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Sample records for impacts multiple oncogenic

  1. Oncogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Compans, R.W.; Cooper, M.; Koprowski, H.; McConell, I.; Melchers, F.; Nussenzweig, V.; Oldstone, M.; Olsnes, S.; Saedler, H.; Vogt, P.K.

    1989-01-01

    This book covers the following topics: Roles of drosophila proto-oncogenes and growth factor homologs during development of the fly; Interaction of oncogenes with differentiation programs; Genetics of src: structure and functional organization of a protein tyrosine kinase; Structures and activities of activated abl oncogenes; Eukaryotic RAS proteins and yeast proteins with which they interact. This book presents up-to-data review articles on oncogenes. The editor includes five contributions which critically evaluate recent research in the field.

  2. Multiple oncogene activation in a radiation carcinogenesis model

    SciTech Connect

    Garte, S.J.; Sawey, M.J.; Burns, F.J.; Felber, M.; Ashkenazi-Kimmel, T.

    1987-01-01

    There is evidence from animal systems to suggest that certain oncogenes may be activated by the direct action of the initiating carcinogen. Consistent activation by a point mutation of a single member of the ras oncogene family in different tumors produced by a single agent has been demonstrated. In contrast the c-myc and other oncogenes have been shown to be activated by a process involving chromosomal translocations, enhanced expression, and/or gene amplification. We have examined a panel of 12 late stage rat skin tumors for activation of oncogenes from the ras and myc complementation groups. These tumors were four squamous cell carcinomas, three poorly differentiated carcinomas (clear cell), one each of basal cell carcinoma, sebaceous carcinoma, sarcoma, fibroma, and mixed (largely squamous) histology carcinoma. The positive tumor DNAs were from three poorly differentiated clear cell carcinomas, a sebaceous carcinoma, a squamous cell carcinoma, and a sarcoma. DNA from one of the primary transfectants was positive in a second round of transfection. The transformed phenotype of the transfectants was confirmed by anchorage independent growth and tumorigenicity in nude mice. Southern blot analysis of DNA from primary and secondary transfectants, as well as from nude mouse tumors arising after injection of transfectant cells revealed the presence of rat derived restriction fragments homologous to the K-ras oncogene against the mouse background. Similar experiments using N- and H-ras probes, revealed only the endogenous mouse fragments in transfectant DNA. 11 refs., 1 tab.

  3. Multiple oncogenic mutations and clonal relationship in spatially distinct benign human epidermal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hafner, Christian; Toll, Agustí; Fernández-Casado, Alejandro; Earl, Julie; Marqués, Miriam; Acquadro, Francesco; Méndez-Pertuz, Marinela; Urioste, Miguel; Malats, Núria; Burns, Julie E.; Knowles, Margaret A.; Cigudosa, Juan C.; Hartmann, Arndt; Vogt, Thomas; Landthaler, Michael; Pujol, Ramón M.; Real, Francisco X.

    2010-01-01

    Malignant tumors result from the accumulation of genetic alterations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Much less is known about the genetic changes in benign tumors. Seborrheic keratoses (SK) are very frequent benign human epidermal tumors without malignant potential. We performed a comprehensive mutational screen of genes in the FGFR3-RAS-MAPK and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-AKT pathways from 175 SK, including multiple lesions from each patient. SK commonly harbored multiple bona fide oncogenic mutations in FGFR3, PIK3CA, KRAS, HRAS, EGFR, and AKT1 oncogenes but not in tumor suppressor genes TSC1 and PTEN. Despite the occurrence of oncogenic mutations and the evidence for downstream ERK/MAPK and PI3K pathway signaling, we did not find induction of senescence or a DNA damage response. Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) analysis revealed that SK are genetically stable. The pattern of oncogenic mutations and X chromosome inactivation departs significantly from randomness and indicates that spatially independent lesions from a given patient share a clonal relationship. Our findings show that multiple oncogenic mutations in the major signaling pathways involved in cancer are not sufficient to drive malignant tumor progression. Furthermore, our data provide clues on the origin and spread of oncogenic mutations in tissues, suggesting that apparently independent (multicentric) adult benign tumors may have a clonal origin. PMID:21078999

  4. Rational engineering of antibody therapeutics targeting multiple oncogene pathways

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have significantly advanced our ability to treat cancer, yet clinical studies have shown that many patients do not adequately respond to monospecific therapy. This is in part due to the multifactorial nature of the disease, where tumors rely on multiple and often redundant pathways for proliferation. Bi- or multi-specific antibodies capable of blocking multiple growth and survival pathways at once have a potential to better meet the challenge of blocking cancer growth, and indeed many of them are advancing in clinical development.1 However, bispecific antibodies present significant design challenges mostly due to the increased number of variables to consider. In this perspective we describe an innovative integrated approach to the discovery of bispecific antibodies with optimal molecular properties, such as affinity, avidity, molecular format and stability. This approach combines simulations of potential inhibitors using mechanistic models of the disease-relevant biological system to reveal optimal inhibitor characteristics with antibody engineering techniques that yield manufacturable therapeutics with robust pharmaceutical properties. We illustrate how challenges of meeting the optimal design criteria and chemistry, manufacturing and control concerns can be addressed simultaneously in the context of an accelerated therapeutic design cycle. Finally, to demonstrate how this rational approach can be applied, we present a case study where the insights from mechanistic modeling were used to guide the engineering of an IgG-like bispecific antibody. PMID:21393992

  5. Simultaneous inhibition of multiple oncogenic miRNAs by a multi-potent microRNA sponge.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaeyun; Yeom, Chanjoo; Choi, Yeon-Sook; Kim, Sinae; Lee, EunJi; Park, Min Ji; Kang, Sang Wook; Kim, Sung Bae; Chang, Suhwan

    2015-08-21

    The roles of oncogenic miRNAs are widely recognized in many cancers. Inhibition of single miRNA using antagomiR can efficiently knock-down a specific miRNA. However, the effect is transient and often results in subtle phenotype, as there are other miRNAs contribute to tumorigenesis. Here we report a multi-potent miRNA sponge inhibiting multiple miRNAs simultaneously. As a model system, we targeted miR-21, miR-155 and miR-221/222, known as oncogenic miRNAs in multiple tumors including breast and pancreatic cancers. To achieve efficient knockdown, we generated perfect and bulged-matched miRNA binding sites (MBS) and introduced multiple copies of MBS, ranging from one to five, in the multi-potent miRNA sponge. Luciferase reporter assay showed the multi-potent miRNA sponge efficiently inhibited 4 miRNAs in breast and pancreatic cancer cells. Furthermore, a stable and inducible version of the multi-potent miRNA sponge cell line showed the miRNA sponge efficiently reduces the level of 4 target miRNAs and increase target protein level of these oncogenic miRNAs. Finally, we showed the miRNA sponge sensitize cells to cancer drug and attenuate cell migratory activity. Altogether, our study demonstrates the multi-potent miRNA sponge is a useful tool to examine the functional impact of simultaneous inhibition of multiple miRNAs and proposes a therapeutic potential.

  6. Multiple endocrine neoplasias type 2B and RET proto-oncogene

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 2B (MEN 2B) is an autosomal dominant complex oncologic neurocristopathy including medullary thyroid carcinoma, pheochromocytoma, gastrointestinal disorders, marphanoid face, and mucosal multiple ganglioneuromas. Medullary thyroid carcinoma is the major cause of mortality in MEN 2B syndrome, and it often appears during the first years of life. RET proto-oncogene germline activating mutations are causative for MEN 2B. The 95% of MEN 2B patients are associated with a point mutation in exon 16 (M918/T). A second point mutation at codon 883 has been found in 2%-3% of MEN 2B cases. RET proto-oncogene is also involved in different neoplastic and not neoplastic neurocristopathies. Other RET mutations cause MEN 2A syndrome, familial medullary thyroid carcinoma, or Hirschsprung's disease. RET gene expression is also involved in Neuroblastoma. The main diagnosis standards are the acetylcholinesterase study of rectal mucosa and the molecular analysis of RET. In our protocol the rectal biopsy is, therefore, the first approach. RET mutation detection offers the possibility to diagnose MEN 2B predisposition at a pre-clinical stage in familial cases, and to perform an early total prophylactic thyroidectomy. The surgical treatment of MEN 2B is total thyroidectomy with cervical limphadenectomy of the central compartment of the neck. When possible, this intervention should be performed with prophylactic aim before 1 year of age in patients with molecular genetic diagnosis. Recent advances into the mechanisms of RET proto-oncogene signaling and pathways of RET signal transduction in the development of MEN 2 and MTC will allow new treatment possibilities. PMID:22429913

  7. [Advances Research on C-MYC Proto-oncogene in Multiple Myeloma -Review].

    PubMed

    Huang, He; Guo, Wen-Jian; Yao, Ron-Xin

    2016-08-01

    Multiple myeloma(MM) as one of the most common tumors of hmatologic system, is characterized by malignant proliferation of plasma cells, and the chemotherapy is the main therapeutic method. MM is an incurable disease because of drug-resistance of MM cells. Although the pathogenesis of MM remains unknown, the chromosome abnormalities exit in half of the patients, particularly the highly expressed gene C-MYC. Furthermore, plenty of clinical researches indicated a high expression level of C-MYC implied worse progression and/or poor prognosis of MM. Recently, the work exploiting the compounds targeting MYC has made substantial progress, even in the MM therapy. In this article, briefly the recent advances of the research on C-MYC proto-oncogene in multiple myeloma are reviewed.

  8. Multiple endocrine neoplasia induced by the promiscuous expression of a viral oncogene.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, R K; Hoekzema, G S; Vogel, J; Hinrichs, S H; Jay, G

    1988-05-01

    There is increasing evidence for the importance of events that govern and influence the interaction between the transformed cell and its host being ultimately responsible for the establishment of the cancer phenotype. To derive an animal model that will allow us to define some of these phenomena at the molecular level, we have chosen to induce the expression of a viral oncogene in all tissue types, with the hope of identifying sites that are more susceptible to malignant transformation. When the gene for simian virus 40 large tumor antigen (T antigen) was placed under the control of a major histocompatibility complex class I gene enhancer, the resulting transgenic mice not only developed choroid plexus papillomas, as seen with wild-type simian virus 40, but also lymphoid hyperplasia and multiple endocrine neoplasias. The development of lymphoid hyperplasia was preceded by an elevated level of expression of T antigen in these tissues at an early age. Surprisingly, the striking thymic hyperplasia has not been observed to progress toward malignancy. The multiple endocrine neoplasias developed later in life and involved the pancreas, pituitary, thyroid, adrenals, and testes. While not preceded by an elevated level of expression of T antigen, once endocrine tumors appeared they quickly progressed toward malignant growth. Although other tissues also exhibited a basal level of expression of the viral oncogene similar to that detected in endocrine tissues, they rarely developed tumors. This transgenic mouse model seems particularly suitable for a molecular understanding of events responsible for certain tissue types being so much more susceptible to neoplastic conversion, with others being so refractory.

  9. Eukaryotic Elongation Factor 2 Kinase Activity Is Controlled by Multiple Inputs from Oncogenic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuemin; Regufe da Mota, Sergio; Liu, Rui; Moore, Claire E.; Xie, Jianling; Lanucara, Francesco; Agarwala, Usha; Pyr dit Ruys, Sébastien; Vertommen, Didier; Rider, Mark H.; Eyers, Claire E.

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase (eEF2K), an atypical calmodulin-dependent protein kinase, phosphorylates and inhibits eEF2, slowing down translation elongation. eEF2K contains an N-terminal catalytic domain, a C-terminal α-helical region and a linker containing several regulatory phosphorylation sites. eEF2K is expressed at high levels in certain cancers, where it may act to help cell survival, e.g., during nutrient starvation. However, it is a negative regulator of protein synthesis and thus cell growth, suggesting that cancer cells may possess mechanisms to inhibit eEF2K under good growth conditions, to allow protein synthesis to proceed. We show here that the mTORC1 pathway and the oncogenic Ras/Raf/MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway cooperate to restrict eEF2K activity. We identify multiple sites in eEF2K whose phosphorylation is regulated by mTORC1 and/or ERK, including new ones in the linker region. We demonstrate that certain sites are phosphorylated directly by mTOR or ERK. Our data reveal that glycogen synthase kinase 3 signaling also regulates eEF2 phosphorylation. In addition, we show that phosphorylation sites remote from the N-terminal calmodulin-binding motif regulate the phosphorylation of N-terminal sites that control CaM binding. Mutations in the former sites, which occur in cancer cells, cause the activation of eEF2K. eEF2K is thus regulated by a network of oncogenic signaling pathways. PMID:25182533

  10. Global Impact of Oncogenic Src on a Phosphotyrosine Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Weifeng; Slebos, Robbert J.; Hill, Salisha; Li, Ming; Brábek, Jan; Amanchy, Ramars; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Pandey, Akhilesh; Ham, Amy-Joan L.; Hanks, Steven K.

    2008-01-01

    Elevated activity of Src, the first characterized protein-tyrosine kinase, is associated with progression of many human cancers, and Src has attracted interest as a therapeutic target. Src is known to act in various receptor signaling systems to impact cell behavior, yet it remains likely that the spectrum of Src protein substrates relevant to cancer is incompletely understood. To better understand the cellular impact of deregulated Src kinase activity, we extensively applied a mass spectrometry shotgun phosphotyrosine (pTyr) proteomics strategy to obtain global pTyr profiles of Src-transformed mouse fibroblasts as well as their nontransformed counterparts. A total of 867 peptides representing 563 distinct pTyr sites on 374 different proteins were identified from the Src-transformed cells, while 514 peptides representing 275 pTyr sites on 167 proteins were identified from nontransformed cells. Distinct characteristics of the two profiles were revealed by spectral counting, indicative of pTyr site relative abundance, and by complementary quantitative analysis using stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). While both pTyr profiles are replete with sites on signaling and adhesion/cytoskeletal regulatory proteins, the Src-transformed profile is more diverse with enrichment in sites on metabolic enzymes and RNA and protein synthesis and processing machinery. Forty-three pTyr sites (32 proteins) are predicted as major biologically relevant Src targets on the basis of frequent identification in both cell populations. This select group, of particular interest as diagnostic biomarkers, includes well-established Src sites on signaling/adhesion/cytoskeletal proteins, but also uncharacterized sites of potential relevance to the transformed cell phenotype. PMID:18563927

  11. De novo RET proto-oncogene mutation in a patient with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B.

    PubMed

    Chang, T J; Wu, S L; Chang, T C; Huang, S H; Chang, T J

    1999-10-01

    We report a case of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B (MEN 2B) with de novo RET proto-oncogene mutation. The patient, a 23-year-old Taiwanese woman, was admitted for treatment of recurrent medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) 7 years after a total thyroidectomy. Mucosal neuromas and marfanoid appearance were also noted. Because MEN 2B was suspected, the patient and her family members underwent genetic analysis. A heterozygous germline mutation at codon 918 (ATG-->ACG) of the proto-oncogene RET was detected in the patient. This mutation was considered de novo, as it was not detected in either of her parents or her siblings. The patient underwent surgery for removal of the recurrent tumor. Although no pheochromocytoma was noted, regular follow-up is necessary because of persistent hypercalcitoninemia.

  12. Analysis of Multiple Sarcoma Expression Datasets: Implications for Classification, Oncogenic Pathway Activation and Chemotherapy Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Goldsmith, Jeffrey D.; Bhasin, Manoj; Pillay, Kamana; Francoeur, Nancy; Libermann, Towia A.; Gebhardt, Mark C.; Spentzos, Dimitrios

    2010-01-01

    Background Diagnosis of soft tissue sarcomas (STS) is challenging. Many remain unclassified (not-otherwise-specified, NOS) or grouped in controversial categories such as malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH), with unclear therapeutic value. We analyzed several independent microarray datasets, to identify a predictor, use it to classify unclassifiable sarcomas, and assess oncogenic pathway activation and chemotherapy response. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed 5 independent datasets (325 tumor arrays). We developed and validated a predictor, which was used to reclassify MFH and NOS sarcomas. The molecular “match” between MFH and their predicted subtypes was assessed using genome-wide hierarchical clustering and Subclass-Mapping. Findings were validated in 15 paraffin samples profiled on the DASL platform. Bayesian models of oncogenic pathway activation and chemotherapy response were applied to individual STS samples. A 170-gene predictor was developed and independently validated (80-85% accuracy in all datasets). Most MFH and NOS tumors were reclassified as leiomyosarcomas, liposarcomas and fibrosarcomas. “Molecular match” between MFH and their predicted STS subtypes was confirmed both within and across datasets. This classification revealed previously unrecognized tissue differentiation lines (adipocyte, fibroblastic, smooth-muscle) and was reproduced in paraffin specimens. Different sarcoma subtypes demonstrated distinct oncogenic pathway activation patterns, and reclassified MFH tumors shared oncogenic pathway activation patterns with their predicted subtypes. These patterns were associated with predicted resistance to chemotherapeutic agents commonly used in sarcomas. Conclusions/Significance STS profiling can aid in diagnosis through a predictor tracking distinct tissue differentiation in unclassified tumors, and in therapeutic management via oncogenic pathway activation and chemotherapy response assessment. PMID:20368975

  13. PPM1D exerts its oncogenic properties in human pancreatic cancer through multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bo; Guo, Bo-Min; Kang, Jie; Deng, Xian-Zhao; Fan, You-Ben; Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Ai, Kai-Xing

    2016-03-01

    Protein phosphatase, Mg(2+)/Mn(2+) dependent, 1D (PPM1D) is emerging as an oncogene by virtue of its negative control on several tumor suppressor pathways. However, the clinical significance of PPM1D in pancreatic cancer (PC) has not been defined. In this study, we determined PPM1D expression in human PC tissues and cell lines and their irrespective noncancerous controls. We subsequently investigated the functional role of PPM1D in the migration, invasion, and apoptosis of MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1 PC cells in vitro and explored the signaling pathways involved. Furthermore, we examined the role of PPM1D in PC tumorigenesis in vivo. Our results showed that PPM1D is overexpressed in human PC tissues and cell lines and significantly correlated with tumor growth and metastasis. PPM1D promotes PC cell migration and invasion via potentiation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway through downregulation of apoptosis-stimulating of p53 protein 2 (ASPP2). In contrast to PPM1D, our results showed that ASPP2 is downregulated in PC tissues. Additionally, PPM1D suppresses PC cell apoptosis via inhibition of the p38 MAPK/p53 pathway through both dephosphorylation of p38 MAPK and downregulation of ASPP2. Furthermore, PPM1D promotes PC tumor growth in vivo. Our results demonstrated that PPM1D is an oncogene in PC.

  14. Multiple Impacts on Monolithic Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    Two-dimensional computer code , . Eulerian computer code Shaped-charge penetration Multiple impact .6, ABYRAC• ( - ms i N twSMW Mni/ffir b? Wok nuftd...material was copper with a yield stress in shear of 1.3 kbar. Before impact, the velocity of the penetrators was 5.0 km/s and the diameter, 3 mm. The steel...target was semi-infinite with a yield stress in shear of 6.8 kbar. Five impact situations were considered: (1) one impact by a 27.0- m-long penetrator

  15. The impact of age on oncogenic potential: tumor-initiating cells and the brain microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Elizabeth A; Horner, Philip J; Rostomily, Robert C

    2013-10-01

    Paradoxically, aging leads to both decreased regenerative capacity in the brain and an increased risk of tumorigenesis, particularly the most common adult-onset brain tumor, glioma. A shared factor contributing to both phenomena is thought to be age-related alterations in neural progenitor cells (NPCs), which function normally to produce new neurons and glia, but are also considered likely cells of origin for malignant glioma. Upon oncogenic transformation, cells acquire characteristics known as the hallmarks of cancer, including unlimited replication, altered responses to growth and anti-growth factors, increased capacity for angiogenesis, potential for invasion, genetic instability, apoptotic evasion, escape from immune surveillance, and an adaptive metabolic phenotype. The precise molecular pathogenesis and temporal acquisition of these malignant characteristics is largely a mystery. Recent studies characterizing NPCs during normal aging, however, have begun to elucidate mechanisms underlying the age-associated increase in their malignant potential. Aging cells are dependent upon multiple compensatory pathways to maintain cell cycle control, normal niche interactions, genetic stability, programmed cell death, and oxidative metabolism. A few multi-functional proteins act as 'critical nodes' in the coordination of these various cellular activities, although both intracellular signaling and elements within the brain environment are critical to maintaining a balance between senescence and tumorigenesis. Here, we provide an overview of recent progress in our understanding of how mechanisms underlying cellular aging inform on glioma pathogenesis and malignancy.

  16. Immunology in the clinic review series; focus on cancer: multiple roles for the immune system in oncogene addiction.

    PubMed

    Bachireddy, P; Rakhra, K; Felsher, D W

    2012-02-01

    Despite complex genomic and epigenetic abnormalities, many cancers are irrevocably dependent on an initiating oncogenic lesion whose restoration to a normal physiological activation can elicit a dramatic and sudden reversal of their neoplastic properties. This phenomenon of the reversal of tumorigenesis has been described as oncogene addiction. Oncogene addiction had been thought to occur largely through tumour cell-autonomous mechanisms such as proliferative arrest, apoptosis, differentiation and cellular senescence. However, the immune system plays an integral role in almost every aspect of tumorigenesis, including tumour initiation, prevention and progression as well as the response to therapeutics. Here we highlight more recent evidence suggesting that oncogene addiction may be integrally dependent upon host immune-mediated mechanisms, including specific immune effectors and cytokines that regulate tumour cell senescence and tumour-associated angiogenesis. Hence, the host immune system is essential to oncogene addiction.

  17. C-MAF oncogene dysregulation in multiple myeloma: frequency and biological relevance.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Thomas; Knudsen, Lene Meldgaard; Dahl, Inger Marie S; Johnsen, Hans Erik

    2003-10-01

    To investigate the frequency and possible biological consequences of c-maf dysregulation, we designed c-maf and IL-4 real-time RT-PCR assays for determination of c-maf and IL-4 mRNA levels. Using the c-maf real-time RT-PCR assay, we tested a panel of 14 B-cell lines, 135 diagnostic bone marrow (BM) samples from patients with multiple myeloma and 10 BM samples from normal donors. In B cell lines and flowsorted CD38++/CD19-/CD56++ myeloma plasma cells (N = 14) the c-maf/GAPDH and IL-4/GAPDH ratios were determined simultaneously using real time RT-PCR. All B cell lines used in the study were characterized by flow cytometry and tested for the presence of Ebstein-Barr virus (EBV). B-cell lines, that were PCR negative for EBV and had a phenotype typical for primary myeloma cells, expressed medium to high levels of c-maf mRNA. However, all EBV PCR positive cell lines, showed a more immature phenotype, lacked expression of aberrant surface markers and contained very low levels of c-maf mRNA. In 4.4% (6/135) of MM patients tested, a c-maf mRNA level comparable to the cell line RPMI 8226 containing at (16:22), translocation was found. In addition, all c-maf positive myeloma cell lines and CD38++/CD19-/CD56++ myeloma plasma cells tested were IL-4 negative. In conclusion, high levels of c-maf mRNA were observed in "true MM cell lines" and 4.4% of MM patients. Further, c-maf dysregulation in myeloma plasma cells did not cause induction of IL-4 transcription.

  18. Hypoxia-inducible microRNA-210 regulates the DIMT1-IRF4 oncogenic axis in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Sho; Kitadate, Akihiro; Abe, Fumito; Saitoh, Hirobumi; Michishita, Yoshihiro; Hatano, Yoshiaki; Kawabata, Yoshinari; Kitabayashi, Atsushi; Teshima, Kazuaki; Kume, Masaaki; Takahashi, Naoto; Tagawa, Hiroyuki

    2017-04-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by the accumulation of a population of malignant plasma cells within the bone marrow and its microenvironment. A hypoxic niche is located within the microenvironment, which causes myeloma cells to become quiescent, anti-apoptotic, glycolytic, and immature. Cell heterogeneity may be related to distinct gene expression profiles under hypoxic and normoxic conditions. During hypoxia, myeloma cells acquire these phenotypes by downregulating interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4), an essential transcription factor in myeloma oncogenesis. To identify essential microRNAs and their targets regulated under hypoxic conditions, we undertook microRNA and cDNA microarray analyses using hypoxia-exposed primary MM samples and myeloma cell lines. Under hypoxia, only miR-210 was highly upregulated and was accompanied by direct downregulation of an 18S rRNA base methyltransferase, DIMT1. This inverse expression correlation was validated by quantitative RT-PCR for primary MM samples. We further determined that DIMT1 has an oncogenic potential as its knockdown reduced tumorigenicity of myeloma cells through regulation of IRF4 expression. Notably, by analyzing gene expression omnibus datasets in the National Center for Biotechnology Information database, we found that DIMT1 expression increased gradually with MM progression. In summary, by screening for targets of hypoxia-inducible microRNA-210, we identified DIMT1 as a novel diagnostic marker and therapeutic target for all molecular subtypes of MM. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  19. Rearrangements of the c-myc oncogene are present in 15% of primary human multiple myeloma tumors.

    PubMed

    Avet-Loiseau, H; Gerson, F; Magrangeas, F; Minvielle, S; Harousseau, J L; Bataille, R

    2001-11-15

    Rearrangements of the c-myc oncogene have been found in most plasmacytomas induced in mice and human myeloma cell lines (HMCLs) analyzed so far. However, neither induced mouse plasmacytomas nor HMCLs represent relevant models for human multiple myeloma (MM). To evaluate the incidence of c-myc rearrangements in human plasma cell dyscrasias, sets of probes were generated to allow direct assessment of c-myc translocations on interphase plasma cells by using fluorescence in situ hybridization. After validation of these probes, a large cohort of patients with either newly diagnosed MM (n = 529), relapsed MM (n = 58), primary plasma cell leukemia (PCL; n = 23), monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (n = 65), or smoldering MM (n = 24) were analyzed. C-myc rearrangements were identified in 15% of patients with MM or primary PCL, independently of the stage of the disease (ie, diagnosis or relapse and MM or primary PCL). Analysis of the 2 main translocations observed on karyotyping, ie, t(8;14) and t(8;22), revealed that these specific translocations represented only 25% (23 of 91) of c-myc rearrangements. c-myc rearrangements were then correlated with several other patients' characteristics: illegitimate IgH recombinations, chromosome 13 deletions, and serum beta2-microglobulin levels. The only significant correlation was with a high beta2-microglobulin level (P =.002), although a trend for association with t(4;14) was observed (P =.08). Thus, c-myc rearrangement analysis in patients with MM revealed a strikingly lower incidence than that in HMCLs and plasmacytomas induced in mice, indicating that data obtained with these models cannot be directly extrapolated to human MM.

