks the 45th anniversary of the dawn of the Space Age (October 4, 1957). On this date the former Soviet Union launched the world's first satellite, Sputnik 1. Sputnik means fellow traveler. For comparison Sputnik 1 weighed only 83.6 kg (184 pounds) while Mars Odyssey weighs in at 758 kg (1,671 pounds).

    This scene shows several interesting geologic features associated with impact craters on Mars. The continuous lobes of material that make up the ejecta blanket of the large impact crater are evidence that the crater ejecta were fluidized upon impact of the meteor that formed the crater. Volatiles within the surface mixed with the ejecta upon impact thus creating the fluidized form. Several smaller impact craters are also observed within the ejecta blanket of the larger impact crater giving a relative timing of events. Layering of geologic units is also observed within the large impact crater walls and floor and may represent different compositional units that erode at variable rates. Cliff faces, dissected gullies, and heavily eroded impact craters are observed in the bottom half of the image at the terminus of a flat-topped plateau.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS

  1. No signature of ejecta interaction with a stellar companion in three type Ia supernovae.

    PubMed

    Olling, Rob P; Mushotzky, Richard; Shaya, Edward J; Rest, Armin; Garnavich, Peter M; Tucker, Brad E; Kasen, Daniel; Margheim, Steve; Filippenko, Alexei V

    2015-05-21

    Type Ia supernovae are thought to be the result of a thermonuclear runaway in carbon/oxygen white dwarfs, but it is uncertain whether the explosion is triggered by accretion from a non-degenerate companion star or by a merger with another white dwarf. Observations of a supernova immediately following the explosion provide unique information on the distribution of ejected material and the progenitor system. Models predict that the interaction of supernova ejecta with a companion star or circumstellar debris lead to a sudden brightening lasting from hours to days. Here we present data for three supernovae that are likely to be type Ia observed during the Kepler mission with a time resolution of 30 minutes. We find no signatures of the supernova ejecta interacting with nearby companions. The lack of observable interaction signatures is consistent with the idea that these three supernovae resulted from the merger of binary white dwarfs or other compact stars such as helium stars.

  2. Emission-line profiles in SNe Ib/c - Probing the ejecta geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Taubenberger, S.; Valenti, S.

    2009-05-03

    To constrain the ejecta geometry of stripped-envelope core-collapse SNe, we investigate nearly 100 nebular spectra of 39 objects, several previously unpublished. We perform a Gauss-fitting of [O I]{lambda}{lambda}6300, 6364 in all spectra, and on the basis of the best-fit parameters organise the objects into morphological classes. We conclude that at least 40% of all SNe Ib/c must be aspherical. In some SNe, the [O I] line exhibits a variety of shifted secondary peaks or shoulders, interpreted as blobs of matter ejected at high velocity. The profile of Mg I]{lambda}4571 generally resembles that of [O I]{lambda}{lambda}6300, 6364, suggesting negligible contamination from other lines and confirming that O and Mg are similarly distributed within the ejecta.

  3. Analytic Inversion of Emission Lines of Arbitrary Optical Depth for the Structure of Supernova Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignace, R.; Hendry, M. A.

    2000-07-01

    We derive a method for inverting emission-line profiles formed in supernova ejecta. The derivation assumes spherical symmetry and homologous expansion [i.e., v(r)~r], is analytic, and even takes account of occultation by a pseudophotosphere. Previous inversion methods have been developed that are restricted to optically thin lines, but the particular case of homologous expansion permits an analytic result for lines of arbitrary optical depth. In fact, we show that the quantity that is generically retrieved is the run of line intensity Iλ with radius in the ejecta. This result is quite general and so could be applied to resonance lines, recombination lines, etc. As a specific example, we show how to derive the run of (Sobolev) optical depth τλ with radius in the case of a pure resonance scattering emission line.

  4. An Analytic Inversion of Emission Lines of Arbitrary Optical Depth for the Structure of Supernova Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignace, R.; Hendry, M. A.

    2000-05-01

    We have derived a method for inverting emission line profiles formed in supernova ejecta. The derivation assumes spherical symmetry and homologous expansion (i.e., v(r) r). The inversion is analytic and even takes account of occultation by a pseudo-photosphere. Previous inversion methods have been developed which are restricted to optically thin lines, but the particular case of homologous expansion permits an analytic inversion for lines of arbitrary optical depth. In fact, we show that the quantity that is generically retrieved is the run of line intensity Iλ with radius in the ejecta shell. This result could be applied to resonance lines, recombination lines, or lines dominated by collisional de-excitation.

  5. Asymmetric High-Velocity Ejecta in the Youngest Galactic SNR G1.9+0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz

    2014-11-01

    Chandra has revealed highly asymmetric supernova ejecta in G1.9+0.3. Iron dominates thermal emission in the radio-bright northern rim, while only intermediate-mass elements are found along the SE-NW axis. The measured X-ray expansion rates decrease radially by about 60% along this axis from 0.84% yr^{-1) to 0.52% yr^{-1}. This corresponds to undecelerated ages of 120 - 190 yr, confirming the young age of G1.9+0.3, and implying that the blast wave is much more decelerated than the reverse shock. Only the outermost ejecta with very high (>18,000 km s^{-1}) free-expansion velocities have been shocked so far. We discuss G1.9+0.3 in the framework of recent asymmetric 3D delayed-detonation Type Ia explosions from Seitenzahl et al. (2013). Their N3 model provides the best match.

  6. Detection of water in the LCROSS ejecta plume.

    PubMed

    Colaprete, Anthony; Schultz, Peter; Heldmann, Jennifer; Wooden, Diane; Shirley, Mark; Ennico, Kimberly; Hermalyn, Brendan; Marshall, William; Ricco, Antonio; Elphic, Richard C; Goldstein, David; Summy, Dustin; Bart, Gwendolyn D; Asphaug, Erik; Korycansky, Don; Landis, David; Sollitt, Luke

    2010-10-22

    Several remote observations have indicated that water ice may be presented in permanently shadowed craters of the Moon. The Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) mission was designed to provide direct evidence. On 9 October 2009, a spent Centaur rocket struck the persistently shadowed region within the lunar south pole crater Cabeus, ejecting debris, dust, and vapor. This material was observed by a second "shepherding" spacecraft, which carried nine instruments, including cameras, spectrometers, and a radiometer. Near-infrared absorbance attributed to water vapor and ice and ultraviolet emissions attributable to hydroxyl radicals support the presence of water in the debris. The maximum total water vapor and water ice within the instrument field of view was 155 ± 12 kilograms. Given the estimated total excavated mass of regolith that reached sunlight, and hence was observable, the concentration of water ice in the regolith at the LCROSS impact site is estimated to be 5.6 ± 2.9% by mass. In addition to water, spectral bands of a number of other volatile compounds were observed, including light hydrocarbons, sulfur-bearing species, and carbon dioxide.

  7. X-Ray Illumination of the Ejecta of Supernova 1987A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsson, J.; Fransson, C.; Oestlin, G.; Groeningsson, P.; Jerkstrand, A.; Kozma, C.; Sollerman, J.; Challis, P.; Kirshner, R. P.; Chevalier, R. A.; Heng, K.; McCray, R.; Suntzeff, N. B.; Bouchet, P.; Crotts, A.; Danziger, J.; Dwek, E.; France, K.; Garnavich, P. M.; Lawrence, S. S.; Leibundgut, B.; Lundqvist, P.; Panagia, N.; Pun, C. S. J.; Sonneborn, G.

    2011-01-01

    When a massive star explodes as a supernova, substantial amounts of radioactive elements-primarily Ni-56, Ni-57 and Ti-44 are produced. After the initial from shock heating, the light emitted by the supernova is due to the decay of these elements. However, after decades, the energy powering a supernova remnant comes from the shock interaction between the ejecta and the surrounding medium. The transition to this phase has hitherto not been observed: supernovae occur too infrequently in the Milky Way to provide a young example, and extragalactic supernovae are generally too faint and too small. Here we report observations that show this transition in the supernova SN 1987A in the Large Magellan Cloud. From 1994 to 200l, the ejecta faded owing to radioactive decay of Ti-44 as predicted. Then the flux started to increase, more than doubling by the end of 2009. We show that this increase is the result of heat deposited by X-rays produced as the ejecta interacts with the surrounding material. In time, the X-rays will penetrate farther into the ejects, enabling us to analyse the structure and chemistry of the vanished star.

  8. THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL STRUCTURE OF INTERIOR EJECTA IN CASSIOPEIA A AT HIGH SPECTRAL RESOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Isensee, Karl; Rudnick, Lawrence; DeLaney, Tracey; Smith, J. D.; Rho, Jeonghee; Reach, William T.; Kozasa, Takashi; Gomez, Haley E-mail: larry@astro.umn.ed E-mail: jd.smith@utoledo.ed E-mail: reach@ipac.caltech.ed E-mail: haley.morgan@astro.cf.ac.u

    2010-12-20

    We used the Spitzer Space Telescope's Infrared Spectrograph to create a high-resolution spectral map of the central region of the Cassiopeia A (Cas A) supernova remnant, allowing us to make a Doppler reconstruction of its three-dimensional structure. The ejecta responsible for this emission have not yet encountered the remnant's reverse shock or the circumstellar medium, making it an ideal laboratory for exploring the dynamics of the supernova explosion itself. We observe that the O, Si, and S ejecta can form both sheet-like structures and filaments. Si and O, which come from different nucleosynthetic layers of the star, are observed to be coincident in velocity space in some regions, and separated by 500 km s{sup -1} or more in others. Ejecta traveling toward us are, on average, {approx}900 km s{sup -1} slower than the material traveling away from us. We compare our observations to recent supernova explosion models and find that no single model can simultaneously reproduce all the observed features. However, models of different supernova explosions can collectively produce the observed geometries and structures of the interior emission. We use the results from the models to address the conditions during the supernova explosion, concentrating on asymmetries in the shock structure. We also predict that the back surface of Cas A will begin brightening in {approx}30 years, and the front surface in {approx}100 years.

  9. The Circumstellar Medium of Cassiopeia A Inferred from the Outer Ejecta Knot Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Una; Laming, J. Martin

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the effect of the circumstellar medium density profile on the X-ray emission from outer ejecta knots in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant using the 1 Ms Chandra observation. The spectra of a number of radial series of ejecta knots at various positions around the remnant are analyzed using techniques similar to those devised in previous papers. We can obtain a reasonable match to our data for a circumstellar density profile proportional to r(sup -2) as would arise from the steady dense wind of a red supergiant, but the agreement is improved if we introduce a central cavity around the progenitor into our models. Such a profile might arise if the progenitor emitted a, fast tenuous stellar wind for a short period immediately prior to explosion. We review other lines of evidence supporting this conclusion. The spectra also indicate the widespread presence of Fe-enriched plasma that was presumably formed by complete Si burning during the explosion, possibly via alpha-rich freezeout. This component is typically associated with hotter and more highly ionized gas than the bulk of the O- and Si-rich ejecta.

  10. X-Ray Emitting Ejecta in Puppis A Observed with Suzaku

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, U.; Petre, R.; Flanagan, K.

    2008-01-01

    We report the detection and localization of X-ray emitting ejecta in the middle-aged Galactic supernova remnant Puppis A using five observations with the Suzaku X-ray Imaging Spectrometer to survey the eastern and middle portions of the remnant. A roughly 3' x 5', double-peaked region in the north center is found to be highly enriched in Si and other elements relative to the rest of the remnant. The X-ray fitted abundances are otherwise well below the solar values. While the ejecta-enhanced regions show some variation of relative element abundances, there is little evidence for a very strong enhancement of one element over the others in the imaged portion of the remnant, except possibly for a region of 0 and Ne enhancement in the remnant's south center. There is no spatial correlation between the compact [0 1111 emitting ejecta knots seen optically and the abundance enhancements seen in X-rays, although they are located in the same vicinity. The map of fitted column density shows strong variations across the remnant that echo earlier X-ray spectral hardness maps. The ionization age (as fitted for single temperature models) is sharply higher in a ridge behind the northeast-east boundary of the remnant, and is probably related to the strong molecular cloud interaction along that boundary. The temperature map, by comparison, shows relatively weak variations.

  11. SULFUR MOLECULE CHEMISTRY IN SUPERNOVA EJECTA RECORDED BY SILICON CARBIDE STARDUST

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, Peter; Fujiya, Wataru; Zinner, Ernst E-mail: fujiya@eps.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2012-02-15

    We studied about 3400 presolar silicon carbide (SiC) grains from the Murchison CM2 meteorite for C- and Si-isotopic compositions. Among these grains we identified 7 unusual or type C SiC (U/C) grains, characterized by isotopically heavy Si, and 36 supernova type X SiC grains, characterized by isotopically light Si. Selected U/C and X grains were also measured for S-, Mg-Al-, and Ca-Ti-isotopic compositions. We show that the U/C grains incorporated radioactive {sup 44}Ti, which is evidence that they formed in the ejecta of Type II supernova (SNII) explosions. Abundances of radioactive {sup 26}Al and {sup 44}Ti are compatible with those observed in X grains. U/C and X grains carry light S with enrichments in {sup 32}S of up to a factor of 2.7. The combination of heavy Si and light S observed in U/C grains is not consistent with abundance predictions of simple supernova models. The isotope data suggest preferential trapping of S from the innermost supernova zones, the production site of radioactive {sup 44}Ti, by the growing silicon carbide particles. A way to achieve this is by sulfur molecule chemistry in the still unmixed ejecta. This confirms model predictions of molecule formation in SNII ejecta and shows that sulfur molecule chemistry operates in the harsh and hot environments of stellar explosions.

  12. An Exploration Zone in Cerberus Containing Young and Old Terrains, Including Fossae/Faults and Shergottite Distal Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, S. P.; Niles, P. B.; Bell, M. S.; Milbury, C.; Rice, J. W.; Burton, A. S.; Archer, P. D.; Rampe, E. B.; Piqueux, S.

    2015-10-01

    Cerberus contains Amazonian lava flows embaying a range of photogeologic units: ridged plains, heavily cratered terrain, highland knobs, and perhaps the Medusa Fossae Fm. Zunil Crater distal ejecta produced secondary crater fields (of shergottites?).

  13. Ejecta from large craters on the moon - Comments on the geometric model of McGetchin et al

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Amendments to a quantitative scheme developed by T. R. McGetchin et al. (1973) for predicting the distribution of ejecta from lunar basins yield substantially thicker estimates of ejecta, deposited at the basin rim-crest and at varying ranges beyond, than does the original model. Estimates of the total volume of material ejected from a basin, illustrated by Imbrium, also are much greater. Because many uncertainties affect any geometric model developed primarily from terrestrial analogs of lunar craters, predictions of ejecta thickness and volume on the moon may range within at least an order of magnitude. These problems are exemplified by the variability of T, thickness of ejecta at the rim-crest of terrestrial experimental craters. The proportion of T to crater rim-height depends critically upon scaled depth-of-burst and whether the explosive is nuclear or chemical.

  14. Ni-, Cr- and PGE Rich Vitric Products Found in Distal Ejecta: New Data from the Stac Fada Member, Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyett, P. C.; Petrus, J. A.; Kamber, B. S.

    2016-08-01

    In this study we suggest different origins for two distinct melt products found in the 1.18 Ga Stac Fada Member ejecta layer. We propose that the magnesian melt product contains siderophile elements from the impactor.

  15. A Mass and Density Estimate for the Unshocked Ejecta in Cas A based on Low Frequency Radio Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLaney, Tracey; Kassim, N.; Rudnick, L.; Isensee, K.

    2012-01-01

    One of the key discoveries from the spectral mapping of Cassiopeia A with the Spitzer Space Telescope was the discovery of infrared emission from cold silicon- and oxygen-rich ejecta interior to the reverse shock. When mapped into three dimensions, the ejecta distribution, including both hot and cold ejecta, appears quite flattened. On the front and back sides of Cas A, the Si- and O-rich ejecta have yet to reach the reverse shock while around the edge these layers are currently encountering the reverse shock giving rise to the Bright Ring structure that dominates Cas A's X-ray, optical, and radio morphology. In addition to morphology, the density and total mass remaining in the cold, unshocked ejecta are important parameters for modeling Cas A's explosion and subsequent evolution. The density estimated from the Spitzer data is not particularly useful (upper limit of 100/cm^3), however the cold ejecta are also observed via free-free absorption at low radio frequencies. Using Very Large Array observations at 330 and 74 MHz, we have a new density estimate of 2.3/cm^3 and a total mass estimate of 0.44 M_solar for the cold, unshocked ejecta. Our estimates are sensitive to a number of factors including temperature and geometry but we are quite pleased that our unshocked mass estimate is within a factor of two of estimates based on dynamical models. We will also ponder the presence, or absence, of cold iron- and carbon-rich ejecta and how these affect our calculations.

  16. An HST Survey of the Highest-velocity Ejecta in Cassiopeia A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fesen, Robert A.; Milisavljevic, Dan

    2016-02-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope WFC3/IR images of the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant that survey its high-velocity, S-rich debris in the NE jet and SW counterjet regions through [S iii] λλ9069, 9531 and [S ii] λλ10,287-10,370 line emissions. We identify nearly 3400 sulfur emitting knots concentrated in ˜120° wide opposing streams, almost triple the number previously known. The vast majority of these ejecta knots lie at projected distances well out ahead of the remnant’s forward blast wave and main shell ejecta, extending to angular distance of 320\\prime\\prime to the NE and 260\\prime\\prime to the SW from the center of expansion. Such angular distances imply undecelerated ejecta knot transverse velocities of 15,600 and 12,700 km s-1, respectively, assuming an explosion date ≈ 1670 AD and a distance of 3.4 kpc. Optical spectra of knots near the outermost tip of the NE ejecta stream show strong emission lines of S, Ca, and Ar. We estimate a total mass ˜0.1 {M}⊙ and a kinetic energy of at least ˜ 1× {10}50 erg for S-rich ejecta in the NE jet and SW counterjet. Although their broadness and kinetic energy argue against the Cas A SN being a jet-induced explosion, the jets are kinematically and chemically distinct from the rest of the remnant. This may reflect an origin in a jet-like mechanism that accelerated interior material from a Si-, S-, Ar-, and Ca-rich region near the progenitor’s core up through the mantle and H-, He-, N-, and O-rich outer layers with velocities that greatly exceeded that of the rapidly expanding photosphere. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc.

  17. Probing Supernova Ejecta Dust with Stellar Lightbulbs: MID-IR Imaging of G54.1+0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz

    2015-10-01

    Stellar explosions govern the interstellar dust lifecycle. In the early Universe, supernovae (SN) injected the first heavy elements into the interstellar medium (ISM). A significant fraction of ejecta was dust, but most of it might have been destroyed in supernova remnant's (SNR) reverse shocks. Our current understanding of both formation of dust in SNe and destruction of dust in shock waves is poor. We propose to observe young SNR G54.1+0.3 with the SOFIA telescope in order to advance our knowledge of dust formation in SNe. Progenitor of SN that produced G54.1+0.3 exploded in a stellar cluster containing a number of hot O and B stars. These stars heat ejecta dust to high temperatures, providing us with a unique opportunity to study its properties prior to arrival of a reverse shock and to shed light on formation of dust in SNe. Ejecta dust heated by the stellar ultraviolet radiation in the vicinity of hot stars emits most efficiently in the infrared spectral window accessible only to SOFIA. The proposed observations will provide spectral and spatial information crucial for understanding of ejecta dust properties such as its temperature, composition, and spatial distribution. We propose to do multi-band imaging observations with FORCAST in four filters to learn about spectral and spatial distribution of ejecta dust in the vicinity of hot stars. The high spatial resolution of SOFIA is crucial to our investigation, and only SOFIA can observe this dust at wavelengths where it emits radiation most efficiently. High-spatial resolution FORCAST images obtained in this investigation will be interpreted in the framework of radiatively-heated ejecta dust. When combined with Spitzer IRAC and MIPS images, and Herschel PACS images, we expect a dramatic advance in understanding of properties of ejecta dust that has not yet been processed by SNR shocks.

  18. THE RELATION BETWEEN EJECTA VELOCITY, INTRINSIC COLOR, AND HOST-GALAXY MASS FOR HIGH-REDSHIFT TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Ryan J.

    2012-04-01

    Recently, using a large low-redshift sample of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), we discovered a relation between SN Ia ejecta velocity and intrinsic color that improves the distance precision of SNe Ia and reduces potential systematic biases related to dust reddening. No SN Ia cosmological results have yet made a correction for the 'velocity-color' relation. To test the existence of such a relation and constrain its properties at high redshift, we examine a sample of 75 SNe Ia discovered and observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey and Supernova Legacy Survey. From each spectrum, we measure ejecta velocities at maximum brightness for the Ca H and K and Si II {lambda}6355 features, v{sup 0}{sub CaHandK} and v{sup 0}{sub SiII}, respectively. Using SN light curve parameters, we determine the intrinsic B{sub max} - V{sub max} for each SN. Similar to what was found at low redshift, we find that SNe Ia with higher ejecta velocity tend to be intrinsically redder than SNe Ia with lower ejecta velocity. The distributions of ejecta velocities for SNe Ia at low and high redshift are similar, indicating that current cosmological results should have little bias related to the velocity-color relation. Additionally, we find a slight (2.4{sigma} significant) trend between SN Ia ejecta velocity and host-galaxy mass such that SNe Ia in high-mass host galaxies tend to have lower ejecta velocities as probed by v{sup 0}{sub CaHandK}. These results emphasize the importance of spectroscopy for SN Ia cosmology.

