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Sample records for impacts involving porous

  1. Numerical simulations of impacts involving porous bodies. I. Implementing sub-resolution porosity in a 3D SPH hydrocode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jutzi, Martin; Benz, Willy; Michel, Patrick

    2008-11-01

    In this paper, we extend our Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) impact code to include the effect of porosity at a sub-resolution scale by adapting the so-called P-alpha model. Many small bodies in the different populations of asteroids and comets are believed to contain a high degree of porosity and the determination of both their collisional evolution and the outcome of their disruption requires that the effect of porosity is taken into account in the computation of those processes. Here, we present our model and show how porosity interfaces with the elastic-perfectly plastic material description and the brittle fracture model generally used to simulate the fragmentation of non-porous rocky bodies. We investigate various compaction models and discuss their suitability to simulate the compaction of (highly) porous material. Then, we perform simple test cases where we compare results of the simulations to the theoretical solutions. We also present a Deep Impact-like simulation to show the effect of porosity on the outcome of an impact. Detailed validation tests will be presented in a next paper by comparison with high-velocity laboratory experiments on porous materials [Jutzi et al., in preparation]. Once validated at small scales, our new impact code can then be used at larger scales to study impacts and collisions involving brittle solids including porosity, such as the parent bodies of C-type asteroid families or cometary materials, both in the strength- and in the gravity-dominated regime.

  2. Droplet impact on a porous substrate: a capillary tube model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hang; Theofanous, Theo

    2009-11-01

    The dynamics of impacting (spreading, penetrating) a droplet on a porous substrate, modeled by an array of capillary tubes, is studied numerically using diffuse interface methods. The absorption rate depends on the diameter ratio of the capillary tube to the droplet, wettability, and liquid properties. The flow dynamics is resolved by solving the Navier-Stokes equations and interface capturing is governed by the Cahn-Hilliard equation. Contact-angle hysteresis is included (Ding&Spelt 2008) and the stress singularity at moving contact lines is relieved using a diffuse interface model (Seppecher 1996; Jaqcmin 2000). The model is validated by studying the evolution of a droplet initially resting on a porous substrate and by comparison to drop-impact experiments involving just one capillary tube (Kogan et al 2008). Comparisons with analytical solutions and results available in the literature (e.g. Hilpert & Ben-David 2009) are presented. Through parametric simulations over relevant ranges of Reynolds and Ohnesorge numbers and contact angles, impact regime maps are derived.

  3. Impact dynamics of porous powder. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Titov, V.M.

    1995-12-31

    The shock adiabats have been built experimentally in the range of moderate pressures for three porous materials: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} wheat flour, and their mixture. The model, which describes the behavior of porous powder materials under large-amplitude dynamic loading, has been constructed. The model applicability to describing the shock wave processes is confirmed by good agreement of the calculated shock adiabats and the data obtained in the experiments. The compressive strength of compacted samples has been determined. The possible trend of further researches is presented in conclusion. 15 refs., 19 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Nonlinear Behavior Of Saturated Porous Media Under External Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perepechko, Y.

    2005-12-01

    This paper deals with nonlinear behavior of liquid saturated porous media in gravity filed under external impact. The continuum is assumed to be a two-velocity medium; it consists of a deformable porous matrix (with Maxwell's reology) and a Newtonian liquid that saturates this matrix. The energy dissipation in this model takes place due the interface friction between the solid matrix and saturating liquid, and also through relaxation of inelastic shear stress in the porous matrix. The elaborated nonisothermal mathematical model for this kind of medium is a thermodynamically consistent and closed model. Godunov's explicit difference scheme was used for computer simulation; the method implies numerical simulation for discontinuity decay in flux calculations. As an illustrative example, we consider the formation of dissipation structures in a plain layer of that medium after pulse or periodic impact on the background of liquid filtration through the porous matrix. At the process beginning, one can observe elastic behavior of the porous matrix. Deformation spreading through the saturated porous matrix occurs almost without distortions and produces a channel-shaped zone of stretching with a high porosity. Later on, dissipation processes and reology properties of porous medium causes the diffusion of this channel. We also observe a correlation between the liquid distribution (porosity for the solid matrix) and dilatancy fields; this allows us to restore the dilatancy field from the measured fluid saturation of the medium. This work was supported by the RFBR (Grant No. 04-05-64107), the Presidium of SB RAS (Grant 106), the President's Grants (NSh-2118.2003.5, NSh-1573.2003.5).

  5. Impact cratering and ejection of material on porous asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Housen, K.; Sweet, W.

    2014-07-01

    The manner in which an impact crater and its ejecta blanket are created involves an interplay between gravity and the strength properties of the target material. Gravity is important because the overburden stress at depth in an asteroid determines the material shear strength, which affects the mechanics of crater and ejecta formation. This has important implications when attempting to use lab experiments to simulate large-crater formation on asteroids. The only way to perform small-scale experimental simulations of cratering events on asteroids is to adjust the ambient ''gravity'', g, such that the experiment has the same product of gL as the actual impact event being simulated, where L is an important length scale, such as the projectile or crater size [1]. In this way, the lab crater has the same overburden stress (and shear strength) and ejecta ballistics as a much larger cratering event on an asteroid. Even though asteroids have weak gravity fields, the overburden stress of a multiple-km crater is larger than can be reproduced in the lab at 1 G. Therefore, simulation of large impacts on asteroids requires that the ''gravity'' of the experiment is greater than 1 G. Here we report on a series of impact experiments conducted at elevated gravity on a geotechnical centrifuge. These experimental craters are subscale replicas of the much larger craters they simulate; larger G-levels simulate larger craters. Using the Boeing 600-G centrifuge, we directly simulate the formation of asteroid (g˜0.001 G) craters as large as several tens of km. The target materials are cohesionless with porosity ranging from 35 % to 95 %. Cratering experiments in soils with small or moderate porosity (<30 %) show a decrease in cratering efficiency (crater volume/impactor volume) with increasing size scale or, equivalently, increasing G in a centrifuge experiment. This well-known gravity-regime behavior is due to the fact that the shear strength of the target material goes up due to the

  6. Impact and Penetration of Nanoparticle Suspension Drops into Porous Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Rakesh; Yarin, Alexander; Pourdeyhimi, Behnam

    2014-03-01

    The impacts and dynamic penetration of drops with suspended nanoparticles into porous membranes are studied experimentally and theoretically. This type of penetration is radically different from the wettability-driven imbibition. Two types of membranes are used in the experiments: (i) glass fiber filter membrane (wettable) and (ii) PTFE depth filter (non-wettable). The nanoparticle entrainment and deposition inside the membrane bulk is used to mostly visualize the ultimate penetration fronts of the carrier fluid by observing the cut cross-sections of the filter membranes, albeit also provides an insight into potentially new applications like circuit printing on nonwovens. The experimental results demonstrate that during the dynamic focusing responsible for water penetration into micro- and nanopores, water can penetrate into a non-wettable porous medium (PTFE). Water also penetrates by the same focusing mechanism into the wettable glass fiber membrane, where it additionally spreads on a much longer time scale due to the wettability-driven flow. A theory explaining dynamic penetration of liquid into porous medium after drop impact is proposed. It is used to explain and predict water penetration into the non-wettable media after drop impact, and the results are compared with the experimental data. The work was supported by the Nonwovens Cooperative Research Center (NCRC).

  7. Numerical Modeling of Ink-droplet Impact on Porous Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Saman; Ashgriz, Nasser; Chandra, Sanjeev; Andrews, John; Droppel, Stephan; Xerox Corporation

    2011-11-01

    Solid ink is wax-resin based ink, which is solid at room temperature, and melts when heated. Impact of a solid ink droplet with different velocities and temperatures on paper is studied. Maximum spreading diameter of solid ink ``Colorstix8200'' on different papers has been evaluated. Increasing the temperature decreases the viscosity of the wax, which causes more spreading and penetration on the paper. Although lateral spreading is very rapid during the initial stages of impact, drop may penetrate inside the substrate too. Dynamically, wax penetration on paper is a function of inertia, surface tension and capillary pressure inside the paper. When a wax drop penetrates into the paper, it mechanically bonds to the paper through anchoring within the pores. After the impact, droplets are removed and remaining areas are measured for adhesion and cohesion characteristic. The adhesion of solid ink to paper has been studied qualitatively using scratch test and tape test techniques. The experimental setup consists of a pendent droplet generator which consists of heated cylinder for molten wax and a nozzle; imaging system, pull test system, and cutting system. Penetration, spreading and adhesion force have been studied for different temperatures and impact velocities on porous substrate.

  8. Experimental study on impact disruption of porous asteroids: Effects of oblique impact and multiple collisions on impact strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Minami; Takano, Shota; Matsue, Kazuma; Arakawa, Masahiko

    2015-08-01

    Most of asteroids would have pores and a plenty of pre-cracks in their interiors, and the pre-cracks could be formed by multiple impacts at various impact angles. Porosity and pre-cracks are important physical properties controlling the impact strength. Okamoto and Arakawa (2009) did impact experiments of porous gypsum spheres to obtain the impact strength of porous asteroids, but they carried out only single impact experiments on the same target at head-on. In this study, we conducted oblique impact and multiple impacts on porous gypsum and examined the effects of impact angle and pre-cracks on the impact strength.We carried out impact experiments by using the one-stage He gas gun and the two-stage H2 gas gun at Kobe University. The impact velocities were <200 m/s (low-vi) and >3 km/s (high-vi). Targets were porous gypsum spheres with the porosity of 55% and the diameters of 7 or 12 cm. The projectiles were a porous gypsum sphere with the diameter of 2.5 cm at low-vi or a polycarbonate sphere with the diameter of 4.7 cm at high-vi. The impact angle changed from 15° to 90°, and the projectile was impacted on the same target for 2-15 times. The impact phenomena were observed by a high-speed digital video camera to measure the fragment velocities.The oblique impact experiments showed that the impact strength did not depend on the impact angle θ between 45° and 90°, and obtained to be ~2000 J/kg, while it drastically changed at the θ from 15° to 30°. We reanalyzed our results by using the effective energy density defined as Qsin2θ, where Q is the energy density, and found that most of the results were consistent with the results of head-on impacts. The multiple impacts showed that the impact strength of pre-impacted targets was larger than that of intact targets in the case of low-vi. This might be caused by the compaction of the target surface. In the case of high-vi, the impact strength of pre-impacted targets was smaller than that of intact targets. This

  9. [The impact of socially involved films].

    PubMed

    Mimoun, M

    1979-01-01

    During the past few years studies on linguistics and particularly on semiology have considerably renewed the approach and investigation methods in artistic expression. Ideology has several languages and expression systems (photography, painting, music, speech, architecture and so on). The film does not only carry an ideological content: besides the signification systems and the signs taken from other means of films. To consider only films which have the ostensible objective to urge the public to a political action as socially involved is wrong: any movie is socially involved. One must appreciate correctly and politically the place, role and level at which it intervenes in the framework of the ideological fight. Audiovisual alphabetization is essential for the progress of new ideas in the field of picture and sound. In the Third World, when they do exist, cinematographies rarely have the political power to consider such an action. Ideological impact depends mostly on the social, political and cultural environment. A movie is 1st questioned from the standpoint of the historical place and of the problems of the public. The example of Algerian cinematography as a socially involved one is given. At its origin, film-making in this country was working at informing the outside world of the meaning of the people's fight. Its goal was to capture the political and social reality in order to change it. Therefore the social involvement role of Algerian film-producing is tightly connected to the revolutionary process in which the whole country is engaged. Algerian film-producing is often understood as a propaganda cinematography. The stagnation or progress of a cinematography cannot be measured in relation to the universal mythical culture, but in relation to the social and cultural reality of the country where it originates. The present deepening of the reflection on film and ideology is a result of a recent accentuation of the ideologic fight.

  10. Impact of pore size variability and network coupling on electrokinetic transport in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh, Shima; Bazant, Martin Z.; Mani, Ali

    2016-11-01

    We have developed and validated an efficient and robust computational model to study the coupled fluid and ion transport through electrokinetic porous media, which are exposed to external gradients of pressure, electric potential, and concentration. In our approach a porous media is modeled as a network of many pores through which the transport is described by the coupled Poisson-Nernst-Planck-Stokes equations. When the pore sizes are random, the interactions between various modes of transport may provoke complexities such as concentration polarization shocks and internal flow circulations. These phenomena impact mixing and transport in various systems including deionization and filtration systems, supercapacitors, and lab-on-a-chip devices. In this work, we present simulations of massive networks of pores and we demonstrate the impact of pore size variation, and pore-pore coupling on the overall electrokinetic transport in porous media.

  11. Involvement of fractal geometry on solute permeation through porous poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) membranes.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, Fumiki; Onuki, Yoshinori; Morishita, Mariko; Takayama, Kozo

    2006-01-10

    Fractal geometry was applied to quantify the complexity of an internal structure of porous membranes prepared with poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA). The porous pHEMA membranes were synthesized by means of free-radical solution polymerization. Boundary lines of the porous structures in the pHEMA membrane were taken by a scanning electron microscope as image data, and these images were fed into a computer to estimate the fractal dimension. The boundary images of porous pHEMA membranes were observed to be a typical fractal and their complexity was quantified as a non-integral fractal dimension. The permeation of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled dextran, molecular weight 4400 (FD-4) as a model penetrant through the porous pHEMA membrane was determined using water-jacket type two-chamber diffusion cells. A fairly good negative relationship between the permeability coefficient of FD-4 and the fractal dimension was observed, suggesting the usefulness of the fractal dimension as a novel means for evaluating solute permeation through the porous membranes.

  12. Protective Effectiveness of Porous Shields Under the Influence of High-Speed Impact Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramshonkov, E. N.; Krainov, A. V.; Shorohov, P. V.

    2016-02-01

    The results of numerical simulations of a compact steel impactor with the aluminum porous shields under high-speed shock loading are presented. The porosity of barrier varies in wide range provided that its mass stays the same, but the impactor has always equal (identical) mass. Here presented the final assessment of the barrier perforation speed depending on its porosity and initial shock speed. The range of initial impact speed varies from 1 to 10 km/s. Physical phenomena such as: destruction, melting, vaporization of a interacting objects are taken into account. The analysis of a shield porosity estimation disclosed that the protection effectiveness of porous shield reveals at the initial impact speed grater then 1.5 km/s, and it increases when initial impact speed growth.

  13. Impact of ambient conditions on evaporation from porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Neriah, Asaf; Assouline, Shmuel; Shavit, Uri; Weisbrod, Noam

    2014-08-01

    The complexity of soil evaporation, depending on the atmospheric conditions, emphasizes the importance of its quantification under potential changes in ambient air temperature, Ta, and relative humidity, RH. Mass loss, soil matric tension, and meteorological measurements, carried out in a climate-controlled laboratory, were used to study the effect of ambient conditions on the drying rates of a porous medium. A set of evaporation experiments from initially saturated sand columns were carried out under constant Ta of 6, 15, 25, and 35°C and related RH (0.66, 0.83, 1.08, and 1.41 kPa, respectively). The results show that the expected increase of the stage 1 (S1) evaporation rate with Ta but also revealed an exponential-like reduction in the duration of S1, which decreased from 29 to 2.3 days (at Ta of 6 and 35°C, respectively). The evaporation rate, e(t), was equal to the potential evaporation, ep(t), under Ta = 6°C, while it was always smaller than ep(t) under higher Ta. The cumulative evaporation during S1 was higher under Ta = 6°C than under the higher temperatures. Evaporation rates during S2 were practically unaffected by ambient conditions. The results were analyzed using a mass transfer formulation linking e(t) with the vapor pressure deficit through a resistance coefficient r. It was shown that rS1 (the resistance during S1) is constant, indicating that the application of such an approach is straightforward during S1. However, for evaporation from a free water surface and S2, the resistances, rBL and rS2, were temperature-dependent, introducing some complexity for these cases.

  14. Impact shock and penetration fragmentation in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Trucano, T.; Grady, D.

    1994-09-01

    In this paper, we discuss experimental, analytical, and computational techniques for studying the high velocity interaction of solid bodies with low density media. We assume that the velocity of the interaction is such that compressible effects in the solid are important. We are particularly interested in the dynamic mechanisms of deformation, erosion, and breakup which dominate the solid response at these high velocities. This is a problem of considerable current interest. Applications include the atmospheric propagation of high velocity aerosols, such as those that might be created in certain kinds of nuclear reactor accidents and explosive weapon accidents. An even more novel application is to the study of the impact of astrophysical bodies, such as meteors, asteroids, and comet fragments into planetary atmospheres. There is significant concern over the threats posed by impacts of these kinds on the earth. We will discuss the application of our methodology to understanding these impacts. In particular, we suggest that the experimental technique we present is applicable to scaled laboratory simulations of some of the phenomena that are believed to be important in atmospheric impacts.

  15. High Velocity Impact Interaction of Metal Particles with Porous Heterogeneous Materials with an Inorganic Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazunov, A. A.; Ishchenko, A. N.; Afanasyeva, S. A.; Belov, N. N.; Burkin, V. V.; Rogaev, K. S.; Tabachenko, A. N.; Khabibulin, M. V.; Yugov, N. T.

    2016-03-01

    A computational-experimental investigation of stress-strain state and fracture of a porous heterogeneous material with an inorganic matrix, used as a thermal barrier coating of flying vehicles, under conditions of a high-velocity impact by a spherical steel projectile imitating a meteorite particle is discussed. Ballistic tests are performed at the velocities about 2.5 km/s. Numerical modeling of the high-velocity impact is described within the framework of a porous elastoplastic model including fracture and different phase states of the materials. The calculations are performed using the Euler and Lagrange numerical techniques for the velocities up to 10 km/s in a complete-space problem statement.

  16. Competence and Affect in Task Involvement and Ego Involvement: The Impact of Social Comparison Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jagacinski, Carolyn M.; Nicholls, John G.

    1987-01-01

    Two studies investigated the impact of information about the effort and performance of others on students' anticipated affects and judgments of competence given success in task-involving and ego-involving contexts. Without social comparison information, competence and positive affects were judged higher when students were asked to imagine…

  17. Hypervelocity impacts into porous graphite: experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hébert, D.; Seisson, G.; Rullier, J.-L.; Bertron, I.; Hallo, L.; Chevalier, J.-M.; Thessieux, C.; Guillet, F.; Boustie, M.; Berthe, L.

    2017-01-01

    We present experiments and numerical simulations of hypervelocity impacts of 0.5 mm steel spheres into graphite, for velocities ranging between 1100 and 4500 m s-1. Experiments have evidenced that, after a particular striking velocity, depth of penetration no longer increases but decreases. Moreover, the projectile is observed to be trapped below the crater surface. Using numerical simulations, we show how this experimental result can be related to both materials, yield strength. A Johnson-Cook model is developed for the steel projectile, based on the literature data. A simple model is proposed for the graphite yield strength, including a piecewise pressure dependence of the Drucker-Prager form, which coefficients have been chosen to reproduce the projectile penetration depth. Comparisons between experiments and simulations are presented and discussed. The damage properties of both materials are also considered, by using a threshold on the first principal stress as a tensile failure criterion. An additional compressive failure model is also used for graphite when the equivalent strain reaches a maximum value. We show that the experimental crater diameter is directly related to the graphite spall strength. Uncertainties on the target yield stress and failure strength are estimated. This article is part of the themed issue 'Experimental testing and modelling of brittle materials at high strain rates'.

  18. A note on the solution of water wave scattering problem involving small deformation on a porous channel-bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, S.; Sarangi, M. R.

    2017-03-01

    The solution of water wave scattering problem involving small deformation on a porous bed in a channel, where the upper surface is bounded above by an infinitely extent rigid horizontal surface, is studied here within the framework of linearized water wave theory. In such a situation, there exists only one mode of waves propagating on the porous surface. A simplified perturbation analysis, involving a small parameter ɛ ( ≪ 1), which measures the smallness of the deformation, is employed to reduce the governing Boundary Value Problem (BVP) to a simpler BVP for the first-order correction of the potential function. The first-order potential function and, hence, the first-order reflection and transmission coefficients are obtained by the method based on Fourier transform technique as well as Green's integral theorem with the introduction of appropriate Green's function. Two special examples of bottom deformation: the exponentially damped deformation and the sinusoidal ripple bed, are considered to validate the results. For the particular example of a patch of sinusoidal ripples, the resonant interaction between the bed and the upper surface of the fluid is attained in the neighborhood of a singularity, when the ripples wavenumbers of the bottom deformation become approximately twice the components of the incident field wavenumber along the positive x-direction. Also, the main advantage of the present study is that the results for the values of reflection and transmission coefficients are found to satisfy the energy-balance relation almost accurately.