  20. In vivo quantification and perturbation of Myc-Max interactions and the impact on oncogenic potential.

    PubMed

    Raffeiner, Philipp; Röck, Ruth; Schraffl, Andrea; Hartl, Markus; Hart, Jonathan R; Janda, Kim D; Vogt, Peter K; Stefan, Eduard; Bister, Klaus

    2014-10-15

    The oncogenic bHLH-LZ transcription factor Myc forms binary complexes with its binding partner Max. These and other bHLH-LZ-based protein-protein interactions (PPI) in the Myc-Max network are essential for the physiological and oncogenic activities of Myc. We have generated a genetically determined and highly specific protein-fragment complementation assay based on Renilla luciferase to analyze the dynamic interplay of bHLH-LZ transcription factors Myc, Max, and Mxd1 in vivo. We also applied this PPI reporter to quantify alterations of nuclear Myc-Max complexes in response to mutational events, competitive binding by the transcriptional repressor Mxd1, or perturbations by small-molecule Myc inhibitors, including recently identified potent PPI inhibitors from a Kröhnke pyridine library. We show that the specificity of Myc-Max PPI reduction by the pyridine inhibitors directly correlates with their efficient and highly specific potential to interfere with the proliferation of human and avian tumor cells displaying deregulated Myc expression. In a direct comparison with known Myc inhibitors using human and avian cell systems, the pyridine compounds reveal a unique inhibitory potential even at sub-micromolar concentrations combined with remarkable specificity for the inhibition of Myc-driven tumor cell proliferation. Furthermore, we show in direct comparisons using defined avian cell systems that different Max PPI profiles for the variant members of the Myc protein family (c-Myc, v-Myc, N-Myc, L-Myc) correlate with their diverse oncogenic potential and their variable sensitivity to the novel pyridine inhibitors.

  1. Impact of the oncogenic status on the mode of recurrence in resected non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Tetsuya; Yatabe, Yasushi; Kuroda, Hiroaki; Sakakura, Noriaki; Sakao, Yukinori

    2016-10-01

    Surgical resection is employed in patients with resectable non-small cell lung cancer. Despite complete resection, recurrence is sometimes observed. Oncogenic mutations promote initiation and progression of lung cancer, and mutation status predicts treatment outcome of advanced non-small cell lung cancer; however, their impact on the recurrence patterns remains poorly understood. We retrospectively studied 401 patients showing recurrence after complete resection of non-small cell lung cancer. Clinicopathological factors were reviewed for time to recurrence, and recurrence patterns were compared according to oncogenic status and examined according to EGFR mutational subtype. Among 401 patients, 185 with EGFR mutation, 46 with KRAS mutation, 15 with ALK rearrangement and 155 with triple-negative mutation were identified. Multivariate analysis following univariate analyses showed that younger age, well-moderately-differentiated histology, earlier pathologic stage and presence of EGFR or ALK mutation were favorable prognostic factors for time to recurrence. Locoregional recurrence was observed in 53.3% of ALK-positive patients, being significantly common in these patients than in EGFR- and KRAS-positive patients. EGFR-positive patients mostly experienced pleural recurrence, the incidence of which was significantly higher in triple-negative mutation patients. Adrenal recurrence was observed in 7.2% of triple-negative mutation patients, but it was rarely identified in EGFR-positive patients. Among EGFR-positive patients, the incidence of brain metastases was significantly higher in L858R cohort than in Del Ex19 cohort. In resected non-small cell lung cancer, younger age, well-moderately-differentiated histology, earlier pathologic stage and presence of EGFR or ALK mutation were favorable factors for TTR, and distinct recurrence patterns were revealed according to oncogenic mutation status and mutational EGFR subtype. Our results may provide suggestions for developing a

  2. A Hybrid Chalcone Combining the Trimethoxyphenyl and Isatinyl Groups Targets Multiple Oncogenic Proteins and Pathways in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lili; Zhang, Lijun; Zhao, Xiang; Zhang, Ye

    2016-01-01

    Small molecule inhibitors that can simultaneously inhibit multiple oncogenic proteins in essential pathways are promising therapeutic chemicals for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To combine the anticancer effects of combretastatins, chalcones and isatins, we synthesized a novel hybrid molecule 3’,4’,5’-trimethoxy-5-chloro-isatinylchalcone (3MCIC). 3MCIC inhibited proliferation of cultured HepG2 cells, causing rounding-up of the cells and massive vacuole accumulation in the cytoplasm. Paxillin and focal adhesion plaques were downregulated by 3MCIC. Surprisingly, unlike the microtubule (MT)-targeting agent CA-4 that inhibits tubulin polymerization, 3MCIC stabilized tubulin polymers both in living cells and in cell lysates. 3MCIC treatment reduced cyclin B1, CDK1, p-CDK1/2, and Rb, but increased p53 and p21. Moreover, 3MCIC caused GSK3β degradation by promoting GSK3β-Ser9 phosphorylation. Nevertheless, 3MCIC inhibited the Wnt/β-catenin pathway by downregulating β-catenin, c-Myc, cyclin D1 and E2F1. 3MCIC treatment not only activated the caspase-3-dependent apoptotic pathway, but also caused massive autophagy evidenced by rapid and drastic changes of LC3 and p62. 3MCIC also promoted cleavage and maturation of the lysosomal protease cathepsin D. Using ligand-affinity chromatography (LAC), target proteins captured onto the Sephacryl S1000-C12-3MCIC resins were isolated and analyzed by mass spectrometry (MS). Some of the LAC-MS identified targets, i.e., septin-2, vimentin, pan-cytokeratin, nucleolin, EF1α1/2, EBP1 (PA2G4), cyclin B1 and GSK3β, were further detected by Western blotting. Moreover, both septin-2 and HIF-1α decreased drastically in 3MCIC-treated HepG2 cells. Our data suggest that 3MCIC is a promising anticancer lead compound with novel targeting mechanisms, and also demonstrate the efficiency of LAC-MS based target identification in anticancer drug development. PMID:27525972

  3. Impact of oncogene rearrangement patterns on outcomes in patients with double-hit non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Landsburg, Daniel J; Petrich, Adam M; Abramson, Jeremy S; Sohani, Aliyah R; Press, Oliver; Cassaday, Ryan; Chavez, Julio C; Song, Kevin; Zelenetz, Andrew D; Gandhi, Mitul; Shah, Namrata; Fenske, Timothy S; Jaso, Jesse; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Yang, David T; Nabhan, Chadi

    2016-02-15

    Double-hit lymphomas (DHLs) are collectively defined as B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas harboring rearrangements of MYC as well as B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2) and/or B-cell lymphoma 6 (BCL6). To the authors' knowledge, the impact of specific oncogene rearrangements on outcomes of patients with DHL who are treated with immunochemotherapy has not been previously described. The authors identified patients whose diagnostic tissue specimens underwent metaphase karyotyping or fluorescence in situ hybridization for MYC as well as both BCL2 and BCL6 rearrangements. Cohorts were defined by the presence (+) or absence (-) of rearrangements: MYC+/BCL2+/BCL6- (BCL2-DHL), MYC+/BCL2-/BCL6+ (BCL6-DHL), and MYC+/BCL2+/BCL6+ (triple-hit lymphoma; THL). A total of 117 patients were included in the current analysis (76 BCL2-DHL patients, 16 BCL6-DHL patients, and 25 THL patients). Compared with patients with BCL2-DHL, those with BCL6-DHL were more likely to be classified as having a non-germinal center cell of origin, presented with extranodal disease, and appeared to achieve higher rates of complete response despite receiving intensive induction therapy less frequently. However, patients with BCL6-DHL experienced a shorter median overall survival if achieving an initial complete response compared with patients with BCL2-DHL. Patients with THL experienced survival outcomes similar to those of patients with BCL2-DHL. Recognition of the specific oncogene rearrangements may be of prognostic value and potentially guide future therapeutic strategies for patients with DHL. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  4. Impact of oncogenic K-RAS on YB-1 phosphorylation induced by ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    repair of DNA-DSB. Likewise, YB-1 siRNA increased radiation sensitivity. Conclusions IR induces YB-1 phosphorylation. YB-1 phosphorylation induced by oncogenic K-Ras or IR enhances repair of DNA-DSB and postirradiation survival via erbB1 downstream PI3K/Akt and MAPK/ERK signaling pathways. PMID:21392397

  5. Overexpression of c-maf is a frequent oncogenic event in multiple myeloma that promotes proliferation and pathological interactions with bone marrow stroma.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Elaine M; Wiestner, Adrian; Rosenwald, Andreas; Shaffer, A L; Campo, Elias; Grogan, Tom; Bergsagel, P Leif; Kuehl, W Michael; Staudt, Louis M

    2004-02-01

    The oncogene c-maf is translocated in approximately 5%-10% of multiple myelomas. Unexpectedly, we observed c-maf expression in myeloma cell lines lacking c-maf translocations and in 50% of multiple myeloma bone marrow samples. By gene expression profiling, we identified three c-maf target genes: cyclin D2, integrin beta7, and CCR1. c-maf transactivated the cyclin D2 promoter and enhanced myeloma proliferation, whereas dominant inhibition of c-maf blocked tumor formation in immunodeficient mice. c-maf-driven expression of integrin beta7 enhanced myeloma adhesion to bone marrow stroma and increased production of VEGF. We propose that c-maf transforms plasma cells by stimulating cell cycle progression and by altering bone marrow stromal interactions. The frequent overexpression of c-maf in myeloma makes it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention.

  6. A rapid screening method for the detection of mutations in the RET proto-oncogene in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A and familial medullary thyroid carcinoma families

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, D.J.; Andrew, S.; Richardson, A.L. |

    1994-09-15

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN2A) and familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (FMTC) are autosomal dominant inherited cancer syndromes with incomplete penetrance. Following the identification of mutations in the RET proto-oncogene that segregate with the disease phenotype in MEN2A, MEN2B, and FMTC, genetic screening of individuals with mutations in RET may be performed. The authors have employed restriction endonuclease digestion of polymerase chain reaction products as an alternative to sequence analysis for rapid identification of mutant gene carriers in families in which MEN2A and RMTC are segregating. Twenty-one Australasian MEN2A and FMTC families have been screened for mutations in a cysteine-rich region of the RET proto-oncogene. Seven independent mutations were identified in key individuals in 16 of these families. The authors have identified a mutation in codon 620, 2053 T {r_arrow}C (Cys620Arg), and two mutations in codon 634 of exon 11 of RET, 2095 T {r_arrow} C (Cys634Arg) and 2096 G {r_arrow} A (Cys634Tyr), all three of which were present in both MEN2A and FMTC families. 7 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  7. Patterned Armor Performance Evaluation for Multiple Impacts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-01

    return it to the originator. Army Research Laboratory Aberdeen Proving Ground , MD 21005-5069 ARL-TR-3038 August 2003 Patterned Armor ...patterned armor performance against multiple impacts. This performance measure can then be compared to a well-posed multiple-hit criterion to assess...Aberdeen Proving Ground , MD, September 2002. de Rosset, W. S. Reactive Armor Model Sensitivity Studies; ARL-TR-1849; U.S. Army Research Laboratory

  8. MicroRNA-7 Inhibits Multiple Oncogenic Pathways to Suppress HER2Δ16 Mediated Breast Tumorigenesis and Reverse Trastuzumab Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Felicia C.; Jones, Frank E.

    2014-01-01

    The oncogenic isoform of HER2, HER2Δ16, is expressed with HER2 in nearly 50% of HER2 positive breast tumors where HER2Δ16 drives metastasis and resistance to multiple therapeutic interventions including tamoxifen and trastuzumab. In recent years microRNAs have been shown to influence multiple aspects of tumorigenesis and tumor cell response to therapy. Accordingly, the HER2Δ16 oncogene alters microRNA expression to promote endocrine resistance. With the goal of identifying microRNA suppressors of HER2Δ16 oncogenic activity we investigated the contribution of altered microRNA expression to HER2Δ16 mediated tumorigenesis and trastuzumab resistance. Using a gene array strategy comparing microRNA expression profiles of MCF-7 to MCF-7/HER2Δ16 cells, we found that expression of HER2Δ16 significantly altered expression of 16 microRNAs by 2-fold or more including a 4.8 fold suppression of the miR-7 tumor suppressor. Reestablished expression of miR-7 in the MCF-7/HER2Δ16 cell line caused a G1 cell cycle arrest and reduced both colony formation and cell migration activity to levels of parental MCF-7 cells. Suppression of miR-7 in the MCF-7 cell line resulted in enhanced colony formation activity but not cell migration, indicating that miR-7 suppression is sufficient to drive tumor cell proliferation but not migration. MiR-7 inhibited MCF-7/HER2Δ16 cell migration through a mechanism involving suppression of the miR-7 target gene EGFR. In contrast, miR-7 inhibition of MCF-7/HER2Δ16 cell proliferation involved a pathway where miR-7 expression resulted in the inactivation of Src kinase independent of suppressed EGFR expression. Also independent of EGFR suppression, reestablished miR-7 expression sensitized refractory MCF-7/HER2Δ16 cells to trastuzumab. Our results demonstrate that reestablished miR-7 expression abolishes HER2Δ16 induced cell proliferation and migration while sensitizing HER2Δ16 expressing cells to trastuzumab therapy. We propose that miR-7 regulated

  9. Impact of Possibly Oncogenic High-Risk Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Types in Triage for ASC-US Cervical Cytology Results.

    PubMed

    Amarosa, Emily J; Winer, Rachel L; Hong, Karen J; Mao, Constance

    2015-10-01

    Current guidelines recommend including 13 or 14 high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types for triage of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) cervical cytology; however, at least 13 additional types are considered possibly oncogenic. We evaluated the effect of including possibly oncogenic HPV types in the test panel. Outcomes for all women 30 years or older with ASC-US and positive HPV testing who underwent colposcopic biopsy at University of Washington Medical Center-affiliated clinics between 2010 and 2011 were reviewed. We compared biopsy results between cases that were HPV positive for 1 or more of 13 possibly oncogenic types only (26/53/55/62/64/67/69/71/73/82/83/84/IS39) versus 1 or more of the 14 established high-risk types (16/18/31/33/35/39/45/51/52/56/58/59/66/68). We used the Fisher exact test to compare cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or higher (CIN2+) diagnoses between HPV risk groups. Three hundred twenty-six ASC-US HPV-positive cervical cytology results were identified, with 170 that were linked to subsequent cervical biopsy results. Among 51 cases positive for possibly oncogenic types only, 31 (61%) had no neoplasia, 20 (39%) had CIN1, and none had CIN2+. Among 119 controls positive for at least one established high-risk type, 64 (53%) had no neoplasia, 42 (35%) had CIN1, and 13 (11%) had CIN2+ (p = .01 for the comparison of CIN2+ diagnoses between groups). The inclusion of possibly oncogenic types in the HPV test panel led to an additional 51 colposcopy biopsies (33% increase), with no additional cases of CIN 2+. Our results suggest that including possibly oncogenic HPV types increases the number of colposcopy biopsies with minimal improvements in detection of CIN2 +.

  10. Analysis of Multiple HPV E6 PDZ Interactions Defines Type-Specific PDZ Fingerprints That Predict Oncogenic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Miranda; Myers, Michael P.; Guarnaccia, Corrado; Banks, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    The high-risk Human Papillomavirus (HPV) E6 oncoproteins are characterised by the presence of a class I PDZ-binding motif (PBM) on their extreme carboxy termini. The PBM is present on the E6 proteins derived from all cancer-causing HPV types, but can also be found on some related non-cancer-causing E6 proteins. We have therefore been interested in investigating the potential functional differences between these different E6 PBMs. Using an unbiased proteomic approach in keratinocytes, we have directly compared the interaction profiles of these different PBMs. This has allowed us to identify the potential PDZ target fingerprints of the E6 PBMs from 7 different cancer-causing HPV types, from 3 HPV types with weak cancer association, and from one benign HPV type that possesses an ancestral PBM. We demonstrate a striking increase in the number of potential PDZ targets bound by each E6 PBM as cancer-causing potential increases, and show that the HPV-16 and HPV-18 PBMs have the most flexibility in their PDZ target selection. Furthermore, the specific interaction with hScrib correlates directly with increased oncogenic potential. In contrast, hDlg is bound equally well by all the HPV E6 PBMs analysed, indicating that this is an evolutionarily conserved interaction, and was most likely one of the original E6 PBM target proteins that was important for the occupation of a potential new niche. Finally, we present evidence that the cell junction components ZO-2 and β-2 syntrophin are novel PDZ domain–containing targets of a subset of high-risk HPV types. PMID:27483446

  11. PDGFRα depletion attenuates glioblastoma stem cells features by modulation of STAT3, RB1 and multiple oncogenic signals

    PubMed Central

    Cenciarelli, Carlo; Marei, Hany E.; Felsani, Armando; Casalbore, Patrizia; Sica, Gigliola; Puglisi, Maria Ausiliatrice; Cameron, Angus J.M.; Olivi, Alessandro; Mangiola, Annunziato

    2016-01-01

    Platelet derived growth factor receptors (PDGFRs) play an important role in tumor pathogenesis, and they are frequently overexpressed in glioblastoma (GBM). Earlier we have shown a higher protein expression of PDGFR isoforms (α and β) in peritumoral-tissue derived cancer stem cells (p-CSC) than in tumor core (c-CSC) of several GBM affected patients. In the current study, in order to assess the activity of PDGFRα/PDGF-AA signaling axis, we performed time course experiments to monitor the effects of exogenous PDGF-AA on the expression of downstream target genes in c-CSC vs p-CSC. Interestingly, in p-CSC we detected the upregulation of Y705-phosphorylated Stat3, concurrent with a decrement of Rb1 protein in its active state, within minutes of PDGF-AA addition. This finding prompted us to elucidate the role of PDGFRα in self-renewal, invasion and differentiation in p-CSC by using short hairpin RNA depletion of PDGFRα expression. Notably, in PDGFRα-depleted cells, protein analysis revealed attenuation of stemness-related and glial markers expression, alongside early activation of the neuronal marker MAP2a/b that correlated with the induction of tumor suppressor Rb1. The in vitro reduction of the invasive capacity of PDGFRα-depleted CSC as compared to parental cells correlated with the downmodulation of markers of epithelial-mesenchymal transition phenotype and angiogenesis. Surprisingly, we observed the induction of anti-apoptotic proteins and compensatory oncogenic signals such as EDN1, EDNRB, PRKCB1, PDGF-C and PDGF-D. To conclude, we hypothesize that the newly discovered PDGFRα/Stat3/Rb1 regulatory axis might represent a potential therapeutic target for GBM treatment. PMID:27344175

  12. Frequency of Injuries in Multiple Impact Crashes

    PubMed Central

    Digges, K.; Bahouth, G.

    2003-01-01

    NASS 1998–2000 was queried to determine the frequency of serious injuries in multiple impact crashes and the distribution of injuries by crash sequence. The data set included all passenger cars and light trucks in NASS/CDS. The results showed that 42% of the MAIS 3+ injuries were in crashes that involved more than one harmful event. Approximately 24% of the MAIS 3+ injuries involved two harmful events, and 18% involved 3 or more harmful events. For multiple crashes with serious injuries, the most frequent initial impact direction was frontal (50%) followed by side (44.9%). The most frequent second impact was side (48.4%) followed by frontal (27.6%). The most harmful sequences were side-side (27.7%), front-side (15.8%) and front-front (14.9). The data suggests the need for further investigation and classification complex multiple impact crashes to aid in the in the design of safety systems. PMID:12941239

  13. A mutation in the RET proto-oncogene in Hirschsprung's disease affects the tyrosine kinase activity associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A and 2B.

    PubMed Central

    Cosma, M P; Panariello, L; Quadro, L; Dathan, N A; Fattoruso, O; Colantuoni, V

    1996-01-01

    We demonstrate that a Hirschsprung (HSCR) mutation in the tyrosine kinase domain of the RET proto-oncogene abolishes in cis the tyrosine-phosphorylation associated with the activating mutation in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN2A) in transiently transfected Cos cells. Yet the double mutant RET2AHS retains the ability to form stable dimers, thus dissociating the dimerization from the phosphorylation potential. Co-transfection experiments with single and double mutants carrying plasmids RET2A and RET2AHS in different ratios drastically reduced the phosphorylation levels of the RET2A protein, suggesting a dominant-negative effect of the HSCR mutation. Also, the phosphorylation associated with the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B (MEN2B) allele was affected in experiments with single and double mutants carrying plasmids co-transfected under the same conditions. Finally, analysis of the enzymic activity of MEN2A and MEN2B tumours confirmed the relative levels of tyrosine phosphorylation observed in Cos cells, indicating that this condition, in vivo, may account for the RET transforming potential. PMID:8670046

  14. Low frequency KRAS mutations in colorectal cancer patients and the presence of multiple mutations in oncogenic drivers in non-small cell lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liyan; Huang, Jiaqi; Morehouse, Chris; Zhu, Wei; Korolevich, Susana; Sui, Dan; Ge, Xiaoxiao; Lehmann, Kim; Liu, Zheng; Kiefer, Christine; Czapiga, Meggan; Su, Xinying; Brohawn, Philip; Gu, Yi; Higgs, Brandon W; Yao, Yihong

    2013-01-01

    Intratumor heterogeneity can confound the results of mutation analyses in oncodriver genes using traditional methods thereby challenging the application of targeted cancer therapy strategies for patients Ultradeep sequencing can detect low frequency and expanded clonal mutations in primary tumors to better inform treatment decisions. KRAS coding exons in 61 treatment-naive colorectal cancer (CRC) tumors and KRAS, EGFR, ALK, and MET in lung tumors from three Chinese non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients were sequenced using ultradeep sequencing methods. Forty-one percent of CRC patients (25/61) harbored mutations in the KRAS active domain, eight of which (13%) were not detected by Sanger sequencing. Three (of eight) had frequencies less than 10% and one patient harbored more than one mutation. Low frequency KRAS active (G12R) and EGFR kinase domain mutations (G719A) were identified in one NSCLC patient. A second NSCLC patient showed an EML4-ALK fusion with ALK, EGFR, and MET mutations. A third NSCLC patient harbored multiple low frequency mutations in KRAS, EGFR, and MET as well as ALK gene copy number increases. Within the same patient, multiple low frequency mutations occurred within a gene. A complex pattern of intrinsic low frequency driver mutations in well-known tumor oncogenes may exist prior to treatment, resulting in resistance to targeted therapies. Ultradeep sequencing can characterize intratumor heterogeneity and identify such mutations to ultimately affect treatment decisions.

  15. Tungsten Heavy Alloys for Multiple Impact Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Werner

    2004-07-01

    Tungsten heavy alloys (WHA) have become quite popular in applications for KE penetrators and blast fragmentation warheads. To take advantage of their greater perforation performance, it is necessary to adapt the material properties to the special applications. Otherwise, the rather high brittleness of this class of alloys can lead to increased shattering of the projectiles and thus, to decreasing performance. This is especially important in multiple impact applications, for example with complex air targets like TBMs (tactical ballistic missiles). To meet these requirements, a comprehensive test program with different WHA materials was carried out. Starting with the baseline WHA 91.5 % W - 5.7 % Ni - 2.8 % Fe, the following parameters were varied: W content, sintering process, both W content and sintering process, matrix material (Ni, Fe, Co). With this spectrum of materials, a number of relevant tests were performed: quasi-static strength tests, dynamic plate impact test in combination with a VISAR and a special test setup for multiple impact loads. The results are presented in this work and can be used as guidelines for the design of WHA material properties for special loading conditions.

  16. Pediatric medullary carcinoma of the thyroid with point mutation of RET proto-oncogene associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia and initially diagnosed by fine-needle aspiration biopsy.

    PubMed

    Chai, Chiling; Lemos, Luciano B; Kaelbling, Margot; Baliga, Mithra

    2003-03-01

    A 7-year-old girl presented with a thyroid mass, elevated serum levels of calcitonin and carcinoembryonic antigen, as well as multiple mucosal nodules in the upper lip and tongue. Cytologic material obtained by fine-needle aspiration biopsy from the thyroid mass was diagnosed as medullary carcinoma and confirmed by immunohistochemical studies in the cell-block sections. Subsequent histopathologic examination showed involvement of both thyroid lobes by medullary carcinoma, and electron microscopic studies further confirmed the diagnosis. Molecular studies showed a point mutation in amino acid 918 in exon 16 of the RET proto-oncogene. Biopsies from the upper lip and tongue showed mucosal neuromas. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy is frequently used in the initial evaluation of thyroid nodules. This case illustrates the value of fine-needle aspiration biopsy as a safe and accurate diagnostic modality in the workup of pediatric thyroid nodules. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy should always be considered for the investigation of thyroid nodules in pediatric patients.