  19. Flow visualization of the water impact problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Hans; Krechetnikov, Rouslan

    2012-11-01

    When a flat plate impacts the surface of an incompressible viscous liquid, the liquid directly beneath the plate is set into motion and an ejecta - a high speed jet - forms at the plate edge giving rise to the familiar ``splashing'' behavior. We present the results of our experimental investigation of the water impact problem using a particle image velocimetry (PIV) system to quantify the flow field beneath the plate immediately after impact with the speeds of the order of 1 m / s . The early-time formation of the ejecta for this flat plate geometry, including the influences of liquid viscosity (1 < μ < 10 mPa . s) and surface tension (20 < σ < 70 mN / m), are also studied with the PIV and high speed photography. Quantitative results for the flow field in the region beneath the plate and the growth of the ejecta are compared to existing and newly-developed theories.

  20. Near-Infrared Knots and Dense Fe Ejecta in the Cassiopeia A Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yong-Hyun; Koo, Bon-Chul; Moon, Dae-Sik; Burton, Michael G.; Lee, Jae-Joon

    2017-03-01

    We report the results of broadband (0.95–2.46 μm) near-infrared spectroscopic observations of the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant. Using a clump-finding algorithm in two-dimensional dispersed images, we identify 63 “knots” from eight slit positions and derive their spectroscopic properties. All of the knots emit [Fe ii] lines together with other ionic forbidden lines of heavy elements, and some of them also emit H and He lines. We identify 46 emission line features in total from the 63 knots and measure their fluxes and radial velocities. The results of our analyses of the emission line features based on principal component analysis show that the knots can be classified into three groups: (1) He-rich, (2) S-rich, and (3) Fe-rich knots. The He-rich knots have relatively small, ≲ 200 {km} {{{s}}}-1, line-of-sight speeds and radiate strong He i and [Fe ii] lines resembling closely optical quasi-stationary flocculi of circumstellar medium, while the S-rich knots show strong lines from O-burning material with large radial velocities up to ∼ 2000 {km} {{{s}}}-1 indicating that they are supernova ejecta material known as fast-moving knots. The Fe-rich knots also have large radial velocities but show no lines from O-burning material. We discuss the origin of the Fe-rich knots and conclude that they are most likely “pure” Fe ejecta synthesized in the innermost region during the supernova explosion. The comparison of [Fe ii] images with other waveband images shows that these dense Fe ejecta are mainly distributed along the southwestern shell just outside the unshocked 44Ti in the interior, supporting the presence of unshocked Fe associated with 44Ti.

  1. PRODUCTION OF ALL THE r-PROCESS NUCLIDES IN THE DYNAMICAL EJECTA OF NEUTRON STAR MERGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Wanajo, Shinya; Sekiguchi, Yuichiro; Kiuchi, Kenta; Shibata, Masaru; Nishimura, Nobuya; Kyutoku, Koutarou

    2014-07-10

    Recent studies suggest that binary neutron star (NS-NS) mergers robustly produce heavy r-process nuclei above the atomic mass number A ∼ 130 because their ejecta consist of almost pure neutrons (electron fraction of Y {sub e} < 0.1). However, the production of a small amount of the lighter r-process nuclei (A ≈ 90-120) conflicts with the spectroscopic results of r-process-enhanced Galactic halo stars. We present, for the first time, the result of nucleosynthesis calculations based on the fully general relativistic simulation of a NS-NS merger with approximate neutrino transport. It is found that the bulk of the dynamical ejecta are appreciably shock-heated and neutrino processed, resulting in a wide range of Y {sub e} (≈0.09-0.45). The mass-averaged abundance distribution of calculated nucleosynthesis yields is in reasonable agreement with the full-mass range (A ≈ 90-240) of the solar r-process curve. This implies, if our model is representative of such events, that the dynamical ejecta of NS-NS mergers could be the origin of the Galactic r-process nuclei. Our result also shows that radioactive heating after ∼1 day from the merging, which gives rise to r-process-powered transient emission, is dominated by the β-decays of several species close to stability with precisely measured half-lives. This implies that the total radioactive heating rate for such an event can be well constrained within about a factor of two if the ejected material has a solar-like r-process pattern.

  2. Gravitational waves and mass ejecta from binary neutron star mergers: Effect of the mass ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Tim; Ujevic, Maximiliano; Tichy, Wolfgang; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Brügmann, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    We present new (3 +1 )D numerical relativity simulations of the binary neutron star (BNS) merger and postmerger phase. We focus on a previously inaccessible region of the binary parameter space spanning the binary's mass ratio q ˜1.00 - 1.75 for different total masses and equations of state, and up to q ˜2 for a stiff BNS system. We study the mass ratio effect on the gravitational waves (GWs) and on the possible electromagnetic (EM) emission associated with dynamical mass ejecta. We compute waveforms, spectra, and spectrograms of the GW strain including all the multipoles up to l =4 . The mass ratio has a specific imprint on the GW multipoles in the late-inspiral-merger signal, and it affects qualitatively the spectra of the merger remnant. The multipole effect is also studied by considering the dependency of the GW spectrograms on the source's sky location. Unequal mass BNSs produce more ejecta than equal mass systems with ejecta masses and kinetic energies depending almost linearly on q . We estimate luminosity peaks and light curves of macronova events associated with the mergers using a simple approach. For q ˜2 the luminosity peak is delayed for several days and can be up to 4 times larger than for the q =1 cases. The macronova emission associated with the q ˜2 BNS is more persistent in time and could be observed for weeks instead of a few days (q =1 ) in the near infrared. Finally, we estimate the flux of possible radio flares produced by the interaction of relativistic outflows with the surrounding medium. Also in this case a large q can significantly enhance the emission and delay the peak luminosity. Overall, our results indicate that the BNS merger with a large mass ratio has EM signatures distinct from the equal mass case and more similar to black hole-neutron star binaries.

  3. Target of Opportunity Observations of TOADS: Finding the Dust in Super-Outburst Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoard, Donald; Ciardi, David; Howell, Steve

    2008-03-01

    Tremendous Outburst Amplitude Dwarf novae (TOADs) consist of a white dwarf primary star and an extremely low mass main sequence or brown dwarf-like secondary star. The latter fills its Roche lobe and transfers matter to the white dwarf through the inner Lagrange point into an accretion disk. TOADs undergo non-thermonuclear (i.e., disk instability) super-outbursts on timescales of decades. During the decline from super-outburst peak they display a characteristic dip in light curves at visible wavelengths, reminiscent of what is observed in slow classical (i.e., thermonuclear runaway) novae. In classical novae, the visible light dip is attributed to the formation of dust in the nova ejecta but, until now, the cause of the dip in TOAD light curves has remained unclear. In 2004, a previously unknown TOAD was discovered as it went into super-outburst, and our team was granted a Spitzer DDT program with which we have detected the likely formation of dust in the outburst ejecta. We now propose a Target of Opportunity program with Spitzer to observe an additional super-outbursting TOAD, in order to address the following questions: 1) Do all TOADs produce dust during their outbursts?; 2) What is the timescale for dust formation and dissipation?; 3) How much dust is produced during a super-outburst?; and 4) How does the dust production scale with the outburst amplitude? Spitzer is uniquely capable of detecting and characterizing the dust formed in the ejecta during super-outbursts and fundamentally changing the understanding of TOADs, their super-outbursts, and their contribution to the recycling of the interstellar medium.

  4. The Evolution of Dust Mass in the Ejecta of SN1987A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwek, Eli; Arendt, Richard G.

    2015-09-01

    We present a new analysis of the infrared (IR) emission from the ejecta of SN 1987A covering days 615, 775, 1144, 8515, and 9090 after the explosion. We show that the observations are consistent with the rapid formation of about 0.4 {M}⊙ of dust, consisting of mostly silicates (MgSiO3), near day 615, and evolving to about 0.45 {M}⊙ of composite dust grains consisting of ˜0.4 {M}⊙ of silicates and ˜0.05 {M}⊙ of amorphous carbon after day ˜8500. The proposed scenario challenges previous claims that dust in supernova (SN) ejecta is predominantly carbon, and that it grew from an initial mass of ˜10-3 {M}⊙ , to over 0.5 {M}⊙ by cold accretion. It alleviates several problems with previous interpretations of the data: (1) it reconciles the abundances of silicon, magnesium, and carbon with the upper limits imposed by nucleosynthesis calculations, (2) it eliminates the requirement that most of the dust observed around day 9000 grew by cold accretion onto the ˜10-3 {M}⊙ of dust previously inferred for days 615 and 775 after the explosion, and (3) establishes the dominance of silicate over carbon dust in the SN ejecta. At early epochs, the IR luminosity of the dust is powered by the radioactive decay of 56Co, and at late times by at least (1.3-1.6) × 10-4 {M}⊙ of 44Ti.

  5. Production of All the r-process Nuclides in the Dynamical Ejecta of Neutron Star Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanajo, Shinya; Sekiguchi, Yuichiro; Nishimura, Nobuya; Kiuchi, Kenta; Kyutoku, Koutarou; Shibata, Masaru

    2014-07-01

    Recent studies suggest that binary neutron star (NS-NS) mergers robustly produce heavy r-process nuclei above the atomic mass number A ~ 130 because their ejecta consist of almost pure neutrons (electron fraction of Y e < 0.1). However, the production of a small amount of the lighter r-process nuclei (A ≈ 90-120) conflicts with the spectroscopic results of r-process-enhanced Galactic halo stars. We present, for the first time, the result of nucleosynthesis calculations based on the fully general relativistic simulation of a NS-NS merger with approximate neutrino transport. It is found that the bulk of the dynamical ejecta are appreciably shock-heated and neutrino processed, resulting in a wide range of Y e (≈0.09-0.45). The mass-averaged abundance distribution of calculated nucleosynthesis yields is in reasonable agreement with the full-mass range (A ≈ 90-240) of the solar r-process curve. This implies, if our model is representative of such events, that the dynamical ejecta of NS-NS mergers could be the origin of the Galactic r-process nuclei. Our result also shows that radioactive heating after ~1 day from the merging, which gives rise to r-process-powered transient emission, is dominated by the β-decays of several species close to stability with precisely measured half-lives. This implies that the total radioactive heating rate for such an event can be well constrained within about a factor of two if the ejected material has a solar-like r-process pattern.

  6. Aspherical abundance distribution of ejecta from neutrino-driven core collapse supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Shin-Ichiro; Kotake, Kei; Hashimoto, Masa-Aki; Ono, Masaomi; Ohnishi, Naofumi

    2010-08-01

    We examine explosive nucleosynthesis during a delayed neutrino-driven, supernova explosion aided by standing accretion shock instability, based on two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the explosion of a 15Msolar progenitor. We find that abundance pattern of the supernova ejecta is similar to that of the solar system, for cases with high explosion energies of ~=1051 ergs. Aspherical distribution of Fe, Si, and O, which is observed in a nearby core-collapse SN remnant such as Cas A, is obtained in spite of the explosion of the non-rotating, spherical progenitor.

  7. Crustal and subcrustal nodules in ejecta from Kilbourne Hole Maar, New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitford-Stark, J. L.

    1987-01-01

    Nodules retrieved from the ejecta of volcanic craters serve as the source of two major items of information. The first is in providing details of the geochemistry and mineralogy of the Earth's interior by supplying samples of materials that cannot be obtained by existing drilling techniques. The other is in providing information regarding the process which led to their transport from the Earth's interior to the surface. The primary purpose of the present study was to examine the morphology of the nodules in an attempt to place some constraints on the process that brought them to the surface. This attempt is briefly discussed.

  8. DENSE IRON EJECTA AND CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA EXPLOSION IN THE YOUNG SUPERNOVA REMNANT G11.2-0.3

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Dae-Sik; Koo, Bon-Chul; Seok, Ji Yeon; Lee, Ho-Gyu; Matthews, Keith; Lee, Jae-Joon; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Hayashi, Masahiko

    2009-09-20

    We present the results of near-infrared spectroscopic observations of dense ({approx}>10{sup 3} cm{sup -3}) iron ejecta in the young core-collapse supernova remnant G11.2-0.3. Five ejecta knots projected to be close to its center show a large dispersion in their Doppler shifts: two knots in the east are blueshifted by more than 1000 km s{sup -1}, while three western knots have relatively small blueshifts of 20-60 km s{sup -1}. This velocity discrepancy may indicate that the western knots have been significantly decelerated or that there exists a systematic velocity difference among the knots. One ejecta filament in the northwestern boundary, on the other hand, is redshifted by {approx}>200 km s{sup -1}, while opposite filament in the southeastern boundary shows a negligible radial motion. Some of the knots and filaments have secondary velocity components, and one knot shows a bow shock-like feature in the velocity structure. The iron ejecta appear to be devoid of strong emission from other heavy elements, such as S, which may attest to the alpha-rich freezeout process in the explosive nucleosynthesis of the core-collapse supernova explosion close to its center. The prominent bipolar distribution of the Fe ejecta in the northwestern and southeastern direction, along with the elongation of the central pulsar wind nebula in the perpendicular direction, is consistent with the interpretation that the supernova exploded primarily along the northwestern and southeastern direction.

  9. The effect of ambient pressure on ejecta sheets from free-surface ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, J. O.; Mansoor, M. M.; Thoroddsen, S. T.; Truscott, T. T.

    2016-05-01

    We present observations from an experimental study of the ablation of a free liquid surface promoted by a focused laser pulse, causing a rapid discharge of liquid in the form of a very thin conical-shaped sheet. In order to capture the dynamics, we employ a state-of-the-art ultra-high-speed video camera capable of capturing events at 5 × 106 fps with shutter speeds down to 20 ns, whereby we were able to capture not only the ejecta sheet, but also the shock wave, emerging at speeds of up to 1.75 km/s, which is thus found to be hypersonic (Mach 5). Experiments were performed at a range of ambient pressures in order to study the effect of air drag on the evolution of the sheet, which was always observed to dome over, even at pressures as low as 3.8 kPa. At reduced pressures, the extended sheet evolution led to the formation of interference fringe patterns from which, by comparison with the opening speed of rupture, we were able to determine the ejecta thickness.

  10. On the Possibility of Dust Condensation in the Ejecta of Supernova 1987a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrz, R. D.; Ney, E. P.

    1987-10-01

    We suggest that supernova 1987a may condense dust of substantial visual optical thickness as do many novae. The dust will act as a calorimeter of the photon luminosity of any central engine that is dominant at the time of dust formation. Observations of novae suggest that dust formation may occur when the expanding ejecta reach a temperature of 1000 K. The early luminosity of the supernova may be dominated by radioactivity that is unrelated to the central engine that determines the energy balance for the long-term development of the supernova. We discuss the possibility that a constant luminosity central power source such as a pulsar dominates the luminosity of the supernova ejecta by the time that dust can condense and argue that, if a shell mass of more than a few tenths of one solar mass was ejected, emission from dust may be observable in the thermal infrared spectral region. Maximum dust optical depth should occur by late 1987 or early 1988. If the dust becomes optically thick, the visual light from the supernova may drop precipitously. The characteristics of an optically thick dust shell as a calorimeter of the luminosity of the central engine are discussed and are related to previous observations of dust formation in type II supernovae. It is suggested that dust of several chemical compositions may form at different epochs.

  11. Ejecta in the Oxygen-Rich SNR G292.0+1.8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, P. F.; Long, K. S.

    2004-08-01

    New optical images of the young supernova remnant (SNR) G292.0+1.8, obtained from the 0.9-m telescope at CTIO, show a far more extensive network of filaments than previous data suggest. Images in [O III] show filaments distributed throughout much of the 8 arcmin diameter shell seen in X-ray and radio images. Most of the outer filaments have a radial, pencil-like morphology that is very suggestive of Rayleigh-Tayor fingers. Simulations of core-collapse supernovae predict the development of such fingers, but they have never before been so clearly observed in a young SNR. In addition to the extensive [O III] filaments, we have detected three small complexes of filaments that show [S II] emission along with the oxygen lines. None of the filaments, with or without [S II], show any evidence for hydrogen, so all must be composed of pure supernova ejecta. The [S II] filaments provide the first evidence for products of oxygen burning in the ejecta from the event that gave rise to G292.0+1.8. This research has been funded primarily by the National Science Foundation through grant AST-0307613.

  12. Gravitational waves and mass ejecta from binary neutron star mergers: Effect of the stars' rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Tim; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Ujevic, Maximiliano; Tichy, Wolfgang

    2017-02-01

    We present new (3 +1 )-dimensional numerical relativity simulations of the binary neutron star (BNS) mergers that take into account the NS spins. We consider different spin configurations, aligned or antialigned to the orbital angular momentum, for equal- and unequal-mass BNSs and for two equations of state. All the simulations employ quasiequilibrium circular initial data in the constant rotational velocity approach, i.e. they are consistent with the Einstein equations and in hydrodynamical equilibrium. We study the NS rotation effect on the energetics, the gravitational waves (GWs) and on the possible electromagnetic (EM) emission associated to dynamical mass ejecta. For dimensionless spin magnitudes of χ ˜0.1 we find that both spin-orbit interactions and spin-induced quadrupole deformations affect the late-inspiral merger dynamics. The latter is, however, dominated by finite-size effects. Spin (tidal) effects contribute to GW phase differences up to ˜5 (20) radians accumulated during the last eight orbits to merger. Similarly, after merger the collapse time of the remnant and the GW spectrogram are affected by the NSs rotation. Spin effects in dynamical ejecta are clearly observed in unequal-mass systems in which mass ejection originates from the tidal tail of the companion. Consequently kilonovae and other EM counterparts are affected by spins. We find that spin aligned to the orbital angular momentum leads to brighter EM counterparts than antialigned spin with luminosities up to a factor of 2 higher.

  13. Suzaku study on the ejecta of the supernova remnant G272.2-3.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamitsukasa, Fumiyoshi; Koyama, Katsuji; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Mori, Koji; Katsuda, Satoru; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    We report reanalyses of the Suzaku observations of the Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G272.2-3.2, for which previous studies were limited below 3 keV. With careful data reduction and background subtraction, we discover the K-shell lines of Ar, Ca, and Fe above 3 keV. The X-ray spectrum of G272.2-3.2 consists of two components, a low-temperature collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE) plasma (kTe ˜ 0.2 keV) and a high-temperature non-equilibrium ionization (NEI) plasma (kTe = 0.6-3 keV). The CIE plasma has solar abundances over the entire area, hence it originates from the interstellar medium. On the other hand, the abundances of the NEI plasma increase toward the inner region, suggesting ejecta origin. The line center energy of the Fe K-shell emission (˜6.4 keV) suggests that the ejecta are recently heated by reverse shock, a common feature in Type Ia SNRs.

  14. A 3D kinematic study of the northern ejecta `jet' of the Crab nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Christine S.; Fesen, Robert A.

    2015-03-01

    We present moderate resolution [O III] λλ4959, 5007 line emission spectra of the Crab nebula's northern ejecta jet. These data along with an [O III] image of the Crab nebula were used to build three-dimensional kinematic maps of the jet and adjacent remnant nebulosity to better understand the jet's properties and thus its likely origin. We find the jet's systemic velocity to be +170 ± 15 km s-1 with radial velocities ranging from -190 to +480 km s-1. Our data indicate that the jet consists of thin filamentary walls (Vexp ≃ 40-75 km s-1), is virtually hollow in [O III] emission, and elliptical and funnel-like in shape rather than a straight cylindrical tube as previously thought. Examination of the Crab's 3D filamentary structure along the jet's base reveals a large and nearly emission-free opening in the remnant's thick outer ejecta shell. The jet's blueshifted and redshifted sides are surprisingly well defined and, like the jet's sharp western limb, appear radially aligned with the remnant's centre of expansion. These alignments, along with the opening in the nebula at the jet's base and proper motions indicating an expansion age in line with the 1054 supernova event, suggest a direct connection between the jet's formation and the Crab's radial expansion. While our analysis supports the scenario that the jet may simply represent the highest velocity material of the remnant's N-S bipolar expansion, the nature of this expansion asymmetry remains unclear.

  15. On the possibility of dust condensation in the ejecta of supernova 1987a

    PubMed Central

    Gehrz, R. D.; Ney, E. P.

    1987-01-01

    We suggest that supernova 1987a may condense dust of substantial visual optical thickness as do many novae. The dust will act as a calorimeter of the photon luminosity of any central engine that is dominant at the time of dust formation. Observations of novae suggest that dust formation may occur when the expanding ejecta reach a temperature of 1000 K. The early luminosity of the supernova may be dominated by radioactivity that is unrelated to the central engine that determines the energy balance for the long-term development of the supernova. We discuss the possibility that a constant luminosity central power source such as a pulsar dominates the luminosity of the supernova ejecta by the time that dust can condense and argue that, if a shell mass of more than a few tenths of one solar mass was ejected, emission from dust may be observable in the thermal infrared spectral region. Maximum dust optical depth should occur by late 1987 or early 1988. If the dust becomes optically thick, the visual light from the supernova may drop precipitously. The characteristics of an optically thick dust shell as a calorimeter of the luminosity of the central engine are discussed and are related to previous observations of dust formation in type II supernovae. It is suggested that dust of several chemical compositions may form at different epochs. PMID:16593876

  16. Meteoritic Microfossils in Eltanin Impact Deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyte, Frank T.; Gersonde, Rainer; Kuhn, Gerhard

    2006-01-01

    We report the unique occurrence of microfossils composed largely of meteoritic ejecta particles from the late Pliocene (2.5 Ma) Eltanin impact event. These deposits are unique, recording the only known km-sized asteroid impact into a deep-ocean (5 km) basin. First discovered as in Ir anomaly in sediment cores that were collected in 1965, the deposits contain nun-sized shock-melted asteroidal material, unmelted meteorite fragments (named the Eltanin meteorite), and trace impact spherules. Two oceanographic expeditions by the FS Polarstern in 1995 and 2001 explored approximately 80,000 sq-km. of the impact region, mapping the distribution of meteoritic ejecta, disturbance of seafloor sediments by the impact, and collected 20 new cores with impact deposits in the vicinity of the Freeden Seamounts (57.3S, 90.5W). Analyses of sediment cores show that the impact disrupted sediments on the ocean floor, redepositing them as a chaotic jumble of sediment fragments overlain by a sequence of laminated sands, silts and clays deposited from the water column. Overprinted on this is a pulse of meteoritic ejecta, likely transported ballistically, then settled through the water column. At some localities, meteoritic ejecta was as much as 0.4 to 2.8 g/cm2. This is the most meteorite-rich locality known on Earth.