  19. Propagation of impact-induced shock waves in porous sandstone using mesoscale modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GÜLdemeister, Nicole; WÜNnemann, Kai; Durr, Nathanael; Hiermaier, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract-Generation and propagation of shock waves by meteorite <span class="hlt">impact</span> is significantly affected by material properties such as porosity, water content, and strength. The objective of this work was to quantify processes related to the shock-induced compaction of pore space by numerical modeling, and compare the results with data obtained in the framework of the Multidisciplinary Experimental and Modeling <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Research Network (MEMIN) <span class="hlt">impact</span> experiments. We use mesoscale models resolving the collapse of individual pores to validate macroscopic (homogenized) approaches describing the bulk behavior of <span class="hlt">porous</span> and water-saturated materials in large-scale models of crater formation, and to quantify localized shock amplification as a result of pore space crushing. We carried out a suite of numerical models of planar shock wave propagation through a well-defined area (the "sample") of <span class="hlt">porous</span> and/or water-saturated material. The <span class="hlt">porous</span> sample is either represented by a homogeneous unit where porosity is treated as a state variable (macroscale model) and water content by an equation of state for mixed material (ANEOS) or by a defined number of individually resolved pores (mesoscale model). We varied porosity and water content and measured thermodynamic parameters such as shock wave velocity and particle velocity on meso- and macroscales in separate simulations. The mesoscale models provide additional data on the heterogeneous distribution of peak shock pressures as a consequence of the complex superposition of reflecting rarefaction waves and shock waves originating from the crushing of pores. We quantify the bulk effect of porosity, the reduction in shock pressure, in terms of Hugoniot data as a function of porosity, water content, and strength of a quartzite matrix. We find a good agreement between meso-, macroscale models and Hugoniot data from shock experiments. We also propose a combination of a porosity compaction model (ɛ-α model) that was</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.H13A1061H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.H13A1061H"><span>The Efficiency Analysis of Low <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Development Applied in Taiwan: A Case Study of <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Pavement</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Huang, Y. H.; Liu, H. J.; Hsu, N. S.; Chang, F. M.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Low <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Development (LID) has been developed since the end of 1990s. Lots of successful experience based on this new technology have been made. Taiwan Executive Yuan is conducting a six-year (2014~2019) program "Integrated River Basin Management Plan" applying LID to build sponge cities. Construction and Planning Agency, Ministry of the Interior is editing the manual of LID technology for Taiwan. However, since the hydrological environments, physiographic conditions, climates, the strength and frequency of disasters in Taiwan are different from that in America, this study takes the first laboratory experiment and model simulation to evaluate the efficiency of application of LID in Taiwan.LID Facilities includes <span class="hlt">porous</span> pavement, rain garden, green roof, tree box filter facilities and so on, and in this study, <span class="hlt">porous</span> pavement is taken as an example for discussion. In the part of laboratory experiments, the sand box experiments is designed to operate with the specified rainfall return period calculated by Horton formula and rainfall characteristics of Taipei. Then the outflow hydrograph in each designed rainfall of specified return period can be evaluated. As for model simulation, this study constructs LID simulation elements by SWMM model and tests the suitability for simulation of the outflow hydrograph obtained from experiments, and definitely quantifies the efficiency of water retention and flood reduction of <span class="hlt">porous</span> pavement. The results fits well with the experimental observation data with less than 10% error of pick flow. It suggests that, with LID simulation elements constructed in this study, the efficiency of LID in actual on-site application can be evaluated.The results shows that <span class="hlt">porous</span> pavement is able to delay arrival time of pick about 5% ~10% and reduce the pick flow about 5%~20%, and hold the ability of near 3~5% water retention. It proves that application of LID can retain water and reduce flood in Taiwan.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li class="active"><span>1</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_1 --> <div id="page_2" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>1</a></li> <li class="active"><span>2</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="21"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998CP....239..459K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998CP....239..459K"><span>Threshold electron attachment and electron <span class="hlt">impact</span> ionization <span class="hlt">involving</span> oxygen dimers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kreil, J.; Ruf, M.-W.; Hotop, H.; Ettischer, I.; Buck, U.</p> <p>1998-12-01</p> <p>Using two different crossed-beams machines we have carried out the first quantitative study of threshold electron attachment and electron <span class="hlt">impact</span>-induced ionization and fragmentation <span class="hlt">involving</span> oxygen dimers (O 2) 2. In the electron attachment experiment we study electron transfer from state-selected Ar **(20d) Rydberg atoms to O 2 molecules and dimers in a skimmed supersonic beam at variable nozzle temperatures ( T0) and stagnation pressures ( p0). The relative dimer density is determined through measurements of Penning ionization by metastable Ne *(3s 3P2,0) atoms and used to estimate the absolute cross-section for O 2- formation in collisions of Ar **(20d) Rydberg atoms with O 2 dimers to be nearly 10 -17 m 2, almost four orders of magnitude larger than that for O 2- formation in collisions of Ar **(20d) Rydberg atoms with O 2 monomers. The fragmentation of the oxygen cluster beam is quantitatively characterized by the transverse helium beam scattering method which allows us to spatially separate different clusters. It is shown that in 70 eV electron <span class="hlt">impact</span> of (O 2) 2 only 3.6(4)% of the dimers are detected as dimer ions (O 2) 2+. In additional experiments <span class="hlt">involving</span> SF 6 clusters we show that SF 6 dimers fragment nearly completely upon 70 eV electron <span class="hlt">impact</span>, yielding SF 5+ ions (probability for (SF 6)·SF 5+ production at most 0.3%).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23474339','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23474339"><span>Effectiveness of low <span class="hlt">impact</span> development practices in two urbanized watersheds: retrofitting with rain barrel/cistern and <span class="hlt">porous</span> pavement.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ahiablame, Laurent M; Engel, Bernard A; Chaubey, Indrajeet</p> <p>2013-04-15</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of urbanization on hydrology and water quality can be minimized with the use of low <span class="hlt">impact</span> development (LID) practices in urban areas. This study assessed the performance of rain barrel/cistern and <span class="hlt">porous</span> pavement as retrofitting technologies in two urbanized watersheds of 70 and 40 km(2) near Indianapolis, Indiana. Six scenarios consisting of the watershed existing condition, 25% and 50% implementation of rain barrel/cistern and <span class="hlt">porous</span> pavement, and 25% rain barrel/cistern combined with 25% <span class="hlt">porous</span> pavement were evaluated using a proposed LID modeling framework and the Long-Term Hydrologic <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Assessment (L-THIA)-LID model. The model was calibrated for annual runoff from 1991 to 2000, and validated from 2001 to 2010 for the two watersheds. For the calibration period, R(2) and NSE values were greater than 0.60 and 0.50 for annual runoff and streamflow. Baseflow was not calibrated in this study. During the validation period, R(2) and NSE values were greater than 0.50 for runoff and streamflow, and 0.30 for baseflow in the two watersheds. The various application levels of barrel/cistern and <span class="hlt">porous</span> pavement resulted in 2-12% reduction in runoff and pollutant loads for the two watersheds. Baseflow loads slightly increased with increase in baseflow by more than 1%. However, reduction in runoff led to reduction in total streamflow and associated pollutant loads by 1-9% in the watersheds. The results also indicate that the application of 50% rain barrel/cistern, 50% <span class="hlt">porous</span> pavement and 25% rain barrel/cistern combined with 25% <span class="hlt">porous</span> pavement are good retrofitting options in these watersheds. The L-THIA-LID model can be used to inform management and decision-making for implementation of LID practices at the watershed scale.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015WRR....51.8973M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015WRR....51.8973M"><span>The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of immobile zones on the transport and retention of nanoparticles in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Molnar, Ian L.; Gerhard, Jason I.; Willson, Clinton S.; O'Carroll, Denis M.</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>Nanoparticle transport and retention within <span class="hlt">porous</span> media is treated by conceptualizing the <span class="hlt">porous</span> media as a series of independent collectors (e.g., Colloid Filtration Theory). This conceptualization assumes that flow phenomena near grain-grain contacts, such as immobile zones (areas of low flow), exert a negligible influence on nanoparticle transport and assumes that retention and release of particles depends only on surface chemistry. This study investigated the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of immobile zones on nanoparticle transport and retention by employing synchrotron X-ray computed microtomography (SXCMT) to examine pore-scale silver nanoparticle distributions during transport through three sand columns: uniform iron oxide, uniform quartz, and well-graded quartz. Extended tailing was observed during the elution phase of all experiments suggesting that hydraulic retention in immobile zones, not detachment from grains, was the source of tailing. A numerical simulation of fluid flow through an SXCMT data set predicted the presence of immobile zones near grain-grain contacts. SXCMT-determined silver nanoparticle concentrations observed that significantly lower nanoparticle concentrations existed near grain-grain contacts throughout the duration of all experiments. In addition, the SXCMT-determined pore-scale concentration gradients were found to be independent of surface chemistry and grain size distribution, suggesting that immobile zones limit the diffusive transport of nanoparticles toward the collectors. These results suggest that the well-known overprediction of nanoparticle retention by traditional CFT may be due to ignoring the influences of grain-grain contacts and immobile zones. As such, accurate prediction of nanoparticle transport requires consideration of immobile zones and their influence on both hydraulic and surface retention.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006WRR....4210405Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006WRR....4210405Y"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of microbial growth on water flow and solute transport in unsaturated <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yarwood, R. R.; Rockhold, M. L.; Niemet, M. R.; Selker, J. S.; Bottomley, P. J.</p> <p>2006-10-01</p> <p>A novel analytical method was developed that permitted real-time, noninvasive measurements of microbial growth and associated changes in hydrodynamic properties in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media under unsaturated flowing conditions. Salicylate-induced, lux gene-based bioluminescence was used to quantify the temporal and spatial development of colonization over a 7-day time course. Water contents were determined daily by measuring light transmission through the system. Hydraulic flow paths were determined daily by pulsing a bromophenol blue dye solution through the colonized region of the sand. Bacterial growth and accumulation had a significant <span class="hlt">impact</span> on the hydraulic properties of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. Microbial colonization caused localized drying within the colonized zone, with decreases in saturation approaching 50% of antecedent values, and a 25% lowering of the capillary fringe height. Flow was retarded within the colonized zone and diverted around it concurrent with the expansion of the colonized zone between days 3 and 6. The location of horizontal dispersion corresponded with the cell densities of 1-3 × 109 cells g-1 dry sand. The apparent solute velocity through the colonized region was reduced from 0.41 cm min-1 (R2 = 0.99) to 0.25 cm min-1 (R2 = 0.99) by the sixth day of the experiment, associated with population densities that would occupy approximately 7% of the available pore space within the colonized region. Changes in the extent of colonization occurred over the course of the experiment, including upward migration against flow. The distribution of cells was not determined by water flow alone, but rather by a dynamic interaction between water flow and microbial growth. This experimental system provides rich data sets for the testing of conceptualizations expressed through numerical modeling.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/894846','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/894846"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of microbial growth on water flow and solute transport in unsaturated <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Yarwood, R. R.; Rockhold, M. L.; Niemet, M. R.; Selker, John S.; Bottomley, Peter J.</p> <p>2006-10-05</p> <p>A novel analytical method was developed that permitted real-time, noninvasive measurements of microbial growth and associated changes in hydrodynamic properties in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media under unsaturated flowing conditions. Salicylate-induced, lux gene-based bioluminescence was used to quantify the temporal and spatial development of colonization over a seven day time course. Water contents were determined daily by measuring light transmission through the system. Hydraulic flow paths were determined daily by pulsing a bromophenol blue dye solution through the colonized region of the sand. Bacterial growth and accumulation had a significant <span class="hlt">impact</span> on the hydraulic properties of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. Microbial colonization caused localized drying within the colonized zone, with decreases in saturation approaching 50% of antecedent values, and a 25% lowering of the capillary fringe height. Flow was retarded within the colonized zone and diverted around it. The apparent solute velocity through the colonized region was reduced from 0.41 cm min 1 (R2 = 0.99) to 0.25 cm min 1 (R2 = 0.99) by the sixth day of the experiment, associated with maximum population densities that would occupy about 7% of the available pore space within the colonized region. Changes in the extent of colonization occurred over the course of the experiment, including upward migration against flow. The distribution of cells was not determined by water flow alone, but rather by a dynamic interaction between water flow and microbial growth. This experimental system provides rich data sets for the testing of conceptualizations expressed through numerical modeling.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/921683','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/921683"><span><span class="hlt">IMPACT</span> OF COMPOSITION AND HEAT TREATMENT ON PORE SIZE IN <span class="hlt">POROUS</span> WALLED HOLLOW GLASS MICROSPHERES</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Raszewski, F; Erich Hansen, E; Ray Schumacher, R; David Peeler, D</p> <p>2007-12-04</p> <p>The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed a new geometric form: hollow glass microspheres (HGMs), with unique <span class="hlt">porous</span> walls. The new geometric form combines the existing technology of HGMs with basic glass science knowledge in the realm of glass-in-glass phase separation. Conceptually, the development of a HGM with <span class="hlt">porous</span> walls (referred to as a PWHGM) provides a unique system in which various media or filling agents can be incorporated into the PWHGM (via transport through the <span class="hlt">porous</span> walls) and ultimately has the capacity to serve as a functional delivery system in various industrial applications. Applications of these types of systems could range from hydrogen storage, molecular sieves, drug and bioactive delivery systems, to environmental, chemical and biological indicators, relevant to Energy, Environmental Processing and Homeland Security fields. As a specific example, previous studies at SRNL have introduced materials capable of hydrogen storage (as well as other materials) into the interior of the PWHGMs. The goal of this project was to determine if the microstructure (i.e., pore size and pore size distribution) of a PWHGM could be altered or tailored by varying composition and/or heat treatment (time and/or temperature) conditions. The ability to tailor the microstructure through composition or heat treatments could provide the opportunity to design the PWHGM system to accommodate different additives or fill agents. To meet this objective, HGMs of various alkali borosilicate compositions were fabricated using a flame forming apparatus installed at the Aiken County Technical Laboratory (ACTL). HGMs were treated under various heat treatment conditions to induce and/or enhance glass in glass phase separation. Heat treatment temperatures ranged from 580 C to 620 C, while heat treatment times were either 8 or 24 hours. Of the two primary variables assessed in this study, heat treatment temperature was determined to be most effective in changing the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=1.51&pg=2&id=ED552172','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=1.51&pg=2&id=ED552172"><span>The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Parental <span class="hlt">Involvement</span> on Kindergarten Student Writing Development</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Anderson, Somer Knight</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Although researchers have studied parental <span class="hlt">involvement</span> and reading achievement, few have examined the effects of parental <span class="hlt">involvement</span> on young children's developmental writing. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between parent <span class="hlt">involvement</span> in a writing workshop and the writing development of kindergarten students in an…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/14827','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/14827"><span>Tailored <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Materials</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>BARTON,THOMAS J.; BULL,LUCY M.; KLEMPERER,WALTER G.; LOY,DOUGLAS A.; MCENANEY,BRIAN; MISONO,MAKOTO; MONSON,PETER A.; PEZ,GUIDO; SCHERER,GEORGE W.; VARTULI,JAMES C.; YAGHI,OMAR M.</p> <p>1999-11-09</p> <p>Tailoring of <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials <span class="hlt">involves</span> not only chemical synthetic techniques for tailoring microscopic properties such as pore size, pore shape, pore connectivity, and pore surface reactivity, but also materials processing techniques for tailoring the meso- and the macroscopic properties of bulk materials in the form of fibers, thin films and monoliths. These issues are addressed in the context of five specific classes of <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials: oxide molecular sieves, <span class="hlt">porous</span> coordination solids, <span class="hlt">porous</span> carbons, sol-gel derived oxides, and <span class="hlt">porous</span> heteropolyanion salts. Reviews of these specific areas are preceded by a presentation of background material and review of current theoretical approaches to adsorption phenomena. A concluding section outlines current research needs and opportunities.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JCHyd.183..109B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JCHyd.183..109B"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of biofilm on bacterial transport and deposition in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bozorg, Ali; Gates, Ian D.; Sen, Arindom</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Laboratory scale experiments were conducted to obtain insights into factors that influence bacterial transport and deposition in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. According to colloidal filtration theory, the removal efficiency of a filter medium is characterized by two main factors: collision efficiency and sticking efficiency. In the case of bacterial transport in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media, bacteria attached to a solid surface can establish a thin layer of biofilm by excreting extracellular polymeric substances which can significantly influence both of these factors in a <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium, and thus, affect the overall removal efficiency of the filter medium. However, such polymeric interactions in bacterial adhesion are not well understood and a method to calculate polymeric interactions is not yet available. Here, to determine how the migration of bacteria flowing within a <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium is affected by the presence of surface-associated extracellular polymeric substances previously produced and deposited by the same bacterial species, a commonly used colloidal filtration model was applied to study transport and deposition of Pseudomonas fluorescens in small-scale columns packed with clean and biofilm coated glass beads. Bacterial recoveries were monitored in column effluents and used to quantify biofilm interactions and sticking efficiencies of the biofilm coated packed-beds. The results indicated that, under identical hydraulic conditions, the sticking efficiencies in packed-beds were improved consistently by 36% when covered by biofilm.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22795398','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22795398"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of traffic states on freeway crash <span class="hlt">involvement</span> rates.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yeo, Hwasoo; Jang, Kitae; Skabardonis, Alexander; Kang, Seungmo</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Freeway traffic accidents are complicated events that are influenced by multiple factors including roadway geometry, drivers' behavior, traffic conditions and environmental factors. Among the various factors, crash occurrence on freeways is supposed to be strongly influenced by the traffic states representing driving situations that are changed by road geometry and cause the change of drivers' behavior. This paper proposes a methodology to investigate the relationship between traffic states and crash <span class="hlt">involvements</span> on the freeway. First, we defined section-based traffic states: free flow (FF), back of queue (BQ), bottleneck front (BN) and congestion (CT) according to their distinctive patterns; and traffic states of each freeway section are determined based on actual measurements of traffic data from upstream and downstream ends of the section. Next, freeway crash data are integrated with the traffic states of a freeway section using upstream and downstream traffic measurements. As an illustrative study to show the applicability, we applied the proposed method on a 32-mile section of I-880 freeway. By integrating freeway crash occurrence and traffic data over a three-year period, we obtained the crash <span class="hlt">involvement</span> rate for each traffic state. The results show that crash <span class="hlt">involvement</span> rate in BN, BQ, and CT states are approximately 5 times higher than the one in FF. The proposed method shows promise to be used for various safety performance measurement including hot spot identification and prediction of the number of crash <span class="hlt">involvements</span> on freeway sections.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=research+AND+hospitality&pg=5&id=EJ816872','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=research+AND+hospitality&pg=5&id=EJ816872"><span><span class="hlt">Impacts</span> of Campus <span class="hlt">Involvement</span> on Hospitality Student Achievement and Satisfaction</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Yin, Dean; Lei, Simon A.</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Campus <span class="hlt">involvement</span> affecting satisfaction and academic achievement (overall grade point average) of hospitality undergraduate students at a state university in the Midwest (University X) was investigated through a survey research. A four-part survey instrument was developed to facilitate this study. There were a number of academic, professional,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27000925','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27000925"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of trainee <span class="hlt">involvement</span> with robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Thomas, Anil A; Derboghossians, Armen; Chang, Allen; Karia, Rajiv; Finley, David S; Slezak, Jeff; Jacobsen, Steven J; Chien, Gary W</p> <p>2013-09-01</p> <p>Robotic-assisted surgery has been rapidly adopted within urology practice. As a result, academic centers are challenged with the burden of how to effectively train residents and fellows to perform robotic-assisted surgery without compromising outcomes. We evaluated the perioperative outcomes of trainee <span class="hlt">involvement</span> with robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) within our healthcare organization. We retrospectively reviewed RARP cases performed at our institution between September 2008 and December 2010 using a single da Vinci robotic platform. Trainees consisted of urology residents and fellows who operated with staff surgeons on select operating days, whereas two staff surgeon teams performed RARP on alternate days. We compared clinicopathologic variables including operating time, estimated blood loss, surgical margin rates, and complication rates between the trainee and staff-only surgeon groups. Overall, 1,019 RARP surgeries were performed within the study period and trainees participated in 162 cases (16 %). Clinical characteristics were similar between men undergoing surgery with a trainee and those without. Positive surgical margin rates were lower for patients with pT2 disease for cases with trainee <span class="hlt">involvement</span> (11 vs. 19 %, p = 0.02), although overall margin rates and margin rates for patients with pT3 disease were similar between the groups (p = 0.34). Surgical cases <span class="hlt">involving</span> trainees were longer (241 vs. 200 min, p < 0.001) and resulted in higher estimated blood loss (190 vs. 120 mL, p < 0.001) than the two staff surgeon cases. However, transfusion rates as well as intraoperative and postoperative complication rates did not differ significantly between groups. In conclusion, surgical margin rates were lower in teaching cases for patients with pT2 disease. Importantly, trainee <span class="hlt">involvement</span> in RARP is safe, with similar perioperative outcomes to staff-only surgical cases. This information may be useful for training and surgical planning.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016LPICo1921.6365W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016LPICo1921.6365W"><span>Subsurface Deformation of Experimental Hypervelocity <span class="hlt">Impacts</span> in Non-<span class="hlt">Porous</span> Targets</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Winkler, R.; Poelchau, M. H.; Schäfer, F.; Kenkmann, T.</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>Experimental hypervelocity <span class="hlt">impacts</span> in quartzite and marble targets under similar <span class="hlt">impact</span> conditions reveal great differences in <span class="hlt">impact</span> induced deformation mechanisms, due to the dynamic mechanical properties of the main rock-forming minerals.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.H31A1407W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.H31A1407W"><span>Free and Forced Convection in High Permeability <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Media: <span class="hlt">Impact</span> on Gas Flux at the Earth-atmosphere Interface</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Weisbrod, N.; Levintal, E.; Dragila, M. I.; Kamai, T.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Gas movement within the earth's subsurface and its exchange with the atmosphere is one of the principal elements contributing to soil and atmospheric function. As the soil permeability increases, gas circulation by convective mechanisms becomes significantly greater than the diffusion. Two of the convective mechanisms, which can be of great importance, are being explored in this research. The first one is thermal convection venting (TCV), which develops when there are unstable density gradients. The second mechanism is wind induced convection (WIC), which develops due to surface winds that drive air movement. Here, we report the results of a study on the relationships between the <span class="hlt">porous</span> media permeability and particle size, and the development and magnitude of TCV and WIC with the development of thermal differences and surface winds. The research included large high-permeability column experiments carried out under highly controlled laboratory conditions, using well-defined single-sized spherical particles while surface winds and thermal differences were forced and monitored. CO2 enriched air, functioned as a tracer, was used to quantify the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of TCV and WIC on gas migration in the <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. Results show that in homogenous <span class="hlt">porous</span> media a permeability range of 10-7 to 10-6 m2 is the threshold value for TCV onset under standard atmospheric conditions. Adding surface wind with an average velocity of 1.5 m s-1 resulted in WIC effect to a depth of -0.3 m in most experimental settings; however, it did not caused additional air circulation at the reference depth of -0.9 m. Furthermore, given the appropriate conditions, a combined effect of TCV and WIC did significantly increase the overall media ventilation. Simulations of temperature profiles in soil under that permeability, showed that as the thermal gradient changes with depth and is a continuous function, TCV cells can be developed in local sections of the profile, not necessarily reaching the atmosphere.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JPhCS.774a2129D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JPhCS.774a2129D"><span>Experimental studies of <span class="hlt">porous</span> composites destruction under electron beam high power <span class="hlt">impact</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Demidov, B. A.; Efremov, V. P.; Kalinin, Yu G.; Kazakov, E. D.; Kurilo, A. A.; Strizhakov, M. G.</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>Studies of constructional material behavior under pulse power densities are very important both for fundamental researches and different applications. Modeling of shock wave generation in <span class="hlt">porous</span> composites is complicated task because of complex structure of such materials. It is necessary to have rather detailed experimental database for verification of these models. In this paper, we present experiments that were carried out on high current electron accelerator “Calamary”. We investigated the surface plasma expansion and mechanical kick pulse dependence from different energy fluxes. Also irradiated targets were investigated by electron microscope.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017ApSS..396..504N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017ApSS..396..504N"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of physicochemical properties of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silica materials conjugated with dexamethasone via pH-responsive hydrazone bond on drug loading and release behavior</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Numpilai, Thanapha; Witoon, Thongthai; Chareonpanich, Metta; Limtrakul, Jumras</p> <p>2017-02-01</p> <p>The conjugation of dexamethasone (DEX) onto modified-<span class="hlt">porous</span> silica materials via a pH-responsive hydrazone bond has been reported to be highly efficient method to specifically deliver the DEX to diseased sites. However, the influence of physicochemical properties of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silica materials has not yet been fully understood. In this paper, the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of pore sizes, particle sizes and silanol contents on surface functionalization, drug loading and release behavior of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silica materials conjugated with dexamethasone via pH-responsive hydrazone bond was investigated. The grafting density was found to relate to the number of silanol groups on the surface of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silica materials. The particle size and macropores of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> silica materials played an vital role on the drug loading and release behavior. Although the <span class="hlt">porous</span> silica materials with larger particle sizes possessed a lower grafting density, a larger amount of drug loading could be achieved. Moreover, the <span class="hlt">porous</span> silica materials with larger particle sizes showed a slower release rate of DEX due to a longer distance for cleaved DEX diffusion out of pores. DEX release rate exhibited pH-dependent, sustained release. At pH 4.5, the amount of DEX release within 10 days could be controlled in the range of 12.74-36.41%, depending on the host material. Meanwhile, less than 1.5% of DEX was released from each of type of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> silica materials at pH 7.4. The results of silica dissolution suggested that the degradation of silica matrix did not significantly affect the release rate of DEX. In addition, the kinetic modeling studies revealed that the DEX releases followed Korsmeyer-Peppas model with a release exponent (n) ranged from 0.3 to 0.47, indicating a diffusion-controlled release mechanism.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.4035M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.4035M"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of multicomponent ionic transport on pH fronts propagation in saturated <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Muniruzzaman, Muhammad; Rolle, Massimo</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Multicomponent ionic interactions have been increasingly recognized as important factors for the displacement of charged species in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media under both diffusion- [1,2] and advection-dominated flow regimes [3,4]. In this study we investigate the propagation of pH fronts during multicomponent ionic transport in saturated <span class="hlt">porous</span> media under flow-through conditions. By performing laboratory bench-scale experiments combined with numerical modeling we show the important influence of Coulombic effects on proton transport in the presence of ionic admixtures. The experiments were performed in a quasi two-dimensional flow-through setup under steady-state flow and transport conditions. Dilute solutions of hydrochloric acid with MgCl2 (1:2 strong electrolyte) were used as tracer solutions to experimentally test the effect of electrochemical cross-coupling on the migration of diffusive/dispersive pH fronts. We focus on two experimental scenarios, with different composition of tracer solutions, causing remarkably different effects on the propagation of the acidic fronts with relative differences in the penetration depth of pH fronts of 36% between the two scenarios and of 25% and 15% for each scenario with respect to the transport of ions at liberated state (i.e., without considering the charge effects). Also significant differences in the dilution of the distinct ionic plumes, quantified using the flux-related dilution index at the laboratory bench scale [5], were measured at the outflow of the flow-through system. The dilution of the pH plumes also changed considerably (26% relative difference) in the two flow-through experiments only due to the different composition of the pore water solution and to the electrostatic coupling of the ions in the flow-through setups. Numerical transport simulations were performed to interpret the laboratory experiments. The simulations were based on a multicomponent ionic formulation accurately capturing the Coulombic interactions between</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4676926','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4676926"><span>Noninvasive Nanoscopy Uncovers the <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of the Hierarchical <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Structure on the Catalytic Activity of Single Dealuminated Mordenite Crystals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kubarev, Alexey V; Janssen, Kris P F; Roeffaers, Maarten B J</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Spatial restrictions around catalytic sites, provided by molecular-sized micropores, are beneficial to reaction selectivity but also inherently limit diffusion. The molecular transport can be enhanced by introducing meso- and macropores. However, the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of this extraframework porosity on the local nanoscale reactivity is relatively unexplored. Herein we show that the area of enhanced reactivity in hierarchical zeolite, examined with super-resolution fluorescence microscopy, is spatially restricted to narrow zones around meso- and macropores, as observed with focused ion-beam-assisted scanning electron microscopy. This comparison indicates that reagent molecules efficiently reach catalytic active sites only in the micropores surrounding extraframework porosity and that extensive macroporosity does not warrant optimal reactivity distribution throughout a hierarchical <span class="hlt">porous</span> zeolite. PMID:26697122</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25730628','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25730628"><span>The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of gambling advertising: Problem gamblers report stronger <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on <span class="hlt">involvement</span>, knowledge, and awareness than recreational gamblers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hanss, Daniel; Mentzoni, Rune A; Griffiths, Mark D; Pallesen, Ståle</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>Although there is a general lack of empirical evidence that advertising influences gambling participation, the regulation of gambling advertising is hotly debated among academic researchers, treatment specialists, lobby groups, regulators, and policymakers. This study contributes to the ongoing debate by investigating perceived <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of gambling advertising in a sample of gamblers drawn from the general population in Norway (n = 6,034). Three dimensions of advertising <span class="hlt">impacts</span> were identified, representing perceived <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on (a) gambling-related attitudes, interest, and behavior ("<span class="hlt">involvement</span>"); (b) knowledge about gambling options and providers ("knowledge"); and (c) the degree to which people are aware of gambling advertising ("awareness"). Overall, <span class="hlt">impacts</span> were strongest for the knowledge dimension, and, for all 3 dimensions, the <span class="hlt">impact</span> increased with level of advertising exposure. Those identified as problem gamblers in the sample (n = 57) reported advertising <span class="hlt">impacts</span> concerning <span class="hlt">involvement</span> more than recreational gamblers, and this finding was not attributable to differences in advertising exposure. Additionally, younger gamblers reported stronger <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on <span class="hlt">involvement</span> and knowledge but were less likely to agree that they were aware of gambling advertising than older gamblers. Male gamblers were more likely than female gamblers to report stronger <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on both <span class="hlt">involvement</span> and knowledge. These findings are discussed with regard to existing research on gambling advertising as well as their implications for future research and policy-making. (PsycINFO Database Record</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012LPI....43.2433B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012LPI....43.2433B"><span>Sub-Surface Excavation of Transient Craters in <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Targets: Explaining the <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Delay</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bowling, T. J.; Melosh, H. J.</p> <p>2012-03-01</p> <p>We numerically investigate the subsurface excavation of the transient crater in the earliest moments after the Deep <span class="hlt">Impact</span> event. At high target porosities the crater remains hidden from observation long enough to explain the "<span class="hlt">impact</span> delay."</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>1</a></li> <li class="active"><span>2</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_2 --> <div id="page_3" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>1</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li class="active"><span>3</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="41"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.H12E..08H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.H12E..08H"><span>Oxygen Transfer in a Fluctuating Capillary Fringe: <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Medium Heterogeneity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Haberer, C.; Rolle, M.; Cirpka, O. A.; Grathwohl, P.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Mass transfer of oxygen from the atmosphere, across the capillary fringe, to anoxic groundwater is of primary importance for many biogeochemical processes affecting groundwater quality. The controlling mechanisms for oxygen transfer across the capillary fringe are the diffusive/dispersive transport as well as mass exchange between entrapped air and groundwater. In addition, the presence of physical heterogeneity in the <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium may strongly affect the oxygen fluxes. We performed quasi two-dimensional flow-through experiments at the laboratory bench-scale to study the effect of a coarse-material inclusion, located in proximity of the water table, on flow and oxygen transfer in the capillary fringe. Flow and transport were monitored under both steady-state and transient flow conditions, the latter obtained by fluctuating the water table. We visually inspected the complex flow field using a dye tracer solution, measured vertical oxygen profiles across the capillary fringe at high spatial resolution, and determined oxygen fluxes in the effluent of the flow-through chamber. Our results show that the coarse-material inclusion significantly affected oxygen transfer during the different phases of the experiments. At steady state, the oxygen flux across the unsaturated/saturated interface was considerably enhanced due to flow focusing in the fully water-saturated coarse lens. During drainage, the capillary barrier effect prevented water to drain from the fine material overlying the coarse lens. The entrapped oxygen-rich aqueous phase contributed to the total amount of oxygen supplied to the system when the water table was raised back to its initial level. In case of imbibition, also pronounced entrapment of air occurred in the coarse lens, causing oxygen to partition between the aqueous and gaseous phases. Thus, we found that oxygen transfer across the capillary fringe was significantly enhanced by the coarse-material inclusion due to flow focusing, the capillary</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE10224E..1XR','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE10224E..1XR"><span>Cellular-automata model of oxygen plasma <span class="hlt">impact</span> on <span class="hlt">porous</span> low-K dielectric</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rezvanov, Askar; Matyushkin, Igor V.; Gutshin, Oleg P.; Gornev, Evgeny S.</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>Cellular-automata model of oxygen plasma influence on the integral properties of <span class="hlt">porous</span> low-K dielectric is studied. The present work investigates the imitative simulation of this process. In our model we consider one isolated pore, which is simulated by cylinder with length L=200 nm and radius 1 nm ignoring the curvature factor. The simulation was performed for 2 million automata steps that correspond to 2 seconds in the real process time. Extrapolating the data to the longer time shows that more and more •CH3 groups will be replaced by the •OH groups, and over time almost all methyl groups will leave the pore surface (there is not more than 20% of the initial methyl groups amount on the first low-K dielectric 40nm after 2 seconds simulation).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015WRR....51.6739M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015WRR....51.6739M"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of multicomponent ionic transport on pH fronts propagation in saturated <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Muniruzzaman, Muhammad; Rolle, Massimo</p> <p>2015-08-01</p> <p>We investigate the propagation of pH fronts during multicomponent ionic transport in saturated <span class="hlt">porous</span> media under flow-through conditions. By performing laboratory bench-scale experiments combined with numerical modeling, we show the important influence of Coulombic effects on proton transport in the presence of ionic admixtures. The experiments were performed in a quasi two-dimensional flow-through setup under steady-state flow and transport conditions. Dilute solutions of hydrochloric acid with MgCl2 (1:2 strong electrolyte) were used as tracer solutions to experimentally test the effect of electrochemical cross coupling on the migration of diffusive/dispersive pH fronts. We focus on two experimental scenarios, with different composition of tracer solutions, causing remarkably different effects on the propagation of the acidic fronts with relative differences in the penetration depth of pH fronts of 36% between the two scenarios and of 25% and 15% for each scenario with respect to the transport of ions at liberated state (i.e., without considering the charge effects). Also differences in the dilution of the distinct ions plumes up to 28% and 45% in experiment 1 and 2, respectively, were measured at the outflow of the flow-through system. The dilution of the pH plumes also changed considerably (26% relative difference) in the two flow-through experiments only due to the different composition of the pore water solution and to the electrostatic coupling of the ions in the flow-through setups. Numerical transport simulations were performed to interpret the laboratory experiments. The simulations were based on a multicomponent ionic formulation accurately capturing the Coulombic interactions between the transported ions in the flow-through system. The results of purely forward simulations show a very good agreement with the high-resolution measurements performed at the outlet of the flow-through setup and confirms the importance of charge effects on pH transport in</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-11-15/pdf/2010-28689.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-11-15/pdf/2010-28689.pdf"><span>75 FR 69630 - <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention on Commercial Activities <span class="hlt">Involving</span>...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-11-15</p> <p>...-0543-02] <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention on Commercial Activities <span class="hlt">Involving</span>... Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC), through the Chemical Weapons Convention Implementation Act (CWCIA) and the Chemical Weapons Convention Regulations (CWCR), has had on commercial activities...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26821548','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26821548"><span>Decreasing Risky Behavior on Social Network Sites: The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Parental <span class="hlt">Involvement</span> in Secondary Education Interventions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Vanderhoven, Ellen; Schellens, Tammy; Valcke, Martin</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>Teenagers face significant risks when using increasingly popular social network sites. Prevention and intervention efforts to raise awareness about these risks and to change risky behavior (so-called "e-safety" interventions) are essential for the wellbeing of these minors. However, several studies have revealed that while school interventions often affect awareness, they have only a limited <span class="hlt">impact</span> on pupils' unsafe behavior. Utilizing the Theory of Planned Behavior and theories about parental <span class="hlt">involvement</span>, we hypothesized that <span class="hlt">involving</span> parents in an e-safety intervention would positively influence pupils' intentions and behavior. In a quasi-experimental study with pre- and post-test measures <span class="hlt">involving</span> 207 pupils in secondary education, we compared the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of an intervention without parental <span class="hlt">involvement</span> with one that included active parental <span class="hlt">involvement</span> by means of a homework task. We found that whereas parental <span class="hlt">involvement</span> was not necessary to improve the intervention's <span class="hlt">impact</span> on risk awareness, it did change intentions to engage in certain unsafe behavior, such as posting personal and sexual information on the profile page of a social network site, and in reducing existing problematic behavior. This beneficial <span class="hlt">impact</span> was particularly evident for boys. These findings suggest that developing prevention campaigns with active parental <span class="hlt">involvement</span> is well worth the effort. Researchers and developers should therefore focus on other efficient strategies to <span class="hlt">involve</span> parents.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=housing+AND+social&pg=5&id=ED531436','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=housing+AND+social&pg=5&id=ED531436"><span>The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Motivation to Lead on College Students' Cocurricular <span class="hlt">Involvement</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Pepper, Robert C.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>This exploratory research examined the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of motivation to lead on college students' cocurricular <span class="hlt">involvement</span>. The question driving this research was: Is motivation to lead a predictor of cocurricular student <span class="hlt">involvement</span>? A 52-item questionnaire that included the Motivation to Lead Self-Report Questionnaire (Chan & Drasgow, 2001) was used to…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017NRL....12...69U','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017NRL....12...69U"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Water Adsorption on Nonlinear Optical Properties of Functionalized <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Silicon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Uklein, Andrii V.; Multian, Volodymyr V.; Oliinyk, Bogdan V.; Doroshchuk, Volodymyr V.; Alekseev, Sergei A.; Lysenko, Volodymyr V.; Brodyn, Mykhailo S.; Gayvoronsky, Volodymyr Ya.</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon (PS) surface modification diagnostics due to functionalization and water adsorption/desorption processes were provided by the self-action effects of picosecond range pulsed laser radiation at 1064 nm. It was shown that the PS surface functionalization—oxide removal, alkylation, and oxidation—resulted in a refractive nonlinear optical (NLO) response sign turn to self-focusing ( Δn>0) versus the self-defocusing ( Δn<0) observed in the aged PS. The sensitivity of the proposed technique was revealed to water adsorption/desorption from the chemically oxidized PS interface. For the dried PS, the self-defocusing effect with corresponding NLO cubic susceptibility Re( χ (3))˜-4.7·10-9 esu was observed versus the self-focusing one (˜5·10-8 esu) for the PS positioned in saturated water vapor at room temperature. The obtained results demonstrate high sensitivity and wide versatility of the proposed readout technique based on pulsed laser radiation self-action at 1064 nm to the PS surface modification monitoring/diagnostics applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014Tectp.634..171B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014Tectp.634..171B"><span>Scaling of sub-surface deformation in hypervelocity <span class="hlt">impact</span> experiments on <span class="hlt">porous</span> sandstone</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Buhl, Elmar; Poelchau, Michael; Dresen, Georg; Kenkmann, Thomas</p> <p>2014-11-01</p> <p>Two hypervelocity <span class="hlt">impact</span> experiments into dry sandstone (Seeberger Sandstein, ~ 23% porosity), performed under similar <span class="hlt">impact</span> conditions but with different projectile sizes, have been analyzed to investigate the size scaling of <span class="hlt">impact</span> damage. For one experiment a 2.5 mm steel projectile was <span class="hlt">impacted</span> at 4.8 km s- 1 onto a sandstone cube of 20 cm side length. For the other experiment a 10 mm iron meteorite projectile was <span class="hlt">impacted</span> at 4.6 km s- 1 onto a sandstone cube of 50 cm side length. The resulting kinetic <span class="hlt">impact</span> energies of 773 and 42,627 J led to crater cavities of 7600 and 612,000 mm3. Investigation of thin sections along cross-sections through both craters revealed that the same deformation microstructures are present in both experiments. The occurrence of different microstructural patterns was mapped and zones of characteristic deformation were defined. This mapping was used to calculate the volumes of material deformed by specific mechanisms. Comparing the results, normalized to the size of the projectile, showed that the sub-surface damage is very similar in size, volume and geometry for both experiments. Analysis of deformation bands found in both experiments regarding their long axes orientation showed that these features are developed under shear deformation. Particle size distributions (PSD), expressed as power-law fits, were measured to quantify the <span class="hlt">impact</span> damage. Comparison showed that the decay of the power-law exponents with increasing distance from the <span class="hlt">impact</span> point source is similar for both experiments. Reconstruction of the loading path allowed to infer the stresses under which distinct deformation microstructures are developed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016WRR....52.3637L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016WRR....52.3637L"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of kinetic mass transfer on free convection in a <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lu, Chunhui; Shi, Liangsheng; Chen, Yiming; Xie, Yueqing; Simmons, Craig T.</p> <p>2016-05-01</p> <p>We investigate kinetic mass transfer effects on unstable density-driven flow and transport processes by numerical simulations of a modified Elder problem. The first-order dual-domain mass transfer model coupled with a variable-density-flow model is employed to describe transport behavior in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. Results show that in comparison to the no-mass-transfer case, a higher degree of instability and more unstable system is developed in the mass transfer case due to the reduced effective porosity and correspondingly a larger Rayleigh number (assuming permeability is independent on the mobile porosity). Given a constant total porosity, the magnitude of capacity ratio (i.e., immobile porosity/mobile porosity) controls the macroscopic plume profile in the mobile domain, while the magnitude of mass transfer timescale (i.e., the reciprocal of the mass transfer rate coefficient) dominates its evolution rate. The magnitude of capacity ratio plays an important role on the mechanism driving the mass flux into the aquifer system. Specifically, for a small capacity ratio, solute loading is dominated by the density-driven transport, while with increasing capacity ratio local mass transfer dominated solute loading may occur at later times. At significantly large times, however, both mechanisms contribute comparably to solute loading. Sherwood Number could be a nonmonotonic function of mass transfer timescale due to complicated interactions of solute between source zone, mobile zone and immobile zone in the top boundary layer, resulting in accordingly a similar behavior of the total mass. The initial assessment provides important insights into unstable density-driven flow and transport in the presence of kinetic mass transfer.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5013512','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5013512"><span>Psychological <span class="hlt">impact</span> and recovery after <span class="hlt">involvement</span> in a patient safety incident: a repeated measures analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Van Gerven, Eva; Bruyneel, Luk; Panella, Massimiliano; Euwema, Martin; Sermeus, Walter; Vanhaecht, Kris</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Objective To examine individual, situational and organisational aspects that influence psychological <span class="hlt">impact</span> and recovery of a patient safety incident on physicians, nurses and midwives. Design Cross-sectional, retrospective surveys of physicians, midwives and nurses. Setting 33 Belgian hospitals. Participants 913 clinicians (186 physicians, 682 nurses, 45 midwives) <span class="hlt">involved</span> in a patient safety incident. Main outcome measures The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Event Scale was used to retrospectively measure psychological <span class="hlt">impact</span> of the safety incident at the time of the event and compare it with psychological <span class="hlt">impact</span> at the time of the survey. Results Individual, situational as well as organisational aspects influenced psychological <span class="hlt">impact</span> and recovery of a patient safety incident. Psychological <span class="hlt">impact</span> is higher when the degree of harm for the patient is more severe, when healthcare professionals feel responsible for the incident and among female healthcare professionals. <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of degree of harm differed across clinicians. Psychological <span class="hlt">impact</span> is lower among more optimistic professionals. Overall, <span class="hlt">impact</span> decreased significantly over time. This effect was more pronounced for women and for those who feel responsible for the incident. The longer ago the incident took place, the stronger <span class="hlt">impact</span> had decreased. Also, higher psychological <span class="hlt">impact</span> is related with the use of a more active coping and planning coping strategy, and is unrelated to support seeking coping strategies. Rendered support and a support culture reduce psychological <span class="hlt">impact</span>, whereas a blame culture increases psychological <span class="hlt">impact</span>. No associations were found with job experience and resilience of the health professional, the presence of a second victim support team or guideline and working in a learning culture. Conclusions Healthcare organisations should anticipate on providing their staff appropriate and timely support structures that are tailored to the healthcare professional <span class="hlt">involved</span> in the incident and to the specific</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19870014065','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19870014065"><span>Centrifuge <span class="hlt">impact</span> cratering experiments: Scaling laws for non-<span class="hlt">porous</span> targets</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Schmidt, Robert M.</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>This research is a continuation of an ongoing program whose objective is to perform experiments and to develop scaling relationships for large body <span class="hlt">impacts</span> onto planetary surfaces. The development of the centrifuge technique has been pioneered by the present investigator and is used to provide experimental data for actual target materials of interest. With both powder and gas guns mounted on a rotor arm, it is possible to match various dimensionless similarity parameters, which have been shown to govern the behavior of large scale <span class="hlt">impacts</span>. Current work is directed toward the determination of scaling estimates for nonporous targets. The results are presented in summary form.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28282608','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28282608"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of lignin structure on oil production via hydroprocessing with a copper-doped <span class="hlt">porous</span> metal oxide catalyst.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gillet, Sebastien; Petitjean, Laurene; Aguedo, Mario; Lam, Chun-Ho; Blecker, Christophe; Anastas, Paul T</p> <p>2017-02-23</p> <p>A copper-catalyzed depolymerization strategy was employed to investigate the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of lignin structure on the distribution of hydroprocessing products. Specifically, lignin was extracted from beech wood and miscanthus grass. The extracted lignins, as well as a commercial lignin (P1000), were then fractionated using ethyl acetate to provide three different portions for each source of lignin [total of 9 fractions]. Each fraction was structurally characterized and treated with a copper-doped <span class="hlt">porous</span> metal oxide (Cu-PMO) catalyst under 4MPa H2 and at 180°C for 12h. The reaction conditions provided notable yields of oil for each fraction of lignin. Analysis of the oils indicated phenolic monomers of commercial interest. The structure of these monomers and the yield of monomer-containing oil was dependent on the origin of the lignin. Our results indicate that hydroprocessing with a Cu-PMO catalyst can selectively provide monomers of commercial interest by careful choice of lignin starting material.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/840685','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/840685"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Parameter Uncertainty, Variability, and Conceptual Model Errors on Predictions of Flow Through Fractured <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>S. Finsterle</p> <p>2000-09-07</p> <p>Model predictions are affected by uncertainty in input parameters, stochastic variability in formation properties, computational roundoff and cancellation errors, and errors in the conceptual model. The source, nature, and relative magnitude of these errors vary considerably, depending on the physical processes <span class="hlt">involved</span>, the quality and amount of available characterization data, and the overall objective of the study. We examined various types of uncertainties and their propagation with a predictive model that simulates a water pulse flowing through an unsaturated, fractured <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium. The propagation of the water pulse depends not only on the hydraulic properties of the fracture network, but also on the strength of fracture-matrix interactions and the storage capacity of the matrix. Different predicted variables (such as local saturation changes, total amount of water retarded in the matrix, or first arrival of water at a certain depth) depend on different parameters and thus show different uncertainty structures. The strong nonlinearities inherent in such a system require the use of Monte Carlo simulations. These simulations investigate the spread of model predictions as a result of changes in spatial variability and uncertainty in key input parameters. We also discuss the role of conceptual-model formulation and parameter estimation in the development of reliable prediction models. We observe that systematic errors in the conceptual model often render probabilistic uncertainty analyses meaningless if not misleading. Nevertheless, sensitivity analyses provide useful insight into the system behavior and help design experiments that eventually would reduce prediction uncertainties.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=IMPROVE+AND+COMMUNICATION+AND+PARENTS+AND+CHILDREN&pg=4&id=EJ929579','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=IMPROVE+AND+COMMUNICATION+AND+PARENTS+AND+CHILDREN&pg=4&id=EJ929579"><span>Home and School Factors <span class="hlt">Impacting</span> Parental <span class="hlt">Involvement</span> in a Title I Elementary School</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bartel, Virginia B.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Before and after the interventions of summer classes for parents and an interactive homework program, parents of children in an inner-city southeastern U.S. elementary school were interviewed and teachers surveyed to determine home and school factors that <span class="hlt">impacted</span> parental <span class="hlt">involvement</span> in their children's education. Beliefs about roles and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=parental+AND+involvement&pg=5&id=ED550114','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=parental+AND+involvement&pg=5&id=ED550114"><span>Examining the <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Teacher Perceptions of Barriers of Parental <span class="hlt">Involvement</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Johnson, Frankie V.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>One school in a Western United States was recently rated academically unacceptable by the state. That same school had an inactive Parent as Teachers organization, and teachers expressed concerns regarding low parental <span class="hlt">involvement</span>. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of teacher perceptions of barriers to parental…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=marquez&pg=2&id=ED552243','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=marquez&pg=2&id=ED552243"><span>Examining Parent <span class="hlt">Involvement</span> Activities in Two Immigrant-<span class="hlt">Impacted</span> Schools: A Comparative Case Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Marquez, Amalia</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>K-12 schools with large immigrant populations face a myriad of challenges, including low academic achievement and high dropout rates of Latino students. Parental <span class="hlt">involvement</span> is a practical strategy in positively influencing student outcomes along the K-12 continuum. To this end, it is essential that immigrant <span class="hlt">impacted</span> schools work together with…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=advertising+AND+effectiveness&pg=4&id=EJ506449','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=advertising+AND+effectiveness&pg=4&id=EJ506449"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Product <span class="hlt">Involvement</span>, Message Format, and Receiver Sex on the Efficacy of Comparative Advertising Messages.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Pfau, Michael</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>Investigates the role and <span class="hlt">impact</span> of receiver <span class="hlt">involvement</span> in product class, comparative message format, and receiver sex on the relative effectiveness of comparative advertising messages. Indicates that females and males respond uniquely to comparative advertising, revealing consistent patterns regarding both circumstances and approaches. (SR)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10129551','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10129551"><span>Proposed Tenaska Washington II Generation Project : Final Environmental <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Statement. Volume 2: Public <span class="hlt">Involvement</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>United States. Bonneville Power Administration.</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>In regard to the proposed Tenaska Washington II Generation Project, the goal of the Bonneville Power Administration`s (BPA) Environmental <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Statement (EIS) public <span class="hlt">involvement</span> process is to determine the issues to be examined and pertinent analyses to be conducted and to solicit comments on the content and quality of information presented in the Draft Environmental <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Statement (DEIS). Comments and questions are solicited from the public and government agencies during the scoping process and during the comment period and public hearing on the DEIS, to find out what is of most concern to them. The end product of the public <span class="hlt">involvement</span> process is the Comment Report which follows in part of this volume on Public <span class="hlt">Involvement</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.6263S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.6263S"><span>Brittle structures in <span class="hlt">porous</span> sandstones, south central Pyrenees, Spain: field characterization and <span class="hlt">impact</span> for fluid flow.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Saillet, Elodie; Vautier, Yannick; Proudhon, Bennoit; Guilbert, Nathanaël; Hannot, Vincent</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>In order to better constrain fluids flow circulations in the continental crust, understanding evolution of fault geometry and hydromecanical properties is essential. The knowledge of faulting in analogous reservoirs is particularly important in silicoclastic context. Indeed the high value of natural porosity and the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of faulting on porosity and permeability will generate potential reservoirs. Depending on the type of faults, deformation in sands and sandstones reservoirs can produces barriers or conduits for fluids. This study focused on an silicoclastic analogous reservoir localised in south central Pyrenees (Spain), named the Aren group, where deformation is recorded by different type of faults. The Aren group is located on the front of the Boixol thrust, on the southern side of the San Corneli anticline. The outcrops are localised in 3 different area, comprised between the towns of Aren, Tremp and Isona. Depending of the outcrop, we identify presence of veins, joints, deformation bands (DBs) and some few sites where both of them are recorded in the same unit. We present a complete field study, based on two different field mapping methods : (i) field photomosaiques and associated detail 2D mapping ; (ii) linear scanlines along deformed outcrops. These two different methods, applied around ten outcrops allow us to obtain : (1) 30 meters squares of 2D detailed maps of fractures and linkage information ; (2) 90 linear meters of fracture density vs. distance all along the outcrop for each type of fracture. Field measurements and quantification was completed by a systematic sampling, in order to give an access to (i) microtectonic elements and fine characterisation of the different fault types by SEM observations ; (ii) a porosity quantification of host rock and fault zones based on the SEM pictures. Field data shows a strong relationship between the different types of brittle structures. On the Aren outcrop, fine DBs (wich act as barriers) are located in</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5308459','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5308459"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of the De-Alloying Kinetics and Alloy Microstructure on the Final Morphology of De-Alloyed Meso-<span class="hlt">Porous</span> Metal Films</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Lin, Bao; Kong, Lingxue; Hodgson, Peter D.; Dumée, Ludovic F.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Nano-textured <span class="hlt">porous</span> metal materials present unique surface properties due to their enhanced surface energy with potential applications in sensing, molecular separation and catalysis. In this paper, commercial alloy foils, including brass (Cu85Zn15 and Cu70Zn30) and white gold (Au50Ag50) foils have been chemically de-alloyed to form nano-<span class="hlt">porous</span> thin films. The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of the initial alloy micro-structure and number of phases, as well as chemical de-alloying (DA) parameters, including etchant concentration, time and solution temperature on the final nano-<span class="hlt">porous</span> thin film morphology and properties were investigated by electron microscopy (EM). Furthermore, the penetration depth of the pores across the alloys were evaluated through the preparation of cross sections by focus ion beam (FIB) milling. It is demonstrated that ordered pores ranging between 100 nm and 600 nm in diameter and 2–5 μm in depth can be successfully formed for the range of materials tested. The microstructure of the foils were obtained by electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) and linked to development of pits across the material thickness and surface during DA. The role of selective etching of both noble and sacrificial metal phases of the alloy were discussed in light of the competitive surface etching across the range of microstructures and materials tested. PMID:28344253</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>1</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li class="active"><span>3</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_3 --> <div id="page_4" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li class="active"><span>4</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="61"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006Icar..180..514W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006Icar..180..514W"><span>A strain-based porosity model for use in hydrocode simulations of <span class="hlt">impacts</span> and implications for transient crater growth in <span class="hlt">porous</span> targets</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wünnemann, K.; Collins, G. S.; Melosh, H. J.</p> <p>2006-02-01</p> <p>Numerical modelling of <span class="hlt">impact</span> cratering has reached a high degree of sophistication; however, the treatment of <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials still poses a large problem in hydrocode calculations. We present a novel approach for dealing with <span class="hlt">porous</span> compaction in numerical modelling of <span class="hlt">impact</span> crater formation. In contrast to previous attempts (e.g., P-alpha model, snowplow model), our model accounts for the collapse of pore space by assuming that the compaction function depends upon volumetric strain rather than pressure. Our new ɛ-alpha model requires only four input parameters and each has a physical meaning. The model is simple and intuitive and shows good agreement with a wide variety of experimental data, ranging from static compaction tests to highly dynamic <span class="hlt">impact</span> experiments. Our major objective in developing the model is to investigate the effect of porosity and internal friction on transient crater formation. We present preliminary numerical model results that suggest that both porosity and internal friction play an important role in limiting crater growth over a large range in gravity-scaled source size.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/960957','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/960957"><span>Seismic stress mobilization of natural colloids in a <span class="hlt">porous</span> rock</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Roberts, Peter M; Abdel-fattah, Amr I</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Stress oscillations at 26 Hz enhanced the release of natural micro-particles (colloids) in a <span class="hlt">porous</span> rock sample. Micron-scale effects were induced by meter-scale wavelengths. The results are attributed to altering the release rate coefficient for colloids trapped in pores. The rate change did not depend on colloid size and thus is not due to altering colloid-pore-wall interactions. Enhanced colloid detachment from pore walls and flushing from dead-end pores are likely mechanisms. This phenomenon could <span class="hlt">impact</span> a broad range of physical sciences <span class="hlt">involving</span> colloid dynamics and <span class="hlt">porous</span> transport.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25054173','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25054173"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of heat and mass transfer during the transport of nitrogen in coal <span class="hlt">porous</span> media on coal mine fires.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shi, Bobo; Zhou, Fubao</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The application of liquid nitrogen injection is an important technique in the field of coal mine fire prevention. However, the mechanism of heat and mass transfer of cryogenic nitrogen in the goaf <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium has not been well accessed. Hence, the implementation of fire prevention engineering of liquid nitrogen roughly relied on an empirical view. According to the research gap in this respect, an experimental study on the heat and mass transfer of liquid nitrogen in coal <span class="hlt">porous</span> media was proposed. Overall, the main mechanism of liquid nitrogen fire prevention technology in the coal mine is the creation of an inert and cryogenic atmosphere. Cryogenic nitrogen gas vapor cloud, heavier than the air, would cause the phenomenon of "gravity settling" in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media firstly. The cryogen could be applicable to diverse types of fires, both in the openings and in the enclosures. Implementation of liquid nitrogen open-injection technique in Yangchangwan colliery achieved the goals of fire prevention and air-cooling. Meanwhile, this study can also provide an essential reference for the research on heat and mass transfer in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media in the field of thermal physics and engineering.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4098614','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4098614"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Heat and Mass Transfer during the Transport of Nitrogen in Coal <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Media on Coal Mine Fires</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Zhou, Fubao</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The application of liquid nitrogen injection is an important technique in the field of coal mine fire prevention. However, the mechanism of heat and mass transfer of cryogenic nitrogen in the goaf <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium has not been well accessed. Hence, the implementation of fire prevention engineering of liquid nitrogen roughly relied on an empirical view. According to the research gap in this respect, an experimental study on the heat and mass transfer of liquid nitrogen in coal <span class="hlt">porous</span> media was proposed. Overall, the main mechanism of liquid nitrogen fire prevention technology in the coal mine is the creation of an inert and cryogenic atmosphere. Cryogenic nitrogen gas vapor cloud, heavier than the air, would cause the phenomenon of “gravity settling” in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media firstly. The cryogen could be applicable to diverse types of fires, both in the openings and in the enclosures. Implementation of liquid nitrogen open-injection technique in Yangchangwan colliery achieved the goals of fire prevention and air-cooling. Meanwhile, this study can also provide an essential reference for the research on heat and mass transfer in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media in the field of thermal physics and engineering. PMID:25054173</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhDT........93H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhDT........93H"><span>Science homework with video directions for parents: The <span class="hlt">impact</span> on parental <span class="hlt">involvement</span> and academic achievement</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hooker, Kathy L.</p> <p></p> <p>The benefits of effective parental <span class="hlt">involvement</span> in education have been well documented and can be far reaching. When educators make an effort to <span class="hlt">involve</span> families, parental <span class="hlt">involvement</span> can be even more meaningful. Homework is a commonly practiced and accepted connection between school and home and affords parents many opportunities to interact with their children on educational endeavors. However, parental <span class="hlt">involvement</span> may be limited because educators do not reach out to parents, parents feel their children do not need their help, or parents are unfamiliar with the content and therefore unable to help. The purpose of this study was too develop and implement a tool to enhance parental <span class="hlt">involvement</span> and academic achievement of fourth grade science students. The tool used in this study was a weekly science video to be viewed by parents when it accompanied science homework assignments. To begin, the researcher created six science videos for parents to watch that supplemented weekly homework assignments. Consequently, the researcher set up treatment and comparison groups to test the effectiveness of the supplemental videos in terms of parental <span class="hlt">involvement</span> and academic achievement. A mixed methods approach was used to collect data from parents and students throughout the study. A combination of quantitative and qualitative data was collected throughout this study from both parents and students. Additionally, data was collected from a variety of sources including baseline, midpoint, and endpoint surveys; scores on homework assignments; and focus group interview sessions with parents and students. Data analysis revealed an overall positive <span class="hlt">impact</span> on parental <span class="hlt">involvement</span> and academic achievement when the videos were utilized.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26407854','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26407854"><span>A Research Framework for Understanding the Practical <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Family <span class="hlt">Involvement</span> in the Juvenile Justice System: The Juvenile Justice Family <span class="hlt">Involvement</span> Model.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Walker, Sarah Cusworth; Bishop, Asia S; Pullmann, Michael D; Bauer, Grace</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Family <span class="hlt">involvement</span> is recognized as a critical element of service planning for children's mental health, welfare and education. For the juvenile justice system, however, parents' roles in this system are complex due to youths' legal rights, public safety, a process which can legally position parents as plaintiffs, and a historical legacy of blaming parents for youth indiscretions. Three recent national surveys of juvenile justice-<span class="hlt">involved</span> parents reveal that the current paradigm elicits feelings of stress, shame and distrust among parents and is likely leading to worse outcomes for youth, families and communities. While research on the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of family <span class="hlt">involvement</span> in the justice system is starting to emerge, the field currently has no organizing framework to guide a research agenda, interpret outcomes or translate findings for practitioners. We propose a research framework for family <span class="hlt">involvement</span> that is informed by a comprehensive review and content analysis of current, published arguments for family <span class="hlt">involvement</span> in juvenile justice along with a synthesis of family <span class="hlt">involvement</span> efforts in other child-serving systems. In this model, family <span class="hlt">involvement</span> is presented as an ascending, ordinal concept beginning with (1) exclusion, and moving toward climates characterized by (2) information-giving, (3) information-eliciting and (4) full, decision-making partnerships. Specific examples of how courts and facilities might align with these levels are described. Further, the model makes predictions for how <span class="hlt">involvement</span> will <span class="hlt">impact</span> outcomes at multiple levels with applications for other child-serving systems.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005JAP....97k3302C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005JAP....97k3302C"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of reductive N2/H2 plasma on <span class="hlt">porous</span> low-dielectric constant SiCOH thin films</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cui, Hao; Carter, Richard J.; Moore, Darren L.; Peng, Hua-Gen; Gidley, David W.; Burke, Peter A.</p> <p>2005-06-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Porous</span> low-dielectric constant (low-κ) SiCOH thin films deposited using a plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition have been comprehensively characterized before and after exposure to a reactive-ion-etch-type plasma of N2 and H2 chemistry. The low-κ film studied in this work is a carbon-doped silicon oxide film with a dielectric constant (κ) of 2.5. Studies show that a top dense layer is formed as a result of significant surface film densification after exposure to N2/H2 plasma while the underlying bulk layer remains largely unchanged. The top dense layer is found to seal the <span class="hlt">porous</span> bulk SiCOH film. SiCOH films experienced significant thickness reduction, κ increase, and leakage current degradation after plasma exposure, accompanied by density increase, pore collapse, carbon depletion, and moisture content increase in the top dense layer. Both film densification and removal processes during N2/H2 plasma treatment were found to play important roles in the thickness reduction and κ increase of this <span class="hlt">porous</span> low-κ SiCOH film. A model based upon mutually limiting film densification and removal processes is proposed for the continuous thickness reduction during plasma exposure. A combination of surface film densification, thickness ratio increase of top dense layer to bulk layer, and moisture content increase results in the increase in κ value of this SiCOH film.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5895210','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5895210"><span>Factors <span class="hlt">involved</span> in evaluating ground water <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of deep coal mine drainage</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Davis, P.R.; Walton, W.C.</p> <p>1982-10-01</p> <p>The determination of probable ground water <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of proposed deep coal mining is required as part of permit applications in the US. <span class="hlt">Impact</span> prediction generally <span class="hlt">involves</span> well production test analysis and modeling of ground water systems associated with coal seams. Well production tests are often complicated due to the relatively low permeabilities of sandstones and shales of ground water systems. The effects of the release of water stored within finite diameter production wells must be considered. Well storage capacity appreciably affects early well production test time drawdown or time recovery data. Low pumping rates, limited cones of depression, and length of required pumping periods are important well production test design factors. Coal seam ground water system models are usually multilayered and leaky artesian. Mine drafts partially penetrate the ground water system. Simulation of coal mine drainage often <span class="hlt">involves</span> the horizontal permeability and storage coefficient of the coal seam zone, vertical permeabilities of sandstones and shales (aquitard) above and below the coal seam zone, and the hydrologic properties of the source bed above the aquitard overlying the coal seam zone.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22390595','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22390595"><span>Rate coefficients for dissociative attachment and resonant electron-<span class="hlt">impact</span> dissociation <span class="hlt">involving</span> vibrationally excited O{sub 2} molecules</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Laporta, V.; Celiberto, R.; Tennyson, J.</p> <p>2014-12-09</p> <p>Rate coefficients for dissociative electron attachment and electron-<span class="hlt">impact</span> dissociation processes, <span class="hlt">involving</span> vibrationally excited molecular oxygen, are presented. Analytical fits of the calculated numerical data, useful in the applications, are also provided.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22456537','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22456537"><span>Differential <span class="hlt">impact</span> of REM sleep deprivation on cytoskeletal proteins of brain regions <span class="hlt">involved</span> in sleep regulation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rodríguez-Vázquez, Jennifer; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio; Velázquez-Moctezuma, Javier</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is <span class="hlt">involved</span> in memory consolidation, which implies synaptic plasticity. This process requires protein synthesis and the reorganization of the neural cytoskeleton. REM sleep deprivation (REMSD) has an <span class="hlt">impact</span> on some neuronal proteins <span class="hlt">involved</span> in synaptic plasticity, such as glutamate receptors and postsynaptic density protein 95, but its effects on cytoskeletal proteins is unknown. In this study, the effects of REMSD on the content of the cytoskeletal proteins MAP2 and TAU were analyzed. Adult female rats were submitted to selective REMSD by using the multiple platform technique. After 24, 48 or 72 h of REMSD, rats were decapitated and the following brain areas were dissected: pons, preoptic area, hippocampus and frontal cortex. Protein extraction and Western blot were performed. Results showed an increase in TAU content in the pons, preoptic area and hippocampus after 24 h of REMSD, while in the frontal cortex a significant increase in TAU content was observed after 72 h of REMSD. A TAU content decrease was observed in the hippocampus after 48 h of REMSD. Interestingly, a marked increase in TAU content was observed after 72 h of REMSD. MAP2 content only increased in the preoptic area at 24 h, and in the frontal cortex after 24 and 72 h of REMSD, without significant changes in the pons and hippocampus. These results support the idea that REM sleep plays an important role in the organization of neural cytoskeleton, and that this effect is tissue-specific.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=sss&pg=3&id=ED517488','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=sss&pg=3&id=ED517488"><span>The Role of Student Support Services in Encouraging Student <span class="hlt">Involvement</span> and Its <span class="hlt">Impact</span> on Student Perceptions and Academic Experiences</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kelley-Hall, Caren</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to explore the role of Student Support Services (SSS) in encouraging student <span class="hlt">involvement</span> and its <span class="hlt">impact</span> on student perceptions and academic experiences in three technical colleges in upstate South Carolina. By examining Alexander Astin's theory of student <span class="hlt">involvement</span> in the services provided by the program, a better…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/872975','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/872975"><span>Rigid <span class="hlt">porous</span> filter</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Chiang, Ta-Kuan; Straub, Douglas L.; Dennis, Richard A.</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>The present invention <span class="hlt">involves</span> a <span class="hlt">porous</span> rigid filter including a plurality of concentric filtration elements having internal flow passages and forming external flow passages there between. The present invention also <span class="hlt">involves</span> a pressure vessel containing the filter for the removal of particulates from high pressure particulate containing gases, and further <span class="hlt">involves</span> a method for using the filter to remove such particulates. The present filter has the advantage of requiring fewer filter elements due to the high surface area-to-volume ratio provided by the filter, requires a reduced pressure vessel size, and exhibits enhanced mechanical design properties, improved cleaning properties, configuration options, modularity and ease of fabrication.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3995719','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3995719"><span>Bacteria and Genes <span class="hlt">Involved</span> in Arsenic Speciation in Sediment <span class="hlt">Impacted</span> by Long-Term Gold Mining</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Costa, Patrícia S.; Scholte, Larissa L. S.; Reis, Mariana P.; Chaves, Anderson V.; Oliveira, Pollyanna L.; Itabayana, Luiza B.; Suhadolnik, Maria Luiza S.; Barbosa, Francisco A. R.; Chartone-Souza, Edmar; Nascimento, Andréa M. A.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The bacterial community and genes <span class="hlt">involved</span> in geobiocycling of arsenic (As) from sediment <span class="hlt">impacted</span> by long-term gold mining were characterized through culture-based analysis of As-transforming bacteria and metagenomic studies of the arsC, arrA, and aioA genes. Sediment was collected from the historically gold mining <span class="hlt">impacted</span> Mina stream, located in one of the world’s largest mining regions known as the “Iron Quadrangle”. A total of 123 As-resistant bacteria were recovered from the enrichment cultures, which were phenotypically and genotypically characterized for As-transformation. A diverse As-resistant bacteria community was found through phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA gene. Bacterial isolates were affiliated with Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Actinobacteria and were represented by 20 genera. Most were AsV-reducing (72%), whereas AsIII-oxidizing accounted for 20%. Bacteria harboring the arsC gene predominated (85%), followed by aioA (20%) and arrA (7%). Additionally, we identified two novel As-transforming genera, Thermomonas and Pannonibacter. Metagenomic analysis of arsC, aioA, and arrA sequences confirmed the presence of these genes, with arrA sequences being more closely related to uncultured organisms. Evolutionary analyses revealed high genetic similarity between some arsC and aioA sequences obtained from isolates and clone libraries, suggesting that those isolates may represent environmentally important bacteria acting in As speciation. In addition, our findings show that the diversity of arrA genes is wider than earlier described, once none arrA-OTUs were affiliated with known reference strains. Therefore, the molecular diversity of arrA genes is far from being fully explored deserving further attention. PMID:24755825</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27030954','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27030954"><span>Numerical modelling of biophysicochemical effects on multispecies reactive transport in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media <span class="hlt">involving</span> Pseudomonas putida for potential microbial enhanced oil recovery application.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sivasankar, P; Rajesh Kanna, A; Suresh Kumar, G; Gummadi, Sathyanarayana N</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>pH and resident time of injected slug plays a critical role in characterizing the reservoir for potential microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) application. To investigate MEOR processes, a multispecies (microbes-nutrients) reactive transport model in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media was developed by coupling kinetic and transport model. The present work differs from earlier works by explicitly determining parametric values required for kinetic model by experimental investigations using Pseudomonas putida at different pH conditions and subsequently performing sensitivity analysis of pH, resident time and water saturation on concentrations of microbes, nutrients and biosurfactant within reservoir. The results suggest that nutrient utilization and biosurfactant production are found to be maximum at pH 8 and 7.5 respectively. It is also found that the sucrose and biosurfactant concentrations are highly sensitive to pH rather than reservoir microbial concentration, while at larger resident time and water saturation, the microbial and nutrient concentrations were lesser due to enhanced dispersion.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5094259','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5094259"><span>Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy in Athletes <span class="hlt">Involved</span> with High-<span class="hlt">impact</span> Sports</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Safinia, Cyrus; Bershad, Eric M.; Clark, H. Brent; SantaCruz, Karen; Alakbarova, Naila; Suarez, Jose I.; Divani, Afshin A.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Background and purpose Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease occurring most commonly in athletes and is caused by repeated concussive or subconcussive blows to the head. The main purpose of this review is to evaluate the published literature on chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in athletes participating in high-<span class="hlt">impact</span> sports. In particular, we highlight the significance of concussive and subconcussive <span class="hlt">impacts</span> in multiple sports, elucidate the differences between clinical/pathological features of CTE and related neurodegenerative diseases, and provide an explanation for the variation in clinical presentation between athletes of different sports. Methods A review targeting relevant publications to CTE was performed. The PubMed/MEDLINE index was searched for keywords such as “chronic traumatic encephalopathy,” “repetitive traumatic brain injury,” “mild traumatic brain injury,” and “concussion” from year 1924 through March 1, 2016. Results A consensus panel’s recent identification of a pathognomonic pathology in CTE, characterized by an irregular distribution of phosphorylated tau deposits, is an important step in developing consensus diagnostic criteria and clinicopathological studies. After review of major clinical studies, evidence suggests that there are clear differences in neuropathological features, clinical progression, and manifestation of symptoms between CTE and other neurodegenerative diseases. The literature suggests boxers tend to have more severe symptoms than other athletes due to more frequent rotational and shearing <span class="hlt">impacts</span>. Data regarding genetic predispositions of CTE have been inconsistent in part due to low subject populations. Positron emission tomography imaging <span class="hlt">involving</span> tau-binding ligands has recently proven effective in differentiating CTE from control groups and other neurodegenerative diseases. Conclusions Further longitudinal studies should be conducted to correlate the number of</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26501893','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26501893"><span>Gatekeeping and its <span class="hlt">impact</span> on father <span class="hlt">involvement</span> among Black South Africans in rural KwaZulu-Natal.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Makusha, Tawanda; Richter, Linda</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Involved</span> and caring fatherhood contributes to the health and wellbeing of children, women and men. The corollary is also true - men, women and children are affected when fathers are not <span class="hlt">involved</span> or supportive of their children. Many factors affect fathers' <span class="hlt">involvement</span>, including women's attitudes, the history and nature of the relationship between mother and father, and the cultural context. This study explores gatekeeping and its <span class="hlt">impact</span> on father <span class="hlt">involvement</span> among Black South Africans in rural KwaZulu-Natal. Among married couples, gatekeeping occurs with respect to childcare and housework through women's attempts to validate their maternal identity according to socially and culturally constructed gender roles. Among unmarried, non-resident parents, women control father-child contact and <span class="hlt">involvement</span>, with mothers and/or their families either facilitating or inhibiting father <span class="hlt">involvement</span>. In this context, we found that cultural gatekeeping had a huge <span class="hlt">impact</span> on father <span class="hlt">involvement</span>, with the non-payment of inhlawulo or lobola regulating father-child <span class="hlt">involvement</span>. In a country like South Africa, where there is high non-marital fertility and father-child non-residence, future research, parenting and family programmes should focus on strategies that encourage positive paternal <span class="hlt">involvement</span> as well as maternal and cultural support for father <span class="hlt">involvement</span>, regardless of parental relationship and residence status.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4495600','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4495600"><span>Systematic Analysis of the Genetic Variability That <span class="hlt">Impacts</span> SUMO Conjugation and Their <span class="hlt">Involvement</span> in Human Diseases</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Xu, Hao-Dong; Shi, Shao-Ping; Chen, Xiang; Qiu, Jian-Ding</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Protein function has been observed to rely on select essential sites instead of requiring all sites to be indispensable. Small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) conjugation or sumoylation, which is a highly dynamic reversible process and its outcomes are extremely diverse, ranging from changes in localization to altered activity and, in some cases, stability of the modified, has shown to be especially valuable in cellular biology. Motivated by the significance of SUMO conjugation in biological processes, we report here on the first exploratory assessment whether sumoylation related genetic variability <span class="hlt">impacts</span> protein functions as well as the occurrence of diseases related to SUMO. Here, we defined the SUMOAMVR as sumoylation related amino acid variations that affect sumoylation sites or enzymes <span class="hlt">involved</span> in the process of connectivity, and categorized four types of potential SUMOAMVRs. We detected that 17.13% of amino acid variations are potential SUMOAMVRs and 4.83% of disease mutations could lead to SUMOAMVR with our system. More interestingly, the statistical analysis demonstrates that the amino acid variations that directly create new potential lysine sumoylation sites are more likely to cause diseases. It can be anticipated that our method can provide more instructive guidance to identify the mechanisms of genetic diseases. PMID:26154679</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015NatSR...510900X','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015NatSR...510900X"><span>Systematic Analysis of the Genetic Variability That <span class="hlt">Impacts</span> SUMO Conjugation and Their <span class="hlt">Involvement</span> in Human Diseases</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Xu, Hao-Dong; Shi, Shao-Ping; Chen, Xiang; Qiu, Jian-Ding</p> <p>2015-07-01</p> <p>Protein function has been observed to rely on select essential sites instead of requiring all sites to be indispensable. Small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) conjugation or sumoylation, which is a highly dynamic reversible process and its outcomes are extremely diverse, ranging from changes in localization to altered activity and, in some cases, stability of the modified, has shown to be especially valuable in cellular biology. Motivated by the significance of SUMO conjugation in biological processes, we report here on the first exploratory assessment whether sumoylation related genetic variability <span class="hlt">impacts</span> protein functions as well as the occurrence of diseases related to SUMO. Here, we defined the SUMOAMVR as sumoylation related amino acid variations that affect sumoylation sites or enzymes <span class="hlt">involved</span> in the process of connectivity, and categorized four types of potential SUMOAMVRs. We detected that 17.13% of amino acid variations are potential SUMOAMVRs and 4.83% of disease mutations could lead to SUMOAMVR with our system. More interestingly, the statistical analysis demonstrates that the amino acid variations that directly create new potential lysine sumoylation sites are more likely to cause diseases. It can be anticipated that our method can provide more instructive guidance to identify the mechanisms of genetic diseases.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25325703','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25325703"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of redox-active polymer molecular weight on the electrochemical properties and transport across <span class="hlt">porous</span> separators in nonaqueous solvents.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nagarjuna, Gavvalapalli; Hui, Jingshu; Cheng, Kevin J; Lichtenstein, Timothy; Shen, Mei; Moore, Jeffrey S; Rodríguez-López, Joaquín</p> <p>2014-11-19</p> <p>Enhancing the ionic conductivity across the electrolyte separator in nonaqueous redox flow batteries (NRFBs) is essential for improving their performance and enabling their widespread utilization. Separating redox-active species by size exclusion without greatly impeding the transport of supporting electrolyte is a potentially powerful alternative to the use of poorly performing ion-exchange membranes. However, this strategy has not been explored possibly due to the lack of suitable redox-active species that are easily varied in size, remain highly soluble, and exhibit good electrochemical properties. Here we report the synthesis, electrochemical characterization, and transport properties of redox-active poly(vinylbenzyl ethylviologen) (RAPs) with molecular weights between 21 and 318 kDa. The RAPs reported here show very good solubility (up to at least 2.0 M) in acetonitrile and propylene carbonate. Ultramicroelectrode voltammetry reveals facile electron transfer with E1/2 ∼ -0.7 V vs Ag/Ag(+)(0.1 M) for the viologen 2+/+ reduction at concentrations as high as 1.0 M in acetonitrile. Controlled potential bulk electrolysis indicates that 94-99% of the nominal charge on different RAPs is accessible and that the electrolysis products are stable upon cycling. The dependence of the diffusion coefficient on molecular weight suggests the adequacy of the Stokes-Einstein formalism to describe RAPs. The size-selective transport properties of LiBF4 and RAPs across commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) separators such as Celgard 2400 and Celgard 2325 were tested. COTS <span class="hlt">porous</span> separators show ca. 70 times higher selectivity for charge balancing ions (Li(+)BF4(-)) compared to high molecular weight RAPs. RAPs rejection across these separators showed a strong dependence on polymer molecular weight as well as the pore size; the rejection increased with both increasing polymer molecular weight and reduction in pore size. Significant rejection was observed even for rpoly/rpore (polymer</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=VOlunteering&pg=5&id=ED558305','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=VOlunteering&pg=5&id=ED558305"><span>The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Elementary Teachers' Perceptions and Practices to Promote Parental <span class="hlt">Involvement</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Lattimore, Myra T.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Parental <span class="hlt">involvement</span>, defined as the educational engagement of parents in activities such as <span class="hlt">involvement</span> in PTA, volunteering, and Science/Math night, promotes academic success. Lack of parental <span class="hlt">involvement</span> is associated with lower academic performance. The purpose of this correlational study was to determine the relationship between parent…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li class="active"><span>4</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_4 --> <div id="page_5" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li class="active"><span>5</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="81"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=parental+AND+involvement&pg=4&id=ED557531','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=parental+AND+involvement&pg=4&id=ED557531"><span>Science Homework with Video Directions for Parents: The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> on Parental <span class="hlt">Involvement</span> and Academic Achievement</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hooker, Kathy L.