  17. The iron chelator deferasirox induces apoptosis by targeting oncogenic Pyk2/β-catenin signaling in human multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Tsutomu; Kawano, Yutaka; Murase, Kazuyuki; Arihara, Yohei; Kikuchi, Shohei; Hayasaka, Naotaka; Usami, Makoto; Iyama, Satoshi; Miyanishi, Koji; Sato, Yasushi; Kobune, Masayoshi; Kato, Junji

    2016-01-01

    Deregulated iron metabolism underlies the pathogenesis of many human cancers. Recently, low expression of ferroportin, which is the only identified non-heme iron exporter, has been associated with significantly reduced overall survival in multiple myeloma (MM); however, the altered iron metabolism in MM biology remains unclear. In this study we demonstrated, by live cell imaging, that MM cells have increased intracellular iron levels as compared with normal cells. In experiments to test the effect of iron chelation on the growth of MM cells, we found that deferasirox (DFX), an oral iron chelator used to treat iron overload in clinical practice, inhibits MM cell growth both in vivo and in vitro. Mechanistically, DFX was found to induce apoptosis of MM cells via the inhibition of proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2), which is known to promote tumor growth in MM. Inhibition of Pyk2 is caused by the suppression of reactive oxygen species, and leads to downregulation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Taken together, our findings indicate that high levels of intracellular iron, which might be due to low ferroportin expression, play a role in MM pathophysiology. Therefore, DFX may provide a therapeutic option for MM that is driven by deregulated iron homeostasis and/or Pyk2/Wnt signaling. PMID:27602957

  18. Venus - Multiple-Floored, Irregular Impact Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-09-26

    NASA' sMagellan imaged this multiple-floored, irregular impact crater at latitude 16.4 degrees north, longitude 352.1 degrees east, during orbits 481 and 482 on 27 September 1990. This crater, about 9.2 kilometers in maximum diameter, was formed on what appears to be a slightly fractured, radar-dark (smooth) plain. The abundant, low viscosity flows associated with this cratering event have, however, filled local, fault-controlled troughs (called graben). These shallow graben are well portrayed on this Magellan image but would be unrecognizable but for their coincidental infilling by the radar-bright crater flows. This fortuitous enhancement by the crater flows of fault structures that are below the resolution of the Magellan synthetic aperture radar is providing the Magellan Science Team with valuable geologic information. The flow deposits from the craters are thought to consist primarily of shock melted rock and fragmented debris resulting from the nearly simultaneous impacts of two projectile fragments into the hot (800 degrees Fahrenheit) surface rocks of Venus. The presence of the various floors of this irregular crater is interpreted to be the result of crushing, fragmentation, and eventual aerodynamic dispersion of a single entry projectile during passage through the dense Venusian atmosphere. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00462

  19. The Impacts of Multiple Simultaneous Climate Variations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    very different from those in LN and Neutral years (Figures 18 and 23). This indicates that MJO Phase 4 has a relatively small impact on SSTAs compared...Oscillation (AO)—have significant impacts on environmental conditions and operating environments around the globe. However, relatively little is known about...responses to the events. This interference causes large differences in the anomalies that are commonly thought to characterize the events—for example

  20. K-ras oncogene DNA sequences in pink salmon in streams impacted by the Exxon Valdez oil spill: no evidence of oil-induced heritable mutations.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Matthew A; Wickliffe, Jeffrey K; Dunina, Yelena; Baker, Robert J

    2002-08-01

    It was hypothesized in previous studies that the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Prince William Sound, Alaska, induced heritable mutations and resulted in mortality of pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) embryos. In one of these studies, laboratory exposure of pink salmon embryos to crude oil resulted in apparent mutation-induction in exon 1 and exon 2 of the K-ras oncogene, but no fish from the area impacted by the oil spill were analyzed. We assessed K-ras exon 1 and exon 2 DNA sequences in pink salmon from five streams that were oiled and five streams that were not oiled by the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Prince William Sound, and two streams with natural oil seeps and one stream without seeps on the Alaska Peninsula. Of the 79 fish analyzed for exon 1 and the 89 fish analyzed for exon 2, none had the nucleotide substitutions representing the mutations induced in the laboratory study. Other variable nucleotides occurred in similar proportions in oiled and non-oiled streams and probably represent natural allelic variation. These data do not support the hypothesis that heritable mutations in the K-ras gene were induced by the Exxon Valdez oil spill or oil seeps.

  1. The Multiple Impacts of Teacher Misbehaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Damien

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impacts of serious teacher misbehaviour (TMB) in schools from the perspective of headteachers, a largely un-researched area. Design/methodology/approach: Data were collected via the documentary analysis of misconduct cases from the Teaching Agency and semi-structured interviews with five…

  2. The Multiple Impacts of Teacher Misbehaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Damien

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impacts of serious teacher misbehaviour (TMB) in schools from the perspective of headteachers, a largely un-researched area. Design/methodology/approach: Data were collected via the documentary analysis of misconduct cases from the Teaching Agency and semi-structured interviews with five…

  3. Impact of nestin analysis in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Sváchová, H; Kovárová, L; Stossová, J; Potácová, A; Pour, L; Hájek, R

    2011-01-01

    Nestin, a marker of multipotent precursor cells, is an important dynamic structure; its polymerization/depolymerization influences intracellular signaling and participates in key cell processes such as proliferation, migration and cell survival. It is presumed that nestin plays a central role in carcinogenesis. It is suggested that nestin might be a suitable diagnostic and prognostic indicator of malignancy and a potential marker of cancer stem cells. Unexpectedly, nestin has been identified in mature CD138+CD38+ plasma cells (PC) of multiple myeloma patients (MM). Expression of nestin, a marker of stem/progenitor cells, in malignant PC, that are considered to be terminally differentiated, indicates that nestin might play a unique role in pathology of MM.

  4. Assessing the Impacts of Multiple Breadbasket Failures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casellas Connors, J. P.; Janetos, A.

    2016-12-01

    A relatively small area of the world accounts for a large proportion of total global cereal production, with most of the area devoted to the production of the world's three major cereal crops, rice, wheat and maize. An extensive literature of the sensitivity of agricultural productivity of these crops, and many others, has arisen over the past 25 years, with a general consensus that continued change in the physical climate system will very likely increase the difficulty of agricultural production in areas of the world that are already marginal with respect to production. But what this research only rarely does is assess the influence of extreme events in shocking agricultural production, and how the rest of the agricultural system reacts, in terms of prices, food insecurity, subsequent land-use change, and terrestrial carbon emissions, among many other possible responses. Because the agricultural system is interlinked with energy systems, food distribution and transportation systems, and economic systems, models that focus only on agricultural productivity can only provide a unidimensional view of the magnitude of potential impacts. We know such impacts can occur as a consequence of extreme climatic events, because they have - the impact of the severe regional drought and heat wave on the Russian and Ukrainian wheat harvests in 2010 had global consequences for food prices, just as one example. In this paper, we use an Integrated Assessment Model, the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), to investigate the potential outcomes of both moderate and severe shocks to agricultural productivity in the major breadbaskets of the world - both singly and in combination. The results demonstrate clearly that there are likely to be multidimensional consequences from the kinds of shocks that are possible from a rapidly changing climate system, especially when combined with other demographic and economic trends in the coming decades. These results are only one aspect of

  5. Oncogene addiction: pathways of therapeutic response, resistance, and road maps toward a cure

    PubMed Central

    Pagliarini, Raymond; Shao, Wenlin; Sellers, William R

    2015-01-01

    A key goal of cancer therapeutics is to selectively target the genetic lesions that initiate and maintain cancer cell proliferation and survival. While most cancers harbor multiple oncogenic mutations, a wealth of preclinical and clinical data supports that many cancers are sensitive to inhibition of single oncogenes, a concept referred to as ‘oncogene addiction’. Herein, we describe the clinical evidence supporting oncogene addiction and discuss common mechanistic themes emerging from the response and acquired resistance to oncogene-targeted therapies. Finally, we suggest several opportunities toward exploiting oncogene addiction to achieve curative cancer therapies. PMID:25680965

  6. Oncogenic human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    McBride, Alison A

    2017-10-19

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are an ancient group of viruses with small, double-stranded DNA circular genomes. They are species-specific and have a strict tropism for mucosal and cutaneous stratified squamous epithelial surfaces of the host. A subset of these viruses has been demonstrated to be the causative agent of several human cancers. Here, we review the biology, natural history, evolution and cancer association of the oncogenic HPVs.This article is part of the themed issue 'Human oncogenic viruses'. © 2017 The Authors.

  7. Oncogenic human papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are an ancient group of viruses with small, double-stranded DNA circular genomes. They are species-specific and have a strict tropism for mucosal and cutaneous stratified squamous epithelial surfaces of the host. A subset of these viruses has been demonstrated to be the causative agent of several human cancers. Here, we review the biology, natural history, evolution and cancer association of the oncogenic HPVs. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Human oncogenic viruses’. PMID:28893940

  8. High Explosive Deonation Threshold Sensitivity Due to Multiple Fragment Impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Georgevich, V; Pincosy, P; Chase, J

    2004-01-07

    Fragments, bullets or projectiles can initiate a detonation in a high explosive (HE). For this to happen certain critical conditions need to be exceeded. For a given explosive, these critical conditions are the projectile velocity, the projectile size and shape, and the projectile material properties. A lot of work has been done in the area of metal shaped charge jets and individual fragments impacting the HE. One major gap in understanding initiation phenomena is the effect of multiple fragment impact. This study shows that multiple fragments can lower the fragment size and the kinetic energy thresholds.

  9. Structure, chromosome location, and expression of the mouse zinc finger gene Krox-20: multiple gene products and coregulation with the proto-oncogene c-fos.

    PubMed Central

    Chavrier, P; Janssen-Timmen, U; Mattéi, M G; Zerial, M; Bravo, R; Charnay, P

    1989-01-01

    We have analyzed the structure and the regulation of Krox-20, a mouse zinc finger-encoding gene which is transiently activated following serum stimulation of quiescent fibroblast cells in culture. The gene is localized on chromosome 10, band B5, in the mouse, and the homologous human gene also maps to chromosome 10 (region q21.1 to q22.1). Alternative splicing of the 5'-most intron of the Krox-20 gene gives rise to mRNAs encoding putative zinc finger proteins with different N termini. The first exon contains a sequence element with strong similarity to the c-fos proto-oncogene serum response element (SRE). This element can functionally substitute for the c-fos SRE, and it binds the same nuclear protein. It is probably responsible for the serum induction of Krox-20, possibly in combination with a weaker SRE located in the 5'-flanking region of the gene. Our findings suggest that c-fos, Krox-20, and a number of immediate-early serum response genes are coregulated and that the SRE and its cognate protein are essential components of this regulatory pathway. Images PMID:2496302

  10. Impact of gsp oncogene on the expression of genes coding for Gsalpha, Pit-1, Gi2alpha, and somatostatin receptor 2 in human somatotroph adenomas: involvement in octreotide sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Barlier, A; Pellegrini-Bouiller, I; Gunz, G; Zamora, A J; Jaquet, P; Enjalbert, A

    1999-08-01

    The impact of the gsp oncogene on the expression of genes engaged in the somatotroph cell phenotype remains poorly understood in human somatotroph adenomas. As the gsp oncogene is associated with an increased octreotide (somatostatin agonist) sensitivity, a group of 8 somatotroph adenomas bearing the gsp mutation (gsp+) and another group of 16 adenomas without the mutation (gsp-) were analyzed, all of them presenting variable octreotide sensitivities. The expressions of genes encoding for G(s)alpha, Pit-1, G(i2)alpha, and SSTR2, involved in the regulation of secretory activity in somatotroph cells, were assessed by Northern blot. A decreased expression of the G(s)alpha gene was found in gsp + tumors, suggesting the existence of a negative feedback of the oncogenic protein upon its own messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA). In contrast, G(i2)alpha, Pit-1, and GH messengers were not significantly different in the groups. A positive correlation between the in vitro and in vivo GH octreotide-induced secretory inhibition and the expression of SSTR2 mRNA was found. However, the expression of the gene for SSTR2 appeared not to be different between gsp + and gsp-, even when the octreotide sensitivity was significantly higher in the adenomas carrying the mutation. Interestingly, the SSTR2 gene expression was significantly correlated to those of G(i2)alpha and Pit-1. In the same way, the G(s)alpha mRNA expression was positively correlated with those of Gi2alpha and Pit-1. Such correlations strongly suggest a concerted dysregulation of the expression of these genes in both categories of adenomas. The loss of the octreotide sensitivity represents one aspect of the dysregulation process that partially results from the decreased SSTR2 expression. However, the improvement of the sensitivity associated with the presence of the gsp oncogene seems to proceed in a way different from SSTR2 expression.

  11. Multiple Case Study on Cyberbullying's Impacts on Adolescent Technology Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Kent W.

    2013-01-01

    This multiple case study focused on whether and how cyberbullying had an impact on students' use of technology. Analysis of the lived experiences of the participants in this study added depth to the quantitative research previously conducted by others in this area. The conceptual framework was based on social learning theory, which suggested that…

  12. Multiple Case Study on Cyberbullying's Impacts on Adolescent Technology Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Kent W.

    2013-01-01

    This multiple case study focused on whether and how cyberbullying had an impact on students' use of technology. Analysis of the lived experiences of the participants in this study added depth to the quantitative research previously conducted by others in this area. The conceptual framework was based on social learning theory, which suggested that…

  13. Therapeutic strategy with artificially-designed i-lncRNA targeting multiple oncogenic microRNAs exhibits effective antitumor activity in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xinying; Ji, Weidan; He, Miaoxia; Qian, Haihua; Song, Xianmin; Yang, Jianmin; Wang, Jianmin; Chen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    In diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), many oncogenic microRNAs (OncomiRs) are highly expressed to promote disease development and progression by inhibiting the expression and function of certain tumor suppressor genes, and these OncomiRs comprise a promising new class of molecular targets for the treatment of DLBCL. However, most current therapeutic studies have focused on a single miRNA, with limited treatment outcomes. In this study, we generated tandem sequences of 10 copies of the complementary binding sequences to 13 OncomiRs and synthesized an interfering long non-coding RNA (i-lncRNA). The highly-expressed i-lncRNA in DLBCL cells would compete with the corresponding mRNAs of OncomiR target genes for binding OncomiRs, thereby effectively consuming a large amount of OncomiRs and protecting many tumor suppressor genes. The in vitro experiments confirmed that the i-lncRNA expression significantly inhibited cell proliferation, induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in DLBCL cell lines, mainly through upregulating the expression of PTEN, p27kip1, TIMP3, RECK and downregulating the expression of p38/MAPK, survivin, CDK4, c-myc. In the established SUDHL-4 xenografts in nude mice, the treatment strategy involving adenovirus-mediated i-lncRNA expression significantly inhibited the growth of DLBCL xenografts. Therefore, this treatment would specifically target the carcinogenic effects of many OncomiRs that are usually expressed in DLBCL and not in normal cells, such a strategy could improve anti-tumor efficacy and safety and may be a good prospect for clinical applications. PMID:27172795

  14. Multiple-ionization of xenon atoms by positron impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruse, Georg; Quermann, Andreas; Raith, Wilhelm; Sinapius, Guenther

    1990-01-01

    Previously the cross sections were measured for positronium formation and single ionization by positron impact for He and H2. With the same apparatus, slightly modified, the single and multiple ionization of xenon is now investigated. The principle of the method is the detection of ion and positron in time correlation which allows the discrimination of positronium formation (whereby the positron vanishes) and the destinction of single, double and triple impact ionization (which lead to different ion flight times from the gas target to the ion detector). By using secondary electrons from the positron moderator, similar measurements were performed on electron impact ionization. By comparing with literature values for electron multiple ionization cross sections, the detection-probability ratios were determined for the differently charged ions.

  15. Oncogenes in retroviruses and cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurth, Reinhard

    1983-09-01

    Oncogenes are genes that cause cancer. Retroviruses contain oncogenes and cause cancer in animals and, perhaps, in man. The viruses have appropriated their oncogenes from normal cellular DNA by genetic recombination. Correspondingly, uninfected vertebrate cells contain a family of evolutionary conserved cellular oncogenes. Retrovirus infection, introducing additional viral oncogenes into the cells, as well as carcinogen-mediated activation of cellular oncogenes may both lead to increased synthesis of oncogene encoded transforming proteins which convert normal cells to tumor cells. Unique retroviruses of human origin have recently been identified. They may, on occasion, directly cause tumors in man. However, the general significance of retroviruses may better be illustrated by their remarkable genetic composition which allows them to promote tumor growth by a variety of genetic mechanisms.

  16. The human oncogenic viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Luderer, A.A.; Weetall, H.H

    1986-01-01

    This book contains eight selections. The titles are: Cytogenetics of the Leukemias and Lymphomas; Cytogenetics of Solid Tumors: Renal Cell Carcinoma, Malignant Melanoma, Retinoblastoma, and Wilms' Tumor; Elucidation of a Normal Function for a Human Proto-Oncogene; Detection of HSV-2 Genes and Gene Products in Cervical Neoplasia; Papillomaviruses in Anogennital Neoplasms; Human Epstein-Barr Virus and Cancer; Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatocellular Carcinoma; and Kaposi's Sarcoma: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and Associated Viruses.

  17. Examining the factor structure of the Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Shawn M; Li, Jian; Rumrill, Phillip D; Merchant, William; Bishop, Malachy

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the factor structure of the Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale (MSIS-29) to assess its suitability for modeling the impact of MS on a nation-wide sample of individuals from the United States. Investigators completed a Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) to examine the two-factor structure proposed by Hobart et al. [17]. Although the original MSIS-29 factor structure did not fit the data exactly, the hypothesized two-factor model was partially supported in the current data. Implications for future instrument development and rehabilitation practice are discussed.

  18. Oncogenes: The Passport for Viral Oncolysis Through PKR Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Janaina

    2016-01-01

    The transforming properties of oncogenes are derived from gain-of-function mutations, shifting cell signaling from highly regulated homeostatic to an uncontrolled oncogenic state, with the contribution of the inactivating mutations in tumor suppressor genes P53 and RB, leading to tumor resistance to conventional and target-directed therapy. On the other hand, this scenario fulfills two requirements for oncolytic virus infection in tumor cells: inactivation of tumor suppressors and presence of oncoproteins, also the requirements to engage malignancy. Several of these oncogenes have a negative impact on the main interferon antiviral defense, the double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR), which helps viruses to spontaneously target tumor cells instead of normal cells. This review is focused on the negative impact of overexpression of oncogenes on conventional and targeted therapy and their positive impact on viral oncolysis due to their ability to inhibit PKR-induced translation blockage, allowing virion release and cell death. PMID:27486347

  19. Oncogenes: The Passport for Viral Oncolysis Through PKR Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Janaina

    2016-01-01

    The transforming properties of oncogenes are derived from gain-of-function mutations, shifting cell signaling from highly regulated homeostatic to an uncontrolled oncogenic state, with the contribution of the inactivating mutations in tumor suppressor genes P53 and RB, leading to tumor resistance to conventional and target-directed therapy. On the other hand, this scenario fulfills two requirements for oncolytic virus infection in tumor cells: inactivation of tumor suppressors and presence of oncoproteins, also the requirements to engage malignancy. Several of these oncogenes have a negative impact on the main interferon antiviral defense, the double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR), which helps viruses to spontaneously target tumor cells instead of normal cells. This review is focused on the negative impact of overexpression of oncogenes on conventional and targeted therapy and their positive impact on viral oncolysis due to their ability to inhibit PKR-induced translation blockage, allowing virion release and cell death.

  20. Avalanche multiplication and impact ionization in amorphous selenium photoconductive target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Wug-Dong; Tanioka, Kenkichi

    2014-03-01

    The avalanche multiplication factor and the hole ionization coefficient in the amorphous selenium (a-Se) high-gain avalanche rushing amorphous photoconductor (HARP) target depend on the electric field. The phenomenon of avalanche multiplication and impact ionization in the 0.4-µm-thick a-Se HARP target is investigated. The hot carrier energy in the 0.4-µm-thick a-Se HARP target increases linearly as the target voltage increases. The energy relaxation length of hot carriers in the a-Se photoconductor of the 0.4-µm-thick HARP target saturates as the electric field increases. The average energy Eav of a hot carrier and the energy relaxation length λE in the a-Se photoconductor of the 0.4-µm-thick HARP target at 1 × 108 V/m were 0.25 eV and 2.5 nm, respectively. In addition, the hole ionization coefficient β and the avalanche multiplication factor M are derived as a function of the electric field, the average energy of a hot carrier, and the impact ionization energy. The experimental hole ionization coefficient β and the avalanche multiplication factor M in the 0.4-µm-thick a-Se HARP target agree with the theoretical results.

  1. The oncogenic action of ionizing radiation on rat skin

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, F.J.

    1991-01-01

    Progress has occurred in several areas corresponding to the specific aims of the proposal: (1) Progression and multiple events in radiation carcinogenesis of rat skin as a function of LET; (2) cell cycle kinetics of irradiated rat epidermis as determined by double labeling and double emulsion autoradiography; (3) oncogene activation detected by in situ hybridization in radiation-induced rat skin tumors; (4) amplification of the c-myc oncogene in radiation-induced rat skin tumors as a function of LET; and (5) transformation of rat skin keratinocytes by ionizing radiation in combination with c-Ki-ras and c-myc oncogenes. 111 refs., 13 figs., 12 tabs.

  2. A multiple-impact origin for the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rufu, Raluca; Aharonson, Oded; Perets, Hagai B.

    2017-01-01

    The hypothesis of lunar origin by a single giant impact can explain some aspects of the Earth-Moon system. However, it is difficult to reconcile giant-impact models with the compositional similarity of the Earth and Moon without violating angular momentum constraints. Furthermore, successful giant-impact scenarios require very specific conditions such that they have a low probability of occurring. Here we present numerical simulations suggesting that the Moon could instead be the product of a succession of a variety of smaller collisions. In this scenario, each collision forms a debris disk around the proto-Earth that then accretes to form a moonlet. The moonlets tidally advance outward, and may coalesce to form the Moon. We find that sub-lunar moonlets are a common result of impacts expected onto the proto-Earth in the early Solar System and find that the planetary rotation is limited by impact angular momentum drain. We conclude that, assuming efficient merger of moonlets, a multiple-impact scenario can account for the formation of the Earth-Moon system with its present properties.

  3. Calculated concrete target damage by multiple rod impact and penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Pincosy, P A; Murphy, M J

    2006-12-29

    The effect of enhanced crater formation has been demonstrated experimentally when multiple and delayed shaped charge jets impact and penetrate concrete. The concept for enhancement utilizes a single follow-on jet at the centerline of holes produced by multiple precursor jets penetrating the surrounding the region. Calculations of the 3D crater enhancement phenomena have been conducted with multiple rods to simulate the steady state portion of the multiple jet penetration process. It is expected that this analysis methodology will be beneficial for optimization of the multiple jet crater enhancement application. We present calculated results using ALE3D where the model uses the standard Gruneisen equation of state combined with a rate dependent strength model including material damage parameters. This study focuses on the concrete material damage model as a representation of the portion of the target that would eventually be ejected creating a large bore-hole. The calculations are compared with the experimental evidence and limitations of the modeling approach are discussed.

  4. Retroviral Oncogenes: A Historical Primer

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Peter K.

    2012-01-01

    Retroviruses are the original source of oncogenes. The discovery and characterization of these genes were made possible by the introduction of quantitative cell biological and molecular techniques for the study of tumor viruses. Key features of all retroviral oncogenes were first identified in src, the oncogene of Rous sarcoma virus. These include non-involvement in viral replication, coding for a single protein, and cellular origin. The myc, ras and erbB oncogenes quickly followed src, and these together with pi3k are now recognized as critical driving forces in human cancer. PMID:22898541

  5. Impact of multiple consecutive donnings on filtering facepiece respirator fit.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Michael S; Viscusi, Dennis J; Zhuang, Ziqing; Palmiero, Andrew J; Powell, Jeffrey B; Shaffer, Ronald E

    2012-05-01

    A concern with reuse of National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health-certified N95 filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) is that multiple donnings could stress FFR components, impairing fit. This study investigated the impact of multiple donnings on the facepiece fit of 6 N95 FFR models using a group of 10 experienced test subjects per model. The TSI PORTACOUNT Plus and N95 Companion accessory were used for all tests. After qualifying by passing a standard Occupational Safety and Health Administration fit test, subjects performed up to 20 consecutive tests on an individual FFR sample using a modified protocol. Regression analyses were performed for the percentage of donnings resulting in fit factors (FFs) ≥100 for all 6 FFR models combined. Regression analyses showed statistical significance for donning groups 1-10, 1-15, and 1-20. The mean percentage of donnings with an FF ≥100 was 81%-93% for donning group 1-5, but dropped to 53%-75% for donning group 16-20. Our results show that multiple donnings had a model-dependent impact on fit for the 6 N95 models evaluated. The data suggest that 5 consecutive donnings can be performed before FFs consistently drop below 100. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  6. Experimental study on impact disruption of porous asteroids: Effects of oblique impact and multiple collisions on impact strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Minami; Takano, Shota; Matsue, Kazuma; Arakawa, Masahiko

    2015-08-01

    Most of asteroids would have pores and a plenty of pre-cracks in their interiors, and the pre-cracks could be formed by multiple impacts at various impact angles. Porosity and pre-cracks are important physical properties controlling the impact strength. Okamoto and Arakawa (2009) did impact experiments of porous gypsum spheres to obtain the impact strength of porous asteroids, but they carried out only single impact experiments on the same target at head-on. In this study, we conducted oblique impact and multiple impacts on porous gypsum and examined the effects of impact angle and pre-cracks on the impact strength.We carried out impact experiments by using the one-stage He gas gun and the two-stage H2 gas gun at Kobe University. The impact velocities were <200 m/s (low-vi) and >3 km/s (high-vi). Targets were porous gypsum spheres with the porosity of 55% and the diameters of 7 or 12 cm. The projectiles were a porous gypsum sphere with the diameter of 2.5 cm at low-vi or a polycarbonate sphere with the diameter of 4.7 cm at high-vi. The impact angle changed from 15° to 90°, and the projectile was impacted on the same target for 2-15 times. The impact phenomena were observed by a high-speed digital video camera to measure the fragment velocities.The oblique impact experiments showed that the impact strength did not depend on the impact angle θ between 45° and 90°, and obtained to be ~2000 J/kg, while it drastically changed at the θ from 15° to 30°. We reanalyzed our results by using the effective energy density defined as Qsin2θ, where Q is the energy density, and found that most of the results were consistent with the results of head-on impacts. The multiple impacts showed that the impact strength of pre-impacted targets was larger than that of intact targets in the case of low-vi. This might be caused by the compaction of the target surface. In the case of high-vi, the impact strength of pre-impacted targets was smaller than that of intact targets. This

  7. Recurrent fusion oncogenes in carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Manuel R

    2006-12-01

    Chromosome structural aberrations giving rise to fusion oncogenes is one of the most common mechanisms in oncogenesis. Although this type of gene rearrangement has long been recognized as a fundamental pathogenetic mechanism in hematologi-cal malignancies and soft-tissue tumors, it has until recently only rarely been described in the common carcinomas. In this review, the existing information on recurrent fusion oncogenes characterizing carcinomas is summarized, namely, the RET and NTRK1 fusion oncogenes in papillary thyroid carcinoma, PAX8-PPARG in follicular thyroid carcinoma, MECT1-MAML2 in mucoepidermoid carcinoma, the TFE3 and TFEB fusion oncogenes in kidney carcinomas, BRD4-NUT in midline carcinomas, ETV6-NTRK3 in secretory breast carcinomas, and TMPRSS2-ETS fusion oncogenes in prostate carcinomas. As in hematological and soft-tissue malignancies, the most common types of genes involved in fusion oncogenes in carcinomas are transcription factors and tyrosine kinases. With a few exceptions, most fusion oncogenes are tumor type specific in carcinomas, as in other cancers. The mechanisms behind the relative specificity of this type of somatic mutation involve the cellular environment influencing the selection of oncogenic fusions, and the oncogenic fusions in turn driving differentiation programs that may alter the cellular environment. The data summarized on different types of carcinomas characterized by fusion oncogenes indicate that the pathogenetic mechanisms involved in epithelial carcino-genesis may be similar to those known to operate in hematological and soft-tissue malignancies, and further anticipates that many more fusion oncogenes await identification in the most common types of human cancer.