  17. JET COLLIMATION IN THE EJECTA OF DOUBLE NEUTRON STAR MERGERS: A NEW CANONICAL PICTURE OF SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Nagakura, Hiroki; Sekiguchi, Yuichiro; Shibata, Masaru; Hotokezaka, Kenta; Ioka, Kunihito

    2014-04-01

    The observations of jet breaks in the afterglows of short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) indicate that the jet has a small opening angle of ≲ 10°. The collimation mechanism of the jet is a longstanding theoretical problem. We numerically analyze the jet propagation in the material ejected by a double neutron star (NS) merger, and demonstrate that if the ejecta mass is ≳ 10{sup –2} M {sub ☉}, the jet is well confined by the cocoon and emerges from the ejecta with the required collimation angle. Our results also suggest that there are some populations of choked (failed) SGRBs or new types of events with low luminosity. By constructing a model for SGRB 130603B, which is associated with the first kilonova/macronova candidate, we infer that the equation of state of NSs would be soft enough to provide sufficient ejecta to collimate the jet, if this event is associated with a double NS merger.

  18. Characteristics of ejecta and alluvial deposits at Meteor Crater, Arizona and Odessa Craters, Texas: Results from ground penetrating radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, J. A.; Schultz, P. H.

    1991-01-01

    Previous ground penetrating radar (GRP) studies around 50,000 year old Meteor Crater revealed the potential for rapid, inexpensive, and non-destructive sub-surface investigations for deep reflectors (generally greater than 10 m). New GRP results are summarized focusing the shallow sub-surfaces (1-2 m) around Meteor Crater and the main crater at Odessa. The following subject areas are covered: (1) the thickness, distribution, and nature of the contact between surrounding alluvial deposits and distal ejecta; and (2) stratigraphic relationships between both the ejecta and alluvium derived from both pre and post crater drainages. These results support previous conclusions indicating limited vertical lowering (less than 1 m) of the distal ejecta at Meteor Crater and allow initial assessment of the gradational state if the Odessa craters.

  19. Jet Collimation in the Ejecta of Double Neutron Star Mergers: A New Canonical Picture of Short Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagakura, Hiroki; Hotokezaka, Kenta; Sekiguchi, Yuichiro; Shibata, Masaru; Ioka, Kunihito

    2014-04-01

    The observations of jet breaks in the afterglows of short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) indicate that the jet has a small opening angle of <~ 10°. The collimation mechanism of the jet is a longstanding theoretical problem. We numerically analyze the jet propagation in the material ejected by a double neutron star (NS) merger, and demonstrate that if the ejecta mass is >~ 10-2 M ⊙, the jet is well confined by the cocoon and emerges from the ejecta with the required collimation angle. Our results also suggest that there are some populations of choked (failed) SGRBs or new types of events with low luminosity. By constructing a model for SGRB 130603B, which is associated with the first kilonova/macronova candidate, we infer that the equation of state of NSs would be soft enough to provide sufficient ejecta to collimate the jet, if this event is associated with a double NS merger.

  20. Ejecta patterns of Meteor Crater, Arizona derived from the linear un-mixing of TIMS data and laboratory thermal emission spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, Michael S.; Christensen, Philip R.

    1992-01-01

    Accurate interpretation of thermal infrared data depends upon the understanding and removal of complicating effects. These effects may include physical mixing of various mineralogies and particle sizes, atmospheric absorption and emission, surficial coatings, geometry effects, and differential surface temperatures. The focus is the examination of the linear spectral mixing of individual mineral or endmember spectra. Linear addition of spectra, for particles larger than the wavelength, allows for a straight-forward method of deconvolving the observed spectra, predicting a volume percent of each endmember. The 'forward analysis' of linear mixing (comparing the spectra of physical mixtures to numerical mixtures) has received much attention. The reverse approach of un-mixing thermal emission spectra was examined with remotely sensed data, but no laboratory verification exists. Understanding of the effects of spectral mixing on high resolution laboratory spectra allows for the extrapolation to lower resolution, and often more complicated, remotely gathered data. Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) data for Meteor Crater, Arizona were acquired in Sep. 1987. The spectral un-mixing of these data gives a unique test of the laboratory results. Meteor Crater (1.2 km in diameter and 180 m deep) is located in north-central Arizona, west of Canyon Diablo. The arid environment, paucity of vegetation, and low relief make the region ideal for remote data acquisition. Within the horizontal sedimentary sequence that forms the upper Colorado Plateau, the oldest unit sampled by the impact crater was the Permian Coconino Sandstone. A thin bed of the Toroweap Formation, also of Permian age, conformably overlays the Coconino. Above the Toroweap lies the Permian Kiabab Limestone which, in turn, is covered by a thin veneer of the Moenkopi Formation. The Moenkopi is Triassic in age and has two distinct sub-units in the vicinity of the crater. The lower Wupatki member is a fine

  1. Venus - Impact Crater 'Jeanne

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This Magellan full-resolution image shows Jeanne crater, a 19.5 kilometer (12 mile) diameter impact crater. Jeanne crater is located at 40.0 degrees north latitude and 331.4 degrees longitude. The distinctive triangular shape of the ejecta indicates that the impacting body probably hit obliquely, traveling from southwest to northeast. The crater is surrounded by dark material of two types. The dark area on the southwest side of the crater is covered by smooth (radar-dark) lava flows which have a strongly digitate contact with surrounding brighter flows. The very dark area on the northeast side of the crater is probably covered by smooth material such as fine-grained sediment. This dark halo is asymmetric, mimicking the asymmetric shape of the ejecta blanket. The dark halo may have been caused by an atmospheric shock or pressure wave produced by the incoming body. Jeanne crater also displays several outflow lobes on the northwest side. These flow-like features may have formed by fine-grained ejecta transported by a hot, turbulent flow created by the arrival of the impacting object. Alternatively, they may have formed by flow of impact melt.

  2. Imprints of the ejecta-companion interaction in Type Ia supernovae: main-sequence, subgiant, and red giant companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehner, P.; Plewa, T.; Langer, N.

    2017-02-01

    We study supernova ejecta-companion interactions in a sample of realistic semidetached binary systems representative of Type Ia supernova progenitor binaries in a single-degenerate scenario. We model the interaction process with the help of a high-resolution hydrodynamic code assuming cylindrical symmetry. We find that the ejecta hole has a half-opening angle of 40-50° with the density by a factor of 2-4 lower, in good agreement with the previous studies. Quantitative differences from the past results in the amounts and kinematics of the stripped companion material and levels of contamination of the companion with the ejecta material can be explained by different model assumptions and effects due to numerical diffusion. We analyse and, for the first time, provide simulation-based estimates of the amounts and of the thermal characteristics of the shock-heated material responsible for producing a prompt, soft X-ray emission. Besides the shocked ejecta material, considered in the original model by Kasen, we also account for the stripped, shock-heated envelope material of stellar companions, which we predict partially contributes to the prompt emission. The amount of the energy deposited in the envelope is comparable to the energy stored in the ejecta. The total energy budget available for the prompt emission is by a factor of about 2-4 smaller than originally predicted by Kasen. Although the shocked envelope has a higher characteristic temperature than the shocked ejecta, the temperature estimates of the shocked material are in good agreement with the Kasen's model. The hottest shocked plasma is produced in the subgiant companion case.

  3. Mixing in ejecta of supernovae. I - General properties of two-dimensional Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and mixing width in ejecta of supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachisu, Izumi; Matsuda, Takuya; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Shigeyama, Toshikazu

    1992-05-01

    Nonlinear growth of 2D Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instabilities are numerically studied to apply to the mixing in the supernova ejecta. Highly refined calculations of mixing in the realistic model of SN 1987A with a better code and various mesh resolutions are presented. It is shown that mixing width (or the extent of mixing) due to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities is still too small to account for the observations even with relatively large initial perturbation. The mixing width is found to depend only slightly on the mesh resolution when the initial amplitude is larger than about 5 percent of the expansion speed. To clarify the basic properties of the R-T instabilities and the dependence of the mixing width on the initial density structure, initial perturbation, and numerical resolution, highly simplified ideal models of R-T instabilities of compressible gas with an adiabatic constant of 4/3 are considered. It is found that, when the initial amplitude of the velocity perturbation is larger than 1 percent of the sound speed, the mixing width in time depends mainly on the initial amplitudes and the density ratio.

  4. The 3-Dimensional Inner and Outer Structure of Ejecta Around Eta Carinae as Detected by the STIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishibashi, Kazunori; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The HST/STIS instrument was used successfully to perform a complete mapping of the Homunculus nebula at two wavelength ranges including H-alpha and H-beta with a spectral resolving power of about 5000 and a spatial resolution of 0.1". The individual spectra were merged to synthesize three-dimensional data cubes that contain a set of images of Eta Car with spatial resolution of 0.10 to 0.251, sliced at velocity increment of 10 -- 30 km/s. For the first time this unique method allows us to diagnose the origin of intrinsic narrow emission structure of the nebula with high spatial and velocity resolution. Our initial analysis revealed the inner emission structure appeared to trace an elongated bipolar shell (possibly other shells as well) with a scale size of an arcsecond (i.e., "little homunculus in the Homunculus"). Furthermore, the mapping data cube revealed that the "fan" or "paddle" -- often referred as the source of peculiar blue-shifted intrinsic emissions including the Strontium cloud -- is not the source of intrinsic emissions. The fan is not even a part of the equatorial disk, but is spatially separated from the peculiar emission structure. Indeed we suggest that the fan is a surface of the Northwest lobe, possibly revealed by a blowout of the equatorial disk. We will use a number of visualization techniques (tomographic animations and simple 3-D models) to show these structures. These new results have strong impact upon future numerical modelings of the Homunculus nebula and of understanding of the evolution of the ejecta powered by the central source(s).

  5. Lateral and Vertical Heterogeneity of Thorium in the Procellarum KREEP Terrane: As Reflected in the Ejecta Deposits of Post-Imbrium Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis, J. J.; Jolliff, B. L.

    1999-01-01

    discussed above and their ejecta, with the goal of describing the materials they excavate. One interpretation for the origin of the high-Th material is that subsurface KREEPy materials have been excavated by impact craters. The material excavated may be either volcanic KREEP (e,g., Apennine Bench Formation), KREEPy impact-melt breccia formed by the Imbrium impact (e.g., Fra Mauro Formation), or other KREEP-rich crustal material. Determining which type of material is responsible for the elevated Th and its extent is important to understanding the premare and possibly the prebasin stratigraphy of the Imbrium-Procellarum Region. Merging the 5 deg. Th data with the shaded relief map, we observe that the highest Th concentrations are not related to pre-Imbrium upper crustal materials. The Apennines, Alpes, and Caucasus Mountains represent the pre-Imbrian highlands material and do not express concentrations of Th, FeO, and TiO2 as high as the most Th-fich materials exposed within the Procellarum KREEP Terrane. We observe that, in general, these massifs contain 10-14 wt% FeO and 4-7 ppm Th. Determining whether the Th signal is from KREEP basalts or KREEPy impact-melt breccias cannot be done with the Clementine data because the two rock types are compositionally and mineralogically too similar (e.g., the Th-rich, mafic impact-melt breccias in the Apollo sample collection are dominated by a KREEP-basalt like component. Mapping-the distribution and sizes of craters and whether they display elevated Th concentrations or not, should reveal the depth and thickness of the KREEP-rich materials, and whether they are ubiquitous (i.e., impact-melt breccia) or more randomly distributed; this might be taken as an indicator of localized KREEP-basalt flows. Within the southeastern region of the Imbrium basin, there are two Th hot spots. The first is associated with the crater Aristillus, and the latter with the Apennine Bench Formation. Adjacent to these two hot spots are craters with a lower Th

  6. Impact Cratering Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.

    2002-01-01

    Many Martian craters are surrounded by ejecta blankets which appear to have been fluidized forming lobate and layered deposits terminated by one or more continuous distal scarps, or ramparts. One of the first hypotheses for the formation of so-called rampart ejecta features was shock-melting of subsurface ice, entrainment of liquid water into the ejecta blanket, and subsequent fluidized flow. Our work quantifies this concept. Rampart ejecta found on all but the youngest volcanic and polar regions, and the different rampart ejecta morphologies are correlated with crater size and terrain. In addition, the minimum diameter of craters with rampart features decreases with increasing latitude indicating that ice laden crust resides closer to the surface as one goes poleward on Mars. Our second goal in was to determine what strength model(s) reproduce the faults and complex features found in large scale gravity driven craters. Collapse features found in large scale craters require that the rock strength weaken as a result of the shock processing of rock and the later cratering shear flows. In addition to the presence of molten silicate in the intensely shocked region, the presence of water, either ambient, or the result of shock melting of ice weakens rock. There are several other mechanisms for the reduction of strength in geologic materials including dynamic tensile and shear induced fracturing. Fracturing is a mechanism for large reductions in strength. We found that by incorporating damage into the models that we could in a single integrated impact calculation, starting in the atmosphere produce final crater profiles having the major features found in the field measurements (central uplifts, inner ring, terracing and faulting). This was accomplished with undamaged surface strengths (0.1 GPa) and in depth strengths (1.0 GPa).

  7. Ejecta particle size measurements from the break-up of micro-jets in vacuum and helium gas using ultraviolet in-line Fraunhofer holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorenson, D. S.; Pazuchanics, P. D.; Johnson, R. P.; Tunnell, T. W.; Smalley, D. D.; Malone, R. M.; Kaufman, M. I.; Marks, D. G.; Capelle, G. A.; Grover, M.; Stevens, G. D.; LaLone, B. M.; Marshall, B. F.; Turley, W. D.

    2017-01-01

    An ultraviolet (UV) in-line Fraunhofer holography diagnostic has been developed for making high-resolution spatial measurements of ejecta particles traveling at many mm/μs. The diagnostic will be described and results from high-explosive shock-driven tin ejecta experiments will be presented.

  8. ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCES IN THE EJECTA OF OLD CLASSICAL NOVAE FROM LATE-EPOCH SPITZER SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Helton, L. Andrew; Vacca, William D.; Gehrz, Robert D.; Woodward, Charles E.; Shenoy, Dinesh P.; Wagner, R. Mark; Evans, Aneurin; Krautter, Joachim; Schwarz, Greg J.; Starrfield, Sumner

    2012-08-10

    We present Spitzer Space Telescope mid-infrared IRS spectra, supplemented by ground-based optical observations, of the classical novae V1974 Cyg, V382 Vel, and V1494 Aql more than 11, 8, and 4 years after outburst, respectively. The spectra are dominated by forbidden emission from neon and oxygen, though in some cases, there are weak signatures of magnesium, sulfur, and argon. We investigate the geometry and distribution of the late time ejecta by examination of the emission line profiles. Using nebular analysis in the low-density regime, we estimate lower limits on the abundances in these novae. In V1974 Cyg and V382 Vel, our observations confirm the abundance estimates presented by other authors and support the claims that these eruptions occurred on ONe white dwarfs (WDs). We report the first detection of neon emission in V1494 Aql and show that the system most likely contains a CO WD.

  9. Radio Emission from Pulsar Wind Nebulae without Surrounding Supernova Ejecta: Application to FRB 121102

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Z. G.; Wang, J. S.; Yu, Y. W.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a new scenario in which a rapidly rotating strongly magnetized pulsar without any surrounding supernova ejecta repeatedly produces fast radio bursts (FRBs) via a range of possible mechanisms; simultaneously, an ultra-relativistic electron/positron pair wind from the pulsar sweeps up its ambient dense interstellar medium, giving rise to a non-relativistic pulsar wind nebula (PWN). We show that the synchrotron radio emission from such a PWN is bright enough to account for the recently discovered persistent radio source associated with the repeating FRB 121102 within reasonable ranges of the model parameters. Our PWN scenario is consistent with the non-evolution of the dispersion measure inferred from all of the repeating bursts observed in four years.

  10. Subeffusive Ejecta At Mount Vesuvius: Evidence For A "shallow" Magma Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cigolini, C.; Ruffini, R.; Laiolo, M.

    Subeffusive ejecta of the 1944 eruption of Mount Vesuvius are tephritic clinopyroxene-rich porphyries and italites. These materials are associated to pyroclas- tic deposits of phono-tephritic composition. Tephrytic porphyries show a hypidiomor- phic granular texture and consist of phenocrystic leucite, diopsidic clinopyroxene, olivine and phlogopite on a holocrystalline matrix of leucite, plagioclase, phlogopite. Titanomagnetite and apatite are accessory phases. Sampled italites ejecta are charac- terized by an orthocumulithic texture consisting of a crystals leucite and interstitial brownish glass. This glass includes rare elongated microphenocrysts of plagioclase and subordinated clinopyroxene. REE patterns for the tephritic porphyries are com- parable with those of recent lavas and tephra and show a sligthly higher enrichment in HREE (up to 10 times the average chondrite). Spider diagrams, normalized to pri- mordial mantle values, indicate that the tephritic porphyries lack a negative anomaly in Ta which, in turn, is strongly negative within the lavas. This is due to the higher content of phenocrystic clinopyroxene (with a high mineral/melt partition coefficient) within the tephritic porphyries. Thermobarometric estimates indicate that leucite is in equilibrium with a tephritic melt at pressures of 5.7-6 kbar for temperatures ranging 1100-1200 C. Moreover, selected reactions for the assemblage Ol+Cpx+An+SiO2 (liq) define equilibrium pressures of 3.2-5 kbar [both for hydrous (with about 2 wt % H2O) and anhydrous conditions] for temperatures ranging 1150-1200 C. These esti- mates suggests the existence of a secondary "shallow" reservoir located at a depth of about 10-18 Km below Mount Vesuvius, which is consistent with recent petrological and geophysical data.

  11. The Host Galaxies of Fast-Ejecta Core-Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Patrick L.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Modjaz, Maryam; Kocevski, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Spectra of broad-lined Type Ic supernovae (SN Ic-BL), the only kind of SN observed at the locations of long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs), exhibit wide features indicative of high ejecta velocities ((is) approximately 0.1c). We study the host galaxies of a sample of 245 low-redshift (z (is) less than 0.2) core-collapse SN, including 17 SN Ic-BL, discovered by galaxy-untargeted searches, and 15 optically luminous and dust-obscured z (is) less than 1.2 LGRBs. We show that, in comparison with SDSS galaxies having similar stellar masses, the hosts of low-redshift SN Ic- BL and z (is) is less than 1.2 LGRBs have high stellar-mass and star-formation-rate densities. Core-collapse SN having typical ejecta velocities, in contrast, show no preference for such galaxies. Moreover, we find that the hosts of SN Ic-BL, unlike those of SN Ib/Ic and SN II, exhibit high gas velocity dispersions for their stellar masses. The patterns likely reflect variations among star-forming environments, and suggest that LGRBs can be used as probes of conditions in high-redshift galaxies. They may be caused by efficient formation of massive binary progenitors systems in densely star-forming regions, or, less probably, a higher fraction of stars created with the initial masses required for a SN Ic-BL or LGRB. Finally, we show that the preference of SN Ic-BL and LGRBs for galaxies with high stellar-mass and star-formation-rate densities cannot be attributed to a preference for low metal abundances but must reflect the influence of a separate environmental factor.

  12. The host galaxies of fast-ejecta core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Patrick L.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Modjaz, Maryam; Kocevski, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    Spectra of broad-lined Type Ic supernovae (SNe Ic-BL), the only kind of SN observed at the locations of long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs), exhibit wide features indicative of high ejecta velocities (∼0.1c). We study the host galaxies of a sample of 245 low-redshift (z < 0.2) core-collapse SNe, including 17 SNe Ic-BL, discovered by galaxy-untargeted searches, and 15 optically luminous and dust-obscured z < 1.2 LGRBs. We show that, in comparison with Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies having similar stellar masses, the hosts of low-redshift SNe Ic-BL and z < 1.2 LGRBs have high stellar mass and star formation rate densities. Core-collapse SNe having typical ejecta velocities, in contrast, show no preference for such galaxies. Moreover, we find that the hosts of SNe Ic-BL, unlike those of SNe Ib/Ic and SNe II, exhibit high gas velocity dispersions for their stellar masses. The patterns likely reflect variations among star-forming environments and suggest that LGRBs can be used as probes of conditions in high-redshift galaxies. They may be caused by efficient formation of massive binary progenitor systems in densely star-forming regions, or, less probably, a higher fraction of stars created with the initial masses required for an SN Ic-BL or LGRB. Finally, we show that the preference of SNe Ic-BL and LGRBs for galaxies with high stellar mass and star formation rate densities cannot be attributed to a preference for low metal abundances but must reflect the influence of a separate environmental factor.

  13. Overlapping Ballistic Ejecta Fields: Separating Distinct Blasts at Kings Bowl, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borg, C.; Kobs-Nawotniak, S. E.; Hughes, S. S.; Sears, D. W. G.; Heldmann, J. L.; Lim, D. S. S.; Haberle, C. W.; Sears, H.; Elphic, R. C.; Kobayashi, L.; Garry, W. B.; Neish, C.; Karunatillake, S.; Button, N.; Purcell, S.; Mallonee, H.; Ostler, B.