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The benefits of effective parental <span class="hlt">involvement</span> in education have been well documented and can be far reaching. When educators make an effort to <span class="hlt">involve</span> families, parental <span class="hlt">involvement</span> can be even more meaningful. Homework is a commonly practiced and accepted connection between school and home and affords parents many opportunities to interact with…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016Icar..268..102M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016Icar..268..102M"><span>Survivability of copper projectiles during hypervelocity <span class="hlt">impacts</span> in <span class="hlt">porous</span> ice: A laboratory investigation of the survivability of projectiles <span class="hlt">impacting</span> comets or other bodies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>McDermott, K. H.; Price, M. C.; Cole, M.; Burchell, M. J.</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>During hypervelocity <span class="hlt">impact</span> (>a few km s-1) the resulting cratering and/or disruption of the target body often outweighs interest on the outcome of the projectile material, with the majority of projectiles assumed to be vaporised. However, on Earth, fragments, often metallic, have been recovered from <span class="hlt">impact</span> sites, meaning that metallic projectile fragments may survive a hypervelocity <span class="hlt">impact</span> and still exist within the wall, floor and/or ejecta of the <span class="hlt">impact</span> crater post-<span class="hlt">impact</span>. The discovery of the remnant impactor composition within the craters of asteroids, planets and comets could provide further information regarding the <span class="hlt">impact</span> history of a body. Accordingly, we study in the laboratory the survivability of 1 and 2 mm diameter copper projectiles fired onto ice at speeds between 1.00 and 7.05 km s-1. The projectile was recovered intact at speeds up to 1.50 km s-1, with no ductile deformation, but some surface pitting was observed. At 2.39 km s-1, the projectile showed increasing ductile deformation and broke into two parts. Above velocities of 2.60 km s-1 increasing numbers of projectile fragments were identified post <span class="hlt">impact</span>, with the mean size of the fragments decreasing with increasing <span class="hlt">impact</span> velocity. The decrease in size also corresponds with an increase in the number of projectile fragments recovered, as with increasing shock pressure the projectile material is more intensely disrupted, producing smaller and more numerous fragments. The damage to the projectile is divided into four classes with increasing speed and shock pressure: (1) minimal damage, (2) ductile deformation, start of break up, (3) increasing fragmentation, and (4) complete fragmentation. The implications of such behaviour is considered for specific examples of <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of metallic impactors onto Solar System bodies, including LCROSS <span class="hlt">impacting</span> the Moon, iron meteorites onto Mars and NASA's ;Deep <span class="hlt">Impact</span>; mission where a spacecraft <span class="hlt">impacted</span> a comet.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=senior+AND+group+AND+activity&pg=6&id=ED546183','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=senior+AND+group+AND+activity&pg=6&id=ED546183"><span>The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of <span class="hlt">Involvement</span> in Mortar Board Senior Honor Society on Lifelong Views of Civic Engagement and Leadership</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Turner, Daniel James</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>This study examines the <span class="hlt">impact</span> that <span class="hlt">involvement</span> in Mortar Board National Senior Honor Society has on lifelong views of civic engagement and leadership. Mortar Board Senior Honor Society is a collegiate honor society established in 1918 that recognizes students for their outstanding contributions to their college or university community in the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMNS31A1954T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMNS31A1954T"><span>A feasible research of rock porosity and water saturation <span class="hlt">impact</span> on audio-magnetotelluric propagation in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tian, Z.; Liu, J.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Abstract: Although various factors have <span class="hlt">impact</span> on the resistivity of subsurface rock formation, in depth range of general electrical prospecting, the conductive actions of rocks are basically realized relying on the aqueous solutions filled in the pores. Therefore, quantitatively studying the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of the water level on rock resistivity is important to analyze and classify strata, investigate the underground structures. In this research, we proposed a feasible research on building electric property rock formation models with different porosity and water saturation based on theories of two-phase media. The propagation of audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) waves is simulated by using finite-difference (FD) scheme, and theoretic resistivity distribution is calculated on account of the response of AMT. According to a sequence of synthetic examples, through comparing and analyzing the simulated results with various porosity and water saturation respectively, we discuss the <span class="hlt">impact</span> on layers resistivity while porosity and water saturation of rock stratum are changing. The results shows the extent that the mentioned factors can have <span class="hlt">impact</span> on the propagation of AMT waves. Key words: audio-magnetotelluric modeling, two-phase media, porosity, water saturation, finite-difference</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3755281','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3755281"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> Carbon Nanoparticle Networks with Tunable Absorbability</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Dai, Wei; Kim, Seong Jin; Seong, Won-Kyeong; Kim, Sang Hoon; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol; Kim, Ho-Young; Moon, Myoung-Woon</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Porous</span> carbon materials with high specific surface areas and superhydrophobicity have attracted much research interest due to their potential application in the areas of water filtration, water/oil separation, and oil-spill cleanup. Most reported superhydrophobic <span class="hlt">porous</span> carbon materials are fabricated by complex processes <span class="hlt">involving</span> the use of catalysts and high temperatures but with low throughput. Here, we present a facile single-step method for fabricating <span class="hlt">porous</span> carbon nanoparticle (CNP) networks with selective absorbability for water and oils via the glow discharge of hydrocarbon plasma without a catalyst at room temperature. <span class="hlt">Porous</span> CNP networks were grown by the continuous deposition of CNPs at a relatively high deposition pressure. By varying the fluorine content, the <span class="hlt">porous</span> CNP networks exhibited tunable repellence against liquids with various degrees of surface tension. These <span class="hlt">porous</span> CNP networks could be applied for the separation of not only water/oil mixtures but also mixtures of liquids with different surface tension levels. PMID:23982181</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27654458','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27654458"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Redox Reactions on Colloid Transport in Saturated <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Media: An Example of Ferrihydrite Colloids Transport in the Presence of Sulfide.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Liao, Peng; Yuan, Songhu; Wang, Dengjun</p> <p>2016-10-18</p> <p>Transport of colloids in the subsurface is an important environmental process with most research interests centered on the transport in chemically stable conditions. While colloids can be formed under dynamic redox conditions, the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of redox reactions on their transport is largely overlooked. Taking the redox reactions between ferrihydrite colloids and sulfide as an example, we investigated how and to what extent the redox reactions modulated the transport of ferrihydrite colloids in anoxic sand columns over a range of environmentally relevant conditions. Our results reveal that the presence of sulfide (7.8-46.9 μM) significantly decreased the breakthrough of ferrihydrite colloids in the sand column. The estimated travel distance of ferrihydrite colloids in the absence of sulfide was nearly 7-fold larger than that in the presence of 46.9 μM sulfide. The reduced breakthrough was primarily attributed to the reductive dissolution of ferrihydrite colloids by sulfide in parallel with formation of elemental sulfur (S(0)) particles from sulfide oxidation. Reductive dissolution decreased the total mass of ferrihydrite colloids, while the negatively charged S(0) decreased the overall zeta potential of ferrihydrite colloids by attaching onto their surfaces and thus enhanced their retention in the sand. Our findings provide novel insights into the critical role of redox reactions on the transport of redox-sensitive colloids in saturated <span class="hlt">porous</span> media.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1032271.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1032271.pdf"><span>The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of a Collaborative Family <span class="hlt">Involvement</span> Program on Latino Families and Children's Educational Performance</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>O'Donnell, Julie; Kirkner, Sandra L.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Latino families highly value education and are committed to their children's educational success; however, Latino students often experience educational challenges. Well-designed family <span class="hlt">involvement</span> programs can encourage Latino families, especially new immigrants or monolingual Spanish-speakers, to increase their <span class="hlt">involvement</span> resulting in positive…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27870993','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27870993"><span>DLVO, hydrophobic, capillary and hydrodynamic forces acting on bacteria at solid-air-water interfaces: Their relative <span class="hlt">impact</span> on bacteria deposition mechanisms in unsaturated <span class="hlt">porous</span> media.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bai, Hongjuan; Cochet, Nelly; Pauss, André; Lamy, Edvina</p> <p>2017-02-01</p> <p>Experimental and modeling studies were performed to investigate bacteria deposition behavior in unsaturated <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. The coupled effect of different forces, acting on bacteria at solid-air-water interfaces and their relative importance on bacteria deposition mechanisms was explored by calculating Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) and non-DLVO interactions such as hydrophobic, capillary and hydrodynamic forces. Negatively charged non-motile bacteria and quartz sands were used in packed column experiments. The breakthrough curves and retention profiles of bacteria were simulated using the modified Mobile-IMmobile (MIM) model, to identify physico-chemical attachment or physical straining mechanisms <span class="hlt">involved</span> in bacteria retention. These results indicated that both mechanisms might occur in both sand. However, the attachment was found to be a reversible process, because attachment coefficients were similar to those of detachment. DLVO calculations supported these results: the primary minimum did not exist, suggesting no permanent retention of bacteria to solid-water and air-water interfaces. Calculated hydrodynamic and resisting torques predicted that bacteria detachment in the secondary minimum might occur. The capillary potential energy was greater than DLVO, hydrophobic and hydrodynamic potential energies, suggesting that film straining by capillary forces might largely govern bacteria deposition under unsaturated conditions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4919665','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4919665"><span>The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of transitions between two-fluid and three-fluidphases on fluid configuration and fluid-fluid interfacial areain <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Carroll, Kenneth C.; McDonald, Kieran; Marble, Justin; Russo, Ann E.; Brusseau, Mark L.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Multiphase-fluid distribution and flow is inherent in numerous areas of hydrology. Yet, pore-scale characterization of transitions between two and three immiscible-fluids is limited. The objective of this study was to examine the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of such transitions on the pore-scale configuration of organic liquid in a multi-fluid system comprising natural <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. Three-dimensional images of an organic liquid (trichloroethene) in two-phase (organic-liquid/water) and three-phase (air/organic-liquid/water) systems were obtained using X-ray microtomography before and after drainage and imbibition. Upon transition from a two-phase to a three-phase system, a significant portion of the organic liquid (intermediate wetting fluid) was observed to exist as lenses and films in contact with air (nonwetting fluid). In these cases, the air was either encased by or contiguous to the organic liquid. The presence of air resulted in an increase in the surface-area-to-volume ratios for the organic-liquid blobs. Upon imbibition, the air was displaced downgradient, and concomitantly, the morphology of the organic-liquid blobs no longer in contact with air reverted to that characteristic of a two-phase distribution (i.e., more spherical blobs and ganglia). This change in morphology resulted in a reduction in the surface-area-to-volume ratio. These results illustrate the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of transitions between two-phase and three-phase conditions on fluid configuration, and they demonstrate the malleable nature of fluid configuration under dynamic, multiphase-flow conditions. The results have implications for characterizing and modeling pore-scale flow and mass-transfer processes. PMID:27350722</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015WRR....51.7189C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015WRR....51.7189C"><span>The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of transitions between two-fluid and three-fluid phases on fluid configuration and fluid-fluid interfacial area in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Carroll, Kenneth C.; McDonald, Kieran; Marble, Justin; Russo, Ann E.; Brusseau, Mark L.</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>Multiphase-fluid distribution and flow is inherent in numerous areas of hydrology. Yet pore-scale characterization of transitions between two and three immiscible fluids is limited. The objective of this study was to examine the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of such transitions on the pore-scale configuration of organic liquid in a multifluid system comprising natural <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. Three-dimensional images of an organic liquid (trichloroethene) in two-phase (organic-liquid/water) and three-phase (air/organic-liquid/water) systems were obtained using X-ray microtomography before and after drainage and imbibition. Upon transition from a two-phase to a three-phase system, a significant portion of the organic liquid (intermediate wetting fluid) was observed to exist as lenses and films in contact with air (nonwetting fluid). In these cases, the air was either encased by or contiguous to the organic liquid. The presence of air resulted in an increase in the surface-area-to-volume ratios for the organic-liquid blobs. Upon imbibition, the air was displaced downgradient, and concomitantly, the morphology of the organic-liquid blobs no longer in contact with air reverted to that characteristic of a two-phase distribution (i.e., more spherical blobs and ganglia). This change in morphology resulted in a reduction in the surface-area-to-volume ratio. These results illustrate the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of transitions between two-phase and three-phase conditions on fluid configuration, and they demonstrate the malleable nature of fluid configuration under dynamic, multiphase-flow conditions. The results have implications for characterizing and modeling pore-scale flow and mass transfer processes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-12-09/pdf/2011-31690.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-12-09/pdf/2011-31690.pdf"><span>76 FR 76935 - <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Implementing the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) on Commercial Activities <span class="hlt">Involving</span>...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-12-09</p> <p>... Bureau of Industry and Security <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Implementing the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) on... implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC), through the Chemical Weapons Convention Implementation Act (CWCIA), and the Chemical Weapons Convention Regulations (CWCR), has had on commercial...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23856594','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23856594"><span>The effect of recovery coaches for substance-<span class="hlt">involved</span> mothers in child welfare: <span class="hlt">impact</span> on juvenile delinquency.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Douglas-Siegel, Jonah A; Ryan, Joseph P</p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>Despite the documented relationship between parental substance abuse and youth delinquency, the effects of parental interventions on delinquency outcomes are unknown. Such interventions are particularly vital for families in the child welfare system who are at heightened risk for both parental substance <span class="hlt">involvement</span> and youth delinquency. The current study tested the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of intensive case management in the form of a recovery coach for substance-<span class="hlt">involved</span> mothers on youth delinquency outcomes among a randomized sample of 453 families <span class="hlt">involved</span> in a Title IV-E experimental waiver demonstration in Cook County, Illinois. In comparison to control group participants, families enrolled in the Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse (AODA) waiver demonstration experienced a lower rate of juvenile arrest, net of factors such as demographic characteristics, primary drug of choice, and time spent in substitute care. Findings support efforts to curb delinquency among child-welfare <span class="hlt">involved</span> youth by providing recovery coaches to their substance abusing or dependent parents.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/895764','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/895764"><span>Resolving the <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Biological Processes on Water Transport in Unsaturated <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Media Through Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Micro-Imaging</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Seymour, Joseph D.</p> <p>2005-06-01</p> <p>The magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) work at Montana State University has extended the imaging of a single biofilm in a 1 mm capillary reactor to correlate T2 magnetic relaxation maps displaying biofilm structure with the corresponding velocity patterns in three dimensions in a Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm fouled square capillary. A square duct geometry is chosen to provide correlation with existing experiments and simulations, as research bioreactors tend to be of square or rectangular cross section for optical or microelectrode access. The spatially resolved velocity data provide details on the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of biofilm induced advection on mass transport from the bulk fluid to the biofilm and through the capillary bioreactor.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.H53N..02P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.H53N..02P"><span>The 2D versus 3D imaging trade-off: The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of over- or under-estimating small throats for simulating permeability in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Peters, C. A.; Crandell, L. E.; Um, W.; Jones, K. W.; Lindquist, W. B.</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>Geochemical reactions in the subsurface can alter the porosity and permeability of a <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium through mineral precipitation and dissolution. While effects on porosity are relatively well understood, changes in permeability are more difficult to estimate. In this work, pore-network modeling is used to estimate the permeability of a <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium using pore and throat size distributions. These distributions can be determined from 2D Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images of thin sections or from 3D X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) images of small cores. Each method has unique advantages as well as unique sources of error. 3D CT imaging has the advantage of reconstructing a 3D pore network without the inherent geometry-based biases of 2D images but is limited by resolutions around 1 μm. 2D SEM imaging has the advantage of higher resolution, and the ability to examine sub-grain scale variations in porosity and mineralogy, but is limited by the small size of the sample of pores that are quantified. A pore network model was created to estimate flow permeability in a sand-packed experimental column investigating reaction of sediments with caustic radioactive tank wastes in the context of the Hanford, WA site. Before, periodically during, and after reaction, 3D images of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium in the column were produced using the X2B beam line facility at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Lab. These images were interpreted using 3DMA-Rock to characterize the pore and throat size distributions. After completion of the experiment, the column was sectioned and imaged using 2D SEM in backscattered electron mode. The 2D images were interpreted using erosion-dilation to estimate the pore and throat size distributions. A bias correction was determined by comparison with the 3D image data. A special image processing method was developed to infer the pore space before reaction by digitally removing the precipitate. The different sets of pore</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25894592','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25894592"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of home care management on the <span class="hlt">involvement</span> of informal caregivers by formal caregivers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>van Wieringen, Marieke; Broese van Groenou, Marjolein I; Groenewegen, Peter</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>This study explores the link between management characteristics of home care agencies and the <span class="hlt">involvement</span> of informal caregivers in caregiving. Based on a study of policy documents of two agencies and semi-structured interviews with five team managers and 31 formal caregivers, we conclude that, although the importance of <span class="hlt">involving</span> informal caregivers is emphasized in official documentation, actual contact with informal caregivers is often lacking. Comparison of the work processes of the two agencies shows that contact with informal caregivers and their potential <span class="hlt">involvement</span> are enhanced by smaller teams, less task division, and clarity about the responsibilities of formal caregivers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..1410629M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..1410629M"><span>Modeling evaporation from <span class="hlt">porous</span> media influenced by atmospheric processes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mosthaf, K.; Baber, K.; Flemisch, B.; Helmig, R.</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>Modeling evaporation processes from partially saturated soils into the ambient air is a challenging task. It <span class="hlt">involves</span> usually a variety of interacting processes and depends on the multitude of properties of the fluids and of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium. Often, the ambient free-flow and the <span class="hlt">porous</span>-medium compartments are modeled separately with a specification of the evaporation rate as boundary condition. We have developed a coupling concept, which allows the combined modeling of a free-flow and a <span class="hlt">porous</span>-medium system under non-isothermal conditions with the evaporative fluxes across the soil-atmosphere interface as model output. It is based on flux continuity and local thermodynamic equilibrium at the interface. Darcy's law for multiple phases is used in the <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium, whereas the ambient air flow is modeled as a compositional single-phase Stokes system. The concept has been implemented in the numerical simulator DuMux. A comparison of simulated and measured data from wind tunnel experiments performed in the group of D. Or (ETH Zürich) will be shown. Furthermore, the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of several parameters, such as a varying wind velocity, temperature or different soil properties on the evaporation process has been analyzed in a numerical parameter study. The results will be presented and discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4691448','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4691448"><span>Parental <span class="hlt">Involvement</span> in Intensive Treatment for Adolescent Panic Disorder and Its <span class="hlt">Impact</span> on Depression</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Pincus, Donna B.; Gallo, Kaitlin P.; Comer, Jonathan S.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The present study investigated whether an 8-day intensive treatment for panic disorder in adolescents conferred a corollary benefit of ameliorating symptoms of depression. Participants included 57 adolescents between the ages of 11 and 18 who were randomly assigned to an intensive panic treatment for adolescents with or without parental <span class="hlt">involvement</span>. Paired samples t tests and hierarchical linear models (HLM) indicated that participants' total depression score and scores on depression subscales declined from baseline to the 3-month follow-up. Additional HLM analyses indicated that the interaction term between age and parent <span class="hlt">involvement</span> was a significant moderator in the negative slope for adolescent depression, with younger participants benefitting more from treatment without parent <span class="hlt">involvement</span> than older participants with regard to depression symptoms. PMID:26715827</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26715827','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26715827"><span>Parental <span class="hlt">Involvement</span> in Intensive Treatment for Adolescent Panic Disorder and Its <span class="hlt">Impact</span> on Depression.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hardway, Christina L; Pincus, Donna B; Gallo, Kaitlin P; Comer, Jonathan S</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>The present study investigated whether an 8-day intensive treatment for panic disorder in adolescents conferred a corollary benefit of ameliorating symptoms of depression. Participants included 57 adolescents between the ages of 11 and 18 who were randomly assigned to an intensive panic treatment for adolescents with or without parental <span class="hlt">involvement</span>. Paired samples t tests and hierarchical linear models (HLM) indicated that participants' total depression score and scores on depression subscales declined from baseline to the 3-month follow-up. Additional HLM analyses indicated that the interaction term between age and parent <span class="hlt">involvement</span> was a significant moderator in the negative slope for adolescent depression, with younger participants benefitting more from treatment without parent <span class="hlt">involvement</span> than older participants with regard to depression symptoms.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25431978','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25431978"><span>Family <span class="hlt">involvement</span> in music <span class="hlt">impacts</span> participation of children with cochlear implants in music education and music activities.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Driscoll, Virginia; Gfeller, Kate; Tan, Xueli; See, Rachel L; Cheng, Hsin-Yi; Kanemitsu, Mikiko</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>Objective Children with cochlear implants (CIs) participate in musical activities in school and daily lives. Considerable variability exists regarding the amount of music <span class="hlt">involvement</span> and enjoyment. Using the Music Engagement Questionnaire-Preschool/Elementary (MEQ-P/E), we wanted to determine patterns of musical participation and the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of familial factors on engagement. Methods Parents of 32 children with CIs (16 preschool and 16 elementary) completed a questionnaire regarding the musical <span class="hlt">involvement</span> of their child with an implant and a normal-hearing (NH) sibling (if one existed). We compared CI children's <span class="hlt">involvement</span> to that of their NH siblings as well as across groups of children with and without CIs. Correlations between parent ratings of music importance, demographic factors, and <span class="hlt">involvement</span> of CI and NH children were conducted within and across groups. Results No significant differences were found between children with CIs and NH siblings, meaning children from the same family showed similar levels of musical <span class="hlt">involvement</span>. When compared at the same developmental stage, no significant differences were found between preschool children with and without CIs. Parents who rated the importance of music as 'low' or 'middle' had children (NH and CI) who were less <span class="hlt">involved</span> in music activities. Children whose parents rated music importance as 'high' were <span class="hlt">involved</span> in monthly to weekly music activities with 81.25% reporting daily music listening. Conclusion Despite a less-than-ideal auditory signal for music, preschool and school-aged CI children enjoy and are <span class="hlt">involved</span> in musical experiences. Families who enjoy and spend a greater amount of time <span class="hlt">involved</span> in music tend to have children who also engage more actively in music.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4420640','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4420640"><span>Family <span class="hlt">involvement</span> in music <span class="hlt">impacts</span> participation of children with cochlear implants in music education and music activities</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Driscoll, Virginia; Gfeller, Kate; Tan, Xueli; See, Rachel L.; Cheng, Hsin-Yi; Kanemitsu, Mikiko</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Objective Children with cochlear implants (CIs) participate in musical activities in school and daily lives. Considerable variability exists regarding the amount of music <span class="hlt">involvement</span> and enjoyment. Using the Music Engagement Questionnaire-Preschool/Elementary (MEQ-P/E), we wanted to determine patterns of musical participation and the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of familial factors on engagement. Methods Parents of 32 children with CIs (16 preschool, 16 elementary) completed a questionnaire regarding the musical <span class="hlt">involvement</span> of their child with an implant and a normal-hearing (NH) sibling (if one existed). We compared CI children's <span class="hlt">involvement</span> to that of their NH siblings as well as across groups of children with and without CIs. Correlations between parent ratings of music importance, demographic factors, and <span class="hlt">involvement</span> of CI and NH children were conducted within and across groups. Results No significant differences were found between children with CIs and NH siblings, meaning children from the same family showed similar levels of musical <span class="hlt">involvement</span>. When compared at the same developmental stage, no significant differences were found between preschool children with and without CIs. Parents who rated the importance of music as “low” or “middle” had children (NH and CI) who were less <span class="hlt">involved</span> in music activities. Children whose parents rated music importance as “high” were <span class="hlt">involved</span> in monthly to weekly music activities with 81.25% reporting daily music listening. Conclusion Despite a less-than-ideal auditory signal for music, preschool and school-aged CI children enjoy and are <span class="hlt">involved</span> in musical experiences. Families who enjoy and spend a greater amount of time <span class="hlt">involved</span> in music tend to have children who also engage more actively in music. PMID:25431978</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li class="active"><span>5</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_5 --> <div id="page_6" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li class="active"><span>6</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="101"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20969922','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20969922"><span>Approaches to mitigate the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of dissolved organic matter on the adsorption of synthetic organic contaminants by <span class="hlt">porous</span> carbonaceous sorbents</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Yanping Guo; Abhishek Yadav; Tanju Karanfil</p> <p>2007-11-15</p> <p>Adsorption of trichloroethylene (TCE) and atrazine, two synthetic organic contaminants (SOCs) having different optimum adsorption pore regions, by four activated carbons and an activated carbon fiber (ACF) was examined. Adsorbents included two coconut-shell based granular activated carbons (GACs), two coal-based GACs (F400 and HD4000) and a phenol formaldehyde-based activated carbon fiber. The selected adsorbents had a wide range of pore size distributions but similar surface acidity and hydrophobicity. Single solute and preloading (with a dissolved organic matter (DOM)) isotherms were performed. Single solute adsorption results showed that (i) the adsorbents having higher amounts of pores with sizes about the dimensions of the adsorbate molecules exhibited higher uptakes, (ii) there were some pore structure characteristics, which were not completely captured by pore size distribution analysis, that also affected the adsorption, and (iii) the BET surface area and total pore volume were not the primary factors controlling the adsorption of SOCs. The preloading isotherm results showed that for TCE adsorbing primarily in pores <10 {angstrom}, the highly microporous ACF and GACs, acting like molecular sieves, exhibited the highest uptakes. For atrazine with an optimum adsorption pore region of 10-20 {angstrom}, which overlaps with the adsorption region of some DOM components, the GACs with a broad pore size distribution and high pore volumes in the 10-20 {angstrom} region had the least <span class="hlt">impact</span> of DOM on the adsorption. 25 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22608708','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22608708"><span>Nonideal transport of contaminants in heterogeneous <span class="hlt">porous</span> media: 9 - <span class="hlt">impact</span> of contact time on desorption and elution tailing.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Brusseau, M L; Russo, A E; Schnaar, G</p> <p>2012-09-01</p> <p>A series of miscible-displacement experiments was conducted to examine the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of sorption contact time on desorption and elution of trichloroethene from a well-characterized soil. A large number of contact times were examined, spanning 1h to 4 years (∼2 × 10(6)h). Effluent trichloroethene concentrations were monitored over a range of greater than six orders of magnitude, allowing characterization of potential asymptotic tailing. The results of the column experiments showed that trichloroethene exhibited extensive elution tailing for all experiments. Each increase in contact time resulted in a successive increase in the extent of tailing. In total, the number of pore volumes of water flushing required to reach the analytical detection limit increased from approximately 1000 for the 1-h contact time to almost 9000 for the 4-year contact time. These results indicate that a contact time of less than 1h produced a sorbed phase that is relatively resistant to desorption, and that a progressive increase in resistance to desorption occurred with increased contact time. A mathematical model incorporating nonlinear, rate-limited sorption/desorption described by a continuous-distribution reaction function was used to successfully simulate the measured data. The nonlinear sorption, the apparent rapid development of desorption resistance, and the progressive increase in resistance with increasing contact time are consistent with behavior anticipated for sorbate interactions with hard-carbon components of the soil.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ847784.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ847784.pdf"><span>The Retention of Experienced Faculty in Online Distance Education Programs: Understanding Factors that <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Their <span class="hlt">Involvement</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Green, Tim; Alejandro, Jeffery; Brown, Abbie H.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The study sought to determine factors that affect faculty decisions regarding their <span class="hlt">involvement</span> in teaching online distance education courses. A survey was administered to online distance education faculty across the United States to determine those factors that encourage or discourage them from continuing to teach online courses. The factors were…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA246555','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA246555"><span>Encouraging Democratic Transitions: The Problematic <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of United States’ <span class="hlt">Involvement</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1991-06-20</p> <p>cultural, social , economic, and political) within that country. As such, increased <span class="hlt">involvement</span> does not necessarily increase the ability of the...limited in comparison to the influence of other factors (historical, cultural, social , economic, and political) within that country. As such, increased...factors which help explain democratic government (historical, cultural, social , economic, political, and international), external factors are the least</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=academic+AND+performance&pg=4&id=EJ1061287','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=academic+AND+performance&pg=4&id=EJ1061287"><span>The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Racial Socialization on the Academic Performance and Prosocial <span class="hlt">Involvement</span> of Black Emerging Adults</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>White-Johnson, Rhonda L.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Despite evidence linking racial socialization processes to the functioning of Black youth, the effect of these parenting practices among Black college students is less clear. This study examined the relationship among racial socialization messages, academic performance, and prosocial <span class="hlt">involvement</span> for 295 Black college students. Results revealed…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Japanese&pg=6&id=EJ948410','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Japanese&pg=6&id=EJ948410"><span>The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Japanese Corporate Transnationalism on Men's <span class="hlt">Involvement</span> in Family Life and Relationships</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Yasuike, Akiko</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>This study examines the ways in which Japanese corporate transnationalism affects husbands' <span class="hlt">involvement</span> in family life and marital relationships primarily from a perspective of wives. It is based on interviews with 22 Japanese wives and 4 husbands. Studies of Japanese corporate transnationalism treat men as mere supervisors to local workers or…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18619707','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18619707"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) source zone architecture on mass removal mechanisms in strongly layered heterogeneous <span class="hlt">porous</span> media during soil vapor extraction.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yoon, Hongkyu; Werth, Charles J; Valocchi, Albert J; Oostrom, Mart</p> <p>2008-08-20</p> <p>An existing multiphase flow simulator was modified in order to determine the effects of four mechanisms on NAPL mass removal in a strongly layered heterogeneous vadose zone during soil vapor extraction (SVE): a) NAPL flow, b) diffusion and dispersion from low permeability zones, c) slow desorption from sediment grains, and d) rate-limited dissolution of trapped NAPL. The <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of water and NAPL saturation distribution, NAPL-type (i.e., free, residual, or trapped) distribution, and spatial heterogeneity of the permeability field on these mechanisms were evaluated. Two different initial source zone architectures (one with and one without trapped NAPL) were considered and these architectures were used to evaluate seven different SVE scenarios. For all runs, slow diffusion from low permeability zones that gas flow bypassed was a dominant factor for diminished SVE effectiveness at later times. This effect was more significant at high water saturation due to the decrease of gas-phase relative permeability. Transverse dispersion contributed to fast NAPL mass removal from the low permeability layer in both source zone architectures, but longitudinal dispersion did not affect overall mass removal time. Both slow desorption from sediment grains and rate-limited mass transfer from trapped NAPL only marginally affected removal times. However, mass transfer from trapped NAPL did affect mass removal at later time, as well as the NAPL distribution. NAPL flow from low to high permeability zones contributed to faster mass removal from the low permeability layer, and this effect increased when water infiltration was eliminated. These simulations indicate that if trapped NAPL exists in heterogeneous <span class="hlt">porous</span> media, mass transfer can be improved by delivering gas directly to zones with trapped NAPL and by lowering the water content, which increases the gas relative permeability and changes trapped NAPL to free NAPL.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17717544','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17717544"><span>High-<span class="hlt">impact</span> medical journals and peace: a history of <span class="hlt">involvement</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bloom, Joshua D; Sambunjak, Dario; Sondorp, Egbert</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>The aim of this study is to explore the positions of five leading general medical journals (The Lancet, British Medical Journal--BMJ, Journal of American Medical Association--JAMA, New England Journal of Medicine--NEJM, and Annals of Internal Medicine--AIM) toward the issues of collective violence. We calculated the proportion of war-related articles in the total number of articles published in these five high-<span class="hlt">impact</span> journals, and in the total number of articles indexed in PubMed during the last 60 years. The results showed a continuous increase in the proportion of war-related articles. Our findings suggest that the leading general medical journals have taken an active editorial stance toward the issues of war and peace. We conclude that high-<span class="hlt">impact</span> medical journals can make an important contribution to efforts aimed at reducing the risks and consequences of war and violence.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.H53C1430R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.H53C1430R"><span>Geochemical <span class="hlt">Impact</span> on the Caprock <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Structure during CO2 Geological Storage : A Laboratory and Modeling Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rhenals Garrido, D. R.; Lafortune, S.; Souli, H.; Dubujet, P.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>CO2 storage is envisioned as a technique which reduces large quantities of CO2 rejected in the atmosphere because of many human activities. The effectiveness of this technique is mainly related to the storage capacity as well as its safety. The safety of this operation is primarily based on the conservation of petro-physical properties of the caprock, which prevents the transport of CO2 towards the surface. However when CO2 reaches the reservoir/caprock interface due to buoyancy effects, the interaction between interstitial fluid and injected fluid creates a serie of dissolution/precipitation reactions affecting the properties of containment of the caprock, which is generally characterized by low transport properties. This study aims to assess the <span class="hlt">impact</span> caused by CO2/interstitial fluid interaction on the nanostructure of a caprock under geological storage conditions. In order to do this, degradation experiments at high pressure of CO2 (88 bar) and isothermal (55°C) conditions have been conducted using batch reactors for 3.5 months. The sample used for these experiments is a well characterized shale, from the Tournemire formation (Aveyron-France). Porosity evolution has been followed by using volumetric adsorption at low pressure, from advanced NLFDT and classical theories based on the micropores filling, and capillary condensation phenomena. Results showed a slight variation in both mesopores and micropores size distributions, as a result of dissolution processes, which dominated at laboratoty time scale. Furthermore, chemical analysis from the water sampled showed an overall increase in Ca,Mg,K,Si,Na. The results obtained by physical adsorption and water chemistry analysis were consistent, with geochemical modeling, which suggested reaction paths with calcite dissolution as the main mineral, by producing porosity at short term and (clays, feldspars) dissolution of aluminosilicates dominating at long term.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA272123','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA272123"><span>Numerical Simulations of Hypervelocity <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Experiments <span class="hlt">Involving</span> Single Whipple Bumper Shields</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1993-10-01</p> <p>laser photographs and high -speed X-ray photography. Computational results of both hydrocodes were compared to each other. * 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15...data to test the predictive capability of the hydrocodes and to compare the results of one code to the other. High -speed photographs of some of the...numerically sinmulating the <span class="hlt">impacts</span> with high fidelity hydrocode calculations that incorporate the appropriate material equations of state and material models</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21871927','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21871927"><span>Cholecystokinin <span class="hlt">impact</span> on rainbow trout glucose homeostasis: possible <span class="hlt">involvement</span> of central glucosensors.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Polakof, Sergio; Míguez, Jesus M; Soengas, José L</p> <p>2011-12-10</p> <p>Although the role of cholecystokinin (CCK) on fish appetite regulation has been widely studied, its <span class="hlt">involvement</span> in the regulation of glucose metabolism had been little explored to date. In the present study we have carried out different experimental approaches to study CCK effects in rainbow trout (a so-called 'glucose intolerant' fish species) glucose homeostasis. We have found that for the first time in a vertebrate species, systemic or central CCK administration causes hyperglycemia, which is at least in part related to the presence of an ancestral gut-brain axis in which CCK is <span class="hlt">involved</span>. By using capsaicin we have found that part of the action of CCK on glucose homeostasis is mediated by vagal and splanchnic afferents. Changes in hepatic metabolism after systemic CCK administration suggest that the effects are not directly taking place on the liver, but probably in other tissues, while after the central CCK administration, the glycogenolytic response observed in liver could be mediated by the activation of the sympathetic system. In hypothalamus and hindbrain changes elicited by CCK-8 treatment are likely related to the glucosensor response to the increased glycemia and/or vagal/splanchnic afferences whereas in hindbrain a possible action through specific CCK-1 receptors cannot be excluded. All these processes result in changes in metabolic parameters related with glucose homeostasis control. Further studies are needed to fully understand the role of this peptide on glucose homeostasis control in fish.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19980201262','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19980201262"><span>Department of Physics' <span class="hlt">Involvement</span> of the <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Testing Project of the High Speed Civil Transport Program (HSCT)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>VonMeerwall, Ernst D.</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>The project <span class="hlt">involved</span> the <span class="hlt">impact</span> testing of a kevlar-like woven polymer material, PBO. The purpose was to determine whether this material showed any promise as a lightweight replacement material for jet engine fan containment. The currently used metal fan containment designs carry a high drag penalty due to their weight. Projectiles were fired at samples of PBO by means of a 0.5 inch diameter Helium powered gun. The Initial plan was to encase the samples inside a purpose-built steel "hot box" for heating and ricochet containment. The research associate's responsibility was to develop the data acquisition programs and techniques necessary to determine accurately the <span class="hlt">impacting</span> projectile's velocity. Beyond this, the Research Associate's duties include any physical computations, experimental design, and data analysis necessary.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26457370','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26457370"><span>The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of emotional <span class="hlt">involvement</span> on online service buying decisions: an event-related potentials perspective.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhao, Meina; Wang, Jing; Han, Weiwei</p> <p>2015-12-02</p> <p>When examining a buying process, changes in human brain signals and their event-related potential (ERP) components can be considered a reflection of the consumers' emotions. In this experiment, participants were shown 12 products and related services that were available for purchase. After recording ERP components, we used a questionnaire to measure the individuals' emotional <span class="hlt">involvement</span> toward the services (i.e. the same services shown in the stimuli) of the 12 products to measure the emotional valence of the services. The emotional ERP components and the late positive potential (LPP) were elicited under the service conditions and distributed over the left frontal regions. We determined that the services may evoke an LPP and that services with a high emotional value may evoke a larger LPP, which suggests that positive emotion may be measured using the LPP amplitude in the left frontal regions. This result helps elucidate whether positive emotions are stimulated during the product-service system decision-making process and helps understand the emotional valences of different services. Our analysis of the emotional motivation of the consumer suggests that the LPP may be useful as an emotional indicator for measuring consumers' evaluation of services that provides a neural view of product-service system buying decisions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4623853','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4623853"><span>The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of emotional <span class="hlt">involvement</span> on online service buying decisions: an event-related potentials perspective</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Wang, Jing; Han, Weiwei</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>When examining a buying process, changes in human brain signals and their event-related potential (ERP) components can be considered a reflection of the consumers’ emotions. In this experiment, participants were shown 12 products and related services that were available for purchase. After recording ERP components, we used a questionnaire to measure the individuals’ emotional <span class="hlt">involvement</span> toward the services (i.e. the same services shown in the stimuli) of the 12 products to measure the emotional valence of the services. The emotional ERP components and the late positive potential (LPP) were elicited under the service conditions and distributed over the left frontal regions. We determined that the services may evoke an LPP and that services with a high emotional value may evoke a larger LPP, which suggests that positive emotion may be measured using the LPP amplitude in the left frontal regions. This result helps elucidate whether positive emotions are stimulated during the product-service system decision-making process and helps understand the emotional valences of different services. Our analysis of the emotional motivation of the consumer suggests that the LPP may be useful as an emotional indicator for measuring consumers’ evaluation of services that provides a neural view of product-service system buying decisions. PMID:26457370</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015TePhL..41..974P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015TePhL..41..974P"><span>Magnetic <span class="hlt">porous</span> composite material: Synthesis and properties</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Peretyat'ko, P. I.; Kulikov, L. A.; Melikhov, I. V.; Perfil'ev, Yu. D.; Pal', A. F.; Timofeev, M. A.; Gudoshnikov, S. A.; Usov, N. A.</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>A new method of obtaining magnetic <span class="hlt">porous</span> composite materials is described, which is based on the self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) in the form of solid-phase combustion. The SHS process <span class="hlt">involves</span> transformation of the nonmagnetic α-Fe2O3 particles (contained in the initial mixture) into magnetic Fe3O4 particles. The synthesized material comprises a <span class="hlt">porous</span> carbonaceous matrix with immobilized Fe3O4 particles. The obtained composite has been characterized by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Mössbauer spectroscopy, and magnetic measurements. The sorption capacity of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> material has been studied.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19656243','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19656243"><span>Molecular events and signalling pathways <span class="hlt">involved</span> in skeletal muscle disuse-induced atrophy and the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of countermeasures.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chopard, Angèle; Hillock, Steven; Jasmin, Bernard J</p> <p>2009-09-01</p> <p>Disuse-induced skeletal muscle atrophy occurs following chronic periods of inactivity such as those <span class="hlt">involving</span> prolonged bed rest, trauma and microgravity environments. Deconditioning of skeletal muscle is mainly characterized by a loss of muscle mass, decreased fibre cross-sectional area, reduced force, increased fatigability, increased insulin resistance and transitions in fibre types. A description of the role of specific transcriptional mechanisms contributing to muscle atrophy by altering gene expression during muscle disuse has recently emerged and focused primarily on short period of inactivity. A better understanding of the transduction pathways <span class="hlt">involved</span> in activation of proteolytic and apoptotic pathways continues to represent a major objective, together with the study of potential cross-talks in these cellular events. In parallel, evaluation of the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of countermeasures at the cellular and molecular levels in short- and long-term disuse experimentations or microgravity environments should undoubtedly and synergistically increase our basic knowledge in attempts to identify new physical, pharmacological and nutritional targets to counteract muscle atrophy. These investigations are important as skeletal muscle atrophy remains an important neuromuscular challenge with <span class="hlt">impact</span> in clinical and social settings affecting a variety of conditions such as those seen in aging, cancer cachexia, muscle pathologies and long-term space exploration.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4516463','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4516463"><span>Molecular events and signalling pathways <span class="hlt">involved</span> in skeletal muscle disuse-induced atrophy and the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of countermeasures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Chopard, Angèle; Hillock, Steven; Jasmin, Bernard J</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Disuse-induced skeletal muscle atrophy occurs following chronic periods of inactivity such as those <span class="hlt">involving</span> prolonged bed rest, trauma and microgravity environments. Deconditioning of skeletal muscle is mainly characterized by a loss of muscle mass, decreased fibre cross-sectional area, reduced force, increased fatigability, increased insulin resistance and transitions in fibre types. A description of the role of specific transcriptional mechanisms contributing to muscle atrophy by altering gene expression during muscle disuse has recently emerged and focused primarily on short period of inactivity. A better understanding of the transduction pathways <span class="hlt">involved</span> in activation of proteolytic and apoptotic pathways continues to represent a major objective, together with the study of potential cross-talks in these cellular events. In parallel, evaluation of the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of countermeasures at the cellular and molecular levels in short- and long-term disuse experimentations or microgravity environments should undoubtedly and synergistically increase our basic knowledge in attempts to identify new physical, pharmacological and nutritional targets to counteract muscle atrophy. These investigations are important as skeletal muscle atrophy remains an important neuromuscular challenge with <span class="hlt">impact</span> in clinical and social settings affecting a variety of conditions such as those seen in aging, cancer cachexia, muscle pathologies and long-term space exploration. PMID:19656243</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23646038','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23646038"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> Shape Memory Polymers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hearon, Keith; Singhal, Pooja; Horn, John; Small, Ward; Olsovsky, Cory; Maitland, Kristen C; Wilson, Thomas S; Maitland, Duncan J</p> <p>2013-02-04</p> <p><span class="hlt">Porous</span> shape memory polymers (SMPs) include foams, scaffolds, meshes, and other polymeric substrates that possess <span class="hlt">porous</span> three-dimensional macrostructures. <span class="hlt">Porous</span> SMPs exhibit active structural and volumetric transformations and have driven investigations in fields ranging from biomedical engineering to aerospace engineering to the clothing industry. The present review article examines recent developments in <span class="hlt">porous</span> SMPs, with focus given to structural and chemical classification, methods of characterization, and applications. We conclude that the current body of literature presents <span class="hlt">porous</span> SMPs as highly interesting smart materials with potential for industrial use.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3639501','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3639501"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> Shape Memory Polymers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Hearon, Keith; Singhal, Pooja; Horn, John; Small, Ward; Olsovsky, Cory; Maitland, Kristen C.; Wilson, Thomas S.; Maitland, Duncan J.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Porous</span> shape memory polymers (SMPs) include foams, scaffolds, meshes, and other polymeric substrates that possess <span class="hlt">porous</span> three-dimensional macrostructures. <span class="hlt">Porous</span> SMPs exhibit active structural and volumetric transformations and have driven investigations in fields ranging from biomedical engineering to aerospace engineering to the clothing industry. The present review article examines recent developments in <span class="hlt">porous</span> SMPs, with focus given to structural and chemical classification, methods of characterization, and applications. We conclude that the current body of literature presents <span class="hlt">porous</span> SMPs as highly interesting smart materials with potential for industrial use. PMID:23646038</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24906461','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24906461"><span>The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of self-concept and college <span class="hlt">involvement</span> on the first-year success of medical students in China.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhou, Ying-Xue; Ou, Chun-Quan; Zhao, Zhi-Tao; Wan, Cheng-Song; Guo, Cui; Li, Li; Chen, Ping-Yan</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>Students' first-year academic success plays a critical role on their overall development in college, which implies the need to concentrate on identifying ways to improve students' first-year academic success. Different from most research on the subject, this study attempted to combine the sociological perspective of college <span class="hlt">impact</span> with a psychological perspective to synthetically explore the causal relationship of specific types of self-concept and college <span class="hlt">involvement</span> with academic success of medical students. A longitudinal study was conducted using 519 matriculates at a medical university in mainland China. We conducted the Cooperative Institutional Research Program freshmen survey and the Your First College Year survey to collect data of the pre-college and college academic and social self-concept, college <span class="hlt">involvement</span> components, and some input characteristics. The academic success was measured by the first-year grade point average. A pathway analysis was conducted and showed the following results. Having high academic self-concept, being engaged in class and putting effort in homework or study directly contributes to increasing college achievement. Students' pre-college achievement and self-concept, faculty interaction, and homework <span class="hlt">involvement</span> positively affected students' college academic self-concept development, which indirectly improved average grade point. These findings contribute to our understanding of a student's ability to interact with his or her collegiate environment and to experience academic success.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li class="active"><span>6</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_6 --> <div id="page_7" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li class="active"><span>7</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="121"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JLTP..185..138M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JLTP..185..138M"><span>Adsorption on Highly Ordered <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Alumina</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mistura, Giampaolo; Bruschi, Lorenzo; Lee, Woo</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Porous</span> anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) is characterized by a regular arrangement of the pores with a narrow pore size distribution over extended areas, uniform pore depth, and solid pore walls without micropores. Thanks to significant improvements in anodization techniques, structural engineering of AAO allows to accurately tailor the pore morphology. These features make <span class="hlt">porous</span> AAO an excellent substrate to study adsorption phenomena. In this paper, we review recent experiments <span class="hlt">involving</span> the adsorption in <span class="hlt">porous</span> AAO. Particular attention will be devoted to adsorption in straight and structured pores with a closed end which shed new light on fundamental issues like the origin of hysteresis in closed end pores and the nature of evaporation from ink-bottle pores. The results will be compared to those obtained in other synthetic materials like <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon and silica.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010NatCh...2..915H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010NatCh...2..915H"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> organic molecules</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Holst, James R.; Trewin, Abbie; Cooper, Andrew I.</p> <p>2010-11-01</p> <p>Most synthetic materials that show molecular-scale porosity consist of one-, two- or three-dimensional networks. <span class="hlt">Porous</span> metal-organic frameworks in particular have attracted a lot of recent attention. By contrast, discrete molecules tend to pack efficiently in the solid state, leaving as little empty space as possible, which leads to non-<span class="hlt">porous</span> materials. This Perspective discusses recent developments with discrete organic molecules that are <span class="hlt">porous</span> in the solid state. Such molecules, which may be either crystalline or amorphous, can be categorized as either intrinsically <span class="hlt">porous</span> (containing permanent covalent cavities) or extrinsically <span class="hlt">porous</span> (inefficiently packed). We focus on the possible advantages of organic molecules over inorganic or hybrid systems in terms of molecular solubility, choice of components and functionalities, and structural mobility and responsiveness in non-covalent extended solids. We also highlight the potential for 'undiscovered' <span class="hlt">porous</span> systems among the large number of cage-like organic molecules that are already known.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20850235','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20850235"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of <span class="hlt">involved</span> field radiotherapy in partial response after doxorubicin-based chemotherapy for advanced aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Moser, Elizabeth C. . E-mail: e.c.moser@lumc.nl; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; Carde, Patrice; Meerwaldt, Jacobus H.; Tirelli, Umberto; Aleman, Berthe M.P.; Baars, Joke; Thomas, Jose; Glabbeke, Martine van; Noordijk, Evert M.</p> <p>2006-11-15</p> <p>Purpose: Whether salvage therapy in patients with advanced aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in partial remission (PR) should consist of radiotherapy or autologous stem-cell transplantation (ASCT) is debatable. We evaluated the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of radiotherapy on outcome in PR patients treated in four successive European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer trials for aggressive NHL. Patients and Methods: Records of 974 patients (1980-1999) were reviewed regarding initial response, final outcome, and type and timing of salvage treatment. After 8 cycles of doxorubicin-based chemotherapy, 227 NHL patients were in PR and treated: 114 received <span class="hlt">involved</span> field radiotherapy, 16 ASCT, 93 second-line chemotherapy, and 4 were operated. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) after radiotherapy were estimated (Kaplan-Meier method) and compared with other treatments (log-rank). <span class="hlt">Impact</span> on survival was evaluated by multivariate analysis (Cox proportional hazards model). Results: The median PFS in PR patients was 4.2 years and 48% remained progression-free at 5 years. Half of the PR patients converted to a complete remission. After conversion, survival was comparable to patients directly in complete remission. Radiotherapy resulted in better OS and PFS compared with other treatments, especially in patients with low to intermediate International Prognostic Index score, bulky disease, or nodal disease only. Correction by multivariate analysis for prognostic factors such as stage, bulky disease, and number of extranodal locations showed that radiotherapy was clearly the most significant factor affecting both OS and PFS. Conclusion: This retrospective analysis demonstrates that radiotherapy can be effective for patients in PR after fully dosed chemotherapy; assessment in a randomized trial (radiotherapy vs. ASCT) is justified.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1257114','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1257114"><span>Hierarchical <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Structures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Grote, Christopher John</p> <p>2016-06-07</p> <p>Materials Design is often at the forefront of technological innovation. While there has always been a push to generate increasingly low density materials, such as aero or hydrogels, more recently the idea of bicontinuous structures has gone more into play. This review will cover some of the methods and applications for generating both <span class="hlt">porous</span>, and hierarchically <span class="hlt">porous</span> structures.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5177290','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5177290"><span>Ventilation of <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Neeper, D.A.</p> <p>1994-02-22</p> <p>Methods are presented for distributing gases throughout the interstices of <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials and removing volatile substances from the interstices of <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials. Continuous oscillation of pressures and flows results in increased penetration of the interstices by flowing gases and increased transport of gaseous components out of the interstices. The invention is particularly useful in soil vapor extraction. 10 figures.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/869166','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/869166"><span>Ventilation of <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Neeper, Donald A.</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>Methods for distributing gases throughout the interstices of <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials and removing volatile substances from the interstices of <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials. Continuous oscillation of pressures and flows results in increased penetration of the interstices by flowing gases and increased transport of gaseous components out of the interstices. The invention is particularly useful in soil vapor extraction.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/415139','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/415139"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> silicon gettering</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Tsuo, Y.S.; Menna, P.; Al-Jassim, M.</p> <p>1995-08-01</p> <p>We have studied a novel extrinsic gettering method that utilizes the very large surface areas, produced by <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon etch on both front and back surfaces of the silicon wafer, as gettering sites. In this method, a simple and low-cost chemical etching is used to generate the <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon layers. Then, a high-flux solar furnace (HFSF) is used to provide high-temperature annealing and the required injection of silicon interstitials. The gettering sites, along with the gettered impurities, can be easily removed at the end the process. The <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon removal process consists of oxidizing the <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon near the end the gettering process followed by sample immersion in HF acid. Each <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon gettering process removes up to about 10 {mu}m of wafer thickness. This gettering process can be repeated so that the desired purity level is obtained.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhDT........66Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhDT........66Y"><span>Ultrasonic Nondestructive Characterization of <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Materials</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yang, Ningli</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>Wave propagation in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media is studied in a wide range of technological applications. In the manufacturing industry, determining porosity of materials in the manufacturing process is required for strict quality control. In the oil industry, acoustic signals and seismic surveys are used broadly to determine the physical properties of the reservoir rock which is a <span class="hlt">porous</span> media filled with oil or gas. In <span class="hlt">porous</span> noise control materials, a precise prediction of sound absorption with frequency and evaluation of tortuosity are necessary. Ultrasonic nondestructive methods are a very important tool for characterization of <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials. The dissertation deals with two types of <span class="hlt">porous</span> media: materials with relatively low and closed porosity and materials with comparatively high and open porosity. Numerical modeling, Finite Element simulations and experimental characterization are all discussed in this dissertation. First, ultrasonic scattering is used to determine the porosity in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media with closed pores. In order get a relationship between the porosity in <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials and ultrasonic scattering independently and to increase the sensitivity to obtain scattering information, ultrasonic imaging methods are applied and acoustic waves are focused by an acoustic lens. To verify the technique, engineered <span class="hlt">porous</span> acrylic plates with varying porosity are measured by ultrasonic scanning and ultrasonic array sensors. Secondly, a laser based ultrasonic technique is explored for predicting the mechanical integrity and durability of cementitious materials. The technique used <span class="hlt">involves</span> the measurement of the phase velocity of fast and slow longitudinal waves in water saturated cement paste. The slow wave velocity is related to the specimen's tortuosity. The fast wave speed is dependent on the elastic properties of <span class="hlt">porous</span> solid. Experimental results detailing the generation and detection of fast and slow wave waves in freshly prepared and aged water-saturated cement samples</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1064437','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1064437"><span>Preparation of asymmetric <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Coker, Eric N [Albuquerque, NM</p> <p>2012-08-07</p> <p>A method for preparing an asymmetric <span class="hlt">porous</span> material by depositing a <span class="hlt">porous</span> material film on a flexible substrate, and applying an anisotropic stress to the <span class="hlt">porous</span> media on the flexible substrate, where the anisotropic stress results from a stress such as an applied mechanical force, a thermal gradient, and an applied voltage, to form an asymmetric <span class="hlt">porous</span> material.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20080004797','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20080004797"><span>Fabricating <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon carbide</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Shor, Joseph S. (Inventor); Kurtz, Anthony D. (Inventor)</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>The formation of <span class="hlt">porous</span> SiC occurs under electrochemical anodization. A sample of SiC is contacted electrically with nickel and placed into an electrochemical cell which cell includes a counter electrode and a reference electrode. The sample is encapsulated so that only a bare semiconductor surface is exposed. The electrochemical cell is filled with an HF electrolyte which dissolves the SiC electrochemically. A potential is applied to the semiconductor and UV light illuminates the surface of the semiconductor. By controlling the light intensity, the potential and the doping level, a <span class="hlt">porous</span> layer is formed in the semiconductor and thus one produces <span class="hlt">porous</span> SiC.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1041028','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1041028"><span><span class="hlt">POROUS</span> WALL, HOLLOW GLASS MICROSPHERES</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Sexton, W.</p> <p>2012-06-30</p> <p>Hollow Glass Microspheres (HGM) is not a new technology. All one has to do is go to the internet and Google{trademark} HGM. Anyone can buy HGM and they have a wide variety of uses. HGM are usually between 1 to 100 microns in diameter, although their size can range from 100 nanometers to 5 millimeters in diameter. HGM are used as lightweight filler in composite materials such as syntactic foam and lightweight concrete. In 1968 a patent was issued to W. Beck of the 3M{trademark} Company for 'Glass Bubbles Prepared by Reheating Solid Glass Particles'. In 1983 P. Howell was issued a patent for 'Glass Bubbles of Increased Collapse Strength' and in 1988 H. Marshall was issued a patent for 'Glass Microbubbles'. Now Google{trademark}, <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), the key words here are <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Wall. Almost every article has its beginning with the research done at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The Savannah River Site (SRS) where SRNL is located has a long and successful history of working with hydrogen and its isotopes for national security, energy, waste management and environmental remediation applications. This includes more than 30 years of experience developing, processing, and implementing special ceramics, including glasses for a variety of Department of Energy (DOE) missions. In the case of glasses, SRS and SRNL have been <span class="hlt">involved</span> in both the science and engineering of vitreous or glass based systems. As a part of this glass experience and expertise, SRNL has developed a number of niches in the glass arena, one of which is the development of <span class="hlt">porous</span> glass systems for a variety of applications. These <span class="hlt">porous</span> glass systems include sol gel glasses, which include both xerogels and aerogels, as well as phase separated glass compositions, that can be subsequently treated to produce another unique type of porosity within the glass forms. The <span class="hlt">porous</span> glasses can increase the surface area compared to 'normal glasses of a 1 to 2 order of</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23651639','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23651639"><span>The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of sexual enhancement alcohol expectancies and risky behavior on alcohol-<span class="hlt">involved</span> rape among college women.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Messman-Moore, Terri L; Ward, Rose Marie; DeNardi, Kathleen A</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>A structural equation model examined sexual enhancement alcohol expectancies, heavy episodic drinking (HED), and risky sexual behavior as correlates of alcohol-<span class="hlt">involved</span> rape in a sample of 353 college women. Prevalence of alcohol-<span class="hlt">involved</span> rape was 15.6%. Sexual enhancement alcohol expectancies were indirectly associated with alcohol-<span class="hlt">involved</span> rape via increased levels of HED, greater likelihood of sex while intoxicated, and number of sex partners. All forms of risky behavior were associated with alcohol-<span class="hlt">involved</span> rape although HED had the strongest relationship. Findings suggest continued focus on women's positive alcohol expectancies and HED as risk factors for alcohol-<span class="hlt">involved</span> rape. Implications for intervention will be discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1013836','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1013836"><span>Method to prepare nanoparticles on <span class="hlt">porous</span> mediums</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Vieth, Gabriel M [Knoxville, TN; Dudney, Nancy J [Oak Ridge, TN; Dai, Sheng [Knoxville, TN</p> <p>2010-08-10</p> <p>A method to prepare <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium decorated with nanoparticles <span class="hlt">involves</span> contacting a suspension of nanoparticles in an ionic liquid with a <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium such that the particles diffuse into the pores of the medium followed by heating the resulting composition to a temperature equal to or greater than the thermal decomposition temperature of the ionic liquid resulting in the removal of the liquid portion of the suspension. The nanoparticles can be a metal, an alloy, or a metal compound. The resulting compositions can be used as catalysts, sensors, or separators.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=cbt+AND+ptsd&pg=2&id=EJ812518','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=cbt+AND+ptsd&pg=2&id=EJ812518"><span>Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Social Support in Female Victims of Sexual Assault: The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Spousal <span class="hlt">Involvement</span> on the Efficacy of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Billette, Valerie; Guay, Stephane; Marchand, Andre</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>The goal of this study is to enhance the efficacy of CBT with victims of sexual assault suffering from PTSD by getting the spouse <span class="hlt">involved</span>. Thus, in addition to attempting to reduce PTSD symptoms, the therapy focuses on improving the support offered by the spouse and favors management of the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of the traumatic event within the couple. A…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1018059','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1018059"><span>Metal filled <span class="hlt">porous</span> carbon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Gross, Adam F.; Vajo, John J.; Cumberland, Robert W.; Liu, Ping; Salguero, Tina T.</p> <p>2011-03-22</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">porous</span> carbon scaffold with a surface and pores, the <span class="hlt">porous</span> carbon scaffold containing a primary metal and a secondary metal, where the primary metal is a metal that does not wet the surface of the pores of the carbon scaffold but wets the surface of the secondary metal, and the secondary metal is interspersed between the surface of the pores of the carbon scaffold and the primary metal.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=professional+AND+learning+AND+communities&pg=5&id=ED557858','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=professional+AND+learning+AND+communities&pg=5&id=ED557858"><span>Beginning High School Teachers' Perceptions of <span class="hlt">Involvement</span> in Professional Learning Communities and Its <span class="hlt">Impact</span> on Teacher Retention</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Lovett, Helen Tomlinson</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to examine beginning high school teachers' perceptions of <span class="hlt">involvement</span> in Professional Learning Communities in southeastern North Carolina and to determine whether beginning teachers' perceptions of <span class="hlt">involvement</span> in Professional Learning Communities influenced their decisions to move to another location, stay in…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1092708.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1092708.pdf"><span>Predictors of Parent <span class="hlt">Involvement</span> and Their <span class="hlt">Impact</span> on Access of Postsecondary Education Facilitators among White and American Indian Parents</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bardhoshi, Gerta; Duncan, Kelly; Schweinle, Amy</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>This study examined demographic factors as predictors of parent <span class="hlt">involvement</span> (engagement with school, support of learning, support of child) among parents of children that attended a school implementing a college access program. The authors also examined whether <span class="hlt">involvement</span> predicted access of postsecondary education facilitators in parents, when…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.7204C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.7204C"><span>Influence of permeability anisotropy on mixing controlled reactive transport simulations in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chiogna, Gabriele; Herrera, Paulo</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Several studies have demonstrated how plume deformation induced by flow heterogeneity in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media can enhance mixing of reactants. This enhancement can have important <span class="hlt">impact</span> on mixing controlled reactions such a biodegradation of plumes of organic compounds. On the other hand, recent studies have indicated the possibility of observing complex flow topology on groundwater flow that occurs in anisotropic yet homogenous <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that those complex flow topologies can also enhance solute mixing. We study the effect of medium anisotropy on reactive solute transport for the case of a chemical reactor composed of two homogeneous anisotropic layers. We simulate different injection strategies for different chemical reactions that <span class="hlt">involve</span> two reactants. We demonstrate the effect of the medium anisotropy by analyzing the results of the simulations and identify best strategies for the operation and design of the system to maximize reaction rates. These findings could have potential application in the design of new remediation systems for contaminated groundwater, chemical reactors and other engineering problems that <span class="hlt">involve</span> flow through <span class="hlt">porous</span> media.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28155033','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28155033"><span>The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Criminal Justice <span class="hlt">Involvement</span> and Housing Outcomes Among Homeless Persons with Co-occurring Disorders.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mitchell, Jessica N; Clark, Colleen; Guenther, Christina C</p> <p>2017-02-02</p> <p>The relationship between criminal justice <span class="hlt">involvement</span> and housing among homeless persons with co-occurring disorders was examined. Program participants assisted in moving to stable housing were interviewed at baseline, six months, and discharge. Those who remained homeless at follow-up and discharge had significantly more time in jail in the past month than those who were housed. However, criminal justice <span class="hlt">involvement</span> was not significantly related to housing status at the six month follow-up or discharge. Findings suggest that housing people with complex behavioral health issues reduces the likelihood of further criminal justice <span class="hlt">involvement</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001ApSS..185..108B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001ApSS..185..108B"><span>Method of <span class="hlt">porous</span> diamond deposition on <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Baranauskas, Vitor; Peterlevitz, Alfredo C.; Chang, Dahge C.; Durrant, Steven F.</p> <p>2001-12-01</p> <p>In this paper, we discuss the experimental results of the fabrication of <span class="hlt">porous</span> diamond/<span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon and <span class="hlt">porous</span> diamond structures by chemical vapor deposition of diamond over a skeleton of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon, replicating the <span class="hlt">porous</span> surface geometry around the Si pores and also creating new <span class="hlt">porous</span> diamond structures. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that the diamond nuclei are deposited on the top of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon skeleton, forming isolated grains in the first nucleation stages, and then growing like the usual structure of most ceramic materials, making a self-sustained <span class="hlt">porous</span> diamond structure. Raman spectroscopy revealed that the diamond films are of good quality, close to that of diamond films grown on crystalline silicon.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li class="active"><span>7</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_7 --> <div id="page_8" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="141"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/230563','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/230563"><span>Parametric study of boiling heat transfer in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Shi, B.; Jones, B.G.; Pan, C.</p> <p>1996-04-01</p> <p>Detailed numerical modeling and parametric variation studies were conducted on boiling heat transfer processes in <span class="hlt">porous</span> deposits with emphasis on applications associated with light water nuclear power reactor systems. The processes of boiling heat transfer in the <span class="hlt">porous</span> corrosion deposits typically <span class="hlt">involve</span> phase changes in finite volumetric regions in the <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. The study examined such processes in two <span class="hlt">porous</span> media configurations, without chimneys (homogeneous <span class="hlt">porous</span> structures) and with chimneys (heterogeneous <span class="hlt">porous</span> structures). A 1-D model and a 2-D model were developed to simulate two-phase flows with phase changes, without dry-out, inside the <span class="hlt">porous</span> media for both structural configurations. For closure of the governing equations, an empirical correlation of the evaporation rate for phase changes inside the <span class="hlt">porous</span> media was introduced. In addition, numerical algorithms were developed to solve the coupled nonlinear equations of mass, momentum, energy, capillary pressure, and evaporation rate. The distributions of temperature, thermodynamic saturation, liquid pressure, vapor pressure, liquid velocity, and vapor velocity were predicted. Furthermore, the effects of heat flux, system pressure, porosity, particle diameter, chimney population density, chimney radius, and crud thickness on the all superheat, critical heat flux, and minimum saturation were examined. The predictions were found to be in good agreement with the available experimental results.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21869999','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21869999"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> silicon nanowires.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Qu, Yongquan; Zhou, Hailong; Duan, Xiangfeng</p> <p>2011-10-05</p> <p>In this mini-review, we summarize recent progress in the synthesis, properties and applications of a new type of one-dimensional nanostructures-single crystalline <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon nanowires. The growth of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon nanowires starting from both p- and n-type Si wafers with a variety of dopant concentrations can be achieved through either one-step or two-step reactions. The mechanistic studies indicate the dopant concentration of Si wafers, oxidizer concentration, etching time and temperature can affect the morphology of the as-etched silicon nanowires. The <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon nanowires are both optically and electronically active and have been explored for potential applications in diverse areas including photocatalysis, lithium ion batteries, gas sensors and drug delivery.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1040878','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1040878"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> material neutron detector</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Diawara, Yacouba [Oak Ridge, TN; Kocsis, Menyhert [Venon, FR</p> <p>2012-04-10</p> <p>A neutron detector employs a <span class="hlt">porous</span> material layer including pores between nanoparticles. The composition of the nanoparticles is selected to cause emission of electrons upon detection of a neutron. The nanoparticles have a maximum dimension that is in the range from 0.1 micron to 1 millimeter, and can be sintered with pores thereamongst. A passing radiation generates electrons at one or more nanoparticles, some of which are scattered into a pore and directed toward a direction opposite to the applied electrical field. These electrons travel through the pore and collide with additional nanoparticles, which generate more electrons. The electrons are amplified in a cascade reaction that occurs along the pores behind the initial detection point. An electron amplification device may be placed behind the <span class="hlt">porous</span> material layer to further amplify the electrons exiting the <span class="hlt">porous</span> material layer.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=104339&keyword=Mechanics&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=90697767&CFTOKEN=94547097','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=104339&keyword=Mechanics&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=90697767&CFTOKEN=94547097"><span>FLUID TRANSPORT THROUGH <span class="hlt">POROUS</span> MEDIA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Fluid transport through <span class="hlt">porous</span> media is a relevant topic to many scientific and engineering fields. Soil scientists, civil engineers, hydrologists and hydrogeologists are concerned with the transport of water, gases and nonaqueous phase liquid contaminants through <span class="hlt">porous</span> earth m...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Treatment+AND+modalities&pg=2&id=EJ842258','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Treatment+AND+modalities&pg=2&id=EJ842258"><span>The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Residential and Nonresidential Drug Treatment on Recidivism among Drug-<span class="hlt">Involved</span> Probationers: A Survival Analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Krebs, Christopher P.; Strom, Kevin J.; Koetse, Willem H.; Lattimore, Pamela K.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>A variety of approaches for addressing drug use and drug-related crime among the nearly 5 million offenders on community supervision in the United States has been tried and evaluated, but questions remain about which policies or programs are most effective. The authors use a large data set to assess the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of residential and nonresidential…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=reading+AND+writing+AND+children&pg=2&id=EJ888222','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=reading+AND+writing+AND+children&pg=2&id=EJ888222"><span><span class="hlt">Involvement</span> of Parents in the Education of Children with Reading and Writing Difficulties--<span class="hlt">Impact</span> of an Intervention</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Manjula, P.; Saraswathi, G.; Prakash, P.; Ashalatha, K. V.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>To know the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of intervention on the parents' participation in the education of children with reading and writing difficulties was studied in schools of Dharwad city. children studying in 6th standard were drawn from 14 schools. Total samples of 418 children were screened based on the child's previous academic performance of the class tests…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=psychological+AND+impact+AND+environment&pg=4&id=EJ1051177','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=psychological+AND+impact+AND+environment&pg=4&id=EJ1051177"><span>The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Self-Concept and College <span class="hlt">Involvement</span> on the First-Year Success of Medical Students in China</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Zhou, Ying-Xue; Ou, Chun-Quan; Zhao, Zhi-Tao; Wan, Cheng-Song; Guo, Cui; Li, Li; Chen, Ping-Yan</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Students' first-year academic success plays a critical role on their overall development in college, which implies the need to concentrate on identifying ways to improve students' first-year academic success. Different from most research on the subject, this study attempted to combine the sociological perspective of college <span class="hlt">impact</span> with a…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Kelly+AND+2005&pg=7&id=EJ780334','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Kelly+AND+2005&pg=7&id=EJ780334"><span>The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Partner Training on the Communicative <span class="hlt">Involvement</span> of Students with Multiple and Severe Disability in Special Schools</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Foreman, Phil; Arthur-Kelly, Michael; Pascoe, Sue</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Background: The outcomes of a pilot program of staff development in communication support in the context of observed changes in student behaviour states and interactive abilities are reported. Participant reports about the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of the program on their professional practices are included. Method: Six teachers and six teacher aides in special…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5687531','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5687531"><span>Factors <span class="hlt">involved</span> in evaluating ground water <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of deep coal mine drainage. [Pumping tests of wells drilled into the coal seam and development of mathematical models; detailed discussion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Davis, P.R.; Walton, W.C.</p> <p>1982-10-01</p> <p>The determination of probable ground water <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of proposed deep coal mining is required as part of permit applications. <span class="hlt">Impact</span> prediction generally <span class="hlt">involves</span> well production test analysis and modeling of ground water systems associated with coal seams. Well production tests are often complicated due to the relatively low permeabilities of sandstones and shales of ground water systems. The effects of the release of water stored within finite diameter production wells must be considered. Well storage capacity appreciably affects early well production test time drawdown or time recovery data. Low pumping rates, limited cones of depression, and length of required pumping periods are important well production test design factors. Coal seam ground water system models are usually multilayered and leaky artesian. Mine shafts partially penetrate the ground water system. Simulation of coal mine drainage often <span class="hlt">involves</span> the horizontal permeability and storage coefficient of the coal seam zone, vertical permeablities of sandstones and shales (aquifer) above and below the coal seam zone, and the hydrologic properties of the source bed above the aquifer overlying the coal seam zone. Ground water level declines in both the coal seam zone and source bed near land surface are necessary factors in <span class="hlt">impact</span> analysis. An example of evaluation studies in southwest Indiana will illustrate factors <span class="hlt">involved</span> in deep coal mine drainage modeling efforts.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1289998','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1289998"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> block nanofiber composite filters</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Ginley, David S.; Curtis, Calvin J.; Miedaner, Alexander; Weiss, Alan J.; Paddock, Arnold</p> <p>2016-08-09</p> <p><span class="hlt">Porous</span> block nano-fiber composite (110), a filtration system (10) and methods of using the same are disclosed. An exemplary <span class="hlt">porous</span> block nano-fiber composite (110) includes a <span class="hlt">porous</span> block (100) having one or more pores (200). The <span class="hlt">porous</span> block nano-fiber composite (110) also includes a plurality of inorganic nano-fibers (211) formed within at least one of the pores (200).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/416137','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/416137"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> silicon gettering</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Tsuo, Y.S.; Menna, P.; Pitts, J.R.</p> <p>1996-05-01</p> <p>The authors have studied a novel extrinsic gettering method that uses the large surface areas produced by a <span class="hlt">porous</span>-silicon etch as gettering sites. The annealing step of the gettering used a high-flux solar furnace. They found that a high density of photons during annealing enhanced the impurity diffusion to the gettering sites. The authors used metallurgical-grade Si (MG-Si) prepared by directional solidification casing as the starting material. They propose to use <span class="hlt">porous</span>-silicon-gettered MG-Si as a low-cost epitaxial substrate for polycrystalline silicon thin-film growth.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1113021.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1113021.pdf"><span>The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of High School Extracurricular <span class="hlt">Involvement</span> on the Postsecondary Outcomes of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Youth</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Schoffstall, Sarah; Cawthon, Stephanie; Dickson, Duncan; Bond, Mark; Ocuto, Oscar; Ge, Jinjin</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Involvement</span> in extracurricular activities provides youth with opportunities to develop important personal skills, abilities, and preferences, and to build meaningful social support networks. Historically, students who are deaf or hard of hearing (SDHH) have had limited access to opportunities for both academic and occupational development,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Diabetes&pg=3&id=EJ1028945','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Diabetes&pg=3&id=EJ1028945"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of a District-Wide Diabetes Prevention Programme <span class="hlt">Involving</span> Health Education for Children and the Community</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Sheeladevi, Sethu; Sagar, Jayanthi; Pujari, Siddharth; Rani, Padmaja Kumari</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Objective: To present results from a district-wide diabetes prevention programme <span class="hlt">involving</span> health education for school children and the local community. Method: The model of health education that was utilized aimed to secure lifestyle changes and the identification of diabetes risk by school children (aged 9-12 years). The children acted as health…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21607578','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21607578"><span>Clinical <span class="hlt">impact</span> of cervical lymph node <span class="hlt">involvement</span> and central neck dissection in patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma: a retrospective analysis of 368 cases.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bozec, Alexandre; Dassonville, Olivier; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Poissonnet, Gilles; Sudaka, Anne; Peyrottes, Isabelle; Ettore, Francette; Haudebourg, Juliette; Bussière, Françoise; Benisvy, Danielle; Marcy, Pierre-Yves; Sadoul, Jean Louis; Hofman, Paul; Lassale, Sandra; Vallicioni, Jacques; Demard, François; Santini, José</p> <p>2011-08-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of cervical lymph node metastases and the optimal surgical management of the neck in patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) remain controversial. The objectives of this retrospective study were to determine, in patients with PTC, the predictive factors and the <span class="hlt">impact</span> on tumor recurrence rate of cervical lymph node <span class="hlt">involvement</span>, and to evaluate the oncologic results and the morbidity of central neck dissection (CND). We reviewed the records of patients who had undergone surgical treatment for PTC at our institution between 1990 and 2000. A total of 368 patients (86 men and 282 women) were included in this study. Young age (p = 0.02), tumor size (p = 0.001) and extrathyroidal tumor extension (p = 0.003) were significant predictive factors of cervical lymph node metastatic <span class="hlt">involvement</span> (multivariate analysis). Initial metastatic cervical lymph node <span class="hlt">involvement</span> was identified as an independent risk factor of tumor recurrence (multivariate analysis, p = 0.01). Metastatic lymph node(s) were found in prophylactic CND specimens in 31% of the patients. CND increased the risk of postoperative hypocalcemia (p = 0.008) and of permanent hypoparathyroidism (p = 0.002). In conclusion, cervical lymph node metastatic <span class="hlt">involvement</span> at the time of initial surgery is an independent risk factor of tumor recurrence. CND provided an up-staging of more than 30% of patients with a clinically N0 neck, but was associated with significant morbidity regarding parathyroid function.