  8. Multiple Levels of Influence That Impact Youth Tobacco Use.

    PubMed

    Cavazos-Rehg, Patricia A; Krauss, Melissa J; Sowles, Shaina J; Spitznagel, Edward L; Grucza, Richard; Chaloupka, Frank J; Bierut, Laura J

    2016-04-01

    Multiple levels of influence interplay to impact youth tobacco use. We work towards understanding important policy and environmental strategies that are associated with youth tobacco use behaviors. We utilized data from participants of the Monitoring the Future (MTF) study and linked national data from multiple sources to assess correlates of youth tobacco use behaviors across individual, family, school, community, and state-level policy influences. Higher cigarette prices had the strongest association with youth tobacco use behaviors. Demographic and socio-economic characteristics at the individual, familial, and community/school-levels were associated with youth tobacco use behaviors. In the present study, we confirm that higher cigarette prices could help to reduce youth tobacco use behaviors. Several states are still lagging behind in terms of their low cigarette tax and they should enact tax policies to reduce youth tobacco use.

  9. Artesunate suppresses tumor growth and induces apoptosis through the modulation of multiple oncogenic cascades in a chronic myeloid leukemia xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chulwon; Lee, Jong Hyun; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Sethi, Gautam; Ahn, Kwang Seok

    2015-01-01

    Artesunate (ART), a semi-synthetic derivative of artemisinin, is one of the most commonly used anti-malarial drugs. Also, ART possesses anticancer potential albeit through incompletely understood molecular mechanism(s). Here, the effect of ART on various protein kinases, associated gene products, cellular response, and apoptosis was investigated. The in vivo effect of ART on the growth of human CML xenograft tumors in athymic nu/nu mice was also examined. In our preliminary experiments, we first observed that phosphorylation of p38, ERK, CREB, Chk-2, STAT5, and RSK proteins were suppressed upon ART exposure. Interestingly, ART induced the expression of SOCS-1 protein and depletion of SOCS-1 using siRNA abrogated the STAT5 inhibitory effect of the drug. Also various dephosphorylations caused by ART led to the suppression of various survival gene products and induced apoptosis through caspase-3 activation. Moreover, ART also substantially potentiated the apoptosis induced by chemotherapeutic agents. Finally, when administered intraperitoneally, ART inhibited p38, ERK, STAT5, and CREB activation in tumor tissues and the growth of human CML xenograft tumors in mice without exhibiting any significant adverse effects. Overall, our results suggest that ART exerts its anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects through suppression of multiple signaling cascades in CML both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25738364

  10. Cytoplasmic calcium increase via fusion with inactivated Sendai virus induces apoptosis in human multiple myeloma cells by downregulation of c-Myc oncogene

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yingzhe; Saga, Kotaro; Miyamoto, Yasuhide; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2016-01-01

    Because the emergence of drug resistance is a major limitation of current treatments for multiple myeloma (MM), it is necessary to continuously develop novel anticancer strategies. Here, using an inactivated Sendai virus (Hemagglutinating Virus of Japan; HVJ) envelope (HVJ-E), we discovered that increase of cytoplasmic Ca2+ by virus-cell fusion significantly induced apoptosis against human MM cells but not peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy donors. Interaction of F protein of HVJ-E with MM cells increased intracellular Ca2+ level of MMs by the induction of Ca2+ efflux from endoplasmic reticulum but not influx from extracellular region. The elevation of the Ca2+ cytoplasmic level induced SMAD1/5/8 phosphorylation and translocation into the nucleus, and SMAD1/5/8 and SMAD4 complex suppressed c-Myc transcription. Meanwhile, HVJ-E decreases S62 phosphorylation of c-Myc and promotes c-Myc protein degradation. Thus, HVJ-E-induced cell death of MM resulted from suppression of c-Myc by both destabilization of c-Myc protein and downregulation of c-Myc transcription. This study indicates that HVJ-E will be a promising tool for MM therapy. PMID:27145280

  11. Single and multiple impact ignition of new and aged high explosives in the Steven Impact Test

    SciTech Connect

    Chidester, S K; DePiero, A H; Garza, R G; Tarver, C M

    1999-06-01

    Threshold impact velocities for ignition of exothermic reaction were determined for several new and aged HMX-based solid high explosives using three types of projectiles in the Steven Test. Multiple impact threshold velocities were found to be approximately 10% lower in damaged charges that did not react in one or more prior impacts. Projectiles with protrusions that concentrate the friction work in a small volume of explosive reduced the threshold velocities by approximately 30%. Flat projectiles required nearly twice as high velocities for ignition as rounded projectiles. Blast overpressure gauges were used for both pristine and damaged charges to quantitatively measure reaction violence. Reactive flow calculations of single and multiple impacts with various projectiles suggest that the ignition rates double in damaged charges.

  12. Oncogenes in melanoma: an update.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma is a highly aggressive tumour with poor prognosis in the metastatic stage. BRAF, NRAS, and KIT are three well-known oncogenes involved in melanoma pathogenesis. Targeting of mutated BRAF kinase has recently been shown to significantly improve overall survival of metastatic melanoma patients, underscoring the particular role of this oncogene in melanoma biology. However, recurrences regularly occur within several months, which supposedly involve further oncogenes. Moreover, oncogenic driver mutations have not been described for up to 30% of all melanomas. In order to obtain a more complete picture of the mutational landscape of melanoma, more recent studies used high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies. A number of new oncogene candidates such as MAPK1/2, ERBB4, GRIN2A, GRM3, RAC1, and PREX2 were identified. Their particular role in melanoma biology is currently under investigation. Evidence for the functional relevance of some of these new oncogene candidates has been provided in in vitro and in vivo experiments. However, these findings await further validation in clinical studies. This review provides an overview on well-known melanoma oncogenes and new oncogene candidates, based on recent high-throughput sequencing studies. The list of genes discussed herein is of course not complete but highlights some of the most significant of recent findings in this area. The new candidates may support more individualized treatment approaches for metastatic melanoma patients in the future.

  13. The impact of drugs for multiple sclerosis on sleep.

    PubMed

    Lanza, Giuseppe; Ferri, Raffaele; Bella, Rita; Ferini-Strambi, Luigi

    2017-01-01

    Although there is a growing literature on the presence of sleep disorders in multiple sclerosis (MS), few studies have specifically addressed the impact of drugs on sleep of these patients. Moreover, even when sleep is considered, quantitative assessment by standardized questionnaires or polysomnography is lacking. The studies that have been done highlight that interferon-beta and some symptomatic medications may affect sleep, thus contributing to fatigue, depression, and poor quality of life; conversely, natalizumab and cannabinoids may improve sleep. Common limitations of the literature reviewed here are small sample size, selection bias, and often a lack of objective outcome measures. Clinicians need to remember to ask about sleep in all MS patients and intervene when appropriate. A systematic approach that takes sleep into account is recommended to enhance recognition and appropriate management of sleep disruption, including disorders related to medication. Consideration of the impact on sleep should also be part of the design of trials of new therapies.

  14. Impact of multiple sclerosis relapse: The NARCOMS participant perspective.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, Molly; Cofield, Stacey S; Tyry, Tuula; Salter, Amber R; Cutter, Gary R; Marrie, Ruth Ann

    2015-05-01

    Acute relapses continue to be a significant aspect of multiple sclerosis (MS) on both the epidemiologic level and the individual patient level. Past work demonstrates residual disability from relapses as well as high patient-reported rates of ineffective relapse treatment. To better characterize the impact of MS relapses on the patient, a relapse-specific survey was administered through the North American Research Committee on Multiple Sclerosis (NARCOMS) Registry to 1000 registry participants who had reported at least one relapse in the past 12 months. Thirty percent of respondents confirmed lack of relapse treatment efficacy at one month and at three months. Relapses also impacted socioeconomic measures; for individuals still going to school or working, more than half missed days and their average loss of school or work was 12.7 days. An impact on household tasks was reported by 68% of respondents. A healthcare facility such as a hospital, emergency room or urgent care center was utilized by 20.4% of respondents. The most common relapse symptoms were fatigue, weakness of the lower extremity, sensory symptoms, problems walking, and weakness of the upper extremity. Of the respondents who reported receiving corticosteroid treatment (53.3%), over half reported an adverse event. However, this was not a significant factor in dictating whether or not respondents would seek a different treatment on their next relapse, although 31% would choose a different treatment for their next relapse. Relapses continue to be an impactful experience that requires continued clinical attention. Improved follow-up from relapses and relapse treatment might be beneficial.

  15. How multiple impacts affect the evolution of the venusian atmosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillmann, C.; Golabek, G.; Tackley, P.; Raymond, S. N.

    2016-12-01

    We study how impacts modify the evolution of Venus and its atmosphere, using a coupled numerical model. We focus on volatile exchanges and their effects on surface conditions. Mantle dynamics, volcanism and degassing processes lead to an input of gases in the atmosphere and are modeled using the StagYY code. Volatile losses are estimated through atmospheric escape modeling. It involves two different aspects: hydrodynamic escape (0-500 Myr) and non-thermal escape. Hydrodynamic escape is massive but occurs only when the solar energy input is strong. Post 4 Ga escape from non-thermal processes is comparatively low. The resulting state of the atmosphere is used to the calculate greenhouse effect and surface temperature, through a one-dimensional gray radiative-convective model. Large impacts are capable of contributing to (i) atmospheric escape, (ii) volatile replenishment and (iii) energy transfer to the mantle. We test various impactor compositions, impact parameters (velocity, location, size, and timing) and eroding power. Various scenarios are tested from cases arbitrarily chosen to test the interactions between multiple impacts to more realistic histories from accretion simulations (Raymond et al., 2013). Small impactors (0-50km radius) have a negligible effect on long term evolution unless one considers the erosion by the swarm of smallest and most numerous objects that can deplete the early atmosphere. Larger impactors have two main effects on the atmosphere. They can (i) create a large input of volatile from the melting they cause during the impact and through the volatiles they carry. This leads to an increase in atmosphere density and surface temperatures. However, early impacts can deplete the mantle of Venus and (assuming strong early escape) ultimately remove volatiles from the system, leading to lower late degassing and lower surface temperatures.

  16. [Impact of gender and age on multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and inflammatory cytokines after multiple injuries].

    PubMed

    Wen, Qiang; Su, Lei

    2009-02-01

    To investigate the impact of age and gender on multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) after multiple injuries and the possible mechanism. The clinical data of 78 patients with multiple injuries admitted in the ICU in our hospital from Jan. 2004 to Jan. 2007 were reviewed for age, gender, ISS, incidence of MODS, sepsis and mortality, days in ICU, and duration of ventilation. The plasma levels of TNF-alpha and IL-6 were examined by ELISA in the first two weeks after the injury, and the results were analyzed in relation to the demographic and clinical data. With similar ISS scores, the male patients were more likely to develop into MODS than the female patients (P<0.05), and age produced a marginal effect on the incidence of MODS (P=0.06). Compared with patients without MODS, those with MODS had a significantly different pattern of plasma TNF-alpha and IL-6 alterations. In the initial week following the injury, the male patients showed significantly higher plasma IL-6 levels than the female patients with the same ISS scores (P=0.04), but the level alteration in the initial two weeks showed no significant difference between the male and female patients (P=0.14). Gender plays an important role in the occurrence of MODS following multiple injuries, but the effect of age on MODS seems only marginal and need to be further investigated.

  17. Multiple sclerosis: impact of physical activity on psychosocial constructs.

    PubMed

    Plow, Matthew A; Mathiowetz, Virgil; Resnik, Linda

    2008-01-01

    To determine the impact of physical activity (PA) interventions and experience with PA on psychosocial constructs. PA, self-efficacy, self-identity, social support, and expected PA frequency were measured pre and post intervention in 39 persons with multiple sclerosis. The MANOVA analysis indicated that self-efficacy and expectation decreased, whereas self-identity and PA improved (P<0.05). Regressions analyses indicated pretest self-identity (beta(2)=0.44) and social support (beta(2)=0.34) were associated with PA. Posttest self-efficacy (beta(2)=0.38) and social support (beta(2)=0.31) were associated with PA (P<0.05). The interventions and experience with PA caused changes in psychosocial constructs, which subsequently affected the correlation of these constructs with PA.

  18. Impacts of multiple stressors during the establishment of fouling assemblages.

    PubMed

    Saloni, Silvia; Crowe, Tasman P

    2015-02-15

    Limited knowledge of the mechanisms through which multiple stressors affect communities and ecosystems limits capacity to predict their effects. Less clear is how stressors impact early colonization of newly available habitats due to scarcity of studies. The present study tested whether copper and freshwater input affect colonization of hard substrata independently or interactively and assessed differences in community respiration and total biomass among early stage assemblages which developed under different regimes of copper and freshwater input. While copper influenced effectively the colonization of individual species, freshwater effect was weak or null. Apart from a significant effect on total community composition, the interactive effect between stressors was weak and mainly driven by antagonistic interactions between copper and water flow. Total biomass and respiration of the community studied were not affected by stressors. These findings contradict the expectation that changes in community structure are likely to cause changes in functioning. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Expected Impact of Multiple Scattering on ATLID Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, D. P.

    2016-06-01

    ATLID stands for "ATmospheric LIDar" and is the lidar to be flown on the Earth Clouds and Radiation Explorer (EarthCARE) platform in 2018. ATLID is a High-Spectral Resolution (HSRL) system operating at 355nm with a narrower field-of-view and lower orbit than the CALIPSO lidar. In spite of the smaller footprint multiple-scattering (MS) will have an important impact on ATLID cloud signals and, in some aspects, the accurate treatment of MS will be more important for ATLID than CALIPSO. On the other hand, the relationship between integrated backscatter and integrated MS induced depolarization in water clouds will be similar between ATLID and CALIPSO indicating that a CALIPSO-like strategy for cloud-phase identification can be successfully applied to ATLID.

  20. Responder definition of the Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale physical impact subscale for patients with physical worsening

    PubMed Central

    Wyrwich, Kathleen W; Guo, Shien; Medori, Rossella; Altincatal, Arman; Wagner, Linda; Elkins, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Background: The 29-item Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale (MSIS-29) was developed to examine the impact of multiple sclerosis (MS) on physical and psychological functioning from a patient’s perspective. Objective: To determine the responder definition (RD) of the MSIS-29 physical impact subscale (PHYS) in a group of patients with relapsing–remitting MS (RRMS) participating in a clinical trial. Methods: Data from the SELECT trial comparing daclizumab high-yield process with placebo in patients with RRMS were used. Physical function was evaluated in SELECT using three patient-reported outcomes measures and the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS). Anchor- and distribution-based methods were used to identify an RD for the MSIS-29. Results: Results across the anchor-based approach suggested MSIS-29 PHYS RD values of 6.91 (mean), 7.14 (median) and 7.50 (mode). Distribution-based RD estimates ranged from 6.24 to 10.40. An RD of 7.50 was selected as the most appropriate threshold for physical worsening based on corresponding changes in the EDSS (primary anchor of interest). Conclusion: These findings indicate that a ≥7.50 point worsening on the MSIS-29 PHYS is a reasonable and practical threshold for identifying patients with RRMS who have experienced a clinically significant change in the physical impact of MS. PMID:24740371

  1. Responder definition of the Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale physical impact subscale for patients with physical worsening.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Glenn A; Wyrwich, Kathleen W; Guo, Shien; Medori, Rossella; Altincatal, Arman; Wagner, Linda; Elkins, Jacob

    2014-11-01

    The 29-item Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale (MSIS-29) was developed to examine the impact of multiple sclerosis (MS) on physical and psychological functioning from a patient's perspective. To determine the responder definition (RD) of the MSIS-29 physical impact subscale (PHYS) in a group of patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) participating in a clinical trial. Data from the SELECT trial comparing daclizumab high-yield process with placebo in patients with RRMS were used. Physical function was evaluated in SELECT using three patient-reported outcomes measures and the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS). Anchor- and distribution-based methods were used to identify an RD for the MSIS-29. Results across the anchor-based approach suggested MSIS-29 PHYS RD values of 6.91 (mean), 7.14 (median) and 7.50 (mode). Distribution-based RD estimates ranged from 6.24 to 10.40. An RD of 7.50 was selected as the most appropriate threshold for physical worsening based on corresponding changes in the EDSS (primary anchor of interest). These findings indicate that a ≥7.50 point worsening on the MSIS-29 PHYS is a reasonable and practical threshold for identifying patients with RRMS who have experienced a clinically significant change in the physical impact of MS. © The Author(s), 2014.

  2. Impact of SNPs on CpG Islands in the MYC and HRAS oncogenes and in a wide variety of tumor suppressor genes: A multi-cancer approach

    PubMed Central

    Samy, Mohammad D.; Yavorski, John M.; Mauro, James A.; Blanck, George

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that occur within CpG Islands may lead to increased hypermethylation if a SNP allele has the potential to form a CpG dinucleotide, as well as potentially lead to hypomethylation if a SNP allele eliminates a CpG dinucleotide. We analyzed CpG-related SNP allele frequencies in whole genome sequences (WGS) across 5 TCGA cancer datasets, thereby exploiting a more recent appreciation for signaling pathway degeneracy in cancer. The cancer data sets were analyzed for SNPs in CpG islands associated with the oncogenes, HRAS and MYC, and in the CpG islands associated with the tumor suppressor genes, APC, DCC, and RB1. We determined that one SNP allele (rs3824120) in a CpG island associated with MYC which eliminated a CpG was more common in the cancer datasets than in the 100Genomes databases (p < 0.01). For HRAS, 2 SNP alleles (rs112690925, rs7939028) that created CpG's occurred significantly less frequently in the cancer data sets than in the general SNP databases (e.g., rs7939028, p < 0.0002, in comparison with AllSNPs(142)). Also, one SNP allele (rs4940177) that created a CpG in a CpG island associated with the DCC tumor suppressor gene, was more common in the cancer datasets (p < 0.0007). To understand a broader picture of the potential of SNP alleles to create CpG's in CpG islands of tumor suppressor genes, we developed a scripted algorithm to assess the SNP alleles associated with the CpG islands of 43 tumor suppressor genes. The following tumor suppressor genes have the possibility of significant, percent increases in their CpG counts, depending on which SNP allele(s) is present: VHL, BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2, PTEN and RB1. PMID:27074591

  3. Impact of SNPs on CpG Islands in the MYC and HRAS oncogenes and in a wide variety of tumor suppressor genes: A multi-cancer approach.

    PubMed

    Samy, Mohammad D; Yavorski, John M; Mauro, James A; Blanck, George

    2016-06-17

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that occur within CpG Islands may lead to increased hypermethylation if a SNP allele has the potential to form a CpG dinucleotide, as well as potentially lead to hypomethylation if a SNP allele eliminates a CpG dinucleotide. We analyzed CpG-related SNP allele frequencies in whole genome sequences (WGS) across 5 TCGA cancer datasets, thereby exploiting a more recent appreciation for signaling pathway degeneracy in cancer. The cancer data sets were analyzed for SNPs in CpG islands associated with the oncogenes, HRAS and MYC, and in the CpG islands associated with the tumor suppressor genes, APC, DCC, and RB1. We determined that one SNP allele (rs3824120) in a CpG island associated with MYC which eliminated a CpG was more common in the cancer datasets than in the 100Genomes databases (p < 0.01). For HRAS, 2 SNP alleles (rs112690925, rs7939028) that created CpG's occurred significantly less frequently in the cancer data sets than in the general SNP databases (e.g., rs7939028, p < 0.0002, in comparison with AllSNPs(142)). Also, one SNP allele (rs4940177) that created a CpG in a CpG island associated with the DCC tumor suppressor gene, was more common in the cancer datasets (p < 0.0007). To understand a broader picture of the potential of SNP alleles to create CpG's in CpG islands of tumor suppressor genes, we developed a scripted algorithm to assess the SNP alleles associated with the CpG islands of 43 tumor suppressor genes. The following tumor suppressor genes have the possibility of significant, percent increases in their CpG counts, depending on which SNP allele(s) is present: VHL, BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2, PTEN and RB1.

  4. EGFR/ARF6 regulation of Hh signalling stimulates oncogenic Ras tumour overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Chabu, Chiswili; Li, Da-Ming; Xu, Tian

    2017-03-10

    Multiple signalling events interact in cancer cells. Oncogenic Ras cooperates with Egfr, which cannot be explained by the canonical signalling paradigm. In turn, Egfr cooperates with Hedgehog signalling. How oncogenic Ras elicits and integrates Egfr and Hedgehog signals to drive overgrowth remains unclear. Using a Drosophila tumour model, we show that Egfr cooperates with oncogenic Ras via Arf6, which functions as a novel regulator of Hh signalling. Oncogenic Ras induces the expression of Egfr ligands. Egfr then signals through Arf6, which regulates Hh transport to promote Hh signalling. Blocking any step of this signalling cascade inhibits Hh signalling and correspondingly suppresses the growth of both, fly and human cancer cells harbouring oncogenic Ras mutations. These findings highlight a non-canonical Egfr signalling mechanism, centered on Arf6 as a novel regulator of Hh signalling. This explains both, the puzzling requirement of Egfr in oncogenic Ras-mediated overgrowth and the cooperation between Egfr and Hedgehog.

  5. EGFR/ARF6 regulation of Hh signalling stimulates oncogenic Ras tumour overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Chabu, Chiswili; Li, Da-Ming; Xu, Tian

    2017-01-01

    Multiple signalling events interact in cancer cells. Oncogenic Ras cooperates with Egfr, which cannot be explained by the canonical signalling paradigm. In turn, Egfr cooperates with Hedgehog signalling. How oncogenic Ras elicits and integrates Egfr and Hedgehog signals to drive overgrowth remains unclear. Using a Drosophila tumour model, we show that Egfr cooperates with oncogenic Ras via Arf6, which functions as a novel regulator of Hh signalling. Oncogenic Ras induces the expression of Egfr ligands. Egfr then signals through Arf6, which regulates Hh transport to promote Hh signalling. Blocking any step of this signalling cascade inhibits Hh signalling and correspondingly suppresses the growth of both, fly and human cancer cells harbouring oncogenic Ras mutations. These findings highlight a non-canonical Egfr signalling mechanism, centered on Arf6 as a novel regulator of Hh signalling. This explains both, the puzzling requirement of Egfr in oncogenic Ras-mediated overgrowth and the cooperation between Egfr and Hedgehog. PMID:28281543

  6. Protein kinase Cι: human oncogene, prognostic marker and therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Alan P.; Regala, Roderick P.

    2009-01-01

    The Protein kinase C (PKC) family of serine/threonine kinases has been the subject of intensive study in the field of cancer since their initial discovery as major cellular receptors for the tumor promoting phorbol esters nearly thirty years ago. However, despite these efforts, the search for a direct genetic link between members of the PKC family and human cancer has yielded only circumstantial evidence that any PKC isozyme is a true cancer gene. This situation changed in the past year with the discovery that atypical protein kinase C iota (PKCι) is a bonafide human oncogene. PKCι is required for the transformed growth of human cancer cells and the PKCι gene is the target of tumor-specific gene amplification in multiple forms of human cancer. PKCι participates in multiple aspects of the transformed phenotype of human cancer cells including transformed growth, invasion and survival. Herein, we review pertinent aspects of atypical PKC structure, function and regulation that relate to the role of these enzymes in oncogenesis. We discuss the evidence that PKCι is a human oncogene, review mechanisms controlling PKCι expression in human cancers, and describe the molecular details of PKCι-mediated oncogenic signaling. We conclude with a discussion of how oncogenic PKCι signaling has been successfully targeted to identify a novel, mechanism-based therapeutic drug currently entering clinical trials for treatment of human lung cancer. Throughout, we identify key unanswered questions and exciting future avenues of investigation regarding this important oncogenic molecule. PMID:17570678

  7. Multiple Path Interference and Its Impact on System Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromage, J.; Winzer, P. J.; Essiambre, R.-J.

    Lightwave communication systems carry information that is encoded onto the intensity, phase, or polarization of light from one point to another along an optical path. When designing such systems, many mechanisms that degrade the transfer of information must be taken into account. Until the late 1990s, the main causes of signal degradation in transmission were fiber nonlinearity and amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) from optical amplifiers. More recently, however, a third type of system degradation, involving the unwanted beating of the signal with a number of weak interferers, has become increasingly important. With reference to Fig. 15.1(a), such interferers can result from imperfect extinction of the drop-signal in optical cross-connects and add-drop multiplexers, which are both key elements for flexible and transparent optical network architectures [1,2]. Also, single-Rayleigh backscattering in bidirectional transmission systems [3, 4] can lead to unwanted interferers at the receiver. Although these two examples involve interferers that are independent of the main signal, the important class of multiple-path interference (MPI) involves interferers that are delayed replicas of the main signal. In the case of MPI, additional (unwanted) optical paths, with losses orders of magnitude greater than the main path, lead to interfering signals at the receiver, and can have a significant impact on system performance. With reference to Figs. 15.1 (b) and 15.1(c), MPI is encountered for

  8. Risk and impact of tuberculosis in patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chun-Kuang; Huon, Leh-Kiong; Ou, Shuo-Ming; Kuan, Ai-Seon; Yeh, Chiu-Mei; Lee, Yu-Ting; Liu, Yao-Chung; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Liu, Jin-Hwang; Liu, Chia-Jen

    2017-11-01

    We investigated the risk and impact of mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) infection in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). We identified 3979 MM patients from Taiwan's National Health Insurance database between 2000 and 2011 and compared the incidence rates of TB infection in these patients with 15,916 randomly selected age-, sex-, and comorbidity-matched subjects without MM. The risk of TB was higher in the myeloma cohort (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 3.11, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.41-4.02). Risk factors for MM patients contracting TB were age ≥65 (adjusted HR 1.93, 95% CI 1.19-3.15), alcohol use disorder (adjusted HR 2.86, 95% CI 1.24-6.62), and steroid daily dose equivalent to prednisone 5 mg or more (adjusted HR 2.38, 95% CI 1.50-3.77). MM patients with TB had a higher mortality risk than those without (adjusted HR 2.03, 95% CI 1.54-2.67). The incidence of TB is significantly higher in MM patients.