    2015-12-01

    Kings Bowl is a ~2200ka pit crater created by a phreatic blast along a volcanic fissure in the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), Idaho. The main crater measures approximately 80m in length, 30m in width, and 30m in depth, with smaller pits located nearby on the Great Rift fissure, and has been targeted by the FINESSE team as a possible analogue for Cyane Fossae, Mars. The phreatic eruption is believed to have occurred due to the interaction of groundwater with lava draining back into the fissure following a lava lake high stand, erupting already solidified basalt from this and previous ERSP lava flows. The contemporaneous draw back of the lava with the explosions may conceal some smaller possible blast pits as more lava drained into the newly formed pits. Ballistic ejecta from the blasts occur on both sides of the fissure. To the east, the ballistic blocks are mantled by fine tephra mixed with eolian dust, the result of a westerly wind during the explosions. We use differential GPS to map the distribution of ballistic blocks on the west side of the fissure, recording position, percent vesiculation, and the length of 3 mutually perpendicular axes for each block >20cm along multiple transects parallel to the fissure. From the several hundred blocks recorded, we have been able to separate the ballistic field into several distinct blast deposits on the basis of size distributions and block concentration. The smaller pits identified from the ballistic fields correspond broadly to the northern and southern limits of the tephra/dust field east of the fissure. Soil formation and bioturbation of the tephra by sagebrush have obliterated any tephrostratigraphy that could have been linked to individual blasts. The ballistic block patterns at Kings Bowl may be used to identify distinct ejecta groups in high-resolution imagery of Mars or other planetary bodies.

  14. Radioactive decay products in neutron star merger ejecta: heating efficiency and γ-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotokezaka, K.; Wanajo, S.; Tanaka, M.; Bamba, A.; Terada, Y.; Piran, T.

    2016-06-01

    The radioactive decay of the freshly synthesized r-process nuclei ejected in compact binary mergers powers optical/infrared macronovae (kilonovae) that follow these events. The light curves depend critically on the energy partition among the different decay products and it plays an important role in estimates of the amount of ejected r-process elements from a given observed signal. We show that 20-50 per cent of the total radioactive energy is released in γ-rays on time-scales from hours to a month. The number of emitted γ-rays per unit energy interval has roughly a flat spectrum between a few dozen keV and 1 MeV so that most of the energy is carried by ˜1 MeV γ-rays. However, at the peak of macronova emission the optical depth of the γ-rays is ˜0.02 and most of the γ-rays escape. The loss of these γ-rays reduces the heat deposition into the ejecta and hence reduces the expected macronova signals if those are lanthanides dominated. This implies that the ejected mass is larger by a factor of 2-3 than what was previously estimated. Spontaneous fission heats up the ejecta and the heating rate can increase if a sufficient amount of transuranic nuclei are synthesized. Direct measurements of these escaping γ-rays may provide the ultimate proof for the macronova mechanisms and an identification of the r-process nucleosynthesis sites. However, the chances to detect these signals are slim with current X-ray and γ-ray missions. New detectors, more sensitive by at least a factor of 10, are needed for a realistic detection rate.

  15. The dust in the hydrogen-poor ejecta of Abell 30

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Harrington, J. Patrick; Blair, William P.; Bregman, Jesse D.

    1994-01-01

    We present new optical and near-infrared images of the hydrogen-poor planetary nebula Abell 30 and produce detailed models that account for the major observed morphological and IR properties. By imaging the nebula in the K band, we confirm the presence of hot dust in an expanding equatorial ring of H-poor gas. No emission was detected from the H-poor polar knots, suggesting a dust deficiency htere relative to the equatorial ring. The near-IR emission is attributed to small carbonaceous dust grains which are stochastically heated by stellar ultraviolet photons. Using an adaptive version of a matrix method devised by Guhathakurta & Draine (1989) to model stochastic heating, we find that the near-IR spectrum observed by Dinerstein & Lester (1984) requires the presence of dust grains down to approximately 0.0007 microns in radius. This minimum grain radius is in excellent agreement with our calculations of the grain destruction by energetic stellar UV photons: we find that carbon clusters with less than approximately 140 atoms (0.0007 microns in radius) are destroyed by stellar UV photons in approximately 1000 yr, the kinematic age of H-poor ejecta. Modeling of the far-IR dust emission implies that the bulk of the dust mass in A30 must reside at distances several times greater than the distance of the equatorial ring from the central star. This spatial dust distribution is attributed to the interaction of the stellar wind with the inhomogeneous H-poor ejecta. Most of the H-poor gas and dust has been apparently carried outward by the stellar wind, leaving behing dense, H-poor knots with prominent wind-blown tails in the equatorial ring and in the polar knots. This picture is supported by the presence of a stellar wind-blown bubble within the H-rich envelope in our optical images.

  16. On the Determination of Ejecta Structure and Explosion Asymmetry from the X-ray Knots of Cassiopeia A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laming, J. Martin; Hwang, Una

    2003-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of Chandra X-ray spectra from individual ejecta knots in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A. The spectra are fitted to give the electron temperature T(sub e), and (single) ionization age n(sub e)t. These quantities are compared with the predictions of self similar hydrodynamic models incorporating time dependent ionization and radiation losses, and Coulomb electron-ion equilibration behind the reverse shock, for a variety of different ejecta density profiles described by a uniform density core and a power law envelope. We find that the ejecta close to the 'jet' region in the NE, but not actually in the jet itself, have a systematically shallower outer envelope than ejecta elsewhere in the remnant, and we interpret this as being due to more energy of the initial explosion being directed in this polar direction as opposed to equatorially. The degree of asymmetry we infer is at the low end of that generally modelled in asymmetric core-collapse simulations, and may be used to rule out highly asymmetric explosion models.

  17. Discovery of X-Ray-Emitting O-Ne-Mg-Rich Ejecta in the Galactic Supernova Remnant Puppis A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Hwang, Una; Petre, Robert; Park, Sangwook; Mori, Koji; Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    We report on the discovery of X-ray-emitting O-Ne-Mg-rich ejecta in the middle-aged Galactic O-rich supernova remnant Puppis A with Chandra and XMM-Newton. We use line ratios to identify a low-ionization filament running parallel to the northeastern edge of the remnant that requires super-solar abundances, particularly for O, Ne, and Mg, which we interpret to be from O-Ne-Mg-rich ejecta. Abundance ratios of Ne/O, Mg/O, and Fe/O are measured to be [approx]2, [approx]2, and <0.3 times the solar values. Our spatially resolved spectral analysis from the northeastern rim to the western rim otherwise reveals sub-solar abundances consistent with those in the interstellar medium. The filament is coincident with several optically emitting O-rich knots with high velocities. If these are physically related, the filament would be a peculiar fragment of ejecta. On the other hand, the morphology of the filament suggests that it may trace ejecta heated by a shock reflected strongly off the dense ambient clouds near the northeastern rim.

  18. The 2011 outburst of recurrent nova T PYX: Radio observations reveal the ejecta mass and hint at complex mass loss

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Thomas; Chomiuk, Laura; Roy, Nirupam; Krauss, Miriam I.; Mioduszewski, Amy J.; Rupen, Michael P.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Weston, Jennifer; Mukai, Koji

    2014-04-10

    Despite being the prototype of its class, T Pyx is arguably the most unusual and poorly understood recurrent nova. Here, we use radio observations from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array to trace the evolution of the ejecta over the course of the 2011 outburst of T Pyx. The radio emission is broadly consistent with thermal emission from the nova ejecta. However, the radio flux began rising surprisingly late in the outburst, indicating that the bulk of the radio-emitting material was either very cold, or expanding very slowly, for the first ∼50 days of the outburst. Considering a plausible range of volume filling factors and geometries for the ejecta, we find that the high peak flux densities of the radio emission require a massive ejection of (1-30) × 10{sup –5} M {sub ☉}. This ejecta mass is much higher than the values normally associated with recurrent novae, and is more consistent with a nova on a white dwarf well below the Chandrasekhar limit.

  19. DISCOVERY OF X-RAY-EMITTING O-Ne-Mg-RICH EJECTA IN THE GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANT PUPPIS A

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuda, Satoru; Hwang, Una; Petre, Robert; Park, Sangwook; Mori, Koji; Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    2010-05-10

    We report on the discovery of X-ray-emitting O-Ne-Mg-rich ejecta in the middle-aged Galactic O-rich supernova remnant Puppis A with Chandra and XMM-Newton. We use line ratios to identify a low-ionization filament running parallel to the northeastern edge of the remnant that requires super-solar abundances, particularly for O, Ne, and Mg, which we interpret to be from O-Ne-Mg-rich ejecta. Abundance ratios of Ne/O, Mg/O, and Fe/O are measured to be {approx}2, {approx}2, and <0.3 times the solar values. Our spatially resolved spectral analysis from the northeastern rim to the western rim otherwise reveals sub-solar abundances consistent with those in the interstellar medium. The filament is coincident with several optically emitting O-rich knots with high velocities. If these are physically related, the filament would be a peculiar fragment of ejecta. On the other hand, the morphology of the filament suggests that it may trace ejecta heated by a shock reflected strongly off the dense ambient clouds near the northeastern rim.

  20. Ejecta Particle-Size Measurements in Vacuum and Helium Gas using Ultraviolet In-Line Fraunhofer Holography

    SciTech Connect

    Sorenson, Danny S.; Pazuchanics, Peter; Johnson, Randall P.; Malone, R. M.; Kaufman, M. I.; Tibbitts, A.; Tunnell, T.; Marks, D.; Capelle, G. A.; Grover, M.; Marshall, B.; Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D.; LaLone, B.

    2014-06-25

    An Ultraviolet (UV) in-line Fraunhofer holography diagnostic has been developed for making high-resolution spatial measurements of ejecta particles traveling at many mm/μsec. This report will discuss the development of the diagnostic including the high-powered laser system and high-resolution optical relay system. In addition, the system required to reconstruct the images from the hologram and the corresponding analysis of those images to extract particles will also be described. Finally, results from six high-explosive (HE), shock-driven Sn ejecta experiments will be presented. Particle size distributions will be shown that cover most of the ejecta velocities for experiments conducted in a vacuum, and helium gas environments. In addition, a modification has been made to the laser system that produces two laser pulses separated by 6.8 ns. This double-pulsed capability allows a superposition of two holograms to be acquired at two different times, thus allowing ejecta velocities to be measured directly. Results from this double pulsed experiment will be described.

  1. Ejecta Particle-Size Measurements in Vacuum and Helium Gas using Ultraviolet In-Line Fraunhofer Holography

    SciTech Connect

    Sorenson, D. S.; Pazuchanics, P.; Johnson, R.; Malone, R. M.; Kaufman, M. I.; Tibbitts, A.; Tunnell, T.; Marks, D.; Capelle, G. A.; Grover, M.; Marshall, B.; Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D.; LaLone, B.

    2014-06-01

    An ultraviolet (UV) in-line Fraunhofer holography diagnostic has been developed for making high-resolution spatial measurements of ejecta particles traveling at many mm/μsec. This report will discuss the development of the diagnostic, including the high-powered laser system and high-resolution optical relay system. In addition, we will also describe the system required to reconstruct the images from the hologram and the corresponding analysis of those images to extract particles. Finally, we will present results from six high-explosive (HE), shock-driven Sn-ejecta experiments. Particle-size distributions will be shown that cover most of the ejecta velocities for experiments conducted in a vacuum, and helium gas environments. In addition, a modification has been made to the laser system that produces two laser pulses separated by 6.8 ns. This double-pulsed capability allows a superposition of two holograms to be acquired at two different times, thus allowing ejecta velocities to be measured directly. Results from this double-pulsed experiment will be described.

  2. Impact cratering: A geologic process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melosh, H. J.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in the formation of impact craters are examined theoretically, reviewing the results of recent investigations. Topics addressed include crater morphology, stress waves in solids, the contact and compression stage, the excavation stage, and ejecta deposits. Consideration is given to the scaling of crater dimensions, the crater modification stage, multiring basins, cratered landscapes, atmospheric interactions, and the implications of impact cratering for planetary evolution. Extensive diagrams, graphs, tables, and images of typical craters are provided.

  3. Impact cratering: A geologic process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melosh, H. J.

    The mechanisms involved in the formation of impact craters are examined theoretically, reviewing the results of recent investigations. Topics addressed include crater morphology, stress waves in solids, the contact and compression stage, the excavation stage, and ejecta deposits. Consideration is given to the scaling of crater dimensions, the crater modification stage, multiring basins, cratered landscapes, atmospheric interactions, and the implications of impact cratering for planetary evolution. Extensive diagrams, graphs, tables, and images of typical craters are provided.

  4. Synchronized Lunar Pole Impact Plume Sample Return Trajectory Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genova, Anthony L.; Foster, Cyrus; Colaprete, Tony

    2016-01-01

    The presented trajectory design enables two maneuverable spacecraft launched onto the same trans-lunar injection trajectory to coordinate a steep impact of a lunar pole and subsequent sample return of the ejecta plume to Earth. To demonstrate this concept, the impactor is assumed to use the LCROSS missions trajectory and spacecraft architecture, thus the permanently-shadowed Cabeus crater on the lunar south pole is assumed as the impact site. The sample-return spacecraft is assumed to be a CubeSat that requires a complimentary trajectory design that avoids lunar impact after passing through the ejecta plume to enable sample-return to Earth via atmospheric entry.

  5. The intercrater plains of Mercury and the Moon: Their nature, origin and role in terrestrial planet evolution. Estimated thickness of ejecta deposits compared to to crater rim heights. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leake, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    The area of the continuous ejecta deposits on mercury was calculated to vary from 2.24 to 0.64 times the crater's area for those of diameter 40 km to 300 km. Because crater boundaries on the geologic map include the detectable continuous ejecta blanket, plains exterior to these deposits must consist of farther-flung ejecta (of that or other craters), or volcanic deposits flooding the intervening areas. Ejecta models are explored.

  6. Apollo 12 lunar module impact: laboratory simulation and possible downrange ballistic effects.

    PubMed

    Swift, H F; McGetchin, T R; Preonas, D D; Johnson, S W

    1970-08-28

    Plastic pellets were fired into sand targets at a launch angle of 4 degrees and a velocity of 1.68 kilometers per second, the conditions of the Apollo 12 lunar module impact. Shallow elliptical or doublet craters were formed, similar to certain lunar craters. Analysis of the ejecta suggests (i) that lunar module debris skipped and, with some crater ejecta, reimpacted far downrange, but (ii) this ballistic rain does not account for the anomalous seismic signal.

  7. Development of Hayabusa-2 Deployable Camera (DCAM3) for observation of impact simulation on asteroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, K.; Arakawa, M.; Sawada, H.; Iijima, Y.; Wada, K.; Honda, R.; Shirai, K.; Ishibashi, K.; Sakatani, N.; Kadono, T.; Nakazawa, S.; Kobayashi, M.; Hayakawa, H.

    2013-09-01

    A miniaturized optical camera unit (DCAM3) is being developed for observations of an artificial impact made by Small Carry-On Impactor (SCI) on asteroid 1999JU3 in the Hayabusa-2 mission. DCAM3 takes images of spreading ejecta motion on the asteroid, which provides information of surface physical properties and ejecta behavior under microgravity. The flight model of DCAM3 is under development and operation tests. The science and instrumental concepts and development status are reported.

  8. NASA's Lunar Impact Monitoring Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suggs, Robert M.; Cooke, William; Swift, Wesley; Hollon, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office nas implemented a program to monitor the Moon for meteoroid impacts from the Marshall Space Flight Center. Using off-the-shelf telescopes and video equipment, the moon is monitored for as many as 10 nights per month, depending on weather. Custom software automatically detects flashes which are confirmed by a second telescope, photometrically calibrated using background stars, and published on a website for correlation with other observations, Hypervelocity impact tests at the Ames Vertical Gun Facility have been performed to determine the luminous efficiency ana ejecta characteristics. The purpose of this research is to define the impact ejecta environment for use by lunar spacecraft designers of the Constellation (manned lunar) Program. The observational techniques and preliminary results will be discussed.

  9. Impact vaporization: Late time phenomena from experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, P. H.; Gault, D. E.

    1987-01-01

    While simple airflow produced by the outward movement of the ejecta curtain can be scaled to large dimensions, the interaction between an impact-vaporized component and the ejecta curtain is more complicated. The goal of these experiments was to examine such interaction in a real system involving crater growth, ejection of material, two phased mixtures of gas and dust, and strong pressure gradients. The results will be complemented by theoretical studies at laboratory scales in order to separate the various parameters for planetary scale processes. These experiments prompt, however, the following conclusions that may have relevance at broader scales. First, under near vacuum or low atmospheric pressures, an expanding vapor cloud scours the surrounding surface in advance of arriving ejecta. Second, the effect of early-time vaporization is relatively unimportant at late-times. Third, the overpressure created within the crater cavity by significant vaporization results in increased cratering efficiency and larger aspect ratios.

  10. LCROSS Impact Simulations and Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asphaug, E.; Korycansky, D.; Jutzi, M.; Plesko, C.; Colaprete, A.

    2008-12-01

    The primary objective of the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) is to confirm the presence or absence of water ice that might have trapped out over time from the lunar exosphere into permanently shadowed inter-crater regolith near the lunar poles. It will provide a critical ground-truth for Lunar Prospector and LRO neutron and radar maps, making it possible to assess the total lunar water inventory and to provide significant insight into the processes that delivered hydrogen to the polar regions. Non-detection of water could lead to significant changes in the architecture of lunar operations and settlement. Ong and Asphaug (LPSC 2008) study the fraction of volatile material that remains bound to the Moon and Mars during comet and asteroid impacts and calculate a mass of water retained over the past 2 Ga of order 1E10-1E11 tons, a few times the water ice inferred by Feldman et al. (Science 1998) on the basis of Lunar Prospector neutron detection. This flux includes small contemporary events but is dominated by major discrete contributions in the past. Whatever the mechanism for the delivery and possible retention of lunar water, interest in the possible presence of water ice has both scientific and operational foundations. If water is present in the upper meters to the few percent level, LCROSS will find it by using a 2000 kg kinetic impactor -- the empty Atlas V Centaur upper stage -- to excavate more than 250 metric tons of regolith. The thermal and spectral signature of the impact flash and the crater ejecta that gets launched into sunlight will be studied in detail, and the results transmitted to Earth before the 700 kg shepherding spacecraft also impacts the Moon. These two impact experiments and their aftermaths will also be observed from a number of Lunar-orbital and Earth-based assets. For the purpose of mission planning, asset security, and scientific prediction, we have conducted a variety of calculations based upon several models

  11. Arrival time of solar eruptive CMEs associated with ICMEs of magnetic cloud and ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugaraju, A.; Syed Ibrahim, M.; Moon, Y.-J.; Kasro Lourdhina, K.; Dharanya, M.

    2015-05-01

    The Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) is an eruptive event in which magnetic plasma is ejected from the Sun into space through the solar corona. We considered a set of 51 Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs) listed by Kim et al. (Solar Phys. 184:77, 2013) from Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop (CDAW, Gopalswamy et al. in Astrophys. J. 710:1111, 2010). Among the 51 events, 22 events are classified as Magnetic Clouds (MC) and 29 events are classified as Ejecta (EJ) where the MC and EJ are subsets of ICMEs. We have analyzed the physical properties of CMEs and ICMEs associated with MC and EJ, and correlated them with the CME's transit time/arrival time from the Sun to the Earth. Main aims of the present study are to examine (a) dependence of transit time on the properties of CMEs and ICMEs, and (b) differences between MC and EJ. It is found that CME's initial speed decides the transit time which is in support of the known results in literature. Apart from this, some important results from the present study are: (i) transit time predicted using an empirical relation obtained in the present work is found comparable with the observations (correlation coefficient=0.70). (ii) The transit time of MC and EJ-associated CMEs ranges from 20 to 120 hours and IP acceleration lies between -10 m/s2 to 5 m/s2. (iii) There are certain differences between MC and EJ such as: (a) Ejecta takes slightly more time to travel and only 30 % of them are accelerated in the interplanetary medium. Whereas, MC takes less time to travel and nearly 50 % of them are accelerated, (b) The correlations of IP acceleration and speed with transit time are higher for MC than that of EJ, (c) A weak relationship between the deflection and transit time is found for MC, but it is absent in the case of EJ and (d) Only EJ-type CMEs have wider range of direction parameter and acceleration. Further, we checked the solar wind speed as another parameter has any influence on CME acceleration and it shows that there

  12. High luminosity, slow ejecta and persistent carbon lines: SN 2009dc challenges thermonuclear explosion scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taubenberger, S.; Benetti, S.; Childress, M.; Pakmor, R.; Hachinger, S.; Mazzali, P. A.; Stanishev, V.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Agnoletto, I.; Bufano, F.; Ergon, M.; Harutyunyan, A.; Inserra, C.; Kankare, E.; Kromer, M.; Navasardyan, H.; Nicolas, J.; Pastorello, A.; Prosperi, E.; Salgado, F.; Sollerman, J.; Stritzinger, M.; Turatto, M.; Valenti, S.; Hillebrandt, W.