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013prpl.conf2S045K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013prpl.conf2S045K"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> dust grains in circumstellar disks</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kirchschlager, Florian; Wolf, Sebastian</p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>We investigate the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of <span class="hlt">porous</span> dust grains on the structure and observable appearance of circumstellar disks (Kirchschlager & Wolf 2013). Our study is motivated by observations and laboratory studies which indicate that dust grains in various astrophysical environments are <span class="hlt">porous</span>. In addition, the modeling of the spatial structure and grain size distribution of debris disks reveals that under the assumption of spherical compact grains the resulting minimum grain size is often significantly larger than the blowout size, which might be a hint for porosity. Using the discrete dipole approximation, we compute the optical properties of spherical, <span class="hlt">porous</span> grains (Draine & Flatau 1994, 2010). Subsequently, we calculate the blowout sizes for various debris disk systems and grain porosities. We find that the blowout size increases with particle porosity and stellar temperature. In addition, the lower dust equilibrium temperature of <span class="hlt">porous</span> particles results in a shift of the maximum of the thermal reemission of debris disks towards longer wavelengths. For our studies of the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of dust grain porosity in protoplanetary disks we use the radiative transfer software MC3D, which is based on the Monte-Carlo method and solves the radiative transfer problem self-consistently (Wolf et al. 1999, Wolf 2003). We find that the spectral energy distribution of protoplanetary disks shows significant differences between the cases of <span class="hlt">porous</span> and compact grains. In particular, the flux in the optical wavelength range is increased for <span class="hlt">porous</span> grains. Furthermore, the silicate peak at ~9.8 microns exhibits a strong dependence on the degree of grain porosity. We also investigate the temperature distribution in the disk. In the midplane no influence of porosity is detectable, but in the vertical direction minor changes of a few Kelvin are found. To complete our study we outline the differences between the two grain types in maps of the linear polarization. We detect a polarization reversal in</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008PhDT.......180B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008PhDT.......180B"><span>Processing and properties of <span class="hlt">porous</span> nickel titanium</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bansiddhi, Ampika</p> <p></p> <p>Increasing interest in long-life bone implants with reduced mechanical properties reducing the stress-shielding effect and a structure mimicking bone <span class="hlt">porous</span> architecture has encouraged study and development of fabrication methods for <span class="hlt">porous</span> NiTi. The main objective of this work was to advance these goals by developing new processing procedures for <span class="hlt">porous</span> NiTi that offer the following advances over existing technology: (i) controllable pore characteristics (porosity, pore size/shape, connectivity) to stimulate and accommodate a high level of bone ingrowth; (ii) mechanical properties (yield strength, stiffness, recovery strain) matching those of bone, to minimize stress-shielding effects; (iii) dense metal struts and walls, to prevent crack initiation and increase ductility; (iv) simplicity and low cost of production; and (v) capability for either shape-memory or superelasticity. A new strategy to fabricate <span class="hlt">porous</span> NiTi with the above characteristics is presented. This strategy is based on densification by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) of a mixture of pre-alloyed NiTi powders and salt space holders, followed by removal of the salt. Using this strategy, the porosity of the NiTi is controllable by varying the volume fraction of the salt, and the pore size and shape can be tailored in accordance with the geometry of the salt used. The effects of using different space holders, i.e. sodium fluoride (NaF) and sodium chloride (NaCl), on the final <span class="hlt">porous</span> product are examined. The influence of HIP temperature and further post-HIP sintering on foam properties is also presented. The high cost associated with HIP processing drove subsequent work towards new strategies to simplify <span class="hlt">porous</span> NiTi synthesis while maintaining high-quality microstructures and mechanical properties. The strategy followed here <span class="hlt">involves</span> combining the NaCl space holder technique with in situ transient liquid phase sintering of pre-alloyed NiTi and Nb powders, thereby integrating the densification of Ni</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6370269','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6370269"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> metallic bodies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Landingham, R.L.</p> <p>1984-03-13</p> <p><span class="hlt">Porous</span> metallic bodies having a substantially uniform pore size of less than about 200 microns and a density of less than about 25 percent theoretical, as well as the method for making them, are disclosed. Group IIA, IIIB, IVB, VB, and rare earth metal hydrides a</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985NIMPB...9..317E','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985NIMPB...9..317E"><span>Analysis of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Earwaker, L. G.; Farr, J. P. G.; Grzeszczyk, P. E.; Sturland, I.; Keen, J. M.</p> <p>1985-06-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Porous</span> silicon, suitable after oxidation for dielectric isolation, has been produced successfully by anodizing silicon in strong HF. The oxidized layer has been shown to have promise in device manufacture, providing high packing densities and radiation hardness. Anodizing has been carried out using both single and double cells, following the effects of current density. HF concentration and silicon resistivity. The resultant <span class="hlt">porous</span> layers have been characterised with respect to composition and structure. The materials produced differ considerably in lattice strain, composition and reactivities. Prompt radiation analyses 19F(p,αγ), 16O(d,α), 12C(d,p), are useful for monitoring the anodizing procedures and subsequent oxidation: currently, interest centres on the mechanistic information obtained. RBS analysis using α-particles gives a much lower Si response from <span class="hlt">porous</span> than from bulk silicon. Glancing angle proton recoil analyses reveal considerable quantities of hydrogen in the <span class="hlt">porous</span> layers. These mutually consistent findings have considerable mechanistic significance; extensive Si-H bonding occurs following a 2 equivalent Faradaic process.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19950065537&hterms=zinc+air+battery&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dzinc%2Bair%2Bbattery','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19950065537&hterms=zinc+air+battery&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dzinc%2Bair%2Bbattery"><span>Hydrophobic, <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Battery Boxes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Bragg, Bobby J.; Casey, John E., Jr.</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>Boxes made of <span class="hlt">porous</span>, hydrophobic polymers developed to contain aqueous potassium hydroxide electrolyte solutions of zinc/air batteries while allowing air to diffuse in as needed for operation. Used on other types of batteries for in-cabin use in which electrolytes aqueous and from which gases generated during operation must be vented without allowing electrolytes to leak out.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4459695','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4459695"><span>What Difference Does Patient and Public <span class="hlt">Involvement</span> Make and What Are Its Pathways to <span class="hlt">Impact</span>? Qualitative Study of Patients and Researchers from a Cohort of Randomised Clinical Trials</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Dudley, Louise; Gamble, Carrol; Preston, Jennifer; Buck, Deborah; Hanley, Bec; Williamson, Paula; Young, Bridget</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Background Patient and public <span class="hlt">involvement</span> (PPI) is advocated in clinical trials yet evidence on how to optimise its <span class="hlt">impact</span> is limited. We explored researchers' and PPI contributors' accounts of the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of PPI within trials and factors likely to influence its <span class="hlt">impact</span>. Methods Semi-structured qualitative interviews with researchers and PPI contributors accessed through a cohort of randomised clinical trials. Analysis of transcripts of audio-recorded interviews was informed by the principles of the constant comparative method, elements of content analysis and informant triangulation. Results We interviewed 21 chief investigators, 10 trial managers and 17 PPI contributors from 28 trials. The accounts of informants within the same trials were largely in agreement. Over half the informants indicted PPI had made a difference within a trial, through contributions that influenced either an aspect of a trial, or how researchers thought about a trial. According to informants, the opportunity for PPI to make a difference was influenced by two main factors: whether chief investigators had goals and plans for PPI and the quality of the relationship between the research team and the PPI contributors. Early <span class="hlt">involvement</span> of PPI contributors and including them in responsive (e.g. advisory groups) and managerial (e.g. trial management groups) roles were more likely to achieve <span class="hlt">impact</span> compared to late <span class="hlt">involvement</span> and oversight roles (e.g. trial steering committees). Conclusion Those seeking to enhance PPI in trials should develop goals for PPI at an early stage that fits the needs of the trial, plan PPI implementation in accordance with these goals, invest in developing good relationships between PPI contributors and researchers, and favour responsive and managerial roles for contributors in preference to oversight-only roles. These features could be used by research funders in judging PPI in trial grant applications and to inform policies to optimise PPI within trials. PMID:26053063</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_8 --> <div id="page_9" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="161"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28054204','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28054204"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Prosocial Behavioral <span class="hlt">Involvement</span> on School Violence Perpetration Among African American Middle School and High School Students.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>McDade, Rhyanne S; King, Keith A; Vidourek, Rebecca A; Merianos, Ashley L</p> <p>2017-01-04</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to examine factors associated with school violence perpetration among African American youth. African American students in 7th through 12th grade (n = 7488) in schools within one Metropolitan area completed the Pride National Drug Survey. Chi square analyses revealed school violence perpetration significantly differed based on grade and prosocial behavioral <span class="hlt">involvement</span>. Students in 7th-8th grade (54.7%) were more likely to engage in school violence in comparison to 9th-12th grade students (48.8%). Students with low prosocial behavior (52.8%) <span class="hlt">involvement</span> were more likely than their counterparts (48.9%) to engage in school violence perpetration. Logistic regression also indicated females and 9th-12th students with low prosocial behavior <span class="hlt">involvement</span> were significantly less likely than their counterparts to engage in school violence. Findings should be considered by health educators and prevention specialists when developing programs and efforts to prevent in school violence perpetration among African American students.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23416226','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23416226"><span>Radioactive characterization of the main materials <span class="hlt">involved</span> in the titanium dioxide production process and their environmental radiological <span class="hlt">impact</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mantero, J; Gazquez, M J; Bolivar, J P; Garcia-Tenorio, R; Vaca, F</p> <p>2013-06-01</p> <p>A study about the distribution of several radionuclides from the uranium and the thorium series radionuclides along the production process of a typical NORM industry devoted to the production of titanium dioxide has been performed. With this end the activity concentrations in raw materials, final product, co-products, and wastes of the production process have been determined by both gamma-ray and alpha-particle spectrometry. The main raw material used in the studied process (ilmenite) presents activity concentrations of around 300 Bq kg(-1) for Th-series radionuclides and 100 Bq kg(-1) for the U-series ones. These radionuclides in the industrial process are distributed in the different steps of the production process according mostly to the chemical behaviour of each radioelement, following different routes. As an example, most of the radium remains associated with the un-dissolved material waste, with activity concentrations around 3 kBq kg(-1) of (228)Ra and around 1 kBq kg(-1) of (226)Ra, while the final commercial products (TiO2 pigments and co-products) contain negligible amounts of radioactivity. The obtained results have allowed assessing the possible public radiological <span class="hlt">impact</span> associated with the use of the products and co-products obtained in this type of industry, as well as the environmental radiological <span class="hlt">impact</span> associated with the solid residues and liquid generated discharges.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24629567','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24629567"><span>Attitudes toward hiring applicants with mental illness and criminal justice <span class="hlt">involvement</span>: the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of education and experience.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Batastini, Ashley B; Bolanos, Angelea D; Morgan, Robert D</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Individuals with mental health diagnoses, as well as those <span class="hlt">involved</span> in the criminal justice system, experience a number of barriers in the recovery and reintegration progress, including access to stable, prosocial employment opportunities. Employment for these populations is important for establishing financial security, reducing unstructured leisure time, increasing self-worth, and improving interpersonal skills. However, research has demonstrated that individuals with psychiatric and/or criminal backgrounds may experience stigmatizing attitudes from employers that impede their ability to find adequate work. This study aimed to evaluate stigmatizing beliefs toward hypothetical applicants who indicated a mental health history, a criminal history, or both, as well as the effectiveness of psychoeducation in reducing stigma. Participants consisted of 465 individuals recruited from a large university who completed a series of online questions about a given applicant. Results of this study varied somewhat across measures of employability, but were largely consistent with extant research suggesting that mental illness and criminal justice <span class="hlt">involvement</span> serve as deterrents when making hiring decisions. Overall, psychoeducation appeared to reduce stigma for hiring decisions when the applicant presented with a criminal history. Unfortunately, similar findings were not revealed when applicants presented with a psychiatric or a psychiatric and criminal history. Implications and limitations of these findings are presented, along with suggestions for future research.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003PhDT........23Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003PhDT........23Z"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> bioactive materials</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhang, Kai</p> <p></p> <p>Bioactive materials chemically bond to tissues through the development of biologically active apatite. <span class="hlt">Porous</span> structures in biomaterials are designed to enhance bioactivity, grow artificial tissues and achieve better integration with host tissues in the body. The goal of this research is to design, fabricate and characterize novel <span class="hlt">porous</span> bioactive materials. 3D ordered macroporous bioactive glasses (3DOM-BGs, pore size: 200--1000 nm) were prepared using a sol-gel process and colloidal crystal templates. 3DOM-BGs are more bioactive and degradable than mesoporous (pore size <50 nm) sol-gel BGs in simulated body fluid (SBF). Apatite formation and 3DOM-BG degradation rates increased with the decrease of soaking ratio. Apatite induction time in SBF increased with 3DOM-BG calcination temperature (600--800°C). Apatite formation and 3DOMBG degradation were slightly enhanced for a phosphate containing composition. Large 3DOM-BG particles formed less apatite and degraded less completely as compared with small particles. An increase in macropore size slowed down 3DOM-BG degradation and apatite formation processes. After heating the converted apatite at a temperature higher than 700°C, highly crystalline hydroxyapatite and a minor tri-calcium phosphate phase formed. 3DOM-BGs have potential applications as bone/periodontal fillers, and drugs and biological factors delivery agents. Anchoring artificial soft tissues (e.g., cartilage) to native bone presents a challenge. <span class="hlt">Porous</span> polymer/bioactive glass composites are candidate materials for engineering artificial soft tissue/bone interfaces. <span class="hlt">Porous</span> composites consisting of polymer matrices (e.g., polysulfone, polylactide, and polyurethane) and bioactive glass particles were prepared by polymer phase separation techniques adapted to include ceramic particles. Composites (thickness: 200--500 mum) have asymmetric structures with dense top layers and <span class="hlt">porous</span> structures beneath. <span class="hlt">Porous</span> structures consist of large pores (>100 mum) in a</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7008502','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7008502"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> electrode preparation method</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Arons, R.M.; Dusek, J.T.</p> <p>1983-10-18</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">porous</span> sintered plaque is provided with a bimodal porosity that is especially well suited for use as an electrode within a molten carbonate fuel cell. The coarse porosity is sufficient for admitting gases into contact with the reaction surfaces while the fine porosity is wetted with and retains molten electrolyte on the reaction sites. The electrode structure is prepared by providing a very fine powder of such as nickel oxide and blending the powder with a suitable decomposable binder to form a solid mass. The mass is comminuted into agglomerate size particles substantially larger than the fine oxide particles and formed into a cohesive compact for subsequent sintering. Sintering is carried out at sufficient conditions to bind the agglomerates together into a <span class="hlt">porous</span> structure having both coarse and fine porosity. Where lithiated nickel oxide cathodes are prepared, the sintering conditions can be moderate enough to retain substantial quantities of lithium within the electrode for adequate conductivity. 2 figs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20100011118','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20100011118"><span>Strong, Lightweight, <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Materials</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Leventis, Nicholas; Meador, Mary Ann B.; Johnston, James C.; Fabrizio, Eve F.; Ilhan, Ulvi</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>A new class of strong, lightweight, <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials has been invented as an outgrowth of an effort to develop reinforced silica aerogels. The new material, called X-Aerogel is less hygroscopic, but no less <span class="hlt">porous</span> and of similar density to the corresponding unmodified aerogels. However, the property that sets X-Aerogels apart is their mechanical strength, which can be as much as two and a half orders of magnitude stronger that the unmodified aerogels. X-Aerogels are envisioned to be useful for making extremely lightweight, thermally insulating, structural components, but they may also have applications as electrical insulators, components of laminates, catalyst supports, templates for electrode materials, fuel-cell components, and filter membranes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/874843','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/874843"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> polymer media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Shepodd, Timothy J.</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Highly crosslinked monolithic <span class="hlt">porous</span> polymer materials for chromatographic applications. By using solvent compositions that provide not only for polymerization of acrylate monomers in such a fashion that a <span class="hlt">porous</span> polymer network is formed prior to phase separation but also for exchanging the polymerization solvent for a running buffer using electroosmotic flow, the need for high pressure purging is eliminated. The polymer materials have been shown to be an effective capillary electrochromatographic separations medium at lower field strengths than conventional polymer media. Further, because of their highly crosslinked nature these polymer materials are structurally stable in a wide range of organic and aqueous solvents and over a pH range of 2-12.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26667637','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26667637"><span>Complications after Total <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Implant Ear Reconstruction and Their Management.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lewin, Sheryl</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Microtia reconstruction using <span class="hlt">porous</span> polyethylene implants has become an established alternative to autologous costal cartilage techniques. Few surgeons are trained in <span class="hlt">porous</span> implant ear reconstruction (PIER), leading to a relative lack of understanding of the nuances of this type of surgery. The risks of exposure, infection, and fracture of the implant have further discouraged surgeons from performing PIERs. Meticulous technique and proper management of complications are critical to the success of surgeries <span class="hlt">involving</span> <span class="hlt">porous</span> implants (Medpor, Su-Por). There are a limited number of articles in the literature that report the management of complications of <span class="hlt">porous</span> implant auricular reconstruction. The purpose of this work is to present a comprehensive review of the management of complications with PIER based on over 10 years of experience with this surgical technique.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/377002','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/377002"><span>Determination of the heat transfer coefficients in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Kim, L.V.</p> <p>1994-06-01</p> <p>The process of transpiration cooling is considered. Methods are suggested for estimating the volumetric coefficient of heat transfer with the use of a two-temperature model and the surface heat transfer coefficient at entry into a <span class="hlt">porous</span> wall. The development of new technology under conditions of increasing heat loads puts the search for effective methods of heat transfer enhancement in the forefront of theoretical investigations. One of the promising trends in the solution of this problem is the use of <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials (PM) in the elements of power units. For thermal protection against convective or radiative heat fluxes, the method of transpiration cooling is successfully used. The mechanism operative in the thermal protection <span class="hlt">involves</span> the injection of a coolant through a <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium to produce a screen over the contour of a body in a flow for removing heat energy from the skeleton of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> material.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21300125','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21300125"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of early developmental arsenic exposure on promotor CpG-island methylation of genes <span class="hlt">involved</span> in neuronal plasticity.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Martínez, Liborio; Jiménez, Verónica; García-Sepúlveda, Christian; Ceballos, Fátima; Delgado, Juan Manuel; Niño-Moreno, Perla; Doniz, Lesly; Saavedra-Alanís, Víctor; Castillo, Claudia G; Santoyo, Martha E; González-Amaro, Roberto; Jiménez-Capdeville, María E</p> <p>2011-04-01</p> <p>Epigenetic mechanisms are crucial to regulate the expression of different genes required for neuronal plasticity. Neurotoxic substances such as arsenic, which induces cognitive deficits in exposed children before any other manifestation of toxicity, could interfere with the epigenetic modulation of neuronal gene expression required for learning and memory. This study assessed in Wistar rats the effects that developmental arsenic exposure had on DNA methylation patterns in hippocampus and frontal cortex. Animals were exposed to arsenic in drinking water (3 and 36ppm) from gestation until 4 months of age, and DNA methylation in brain cells was determined by flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry and methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the promoter regions of reelin (RELN) and protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) at 1, 2, 3 and 4 months of age. Immunoreactivity to 5 methyl-cytosine was significantly higher in the cortex and hippocampus of exposed animals compared to controls at 1 month, and DNA hypomethylation was observed the following months in the cortex at high arsenic exposure. Furthermore, we observed a significant increase in the non-methylated form of PP1 gene promoter at 2 and 3 months of age, either in cortex or hippocampus. In order to determine whether this exposure level is associated with memory deficits, a behavioral test was performed at the same age points, revealing progressive and dose-dependent deficits of fear memory. Our results demonstrate alterations of the methylation pattern of genes <span class="hlt">involved</span> in neuronal plasticity in an animal model of memory deficit associated with arsenic exposure.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26500837','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26500837"><span>Analysis by a highly sensitive split luciferase assay of the regions <span class="hlt">involved</span> in APP dimerization and its <span class="hlt">impact</span> on processing.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Decock, Marie; El Haylani, Laetitia; Stanga, Serena; Dewachter, Ilse; Octave, Jean-Noël; Smith, Steven O; Constantinescu, Stefan N; Kienlen-Campard, Pascal</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease that causes progressive loss of cognitive functions, leading to dementia. Two types of lesions are found in AD brains: neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques. The latter are composed mainly of the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) generated by amyloidogenic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Several studies have suggested that dimerization of APP is closely linked to Aβ production. Nevertheless, the mechanisms controlling APP dimerization and their role in APP function are not known. Here we used a new luciferase complementation assay to analyze APP dimerization and unravel the <span class="hlt">involvement</span> of its three major domains: the ectodomain, the transmembrane domain and the intracellular domain. Our results indicate that within cells full-length APP dimerizes more than its α and β C-terminal fragments, confirming the pivotal role of the ectodomain in this process. Dimerization of the APP transmembrane (TM) domain has been reported to regulate processing at the γ-cleavage site. We show that both non-familial and familial AD mutations in the TM GXXXG motifs strongly modulate Aβ production, but do not consistently change dimerization of the C-terminal fragments. Finally, we found for the first time that removal of intracellular domain strongly increases APP dimerization. Increased APP dimerization is linked to increased non-amyloidogenic processing.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26237334','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26237334"><span>The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of frequency of behavior and type of contact on judgments <span class="hlt">involving</span> a criminal stalking case.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Magyarics, Casey L; Lynch, Kellie R; Golding, Jonathan M; Lippert, Anne</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>We investigated mock juror perceptions of the frequency of behavior and type of contact in an ex-intimate stalking case. We used a mock-juror methodology, in which 204 community members (129 women) read a stalking trial summary, rendered a verdict, and evaluated the intent of the defendant to cause the victim fear and distress, as well as the victim's experience with these emotions. The trial varied as to whether there were 5 or 30 stalking incidents and whether the stalking <span class="hlt">involved</span> personal contact or stalking via text message. Results showed that females were more likely to render a guilty verdict when the victim had been stalked 30 times rather than 5 times while males were equally likely to render a guilty verdict regardless of the frequency. Mock jurors were significantly more likely to render guilty verdicts in the personal contact condition than in the text message condition. Females' perceptions of the victim's fear and distress mediated the frequency of incidents x gender interaction. The victim's fear and the defendant's intentions mediated the main effect of type of contact on verdict. Cognitive network analyses showed that victim fear and the defendant's intent to cause fear were central to participant verdict decision making. We discuss these results in terms of the implications, specifically that victim fear should be a primary focus in stalking legislation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27087103','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27087103"><span>Study investigating the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of pharmacist <span class="hlt">involvement</span> on the outcomes of diabetes medication therapy adherence program Malaysia.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lim, Phei Ching; Lim, Kelvin; Embee, Zubaidah Che; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Thiagarajan, Anuradha; Khan, Tahir Mehmood</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Involvement</span> of pharmacists in improving medication adherence among diabetic patients is recognized globally. In Malaysian healthcare system, pharmacists are also operating health services i.e. Diabetes Medication Therapy Adherence Clinic (DMTAC). This study aimed to assess the clinical outcomes of patients managed by pharmacists (DMTAC), in a Malaysian hospital setting. This was an open labelled randomised study. Type 2 diabetes patients with HbA1c ≥8% were recruited and arbitrarily divided into the intervention group (usual care plus DMTAC) and the non-intervention group (usual care only). Those enrolled in the intervention group were scheduled for follow-up for eight consecutive visits. Improvements in lab results were compared longitudinally (pre and post analysis) between the groups. Data analysis was done using PASW 18® version. A total of 76 patients were enrolled, with 39 patients in the intervention group and 37 patients in the non-intervention group. Mean HbA1c (-0.90% vs. -0.08%, p=0.011) and fasting blood glucose levels (-3.45 mmol.l vs. +0.79 mmol/l, p=0.002) reduced significantly between the intervention group vs. non-intervention group. Total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) were also significantly reduced in the intervention group (TC -0.34 mmol/l, p=0.018) (LDL -0.45 mmol/l, p=0.001). In conclusion, pharmacists managed DMTAC significantly improved glycaemic control and lipid profile of diabetic patients.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25205453','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25205453"><span>Ki-1/57 and CGI-55 ectopic expression <span class="hlt">impact</span> cellular pathways <span class="hlt">involved</span> in proliferation and stress response regulation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Costa, Fernanda C; Saito, Angela; Gonçalves, Kaliandra A; Vidigal, Pedro M; Meirelles, Gabriela V; Bressan, Gustavo C; Kobarg, Jörg</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Ki-1/57 (HABP4) and CGI-55 (SERBP1) are regulatory proteins and paralogs with 40.7% amino acid sequence identity and 67.4% similarity. Functionally, they have been implicated in the regulation of gene expression on both the transcriptional and mRNA metabolism levels. A link with tumorigenesis is suggested, since both paralogs show altered expression levels in tumor cells and the Ki-1/57 gene is found in a region of chromosome 9q that represents a haplotype for familiar colon cancer. However, the target genes regulated by Ki-1/57 and CGI-55 are unknown. Here, we analyzed the alterations of the global transcriptome profile after Ki-1/57 or CGI-55 overexpression in HEK293T cells by DNA microchip technology. We were able to identify 363 or 190 down-regulated and 50 or 27 up-regulated genes for Ki-1/57 and CGI-55, respectively, of which 20 were shared between both proteins. Expression levels of selected genes were confirmed by qRT-PCR both after protein overexpression and siRNA knockdown. The majority of the genes with altered expression were associated to proliferation, apoptosis and cell cycle control processes, prompting us to further explore these contexts experimentally. We observed that overexpression of Ki-1/57 or CGI-55 results in reduced cell proliferation, mainly due to a G1 phase arrest, whereas siRNA knockdown of CGI-55 caused an increase in proliferation. In the case of Ki-1/57 overexpression, we found protection from apoptosis after treatment with the ER-stress inducer thapsigargin. Together, our data give important new insights that may help to explain these proteins putative <span class="hlt">involvement</span> in tumorigenic events.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3600995','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3600995"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> microsphere and its applications</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Cai, Yunpeng; Chen, Yinghui; Hong, Xiaoyun; Liu, Zhenguo; Yuan, Weien</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Porous</span> microspheres have drawn great attention in the last two decades for their potential applications in many fields, such as carriers for drugs, absorption and desorption of substances, pulmonary drug delivery, and tissue regeneration. The application of <span class="hlt">porous</span> microspheres has become a feasible way to address existing problems. In this essay, we give a brief introduction of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> microsphere, its characteristics, preparation methods, applications, and a brief summary of existing problems and research tendencies. PMID:23515359</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19960009264','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19960009264"><span>Selective formation of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Fathauer, Robert W. (Inventor); Jones, Eric W. (Inventor)</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>A pattern of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon is produced in the surface of a silicon substrate by forming a pattern of crystal defects in said surface, preferably by applying an ion milling beam through openings in a photoresist layer to the surface, and then exposing said surface to a stain etchant, such as HF:HNO3:H2O. The defected crystal will preferentially etch to form a pattern of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon. When the amorphous content of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon exceeds 70 percent, the <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon pattern emits visible light at room temperature.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940011487','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940011487"><span>Selective formation of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Fathauer, Jones (Inventor)</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>A pattern of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon is produced in the surface of a silicon substrate by forming a pattern of crystal defects in said surface, preferably by applying an ion milling beam through openings in a photoresist layer to the surface, and then exposing said surface to a stain etchant, such as HF:HNO3:H20. The defected crystal will preferentially etch to form a pattern of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon. When the amorphous content of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon exceeds 70 percent, the <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon pattern emits visible light at room temperature.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23510512','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23510512"><span>Photoactive <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon nanopowder.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Meekins, Benjamin H; Lin, Ya-Cheng; Manser, Joseph S; Manukyan, Khachatur; Mukasyan, Alexander S; Kamat, Prashant V; McGinn, Paul J</p> <p>2013-04-24</p> <p>Bulk processing of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon nanoparticles (nSi) of 50-300 nm size and surface area of 25-230 m(2)/g has been developed using a combustion synthesis method. nSi exhibits consistent photoresponse to AM 1.5 simulated solar excitation. In confirmation of photoactivity, the films of nSi exhibit prompt bleaching following femtosecond laser pulse excitation resulting from the photoinduced charge separation. Photocurrent generation observed upon AM 1.5 excitation of these films in a photoelectrochemical cell shows strong dependence on the thickness of the intrinsic silica shell that encompasses the nanoparticles and hinders interparticle electron transfer.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17979254','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17979254"><span>Tortuosity of <span class="hlt">porous</span> particles.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Barrande, M; Bouchet, R; Denoyel, R</p> <p>2007-12-01</p> <p>Tortuosity is often used as an adjustable parameter in models of transfer properties through <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. This parameter, not reducible to classical measured microstructural parameters like specific surface area, porosity, or pore size distribution, reflects the efficiency of percolation paths, which is linked to the topology of the material. The measurement of the effective conductivity of a bed of particles saturated with an electrolyte is a simple way to evaluate tortuosity. Nevertheless, it received only little attention because of the real difficulties in both getting reliable results and interpreting data. Notably, the discrimination between the contribution of interparticle and intraparticle porosities to the tortuosity is not resolved. To our knowledge, there is no model able to fit the experimental data of the tortuosity of a suspension, and a fortiori of a particle bed, in the whole porosity range. Only empirical expressions have been proposed, but they do not allow deriving intratortuosity of a <span class="hlt">porous</span> particle. For a dilute system, Maxwell's equation predicts the effective conductivity of suspensions of spherical particles as a function of the bulk electrolyte conductivity and of particle conductivity. The intraparticle tortuosity can be derived from the particle conductivity obtained from the Maxwell equation applied to data at infinite dilution of particles. Then, by assuming that the Maxwell equation is a first-order approximation of the conductivity as a function of porosity, we propose an explicit relation of the tortuosity tau of a suspension of <span class="hlt">porous</span> particles, obtained by conductivity measurement, as tau = tau(epsilon, epsilon(p), tau(p)), where epsilon is the total porosity of the suspension, tau(p) is the intraparticle tortuosity, and epsilon(p) is the particle porosity. This relationship fits the experimental data in the whole porosity range and can be used to determine tau(p) from an experiment at only one porosity. Finally, the obtained</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20080012236','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20080012236"><span>Crosslinked, <span class="hlt">porous</span>, polyacrylate beads</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Dreyer, William J. (Inventor)</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>Uniformly-shaped, <span class="hlt">porous</span>, round beads are prepared by the co-polymerization of an acrylic monomer and a cross-linking agent in the presence of 0.05 to 5% by weight of an aqueous soluble polymer such as polyethylene oxide. Cross-linking proceeds at high temperature above about 50.degree. C or at a lower temperature with irradiation. Beads of even shape and even size distribution of less than 2 micron diameter are formed. The beads will find use as adsorbents in chromatography and as markers for studies of cell surface receptors.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_9 --> <div id="page_10" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="181"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20080006880','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20080006880"><span>Small, <span class="hlt">porous</span> polyacrylate beads</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping Siao (Inventor); Dreyer, William J. (Inventor)</p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p>Uniformly-shaped, <span class="hlt">porous</span>, round beads are prepared by the co-polymerization of an acrylic monomer and a cross-linking agent in the presence of 0.05 to 5% by weight of an aqueous soluble polymer such as polyethylene oxide. Cross-linking proceeds at high temperature above about 50.degree.C or at a lower temperature with irradiation. Beads of even shape and even size distribution of less than 2 micron diameter are formed. The beads will find use as adsorbents in chromatography and as markers for studies of cell surface receptors.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20080006886','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20080006886"><span>Crosslinked, <span class="hlt">porous</span>, polyacrylate beads</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping Siao (Inventor); Dreyer, William J. (Inventor)</p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p>Uniformly-shaped, <span class="hlt">porous</span>, round beads are prepared by the co-polymerization of an acrylic monomer and a cross-linking agent in the presence of 0.05 to 5% by weight of an aqueous soluble polymer such as polyethylene oxide. Cross-linking proceeds at high temperature above about 50.degree.C or at a lower temperature with irradiation. Beads of even shape and even size distribution of less than 2 micron diameter are formed. The beads will find use as adsorbents in chromatography and as markers for studies of cell surface receptors.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012SPIE.8465E..1BM','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012SPIE.8465E..1BM"><span>Optimizing the sensitivity of <span class="hlt">porous</span> thin film optical sensors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mackay, Tom G.</p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>We considered a <span class="hlt">porous</span> thin film as a platform for optical sensing. It is envisaged that the <span class="hlt">porous</span> thin filmbecomes infiltrated by a fluid containing an agent to be sensed. The basis for detection of this agent to besensed is provided by changes in the optical properties of the infiltrated <span class="hlt">porous</span> thin film. Provided that thepore sizes are much smaller than the wavelengths <span class="hlt">involved</span>, the infiltrated <span class="hlt">porous</span> thin film may be regardedas a homogenized composite material. Using the well-established Bruggeman homogenization formalism, thesensitivity of such an optical sensor was investigated theoretically. The sensitivity was considered in relation tothe optical properties of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> thin film and the infiltrating fluid, the porosity of the thin film, and theshape of the pores. For the case of an isotropic dielectric <span class="hlt">porous</span> thin film of relative permittivity ɛa and anisotropic dielectric fluid of relative permittivity ɛb, the sensitivity was found to be maximized if: (i) the contrast between ɛa and ɛb was maximized; (ii) mid-range values of porosity were used; (iii) the regime 0 < ɛb < 1 with ɛa » 1 pertained, for example; and (iv) pores which have elongated spheroidal shapes were incorporated.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27906387','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27906387"><span>Hierarchically <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials: synthesis strategies and structure design.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yang, Xiao-Yu; Chen, Li-Hua; Li, Yu; Rooke, Joanna Claire; Sanchez, Clément; Su, Bao-Lian</p> <p>2017-01-23</p> <p>Owing to their immense potential in energy conversion and storage, catalysis, photocatalysis, adsorption, separation and life science applications, significant interest has been devoted to the design and synthesis of hierarchically <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials. The hierarchy of materials on porosity, structural, morphological, and component levels is key for high performance in all kinds of applications. Synthesis and applications of hierarchically structured <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials have become a rapidly evolving field of current interest. A large series of synthesis methods have been developed. This review addresses recent advances made in studies of this topic. After identifying the advantages and problems of natural hierarchically <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials, synthetic hierarchically <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials are presented. The synthesis strategies used to prepare hierarchically <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials are first introduced and the features of synthesis and the resulting structures are presented using a series of examples. These <span class="hlt">involve</span> templating methods (surfactant templating, nanocasting, macroporous polymer templating, colloidal crystal templating and bioinspired process, i.e. biotemplating), conventional techniques (supercritical fluids, emulsion, freeze-drying, breath figures, selective leaching, phase separation, zeolitization process, and replication) and basic methods (sol-gel controlling and post-treatment), as well as self-formation phenomenon of <span class="hlt">porous</span> hierarchy. A series of detailed examples are given to show methods for the synthesis of hierarchically <span class="hlt">porous</span> structures with various chemical compositions (dual porosities: micro-micropores, micro-mesopores, micro-macropores, meso-mesopores, meso-macropores, multiple porosities: micro-meso-macropores and meso-meso-macropores). We hope that this review will be helpful for those entering the field and also for those in the field who want quick access to helpful reference information about the synthesis of new hierarchically <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19780019129','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19780019129"><span>Application of <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials for laminar flow control</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Pearce, W. E.</p> <p>1978-01-01</p> <p>Fairly smooth <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials were elected for study Doweave; Fibermetal; Dynapore; and perforated titanium sheet. Factors examined include: surface smoothness; suction characteristics; porosity; surface <span class="hlt">impact</span> resistance; and strain compatibility. A laminar flow control suction glove arrangement was identified with material combinations compatible with thermal expansion and structural strain.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22869206','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22869206"><span>The Citizenship Project part II: <span class="hlt">impact</span> of a citizenship intervention on clinical and community outcomes for persons with mental illness and criminal justice <span class="hlt">involvement</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Clayton, Ashley; O'Connell, Maria J; Bellamy, Chyrell; Benedict, Patricia; Rowe, Michael</p> <p>2013-03-01</p> <p>This study assessed the effectiveness of an intervention based on a theoretical framework of citizenship on reducing psychiatric symptoms, alcohol use, and drug use, and increasing quality of life for persons with serious mental illness (SMI) and criminal justice <span class="hlt">involvement</span>. One-hundred fourteen adults with SMI and a history of criminal justice <span class="hlt">involvement</span> participated in a 2 × 3 longitudinal randomized controlled trial of a four-month citizenship intervention versus usual services. Linear mixed model analyses were used to assess the intervention's <span class="hlt">impact</span> on quality of life, symptoms, and substance use. After controlling for baseline covariates, participants in the experimental condition reported significantly increased quality of life, greater satisfaction with and amount of activity, higher satisfaction with work, and reduced alcohol and drug use over time. However, individuals in the experimental condition also reported increased anxiety/depression and agitation at 6 months (but not 12 months) and significantly increased negative symptoms at 12 months. Findings suggest that community-oriented, citizenship interventions for persons with SMI and criminal justice histories may facilitate improved clinical and community outcomes in some domains, but some negative clinical findings suggest the need for post-intervention support for intervention participants. Implications for practice and future research are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EPJST.224.1749C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EPJST.224.1749C"><span>A comprehensive multiscale moisture transport analysis: From <span class="hlt">porous</span> reference silicates to cement-based materials</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chemmi, H.; Petit, D.; Tariel, V.; Korb, J.-P.; Denoyel, R.; Bouchet, R.; Levitz, P.</p> <p>2015-07-01</p> <p>Natural and manufactured disordered systems are ubiquitous and often <span class="hlt">involve</span> hierarchical structures. This structural organization optimizes defined physical properties at several scales from molecular to representative volumes where the usual homogenization approach becomes efficient. For studying a particular physical property on these systems it is thus required to use a general method of analysis based on the joint application of complementary techniques covering the whole set of time-and length-scales. Here we review a comprehensive multiscale method presented for analyzing the three-dimensional moisture transport in hierarchical <span class="hlt">porous</span> media such as synthesized reference silicates and cement-based materials. Several techniques (NMR spectroscopy, relaxometry, diffusometry, X-ray micro-tomography, conductivity…) have been used to evidence the interplay between the different scales <span class="hlt">involved</span> in this transport process. This method allows answering the general opened questions concerning the scale dependence of such a moisture transport in cement-based materials. We outline the main results of the multiscale techniques applied on reference <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicates allowing separating the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of geometry, hydric state and wettability on the moisture transport. Based on this approach, we prove that this transport at micro- and meso-scale is determinant to modify the moisture at macro-scale during setting or for hardened cement-based materials.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22287819','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22287819"><span>Analysis of the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of professional <span class="hlt">involvement</span> in evidence generation for the HTA Process, subproject "cochlear implants": methodology, results and recommendations.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Berrettini, S; Arslan, E; Baggiani, A; Burdo, S; Cassandro, E; Cuda, D; Filipo, R; Rossi, P Giorgi; Mancini, P; Martini, A; Quaranta, A; Quaranta, N; Turchetti, G; Forli, F</p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>The aim of Health Technology Assessment (HTA) is to provide decision-makers, distributors and recipients with information on the effectiveness, cost and <span class="hlt">impact</span> of health technologies. The present study constitutes a subproject within the wider project "Analysis of the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of professional <span class="hlt">involvement</span> in evidence generation for the HTA process", which is part of the strategic programme "Transfer of the results of the research in clinical practice and organisation of healthcare services", coordinated by Laziosanità - Agency of Public Healthcare of the Lazio Region and AgeNaS (National Agency for Regional Healthcare Services). The objectives of the present subproject (cochlear implants) are as follows: a) to produce a report regarding the health <span class="hlt">impact</span> of cochlear implants (CI) on their recipients, through a systematic review of literature and extensive selection of relative studies, combining the outcomes with metanalytical techniques. Output: report on the indications of usage in the groups of population for which benefits are controversial; b) to create a registry of patients using cochlear implants. The registry should contain a selection of anagraphic and clinical information relative to patient follow-up in order to assess factors associated with safety and <span class="hlt">impact</span> on cochlear implant users. This source of information is essential for future observational studies. This was divided into 4 phases: 1(st) phase: definition of key participants in the assessment process; 2(nd) phase: definition of methods and timing of "Aims" (definition of the objective); 3(rd) phase: definition of the methods and times of the "assessment process", 4(th) phase: production of the final report. From the analysis of systematic reviews and italian and international guidelines, the Working Group members approved recommendations on the following topics: results after CI in children in relation to age at implantation, bilateral CI in children, CI in deaf children with associated</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.B41L..04H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.B41L..04H"><span>Biogenic Cracks in <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Rock</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hemmerle, A.; Hartung, J.; Hallatschek, O.; Goehring, L.; Herminghaus, S.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Microorganisms growing on and inside <span class="hlt">porous</span> rock may fracture it by various processes. Some of the mechanisms of biofouling and bioweathering are today identified and partially understood but most emphasis is on chemical weathering, while mechanical contributions have been neglected. However, as demonstrated by the perseverance of a seed germinating and cracking up a concrete block, the turgor pressure of living organisms can be very significant. Here, we present results of a systematic study of the effects of the mechanical forces of growing microbial populations on the weathering of <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. We designed a model <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium made of glass beads held together by polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a curable polymer. The rheological properties of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium, whose shape and size are tunable, can be controlled by the ratio of crosslinker to base used in the PDMS (see Fig. 1). Glass and PDMS being inert to most chemicals, we are able to focus on the mechanical processes of biodeterioration, excluding any chemical weathering. Inspired by recent measurements of the high pressure (~0.5 Mpa) exerted by a growing population of yeasts trapped in a microfluidic device, we show that yeast cells can be cultured homogeneously within <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium until saturation of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> space. We investigate then the effects of such an inner pressure on the mechanical properties of the sample. Using the same model system, we study also the complex interplay between biofilms and <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. We focus in particular on the effects of pore size on the penetration of the biofilm within the <span class="hlt">porous</span> sample, and on the resulting deformations of the matrix, opening new perspectives into the understanding of life in complex geometry. Figure 1. Left : cell culture growing in a model <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium. The white spheres represent the grains, bonds are displayed in grey, and microbes in green. Right: microscopy picture of glass beads linked by PDMS bridges, scale bar: 100 μm.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140001874','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140001874"><span>Regeneratively Cooled <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Media Jacket</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Mungas, Greg (Inventor); Fisher, David J. (Inventor); London, Adam Pollok (Inventor); Fryer, Jack Merrill (Inventor)</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The fluid and heat transfer theory for regenerative cooling of a rocket combustion chamber with a <span class="hlt">porous</span> media coolant jacket is presented. This model is used to design a regeneratively cooled rocket or other high temperature engine cooling jacket. Cooling jackets comprising impermeable inner and outer walls, and <span class="hlt">porous</span> media channels are disclosed. Also disclosed are <span class="hlt">porous</span> media coolant jackets with additional structures designed to transfer heat directly from the inner wall to the outer wall, and structures designed to direct movement of the coolant fluid from the inner wall to the outer wall. Methods of making such jackets are also disclosed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998PhDT.......108P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998PhDT.......108P"><span>Light emission from <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Penczek, John</p> <p></p> <p>The continuous evolution of silicon microelectronics has produced significant gains in electronic information processing. However, greater improvements in performance are expected by utilizing optoelectronic techniques. But these techniques have been severely limited in silicon- based optoelectronics due to the lack of an efficient silicon light emitter. The recent observation of efficient light emission from <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon offer a promising opportunity to develop a suitable silicon light source that is compatible with silicon microelectronics. This dissertation examined the <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon emission mechanism via photoluminescence, and by a novel device structure for <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon emitters. The investigation first examined the correlation between <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon formation conditions (and subsequent morphology) with the resulting photoluminescence properties. The quantum confinement theory for <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon light emission contends that the morphology changes induced by the different formation conditions determine the optical properties of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon. The photoluminescence spectral shifts measured in this study, in conjunction with TEM analysis and published morphological data, lend support to this theory. However, the photoluminescence spectral broadening was attributed to electronic wavefunction coupling between adjacent silicon nanocrystals. An novel device structure was also investigated in an effort to improve current injection into the <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon layer. The selective etching properties of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon were used to create a p-i-n structure with crystalline silicon contacts to the <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon layer. The resulting device was found to have unique characteristics, with a negative differential resistance region and current-induced emission that spanned from 400 nm to 5500 nm. The negative differential resistance was correlated to resistive heating effects in the device. A numerical analysis of thermal emission spectra from silicon films, in addition to</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EML....12...17J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EML....12...17J"><span>Fabrication and characterization of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon nanowires</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jung, Daeyoon; Cho, Soo Gyeong; Moon, Taeho; Sohn, Honglae</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>We report the synthesis of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon nanowires through the metalassisted chemical etching of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon in a solution of hydrofluoric acid and hydrogen peroxide. The morphology of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon nanowires was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The etch rate of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon nanowires was faster than that of silicon nanowires, but slower than that of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon. The <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon nanowires distributed uniformly on the entire <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon layer and the tips of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon nanowires congregated together. The single crystalline and sponge-like <span class="hlt">porous</span> structure with the pore diameters of less than 5 nm was confirmed for the <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon nanowires. [Figure not available: see fulltext.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22475958','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22475958"><span>Efficient visible-light photocatalytic performance of cuprous oxide <span class="hlt">porous</span> nanosheet arrays</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Li, Xianghua; Wang, Jianqiang; Cao, Minhua</p> <p>2015-10-15</p> <p>Graphical Abstract: We demonstrated a facile and efficient process for fabricating Cu{sub 2}O <span class="hlt">porous</span> nanosheet arrays on Cu mesh. Benefiting from the 1D array structure and <span class="hlt">porous</span> structure, the as-prepared Cu{sub 2}O sample exhibited significantly improved photocatalytic activity for methyl orange degradation under visible light irradiation. - Highlights: • Cu{sub 2}O <span class="hlt">porous</span> nanosheet arrays on Cu mesh were synthesized via the facile and efficient process. • The Cu{sub 2}O sample exhibited the 1D array structure and <span class="hlt">porous</span> nanosheet morphology. • The as-prepared Cu{sub 2}O <span class="hlt">porous</span> nanosheet arrays exhibited significantly improved photocatalytic activity. - Abstract: One-dimensional nanostructures are of great interest for a wide range of applications. In this work, we demonstrated the fabrication of visible-light-responsive Cu{sub 2}O <span class="hlt">porous</span> nanosheet arrays. The synthesis <span class="hlt">involved</span> the growth of Cu(OH){sub 2} nanosheet arrays on Cu mesh by solution-based corrosion and thermal transformation of Cu(OH){sub 2} nanosheet to Cu{sub 2}O <span class="hlt">porous</span> nanosheets on Cu mesh. Benefiting from the one dimensional array structure and <span class="hlt">porous</span> structure, the as-prepared Cu{sub 2}O <span class="hlt">porous</span> nanosheet arrays exhibited significantly improved photocatalytic activity for methyl orange degradation under visible light irradiation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20100011222','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20100011222"><span>Freeze Tape Casting of Functionally Graded <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Ceramics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Sofie, Stephen W.</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Freeze tape casting is a means of making preforms of ceramic sheets that, upon subsequent completion of fabrication processing, can have anisotropic and/or functionally graded properties that notably include aligned and graded porosity. Freeze tape casting was developed to enable optimization of the microstructures of <span class="hlt">porous</span> ceramic components for use as solid oxide electrodes in fuel cells: Through alignment and grading of pores, one can tailor surface areas and diffusion channels for flows of gas and liquid species <span class="hlt">involved</span> in fuel-cell reactions. Freeze tape casting offers similar benefits for fabrication of optimally <span class="hlt">porous</span> ceramics for use as catalysts, gas sensors, and filters.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1994HyInt..84..109J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1994HyInt..84..109J"><span>EPR study of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jishi, Fu; Jinchang, Mao; En, Wu; Yongqiang, Jia; Borui, Zhang; Lizhu, Zhang; Guogang, Qin; Yuhua, Zhang; Genshuan, Wui</p> <p>1994-12-01</p> <p>An anisotropic EPR signal was observed in <span class="hlt">porous</span> Si. According to its symmetry and g value, the EPR signal can be attributed to silicon dangling bonds located on the surface of a <span class="hlt">porous</span> Si skeleton. The evolution of the EPR signal at room temperature in air was measured. The annealing temperature dependence of the EPR and the PL of <span class="hlt">porous</span> Si in oxygen and the effects of gamma irradiation on the EPR and the PL spectra of <span class="hlt">porous</span> Si were studied. The changes of the EPR signal and the PL intensity induced in atmosphere by ethyl alcohol and acetone were discovered. The dangling bond is only one of the factors which affect the PL.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1150645','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1150645"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> substrates filled with nanomaterials</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Worsley, Marcus A.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Stadermann, Michael</p> <p>2014-08-19</p> <p>A composition comprising: at least one <span class="hlt">porous</span> carbon monolith, such as a carbon aerogel, comprising internal pores, and at least one nanomaterial, such as carbon nanotubes, disposed uniformly throughout the internal pores. The nanomaterial can be disposed in the middle of the monolith. In addition, a method for making a monolithic solid with both high surface area and good bulk electrical conductivity is provided. A <span class="hlt">porous</span> substrate having a thickness of 100 microns or more and comprising macropores throughout its thickness is prepared. At least one catalyst is deposited inside the <span class="hlt">porous</span> substrate. Subsequently, chemical vapor deposition is used to uniformly deposit a nanomaterial in the macropores throughout the thickness of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> substrate. Applications include electrical energy storage, such as batteries and capacitors, and hydrogen storage.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1040865','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1040865"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> light-emitting compositions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Burrell, Anthony K; McCleskey, Thomas Mark; Jia, Quanxi; Bauer, Eve; Mueller, Alexander H</p> <p>2012-04-17</p> <p>Light-emitting devices are prepared by coating a <span class="hlt">porous</span> substrate using a polymer-assisted deposition process. Solutions of metal precursor and soluble polymers having binding properties for metal precursor were coated onto <span class="hlt">porous</span> substrates. The coated substrates were heated at high temperatures under a suitable atmosphere. The result was a substrate with a conformal coating that did not substantially block the pores of the substrate.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010REDS..165..566A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010REDS..165..566A"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> carbon EOS: numerical analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Aliverdiev, A.; Batani, D.; Dezulian, R.; Vinci, T.</p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>In this paper, we address the problem of direct simulation of laser-driven shock experiments aiming at determining the equation of state (EOS) of carbon using the "relative" impedance mismatch method. In particular, using tabulated carbon EOS (SESAME library, material number 7830), we have found some difficulties in reducing the initial density of the material in simulations with <span class="hlt">porous</span> carbon. We have therefore calculated a new EOS for <span class="hlt">porous</span> carbon with a reduced bulk modulus.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AIPC.1769j0011S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AIPC.1769j0011S"><span>Formation of <span class="hlt">porous</span> inner architecture at the interface of magnetic pulse welded Al/Cu joints</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sapanathan, T.; Raoelison, R. N.; Yang, K.; Buiron, N.; Rachik, M.</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Porous</span> inner architecture has been revealed at the interface of magnetic pulse welded aluminum/copper (Al/Cu) joints. These materials could serve the purpose of heterogeneous architectured materials, while their makeup of inner architecture of <span class="hlt">porous</span> interface with the pore sizes of sub-micron to a few microns, could offer potential attributes in energy storage application. Two welding cases with various <span class="hlt">impact</span> intensities are compared. An input voltage of 6.5 kV with an initial air gap of 1.5 mm and a higher voltage of 7.5 kV with a large initial air gap of 5 mm are respectively considered as two cases with low and high velocity <span class="hlt">impacts</span>. Overall morphology of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium was revealed at the interface either in layered or pocketed structures. The allocation of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> zone and pore sizes vary with the <span class="hlt">impact</span> condition. The low velocity <span class="hlt">impact</span> welding conditions also produces smaller pores compared to the high velocity <span class="hlt">impact</span> case, where the pore sizes varies in submicron to a few microns (<10μm). By investigating the potential mechanism of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> zone formation, it was identified that a combined phenomena of cavitation and coalescence play a major role in nucleation and growth of the pores where a rapid cooling that eventually freezes the <span class="hlt">porous</span> structure at the interface.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17729137','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17729137"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of lowering the legal blood alcohol concentration limit to 0.03 on male, female and teenage drivers <span class="hlt">involved</span> alcohol-related crashes in Japan.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Desapriya, E; Shimizu, S; Pike, I; Subzwari, S; Scime, G</p> <p>2007-09-01</p> <p>In June of 2002, a revision to part of the Road Traffic Act drastically increased the penalties for drinking and driving offences in Japan. Most notably, the legal blood alcohol concentration (BAC) limit for driving was lowered from 0.05 mg/ml to 0.03 mg/ml. The rationale for the new lower BAC limit was predicated on the assumption that drinking drivers will comply with the new, lower limit by reducing the amount of alcohol they consume prior to driving, thereby lowering their risk of crash <span class="hlt">involvement</span>. This, in turn, would lead to fewer alcohol-related crashes. A key limitation of previous lower BAC evaluation research in determining the effectiveness of lower legal BAC limit policies is the assumption of population homogeneity in responding to the laws. The present analysis is unique in this perspective and focuses on the evaluation of the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of BAC limit reduction on different segments of the population. The chief objective of this research is to quantify the extent to which lowering the legal limit of BAC has reduced male, female and teenager <span class="hlt">involvement</span> in motor vehicle crashes in Japan since 2002. Most notably, the introduction of reduced BAC limit legislation resulted in a statistically significant decrease in the number of alcohol-impaired drivers on the road in Japan, indicating responsiveness to the legal change among adults and teenagers. In addition, this preliminary assessment appears to indicate that the implementation of 0.03 BAC laws and other associated activities are associated with statistically significant reductions in alcohol-<span class="hlt">involved</span> motor vehicle crashes. In comparison, the rates of total crashes showed no statistically significant decline nor increase in the period following the introduction of the BAC law, indicating that the lower BAC limit only had an effect on alcohol-related crashes in Japan. The evidence suggests that the lower BAC legal limit and perceived risk of detection are the two most important factors resulting in a</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_10 --> <div id="page_11" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="201"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25500631','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25500631"><span>Additively manufactured <span class="hlt">porous</span> tantalum implants.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wauthle, Ruben; van der Stok, Johan; Amin Yavari, Saber; Van Humbeeck, Jan; Kruth, Jean-Pierre; Zadpoor, Amir Abbas; Weinans, Harrie; Mulier, Michiel; Schrooten, Jan</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>The medical device industry's interest in open <span class="hlt">porous</span>, metallic biomaterials has increased in response to additive manufacturing techniques enabling the production of complex shapes that cannot be produced with conventional techniques. Tantalum is an important metal for medical devices because of its good biocompatibility. In this study selective laser melting technology was used for the first time to manufacture highly <span class="hlt">porous</span> pure tantalum implants with fully interconnected open pores. The architecture of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> structure in combination with the material properties of tantalum result in mechanical properties close to those of human bone and allow for bone ingrowth. The bone regeneration performance of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> tantalum was evaluated in vivo using an orthotopic load-bearing bone defect model in the rat femur. After 12 weeks, substantial bone ingrowth, good quality of the regenerated bone and a strong, functional implant-bone interface connection were observed. Compared to identical <span class="hlt">porous</span> Ti-6Al-4V structures, laser-melted tantalum shows excellent osteoconductive properties, has a higher normalized fatigue strength and allows for more plastic deformation due to its high ductility. It is therefore concluded that this is a first step towards a new generation of open <span class="hlt">porous</span> tantalum implants manufactured using selective laser melting.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21343925','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21343925"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> organic molecular solids by dynamic covalent scrambling.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jiang, Shan; Jones, James T A; Hasell, Tom; Blythe, Charlotte E; Adams, Dave J; Trewin, Abbie; Cooper, Andrew I</p> <p>2011-02-22</p> <p>The main strategy for constructing <span class="hlt">porous</span> solids from discrete organic molecules is crystal engineering, which <span class="hlt">involves</span> forming regular crystalline arrays. Here, we present a chemical approach for desymmetrizing organic cages by dynamic covalent scrambling reactions. This leads to molecules with a distribution of shapes which cannot pack effectively and, hence, do not crystallize, creating porosity in the amorphous solid. The <span class="hlt">porous</span> properties can be fine tuned by varying the ratio of reagents in the scrambling reaction, and this allows the preparation of materials with high gas selectivities. The molecular engineering of <span class="hlt">porous</span> amorphous solids complements crystal engineering strategies and may have advantages in some applications, for example, in the compatibilization of functionalities that do not readily cocrystallize.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6060851','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6060851"><span>The formation of microbial barriers in saturated <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Hendry, M.J.; Lawrence, J.R. )</p> <p>1993-10-01</p> <p>Control of contaminant migration in the subsurface to prevent off-site migration and facilitate treatment is an essential component of any remediation scheme. In situ plugging of pore spaces by introduced bacteria has been suggested as a mechanism to seal permeable zones and to enhance bioremediation. This procedure <span class="hlt">involves</span> the injection of bacteria which adsorb to the geologic media, are stimulated with a nutrient solution and grow producing an exopolysaccharide plug. The objective of the current research was to evaluate the feasibility of in situ placement of biological barriers for containment of contaminants in subsurface environments. Transport of bacteria through sands at a groundwater velocity of 0.3 m/day and the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of growth and exopolymer production during nutrient stimulation were studied over time using confocal laser microscopy and viable fluorescence exclusion techniques. The inoculum rapidly colonized the sand matrix and dominated surface sites while forming extensive biofilms. After three to four days the native ground-water flora invaded the established biofilm, creating a mixed species biofilm which reduced the effective porosity of the geologic medium. The resulting biobarrier reduced the hydraulic conductivity of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> media by two orders of magnitude, and exhibited self-sealing properties in response to changes in hydraulic head.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016APS..DFDD40008L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016APS..DFDD40008L"><span>Modeling and Simulations of Particulate Flows through Functionalized <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Li, Chunhui; Dutta, Prashanta; Liu, Jin</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>Transport of particulate fluid through a functionalized <span class="hlt">porous</span> material is of significant interest in many industrial applications, such as earth sciences, battery designs and water/air purifications. The entire process is complex, which <span class="hlt">involves</span> the convection of fluid, diffusion of reactants as well as reversible chemical reactions at the fluid-solid interface In this work we present a convection-diffusion-reaction model and simulate the transport of particulate fluid through a functionalized <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. The <span class="hlt">porous</span> structures are generated and manipulated through the quartet structure generation set method. The Navier-Stokes with convection-diffusion equations are solved using the lattice Boltzmann method. The chemical reactions at the interface are modeled by an absorption-desorption process and treated as the boundary conditions for above governing equations. Through our simulations we study the effects of <span class="hlt">porous</span> structures, including porosity, pore orientation, and pore size as well as the kinetic rates of surface reactions on the overall performance of removal efficiency of the species from the solution. Our results show that whole process is highly affected by both the <span class="hlt">porous</span> structures and absorption rate. The optimal parameters can be achieved by proper design. This work is supported by NSF Grants: CBET-1250107 and CBET -1604211.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JMPSo..84..436M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JMPSo..84..436M"><span>An analytical model for <span class="hlt">porous</span> single crystals with ellipsoidal voids</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mbiakop, A.; Constantinescu, A.; Danas, K.</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>A rate-(in)dependent constitutive model for <span class="hlt">porous</span> single crystals with arbitrary crystal anisotropy (e.g., FCC, BCC, HCP, etc.) containing general ellipsoidal voids is developed. The proposed model, denoted as modified variational model (MVAR), is based on the nonlinear variational homogenization method, which makes use of a linear comparison <span class="hlt">porous</span> material to estimate the response of the nonlinear <span class="hlt">porous</span> single crystal. Periodic multi-void finite element simulations are used in order to validate the MVAR for a large number of parameters including cubic (FCC, BCC) and hexagonal (HCP) crystal anisotropy, various creep exponents (i.e., nonlinearity), several stress triaxiality ratios, general void shapes and orientations and various porosity levels. The MVAR model, which <span class="hlt">involves</span> a priori no calibration parameters, is found to be in good agreement with the finite element results for all cases considered in the rate-dependent context. The model is then used in a predictive manner to investigate the complex response of <span class="hlt">porous</span> single crystals in several cases with strong coupling between the anisotropy of the crystal and the (morphological) anisotropy induced by the shape and orientation of the voids. Finally, a simple way of calibrating the MVAR with just two adjustable parameters is depicted in the rate-independent context so that an excellent agreement with the FE simulation results is obtained. In this last case, this proposed model can be thought as a generalization of the Gurson model in the context of <span class="hlt">porous</span> single crystals and general ellipsoidal void shapes and orientations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22136546','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22136546"><span>A <span class="hlt">POROUS</span>, LAYERED HELIOPAUSE</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Swisdak, M.; Drake, J. F.; Opher, M. E-mail: drake@umd.edu</p> <p>2013-09-01</p> <p>The picture of the heliopause (HP)-the boundary between the domains of the Sun and the local interstellar medium (LISM)-as a pristine interface with a large rotation in the magnetic field fails to describe recent Voyager 1 (V1) data. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the global heliosphere reveal that the rotation angle of the magnetic field across the HP at V1 is small. Particle-in-cell simulations, based on cuts through the MHD model at V1's location, suggest that the sectored region of the heliosheath (HS) produces large-scale magnetic islands that reconnect with the interstellar magnetic field while mixing LISM and HS plasma. Cuts across the simulation reveal multiple, anti-correlated jumps in the number densities of LISM and HS particles, similar to those observed, at the magnetic separatrices. A model is presented, based on both the observations and simulations, of the HP as a <span class="hlt">porous</span>, multi-layered structure threaded by magnetic fields. This model further suggests that contrary to the conclusions of recent papers, V1 has already crossed the HP.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7034896','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7034896"><span>Numerical simulation of chemical migration in physically and chemically heterogeneous <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Tompson, A.F.B. )</p> <p>1993-11-01</p> <p>A series of chemical transport simulations in saturated <span class="hlt">porous</span> media are conducted to examine the coupled <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on chemical mobility induced by nonuniform sorption reactions and heterogeneous flow fields. The simulations <span class="hlt">involve</span> the calculation of fluid flow and chemical migration within highly resolved, three-dimensional cubic regions with synthetically derived material properties. Nonuniformities in subsurface materials are represented as randomly correlated hydraulic conductivity and sorption partition coefficient fields. Transport computations are based upon a random walk particle model, appropriately modified to treat equilibrium sorption reactions. Current experiments focus on four hypothetical constituents, one being inert, and the other three independently obeying linear, Freundlich, and Langmuir partitioning relationships. Results show distinct effects of the nonuniform flow and sorption processes on the overall displacement, dispersion, and partitioning/retardation and the breakthrough behavior of the constituent plumes, as well as on the sharpening fronts and skewed concentration profiles associated with nonlinear partitioning models. 37 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=control+AND+postural&pg=7&id=ED080564','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=control+AND+postural&pg=7&id=ED080564"><span>On <span class="hlt">Involvement</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Greene, Michael B.</p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Involvement</span> Ratings In Settings (IRIS), a multi-dimensional non-verbal scale of <span class="hlt">involvement</span> adaptable to a time-sampling method of data collection, was constructed with the aid of the videotapes of second-grade Follow Through classrooms made by CCEP. Scales were defined through observations of <span class="hlt">involved</span> and alienated behavior, and the IRIS was…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24245166','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24245166"><span>Large-scale fabrication of In2S3 <span class="hlt">porous</span> films via one-step hydrothermal process.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chen, Fei; Deng, Dan; Lei, Yinlin</p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>Large-scale indium sulfide (In2S3) <span class="hlt">porous</span> films were fabricated via a facile one-step and non-template hydrothermal process using L-cysteine as a capping agent. The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of reaction conditions such as reaction time, temperatures, and capping agents on the synthesis of the In2S3 <span class="hlt">porous</span> films were studied. The morphology, structure, and phase composition of In2S3 <span class="hlt">porous</span> films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The formation process and the optical property of the In2S3 <span class="hlt">porous</span> films were also evaluated.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27573758','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27573758"><span><span class="hlt">Impacts</span> on the terrestrial environment in case of a hypothetical accident <span class="hlt">involving</span> the recovery of the dumped Russian submarine K-27.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Brown, J E; Amundsen, I; Bartnicki, J; Dowdall, M; Dyve, J E; Hosseini, A; Klein, H; Standring, W</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>Objects containing radioactivity have been routinely dumped in Arctic waters near NW Russia up until the 1990s. One of the most radioactive objects in this region, the nuclear submarine K-27, was dumped in Stepogovo Fjord and contained spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Although the two K-27 submarine reactors were mothballed before dumping, concerns about the potential long term risks of contamination remain and plans to retrieve and decommission K-27 exist. In this article, human dose and environmental <span class="hlt">impact</span> aseessments are presented for two possible future scenarios <span class="hlt">involving</span>: (1) an ingress of water into a reactor in situ leading to a spontaneous chain reaction (SCR) and (2) an on-board fire when SNF is being removed at the mainland decommissiong site at Gremhika Bay on the Kola Peninsula. Assessments have been completed using conservative assumptions, focusing on possible effects to Norwegian territory. Atmospheric transport and deposition of radioactivity was modelled near field and regionally, using appropriate models, whilst human doses and environmental exposures were modelled using a standard IAEA approach and the ERICA tool, respectively. Results indicate that large areas of Norwegian territory could be affected by fallout from the Gremhika scenario, especially in the north, though at levels two orders of magnitude lower than those observed after the Chernobyl accident. Potential doses, primarily due to ground shine, to a critical group of personnel on-site at Stepogovo resulting from a SCR could require preventative measures based on ICRP recommendations (20-100 mSv). Doses to non-human biota in Norway for the Gremhika scenario would be negligible, typical of background dose rates for terrestrial organisms.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21499737','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21499737"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Cranial Irradiation Added to Intrathecal Conditioning in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Central Nervous System <span class="hlt">Involvement</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Mayadev, Jyoti S.; Douglas, James G.; Storer, Barry E.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Storb, Rainer</p> <p>2011-05-01</p> <p>Purpose: Neither the prognostic importance nor the appropriate management of central nervous system (CNS) <span class="hlt">involvement</span> is known for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We examined the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of a CNS irradiation boost to standard intrathecal chemotherapy (ITC). Methods and Materials: From 1995 to 2005, a total of 648 adult AML patients received a myeloablative HCT: 577 patients were CNS negative (CNS-), and 71 were CNS positive (CNS+). Of the 71 CNS+ patients, 52 received intrathecal chemotherapy alone (CNS+ITC), and 19 received ITC plus an irradiation boost (CNS+RT). Results: The CNS-, CNS+ITC, and CNS+RT patients had 1- and 5-year relapse-free survivals (RFS) of 43% and 35%, 15% and 6%, and 37% and 32%, respectively. CNS+ITC patients had a statistically significant worse RFS compared with CNS- patients (hazard ratio [HR], 2.65; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.0-3.6; p < 0.0001). CNS+RT patients had improved relapse free survival over that of CNS+ITC patients (HR, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.2-0.8; p = 0.01). The 1- and 5-year overall survivals (OS) of patients with CNS-, CNS+ITC, and CNS+RT, were 50% and 38%, 21% and 6%, and 53% and 42%, respectively. The survival of CNS+RT were significantly better than CNS+ITC patients (p = 0.004). After adjusting for known risk factors, CNS+RT patients had a trend toward lower relapse rates and reduced nonrelapse mortality. Conclusions: CNS+ AML is associated with a poor prognosis. The role of a cranial irradiation boost to intrathecal chemotherapy appears to mitigate the risk of CNS disease, and needs to be further investigated to define optimal treatment strategies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26975034','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26975034"><span>Absorption of impinging water droplet in <span class="hlt">porous</span> stones.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lee, J B; Radu, A I; Vontobel, P; Derome, D; Carmeliet, J</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>This paper presents an experimental investigation and numerical analysis of the absorption of water droplets <span class="hlt">impacting</span> <span class="hlt">porous</span> stones. The absorption process of an impinging droplet is here fully characterized from spreading to evaporation in terms of absorbed mass during droplet depletion and moisture content distribution in a time-resolved manner for three different natural stones. High-speed imaging and neutron radiography are used to quantify moisture absorption in <span class="hlt">porous</span> stones of varying moisture properties from deposition until depletion. During <span class="hlt">impact</span> and spreading, the droplet exhibits a dynamic non-wetting behavior. At maximum spreading, the droplet undergoes pinning, resulting into the contact radius remaining constant until droplet depletion. Absorption undergoes two phases: initially, absorption is hindered due a contact resistance attributed to entrapped air; afterwards, a more perfect capillary contact occurs and absorption goes on until depletion, concurrently with evaporation and further redistribution. A finite-element numerical model for isothermal unsaturated moisture transport in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media captures the phases of mass absorption in good agreement with the experimental data. Droplet spreading and absorption are highly determined by the <span class="hlt">impact</span> velocity of the droplet, while moisture content redistribution after depletion is much less dependent on <span class="hlt">impact</span> conditions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JSG....63...50F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JSG....63...50F"><span>Anisotropy of permeability in faulted <span class="hlt">porous</span> sandstones</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Farrell, N. J. C.; Healy, D.; Taylor, C. W.</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>Studies of fault rock permeabilities advance the understanding of fluid migration patterns around faults and contribute to predictions of fault stability. In this study a new model is proposed combining brittle deformation structures formed during faulting, with fluid flow through pores. It assesses the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of faulting on the permeability anisotropy of <span class="hlt">porous</span> sandstone, hypothesising that the formation of fault related micro-scale deformation structures will alter the host rock porosity organisation and create new permeability pathways. Core plugs and thin sections were sampled around a normal fault and oriented with respect to the fault plane. Anisotropy of permeability was determined in three orientations to the fault plane at ambient and confining pressures. Results show that permeabilities measured parallel to fault dip were up to 10 times higher than along fault strike permeability. Analysis of corresponding thin sections shows elongate pores oriented at a low angle to the maximum principal palaeo-stress (σ1) and parallel to fault dip, indicating that permeability anisotropy is produced by grain scale deformation mechanisms associated with faulting. Using a soil mechanics 'void cell model' this study shows how elongate pores could be produced in faulted <span class="hlt">porous</span> sandstone by compaction and reorganisation of grains through shearing and cataclasis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Romance&pg=2&id=EJ1039711','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Romance&pg=2&id=EJ1039711"><span>The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Direct <span class="hlt">Involvement</span> I and Direct <span class="hlt">Involvement</span> II Experiences on Secondary School Students' Social Capital, as Measured by Co-Cognitive Factors of the Operation Houndstooth Intervention Theory</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Sands, Michelle M.; Heilbronner, Nancy N.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>A mixed-methods study grounded in Renzulli's Operation Houndstooth Intervention Theory examined the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of different types of volunteer experiences on the six co-cognitive factors (Optimism, Courage, Romance With a Topic/Discipline, Sensitivity to Human Concerns, Physical/Mental Energy, and Vision/Sense of Destiny) associated with the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhDT........76M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhDT........76M"><span>Modeling isothermal and non-isothermal flows in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mohseni Languri, Ehsan</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>A complete understanding of the physics of flow and heat transfer phenomena in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media is vital for accurate simulation of flow processes in industrial applications. In one such application pertaining to liquid composite molding (LCM) for manufacturing polymer composites, the fiber preforms used in LCM as reinforcements are limited not only to the single-scale <span class="hlt">porous</span> media in the form of random fiber-mats, but also include dual-scale <span class="hlt">porous</span> media in the form of woven or stitched fiber-mats. The conventional flow physics is not able to model the resin filling process in LCM <span class="hlt">involving</span> the dual-scale <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. In this study, the flow in dual-scale <span class="hlt">porous</span> media is studied in order to predict the permeability of these fiber mats. The effect of aspect ratio of the fiber preform on the accuracy and flow during permeability estimation in single- and dual-scale <span class="hlt">porous</span> media is analyzed experimentally and numerically. Flow of liquid in a free channel bounded on one side by <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium is studied next, and two well-known boundary conditions of stress continuity and stress jump at the interface of the two regions are evaluated numerically. A point-wise solution for Stokes flow through periodic and non periodic <span class="hlt">porous</span> media (made of cylindrical particles) adjacent to the free channel is presented using the Imite element based CFD software COMSOL. The efficacy of the two interfacial conditions is evaluated after volume averaging the point-wise velocity using a long averaging volume, also called the representative elementary volume or REV, and then comparing such a volume-averaged velocity profile with the available analytical solution. The investigation is carried out for five different porosities at three different Reynolds numbers to cover a wide range of applications. The presence of randomly-placed cylinders during the creation of non-periodic <span class="hlt">porous</span> media damps out spatial fluctuations in the averaged velocity observed in periodic <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. The analytical</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110011143','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110011143"><span>Acoustic Absorption in <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Materials</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Johnston, James C.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>An understanding of both the areas of materials science and acoustics is necessary to successfully develop materials for acoustic absorption applications. This paper presents the basic knowledge and approaches for determining the acoustic performance of <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials in a manner that will help materials researchers new to this area gain the understanding and skills necessary to make meaningful contributions to this field of study. Beginning with the basics and making as few assumptions as possible, this paper reviews relevant topics in the acoustic performance of <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials, which are often used to make acoustic bulk absorbers, moving from the physics of sound wave interactions with <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials to measurement techniques for flow resistivity, characteristic impedance, and wavenumber.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011APS..MART30009Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011APS..MART30009Y"><span>Templated Electrodeposition of Highly <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Nanostructured Materials</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yang, Han-Chang; Lim, Stephanie; Liu, Jiabin; Wu, Qian; Cheng, X. M.</p> <p>2011-03-01</p> <p>The fabrication of nanoporous materials has been of great interest for applications such as biosensors, photonic materials and energy storage. Compared to many other methods, the templated electrodeposition method is low cost, fast, and compatible with large-scale production. In this work, we developed a templated electrochemical deposition technique for fabricating highly ordered and highly <span class="hlt">porous</span> nanostructured materials. The fabrication <span class="hlt">involves</span> the following steps: self-assembly of monodispersed polystyrene spheres, electrochemical deposition of the desired materials, and sphere removal by a dissolution process. Deposition of Au and Ni layered metallic nanoporous structures were studied using different electrolytes at appropriate potentials. The pore size of the materials was tuned by using different sizes of template polystyrene spheres ranging from 50nm to 1000nm. Scanning electron microscopy images confirmed the highly ordered 3-dimensional hexagonal closed pack (hcp) structures in the samples. The templated electrochemical deposition technique provides a promising alternative approach to preparing highly <span class="hlt">porous</span> anode materials for battery applications. Work supported by Bryn Mawr K/G fund for faculty research.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18517570','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18517570"><span>Diffusion of colloidal fluids in random <span class="hlt">porous</span> media.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chávez-Rojo, M A; Juárez-Maldonado, R; Medina-Noyola, M</p> <p>2008-04-01</p> <p>The diffusive relaxation of a colloidal fluid adsorbed in a <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium depends on many factors, including the concentration and composition of the adsorbed colloidal fluid, the average structure of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> matrix, and the nature of the colloid-colloid and colloid-substrate interactions. A simple manner to describe these effects is to model the <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium as a set of spherical particles fixed in space at random positions with prescribed statistical structural properties. Within this model one may describe the relaxation of concentration fluctuations of the adsorbed fluid by simply setting to zero the short-time mobility of one species (the <span class="hlt">porous</span> matrix) in a theory of the dynamics of equilibrium colloidal mixtures, or by extending such dynamic theory to explicitly consider the <span class="hlt">porous</span> matrix as a random external field, as recently done in the framework of mode coupling theory [V. Krakoviack, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 065703 (2005)]. Here we consider the first approach and employ the self-consistent generalized Langevin equation (SCGLE) theory of the dynamics of equilibrium colloidal mixtures, to describe the dynamics of the mobile component. We focus on the short- and intermediate-time regimes, which we compare with Brownian dynamics simulations <span class="hlt">involving</span> a binary mixture with screened Coulomb interactions for two models of the average static structure of the matrix: a <span class="hlt">porous</span> matrix constructed by quenching configurations of an equilibrium mixture in which both species were first equilibrated together, and a preexisting matrix with prescribed average structure, in which we later add the mobile species. We conclude that in both cases, if the correct static structure factors are provided as input, the SCGLE theory correctly predicts the main features of the dynamics of the permeating fluid.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/911718','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/911718"><span>FLUID FLOW, SOLUTE MIXING AND PRECIPITATION IN <span class="hlt">POROUS</span> MEDIA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Redden, George D; Y. Fang; T.D. Scheibe; A.M. Tartakovsky; Fox, Don T; Fujita, Yoshiko; White, Timothy A</p> <p>2006-09-01</p> <p> carbonate ions came into contact along a parallel flow boundary and mixed by dispersion and diffusion. The result is the propagation of calcium carbonate precipitates along the solution-solution boundary in the direction of flow. As carbonate precipitates fill the pore space mixing of the two solutions is restricted and therefore precipitation, flow, and transport are coupled. The distribution of carbonate phases is a complex interaction <span class="hlt">involving</span> precipitation and dissolution kinetics, which are functions of pore-scale saturation indices and solute ratios, heterogeneous vs. homogeneous nucleation and growth mechanisms and changes in porosity and flow. Experimental and modeling results illustrate challenges in understanding the macroscopic and microscopic phenomena that depend on solute mixing, the relevance of molecular and pore-scale processes to the macroscopic behavior, and potential <span class="hlt">impact</span> on metal mobility in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. Mineral precipitation and changes in porosity are simulated at the pore-scale using the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics method. Macroscopic simulations were performed using discretized, continuum-scale modeling with parameterization representing macroscopic media properties. One of the modeling goals is to use pore-scale simulations to provide the basis for parameterization of macroscopic (more practical) model predictions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20010044861&hterms=asteroid+impact&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dasteroid%2Bimpact','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20010044861&hterms=asteroid+impact&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dasteroid%2Bimpact"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> on Comets and Asteroids</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>OKeefe, John D.; Stewart, Sarah T.; Ahrens, Thomas J.</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>We characterized the <span class="hlt">impact</span> physics in collisions on <span class="hlt">porous</span> bodies by various density projectiles and defined different penetration modes (compression, spreading, or breakup) based on transitions between instability regimes. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_11 --> <div id="page_12" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="221"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993PhyB..185..603C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993PhyB..185..603C"><span>Luminescence decay of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chen, X.; Uttamchandani, D.; Sander, D.; O'Donnell, K. P.</p> <p>1993-04-01</p> <p>The luminescence decay pattern of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon samples prepared by electrochemical etching is characterised experimentally by a non-exponential profile, a strong dependence on temperature and an absence of spectral diffusion. We describe this luminescence as carrier-dopping-assisted recombination. Following the correlation function approach to non-dispersive transport developed by Scher and co-workers [Physics Today 41 (1991) 26], we suggest a simple derivation of analytical functions which accurately describes the anomalous luminescence decay of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon, and show that this model includes exponential and Kohlrausch [Pogg. Ann. Phys. 119 (1863) 352] (stretched-exponential) relaxations as special cases.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/868499','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/868499"><span>Metal recovery from <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Sturcken, Edward F.</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>A method for recovering plutonium and other metals from materials by leaching comprising the steps of incinerating the materials to form a <span class="hlt">porous</span> matrix as the residue of incineration, immersing the matrix into acid in a microwave-transparent pressure vessel, sealing the pressure vessel, and applying microwaves so that the temperature and the pressure in the pressure vessel increase. The acid for recovering plutonium can be a mixture of HBF.sub.4 and HNO.sub.3 and preferably the pressure is increased to at least 100 PSI and the temperature to at least 200.degree. C. The <span class="hlt">porous</span> material can be pulverized before immersion to further increase the leach rate.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1014938','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1014938"><span>Enhancement of thermal stability of <span class="hlt">porous</span> bodies comprised of stainless steel or an alloy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Bischoff, Brian L.; Sutton, Theodore G.; Judkins, Roddie R.; Armstrong, Timothy R.; Adcock, Kenneth D.</p> <p>2010-11-09</p> <p>A method for treating a <span class="hlt">porous</span> item constructed of metal powder, such as a powder made of Series 400 stainless steel, <span class="hlt">involves</span> a step of preheating the <span class="hlt">porous</span> item to a temperature of between about 700 and 900.degree. C. degrees in an oxidizing atmosphere and then sintering the body in an inert or reducing atmosphere at a temperature which is slightly below the melting temperature of the metal which comprises the <span class="hlt">porous</span> item. The thermal stability of the resulting item is enhanced by this method so that the item retains its porosity and metallic characteristics, such as ductility, at higher (e.g. near-melting) temperatures.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ResPh...6..337L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ResPh...6..337L"><span>Study of the deposition process of vinpocetine on the surface of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lenshin, A. S.; Polkovnikova, Yu. A.; Seredin, P. V.