  9. [Multiple sclerosis: socioeconomic effects and impact on quality of life].

    PubMed

    Ayuso, Guillermo Izquierdo

    2014-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that affects young adults. Survival is long, more than 35 years, and consequently the disease has a huge socioeconomic impact. The present article discusses the enormous difficulties of carrying out economic assessments in this field but also describes the advances made in research on this topic and the advantages of performing socioeconomic evaluations with increasingly sophisticated tools. We also discuss the need to quantify indirect and intangible costs to translate them into quality of life and subsequently into economic cost, expressed in euros in the case of Spain. The available data indicate that the enormous cost of the disease (1200 million euros per year) is due more to disability-related expenditure than to treatment, which-although expensive-does not represent more than 16-18% of the total expenditure (approximately 200 million euros per year). The increase represented by the cost of MS is not based on higher treatment expenditure but on an increase in the incidence and-especially-the prevalence of the disease. Above all, in the last few years, there has been a considerable rise in the percentage of patients with an indication for treatment. Reflection is therefore needed on the use of drug therapy in MS, since a saving in the most effective products seems to increase the overall cost of MS, while expenditure on these drugs represents a saving in the long-term. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. The Impact of Disjoint Multiple Paths on SCTP in the Connected MANET for Emergency Situations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jeongseo; Cho, Jinsoo; Park, Taekeun

    In this letter, we investigate the performance impact of disjoint multiple paths on SCTP in the connected MANET under emergency situations. Disjoint multiple paths allow multi-homing of SCTP to be fully utilized in MANETs, but it may cause inappropriate SACK handling. Through simulations, we evaluate the impact in terms of throughput and energy efficiency.

  11. Avian oncogenic virus differential diagnosis in chickens using oligonucleotide microarray.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lih-Chiann; Huang, Dean; Pu, Chang-En; Wang, Ching-Ho

    2014-12-15

    Avian oncogenic viruses include the avian leukosis virus (ALV), reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) and Marek's disease virus (MDV). Multiple oncogenic viral infections are frequently seen, with even Marek's disease vaccines reported to be contaminated with ALV and REV. The gross lesions caused by avian oncogenic viruses often overlap, making differentiation diagnosis based on histopathology difficult. The objective of this study is to develop a rapid approach to simultaneously differentiate, subgroup and pathotype the avian oncogenic viruses. The oligonucleotide microarray was employed in this study. Particular DNA sequences were recognized using specific hybridization between the DNA target and probe on the microarray, followed with colorimetric development through enzyme reaction. With 10 designed probes, ALV-A, ALV-E, ALV-J, REV, MDV pathogenic and vaccine strains were clearly discriminated on the microarray with the naked eyes. The detection limit was 27 copy numbers, which was 10-100 times lower than multiplex PCR. Of 102 field samples screened using the oligonucleotide microarray, 32 samples were positive for ALV-E, 17 samples were positive for ALV-J, 6 samples were positive for REV, 4 samples were positive for MDV, 7 samples were positive for both ALV-A and ALV-E, 5 samples were positive for ALV-A, ALV-E and ALV-J, one sample was positive for both ALV-J and MDV, and 3 samples were positive for both REV and MDV. The oligonucleotide microarray, an easy-to-use, high-specificity, high-sensitivity and extendable assay, presents a potent technique for rapid differential diagnosis of avian oncogenic viruses and the detection of multiple avian oncogenic viral infections under field conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Impact of Multiple Environmental Stresses on Wetland Vegetation Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muneepeerakul, C. P.; Tamea, S.; Muneepeerakul, R.; Miralles-Wilhelm, F. R.; Rinaldo, A.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.

    2009-12-01

    This research quantifies the impacts of climate change on the dynamics of wetland vegetation under the effect of multiple stresses, such as drought, water-logging, shade and nutrients. The effects of these stresses are investigated through a mechanistic model that captures the co-evolving nature between marsh emergent plant species and their resources (water, nitrogen, light, and oxygen). The model explicitly considers the feedback mechanisms between vegetation, light and nitrogen dynamics as well as the specific dynamics of plant leaves, rhizomes, and roots. Each plant species is characterized by three independent traits, namely leaf nitrogen (N) content, specific leaf area, and allometric carbon (C) allocation to rhizome storage, which govern the ability to gain and maintain resources as well as to survive in a particular multi-stressed environment. The modeling of plant growth incorporates C and N into the construction of leaves and roots, whose amount of new biomass is determined by the dynamic plant allocation scheme. Nitrogen is internally recycled between pools of plants, litter, humus, microbes, and mineral N. The N dynamics are modeled using a parallel scheme, with the major modifications being the calculation of the aerobic and anoxic periods and the incorporation of the anaerobic processes. A simple hydrologic model with stochastic rainfall is used to describe the water level dynamics and the soil moisture profile. Soil water balance is evaluated at the daily time scale and includes rainfall, evapotranspiration and lateral flow to/from an external water body, with evapotranspiration loss equal to the potential value, governed by the daily average condition of atmospheric water demand. The resulting feedback dynamics arising from the coupled system of plant-soil-microbe are studied in details and species’ fitnesses in the 3-D trait space are compared across various rainfall patterns with different mean and fluctuations. The model results are then

  13. Oncogenic activation of NF-kappaB.

    PubMed

    Staudt, Louis M

    2010-06-01

    Recent genetic evidence has established a pathogenetic role for NF-kappaB signaling in cancer. NF-kappaB signaling is engaged transiently when normal B lymphocytes respond to antigens, but lymphomas derived from these cells accumulate genetic lesions that constitutively activate NF-kappaB signaling. Many genetic aberrations in lymphomas alter CARD11, MALT1, or BCL10, which constitute a signaling complex that is intermediate between the B-cell receptor and IkappaB kinase. The activated B-cell-like subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma activates NF-kappaB by a variety of mechanisms including oncogenic mutations in CARD11 and a chronic active form of B-cell receptor signaling. Normal plasma cells activate NF-kappaB in response to ligands in the bone marrow microenvironment, but their malignant counterpart, multiple myeloma, sustains a variety of genetic hits that stabilize the kinase NIK, leading to constitutive activation of the classical and alternative NF-kappaB pathways. Various oncogenic abnormalities in epithelial cancers, including mutant K-ras, engage unconventional IkappaB kinases to activate NF-kappaB. Inhibition of constitutive NF-kappaB signaling in each of these cancer types induces apoptosis, providing a rationale for the development of NF-kappaB pathway inhibitors for the treatment of cancer.

  14. Erosion of metals by multiple impacts with water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudy, S. L.; Thiruvengadam, A.

    1971-01-01

    Investigation determines - relation between impact velocity and minimum number of impacts producing visible erosion, relation between high frequency fatigue stresses and number of cycles to failure, water-hammer stresses relation to high frequency endurance limit, erosion rate as exposure time function, and correlates experimental data with recent theory.

  15. TRKing down an old oncogene in a new era of targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Vaishnavi, Aria; Le, Anh; Doebele, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    The employment of high-throughput next-generation sequencing techniques in multiple tumor types during the last few years has identified NTRK1, 2, and 3 gene rearrangements encoding novel oncogenic fusions in 19 different tumor types to date. These recent developments have led us to revisit an old oncogene, Trk, (originally identified as OncD), which encodes the TPM3-NTRK1 gene fusion and was one of the first transforming chromosomal rearrangements identified 32 years ago. However, no drug has yet been approved by the US FDA for cancers harboring this oncogene. This review will discuss the biology of the Trk family of receptors, their role in human cancer, the types of oncogenic alterations, and drugs that are currently in development for this family of oncogene targets. PMID:25527197

  16. Prediction of oncogenic interactions and cancer-related signaling networks based on network topology.

    PubMed

    Acencio, Marcio Luis; Bovolenta, Luiz Augusto; Camilo, Esther; Lemke, Ney

    2013-01-01

    Cancer has been increasingly recognized as a systems biology disease since many investigators have demonstrated that this malignant phenotype emerges from abnormal protein-protein, regulatory and metabolic interactions induced by simultaneous structural and regulatory changes in multiple genes and pathways. Therefore, the identification of oncogenic interactions and cancer-related signaling networks is crucial for better understanding cancer. As experimental techniques for determining such interactions and signaling networks are labor-intensive and time-consuming, the development of a computational approach capable to accomplish this task would be of great value. For this purpose, we present here a novel computational approach based on network topology and machine learning capable to predict oncogenic interactions and extract relevant cancer-related signaling subnetworks from an integrated network of human genes interactions (INHGI). This approach, called graph2sig, is twofold: first, it assigns oncogenic scores to all interactions in the INHGI and then these oncogenic scores are used as edge weights to extract oncogenic signaling subnetworks from INHGI. Regarding the prediction of oncogenic interactions, we showed that graph2sig is able to recover 89% of known oncogenic interactions with a precision of 77%. Moreover, the interactions that received high oncogenic scores are enriched in genes for which mutations have been causally implicated in cancer. We also demonstrated that graph2sig is potentially useful in extracting oncogenic signaling subnetworks: more than 80% of constructed subnetworks contain more than 50% of original interactions in their corresponding oncogenic linear pathways present in the KEGG PATHWAY database. In addition, the potential oncogenic signaling subnetworks discovered by graph2sig are supported by experimental evidence. Taken together, these results suggest that graph2sig can be a useful tool for investigators involved in cancer research

  17. Assessing the 20-Year Impact of Multiple Intelligences on Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuban, Larry

    2004-01-01

    The article analyzes one claim that I make about Howard Gardner's work on MI: Multiple intelligences has had the greatest influence on educators' beliefs and talk about differences in children's intelligence, moderate to high influence on the formal curriculum and instructional materials, and least influence on mainstream teaching and assessment…

  18. Assessing the 20-Year Impact of Multiple Intelligences on Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuban, Larry

    2004-01-01

    The article analyzes one claim that I make about Howard Gardner's work on MI: Multiple intelligences has had the greatest influence on educators' beliefs and talk about differences in children's intelligence, moderate to high influence on the formal curriculum and instructional materials, and least influence on mainstream teaching and assessment…

  19. Oncogenicity of human N-ras oncogene and proto-oncogene introduced into retroviral vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Souyri, M.; Vigon, I.; Charon, M.; Tambourin, P. )

    1989-09-01

    The N-ras gene is the only member of the ras family which has never been naturally transduced into a retrovirus. In order to study the in vitro and in vivo oncogenicity of N-ras and to compare its pathogenicity to that of H-ras, the authors have inserted an activated or a normal form of human N-ras cDNA into a slightly modified Harvey murine sarcoma virus-derived vector in which the H-ras p21 coding region had been deleted. The resulting constructions were transfected into NIH 3T3 cells. The activated N-ras-containing construct (HSN) induced 10{sup 4} foci per {mu}g of DNA and was found to be as transforming as H-ras was. After infection of the transfected cells by either the ecotropic Moloney murine leukemia virus or the amphotropic 4070A helper viruses, rescued transforming viruses were injected into newborn mice. Both pseudotypes of HSN virus containing activated N-ras induced the typical Harvey disease with similar latency. However, they found that the virus which contained normal N-ras p21 (HSn) was also pathogenic and induced splenomegaly, lymphadenopathies, and sarcoma in mice after a latency of 3 to 7 weeks. In addition, Moloney murine leukemia virus pseudotypes of N-ras caused neurological disorders in 30% of the infected animals. These results differed markedly from those of previous experiments in which the authors had inserted the activated form of N-ras in the pSV(X) vector: the resulting SVN-ras virus was transforming on NIH 3T3 cells but was poorly oncogenic in vivo. Altogether, these data demonstrated unequivocally that N-ras is potentially as oncogenic as H-ras and that such oncogenic effect could depend on the vector environment.

  20. Impacts of Multiple Stressors on Southern New England Salt Marshes

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the Northeastern U.S., salt marsh area is in decline. Low sediment supply combined with regionally high rates of sea level rise mean that future salt marsh survival depends primarily on biomass production and organic matter accumulation, which are impacted by high nutrient lo...

  1. Multiple Year Extension Program Outcomes & Impacts through Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hachfeld, Gary A.; Bau, David B.; Holcomb, C. Robert; Craig, J. William

    2013-01-01

    Dwindling public funding as well as greater competition for grant dollars create a challenge for Extension. For Extension to remain a financially viable organization, educators have to be able to produce substantive, measurable program outcomes and impacts. Evaluative data can inform program development and delivery, and helps administrators…

  2. Impacts of Multiple Stressors on Southern New England Salt Marshes

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the Northeastern U.S., salt marsh area is in decline. Low sediment supply combined with regionally high rates of sea level rise mean that future salt marsh survival depends primarily on biomass production and organic matter accumulation, which are impacted by high nutrient lo...

  3. Multiple Policy Innovations: The Impact on Special Educational Needs Provision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Sally

    1994-01-01

    Effects of educational policy reforms on provision of special educational services to students with disabilities in Scotland are examined. Topics discussed include the impact of British policy on Scottish practice; the culture of achievement; devolved school management; parents as consumers; consumerism, competition, and the Warnock legacy; the…

  4. The neural basis of stereotypic impact on multiple social categorization.

    PubMed

    Hehman, Eric; Ingbretsen, Zachary A; Freeman, Jonathan B

    2014-11-01

    Perceivers extract multiple social dimensions from another's face (e.g., race, emotion), and these dimensions can become linked due to stereotypes (e.g., Black individuals → angry). The current research examined the neural basis of detecting and resolving conflicts between top-down stereotypes and bottom-up visual information in person perception. Participants viewed faces congruent and incongruent with stereotypes, via variations in race and emotion, while neural activity was measured using fMRI. Hand movements en route to race/emotion responses were recorded using mouse-tracking to behaviorally index individual differences in stereotypical associations during categorization. The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) showed stronger activation to faces that violated stereotypical expectancies at the intersection of multiple social categories (i.e., race and emotion). These regions were highly sensitive to the degree of incongruency, exhibiting linearly increasing responses as race and emotion became stereotypically more incongruent. Further, the ACC exhibited greater functional connectivity with the lateral fusiform cortex, a region implicated in face processing, when viewing stereotypically incongruent (relative to congruent) targets. Finally, participants with stronger behavioral tendencies to link race and emotion stereotypically during categorization showed greater dorsolateral prefrontal cortex activation to stereotypically incongruent targets. Together, the findings provide insight into how conflicting stereotypes at the nexus of multiple social dimensions are resolved at the neural level to accurately perceive other people.

  5. Combining Scores in Multiple-Criteria Assessment Systems: The Impact of Combination Rule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBee, Matthew T.; Peters, Scott J.; Waterman, Craig

    2014-01-01

    Best practice in gifted and talented identification procedures involves making decisions on the basis of multiple measures. However, very little research has investigated the impact of different methods of combining multiple measures. This article examines the consequences of the conjunctive ("and"), disjunctive/complementary…

  6. An Approach for Addressing the Multiple Testing Problem in Social Policy Impact Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schochet, Peter Z.

    2009-01-01

    In social policy evaluations, the multiple testing problem occurs due to the many hypothesis tests that are typically conducted across multiple outcomes and subgroups, which can lead to spurious impact findings. This article discusses a framework for addressing this problem that balances Types I and II errors. The framework involves specifying…

  7. Residual Strength of Composites with Multiple Impact Damage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    Follow On Structural Fatigue Test Program ( IFOSTP ). -5- 32 The CREDP Stabilator Repair As part of the CREDP program , the Aeronautical Research Laboratory...previously developed for single impact damaged structures , was applied. This methodology was verified via a coupon test program and an experimental... test rig for a dynamic test on the IFOSTP horizontal stabilator. The stabilator was mounted in the rig by means of the

  8. Impact of Misalignment of Trading Agent Strategy across Multiple Markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Jung-Woo; Lee, Sooyeon; Mullen, Tracy

    We examine the effect of a market pricing policy designed to attract high-valued traders in a multiple market context using JCAT software. Our experiments show that a simple change to pricing policy can create market performance effects that traditional adaptive trading agents are unable to recognize or capitalize on, but that market-policy-aware trading agents can generally obtain. This suggests as parameterized and tunable markets become more common, trading strategies will increasingly need to be conditional on each individual market’s policies.

  9. Brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis: therapeutic, cognitive and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Juan Ignacio; Patrucco, Liliana; Miguez, Jimena; Cristiano, Edgardo

    2016-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) was always considered as a white matter inflammatory disease. Today, there is an important body of evidence that supports the hypothesis that gray matter involvement and the neurodegenerative mechanism are at least partially independent from inflammation. Gray matter atrophy develops faster than white matter atrophy, and predominates in the initial stages of the disease. The neurodegenerative mechanism creates permanent damage and correlates with physical and cognitive disability. In this review we describe the current available evidence regarding brain atrophy and its consequence in MS patients.

  10. Temperature impacts the multiple attack action of amylases.

    PubMed

    Bijttebier, Annabel; Goesaert, Hans; Delcour, Jan A

    2007-03-01

    The action pattern of several amylases was studied at 35, 50, and 70 degrees C using potato amylose, a soluble (Red Starch) and insoluble (cross-linked amylose) chromophoric substrate. With potato amylose as substrate, Bacillus stearothermophilus alpha-amylase (BStA) and porcine pancreatic alpha-amylase displayed a high degree of multiple attack (DMA, i.e., the number of bonds broken during the lifetime of an enzyme-substrate complex minus one), the fungal alpha-amylase from Aspergillus oryzae a low DMA, and the alpha-amylases from B. licheniformis, Thermoactinomyces vulgaris, B. amyloliquifaciens, and B. subtilis an intermediate DMA. These data are discussed in relation to structural properties of the enzymes. The level of multiple attack (LMA), based on the relation between the drop in iodine binding of amylose and the increase in total reducing value, proved to be a good alternative for DMA measurements. The LMA of the endo-amylases increased with temperature to a degree depending on the amylase. In contrast, BStA showed a decreased LMA when temperature was raised. Furthermore, different enzymes had different activities on Red Starch and cross-linked amylose. Hence, next to the temperature, the action pattern of alpha-amylases is influenced by structural parameters of the starch substrate.

  11. Technical Methods Report: Guidelines for Multiple Testing in Impact Evaluations. NCEE 2008-4018

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schochet, Peter Z.

    2008-01-01

    This report presents guidelines for addressing the multiple comparisons problem in impact evaluations in the education area. The problem occurs due to the large number of hypothesis tests that are typically conducted across outcomes and subgroups in these studies, which can lead to spurious statistically significant impact findings. The…

  12. Combining immunotherapy with oncogene-targeted therapy: a new road for melanoma treatment.

    PubMed

    Aris, Mariana; Barrio, María Marcela

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous melanoma arises from the malignant transformation of skin melanocytes; its incidence and mortality have been increasing steadily over the last 50 years, now representing 3% of total tumors. Once melanoma metastasizes, prognosis is somber and therapeutic options are limited. However, the discovery of prevalent BRAF mutations in at least 50% of melanoma tumors led to development of BRAF-inhibitors, and other drugs targeting the MAPK pathway including MEK-inhibitors, are changing this reality. These recently approved treatments for metastatic melanoma have made a significant impact on patient survival; though the results are shadowed by the appearance of drug-resistance. Combination therapies provide a rational strategy to potentiate efficacy and potentially overcome resistance. Undoubtedly, the last decade has also born a renaissance of immunotherapy, and encouraging advances in metastatic melanoma treatment are illuminating the road. Immune checkpoint blockades, such as CTLA-4 antagonist-antibodies, and multiple cancer vaccines are now invaluable arms of anti-tumor therapy. Recent work has brought to light the delicate relationship between tumor biology and the immune system. Host immunity contributes to the anti-tumor activity of oncogene-targeted inhibitors within a complex network of cytokines and chemokines. Therefore, combining immunotherapy with oncogene-targeted drugs may be the key to melanoma control. Here, we review ongoing clinical studies of combination therapies using both oncogene inhibitors and immunotherapeutic strategies in melanoma patients. We will revisit the preclinical evidence that tested sequential and concurrent schemes in suitable animal models and formed the basis for the current trials. Finally, we will discuss potential future directions of the field.

  13. Combining Immunotherapy with Oncogene-Targeted Therapy: A New Road for Melanoma Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Aris, Mariana; Barrio, María Marcela

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous melanoma arises from the malignant transformation of skin melanocytes; its incidence and mortality have been increasing steadily over the last 50 years, now representing 3% of total tumors. Once melanoma metastasizes, prognosis is somber and therapeutic options are limited. However, the discovery of prevalent BRAF mutations in at least 50% of melanoma tumors led to development of BRAF-inhibitors, and other drugs targeting the MAPK pathway including MEK-inhibitors, are changing this reality. These recently approved treatments for metastatic melanoma have made a significant impact on patient survival; though the results are shadowed by the appearance of drug-resistance. Combination therapies provide a rational strategy to potentiate efficacy and potentially overcome resistance. Undoubtedly, the last decade has also born a renaissance of immunotherapy, and encouraging advances in metastatic melanoma treatment are illuminating the road. Immune checkpoint blockades, such as CTLA-4 antagonist-antibodies, and multiple cancer vaccines are now invaluable arms of anti-tumor therapy. Recent work has brought to light the delicate relationship between tumor biology and the immune system. Host immunity contributes to the anti-tumor activity of oncogene-targeted inhibitors within a complex network of cytokines and chemokines. Therefore, combining immunotherapy with oncogene-targeted drugs may be the key to melanoma control. Here, we review ongoing clinical studies of combination therapies using both oncogene inhibitors and immunotherapeutic strategies in melanoma patients. We will revisit the preclinical evidence that tested sequential and concurrent schemes in suitable animal models and formed the basis for the current trials. Finally, we will discuss potential future directions of the field. PMID:25709607

  14. (Oncogenic action of ionizing radiation)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    An extensive experiment involving approximately 400 rats exposed to the neon ion beam at the Bevalac in Berkeley, CA and to electrons is nearing completion. The carcinogenicity of energetic electrons was determined for comparison with the neon ion results. As in past reports we will describe progress in three areas corresponding to the specific aims of the proposal: (1) carcinogenesis and DNA strand breaks in rat skin following exposure by the neon ions or electrons; (2) DNA strand breaks in the epidermis as a function of radiation penetration; (3) oncogene activation in radiation-induced rat skin cancers. 72 refs., 6 tabs.

  15. Tryptophan Metabolites and Their Impact on Multiple Sclerosis Progression.

    PubMed

    Watzlawik, Jens O; Wootla, Bharath; Rodriguez, Moses

    2015-12-14

    Accumulating evidence demonstrates involvement of tryptophan metabolites and in particular activation of the kynurenine pathway (KP) in neurocognitive disorders under CNS inflammatory conditions. The KP is involved in several brain-associated disorders including Parkinson's disease, AIDS dementia, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, schizophrenia, and brain tumors. Our review is an attempt to address any relevant association between dysregulation of KP and multiple sclerosis (MS), an inflammatory CNS disorder that ultimately leads to demyelinated brain areas and severe neurological deficits. Modulation of KP is a new topic for the field of MS and warrants further research. The availability of potential KP modulators approved for MS may shed some light into the therapeutic potential of KP antagonists for the treatment of MS patients.

  16. Tryptophan Catabolites and Their Impact on Multiple Sclerosis Progression.

    PubMed

    Watzlawik, Jens O; Wootla, Bharath; Rodriguez, Moses

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence demonstrates involvement of tryptophan metabolites and in particular activation of the kynurenine pathway (KP) in neurocognitive disorders under CNS inflammatory conditions. The KP is involved in several brain-associated disorders including Parkinson's disease, AIDS dementia, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, schizophrenia, and brain tumors. Our review is an attempt to address any relevant association between dysregulation of KP and multiple sclerosis (MS), an inflammatory CNS disorder that ultimately leads to demyelinated brain areas and severe neurological deficits. Modulation of KP is a new topic for the field of MS and warrants further research. The availability of potential KP modulators approved for MS may shed some light into the therapeutic potential of KP antagonists for the treatment of MS patients.

  17. The impacts of multiple stressors to model ecological structures

    SciTech Connect

    Landis, W.G.; Kelly, S.A.; Markiewicz, A.J.; Matthews, R.A.; Matthews, G.B.

    1995-12-31

    The basis of the community conditioning hypothesis is that ecological structures are the result of their unique etiology. Systems that have been exposed to a variety of stressors should reflect this history. The authors how conducted a series of microcosm experiments that can compare the effects of multiple stressors upon community dynamics. The microcosm protocols are derived from the Standardized Aquatic Microcosm (SAM) and have Lemma and additional protozoan species. Two multiple stressor experiments have been conducted. In an extended length SAM (ELSAM), two of four treatments were dosed with the turbine fuel JP-8 one week into the experiment. Two treatments were later exposed to the heat stress, one that had received jet fuel and one that had not. Similarly, an ELSAM was conducted with the second stressor being the further addition of JP-8 replacing the heat shock. Biological, physical and chemical data were analyzed with multivariate techniques including nonmetric clustering and association analysis. Space-time worms and phase diagrams were also employed to ascertain the dynamic relationships of variables identified as important by the multivariate techniques. The experiments do not result in a simple additive linear response to the additional stressor. Examination of the relative population dynamics reveal alterations in trajectories that suggest treatment related effects. As in previous single stressor experiments, recovery does not occur even after extended experimental periods. The authors are now attempting to measure the resulting trajectories, changes in similarity vectors and overall dynamics. However, community conditioning does appear to be an important framework in understanding systems with a heterogeneous array of stressors.