    2011-04-01

    Extended optical and near-IR observations reveal that SN 2009dc shares a number of similarities with normal Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), but is clearly overluminous, with a (pseudo-bolometric) peak luminosity of log (L) = 43.47 (erg s-1). Its light curves decline slowly over half a year after maximum light [Δm15(B)true= 0.71], and the early-time near-IR light curves show secondary maxima, although the minima between the first and the second peaks are not very pronounced. The bluer bands exhibit an enhanced fading after ˜200 d, which might be caused by dust formation or an unexpectedly early IR catastrophe. The spectra of SN 2009dc are dominated by intermediate-mass elements and unburned material at early times, and by iron-group elements at late phases. Strong C II lines are present until ˜2 weeks past maximum, which is unprecedented in thermonuclear SNe. The ejecta velocities are significantly lower than in normal and even subluminous SNe Ia. No signatures of interaction with a circumstellar medium (CSM) are found in the spectra. Assuming that the light curves are powered by radioactive decay, analytic modelling suggests that SN 2009dc produced ˜1.8 M⊙ of 56Ni assuming the smallest possible rise time of 22 d. Together with a derived total ejecta mass of ˜2.8 M⊙, this confirms that SN 2009dc is a member of the class of possible super-Chandrasekhar-mass SNe Ia similar to SNe 2003fg, 2006gz and 2007if. A study of the hosts of SN 2009dc and other superluminous SNe Ia reveals a tendency of these SNe to explode in low-mass galaxies. A low metallicity of the progenitor may therefore be an important prerequisite for producing superluminous SNe Ia. We discuss a number of possible explosion scenarios, ranging from super-Chandrasekhar-mass white-dwarf progenitors over dynamical white-dwarf mergers and Type I? SNe to a core-collapse origin of the explosion. None of the models seems capable of explaining all properties of SN 2009dc, so that the true nature of this SN

  13. Influence of shockwave profile on ejecta from shocked Pb surface: Atomistic calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Guo-Wu; Zhang, Shi-Wen; Hong, Ren-Kai; Tang, Tie-Gang; Chen, Yong-Tao

    2016-08-01

    We conduct molecular dynamics simulations of the ejection process from a grooved Pb surface subjected to supported and unsupported shock waves with various shock-breakout pressures (P SB) inducing a solid-liquid phase transition upon shock or release. It is found that the total ejecta mass changing with P SB under a supported shock reveals a similar trend with that under an unsupported shock and the former is always less than the latter at the same P SB. The origin of such a discrepancy could be unraveled that for an unsupported shock, a larger velocity difference between the jet tip and its bottom at an early stage of jet formation results in more serious damage, and therefore a greater amount of ejected particles are produced. The cumulative areal density distributions also display the discrepancy. In addition, we discuss the difference of these simulated results compared to the experimental findings. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11472254 and 11272006).

  14. Type Ib SN 1999dn as an example of the thoroughly mixed ejecta of Ib supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cano, Zach; Maeda, Keiichi; Schulze, Steve

    2014-03-01

    We present the results of modelling archival observations of Type Ib SN 1999dn. In the spectra, two He I absorption features are seen: a slower component with larger opacity, and a more rapid He I component with smaller opacity. Complementary results are obtained from modelling the bolometric light curve of SN 1999dn, where a two-zone model (dense inner region, and less dense outer region) provides a much better fit than a one-zone model. A key result we find is that roughly equal amounts of radioactive material are found in both regions. The two-zone analytical model provides a more realistic representation of the structure of the ejecta, including mixing and asymmetries, which offers a physical explanation for how the radioactive material is propelled to, and mixed within, the outer regions. Our result supports the theoretical expectation that the radioactive content in the outflow of a Type Ib supernova (SN) is thoroughly mixed. We fit our model to six additional SNe Ibc, of which the majority of the SNe Ib are best described by the two-zone model, and the majority of the SNe Ic by the one-zone model. Of the SNe Ic, only SN 2007gr was best fitted by the two-zone model, indicating that the lack of helium spectral features for this event cannot be attributed to poor mixing.

  15. Confirmation of Dust Condensation in the Ejecta of Supernova 1987a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrz, R. D.; Ney, E. P.

    1990-06-01

    Shortly after its outburst, we suggested that supernova 1987a might condense a dust shell of substantial visual optical thickness as many classical novae do and predicted that dust might form within a year after the explosion. A critical examination of recent optical and infrared observations reported by others confirms that dust grains had begun to grow at a temperature of 1000 K after 300 days and that the dust shell had become optically thick by day 600. After day 600, the infrared luminosity closely followed the intrinsic luminosity expected for thermalized 56Co γ rays, demonstrating that the luminosity is powered by radioactivity and that the dust is outside the radioactivity zone. The infrared luminosity sets an upper limit to the soft intrinsic bolometric luminosity of a pulsar central engine. This upper limit for the pulsar in supernova 1987a is the same luminosity as the Crab pulsar has today 936 years after its formation. It is unlikely that the rotation rate for a pulsar in supernova 1987a can be much higher than ≈ 30 revolutions per sec. The relatively long time required for the shell to grow to maximum optical depth as compared with the dust in nova shells may be related to the relatively low outflow velocity of the condensible ejecta.

  16. The Interplay between Chemistry and Nucleation in the Formation of Carbonaceous Dust in Supernova Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzati, Davide; Heger, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    Core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) are considered to be important contributors to the primitive dust enrichment of the interstellar medium in the high-redshift universe. Theoretical models of dust formation in stellar explosions have so far provided controversial results and a generally poor fit to the observations of dust formation in local supernovae. We present a new methodology for the calculation of carbonaceous dust formation in young supernova remnants. Our new technique uses both the nucleation theory and a chemical reaction network to allow us to compute the dust growth beyond the molecular level as well as consider the chemical erosion of the forming grains. We find that carbonaceous dust forms efficiently in the core of the ejecta, but takes several years to condensate, longer than previously estimated. It forms unevenly and remains concentrated in the inner part of the remnant. These results support the role of CCSNe as dust factories and provide new insight into the observations of SN 1987A, in which large amounts of dust have been detected to form on a timescale of years after core-collapse.

  17. Confirmation of dust condensation in the ejecta of supernova 1987a.

    PubMed Central

    Gehrz, R D; Ney, E P

    1990-01-01

    Shortly after its outburst, we suggested that supernova 1987a might condense a dust shell of substantial visual optical thickness as many classical novae do and predicted that dust might form within a year after the explosion. A critical examination of recent optical and infrared observations reported by others confirms that dust grains had begun to grow at a temperature of 1000 K after 300 days and that the dust shell had become optically thick by day 600. After day 600, the infrared luminosity closely followed the intrinsic luminosity expected for thermalized 56Co gamma rays, demonstrating that the luminosity is powered by radioactivity and that the dust is outside the radioactivity zone. The infrared luminosity sets an upper limit to the soft intrinsic bolometric luminosity of a pulsar central engine. This upper limit for the pulsar in supernova 1987a is the same luminosity as the Crab pulsar has today 936 years after its formation. It is unlikely that the rotation rate for a pulsar in supernova 1987a can be much higher than approximately 30 revolutions per sec. The relatively long time required for the shell to grow to maximum optical depth as compared with the dust in nova shells may be related to the relatively low outflow velocity of the condensible ejecta. PMID:11607082

  18. A STUBBORNLY LARGE MASS OF COLD DUST IN THE EJECTA OF SUPERNOVA 1987A

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura, M.; Barlow, M. J.; Dwek, E.; Babler, B.; Baes, M.; Fritz, Jacopo; Meixner, M.; Cernicharo, José; Clayton, Geoff C.; Dunne, L.; Fransson, C.; Lundqvist, P.; Gear, Walter; Gomez, H. L.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Indebetouw, R.; Ivison, R. J.; Jerkstrand, A.; Lebouteiller, V.; and others

    2015-02-10

    We present new Herschel photometric and spectroscopic observations of Supernova 1987A, carried out in 2012. Our dedicated photometric measurements provide new 70 μm data and improved imaging quality at 100 and 160 μm compared to previous observations in 2010. Our Herschel spectra show only weak CO line emission, and provide an upper limit for the 63 μm [O I] line flux, eliminating the possibility that line contaminations distort the previously estimated dust mass. The far-infrared spectral energy distribution (SED) is well fitted by thermal emission from cold dust. The newly measured 70 μm flux constrains the dust temperature, limiting it to nearly a single temperature. The far-infrared emission can be fitted by 0.5 ± 0.1 M {sub ☉} of amorphous carbon, about a factor of two larger than the current nucleosynthetic mass prediction for carbon. The observation of SiO molecules at early and late phases suggests that silicates may also have formed and we could fit the SED with a combination of 0.3 M {sub ☉} of amorphous carbon and 0.5 M {sub ☉} of silicates, totalling 0.8 M {sub ☉} of dust. Our analysis thus supports the presence of a large dust reservoir in the ejecta of SN 1987A. The inferred dust mass suggests that supernovae can be an important source of dust in the interstellar medium, from local to high-redshift galaxies.

  19. Locating and Measuring the High Mass Ejecta from the Unstable Massive Star System eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Patrick

    2014-10-01

    The luminous, massive binary system eta Carinae is both one of the nearest and most unstable objects in a class of evolved massive stars, near the end of its lifetime before expected destruction in a supernova. It experienced a major outburst in 1843, producing the well-known Homunculus nebula, containing some 15 to 40 Msun in warm (~170 K) and cool (90-110 K) dust and associated gas, according to mid-infrared ISO spectroscopy. The location of this material is very uncertain, due to large apertures of the spectroscopic observations, and lack of direct imaging beyond 25 microns. We propose to use the FORCAST imager with long wavelength filters to better locate and estimate the mass in thermal components of this material that may be resolved, constraining it to the interior regions or bipolar lobes of the Homunculus nebula, or in outer ejecta that would support the hypothesis of a major event prior to the 1843 eruption. This is crucial to understanding the mass-loss history of this object on the edge of a final supernova explosion, and provide constraints on the distribution and extinction properties of the dust in 3D hydrodynamical + radiative transfer numerical modeling of the Homunculus nebula.

  20. The neon nova. II - Condensation of silicate grains in the ejecta of Nova Vulpeculae 1984 number 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrz, R. D.; Grasdalen, G. L.; Greenhouse, M.; Hackwell, J. A.; Hayward, T.; Bentley, A. F.

    1986-09-01

    Infrared photometry of Nova Vulpeculae 1984 number 2 (NV2) from 2.3 to 19.5 microns during May 14, 1985 to March 31, 1986 shows that silicate grains had condensed and grown in the nova ejecta by August 23, 1985, 240 days after the eruption. A relative overabundance of oxygen in the nova shell seems indicated. Forbidden 12.8-micron Ne II forbidden line emission was a factor of about 41 above the continuum at a spectral resolution of 67 on day 240; the line persisted through day 461. The anomalous chemical composition of NV2's ejecta supports recent suggestions that ONeMg white dwarfs (evolved from 8-12 solar-mass progenitor stars) are accreting matter in binary systems.

  1. Fe-rich ejecta in the supernova remnant G352.7–0.1 with Suzaku

    SciTech Connect

    Sezer, A.; Gök, F.

    2014-07-20

    In this work, we present results from a ∼201.6 ks observation of G352.7–0.1 using the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer on board Suzaku X-ray Observatory. The X-ray emission from the remnant is well described by two-temperature thermal models of non-equilibrium ionization with variable abundances with a column density of N{sub H} ∼ 3.3 × 10{sup 22} cm{sup –2}. The soft component is characterized by an electron temperature of kT{sub e} ∼ 0.6 keV, an ionization timescale of τ ∼ 3.4 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup –3} s, and enhanced Si, S, Ar, and Ca abundances. The hard component has kT{sub e} ∼ 4.3 keV, τ ∼ 8.8 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup –3} s, and enhanced Fe abundance. The elemental abundances of Si, S, Ar, Ca, and Fe are found to be significantly higher than the solar values that confirm the presence of ejecta. We detected strong Fe K-shell emission and determined its origin to be the ejecta for the first time. The detection of Fe ejecta with a lower ionization timescale favors a Type Ia origin for this remnant.

  2. Dynamical ejecta from precessing neutron star-black hole mergers with a hot, nuclear-theory based equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucart, F.; Desai, D.; Brege, W.; Duez, M. D.; Kasen, D.; Hemberger, D. A.; Kidder, L. E.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Scheel, M. A.

    2017-02-01

    Neutron star-black hole binaries are among the strongest sources of gravitational waves detectable by current observatories. They can also power bright electromagnetic signals (gamma-ray bursts, kilonovae), and may be a significant source of production of r-process nuclei. A misalignment of the black hole spin with respect to the orbital angular momentum leads to precession of that spin and of the orbital plane, and has a significant effect on the properties of the post-merger remnant and of the material ejected by the merger. We present a first set of simulations of precessing neutron star-black hole mergers using a hot, composition dependent, nuclear-theory based equation of state (DD2). We show that the mass of the remnant and of the dynamical ejecta are broadly consistent with the result of simulations using simpler equations of state, while differences arise when considering the dynamics of the merger and the velocity of the ejecta. We show that the latter can easily be understood from assumptions about the composition of low-density, cold material in the different equations of state, and propose an updated estimate for the ejecta velocity which takes those effects into account. We also present an updated mesh-refinement algorithm which allows us to improve the numerical resolution used to evolve neutron star-black hole mergers.

  3. Survivability of bacteria ejected from icy surfaces after hypervelocity impact.

    PubMed

    Burchell, Mark J; Galloway, James A; Bunch, Alan W; Brandão, Pedro F B

    2003-02-01

    Both the Saturnian and Jovian systems contain satellites with icy surfaces. If life exists on any of these icy bodies (in putative subsurface oceans for example) then the possibility exists for transfer of life from icy body to icy body. This is an application of the idea of Panspermia, wherein life migrates naturally through space. A possible mechanism would be that life, here taken as bacteria, could become frozen in the icy surface of one body. If a high-speed impact occurred on that surface, ejecta containing the bacteria could be thrown into space. It could then migrate around the local region of space until it arrived at a second icy body in another high-speed impact. In this paper we consider some of the necessary steps for such a process to occur, concentrating on the ejection of ice bearing bacteria in the initial impact, and on what happens when bacteria laden projectiles hit an icy surface. Laboratory experiments using high-speed impacts with a light gas gun show that obtaining icy ejecta with viable bacterial loads is straightforward. In addition to demonstrating the viability of the bacteria carried on the ejecta, we have also measured the angular and size distribution of the ejecta produced in hypervelocity impacts on ice. We have however been unsuccessful at transferring viable bacteria to icy surfaces from bacteria laden projectiles impacting at hypervelocities.

  4. The impact environment of the Hadean Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abramov, Oleg; Kring, David A. Kring; Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Impact bombardment in the first billion years of solar system history determined in large part the initial physical and chemical states of the inner planets and their potential to host biospheres. The range of physical states and thermal consequences of the impact epoch, however, are not well quantified. Here, we assess these effects on the young Earth's crust as well as the likelihood that a record of such effects could be preserved in the oldest terrestrial minerals and rocks. We place special emphasis on modeling the thermal effects of the late heavy bombardment (LHB) – a putative spike in the number of impacts at about 3.9 Gyr ago – using several different numerical modeling and analytical techniques. A comprehensive array of impact-produced heat sources was evaluated which includes shock heating, impact melt generation, uplift, and ejecta heating. Results indicate that ∼1.5–2.5 vol.% of the upper 20 km of Earth's crust was melted in the LHB, with only ∼0.3–1.5 vol.% in a molten state at any given time. The model predicts that approximately 5–10% of the planet's surface area was covered by >1 km deep impact melt sheets. A global average of ∼600–800 m of ejecta and ∼800–1000 m of condensed rock vapor is predicted to have been deposited in the LHB, with most of the condensed rock vapor produced by the largest (>100-km) projectiles. To explore for a record of such catastrophic events, we created two- and three-dimensional models of post-impact cooling of ejecta and craters, coupled to diffusion models of radiogenic Pb*-loss in zircons. We used this to estimate what the cumulative effects of putative LHB-induced age resetting would be of Hadean zircons on a global scale. Zircons entrained in ejecta are projected to have the following average global distribution after the end of the LHB: ∼59% with no impact-induced Pb*-loss, ∼26% with partial Pb*-loss and ∼15% with complete Pb*-loss or destruction of the grain. In addition to the

  5. TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA COLORS AND EJECTA VELOCITIES: HIERARCHICAL BAYESIAN REGRESSION WITH NON-GAUSSIAN DISTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Mandel, Kaisey S.; Kirshner, Robert P.; Foley, Ryan J.

    2014-12-20

    We investigate the statistical dependence of the peak intrinsic colors of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) on their expansion velocities at maximum light, measured from the Si II λ6355 spectral feature. We construct a new hierarchical Bayesian regression model, accounting for the random effects of intrinsic scatter, measurement error, and reddening by host galaxy dust, and implement a Gibbs sampler and deviance information criteria to estimate the correlation. The method is applied to the apparent colors from BVRI light curves and Si II velocity data for 79 nearby SNe Ia. The apparent color distributions of high-velocity (HV) and normal velocity (NV) supernovae exhibit significant discrepancies for B – V and B – R, but not other colors. Hence, they are likely due to intrinsic color differences originating in the B band, rather than dust reddening. The mean intrinsic B – V and B – R color differences between HV and NV groups are 0.06 ± 0.02 and 0.09 ± 0.02 mag, respectively. A linear model finds significant slopes of –0.021 ± 0.006 and –0.030 ± 0.009 mag (10{sup 3} km s{sup –1}){sup –1} for intrinsic B – V and B – R colors versus velocity, respectively. Because the ejecta velocity distribution is skewed toward high velocities, these effects imply non-Gaussian intrinsic color distributions with skewness up to +0.3. Accounting for the intrinsic-color-velocity correlation results in corrections to A{sub V} extinction estimates as large as –0.12 mag for HV SNe Ia and +0.06 mag for NV events. Velocity measurements from SN Ia spectra have the potential to diminish systematic errors from the confounding of intrinsic colors and dust reddening affecting supernova distances.

  6. Ultraviolet Changes of the Central Source and the Very Nearby Ejecta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore R.; Nielsen, Krister; Vierira, Gladys; Hillier, John; Walborn, Nolan; Davidson, Kris

    2004-01-01

    We utilized the high spatial and high spectral resolution of the HST/STIS MAMA echelle modes in the ultraviolet (0.025 inch spatial resolution and 30,000 to 120,000 spectral resolving power) to view changes in and around Eta Carinae before and after the X-Ray drop which occurred on June 29, 2003 (M. Corcoran, IAUC 8160). Major changes in the spectra of the Central Source and nearby nebulosities occurred between June 22 and July 5. Visibility of the Central Source dropped, especially between 1175 and 1350 Angstroms, but not uniformly throughout the ultraviolet. This fading is likely due to multiple line absorptions both in the source and in the intervening ejecta. Nebular emission of Si III] and Fe III, located 0.09 sec. to the west, disappeared. By July 29, a bright feature extending up to 0.071 sec. east of the Central Source became prominent in broad emission lines near 2500 Angstroms, but was not noticeable longward of 2900 Angstroms. ACS/HRC imagery and STIS CCD spectra taken concurrently are being examined for larger scale changes. Numerous narrow velocity components between -146 and -585 kilometers per second were identified in spectra before the minimum. New components appeared primarily in Fe II absorption lines with velocities between -170 and -380 kilometers per second. While the lines of the -513 kilometers per second component did not change, most lines of the -146 kilometers per second component changed considerably. Lines originating from high energy levels diminished or disappeared, while lines originating from lower energy levels strengthened. Strong absorption lines of Ti II, not present before the X-Ray drop, appeared within seven days, but disappeared by July 29. Further analysis of these unprecedented data will provide significant new information about the structure of Eta Carinae and its periodic variations.

  7. Elemental and Molecular Relative Abundances in the Ejecta of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kober, G. V.; Gull, T. R.; Nielsen, K.; Bruhweiler, F.; Verner, K.; Stahl, O.; Weis, K.; Bomans, D.

    2006-01-01

    We are measuring relative elemental abundances for the ejecta in the line of sight from Eta Carinae using high dispersion spectroscopy with the HST/STIS and the VLT/UVES. While multiple velocity components have been identified, we focus on the -513 and -146 km/s components originating from the Homunculus and the Little Homunculus. Complicating factors are the complex nebular structures in the immediate vicinity of the bright, massive star: the very bright emission structures, Weigelt blobs B, C and D, the broad, clumpy structures of the extended wind apparently not photoionized by Eta Car B, and general scattered starlight from the extended wind and the dusty core of the circumstellar material. We have used the 3050 to 3160A region of overlap between STIS and UVES to intercompare equivalent widths of absorption lines to estimate the 'contributing factor', namely the amount of light originating from the star compared to nebular structures. While the extracted STIS spectra are from 0.1" wide aperture, the UVES spectra are limited by the 1" seeing conditions. Curiously we find that the scattering contribution in the UVES spectra changes with time, apparently with orbital phase of the 5.54-year period. This indicates that the dust may be modified by changes in the central source with phase. The noticeable drop in scattered light appears to occur about 1.7 years (phase 0.35) after the spectroscopic minimum. Relative abundances of iron peak elements and some molecules will be estimated. Observations in this study were accomplished with HST through STSci and with VLT through ESO and funded under STIS GTO resources.

  8. NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF THE TYPE IIn SN 2010jl: EVIDENCE FOR HIGH VELOCITY EJECTA

    SciTech Connect

    Borish, H. Jacob; Huang, Chenliang; Chevalier, Roger A.; Breslauer, Benjamin M.; Kingery, Aaron M.; Privon, George C.