</p> <p></p> <p>Currently the most prospective way in pharmacotherapy is the obtaining of nanoparticles <span class="hlt">involving</span> pharmaceutical substances. Application of <span class="hlt">porous</span> inorganic materials on the basis of silicon is among the main features in solving of this problem. The present work is concerned with the problem of the deposition of pharmaceutical drug with nootropic activity - vinpocetine - into <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon. Silicon nanoparticles were obtained by electrochemical anodic etching of Si plates. The process of vinpocetine deposition was studied in dependence of the deposition time. As a result of the investigations it was found that infrared transmission spectra of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon with the deposited vinpocetine revealed the absorption bands characteristic of vinpocetine substance.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED343233.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED343233.pdf"><span>Family <span class="hlt">Involvement</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Liontos, Lynn Balster</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>Family <span class="hlt">involvement</span> in schools will work only when perceived as an enlarged concept focusing on all children, including those from at-risk families. Each publication reviewed here is specifically concerned with family <span class="hlt">involvement</span> strategies concerned with all children or targeted at primarily high risk students. Susan McAllister Swap looks at three…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/441854','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/441854"><span>Process of preparing tritiated <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Tam, S.W.</p> <p>1997-02-18</p> <p>A process of preparing tritiated <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon is described in which <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon is equilibrated with a gaseous vapor containing HT/T{sub 2} gas in a diluent for a time sufficient for tritium in the gas phase to replace hydrogen present in the pore surfaces of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon. 1 fig.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.H43E1407R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.H43E1407R"><span>Linking Colloid Deposit Morphology and Clogging in <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Roth, E. J.; Mont-eton, M. E.; Mays, D. C.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p> analyzed to provide measurement of deposit fractal dimension—a novel technique that is unique to our research. Experimental results indicate that deposit fractal dimension can be quantified. Continuing research is investigating the extent to which colloid concentration, ionic strength, flow velocity, and other environmental factors will <span class="hlt">impact</span> colloid deposit morphology in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media and the resulting <span class="hlt">impact</span> on clogging. The ultimate goal of this research is to create a clogging model that links colloidal and environmental characteristics to permeability in soils.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..1511914L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..1511914L"><span>Instability of fluid flow over saturated <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lyubimova, Tatyana; Kolchanova, Ekaterina; Lyubimov, Dmitry</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>We investigate the stability of a fluid flow over a saturated <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium. The problem is of importance due to the applications to washing out of contaminants from the bottom layer of vegetation, whose properties are similar to the properties of <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium. In the case of <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium with the relatively high permeability and porosity the flow <span class="hlt">involves</span> a part of the fluid saturating the <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium, with the tangential fluid velocity drop occurring because of the resistance of the solid matrix. The drop leads to the instability analogous to Kelvin-Helmholtz one accompanied by the formation of travelling waves. In the present paper we consider a two-layer system consisting of a pure fluid layer and a <span class="hlt">porous</span> layer saturated by the fluid located underneath. The system is bounded by a rigid surface at the bottom and a non-deformable free surface at the top. It is under the gravity and inclined at a slight angle to the horizontal axis. The boundary conditions at the interface between the fluid and <span class="hlt">porous</span> layers are the continuity of fluid velocities and the balance of normal and tangential stresses taking into account the resistance of the solid matrix with respect to the fluid flow near the interface [1-2]. The problem is solved in the framework of the Brinkman model applying the classical shooting algorithm with orthogonalization. The stability boundaries of the stationary fluid flow over the saturated <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium with respect to the small oscillatory perturbations are obtained for the various values of the Darcy number and the ratio of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> layer thickness to the full thickness of the system d. It was shown that at the d > 0.5 with increasing the <span class="hlt">porous</span> layer thickness (or with decreasing of the fluid layer thickness) the stability threshold rises. This is because of the fact that the instability is primarily caused by perturbations located in the fluid layer. At the d < 0.5 the reduction of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> layer thickness leads to the stability threshold</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhDT.......340S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhDT.......340S"><span>Engineered Surface Properties of <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Tungsten from Cryogenic Machining</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Schoop, Julius Malte</p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Porous</span> tungsten is used to manufacture dispenser cathodes due to it refractory properties. Surface porosity is critical to functional performance of dispenser cathodes because it allows for an impregnated ceramic compound to migrate to the emitting surface, lowering its work function. Likewise, surface roughness is important because it is necessary to ensure uniform wetting of the molten impregnate during high temperature service. Current industry practice to achieve surface roughness and surface porosity requirements <span class="hlt">involves</span> the use of a plastic infiltrant during machining. After machining, the infiltrant is baked and the cathode pellet is impregnated. In this context, cryogenic machining is investigated as a substitutionary process for the current plastic infiltration process. Along with significant reductions in cycle time and resource use, surface quality of cryogenically machined un-infiltrated (as-sintered) <span class="hlt">porous</span> tungsten has been shown to significantly outperform dry machining. The present study is focused on examining the relationship between machining parameters and cooling condition on the as-machined surface integrity of <span class="hlt">porous</span> tungsten. The effects of cryogenic pre-cooling, rake angle, cutting speed, depth of cut and feed are all taken into consideration with respect to machining-induced surface morphology. Cermet and Polycrystalline diamond (PCD) cutting tools are used to develop high performance cryogenic machining of <span class="hlt">porous</span> tungsten. Dry and pre-heated machining were investigated as a means to allow for ductile mode machining, yet severe tool-wear and undesirable smearing limited the feasibility of these approaches. By using modified PCD cutting tools, high speed machining of <span class="hlt">porous</span> tungsten at cutting speeds up to 400 m/min is achieved for the first time. Beyond a critical speed, brittle fracture and built-up edge are eliminated as the result of a brittle to ductile transition. A model of critical chip thickness ( hc ) effects based on cutting</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017MS%26E..174a2031M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017MS%26E..174a2031M"><span>Saturated <span class="hlt">porous</span> layers squeezed between parallel disks in enclosed cells</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Melciu, I. C.; Cicone, T.; Pascovici, M. D.</p> <p>2017-02-01</p> <p>Theoretical and experimental evidences show that high lift forces can be generated when a <span class="hlt">porous</span> layer imbibed with a fluid is subjected to compression by a rigid and impermeable component in normal (approaching) relative motion. If the <span class="hlt">porous</span> layer is soft enough to neglect its solid structure reaction to compression then the pressure increase can be entirely attributed to the flow resistance of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> structure when the fluid is squeezed out. The mechanism is highly dependent on the variation of permeability with porosity at its turn variable with the rate of compression. Such a mechanism can be used for <span class="hlt">impact</span> damping but realistic applications need to consider an enclosed system which keeps the squeezed fluid inside and allows for re-imbibition. The paper presents a simple analytical model for the effects produced in highly compressible <span class="hlt">porous</span> layers imbibed with Newtonian liquids, during compression between two parallel rigid disks placed in enclosed cells with variable volume buffer, similar to a hydro-pneumatic accumulator.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985lock.rept.....K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985lock.rept.....K"><span>Reaction profiles in <span class="hlt">porous</span> electrodes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Katan, T.; Carlen, P. J.</p> <p>1985-05-01</p> <p>An experimental program was conducted to ascertain causes of alkaline zinc electrode shape change and to determine the development of reaction profiles within the pores of <span class="hlt">porous</span> zinc electrodes. Various analog electrochemical cells were operated to isolate and evaluate the individual processes occurring during charge and discharge. It was found that both edge effects and osmosis can be responsible for the shape change phenomenon.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21254921','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21254921"><span>Neural Tissue as <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Basser, Peter J.</p> <p>2008-12-05</p> <p>The fields of MR in <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Media and Neuroradiology have largely developed separately during the past two decades with little appreciation of the problems, challenges and methodologies of the other. However, this trend is clearly changing and possibilities for significant cross-fertilization and synergies are now being realized.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/228041','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/228041"><span>Whey drying on <span class="hlt">porous</span> carriers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Mitura, E.; Kaminski, W.</p> <p>1996-05-01</p> <p>Whey is treated very often as a waste which pollutes the natural environment. Whey which is a valuable source of protein, lacrose, vitamins and mineral salts should be utilized completely. The present paper is a proposal of whey drying on <span class="hlt">porous</span> carriers. It is proved experimentally that the proposed drying method guarantees good product quality.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10162698','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10162698"><span>Metal recovery from <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Sturcken, E.F.</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>The present invention relates to recovery of metals. More specifically, the present invention relates to the recovery of plutonium and other metals from <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials using microwaves. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5028764','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5028764"><span>Superhydrophobic <span class="hlt">porous</span> networks for enhanced droplet shedding</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Liu, Yahua; Wang, Zuankai</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Recent research has shown that the use of submillimeter-scale tapered post arrays could generate the so-called pancake bouncing, which is characterized by the fast shedding of impinging drops from the surface in a pancake shape without undergoing the retraction stage as observed on conventional superhydrophobic surfaces. Despite this exciting discovery, the fabrication of this unique superhydrophobic surface with tapered post arrays <span class="hlt">involves</span> complex processes, hindering its wide applications in practical sectors. Here, we report on the facile strategy to prepare a new hierarchical multilayered superhydrophobic surface directly from commercially available <span class="hlt">porous</span> matrix that allows for efficient drop shedding. Further study shows that the enhanced drop mobility observed on such a surface is attributed to the synergistic cooperation of hierarchical structures endowing an adequate energy storage and effective energy release. The facile fabrication of superhydrophobic surface with enhanced drop mobility may find many practical applications including anti-icing, dropwise condensation and self-cleaning. PMID:27644452</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016NatSR...633817L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016NatSR...633817L"><span>Superhydrophobic <span class="hlt">porous</span> networks for enhanced droplet shedding</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Liu, Yahua; Wang, Zuankai</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>Recent research has shown that the use of submillimeter-scale tapered post arrays could generate the so-called pancake bouncing, which is characterized by the fast shedding of impinging drops from the surface in a pancake shape without undergoing the retraction stage as observed on conventional superhydrophobic surfaces. Despite this exciting discovery, the fabrication of this unique superhydrophobic surface with tapered post arrays <span class="hlt">involves</span> complex processes, hindering its wide applications in practical sectors. Here, we report on the facile strategy to prepare a new hierarchical multilayered superhydrophobic surface directly from commercially available <span class="hlt">porous</span> matrix that allows for efficient drop shedding. Further study shows that the enhanced drop mobility observed on such a surface is attributed to the synergistic cooperation of hierarchical structures endowing an adequate energy storage and effective energy release. The facile fabrication of superhydrophobic surface with enhanced drop mobility may find many practical applications including anti-icing, dropwise condensation and self-cleaning.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27644452','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27644452"><span>Superhydrophobic <span class="hlt">porous</span> networks for enhanced droplet shedding.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Liu, Yahua; Wang, Zuankai</p> <p>2016-09-20</p> <p>Recent research has shown that the use of submillimeter-scale tapered post arrays could generate the so-called pancake bouncing, which is characterized by the fast shedding of impinging drops from the surface in a pancake shape without undergoing the retraction stage as observed on conventional superhydrophobic surfaces. Despite this exciting discovery, the fabrication of this unique superhydrophobic surface with tapered post arrays <span class="hlt">involves</span> complex processes, hindering its wide applications in practical sectors. Here, we report on the facile strategy to prepare a new hierarchical multilayered superhydrophobic surface directly from commercially available <span class="hlt">porous</span> matrix that allows for efficient drop shedding. Further study shows that the enhanced drop mobility observed on such a surface is attributed to the synergistic cooperation of hierarchical structures endowing an adequate energy storage and effective energy release. The facile fabrication of superhydrophobic surface with enhanced drop mobility may find many practical applications including anti-icing, dropwise condensation and self-cleaning.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JAMTP..53..231M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JAMTP..53..231M"><span>Local nonsimilarity solution for the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of the buoyancy force on heat and mass transfer in a flow over a <span class="hlt">porous</span> wedge with a heat source in the presence of suction/injection</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Muhaimin, I.; Kandasamy, R.; Loganathan, P.; Puvi Arasu, P.</p> <p>2012-03-01</p> <p>Combined heat and mass transfer in free, forced and mixed convection flows along a <span class="hlt">porous</span> wedge with internal heat generation in the presence of uniform suction or injection is investigated. The boundary-layer analysis is formulated in terms of the combined thermal and solute buoyancy effect. The flow field characteristics are analyzed using the Runge-Kutta-Gill method, the shooting method, and the local nonsimilarity method. Due to the effect of the buoyancy force, power law of temperature and concentration, and suction/injection on the wall of the wedge, the flow field is locally nonsimilar. Numerical calculations up to third-order level of truncation are carried out for different values of dimensionless parameters as a special case. The effects of the buoyancy force, suction, heat generation, and variable wall temperature and concentration on the dimensionless velocity, temperature, and concentration profiles are studied. The results obtained are found to be in good agreement with previously published works.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=customer+AND+service&pg=3&id=ED552368','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=customer+AND+service&pg=3&id=ED552368"><span>Multi-Generational Perspectives: How They Interact and <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Service to Students and Their Families in an Age of Highly-<span class="hlt">Involved</span> Parents</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Wawrzusin, Andrea C.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Although there have always been differences in how generations navigate decision-making in higher education, highly <span class="hlt">involved</span> parents have led to conflicting inter-generational educational expectations. This research study investigated the phenomenon of parental <span class="hlt">involvement</span> and how meanings on educational expectations vary depending on generation.…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED545474.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED545474.pdf"><span>The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Family <span class="hlt">Involvement</span> on the Education of Children Ages 3 to 8: A Focus on Literacy and Math Achievement Outcomes and Social-Emotional Skills</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Van Voorhis, Frances L.; Maier, Michelle F.; Epstein, Joyce L.; Lloyd, Chrishana M.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>This report summarizes research conducted primarily over the past 10 years on how families' <span class="hlt">involvement</span> in children's learning and development through activities at home and at school affects the literacy, mathematics, and social-emotional skills of children ages 3 to 8. A total of 95 studies of family <span class="hlt">involvement</span> are reviewed. These include both…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_12 --> <div id="page_13" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="241"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20080006974','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20080006974"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> silicon carbide (SIC) semiconductor device</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Shor, Joseph S. (Inventor); Kurtz, Anthony D. (Inventor)</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Porous</span> silicon carbide is fabricated according to techniques which result in a significant portion of nanocrystallites within the material in a sub 10 nanometer regime. There is described techniques for passivating <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon carbide which result in the fabrication of optoelectronic devices which exhibit brighter blue luminescence and exhibit improved qualities. Based on certain of the techniques described <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon carbide is used as a sacrificial layer for the patterning of silicon carbide. <span class="hlt">Porous</span> silicon carbide is then removed from the bulk substrate by oxidation and other methods. The techniques described employ a two-step process which is used to pattern bulk silicon carbide where selected areas of the wafer are then made <span class="hlt">porous</span> and then the <span class="hlt">porous</span> layer is subsequently removed. The process to form <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon carbide exhibits dopant selectivity and a two-step etching procedure is implemented for silicon carbide multilayers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26657931','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26657931"><span>Hydromagnetic Flow and Heat Transfer over a <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Oscillating Stretching Surface in a Viscoelastic Fluid with <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Medium.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Khan, Sami Ullah; Ali, Nasir; Abbas, Zaheer</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>An analysis is carried out to study the heat transfer in unsteady two-dimensional boundary layer flow of a magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) second grade fluid over a <span class="hlt">porous</span> oscillating stretching surface embedded in <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium. The flow is induced due to infinite elastic sheet which is stretched periodically. With the help of dimensionless variables, the governing flow equations are reduced to a system of non-linear partial differential equations. This system has been solved numerically using the finite difference scheme, in which a coordinate transformation is used to transform the semi-infinite physical space to a bounded computational domain. The influence of the <span class="hlt">involved</span> parameters on the flow, the temperature distribution, the skin-friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number is shown and discussed in detail. The study reveals that an oscillatory sheet embedded in a fluid-saturated <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium generates oscillatory motion in the fluid. The amplitude and phase of oscillations depends on the rheology of the fluid as well as on the other parameters coming through imposed boundary conditions, inclusion of body force term and permeability of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium. It is found that amplitude of flow velocity increases with increasing viscoelastic and mass suction/injection parameters. However, it decreases with increasing the strength of the applied magnetic field. Moreover, the temperature of fluid is a decreasing function of viscoelastic parameter, mass suction/injection parameter and Prandtl number.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4682809','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4682809"><span>Hydromagnetic Flow and Heat Transfer over a <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Oscillating Stretching Surface in a Viscoelastic Fluid with <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Medium</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Khan, Sami Ullah; Ali, Nasir; Abbas, Zaheer</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>An analysis is carried out to study the heat transfer in unsteady two-dimensional boundary layer flow of a magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) second grade fluid over a <span class="hlt">porous</span> oscillating stretching surface embedded in <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium. The flow is induced due to infinite elastic sheet which is stretched periodically. With the help of dimensionless variables, the governing flow equations are reduced to a system of non-linear partial differential equations. This system has been solved numerically using the finite difference scheme, in which a coordinate transformation is used to transform the semi-infinite physical space to a bounded computational domain. The influence of the <span class="hlt">involved</span> parameters on the flow, the temperature distribution, the skin-friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number is shown and discussed in detail. The study reveals that an oscillatory sheet embedded in a fluid-saturated <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium generates oscillatory motion in the fluid. The amplitude and phase of oscillations depends on the rheology of the fluid as well as on the other parameters coming through imposed boundary conditions, inclusion of body force term and permeability of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium. It is found that amplitude of flow velocity increases with increasing viscoelastic and mass suction/injection parameters. However, it decreases with increasing the strength of the applied magnetic field. Moreover, the temperature of fluid is a decreasing function of viscoelastic parameter, mass suction/injection parameter and Prandtl number. PMID:26657931</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19990027885&hterms=materials+insulation&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dmaterials%2Binsulation','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19990027885&hterms=materials+insulation&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dmaterials%2Binsulation"><span>Advanced <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Coating for Low-Density Ceramic Insulation Materials</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Leiser, Daniel B.; Churchward, Rex; Katvala, Victor; Stewart, David; Balter, Aliza</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>The need for improved coatings on low-density reusable surface insulation (RSI) materials used on the space shuttle has stimulated research into developing tougher coatings. The processing of a new <span class="hlt">porous</span> composite "coating" for RST called toughened unipiece fibrous insulation Is discussed. Characteristics including performance in a simulated high-speed atmospheric entry, morphological structure before and after this exposure, resistance to <span class="hlt">Impact</span>, and thermal response to a typical heat pulse are described. It is shown that this coating has improved <span class="hlt">impact</span> resistance while maintaining optical and thermal properties comparable to the previously available reaction-cured glass coating.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3989372','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3989372"><span>Environmental concentrations of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine <span class="hlt">impact</span> specific behaviors <span class="hlt">involved</span> in reproduction, feeding and predator avoidance in the fish Pimephales promelas (fathead minnow)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Weinberger, Joel; Klaper, Rebecca</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCP) have been found in surface waters worldwide, but little is understood of their effects on the wildlife that inhabit these waters. Fluoxetine (Prozac; Eli Lilly), a highly prescribed selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), is a commonly found PPCP in surface water. The purpose of this project was to determine if environmentally relevant concentrations of fluoxetine <span class="hlt">impact</span> behavior that is important for population survival in native fish species, including reproduction, feeding and predator avoidance. Chronic 4-week exposures were conducted with doses ranging from 100 ng/L to 100 μg/L to cover a range of environmentally relevant concentrations up to higher concentrations comparable to other published studies with the same drug that have documented various physiological <span class="hlt">impacts</span>. Pimephales promelas (fathead minnow), a species native to North America, was used as it conducts a range of specific mating behaviors and therefore serves as an excellent model of specific <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on brain function. Fluoxetine concentrations as low as 1 μg/L, a concentration that has been found in many freshwater environments, were found to significantly <span class="hlt">impact</span> mating behavior, specifically nest building and defending in male fish. Males were also found to display aggression, isolation, and repetitive behaviors at higher concentrations. Female mating behavior was largely unaffected. In addition, predator avoidance behaviors in males and females were also <span class="hlt">impacted</span> at 1 μg/L. Feeding was <span class="hlt">impacted</span> at 10 μg/L and in the highest exposure (100 μg/L), egg production was limited by deaths of females due to significant male aggressive behaviors in first two weeks of exposure. Specific behavioral changes occurred at each concentration (most noticeably 1 μg/L and 100 μg/L) indicating a dose dependent effect that triggered different responses at lower exposures versus higher exposures or differential <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of dose depending on brain region</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23313642','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23313642"><span>Platelets self-assemble into <span class="hlt">porous</span> nacre during freeze casting.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hunger, Philipp M; Donius, Amalie E; Wegst, Ulrike G K</p> <p>2013-03-01</p> <p>Nacre possesses a remarkable combination of mechanical properties. Its high stiffness, strength and toughness are attributed to a highly aligned structure of aragonite platelets "glued" together by a small fraction (∼5vol%) of polymer; theoretically it can be described by a shear-lag model of staggered tensile elements between which loads are transferred via shear. Despite extensive research, it has not been possible yet to manufacture this aligned structure as a bulk material of considerable volume with a fast and easy production process. Particularly <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials would benefit from enhanced wall material properties to compensate for performance loss due to their high porosity. An important application for such <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials are tissue scaffolds for bone substitution. Bone, like nacre, exhibits excellent mechanical properties, particularly an exceptionally high toughness, because of its composite structure of hydroxyapatite platelets aligned in a ∼35vol% polymer matrix. Through the freeze casting process, which results in a fast and straightforward self-assembly of platelet-shaped particles during directional solidification, highly <span class="hlt">porous</span> bulk materials with nacre-like cell walls can now be created. This <span class="hlt">porous</span> nacre outperforms by a factor of 1.5-4 in terms of stiffness, strength and toughness materials that have the same amount of porosity but do not exhibit the nacre-like microarchitecture. The self-assembly process presented in this study thus has tremendous potential for the creation of highly <span class="hlt">porous</span>, yet mechanically strong tissue scaffolds for low or medium load bearing bone substitute materials. Due to the versatility of the freeze casting process, materials with a self-assembled cell wall structure can be created from high-aspect ratio particles of all material classes. This enables material optimization for a great variety of applications such as <span class="hlt">impact</span> protection, filtration, catalysis, energy generation and storage, in addition to those with</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28106303','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28106303"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> One-Dimensional Nanomaterials: Design, Fabrication and Applications in Electrochemical Energy Storage.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wei, Qiulong; Xiong, Fangyu; Tan, Shuangshuang; Huang, Lei; Lan, Esther H; Dunn, Bruce; Mai, Liqiang</p> <p>2017-01-20</p> <p>Electrochemical energy storage technology is of critical importance for portable electronics, transportation and large-scale energy storage systems. There is a growing demand for energy storage devices with high energy and high power densities, long-term stability, safety and low cost. To achieve these requirements, novel design structures and high performance electrode materials are needed. <span class="hlt">Porous</span> 1D nanomaterials which combine the advantages of 1D nanoarchitectures and <span class="hlt">porous</span> structures have had a significant <span class="hlt">impact</span> in the field of electrochemical energy storage. This review presents an overview of <span class="hlt">porous</span> 1D nanostructure research, from the synthesis by bottom-up and top-down approaches with rational and controllable structures, to several important electrochemical energy storage applications including lithium-ion batteries, sodium-ion batteries, lithium-sulfur batteries, lithium-oxygen batteries and supercapacitors. Highlights of <span class="hlt">porous</span> 1D nanostructures are described throughout the review and directions for future research in the field are discussed at the end.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016Fract..2450013L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016Fract..2450013L"><span>Analysis of Fractional Flow for Transient Two-Phase Flow in Fractal <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Medium</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lu, Ting; Duan, Yonggang; Fang, Quantang; Dai, Xiaolu; Wu, Jinsui</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>Prediction of fractional flow in fractal <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium is important for reservoir engineering and chemical engineering as well as hydrology. A physical conceptual fractional flow model of transient two-phase flow is developed in fractal <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium based on the fractal characteristics of pore-size distribution and on the approximation that <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium consist of a bundle of tortuous capillaries. The analytical expression for fractional flow for wetting phase is presented, and the proposed expression is the function of structural parameters (such as tortuosity fractal dimension, pore fractal dimension, maximum and minimum diameters of capillaries) and fluid properties (such as contact angle, viscosity and interfacial tension) in fractal <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium. The sensitive parameters that influence fractional flow and its derivative are formulated, and their <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on fractional flow are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15890400','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15890400"><span>Protein binding properties of surface-modified <span class="hlt">porous</span> polyethylene membranes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Greene, George; Radhakrishna, Harish; Tannenbaum, Rina</p> <p>2005-10-01</p> <p>In this study, we quantified the adsorption of immunoglobulin G (IgG) protein onto several polyelectrolyte-modified sintered <span class="hlt">porous</span> polyethylene (PPE) membranes. The polymer surfaces had both cationic and anionic charges obtained via the adsorption of polyethylenimine (PEI) and polyacrylic acid (PAA), respectively, onto plasma-activated PPE. The amount of IgG adsorption was determined by measuring the gamma radiation emitted by [125I]-IgG radio labeled protein. By studying the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of pH and ionic strength on IgG adsorption, we attempted to characterize the role and nature of the electrostatic interactions <span class="hlt">involved</span> in the adsorption process to better understand how these interactions were influenced by the charge and structure of immobilized polyelectrolyte complexes at modified membrane surfaces. We were able to show that surface modification of PPE membranes with adsorbed PEI monolayers and PEI-PAA bilayers can greatly improve the IgG binding ability of the membrane under optimized conditions. We also showed that the observed improvement in the IgG binding is derived from electrostatic interactions between IgG and the polyelectrolyte surface. In addition, we found that the greatest IgG adsorption occurred when the IgG and the surface possessed predominantly opposite charges, rather than when the surface possessed the greatest electrostatic charge. Finally, we have found that the molecular weight of the terminating polyelectrolyte has a noticeable effect upon the electrostatic interactions between IgG and the PEI-PAA bilayer-modified PPE surfaces.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7278897','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7278897"><span>Metal recovery from <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Sturcken, E.F.</p> <p>1992-10-13</p> <p>A method is described for recovering plutonium and other metals from materials by leaching comprising the steps of incinerating the materials to form a <span class="hlt">porous</span> matrix as the residue of incineration, immersing the matrix into acid in a microwave-transparent pressure vessel, sealing the pressure vessel, and applying microwaves so that the temperature and the pressure in the pressure vessel increase. The acid for recovering plutonium can be a mixture of HBF[sub 4] and HNO[sub 3] and preferably the pressure is increased to at least 100 PSI and the temperature to at least 200 C. The <span class="hlt">porous</span> material can be pulverized before immersion to further increase the leach rate.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008JOM....60e..45V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008JOM....60e..45V"><span>Engineered <span class="hlt">porous</span> metals for implants</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Vamsi Krishna, B.; Xue, Weichang; Bose, Susmita; Bandyopadhyay, Amit</p> <p>2008-05-01</p> <p>Interest is significant in patient-specific implants with the possibility of guided tissue regeneration, particularly for load-bearing implants. For such implants to succeed, novel design approaches and fabrication technologies that can achieve balanced mechanical and functional performance in the implants are necessary. This article is focused on <span class="hlt">porous</span> load-bearing implants with tailored micro-as well as macrostructures using laser-engineered net shaping (LENS™), a solid freeform fabrication or rapid prototyping technique that can be used to manufacture patient-specific implants. This review provides an insight into LENS, some properties of <span class="hlt">porous</span> metals, and the potential applications of this process to fabricate unitized structures which can eliminate longstanding challenges in load-bearing implants to increase their in-vivo lifetime, such as in a total hip prosthesis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvP...5d4020M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvP...5d4020M"><span>Large Deformations of a Soft <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Material</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>MacMinn, Christopher W.; Dufresne, Eric R.; Wettlaufer, John S.</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Compressing a <span class="hlt">porous</span> material will decrease the volume of the pore space, driving fluid out. Similarly, injecting fluid into a <span class="hlt">porous</span> material can expand the pore space, distorting the solid skeleton. This poromechanical coupling has applications ranging from cell and tissue mechanics to geomechanics and hydrogeology. The classical theory of linear poroelasticity captures this coupling by combining Darcy's law with Terzaghi's effective stress and linear elasticity in a linearized kinematic framework. Linear poroelasticity is a good model for very small deformations, but it becomes increasingly inappropriate for moderate to large deformations, which are common in the context of phenomena such as swelling and damage, and for soft materials such as gels and tissues. The well-known theory of large-deformation poroelasticity combines Darcy's law with Terzaghi's effective stress and nonlinear elasticity in a rigorous kinematic framework. This theory has been used extensively in biomechanics to model large elastic deformations in soft tissues and in geomechanics to model large elastoplastic deformations in soils. Here, we first provide an overview and discussion of this theory with an emphasis on the physics of poromechanical coupling. We present the large-deformation theory in an Eulerian framework to minimize the mathematical complexity, and we show how this nonlinear theory simplifies to linear poroelasticity under the assumption of small strain. We then compare the predictions of linear poroelasticity with those of large-deformation poroelasticity in the context of two uniaxial model problems: fluid outflow driven by an applied mechanical load (the consolidation problem) and compression driven by a steady fluid throughflow. We explore the steady and dynamical errors associated with the linear model in both situations, as well as the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of introducing a deformation-dependent permeability. We show that the error in linear poroelasticity is due primarily to kinematic</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/7189244','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/7189244"><span>Theoretical studies of non-Newtonian and Newtonian fluid flow through <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Wu, Yu-Shu.</p> <p>1990-02-01</p> <p>A comprehensive theoretical study has been carried out on the flow behavior of both single and multiple phase non-Newtonian fluids in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. This work is divided into three parts: development of numerical and analytical solutions; theoretical studies of transient flow of non-Newtonian fluids in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media; and applications of well test analysis and displacement efficiency evaluation to field problems. A fully implicit, integral finite difference model has been developed for simulation of non-Newtonian and Newtonian fluid flow through <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. Several commonly-used rheological models of power-law and Bingham plastic non-Newtonian fluids have been incorporated in the simulator. A Buckley-Leverett type analytical solution for one-dimensional, immiscible displacement <span class="hlt">involving</span> non-Newtonian fluids in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media has been developed. An integral method is also presented for the study of transient flow of Bingham fluids in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. In addition, two well test analysis methods have been developed for analyzing pressure transient tests of power-law and Bingham fluids, respectively. Applications are included to demonstrate this new technology. The physical mechanisms <span class="hlt">involved</span> in immiscible displacement with non-Newtonian fluids in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media have been studied using the Buckley-Leverett type analytical solution. In another study, an idealized fracture model has been used to obtain some insights into the flow of a power-law fluid in a double-porosity medium. Transient flow of a general pseudoplastic fluid has been studied numerically. 125 refs., 91 figs., 12 tabs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007MSSP...21..535Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007MSSP...21..535Y"><span>FEA for damping of structures having elastic bodies, viscoelastic bodies, <span class="hlt">porous</span> media and gas</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yamaguchi, Takao; Kurosawa, Yoshio; Matsumura, Shuuji</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>A numerical method is proposed to calculate damping properties for soundproof structures <span class="hlt">involving</span> solid bodies, <span class="hlt">porous</span> media and air in two-dimensional regions. Both effective density and bulk modulus have complex quantity to represent damped sound fields in the <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. Particle displacements in the media are discretized using finite element method. For damped solid bodies, displacements are formulated using conventional finite elements including complex modulus of elasticity. Displacement vectors as common unknown variables are solved under coupled condition between solid bodies, <span class="hlt">porous</span> media and gas. Further, by applying asymptotic method to complex eigenvalue problem, explicit expressions of modal loss factor for the mixed structures are derived. The proposed methods yield appropriate results for some typical problems and this method diminish computational time for large-scaled finite element models concerning the mixed structure. Moreover, it is found that damping can be coupled in the mixed structures between solid bodies, <span class="hlt">porous</span> media and air.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22262346','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22262346"><span>Diffusion in <span class="hlt">porous</span> crystalline materials.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Krishna, Rajamani</p> <p>2012-04-21</p> <p>The design and development of many separation and catalytic process technologies require a proper quantitative description of diffusion of mixtures of guest molecules within <span class="hlt">porous</span> crystalline materials. This tutorial review presents a unified, phenomenological description of diffusion inside meso- and micro-<span class="hlt">porous</span> structures. In meso-<span class="hlt">porous</span> materials, with pore sizes 2 nm < d(p) < 50 nm, there is a central core region where the influence of interactions of the molecules with the pore wall is either small or negligible; meso-pore diffusion is governed by a combination of molecule-molecule and molecule-pore wall interactions. Within micro-pores, with d(p) < 2 nm, the guest molecules are always under the influence of the force field exerted with the wall and we have to reckon with the motion of adsorbed molecules, and there is no "bulk" fluid region. The characteristics and physical significance of the self-, Maxwell-Stefan, and Fick diffusivities are explained with the aid of data obtained either from experiments or molecular dynamics simulations, for a wide variety of structures with different pore sizes and topology. The influence of adsorption thermodynamics, molecular clustering, and segregation on both magnitudes and concentration dependences of the diffusivities is highlighted. In mixture diffusion, correlations in molecular hops have the effect of slowing-down the more mobile species. The need for proper modeling of correlation effects using the Maxwell-Stefan formulation is stressed with the aid of examples of membrane separations and catalytic reactors.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993EOSTr..74..252A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993EOSTr..74..252A"><span>Heterogeneous <span class="hlt">porous</span> media in hydrology</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ababou, Rachid</p> <p></p> <p>In natural geologic formations, flow and transport-related processes are perturbed by multidimensional and anisotropic material heterogeneities of diverse sizes, shapes, and origins (bedding, layering, inclusions, fractures, grains, for example). Heterogeneity tends to disperse and mix transported quantities and may initiate new transfer mechanisms not seen in ideally homogeneous <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. Effective properties such as conductivity and dispersivity may not be simple averages of locally measured quantities.The special session, “Effective Constitutive Laws for Heterogeneous <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Media,” convened at AGU's 1992 Fall Meeting in San Francisco, addressed these issue. Over forty-five contributions, both oral and poster, covering a broad range of physical phenomena were presented. The common theme was the macroscale characterization and modeling of flow and flow-related processes in geologic media that are heterogeneous at various scales (from grain size or fracture aperture, up to regional scales). The processes analyzed in the session included coupled hydro-mechanical processes; Darcy-type flow in the saturated, unsaturated, or two-phase regimes; tracer transport, dilution, and dispersion. These processes were studied for either continuous (<span class="hlt">porous</span>) or discontinuous (fractured) media.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013MSMSE..21g4009C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013MSMSE..21g4009C"><span>Validity of the Bruggeman relation for <span class="hlt">porous</span> electrodes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chung, Ding-Wen; Ebner, Martin; Ely, David R.; Wood, Vanessa; García, R. Edwin</p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>The ability to engineer electrode microstructures to increase power and energy densities is critical to the development of high-energy density lithium-ion batteries. Because high tortuosities in <span class="hlt">porous</span> electrodes are linked to lower delivered energy and power densities, in this paper, we experimentally and computationally study tortuosity and consider possible approaches to decrease it. We investigate the effect of electrode processing on the tortuosity of in-house fabricated <span class="hlt">porous</span> electrodes, using three-dimensionally reconstructed microstructures obtained by synchrotron x-ray tomography. Computer-generated electrodes are used to understand the experimental findings and assess the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of particle size distribution and particle packing on tortuosity and reactive area density. We highlight the limitations and tradeoffs of reducing tortuosity and develop a practical set of guidelines for active material manufacture and electrode preparation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011APS..DFDA17006B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011APS..DFDA17006B"><span>Drop Impingement on Highly Wetting Micro/Nano <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Surfaces</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Buie, Cullen; Joung, Youngsoo</p> <p>2011-11-01</p> <p>Recently, we developed a novel fabrication method using a combination of electrophoretic deposition (EPD) and break down anodization (BDA) to achieve highly wetting nanoporous surfaces with microscale features. In this study we investigate droplet impingement behavior on these surfaces as a function of <span class="hlt">impact</span> velocity, droplet size, and liquid properties. We observe impingement modes we denote as ``necking'' (droplet breaks before full penetration in the <span class="hlt">porous</span> surface), ``spreading'' (continuous wicking into the <span class="hlt">porous</span> surface), and ``jetting'' (jets of liquid emanate from the edges of the wicking liquid). To predict the droplet impingement modes, we've developed a non-dimensional parameter that is a function of droplet velocity, dynamic viscosity, effective pore radius and contact angle. The novel dimensionless parameter successfully predicts drop impingement modes across multiple fluids. Results of this study will inform the design of spray impingement cooling systems for electronics applications where the ``spreading'' mode is preferred.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017CPL...669..202S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017CPL...669..202S"><span>Transportation of MHD nanofluid free convection in a <span class="hlt">porous</span> semi annulus using numerical approach</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sheikholeslami, M.; Ganji, D. D.</p> <p>2017-02-01</p> <p>Nanofluid free convection in presence of Lorentz forces in a permeable semi annulus is simulated using Control Volume based Finite Element Method. <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of <span class="hlt">porous</span> media on governing equations is considered by means of Darcy law. Brownian motion <span class="hlt">impact</span> on properties of nanofluid is taken into account using Koo-Kleinstreuer-Li (KKL) model. Important parameters are inclination angle (ξ) , CuO-water volume fraction (ϕ) , Hartmann (Ha) and Rayleigh (Ra) numbers for <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium. A formula for Nuave is provided. Results indicated that temperature gradient detracts with enhance of Ha but it enhances with rise of ξ, Ra . Heat transfer augmentation enhances with rise of Lorentz forces.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JAMTP..51..721M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JAMTP..51..721M"><span>Local Nonsimilarity Solution for the <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of a Chemical Reaction in an MHD Mixed Convection Heat and Mass Transfer Flow over a <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Wedge in the Presence Of Suction/Injection</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Muhaimin, I.; Kandasamy, R.</p> <p>2010-09-01</p> <p>Combined heat and mass transfer in free, forced, and mixed convection flows along a <span class="hlt">porous</span> wedge with a magnetic effect in the presence of a chemical reaction is investigated. The flow field characteristics are analyzed with the Runge—Kutta—Gill method in conjunction with the shooting method, and local nonsimilarity method. The governing boundary-layer equations are written in a dimensionless form with the use of the Falkner—Skan transformations. Owing to the effect of the buoyancy force, the power law of temperature and concentration, and suction/injection on the wall of the wedge, the flow field is locally nonsimilar. Numerical calculations up to the third-order level of truncation are carried out for different values of dimensionless parameters as a special case. Effects of the magnetic field strength in the presence of a chemical reaction with a variable wall temperature and concentration on the dimensionless velocity, temperature, and concentration profiles are shown graphically. Comparisons with previously published works are performed, and excellent agreement between the results is obtained.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_13 --> <div id="page_14" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="261"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.H33H1717T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.H33H1717T"><span>Macroscopic properties of fractured <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Thovert, J.; Mourzenko, V. V.; Adler, P. M.</p> <p>2007-12-01</p> <p>The determination of the local fields in fractured <span class="hlt">porous</span> media is a challenging problem, because of the multiple scales that are <span class="hlt">involved</span> and of the possible nonlinearity of the governing equations. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overall view of the numerical technique which has been used to solve numerous problems. It is based on a three-dimensional discrete description of the fracture network and of the embedding matrix. Any fracture network geometry, any type of boundary condition, and any distribution of the fracture and matrix properties can be addressed, without simplifying approximations. The first step is to mesh the fracture network as it is by triangles of a controlled size. This meshing by an advancing front technique is done successively for each fracture and the intersections between fractures are taken into account. Then, the space in between the fractures is meshed by tetrahedra by the advancing front technique again. The faces of the tetrahedra which are in contact with fractures, coincide with the corresponding triangles in these fractures. The performances of these meshing codes will be illustrated by a few examples. The second step consists in discretizing the conservation equations by the finite volume technique. Specific properties are given to each fracture such as a surface permeability or a joint rigidity. This general technique has been applied to the basic and most important properties of fracture networks and of fractured <span class="hlt">porous</span> media (1). These properties are single and two phase flows, wether they are accompagnied or not by dispersion of a solute and mechanical properties possibly coupled with flow. These applications will be briefly illustrated by some examples, including when possible comparison with real data. Ref: (1) P.M. Adler, V.V. Mourzenko, J.-F. Thovert, I. Bogdanov, in Dynamics of fluids and transport in fractured rock, ed. B. Faybishenko, Geophysical Monograph Series, 162, 33, 2005.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22190767','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22190767"><span>Photocatalytic Properties of <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Silicon Nanowires.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Qu, Yongquan; Zhong, Xing; Li, Yujing; Liao, Lei; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Porous</span> silicon nanowires are synthesized through metal assisted wet-chemical etch of highly-doped silicon wafer. The resulted <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon nanowires exhibit a large surface area of 337 m(2)·g(-1) and a wide spectrum absorption across the entire ultraviolet, visible and near infrared regime. We further demonstrate that platinum nanoparticles can be loaded onto the surface of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon nanowires with controlled density. These combined advancements make the <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon nanowires an interesting material for photocatalytic applications. We show that the <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon nanowires and platinum nanoparticle loaded <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon nanowires can be used as effective photocatalysts for photocatalytic degradation of organic dyes and toxic pollutants under visible irradiation, and thus are of significant interest for organic waste treatment and environmental remediation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20130000617','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20130000617"><span>Thermally conductive <span class="hlt">porous</span> element-based recuperators</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Du, Jian Hua (Inventor); Chow, Louis C (Inventor); Lin, Yeong-Ren (Inventor); Wu, Wei (Inventor); Kapat, Jayanta (Inventor); Notardonato, William U. (Inventor)</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>A heat exchanger includes at least one hot fluid flow channel comprising a first plurality of open cell <span class="hlt">porous</span> elements having first gaps there between for flowing a hot fluid in a flow direction and at least one cold fluid flow channel comprising a second plurality of open cell <span class="hlt">porous</span> elements having second gaps therebetween for flowing a cold fluid in a countercurrent flow direction relative to the flow direction. The thermal conductivity of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> elements is at least 10 W/mK. A separation member is interposed between the hot and cold flow channels for isolating flow paths associated these flow channels. The first and second plurality of <span class="hlt">porous</span> elements at least partially overlap one another to form a plurality of heat transfer pairs which transfer heat from respective ones of the first <span class="hlt">porous</span> elements to respective ones of the second <span class="hlt">porous</span> elements through the separation member.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006ApPhL..88k1905V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006ApPhL..88k1905V"><span>Piezoelectric and piezooptic effects in <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Vinikman-Pinhasi, Shirly; Ribak, Erez N.</p> <p>2006-03-01</p> <p>Although silicon is a simple cubic crystal, it can be induced to have a piezoelectric response, by making pores in it and thus spoiling its symmetry. By etching a silicon wafer into <span class="hlt">porous</span> material, we found that it responds to voltage applied to it, as well as to light. A <span class="hlt">porous</span> shallow layer on the surface of the wafer induced bimorph bending roughly proportional to the voltage squared. Illuminating the <span class="hlt">porous</span> patch caused a similar bending.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1162233','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1162233"><span>Final Report - Montana State University - Microbial Activity and Precipitation at Solution-Solution Mixing Zones in <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Gerlach, Robin</p> <p>2014-10-31</p> <p>Background. The use of biological and chemical processes that degrade or immobilize contaminants in subsurface environments is a cornerstone of remediation technology. The enhancement of biological and chemical processes in situ, <span class="hlt">involves</span> the transport, displacement, distribution and mixing of one or more reactive agents. Biological and chemical reactions all require diffusive transport of solutes to reaction sites at the molecular scale and accordingly, the success of processes at the meter-scale and larger is dictated by the success of phenomena that occur at the micron-scale. However, current understanding of scaling effects on the mixing and delivery of nutrients in biogeochemically dynamic <span class="hlt">porous</span> media systems is limited, despite the limitations this imposes on the efficiency and effectiveness of the remediation challenges at hand. Objectives. We therefore proposed to experimentally characterize and computationally describe the growth, evolution, and distribution of microbial activity and mineral formation as well as changes in transport processes in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media that receive two or more reactive amendments. The model system chosen for this project was based on a method for immobilizing 90Sr, which <span class="hlt">involves</span> stimulating microbial urea hydrolysis with ensuing mineral precipitation (CaCO3), and co-precipitation of Sr. Studies at different laboratory scales were used to visualize and quantitatively describe the spatial relationships between amendment transport and consumption that stimulate the production of biomass and mineral phases that subsequently modify the permeability and heterogeneity of <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. Biomass growth, activity, and mass deposition in mixing zones was investigated using two-dimensional micro-model flow cells as well as flow cells that could be analyzed using synchrotron-based x-ray tomography. Larger-scale flow-cell experiments were conducted where the spatial distribution of media properties, flow, segregation of biological activity and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EML.....9..783C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EML.....9..783C"><span>Bimodal <span class="hlt">porous</span> gold opals for molecular sensing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chae, Weon-Sik; Yu, Hyunung; Ham, Sung-Kyoung; Lee, Myung-Jin; Jung, Jin-Seung; Robinson, David B.</p> <p>2013-11-01</p> <p>We have fabricated bimodal <span class="hlt">porous</span> gold skeletons by double-templating routes using poly(styrene) colloidal opals as templates. The fabricated gold skeletons show a bimodal pore-size distribution, with small pores within spheres and large pores between spheres. The templated bimodal <span class="hlt">porous</span> gold skeletons were applied in Raman scattering experiments to study sensing efficiency for probe molecules. We found that the bimodal <span class="hlt">porous</span> gold skeletons showed obvious enhancement of Raman scattering signals versus that of the unimodal <span class="hlt">porous</span> gold which only has interstitial pores of several hundred nanometers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25811970','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25811970"><span>Foam drainage placed on a <span class="hlt">porous</span> substrate.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Arjmandi-Tash, O; Kovalchuk, N; Trybala, A; Starov, V</p> <p>2015-05-14</p> <p>A model for drainage/imbibition of a foam placed on the top of a <span class="hlt">porous</span> substrate is presented. The equation of liquid imbibition into the <span class="hlt">porous</span> substrate is coupled with a foam drainage equation at the foam/<span class="hlt">porous</span> substrate interface. The deduced dimensionless equations are solved using a finite element method. It was found that the kinetics of foam drainage/imbibition depends on three dimensionless numbers and the initial liquid volume fraction. The result shows that there are three different regimes of the process. Each regime starts after initial rapid decrease of a liquid volume fraction at the foam/<span class="hlt">porous</span> substrate interface: (i) rapid imbibition: the liquid volume fraction inside the foam at the foam/<span class="hlt">porous</span> substrate interface remains constant close to a final liquid volume fraction; (ii) intermediate imbibition: the liquid volume fraction at the interface with the <span class="hlt">porous</span> substrate experiences a peak point and imbibition into the <span class="hlt">porous</span> substrate is slower as compared with the drainage; (iii) slow imbibition: the liquid volume fraction at the foam/<span class="hlt">porous</span> substrate interface increases to a maximum limiting value and a free liquid layer is formed between the foam and the <span class="hlt">porous</span> substrate. However, the free liquid layer disappears after some time. The transition points between these three different drainage/imbibition regimes were delineated by introducing two dimensionless numbers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1255215','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1255215"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> media heat transfer for injection molding</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Beer, Neil Reginald</p> <p>2016-05-31</p> <p>The cooling of injection molded plastic is targeted. Coolant flows into a <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium disposed within an injection molding component via a <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium inlet. The <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium is thermally coupled to a mold cavity configured to receive injected liquid plastic. The <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium beneficially allows for an increased rate of heat transfer from the injected liquid plastic to the coolant and provides additional structural support over a hollow cooling well. When the temperature of the injected liquid plastic falls below a solidifying temperature threshold, the molded component is ejected and collected.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930000586&hterms=transpiration&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dtranspiration','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930000586&hterms=transpiration&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dtranspiration"><span>Transpiration Control Of Aerodynamics Via <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Surfaces</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Banks, Daniel W.; Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>Quasi-active <span class="hlt">porous</span> surface used to control pressure loading on aerodynamic surface of aircraft or other vehicle, according to proposal. In transpiration control, one makes small additions of pressure and/or mass to cavity beneath surface of <span class="hlt">porous</span> skin on aerodynamic surface, thereby affecting rate of transpiration through <span class="hlt">porous</span> surface. <span class="hlt">Porous</span> skin located on forebody or any other suitable aerodynamic surface, with cavity just below surface. Device based on concept extremely lightweight, mechanically simple, occupies little volume in vehicle, and extremely adaptable.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7095112','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7095112"><span>Alternative simulations of forestry scenarios <span class="hlt">involving</span> carbon sequestration options: Investigation of <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on regional and national timber markets. Forest Service general technical report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Haynes, R.W.; Alig, R.J.; Moore, E.</p> <p>1994-08-01</p> <p>This report explores a number of contemporary issues as background to the emerging interest in using forest policies to mitigate global climate change. The intent of most of these policies is to sequester carbon in the forests of the United States. Most of the policies are variations on past forest policies explored as part of the Resources Planning Act (RPA) process. The analysis projects the effects of alternative scenarios on forest area, inventory, harvest, and prices (stumpage and product), as well as welfare effects of alternative mitigation strategies. The market <span class="hlt">impacts</span> are analyzed by using the TAMM and ATLAS forest inventory modeling systems.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1234217','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1234217"><span>A Scoping Analysis Of The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Of SiC Cladding On Late-Phase Accident Progression <span class="hlt">Involving</span> Core–Concrete Interaction</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Farmer, M. T.</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>The overall objective of the current work is to carry out a scoping analysis to determine the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of ATF on late phase accident progression; in particular, the molten core-concrete interaction portion of the sequence that occurs after the core debris fails the reactor vessel and relocates into containment. This additional study augments previous work by including kinetic effects that govern chemical reaction rates during core-concrete interaction. The specific ATF considered as part of this study is SiC-clad UO<sub>2</sub>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22921844','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22921844"><span>Foam-oil interaction in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media: implications for foam assisted enhanced oil recovery.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Farajzadeh, R; Andrianov, A; Krastev, R; Hirasaki, G J; Rossen, W R</p> <p>2012-11-15</p> <p>The efficiency of a foam displacement process in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) depends largely on the stability of foam films in the presence of oil. Experimental studies have demonstrated the detrimental <span class="hlt">impact</span> of oil on foam stability. This paper reviews the mechanisms and theories (disjoining pressure, coalescence and drainage, entering and spreading of oil, oil emulsification, pinch-off, etc.) suggested in the literature to explain the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of oil on foam stability in the bulk and <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. Moreover, we describe the existing approaches to foam modeling in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media and the ways these models describe the oil effect on foam propagation in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. Further, we present various ideas on an improvement of foam stability and longevity in the presence of oil. The outstanding questions regarding foam-oil interactions and modeling of these interactions are pointed out.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA098177','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA098177"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> Portland Cement Concrete; The State of the Art.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>This study investigates the current state of the art relating to the production and use of those <span class="hlt">porous</span> portland cement concretes that may be...suitable for the construction of <span class="hlt">porous</span> portland cement friction courses. <span class="hlt">Porous</span> concretes produced by gap grading or elimination of the fine aggregate...applications discussed include: a no-fines pavement layer, <span class="hlt">porous</span> portland cement concrete pavements, and <span class="hlt">porous</span> pavement edge drains or <span class="hlt">porous</span> hard shoulders</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998PhDT.......212M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998PhDT.......212M"><span>Fluid diffusion in <span class="hlt">porous</span> silica</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>McCann, Lowell I.</p> <p></p> <p>Fluid motion in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media has received a great deal of theoretical and experimental attention due to its importance in systems as diverse as ground water aquifers, catalytic processes, and size separation schemes. Often, the motion of interest is the random thermal motion of molecules in a fluid undergoing no net flow. This diffusive motion is particularly important when the size of the pores is nearly the same as the size of the molecules. In this study, fluid diffusion is measured in several varieties of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silica whose pore structure is determined by the process by which it is made. The samples in this study have porosities (φ, the ratio of the pore volume to the total sample volume) that vary from 0.3 to 0.75 and average pore radii that range from approximately 15 to 120 A. Determining the effect of the pore structure on the diffusion of a liquid in a <span class="hlt">porous</span> material is complicated by the chemical interactions between the diffusing molecules and the pore surface. In this study, ions in a hydrophilic fluid are used to block the adsorption of the diffusing dye molecules to the hydroxyl groups covering the silica surface. This technique is unlike typical surface treatments of silica in that it does not permanently alter the pore geometry. In this work, fluid diffusion is measured with a transient holographic grating technique where interfering laser beams create a periodic refractive index modulation in the fluid. The diffraction of a third laser off this grating is monitored to determine how quickly the grating relaxes, thereby determining the diffusion coefficient of the molecules in the fluid. Varying the grating periodicity controls the length scale of the diffusion measurement from 1.2 to 100 μm which is much larger than the average pore sizes of the samples. Therefore, over these large scales, we measure 'normal' diffusion, where the mean squared displacement of a diffusing particle varies linearly with time. In one particular type of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silica</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMNS24A..01W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMNS24A..01W"><span>Imaging Microbial Biofilms in Opaque Three-dimensional <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Media: Opportunities and Limitations (Invited)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wildenschild, D.; Iltis, G.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Microbial biofilms are observed in both natural and engineered subsurface environments and can dramatically alter the physical properties of <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. Current understanding of biofilm formation and the associated <span class="hlt">impacts</span> to structural and hydrodynamic properties of <span class="hlt">porous</span> media are limited by our ability to observe changes to pore morphology non-destructively. Imaging biofilm within opaque <span class="hlt">porous</span> media has historically presented a significant challenge. X-ray computed microtomography has traditionally been used for non-destructive imaging of a variety of processes and phenomena in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media, yet, the conventional contrast agents used in tomography research tend to diffuse quite readily into both the aqueous phase as well as the <span class="hlt">porous</span> media-associated biofilm, thereby preventing delineation of the two phases. A couple of new methods for imaging biofilm within opaque <span class="hlt">porous</span> media using x-ray microtomography have been developed in recent years, and this presentation will discuss advantages and limitations to using polychromatic vs. monochromatic (synchrotron) radiation, as well as different types, and various concentrations of, contrast agents.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10148699','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10148699"><span>DDT modeling and shock compression experiments of <span class="hlt">porous</span> or damaged energetic materials</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Baer, M.R.; Anderson, M.U.; Graham, R.A.</p> <p>1994-05-01</p> <p>In this presentation, we present modeling of DDT in <span class="hlt">porous</span> energetic materials and experimental studies of a time-resolved, shock compression of highly <span class="hlt">porous</span> inert and reactive materials. This combined theoretical and experimental studies explore the nature of the microscale processes of consolidation, deformation and reaction which are key features of the shock response of <span class="hlt">porous</span> or damaged energetic materials. The theoretical modeling is based on the theory of mixtures in which multiphase mixtures are treated in complete nonequilibrium allowing for internal boundary effects associated mass/momentum and energy exchange between phases, relative flow, rate-dependent compaction behavior, multistage chemistry and interphase boundary effects. Numerous studies of low-velocity <span class="hlt">impacts</span> using a high resolution adaptive finite element method are presented which replicate experimental observations. The incorporation of this model into multi-material hydrocode analysis will be discussed to address the effects of confinement and its influence on accelerated combustion behavior. The experimental studies will focus on the use of PVDF piezoelectric polymer stress-rate gauge to precisely measure the input and propagating shock stress response of <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials. In addition to single constituent <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials, such as granular HMX, we have resolved shock waves in <span class="hlt">porous</span> composite intermetallic powders that confirm a dispersive wave nature which is highly morphologically and material dependent. This document consists of viewgraphs from the poster session.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25062819','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25062819"><span>Neighborhood characteristics and sexual intimate partner violence against women among low-income, drug-<span class="hlt">involved</span> New York City residents: results from the <span class="hlt">IMPACT</span> Studies.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Frye, Victoria; Blaney, Shannon; Cerdá, Magdalena; Vlahov, David; Galea, Sandro; Ompad, Danielle C</p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>We assessed relations among neighborhood characteristics and sexual intimate partner violence against women (SIPVAW), among low-income, drug-<span class="hlt">involved</span>, women (n = 360) and men (n = 670) in New York City between 2005 and 2009. Six percent of women (n = 22) and 5% of men (n = 33) reported experiencing and perpetrating SIPVAW in the past year with a main partner. In adjusted mixed models among women, neighborhood ethnic heterogeneity was significantly negatively associated with SIPVAW victimization. In adjusted logistic models among men, neighborhood collective efficacy was significantly positively associated with SIPVAW perpetration. Novel theoretical frameworks are needed to guide research on neighborhoods and partner violence.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4516172','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4516172"><span>NEIGHBORHOOD CHARACTERISTICS AND SEXUAL INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN AMONG LOW-INCOME, DRUG-<span class="hlt">INVOLVED</span> NEW YORK CITY RESIDENTS: RESULTS FROM THE <span class="hlt">IMPACT</span> STUDIES</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Frye, Victoria; Blaney, Shannon; Cerda, Magdalena; Vlahov, David; Galea, Sandro; Ompad, Danielle C.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>We assessed relations among neighborhood characteristics and sexual intimate partner violence against women (SIPVAW), among low-income, drug-<span class="hlt">involved</span>, women (N=360) and men (N=670) in New York City between 2005 and 2009. Six percent of women (n=22) and 5% of men (n=33) reported experiencing and perpetrating SIPVAW in the past year with a main partner. In adjusted mixed models among women, neighborhood ethnic heterogeneity was significantly, negatively associated with SIPVAW victimization. In adjusted logistic models among men, neighborhood collective efficacy was significantly, positively associated with SIPVAW perpetration. Novel theoretical frameworks are needed to guide research on neighborhoods and partner violence. PMID:25062819</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22318045','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22318045"><span>ZnO/<span class="hlt">porous</span>-Si and TiO{sub 2}/<span class="hlt">porous</span>-Si nanocomposite nanopillars</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Wang, Dong Yan, Yong; Schaaf, Peter; Sharp, Thomas; Schönherr, Sven; Ronning, Carsten; Ji, Ran</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Porous</span> Si nanopillar arrays are used as templates for atomic layer deposition of ZnO and TiO{sub 2}, and thus, ZnO/<span class="hlt">porous</span>-Si and TiO{sub 2}/<span class="hlt">porous</span>-Si nanocomposite nanopillars are fabricated. The diffusion of the precursor molecules into the inside of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> structure occurs via Knudsen diffusion and is strongly limited by the small pore size. The luminescence of the ZnO/<span class="hlt">porous</span>-Si nanocomposite nanopillars is also investigated, and the optical emission can be changed and even quenched after a strong plasma treatment. Such nanocomposite nanopillars are interesting for photocatalysis and sensors.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.H51F1439M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.H51F1439M"><span>Upscaling of Large-Scale Transport in Spatially Heterogeneous <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Media Using Wavelet Transformation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Moslehi, M.; de Barros, F.; Ebrahimi, F.; Sahimi, M.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Modeling flow and solute transport in large-scale heterogeneous <span class="hlt">porous</span> media <span class="hlt">involves</span> substantial computational burdens. A common approach to alleviate this complexity is to utilize upscaling methods. These processes generate upscaled models with less complexity while attempting to preserve the hydrogeological properties comparable to the original fine-scale model. We use Wavelet Transformations (WT) of the spatial distribution of aquifer's property to upscale the hydrogeological models and consequently transport processes. In particular, we apply the technique to a <span class="hlt">porous</span> formation with broadly distributed and correlated transmissivity to verify the performance of the WT. First, transmissivity fields are coarsened using WT in such a way that the high transmissivity zones, in which more important information is embedded, mostly remain the same, while the low transmissivity zones are averaged out since they contain less information about the hydrogeological formation. Next, flow and non-reactive transport are simulated in both fine-scale and upscaled models to predict both the concentration breakthrough curves at a control location and the large-scale spreading of the plume around its centroid. The results reveal that the WT of the fields generates non-uniform grids with an average of 2.1% of the number of grid blocks in the original fine-scale models, which eventually leads to a significant reduction in the computational costs. We show that the upscaled model obtained through the WT reconstructs the concentration breakthrough curves and the spreading of the plume at different times accurately. Furthermore, the <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of the Hurst coefficient, size of the flow domain and the orders of magnitude difference in transmissivity values on the results have been investigated. It is observed that as the heterogeneity and the size of the domain increase, better agreement between the results of fine-scale and upscaled models can be achieved. Having this framework at hand aids</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_14 --> <div id="page_15" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="281"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.S11B1731H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.S11B1731H"><span>Infrasound Sensor and <span class="hlt">Porous</span>-Hose Filter Characterization Results</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hart, D. M.; Harris, J. M.</p> <p>2008-12-01</p> <p>The Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research and Development (GNEM R&D) program at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is regarded as the primary center for unbiased expertise in testing and evaluation of geophysical sensors and instrumentation for nuclear explosion monitoring. Over the past year much of our work has focused in the area of infrasound sensor characterization through the continuing development of an infrasound sensor characterization test-bed. Our main areas of focus have been in new sensor characterization and understanding the effects of <span class="hlt">porous</span>-hose filters for reducing acoustic background signals. Three infrasound sensors were evaluated for characteristics of instrument response, linearity and self-noise. The sensors tested were Chaparral Physics model 2.5 low-gain, New Mexico Tech All-Sensor and the Inter-Mountain Labs model SS avalanche sensor. For the infrasound sensors tested, the test results allow us to conclude that two of the three sensors had sufficiently quiet noise floor to be at or below the Acoustic low-noise model from 0.1 to 7 Hz, which make those sensors suitable to explosion monitoring. The other area of focus has been to understand the characteristics of <span class="hlt">porous</span>-hose filters used at some monitoring sites. For this, an experiment was designed in which two infrasound sensors were co- located. One sensor was connected to a typical <span class="hlt">porous</span>-hose spatial filter consisting of eight individual hoses covering a 30m aperture and the second sensor was left open to unimpeded acoustic input. Data were collected for several days, power spectrum computed for two-hour windows and the relative gain of the <span class="hlt">porous</span>-hose filters were estimated by dividing the power spectrum. The <span class="hlt">porous</span>-hose filter appears to attenuate less than 3 dB (rel 1 Pa**2/Hz) below 0.1 Hz and as much as 25 dB at 1 Hz and between 20 to 10 dB above 10 Hz. Several more experiments will be designed to address the effects of different characteristics of the individual <span class="hlt">porous</span></p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26732708','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26732708"><span>Fe2+ chelator proferrorosamine A: a gene cluster of Erwinia rhapontici P45 <span class="hlt">involved</span> in its synthesis and its <span class="hlt">impact</span> on growth of Erwinia amylovora CFBP1430.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Born, Yannick; Remus-Emsermann, Mitja N P; Bieri, Marco; Kamber, Tim; Piel, Jörn; Pelludat, Cosima</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>Proferrorosamine A (proFRA) is an iron (Fe2+) chelator produced by the opportunistic plant pathogen Erwinia rhapontici P45. To identify genes <span class="hlt">involved</span> in proFRA synthesis, transposon mutagenesis was performed. The identified 9.3 kb gene cluster, comprising seven genes, designated rosA-rosG, encodes proteins that are <span class="hlt">involved</span> in proFRA synthesis. Based on gene homologies, a biosynthetic pathway model for proFRA is proposed. To obtain a better understanding of the effect of proFRA on non-proFRA producing bacteria, E. rhapontici P45 was co-cultured with Erwinia amylovora CFBP1430, a fire-blight-causing plant pathogen. E. rhapontici P45, but not corresponding proFRA-negative mutants, led to a pink coloration of E. amylovora CFBP1430 colonies on King's B agar, indicating accumulation of the proFRA-iron complex ferrorosamine, and growth inhibition in vitro. By saturating proFRA-containing extracts with Fe2+, the inhibitory effect was neutralized, suggesting that the iron-chelating capability of proFRA is responsible for the growth inhibition of E. amylovora CFBP1430.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4305408','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4305408"><span>Cytoskeleton remodelling of confluent epithelial cells cultured on <span class="hlt">porous</span> substrates</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Rother, Jan; Büchsenschütz-Göbeler, Matthias; Nöding, Helen; Steltenkamp, Siegfried; Samwer, Konrad; Janshoff, Andreas</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of substrate topography on the morphological and mechanical properties of confluent MDCK-II cells cultured on <span class="hlt">porous</span> substrates was scrutinized by means of various imaging techniques as well as atomic force microscopy comprising force volume and microrheology measurements. Regardless of the pore size, ranging from 450 to 5500 nm in diameter, cells were able to span the pores. They did not crawl into the holes or grow around the pores. Generally, we found that cells cultured on non-<span class="hlt">porous</span> surfaces are stiffer, i.e. cortical tension rises from 0.1 to 0.3 mN m−1, and less fluid than cells grown over pores. The mechanical data are corroborated by electron microscopy imaging showing more cytoskeletal filaments on flat samples in comparison to <span class="hlt">porous</span> ones. By contrast, cellular compliance increases with pore size and cells display a more fluid-like behaviour on larger pores. Interestingly, cells on pores larger than 3500 nm produce thick actin bundles that bridge the pores and thereby strengthen the contact zone of the cells. PMID:25566882</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016APS..DFDH40009Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016APS..DFDH40009Z"><span>On the Examination of Darcy Permeability a Thin Fibrous <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Layer</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhu, Zenghao; Wang, Qiuyun; Wu, Qianhong; Vucbmss Team</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>In this paper, we report a novel experimental approach to investigate the Darcy permeability of a soft and thin fibrous <span class="hlt">porous</span> layer. The project is inspired by recent studies <span class="hlt">involved</span> compression of very thin <span class="hlt">porous</span> films and the resultant pore fluid flow inside the confined <span class="hlt">porous</span> structure. The Darcy permeability plays a critical role during the process, which however, is tricky to measure due to the very thin nature of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. In the current study, a special micro-fluidic device is developed that consists of a rectangular flow channel with adjustable gap height ranging from 20 mm to 0.5 mm. Air is forced through the thin gap filled with testing fibrous materials. By measuring the flow rate and the pressure drop, we have successfully obtained the Darcy permeability of different thin <span class="hlt">porous</span> sheets at different compression ratios. Furthermore, the surface area of the fibers are evaluated using a Micromeritics® ASAP 2020 (Accelerated Surface Area and Porosimetry) system. We found that, although the functions relating the permeability and porosities are different for different fibrous materials, these functions collapse to a single relationship if one express the permeability as a function of the solid phase surface area per unit volume. This finding provides a useful approach to evaluate the permeability of very thin fibrous <span class="hlt">porous</span> sheet, which otherwise is difficult to measure directly. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation under Award #1511096.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26185472','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26185472"><span>Designing and testing lightweight shoulder prostheses with hybrid actuators for movements <span class="hlt">involved</span> in typical activities of daily living and <span class="hlt">impact</span> absorption.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sekine, Masashi; Kita, Kahori; Yu, Wenwei</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Unlike forearm amputees, transhumeral amputees have residual stumps that are too small to provide a sufficient range of operation for their prosthetic parts to perform usual activities of daily living. Furthermore, it is difficult for small residual stumps to provide sufficient <span class="hlt">impact</span> absorption for safe manipulation in daily living, as intact arms do. Therefore, substitution of upper limb function in transhumeral amputees requires a sufficient range of motion and sufficient viscoelasticity for shoulder prostheses under critical weight and dimension constraints. We propose the use of two different types of actuators, ie, pneumatic elastic actuators (PEAs) and servo motors. PEAs offer high power-to-weight performance and have intrinsic viscoelasticity in comparison with motors or standard industrial pneumatic cylinder actuators. However, the usefulness of PEAs in large working spaces is limited because of their short strokes. Servo motors, in contrast, can be used to achieve large ranges of motion. In this study, the relationship between the force and stroke of PEAs was investigated. The <span class="hlt">impact</span> absorption of both types of actuators was measured using a single degree-of-freedom prototype to evaluate actuator compliance for safety purposes. Based on the fundamental properties of the actuators identified, a four degree-of-freedom robotic arm is proposed for prosthetic use. The configuration of the actuators and functional parts was designed to achieve a specified range of motion and torque calculated from the results of a simulation of typical movements performed in usual activities of daily living. Our experimental results showed that the requirements for the shoulder prostheses could be satisfied.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4501219','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4501219"><span>Designing and testing lightweight shoulder prostheses with hybrid actuators for movements <span class="hlt">involved</span> in typical activities of daily living and <span class="hlt">impact</span> absorption</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Sekine, Masashi; Kita, Kahori; Yu, Wenwei</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Unlike forearm amputees, transhumeral amputees have residual stumps that are too small to provide a sufficient range of operation for their prosthetic parts to perform usual activities of daily living. Furthermore, it is difficult for small residual stumps to provide sufficient <span class="hlt">impact</span> absorption for safe manipulation in daily living, as intact arms do. Therefore, substitution of upper limb function in transhumeral amputees requires a sufficient range of motion and sufficient viscoelasticity for shoulder prostheses under critical weight and dimension constraints. We propose the use of two different types of actuators, ie, pneumatic elastic actuators (PEAs) and servo motors. PEAs offer high power-to-weight performance and have intrinsic viscoelasticity in comparison with motors or standard industrial pneumatic cylinder actuators. However, the usefulness of PEAs in large working spaces is limited because of their short strokes. Servo motors, in contrast, can be used to achieve large ranges of motion. In this study, the relationship between the force and stroke of PEAs was investigated. The <span class="hlt">impact</span> absorption of both types of actuators was measured using a single degree-of-freedom prototype to evaluate actuator compliance for safety purposes. Based on the fundamental properties of the actuators identified, a four degree-of-freedom robotic arm is proposed for prosthetic use. The configuration of the actuators and functional parts was designed to achieve a specified range of motion and torque calculated from the results of a simulation of typical movements performed in usual activities of daily living. Our experimental results showed that the requirements for the shoulder prostheses could be satisfied. PMID:26185472</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999APS..SHK..M533G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999APS..SHK..M533G"><span>Mathematical Model of <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Medium Dynamics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gerschuk, Peotr; Sapozhnikov, Anatoly</p> <p>1999-06-01</p> <p>Semiempirical model describing <span class="hlt">porous</span> material strains under pulse mechanical and thermal loadings is proposed. <span class="hlt">Porous</span> medium is considered as continuous one but with special form of pressure dependence upon strain. This model takes into account principal features of <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials behavior which can be observed when the material is strained in dynamic and static experiments ( non-reversibility of large strains, nonconvexity of loading curve). Elastoplastic properties of <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium, its damages when it is strained and dynamic fracture are also taken into account. Dispersion of unidirectional motion caused by medium heterogeneity (<span class="hlt">porousness</span>) is taken into acount by introducing the physical viscosity depending upon pores size. It is supposed that at every moment of time pores are in equilibrium with pressure i.e. kinetic of pores collapse is not taken into account. The model is presented by the system of differential equations connecting pressure and energy of <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium with its strain. These equations close system of equations of motion and continuity which then is integrated numerically. The proposed model has been tested on carbon materials and <span class="hlt">porous</span> copper . Results of calculation of these materials shock compressing are in satisfactory agreement with experimental data. Results of calculation of thin plate with <span class="hlt">porous</span> copper layer collision are given as an illustration.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1265277','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1265277"><span>Thiazolothiazole-linked <span class="hlt">porous</span> organic polymers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Zhu, Xiang; Tian, Chengcheng; Jin, Tian; Wang, Jitong; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Mei, Wenwen; Xiong, Yan; Hu, Jun; Feng, Xinliang; Liu, Honglai; Dai, Sheng</p> <p>2014-10-07</p> <p>In this study, thiazolothiazole-linked <span class="hlt">porous</span> organic polymers have been synthesized from a facile catalyst-free condensation reaction between aldehydes and dithiooxamide under solvothermal conditions. The resultant <span class="hlt">porous</span> frameworks exhibit a highly selective uptake of CO<sub>2</sub> over N<sub>2</sub> under ambient conditions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1265277-thiazolothiazole-linked-porous-organic-polymers','SCIGOV-DOEP'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1265277-thiazolothiazole-linked-porous-organic-polymers"><span>Thiazolothiazole-linked <span class="hlt">porous</span> organic polymers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/pages">DOE PAGES</a></p> <p>Zhu, Xiang; Tian, Chengcheng; Jin, Tian; ...</p> <p>2014-10-07</p> <p>In this study, thiazolothiazole-linked <span class="hlt">porous</span> organic polymers have been synthesized from a facile catalyst-free condensation reaction between aldehydes and dithiooxamide under solvothermal conditions. The resultant <span class="hlt">porous</span> frameworks exhibit a highly selective uptake of CO2 over N2 under ambient conditions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1005634','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1005634"><span>Measurement and Estimation of Organic-Liquid/Water Interfacial Areas for Several Natural <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Brusseau, M.L.; Narter, M.; Schnaar, G.; Marble, J.</p> <p>2009-06-01</p> <p>The objective of this study was to quantitatively characterize the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of <span class="hlt">porous</span>-medium texture on interfacial area between immiscible organic liquid and water residing within natural <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. Synchrotron X-ray microtomography was used to obtain high-resolution, three-dimensional images of solid and liquid phases in packed columns. The image data were processed to generate quantitative measurements of organic-liquid/water interfacial area and of organic-liquid blob sizes. Ten <span class="hlt">porous</span> media, comprising a range of median grain sizes, grain-size distributions, and geochemical properties, were used to evaluate the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of <span class="hlt">porous</span>-medium texture on interfacial area. The results show that fluid-normalized specific interfacial area (A{sub f}) and maximum specific interfacial area (A{sub m}) correlate very well to inverse median grain diameter. These functionalities were shown to result from a linear relationship between effective organic-liquid blob diameter and median grain diameter. These results provide the basis for a simple method for estimating specific organic-liquid/water interfacial area as a function of fluid saturation for a given <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium. The availability of a method for which the only parameter needed is the simple-to-measure median grain diameter should be of great utility for a variety of applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1021902','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1021902"><span>Microelectromechanical pump utilizing <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Lantz, Jeffrey W.; Stalford, Harold L.</p> <p>2011-07-19</p> <p>A microelectromechanical (MEM) pump is disclosed which includes a <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon region sandwiched between an inlet chamber and an outlet chamber. The <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon region is formed in a silicon substrate and contains a number of pores extending between the inlet and outlet chambers, with each pore having a cross-section dimension about equal to or smaller than a mean free path of a gas being pumped. A thermal gradient is provided along the length of each pore by a heat source which can be an electrical resistance heater or an integrated circuit (IC). A channel can be formed through the silicon substrate so that inlet and outlet ports can be formed on the same side of the substrate, or so that multiple MEM pumps can be connected in series to form a multi-stage MEM pump. The MEM pump has applications for use in gas-phase MEM chemical analysis systems, and can also be used for passive cooling of ICs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..11.5234B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..11.5234B"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> Soil as Complex Network</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Benito, R. M.; Santiago, A.; Cárdenas, J. P.; Tarquis, A. M.; Borondo, F.; Losada, J. C.</p> <p>2009-04-01</p> <p>We present a complex network model based on a heterogeneous preferential attachment scheme [1,2] to quantify the structure of <span class="hlt">porous</span> soils [3]. Under this perspective pores are represented by nodes and the space for the flow of fluids between them are represented by links. Pore properties such as position and size are described by fixed states in a metric space, while an affinity function is introduced to bias the attachment probabilities of links according to these properties. We perform an analytical and numerical study of the degree distributions in the soil model and show that under reasonable conditions all the model variants yield a multiscaling behavior in the connectivity degrees, leaving a empirically testable signature of heterogeneity in the topology of pore networks. References [1] A. Santiago and R. M. Benito, "Emergence of multiscaling in heterogeneous complex networks". Int. J. Mod. Phys. C 18, 1591 (2007). [2] A. Santiago and R. M. Benito, "An extended formalism for preferential attachment in heterogeneous complex networks". Europhys. Lett. 82, 58004 (2008). [3] A. Santiago, R. M. Benito, J. P. Cárdenas, J. C. Losada, A. M. Tarquis and F. Borondo, "Multiscaling of <span class="hlt">porous</span> soils as heterogeneous complex networks". Nonl. Proc. Geophys. 15, 1-10 (2008).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012APS..DFDD29004Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012APS..DFDD29004Z"><span>Fluid Drainage from <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Reservoirs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zheng, Zhong; Soh, Beatrice; Huppert, Herbert; Stone, Howard; Stone Group Team</p> <p>2012-11-01</p> <p>We report theoretical and experimental studies to describe buoyancy-driven fluid drainage from a <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium. We first study homogeneous <span class="hlt">porous</span> systems. To investigate the influence of heterogeneities, we consider the case where the permeability varies transverse to the flow direction, exemplified by a V-shaped Hele-Shaw cell. Finally, we analyze a model where both the permeability and the porosity vary transverse to the flow direction. In each case, a self-similar solution for the shape of the gravity current is found and a power-law behavior in time is derived for the mass remaining in the system. Laboratory experiments are conducted in homogeneous and V-shaped Hele-Shaw cells, and the measured profile shapes and the mass remaining in the cells agree well with our model predictions. Our study provides new insights into drainage processes such as may occur in a variety of natural and industrial activities including the geological storage of carbon dioxide. This work is supported by a grant from Carbon Mitigation Initiative at Princeton University.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhRvE..87a2718D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhRvE..87a2718D"><span>Hydrodynamic dispersion within <span class="hlt">porous</span> biofilms</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Davit, Y.; Byrne, H.; Osborne, J.; Pitt-Francis, J.; Gavaghan, D.; Quintard, M.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Many microorganisms live within surface-associated consortia, termed biofilms, that can form intricate <span class="hlt">porous</span> structures interspersed with a network of fluid channels. In such systems, transport phenomena, including flow and advection, regulate various aspects of cell behavior by controlling nutrient supply, evacuation of waste products, and permeation of antimicrobial agents. This study presents multiscale analysis of solute transport in these <span class="hlt">porous</span> biofilms. We start our analysis with a channel-scale description of mass transport and use the method of volume averaging to derive a set of homogenized equations at the biofilm-scale in the case where the width of the channels is significantly smaller than the thickness of the biofilm. We show that solute transport may be described via two coupled partial differential equations or telegrapher's equations for the averaged concentrations. These models are particularly relevant for chemicals, such as some antimicrobial agents, that penetrate cell clusters very slowly. In most cases, especially for nutrients, solute penetration is faster, and transport can be described via an advection-dispersion equation. In this simpler case, the effective diffusion is characterized by a second-order tensor whose components depend on (1) the topology of the channels' network; (2) the solute's diffusion coefficients in the fluid and the cell clusters; (3) hydrodynamic dispersion effects; and (4) an additional dispersion term intrinsic to the two-phase configuration. Although solute transport in biofilms is commonly thought to be diffusion dominated, this analysis shows that hydrodynamic dispersion effects may significantly contribute to transport.