  18. Sewage impacts coral reefs at multiple levels of ecological organization.

    PubMed

    Reopanichkul, Pasinee; Schlacher, Thomas A; Carter, R W; Worachananant, Suchai

    2009-09-01

    Against a backdrop of rising sea temperatures and ocean acidification which pose global threats to coral reefs, excess nutrients and turbidity continue to be significant stressors at regional and local scales. Because interventions usually require local data on pollution impacts, we measured ecological responses to sewage discharges in Surin Marine Park, Thailand. Wastewater disposal significantly increased inorganic nutrients and turbidity levels, and this degradation in water quality resulted in substantial ecological shifts in the form of (i) increased macroalgal density and species richness, (ii) lower cover of hard corals, and (iii) significant declines in fish abundance. Thus, the effects of nutrient pollution and turbidity can cascade across several levels of ecological organization to change key properties of the benthos and fish on coral reefs. Maintenance or restoration of ecological reef health requires improved wastewater management and run-off control for reefs to deliver their valuable ecosystems services.

  19. Multiple vibration displacements at multiple vibration frequencies stress impact on human femur computational analysis.

    PubMed

    Ezenwa, Bertram; Yeoh, Han Teik

    2011-01-01

    Whole-body vibration training using single-frequency methods has been reported to improve bone mineral density. However, the intensities can exceed safe levels and have drawn unfavorable comments from subjects. In a previous article, whole-body vibration training using multiple vibration displacements at multiple vibration frequencies (MVDMVF) was reported. This article presents the computational simulation evaluation of stress dispersion on a femur with and without the MVDMVF input. A model of bone femur was developed from a computed tomography image of the lower limb with Mimics software from Materialise (Plymouth, Michigan). We analyzed the mesh model in COMSOL Multiphysics (COMSOL, Inc; Burlington, Massachusetts) with and without MVDMVF input, with constraints and load applied to the femur model. We compared the results with published joint stresses during walking, jogging, and stair-climbing and descending and with standard vibration exposure limits. Results showed stress levels on the femur are significantly higher with MVDMVF input than without. The stress levels were within the published levels during walking and stair-climbing and descending but below the stress levels during jogging. Our computational results demonstrate that MVDMVF generates stress level equivalent to the level during walking and stair-climbing. This evidence suggests that MVDMVF is safe for prolonged use in subjects with osteoporosis who ambulate independently.

  20. Protein Kinase Cι Expression and Oncogenic Signaling Mechanisms in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Nicole R.; Kalari, Krishna R.; Fields, Alan P.

    2010-01-01

    Accumulating evidence demonstrates that PKCι is an oncogene and prognostic marker that is frequently targeted for genetic alteration in many major forms of human cancer. Functional data demonstrate that PKCι is required for the transformed phenotype of NSCLC, pancreatic, ovarian, prostate, colon and brain cancer cells. Future studies will be required to determine whether PKCι is also an oncogene in the many other cancer types that also overexpress PKCι. Studies of PKCι using genetically defined models of tumorigenesis have revealed a critical role for PKCι in multiple stages of tumorigenesis, including tumor initiation, progression and metastasis. Recent studies in a genetic model of lung adenocarcinoma suggest a role for PKCι in transformation of lung cancer stem cells. These studies have important implications for the therapeutic use of aurothiomalate (ATM), a highly selective PKCι signaling inhibitor currently undergoing clinical evaluation. Significant progress has been made in determining the molecular mechanisms by which PKCι drives the transformed phenotype, particularly the central role played by the oncogenic PKCι-Par6 complex in transformed growth and invasion, and of several PKCι-dependent survival pathways in chemo-resistance. Future studies will be required to determine the composition and dynamics of the PKCι-Par6 complex, and the mechanisms by which oncogenic signaling through this complex is regulated. Likewise, a better understanding of the critical downstream effectors of PKCι in various human tumor types holds promise for identifying novel prognostic and surrogate markers of oncogenic PKCι activity that may be clinically useful in ongoing clinical trials of ATM. PMID:20945390

  1. Simulating feedback from nuclear clusters: the impact of multiple sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, Martin A.; Power, Chris

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear star clusters (NCs) are found to exist in the centres of many galaxies and appear to follow scaling relations similar to those of supermassive black holes. Previous analytical work has suggested that such relations are a consequence of feedback-regulated growth. We explore this idea using high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations, focusing on the validity of the simplifying assumptions made in analytical models. In particular, we investigate feedback emanating from multiple stellar sources rather than from a single source, as is usually assumed, and show that collisions between shells of gas swept up by feedback leads to momentum cancellation and the formation of high-density clumps and filaments. This high-density material is resistant both to expulsion from the galaxy potential and to disruption by feedback; if it falls back on to the NC, we expect the gas to be available for further star formation or for feeding a central black hole. We also note that our results may have implications for the evolution of globular clusters and stellar clusters in high-redshift dark matter haloes.

  2. Impact of pomalidomide therapy in multiple myeloma: a recent survey.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arvind; Porwal, Mayur; Verma, Ankita; Mishra, Arun K

    2014-12-01

    Pomalidomide (Pomalyst(®)) is a synthetic compound derived by modifying the chemical structure of thalidomide to improve its potency and reduce its side effects and third drug in the class of immunomodulatory drugs. Pomalidomide is under global development with Celgene Corporation, was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on February 8, 2013 to treat patients with relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma (MM) who have received at least two prior therapies including bortezomib and lenalidomide. In October 2009, it has found orphan designation for the treatment of relapsed and refractory MM by the EMA, and on August 2013, marketing authorization has issued in Europe by gaining a positive response. It inhibits myeloma cell growth and angiogenesis directly. Pomalidomide is the latest myeloma cell growth inhibitor to be approved in both USA and EU. The predominant side effects are thrombocytopenia, neuropathy, and deep vein thrombosis. Pomalidomide is also being investigated in patients with amyloidosis, prostate cancer, small cell lung cancer, pancreatic cancer, graft-versus-host disease, and Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia. This article reviews the available information on pomalidomide with respect to its clinical pharmacology, mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, metabolism, pre-clinical studies, and clinical trials.

  3. Eyjabakkajokull Glacial Landsystem, Iceland: Geomorphic Impact of Multiple Surges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingolfsson, O.; Schomacker, A.; Benediktsson, I.

    2013-12-01

    A new glacial geomorphological map of the Eyjabakkajökull forefield in Iceland is presented. The map covers c. 60 km2 and is based on high-resolution aerial photographs recorded in August 2008 as well as field checking. Landforms are manually registered in a geographical information system (ArcGIS) based on inspection of orthorectified imagery and digital elevation models of the area. We mapped subglacially streamlined landforms such as flutes and drumlins on the till plain, supraglacial landforms such as ice-cored moraine, pitted outwash, and concertina eskers, and ice-marginal landforms such as the large, multi-crested 1890 surge end moraine and smaller single-crested end moraines. The glaciofluvial landforms are represented by outwash plains, minor outwash fans, and sinuous eskers. Extramarginal sediments were also registered and consist mainly of old sediments in wetlands or locally weathered bedrock. Eyjabakkajökull has behaved as a surge-type glacier for 2200 years; hence, the mapped landforms originate from multiple surges. Landforms such as large glaciotectonic end moraines, hummocky moraine, long flutes, crevasse-fill ridges, and concertina eskers are characteristic for surge-type glaciers. The surging glacier landsystem of Eyjabakkajökull serves as a modern analog to the landsystems of terrestrial paleo-ice streams.

  4. Caregiver burden in multiple sclerosis: the impact of neuropsychiatric symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Figved, Nanna; Myhr, Kjell‐Morten; Larsen, Jan‐Petter; Aarsland, Dag

    2007-01-01

    Background We studied the level of distress in caregivers of patients with recently diagnosed multiple sclerosis (MS), and their relation to clinical characteristics. Methods Caregivers of patients with MS and Parkinson's disease completed measures of distress and quality of life. MS patients underwent neurological, neuropsychiatric and neuropsychological examinations. Multivariate regression analyses were used to explore the relationship between patient variables and caregiver distress. Results Caregivers of patients with MS experienced high levels of distress and reduced quality of life related to caregiving. The level of distress was similar to that reported by elderly spouses of patients with longstanding Parkinson's disease. Psychiatric symptoms and cognitive impairment in patients with MS were associated with caregiver's distress and quality of life, even after controlling for level of disability (all p values <0.01). Patients' physical impairment was associated with caregiver distress, but not with caregiver quality of life. Conclusion Caregivers of patients with MS experience high levels of distress and reduced quality of life. Psychiatric symptoms and cognitive impairment contributed significantly to caregiver distress, over and above the effect of disability due to neurological symptoms. PMID:17237144

  5. Doubly Differential Multiple Ionization of Neon by Electron Impact*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. C. F.; Dubois, R. D.; Hasan, A.

    2003-05-01

    Absolute doubly differential cross sections for single, double and triple ionization of Ne atoms have been measured for 750 eV electron impact as a function of projectile energy loss and scattering angle. Angular distributions between 0 and +/- 12 degrees were obtained for energy losses between 0 and 600 eV. In this energy-loss range only L shell electrons are available for target ionization. The data were normalized to total ionization cross sections available in the literature. A comparison is made with photoionization data as well as with argon data taken using similar methods in order to study the role played by the static target potential. 1- R. D. DuBois, C. Doudna, C. Lloyd, M. Kahveci, Kh Khayyat, Y. Zhou, and D. H. Madison, J. Phys. B 34 (2001) L783-L789. 2- R. D. DuBois, Kh Khayyat, C. Doudna, C. Lloyd, NIM B 192 (2002) 63-66. 3- A. C. F. Santos, A. Hasan, T. Yates, R. D. DuBois, submitted to Phys. Rev. A (2003).

  6. Estrogen Signaling Multiple Pathways to Impact Gene Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Maria; Galluzzo, Paola; Ascenzi, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    Steroid hormones exert profound effects on cell growth, development, differentiation, and homeostasis. Their effects are mediated through specific intracellular steroid receptors that act via multiple mechanisms. Among others, the action mechanism starting upon 17β-estradiol (E2) binds to its receptors (ER) is considered a paradigmatic example of how steroid hormones function. Ligand-activated ER dimerizes and translocates in the nucleus where it recognizes specific hormone response elements located in or near promoter DNA regions of target genes. Behind the classical genomic mechanism shared with other steroid hormones, E2 also modulates gene expression by a second indirect mechanism that involves the interaction of ER with other transcription factors which, in turn, bind their cognate DNA elements. In this case, ER modulates the activities of transcription factors such as the activator protein (AP)-1, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and stimulating protein-1 (Sp-1), by stabilizing DNA-protein complexes and/or recruiting co-activators. In addition, E2 binding to ER may also exert rapid actions that start with the activation of a variety of signal transduction pathways (e.g. ERK/MAPK, p38/MAPK, PI3K/AKT, PLC/PKC). The debate about the contribution of different ER-mediated signaling pathways to coordinate the expression of specific sets of genes is still open. This review will focus on the recent knowledge about the mechanism by which ERs regulate the expression of target genes and the emerging field of integration of membrane and nuclear receptor signaling, giving examples of the ways by which the genomic and non-genomic actions of ERs on target genes converge. PMID:18369406

  7. Impact of Multiple Factors on the Degree of Tinnitus Distress

    PubMed Central

    Brüggemann, Petra; Szczepek, Agnieszka J.; Rose, Matthias; McKenna, Laurence; Olze, Heidi; Mazurek, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The primary cause of subjective tinnitus is a dysfunction of the auditory system; however, the degree of distress tinnitus causes depends largely on the psychological status of the patient. Our goal was to attempt to associate the grade of tinnitus-related distress with the psychological distress, physical, or psychological discomfort patients experienced, as well as potentially relevant social parameters, through a simultaneous analysis of these factors. Methods: We determined the level of tinnitus-related distress in 531 tinnitus patients using the German version of the tinnitus questionnaire (TQ). In addition, we used the Perceived Stress Questionnaire (PSQ); General Depression Scale Allgemeine Depression Skala (ADS), Berlin Mood Questionnaire (BSF); somatic symptoms inventory (BI), and SF-8 health survey as well as general information collected through a medical history. Results: The TQ score significantly correlated with a score obtained using PSQ, ADS, BSF, BI, and SF-8 alongside psychosocial factors such as age, gender, and marital status. The level of hearing loss and the auditory properties of the specific tinnitus combined with perceived stress and the degree of depressive mood and somatic discomfort of a patient were identified as medium-strong predictors of chronic tinnitus. Social factors such as gender, age, or marital status also had an impact on the degree of tinnitus distress. The results that were obtained were implemented in a specific cortical distress network model. Conclusions: Using a large representative sample of patients with chronic tinnitus permitted a simultaneous statistical measurement of psychometric and audiological parameters in predicting tinnitus distress. We demonstrate that single factors can be distinguished in a manner that explains their causative association and influence on the induction of tinnitus-related distress. PMID:27445776

  8. Expression of Cellular Oncogenes in Human Malignancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slamon, Dennis J.; Dekernion, Jean B.; Verma, Inder M.; Cline, Martin J.

    1984-04-01

    Cellular oncogenes have been implicated in the induction of malignant transformation in some model systems in vitro and may be related to malignancies in vivo in some vertebrate species. This article describes a study of the expression of 15 cellular oncogenes in fresh human tumors from 54 patients, representing 20 different tumor types. More than one cellular oncogene was transcriptionally active in all of the tumors examined. In 14 patients it was possible to study normal and malignant tissue from the same organ. In many of these patients, the transcriptional activity of certain oncogenes was greater in the malignant than the normal tissue. The cellular fes (feline sarcoma) oncogene, not previously known to be transcribed in mammalian tissue, was found to be active in lung and hematopoietic malignancies.

  9. Small genomic insertions form enhancers that misregulate oncogenes

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Brian J.; Hnisz, Denes; Weintraub, Abraham S.; Kwiatkowski, Nicholas; Li, Charles H.; Li, Zhaodong; Weichert-Leahey, Nina; Rahman, Sunniyat; Liu, Yu; Etchin, Julia; Li, Benshang; Shen, Shuhong; Lee, Tong Ihn; Zhang, Jinghui; Look, A. Thomas; Mansour, Marc R.; Young, Richard A.

    2017-01-01

    The non-coding regions of tumour cell genomes harbour a considerable fraction of total DNA sequence variation, but the functional contribution of these variants to tumorigenesis is ill-defined. Among these non-coding variants, somatic insertions are among the least well characterized due to challenges with interpreting short-read DNA sequences. Here, using a combination of Chip-seq to enrich enhancer DNA and a computational approach with multiple DNA alignment procedures, we identify enhancer-associated small insertion variants. Among the 102 tumour cell genomes we analyse, small insertions are frequently observed in enhancer DNA sequences near known oncogenes. Further study of one insertion, somatically acquired in primary leukaemia tumour genomes, reveals that it nucleates formation of an active enhancer that drives expression of the LMO2 oncogene. The approach described here to identify enhancer-associated small insertion variants provides a foundation for further study of these abnormalities across human cancers. PMID:28181482

  10. Pharmacological strategies to target oncogenic KRAS signaling in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Hsiao-Ching; Huang, Po-Hsien; Kulp, Samuel K; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2017-03-01

    The clear importance of mutated KRAS as a therapeutic target has driven the investigation of multiple approaches to inhibit oncogenic KRAS signaling at different molecular levels. However, no KRAS-targeted therapy has reached the clinic to date, which underlies the intrinsic difficulty in developing effective, direct inhibitors of KRAS. Thus, this article provides an overview of the history and recent progress in the development of pharmacological strategies to target oncogenic KRAS with small molecule agents. Mechanistically, these KRAS-targeted agents can be classified into the following four categories. (1) Small-molecule RAS-binding ligands that prevent RAS activation by binding within or outside the nucleotide-binding motif. (2) Inhibitors of KRAS membrane anchorage. (3) Inhibitors that bind to RAS-binding domains of RAS-effector proteins. (4) Inhibitors of KRAS expression. The advantage and limitation of each type of these anti-KRAS agents are discussed.

  11. Multiple oncogenic changes (K-RAS(V12), p53 knockdown, mutant EGFRs, p16 bypass, telomerase) are not sufficient to confer a full malignant phenotype on human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sato, Mitsuo; Vaughan, Melville B; Girard, Luc; Peyton, Michael; Lee, Woochang; Shames, David S; Ramirez, Ruben D; Sunaga, Noriaki; Gazdar, Adi F; Shay, Jerry W; Minna, John D

    2006-02-15

    We evaluated the contribution of three genetic alterations (p53 knockdown, K-RAS(V12), and mutant EGFR) to lung tumorigenesis using human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC) immortalized with telomerase and Cdk4-mediated p16 bypass. RNA interference p53 knockdown or oncogenic K-RAS(V12) resulted in enhanced anchorage-independent growth and increased saturation density of HBECs. The combination of p53 knockdown and K-RAS(V12) further enhanced the tumorigenic phenotype with increased growth in soft agar and an invasive phenotype in three-dimensional organotypic cultures but failed to cause HBECs to form tumors in nude mice. Growth of HBECs was highly dependent on epidermal growth factor (EGF) and completely inhibited by EGF receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors, which induced G1 arrest. Introduction of EGFR mutations E746-A750 del and L858R progressed HBECs toward malignancy as measured by soft agar growth, including EGF-independent growth, but failed to induce tumor formation. Mutant EGFRs were associated with higher levels of phospho-Akt, phospho-signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 [but not phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2], and increased expression of DUSP6/MKP-3 phosphatase (an inhibitor of phospho-ERK1/2). These results indicate that (a) the HBEC model system is a powerful new approach to assess the contribution of individual and combinations of genetic alterations to lung cancer pathogenesis; (b) a combination of four genetic alterations, including human telomerase reverse transcriptase overexpression, bypass of p16/RB and p53 pathways, and mutant K-RAS(V12) or mutant EGFR, is still not sufficient for HBECs to completely transform to cancer; and (c) EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors inhibit the growth of preneoplastic HBEC cells, suggesting their potential for chemoprevention.

  12. Oncogenic role of EAPII in lung cancer development and its activation of the MAPK–ERK pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, C; Fan, S; Owonikoko, T K; Khuri, F R; Sun, S-Y; Li, R

    2011-01-01

    Cancer progression involves multiple complex and interdependent steps, including progressive proliferation, angiogenesis and metastases. The complexity of these processes requires a comprehensive elucidation of the integrated signaling networks for better understanding. EAPII interacts with multiple cancer-related proteins, but its biological significance in cancer development remains unknown. In this report we identified the elevated level of EAPII protein in non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) patients and NSCLC cell lines in culture. The oncogenic role of EAPII in lung cancer development was demonstrated using NSCLC cells with genetic manipulations that influence EAPII expression: EAPII overexpression increases proliferation of NSCLC cells with an accelerated transition of cell cycle and facilitates xenograft tumor growth in vivo; EAPII knockdown results in apoptosis of NSCLC cells and reduces xenograft tumor formation. To further explore the mechanism of EAPII's oncogenic role in lung cancer development and to elucidate the potential signaling pathway(s) that EAPII may impact, we employed antibody array to investigate the alternation of the major signaling pathways in NSCLC cells with altered EAPII level. We found that EAPII overexpression significantly activated Raf1 and ERK1/2, but not c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 pathways. Consistently, the protein and mRNA levels of MYC and cyclin D1, which are targets of the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK–ERK) pathway, are significantly increased by EAPII overexpression. Taken together, we demonstrated that EAPII is an oncogenic factor and the activation of MAPK–ERK signaling pathway by EAPII may contribute to lung cancer development. PMID:21478903

  13. Oncogene addiction: sometimes a temporary slavery.

    PubMed

    Jonkers, Jos; Berns, Anton

    2004-12-01

    Tumors induced in conditional oncomice can show remarkable different responses to subsequent oncogene deprivation. Complete sustained regression, concomitant with massive differentiation and/or apoptosis, and partial regression are both observed. In the latter case, tumor growth either resumes without being dependent any longer on the oncogene, or requires reactivation of the oncogene in cells that have become dormant. These models reflect many of the features we also witness in human cancer and can therefore assist us in understanding the underlying mechanisms and in designing more effective treatment protocols.

  14. DARWIN Glass and DARWIN Crater Revisited. Multiple Impacts in the Australasian Strewn Field?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisel, T.; Biino, G. G.; Villa, I. M.; Chambers, J. E.; McHone, J. F.

    1995-09-01

    Darwin glass, an impact glass occurring in South West Tasmania, has been found at least since human beings reached Tasmania ca. 40 k.y. ago. Darwin glass, although in the proximity of the Australasian tektites strewn field, has never been counted as part of it. Darwin Crater was recognized about 30 years ago. Still, the existence of an impact structure in Tasmania has been neglected and does not show up in most compilations of known impact craters. Age determinations on Darwin Glass from the early 70's revealed a combined K-Ar and fission track age of 0.73 +/- 0.04 m.y. [1]. The most recent and most precise estimate for Australites and Indochinites yields 0.784 +/- 0.012 m.y. [2]. The two ages are indistinguishable from each other. This contemporaneity lead to the hypothesis that impact on Earth producing australites also formed Darwin Crater as a primary and/or secondary crater (Gentner et al., 1973). If one believes that all tektites of the Australian strewn field were produced by one impact in or near Indochina, then a special case is required to also form Darwin Crater, which is at least 5000 km away. Atmospheric breakup of a planetary body is a very unlikely possibility, because the distance travelled after breakup is too small to account for the dispersion. Double craters on Earth are always close to each other (e.g., Kara and Kara Ust). A more likely scenario could be an impact of an asteroidal body with an accompanying small moon (e.g., Ida and Gaspra). If one believes in multiple impacts for the formation of Muong Nong-type or layered tektites in the Australasian strewn field, then a collision of an asteroidal body with another body shortly before impact on Earth is required. In this case, an impact on Earth a large distance away (i.e., Tasmania) is realistic. To address the problem of crater recognition and possible simultaneous impact events, a new multidisciplinary investigation is currently underway. We intend to determine the age of three Darwin

  15. The Impact of Multiple AIDS-Related Bereavement in the Gay Male Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, Carrie A.; Lease, Suzanne H.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the issue of AIDS-related loss and the correlative epidemic of AIDS-related bereavement. Notes that individuals are considered particularly susceptible to such bereavement when loss is multiple, as is often the case in the gay male population. Reviews the research exploring the impact of AIDS-related loss and suggests counseling…

  16. The Impact of Medical Conditions on the Support of Children with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zijlstra, H. P.; Vlaskamp, C.

    2005-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to analyse the impact of medical conditions of children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities on the professional support they receive in centres for special education. Method: The medical files, the daily records and daily communication records between parents and professionals were reviewed…

  17. The Impact of Medical Conditions on the Support of Children with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zijlstra, H. P.; Vlaskamp, C.

    2005-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to analyse the impact of medical conditions of children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities on the professional support they receive in centres for special education. Method: The medical files, the daily records and daily communication records between parents and professionals were reviewed…

  18. Impact of depression, fatigue and disability on quality of life in Chinese patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kelong; Fan, Yongping; Hu, Rui; Yang, Tao; Li, Kangning

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate and analyze the main factors that influence the quality of life (QOL) of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. The QOL (multiple sclerosis impact scale), disability (expanded disability status scale), fatigue (modified fatigue impact scale) and depression (Beck Depression Inventory) were assessed in 100 MS patients. Correlation analysis shows that QOL is positively correlated with disability status, fatigue and depression, i.e., the more severe the disability, fatigue and depression, the worse the QOL. Multiple linear regression analysis indicated that Expanded Disability Status Scale grade and fatigue have important predictive value on the somatic QOL of MS patients. On the other hand, depression and fatigue have important predictive value on the mental QOL of MS patients. The QOL of MS patients is influenced by various factors, nursing care that focuses on patient disability, fatigue and depression should be strengthened. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Webinar Presentation: Linking Regional Aerosol Emission Changes with Multiple Impact Measures through Direct and Cloud-Related Forcing Estimates

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This presentation, Linking Regional Aerosol Emission Changes with Multiple Impact Measures through Direct and Cloud-Related Forcing Estimates, was given at the STAR Black Carbon 2016 Webinar Series: Accounting for Impact, Emissions, and Uncertainty.

  20. A Multiple Impact Hypothesis for Moon Formation: Target Spin and Disk Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rufu, R.; Aharonson, O.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate aspects of the multiple impact hypothesis for Moon's formation, whereby the proto-Earth suffers successive collisions, each forming a debris disk that accretes to form a moonlet. The moonlets tidally advance outward, and potentially coalesce to form the Moon. In addressing the fundamental problem of the Moon's formation, we consider smaller impactors than previously studied, and investigate the effect of new geometries using a Smoothed Particles Hydrodynamics (SPH) code. For impacts within the equatorial plane, we find multiple impactors are effective in draining angular momentum from the target's initial spin due to the often-neglected angular momentum carried by escaping mass. Our simulations reveal new consequences of non-equatorial inclination of the impactor, also previously neglected. We note relationships with the resulting disks of corresponding equatorial cases, but find that the target's axis of rotation can now be tilted by a significant amount (10's of degrees) with sub-Mars size impactors. Importantly for distinguishing among competing Moon formation hypotheses, our results imply that (i) the rotational acceleration of the proto-Earth by successive impacts may be limited by angular momentum drain if the impacting population contains multiple members of medium size, and (ii) impacts onto such a non-rapidly rotation proto-Earth (well below break-up speed) can produce disks compatible with sub-Moon fragments in mass, momentum, and composition.

  1. Impact of arthritis and multiple chronic conditions on selected life domains - United States, 2013.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jin; Theis, Kristina A; Barbour, Kamil E; Helmick, Charles G; Baker, Nancy A; Brady, Teresa J

    2015-06-05

    About half of U.S. adults have at least one chronic health condition, and the prevalence of multiple (two or more) chronic conditions increased from 21.8% in 2001 to 25.5% in 2012. Chronic conditions profoundly affect quality of life, are leading causes of death and disability, and account for 86% of total health care spending. Arthritis is a common cause of disability, one of the most common chronic conditions, and is included in prevalent combinations of multiple chronic conditions. To determine the impact of having arthritis alone or as one of multiple chronic conditions on selected important life domains, CDC analyzed data from the 2013 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). Having one or more chronic conditions was associated with significant and progressively higher prevalences of social participation restriction, serious psychological distress, and work limitations. Adults with arthritis as one of their multiple chronic conditions had higher prevalences of adverse outcomes on all three life domains compared with those with multiple chronic conditions but without arthritis. The high prevalence of arthritis, its common co-occurrence with other chronic conditions, and its significant adverse effect on life domains suggest the importance of considering arthritis in discussions addressing the effect of multiple chronic conditions and interventions needed to reduce that impact among researchers, health care providers, and policy makers.