    2015-03-01

    The Type IIn supernova SN 2010jl was relatively nearby and luminous, allowing detailed studies of the near-infrared (NIR) emission. We present 1-2.4 μm spectroscopy over the age range of 36-565 days from the earliest detection of the supernova. On day 36, the H lines show an unresolved narrow emission component along with a symmetric broad component that can be modeled as the result of electron scattering by a thermal distribution of electrons. Over the next hundreds of days, the broad components of the H lines shift to the blue by 700 km s{sup –1}, as is also observed in optical lines. The narrow lines do not show a shift, indicating they originate in a different region. He I λ10830 and λ20587 lines both show an asymmetric broad emission component, with a shoulder on the blue side that varies in prominence and velocity from –5500 km s{sup –1} on day 108 to –4000 km s{sup –1} on day 219. This component may be associated with the higher velocity flow indicated by X-ray observations of the supernova. The absence of the feature in the H lines suggests that this is from a He-rich ejecta flow. The He I λ10830 feature has a narrow P Cygni line, with absorption extending to ∼100 km s{sup –1} and strengthening over the first 200 days, and an emission component which weakens with time. At day 403, the continuum emission becomes dominated by a blackbody spectrum with a temperature of ∼1900 K, suggestive of dust emission.

  9. Three-dimensional Distribution of Ejecta in Supernova 1987A at 10,000 Days

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, J.; Fransson, C.; Spyromilio, J.; Leibundgut, B.; Challis, P.; Chevalier, R. A.; France, K.; Jerkstrand, A.; Kirshner, R. P.; Lundqvist, P.; Matsuura, M.; McCray, R.; Smith, N.; Sollerman, J.; Garnavich, P.; Heng, K.; Lawrence, S.; Mattila, S.; Migotto, K.; Sonneborn, G.; Taddia, F.; Wheeler, J. C.

    2016-12-01

    Due to its proximity, SN 1987A offers a unique opportunity to directly observe the geometry of a stellar explosion as it unfolds. Here we present spectral and imaging observations of SN 1987A obtained ˜10,000 days after the explosion with HST/STIS and VLT/SINFONI at optical and near-infrared wavelengths. These observations allow us to produce the most detailed 3D map of Hα to date, the first 3D maps for [Ca ii] λ λ 7292,7324, [O i] λ λ 6300,6364, and Mg ii λ λ 9218,9244, as well as new maps for [Si i]+[Fe ii] 1.644 μ {{m}} and He i 2.058 μm. A comparison with previous observations shows that the [Si i]+[Fe ii] flux and morphology have not changed significantly during the past ten years, providing evidence that this line is powered by 44Ti. The time evolution of Hα shows that it is predominantly powered by X-rays from the ring, in agreement with previous findings. All lines that have sufficient signal show a similar large-scale 3D structure, with a north-south asymmetry that resembles a broken dipole. This structure correlates with early observations of asymmetries, showing that there is a global asymmetry that extends from the inner core to the outer envelope. On smaller scales, the two brightest lines, Hα and [Si i]+[Fe ii] 1.644 μm, show substructures at the level of ˜200-1000 km s-1and clear differences in their 3D geometries. We discuss these results in the context of explosion models and the properties of dust in the ejecta.

  10. Type Ia Supernova Colors and Ejecta Velocities: Hierarchical Bayesian Regression with Non-Gaussian Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandel, Kaisey S.; Foley, Ryan J.; Kirshner, Robert P.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the statistical dependence of the peak intrinsic colors of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) on their expansion velocities at maximum light, measured from the Si II λ6355 spectral feature. We construct a new hierarchical Bayesian regression model, accounting for the random effects of intrinsic scatter, measurement error, and reddening by host galaxy dust, and implement a Gibbs sampler and deviance information criteria to estimate the correlation. The method is applied to the apparent colors from BVRI light curves and Si II velocity data for 79 nearby SNe Ia. The apparent color distributions of high-velocity (HV) and normal velocity (NV) supernovae exhibit significant discrepancies for B - V and B - R, but not other colors. Hence, they are likely due to intrinsic color differences originating in the B band, rather than dust reddening. The mean intrinsic B - V and B - R color differences between HV and NV groups are 0.06 ± 0.02 and 0.09 ± 0.02 mag, respectively. A linear model finds significant slopes of -0.021 ± 0.006 and -0.030 ± 0.009 mag (103 km s-1)-1 for intrinsic B - V and B - R colors versus velocity, respectively. Because the ejecta velocity distribution is skewed toward high velocities, these effects imply non-Gaussian intrinsic color distributions with skewness up to +0.3. Accounting for the intrinsic-color-velocity correlation results in corrections to AV extinction estimates as large as -0.12 mag for HV SNe Ia and +0.06 mag for NV events. Velocity measurements from SN Ia spectra have the potential to diminish systematic errors from the confounding of intrinsic colors and dust reddening affecting supernova distances.

  11. Implications of a global survey of venusian impact craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrick, Robert R.; Phillips, Roger J.

    1994-01-01

    We present a global survey of the areal distribution, size-frequency distribution, and morphometric properties of the venusian impact cratering record. We explore the resurfacing history of Venus, crater degradation, ejecta emplacement, and cratering mechanics. The number of volcanically embayed and tectonically deformed craters from 0.5 to 1.0 km above mean planetary radius is disproportionately high for an otherwise crater-deficient elevation range. More resurfacing occurred in this range, an elevation range dominated by volcanic rises, rifts, and coronae, than elsewhere on Venus. Although the majority of craters appear to be relatively undisturbed and have intact ejecta blankets, some craters appear particularly `fresh' because thay have radar-bright floors, a radar-dark halo surrounding the ejecta blanket, and a west facing parabola of low radar return; 20, 35, and 8%, respectively, of craters with diameters greater than 22.6 km have these features. Characteristics of ejecta deposits for venusian craters change substantially with size, particularly at 20 km crater diameter, which marks the transition at which the boundaries of ejecta blankets go from ragged to lobate and the slope of the ejecta distance vs diameter curve steepens. Secondary craters are a ubiquitous part of the ejecta blanket for craters over 50 km but occur infrequently as isolated rays about smaller craters. Comparison of complex craters found on Venus with those of other planets gave results that were consistent with the idea that interplanetary differences in complex crater shape are controlled by interplanetary differences in gravity and crustal strength. The interplanetary comparison indicates that Venus, the Moon, and Mercury appear to have stronger crusts than do Mars and Ganymede/Callisto.

  12. Geomorphic analysis of small rayed craters on Mars: Examining primary versus secondary impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calef, Fred J.; Herrick, Robert R.; Sharpton, Virgil L.

    2009-10-01

    Twenty confirmed impacts over a 7-year time period on Mars were qualitatively and statistically compared to 287 secondary craters believed to originate from Zunil, an ˜500 ka, 10-km diameter, primary crater. Our goal was to establish criteria to distinguish secondaries from primaries in the general crater population on the basis of their horizontal planforms. Recent primary impacts have extensive “air blast” zones, distal ray systems (>100 crater radii, R), and ephemeral ejecta. Recent primaries formed clusters of craters from atmospheric fragmentation of the meteoroid body. Secondary craters have ejecta blankets with shorter rays that are consistent with emplacement by low-impact velocities (near 1 km/s). The mean extent of the continuous ejecta blankets was less distal for secondaries (5.38 ± 1.57R) versus primaries (18.07 ± 7.01R), though primary ejecta were less fractal (Fractal Dimension Index (FD I ) < 1.30) and more circular on average (Circularity Ratio (C R ) = 0.55 ± 0.25 versus 0.27 ± 0.13 for secondaries). Crater rims were remarkably circular (primaries C R = 0.97 ± 0.02, secondaries at 0.94 ± 0.05), though secondaries have the lowest values (C R < 0.9). Secondary crater rims were elongated toward or orthogonal to their primary of origin. Uprange source directions for most secondaries, determined by ejecta planform and crater rim ellipticity, point toward Zunil, although contamination from other primaries is considered in some areas. Ejecta blanket discrepancies between recent primaries and Zunil secondaries are attributable to differences in impact velocity and retention age. After removal of the ejecta blanket, crater rims are generally not diagnostic for determining crater origin. Fragmentation of primaries may play some role in steepening the size-frequency distribution of crater diameters in the 5 m < D < 30 m range.

  13. Fractal dimensions of rampart impact craters on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ching, Delwyn; Taylor, G. Jeffrey; Mouginis-Mark, Peter; Bruno, Barbara C.

    1993-01-01

    Ejecta blanket morphologies of Martian rampart craters may yield important clues to the atmospheric densities during impact, and the nature of target materials (e.g., hard rock, fine-grained sediments, presence of volatiles). In general, the morphologies of such craters suggest emplacement by a fluidized, ground hugging flow instead of ballistic emplacement by dry ejecta. We have quantitatively characterized the shape of the margins of the ejecta blankets of 15 rampart craters using fractal geometry. Our preliminary results suggest that the craters are fractals and are self-similar over scales of approximately 0.1 km to 30 km. Fractal dimensions (a measure of the extent to which a line fills a plane) range from 1.06 to 1.31. No correlations of fractal dimension with target type, elevation, or crater size were observed, though the data base is small. The range in fractal dimension and lack of correlation may be due to a complex interplay of target properties (grain size, volatile content), atmospheric pressure, and crater size. The mere fact that the ejecta margins are fractals, however, indicates that viscosity and yield strength of the ejecta were at least as low as those of basalts, because silicic lava flows are not generally fractals.

  14. PREDICTING CME EJECTA AND SHEATH FRONT ARRIVAL AT L1 WITH A DATA-CONSTRAINED PHYSICAL MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, Phillip; Zhang, Jie

    2015-10-20

    We present a method for predicting the arrival of a coronal mass ejection (CME) flux rope in situ, as well as the sheath of solar wind plasma accumulated ahead of the driver. For faster CMEs, the front of this sheath will be a shock. The method is based upon geometrical separate measurement of the CME ejecta and sheath. These measurements are used to constrain a drag-based model, improved by including both a height dependence and accurate de-projected velocities. We also constrain the geometry of the model to determine the error introduced as a function of the deviation of the CME nose from the Sun–Earth line. The CME standoff-distance in the heliosphere fit is also calculated, fit, and combined with the ejecta model to determine sheath arrival. Combining these factors allows us to create predictions for both fronts at the L1 point and compare them against observations. We demonstrate an ability to predict the sheath arrival with an average error of under 3.5 hr, with an rms error of about 1.58 hr. For the ejecta the error is less than 1.5 hr, with an rms error within 0.76 hr. We also discuss the physical implications of our model for CME expansion and density evolution. We show the power of our method with ideal data and demonstrate the practical implications of having a permanent L5 observer with space weather forecasting capabilities, while also discussing the limitations of the method that will have to be addressed in order to create a real-time forecasting tool.

  15. NEUTRON-STAR MERGER EJECTA AS OBSTACLES TO NEUTRINO-POWERED JETS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Just, O.; Janka, H.-T.; Schwarz, N.; Obergaulinger, M.

    2016-01-10

    We present the first special relativistic, axisymmetric hydrodynamic simulations of black hole-torus systems (approximating general relativistic gravity) as remnants of binary-neutron star (NS–NS) and neutron star–black hole (NS–BH) mergers, in which the viscously driven evolution of the accretion torus is followed with self-consistent energy-dependent neutrino transport and the interaction with the cloud of dynamical ejecta expelled during the NS–NS merging is taken into account. The modeled torus masses, BH masses and spins, and the ejecta masses, velocities, and spatial distributions are adopted from relativistic merger simulations. We find that energy deposition by neutrino annihilation can accelerate outflows with initially high Lorentz factors along polar low-density funnels, but only in mergers with extremely low baryon pollution in the polar regions. NS–BH mergers, where polar mass ejection during the merging phase is absent, provide sufficiently baryon-poor environments to enable neutrino-powered, ultrarelativistic jets with terminal Lorentz factors above 100 and considerable dynamical collimation, favoring short gamma-ray bursts (sGRBs), although their typical energies and durations might be too small to explain the majority of events. In the case of NS–NS mergers, however, neutrino emission of the accreting and viscously spreading torus is too short and too weak to yield enough energy for the outflows to break out from the surrounding ejecta shell as highly relativistic jets. We conclude that neutrino annihilation alone cannot power sGRBs from NS–NS mergers.

  16. Light-curve modelling of superluminous supernova 2006gy: collision between supernova ejecta and a dense circumstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriya, Takashi J.; Blinnikov, Sergei I.; Tominaga, Nozomu; Yoshida, Naoki; Tanaka, Masaomi; Maeda, Keiichi; Nomoto, Ken'ichi

    2013-01-01

    We show model light curves of superluminous supernova 2006gy on the assumption that the supernova is powered by the collision of supernova ejecta and a dense circumstellar medium. The initial conditions are constructed based on the shock breakout condition, assuming that the circumstellar medium is dense enough to cause a shock breakout within it. We perform a set of numerical light-curve calculations using the one-dimensional multigroup radiation hydrodynamics code stella. We succeed in reproducing the overall features of the early light curve of SN 2006gy with a circumstellar medium of mass about 15 M⊙ (the average mass-loss rate is ˜0.1 M⊙ yr-1). Thus, the progenitor of SN 2006gy is likely a very massive star. The density profile of the circumstellar medium is not well constrained by light-curve modelling alone, but our modelling disfavours a circumstellar medium formed by steady mass loss. The ejecta mass is estimated to be comparable to or less than 15 M⊙ and the explosion energy is expected to be more than 4 × 1051 erg. No 56Ni is required to explain the early light curve. We find that multidimensional effects, e.g. Rayleigh-Taylor instability, which is expected to take place in the cool dense shell between the supernova ejecta and the dense circumstellar medium, are important in understanding supernovae powered by shock interaction. We also show the evolution of optical and near-infrared model light curves of high-redshift superluminous supernovae. They can potentially be used to identify SN 2006gy-like superluminous supernovae in future optical and near-infrared transient surveys.

  17. Inferring supernova IIb/Ib/Ic ejecta properties from light curves and spectra: correlations from radiative-transfer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessart, Luc; Hillier, D. John; Woosley, Stan; Livne, Eli; Waldman, Roni; Yoon, Sung-Chul; Langer, Norbert

    2016-05-01

    We present 1D non-local thermodynamic equilibrium time-dependent radiative-transfer simulations for a large grid of supernovae (SNe) IIb/Ib/Ic that result from the terminal explosion of the mass donor in a close-binary system. Our sample covers ejecta masses Me of 1.7-5.2 M⊙, kinetic energies Ekin of 0.6-5.0 × 1051 erg, and 56Ni masses of 0.05-0.30 M⊙. We find a strong correlation between the 56Ni mass and the photometric properties at maximum, and between the rise time to bolometric maximum and the post-maximum decline rate. We confirm the small scatter in (V - R) at 10 d past R-band maximum. The quantity V_m ≡ √{2E_kin/M_e} is comparable to the Doppler velocity measured from He I 5875 Å at maximum in SNe IIb/Ib, although some scatter arises from the uncertain level of chemical mixing. The O I 7772 Å line may be used for SNe Ic, but the correspondence deteriorates with higher ejecta mass/energy. We identify a temporal reversal of the Doppler velocity at maximum absorption in the ˜1.05 μm feature in all models. The reversal is due to He I alone and could serve as a test for the presence of helium in SNe Ic. Because of variations in composition and ionization, the ejecta opacity shows substantial variations with both velocity and time. This is in part the origin of the offset between our model light curves and the predictions from the Arnett model.

  18. Hellas basin, Mars: Formation by oblique impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, Gregory J.; Tanaka, Kenneth L.

    1993-01-01

    Hellas, a 2,000-km-diameter, roughly circular multiring impact basin in the southern highlands of Mars, has a pronounced southeastern lobe of rim material that extends for some 1,500 km. This lobe and a system of ridges concentric to the southern part of the basin (including part of the lobe) were interpreted to be formed by an oblique impact that was inclined in the direction of the lobe. Our preliminary geologic mapping of the Hellas region (lat -20 to -65 deg, long 250 to 320 deg) at 1:5,000,000 scale gives this hypothesis additional supporting evidence, including a symmetric distribution of basin ejecta and volcanic centers across the inferred trend of the impact. Furthermore, measurements of relief indicate that the downrange ejecta may be about twice as thick as they are elsewhere around the rim.

  19. Environmental effects of large impacts on Mars.

    PubMed

    Segura, Teresa L; Toon, Owen B; Colaprete, Anthony; Zahnle, Kevin

    2002-12-06

    The martian valley networks formed near the end of the period of heavy bombardment of the inner solar system, about 3.5 billion years ago. The largest impacts produced global blankets of very hot ejecta, ranging in thickness from meters to hundreds of meters. Our simulations indicated that the ejecta warmed the surface, keeping it above the freezing point of water for periods ranging from decades to millennia, depending on impactor size, and caused shallow subsurface or polar ice to evaporate or melt. Large impacts also injected steam into the atmosphere from the craters or from water innate to the impactors. From all sources, a typical 100-, 200-, or 250-kilometers asteroid injected about 2, 9, or 16 meters, respectively, of precipitable water into the atmosphere, which eventually rained out at a rate of about 2 meters per year. The rains from a large impact formed rivers and contributed to recharging aquifers.

  20. Lateral and Vertical Heterogeneity of Thorium in the Procellarum KREEP Terrane: As Reflected in the Ejecta Deposits of Post-Imbrium Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis, J. J.; Jolliff, B. L.

    1999-01-01

    discussed above and their ejecta, with the goal of describing the materials they excavate. One interpretation for the origin of the high-Th material is that subsurface KREEPy materials have been excavated by impact craters. The material excavated may be either volcanic KREEP (e,g., Apennine Bench Formation), KREEPy impact-melt breccia formed by the Imbrium impact (e.g., Fra Mauro Formation), or other KREEP-rich crustal material. Determining which type of material is responsible for the elevated Th and its extent is important to understanding the premare and possibly the prebasin stratigraphy of the Imbrium-Procellarum Region. Merging the 5 deg. Th data with the shaded relief map, we observe that the highest Th concentrations are not related to pre-Imbrium upper crustal materials. The Apennines, Alpes, and Caucasus Mountains represent the pre-Imbrian highlands material and do not express concentrations of Th, FeO, and TiO2 as high as the most Th-fich materials exposed within the Procellarum KREEP Terrane. We observe that, in general, these massifs contain 10-14 wt% FeO and 4-7 ppm Th. Determining whether the Th signal is from KREEP basalts or KREEPy impact-melt breccias cannot be done with the Clementine data because the two rock types are compositionally and mineralogically too similar (e.g., the Th-rich, mafic impact-melt breccias in the Apollo sample collection are dominated by a KREEP-basalt like component. Mapping-the distribution and sizes of craters and whether they display elevated Th concentrations or not, should reveal the depth and thickness of the KREEP-rich materials, and whether they are ubiquitous (i.e., impact-melt breccia) or more randomly distributed; this might be taken as an indicator of localized KREEP-basalt flows. Within the southeastern region of the Imbrium basin, there are two Th hot spots. The first is associated with the crater Aristillus, and the latter with the Apennine Bench Formation. Adjacent to these two hot spots are craters with a lower Th

  1. Hydrothermal Alteration at Lonar Crater, India and Elemental Variations in Impact Crater Clays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, H. E.; Nelson, M. J.; Shearer, C. K.; Misra, S.; Narasimham, V.

    2005-01-01

    The role of hydrothermal alteration and chemical transport involving impact craters could have occurred on Mars, the poles of Mercury and the Moon, and other small bodies. We are studying terrestrial craters of various sizes in different environments to better understand aqueous alteration and chemical transport processes. The Lonar crater in India (1.8 km diameter) is particularly interesting being the only impact crater in basalt. In January of 2004, during fieldwork in the ejecta blanket around the rim of the Lonar crater we discovered alteration zones not previously described at this crater. The alteration of the ejecta blanket could represent evidence of localized hydrothermal activity. Such activity is consistent with the presence of large amounts of impact melt in the ejecta blanket. Map of one area on the north rim of the crater containing highly altered zones at least 3 m deep is shown.

  2. ESTIMATING THE SIZE OF LATE VENEER IMPACTORS FROM IMPACT-INDUCED MIXING ON MERCURY

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera-Valentin, E. G.; Barr, A. C.

    2014-02-10

    Late accretion of a ''veneer'' of compositionally diverse planetesimals may introduce chemical heterogeneity in the mantles of the terrestrial planets. The size of the late veneer objects is an important control on the angular momenta, eccentricities, and inclinations of the terrestrial planets, but current estimates range from meter-scale bodies to objects with diameters of thousands of kilometers. We use a three-dimensional global Monte Carlo model of impact cratering, excavation, and ejecta blanket formation to show that evidence of mantle heterogeneity can be preserved within ejecta blankets of mantle-exhuming impacts on terrestrial planets. Compositionally distinct provinces implanted at the time of the late veneer are most likely to be preserved in bodies whose subsequent geodynamical evolution is limited. Mercury may have avoided intensive mixing by solid-state convection during much of its history. Its subsequent bombardment may have then excavated evidence of primordial mantle heterogeneity introduced by the late veneer. Simple geometric arguments can predict the amount of mantle material in the ejecta blanket of mantle-exhuming impacts, and deviations in composition relative to geometric predictions can constrain the length-scale of chemical heterogeneities in the subsurface. A marked change in the relationship between mantle and ejecta composition occurs when chemically distinct provinces are ∼250 km in diameter; thus, evidence of bombardment by thousand-kilometer-sized objects should be readily apparent from the variation in compositions of ejecta blankets in Mercury's ancient cratered terrains.

  3. Use of elemental materials for the creation of an in-situ space dust impacts detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faure, P.; Matsumoto, S.; Akahoshi, Y.; Cho, M.; Narumi, T.; Kitazawa, Y.; Sakurai, A.; Koura, T.