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.3949B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.3949B"><span>Effect of sequential release of NAPLs on NAPL migration in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bang, Woohui; Yeo, In Wook</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>NAPLs (Non-aqueous phase liquids) are common groundwater contaminants and are classified as LNAPLs (Light non-aqueous phase liquids) and DNAPLs (Dense non-aqueous phase liquids) according to relative density for water. Due to their low solubility in water, NAPLs remain for a long time in groundwater, and they pose a serious environmental problem. Therefore, understanding NAPLs migration in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media is essential for effective NAPLs remediation. DNAPLs tend to move downward through the water table by gravity force because its density is higher than water. However, if DNAPLs do not have sufficient energy which breaks capillary force of <span class="hlt">porous</span> media, they will just accumulate above capillary zone or water table. Mobile phase of LNAPLs rises and falls depending on fluctuation of water table, and it could change the wettability of <span class="hlt">porous</span> media from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. This could <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on the migration characteristics of subsequently-released DNAPLs. LNAPLs and DNAPLs are sometime disposed at the same place (for example, the Hill air force base, USA). Therefore, this study focuses on the effect of sequential release of NAPLs on NAPLs (in particular, DNAPL) migration in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. We have conducted laboratory experiments. Gasoline, which is known to change wettability of <span class="hlt">porous</span> media from hydrophilic to intermediate, and TCE (Trichloroethylene) were used as LNAPL and DNAPL, respectively. Glass beads with the grain size of 1 mm and 2 mm were prepared for two sets of <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. Gasoline and TCE was dyed for visualization. First, respective LNAPL and DNAPL of 10 ml were separately released into prepared <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. For the grain size of 2 mm glass beads, LNAPL became buoyant above the water table, and DNAPL just moved downward through <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. However, for the experiment with the grain size of 1 mm glass beads, NAPLs behaved very differently. DNAPL did not migrate downward below and just remained above the water table due to capillary pressure of</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24407681','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24407681"><span>Microscale simulation of particle deposition in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Boccardo, Gianluca; Marchisio, Daniele L; Sethi, Rajandrea</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>In this work several geometries, each representing a different <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium, are considered to perform detailed computational fluid dynamics simulation for fluid flow, particle transport and deposition. Only Brownian motions and steric interception are accounted for as deposition mechanisms. Firstly pressure drop in each <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium is analyzed in order to determine an effective grain size, by fitting the results with the Ergun law. Then grid independence is assessed. Lastly, particle transport in the system is investigated via Eulerian steady-state simulations, where particle concentration is solved for, not following explicitly particles' trajectories, but solving the corresponding advection-diffusion equation. An assumption was made in considering favorable collector-particle interactions, resulting in a "perfect sink" boundary condition for the collectors. The gathered simulation data are used to calculate the deposition efficiency due to Brownian motions and steric interception. The original Levich law for one simple circular collector is verified; subsequently <span class="hlt">porous</span> media constituted by a packing of collectors are scrutinized. Results show that the interactions between the different collectors result in behaviors which are not in line with the theory developed by Happel and co-workers, highlighting a different dependency of the deposition efficiency on the dimensionless groups <span class="hlt">involved</span> in the relevant correlations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/287534','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/287534"><span>Laboratory experiments with heterogeneous reactions in mixed <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Burris, D.R.; Hatfield, K.; Wolfe, N.L.</p> <p>1996-08-01</p> <p>The limited success and high cost of traditional active ground-water-contaminant plume management efforts (i.e., pump-and-treat systems) has stimulated a search for less expensive passive plume interception and in-situ treatment technologies. The funnel/gate system, which uses heterogeneous (surface-mediated) reactions on <span class="hlt">porous</span> media to degrade dissolved contaminants, is one passive technology under consideration. Research on a heterogeneous reaction is presented in this paper, which can be extended to facilitate the design of engineered <span class="hlt">porous</span> media systems (i.e., funnel/gates). Results are examined from batch and flow-through column experiments <span class="hlt">involving</span> nitrobenzene degradation in a surface-mediated reaction with granular metallic iron. A nonequilibrium transport model that incorporates solute mass-transfer resistance near reactive iron surfaces is shown to simulate breakthrough curves (BTCs) from column systems, using model parameters estimated from batch systems. The investigation shows pseudo first-order degradation-rate coefficients increasing with higher solid:liquid ratios and with greater iron concentrations. In addition, nitrobenzene degradation is found to be faster in batch systems than in comparable column systems, indicating the presence of mass-transfer limitations in the flow-through systems. Finally, the present study provides insights on conditions pertinent to the design of engineered in-situ treatment zones, such as how mass-transfer, hydraulic, and reaction kinetic conditions affect ground-water-contaminant fate and transport through reactive <span class="hlt">porous</span> media.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26422294','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26422294"><span>Development Trends in <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Adsorbents for Carbon Capture.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sreenivasulu, Bolisetty; Sreedhar, Inkollu; Suresh, Pathi; Raghavan, Kondapuram Vijaya</p> <p>2015-11-03</p> <p>Accumulation of greenhouse gases especially CO2 in the atmosphere leading to global warming with undesirable climate changes has been a serious global concern. Major power generation in the world is from coal based power plants. Carbon capture through pre- and post- combustion technologies with various technical options like adsorption, absorption, membrane separations, and chemical looping combustion with and without oxygen uncoupling have received considerable attention of researchers, environmentalists and the stake holders. Carbon capture from flue gases can be achieved with micro and meso <span class="hlt">porous</span> adsorbents. This review covers carbonaceous (organic and metal organic frameworks) and noncarbonaceous (inorganic) <span class="hlt">porous</span> adsorbents for CO2 adsorption at different process conditions and pore sizes. Focus is also given to noncarbonaceous micro and meso <span class="hlt">porous</span> adsorbents in chemical looping combustion <span class="hlt">involving</span> insitu CO2 capture at high temperature (>400 °C). Adsorption mechanisms, material characteristics, and synthesis methods are discussed. Attention is given to isosteric heats and characterization techniques. The options to enhance the techno-economic viability of carbon capture techniques by integrating with CO2 utilization to produce industrially important chemicals like ammonia and urea are analyzed. From the reader's perspective, for different classes of materials, each section has been summarized in the form of tables or figures to get a quick glance of the developments.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016E%26ES...36a2021B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016E%26ES...36a2021B"><span>Adsorption isotherm of non-azeotropic solution onto <span class="hlt">porous</span> adsorbents</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bono, A.; Ramlan, N. A.; Anisuzzaman, S. M.; Chu, C. M.; Farm, Y. Y.</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>Adsorption isotherm is essential component in the understanding of the adsorption process. Several methods of the measurements, analysis and interpretation of adsorption from solution have been reported in the literature. Most of the measurements of adsorption isotherm from solution were <span class="hlt">involved</span> the measurement of excess isotherm conducted at low region of sorbates concentration. Direct interpretation of excess adsorption isotherm as adsorption isotherm is always been practice. Therefore, in this work a study on the measurement of the adsorption isotherm from solution of non-azeotropic organic solvent mixture onto <span class="hlt">porous</span> adsorbents for whole range of liquid concentration was conducted. The study included the measurement of excess adsorption isotherm using conventional technique. Theoretical analysis and interpretation of adsorption isotherm from the excess isotherm were conducted using Pseudo Ideal Adsorption, Gibbs Dividing Plane Model and Langmuir-Fruendlich binary isotherm model. For organic solvents, acetone and propanol were chosen as the adsorbates due to the non-azeotropic properties in the mixture. Activated carbon and silicalite were chosen as adsorbents due to the different in their porosity such as macro <span class="hlt">porous</span> and micro <span class="hlt">porous</span> structure. The result of the study has revealed that the adsorption isotherm of non-azeotropic mixture onto activated carbon and silicalite can be interpreted as monolayer type of adsorption.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20090024823&hterms=Ballistics&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3DBallistics','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20090024823&hterms=Ballistics&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3DBallistics"><span>Ballistic Performance of <span class="hlt">Porous</span>-Ceramic, Thermal-Protection-Systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Christiansen, E. L.; Davis, B. A.; Miller, J. E.; Bohl, W. E.; Foreman, C. D.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Porous</span>-ceramic, thermal protection systems are used heavily in current reentry vehicles like the Space Shuttle and are currently being proposed for the next generation of manned spacecraft, Orion. These materials insulate the structural components of a spacecraft against the intense thermal environments of atmospheric reentry. Furthermore, these materials are also highly exposed to space environmental hazards like meteoroid and orbital debris <span class="hlt">impacts</span>. This paper discusses recent <span class="hlt">impact</span> testing up to 9 km/s, and the findings of the influence of material equation-of-state on the simulation of the <span class="hlt">impact</span> event to characterize the ballistic performance of these materials. These results will be compared with heritage models1 for these materials developed from testing at lower velocities. Assessments of predicted spacecraft risk based upon these tests and simulations will also be discussed.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_15 --> <div id="page_16" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="301"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SJCE...22b...1D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SJCE...22b...1D"><span>Comparison of a Wooden House and a <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Concrete Masonry House</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ďurica, Pavol; Badurové, Silvia; Časnocha, Peter</p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>This paper deals with an evaluation of an existing wooden panel house and its comparison with alternative material composition (<span class="hlt">porous</span> concrete masonry house). The criteria for evaluation are the energy performance, size of the usable area, environmental <span class="hlt">impact</span> and final costs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012LPICo1667.6250S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012LPICo1667.6250S"><span>Experimental Study on Collisional Sticking of Isometric Sintered <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Ice Spheres</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Shimaki, Y.; Arakawa, M.</p> <p>2012-05-01</p> <p>We conducted low-velocity collision experiment of isometric sintered <span class="hlt">porous</span> ice spheres with porosity of 44% to 80% at the <span class="hlt">impact</span> velocity of 0.44 to 4.14 m/s to study sticking process of icy dust in protoplanetary disk.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhLA..381..494S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhLA..381..494S"><span>Numerical simulation of magnetic nanofluid natural convection in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sheikholeslami, Mohsen</p> <p>2017-02-01</p> <p>Free convection of magnetic nanofluid in a <span class="hlt">porous</span> curved cavity is investigated. Influence of external magnetic source is taken into account. Innovative numerical approach, namely CVFEM, is applied. <span class="hlt">Impacts</span> of Darcy number (Da), Rayleigh (Ra), Hartmann (Ha) numbers and volume fraction of Fe3O4 (ϕ) on hydrothermal characteristics are examined. Results indicate that heat transfer augmentation augments with rise of Ha and reduces with rise of Da , Ra . Lorentz forces make the nanofluid motion to decrease and enhance the thermal boundary layer thickness. Temperature gradient enhances with increase of Da , Ra , ϕ, but it reduces with rise of Ha.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016APS..DFDD40001A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016APS..DFDD40001A"><span>Title: Spatial velocity fluctuations in flow through <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Aramideh, Soroush; Guo, Tianqi; Vlachos, Pavlos P.; Ardekani, Arezoo M.</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>Understanding the flow in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media is of great importance and has direct <span class="hlt">impact</span> on many processes in chemical and oil industries, fuel cell design, and filtration. In this work, we use direct numerical simulations (DNS) to examine the flow through variety of sphere packings with different levels of complexity and heterogeneity. DNS results are validated with velocity fields obtained via volumetric particle tracking velocimetry at high resolution. We show that flow in random close packing of spheres has unique statistical properties while the medium is random itself. Furthermore, we quantify the relationship between pore geometry and velocity fluctuations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.H43E1060P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.H43E1060P"><span>Colloid Straining within Saturated Heterogeneous <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Porubcan, A.; Walczak, J.; Xu, S.</p> <p>2008-12-01</p> <p>A thorough understanding of colloid movement in the subsurface system is critical to the assessment of groundwater pollution by pathogenic bacteria and colloid-bound contaminants. It is increasingly recognized that straining, a process that occurs when the pore space is too small to allow for a particle's passage, represents an important process in colloid immobilization within groundwater systems. Previously published studies have focused on the kinetics of colloid straining within sand packs composed of uniform mineral grains. Natural aquifers, however, are usually characterized by physically heterogeneous sediments. In this study, we conducted column transport experiments with carboxylated latex particles and quartz sand to investigate the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of sediment texture (i.e., the size distribution of mineral grains) on colloid straining kinetics. The quartz sands used in the experiment were thoroughly cleaned and the strong repulsive interactions between colloid particles and quartz sands resulted in minimal physicochemical deposition so the straining kinetics can be quantified unambiguously. Sand packs of different textures were prepared by mixing sands of various sizes (mesh sizes of 20-25, 35-40 and 60-70). Our results suggested that the ratio of colloid size and the median sand grain size was insufficient to predict colloid straining within heterogeneous sediments. Soil texture, which was related to the size distribution of the sand grains, must be considered. A relationship between colloid straining kinetics and the heterogeneity of <span class="hlt">porous</span> media that can be useful for the prediction of colloid transport within heterogeneous sediments was presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED104543.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED104543.pdf"><span>Preparing Teachers for Parent <span class="hlt">Involvement</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Safran, Daniel</p> <p></p> <p>This paper examines the potential <span class="hlt">impact</span> of parent <span class="hlt">involvement</span> in the formal education of their children and suggests ways that teacher education can be restructured to prepare teachers to work with parents. This paper attempts to answer five questions: (1) Why should parents be <span class="hlt">involved</span> in the formal education of their children? (2) Why should…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22955799','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22955799"><span>Health-related quality of life in Turkish patients with ankylosing spondylitis: <span class="hlt">impact</span> of peripheral <span class="hlt">involvement</span> on quality of life in terms of disease activity, functional status, severity of pain, and social and emotional functioning.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yılmaz, Ozlem; Tutoğlu, Ahmet; Garip, Yeşim; Ozcan, Esra; Bodur, Hatice</p> <p>2013-05-01</p> <p>Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) affects sacroiliac joints at early stages and may <span class="hlt">involve</span> the axial skeleton at later stages of disease. Peripheral <span class="hlt">involvement</span> usually occurs in lower extremities. When it develops early in the disease course, it is a predictor of more aggressive disease. The aim of this study is to evaluate health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in AS and to assess the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of peripheral <span class="hlt">involvement</span> on HRQoL domains in terms of disease activity, functional status, pain, and social and emotional functioning. Seventy-four AS patients were included. Peripheral <span class="hlt">involvement</span> was present in 51.35 % of the patients. In 65.79 % of these cases the hips, in 31.58 % the knees, in 18.42 % the shoulders and in 13.16 % the ankles were affected. Patients were evaluated by Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life (ASQoL), Short Form-36 (SF-36), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS) and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI). ASQoL was strongly correlated with ASDAS, BASDAI, BASFI, and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI), severity of total pain, night pain, fatigue, morning stiffness and ESR. ASDAS and BASDAI showed the strongest correlation with ASQoL. Severity of total pain, functional status and severity of night pain followed it, respectively. Patients with peripheral <span class="hlt">involvement</span> scored significantly lower in all subgroups of SF36 and significantly higher in ASDAS, BASDAI, BASFI, BASMI and ASQoL scores and levels of pain, night pain, fatigue and morning stiffness. Peripheral <span class="hlt">involvement</span> is associated with more active disease and functional disability and has a negative influence on HRQoL including physical, social and emotional functioning.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016DPS....4831812Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016DPS....4831812Y"><span>Effect of oblique <span class="hlt">impact</span> on <span class="hlt">impact</span> strength of planetesimals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yasui, Minami; Yoshida, Yusaku; Matsue, Kazuma; Takano, Shota; Arakawa, Masahiko; Ogawa, Kazunori; Okamoto, Chisato</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>Collisional processes among planetesimals have played an important role for the formation and the evolution of the bodies in the solar system. Some researchers conducted <span class="hlt">impact</span> experiments to examine the effects of target material, <span class="hlt">impact</span> velocity, etc., on the <span class="hlt">impact</span> strength. Planetesimals could collide with each other at various <span class="hlt">impact</span> angles. Therefore, the effect of <span class="hlt">impact</span> angle on the <span class="hlt">impact</span> strength should be examined, but there are only a few studies about oblique <span class="hlt">impact</span> experiments. In this study, we conducted oblique <span class="hlt">impact</span> experiments of <span class="hlt">porous</span> gypsum and glass spheres simulating planetesimals and examined the effect of the <span class="hlt">impact</span> angle on the <span class="hlt">impact</span> strength.We used a <span class="hlt">porous</span> gypsum sphere and a glass sphere as a target. We carried out <span class="hlt">impact</span> experiments by using two-stage H2 gas gun at Kobe University. A polycarbonate spherical projectile was accelerated at 2 to 7 km/s. The <span class="hlt">impact</span> angle, θ, changed from 10° to 90° (90° at a head-on <span class="hlt">impact</span>). The <span class="hlt">impact</span> phenomena were observed by a high-speed camera to measure the fragment velocities.The <span class="hlt">impact</span> strength Q* is defined as an energy density Q, which is the kinetic energy of impactor normalized by the target mass, when the largest fragment mass is half of the original target mass. In both cases of <span class="hlt">porous</span> gypsum and glass targets, the Q* became larger as the θ decreased. We reanalyzed our results by using the effective energy density, Qc*, defined as Qsin2θ and we found that the results of oblique <span class="hlt">impacts</span> matched with those of a head-on <span class="hlt">impact</span>. Furthermore, the relationship between the Qc and the normalized largest fragment mass, ml/Mt, could be fitted by ml/Mt=A×Qc-p and the parameters, A and p, were 82.2 and 0.72 for a <span class="hlt">porous</span> gypsum target and 1.1×106 and 2.12 for a glass target, respectively. We defined the <span class="hlt">impact</span> strength Qc* by using the Qc, and the Qc* was about 1000 J/kg for both targets. The power p for a glass target was about 3 times larger than that for a <span class="hlt">porous</span> gypsum target. This means</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20725982','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20725982"><span>The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of plasma rich in growth factors on clinical and biological factors <span class="hlt">involved</span> in healing processes after third molar extraction.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mozzati, Marco; Martinasso, Germana; Pol, Renato; Polastri, Carolina; Cristiano, Antonio; Muzio, Giuliana; Canuto, Rosa</p> <p>2010-12-01</p> <p>Extraction of an <span class="hlt">impacted</span> mandibular third molar is a common surgical procedure, although it still leads to several postoperative symptoms and complications. The study assessed the efficacy of autologous plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) in the healing process by checking the difference of tissue cytokines and other healing factors produced by the mucosa after extraction between sites treated with PRGF and control sites and, at the same time, by evaluating the clinical efficacy of PRGF in terms of reduced pain and facial swelling. This study was a split-mouth study, in which the patient becomes his/her own control, to eliminate any individual response differences toward PRGF treatment. The parameters regarding inflammation and subsequent wound healing were all significantly higher at PRGF sites than at control sites. The increase at PRGF sites of the two proinflammatory cytokines evaluated, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, was accompanied by the increase of two anti-inflammatory cytokines, IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β. Furthermore, IL-1β and IL-6 induce fibroblast and keratinocyte proliferation, important events in wound healing. Postoperative pain and the swelling, measured at all experimental times, were reduced in the presence of PRGF.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012Tectp.576..116B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012Tectp.576..116B"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of fracture stratigraphy on the paleo-hydrogeology of the Madison Limestone in two basement-<span class="hlt">involved</span> folds in the Bighorn basin, (Wyoming, USA)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Barbier, Mickael; Leprêtre, Rémi; Callot, Jean-Paul; Gasparrini, Marta; Daniel, Jean-Marc; Hamon, Youri; Lacombe, Olivier; Floquet, Marc</p> <p>2012-11-01</p> <p>Based on the study of the Madison Limestone at Sheep Mountain and Rattlesnake Mountain, a unique outcrop dataset including (1) facies and diagenetic analyses, (2) vertical persistence and cement stratigraphy of vein sets and (3) fluid inclusions thermometry are used to demonstrate the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of folding and fracturing on paleo-hydrogeology. Quantification of the vertical persistence of fractures shows that Sheep Mountain and Rattlesnake Mountain differ by the vertical persistence of the pre-folding Laramide vein sets, which are strictly bed-confined in Sheep Mountain but cut across bedding at Rattlesnake Mountain, whereas the syn-folding veins are through-going in both. The emplacement chronology and the various sources of the fluids responsible for the paragenetic sequence are based on isotope chemistry and fluid inclusions analysis of the matrix and vein cements. At Sheep Mountain and Rattlesnake Mountain, the cements related to the burial are characterized by isotopic signatures of marine formation waters that were diluted during the karstification of the Madison Platform at the end of Mississippian. Meteoric fluids, presumably migrating during the Cenomanian from Wind River Range and Teton Range, recharge zones located in the south-west of the Bighorn Basin, were remobilized in the early bed-confined and through-going syn-folding veins of the Sheep Mountain Anticline. The former vein set drained only local fluids whose isotopic signature relates to an increase of temperature of the meteoric fluids during their migration, whereas the latter set allowed quick drainage of basinal fluids.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhDT.......246T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhDT.......246T"><span>Micro/macroscopic fluid flow in open cell fibrous structures and <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tamayol, Ali</p> <p></p> <p>Fibrous <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials are <span class="hlt">involved</span> in a wide range of applications including composite fabrication, filtration, compact heat exchangers, fuel cell technology, and tissue engineering to name a few. Fibrous structures, such as metalfoams, have unique characteristics such as low weight, high porosity, high mechanical strength, and high surface to volume ratio. More importantly, in many applications the fibrous microstructures can be tailored to meet a range of requirements. Therefore, fibrous materials have the potential to be used in emerging sustainable energy conversion applications. The first step for analyzing transport phenomena in <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials is to determine the micro/macroscopic flow-field inside the medium. In applications where the <span class="hlt">porous</span> media is confined in a channel, the system performance is tightly related to the flow properties of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium and its interaction with the channel walls, i.e., macroscopic velocity distribution. Therefore, the focus of the study has been on: developing new mechanistic model(s) for determining permeability and inertial coefficient of fibrous <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials; investigating the effects of microstructural and mechanical parameters such as porosity, fiber orientation, mechanical compression, and fiber distribution on the flow properties and pressure drop of fibrous structures; determining the macroscopic flow-field in confined <span class="hlt">porous</span> media where the <span class="hlt">porous</span> structure fills the channel cross-section totally or partially. A systematic approach has been followed to study different aspects of the flow through fibrous materials. The complex microstructure of real materials has been modelled using unit cells that have been assumed to be repeated throughout the media. Implementing various exact and approximate analytical techniques such as integral technique, point matching, blending rules, and scale analysis the flow properties of such media have been modelled; the targeted properties include permeability and inertial</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/810008','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/810008"><span>Countercurrent Gaseous Diffusion Model of Oxidation Through a <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Coating</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Holcomb, G.R.</p> <p>1996-07-01</p> <p>A countercurrent gaseous diffusion model was developed to describe oxidation through <span class="hlt">porous</span> coatings and scales. The specific system modeled <span class="hlt">involved</span> graphite oxidized through a <span class="hlt">porous</span> alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) overcoat between 570 C (1,058 F) and 975 C (1,787 F). The model separated the <span class="hlt">porous</span> Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating into two gas diffusion regions separated by a flame front, where oxygen (O{sub 2}) and carbon monoxide (CO) react to form carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). In the outer region O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} counterdiffused. In the inner region, CO{sub 2} and CO counterdiffused. Concentration gradients of each gaseous specie in the pores of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were determined, and the oxidation rate was calculated. The model was verified by oxidation experiments using graphite through various <span class="hlt">porous</span> Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overcoats. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overcoats ranged in fractional porosity and in average pore radius from 0.077 {micro}m (3.0 x 10{sup -6} in., Knudsen diffusion) to 10.0 {micro}m (3.9 x 10{sup -4} in., molecular diffusion). Predicted and measured oxidation rates were shown to have the same dependence upon porosity, pore radius, temperature, and oxygen partial pressure (P{sub O{sub 2}}). Use of the model was proposed for other oxidation systems and for chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). This work was part of the U.S. Bureau of Mines corrosion research program.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/948405','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/948405"><span>Evaluation of Sampling Tools for Environmental Sampling of Bacterial Endospores from <span class="hlt">Porous</span> and Non-<span class="hlt">porous</span> Surfaces</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Valentine, Nancy B.; Butcher, Mark G.; Su, Yin-Fong; Jarman, Kristin H.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Panisko, Ellen A.; Seiders, Barbara AB; Wahl, Karen L.</p> <p>2008-03-08</p> <p>Aims: Having and executing a well-defined and validated sampling protocol is critical following a purposeful release of a biological agent for response and recovery activities, for clinical and epidemiological analysis and for forensic purposes. The objective of this study was to address the need for validated sampling and analysis methods called out by the General Accounting Office and others to systematically compare the collection efficiency of various swabs and wipes for collection of bacterial endospores from five different surfaces, both <span class="hlt">porous</span> and non-<span class="hlt">porous</span>. This study was also designed to test the collection and extraction solutions used for endospore recovery from swabs and wipes. Methods and Results: Eight collection tools were used, five swabs and three wipes. Three collection/preservation solutions were evaluated: sterile E-pure® water, phosphate buffered saline (PBS), and phosphate buffered saline with 0.3% Tween (PBST). An Ink Jet Aerosol Generator (IJAG) was used to apply Bacillus subtilis endospores to five <span class="hlt">porous</span> and non-<span class="hlt">porous</span> surfaces. The collection efficiencies of the swabs and wipes were compared using a statistical multiple comparison analysis. Results indicated that wipes tend to have higher collection efficiency than swabs. Of the swabs tested, the recovery from most of the surfaces was highest with the polyurethane foam swab. Conclusions: The ScottPure® wipe had the highest collection efficiency and PBST was the best collection solution of those tested. Significance and <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Study: Validated sampling for potential biological warfare is of significant importance and this study answered some relevant questions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25866120','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25866120"><span>Social <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Stigma Regarding Tuberculosis Hindering Adherence to Treatment: A Cross Sectional Study <span class="hlt">Involving</span> Tuberculosis Patients in Rajshahi City, Bangladesh.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chowdhury, Md Rocky Khan; Rahman, Md Shafiur; Mondal, Md Nazrul Islam; Sayem, Abu; Billah, Baki</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Stigma, considered a social disease, is more apparent in developing societies which are driven by various social affairs, and influences adherence to treatment. The aim of the present study was to examine levels of social stigma related to tuberculosis (TB) in sociodemographic context and identify the effects of sociodemographic factors on stigma. The study sample consisted of 372 TB patients. Data were collected using stratified sampling with simple random sampling techniques. T tests, chi-square tests, and binary logistic regression analysis were performed to examine correlations between stigma and sociodemographic variables. Approximately 85.9% of patients had experienced stigma. The most frequent indicator of the stigma experienced by patients <span class="hlt">involved</span> problems taking part in social programs (79.5%). Mean levels of stigma were significantly higher in women (55.5%), illiterate individuals (60.8%), and villagers (60.8%) relative to those of other groups. Chi-square tests revealed that education, monthly family income, and type of patient (pulmonary and extrapulmonary) were significantly associated with stigma. Binary logistic regression analysis demonstrated that stigma was influenced by sex, education, and type of patient. Stigma is one of the most important barriers to treatment adherence. Therefore, in interventions that aim to reduce stigma, strong collaboration between various institutions is essential.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26583741','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26583741"><span>Evaluation of a numerical simulation model for a system coupling atmospheric gas, surface water and unsaturated or saturated <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hibi, Yoshihiko; Tomigashi, Akira; Hirose, Masafumi</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Numerical simulations that couple flow in a surface fluid with that in a <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium are useful for examining problems of pollution that <span class="hlt">involve</span> interactions among the atmosphere, surface water and groundwater, including, for example, saltwater intrusion along coasts. We previously developed a numerical simulation method for simulating a coupled atmospheric gas, surface water, and groundwater system (called the ASG method) that employs a saturation equation for flow in a <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium; this equation allows both the void fraction of water in the surface system and water saturation in the <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium to be solved simultaneously. It remained necessary, however, to evaluate how global pressure, including gas pressure, water pressure, and capillary pressure, should be specified at the boundary between the surface and the <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium. Therefore, in this study, we derived a new equation for global pressure and integrated it into the ASG method. We then simulated water saturation in a <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium and the void fraction of water in a surface system by the ASG method and reproduced fairly well the results of two column experiments. Next, we simulated water saturation in a <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium (sand) with a bank, by using both the ASG method and a modified Picard (MP) method. We found only a slight difference in water saturation between the ASG and MP simulations. This result confirmed that the derived equation for global pressure was valid for a <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium, and that the global pressure value could thus be used with the saturation equation for <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. Finally, we used the ASG method to simulate a system coupling atmosphere, surface water, and a <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium (110m wide and 50m high) with a trapezoidal bank. The ASG method was able to simulate the complex flow of fluids in this system and the interaction between the <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium and the surface water or the atmosphere.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24530616','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24530616"><span>The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of youth, family, peer and neighborhood risk factors on developmental trajectories of risk <span class="hlt">involvement</span> from early through middle adolescence.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wang, Bo; Deveaux, Lynette; Li, Xiaoming; Marshall, Sharon; Chen, Xinguang; Stanton, Bonita</p> <p>2014-04-01</p> <p>Few studies have analyzed the development course beginning in pre-/early adolescence of overall engagement in health-risk behaviors and associated social risk factors that place individuals in different health-risk trajectories through mid-adolescence. The current longitudinal study identified 1276 adolescents in grade six and followed them for three years to investigate their developmental trajectories of risk behaviors and to examine the association of personal and social risk factors with each trajectory. Group-based trajectory modeling was applied to identify distinctive trajectory patterns of risk behaviors. Multivariate multinomial logistic regression analyses were performed to examine the effects of the personal and social risk factors on adolescents' trajectories. Three gender-specific behavioral trajectories were identified for males (55.3% low-risk, 37.6% moderate-risk, increasing, and 7.1% high-risk, increasing) and females (41.4% no-risk, 53.4% low-risk, increasing and 5.2% moderate to high-risk, increasing). Sensation-seeking, family, peer, and neighborhood factors at baseline predicted following the moderate-risk, increasing trajectory and the high-risk, increasing trajectory in males; these risk factors predicted following the moderate to high-risk, increasing trajectory in females. The presence of all three social risk factors (high-risk neighborhood, high-risk peers and low parental monitoring) had a dramatic <span class="hlt">impact</span> on increased probability of being in a high-risk trajectory group. These findings highlight the developmental significance of early personal and social risk factors on subsequent risk behaviors in early to middle adolescence. Future adolescent health behavior promotion interventions might consider offering additional prevention resources to pre- and early adolescent youth who are exposed to multiple contextual risk factors (even in the absence of risk behaviors) or youth who are early-starters of delinquency and substance use behaviors</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27931878','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27931878"><span><span class="hlt">Impacts</span> on the marine environment in the case of a hypothetical accident <span class="hlt">involving</span> the recovery of the dumped Russian submarine K-27, based on dispersion of (137)Cs.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hosseini, A; Amundsen, I; Brown, J; Dowdall, M; Karcher, M; Kauker, F; Schnur, R</p> <p>2017-02-01</p> <p>There is increasing concern regarding the issue of dumped nuclear waste in the Arctic Seas and in particular dumped objects with Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF). Amongst dumped objects in the Arctic, the dumped Russian submarine K-27 has received great attention as it contains two reactors with highly enriched fuel and lies at a depth of about 30 m under water. To address these concerns a health and environmental <span class="hlt">impact</span> assessment has been undertaken. Marine dispersion of potentially released radionuclides as a consequence of different hypothetical accident scenarios was modelled using the model NAOSIM. The outputs from the dispersion modelling have been used as inputs to food-chain transfer and environmental dosimetry models. The annual effective doses for subsistence fishing communities of the Barents-Kara seas region do not exceed 0.6 mSv for hypothetical accidents located at Stepovogo fjord or the Barents Sea. For high rate consumers of fish in Norway, following a potential accident at the Gremikha Bay, annual effects doses would be at around 0.15 mSv. Accumulated doses (over 90 days) for various organisms and for all release scenarios considered were never in excess of 150 μGy. The levels of (137)Cs derived for marine organism in areas close to Norway were not values that would likely cause concern from a regulatory perspective although for subsistence fishing communities close to the considered accident locations, it is not inconceivable that some restrictions on fishing etc. would need to be introduced.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26920536','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26920536"><span>Postprandial kinetics of gene expression of proteins <span class="hlt">involved</span> in the digestive process in rainbow trout (O. mykiss) and <span class="hlt">impact</span> of diet composition.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Borey, Marion; Panserat, Stephane; Surget, Anne; Cluzeaud, Marianne; Plagnes-Juan, Elisabeth; Herman, Alexandre; Lazzarotto, Viviana; Corraze, Geneviève; Médale, Françoise; Lauga, Beatrice; Burel, Christine</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of increased incorporation of plant ingredients on diets for rainbow trout was evaluated in terms of gene expression of gastric (gastric lipase, pepsinogen) and intestinal (prolidase, maltase, phospholipase A2) digestive enzymes and nutrient transporters (peptide and glucose transporters), as well as of postprandial levels of plasma glucose, triglycerides and total free amino acids. For that purpose, trout alevins were fed from the start of exogenous feeding one of three different experimental diets: a diet rich in fish meal and fish oil (FM-FO), a plant-based diet (noFM-noFO) totally free from fish meal and fish oil, but containing plant ingredients and a Mixed diet (Mixed) intermediate between the FM-FO and noFM-noFO diets. After 16 months of rearing, all fish were left unfed for 72 h and then given a single meal to satiation. Blood, stomach and anterior intestine were sampled before the meal and at 2, 6 and 12 h after this meal. The postprandial kinetics of gene expression of gastric and intestinal digestive enzymes and nutrient transporters were then followed in trout fed the FM-FO diet. The postprandial profiles showed that the expression of almost all genes studied was stimulated by the presence of nutrients in the digestive tract of trout, but the timing (appearance of peaks) varied between genes. Based on these data, we have focused on the molecular response to dietary factors in the stomach and the intestine at 6 and 12 h after feeding, respectively. The reduction in FM and FO levels of dietary incorporation induced a significant decrease in the gene expression of gastric lipase, GLUT2 and PEPT1. The plasma glucose and triglycerides levels were also reduced in trout fed the noFM-noFO diet. Consequently, the present study suggests a decrease in digestive capacities in trout fed a diet rich in plant ingredients.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22156920','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22156920"><span>Chondroitin sulfate N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase-1 (CSGalNAcT-1) <span class="hlt">involved</span> in chondroitin sulfate initiation: <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of sulfation on activity and specificity.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gulberti, Sandrine; Jacquinet, Jean-Claude; Chabel, Matthieu; Ramalanjaona, Nick; Magdalou, Jacques; Netter, Patrick; Coughtrie, Michael W H; Ouzzine, Mohamed; Fournel-Gigleux, Sylvie</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) assembly initiates through the formation of a linkage tetrasaccharide region serving as a primer for both chondroitin sulfate (CS) and heparan sulfate (HS) chain polymerization. A possible role for sulfation of the linkage structure and of the constitutive disaccharide unit of CS chains in the regulation of CS-GAG chain synthesis has been suggested. To investigate this, we determined whether sulfate substitution of galactose (Gal) residues of the linkage region or of N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) of the disaccharide unit influences activity and specificity of chondroitin sulfate N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase-1 (CSGalNAcT-1), a key glycosyltransferase of CS biosynthesis. We synthesized a series of sulfated and unsulfated analogs of the linkage oligosaccharide and of the constitutive unit of CS and tested these molecules as potential acceptor substrates for the recombinant human CSGalNAcT-1. We show here that sulfation at C4 or C6 of the Gal residues markedly influences CSGalNAcT-1 initiation activity and catalytic efficiency. Kinetic analysis indicates that CSGalNAcT-1 exhibited 3.6-, 1.6-, and 2.2-fold higher enzymatic efficiency due to lower K(m) values toward monosulfated trisaccharides substituted at C4 or C6 position of Gal1, and at C6 of Gal2, respectively, compared with the unsulfated oligosaccharide. This highlights the critical influence of Gal substitution on both CSGalNAcT-1 activity and specifity. No GalNAcT activity was detected toward sulfated and unsulfated analogs of the CS constitutive disaccharide (GlcA-β1,3-GalNAc), indicating that CSGalNAcT-1 was <span class="hlt">involved</span> in initiation but not in elongation of CS chains. Our results strongly suggest that sulfation of the linkage region acts as a regulatory signal in CS chain initiation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6256776','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6256776"><span>Method of preparing thin <span class="hlt">porous</span> sheets of ceramic material</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Swarr, T.E.; Nickols, R.C.; Krasij, M.</p> <p>1984-05-23</p> <p>A method of forming thin <span class="hlt">porous</span> sheets of ceramic material for use as electrodes or other components in a molten carbonate fuel cell is disclosed. The method <span class="hlt">involves</span> spray drying a slurry of fine ceramic particles in liquid carrier to produce generally spherical agglomerates of high porosity and a rough surface texture. The ceramic particles may include the electrode catalyst and the agglomerates can be calcined to improve mechanical strength. After slurrying with suitable volatile material and binder tape casting is used to form sheets that are sufficiently strong for further processing and handling in the assembly of a high temperature fuel cell.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_16 --> <div id="page_17" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="321"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24123386','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24123386"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> polymers by controlling phase separation during vapor deposition polymerization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tao, Ran; Anthamatten, Mitchell</p> <p>2013-11-01</p> <p>A template-free method is described to fabricate continuous-phase, <span class="hlt">porous</span> polymer films by simultaneous phase separation during vapor deposition polymerization. The technique <span class="hlt">involves</span> concurrent polymerization, crosslinking, and phase separation of condensed species and reaction products. Deposited films form open-cell, macroporous structures consisting of crosslinked and glassy poly(glycidyl methacrylate). By limiting phase separation during vapor phase deposition, spatially dependent morphologies, such as layered morphologies, can be grown. Results show that combining vapor deposition polymerization with phase separation establishes morphological control, which may be applied to applications including cellular scaffolds, thin cushions and vibration dampers, and membranes for separations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ZaMP...67...63S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ZaMP...67...63S"><span>On <span class="hlt">porous</span>-elastic system with localized damping</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Santos, M. L.; Almeida Júnior, D. S.</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>In this article, we are considering the one-dimensional equations of an homogeneous and isotropic <span class="hlt">porous</span> elastic solid, where the localized damping <span class="hlt">involves</span> the sum of displacement velocity of a solid elastic material and the volume fraction velocity. First we show, using a result due to Benchimol (SIAM J Control Optim 16:373-379, 1978), that the semigroup associated with the system is strongly stable if and only if the boundary of the support of feedback control intersects that of the interval under consideration. Then we use the frequency domain method combined with careful inequalities obtained using multiplicative techniques to prove that the semigroup under consideration is exponentially stable.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26871575','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26871575"><span>HMGB1 Is <span class="hlt">Involved</span> in IFN-α Production and TRAIL Expression by HIV-1-Exposed Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells: <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of the Crosstalk with NK Cells.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Saïdi, Héla; Bras, Marlène; Formaglio, Pauline; Melki, Marie-Thérèse; Charbit, Bruno; Herbeuval, Jean-Philippe; Gougeon, Marie-Lise</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are innate sensors of viral infections and important mediators of antiviral innate immunity through their ability to produce large amounts of IFN-α. Moreover, Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) and 9 (TLR9) ligands, such as HIV and CpG respectively, turn pDCs into TRAIL-expressing killer pDCs able to lyse HIV-infected CD4+ T cells. NK cells can regulate antiviral immunity by modulating pDC functions, and pDC production of IFN-α as well as cell-cell contact is required to promote NK cell functions. Impaired pDC-NK cell crosstalk was reported in the setting of HIV-1 infection, but the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of HIV-1 on TRAIL expression and innate antiviral immunity during this crosstalk is unknown. Here, we report that low concentrations of CCR5-tropic HIV-1Ba-L promote the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IFN-α, TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-12, and CCR5-interacting chemokines (MIP-1α and MIP-1β) in NK-pDCs co-cultures. At high HIV-1BaL concentrations, the addition of NK cells did not promote the release of these mediators, suggesting that once efficiently triggered by the virus, pDCs could not integrate new activating signals delivered by NK cells. However, high HIV-1BaL concentrations were required to trigger IFN-α-mediated TRAIL expression at the surface of both pDCs and NK cells during their crosstalk. Interestingly, we identified the alarmin HMGB1, released at pDC-NK cell synapse, as an essential trigger for the secretion of IFN-α and IFN-related soluble mediators during the interplay of HIV-1 exposed pDCs with NK cells. Moreover, HMGB1 was found crucial for mTRAIL translocation to the plasma membrane of both pDCs and NK cells during their crosstalk following pDC exposure to HIV-1. Data from serum analyses of circulating HMGB1, HMGB1-specific antibodies, sTRAIL and IP-10 in a cohort of 67 HIV-1+ patients argue for the in vivo relevance of these observations. Altogether, these findings identify HMGB1 as a trigger for IFN</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..1513748B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..1513748B"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of fracture stratigraphy on the paleohydrogeology of the Madison limestone in two basement <span class="hlt">involved</span> folds in the Bighorn Basin (Wyoming, USA)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Barbier, Mickael; Leprêtre, Rémi; Hamon, Youri; Callot, Jean-Paul; Gasparrini, Marta; Daniel, Jean-Marc; Lacombe, Olivier</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>Based on the study of the Madison Limestone at Sheep Mountain and Rattlesnake Mountain, a unique outcrop dataset including (1) facies and diagenenitc analyses, (2) vertical persistence and cement stratigraphy of vein sets and (3) fluid inclusions thermometry are used to demonstrate (i) the importance of the eo-diagenetic phases on reservoirs petrophysical and mechanical properties, and (ii) the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of folding and fracturing on paleo-hydrogeology. The different phases of porosity and permeability development of the carbonates of the Madison Limestone occurred mainly during the syn-depositional eogenesis, the postponed eogenesis (reflux of brine during LFS3) and during the karstification at the end of the Mississippian. The early sealing by the Amsden Formation during the Early Pennsylvanian, limited the vertical exchanges and initiated the confinement of the Madison "aquifer". The burial of the Madison Limestone leaded to the occlusion of the pore network due to the calcite cementation in the distal parts of the platform whereas it leaded to the pore network development due to the crystallization of dolomite in proximal parts. Quantification of the vertical persistence of fractures shows that Sheep Mountain and Rattlesnake Mountain differ by the vertical persistence of the pre-folding Laramide vein sets, which are strictly bed-confined in Sheep Mountain but cut across bedding at Rattlesnake Mountain, whereas the syn-folding veins are through-going in both. The emplacement chronology and the various sources of the fluids responsible for the paragenetic sequence are based on isotope chemistry and fluid inclusions analysis of the matrix and vein cements. At Sheep Mountain and Rattlesnake Mountain, the two cements related to the burial are characterized by isotopic signatures of marine formation waters that were diluted during the karstification of the Madison Platform at the end of Mississippian. Meteoric fluids, presumably migrating during the Cenomanian from Wind</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002IJNAM..26..683P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002IJNAM..26..683P"><span>Solute transport through a deforming <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Peters, Glen P.; Smith, David W.</p> <p>2002-06-01</p> <p>Solute transport through a <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium is typically modelled assuming the <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium is rigid. However, many applications exist where the <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium is deforming, including, municipal landfill liners, mine tailings dams, and land subsidence. In this paper, mass balance laws are used to derive the flow and transport equations for a deforming <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium. The equations are derived in both spatial and material co-ordinate systems. Solute transport through an engineered landfill liner is used as an illustrative example to show the differences between the theory for a rigid <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium, and small and large deformation analysis of a deforming <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium. It is found that the large deformation model produces shorter solute breakthrough times, followed by the small deformation model, and then the rigid <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium model. It is also found that it is important to include spatial and temporal void ratio variations in the large deformation analysis. It is shown that a non-linear large deformation model may greatly reduce the solute breakthrough time, compared to a standard transport analysis typically employed by environmental engineers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12818493','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12818493"><span>Spreading of liquid drops over <span class="hlt">porous</span> substrates.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Starov, V M; Zhdanov, S A; Kosvintsev, S R; Sobolev, V D; Velarde, M G</p> <p>2003-07-01</p> <p>The spreading of small liquid drops over thin and thick <span class="hlt">porous</span> layers (dry or saturated with the same liquid) has been investigated in the case of both complete wetting (silicone oils of different viscosities) and partial wetting (aqueous SDS solutions of different concentrations). Nitrocellulose membranes of different porosity and different average pore size have been used as a model of thin <span class="hlt">porous</span> layers, glass and metal filters have been used as a model of thick <span class="hlt">porous</span> substrates. The first problem under investigation has been the spreading of small liquid drops over thin <span class="hlt">porous</span> layers saturated with the same liquid. An evolution equation describing the drop spreading has been deduced, which showed that both an effective lubrication and the liquid exchange between the drop and the <span class="hlt">porous</span> substrates are equally important. Spreading of silicone oils over different nitrocellulose microfiltration membranes was carried out. The experimental laws of the radius of spreading on time confirmed the theory predictions. The spreading of small liquid drops over thin dry <span class="hlt">porous</span> layers has also been investigated from both theoretical and experimental points of view. The drop motion over a dry <span class="hlt">porous</span> layer appears caused by the interplay of two processes: (a). the spreading of the drop over already saturated parts of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> layer, which results in a growth of the drop base, and (b). the imbibition of the liquid from the drop into the <span class="hlt">porous</span> substrate, which results in a shrinkage of the drop base and a growth of the wetted region inside the <span class="hlt">porous</span> layer. As a result of these two competing processes the radius of the drop base goes through a maximum as time proceeds. A system of two differential equations has been derived to describe the time evolution of the radii of both the drop base and the wetted region inside the <span class="hlt">porous</span> layer. This system includes two parameters, one accounts for the effective lubrication coefficient of the liquid over the wetted <span class="hlt">porous</span> substrate, and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23571671','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23571671"><span>Photonic crystal sensors based on <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pacholski, Claudia</p> <p>2013-04-09</p> <p><span class="hlt">Porous</span> silicon has been established as an excellent sensing platform for the optical detection of hazardous chemicals and biomolecular interactions such as DNA hybridization, antigen/antibody binding, and enzymatic reactions. Its <span class="hlt">porous</span> nature provides a high surface area within a small volume, which can be easily controlled by changing the pore sizes. As the porosity and consequently the refractive index of an etched <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon layer depends on the electrochemial etching conditions photonic crystals composed of multilayered <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon films with well-resolved and narrow optical reflectivity features can easily be obtained. The prominent optical response of the photonic crystal decreases the detection limit and therefore increases the sensitivity of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon sensors in comparison to sensors utilizing Fabry-Pérot based optical transduction. Development of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon photonic crystal sensors which allow for the detection of analytes by the naked eye using a simple color change or the fabrication of stacked <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon photonic crystals showing two distinct optical features which can be utilized for the discrimination of analytes emphasize its high application potential.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1016458','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1016458"><span>Foam Transport in <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Media - A Review</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Zhang, Z. F.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Zhong, Lirong</p> <p>2009-11-11</p> <p> transport of foam in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media is complicated in that the number of lamellae present governs flow characteristics such as viscosity, relative permeability, fluid distribution, and interactions between fluids. Hence, foam is a non-Newtonian fluid. During transport, foam destruction and formation occur. The net result of the two processes determines the foam texture (i.e., bubble density). Some of the foam may be trapped during transport. According to the <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of the aqueous and gas flow rates, foam flow generally has two regimes – weak and strong foam. There is also a minimum pressure gradient to initiate foam flow and a critical capillary for foam to be sustained. Similar to other fluids, the transport of foam is described by Darcy’s law with the exception that the foam viscosity is variable. Three major approaches to modeling foam transport in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media are the empirical, semi-empirical, and mechanistic methods. Mechanistic approaches can be complete in principal but may be difficult to obtain reliable parameters, whereas empirical and semi-empirical approaches can be limited by the detail used to describe foam rheology and mobility. Mechanistic approaches include the bubble population-balance model, the network/percolation theory, the catastrophe theory, and the filtration theory. Among these methods, all were developed for modeling polyhedral foam with the exception that the method based on the filtration theory was for the ball foam (microfoam).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=71493&keyword=chemical+AND+equation&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=89954683&CFTOKEN=54307026','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=71493&keyword=chemical+AND+equation&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=89954683&CFTOKEN=54307026"><span>VIRUS TRANSPORT IN PHYSICALLY AND GEOCHEMICALLY HETEROGENEOUS SUBSURFACE <span class="hlt">POROUS</span> MEDIA. (R826179)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><p>A two-dimensional model for virus transport in physically and geochemically heterogeneous subsurface <span class="hlt">porous</span> media is presented. The model <span class="hlt">involves</span> solution of the advection–dispersion equation, which additionally considers virus inactivation in the solution, as well as ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998PhDT.......116R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998PhDT.......116R"><span>Nonlinear flow in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rojas, Sergio Jesus</p> <p>1998-07-01</p> <p>Numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations in two-dimensional quasi-periodic and quasi-isotropic random media were obtained to analyze the local and large scale aspects of finite Reynolds number flow. For Reynolds number less than one, the results show a first correction to Darcy's law which is cubic in the Darcy (averaged) velocity, while for Reynolds number greater than one, the results are in agreement with Forchheimer equation. That is, the correction to Darcy's law is quadratic in the average (Darcy) velocity. The cubic correction to Darcy's law support Mei and Auriault's (1991) theoretical study, based on homogenization theory. In addition, the results show support to a unifying empirical equation describing fluid flow in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media of similar structure, first proposed by Beavers and Sparrow (1969). Also, the results show agreement, except by a multiplicative constant, with Sangani and Acrivos (1982) equation for the drag on dilute array of cylinders.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2772207','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2772207"><span>Enhanced Biocompatibility of <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Nitinol</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Munroe, Norman; Pulletikurthi, Chandan; Haider, Waseem</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Porous</span> Nitinol (PNT) has found vast applications in the medical industry as interbody fusion devices, synthetic bone grafts, etc. However, the tendency of the PNT to corrode is anticipated to be greater as compared to solid nitinol since there is a larger surface area in contact with body fluids. In such cases, surface preparation is known to play a major role in a material’s biocompatibility. In an effort to check the effect of surface treatments on the in vitro corrosion properties of PNT, in this investigation, they were subjected to different surface treatments such as boiling in water, dry heating, and passivation. The localized corrosion resistance of alloys before and after each treatment was evaluated in phosphate buffer saline solution (PBS) using cyclic polarization tests in accordance with ASTM F 2129-08. PMID:19956797</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Pica&pg=5&id=EJ418837','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Pica&pg=5&id=EJ418837"><span>Parent <span class="hlt">Involvement</span>: What Is It That Works?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Leik, Robert K.; Chalkley, Mary Anne</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>Discusses the assessment of the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of parent <span class="hlt">involvement</span> in the Head Start Family <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Project. This project was undertaken with cooperation from the Parents in Community Action (PICA) component of the Hennepin County, Minnesota, Head Start Program. (BB)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/4139336','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/4139336"><span>METHOD OF IMPREGNATING A <span class="hlt">POROUS</span> MATERIAL</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Steele, G.N.</p> <p>1960-06-01</p> <p>A method of impregnating a <span class="hlt">porous</span> body with an inorganic uranium- containing salt is outlined and comprises dissolving a water-soluble uranium- containing salt in water; saturating the intercommunicating pores of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> body with the salt solution; infusing ammonia gas into the intercommunicating pores of the body, the ammonia gas in water chemically reacting with the water- soluble uranium-containing salt in the water solvent to form a nonwater-soluble uranium-containing precipitant; and evaporating the volatile unprecipitated products from the intercommunicating pores whereby the uranium-containing precipitate is uniformly distributed in the intercommunicating peres of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> body.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..1810215B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..1810215B"><span>Dynamics of water evaporation from saline <span class="hlt">porous</span> media with mixed wettability</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bergstad, Mina; Shokri, Nima</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Understanding of the dynamics of salt transport and precipitation in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media during evaporation is of crucial concern in various environmental and hydrological applications such as soil salinization, rock weathering, terrestrial ecosystem functioning, microbiological activities and biodiversity in vadose zone. Vegetation, plant growth and soil organisms can be severely limited in salt-affected land. This process is influenced by the complex interaction among atmospheric conditions, transport properties of <span class="hlt">porous</span> media and properties of the evaporating solution (1-5). We investigated effects of mixed wettability conditions on salt precipitation during evaporation from saline <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. To do so, we conducted a series of evaporation experiments with sand mixtures containing different fractions of hydrophobic grains saturated with NaCl solutions. The dynamics of salt precipitation at the surface of sand columns (mounted on digital balances to record the evaporation curves) as well as the displacement of the receding drying front (the interface between wet and partially wet zone) were recorded using an automatic imaging system at well-defined time intervals. The experiments were conducted with sand packs containing 0, 25, 40, 50, 65, and 80% fraction of hydrophobic grains. All experiments were conducted in an environmental chamber in which the relative humidity and ambient temperature were kept constant at 30% and 30 C, respectively. Our results show that partial wettability conditions had minor <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on the evaporative mass losses from saline sand packs due to the presence of salt. This is significantly different than what is normally observed during evaporation from mixed wettability <span class="hlt">porous</span> media saturated with pure water (6). In our experiments, increasing the fraction of hydrophobic grains did not result in any notable reduction of the evaporative mass losses from saline <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. Our results show that the presence of hydrophobic grains on the surface</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008PhDT........32P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008PhDT........32P"><span>Modeling of shape memory alloys and application to <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Panico, Michele</p> <p></p> <p> permanent inelasticity in the shape memory matrix. First, an idealized model of <span class="hlt">porous</span> material has been used and samples with different material porosities have been constructed. With this simulation method, the complex interaction between porosity, local phase transformation and macroscale response has been evaluated. Then, a real experimental microstructure has been used to build a three-dimensional model of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> SMA. The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of microstructural characteristics on the average macroscopic response has been investigated. The results have significant implications for use of <span class="hlt">porous</span> SMAs in biomedical and structural applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/449678','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/449678"><span>Wave-induced pore pressure and effective stresses in a <span class="hlt">porous</span> seabed with variable permeability</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Jeng, D.S.; Seymour, B.R.</p> <p>1996-12-31</p> <p>An evaluation of wave-induced soil response is particularly useful for geotechnical and coastal engineers <span class="hlt">involved</span> in the design of foundations for offshore structures. To simplify the mathematical procedure, most theories available for the wave/seabed interaction problem have assumed a <span class="hlt">porous</span> seabed with uniform permeability, despite strong evidence of variable permeability. This paper proposes an analytical solution for the wave induced soil response in a <span class="hlt">porous</span> seabed with variable permeability. Verification is available through reduction to the simple case of uniform permeability. The numerical results indicate that the effect of variable soil permeability on pore pressure and effective stresses is significant.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFM.H34D..08I','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFM.H34D..08I"><span>Biofilm Growth in <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Media: Validation of three-dimensional characterization of biofilm growth in packed bead columns</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Iltis, G.; Armstrong, R. T.; Jansik, D. P.; Wood, B. D.; Wildenschild, D.</p> <p>2009-12-01</p> <p>Current understanding of subsurface microbial biofilm formation and the <span class="hlt">impact</span> on fluid hydrodynamics associated with biofilm growth is limited by our ability to observe the in situ pore-scale geometry of developed biofilms. Biomass distribution in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media has been observed primarily in two-dimensional systems to date; currently, no high-resolution three-dimensional structural data sets exist for opaque <span class="hlt">porous</span> media that provide sufficient information about biomass distribution such that the <span class="hlt">impact</span> on flow and solute transport at the pore-scale can be directly assessed. A new method for resolving high-resolution three-dimensional tomographic images of biofilms in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media using synchrotron-based x-ray microtomography has been developed. As a part of this method, silver coated, neutrally buoyant microspheres are used to delineate the surface of the biofilm within <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. Quantitative validation of this method will be presented along with three-dimensional characterization of biofilm growth in packed bead columns. Current and future applications for this imaging method include quantitative experimental validation of mathematical models pertaining to spatial distribution of biofilm and variation in hydrodynamic flow pathways within <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. Our current research into this area focuses on evaluating microbially mediated co-precipitation of heavy metals in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. Results will be presented from new imaging experiments comparing different microbes and varying flow rates to address effects of biofilm type and density on the image quality.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JPhD...49F5301J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JPhD...49F5301J"><span>Enhancement of a dynamic <span class="hlt">porous</span> model considering compression-release hysteresis behavior: application to graphite</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jodar, B.; Seisson, G.; Hébert, D.; Bertron, I.; Boustie, M.; Berthe, L.</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>Because of their shock wave attenuation properties, <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials and foams are increasingly used for various applications such as graphite in the aerospace industry and polyurethane (PU) foams in biomedical engineering. For these two materials, the absence of residual compaction after compression and release cycles limits the efficiency of the usual numerical dynamic <span class="hlt">porous</span> models such as P-α and POREQST. In this paper, we suggest a simple enhancement of the latter in order to take into account the compression-release hysteresis behavior experimentally observed for the considered materials. The new model, named H-POREQST, was implemented into a Lagrangian hydrocode and tested for simulating plate <span class="hlt">impact</span> experiments at moderate pressure onto a commercial grade of <span class="hlt">porous</span> graphite (EDM3). It proved to be in far better agreement with experimental data than the original model which encourages us to pursue numerical tests and developments.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28026914','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28026914"><span>Synthetic vs Natural: Diatoms Bioderived <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Materials for the Next Generation of Healthcare Nanodevices.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rea, Ilaria; Terracciano, Monica; De Stefano, Luca</p> <p>2017-02-01</p> <p>Nanostructured <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials promise a next generation of innovative devices for healthcare and biomedical applications. The fabrication of such materials generally requires complex synthesis procedures, not always available in laboratories or sustainable in industries, and has adverse environmental <span class="hlt">impact</span>. Nanosized <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials can also be obtained from natural resources, which are an attractive alternative approach to man-made fabrication. Biogenic nanoporous silica from diatoms, and diatomaceous earths, constitutes largely available, low-cost reservoir of mesoporous nanodevices that can be engineered for theranostic applications, ranging from subcellular imaging to drug delivery. In this progress report, main experiences on nature-derived nanoparticles with healthcare and biomedical functionalities are reviewed and critically analyzed in search of a new collection of biocompatible <span class="hlt">porous</span> nanomaterials.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1346011','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1346011"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> graphene nanocages for battery applications</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Amine, Khalil; Lu, Jun; Du, Peng; Wen, Jianguo; Curtiss, Larry A.</p> <p>2017-03-07</p> <p>An active material composition includes a <span class="hlt">porous</span> graphene nanocage and a source material. The source material may be a sulfur material. The source material may be an anodic material. A lithium-sulfur battery is provided that includes a cathode, an anode, a lithium salt, and an electrolyte, where the cathode of the lithium-sulfur battery includes a <span class="hlt">porous</span> graphene nanocage and a sulfur material and at least a portion of the sulfur material is entrapped within the <span class="hlt">porous</span> graphene nanocage. Also provided is a lithium-air battery that includes a cathode, an anode, a lithium salt, and an electrolyte, where the cathode includes a <span class="hlt">porous</span> graphene nanocage and where the cathode may be free of a cathodic metal catalyst.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_17 --> <div id="page_18" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="341"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20050160254','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20050160254"><span>Drag Measurements of <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Plate Acoustic Liners</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Wolter, John D.</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>This paper presents the results of direct drag measurements on a variety of <span class="hlt">porous</span> plate acoustic liners. The existing literature describes numerous studies of drag on <span class="hlt">porous</span> walls with injection or suction, but relatively few of drag on <span class="hlt">porous</span> plates with neither injection nor suction. Furthermore, the porosity of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> plate in existing studies is much lower than typically used in acoustic liners. In the present work, the acoustic liners consisted of a perforated face sheet covering a bulk acoustic absorber material. Factors that were varied in the experiment were hole diameter, hole pattern, face sheet thickness, bulk material type, and size of the gap (if any) between the face sheet and the absorber material.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009ZaMP...60..138I','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009ZaMP...60..138I"><span>Thermal effects in orthotropic <span class="hlt">porous</span> elastic beams</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Iaşan, D.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>This paper is concerned with the linear theory of anisotropic <span class="hlt">porous</span> elastic bodies. The extension and bending of orthotropic <span class="hlt">porous</span> elastic cylinders subjected to a plane temperature field is investigated. The work is motivated by the recent interest in the using of the orthotropic <span class="hlt">porous</span> elastic solid as model for bones and various engineering materials. First, the thermoelastic deformation of inhomogeneous beams whose constitutive coefficients are independent of the axial coordinate is studied. Then, the extension and bending effects in orthotropic cylinders reinforced by longitudinal rods are investigated. The three-dimensional problem is reduced to the study of two-dimensional problems. The method is used to solve the problem of an orthotropic <span class="hlt">porous</span> circular cylinder with a special kind of inhomogeneity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22990753','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22990753"><span>Methane storage in advanced <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Makal, Trevor A; Li, Jian-Rong; Lu, Weigang; Zhou, Hong-Cai</p> <p>2012-12-07</p> <p>The need for alternative fuels is greater now than ever before. With considerable sources available and low pollution factor, methane is a natural choice as petroleum replacement in cars and other mobile applications. However, efficient storage methods are still lacking to implement the application of methane in the automotive industry. Advanced <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials, metal-organic frameworks and <span class="hlt">porous</span> organic polymers, have received considerable attention in sorptive storage applications owing to their exceptionally high surface areas and chemically-tunable structures. In this critical review we provide an overview of the current status of the application of these two types of advanced <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials in the storage of methane. Examples of materials exhibiting high methane storage capacities are analyzed and methods for increasing the applicability of these advanced <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials in methane storage technologies described.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10117349','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10117349"><span>Multiphase flow in fractured <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Firoozabadi, A.</p> <p>1995-02-01</p> <p>The major goal of this research project was to improve the understanding of the gas-oil two-phase flow in fractured <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. In addition, miscible displacement was studied to evaluate its promise for enhanced recovery.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED094863.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED094863.pdf"><span>Evaluating Parent <span class="hlt">Involvement</span>. Issue Paper No. 1.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Safran, Daniel</p> <p></p> <p>This paper poses a series of questions to assist programs in deciding what it is about parent <span class="hlt">involvement</span> that they wish to evaluate. The questions focus on the nature of parent <span class="hlt">involvement</span>, why parent <span class="hlt">involvement</span> is needed, and what evaluation of parent <span class="hlt">involvement</span> should include. A conceptual framework for research on the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of parent…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhDT.......205M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhDT.......205M"><span>Synthesis and gas adsorption study of <span class="hlt">porous</span> metal-organic framework materials</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mu, Bin</p> <p></p> <p>Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) or <span class="hlt">porous</span> coordination polymers (PCPs) have become the focus of intense study over the past decade due to their potential for advancing a variety of applications including air purification, gas storage, adsorption separations, catalysis, gas sensing, drug delivery, and so on. These materials have some distinct advantages over traditional <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials such as the well-defined structures, uniform pore sizes, chemically functionalized sorption sites, and potential for postsynthetic modification, etc. Thus, synthesis and adsorption studies of <span class="hlt">porous</span> MOFs have increased substantially in recent years. Among various prospective applications, air purification is one of the most immediate concerns, which has urgent requirements to improve current nuclear, biological, and chemical (NBC) filters <span class="hlt">involving</span> commercial and military purposes. Thus, the major goal of this funded project is to search, synthesize, and test these novel hybrid <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials for adsorptive removal of toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) and chemical warfare agents (CWAs), and to install the benchmark for new-generation NBC filters. The objective of this study is three-fold: (i) Advance our understanding of coordination chemistry by synthesizing novel MOFs and characterizing these <span class="hlt">porous</span> coordination polymers; (ii) Evaluate <span class="hlt">porous</span> MOF materials for gasadsorption applications including CO2 capture, CH4 storage, other light gas adsorption and separations, and examine the chemical and physical properties of these solid adsorbents including thermal stability and heat capacity of MOFs; (iii) Evaluate <span class="hlt">porous</span> MOF materials for next-generation NBC filter media by adsorption breakthrough measurements of TICs on MOFs, and advance our understanding about structureproperty relationships of these novel adsorbents.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016GeoRL..43.4426B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016GeoRL..43.4426B"><span>Evaporation of NaCl solution from <span class="hlt">porous</span> media with mixed wettability</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bergstad, Mina; Shokri, Nima</p> <p>2016-05-01</p> <p>Evaporation of saline water from <span class="hlt">porous</span> media is ubiquitous in many processes including soil salinization, crop production, and CO2 sequestration in deep saline acquirer. It is controlled by the transport properties of <span class="hlt">porous</span> media, atmospheric conditions, and properties of the evaporating saline solution. In the present study, the effects of mixed wettability conditions on the general dynamics of water evaporation from <span class="hlt">porous</span> media saturated with NaCl solution were investigated. To do so, we conducted a comprehensive series of evaporation experiments using sand mixtures containing different fractions of hydrophobic grains saturated with NaCl solutions. Our results showed that increasing fraction of hydrophobic grains in the mixed wettability sand pack had minor <span class="hlt">impact</span> on the evaporative mass losses due to the presence of salt whose precipitation patterns were significantly influenced by the mixed wettability condition. Through macroscale and microscale investigations, we found formation of patchy efflorescence in the case of mixed wettability sand pack as opposed to crusty efflorescence in the case of completely hydrophilic <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. Furthermore, the presence of salty water and hydrophobic grains in the sand pack significantly influenced the general dynamics and morphology of the receding drying front. Our results extend the understanding of the saline water evaporation from <span class="hlt">porous</span> media with direct applications to various hydrological and engineering processes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21951321','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21951321"><span>A new approach to model the spatiotemporal development of biofilm phase in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bozorg, Ali; Sen, Arindom; Gates, Ian D</p> <p>2011-11-01</p> <p>Bacteria can exist within biofilms that are attached to the solid matrix of a <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium. Under certain conditions, the biomass can fully occupy the pore space leading to reduced hydraulic conductivity and mass transport. Here, by treating biofilm as a growing, high-viscosity phase, a novel macroscopic approach to model biofilm spatial expansion and its corresponding effects on <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium hydraulic properties is presented. The separate yet coupled flow of the water and biofilm phases is handled by using relative permeability curves that allow for biofilm movement within the <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium and bioclogging effects. Fluid flow is governed by Darcy's law and component transport is set by the convection-diffusion equation reaction terms for each component. Here, the system of governing equations is solved by using a commercial multiphase flow reservoir simulator, which is used to validate the model against published laboratory experiments. A comparison of the model and experimental observations reveal that the model provides a reasonable means to predict biomass development in the <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium. The results reveal that coupled flow of water and movement of biofilm, as described by relative permeability curves, is complex and has a large <span class="hlt">impact</span> on the development of biomass and consequent bioclogging in the <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1990JVSJ...33..637S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1990JVSJ...33..637S"><span>Development Of <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Glass Fiber Optic Sensors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Macedo, P. B.; Barkatt, Aa.; Feng, X.; Finger, S. M.; Hojaji, H.; Laberge, N.; Mohr, R.; Penafiel, M.; Saad, E.</p> <p></p> <p>A method for producing rugged, continuous <span class="hlt">porous</span> glass fiber optic sensors was developed. pH and temperature sensors based on this technology have been successfully produced. The sensor portion of the fiber is made <span class="hlt">porous</span> by selective leaching of a specially formulated borosilicate glass fiber. This results in a strong, monolithic structure where the sensor portion of the fiber remains integrally attached to the rest of the fiber (which acts as a light pipe), essentially eliminating losses at the sensor-light pipe interface. Pore size in the sensor can be controllably varied by modifying heat treatment conditions, making these sensors suitable for chemical concentration measurements in liquids and gases. Appropriate dyes were chemically bonded by silanization to the large interior surface area of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> sensors to produce the pH and temperature sensors. Cresol red and phenol red were used for pH and pinacyanol chloride was used for temperature sensing. The sensitivity of these devices can be controlled by varying the concentration of the chemically bonded dye and the length of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> region. Optical absorbance measurements were made in the visible range. The tip of the sensors was coated with a thin, <span class="hlt">porous</span> layer of gold to reflect the incident light, resulting in a double pass across the <span class="hlt">porous</span> sensor. Experimental measurements were made over a pH range of 3 to 8 and a temperature range of 28-70 C. These <span class="hlt">porous</span> glass fiber optic sensors were found to be rugged and reliable due to their monolithic structure and large interior surface area for attachment of active species. A broad range of sensors based on this technology could be developed by using different active species, such as enzymes and other biochemicals, which could be bonded to the interior surface of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> glass sensor.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/864009','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/864009"><span>Method for preparing <span class="hlt">porous</span> metal hydride compacts</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Ron, Moshe; Gruen, Dieter M.; Mendelsohn, Marshall H.; Sheft, Irving</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>A method for preparing <span class="hlt">porous</span> metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form <span class="hlt">porous</span> metallic-matrix hydride compacts.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5136537','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5136537"><span>Method for preparing <span class="hlt">porous</span> metal hydride compacts</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Ron, M.; Gruen, D.M.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Sheft, I.</p> <p>1980-01-21</p> <p>A method for preparing <span class="hlt">porous</span> metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form <span class="hlt">porous</span> metallic-matrix hydride compacts.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4698168','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4698168"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> titanium bases for osteochondral tissue engineering</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Nover, Adam B.; Lee, Stephanie L.; Georgescu, Maria S.; Howard, Daniel R.; Saunders, Reuben A.; Yu, William T.; Klein, Robert W.; Napolitano, Anthony P.; Ateshian, Gerard A.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Tissue engineering of osteochondral grafts may offer a cell-based alternative to native allografts, which are in short supply. Previous studies promote the fabrication of grafts consisting of a viable cell-seeded hydrogel integrated atop a <span class="hlt">porous</span>, bone-like metal. Advantages of the manufacturing process have led to the evaluation of <span class="hlt">porous</span> titanium as the bone-like base material. Here, <span class="hlt">porous</span> titanium was shown to support the growth of cartilage to produce native levels of Young’s modulus, using a clinically relevant cell source. Mechanical and biochemical properties were similar or higher for the osteochondral constructs compared to chondral-only controls. Further investigation into the mechanical influence of the base on the composite material suggests that underlying pores may decrease interstitial fluid pressurization and applied strains, which may be overcome by alterations to the base structure. Future studies aim to optimize titanium-based tissue engineered osteochondral constructs to best match the structural architecture and strength of native grafts. Statement of Significance The studies described in this manuscript follow up on previous studies from our lab pertaining to the fabrication of osteochondral grafts that consist of a bone-like <span class="hlt">porous</span> metal and a chondrocyte-seeded hydrogel. Here, tissue engineered osteochondral grafts were cultured to native stiffness using adult chondrocytes, a clinically relevant cell source, and a <span class="hlt">porous</span> titanium base, a material currently used in clinical implants. This <span class="hlt">porous</span> titanium is manufactured via selective laser melting, offering the advantages of precise control over shape, pore size, and orientation. Additionally, this manuscript describes the mechanical influence of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> base, which may have applicability to <span class="hlt">porous</span> bases derived from other materials. PMID:26320541</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA567126','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA567126"><span>Fully Scalable <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Metal Electrospray Propulsion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-03-20</p> <p><span class="hlt">porous</span> metals: in silicon, fluid transport is very inefficient given the poor wettability of ionic liquids on this material. Initial attempts tried to...period of performance of this work, we demonstrated that such configuration and process is possible with <span class="hlt">porous</span> metals, even if the raw wettability ...extraction and acceleration grids. Here two flat < 1 µm porosity tungsten arrays of 20 emitters each were configured within an ABS plastic body and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhFl...23l2107M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhFl...23l2107M"><span>Scaling percolation in thin <span class="hlt">porous</span> layers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Médici, E. F.; Allen, J. S.</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>Percolation in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media is a complex process that depends on the flow rate, material, and fluids properties as well as the boundary conditions. Traditional methods of characterizing percolation rely upon visual observation of a flow pattern or a pressure-saturation relation valid only in the limit of no flow. In this paper, the dynamics of fluid percolation in thin <span class="hlt">porous</span> media is approached through a new scaling. This new scaling in conjunction with the capillary number and the viscosity ratio has resulted in a linear non-dimensional correlation of the percolation pressure and wetted area in time unique to each <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. The effect of different percolation flow patterns on the dynamic pressure-saturation relation can be condensed into a linear correlation using this scaling. The general trend and implications of the scaling have been analyzed using an analytical model of a fluid percolating between two parallel plates and by experimental testing on thin <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. Cathode <span class="hlt">porous</span> transport layers (PTLs), also known as gas diffusion layers, of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell having different morphological and wetting properties were tested under drainage conditions. Images of the fluid percolation evolution and the percolation pressure in the PTLs were simultaneously recorded. A unique linear correlation is obtained for each type of PTL samples using the new scaling. The correlation derived from this new scaling can be used to quantitatively characterize <span class="hlt">porous</span> media with respect to percolation. While the characterization method discussed herein was developed for the study of <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials used in PEM fuel cells, the method and scaling are applicable to any <span class="hlt">porous</span> media.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20050210230&hterms=ion+exchange&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dion%2Bexchange','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20050210230&hterms=ion+exchange&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dion%2Bexchange"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> Ceramic Spheres from Ion Exchange Resin</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Dynys, Fred</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>A commercial cation ion exchange resin, cross-linked polystyrene, has been successfully used as a template to fabricate 20 to 50 micron <span class="hlt">porous</span> ceramic spheres. Ion exchange resins have dual template capabilities. Pore architecture of the ceramic spheres can be altered by changing the template pattern. Templating can be achieved by utilizing the internal <span class="hlt">porous</span> structure or the external surface of the resin beads. Synthesis methods and chemical/physical characteristics of the ceramic spheres will be reported.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.H21L..04A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.H21L..04A"><span>Natural thermal convection in fractured <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Adler, P. M.; Mezon, C.; Mourzenko, V.; Thovert, J. F.; Antoine, R.; Finizola, A.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>In the crust, fractures/faults can provide preferential pathways for fluid flow or act as barriers preventing the flow across these structures. In hydrothermal systems (usually found in fractured rock masses), these discontinuities may play a critical role at various scales, controlling fluid flows and heat transfer. The thermal convection is numerically computed in 3D fluid satured fractured <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. Fractures are inserted as discrete objects, randomly distributed over a damaged volume, which is a fraction of the total volume. The fluid is assumed to satisfy Darcy's law in the fractures and in the <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium with exchanges between them. All simulations were made for Rayleigh numbers (Ra) < 150 (hence, the fluid is in thermal equilibrium with the medium), cubic boxes and closed-top conditions. Checks were performed on an unfractured <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium and the convection cells do start for the theoretical value of Ra, namely 4p². 2D convection was verified up to Ra=800. The influence of parameters such as fracture aperture (or fracture transmissivity), fracture density and fracture length is studied. Moreover, these models are compared to <span class="hlt">porous</span> media with the same macroscopic permeability. Preliminary results show that the non-uniqueness associated with initial conditions which makes possible either 2D or 3D convection in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media (Schubert & Straus 1979) is no longer true for fractured <span class="hlt">porous</span> media (at least for 50<Ra<150). The influence of fracture density and fracture aperture on the Nusselt number (Nu) is highly Ra dependent. The effect of the damaged zone on Nu is roughly proportional to its size. All these models also allows us to determine for which range of fracture density the fractured <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium is in good agreement with an unfractured <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium of the same bulk permeability.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1083909','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1083909"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> polymeric materials for hydrogen storage</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Yu, Luping; Liu, Di-Jia; Yuan, Shengwen; Yang, Junbing</p> <p>2013-04-02</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">porous</span> polymer, poly-9,9'-spirobifluorene and its derivatives for storage of H.sub.2 are prepared through a chemical synthesis method. The <span class="hlt">porous</span> polymers have high specific surface area and narrow pore size distribution. Hydrogen uptake measurements conducted for these polymers determined a higher hydrogen storage capacity at the ambient temperature over that of the benchmark materials. The method of preparing such polymers, includes oxidatively activating solids by CO.sub.2/steam oxidation and supercritical water treatment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010PhDT........56L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010PhDT........56L"><span>Application of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon in terahertz technology</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lo, Shu-Zee Alencious</p> <p></p> <p>In this thesis, we discuss our efforts in developing <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon based devices for terahertz signal processing. In the first stage of our research, we demonstrate that <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon samples fabricated from highly doped p-type silicon can have adjustable refractive indices ranging from 1.5--2.1 and can exhibit a resistivity that is four orders of magnitude higher than that of the silicon wafer from which they were made. We show that the <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon becomes stable and relatively lossless after thermal oxidation. The partially oxidized <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon is shown to exhibit a smooth absorption spectrum, with low absorption loss of <10 cm-1 over the entire terahertz spectrum. As a proof of concept, we fabricated, for the first time, a <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon based multilayered Bragg filter with reflectance of 93% and full-width at half-maximum bandwidth of 0.26 THz. Compared with other multilayered filtering techniques, <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon has the advantage that it can be easily fabricated, and offers the possibility of forming multilayer and graded index structures for more advanced filters. The large surface area of nanoporous silicon makes it an especially attractive platform for applications in biochemical detection and diagnostics As part of our effort in developing terahertz waveguide for biosensing, we reported the world's first <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon based terahertz waveguide using the principle of surface plasmon polaritons. The effect of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon film thickness on the propagation of surface plasmons is explained theoretically in this thesis and is found to be in good agreement with experimental results.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28288217','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28288217"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> membranes in secondary battery technologies.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lu, Wenjing; Yuan, Zhizhang; Zhao, Yuyue; Zhang, Hongzhang; Zhang, Huamin; Li, Xianfeng</p> <p>2017-03-13</p> <p>Secondary batteries have received huge attention due to their attractive features in applications of large-scale energy storage and portable electronic devices, as well as electrical vehicles. In a secondary battery, a membrane plays the role of separating the anode and cathode to prevent the occurrence of a short circuit, while allowing the transport of charge carriers to achieve a complete circuit. The properties of a membrane will largely determine the performance of a battery. In this article, we review the research and development progress of <span class="hlt">porous</span> membranes in secondary battery technologies, such as lithium-based batteries together with flow batteries. The preparation methods as well as the required properties of <span class="hlt">porous</span> membranes in different secondary battery technologies will be elucidated thoroughly and deeply. Most importantly, this review will mainly focus on the optimization and modification of <span class="hlt">porous</span> membranes in different secondary battery systems. And various modifications on commercial <span class="hlt">porous</span> membranes along with novel membrane materials are widely discussed and summarized. This review will help to optimize the membrane material for different secondary batteries, and favor the understanding of the preparation-structure-performance relationship of <span class="hlt">porous</span> membranes in different secondary batteries. Therefore, this review will provide an extensive, comprehensive and professional reference to design and construct high-performance <span class="hlt">porous</span> membranes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ApSS..356..553C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ApSS..356..553C"><span>Enhanced supercapacitor performances using C-doped <span class="hlt">porous</span> TiO2 electrodes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chen, Juanrong; Qiu, Fengxian; Zhang, Ying; Liang, Jianzheng; Zhu, Huijun; Cao, Shunsheng</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>Considerable efforts have been paid to develop electrochemical capacitors with energy storage capability in order to meet the demands of multifunctional electronics. Here we report a facile method to fabricate C-doped <span class="hlt">porous</span> anatase TiO2. This technique <span class="hlt">involves</span> the preparation of monodisperse cationic polystyrene nanoparticles (CPN), following sequential deposition of tetrabutylorthotitanate (TBT), and directly carbonizing of CPN. Interestingly, during the process of carbonizing CPN, a phase transition of TiO2 will be happened and whist C-doped <span class="hlt">porous</span> anatase TiO2 is in situ formed. When this <span class="hlt">porous</span> C-doped TiO2 is used as electrode material to prepare electrochemical capacitor, it manifests a higher capacitance than the commercial P25, effectively broadening it potential for many practical applications.