  2. Mutations in the RET proto-oncogene in sporadic pheochromocytomas

    SciTech Connect

    Thibodeau, S.N.; Lindor, N.M.; Honchel, R.

    1994-09-01

    Mutations in the RET proto-oncogene have recently been demonstrated in kindreds with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia (MEN) types 2A and 2B. Both of these autosomal dominant disorders are characterized by the development of neoplasia in cell lines of neural crest origin, such as medullary throid carcinomas and pheochromocytomas. Individuals with MEN 2B have, in addition, ganglioneuromas of the lips, tongue and colon, a marfanoid habitus, and corneal nerve thickening. Approximately 90% of patients with MEN 2A have a germline mutation in exons 10 or 11, while 95% of patients with MEN 2B have a T{yields}C transition in codon 918 of exon 16. In this study, pheochromocytomas from 29 individuals who had no clinical evidence of MEN 2A or 2B (sporadic) were examined for the presence of either germline or somatic mutations in exons 10, 11, and 16 of the RET proto-oncogene. Of the 29 tumors examined, 3 (10%) were found to have a mutation in one of the three exons. One tumor had a G{yields}A transition in codon 609 (exon 10), another had a 6 bp deletion encompassing codons 632 & 633 (exon 11), and the final tumor had a T{yields}C transition in codon 918 (exon 16). These mutations were not found in the corresponding normal DNA from these individuals, indicating that the mutation were somatic in origin. Although we cannot exclude the possibility of mutations in other regions of the RET proto-oncogene, our data suggests that: (1) individuals presenting with apparently sporadic pheochromocytomas are not likely to have undiagnosed MEN 2A or 2B; and (2) somatic mutations in the RET proto-oncogene contribute to the process of tumorigenesis in a small percentage of sporadic pheochromocytomas.

  3. Impact ionization can explain carrier multiplication in PbSe quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Franceschetti, A; An, J M; Zunger, A

    2006-10-01

    The efficiency of conventional solar cells is limited because the excess energy of absorbed photons converts to heat instead of producing electron-hole pairs. Recently, efficient carrier multiplication has been observed in semiconductor quantum dots. In this process, a single, high-energy photon generates multiple electron-hole pairs. Rather exotic mechanisms have been proposed to explain the efficiency of carrier multiplication in PbSe quantum dots. Using atomistic pseudopotential calculations, we show here that the more conventional impact ionization mechanism, whereby a photogenerated electron-hole pair decays into a biexciton in a process driven by Coulomb interactions between the carriers, can explain both the rate (<1 ps) and the energy threshold ( approximately 2.2 times the band gap) of carrier multiplication, without the need to invoke alternative mechanisms.

  4. Oncogenic potential of bifunctional bioreductive drugs.

    PubMed

    Hei, T K; Liu, S X; Hall, E J

    1996-07-01

    Potential oncogenicity must be a factor of concern in the design and development of novel bioreductive drugs. In the present studies, the cytotoxicity and oncogenic transforming potential of a series of heterocyclic mono-N-oxides, designed to be used as bioreductive drugs, were examined using the mouse C3H 10T1/2 cell system. Exponential phase cultures of 10T1/2 cells were treated with graded doses of the bioreductive drugs for a 4 h period, either in air or hypoxia, at 37 degrees C. After treatment, cultures were replated for both survival and transformation assays. The fused pyrazine mono-N-oxide RB 90740 and its N-deoxy analogue, RB 92816, demonstrated a dose-dependent cytotoxicity and oncogenic transforming potency under aerobic conditions. Similarly, the indoloquinone E09 and the structurally related mitomycin C demonstrated dose dependence in both toxicity and oncogenic transforming potential. The most cytotoxic aromatic-N-oxides tested, RB 92816, also demonstrated the highest oncogenic transformation incidence. In hypoxia, the bioreductive metabolites of RB 90740 were substantially more cytotoxic and induced a higher oncogenic transformation yield than the drug in air. These data are consistent with the structure-activity relationship for bioreductive drugs in that heterocyclic-N-oxides with reactive side chains such as RB 92816 are cytotoxic and potentially carcinogenic.

  5. Impact and point prediction using a neural extended Kalman filter with multiple sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubberud, Stephen C.; Kramer, Kathleen A.

    2007-04-01

    The neural extended Kalman filter is an adaptive estimation technique that has been shown to learn on-line the maneuver model of the trajectory of a target. This improved motion model can be used to better predict the location of a target at given point in time, especially when the target, such as a mortar shell, has limited maneuvering capabilities. In this paper, the neural extended Kalman filter is used to predict, with multiple-sensor-systems provided measurement reports, impact point and impact time of a ballistic-like projectile when the drag on the shell was not accurately modeled in the motion model. In previous work, the neural extended Kalman filter was shown to work well with a single sensor with a uniform sample rate. Multiple sensors can incorporate two major differences into the problem. The first difference is that of the multiple aspect angles and uncertainty that are used in the model adaptation. The second difference is that of a non-uniform update rate of the measurements to the tracking system. While most tracking systems can easily handle this difference, the adaptation of the neural network training parameters can be deleteriously affected by these variations. The first of these two differences, potential concerns to the neural extended Kalman filter's implementation, is investigated in this effort. In this effort, performance of this adaptive and predictive scheme with multiple sensors in a three dimensional space is shown to provide a quality impact estimate.

  6. Oncogenic PTEN functions and models in T-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Tesio, M; Trinquand, A; Macintyre, E; Asnafi, V

    2016-07-28

    PTEN is a protein phosphatase that is crucial to prevent the malignant transformation of T-cells. Although a numerous mechanisms regulate its expression and function, they are often altered in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemias and T-cell lymphomas. As such, PTEN inactivation frequently occurs in these malignancies, where it can be associated with chemotherapy resistance and poor prognosis. Different Pten knockout models recapitulated the development of T-cell leukaemia/lymphoma, demonstrating that PTEN loss is at the center of a complex oncogenic network that sustains and drives tumorigenesis via the activation of multiple signalling pathways. These aspects and their therapeutic implications are discussed in this review.

  7. Assessment of aircraft emissions impacts on air quality at multiple model scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennam, Lakshmi Pradeepa

    Aviation activity has grown steadily, and will likely continue to grow in the future. Aviation-related air pollutants occurring during full-flight (landing and takeoff, as well as cruise) can impact air quality, human health and climate. The overall goal of this dissertation is to study the air quality impacts of aviation at local, regional and global scales. The central hypothesis of this study is that fine scale modeling provides better characterization of aviation emissions impacts on air quality and health. To test this hypothesis, a model-based assessment of aviation emissions impacts was conducted at multiple scales ranging from local (4 x 4 km2) to hemispheric (108 x 108 km2) scales. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  8. Experimental Impacts into Chondritic Targets. Part 1; Disruption of an L6 Chondrite by Multiple Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cintala, Mark J.; Horz, Friedrich

    2007-01-01

    A fragment of an L6 chondrite (ALH 85017,13) with an initial mass (M(sub 0)) of 464.1 g was the target in a series of experimental impacts in which the largest remaining fragment (M(sub R)) after each shot was impacted by a 3.18-mm ceramic sphere at a nominal speed of 2 km/s. This continued until the mass of the largest remaining piece was less than half the mass of the target presented to that shot (M(sub S)). Two chunks of Bushveldt gabbro with similar initial masses were also impacted under the same conditions until M(sub R) was less than half M(sub 0). The two gabbro targets required a total of 1.51x10(exp 7) and 1.75x10(exp 7) erg/g to attain 0.27 and 0.33 M(sub R)/M(sub 0), respectively; the chondrite, however, was considerably tougher, reaching 0.40 and 0.21 M(sub R)/M(sub 0) only after receiving 2.37x10(exp 7) and 3.10x10(exp 7) erg g-1, respectively. The combined ejecta and spallation products from the gabbro impacts were coarser than those from the chondrite and in sufficient quantities that the new surface areas exceeded those from the meteorite until the fifth shot in the chondrite series, which was the number of impacts required to disrupt each gabbro target (i.e., MR/M0 = 0.5). Unlike the behavior shown in previous regolith-evolution series, neither gabbro target produced an enhancement in the size fraction reflecting the mean size of the crystals composing the rock (about 3 mm), an effect possibly related to the width of the shock pulse. The original chondrite was so fine-grained and fractured, and the variance in its grain-size distribution so large, that effects related to grain-size were relegated to the <63- m fraction. Impacts into ALH 85017 produced abundant, fine-grained debris, but otherwise the slopes of its size distributions were comparable to those from other experiments involving natural and fabricated terrestrial targets. The characteristic slopes of the chondrite's size distributions, however, were notably more constant over the entire

  9. Experimental impacts into chondritic targets, part I: Disruption of an L6 chondrite by multiple impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cintala, Mark J.; Hörz, Friedrich

    2008-04-01

    A fragment of an L6 chondrite (Allan Hills [ALH] 85017,13) with an initial mass (M0) of 464.1 g was the target in a series of experimental impacts in which the largest remaining fragment (MR) after each shot was impacted by a 3.18 mm ceramic sphere at a nominal speed of 2 km s-1. This continued until the mass of the largest remaining piece was less than half the mass of the target presented to that shot (MS). Two chunks of Bushveldt gabbro with similar initial masses were also impacted under the same conditions until MR was less than half M0. The two gabbro targets required a total of 1.51 × 107 and 1.75 × 107 erg g-1 to attain 0.27 and 0.33 MR/M0, respectively; the chondrite, however, was considerably tougher, reaching 0.40 and 0.21 MR/M0 only after receiving 2.37 × 107 and 3.10 × 107 erg g-1, respectively. The combined ejecta and spallation products from the gabbro impacts were coarser than those from the chondrite and in sufficient quantities that the new surface areas exceeded those from the meteorite until the fifth shot in the chondrite series, which was the number of impacts required to disrupt each gabbro target (i.e., MR/M0 ≤ 0.5). Unlike the behavior shown in previous regolith-evolution series, neither gabbro target produced an enhancement in the size fraction reflecting the mean size of the crystals composing the rock (about 3 mm), an effect possibly related to the width of the shock pulse. The original chondrite was so fine-grained and fractured, and the variance in its grain-size distribution so large, that effects related to grain size were relegated to the <63 μm fraction. Impacts into ALH 85017 produced abundant, fine-grained debris, but otherwise the slopes of its size distributions were comparable to those from other experiments involving natural and fabricated terrestrial targets. The characteristic slopes of the chondrite’s size distributions, however, were notably more constant over the entire nine-impact series than those from any of

  10. Urinary catheterization may not adversely impact quality of life in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    James, Rebecca; Frasure, Heidi E; Mahajan, Sangeeta T

    2014-01-01

    Background. Multiple sclerosis (MS) healthcare providers (HCP) have undergone considerable educational efforts regarding the importance of evaluating and treating pelvic floor disorders, specifically, urinary dysfunction. However, limited data are available to determine the impact of catheterization on patient quality of life (QoL). Objectives. To describe the use of urinary catheterization among MS patients and determine the differences between those who report positive versus negative impact of this treatment on QoL. Methods. Patients were queried as part of the 2010 North American Research Committee On Multiple Sclerosis survey; topics included 1) urinary/bladder, bowel, or sexual problems; 2) current urine leakage; 3) current catheter use; 4) catheterizing and QoL. Results. Respondents with current urine leakage were 5143 (54.7%), of which 1201 reported current catheter use (12.8%). The types of catheters (intermittent self-catheterization and Foley catheter (indwelling and suprapubic)) did not differ significantly. Of the current catheter users, 304 (25.35%) respondents reported catheterization negatively impacting QoL, 629 (52.4%) reported a positive impact on QoL, and 223 (18.6%) reported neutral QoL. Conclusions. A large proportion of catheterized MS patients report negative or positive changes in QoL associated with urinary catheterization. Urinary catheterization does not appear to have a universally negative impact on patient QoL.

  11. Accounting for multiple sources of uncertainty in impact assessments: The example of the BRACE study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, B. C.

    2015-12-01

    Assessing climate change impacts often requires the use of multiple scenarios, types of models, and data sources, leading to a large number of potential sources of uncertainty. For example, a single study might require a choice of a forcing scenario, climate model, bias correction and/or downscaling method, societal development scenario, model (typically several) for quantifying elements of societal development such as economic and population growth, biophysical model (such as for crop yields or hydrology), and societal impact model (e.g. economic or health model). Some sources of uncertainty are reduced or eliminated by the framing of the question. For example, it may be useful to ask what an impact outcome would be conditional on a given societal development pathway, forcing scenario, or policy. However many sources of uncertainty remain, and it is rare for all or even most of these sources to be accounted for. I use the example of a recent integrated project on the Benefits of Reduced Anthropogenic Climate changE (BRACE) to explore useful approaches to uncertainty across multiple components of an impact assessment. BRACE comprises 23 papers that assess the differences in impacts between two alternative climate futures: those associated with Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) 4.5 and 8.5. It quantifies difference in impacts in terms of extreme events, health, agriculture, tropical cyclones, and sea level rise. Methodologically, it includes climate modeling, statistical analysis, integrated assessment modeling, and sector-specific impact modeling. It employs alternative scenarios of both radiative forcing and societal development, but generally uses a single climate model (CESM), partially accounting for climate uncertainty by drawing heavily on large initial condition ensembles. Strengths and weaknesses of the approach to uncertainty in BRACE are assessed. Options under consideration for improving the approach include the use of perturbed physics

  12. Simultaneous Multiple-Jet Impacts in Concrete-Experiments and Advanced Computational Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, D.W.; Kuklo, R.M.; Routh, J.W.; Simonson, S.C.

    1999-08-12

    The simultaneous impact of multiple shaped-charge jets on a concrete target has been observed experimentally to lead to the formation of a larger and deeper entrance crater than would be expected from the superposition of the craters of the individual jets. The problem has been modeled with the 3-D simulation code ALE3D, running on massively parallel processors. These calculations indicate that the enlarged damage area is the result of tensile stresses caused by the interactions among the pressure waves simultaneously emanating from the three impact sites. This phenomenon has the potential for enhancing the penetration of a follow-on projectile.

  13. Development of Explosive Systems for Investigating Multiple Impacts of Solid Projectiles with Moderate Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, E. E.; Bodrenko, S. I.; Burtsev, V. V.; Bushmelev, P. S.; Vasil'ev, M. L.; Vlasova, M. A.; Domnichev, V. V.; Zhabitskii, S. K.; Lobanov, V. N.; Mel'tsas, V. Yu.; Portnyagina, G. F.; Prokhorov, S. V.; Stadnik, A. L.; Tanakov, Z. V.; Yanilkin, Yu. V.

    2006-08-01

    We present the results of development of explosive systems for investigating multiple action of solid projectiles upon an obstacle at a moderate impact velocity on the order of 1 km/s. Two types of systems are considered, namely: 1) evacuating shock tube with plane high explosive (HE), 2) ballistic gun with distributed shot of plastic HE. In the first system an acceleration of steel spheres are realized in flux of expanding explosive products. The second system provides the acceleration of a "soft" plastic block with steel spheres having certain mutual orientation. The experiments with these explosive systems testify to higher effectiveness of projectiles penetration into obstacles at multiple impact with a moderate velocity.

  14. The impact of multiple infections on wild animal hosts: a review

    PubMed Central

    Bordes, Frédéric; Morand, Serge

    2011-01-01

    Field parasitological studies consistently demonstrate the reality of polyparasitism in natural systems. However, only recently, studies from ecological and evolutionary fields have emphasised a broad spectrum of potential multiple infections-related impacts. The main goal of our review is to reunify the different approaches on the impacts of polyparasitism, not only from laboratory or human medical studies but also from field or theoretical studies. We put forward that ecological and epidemiological determinants to explain the level of polyparasitism, which regularly affects not only host body condition, survival or reproduction but also host metabolism, genetics or immune investment. Despite inherent limitations of all these studies, multiple infections should be considered more systematically in wildlife to better appreciate the importance of parasite diversity in wildlife, cumulative effects of parasitism on the ecology and evolution of their hosts. PMID:22957114

  15. Mesiodens with an unusual morphology and multiple impacted supernumerary teeth in a non-syndromic patient.

    PubMed

    Srivatsan, Pavithra; Aravindha Babu, N

    2007-01-01

    Supernumerary teeth are a relatively frequent disorder of odontogenesis characterized by an excess number of teeth. Mesiodens is the most common type of supernumerary tooth found in the premaxilla between the two central incisors. They can be supplemental (resembling natural teeth), conical, tuberculate or molariform. We present the case of a 19 year-old girl who presented with a mesiodens of an unusual morphology and multiple impacted supernumerary teeth not associated with any syndrome.

  16. Interactions between tobamovirus replication proteins and cellular factors: their impacts on virus multiplication.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Kazuhiro; Nishikiori, Masaki; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2010-11-01

    Most viral gene products function inside cells in the presence of various host proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids. Thus, viral gene products come into direct contact with these molecules. The replication proteins of tobamovirus participate not only in viral genome replication but also in counterdefense mechanisms against RNA silencing and other plant defense systems. Accumulating evidence indicates that these functions are carried out through interactions with specific host components. Interactions with some cellular factors, however, are inhibitory to virus multiplication and contribute to host range restriction of tobamovirus. The interactions that have positive and negative impacts on virus multiplication should have been maintained and lost, respectively, during adaptation of the viruses to their respective natural hosts. This review lists the host factors that interact with the replication proteins of tobamovirus and discusses how they influence multiplication of the virus.

  17. Impacts and interactions of multiple human perturbations in a California salt marsh.

    PubMed

    Goldman Martone, Rebecca; Wasson, Kerstin

    2008-11-01

    Multiple disturbances to ecosystems can influence community structure by modifying resistance to and recovery from invasion by non-native species. Predicting how invasibility responds to multiple anthropogenic impacts is particularly challenging due to the variety of potential stressors and complex responses. Using manipulative field experiments, we examined the relative impact of perturbations that primarily change abiotic or biotic factors to promote invasion in coastal salt marsh plant communities. Specifically we test the hypotheses that nitrogen enrichment and human trampling facilitate invasion of upland weeds into salt marsh, and that the ability of salt marsh communities to resist and/or recover from invasion is modified by hydrological conditions. Nitrogen enrichment affected invasion of non-native upland plants at only one of six sites, and increased aboveground native marsh biomass at only two sites. Percent cover of native marsh plants declined with trampling at all sites, but recovered earlier at tidally flushed sites than at tidally restricted sites. Synergistic interactions between trampling and restricting tidal flow resulted in significantly higher cover of non-native upland plants in trampled plots at tidally restricted sites. Percent cover of non-native plants recovered to pre-trampling levels in fully tidal sites, but remained higher in tidally restricted sites after 22 months. Thus, perturbations that reduce biotic resistance interact with perturbations that alter abiotic conditions to promote invasion. This suggests that to effectively conserve or restore native biodiversity in altered systems, one must consider impacts of multiple human disturbances, and the interactions between them.

  18. The impact of comorbidity on mortality in multiple myeloma: a Danish nationwide population-based study.

    PubMed

    Gregersen, Henrik; Vangsted, Annette Juul; Abildgaard, Niels; Andersen, Niels Frost; Pedersen, Robert Schou; Frølund, Ulf Christian; Helleberg, Carsten; Broch, Bettina; Pedersen, Per Trøllund; Gimsing, Peter; Klausen, Tobias Wirenfeldt

    2017-07-01

    To describe the prevalence of comorbidity and its impact on survival in newly diagnosed multiple myeloma patients compared with population controls. Cases of newly diagnosed symptomatic multiple myeloma during the 2005-2012 period were identified in the Danish National Multiple Myeloma Registry. For each myeloma patient, 10 members of the general population matched by age and sex were chosen from the national Civil Registration System. Data on comorbidity in the myeloma patients and the general population comparison cohort were collected by linkage to the Danish National Patient Registry (DNPR). Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to evaluate the prognostic significance of comorbidity. The study included 2190 cases of multiple myeloma and 21,900 population controls. The comorbidity was increased in multiple myeloma patients compared with population controls, odds ratio (OR) 1.4 (1.1-1.7). The registration of comorbidity was highly increased within the year preceding diagnosis of multiple myeloma (OR 3.0 [2.5-3.5]), which was attributable to an increased registration of various diseases, in particular, renal disease with OR 11.0 (8.1-14.9). The median follow-up time from diagnosis of multiple myeloma for patients alive was 4.3 years (interquartile range 2.4-6.3). Patients with registered comorbidity had increased mortality compared with patients without comorbidity, hazard ratio 1.6 (1.5-1.8). Multiple myeloma patients have increased comorbidity compared with the background population, in particular during the year preceding the diagnosis of myeloma. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Analysing the impact of multiple stressors in aquatic biomonitoring data: A 'cookbook' with applications in R.

    PubMed

    Feld, Christian K; Segurado, Pedro; Gutiérrez-Cánovas, Cayetano

    2016-12-15

    Multiple stressors threaten biodiversity and ecosystem integrity, imposing new challenges to ecosystem management and restoration. Ecosystem managers are required to address and mitigate the impact of multiple stressors, yet the knowledge required to disentangle multiple-stressor effects is still incomplete. Experimental studies have advanced the understanding of single and combined stressor effects, but there is a lack of a robust analytical framework, to address the impact of multiple stressors based on monitoring data. Since 2000, the monitoring of Europe's waters has resulted in a vast amount of biological and environmental (stressor) data of about 120,000 water bodies. For many reasons, this data is rarely exploited in the multiple-stressor context, probably because of its rather heterogeneous nature: stressors vary and are mixed with broad-scale proxies of environmental stress (e.g. land cover), missing values and zero-inflated data limit the application of statistical methods and biological indicators are often aggregated (e.g. taxon richness) and do not respond stressor-specific. Here, we present a 'cookbook' to analyse the biological response to multiple stressors using data from biomonitoring schemes. Our 'cookbook' includes guidance for the analytical process and the interpretation of results. The 'cookbook' is accompanied by scripts, which allow the user to run a stepwise analysis based on his/her own data in R, an open-source language and environment for statistical computing and graphics. Using simulated and real data, we show that the recommended procedure is capable of identifying stressor hierarchy (importance) and interaction in large datasets. We recommend a minimum number of 150 independent observations and a minimum stressor gradient length of 75% (of the most relevant stressor's gradient in nature), to be able to reliably rank the stressor's importance, detect relevant interactions and estimate their standardised effect size. We conclude with

  20. Modeling oncogene addiction using RNA interference

    PubMed Central

    Rothenberg, S. Michael; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Le, Sheila; Riese, David J.; Haber, Daniel A.; Settleman, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of selective kinase inhibitors suggests that some cancer cells may become dependent on a single oncogene for survival. RNAi has been increasingly used to understand such “oncogene addiction” and validate new therapeutic targets. However, RNAi approaches suffer from significant off-target effects that limit their utility. Here, we combine carefully titrated lentiviral-mediated short hairpin RNA knockdown of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with heterologous reconstitution by EGFR mutants to rigorously analyze the structural features and signaling activities that determine addiction to the mutationally activated EGFR in human lung cancer cells. EGFR dependence is differentially rescued by distinct EGFR variants and oncogenic mutants, is critically dependent on its heterodimerization partner ErbB-3, and surprisingly, does not require autophosphorylation sites in the cytoplasmic domain. Quantitative “oncogene rescue” analysis allows mechanistic dissection of oncogene addiction, and, when broadly applied, may provide functional validation for potential therapeutic targets identified through large-scale RNAi screens. PMID:18711136

  1. Perceived Impact of Spasticity Is Associated with Spatial and Temporal Parameters of Gait in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Balantrapu, Swathi; Sandroff, Brian M.; Sosnoff, Jacob J.; Motl, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Spasticity is prevalent and disabling in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS), and the development of the Multiple Sclerosis Spasticity Scale-88 (MSSS-88) provides an opportunity for examining the perceived impact of spasticity and its association with gait in this population. Purpose. This study examined the association between the perceived impact of spasticity and spatio-temporal parameters of gait in persons with MS. Methods. The sample included 44 adults with MS who completed the MSSS-88 and 4 walking trials on a 26-foot GAITRiteTM electronic walkway for measurement of spatio-temporal components of gait including velocity, cadence, base of support, step time, single support, double support, and swing phase. Results. The overall MSSS-88 score was significantly associated with velocity (r = −0.371), cadence (r = −0.306), base of support (r = 0.357), step time (r = 0.305), single leg support (r = −0.388), double leg support (r = 0.379), and swing phase (r = −0.386). Conclusions. The perceived impact of spasticity coincides with alterations of the spatio-temporal parameters of gait in MS. This indicates that subsequent interventions might target a decrease in spasticity or its perceived impact as an approach for improving mobility in MS. PMID:22462022

  2. The impact of embedding multiple modes of representation on student construction of chemistry knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, Mark Andrew

    2009-12-01

    This study was designed to examine the impact of embedding multiple modes of representing science information on student conceptual understanding in science. Multiple representations refer to utilizing charts, graphs, diagrams, and other types of representations to communicate scientific information. This study investigated the impact of encouraging students to embed or integrate the multiple modes with text in end of unit writing-to-learn activities. A quasi-experimental design with four separate sites consisting of intact chemistry classes taught by different teachers at each site was utilized. At each site, approximately half of the classes were designated treatment classes and students in these classes participated in activities designed to encourage strategies to embed multiple modes within text in student writing. The control classes did not participate in these activities. All classes participated in identical end of unit writing tasks in which they were required to use at least one mode other than text, followed by identical end of unit assessments. This progression was then repeated for a second consecutive unit of study. Analysis of quantitative data indicated that in several cases, treatment classes significantly outperformed control classes both on measures of embeddedness in writing and on end of unit assessment measures. In addition, analysis at the level of individual students indicated significant positive correlations in many cases between measures of student embeddedness in writing and student performance on end of unit assessments. Three factors emerged as critical in increasing the likelihood of benefit for students from these types of activities. First, the level of teacher implementation and emphasis on the embeddedness lessons was linked to the possibility of conceptual benefit. Secondly, students participating in two consecutive lessons appeared to receive greater benefit during the second unit, inferring a cumulative benefit. Finally

  3. Multiplicity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    practice as a "[descent] into that inner circle of the Inferno where the damned endlessly degate multiplicity for sentencing." United States v. Barnard...select the charges to be brought in a particular case"). 19 Brown v. Ohio, 432 U.S. 161, 165 (1977). 20 Whalen v. United States, 445 U.S. at 689. 21...parte Lange, 8-5 U.S. (19 Wall.) 163 (1874). Cf. Brown v. Ohio, 432 U.S. at 165 ("once the legislature has acted courts may not impose more than one

  4. Doubly differential single and multiple ionization of krypton by electron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Lucio, O. G. de; Gavin, J.; DuBois, R. D.