    2012-02-01

    This research focuses on space dust ranging from 100μm to 1mm. Space dust is mainly due to secondary space debris, which is called ejecta. The objective was to create an inexpensive space dust impacts detector using elemental materials. The detector is a glass/epoxy laminate printed circuit board with an area of 81cm2 for a weight of 30g. The detector can estimate the number of impacts and can give an approximation of the space dust size. The detector will be mounted on Horyu II that will operate in polar orbit for one year. In this article the authors report: a) the production of ejecta, b) the ejecta experiments on solar array coupon, aluminium honeycomb and CFRP/aluminium honeycomb, c) the detector's working principle and d) the estimations of the minimum detectable size of debris and collision probability. The ejecta experiments demonstrated that the ejecta's mass is 7 to 46 times higher than the projectile's mass. For space dust in the range 100μm - 600μm in diameter, the collision probability was calculated to be 16.5 percent. The detector's capabilities to detect broken lines and to transmit the data to the on-board computer were also demonstrated. This in-situ space dust impacts detector is thus a very promising research area for its lightness, low cost and its ability to provide immediate data on space dust population.

  4. Impact Debris With Biological Material In The Inner Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, Carlos E.; Reyes-Ruiz, M.

    2010-10-01

    Here we revisited the article published by Gladman et al. 2005 in which is assumed that asteroidal and cometary impacts onto Earth can liberate material containing viable microorganisms, we studied the subsequent distribution of the escaping impact ejecta throughout the inner Solar System on time scales of 30,000 years. We reproduce their results and found that there are impacts with Jupiter too, that is relevant since the satellites Europa and Ganymede are believed to have liquid oceans below their surfaces.

  5. PRIME: Studying Low-Velocity Impacts in Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colwell, J.; Brisset, J.; Dove, A.; Whizin, A.; Nagler, H.; Brown, N.

    2015-10-01

    We report on the results of the third PRIME (Physics of Regolith Impacts in Microgravity Experiment) campaign on-board the NASA C-9 airplane in August 2014. The objective of the PRIME experiment is to study low-velocity impacts of cmsized particles into dusty regolith under asteroid level- and microgravity conditions. First data analysis shows that this latest campaign successfully extended the previous measurements of coefficient of restitution and ejecta velocities to much lower impact energies.

  6. Oceanic Impact: Mechanisms and Environmental Perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gersonde, Rainer (Editor); Deutsch, Alex (Editor); Ivanov, Boris A. (Editor); Kyte, Frank T. (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    The contents include the following: Oceanic impacts-a growing field of fundamental geoscience. Shock metamorphism on the ocean floor (numerical simulations). Numerical modeling of impact-induced modifications of the deep-sea floor. Computer modelling of the water resurge at a marine impact: the Lockne crater, Sweden. Experimental investigation of the role of water in impact vaporization chemistry. Calcareous plankton stratigraphy around the Pliocene Eltanin asteroid impact area (SE Pacific): documentation and application for geological and paleoceanographic reconstruction. Composition of impact melt debris from the Eltanin impact strewn field, Bellingshausen Sea. Iridium concentrations and abundances of meteoritic ejecta from the Eltanin impact in sediment cores from Polarstern expedition ANT XII/4. Unmelted meteoritic debris collected from Eltanin ejecta in Polarstern cores from expedition ANT XII/4. Impact tsunami-Eltanin. Ancient impact structures on modern continental shelves: The Chesapeake Bay, Montagnais, and Toms Canyon craters, Atlantic margin of North America. The Mjolnir marine impact crater porosity anomaly. Kardla (Hiiu-maa Island, Estonia) - the buried and well-preserved Ordovician marine impact structure. Long-term effect of the Kardla crater (Hiiu-maa, Estonia) on Late Ordovician carbonate sedimentation. The middle Devonian Kaluga impact crater (Russia): new interpretation of marine setting.

  7. Exploring a Detonation Nature of Mesoscopic Perturbations and Ejecta Formation from the Mesoscale Probing of the PBX-driven Liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaksin, Igor; Guiruis, Raafat; Rodrigues, Luis; Mendes, Ricardo; Plaksin, Svyatoslav; Fernandes, Eduardo; Ferreira, Claudia

    2015-06-01

    Ejecting debris from free surface of liner is of considerable interest at optimization of explosive devices, in which the PBX-driven liner effects shock compression of gaseous matter. Following factors were historically considered as main drivers of material ejection: granular microstructure of liner material, roughness and surface defects of liner, and shock pressure time history in PBX-driven liner. In contrast to existing models, we are considering the small scale fluctuations of detonation flow as probable dominating factor of surface jetting in the PBX-driven collapsing liners. Obtained experimental evidence is indicative that jetting from the liners is caused by meso-scale perturbations of PBX detonations, which are identified as (1) ejecta of overdriven detonation products through detonation front, (2) ejecta-driven detonation cells, and (3) galloping detonation front motion. Spatially resolved scenarios of each of phenomena (1-3) were obtained in experiments with copper-liners and HMX-based PBXs fabricated on maximum packing density of crystalline constituents. Both the DRZ-induced perturbations translated to a PBX-driven liner and the ejected debris were recorded and quantitatively measured in the mesoscale range with application of the 96-channel optical analyzer MCOA-UC. Work was supported by the ONR and ONR Global Grants N00014-12-1-0477 and N62909-12-1-7131 with Drs. Clifford Bedford and John Zimmerman Program Managers.

  8. Explosively driven two-shockwave tools with application to ejecta formation at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Proton Radiography Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttler, William

    2013-06-01

    We present the development of an explosively driven physics tool to generate two mostly uniaxial shockwaves. The tool is being used to extend single shockwave ejecta models to a subsequent shockwave event separated by a time interval on the order of a few microseconds. We explore the possibility of varying the amplitude of both the first and second shockwaves, and we apply the tool in experimental geometries on Sn with a surface roughness of Ra = 0 . 8 μ m. We then evaluate the tool further at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Proton Radiography (pRad) Facility in an application to Sn with larger scale perturbations of wavelength 550 μ m, and various amplitudes that gave wave-number amplitude products of η0 2 π / λ = { 3 / 4 , 1 / 2 , 1 / 4 , 1 / 8 } , where the perturbation amplitude is η0, and the wave-number k = 2 π / λ . The pRad data and velocimetry imply it should be possible to develop a second shock ejecta model based on unstable Richtmyer-Meshkov physics. In collaboration with David Oro, Fesseha Mariam, Alexander Saunders, Malcolm Andrews, Frank Cherne, James Hammerberg. Robert Hixson, Christopher Morris, Russell Olson, Dean Preston, Joseph Stone, Dale Tupa, and Wendy Vogan-McNeil, Los Alamos National Laboratory,

  9. Observation of explosion pits and test results of ejecta above a rock avalanche triggered by the Wenchuan earthquake, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Y. J.; Liu, J. Q.; Liu, D. A.; Zhang, L. Q.; Xia, Y. Q.; Lei, T. Z.

    2015-02-01

    The 12 May 2008 Wenchuan earthquake in China triggered many rock avalanches that disrupted the transportation system and thereby caused additional fatalities. In this paper, several lines of evidence were forwarded to show that the rock avalanches, distributed along some highly destructed areas, i.e., the main seismic fault (F2), had been enhanced by natural explosions and fires immediately after the main earthquake. Burned rock samples from the explosion pits near the highly destructed parts of Shuijingyan (SJY), north of Beichuan County, were collected and analyzed in the laboratory. The brown porous ejecta were featured by intensive thermophili degradation because they had high content of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Microstructure and composition analyses indicated that four samples, a mixture of reef limestone and manganese ore, were carbonate manganese and carbonaceous rock, which generally is buried at 500-2000 m depth. With high content of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, the brown porous ejecta were believed to have reached a highly thermal degradation process compared with surrounding and intact counterpart rocks.

  10. The role of impact bombardment history in lunar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolf, T.; Zhu, M.-H.; Wünnemann, K.; Werner, S. C.

    2017-04-01

    The lunar surface features diverse impact structures originating from its early bombardment; the largest among them are the lunar basins. Basin-forming impacts delivered large amounts of energy to the target and expelled lots of material that deposited as an insulating blanket in the vicinity of the impact. Here, we investigate how such processes may have altered the lunar evolution. We combine lunar basin chronologies with numerical models of basin formation and 3D thermochemical mantle convection and analyse the role of single generic impacts resulting in basins with varying diameter, formation time, location and ejecta properties. The direct effects of a single impact are enhanced melt generation as well as thermal and heat flux anomalies, but these are limited to ∼ 100 Myr following the impact. We use these insights in multi-impact scenarios more relevant for the Moon, which lead to a widespread ejecta blanket and make impact-induced effects more substantial. Lunar contraction history may be altered by the impact bombardment in favour of an early expansion phase as suggested by recent observations. Moreover, imprints of the early bombardment may be kept in the thermal and compositional state of the Moon's interior until modern times. These can be as large as those induced by uncertainties in bulk lunar heat content, if surface insulation due to ejecta is efficient. In this case, model-predicted present-day thermal profiles match independent constraints better if the bulk Moon is not significantly enriched in refractory elements compared to Earth.

  11. Correlation of lunar far-side magnetized regions with ringed impact basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, K.A.; Wilhelms, D.E.

    1979-01-01

    By the method of electron reflection, we have identified seven well-defined magnetized regions in the equatorial belt of the lunar far side sampled by the Apollo 16 Particles and Fields subsatellite. Most of these surface magnetic fields lie within one basin radius from the rim of a ringed impact basin, where thick deposits of basin ejecta are observed or inferred. The strongest of the seven magnetic features is linear, at least 250 km long, and radial to the Freundlich-Sharonov basin. The apparent correlation with basin ejecta suggests some form of impact origin for the observed permanently magnetized regions. ?? 1979.

  12. Modeling SNR Cassiopeia A from the Supernova Explosion to its Current Age: The Role of Post-explosion Anisotropies of Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, S.; Miceli, M.; Pumo, M. L.; Bocchino, F.

    2016-05-01

    The remnants of core-collapse supernovae (SNe) have complex morphologies that may reflect asymmetries and structures developed during the progenitor SN explosion. Here we investigate how the morphology of the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (Cas A) reflects the characteristics of the progenitor SN with the aim of deriving the energies and masses of the post-explosion anisotropies responsible for the observed spatial distribution of Fe and Si/S. We model the evolution of Cas A from the immediate aftermath of the progenitor SN to the three-dimensional interaction of the remnant with the surrounding medium. The post-explosion structure of the ejecta is described by small-scale clumping of material and larger-scale anisotropies. The hydrodynamic multi-species simulations consider an appropriate post-explosion isotopic composition of the ejecta. The observed average expansion rate and shock velocities can be well reproduced by models with ejecta mass M ej ≈ 4M ⊙ and explosion energy E SN ≈ 2.3 × 1051 erg. The post-explosion anisotropies (pistons) reproduce the observed distributions of Fe and Si/S if they had a total mass of ≈0.25 M ⊙ and a total kinetic energy of ≈1.5 × 1050 erg. The pistons produce a spatial inversion of ejecta layers at the epoch of Cas A, leading to the Si/S-rich ejecta physically interior to the Fe-rich ejecta. The pistons are also responsible for the development of the bright rings of Si/S-rich material which form at the intersection between the reverse shock and the material accumulated around the pistons during their propagation. Our result supports the idea that the bulk of asymmetries observed in Cas A are intrinsic to the explosion.

  13. Deep-sea record of impact apparently unrelated to mass extinction in the Late Triassic

    PubMed Central

    Onoue, Tetsuji; Sato, Honami; Nakamura, Tomoki; Noguchi, Takaaki; Hidaka, Yoshihiro; Shirai, Naoki; Ebihara, Mitsuru; Osawa, Takahito; Hatsukawa, Yuichi; Toh, Yosuke; Koizumi, Mitsuo; Harada, Hideo; Orchard, Michael J.; Nedachi, Munetomo

    2012-01-01

    The 34-million-year (My) interval of the Late Triassic is marked by the formation of several large impact structures on Earth. Late Triassic impact events have been considered a factor in biotic extinction events in the Late Triassic (e.g., end-Triassic extinction event), but this scenario remains controversial because of a lack of stratigraphic records of ejecta deposits. Here, we report evidence for an impact event (platinum group elements anomaly with nickel-rich magnetite and microspherules) from the middle Norian (Upper Triassic) deep-sea sediment in Japan. This includes anomalously high abundances of iridium, up to 41.5 parts per billion (ppb), in the ejecta deposit, which suggests that the iridium-enriched ejecta layers of the Late Triassic may be found on a global scale. The ejecta deposit is constrained by microfossils that suggest correlation with the 215.5-Mya, 100-km-wide Manicouagan impact crater in Canada. Our analysis of radiolarians shows no evidence of a mass extinction event across the impact event horizon, and no contemporaneous faunal turnover is seen in other marine planktons. However, such an event has been reported among marine faunas and terrestrial tetrapods and floras in North America. We, therefore, suggest that the Manicouagan impact triggered the extinction of terrestrial and marine organisms near the impact site but not within the pelagic marine realm. PMID:23129649

  14. Deep-sea record of impact apparently unrelated to mass extinction in the Late Triassic.

    PubMed

    Onoue, Tetsuji; Sato, Honami; Nakamura, Tomoki; Noguchi, Takaaki; Hidaka, Yoshihiro; Shirai, Naoki; Ebihara, Mitsuru; Osawa, Takahito; Hatsukawa, Yuichi; Toh, Yosuke; Koizumi, Mitsuo; Harada, Hideo; Orchard, Michael J; Nedachi, Munetomo

    2012-11-20

    The 34-million-year (My) interval of the Late Triassic is marked by the formation of several large impact structures on Earth. Late Triassic impact events have been considered a factor in biotic extinction events in the Late Triassic (e.g., end-Triassic extinction event), but this scenario remains controversial because of a lack of stratigraphic records of ejecta deposits. Here, we report evidence for an impact event (platinum group elements anomaly with nickel-rich magnetite and microspherules) from the middle Norian (Upper Triassic) deep-sea sediment in Japan. This includes anomalously high abundances of iridium, up to 41.5 parts per billion (ppb), in the ejecta deposit, which suggests that the iridium-enriched ejecta layers of the Late Triassic may be found on a global scale. The ejecta deposit is constrained by microfossils that suggest correlation with the 215.5-Mya, 100-km-wide Manicouagan impact crater in Canada. Our analysis of radiolarians shows no evidence of a mass extinction event across the impact event horizon, and no contemporaneous faunal turnover is seen in other marine planktons. However, such an event has been reported among marine faunas and terrestrial tetrapods and floras in North America. We, therefore, suggest that the Manicouagan impact triggered the extinction of terrestrial and marine organisms near the impact site but not within the pelagic marine realm.

  15. Ruthenium/Iridium Ratios in the Cretaceous-tertiary Boundary Clay: Implications for Global Dispersal and Fractionation Within the Ejecta Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Noreen Joyce; Goodfellow, W. D.; Gregoire, D. C.; Veizer, J.

    1992-01-01

    Ruthenium (Ru) and iridium (Ir) are the least mobile platinum group elements (PGE's) within the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary clay (BC). The Ru/Ir ratio is, therefore, the most useful PGE interelement ratio for distinguishing terrestrial and extraterrestrial contributions to the BC. The Ru/Ir ratio of marine K-T sections (1.77 +/- 0.53) is statistically different from that of the continental sections (0.93 +/- 0.28). The marine Ru/Ir ratios are chondritic (C1 = 1.48 +/- 0.09), but the continental ratios are not. We discovered an inverse correlation of shocked quartz size (or distance from the impact site) and Ru/Ir ratio. This correlation may arise from the difference in Ru and Ir vaporization temperature and/or fractionation during condensation from the ejecta cloud. Postsedimentary alteration, remobilization, or terrestrial PGE input may be responsible for the Ru/Ir ratio variations within the groups of marine and continental sites studied. The marine ratios could also be attained if approximately 15 percent of the boundary metals were contributed by Deccan Trap emissions. However, volcanic emissions could not have been the principal source of the PGE's in the BC because mantle PGE ratios and abundances are inconsistent with those measured in the clay. The Ru/Ir values for pristine Tertiary mantle xenoliths (2.6 +/- 0.48), picrites (4.1 +/- 1.8), and Deccan Trap basalt (3.42 +/- 1.96) are all statistically distinct from those measured in the K-T BC.

  16. Spitzer Observations of the Young Core-Collapse Supernova Remnant 1E0102-72.3: Infrared Ejecta Emission and Dust Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, J.; Reach, W. T.; Tappe, A.; Hwang, U.; Slavin, J. D.; Kozasa, T.; Dunne, L.

    2009-07-01

    We present Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph and Infrared Array Camera observations of the young supernova remnant E0102 (SNR 1E0102-7219) in the Small Magellanic Cloud. The infrared spectra show strong lines of Ne and O, with the [Ne II] line at 12.8 μm having a large velocity dispersion of 2000-4500 km s-1 indicative of fast-moving ejecta. Unlike the young Galactic SNR Cas A, E0102 lacks emission from Ar and Fe. Diagnostics of the observed [Ne III] line pairs imply that [Ne III] emitting ejecta have a low temperature of 650 K, while [Ne V] line pairs imply that the infrared [Ne V] emitting ejecta have a high density of ~104 cm-3. We have calculated radiative shock models for various velocity ranges including the effects of photoionization. The shock model indicates that the [Ne V] lines come mainly from the cooling zone, which is hot and dense, whereas [Ne II] and [Ne III] come mainly from the photoionization zone, which has a low temperature of 400-1000 K. We estimate an infrared-emitting Ne ejecta mass of 0.04 M sun from the infrared observations, and discuss implications for the progenitor mass. The spectra also have a dust continuum feature peaking at 18 μm that coincides spatially with the ejecta, providing evidence that dust formed in the expanding ejecta. The 18 μm peak dust feature is fitted by a mixture of MgSiO3 and Si dust grains, while the rest of the continuum requires either carbon or Al2O3 grains. We measure the total dust mass formed within the ejecta of E0102 to be ~0.014 M sun. The dust mass in E0102 is thus a factor of a few smaller than that in Cas A. The composition of the dust is also different, showing relatively less silicate and likely no Fe-bearing dust, as is suggested by the absence of Fe-emitting ejecta.

  17. GK Per (Nova Persei 1901): HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE IMAGERY AND SPECTROSCOPY OF THE EJECTA, AND FIRST SPECTRUM OF THE JET-LIKE FEATURE

    SciTech Connect

    Shara, Michael M.; Zurek, David; Mizusawa, Trisha; De Marco, Orsola; Williams, Robert; Livio, Mario

    2012-06-15

    We have imaged the ejecta of GK Persei (Nova Persei 1901 A.D.) with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), whose 0.1 arcsec resolution reveals hundreds of cometary-like structures with long axes aligned toward GK Per. One or both ends of the structures often show a brightness enhancement relative to the structures' middle sections, but there is no simple regularity to their morphologies (in contrast with, for example, the Helix nebula). Some of structures' morphologies suggest the presence of slow-moving or stationary material with which the ejecta is colliding, while others suggest shaping from a wind emanating from GK Per itself. The most detailed expansion map of any classical nova's ejecta was created by comparing HST images taken in successive years. Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 narrowband images and Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph spectra demonstrate that the physical conditions in this nova's ejecta vary strongly on spatial scales much smaller than those of the ejecta. Directly measuring accurate densities and compositions, and hence masses of this and other nova shells, will demand data at least as resolved spatially as those presented here. The filling factor of the ejecta is 1% or less, and the nova ejecta mass must be less than 10{sup -4} M{sub Sun }. A modest fraction of the emission nebulosities vary in brightness by up to a factor of two on timescales of one year. Finally, we present the deepest images yet obtained of a jet-like feature outside the main body of GK Per nebulosity, and the first spectrum of that feature. Dominated by strong, narrow emission lines of [N II], [O II], [O III], and [S II], this feature is probably a shock due to ejected material running into stationary interstellar matter, slowly moving ejecta from a previous nova episode, or circumbinary matter present before 1901. An upper limit to the mass of the jet is of order a few times 10{sup -6} M{sub Sun }. If the jet mass is close to this limit then the jet might be an

  18. Largest impact craters on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, B. A.; Weitz, C. M.; Basilevsky, A. T.

    1992-01-01

    High-resolution radar images from the Magellan spacecraft have allowed us to perform a detailed study on 25 large impact craters on Venus with diameters from 70 to 280 km. The dimension of these large craters is comparable with the characteristic thickness of the venusian lithosphere and the atmospheric scale height. Some physical parameters for the largest impact craters on Venus (LICV), such as depth, ring/diameter ratio, and range of ballistic ejecta deposits, have been obtained from the SAR images and the altimetry dataset produced by MIT. Data related to each of these parameters is discussed.

  19. Phobos and deimos: Analysis of surface features, ejecta dynamics and a volatile loss mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, D. R.; Chapman, C. R.; Greenberg, R.; Weidenschilling, S. J.

    1980-01-01

    The question of whether the crater population on Phobos represents a production population or an equilibrium population is considered. The absolute ages of cratered surfaces are interpreted and analyzed. A computer program was developed to study the dynamics of material ejected from Martian satellites and to investigate the hypothesis that at least some of the extensive set of linear features discovered on the surface of Phobos could be the result of secondary cratering from the Stickney impact. The possibility that Deimos was catastrophically disrupted by a large impact but subsequently reaccreted is considered as well as the probability the Phobos had an impact nearly large enough to disrupt it are also discussed.

  20. Geologic Mapping of the Martian Impact Crater Tooting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouginis-Mark, Peter; Boyce, Joseph M.