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_18 --> <div id="page_19" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="361"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JMFM..tmp...21S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JMFM..tmp...21S"><span>Nonlinear Stability of Convection in a <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Layer with Solid Partitions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Straughan, B.</p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>We show that for many classes of convection problem <span class="hlt">involving</span> a <span class="hlt">porous</span> layer, or layers, interleaved with finite but non-deformable solid layers, the global nonlinear stability threshold is exactly the same as the linear instability one. The layer(s) of <span class="hlt">porous</span> material may be of Darcy type, Brinkman type, possess an anisotropic permeability, or even be such that they are of local thermal non-equilibrium type where the fluid and solid matrix constituting the <span class="hlt">porous</span> material may have different temperatures. The key to the global stability result lies in proving the linear operator attached to the convection problem is a symmetric operator while the nonlinear terms must satisfy appropriate conditions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/13828','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/13828"><span>Optimization of Fluid Front Dynamics in <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Media Using Rate Control: I. Equal Mobility Fluids</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Sundaryanto, Bagus; Yortsos, Yanis C.</p> <p>1999-10-18</p> <p>In applications <span class="hlt">involving</span> this injection of a fluid in a <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium to displace another fluid, a main objective is the maximization of the displacement efficiency. For a fixed arrangement of injection and production points (sources and sinks), such optimization is possible by controlling the injection rate policy. Despite its practical relevance, however, this aspect has received scant attention in the literature. In this paper, a fundamental approach based on optimal control theory, for the case when the fluids are miscible, of equal viscosity and in the absence of dispersion and gravity effects. Both homogeneous and heterogeneous <span class="hlt">porous</span> media are considered. From a fluid dynamics viewpoint, this is a problem in the deformation of material lines in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media, as a function of time-varying injection rates.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6300916','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6300916"><span>Shock induced hot-spot formation and subsequent decomposition in granular, <span class="hlt">porous</span> hexanitrostilbene explosive</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Hayes, D B</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>Experimental and theoretical studies on granular, <span class="hlt">porous</span> hexanitrostilbene (HNS) explosive have yielded an increased understanding of microstructural processes occurring during initiation by shock loading. Experiments <span class="hlt">involved</span> the planar <span class="hlt">impact</span> of HNS specimens onto fused-silica targets. Chemical decomposition liberated gaseous products, causing the pressure in the HNS to rise. Velocity interferometry measured material velocity, hence, pressure at the fused silica/HNS interface. An analysis of this pressure excursion yields chemical decomposition history. The data are interpreted in terms of a quantitative two-temperature model which considers hot spots to be formed at pore sites as a result of the irreversible work accompanying the shock. Subsequently, decomposition completion is achieved by burn fronts which propagate radially out from each hot spot at a velocity which can be determined from the bulk decomposition rate. Analysis of the experimental data in the context of the model yields several important results: the delay times corresponding to hot-spot decomposition are shorter than expected; model calculations show about the same inferred hot-spot temperature for different initial porosities and particle sizes in HNS, shock-loaded to equal pressures, which is consistent with experimental results.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27429500','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27429500"><span>A Semi-implicit Treatment of <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Media in Steady-State CFD.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Domaingo, Andreas; Langmayr, Daniel; Somogyi, Bence; Almbauer, Raimund</p> <p></p> <p>There are many situations in computational fluid dynamics which require the definition of source terms in the Navier-Stokes equations. These source terms not only allow to model the physics of interest but also have a strong <span class="hlt">impact</span> on the reliability, stability, and convergence of the numerics <span class="hlt">involved</span>. Therefore, sophisticated numerical approaches exist for the description of such source terms. In this paper, we focus on the source terms present in the Navier-Stokes or Euler equations due to <span class="hlt">porous</span> media-in particular the Darcy-Forchheimer equation. We introduce a method for the numerical treatment of the source term which is independent of the spatial discretization and based on linearization. In this description, the source term is treated in a fully implicit way whereas the other flow variables can be computed in an implicit or explicit manner. This leads to a more robust description in comparison with a fully explicit approach. The method is well suited to be combined with coarse-grid-CFD on Cartesian grids, which makes it especially favorable for accelerated solution of coupled 1D-3D problems. To demonstrate the applicability and robustness of the proposed method, a proof-of-concept example in 1D, as well as more complex examples in 2D and 3D, is presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015E%26ES...27a2027S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015E%26ES...27a2027S"><span>Modeling of seismic field in <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium:Simulation study of single pore and pore ensemble effects</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Shatskaya, A. A.; Nemirovich-Danchenko, M. M.; Terre, D. A.</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>The article considers the effect of <span class="hlt">porous</span> media on elastic wave field. Based on numerical modeling, diffraction pattern of the wave propagating through a single pore in carbonates has been produced. Matrix properties (calcite and dolomite) and fluid (water) are modeled based on thin core section image. The qualitative comparison with the available computational data has been performed. Provided that ensemble of pores is <span class="hlt">involved</span>, the effect of <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium on seismic field has been studied. For comparison with experimental data the model of <span class="hlt">porous</span> sintered aluminum Al-6061 has been considered. The processing of numerical modeling results made it possible to estimate average velocities in the model of <span class="hlt">porous</span> aluminum and compare them with physical modeling data. The provided estimates have indicated qualitative (single pore) and quantitative (ensemble of pores) correlation of simulation and experiment results.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27285778','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27285778"><span>A novel strategy for the preparation of <span class="hlt">porous</span> microspheres and its application in peptide drug loading.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wei, Yi; Wang, Yuxia; Zhang, Huixia; Zhou, Weiqing; Ma, Guanghui</p> <p>2016-09-15</p> <p>A new strategy is developed to prepare <span class="hlt">porous</span> microspheres with narrow size distribution for peptides controlled release, <span class="hlt">involving</span> a fabrication of <span class="hlt">porous</span> microspheres without any porogens followed by a pore closing process. Amphiphilic polymers with different hydrophobic segments (poly(monomethoxypolyethylene glycol-co-d,l-lactide) (mPEG-PLA), poly(monomethoxypolyethylene glycol-co-d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (mPEG-PLGA)) are employed as microspheres matrix to prepare <span class="hlt">porous</span> microspheres based on a double emulsion-premix membrane emulsification technique combined with a solvent evaporation method. Both microspheres possess narrow size distribution and <span class="hlt">porous</span> surface, which are mainly caused by (a) hydrophilic polyethylene glycol (PEG) segments absorbing water molecules followed by a water evaporation process and (b) local explosion of microspheres due to fast evaporation of dichloromethane (MC). Importantly, mPEG-PLGA microspheres have a honeycomb like structure while mPEG-PLA microspheres have a solid structure internally, illustrating that the different hydrophobic segments could modulate the affinity between solvent and matrix polymer and influence the phase separation rate of microspheres matrix. Long term release patterns are demonstrated with pore-closed microspheres, which are prepared from mPEG-PLGA microspheres loading salmon calcitonin (SCT). These results suggest that it is potential to construct <span class="hlt">porous</span> microspheres for drug sustained release using permanent geometric templates as new porogens.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20060021945','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20060021945"><span>Conceptual Design of a Condensing Heat Exchanger for Space Systems Using <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hasan, Mohammad M.; Khan, Lutful I.; Nayagam, Vedha; Balasubramaniam, Ramaswamy</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>Condensing heat exchangers are used in many space applications in the thermal and humidity control systems. In the International Space Station (ISS), humidity control is achieved by using a water cooled fin surface over which the moist air condenses, followed by "slurper bars" that take in both the condensate and air into a rotary separator and separates the water from air. The use of a cooled <span class="hlt">porous</span> substrate as the condensing surface provides and attractive alternative that combines both heat removal as well as liquid/gas separation into a single unit. By selecting the pore sizes of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> substrate a gravity independent operation may also be possible with this concept. Condensation of vapor into and on the <span class="hlt">porous</span> surface from the flowing air and the removal of condensate from the <span class="hlt">porous</span> substrate are the critical processes <span class="hlt">involved</span> in the proposed concept. This paper describes some preliminary results of the proposed condensate withdrawal process and discusses the on-going design and development work of a <span class="hlt">porous</span> media based condensing heat exchanger at the NASA Glenn Research Center in collaboration with NASA Johnson Space Center.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910025976&hterms=nebular+hypothesis&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dnebular%2Bhypothesis','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910025976&hterms=nebular+hypothesis&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dnebular%2Bhypothesis"><span>Xenon fractionation in <span class="hlt">porous</span> planetesimals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Zahnle, Kevin; Pollack, James B.; Kasting, James F.</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>The distinctively fractionated Xe on Mars and earth may have its root in a common source from which both planets accreted. Beginning with Ozima and Nakazawa's (1980) hypothesis that terrestrial Xe fractionation was caused by gravitational separation of adsorbed solar nebular gases inside large <span class="hlt">porous</span> planetesimals, it is pointed out that Xe would have been trapped as the planetesimal grew and pores were squeezed shut by lithostatic pressure. It is shown that enough fractionated Xe to supply the earth could have been trapped this way. The degree of fractionation is controlled by the lithostatic pressure at the pore-closing front and so would have been roughly the same for all large planetesimals. The predicted degree of fractionation agrees well with that preserved in terrestrial and Martian Xe. Relative to Xe, this source is strongly depleted in other noble gases. In contrast to the original Ozima and Nakazawa hypothesis, the present hypothesis predicts the observed fractionation, and it allows planetary accretion to occur after the dissipation of the solar nebula.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11537194','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11537194"><span>Xenon fractionation in <span class="hlt">porous</span> planetesimals.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zahnle, K; Pollack, J B; Kasting, J F</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>The distinctively fractionated Xe on Mars and Earth may have its root in a common source from which both planets accreted. We begin with Ozima and Nakazawa's hypothesis that terrestrial Xe fractionation was caused by gravitational separation of adsorbed solar nebular gases inside large <span class="hlt">porous</span> planetesimals. We point out that Xe would have been trapped as the planetesimal grew and pores were squeezed shut by lithostatic pressure. We show that enough fractionated Xe to supply the Earth could have been trapped this way. The degree of fractionation is controlled by the lithostatic pressure at the pore-closing front and so would have been roughly the same for all large planetesimals. The predicted degree of fractionation agrees well with that preserved in terrestrial and martian Xe. Relative to Xe, this source is strongly depleted in other noble gases. In contrast to the original Ozima and Nakazawa hypothesis, our hypothesis predicts the observed fractionation, and it allows planetary accretion to occur after the dissipation of the solar nebula. The required planetesimals are large, representing a class of object now extinct in the solar system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23122704','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23122704"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> silicon biosensor: current status.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dhanekar, Saakshi; Jain, Swati</p> <p>2013-03-15</p> <p>Biosensing technologies cater to modern day diagnostics and point of care multi-specialty clinics, hospitals and laboratories. Biosensors aggregate the sensitivity of detection methodologies and constitutional selectivity of biomolecules. Endeavors to develop highly sensitive, fast, stable and low cost biosensors have been made possible by extensive and arduous research. Immense research work is going on for detection of molecules using various materials as immobilization substrate and sensing elements. Amongst materials being used as bio-sensing substrates, nano-<span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon (PS) has amassed attention and gained popularity in recent years. It has captivating and tunable features like ease of fabrication, special optico-physico properties, tailored morphological structure and versatile surface chemistry enhancing its prospects as transducer for fabricating biosensors. The present review describes the fabrication of PS and its biosensing capabilities for detection of various analytes including, but not limited to, glucose, DNA, antibodies, bacteria and viruses. Attention has been consecrated on the various methodologies such as electrical, electrochemical, optical and label free techniques along with the performances of these biosensors. It concludes with some future prospects and challenges of PS based biosensors.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010PhDT.......264M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010PhDT.......264M"><span>Modeling imbibition of liquids into rigid and swelling <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Masoodi, Reza</p> <p></p> <p>In <span class="hlt">porous</span> media studies, imbibition is the spontaneous movement of a liquid into a <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium under the influence of capillary forces. It is also known by the name wicking, and can sometimes be aided by an external pressure, as in the case of forced infiltration of liquid polymers into a bed of fibermats. In this study, the imbibition of liquids into <span class="hlt">porous</span> media in important engineering applications is studied. A relatively new approach of using the single-phase flow behind a clearly-defined liquid front in a <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium has been adopted in this work to model imbibition or wicking. Such an approach employs Darcy's law in conjunction with the continuity equation to model the liquid flow behind the front. First the modeling of liquid flow in polymer wicks is undertaken. A new formula to predict the capillary suction-pressure at the liquid fronts in commercial wicks made of sintering the polymer beads was proposed. Later, a more general formula was derived and verified for estimating the capillary suction pressure in any kind of <span class="hlt">porous</span> substance. We compared the performance of the proposed Darcy's-law based approach with that of the Lucas-Washburn equation; some new methods were suggested to improve the accuracy of these two dominant methods for modeling the liquid transport in aforementioned wicks. Our Darcy's law based modeling approach is superior to the previous Washburn Equation based approaches as the former can be easily extended to 2-D and 3-D unlike the latter. The 3-D liquid flow in the wicks was studied numerically using PORE-FLOW(c), an in-house computer program to model <span class="hlt">porous</span>-media flows. For the first time, the finite element/control volume (FE/CV) algorithm is employed to solve the moving- boundary problem encountered in wicking. A good validation is achieved against the 1-D wicking-flow analytical solution as well as a 3-D wicking experiment <span class="hlt">involving</span> a wick with two different cross-sections. A special case of wicking, in which both the external</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25656560','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25656560"><span>From <span class="hlt">porous</span> gold nanocups to <span class="hlt">porous</span> nanospheres and solid particles--a new synthetic approach.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ihsan, Ayesha; Katsiev, Habib; Alyami, Noktan; Anjum, Dalaver H; Khan, Waheed S; Hussain, Irshad</p> <p>2015-05-15</p> <p>We report a versatile approach for the synthesis of <span class="hlt">porous</span> gold nanocups, <span class="hlt">porous</span> gold nanospheres and solid gold nanoparticles. Gold nanocups are formed by the slow reduction of gold salt (HAuCl4⋅3H2O) using aminoantipyrene (AAP) as a reducing agent. Adding polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) to the gold salt followed by reduction with AAP resulted in the formation of <span class="hlt">porous</span> gold nanospheres. Microwave irradiation of both of these <span class="hlt">porous</span> gold particles resulted in the formation of slightly smaller but solid gold particles. All these nanoparticles are thoroughly characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and bright-field tomography. Due to the larger size, <span class="hlt">porous</span> nature, low density and higher surface area, these nanomaterials may have interesting applications in catalysis, drug delivery, phototherapy and sensing.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3506525','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3506525"><span>Nanostructures formed by displacement of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon with copper: from nanoparticles to <span class="hlt">porous</span> membranes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The application of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon as a template for the fabrication of nanosized copper objects is reported. Three different types of nanostructures were formed by displacement deposition of copper on <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon from hydrofluoric acid-based solutions of copper sulphate: (1) copper nanoparticles, (2) quasi-continuous copper films, and (3) free <span class="hlt">porous</span> copper membranes. Managing the parameters of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon (pore sizes, porosity), deposition time, and wettability of the copper sulphate solution has allowed to achieve such variety of the copper structures. Elemental and structural analyses of the obtained structures are presented. Young modulus measurements of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> copper membrane have been carried out and its modest activity in surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy is declared. PMID:22916840</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20849094','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20849094"><span>Direct imprinting of <span class="hlt">porous</span> substrates: a rapid and low-cost approach for patterning <span class="hlt">porous</span> nanomaterials.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ryckman, Judson D; Liscidini, Marco; Sipe, J E; Weiss, S M</p> <p>2011-05-11</p> <p>This work describes a technique for one-step, direct patterning of <span class="hlt">porous</span> nanomaterials, including insulators, semiconductors, and metals without the need for intermediate polymer processing or dry etching steps. Our process, which we call "direct imprinting of <span class="hlt">porous</span> substrates (DIPS)", utilizes reusable stamps with micro- and nanoscale features that are applied directly to a <span class="hlt">porous</span> material to selectively compress or crush the <span class="hlt">porous</span> network. The stamp pattern is transferred to the <span class="hlt">porous</span> material with high fidelity, vertical resolution below 5 nm, and lateral resolution below 100 nm. The process is performed in less than one minute at room temperature and at standard atmospheric pressure. We have demonstrated structures ranging from subwavelength optical components to microparticles and present exciting avenues for applications including surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), label-free biosensors, and drug delivery.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21072297','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21072297"><span>Entropy-induced separation of star polymers in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Blavats'ka, V.; Ferber, C. von; Holovatch, Yu.</p> <p>2006-09-15</p> <p>We present a quantitative picture of the separation of star polymers in a solution where part of the volume is influenced by a <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium. To this end, we study the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of long-range-correlated quenched disorder on the entropy and scaling properties of f-arm star polymers in a good solvent. We assume that the disorder is correlated on the polymer length scale with a power-law decay of the pair correlation function g(r){approx}r{sup -a}. Applying the field-theoretical renormalization group approach we show in a double expansion in {epsilon}=4-d and {delta}=4-a that there is a range of correlation strengths {delta} for which the disorder changes the scaling behavior of star polymers. In a second approach we calculate for fixed space dimension d=3 and different values of the correlation parameter a the corresponding scaling exponents {gamma}{sub f} that govern entropic effects. We find that {gamma}{sub f}-1, the deviation of {gamma}{sub f} from its mean field value is amplified by the disorder once we increase {delta} beyond a threshold. The consequences for a solution of diluted chain and star polymers of equal molecular weight inside a <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium are that star polymers exert a higher osmotic pressure than chain polymers and in general higher branched star polymers are expelled more strongly from the correlated <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium. Surprisingly, polymer chains will prefer a stronger correlated medium to a less or uncorrelated medium of the same density while the opposite is the case for star polymers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11909255','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11909255"><span>Lattice Boltzmann simulation of chemical dissolution in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kang, Qinjun; Zhang, Dongxiao; Chen, Shiyi; He, Xiaoyi</p> <p>2002-03-01</p> <p>In this paper, we develop a lattice Boltzmann model for simulating the transport and reaction of fluids in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. To simulate such a system, we account for the interaction of forced convection, molecular diffusion, and surface reaction. The problem is complicated by the evolution of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> media geometry due to chemical reactions, which may significantly and continuously modify the hydrologic properties of the media. The particular application that motivates the present study is acid stimulation, a common technique used to increase production from petroleum reservoirs. This technique <span class="hlt">involves</span> the injection of acid (e.g., hydrochloric acid, HCl, acetic acid, HAc) into the formation to dissolve minerals comprising the rock. As acid is injected, highly conductive channels or "wormholes" may be formed. The dissolution of carbonate rocks in 0.5M HCl and 0.5M HAc is simulated with the lattice Boltzmann model developed in this study. The dependence of dissolution process and the geometry of the final wormhole pattern on the acid type and the injection rate is studied. The results agree qualitatively with the experimental and theoretical analyses of others and substantiate the previous finding that there exists an optimal injection rate at which the wormhole is formed as well as the number of pore volumes of the injected fluid to break through is minimized. This study also confirms the experimentally observed phenomenon that the optimal injection rate decreases and the corresponding minimized number of pore volumes to break through increases as the acid is changed from HCl to HAc. Simulations suggest that the proposed lattice Boltzmann model may serve as an alternative reliable quantitative approach to study chemical dissolution in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMMR52A..03P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMMR52A..03P"><span>Flow and Fracture in Deformable <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Media: a Magmatic Perspective</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Petford, N.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>This contribution reviews some recent advances in the flow and fracture of deformable <span class="hlt">porous</span> media with implications for melt extraction in the lower crust and upper mantle. A long standing issue concerning extraction of partial melt from hot, high pressure regions (that is, most of the earth's solid interior) is the apparent contradiction that fracturing can occur in highly compliant material. I argue that much of the source of conflict surrounding the idea of 'fracture' in ductile/plastic rock is due to lack of clarity of terminology combined with conceptual notions equating fracture as defined in brittle rock through the theory of linear elasticity (a process well understood), with deformation and failure in weakly consolidated rock. So, while the former is based fundamentally on stress singularities and strain energy processes at a propagating fracture tip, continuum models of fracture in granular media struggle to define precisely the discontinuous nature of the physics <span class="hlt">involved</span>. Thus, for fracture in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media (and here an equivalence is made with igneous <span class="hlt">porous</span> media, that is, a silicate melt phase plus skeletal, granular matrix), verbs like parting, dilation and seepage in response to fluid (melt) pressurised translation of a weakly bonded matrix become the equivalent of cracks/veins/fractures in traditional (Griffiths) fracture mechanics. At its simplest, the process of fracturing in both classes of material can be defined by the difference in lengthscale and geometry of dissipated energy around the opening fracture. Treated in this way, controversies about the ability of weak/ductile rock to 'fracture' become instead productive discussions on the relative roles of fluid pressure, flow rates and rheology in promoting localised deformation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6284523','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6284523"><span>Combustion and heat transfer in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Sathe, S.B.; Peck, R.E.; Tong, T.W.</p> <p>1990-06-01</p> <p>The objective of the present study is to generate fundamental knowledge about heat transfer and combustion in <span class="hlt">porous</span> radiant burners (PRBs) in order to improve their performance. A theoretical heat transfer and combustion model is developed to study the characteristics of PRBs. The model accounts for non-local thermal equilibrium between the solid and gas phases. The solid is assumed to absorb, emit and scatter radiant energy. Combustion is modeled as a one-step global reaction. It is revealed that the flame speed inside the <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium is enhanced compared to the adiabatic flame speeds due to the higher conductivity of the solid compared to the gas as well as due to radiative preheating of the reactants. The effects of the properties of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> material on the flame speeds, radiative outputs and efficiencies were investigated. To improve the radiative output from the burner, it is desirable that the <span class="hlt">porous</span> layer has an optical thickness of about ten. The radiative output and the efficiency is higher for lower scattering albedo. The heat transfer coupling between the solid and gas phases should be high enough to ensure local thermal equilibrium, by choosing a fine <span class="hlt">porous</span> matrix. Higher solid phase conduction enhances the flame speed and the radiative output. Experiments are performed on a ceramic foam to verify the theoretical findings. The existence of the two stability regions was verified experimentally.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4483870','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4483870"><span>The application of <span class="hlt">porous</span> tantalum cylinder to the repair of comminuted bone defects: a study of rabbit firearm injuries</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ren, Bo; Zhai, Zhenbo; Guo, Kai; Liu, Yanpu; Hou, Weihuan; Zhu, Qingsheng; Zhu, Jinyu</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of <span class="hlt">porous</span> tantalum material in repair tibial defects caused by firearm injuries in a rabbit model. A multifunctional biological <span class="hlt">impact</span> machine was used to establish a rabbit tibial defect model of firearm injury. <span class="hlt">Porous</span> tantalum rods were processed into a hollow cylinder. Kirschner wires were used for intramedullary fixation. We compared the differences of the bone ingrowth of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> tantalum material by gross observations, X-rays and histological evaluations. The radiographic observations revealed that fibrous tissue covered the material surface after 4 weeks, and periosteal reactions and new bone callus extending materials appeared after 8 weeks. After 16 weeks, the calluses of the firearm injury group were completely wrapped around a <span class="hlt">porous</span> tantalum material. The group with the highest Lane-Sandhu X-rays cores was the firearm injury and tantalum implant group, and the blank control group exhibited the lowest scores. The histological evaluations revealed that the presence of new bone around the biomaterial had grown into the <span class="hlt">porous</span> tantalum. By the 16th week, the areas of bone tissue of the firearm injury group was significant higher than that of non-firearm injury group (P<0.05). The comminuted fractures treated with tantalum cylinders exhibited greater bone ingrowth in the firearm injury group. In conditions of firearm injuries, the <span class="hlt">porous</span> tantalum biomaterial exhibited bone ingrowth that was beneficial to the treatment of bone defects. PMID:26131078</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016NatSR...622309C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016NatSR...622309C"><span>Morphology-dependent Electrochemical Enhancements of <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Carbon as Sensitive Determination Platform for Ascorbic Acid, Dopamine and Uric Acid</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cheng, Qin; Ji, Liudi; Wu, Kangbing; Zhang, Weikang</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>Using starch as the carbon precursor and different-sized ZnO naoparticles as the hard template, a series of <span class="hlt">porous</span> carbon materials for electrochemical sensing were prepared. Experiments of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms reveal that the particle size of ZnO has big <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on the <span class="hlt">porous</span> morphology and surface area of the resulting carbon materials. Through ultrasonic dispersion of <span class="hlt">porous</span> carbon and subsequent solvent evaporation, different sensing interfaces were constructed on the surface of glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The electrochemical behaviors of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA) were studied. On the surface of <span class="hlt">porous</span> carbon materials, the accumulation efficiency and electron transfer ability of AA, DA and UA are improved, and consequently their oxidation signals enhance greatly. Moreover, the interface enhancement effects of <span class="hlt">porous</span> carbon are also controlled by the particle size of hard template. The constructed <span class="hlt">porous</span> carbon interface displays strong signal amplification ability and holds great promise in constructing a sensitive platform for the simultaneous determination of AA, DA and UA.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_19 --> <div id="page_20" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="381"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4770411','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4770411"><span>Morphology-dependent Electrochemical Enhancements of <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Carbon as Sensitive Determination Platform for Ascorbic Acid, Dopamine and Uric Acid</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Cheng, Qin; Ji, Liudi; Wu, Kangbing; Zhang, Weikang</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Using starch as the carbon precursor and different-sized ZnO naoparticles as the hard template, a series of <span class="hlt">porous</span> carbon materials for electrochemical sensing were prepared. Experiments of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms reveal that the particle size of ZnO has big <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on the <span class="hlt">porous</span> morphology and surface area of the resulting carbon materials. Through ultrasonic dispersion of <span class="hlt">porous</span> carbon and subsequent solvent evaporation, different sensing interfaces were constructed on the surface of glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The electrochemical behaviors of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA) were studied. On the surface of <span class="hlt">porous</span> carbon materials, the accumulation efficiency and electron transfer ability of AA, DA and UA are improved, and consequently their oxidation signals enhance greatly. Moreover, the interface enhancement effects of <span class="hlt">porous</span> carbon are also controlled by the particle size of hard template. The constructed <span class="hlt">porous</span> carbon interface displays strong signal amplification ability and holds great promise in constructing a sensitive platform for the simultaneous determination of AA, DA and UA. PMID:26924080</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26831681','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26831681"><span>Effect of Graphene Oxide on the Properties of <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Silicon.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Olenych, Igor B; Aksimentyeva, Olena I; Monastyrskii, Liubomyr S; Horbenko, Yulia Yu; Partyka, Maryan V; Luchechko, Andriy P; Yarytska, Lidia I</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>We studied an effect of the graphene oxide (GO) layer on the optical and electrical properties of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon (PS) in hybrid PS-GO structure created by electrochemical etching of silicon wafer and deposition of GO from water dispersion on PS. With the help of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic-force microscopy (AFM), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, it was established that GO formed a thin film on the PS surface and is partly embedded in the pores of PS. A comparative analysis of the FTIR spectra for the PS and PS-GO structures confirms the passivation of the PS surface by the GO film. This film has a sufficient transparency for excitation and emission of photoluminescence (PL). Moreover, GO modifies PL spectrum of PS, shifting the PL maximum by 25 nm towards lower energies. GO deposition on the surface of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon leads to the change in the electrical parameters of PS in AC and DC modes. By means of current-voltage characteristics (CVC) and impedance spectroscopy, it is shown that the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of GO on electrical characteristics of PS manifests in reduced capacitance and lower internal resistance of hybrid structures.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JPS...309...11G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JPS...309...11G"><span>Microstructural effects on the average properties in <span class="hlt">porous</span> battery electrodes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>García-García, Ramiro; García, R. Edwin</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>A theoretical framework is formulated to analytically quantify the effects of the microstructure on the average properties of <span class="hlt">porous</span> electrodes, including reactive area density and the through-thickness tortuosity as observed in experimentally-determined tomographic sections. The proposed formulation includes the microstructural non-idealities but also captures the well-known perfectly spherical limit. Results demonstrate that in the absence of any particle alignment, the through-thickness Bruggeman exponent α, reaches an asymptotic value of α ∼ 2 / 3 as the shape of the particles become increasingly prolate (needle- or fiber-like). In contrast, the Bruggeman exponent diverges as the shape of the particles become increasingly oblate, regardless of the degree of particle alignment. For aligned particles, tortuosity can be dramatically suppressed, e.g., α → 1 / 10 for ra → 1 / 10 and MRD ∼ 40 . Particle size polydispersity <span class="hlt">impacts</span> the porosity-tortuosity relation when the average particle size is comparable to the thickness of the electrode layers. Electrode reactivity density can be arbitrarily increased as the particles become increasingly oblate, but asymptotically reach a minimum value as the particles become increasingly prolate. In the limit of a <span class="hlt">porous</span> electrode comprised of fiber-like particles, the area density decreases by 24% , with respect to a distribution of perfectly spherical particles.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016NRL....11...43O','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016NRL....11...43O"><span>Effect of Graphene Oxide on the Properties of <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Silicon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Olenych, Igor B.; Aksimentyeva, Olena I.; Monastyrskii, Liubomyr S.; Horbenko, Yulia Yu.; Partyka, Maryan V.; Luchechko, Andriy P.; Yarytska, Lidia I.</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>We studied an effect of the graphene oxide (GO) layer on the optical and electrical properties of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon (PS) in hybrid PS-GO structure created by electrochemical etching of silicon wafer and deposition of GO from water dispersion on PS. With the help of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic-force microscopy (AFM), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, it was established that GO formed a thin film on the PS surface and is partly embedded in the pores of PS. A comparative analysis of the FTIR spectra for the PS and PS-GO structures confirms the passivation of the PS surface by the GO film. This film has a sufficient transparency for excitation and emission of photoluminescence (PL). Moreover, GO modifies PL spectrum of PS, shifting the PL maximum by 25 nm towards lower energies. GO deposition on the surface of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon leads to the change in the electrical parameters of PS in AC and DC modes. By means of current-voltage characteristics (CVC) and impedance spectroscopy, it is shown that the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of GO on electrical characteristics of PS manifests in reduced capacitance and lower internal resistance of hybrid structures.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JPhCS.500r2030P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JPhCS.500r2030P"><span>Modelling dynamic compaction of <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials with the overstress approach</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Partom, Y.</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>To model compaction of a <span class="hlt">porous</span> material we need 1) an equation of state of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> material in terms of the equation of state of its matrix, and 2) a compaction law. For an equation of state it is common to use Herrmann's suggestion, as in his Pα model. For a compaction law it is common to use a quasi-static compaction relation obtained from 1) a meso-scale model (as in Carroll and Holt's spherical shell model), or from 2) quasi-static tests. Here we are interested in dynamic compaction, like in a planar <span class="hlt">impact</span> test. In dynamic compaction the state may change too fast for the state point to follow the quasi-static compaction curve. We therefore get an overstress situation. The state point moves out of the quasi-static compaction boundary, and only with time collapses back towards it at a certain rate. In this way the dynamic compaction event becomes rate dependent. In the paper we first write down the rate equations for dynamic compaction according to the overstress approach. We then implement these equations in a hydro-code and run some examples. We show how the overstress rate parameter can be calibrated from tests.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007SPIE.6447E..0OK','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007SPIE.6447E..0OK"><span>Nanostructured <span class="hlt">porous</span> polymeric photonic bandgap structures for sensing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kim, Sung Jin; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P.; Bukowski, Rachel; Titus, A. H.; Cartwright, Alexander N.; Swihart, Mark T.; Bright, Frank; Bunning, Timothy J.</p> <p>2007-02-01</p> <p>A methodology for enabling biochemical sensing applications using <span class="hlt">porous</span> polymer photonic bandgap structures is presented. Specifically, we demonstrate an approach to encapsulation of chemical and biological recognition elements within the pores of these structures. This sensing platform is built on our recently demonstrated nanofabrication technique using holographic interferometry of a photo-activated mixture that includes a volatile solvent as well as monomers, photoinitiators, and co-initiators. Evaporation of the solvent after polymerization yields nanoporous polymeric 1D photonic bandgap structures that can be directly integrated into optical sensor systems that we have previously developed. More importantly, these composite structures are simple to fabricate, chromatically tunable, highly versatile, and can be employed as a general template for the encapsulation of biochemical recognition elements. As a specific example of a prototype device, we demonstrate an oxygen (O II) sensor by encapsulating the fluorophore (tris(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenathroline)ruthenium(II) within these nanostructured materials. Finally, we report initial results of extending this technique to the development of a hydrophilic <span class="hlt">porous</span> polymer photonic bandgap structure for sensing in aqueous environments. The ability to control the hydrophilic/hydrophobic nature of these materials has direct <span class="hlt">impact</span> on chemical and biological sensing.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.7867J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.7867J"><span>Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical Evolution of Transport Properties in <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Media: From Laboratory to the Groß-Schönebeck Geothermal Reservoir.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jacquey, Antoine; Cacace, Mauro; Blöcher, Guido; Watanabe, Norihiro; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magadalena</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Quantifying variations of transport properties of <span class="hlt">porous</span> material, which are porosity and permeability is of special interest for geothermal applications. Variations of these properties result from the coupling between rock deformation and thermal processes. Significant pore pressure and temperature changes can occur during injection and production of fluid. Such changes have a direct <span class="hlt">impact</span> on the stress-field affecting the geothermal reservoir performance. Understanding the coupling between deformation of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> material and variation of its properties for mass and energy transfer is therefore a major focus for any geothermal operations. Deformation of a <span class="hlt">porous</span> material filled with fluid is based on variations of bulk and pore volumes and affects therefore the basic transport properties of the rock. Variations of the transport properties can be expressed by theoretical formulations based on experimental observations and then integrated into numerical models which can be used to predict reservoir performance at the field scale. The aim of this study is to develop a complete poro- and thermoelastic formulation capable of explaining and quantifying fluid-rock interactions in a context of geothermal applications. In a first step, formulations to quantify porosity variations are tested with the open-source finite element method based software OpenGeoSys (Kolditz et al. 2012) and compared to laboratory experiments to constrain the parameters <span class="hlt">involved</span>. Numerical description of the physical phenomena <span class="hlt">involved</span> for such behavior requires to account for the coupling between deformation, thermal and hydraulic processes and the relations between different scales. Three different formulations with H-M coupling are studied which are based on the theories of poroelasticity and crack closure (Zimmerman 1991, Blöcher et al. 2013 and Chin et al. 2000). These three formulations are tested on two different kinds of sandstones (Flechtinger and Bentheimer sandstones) by comparing</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21899881','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21899881"><span>The influence of surface topography of a <span class="hlt">porous</span> perfluoropolyether polymer on corneal epithelial tissue growth and adhesion.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Evans, Margaret D M; Chaouk, Hassan; Wilkie, John S; Dalton, Beatrice A; Taylor, Sarah; Xie, Ruo Zhong; Hughes, Timothy C; Johnson, Graham; McFarland, Gail A; Griesser, Hans H; Steele, John G; Meijs, Gordon F; Sweeney, Deborah F; McLean, Keith M</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>Design principles for corneal implants are challenging and include permeability which inherently <span class="hlt">involves</span> pore openings on the polymer surface. These topographical cues can be significant to a successful clinical outcome where a stratified epithelium is needed over the device surface, such as with a corneal onlay or corneal repair material. The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of polymer surface topography on the growth and adhesion of corneal epithelial tissue was assessed using <span class="hlt">porous</span> perfluoropolyether membranes with a range of surface topography. Surfaces were characterised by AFM and XPS, and the permeability and water content of membranes was measured. Biological testing of membranes <span class="hlt">involved</span> a 21-day in vitro tissue assay to evaluate migration, stratification and adhesion of corneal epithelium. Similar parameters were monitored in vivo by surgically implanting membranes into feline corneas for up to 5 months. Data showed optimal growth and adhesion of epithelial tissue in vitro when polymer surface features were below a 150 nm RMS value. Normal processes of tissue growth and adhesion were disrupted when RMS values approached 300 nm. Data from the in vivo study confirmed these findings. Together, outcomes demonstrated the importance of surface topography in the design of implantable devices that depend on functional epithelial cover.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26920663','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26920663"><span>Synthesis, characterization, and evaluation of a superficially <span class="hlt">porous</span> particle with unique, elongated pore channels normal to the surface.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wei, Ta-Chen; Mack, Anne; Chen, Wu; Liu, Jia; Dittmann, Monika; Wang, Xiaoli; Barber, William E</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>In recent years, superficially <span class="hlt">porous</span> particles (SPPs) have drawn great interest because of their special particle characteristics and improvement in separation efficiency. Superficially <span class="hlt">porous</span> particles are currently manufactured by adding silica nanoparticles onto solid cores using either a multistep multilayer process or one-step coacervation process. The pore size is mainly controlled by the size of the silica nanoparticles and the tortuous pore channel geometry is determined by how those nanoparticles randomly aggregate. Such tortuous pore structure is also similar to that of all totally <span class="hlt">porous</span> particles used in HPLC today. In this article, we report on the development of a next generation superficially <span class="hlt">porous</span> particle with a unique pore structure that includes a thinner shell thickness and ordered pore channels oriented normal to the particle surface. The method of making the new superficially <span class="hlt">porous</span> particles is a process called pseudomorphic transformation (PMT), which is a form of micelle templating. Porosity is no longer controlled by randomly aggregated nanoparticles but rather by micelles that have an ordered liquid crystal structure. The new particle possesses many advantages such as a narrower particle size distribution, thinner <span class="hlt">porous</span> layer with high surface area and, most importantly, highly ordered, non-tortuous pore channels oriented normal to the particle surface. This PMT process has been applied to make 1.8-5.1μm SPPs with pore size controlled around 75Å and surface area around 100m(2)/g. All particles with different sizes show the same unique pore structure with tunable pore size and shell thickness. The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of the novel pore structure on the performance of these particles is characterized by measuring van Deemter curves and constructing kinetic plots. Reduced plate heights as low as 1.0 have been achieved on conventional LC instruments. This indicates higher efficiency of such particles compared to conventional totally <span class="hlt">porous</span> and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016HyInt.237..105Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016HyInt.237..105Y"><span>Iron films deposited on <span class="hlt">porous</span> alumina substrates</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yamada, Yasuhiro; Tanabe, Kenichi; Nishida, Naoki; Kobayashi, Yoshio</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>Iron films were deposited on <span class="hlt">porous</span> alumina substrates using an arc plasma gun. The pore sizes (120 - 250 nm) of the substrates were controlled by changing the temperature during the anodic oxidation of aluminum plates. Iron atoms penetrated into pores with diameters of less than 160 nm, and were stabilized by forming γ-Fe, whereas α-Fe was produced as a flat plane covering the pores. For <span class="hlt">porous</span> alumina substrates with pore sizes larger than 200 nm, the deposited iron films contained many defects and the resulting α-Fe had smaller hyperfine magnetic fields. In addition, only a very small amount of γ-Fe was obtained. It was demonstrated that the composition and structure of an iron film can be affected by the surface morphology of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> alumina substrate on which the film is grown.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20442561','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20442561"><span>Ear reconstruction with <span class="hlt">porous</span> polyethylene implants.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Berghaus, Alexander; Stelter, Klaus; Naumann, Andreas; Hempel, John Martin</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>This article describes a surgical technique using <span class="hlt">porous</span> polyethylene as the framework material for ear reconstruction. In comparison to the use of rib cartilage, <span class="hlt">porous</span> polyethylene - first described by Berghaus in 1982 - provides better definition and projection as well as congruency with the opposite side. Hospitalization time is significantly shorter. There are less surgical interventions than with traditional microtia operations that use rib cartilage, and the patient is spared the additional procedure needed to remove the rib cartilage, with all the associated complications as well as the resulting thorax scar. Also, reconstruction can take place at an earlier age, which is advantageous for those concerned. Using <span class="hlt">porous</span> polyethylene as the frame material, a temporoparietal flap and full-thickness skin cover, we have been able to achieve very convincing results over recent years.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011APS..MAR.C1061C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011APS..MAR.C1061C"><span>Highly Swollen <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Microstructures in Polyelectrolyte Multilayers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cho, Chungyeon; Kaiser, Jeremy; Zacharia, Nicole</p> <p>2011-03-01</p> <p>We investigated the creation of <span class="hlt">porous</span> morphologies from polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) consisting of linear poly(ethylenimine) and poly(acrylic acid), and poly (allylamine hydrochloride) and poly (acrylic acid) as a function of pH and immersion time under post-base assembly treatment. The <span class="hlt">porous</span> transition is linked to the neutralization of the polycations electrolytes as well as ionization of PAA by the exposing LbL films to high pH. This causes PEMs to undergo spinodal decomposition, creating pores and an increase in film thickness. By using reactive wet stamping technique, we were able to locally cause porosity changes under high pH conditions in the LbL films. Further investigation of the mechanical properties of patterned LbL films was done by performing nano-indentation analysis. The results showed clear difference of physical properties such as hardness and modulus between stamped and unstamped regions based on <span class="hlt">porous</span> transition.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11802347','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11802347"><span>Nasal reconstruction using <span class="hlt">porous</span> polyethylene implants.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Romo, T; Sclafani, A P; Jacono, A A</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>Nasal reconstruction presents a significant challenge to the facial plastic surgeon. The dual goals of reconstruction are restoration of the desired aesthetic nasal contour and an improved nasal airway. Autologous cartilage and bone are considered optimal grafting material, but their supply is often limited and harvesting entails additional morbidity. Many synthetic materials have been introduced in nasal reconstruction, but high infection and extrusion rates limited their use. <span class="hlt">Porous</span> high density polyethylene implants present an alternative to autologous material as they allow for fibrovascular ingrowth, leading to stability of the implant and decreased rates of infection. Herein we describe the use of <span class="hlt">porous</span> high density polyethylene implants for reconstruction of the platyrrhine nose and in revision rhinoplasty. The use of preformed nasal-dorsal tip and alar batten implants are described, as well as the use of columellar strut and premaxillary plumper implants. We believe that <span class="hlt">porous</span> high density polyethylene implants provide a safe, desirable alternative in functional and aesthetic nasal reconstruction.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EJPh...37e5102C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EJPh...37e5102C"><span>Fluid dynamics in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media with Sailfish</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Coelho, Rodrigo C. V.; Neumann, Rodrigo F.</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>In this work we show the application of Sailfish to the study of fluid dynamics in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. Sailfish is an open-source software based on the lattice-Boltzmann method. This application of computational fluid dynamics is of particular interest to the oil and gas industry and the subject could be a starting point for an undergraduate or graduate student in physics or engineering. We built artificial samples of <span class="hlt">porous</span> media with different porosities and used Sailfish to simulate the fluid flow through them in order to calculate their permeability and tortuosity. We also present a simple way to obtain the specific superficial area of <span class="hlt">porous</span> media using Python libraries. To contextualise these concepts, we analyse the applicability of the Kozeny-Carman equation, which is a well-known permeability-porosity relation, to our artificial samples.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007ZaMP...58..646S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007ZaMP...58..646S"><span>Flow past a <span class="hlt">porous</span> approximate spherical shell</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Srinivasacharya, D.</p> <p>2007-07-01</p> <p>In this paper, the creeping flow of an incompressible viscous liquid past a <span class="hlt">porous</span> approximate spherical shell is considered. The flow in the free fluid region outside the shell and in the cavity region of the shell is governed by the Navier Stokes equation. The flow within the <span class="hlt">porous</span> annulus region of the shell is governed by Darcy’s Law. The boundary conditions used at the interface are continuity of the normal velocity, continuity of the pressure and Beavers and Joseph slip condition. An exact solution for the problem is obtained. An expression for the drag on the <span class="hlt">porous</span> approximate spherical shell is obtained. The drag experienced by the shell is evaluated numerically for several values of the parameters governing the flow.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25123376','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25123376"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> polymers based on aryleneethynylene building blocks.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bunz, Uwe H F; Seehafer, Kai; Geyer, Florian L; Bender, Markus; Braun, Ingo; Smarsly, Emanuel; Freudenberg, Jan</p> <p>2014-09-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Porous</span> conjugated polymers are synthesized by metal-catalyzed coupling reactions. The progress for <span class="hlt">porous</span> polymers when planar or tetrahedral building blocks are connected by alkyne units into novel materials is highlighted. The most prominent reaction for the buildup of the microporous alkyne-bridged polymers is the Sonogashira reaction, connecting alkynes to aromatic iodides or bromides. The availability of the building blocks and the potency of the Sonogashira reaction allow preparing a large variety of intrinsically <span class="hlt">porous</span> polymeric materials, in which rigid struts connect multipronged centers. The microporous polymers are used as catalysts and as storage materials for gases and sensors. Postfunctionalization schemes, understanding of structure-property relationships, and the quest for high porosity are pertinent.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/867359','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/867359"><span>Joining of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon carbide bodies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Bates, Carl H.; Couhig, John T.; Pelletier, Paul J.</p> <p>1990-05-01</p> <p>A method of joining two <span class="hlt">porous</span> bodies of silicon carbide is disclosed. It entails utilizing an aqueous slip of a similar silicon carbide as was used to form the <span class="hlt">porous</span> bodies, including the sintering aids, and a binder to initially join the <span class="hlt">porous</span> bodies together. Then the composite structure is subjected to cold isostatic pressing to form a joint having good handling strength. Then the composite structure is subjected to pressureless sintering to form the final strong bond. Optionally, after the sintering the structure is subjected to hot isostatic pressing to further improve the joint and densify the structure. The result is a composite structure in which the joint is almost indistinguishable from the silicon carbide pieces which it joins.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1980STIN...8116332D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1980STIN...8116332D"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> pavement. Phase 1: Design and operational criteria</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Diniz, E. V.</p> <p>1980-08-01</p> <p>Utilization concepts, benefits and disadvantages, as well as other characteristics of <span class="hlt">porous</span> pavements are presented with emphasis on <span class="hlt">porous</span> asphalt pavements, but the criteria and design approach are applicable to all other <span class="hlt">porous</span> pavement types. Design considerations include siting problems, load bearing design and hydrologic design. The history of <span class="hlt">porous</span> pavement development and previous experience with <span class="hlt">porous</span> pavement by several designers, contractors and operators are described. A computer model for hydrologic performance evaluation of existing or proposed <span class="hlt">porous</span> pavement systems is also examined. Load bearing design criteria are based on previous work conducted for <span class="hlt">porous</span> asphalt pavements. Appendices include a sample set of specifications for <span class="hlt">porous</span> asphalt construction and a list of soils and their permeability classes as prepared by the U.S. Soil Conservation Service.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25065767','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25065767"><span>Guar gum solutions for improved delivery of iron particles in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media (part 1): <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium rheology and guar gum-induced clogging.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gastone, Francesca; Tosco, Tiziana; Sethi, Rajandrea</p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>The present work is the first part of a comprehensive study on the use of guar gum to improve delivery of microscale zero-valent iron particles in contaminated aquifers. Guar gum solutions exhibit peculiar shear thinning properties, with high viscosity in static conditions and lower viscosity in dynamic conditions: this is beneficial both for the storage of MZVI dispersions, and also for the injection in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. In the present paper, the processes associated with guar gum injection in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media are studied performing single-step and multi-step filtration tests in sand-packed columns. The experimental results of single-step tests performed by injecting guar gum solutions prepared at several concentrations and applying different dissolution procedures evidenced that the presence of residual undissolved polymeric particles in the guar gum solution may have a relevant negative <span class="hlt">impact</span> on the permeability of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium, resulting in evident clogging. The most effective preparation procedure which minimizes the presence of residual particles is dissolution in warm water (60°C) followed by centrifugation (procedure T60C). The multi-step tests (i.e. injection of guar gum at constant concentration with a step increase of flow velocity), performed at three polymer concentrations (1.5, 3 and 4g/l) provided information on the rheological properties of guar gum solutions when flowing through a <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium at variable discharge rates, which mimic the injection in radial geometry. An experimental protocol was defined for the rheological characterization of the fluids in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media, and empirical relationships were derived for the quantification of rheological properties and clogging with variable injection rate. These relationships will be implemented in the second companion paper (Part II) in a radial transport model for the simulation of large-scale injection of MZVI-guar gum slurries.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JCHyd.166...23G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JCHyd.166...23G"><span>Guar gum solutions for improved delivery of iron particles in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media (Part 1): <span class="hlt">Porous</span> medium rheology and guar gum-induced clogging</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gastone, Francesca; Tosco, Tiziana; Sethi, Rajandrea</p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>The present work is the first part of a comprehensive study on the use of guar gum to improve delivery of microscale zero-valent iron particles in contaminated aquifers. Guar gum solutions exhibit peculiar shear thinning properties, with high viscosity in static conditions and lower viscosity in dynamic conditions: this is beneficial both for the storage of MZVI dispersions, and also for the injection in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. In the present paper, the processes associated with guar gum injection in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media are studied performing single-step and multi-step filtration tests in sand-packed columns. The experimental results of single-step tests performed by injecting guar gum solutions prepared at several concentrations and applying different dissolution procedures evidenced that the presence of residual undissolved polymeric particles in the guar gum solution may have a relevant negative <span class="hlt">impact</span> on the permeability of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium, resulting in evident clogging. The most effective preparation procedure which minimizes the presence of residual particles is dissolution in warm water (60 °C) followed by centrifugation (procedure T60C). The multi-step tests (i.e. injection of guar gum at constant concentration with a step increase of flow velocity), performed at three polymer concentrations (1.5, 3 and 4 g/l) provided information on the rheological properties of guar gum solutions when flowing through a <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium at variable discharge rates, which mimic the injection in radial geometry. An experimental protocol was defined for the rheological characterization of the fluids in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media, and empirical relationships were derived for the quantification of rheological properties and clogging with variable injection rate. These relationships will be implemented in the second companion paper (Part II) in a radial transport model for the simulation of large-scale injection of MZVI-guar gum slurries.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_20 --> <div id="page_21" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="401"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/15005278','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/15005278"><span>Synthesis and characterization of <span class="hlt">porous</span> hydroxyapatite and hydroxyapatite coatings</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Nieh, T G; Choi, B W; Jankowski, A F</p> <p>2000-10-25</p> <p>A technique is developed to construct bulk hydroxyapatite (HAp) with different cellular structures. The technique <span class="hlt">involves</span> the initial synthesis of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite powder from an aqueous solution using water-soluble compounds and then followed by spray drying into agglomerated granules. The granules were further cold pressed and sintered into bulks at elevated temperatures. The sintering behavior of the HAp granules was characterized and compared with those previously reported. Resulting from the fact that the starting HAp powders were extremely fine, a relatively low activation energy for sintering was obtained. In the present study, both <span class="hlt">porous</span> and dense structures were produced by varying powder morphology and sintering parameters. <span class="hlt">Porous</span> structures consisting of open cells were constructed. Sintered structures were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and x-ray tomography. In the present paper, hydroxyapatite coatings produced by magnetron sputtering on silicon and titanium substrates will also be presented. The mechanical properties of the coatings were measured using nanoindentation techniques and microstructures examined using transmission electron microscopy.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24411349','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24411349"><span>Hydroxyapatite-silver nanoparticles coatings on <span class="hlt">porous</span> polyurethane scaffold.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ciobanu, Gabriela; Ilisei, Simona; Luca, Constantin</p> <p>2014-02-01</p> <p>The present paper is focused on a study regarding the possibility of obtaining hydroxyapatite-silver nanoparticle coatings on <span class="hlt">porous</span> polyurethane scaffold. The method applied is based on a combined strategy <span class="hlt">involving</span> hydroxyapatite biomimetic deposition on polyurethane surface using a Supersaturated Calcification Solution (SCS), combined with silver ions reduction and in-situ crystallization processes on hydroxyapatite-polyurethane surface by sample immersing in AgNO3 solution. The morphology, composition and phase structure of the prepared samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-Vis spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements. The data obtained show that a layer of hydroxyapatite was deposited on <span class="hlt">porous</span> polyurethane support and the silver nanoparticles (average size 34.71 nm) were dispersed among and even on the hydroxyapatite crystals. Hydroxyapatite/polyurethane surface acts as a reducer and a stabilizing agent for silver ions. The surface plasmon resonance peak in UV-Vis absorption spectra showed an absorption maximum at 415 nm, indicating formation of silver nanoparticles. The hydroxyapatite-silver polyurethane scaffolds were tested against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli and the obtained data were indicative of good antibacterial properties of the materials.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22213663','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22213663"><span>Explosion propagation in inert <span class="hlt">porous</span> media.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ciccarelli, G</p> <p>2012-02-13</p> <p><span class="hlt">Porous</span> media are often used in flame arresters because of the high surface area to volume ratio that is required for flame quenching. However, if the flame is not quenched, the flow obstruction within the <span class="hlt">porous</span> media can promote explosion escalation, which is a well-known phenomenon in obstacle-laden channels. There are many parallels between explosion propagation through <span class="hlt">porous</span> media and obstacle-laden channels. In both cases, the obstructions play a duel role. On the one hand, the obstruction enhances explosion propagation through an early shear-driven turbulence production mechanism and then later by shock-flame interactions that occur from lead shock reflections. On the other hand, the presence of an obstruction can suppress explosion propagation through momentum and heat losses, which both impede the unburned gas flow and extract energy from the expanding combustion products. In obstacle-laden channels, there are well-defined propagation regimes that are easily distinguished by abrupt changes in velocity. In <span class="hlt">porous</span> media, the propagation regimes are not as distinguishable. In <span class="hlt">porous</span> media the entire flamefront is affected, and the effects of heat loss, turbulence and compressibility are smoothly blended over most of the propagation velocity range. At low subsonic propagation speeds, heat loss to the <span class="hlt">porous</span> media dominates, whereas at higher supersonic speeds turbulence and compressibility are important. This blending of the important phenomena results in no clear transition in propagation mechanism that is characterized by an abrupt change in propagation velocity. This is especially true for propagation velocities above the speed of sound where many experiments performed with fuel-air mixtures show a smooth increase in the propagation velocity with mixture reactivity up to the theoretical detonation wave velocity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23323515','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23323515"><span>Photoelectrochemical properties of cadmium chalcogenide-sensitized textured <span class="hlt">porous</span> zinc oxide plate electrodes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Emin, Saim; Fanetti, Mattia; Abdi, Fatwa F; Lisjak, Darja; Valant, Matjaz; van de Krol, Roel; Dam, Bernard</p> <p>2013-02-01</p> <p>We report the photoelectrochemical (PEC) performance of textured <span class="hlt">porous</span> ZnO and CdX-coated ZnO films (X = S, Se). <span class="hlt">Porous</span> ZnO films were grown with a platelike morphology on F-doped SnO(2) (FTO) substrates. The growth of ZnO films <span class="hlt">involves</span> a two-step procedure. In the first step, we electrochemically grew simonkolleite (Zn(5)(OH)(8)Cl(2)·H(2)O) plate films. Annealing of the simonkolleite at 450 °C results in textured <span class="hlt">porous</span> ZnO films. The as-obtained <span class="hlt">porous</span> ZnO electrodes were then used in PEC studies. To increase the light-harvesting efficiency, we sensitized these ZnO electrodes with CdS and CdSe quantum dots, using the so-called "successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method". As expected, the photocurrent density systematically increases when going from ZnO to ZnO/CdS to ZnO/CdSe. The highest photocurrent, ∼3.1 mA/cm(2) at 1.2 V vs RHE, was obtained in the CdSe-sensitized ZnO electrodes, because of their enhanced absorption in the visible range. Additionally, quantum efficiency values as high as 90% were achieved with the textured <span class="hlt">porous</span> ZnO films. These results demonstrate that both CdS and CdSe-sensitized textured <span class="hlt">porous</span> ZnO electrodes could be potentially useful materials in light-harvesting applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AIPC.1426...84M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AIPC.1426...84M"><span>Ballistic performance of <span class="hlt">porous</span>-ceramic, thermal protection systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Miller, Joshua E.; Bohl, William E.; Christiansen, Eric C.; Davis, Bruce A.; Foreman, Cory D.</p> <p>2012-03-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Porous</span>-ceramic, thermal protection systems are used heavily in current reentry vehicles like the Orbiter, and they are currently being proposed for the next generation of US manned spacecraft, Orion. These systems insulate reentry critical components of a spacecraft against the intense thermal environments of atmospheric reentry. Additionally, these materials are highly exposed to space environment hazards like solid particle <span class="hlt">impacts</span>. This paper discusses <span class="hlt">impact</span> studies up to 10 km/s on 8 lb/ft3 alumina-fiber-enhanced-thermal-barrier (AETB8) tiles coated with a toughened-unipiece-fibrousinsulation/ reaction-cured-glass layer (TUFI/RCG). A semi-empirical, first principles <span class="hlt">impact</span> model that describes projectile dispersion is described that provides excellent agreement with observations over a broad range of <span class="hlt">impact</span> velocities, obliquities and projectile materials. Model extensions to look at the implications of greater than 10 GPa equation of state is also discussed. Predicted penetration probabilities for a vehicle visiting the International Space Station is 60% lower for orbital debris and 95% lower for meteoroids with this model compared to an energy scaled approach.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011APS..SHK.Q6001M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011APS..SHK.Q6001M"><span>Ballistic Performance of <span class="hlt">Porous</span>-Ceramic, Thermal Protection Systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Miller, Joshua; Bohl, William; Christiansen, Eric; Davis, B. Alan; Foreman, Cory</p> <p>2011-06-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Porous</span>-ceramic, thermal protection systems are used heavily in current reentry vehicles like the Orbiter, and they are currently being proposed for the next generation of US manned spacecraft, Orion. These systems insulate reentry critical components of a spacecraft against the intense thermal environments of atmospheric reentry. Additionally, these materials are also highly exposed to space environment hazards like solid particle <span class="hlt">impacts</span>. This paper discusses <span class="hlt">impact</span> testing up to 9.65 km/s on one of these systems. The materials considered are 8 lb/ft3 alumina-fiber-enhanced-thermal-barrier (AETB8) tiles coated with a toughened-unipiece-fibrous-insulation/reaction-cured-glass layer (TUFI/RCG). A semi-empirical, first principals <span class="hlt">impact</span> model that describes projectile dispersion is described that provides excellent agreement with observations over a broad range of <span class="hlt">impact</span> velocities, obliquities and projectile materials. A model extension to look at the implications of greater than 10 GPa equation of state measurements is also discussed. Predicted penetration probabilities for a vehicle visiting the International Space Station is 60% lower for orbital debris and 95% lower for meteoroids with this model compared to an energy scaled approach.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110011349','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110011349"><span>Ballistic Performance of <span class="hlt">Porous</span>-Ceramic, Thermal Protection Systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Miller, J. E.; Bohl, W. E.; Christiansen, Eric C.; Davis, B. A.; Foreman, C. D.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Porous</span>-ceramic, thermal protection systems are used heavily in current reentry vehicles like the Orbiter, and they are currently being proposed for the next generation of US manned spacecraft, Orion. These systems insulate reentry critical components of a spacecraft against the intense thermal environments of atmospheric reentry. Additionally, these materials are highly exposed to space environment hazards like solid particle <span class="hlt">impacts</span>. This paper discusses <span class="hlt">impact</span> studies up to 10 km/s on 8 lb/cu ft alumina-fiber-enhanced-thermal-barrier (AETB8) tiles coated with a toughened-unipiece-fibrous-insulation/ reaction-cured-glass layer (TUFI/RCG). A semi-empirical, first principals <span class="hlt">impact</span> model that describes projectile dispersion is described that provides excellent agreement with observations over a broad range of <span class="hlt">impact</span> velocities, obliquities and projectile materials. Model extensions to look at the implications of greater than 10 GPa equation of state is also discussed. Predicted penetration probabilities for a vehicle visiting the International Space Station is 60% lower for orbital debris and 95% lower for meteoroids with this model compared to an energy scaled approach.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMGP11B..07M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMGP11B..07M"><span>Heterogeneous Shock In <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Chondrites: Implications For Allende Magnetization</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Muxworthy, A. R.; Bland, P.; Collins, G. S.; Moore, J.; Davison, T.; Ciesla, F. J.</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>Paleomagnetic data from Allende has been interpreted as suggesting an internally generated field within the parent asteroid, and a liquid metallic core, i.e., the CV parent body is a differentiated object. Previous researchers considered <span class="hlt">impact</span>-generated fields as a possible mechanism but were excluded, based on the absence of macroscopic shock textures in Allende (S1). We have conducted new paleomagnetic analysis of Allende. Our results are consistent with previous studies, but we also find evidence for a strong intrinsic magnetic anisotropy that may be coincident with a pervasive uniaxial crystallographic fabric delineated by oriented matrix grains that was plausibly <span class="hlt">impact</span>-induced. Based on EBSD analysis we can quantify pre-compaction porosity, and by modeling <span class="hlt">impact</span>-induced porosity reduction we can define the continuum shock pressure and temperature that Allende must have experienced. Assuming a (conservative) initial temperature of 300K, the fabric/porosity data would be consistent with an average pressure of 1.7GPa and a temperature of 553K (below the Curie temperature for pyrrhotite, the principle magnetic carrier). At sub-micron scales in <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials - relevant to the Allende matrix - shock is highly heterogeneous, with temperature excursions of 2-3 times above background commonly observed. Our own 2D meso-scale nu-merical simulations of shock waves propagating through chondrule / matrix mixtures support this: matrix experi-ences much higher peak shock pressures and temperatures than chondrules, and shows significant heterogeneity in shock effects. There is evidence for this in Allende: TEM studies of matrix indicate high shock pressures and temperatures. These high transient temperatures equilibrate rapidly in the matrix, with the lower continuum temperature. Our pressure estimates allow us to constrain the position of Allende within the parent body with respect to various <span class="hlt">impact</span> scenarios: 1.7GPa pressures are encountered in the breccia lens. The</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20090027707','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20090027707"><span>Ballistic Performance of <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Ceramic Thermal Protection Systems at 9 km/s</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Miller, Joshua E.; Bohl, W. E.; Foreman, C. D.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Davis, B. A.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Porous</span>-ceramic, thermal-protection-systems are used heavily in current reentry vehicles like the Orbiter, and they are currently being proposed for the next generation of manned spacecraft, Orion. These materials insulate the structural components and sensitive electronic components of a spacecraft against the intense thermal environments of atmospheric reentry. Furthermore, these materials are also highly exposed to space environmental hazards like meteoroid and orbital debris <span class="hlt">impacts</span>. This paper discusses recent <span class="hlt">impact</span> testing up to 9 km/s on ceramic tiles similar to those used on the Orbiter. These tiles have a <span class="hlt">porous</span>-batting of nominally 8 lb/cubic ft alumina-fiber-enhanced-thermal-barrier (AETB8) insulating material coated with a damage-resistant, toughened-unipiece-fibrous-insulation (TUFI) layer.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.4282A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.4282A"><span>Barometric pumping of a fractured <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Adler, Pierre; Varloteaux, Clément; Mourzenko, Valeri; François Thovert, Jean; Guillon, Sophie; Pili, Eric</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Fluctuations in the ambient atmospheric pressure result in motion of air in <span class="hlt">porous</span> and fractured media. This mechanism, known as barometric (or atmospheric) pumping, efficiently transports gaseous species through the vadose zone to the atmosphere. This is of interest in many environmental and engineering fields, such as transport of trace gases from soil to atmosphere, environmental remediation of contaminated sites, radon in buildings and last but not least detection of nuclear explosions or leakage from carbon sequestration sites. The physical situation has been addressed in the following way. The fractures are modeled as polygonal plane surfaces with a given transmissivity embedded in a <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium with a given permeability. The fluid is slightly compressible and is assumed to obey Darcy's law in the fractures and the <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium with exchanges between them. The solute obeys convection-diffusion equations in both media again with exchanges between them. The fractures and the <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium located in between them are meshed by triangles and tetrahedra. The equations are discretized by the finite volume method. In order to improve numerical precision, a Flux Limiting Scheme is applied to the transport equations ; moreover, special care is devoted to the description of the solute transfer between the fractures and the <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium. The resulting equations are solved by conjugate gradient algorithms. This model is applied to the Roselend Natural Laboratory. At a 55 m depth, a sealed cavity allows for gas release experiments across fractured <span class="hlt">porous</span> rocks in the unsaturated zone. The fractures are hexagons with a radius of 5m; their density is larger than 2.4 10-3 m-3; the aperture is of the order of 0.5 mm. The pressure fluctuations are sinusoidal, of amplitude 0.01 bar and period 1 week. The solute concentration is supposed to be equal to 1 at the bottom of the site. Systematic results will be presented. First, the precision of the calculations is assessed</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24067596','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24067596"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> silicon nanowires for lithium rechargeable batteries.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yoo, Jung-Keun; Kim, Jongsoon; Lee, Hojun; Choi, Jaesuk; Choi, Min-Jae; Sim, Dong Min; Jung, Yeon Sik; Kang, Kisuk</p> <p>2013-10-25</p> <p><span class="hlt">Porous</span> silicon nanowire is fabricated by a simple electrospinning process combined with a magnesium reduction; this material is investigated for use as an anode material for lithium rechargeable batteries. We find that the <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon nanowire electrode from the simple and scalable method can deliver a high reversible capacity with an excellent cycle stability. The enhanced performance in terms of cycling stability is attributed to the facile accommodation of the volume change by the pores in the interconnect and the increased electronic conductivity due to a multi-level carbon coating during the fabrication process.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013Nanot..24P4008Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013Nanot..24P4008Y"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> silicon nanowires for lithium rechargeable batteries</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yoo, Jung-Keun; Kim, Jongsoon; Lee, Hojun; Choi, Jaesuk; Choi, Min-Jae; Sim, Dong Min; Jung, Yeon Sik; Kang, Kisuk</p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Porous</span> silicon nanowire is fabricated by a simple electrospinning process combined with a magnesium reduction; this material is investigated for use as an anode material for lithium rechargeable batteries. We find that the <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon nanowire electrode from the simple and scalable method can deliver a high reversible capacity with an excellent cycle stability. The enhanced performance in terms of cycling stability is attributed to the facile accommodation of the volume change by the pores in the interconnect and the increased electronic conductivity due to a multi-level carbon coating during the fabrication process.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900000024&hterms=filter+pressure+drop&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dfilter%2Bpressure%2Bdrop','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900000024&hterms=filter+pressure+drop&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dfilter%2Bpressure%2Bdrop"><span>Predicting Pressure Drop In <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Materials</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Lawing, Pierce L.</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>Theory developed to predict drop in pressure based on drag of individual fibers. Simple correlation method for data also developed. Helps in predicting flow characteristics of many strain-isolation pad (SIP) glow geometries in Shuttle Orbiter tile system. Also helps in predicting venting characteristics of tile assemblies during ascent and leakage of hot gas under tiles during descent. Useful in study of mechanics of flows through fibrous and <span class="hlt">porous</span> media, and procedures applicable to purged fiberglass insulation, dialysis filters, and other fibrous and <span class="hlt">porous</span> media.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19940000664&hterms=Stain&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3DStain','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19940000664&hterms=Stain&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3DStain"><span>Making <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Luminescent Regions In Silicon Wafers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Fathauer, Robert W.; Jones, Eric W.</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>Regions damaged by ion implantation stain-etched. <span class="hlt">Porous</span> regions within single-crystal silicon wafers fabricated by straightforward stain-etching process. Regions exhibit visible photoluminescence at room temperature and might constitute basis of novel class of optoelectronic devices. Stain-etching process has advantages over recently investigated anodic-etching process. Process works on both n-doped and p-doped silicon wafers. Related development reported in article, "<span class="hlt">Porous</span> Si(x)Ge(1-x) Layers Within Single Crystals of Si," (NPO-18836).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21706602','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21706602"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> polymers: enabling solutions for energy applications.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Thomas, Arne; Kuhn, Pierre; Weber, Jens; Titirici, Maria-Magdalena; Antonietti, Markus</p> <p>2009-02-18</p> <p>A new generation of <span class="hlt">porous</span> polymers was made for various energy-related applications, e.g., as fuel cell membranes, as electrode materials for batteries, for gas storage, partly from renewable resources. This review intends to catch this emerging field by reporting on a variety of different approaches to make high performing polymers <span class="hlt">porous</span>. This includes template techniques, polymers with inherent microporosity, polymer frameworks by ionothermal polymerization, and the polymerization of carbon from appropriate precursors and by hydrothermal polymerization. In this process, we try to not only identify the current status of the field, but also point to open question and tasks to identify the potentially relevant progress.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10120802','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10120802"><span>Transport of subsurface bacteria in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Bales, R.C.; Arnold, R.G.; Gerba, C.P.</p> <p>1995-02-01</p> <p>The primary objective of this study was to develop tools with which to measure the advective transport of microorganisms through <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. These tools were then applied to investigate the sorptive properties of representative microorganisms that were selected at random from the DOE`s deep subsurface collection of bacterial, maintained at Florida State University. The transport screening procedure that arose from this study was also used to investigate biological factors that affect the transport/sorption of biocolloids during their movement through <span class="hlt">porous</span> media with the bulk advective flow.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22134621','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22134621"><span>Functional <span class="hlt">porous</span> organic polymers for heterogeneous catalysis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhang, Yugen; Riduan, Siti Nurhanna</p> <p>2012-03-21</p> <p><span class="hlt">Porous</span> organic polymers (POPs), a class of highly crosslinked amorphous polymers possessing nano-pores, have recently emerged as a versatile platform for the deployment of catalysts. The bottom-up approach for <span class="hlt">porous</span> organic polymer synthesis provides the opportunity for the design of polymer frameworks with various functionalities, for their use as catalysts or ligands. This tutorial review focuses on the framework structures and functionalities of catalytic POPs. Their structural design, functional framework synthesis and catalytic reactions are discussed along with some of the challenges.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012APS..TSF.B9007M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012APS..TSF.B9007M"><span>Characterization of Energetic Properties of <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Silicon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>McCracken, Blake</p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Porous</span> silicon has recently been found to explode when under certain oxidation or nitration conditions. However, characterization of the velocity and pressure of these explosions is not been complete, as there are many kinds of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon. We present a simple and inexpensive method to measure these properties using PVDF piezoelectric gauges. Here, the gauges are calibrated qualitatively against common firecrackers, similar to black cats. While the pressure measurements from our results are still being analyzed, the velocity of the shock wave produced by the explosion is faster than the speed of sound, about 430 m/s.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18272457','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18272457"><span>Engineering <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials for fuel cell applications.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Brandon, N P; Brett, D J</p> <p>2006-01-15</p> <p><span class="hlt">Porous</span> materials play an important role in fuel cell engineering. For example, they are used to support delicate electrolyte membranes, where mechanical integrity and effective diffusivity to fuel gases is critical; they are used as gas diffusion layers, where electronic conductivity and permeability to both gas and water is critical; and they are used to construct fuel cell electrodes, where an optimum combination of ionic conductivity, electronic conductivity, porosity and catalyst distribution is critical. The paper will discuss these characteristics, and introduce the materials and processing methods used to engineer <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials within two of the leading fuel cell variants, the solid oxide fuel cell and the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JMMM..396..237M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JMMM..396..237M"><span>Novel hybrid multifunctional magnetoelectric <span class="hlt">porous</span> composite films</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Martins, P.; Gonçalves, R.; Lopes, A. C.; Venkata Ramana, E.; Mendiratta, S. K.; Lanceros-Mendez, S.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Novel multifunctional <span class="hlt">porous</span> films have been developed by the integration of magnetic CoFe2O4 (CFO) nanoparticles into poly(vinylidene fluoride)-Trifuoroethylene (P(VDF-TrFE)), taking advantage of the synergies of the magnetostrictive filler and the piezoelectric polymer. The <span class="hlt">porous</span> films show a piezoelectric response with an effective d33 coefficient of -22 pC/N-1, a maximum magnetization of 12 emu g-1 and a maximum magnetoelectric coefficient of 9 mV cm-1 Oe-1. In this way, a multifunctional membrane has been developed suitable for advanced applications ranging from biomedical to water treatment.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_21 --> <div id="page_22" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="421"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/929726','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/929726"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> ceramic scaffolds with complex architectures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Saiz, Eduardo; Munch, Etienne; Franco, Jaime; Deville, Sylvain; Hunger, Phillip; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.</p> <p>2008-03-15</p> <p>This work compares two novel techniques for the fabrication of ceramic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering with complex porosity: robocasting and freeze casting. Both techniques are based on the preparation of concentrated ceramic suspensions with suitable properties for the process. In robocasting, the computer-guided deposition of the suspensions is used to build <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials with designed three dimensional (3-D) geometries and microstructures. Freeze casting uses ice crystals as a template to form <span class="hlt">porous</span> lamellar ceramic materials. Preliminary results on the compressive strengths of the materials are also reported.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1034299','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1034299"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> polymeric materials for hydrogen storage</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Yu, Luping [Hoffman Estates, IL; Liu, Di-Jia [Naperville, IL; Yuan, Shengwen [Chicago, IL; Yang, Junbing [Westmont, IL</p> <p>2011-12-13</p> <p><span class="hlt">Porous</span> polymers, tribenzohexazatriphenylene, poly-9,9'-spirobifluorene, poly-tetraphenyl methane and their derivatives for storage of H.sub.2 prepared through a chemical synthesis method. The <span class="hlt">porous</span> polymers have high specific surface area and narrow pore size distribution. Hydrogen uptake measurements conducted for these polymers determined a higher hydrogen storage capacity at the ambient temperature over that of the benchmark materials. The method of preparing such polymers, includes oxidatively activating solids by CO.sub.2/steam oxidation and supercritical water treatment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1312627','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1312627"><span>Additive Manufacturing of Hierarchical <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Structures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Grote, Christopher John</p> <p>2016-08-30</p> <p>Additive manufacturing has become a tool of choice for the development of customizable components. Developments in this technology have led to a powerful array of printers that t serve a variety of needs. However, resin development plays a crucial role in leading the technology forward. This paper addresses the development and application of printing hierarchical <span class="hlt">porous</span> structures. Beginning with the development of a <span class="hlt">porous</span> scaffold, which can be functionalized with a variety of materials, and concluding with customized resins for metal, ceramic, and carbon structures.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ApPhL.108q1603J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ApPhL.108q1603J"><span>Superhydrophobicity on nanostructured <span class="hlt">porous</span> hydrophilic material</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jiang, Hong-Ren; Chan, Deng-Chi</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>By applying laser oxidation, ablation, and plasma treatment to modify a surface of polydimethylsiloxane, we show that creating hydrophobic sites on an originally superhydrophilic nanostructured <span class="hlt">porous</span> surface greatly changes the wetting properties of the surface. The modified surface may even become superhydrophobic while the ratio of added hydrophobic site to the surface is relatively low. The relation between the contact angles and the effect of hydrophobic sites is further tested in blade scraping method and a similar result is also obtained. This method to achieve superhydrophobicity on the hydrophilic nanostructured <span class="hlt">porous</span> material may open possibilities for achieving superhydrophobicity and enable functional superhydrophobic surfaces with heterogeneous components.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009dasn.book..325S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009dasn.book..325S"><span>Ultrasonic Emission from Nanocrystalline <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Silicon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Shinoda, Hiroyuki; Koshida, Nobuyoshi</p> <p></p> <p>A simple layer structure composed of a metal thin film and a <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon layer on a silicon substrate generates intense and wide-band airborne ultrasounds. The large-bandwidth and the fidelity of the sound reproduction are leveraged in applications varying from sound-based measurement to a scientific study of animal ecology. This chapter describes the basic principle of the ultrasound generation. The macroscopic properties of the low thermal conductivity and the small heat capacity of nanocrystalline <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon thermally induce ultrasonic emission. The state-of-the-art of the achievable sound pressure and sound signal properties is introduced, with the technological and scientific applications of the devices.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12411321','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12411321"><span>Furin gene (fur) regulation in differentiating human megakaryoblastic Dami cells: <span class="hlt">involvement</span> of the proximal GATA recognition motif in the P1 promoter and <span class="hlt">impact</span> on the maturation of furin substrates.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Laprise, Marie-Hélène; Grondin, Francine; Cayer, Pauline; McDonald, Patrick P; Dubois, Claire M</p> <p>2002-11-15</p> <p>The convertase furin is <span class="hlt">involved</span> in the maturation of key growth/aggregation mediators synthesized by the platelet producers, megakaryocytes, but the regulation of furin in these cells remains unknown. Computer-assisted search of the furin promoter sequence revealed multiple potential binding motifs for GATA-1, suggesting that furin is expressed and regulated in these cells. Using megakaryoblastic Dami cells, we observed that fur mRNA expression increased gradually on phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced differentiation, reaching maximum levels (8.3-fold increase) at 10 days. Transient transfections with P1, P1A, or P1B fur-LUC-promoter constructs revealed that in Dami cells, the P1 promoter is the strongest and the most sensitive to forced expression of GATA-1. Coexpression of GATA-1 and its comodulator, Friend of GATA-1 (FOG-1), resulted in a cooperative increase in P1 activity. Deletion analysis indicated that important GATA-1-regulated sequences are located in the most proximal region of the P1 promoter. Further analysis revealed 2 potential GATA-binding motifs at positions -66 and +62. Point mutation of each of the 2 motifs indicated that the intactness of the first GATA site is required for full basal and GATA-1-stimulated promoter activity. Finally, the inhibition of furin activity through gene transfer of the inhibitor alpha1-AT-PDX led to a block in maturation of the furin substrates transforming growth factor-beta1 and platelet-derived growth factor. Taken together, these results indicate that the most proximal GATA element in the P1 promoter is needed for fur gene expression in megakaryoblastic cells. They also suggest that proper regulation of the fur gene in megakaryocytes has an <span class="hlt">impact</span> on the activation of furin substrates <span class="hlt">involved</span> in megakaryocyte maturation and platelet functions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011LPI....42.1993H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011LPI....42.1993H"><span>Ejecta Dynamics during Hypervelocity <span class="hlt">Impacts</span> into Dry and Wet Sandstone</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hoerth, T.; Schäfer, F.; Thoma, K.; Poelchau, M.; Kenkmann, T.; Deutsch, A.</p> <p>2011-03-01</p> <p>Hypervelocity <span class="hlt">impact</span> experiments into dry and water saturated <span class="hlt">porous</span> Seeberger sandstone were conducted at the two-stage light gas accelerator at the Ernst-Mach-Institute (EMI) and the ejecta dynamics were analyzed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFM.H43B1013W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFM.H43B1013W"><span>Colloid Transport in <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Medium: <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of High Salinity Solutions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Weisbrod, N.; Magal, E.; Yechieli, Y.; Yakirevich, A.</p> <p>2009-12-01</p> <p>We explored the transport of colloids suspended in natural saline solutions with a wide range of ionic strengths, up to Dead Sea brines. Migration of latex microspheres through saturated sand columns of different sizes was studied in lab experiments, and colloid transport was simulated with a mathematical model. We have found that latex microspheres were mobile even in the extremely saline brines of the Dead Sea (ionic strength = 100.9 M). At this high ionic strength, according to the common colloid transport theories, no energetic barrier to colloid attachment exists and colloid adsorption was expected to be a favorable process. Apparently, even in that high salinity, colloids adsorption is not complete and ~20% colloids are allowed to transport (through 30-cm long column). Colloid transport was found to be related to the solution salinity, as expected. After 2-3 pore volumes (PV) the relative concentration of colloids at the outlet of 30-cm long columns decreased as the solution ionic strength increased until some critical value (ionic strength greater than 10-1.8 M) and then remained constant as the solution salinity increased. To further explore the sorption of colloids on sand surfaces in Dead Sea brines, breakthrough curves (BTCs) were studied using 7-cm long columns, through which hundreds of PV were introduced. The observed BTCs exhibited a bi-modal shape that suggests different rates of colloid attachment. After initial breakthrough the relative concentration of colloids at the outlet rose to a value of 0.8 (after 1.5 PV), and it remained relatively constant until approximately 17 PV were flushed through the column. After a total flow of about 20 PV, the relative concentration reached a value of one. The colloid migration process was successfully modeled using the limited entrapment model (Pachepsky et al., 2006), assuming the colloid attachment rate is dependent on the concentration of attached colloids.