    2008-01-01

    Tooting crater is approximately 29 km in diameters, is located at 23.4 deg N, 207.5 deg E and is classified as a multi-layered ejecta crater. Tooting crater is a very young crater, with an estimated age of 700,000 to 2M years. The crater formed on virtually flat lava flows within Amazonis Planitia where there appears to have been no major topographic features prior to the impact, so that we can measure ejecta thickness and cavity volume. In the past 12 months, the authors have: published their first detailed analysis of the geometry of the crater cavity and the distribution of the ejecta layers; refined the geologic map of the interior of Tooting crater through mapping of the cavity at a scale of 1:1100K; and continued the analysis of an increasing number of high resolution images obtained by the CTX and HiRISE instruments. Currently the authors seek to resolve several science issues that have been identified during this mapping, including: what is the origin of the lobate flows on the NW and SW rims of the crater?; how did the ejecta curtain break apart during the formation of the crater, and how uniform was the emplacement process for the ejecta layers; and, can we infer physical characteristics about the ejecta? Future study plans include the completion of a draft geologic map of Tooting crater and submission of it to the U.S. Geological survey for a preliminary review, publishing a second research paper on the detailed geology of the crater cavity and the distribution of the flows on the crater rim, and completing the map text for the 1:100K geologic map description of units at Tooting crater.

  1. Venus - Impact Crater in Eastern Navka Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This Magellan image, which is 50 kilometers (31 miles) in width and 80 kilometers (50 miles) in length, is centered at 11.9 degrees latitude, 352 degrees longitude in the eastern Navka Region of Venus. The crater, which is approximately 8 kilometers (5 miles) in diameter, displays a butterfly symmetry pattern. The ejecta pattern most likely results from an oblique impact, where the impactor came from the south and ejected material to the north.

  2. Gel versus aerogel to collect high velocity ejectas from laser shock-loaded metallic targets for postrecovery analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lescoute, Emilien; De Rességuier, Thibaut; Chevalier, Jean-Marc

    2012-03-01

    Soft recovery of fast objects is an issue of considerable interest for many applications involving shock wave loading, such as ballistics, armor design, or more recently laser-driven inertial confinement fusion, where the characterization of the debris ejected from metallic shells subjected to intense laser irradiation conditions the design of the experiments. In this work, we compare the high velocity ejecta recovery efficiency of two materials: silica aerogel (density 0.03 g/cm3), which has been used as fragment collector for many years, and "varagel" (density 0.9 g/cm3), which we have tested recently in laser shock experiments. Ejected fragments have been recovered in both types of collectors. Then, samples have been analyzed by X-ray tomography at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). Three-dimensional reconstructions of the fragments populations have been achieved, and quantitative comparisons between both collecting materials, used in the same conditions, have been performed.

  3. Nature Versus Nurture: Do Asymmetries in Supernova Remnant Ejecta Reflect the Explosion or the Environment of the Progenitor?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Laura A.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.

    2011-09-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that Type Ia supernova remnants (SNRs) have statistically more spherical and mirror-symmetric X-ray line and continuum emission than core-collapse (CC) SNRs. The ability to type SNRs based on thermal X-ray emission morphology alone could reflect either the distinct explosion mechanisms or the different circumstellar environments of Type Ia and CC SNRs. In this talk, we present new results exploring this "nature" versus "nurture" conundrum. To test if asymmetries arise from explosions, we examine whether pulsar kick velocities are correlated with ejecta (a)symmetries (as measured using Chandra, XMM-Newton, and ROSAT images). We also study Type Ia and CC SNRs in a variety of conditions to search for trends in (a)symmetries with environmental factors (e.g., star-formation activity). Collectively, this work provides new insights into the nature of SN explosions and the dynamical evolution of their remnants.

  4. The late behavior of supernova 1987A. I - The light curve. II - Gamma-ray transparency of the ejecta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnett, W. David; Fu, Albert

    1989-01-01

    Observations of the late (t = 20-1500 days) bolometric light curve and the gamma-lines and X-rays from supernova 1987A are compared to theoretical models. It is found that 0.073 + or - 0.015 solar masses of freshly synthesized Ni-56 must be present to fit the bolometric light curve. The results place limits on the luminosity and presumed period of the newly formed pulsar/neutron star. In the second half of the paper, the problem of computing the luminosities in gamma-ray lines and in X-rays from supernova 1987A is addressed. High-energy observations suggest the development of large-scale clumping and bubbling of radioactive material in the ejecta. A model is proposed with a hydrogen envelope mass of about 7 solar masses, homologous scale expansion velocities of about 3000 km/s, and an approximately uniform mass distribution.

  5. Far-Flung Filaments of Fast Ejecta in the Oxygen-Rich SNR G292.0+1.8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, P. F.; Reith, C. N.; Long, K. S.

    2005-05-01

    New optical images of the young supernova remnant (SNR) G292.0+1.8, obtained from the 0.9-m telescope at CTIO, show a far more extensive network of filaments than previous data indicate. Images in [O III] show filaments distributed throughout much of the 8 arcmin diameter shell seen in X-ray and radio images. Many of the outer filaments have a radial, pencil-like morphology that is very suggestive of Rayleigh-Tayor fingers. Comparison of images from epochs 1986-2002 shows filamentary proper motions roughly in the direction of these fingers, consistent with expansion from a point near the central pulsar with a kinematic age of about 3000 yr. Simulations of core-collapse supernovae predict the development of such fingers, but they have never before been so clearly observed in a young SNR. In addition to the extensive [O III] filaments, we have detected three small complexes of filaments that show [S II] emission along with the oxygen lines. None of the fast filaments, with or without [S II], show any evidence for hydrogen; all must be composed of pure supernova ejecta. Limited spectra indicate differences of more than a factor of 5 in the relative strengths of S and O lines, which cannot be attributed to differences in excitation. The progenitor to G292.0+1.8 must have undergone at least some oxygen burning, the products of which have been mixed in variable amounts into at least a few filaments of ejecta. This research has been funded primarily by the National Science Foundation through grant AST-0307613.

  6. Fe K and ejecta emission in SNR G15.9+0.2 with XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, Pierre; Acero, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We present a study of the Galactic supernova remnant SNR G15.9+0.2 with archival XMM-Newton observations. Methods: EPIC data are used to investigate the morphological and spectral properties of the remnant, searching in particular for supernova ejecta and Fe K line emission. By comparing the SNR's X-ray absorption column density with the atomic and molecular gas distribution along the line of sight, we attempt to constrain the distance to the SNR. Results: Prominent line features reveal the presence of ejecta. Abundance ratios of Mg, Si, S, Ar, and Ca strongly suggest that the progenitor of SNR G15.9+0.2 was a massive star with a main sequence mass likely in the range 20-25 M⊙, strengthening the physical association with a candidate central compact object detected with Chandra. Using EPIC's collective power, Fe K line emission from SNR G15.9+0.2 is detected for the first time. We measure the line properties and find evidence for spatial variations. We discuss how the source fits within the sample of SNRs with detected Fe K emission and find that it is the core-collapse SNR with the lowest Fe K centroid energy. We also present some caveats regarding the use of Fe K line centroid energy as a typing tool for SNRs. Only a lower limit of 5 kpc is placed on the distance to SNR G15.9+0.2, constraining its age to tSNR ≳ 2 kyr.

  7. Bilateral symmetry elements of the Zhamanshin impact crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masaytis, V. L.

    1988-01-01

    The internal structure of the Zhamanshin impact structure and the nature of rocks developed within it are studied to establish the impact structure parameters. It is found that the diameter of the visible crater is about 13 km. The small annular structures observed are found to not be secondary craters, and no correlation is found between the asymmetrical distribution of ejecta material and the arrangement of these annular forms.

  8. Analysis of the flux and polarization spectra of the type Ia supernova SN 2001el: Exploring the geometry of the high-velocity Ejecta

    SciTech Connect

    Kasen, Daniel; Nugent, Peter; Wang, Lifan; Howell, D.A.; Wheeler, J. Craig; Hoeflich, Peter; Baade, Dietrich; Baron, E.; Hauschildt, P.H.

    2003-01-15

    SN 2001el is the first normal Type Ia supernova to show a strong, intrinsic polarization signal. In addition, during the epochs prior to maximum light, the CaII IR triplet absorption is seen distinctly and separately at both normal photospheric velocities and at very high velocities. The unusual, high-velocity triplet absorption is highly polarized, with a different polarization angle than the rest of the spectrum. The unique observation allows us to construct a relatively detailed picture of the layered geometrical structure of the supernova ejecta: in our interpretation, the ejecta layers near the photosphere (v approximately 10,000 km/s) obey a near axial symmetry, while a detached, high-velocity structure (v approximately 18,000-25,000 $ km/s) of CaII line opacity deviates from the photospheric axisymmetry. By partially obscuring the underlying photosphere, the high-velocity structure causes a more incomplete cancellation of the polarization of the photospheric light, and so gives rise to the polarization peak of the high-velocity IR triplet feature. In an effort to constrain the ejecta geometry, we develop a technique for calculating 3-D synthetic polarization spectra and use it to generate polarization profiles for several parameterized configurations. In particular, we examine the case where the inner ejecta layers are ellipsoidal and the outer, high-velocity structure is one of four possibilities: a spherical shell, an ellipsoidal shell, a clumped shell, or a toroid. The synthetic spectra rule out the clearly discriminated if observations are obtained from several different lines of sight. Thus, assuming the high velocity structure observed for SN 2001el is a consistent feature of at least known subset of type Ia supernovae, future observations and analyses such as these may allow one to put strong constraints on the ejecta geometry and hence on supernova progenitors and explosion mechanisms.

  9. Meteoritic Microfossils In Eltanin Impact Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyte, F. T.; Wollenburg, J.; Gersonde, R.; Kuhn, G.

    2006-12-01

    Introduction: We report the unique occurrence of microfossils composed largely of meteoritic ejecta particles from the late Pliocene (2.5 Ma) Eltanin impact event. These deposits are unique, recording the only known km- sized asteroid impact into a deep-ocean (5 km) basin. First discovered as in Ir anomaly in sediment cores that were collected in 1965, the deposits contain mm-sized shock-melted asteroidal material, unmelted meteorite fragments (named the Eltanin meteorite), and trace impact spherules. Two oceanographic expeditions by the FS Polarstern in 1995 and 2001 explored 80,000 square km of the impact region, mapping the distribution of meteoritic ejecta, disturbance of seafloor sediments by the impact, and collected 20 new cores with impact deposits in the vicinity of the Freeden Seamounts (57.3S, 90.5W). Analyses of sediment cores show that the impact disrupted sediments on the ocean floor, redepositing them as a chaotic jumble of sediment fragments overlain by a sequence of laminated sands, silts and clays deposited from the water column. Overprinted on this is a pulse of meteoritic ejecta, likely transported ballistically, then settled through the water column. At some localities, meteoritic ejecta was as much as 5 to 50 kg per square meter. This is the most meteorite-rich locality known on Earth. Results: Two cores were taken in a basin near the top of the Freeden Seamounts at a water depth of 2.7 km. Sediments in this shallow basin are compositionally different than those at all other sites as they contain abundant calcareous microfossils. In deeper water sites (4 to 5 km depth), higher pressures and CO2 concentrations cause dissolution of calcite and sediments contain siliceous (opal) microfossils or are barren. An exception to this is a few sites in the immediate vicinity of the seamounts that contain calcareous sediments that flowed off the seamounts after being disturbed by the impact. At the top of the seamounts, sediments with meteoritic ejecta

  10. Analysis of the Younger Dryas Impact Layer

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Richard B.; West, Allen; Revay, Zsolt; Hagstrum, Jonathon T,; Belgya, Thomas; Hee, Shane S. Que; Smith, Alan R.

    2010-02-27

    We have uncovered a thin layer of magnetic grains and microspherules, carbon spherules, and glass-like carbon at nine sites across North America, a site in Belgium, and throughout the rims of 16 Carolina Bays. It is consistent with the ejecta layer from an impact event and has been dated to 12.9 ka BP coinciding with the onset of Younger Dryas (YD) cooling and widespread megafaunal extinctions in North America. At many locations the impact layer is directly below a black mat marking the sudden disappearance of the megafauna and Clovis people. The distribution pattern of the Younger Dryas boundary (YDB) ejecta layer is consistent with an impact near the Great Lakes that deposited terrestrial-like ejecta near the impact site and unusual, titanium-rich projectile-like ejecta further away. High water content associated with the ejecta, up to 28 at. percent hydrogen (H), suggests the impact occurred over the Laurentide Ice Sheet. YDB microspherules and magnetic grains are highly enriched in TiO{sub 2}. Magnetic grains from several sites are enriched in iridium (Ir), up to 117 ppb. The TiO{sub 2}/FeO, K/Th, TiO{sub 2}/Zr, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/FeO+MgO, CaO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, REE/ chondrite, FeO/MnO ratios and SiO{sub 2}, Na{sub 2}O, K{sub 2}O, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Ni, Co, U, Th and other trace element abundances are inconsistent with all terrestrial and extraterrestrial (ET) sources except for KREEP, a lunar igneous rock rich in potassium (K), rare-earth elements (REE), phosphorus (P), and other incompatible elements including U and Th. Normal Fe, Ti, and {sup 238}U/{sup 235}U isotopic abundances were found in the magnetic grains, but {sup 234}U was enriched over equilibrium values by 50 percent in Murray Springs and by 130 percent in Belgium. 40K abundance is enriched by up to 100 percent in YDB sediments and Clovis chert artifacts. Highly vesicular carbon spherules containing nanodiamonds, glass-like carbon, charcoal and soot found in large quantities in the YDB layer are

  11. The Impact Environment of the Hadean Earth at the Dawn of Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, O.; Kring, D. A.; Mojzsis, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    Impact bombardments in the first billion years of Solar System history determined in large part the initial physical and chemical states of the terrestrial planets and their potential to host biospheres. The range of physical states and thermal consequences of the impact epoch, however, is not well quantified. Here, we assess these effects on the young Earth's crust with special emphasis on the Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB) - a putative spike in the number of impacts at about 3.9 Gyr ago - using several different numerical modeling and analytical techniques. A comprehensive array of impact-produced heat sources was evaluated, which includes shock heating, impact melt generation, uplift, and ejecta heating. Results indicate that ~1.5 - 2.5 vol. % of the upper 20 km of the crust was melted in the LHB, with only ~0.3 - 1.5 vol. % in a molten state at any given time. The model predicts that approximately 5 to 10% of the Earth's surface area was covered by > 1 km deep impact melt sheets. A global average of ~600-800 m of ejecta and ~800-1000 m of condensed rock vapor is predicted to have been deposited at that time, with most of the condensed rock vapor produced by the largest (> 100-km) projectiles. Two- and three- dimensional models of post-impact cooling of ejecta and craters, coupled to diffusion models of radiogenic Pb*-loss in zircons were used to evaluate what the cumulative effects of putative LHB-induced age resetting would be of Hadean zircons on a global scale. Zircons entrained in ejecta are projected have the following average global distribution after the end of the LHB: ~59% with no impact-induced Pb*-loss, ~26% with partial Pb*-loss, and ~15% with complete Pb*-loss or destruction of the grain. In addition to the relatively high erodibility of ejecta, our results show that if the ca. 3.9 Gyr old zones documented in the Jack Hills zircons are a signature of the LHB, they were most likely sourced from impact ejecta. Degree of melting in the upper 20 km of

  12. On reported occurrences of shock-deformed clasts in the volcanic ejecta from Toba caldera, Sumatra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpton, V. L.; Schuraytz, B. C.

    1989-01-01

    Reports of shock-deformed phenocrysts from the Toba ignimbrite deposits, Sumatra, have prompted considerable debate over whether shock-deformation products are clear evidence of a meteorite impact origin for the K/T boundary deposits as well as terresrial 'cryptoexplosion' structures. Evidence presented in favor of volcanically induced shock at Toba includes kinked biotites and rare occurrences of single set of lamellae in quartz grains but rests most heavily upon occurrences of mosaic extinction patterns in plagioclase phenocrysts. The present analysis of several of the same Toba samples reveals that these mosaic patterns ae related to distinct compositional zoning and cannot be attributed to deformation of the crystal lattice that shock would produce. Additionally, in more than 200 quartz grains examined, no occurrences of microdeformation features or mosaic textures similar to those associated with known impact structures and the K/T boundary are detected. It is concluded that evidence of shock deformation in the Toba deposits has not been demonstrated.

  13. High-explosive cratering analogs for bowl-shaped, central uplift, and multiring impact craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roddy, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes six experimental explosion craters in terms of their basic morphology, subsurface structural deformation, and surrounding ejecta blanket. These craters exhibit one or more of the following features: bowl shapes with underlying breccia lens, central uplifts, multirings, terraced walls, rim strata, zones of concentric rim deformation, inner continuous ground cover of ejecta blankets formed by overturned flaps, secondary cratering, and fused alluvium. These craters were formed by large shock wave energy transfers at or near zero heights-of-burst, and it is possible that impact craters with analogous morphologic and structural features may have formed under similar surface energy transfer conditions.

  14. Geomorphologic mapping of the lunar crater Tycho and its impact melt deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, T.; van der Bogert, C. H.; Hiesinger, H.

    2016-07-01

    Using SELENE/Kaguya Terrain Camera and Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) data, we produced a new, high-resolution (10 m/pixel), geomorphological and impact melt distribution map for the lunar crater Tycho. The distal ejecta blanket and crater rays were investigated using LROC wide-angle camera (WAC) data (100 m/pixel), while the fine-scale morphologies of individual units were documented using high resolution (∼0.5 m/pixel) LROC narrow-angle camera (NAC) frames. In particular, Tycho shows a large coherent melt sheet on the crater floor, melt pools and flows along the terraced walls, and melt pools on the continuous ejecta blanket. The crater floor of Tycho exhibits three distinct units, distinguishable by their elevation and hummocky surface morphology. The distribution of impact melt pools and ejecta, as well as topographic asymmetries, support the formation of Tycho as an oblique impact from the W-SW. The asymmetric ejecta blanket, significantly reduced melt emplacement uprange, and the depressed uprange crater rim at Tycho suggest an impact angle of ∼25-45°.

  15. The Chicxulub Impact Crater and Oblique Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, M.; Gulick, S.; Melosh, H.; Christeson, G.

    2007-05-01

    Determining whether or not the Chicxulub impact was oblique (<45 degrees) will aid in our understanding of the environmental consequences 65 Ma. Planetary impact events, and impact simulations in the laboratory, show that oblique impacts have clear asymmetric ejecta distributions. However, the subsurface structures of the resultant craters are not well understood. In 2005, we acquired 1822 km of seismic reflection data onboard the R/V Maurice Ewing imaging the massive (200+ km) Chicxulub impact crater. The seismic profiles show that pre- crater stratigraphy outside the central basin of the Chicxulub impact crater is offset downward into the crater marking the post-impact slumping and formation of the terrace zone. The inward collapse of the Chicxulub terrace zone coincides with the outward collapse of the central uplift to form the peak ring. Chicxulub's peak ring is offset to the southeast, away from the deepest terrace zone mapped in the seismic data, suggesting that its peak ring was offset toward a more gradual wall of the transient cavity. Peak ring offsets, relative to crater center, of Venusian craters from radar images in the Magellan data set allow us to determine whether there are systematic variations in peak ring offset due to oblique impact. Ten pristine Venusian peak ring craters formed by oblique impact show that peak rings are offset both uprange and downrange, suggesting that peak ring position, and related subsurface asymmetries in the terrace zone, do not provide information about impact obliquity. This analysis supports the idea that Chicxulub's peak ring offset is a consequence of target properties and pre-impact structure and independent of impact trajectory.

  16. Experimental studies of oblique impact. [of meteorites on planetary surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gault, D. E.; Wedekind, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    Meteoritic materials most probably impact planetary bodies along oblique trajectories inclined less than 45 deg above their surfaces. Laboratory studies of hypervelocity impacts against rock and particulate media are presented that indicate important effects of obliquity on crater size, shape, and ejecta distribution. The effects are particularly important to crater size-frequency analyses and geologic interpretations of crater formations. Impacts at shallow incidence, which are not uncommon, lead to ricochet of the impacting object accompanied with some entrained excavated materials at velocities only slightly reduced from the pre-impact value.

  17. The meteorite impact-induced tsunami hazard.

    PubMed

    Wünnemann, K; Weiss, R

    2015-10-28

    When a cosmic object strikes the Earth, it most probably falls into an ocean. Depending on the impact energy and the depth of the ocean, a large amount of water is displaced, forming a temporary crater in the water column. Large tsunami-like waves originate from the collapse of the cavity in the water and the ejecta splash. Because of the far-reaching destructive consequences of such waves, an oceanic impact has been suggested to be more severe than a similar-sized impact on land; in other words, oceanic impacts may punch over their weight. This review paper summarizes the process of impact-induced wave generation and subsequent propagation, whether the wave characteristic differs from tsunamis generated by other classical mechanisms, and what methods have been applied to quantify the consequences of an oceanic impact. Finally, the impact-induced tsunami hazard will be evaluated by means of the Eltanin impact event.

  18. Impact-generated winds on Venus: Causes and effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Pater H.

    1992-01-01

    The pressure of the dense atmosphere of Venus significantly changes the appearance of ejecta deposits relative to craters on the Moon and Mercury. Conversely, specific styles and sequences of ejecta emplacement can be inferred to represent different intensities of atmospheric response winds acting over different timescales. Three characteristic timescales can be inferred from the geologic record: surface scouring and impactor-controlled (angle and direction) initiation of the long fluidized run-out flows; nonballistic emplacement of inner, radar-bright ejecta facies and radar-dark outer facies; and very late reworking of surface materials. These three timescales roughly correspond to processes observed in laboratory experiments that can be scaled to conditions on Venus (with appropriate assumptions): coupling between the atmosphere and earlytime vapor/melt (target and impactor) that produces an intense shock that subsequently evolves into blast/response winds; less energetic dynamic response of the atmosphere to the outward-moving ballistic <