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21180168','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21180168"><span>Anomalous Diffusion Mediated by Atom Deposition into a <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Substrate</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Brault, Pascal; Bauchire, Jean-Marc; Josserand, Christophe; Caillard, Amaeel; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod W.</p> <p>2009-01-30</p> <p>Constant flux atom deposition into a <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium is shown to generate a dense overlayer and a diffusion profile. Scaling analysis shows that the overlayer acts as a dynamic control for atomic diffusion in the <span class="hlt">porous</span> substrate. This is modeled by generalizing the <span class="hlt">porous</span> diffusion equation with a time-dependent diffusion coefficient equivalent to a nonlinear rescaling of time.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1129389','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1129389"><span>Microfluidic devices and methods including <span class="hlt">porous</span> polymer monoliths</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Hatch, Anson V; Sommer, Gregory J; Singh, Anup K; Wang, Ying-Chih; Abhyankar, Vinay V</p> <p>2014-04-22</p> <p>Microfluidic devices and methods including <span class="hlt">porous</span> polymer monoliths are described. Polymerization techniques may be used to generate <span class="hlt">porous</span> polymer monoliths having pores defined by a liquid component of a fluid mixture. The fluid mixture may contain iniferters and the resulting <span class="hlt">porous</span> polymer monolith may include surfaces terminated with iniferter species. Capture molecules may then be grafted to the monolith pores.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1227358','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1227358"><span>Microfluidic devices and methods including <span class="hlt">porous</span> polymer monoliths</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Hatch, Anson V.; Sommer, Gregory j.; Singh, Anup K.; Wang, Ying-Chih; Abhyankar, Vinay</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Microfluidic devices and methods including <span class="hlt">porous</span> polymer monoliths are described. Polymerization techniques may be used to generate <span class="hlt">porous</span> polymer monoliths having pores defined by a liquid component of a fluid mixture. The fluid mixture may contain iniferters and the resulting <span class="hlt">porous</span> polymer monolith may include surfaces terminated with iniferter species. Capture molecules may then be grafted to the monolith pores.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=305100','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=305100"><span>Transport, retention, and size perturbation of graphene oxide in saturated <span class="hlt">porous</span> media: Effects of input concentration and grain size</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Accurately predicting the fate and transport of graphene oxide (GO) in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media is critical to assess its environmental <span class="hlt">impact</span>. In this work, sand column experiments were conducted to determine the effect of input concentration and grain size on transport, retention, and size perturbation of GO ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016CPM.....3..429G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016CPM.....3..429G"><span>Instationary compaction wave propagation in highly <span class="hlt">porous</span> cohesive granular media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gunkelmann, Nina; Ringl, Christian; Urbassek, Herbert M.</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>We study the collision of a highly <span class="hlt">porous</span> granular aggregate of adhesive \\upmu m-sized silica grains with a hard wall using a granular discrete element method. A compaction wave runs through the granular sample building up an inhomogeneous density profile. The compaction is independent of the length of the aggregate, within the regime of lengths studied here. Also short pulses, as they might be exerted by a piston pushing the granular material, excite a compaction wave that runs through the entire material. The speed of the compaction wave is larger than the <span class="hlt">impact</span> velocity but considerably smaller than the sound speed. The wave speed is related to the compaction rate at the colliding surface and the average slope of the linear density profile.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008SPIE.6927E..1UP','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008SPIE.6927E..1UP"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> conductive polyblends of polyaniline in poly(methyl methacrylate)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Price, Aaron D.; Naguib, Hani E.</p> <p>2008-03-01</p> <p>The conductive polymer polyaniline is typically blended with conventional industrial thermoplastics in order to obtain an electrically conductive polymer blend with adequate mechanical properties. Processing these polyblends into foams yields a <span class="hlt">porous</span> conductive material that exhibits immense application potential such as dynamic separation media and low-density electrostatic discharge protection. In the current study, the morphology of a thermally-processable blend consisting of an electrically conductive polyaniline-dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid complex and poly(methyl methacrylate) is explored using a two-phase batch foaming setup. The effect of blend composition and processing parameters on the resulting cellular morphology is investigated. Finally, the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of the underlying microstructure on the frequency dependent electrical conductivity is elucidated.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20829206','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20829206"><span>Solid thoron source preparation in a <span class="hlt">porous</span> mineral matrix.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jobbágy, V; Bety-Denissa, B</p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>Thoron and progeny are decay products of (232)Th with a great <span class="hlt">impact</span> on human health. The release of thoron gas from the mining and milling of thorite, monazite and other major thorium ores has been recognised as a potential radiological health hazard. For precise measurements, calibration is a very important factor. This paper describes a cheap and easy way of producing a stable thoron source made of thorium nitrate packed in a <span class="hlt">porous</span> clay mineral matrix used as (220)Rn generator. The source should have a small spherical shape and be fired at 600°C; this will lead to a great pore volume, necessary for the thoron gas. High importance should be given to the water uptake. The exhalation power of (220)Rn was measured using a Lucas scintillation cell. Experimental efficiency values obtained ranged between 0.16 and 1.44 %.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/270497','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/270497"><span>Biopolymer system for permeability modification in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Stepp, A.K.; Bryant, R.S.; Llave, F.M.</p> <p>1995-12-31</p> <p>New technologies are needed to reduce the current high rate of well abandonment. Improved sweep efficiency, reservoir conformance, and permeability modification can have a significant <span class="hlt">impact</span> on oil recovery processes. Microorganisms can be used to selectively plug high-permeability zones to improve sweep efficiency and impart conformance control. Studies of a promising microbial system for polymer production were conducted to evaluate reservoir conditions in which this system would be effective. Factors which can affect microbial growth and polymer production include salinity, pH, temperature, divalent ions, presence of residual oil, and rock matrix. Flask tests and coreflooding experiments were conducted to optimize and evaluate the effectiveness of this system. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI) was used to visualize microbial polymer production in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. Changes in fluid distribution within the pore system of the core were detected.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMMR23A4320C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMMR23A4320C"><span>3-D Numerical Simulation of Hydrostatic Tests of <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Rocks Using Adapted Constitutive Model</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chemenda, A. I.; Daniel, M.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>The high complexity and poor knowledge of the constitutive properties of <span class="hlt">porous</span> rocks are principal obstacles for the modeling of their deformation. Normally, the constitutive lows are to be derived from the experimental data (nominal strains and stresses). They are known, however, to be sensitive to the mechanical instabilities within the rock specimen and the boundary (notably friction) conditions at its ends. To elucidate the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of these conditions on the measured mechanical response we use 3-D finite-difference simulations of experimental tests. Modeling of hydrostatic tests was chosen because it does not typically <span class="hlt">involve</span> deformation instabilities. The ends of the cylindrical 'rock sample' are in contact with the 'steel' elastic platens through the frictional interfaces. The whole system is subjected to a normal stress Pc applied to the external model surface. A new constitutive model of <span class="hlt">porous</span> rocks with the cap-type yield function is used. This function is quadratic in the mean stress σm and depends on the inelastic strain γp in a way to generate strain softening at small σm and strain-hardening at high σm. The corresponding material parameters are defined from the experimental data and have clear interpretation in terms of the geometry of the yield surface. The constitutive model with this yield function and the Drucker-Prager plastic potential has been implemented in 3-D dynamic explicit code Flac3D. The results of an extensive set of numerical simulations at different model parameters will be presented. They show, in particular, that the shape of the 'numerical' hydrostats is very similar to that obtained from the experimental tests and that it is practically insensitive to the interface friction. On the other hand, the stress and strain fields within the specimen dramatically depend on this parameter. The inelastic deformation at the specimen's ends starts well before reaching the grain crushing pressure P* and evolves heterogeneously with Pc</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25047379','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25047379"><span>Tools, harmonization and standardization procedures of the <span class="hlt">impact</span> and outcome evaluation indices obtained during a kindergarten-based, family-<span class="hlt">involved</span> intervention to prevent obesity in early childhood: the ToyBox-study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mouratidou, T; Miguel, M L; Androutsos, O; Manios, Y; De Bourdeaudhuij, I; Cardon, G; Kulaga, Z; Socha, P; Galcheva, S; Iotova, V; Payr, A; Koletzko, B; Moreno, L A</p> <p>2014-08-01</p> <p>The ToyBox-intervention is a kindergarten-based, family-<span class="hlt">involved</span> intervention targeting multiple lifestyle behaviours in preschool children, their teachers and their families. This intervention was conducted in six European countries, namely Belgium, Bulgaria, Germany, Greece, Poland and Spain. The aim of this paper is to provide a descriptive overview of the harmonization and standardization procedures of the baseline and follow-up evaluation of the study (and substudies). Steps related to the study's operational, standardization and harmonization procedures as well as the <span class="hlt">impact</span> and outcome evaluation assessment tools used are presented. Experiences from the project highlight the importance of safeguarding the measurement process to minimize data heterogeneity derived from potential measurement error and country-by-country differences. In addition, it was made clear that continuing quality control and support is an important component of such studies. For this reason, well-supported communication channels, such as regular email updates and teleconferences, and regular internal and external meetings to ensure smooth and accurate implementation were in place during the study. The ToyBox-intervention and its harmonized and standardized procedures can serve as a successful case study for future studies evaluating the efficacy of similar interventions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016NatSR...624798M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016NatSR...624798M"><span>Role of an Oxidant Mixture as Surface Modifier of <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Silicon Microstructures Evaluated by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Montiel-González, Zeuz; Escobar, Salvador; Nava, Rocío; Del Río, J. Antonio; Tagüeña-Martínez, Julia</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Current research on <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon includes the construction of complex structures with luminescent and/or photonic properties. However, their preparation with both characteristics is still challenging. Recently, our group reported a possible method to achieve that by adding an oxidant mixture to the electrolyte used to produce <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon. This mixture can chemically modify their microstructure by changing the thickness and surface passivation of the pore walls. In this work, we prepared a series of samples (with and without oxidant mixture) and we evaluated the structural differences through their scanning electron micrographs and their optical properties determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry. The results showed that ellipsometry is sensitive to slight variations in the <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon structure, caused by changes in their preparation. The fitting process, based on models constructed from the features observed in the micrographs, allowed us to see that the mayor effect of the oxidant mixture is on samples of high porosity, where the surface oxidation strongly contributes to the skeleton thinning during the electrochemical etching. This suggests the existence of a porosity threshold for the action of the oxidant mixture. These results could have a significant <span class="hlt">impact</span> on the design of complex <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon structures for different optoelectronic applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JAMTP..57..808S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JAMTP..57..808S"><span>Analyzing the deformation of a <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium with account for the collapse of pores</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sadovskii, V. M.; Sadovskaya, O. V.</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>The generalized rheological method is used to construct a mathematical model of small deformations of a <span class="hlt">porous</span> media with open pores. Changes in the resistance of the material to external mechanical <span class="hlt">impact</span> at the moment of collapse of the pores is described using the von Mises-Schleicher strength condition. The irreversible deformation is accounted for with the help of the classic versions of the von Mises-Tresca-Saint-Venant yield condition and the condition that simulates the plastic loss of stability of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> skeleton. Within the framework of the constructed model, this paper describes the analysis of the propagation of plane longitudinal compression waves in a homogeneous medium accompanied with plastic strain of the skeleton and densification of the material. A parallel computational algorithm is developed for the study of the elastoplastic deformation of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium under external dynamics loads. The algorithm and the program are tested by calculating the propagation of plane longitudinal compression shock waves and the extension of the cylindrical cavity in an infinite <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium. The calculation results are compared with exact solutions, and it is shown that they are in good agreement.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_22 --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="441"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4838841','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4838841"><span>Role of an Oxidant Mixture as Surface Modifier of <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Silicon Microstructures Evaluated by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Montiel-González, Zeuz; Escobar, Salvador; Nava, Rocío; del Río, J. Antonio; Tagüeña-Martínez, Julia</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Current research on <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon includes the construction of complex structures with luminescent and/or photonic properties. However, their preparation with both characteristics is still challenging. Recently, our group reported a possible method to achieve that by adding an oxidant mixture to the electrolyte used to produce <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon. This mixture can chemically modify their microstructure by changing the thickness and surface passivation of the pore walls. In this work, we prepared a series of samples (with and without oxidant mixture) and we evaluated the structural differences through their scanning electron micrographs and their optical properties determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry. The results showed that ellipsometry is sensitive to slight variations in the <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon structure, caused by changes in their preparation. The fitting process, based on models constructed from the features observed in the micrographs, allowed us to see that the mayor effect of the oxidant mixture is on samples of high porosity, where the surface oxidation strongly contributes to the skeleton thinning during the electrochemical etching. This suggests the existence of a porosity threshold for the action of the oxidant mixture. These results could have a significant <span class="hlt">impact</span> on the design of complex <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon structures for different optoelectronic applications. PMID:27097767</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27097767','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27097767"><span>Role of an Oxidant Mixture as Surface Modifier of <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Silicon Microstructures Evaluated by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Montiel-González, Zeuz; Escobar, Salvador; Nava, Rocío; del Río, J Antonio; Tagüeña-Martínez, Julia</p> <p>2016-04-21</p> <p>Current research on <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon includes the construction of complex structures with luminescent and/or photonic properties. However, their preparation with both characteristics is still challenging. Recently, our group reported a possible method to achieve that by adding an oxidant mixture to the electrolyte used to produce <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon. This mixture can chemically modify their microstructure by changing the thickness and surface passivation of the pore walls. In this work, we prepared a series of samples (with and without oxidant mixture) and we evaluated the structural differences through their scanning electron micrographs and their optical properties determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry. The results showed that ellipsometry is sensitive to slight variations in the <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon structure, caused by changes in their preparation. The fitting process, based on models constructed from the features observed in the micrographs, allowed us to see that the mayor effect of the oxidant mixture is on samples of high porosity, where the surface oxidation strongly contributes to the skeleton thinning during the electrochemical etching. This suggests the existence of a porosity threshold for the action of the oxidant mixture. These results could have a significant <span class="hlt">impact</span> on the design of complex <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon structures for different optoelectronic applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27184707','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27184707"><span>Compensation strategy to reduce geometry and mechanics mismatches in <span class="hlt">porous</span> biomaterials built with Selective Laser Melting.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bagheri, Zahra S; Melancon, David; Liu, Lu; Johnston, R Burnett; Pasini, Damiano</p> <p>2016-05-06</p> <p>The accuracy of Additive Manufacturing processes in fabricating <span class="hlt">porous</span> biomaterials is currently limited by their capacity to render pore morphology that precisely matches its design. In a <span class="hlt">porous</span> biomaterial, a geometric mismatch can result in pore occlusion and strut thinning, drawbacks that can inherently compromise bone ingrowth and severely <span class="hlt">impact</span> mechanical performance. This paper focuses on Selective Laser Melting of <span class="hlt">porous</span> microarchitecture and proposes a compensation scheme that reduces the morphology mismatch between as-designed and as-manufactured geometry, in particular that of the pore. A spider web analog is introduced, built out of Ti-6Al-4V powder via SLM, and morphologically characterized. Results from error analysis of strut thickness are used to generate thickness compensation relations expressed as a function of the angle each strut formed with the build plane. The scheme is applied to fabricate a set of three-dimensional <span class="hlt">porous</span> biomaterials, which are morphologically and mechanically characterized via micro Computed Tomography, mechanically tested and numerically analyzed. For strut thickness, the results show the largest mismatch (60% from the design) occurring for horizontal members, reduces to 3.1% upon application of the compensation. Similar improvement is observed also for the mechanical properties, a factor that further corroborates the merit of the design-oriented scheme here introduced.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/867640','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/867640"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> radiant burners having increased radiant output</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Tong, Timothy W.; Sathe, Sanjeev B.; Peck, Robert E.</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>Means and methods for enhancing the output of radiant energy from a <span class="hlt">porous</span> radiant burner by minimizing the scattering and increasing the adsorption, and thus emission of such energy by the use of randomly dispersed ceramic fibers of sub-micron diameter in the fabrication of ceramic fiber matrix burners and for use therein.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016APS..DFDD20006D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016APS..DFDD20006D"><span>Bacterial Trapping in <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Media Flows</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dehkharghani, Amin; Waisbord, Nicolas; Dunkel, Jörn; Guasto, Jeffrey</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>Swimming bacteria inhabit heterogeneous, microstructured environments that are often characterized by complex, ambient flows. Understanding the physical mechanisms underlying cell transport in these systems is key to controlling important processes such as bioremediation in <span class="hlt">porous</span> soils and infections in human tissues. We study the transport of swimming bacteria (Bacillus subtilis) in quasi-two-dimensional <span class="hlt">porous</span> microfluidic channels with a range of periodic microstructures and flow strengths. Measured cell trajectories and the local cell number density reveal the formation of filamentous cell concentration patterns within the <span class="hlt">porous</span> structures. The local cell densification is maximized at shear rates in the range 1-10 s-1, but widely varies with pore geometry and flow topology. Experimental observations are complemented by Langevin simulations to demonstrate that the filamentous patterns result from a coupling of bacterial motility to the complex flow fields via Jeffery orbits, which effectively 'trap' the bacteria on streamlines. The resulting microscopic heterogeneity observed here suppresses bacterial transport and likely has implications for both mixing and cell nutrient uptake in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media flows. NSF CBET-1511340.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/867599','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/867599"><span>Method of making <span class="hlt">porous</span> ceramic fluoride</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Reiner, Robert H.; Holcombe, Cressie E.</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>A process for making a <span class="hlt">porous</span> ceramic composite where fumed silica particles are coated with a nitrate, preferably aluminum nitrate. Next the nitrate is converted to an oxide and formed into a desired configuration. This configuration is heated to convert the oxide to an oxide silicate which is then react with HF, resulting in the fluoride ceramic, preferably aluminum fluoride.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19780000518&hterms=gas+chromatography&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dgas%2Bchromatography','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19780000518&hterms=gas+chromatography&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dgas%2Bchromatography"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> bead packings for gas chromatography</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Pollock, G. E.; Woeller, F. H.</p> <p>1979-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Porous</span> polyaromatic packing beads have low polarity, high efficiency, short retention time, and may be synthesized in size range of 50 to 150 micrometers (100 to 270 mesh). Mechanically strong beads may be produced using various materials depending on elements and compounds to be identified.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992JEMat..21..205P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992JEMat..21..205P"><span>Conducting polyheterocycle composites based on <span class="hlt">porous</span> hosts</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Park, J. S.; Ruckenstein, E.</p> <p>1992-02-01</p> <p>Conducting composites based on <span class="hlt">porous</span> substrates (cotton fiber, non-woven polypropylene mat and <span class="hlt">porous</span> crosslinked polystyrene) have been prepared by a two step imbibition technique. First, the substrate was imbibed with a solution of monomer (pyrrole or bithiophene) in acetonitrile, followed by partial drying. Subsequently, the substrate was again imbibed, this time with an oxidant dissolved in a suitable solvent. The polymerization of the monomer inside the host in the presence of the oxidant and the doping of the polymer with the oxidant leads to the conducting composite. The highly hydrophobic and <span class="hlt">porous</span> crosslinked polystyrene, prepared by the concentrated emulsion polymerization method, is the most efficient. The solvent employed for the oxidant plays a major role. A FeCl3-methanol system and <span class="hlt">porous</span> crosslinked polystyrene lead to conductivities of polythiophene and polypyrrole based composites of 3.63 and 0.65 S/cm, respectively. Copper perchlorate and iron perchlorate are also suitable oxidants. The environmental and thermal stabilities of polypyrrole based composites are lower than those of polythiophene based composites. The thermal stability of polypyrrole based composites can be enhanced by including a small amount of an organic antioxidant, such as amides or substituted phenols, in the composite.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2666262','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2666262"><span>Intravitreal properties of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon photonic crystals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Cheng, L; Anglin, E; Cunin, F; Kim, D; Sailor, M J; Falkenstein, I; Tammewar, A; Freeman, W R</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Aim To determine the suitability of <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon photonic crystals for intraocular drug-delivery. Methods A rugate structure was electrochemically etched into a highly doped p-type silicon substrate to create a <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon film that was subsequently removed and ultrasonically fractured into particles. To stabilise the particles in aqueous media, the silicon particles were modified by surface alkylation (using thermal hydrosilylation) or by thermal oxidation. Unmodified particles, hydrosilylated particles and oxidised particles were injected into rabbit vitreous. The stability and toxicity of each type of particle were studied by indirect ophthalmoscopy, biomicroscopy, tonometry, electroretinography (ERG) and histology. Results No toxicity was observed with any type of the particles during a period of >4 months. Surface alkylation led to dramatically increased intravitreal stability and slow degradation. The estimated vitreous half-life increased from 1 week (fresh particles) to 5 weeks (oxidised particles) and to 16 weeks (hydrosilylated particles). Conclusion The <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon photonic crystals showed good biocompatibility and may be used as an intraocular drug-delivery system. The intravitreal injectable <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon photonic crystals may be engineered to host a variety of therapeutics and achieve controlled drug release over long periods of time to treat chronic vitreoretinal diseases. PMID:18441177</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/874700','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/874700"><span>Open-cell glass crystalline <span class="hlt">porous</span> material</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Anshits, Alexander G.; Sharonova, Olga M.; Vereshchagina, Tatiana A.; Zykova, Irina D.; Revenko, Yurii A.; Tretyakov, Alexander A.; Aloy, Albert S.; Lubtsev, Rem I.; Knecht, Dieter A.; Tranter, Troy J.; Macheret, Yevgeny</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>An open-cell glass crystalline <span class="hlt">porous</span> material made from hollow microspheres which are cenospheres obtained from fly ash, having an open-cell porosity of up to 90 vol. % is produced. The cenospheres are separated into fractions based on one or more of grain size, density, magnetic or non-magnetic, and perforated or non-perforated. Selected fractions are molded and agglomerated by sintering with a binder at a temperature below the softening temperature, or without a binder at a temperature about, or above, the softening temperature but below the temperature of liquidity. The <span class="hlt">porous</span> material produced has an apparent density of 0.3-0.6 g/cm.sup.3, a compressive strength in the range of 1.2-3.5 MPa, and two types of openings: through-flow wall pores in the cenospheres of 0.1-30 micrometers, and interglobular voids between the cenospheres of 20-100 micrometers. The <span class="hlt">porous</span> material of the invention has properties useful as <span class="hlt">porous</span> matrices for immobilization of liquid radioactive waste, heat-resistant traps and filters, supports for catalysts, adsorbents and ion-exchangers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=65462&keyword=insulation&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=78675524&CFTOKEN=87180299','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=65462&keyword=insulation&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=78675524&CFTOKEN=87180299"><span>TESTING ANTIMICROBIAL EFFICACY ON <span class="hlt">POROUS</span> MATERIALS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The efficacy of antimicrobial treatments to eliminate or control biological growth in the indoor environment can easily be tested on nonporous surfaces. However, the testing of antimicrobial efficacy on <span class="hlt">porous</span> surfaces, such as those found in the indoor environment [i.e., gypsum ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20150016931','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20150016931"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> Cross-Linked Polyimide Networks</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor); Guo, Haiquan (Inventor)</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Porous</span> cross-linked polyimide networks are provided. The networks comprise an anhydride end-capped polyamic acid oligomer. The oligomer (i) comprises a repeating unit of a dianhydride and a diamine and terminal anhydride groups, (ii) has an average degree of polymerization of 10 to 50, (iii) has been cross-linked via a cross-linking agent, comprising three or more amine groups, at a balanced stoichiometry of the amine groups to the terminal anhydride groups, and (iv) has been chemically imidized to yield the <span class="hlt">porous</span> cross-linked polyimide network. Also provided are <span class="hlt">porous</span> cross-linked polyimide aerogels comprising a cross-linked and imidized anhydride end-capped polyamic acid oligomer, wherein the oligomer comprises a repeating unit of a dianhydride and a diamine, and the aerogel has a density of 0.10 to 0.333 g/cm.sup.3 and a Young's modulus of 1.7 to 102 MPa. Also provided are thin films comprising aerogels, and methods of making <span class="hlt">porous</span> cross-linked polyimide networks.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/432952','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/432952"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> Si structure as moisture sensor</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Peterson, D.W.; Nguyen, L.T.</p> <p>1996-12-31</p> <p>Development and characterization of a capacitive moisture sensor made from <span class="hlt">porous</span> Si is presented. The sensor development was in support of the DoD funded Plastic Package Availability program and was intended for the detection of pinholes and defects in moisture barrier coatings applied to ICs during fabrication or during the plastic encapsulation assembly process.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3568110','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3568110"><span>Highly <span class="hlt">porous</span> drug-eluting structures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Elsner, Jonathan J.; Kraitzer, Amir; Grinberg, Orly; Zilberman, Meital</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>For many biomedical applications, there is need for <span class="hlt">porous</span> implant materials. The current article focuses on a method for preparation of drug-eluting <span class="hlt">porous</span> structures for various biomedical applications, based on freeze drying of inverted emulsions. This fabrication process enables the incorporation of any drug, to obtain an “active implant” that releases drugs to the surrounding tissue in a controlled desired manner. Examples for <span class="hlt">porous</span> implants based on this technique are antibiotic-eluting mesh/matrix structures used for wound healing applications, antiproliferative drug-eluting composite fibers for stent applications and local cancer treatment, and protein-eluting films for tissue regeneration applications. In the current review we focus on these systems. We show that the release profiles of both types of drugs, water-soluble and water-insoluble, are affected by the emulsion's formulation parameters. The former's release profile is affected mainly through the emulsion stability and the resulting <span class="hlt">porous</span> microstructure, whereas the latter's release mechanism occurs via water uptake and degradation of the host polymer. Hence, appropriate selection of the formulation parameters enables to obtain desired controllable release profile of any bioactive agent, water-soluble or water-insoluble, and also fit its physical properties to the application. PMID:23507890</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1274884','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1274884"><span>Adsorption Kinetics in Nanoscale <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Coordination Polymers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Nune, Satish K.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; McGrail, Benard Peter; Annapureddy, Harsha V. R.; Dang, Liem X.; Mei, Donghai; Karri, Naveen; Alvine, Kyle J.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Arey, Bruce W.; Dohnalkova, Alice</p> <p>2015-10-07</p> <p>Nanoscale <span class="hlt">porous</span> coordination polymers were synthesized using simple wet chemical method. The effect of various polymer surfactants on colloidal stability and shape selectivity was investigated. Our results suggest that the nanoparticles exhibited significantly improved adsorption kinetics compared to bulk crystals due to decreased diffusion path lengths and preferred crystal plane interaction.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/AD1011610','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/AD1011610"><span>Energy Harvesting from Energetic <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Silicon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>ARL-TR-7719 ● JULY 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Energy Harvesting from Energetic <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Silicon by Louis B Levine, Matthew...it is no longer needed. Do not return it to the originator. ARL-TR-7719 ● JULY 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Energy ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21544222','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21544222"><span>Bioinspired Strong and Highly <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Glass Scaffolds.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Fu, Qiang; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P</p> <p>2011-03-22</p> <p>The quest for more efficient energy-related technologies is driving the development of <span class="hlt">porous</span> and high-performance structural materials with exceptional mechanical strength. Natural materials achieve their strength through complex hierarchical designs and anisotropic structures that are extremely difficult to replicate synthetically. We emulate nature's design by direct-ink-write assembling of glass scaffolds with a periodic pattern, and controlled sintering of the filaments into anisotropic constructs similar to biological materials. The final product is a <span class="hlt">porous</span> glass scaffold with a compressive strength (136 MPa) comparable to that of cortical bone and a porosity (60%) comparable to that of trabecular bone. The strength of this <span class="hlt">porous</span> glass scaffold is ~100 times that of polymer scaffolds and 4-5 times that of ceramic and glass scaffolds with comparable porosities reported elsewhere. The ability to create both <span class="hlt">porous</span> and strong structures opens a new avenue for fabricating scaffolds for a broad array of applications, including tissue engineering, filtration, lightweight composites, and catalyst support.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1174645','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1174645"><span>Open-cell glass crystalline <span class="hlt">porous</span> material</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Anshits, Alexander G.; Sharonova, Olga M.; Vereshchagina, Tatiana A.; Zykova, Irina D.; Revenko, Yurii A.; Tretyakov, Alexander A.; Aloy, Albert S.; Lubtsev, Rem I.; Knecht, Dieter A.; Tranter, Troy J.; Macheret, Yevgeny</p> <p>2003-12-23</p> <p>An open-cell glass crystalline <span class="hlt">porous</span> material made from hollow microspheres which are cenospheres obtained from fly ash, having an open-cell porosity of up to 90 vol. % is produced. The cenospheres are separated into fractions based on one or more of grain size, density, magnetic or non-magnetic, and perforated or non-perforated. Selected fractions are molded and agglomerated by sintering with a binder at a temperature below the softening temperature, or without a binder at a temperature about, or above, the softening temperature but below the temperature of liquidity. The <span class="hlt">porous</span> material produced has an apparent density of 0.3-0.6 g/cm.sup.3, a compressive strength in the range of 1.2-3.5 MPa, and two types of openings: through-flow wall pores in the cenospheres of 0.1-30 micrometers, and interglobular voids between the cenospheres of 20-100 micrometers. The <span class="hlt">porous</span> material of the invention has properties useful as <span class="hlt">porous</span> matrices for immobilization of liquid radioactive waste, heat-resistant traps and filters, supports for catalysts, adsorbents and ion-exchangers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016OptSp.121..253P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016OptSp.121..253P"><span>Polymerization and photochromism of ammonium molybdate in <span class="hlt">porous</span> glass</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pak, V. N.; Borisov, A. N.</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>Modification of <span class="hlt">porous</span> glass (PG) plates is carried out by impregnation with aqueous solutions of ammonium molybdate (NH4)2MoO4 with subsequent removal of water at 120°C. A long-wavelength shift of absorption spectra upon accumulation of the salt in PG indicates polymerization of MoO 4 2- anions at low concentrations of the encapsulated salt. Photochromism manifests itself as the anionic forms in PG become larger. UV irradiation of the modified plates causes enhancement of continuous absorption in the visible range. The proposed mechanism of photoreduction of the polianions in PG <span class="hlt">involves</span> the removal of oxygen atoms from the bridging-Mo-O-Mo-bonds and stabilization of the colored forms by means of conjugation of the electrons released from the 4 d-levels of pentavalent molybdenum.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24688366','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24688366"><span>Heat and mass transfer with condensation in capillary <span class="hlt">porous</span> bodies.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Larbi, Salah</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this present work is related to wetting process analysis caused by condensation phenomena in capillary <span class="hlt">porous</span> material by using a numerical simulation. Special emphasis is given to the study of the mechanism <span class="hlt">involved</span> and the evaluation of classical theoretical models used as a predictive tool. A further discussion will be given for the distribution of the liquid phase for both its pendular and its funicular state and its consequence on diffusion coefficients of the mathematical model used. Beyond the complexity of the interaction effects between vaporisation-condensation processes on the gas-liquid interfaces, the comparison between experimental and numerical simulations permits to identify the specific contribution and the relative part of mass and energy transport parameters. This analysis allows us to understand the contribution of each part of the mathematical model used and to simplify the study.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_23 --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="461"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1128707','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1128707"><span>Activation of <span class="hlt">porous</span> MOF materials</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar K</p> <p>2014-04-01</p> <p>A method for the treatment of solvent-containing MOF material to increase its internal surface area <span class="hlt">involves</span> introducing a liquid into the MOF in which liquid the solvent is miscible, subjecting the MOF to supercritical conditions for a time to form supercritical fluid, and releasing the supercritical conditions to remove the supercritcal fluid from the MOF. Prior to introducing the liquid into the MOF, occluded reaction solvent, such as DEF or DMF, in the MOF can be exchanged for the miscible solvent.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1083304','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1083304"><span>Activation of <span class="hlt">porous</span> MOF materials</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar K</p> <p>2013-04-23</p> <p>A method for the treatment of solvent-containing MOF material to increase its internal surface area <span class="hlt">involves</span> introducing a liquid into the MOF in which liquid the solvent is miscible, subjecting the MOF to supercritical conditions for a time to form supercritical fluid, and releasing the supercritical conditions to remove the supercritical fluid from the MOF. Prior to introducing the liquid into the MOF, occluded reaction solvent, such as DEF or DMF, in the MOF can be exchanged for the miscible solvent.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19930086881','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19930086881"><span>Wire Cloth as <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Material for Transpiration-cooled Walls</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Eckert, E R G; Kinsler, Martin R; Cochran, Reeves B</p> <p>1951-01-01</p> <p>The permeability characteristics and tensile strength of a <span class="hlt">porous</span> material developed from stainless-steel corduroy wire cloth for use in transpiration-cooled walls where the primary stresses are in one direction were investigated. The results of this investigation are presented and compared with similar results obtained with <span class="hlt">porous</span> sintered metal compacts. A much wider range of permeabilities is obtainable with the wire cloth than with the <span class="hlt">porous</span> metal compacts considered and the ultimate tensile strength in the direction of the primary stresses for <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials produced from three mesh sizes of wire cloth are from two to three times the ultimate tensile strengths of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> metal compacts.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.1963A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.1963A"><span>Transport of molecular fluids through three-dimensional <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Adler, Pierre; Pazdniakou, Aliaksei</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>The main purpose of this study is to extend the analysis which has been made for the double layer theory (summarized by [1]) to situations where the distance between the solid walls is of the order of several molecular diameters. This is of a large interest from a scientific viewpoint and for various engineering applications. The intermolecular forces and their influence on fluid structure and dynamics can be taken into account by using the mesoscopic scale models based on the Boltzmann equation [2]. The numerical methods derived from these models are less demanding in computational resources than conventional molecular dynamics methods and therefore long time evolution of large samples can be considered. Three types of fluid particles are considered, namely the anions, the cations and the solvent. They possess a finite diameter which should be at least a few lattice units. The collision frequency between particles is increased by the pair correlation function for hard spheres. The lattice Boltzmann model is built in three dimensions with 19 velocities; it <span class="hlt">involves</span> two relaxation times. The particle distribution functions are discretized over a basis of Hermite polynomial tensors. Electric forces are included and a Poisson equation is simultaneously solved by a successive over-relaxation method. The numerical algorithm is detailed; it is devised in order to be able to address any three-dimensional <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. It <span class="hlt">involves</span> the determination of the densities of each particle species, of the overall density and of the equilibrium distribution function. Then, the electric forces are determined. Collision operators are applied as well as the boundary conditions. Finally, the propagation step is performed and the algorithm starts a new loop. The influence of parameters can be illustrated by systematic calculations in a plane Poiseuille configuration. The drastic influence of the ratio between the channel width and the particle sizes on the local densities and the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28001358','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28001358"><span>Additively Manufactured and Surface Biofunctionalized <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Nitinol.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gorgin Karaji, Z; Speirs, M; Dadbakhsh, S; Kruth, J-P; Weinans, H; Zadpoor, A A; Amin Yavari, S</p> <p>2017-01-18</p> <p>Enhanced bone tissue regeneration and improved osseointegration are among the most important goals in design of multifunctional orthopedic biomaterials. In this study, we used additive manufacturing (selective laser melting) to develop multifunctional <span class="hlt">porous</span> nitinol that combines superelasticity with a rationally designed microarchitecture and biofunctionalized surface. The rational design based on triply periodic minimal surfaces aimed to properly adjust the pore size, increase the surface area (thereby amplifying the effects of surface biofunctionalization), and resemble the curvature characteristics of trabecular bone. The surface of additively manufactured (AM) <span class="hlt">porous</span> nitinol was biofunctionalized using polydopamine-immobilized rhBMP2 for better control of the release kinetics. The actual morphological properties of <span class="hlt">porous</span> nitinol measured by microcomputed tomography (e.g., open/close porosity, and surface area) closely matched the design values. The superelasticity originated from the austenite phase formed in the nitinol <span class="hlt">porous</span> structure at room temperature. Polydopamine and rhBMP2 signature peaks were confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy tests. The release of rhBMP2 continued until 28 days. The early time and long-term release profiles were found to be adjustable independent of each other. In vitro cell culture showed improved cell attachment, cell proliferation, cell morphology (spreading, spindle-like shape), and cell coverage as well as elevated levels of ALP activity and increased calcium content for biofunctionalized surfaces as compared to as-manufactured specimens. The demonstrated functionalities of <span class="hlt">porous</span> nitinol could be used as a basis for deployable orthopedic implants with rationally designed microarchitectures that maximize bone tissue regeneration performance by release of biomolecules with adjustable and well-controlled release profiles.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21185052','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21185052"><span>Colloid straining within saturated heterogeneous <span class="hlt">porous</span> media.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Porubcan, Alexis A; Xu, Shangping</p> <p>2011-02-01</p> <p>The transport of 0.46 μm, 2.94 μm, 5.1 μm and 6.06 μm latex particles in heterogeneous <span class="hlt">porous</span> media prepared from the mixing of 0.78 mm, 0.46 mm and 0.23 mm quartz sands was investigated through column transport experiments. It was observed that the 0.46 μm particles traveled conservatively within the heterogeneous <span class="hlt">porous</span> media, suggesting that under the experimental conditions employed in this research the strong repulsive interactions between the negatively charged latex particles and the clean quartz sands led to minimal colloid immobilization due to physicochemical filtration. The immobilization of the 2.94 μm, 5.1 μm and 6.06 μm latex particles was thus attributed to colloid straining. Experimental results showed that the straining of colloidal particles within heterogeneous sand mixtures increased when the fraction of finer sands increased. The mathematical model that was developed and tested based on results obtained using uniform sands (Xu et al., 2006) was found to be able to describe colloid straining within heterogeneous <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. Examination of the relationship between the best-fit values of the clean-bed straining rate coefficients (k(0)) and the ratio of colloid diameter (d(p)) and sand grain size (d(g)) indicated that when number-average sizes were used to represent the size of the heterogeneous <span class="hlt">porous</span> media, there existed a consistent relationship for both uniform sands and heterogeneous sand mixtures. Similarly, the use of the number-averaged sizes for the heterogeneous <span class="hlt">porous</span> media produced a uniform relationship between the colloid straining capacity term (λ) and the ratio of d(p)/d(g) for all the sand treatments.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016APS..MARK53002F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016APS..MARK53002F"><span>Smart microgels for controlling two-phase fluid structure in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fan, Jing; Weitz, David</p> <p></p> <p>Understanding the transport of microgels in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media directly benefits the conformance improvement technique using preformed gels in the oil industry. We develop a new type of microgels that can swell in response to specific stimuli in an aqueous environment. From a practical point of view, this enables us to deliver the microgels to the deep reservoir formation and control the permeability profile more effectively. With confocal microscopy imaging, we show that we can deliver such smart microgels to the high-permeability region in a stratified <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium, which subsequently changes the two-phase fluid structure in the medium. From a scientific point of view, this allows for characterizing the permeability change due to homogeneous pore-clogging by soft particles instead of surface clogging; using the typical microgels this can hardly be done because we cannot place gel particles with comparable size to the pore uniformly into a <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium. This study may shed light on understanding many other processes <span class="hlt">involving</span> the transport of soft particles in <span class="hlt">porous</span> structures. The authors acknowledge the financial support from Advanced Energy Consortium, BEG08-27.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ESRv..129..120P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ESRv..129..120P"><span>Neutron imaging of hydrogen-rich fluids in geomaterials and engineered <span class="hlt">porous</span> media: A review</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Perfect, E.; Cheng, C.-L.; Kang, M.; Bilheux, H. Z.; Lamanna, J. M.; Gragg, M. J.; Wright, D. M.</p> <p>2014-02-01</p> <p>Recent advances in visualization technologies are providing new discoveries as well as answering old questions with respect to the phase structure and flow of hydrogen-rich fluids, such as water and oil, within <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. Magnetic resonance and x-ray imaging are sometimes employed in this context, but are subject to significant limitations. In contrast, neutrons are ideally suited for imaging hydrogen-rich fluids in abiotic non-hydrogenous <span class="hlt">porous</span> media because they are strongly attenuated by hydrogen and can "see" through the solid matrix in a non-destructive fashion. This review paper provides an overview of the general principles behind the use of neutrons to image hydrogen-rich fluids in both 2-dimensions (radiography) and 3-dimensions (tomography). Engineering standards for the neutron imaging method are examined. The main body of the paper consists of a comprehensive review of the diverse scientific literature on neutron imaging of static and dynamic experiments <span class="hlt">involving</span> variably-saturated geomaterials (rocks and soils) and engineered <span class="hlt">porous</span> media (bricks and ceramics, concrete, fuel cells, heat pipes, and <span class="hlt">porous</span> glass). Finally some emerging areas that offer promising opportunities for future research are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1057823','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1057823"><span>Effects of <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Medium Heterogeneity on Vadose Zone Desiccation: Intermediate-scale Laboratory Experiments and Simulations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Oostrom, Martinus; Freedman, Vicky L.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Dane, Jacob H.; Truex, Michael J.</p> <p>2012-11-01</p> <p>Soil desiccation (drying), <span class="hlt">involving</span> water evaporation induced by dry gas injection, is a potentially robust vadose zone remediation process to limit contaminant transport through the vadose zone. A series of four intermediate-scale flow cell experiments was conducted in homogeneous and simple layered heterogeneous <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium systems to investigate the effects of heterogeneity on desiccation of unsaturated <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. The permeability ratios of <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium layers ranged from about five to almost two orders of magnitude. The insulated flow cell was equipped with twenty humidity and temperature sensors and a dual-energy gamma system was used to determine water saturations at various times. The multiphase code STOMP was used to simulate the desiccation process. Results show that injected dry gas flowed predominantly in the higher permeability layer and delayed water removal from the lower permeability material. For the configurations tested, water vapor diffusion from the lower to the higher permeability zone was considerable over the duration of the experiments, resulting in much larger relative humidity values of the outgoing air than based on permeability ratios alone. Acceptable numerical matches with the experimental data were obtained when an extension of the saturation-capillary pressure relation below the residual water saturation was used. The agreements between numerical and experimental results suggest that the correct physics are implemented in the simulator and that the thermal and hydraulic properties of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> media, flow cell wall and insulation materials were properly represented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28284939','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28284939"><span>Pore size dependent molecular adsorption of cationic dye in biomass derived hierarchically <span class="hlt">porous</span> carbon.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chen, Long; Ji, Tuo; Mu, Liwen; Shi, Yijun; Wang, Huaiyuan; Zhu, Jiahua</p> <p>2017-03-08</p> <p>Hierarchically <span class="hlt">porous</span> carbon adsorbents were successfully fabricated from different biomass resources (softwood, hardwood, bamboo and cotton) by a facile two-step process, i.e. carbonization in nitrogen and thermal oxidation in air. Without <span class="hlt">involving</span> any toxic/corrosive chemicals, large surface area of up to 890 m(2)/g was achieved, which is comparable to commercial activated carbon. The <span class="hlt">porous</span> carbons with various surface area and pore size were used as adsorbents to investigate the pore size dependent adsorption phenomenon. Based on the density functional theory, effective (E-SSA) and ineffective surface area (InE-SSA) was calculated considering the geometry of used probing adsorbate. It was demonstrated that the adsorption capacity strongly depends on E-SSA instead of total surface area. Moreover, a regression model was developed to quantify the adsorption capacities contributed from E-SSA and InE-SSA, respectively. The applicability of this model has been verified by satisfactory prediction results on <span class="hlt">porous</span> carbons prepared in this work as well as commercial activated carbon. Revealing the pore size dependent adsorption behavior in these biomass derived <span class="hlt">porous</span> carbon adsorbents will help to design more effective materials (either from biomass or other carbon resources) targeting to specific adsorption applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992JAP....72.2612T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992JAP....72.2612T"><span>Cross-property relations for momentum and diffusional transport in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Torquato, S.; Kim, In Chan</p> <p>1992-10-01</p> <p>Cross-property relations linking the fluid permeability k associated with viscous flow through a <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium to effective diffusion properties of the medium have recently been derived. Torquato [Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 2644 (1990)] found that k≤Dφ1τ, where τ is the ``mean survival time'' associated with steady-state diffusion of ``reactants'' in the fluid region of diffusion coefficient D and porosity φ1 of a <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium containing absorbing walls (i.e., trap boundaries). Subsequently, Avellaneda and Torquato [Phys. Fluids A 3, 2529 (1991)] related k to the electrical formation factor F (inverse of the dimensionless effective electrical conductivity) and the principal (largest) diffusion relaxation time T1 associated with the time-dependent trapping problem, namely, k≤DT1/F. In this study, we compute the aforementioned bounds, using an efficient first-passage-time algorithm, for grain-consolidation models of <span class="hlt">porous</span> media and compare them to exact results for these models. We also conjecture a new relation connecting k to τ and F for a wide class of <span class="hlt">porous</span> media, namely, k≤Dτ/F, and show that it gives the sharpest permeability estimate among the existing bounds. The importance of this relation lies not only in its usefulness as an estimator of the permeability but that it <span class="hlt">involves</span> the diffusional parameters τ and F which can be measured in situ.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/647045','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/647045"><span>Color image analysis of contaminants and bacteria transport in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Rashidi, M.; Dehmeshid, J.; Dacini, F.; Cole, L.; Dickenson, E.</p> <p>1997-07-01</p> <p>Transport of contaminants and bacteria in aqueous heterogeneous saturated <span class="hlt">porous</span> systems have been studies experimentally using a novel fluorescent microscopic imaging (FMI) technique. The approach <span class="hlt">involves</span> color visualization and quantification of bacterium and contaminant distributions within a transparent <span class="hlt">porous</span> column. By introducing stained bacteria and an organic dye as a contaminant into the column and illuminating the <span class="hlt">porous</span> regions with a planar sheet of laser beam, contaminant and bacterial transport processes through the <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium can be observed and measured microscopically. A computer controlled CCD camera is used to record the fluorescent images as a function of time. These images are recorded by a frame accurate high resolution VCR and are then analyzed using a color image analysis code written in our laboratories. The color images are digitalized this way and simultaneously concentration and velocity distributions of both contaminant and bacterium are evaluated as a function of time and pore characteristics. The approach provides a unique dynamic probe to observe these transport processes microscopically. These results are extremely valuable in in-situ bioremediation problems since microscopic particle-contaminant-bacterium interactions are the key to understanding and optimization of these processes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JPhCS.738a2090E','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JPhCS.738a2090E"><span>Potential of Lattice Boltzmann Method to Determine the Ohmic Resistance in <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Materials</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Espinoza-Andaluz, Mayken; Andersson, Martin; Sundén, Bengt</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is a suitable tool for solving transport phenomena that occur in gas- and liquid phases at different length scales, especially when complex geometries such as <span class="hlt">porous</span> media are <span class="hlt">involved</span>. However, investigations about applications of LBM in the solid electrical conducting material have not been carried out yet. Since in fuel cells (FCs) the multifunctional layers play an important role during the energy conversion process, and such layers consist of <span class="hlt">porous</span> material, the ohmic resistance of <span class="hlt">porous</span> materials represents a crucial characteristic to be studied to predict the internal ohmic losses. The purpose of this paper is to show the feasibility of LBM to determine the ohmic resistance of electrical conducting materials whose dimensions are modified considering the crosssectional area and length. Characteristics, limitations and recommendations of LBM applied to solid electrical conducting materials calculating the ohmic resistance are presented considering the coupling of the methodology with the Ohm's Law. Additionally, the behavior of the ohmic resistance for a given <span class="hlt">porous</span> material is presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6683302','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6683302"><span>Aspects of non-Newtonian flow and displacement in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Shah, C.; Yortsos, Y.C.</p> <p>1993-02-01</p> <p>The rheology of many heavy oils has been shown to be non-Newtonian, Bingham plastics being one manifestation of heavy oil flow. In EOR applications, non-Newtonian fluids such as low concentration polymer solutions, emulsions, gels etc. are simultaneously injected to increase the viscosity of driving agents that displace oil. Such rheologically complex fluids are used to improve sweep efficiencies, divert displacing fluids and block swept zones. The present study has been undertaken to understand the flow of non-Newtonian fluids through <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. The work considered <span class="hlt">involves</span> the numerical (pore network) modeling of both single and multiphase flow of power-law and Bingham plastic fluids in network-like <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. We consider aspects of both single- and multi-phase flow and displacement. Section 2 describes elementary aspects of non-Newtonian flow and some simple models for <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. Viscoelastic effects in the flow of non-Newtonian fluids are also discussed. The section includes a brief literature review on non-Newtonian flow in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. Section 3 describes single-phase flow.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016APS..DFDD40004G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016APS..DFDD40004G"><span>Preferential paths in yield stress fluid flow through a <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Guasto, Jeffrey; Waisbord, Nicolas; Stoop, Norbert; Dunkel, Jörn</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>A broad range of biological, geological, and industrial materials with complex rheological properties are subjected to flow through <span class="hlt">porous</span> media in applications ranging from oil recovery to food manufacturing. In this experimental study, we examine the flow of a model yield stress fluid (Carbopol micro-gel) through a quasi-2D <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium, fabricated in a microfluidic channel. The flow is driven by applying a precisely-controlled pressure gradient and measured by particle tracking velocimetry, and our observations are complemented by a pore-network model of the yield stress fluid flow. While remaining unyielded at small applied pressure, the micro-gel begins to yield at a critical pressure gradient, exhibiting a single preferential flow path that percolates through the <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium. As the applied pressure gradient increases, we observe a subsequent coarsening and invasion of the yielded, fluidized network. An examination of both the yielded network topology and pore-scale flow reveal that two cooperative phenomena are <span class="hlt">involved</span> in sculpting the preferential flow paths: (1) the geometry of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> microstructure, and (2) the adhesive surface interactions between the micro-gel and substrate. NSF CBET-1511340.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26034679','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26034679"><span>Liquid film condensation along a vertical surface in a thin <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium with large anisotropic permeability.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sanya, Arthur S O; Akowanou, Christian; Sanya, Emile A; Degan, Gerard</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The problems of steady film condensation on a vertical surface embedded in a thin <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium with anisotropic permeability filled with pure saturated vapour are studied analytically by using the Brinkman-Darcy flow model. The principal axes of anisotropic permeability are oriented in a direction that non-coincident with the gravity force. On the basis of the flow permeability tensor due to the anisotropic properties and the Brinkman-Darcy flow model adopted by considering negligible macroscopic and microscopic inertial terms, boundary-layer approximations in the <span class="hlt">porous</span> liquid film momentum equation is solved analytically. Scale analysis is applied to predict the order-of-magnitudes <span class="hlt">involved</span> in the boundary layer regime. The first novel contribution in the mathematics consists in the use of the anisotropic permeability tensor inside the expression of the mathematical formulation of the film condensation problem along a vertical surface embedded in a <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium. The present analytical study reveals that the anisotropic permeability properties have a strong influence on the liquid film thickness, condensate mass flow rate and surface heat transfer rate. The comparison between thin and thick <span class="hlt">porous</span> media is also presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4726633','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4726633"><span>Soret and Dufour Effects on MHD Peristaltic Flow of Jeffrey Fluid in a Rotating System with <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Medium</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Hayat, Tasawar; Rafiq, Maimona; Ahmad, Bashir</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The objective of present paper is to examine the peristaltic flow of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Jeffrey fluid saturating <span class="hlt">porous</span> space in a channel through rotating frame. Unlike the previous attempts, the flow formulation is based upon modified Darcy's law <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium effect in Jeffrey fluid situation. In addition the <span class="hlt">impacts</span> due to Soret and Dufour effects in the radiative peristaltic flow are accounted. Rosseland’s approximation has been utilized for the thermal radiative heat flux. Lubrication approach is implemented for the simplification. Resulting problems are solved for the stream function, temperature and concentration. Graphical results are prepared and analyzed for different parameters of interest entering into the problems. PMID:26808387</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20080007422','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20080007422"><span>Method of fabricating <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon carbide (SiC)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Shor, Joseph S. (Inventor); Kurtz, Anthony D. (Inventor)</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Porous</span> silicon carbide is fabricated according to techniques which result in a significant portion of nanocrystallites within the material in a sub 10 nanometer regime. There is described techniques for passivating <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon carbide which result in the fabrication of optoelectronic devices which exhibit brighter blue luminescence and exhibit improved qualities. Based on certain of the techniques described <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon carbide is used as a sacrificial layer for the patterning of silicon carbide. <span class="hlt">Porous</span> silicon carbide is then removed from the bulk substrate by oxidation and other methods. The techniques described employ a two-step process which is used to pattern bulk silicon carbide where selected areas of the wafer are then made <span class="hlt">porous</span> and then the <span class="hlt">porous</span> layer is subsequently removed. The process to form <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon carbide exhibits dopant selectivity and a two-step etching procedure is implemented for silicon carbide multilayers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004E%26PSL.222....1C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004E%26PSL.222....1C"><span>The hazard of near-Earth asteroid <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on earth</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chapman, Clark R.</p> <p>2004-05-01</p> <p>Near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) have struck the Earth throughout its existence. During epochs when life was gaining a foothold ˜4 Ga, the <span class="hlt">impact</span> rate was thousands of times what it is today. Even during the Phanerozoic, the numbers of NEAs guarantee that there were other <span class="hlt">impacts</span>, possibly larger than the Chicxulub event, which was responsible for the Cretaceous-Tertiary extinctions. Astronomers have found over 2500 NEAs of all sizes, including well over half of the estimated 1100 NEAs >1 km diameter. NEAs are mostly collisional fragments from the inner half of the asteroid belt and range in composition from <span class="hlt">porous</span>, carbonaceous-chondrite-like to metallic. Nearly one-fifth of them have satellites or are double bodies. When the international telescopic Spaceguard Survey, which has a goal of discovering 90% of NEAs >1 km diameter, is completed, perhaps as early as 2008, nearly half of the remaining <span class="hlt">impact</span> hazard will be from land or ocean <span class="hlt">impacts</span> by bodies 70-600 m diameter. (Comets are expected to contribute only about 1% of the total risk.) The consequences of <span class="hlt">impacts</span> for civilization are potentially enormous, but <span class="hlt">impacts</span> are so rare that worldwide mortality from <span class="hlt">impacts</span> will have dropped to only about 150 per year (averaged over very long durations) after the Spaceguard goal has, presumably, ruled out near-term <span class="hlt">impacts</span> by 90% of the most dangerous ones; that is, in the mid-range between very serious causes of death (disease, auto accidents) and minor but frightening ones (like shark attacks). Differences in perception concerning this rather newly recognized hazard dominate evaluation of its significance. The most likely type of <span class="hlt">impact</span> events we face are hyped or misinterpreted predicted <span class="hlt">impacts</span> or near-misses <span class="hlt">involving</span> small NEAs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19880043434&hterms=ganglion&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dganglion','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19880043434&hterms=ganglion&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dganglion"><span>Multiphase flow in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Adler, Pierre M.; Brenner, Howard</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>A development history and current status evaluation are presented for the theory of permeability and percolation. The microscale phenomena treated in this field have proven difficult to analyze due both to their tortuous geometry and the influence of capilarity. Capilary effects may be not only important but predominant, and are differentiated into those at the fluid-fluid interface, and those <span class="hlt">involving</span> the existence of a contact line between the solid substrate and this interface. Percolation theory has been borrowed from physics and adapted to the two-phase engineering context.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10443675','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10443675"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of gsp oncogene on the expression of genes coding for Gsalpha, Pit-1, Gi2alpha, and somatostatin receptor 2 in human somatotroph adenomas: <span class="hlt">involvement</span> in octreotide sensitivity.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Barlier, A; Pellegrini-Bouiller, I; Gunz, G; Zamora, A J; Jaquet, P; Enjalbert, A</p> <p>1999-08-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of the gsp oncogene on the expression of genes engaged in the somatotroph cell phenotype remains poorly understood in human somatotroph adenomas. As the gsp oncogene is associated with an increased octreotide (somatostatin agonist) sensitivity, a group of 8 somatotroph adenomas bearing the gsp mutation (gsp+) and another group of 16 adenomas without the mutation (gsp-) were analyzed, all of them presenting variable octreotide sensitivities. The expressions of genes encoding for G(s)alpha, Pit-1, G(i2)alpha, and SSTR2, <span class="hlt">involved</span> in the regulation of secretory activity in somatotroph cells, were assessed by Northern blot. A decreased expression of the G(s)alpha gene was found in gsp + tumors, suggesting the existence of a negative feedback of the oncogenic protein upon its own messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA). In contrast, G(i2)alpha, Pit-1, and GH messengers were not significantly different in the groups. A positive correlation between the in vitro and in vivo GH octreotide-induced secretory inhibition and the expression of SSTR2 mRNA was found. However, the expression of the gene for SSTR2 appeared not to be different between gsp + and gsp-, even when the octreotide sensitivity was significantly higher in the adenomas carrying the mutation. Interestingly, the SSTR2 gene expression was significantly correlated to those of G(i2)alpha and Pit-1. In the same way, the G(s)alpha mRNA expression was positively correlated with those of Gi2alpha and Pit-1. Such correlations strongly suggest a concerted dysregulation of the expression of these genes in both categories of adenomas. The loss of the octreotide sensitivity represents one aspect of the dysregulation process that partially results from the decreased SSTR2 expression. However, the improvement of the sensitivity associated with the presence of the gsp oncogene seems to proceed in a way different from SSTR2 expression.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUSM.H54B..06S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUSM.H54B..06S"><span>Magnetic Resonance Microscopy of Scale Dependent Transport Phenomena and Bioactivity in <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Seymour, J. D.; Codd, S. L.; Romanenko, K. V.; Hornemann, J. A.; Brosten, T. R.</p> <p>2008-05-01</p> <p>Magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) provides the ability to obtain data on the pore scale via imaging and the sample scale by bulk measurement, allowing for connection between microscale dynamics and macroscale transport phenomena. This has led to MRM techniques becoming a preeminent method for characterization of dynamics in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. A significant question in modeling transport in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media is definition of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> media structure as homogeneous (ordered) or heterogeneous (disordered)[1]. One means of defining the 'complexity' of a <span class="hlt">porous</span> media is based on the dynamics of the system[2]. The ability of MRM to measure the time dependent statistics of the dynamics [3,4,5] provides quantification of the pre-asymptotic dynamics. The transition from preasymptotic to Gaussian transport consistent with models of homogeneous <span class="hlt">porous</span> media is clearly visualized. Biological activity in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media, such as microbial growth, typically manifests itself as biofilms or colonies of microbes that adhere to surfaces and are surrounded by a hydrogel of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS). The biofilm growth introduces complexity into the system structure in generation of physical pore blocking, trapping within the EPS gel, elastic interfaces due to the EPS and generation of channels in which faster flow occur. The hierarchy of length and time scales and multiple physical processes which are introduced by the biofilm growth <span class="hlt">impacts</span> the <span class="hlt">porous</span> media transport as reflected in the change in dynamics [6]. The transition can be modeled using statistical mechanical approaches based on continuous time random walk (CTRW) processes that generate fractional differential equations[7]. The bioactivity alters the structure of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> media from homogeneous to heterogeneous resulting in the transition from a Gaussian to a non Gaussian subdiffusive dispersion process. References 1. M. Quintard and S. Whitaker, Transport in ordered and disordered <span class="hlt">porous</span> media: Volume averaged</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhDT........11B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhDT........11B"><span>Advancing <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Silicon Biosensor Technology for Use in Clinical Diagnostics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bonanno, Lisa Marie</p> <p></p> <p>Inexpensive and robust analytical techniques for detecting molecular recognition events are in great demand in healthcare, food safety, and environmental monitoring. Despite vast research in this area, challanges remain to develop practical biomolecular platforms that, meet the rigorous demands of real-world applications. This includes maintaining low-cost devices that are sensitive and specific in complex test specimens, are stable after storage, have short assay time, and possess minimal complexity of instrumentation for readout. Nanostructured <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon (PSi) material has been identified as an ideal candidate towards achieving these goals and the past decade has seen diverse proof-of-principle studies developing optical-based sensing techniques. In Part 1 of this thesis, the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of surface chemistry and PSi morphology on detection sensitivity of target molecules is investigated. Initial proof-of-concept that PSi devices facilitate detection of protein in whole blood is demonstrated. This work highlights the importance of material stability and blocking chemistry for sensor use in real world biological samples. In addition, the intrinisic filtering capability of the 3-D PSi morphology is shown as an advantage in complex solutions, such as whole blood. Ultimately, this initial work identified a need to improve detection sensitivity of the PSI biosensor technique to facilitate clinical diagnostic use over relevant target concentration ranges. The second part of this thesis, builds upon sensitivity challenges that are highlighted in the first part of the thesis and development of a surface-bound competitive inhibition immunoassay facilitated improved detection sensitivity of small molecular weight targets (opiates) over a relevant clinical concentration range. In addition, optimization of assay protocol addressed issues of maintaining stability of sensors after storage. Performance of the developed assay (specificity and sensitivity) was then validated in a</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.tsalliance.org/about-tsc/signs-and-symptoms-of-tsc/eyes/','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="http://www.tsalliance.org/about-tsc/signs-and-symptoms-of-tsc/eyes/"><span>Eye <span class="hlt">Involvement</span> in TSC</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... Privacy Policy Sitemap Learn Engage Donate About TSC Eyes Campbell (1905) first described the eye <span class="hlt">involvement</span> in ... some form of eye <span class="hlt">involvement</span>. Nonretinal and Retinal Eye Findings Facial angiofibromas may <span class="hlt">involve</span> the eyelids of ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AIPC.1787b0004A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AIPC.1787b0004A"><span>Mixed convection flow over a stretching <span class="hlt">porous</span> wedge with Newtonian heating in the presence of heat generation or absorption</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ashraf, M.; Narahari, Marneni; Muthuvalu, Mohana Sundaram</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>Time independent mixed convective boundary layer flow of a viscous fluid over a <span class="hlt">porous</span> stretching wedge is investigated analytically. The <span class="hlt">porous</span> wedge is subjected to Newtonian heating in the existence of heat generation /absorption. Employing non-dimensional transformations the governing PDE's converted to nonlinear ODE's which are further solved by using homotopy analysis method. The convergence of the solution is properly checked and the effects of various <span class="hlt">involved</span> parameters on velocity and temperature distributions are illustrated through graphs. The reliability and effectiveness of HAM have been verified by comparing the present analytical results with existing numerical results for skin-friction coefficient. The results are found to be in good agreement.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/750286','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/750286"><span>A 2-D Pore-Network Model of the Drying of Single-Component Liquids in <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Yortsos, Yanic C.; Yiotis, A.G.; Stubos, A.K.; Boundovis, A.G.</p> <p>2000-01-20</p> <p>The drying of liquid-saturated <span class="hlt">porous</span> media is typically approaching using macroscopic continuum models <span class="hlt">involving</span> phenomenological coefficients. Insight on these coefficients can be obtained by a more fundamental study at the pore- and pore-network levels. In this report, a model based on pore-network representation of <span class="hlt">porous</span> media that accounts for various process at the pore-scale is presented. These include mass transfer by advection and diffusion in the gas phase, viscous flow in liquid and gas phases and capillary effects at the gas-liquid menisci in the pore throats.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017Nonli..30.1449V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017Nonli..30.1449V"><span>On the well-posedness of the Darcy–Brinkman–Forchheimer equations for coupled <span class="hlt">porous</span> media-clear fluid flow</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Varsakelis, C.; Papalexandris, M. V.</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>In this paper, we present an existence and uniqueness theory for the Darcy–Brinkman–Forchheimer equations that govern the stationary flow of a <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium and a clear fluid occupying both bounded and unbounded domains. By extending Ladyzhenskaya’s functional method to the equations at hand, we establish the existence of at least one weak solution. For the case of bounded domains, we additionally show that this solution is unique provided that a suitable smallness assumption, <span class="hlt">involving</span> the Reynolds number, the porosity of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium and the first eigenvalue of the Laplacian, is satisfied.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EPJWC..5004002L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EPJWC..5004002L"><span>Transport study in unsaturated <span class="hlt">porous</span> media by tracer experiment in a dichromatic X-ray experimental device</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Latrille, C.; Néel, M. C.</p> <p>2013-05-01</p> <p>Estimating contaminant migration in the context of waste disposal and/or environmental remediation of polluted soils requires a complete understanding of the underlying transport processes. In unsaturated <span class="hlt">porous</span> media, water content is one of the most determining parameters to describe solute migration because it <span class="hlt">impacts</span> directly on solute pore velocity. However, numerous studies are satisfied with only a global or a partial spatial distribution of water content within the studied <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. Therefore, distribution of water content in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media must be precisely achieved to optimize transport processes modeling. Tracer experiments with downward flow were performed on the BEETI experimental device equipped with a sand column. Water content and concentration profiles of tracer (KI) were measured along the column during experiment. The relative dispersion of water content, calculated along the column, gives an idea of influence of this parameter on transport properties. A relationship between pore velocity, Darcy flow velocity and water content is proposed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992PhDT.......142L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992PhDT.......142L"><span>Dynamic Analysis of Mcfc <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Electrode</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lee, Gwo-Lin Kevin</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>The intent of this work is to develop AC impedance measurements, in combination with other methods, as a tool to determine the relative importance of various resistance sources in the multi-step process occurring at a gas-diffusion <span class="hlt">porous</span> electrode. In particular, the case of a MCFC cathode is studied. The goals of this study are: (1) elucidation of electrode mechanism; (2) analysis of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> electrode performance for the purpose of optimizing design; and (3) developing the capabilities of AC impedance as an index of long-term cell performance decay. The oxygen reduction reaction of molten carbonate fuel cell and the corresponding kinetic as well as transport parameters were tried to be estimated by using impedance techniques combining with other electrochemical methods from flag, wire and rotating disk electrodes in pot cell as well as <span class="hlt">porous</span> electrode in lab cell. The dominant pathway for oxygen reduction in 62%Li _2CO_3/38%K _2CO_3 melt at 650^circC is via superoxide ions. This follows from flag electrode impedance results indicating that O_sp{2}{ -}/CO_2 mixed diffusion is the dominant source of resistance. The polarization behavior of gas-diffusion <span class="hlt">porous</span> electrodes has been analyzed in terms of individual voltage loss and overall voltage loss. In most cases, the optimal electrolyte filling will be obtained when the dominant source of voltage loss switches from ohmic or mass transfer resistances to kinetic activation resistance, and similar behavior for optimal electrode thickness. Pressurized operation is favorable for performance if the reaction mechanism follows the superoxide mechanism, but not if the peroxide path dominates. A distributed-network approach has been developed and it is concluded that a digital simulation of AC-superimposed -on-DC impedance of a <span class="hlt">porous</span> electrode is possible and helpful. Kinetic activation and mass transfer resistances are extracted separate and conclude that both peroxide and superoxide contribute the oxygen reduction</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.epa.gov/navajo-nation-uranium-cleanup/community-involvement-plan-presentation-western-agency','PESTICIDES'); return false;" href="https://www.epa.gov/navajo-nation-uranium-cleanup/community-involvement-plan-presentation-western-agency"><span>Community <span class="hlt">Involvement</span> Plan Presentation in Western Agency</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/search.htm">EPA Pesticide Factsheets</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>EPA Region 9 will host a Community <span class="hlt">Involvement</span> Plan presentation in the Western Agency chapter to discuss EPA’s outreach plans with community members in uranium <span class="hlt">impacted</span> areas and answer questions about mine cleanup progress.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..1812444J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..1812444J"><span>A visco-poroelastic damage model for modelling compaction and brittle failure of <span class="hlt">porous</span> rocks</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jacquey, Antoine B.; Cacace, Mauro; Blöcher, Guido; Milsch, Harald; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Hydraulic stimulation of geothermal wells is often used to increase heat extraction from deep geothermal reservoirs. Initiation and propagation of fractures due to pore pressure build-up increase the effective permeability of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium. Understanding the processes controlling the initiation of fractures, the evolution of their geometries and the hydro-mechanical <span class="hlt">impact</span> on transport properties of the <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium is therefore of great interest for geothermal energy production. In this contribution, we will present a thermodynamically consistent visco-poroelastic damage model which can deal with the multi-scale and multi-physics nature of the physical processes occurring during deformation of a <span class="hlt">porous</span> rock. Deformation of a <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium is crucially influenced by the changes in the effective stress. Considering a strain-formulated yield cap and the compaction-dilation transition, three different regimes can be identified: quasi-elastic deformation, cataclastic compaction with microcracking (damage accumulation) and macroscopic brittle failure with dilation. The governing equations for deformation, damage accumulation/healing and fluid flow have been implemented in a fully-coupled finite-element-method based framework (MOOSE). The MOOSE framework provides a powerful and flexible platform to solve multiphysics problems implicitly and in a tightly coupled manner on unstructured meshes which is of interest for such non-linear context. To validate and illustrate the model, simulations of the deformation behaviour of cylindrical <span class="hlt">porous</span> Bentheimer sandstone samples under different confining pressures are compared to experiments. The first experiment under low confining pressure leads to shear failure, the second for high confining pressure leads to cataclastic compaction and the third one with intermediate confining pressure correspond to a transitional regime between the two firsts. Finally, we will demonstrate that this approach can also be used at the field</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AGUFM.H43A0491D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AGUFM.H43A0491D"><span>Uncertainty Quantification Bayesian Framework for <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Media Flows</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Demyanov, V.; Christie, M.; Erbas, D.</p> <p>2005-12-01</p> <p>Uncertainty quantification is an increasingly important aspect of many areas of applied science, where the challenge is to make reliable predictions about the performance of complex physical systems in the absence of complete or reliable data. Predicting flows of fluids through undersurface reservoirs is an example of a complex system where accuracy in prediction is needed (e.g. in oil industry it is essential for financial reasons). Simulation of fluid flow in oil reservoirs is usually carried out using large commercially written finite difference simulators solving conservation equations describing the multi-phase flow through the <span class="hlt">porous</span> reservoir rocks, which is a highly computationally expensive task. This work examines a Bayesian Framework for uncertainty quantification in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media flows that uses a stochastic sampling algorithm to generate models that match observed time series data. The framework is flexible for a wide range of general physical/statistical parametric models, which are used to describe the underlying hydro-geological process in its temporal dynamics. The approach is based on exploration of the parameter space and update of the prior beliefs about what the most likely model definitions are. Optimization problem for a highly parametric physical model usually have multiple solutions, which <span class="hlt">impact</span> the uncertainty of the made predictions. Stochastic search algorithm (e.g. genetic algorithm) allows to identify multiple "good enough" models in the parameter space. Furthermore, inference of the generated model ensemble via MCMC based algorithm evaluates the posterior probability of the generated models and quantifies uncertainty of the predictions. Machine learning algorithm - Artificial Neural Networks - are used to speed up the identification of regions in parameter space where good matches to observed data can be found. Adaptive nature of ANN allows to develop different ways of integrating them into the Bayesian framework: as direct time</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.5340M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.5340M"><span>Mobility of engineered inorganic nanoparticles in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Metreveli, George; Heidmann, Ilona; Schaumann, Gabriele Ellen</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>., Renshaw, J. C. Lead, J. R. 2009. Silver nanoparticle <span class="hlt">impact</span> on bacterial growth: Effect of pH, concentration, and organic matter. Environ. Sci. Technol. 43 (19): 7285-7290 Metreveli, G., Kaulisch, E.-M., Frimmel, F. H. 2005. Coupling of a column system with ICP-MS for the characterisation of colloid mediated metal(loid) transport in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media. Acta Hydrochim. Hydrobiol. 33 (4): 337-345</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013NRL.....8..383L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013NRL.....8..383L"><span>Structure, morphology, and photoluminescence of <span class="hlt">porous</span> Si nanowires: effect of different chemical treatments</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Leontis, Ioannis; Othonos, Andreas; Nassiopoulou, Androula G.</p> <p>2013-09-01</p> <p>The structure and light-emitting properties of Si nanowires (SiNWs) fabricated by a single-step metal-assisted chemical etching (MACE) process on highly boron-doped Si were investigated after different chemical treatments. The Si nanowires that result from the etching of a highly doped p-type Si wafer by MACE are fully <span class="hlt">porous</span>, and as a result, they show intense photoluminescence (PL) at room temperature, the characteristics of which depend on the surface passivation of the Si nanocrystals composing the nanowires. SiNWs with a hydrogen-terminated nanostructured surface resulting from a chemical treatment with a hydrofluoric acid (HF) solution show red PL, the maximum of which is blueshifted when the samples are further chemically oxidized in a piranha solution. This blueshift of PL is attributed to localized states at the Si/SiO2 interface at the shell of Si nanocrystals composing the <span class="hlt">porous</span> SiNWs, which induce an important pinning of the electronic bandgap of the Si material and are <span class="hlt">involved</span> in the recombination mechanism. After a sequence of HF/piranha/HF treatment, the SiNWs are almost fully dissolved in the chemical solution, which is indicative of their fully <span class="hlt">porous</span> structure, verified also by transmission electron microscopy investigations. It was also found that a continuous <span class="hlt">porous</span> Si layer is formed underneath the SiNWs during the MACE process, the thickness of which increases with the increase of etching time. This supports the idea that <span class="hlt">porous</span> Si formation precedes nanowire formation. The origin of this effect is the increased etching rate at sites with high dopant concentration in the highly doped Si material.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.H21E1422W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.H21E1422W"><span>A Feasibility Study on Operating Large Scale Compressed Air Energy Storage in <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Formations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wang, B.; Pfeiffer, W. T.; Li, D.; Bauer, S.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Compressed air energy storage (CAES) in <span class="hlt">porous</span> formations has been considered as one promising option of large scale energy storage for decades. This study, hereby, aims at analyzing the feasibility of operating large scale CAES in <span class="hlt">porous</span> formations and evaluating the performance of underground <span class="hlt">porous</span> gas reservoirs. To address these issues quantitatively, a hypothetic CAES scenario with a typical anticline structure in northern Germany was numerically simulated. Because of the rapid growth in photovoltaics, the period of extraction in a daily cycle was set to the early morning and the late afternoon in order to bypass the massive solar energy production around noon. The gas turbine scenario was defined referring to the specifications of the Huntorf CAES power plant. The numerical simulations <span class="hlt">involved</span> two stages, i.e. initial fill and cyclic operation, and both were carried out using the Eclipse E300 simulator (Schlumberger). Pressure loss in the gas wells was post analyzed using an analytical solution. The exergy concept was applied to evaluate the potential energy amount stored in the specific <span class="hlt">porous</span> formation. The simulation results show that <span class="hlt">porous</span> formations prove to be a feasible solution of large scale CAES. The initial fill with shut-in periods determines the spatial distribution of the gas phase and helps to achieve higher gas saturation around the wells, and thus higher deliverability. The performance evaluation shows that the overall exergy flow of stored compressed air is also determined by the permeability, which directly affects the deliverability of the gas reservoir and thus the number of wells required.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/4301191','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/4301191"><span>Production of sintered <span class="hlt">porous</span> metal fluoride pellets</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Anderson, L.W.; Stephenson, M.J.</p> <p>1973-12-25</p> <p><span class="hlt">Porous</span> pellets characterized by a moderately reactive crust and a softer core of higher reactivity are produced by forming agglomerates containing a metal fluoride powder and a selected amount ofwater. The metal fluoride is selected to be sinterable and essentially non-reactive with gaseous fluorinating agents. The agglomerates are contacted with a gaseous fluorinating agent under controlled conditions whereby the heat generated by localized reaction of the agent and water is limited to values effccting bonding by localized sintering. <span class="hlt">Porous</span> pellets composed of cryolite (Na/sub 3/AlF/sub 6/) can be used to selectively remove trace quantities of niobium pentafluoride from a feed gas consisting predominantly of uranium hexafluoride. (Official Gazette)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4171714','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4171714"><span><span class="hlt">Porous</span> silicon functionalization for possible arsenic adsorption</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Thiol-functionalized <span class="hlt">porous</span> silicon (PS) monolayer was evaluated for its possible application in As (III) adsorption. Dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) attached to mesoporous silicon via amide bond linkages was used as a chelate for As (III). Two different aminosilanes namely 3-(aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APTES) and 3-aminopropyl (diethoxy)-methylsilane (APDEMS) were tested as linkers to evaluate the relative response for DMSA attachment. The aminosilane-modified PS samples were attached to DMSA by wet impregnation followed by the adsorption of As (III). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been used to identify the functional groups and to estimate the As (III) content, respectively. FTIR spectroscopy confirmed the covalent bonding of DMSA with amide and R-COOH groups on the nanostructured <span class="hlt">porous</span> surface. XPS confirms the preferred arsenic adsorption on the surface of PS/DMSA samples as compared to the aminosilane-modified and bare PS substrates. PMID:25249826</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016RJPCA..90.2377S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016RJPCA..90.2377S"><span>Tetrahydrofuran hydrate decomposition characteristics in <span class="hlt">porous</span> media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Song, Yongchen; Wang, Pengfei; Wang, Shenglong; Zhao, Jiafei; Yang, Mingjun</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>Many tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate properties are similar to those of gas hydrates. In the present work THF hydrate dissociation in four types of <span class="hlt">porous</span> media is studied. THF solution was cooled to 275.15 K with formation of the hydrate under ambient pressure, and then it dissociated under ambient conditions. THF hydrate dissociation experiments in each <span class="hlt">porous</span> medium were conducted three times. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to obtain images. Decomposition time, THF hydrate saturation and MRI mean intensity (MI) were measured and analyzed. The experimental results showed that the hydrate decomposition time in BZ-4 and BZ-3 was similar and longer than that in BZ-02. In each dissociation process, the hydrate decomposition time of the second and third cycles was shorter than that of the first cycle in BZ-4, BZ-3, and BZ-02. The relationship between THF hydrate saturation and time is almost linear.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20449059','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20449059"><span>Tuneable <span class="hlt">porous</span> carbonaceous materials from renewable resources.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>White, Robin J; Budarin, Vitaly; Luque, Rafael; Clark, James H; Macquarrie, Duncan J</p> <p>2009-12-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Porous</span> carbon materials are ubiquitous with a wide range of technologically important applications, including separation science, heterogeneous catalyst supports, water purification filters, stationary phase materials, as well as the developing future areas of energy generation and storage applications. Hard template routes to ordered mesoporous carbons are well established, but whilst offering different mesoscopic textural phases, the surface of the material is difficult to chemically post-modify and processing is energy, resource and step intensive. The production of carbon materials from biomass (i.e. sugars or polysaccharides) is a relatively new but rapidly expanding research area. In this tutorial review, we compare and contrast recently reported routes to the preparation of <span class="hlt">porous</span> carbon materials derived from renewable resources, with examples of our previously reported mesoporous polysaccharide-derived "Starbon" carbonaceous material technology.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20100011215','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20100011215"><span>Electrophoretic Deposition on <span class="hlt">Porous</span> Non-Conductors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Compson, Charles; Besra, Laxmidhar; Liu, Meilin</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>A method of electrophoretic deposition (EPD) on substrates that are <span class="hlt">porous</span> and electrically non-conductive has been invented. Heretofore, in order to perform an EPD, it has been necessary to either (1) use a substrate material that is inherently electrically conductive or (2) subject a non-conductive substrate to a thermal and/or chemical treatment to render it conductive. In the present method, instead of relying on the electrical conductivity of the substrate, one ensures that the substrate is <span class="hlt">porous</span> enough that when it is immersed in an EPD bath, the solvent penetrates throughout the thickness, thereby forming quasi-conductive paths through the substrate. By making it unnecessary to use a conductive substrate, this method simplifies the overall EPD process and makes new applications possible. The method is expected to be especially beneficial in enabling deposition of layers of ceramic and/or metal for chemical and electrochemical devices, notably including solid oxide fuel cells.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_25 --> <center> <div class="footer-extlink text-muted"><small>Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. 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