    2007-05-15

    Differential measurements for single and multiple ionization of Kr by 240 and 500 eV electron impact are presented. Using a pulsed extraction field, Kr{sup +}, Kr{sup 2+}, and Kr{sup 3+} ions were measured in coincidence with scattered electrons for energy losses up to 120 eV and scattering angles between 16 degree sign and 90 degree sign . Scaling properties of the doubly differential cross sections (DDCS) are investigated as a function of energy loss, scattering angle, and momentum transfer. It is shown that scaling the DDCS as outlined by Kim and Inokuti and plotting them versus a parameter consisting of the momentum transfer divided by the square root of the impact energy times 1-cos({theta}), where {theta} is the scattering angle, yielded similar curves, but with different magnitudes, for single and multiple ionization. Normalizing these curves together produced two universal curves, one appropriate for single and multiple electron emission at larger scattering angles ({theta}{>=}30 degree sign ) and one appropriate for small scattering angles ({theta}<30 degree sign )

  5. Meteorite impacts on ancient oceans opened up multiple NH3 production pathways.

    PubMed

    Shimamura, Kohei; Shimojo, Fuyuki; Nakano, Aiichiro; Tanaka, Shigenori

    2017-05-10

    A recent series of shock experiments by Nakazawa et al. starting in 2005 (e.g. [Nakazawa et al., Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 2005, 235, 356]) suggested that meteorite impacts on ancient oceans would have yielded a considerable amount of NH3 to the early Earth from atmospheric N2 and oceanic H2O through reduction by meteoritic iron. To clarify the mechanisms, we imitated the impact events by performing multi-scale shock technique-based ab initio molecular dynamics in the framework of density functional theory in combination with multi-scale shock technique (MSST) simulations. Our previous simulations with impact energies close to that of the experiments revealed picosecond-order rapid NH3 production during shock compression [Shimamura et al., Sci. Rep., 2016, 6, 38952]. It was also shown that the reduction of N2 took place with an associative mechanism as seen in the catalysis of nitrogenase enzymes. In this study, we performed an MSST-AIMD simulation to investigate the production by meteorite impacts with higher energies, which are closer to the expected values on the early Earth. It was found that the amount of NH3 produced further increased. We also found that the increased NH3 production is due to the emergence of multiple reaction mechanisms at increased impact energies. We elucidated that the reduction of N2 was not only attributed to the associative mechanism but also to a dissociative mechanism as seen in the Haber-Bosch process and to a mechanism through a hydrazinium ion. The emergence of these multiple production mechanisms capable of providing a large amount of NH3 would support the suggestions from recent experiments much more strongly than was previously believed, i.e., shock-induced NH3 production played a key role in the origin of life on Earth.

  6. Defining high, medium and low impact prognostic factors for developing multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tintore, Mar; Rovira, Àlex; Río, Jordi; Otero-Romero, Susana; Arrambide, Georgina; Tur, Carmen; Comabella, Manuel; Nos, Carlos; Arévalo, María Jesús; Negrotto, Laura; Galán, Ingrid; Vidal-Jordana, Angela; Castilló, Joaquin; Palavra, Filipe; Simon, Eva; Mitjana, Raquel; Auger, Cristina; Sastre-Garriga, Jaume; Montalban, Xavier

    2015-07-01

    [adjusted hazard ratio 0.6 (0.4-1.0)] in adjusted models. The presence of oligoclonal bands increased the risk of clinically definite multiple sclerosis [adjusted hazard ratio 1.3 (1.0-1.8)] and of disability [adjusted hazard ratio 2.0 (1.2-3.6)] independently of other factors. The presence of 10 or more brain lesions on magnetic resonance increased the risk of clinically definite multiple sclerosis [adjusted hazard ratio 11.3 (6.7-19.3)] and disability [adjusted hazard ratio 2.9 (1.4-6.0)]. Disease-modifying treatment before the second attack reduced the risk of McDonald multiple sclerosis [adjusted hazard ratio 0.6 (0.4-0.9)] and disability accumulation [adjusted hazard ratio 0.5 (0.3-0.9)]. We conclude that the demographic and topographic characteristics are low-impact prognostic factors, the presence of oligoclonal bands is a medium-impact prognostic factor, and the number of lesions on brain magnetic resonance is a high-impact prognostic factor.

  7. The roles of oncogenic miRNAs and their therapeutic importance in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    O'Bryan, Samia; Dong, Shengli; Mathis, J Michael; Alahari, Suresh K

    2017-02-01

    Since the discovery of tumour suppressive miRNA in 2002, the dysregulation of miRNAs was implicated in many cancers, exhibiting both tumour suppressive and oncogenic roles. Dysregulation of miRNAs was found to be involved in the initiation of oncogenesis, as well as the progression, invasion and metastasis of cancers. While normal miRNA inhibitory functions help regulate gene expression in the cell, oncogenic miRNA, when dysregulated can lead to suppression of critical pathways that control apoptosis, cell cycle progression, growth and proliferation. This suppression allows for the upregulation of pro-oncogenic factors that drive cell survival, growth and proliferation. Due to emerging discoveries, oncogenic miRNAs are proving to be a critical component in cancers, such as breast cancer, and may provide novel avenues for cancer treatment. In this article, we discuss the roles of the most studied oncogenic miRNAs in breast cancer including clusters and families involved as well as the less studied and recently discovered oncogenic miRNAs. These miRNAs provide valuable information into the complexity of regulatory elements affected by their overexpression and the overall impact in the progression of breast cancer. Also, identifying miRNAs causing or leading to resistance or sensitivity to current anti-cancer drugs prior to treatment may lead to an improvement in treatment selection and overall patient response. This review summarizes known and recently discovered miRNAs in literature found to have oncogenic roles in breast cancer initiation and the progression, invasion and metastasis of the disease.

  8. Modulating the Strength and Threshold of NOTCH Oncogenic Signals by mir-181a-1/b-1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Song; Schaffert, Steven; Gong, Xue; Yue, Sibiao; Luong, Richard; Min, Hyeyoung; Yashiro-Ohtani, Yumi; Davis, Mark; Pear, Warren; Chen, Chang-Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Oncogenes, which are essential for tumor initiation, development, and maintenance, are valuable targets for cancer therapy. However, it remains a challenge to effectively inhibit oncogene activity by targeting their downstream pathways without causing significant toxicity to normal tissues. Here we show that deletion of mir-181a-1/b-1 expression inhibits the development of Notch1 oncogene-induced T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). mir-181a-1/b-1 controls the strength and threshold of Notch activity in tumorigenesis in part by dampening multiple negative feedback regulators downstream of NOTCH and pre-T cell receptor (TCR) signaling pathways. Importantly, although Notch oncogenes utilize normal thymic progenitor cell genetic programs for tumor transformation, comparative analyses of mir-181a-1/b-1 function in normal thymocyte and tumor development demonstrate that mir-181a-1/b-1 can be specifically targeted to inhibit tumor development with little toxicity to normal development. Finally, we demonstrate that mir-181a-1/b-1, but not mir-181a-2b-2 and mir-181-c/d, controls the development of normal thymic T cells and leukemia cells. Together, these results illustrate that NOTCH oncogene activity in tumor development can be selectively inhibited by targeting the molecular networks controlled by mir-181a-1/b-1. PMID:22916024

  9. Youth crowds and substance use: the impact of perceived group norm and multiple group identification.

    PubMed

    Verkooijen, Kirsten T; de Vries, Nanne K; Nielsen, Gert A

    2007-03-01

    The impact of group identity on adolescent tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use was examined through a postal survey. The study included adolescents who identified with 1 subgroup (n = 1425) as well as adolescents who identified with 2 (n = 895) or 3 (n = 339) subgroups. The results showed that identification with the pop, skate/hip-hop, techno, and hippie subgroups was associated with higher risks of substance use, whereas identification with the sporty, quiet, computer nerd, and religious subgroups was associated with lower risks. Perceived group norm mediated the group identity-substance use relationship. Furthermore, identification with multiple groups with corresponding norm increased norm-consistent substance use, whereas identification with multiple groups with opposing norms reduced normative behavior. Implications for health promotion are discussed. (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved.

  10. Study of the Impact of Stellar Multiplicity on Planet Occurrence and Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorp, Rachel; Desert, J.; Baranec, C.; Law, N. M.; Johnson, J. A.; Riddle, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    Stellar multiplicity in an exoplanet host star system is likely to affect planetary formation and evolution. To explore this possibility, we used visible-light adaptive optics to search for the presence of possible bounded stellar companions to known exoplanet host stars. Here we present the results and analysis of 48 exoplanet host stars as imaged by the Robo-AO system on the 1.5-m telescope at Palomar Observatory. For each object, we performed a search for the presence of stellar companions using several techniques, and for each method we assessed its detection limits. Finally, we address the questions of sensitivity, density number, and spectral types of stellar companions from a statistical standpoint, and conclude on the impact of stellar multiplicity to exoplanet host stars.

  11. Irreducible procidentia due to multiple bladder calculi mimicking impacted faecal mass.

    PubMed

    Rajamaheswari, N; Agarwal, S; Krishnan, S

    2012-10-01

    A case of massive irreducible procidentia with a hard palpable mass in the anterior vaginal wall mimicking an impacted faecal mass in a 57-year-old multiparous, post-menopausal woman is reported. Inability to walk, constipation and urinary incontinence were her primary complaints. Routine CT of the abdomen and pelvis excluded intestinal pathology, but failed to reveal multiple vesical calculi as the procidentia was lying outside the imaging zone of the pelvic CT. However, targeted plain X-ray and ultrasound of the prolapsed mass disclosed the existence of multiple vesical calculi. The patient was managed with single-stage laparotomy and vaginal hysterectomy. Hysterectomy permitted the reduction of the prolapse and facilitated extraperitoneal vesicolithotomy. Laparotomy excluded bowel pathology. No reconstructive surgical steps for repair and reconstruction were combined. Currently, the patient is relieved of all symptoms and her asymptomatic stage II vault prolapse is managed conservatively.

  12. Progression of a Fracture Site Impaction as a Prognostic Indicator of Impacted Femoral Neck Fracture Treated with Multiple Pinning

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Pil Whan; Shin, Young Ho; Yoo, Jeong Joon; Yoon, Kang Sup

    2012-01-01

    Background We evaluated the clinical and radiologic results of impacted femoral neck fractures treated with multiple pinning and determined the influence of the progression of impaction at the fracture site on clinical outcome. Methods There were 34 patients with a mean age of 65.5 years. The mean follow-up period was 3.4 years. Progression of fracture site impaction was measured using an articulo-trochanteric distance index and the percentage decrease in the articulo-trochanteric distance index between follow-up intervals. The failure of treatment was clarified as non-union and avascular necrosis. Other characteristics of the patients, including mean waiting time for surgery, preoperative Singh index score, and body mass index, were also measured to evaluate the influence on the clinical outcome of surgery. Results There were 6 fractures which were not treated successfully (3 non-union, 8.8% and 3 avascular necrosis, 8.8%). The mean percentage decrease of the articulo-trochanteric distance index within the first 6 weeks after surgery was 4.5% in the successful group and 25.1% in the failure group (p < 0.001). There was also a significant mean percentage decrease in the articulo-trochanteric distance index between 6 weeks and 3 months (p < 0.001). Conclusions Primary stabilization with Knowles pins for impacted femoral neck fractures had a reasonable clinical outcome with low morbidity. Despite a significant difference of a mean percentage decrease in the articulo-trochanteric distance index between the successful group and the failure group, we could not verify it as a risk factor for failure of treatment because the odds ratio was not statistically significant. PMID:22379557

  13. Progression of a fracture site impaction as a prognostic indicator of impacted femoral neck fracture treated with multiple pinning.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Pil Whan; Shin, Young Ho; Yoo, Jeong Joon; Yoon, Kang Sup; Kim, Hee Joong

    2012-03-01

    We evaluated the clinical and radiologic results of impacted femoral neck fractures treated with multiple pinning and determined the influence of the progression of impaction at the fracture site on clinical outcome. There were 34 patients with a mean age of 65.5 years. The mean follow-up period was 3.4 years. Progression of fracture site impaction was measured using an articulo-trochanteric distance index and the percentage decrease in the articulo-trochanteric distance index between follow-up intervals. The failure of treatment was clarified as non-union and avascular necrosis. Other characteristics of the patients, including mean waiting time for surgery, preoperative Singh index score, and body mass index, were also measured to evaluate the influence on the clinical outcome of surgery. There were 6 fractures which were not treated successfully (3 non-union, 8.8% and 3 avascular necrosis, 8.8%). The mean percentage decrease of the articulo-trochanteric distance index within the first 6 weeks after surgery was 4.5% in the successful group and 25.1% in the failure group (p < 0.001). There was also a significant mean percentage decrease in the articulo-trochanteric distance index between 6 weeks and 3 months (p < 0.001). Primary stabilization with Knowles pins for impacted femoral neck fractures had a reasonable clinical outcome with low morbidity. Despite a significant difference of a mean percentage decrease in the articulo-trochanteric distance index between the successful group and the failure group, we could not verify it as a risk factor for failure of treatment because the odds ratio was not statistically significant.

  14. Oncogene v-jun modulates DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Wasylyk, C; Schneikert, J; Wasylyk, B

    1990-07-01

    Cell transformation leads to alterations in both transcription and DNA replication. Activation of transcription by the expression of a number of transforming oncogenes is mediated by the transcription factor AP1 (Herrlich & Ponta, 1989; Imler & Wasylyk, 1989). AP1 is a composite transcription factor, consisting of members of the jun and fos gene-families. c-jun and c-fos are progenitors of oncogenes, suggestion that an important transcriptional event in cell transformation is altered activity of AP1, which may arise either indirectly by oncogene expression or directly by structural modification of AP1. We report here that the v-jun oncogene and its progenitor c-jun, as fusion proteins with the lex-A-repressor DNA binding domain, can activate DNA replication from the Polyoma virus (Py) origin of replication, linked to the lex-A operator. The transcription-activation region of v-jun is required for activation of replication. When excess v-jun is expressed in the cell, replication is inhibited or 'squelched'. These results suggest that one consequence of deregulated jun activity could be altered DNA replication and that there are similarities in the way v-jun activates replication and transcription.

  15. Oncogenic mutations of thyroid hormone receptor β

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeong Won; Zhao, Li; Willingham, Mark; Cheng, Sheue-yann

    2015-01-01

    The C-terminal frame-shift mutant of the thyroid hormone receptor TRβ1, PV, functions as an oncogene. An important question is whether the oncogenic activity of mutated TRβ1 is uniquely dependent on the PV mutated sequence. Using four C-terminal frame-shift mutants—PV, Mkar, Mdbs, and AM—we examined that region in the oncogenic actions of TRβ1 mutants. Remarkably, these C-terminal mutants induced similar growth of tumors in mouse xenograft models. Molecular analyses showed that they physically interacted with the p85α regulatory subunit of PI3K similarly in cells. In vitro GST-binding assay showed that they bound to the C-terminal Src-homology 2 (CSH2) of p85α with markedly higher avidity. The sustained association of mutants with p85α led to activation of the common PI3K-AKT-ERK/STAT3 signaling to promote cell proliferation and invasion and to inhibit apoptosis. Thus, these results argue against the oncogenic activity of PV being uniquely dependent on the PV mutated sequence. Rather, these four mutants could favor a C-terminal conformation that interacted with the CSH2 domain of p85α to initiate activation of PI3K to relay downstream signaling to promote tumorigenesis. Thus, we propose that the mutated C-terminal region of TRβ1 could function as an “onco-domain” and TRβ1 is a potential therapeutic target. PMID:25924236

  16. Novel Oncogenes in Breast Cancer Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-07-01

    determinants that contribute to the development of breast cancer remain unknown We have developed and applied a novel retrovirus-based library ... screening strategy coupled to a biological assay for growth transformation, to identify novel oncogenes in breast cancer development The approach involves the

  17. Stochastic responses of a viscoelastic-impact system under additive and multiplicative random excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiangrong; Xu, Wei; Yang, Yongge; Wang, Xiying

    2016-06-01

    This paper deals with the stochastic responses of a viscoelastic-impact system under additive and multiplicative random excitations. The viscoelastic force is replaced by a combination of stiffness and damping terms. The non-smooth transformation of the state variables is utilized to transform the original system to a new system without the impact term. The stochastic averaging method is applied to yield the stationary probability density functions. The validity of the analytical method is verified by comparing the analytical results with the numerical results. It is invaluable to note that the restitution coefficient, the viscoelastic parameters and the damping coefficients can induce the occurrence of stochastic P-bifurcation. Furthermore, the joint stationary probability density functions with three peaks are explored.

  18. Oncogenic viruses and hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ben Ari, Ziv; Weitzman, Ella; Safran, Michal

    2015-05-01

    About 80% of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is caused by hepatitis B virus (HBV) and/or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections especially in the setting of established cirrhosis or advanced fibrosis, making HCC prevention a major goal of antiviral therapy. HCC tumors are highly complex and heterogeneous resulting from the aberrant function of multiple molecular pathways. The roles of HCV or HBV in promoting HCC development are still either directly or indirectly are still speculative, but the evidence for both effects is compelling. In patients with chronic hepatitis viral infection, cirrhosis is not a prerequisite for tumorigenesis.

  19. Multiple stressors in sediments impact adjacent hard substrate habitats and across biological domains.

    PubMed

    Lawes, Jasmin C; Dafforn, Katherine A; Clark, Graeme F; Brown, Mark V; Johnston, Emma L

    2017-08-15

    Coastal systems are increasingly impacted by human activities. While the direct effects of individual contaminants have been investigated, the potential for multiple contaminants to impact adjacent hard substrate habitats is poorly understood. Sediment-bound contaminants pose a risk to water column organisms through resuspension and the fluxing of dissolved nutrients and metals. This study experimentally manipulated contaminated coastal sediments in mesocosms with additions of a common fertiliser to investigate the impact on both bacterial biofilms and macrofouling communities on nearby hard substrates. Field mesocosms were deployed sub-tidally for two weeks in a fully crossed design with two levels of metal contamination (ambient or high) and three levels of organic enrichment (ambient, low and high). Developing biofilm and macrofaunal communities were collected on acetate settlement sheets above the mesocosm sediments and censused with a combination of high-throughput sequencing (biofilm) and microscopy (macrofauna). Organic enrichment of sediments induced compositional shifts in biofilm communities, reducing their diversity, evenness and richness. Furthermore, co-occurrence networks built from microbial assemblages exposed to contaminated sediments displayed reduced connectivity compared to controls, suggesting a more stochastic assembly dynamic, where microbial interactions are reduced. Macrofouling community composition shifted in response to increased enrichment with separate and interactive effects of metals also observed for individual taxa. Specifically, antagonistic stressor interactions were observed for colonial ascidians and arborescent bryozoans; metal contamination decreased abundances of these taxa, except under high enrichment conditions. Together these micro- and macrofaunal responses indicate selection for depauperate, but contaminant-tolerant, communities and a potential breakdown in biotic connectivity through multiple stressor impacts across

  20. The impact of dynamic balance measures on walking performance in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Nora E.; Marasigan, Rhul Evans R.; Calabresi, Peter A.; Newsome, Scott D.; Zackowski, Kathleen M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Static posture imbalance and gait dysfunction are common in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). Although the impact of strength and static balance on walking has been examined, little is known about the impact of dynamic standing balance on walking in MS. Objective To determine the impact of dynamic balance, static balance, sensation, and strength measures to walking in individuals with MS. Methods 52 individuals with MS (27 females; 26 relapsing-remitting; mean age 45.6±10.3 years; median EDSS 3.5 (range 0-7) participated in testing for dynamic and static posturography (Kistler 9281 force plate), hip flexion, hip extension, and ankle dorsiflexion strength (Microfet2 hand-held dynamometer), sensation (Vibratron II) and walk velocity (Optotrak Motion Analysis System). Mann-Whitney tests, Spearman correlation coefficients, and forward stepwise multiple regression were used to assess statistical significance. Results All measures were significantly abnormal in MS subjects when compared to age and sex-matched norms (p<0.05 for all). Static balance (eyes open, feet together [EOFT]), anterior- posterior (AP) dynamic sway, and hip extension strength were strongly correlated with fast walking velocity (AP sway r=0.68; hip extension strength r=0.73; EOFT r=-0.40). Together, AP dynamic sway (ρr=0.71, p<0.001), hip extension strength (ρr=0.54, p<0.001), and EOFT static balance (ρr=-0.41, p=0.01) explained more than 70% of the variance in fast walking velocity (p<0.001). Conclusions These data suggest that AP dynamic sway impacts walking performance in MS. A combined evaluation of dynamic balance, static balance and strength may lead to a better understanding of walking mechanisms as well as the development of strategies to improve walking. PMID:24795162

  1. Viral oncogenes, proto-oncogenes and homoeotic genes related to cell proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Antohi, S; Antohi-Talle, O

    1987-01-01

    Molecular studies on viral oncogenes and their products have led to the discovery of physiological proto-oncogenes, involved in the control of cell proliferation and gene activation. Other genetic and molecular investigations, initiated in Drosophila melanogaster and continued in different multicellular eukaryotes, have made evident the homoeotic genes, which are directly correlated with cell specialization, in the complex processes of differentiation and morphogenesis. Both gene classes are conserved to a high extent during evolution. They are involved in the eukaryotic mechanisms of differentiation control and proto-oncogenes, in particular, are related to malignant transformation. Some available data suggest a certain extent of relatedness between the gene products of both gene classes. A differentiation trigger model, including retroviral transposition, homoeotic genes and proto-oncogenes is discussed.

  2. Impact experiments into multiple-mesh targets: Concept development of a lightweight collisional bumper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoerz, Friedrich; Cintala, Mark J.; Bernhard, Ronald P.; Cardenas, Frank; Davidson, William; Haynes, Gerald; See, Thomas H.; Winkler, Jerry; Gray, Barry

    1993-01-01

    The utility of multiple-mesh targets as potential lightweight shields to protect spacecraft in low-Earth orbit against collisional damage is explored. Earlier studies revealed that single meshes comminute hypervelocity impactors with efficiencies comparable to contiguous targets. Multiple interaction of projectile fragments with any number of meshes should lead to increased comminution, deceleration, and dispersion of the projectile, such that all debris exiting the mesh stack possesses low specific energies (ergs/sq cm) that would readily be tolerated by many flight systems. The study is conceptually exploring the sensitivity of major variables such as impact velocity, the specific areal mass (g/sq cm) of the total mesh stack (SM), and the separation distance (S) between individual meshes. Most experiments employed five or ten meshes with total SM typically less than 0.5 the specific mass of the impactor, and silicate glass impactors rather than metal projectiles. While projectile comminution increases with increasing impact velocity due to progressively higher shock stresses, encounters with multiple-meshes at low velocity (1-2 km/s) already lead to significant disruption of the glass impactors, with the resulting fragments being additionally decelerated and dispersed by subsequent meshes, and, unlike most contiguous single-plate bumpers, leading to respectable performance at low velocity. Total specific bumper mass must be the subject of careful trade-off studies; relatively massive bumpers will generate too much debris being dislodged from the bumper itself, while exceptionally lightweight designs will not cause sufficient comminution, deceleration, or dispersion of the impactor. Separation distance was found to be a crucial design parameter, as it controls the dispersion of the fragment cloud. Substantial mass savings could result if maximum separation distances were employed. The total mass of debris dislodged by multiple-mesh stacks is modestly smaller than

  3. Tracking MET de-addiction in lung cancer: A road towards the oncogenic target.

    PubMed

    Pilotto, S; Carbognin, L; Karachaliou, N; Ma, P C; Rosell, R; Tortora, G; Bria, E

    2017-08-20

    The discovery of druggable oncogenic drivers (i.e. EGFR and ALK), along with the introduction of comprehensive tumor genotyping techniques into the daily clinical practice define non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) asa group of heterogeneous diseases, requiring a context-personalized clinico-therapeutical approach. Among the most investigated biomarkers, the MET proto-oncogene has been extensively demonstrated to play a crucial role throughout the lung oncogenesis, unbalancing the proliferation/apoptosis signaling and influencing the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and the invasive phenotype. Nevertheless, although different mechanisms eliciting the aberrant MET-associated oncogenic stimulus have been detected in lung cancer (such as gene amplification, increased gene copy number, mutations and MET/HGF overexpression), to date no clinically impactful results have been achieved with anti-MET tyrosine kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies in the context of an unselected or MET enriched population. Recently, MET exon 14 splicing abnormalities have been identified asa potential oncogenic target in lung cancer, able to drive the activity of MET inhibitors in molecularly selected patients. In this paper, the major advancement and drawbacks of MET history in lung cancer are reviewed, underlying the renewed scientific euphoria related to the recent identification of MET exon 14 splicing variants asan actionable oncogenic target. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Spi-1, Fli-1 and Fli-3 (miR-17-92) oncogenes contribute to a single oncogenic network controlling cell proliferation in friend erythroleukemia.

    PubMed

    Kayali, Samer; Giraud, Guillaume; Morlé, François; Guyot, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Clonal erythroleukemia developing in susceptible mice infected by Friend virus complex are associated with highly recurrent proviral insertions at one of three loci called Spi-1, Fli-1 or Fli-3, leading to deregulated expression of oncogenic Spi-1 or Fli-1 transcription factors or miR-17-92 miRNA cluster, respectively. Deregulated expression of each of these three oncogenes has been independently shown to contribute to cell proliferation of erythroleukemic clones. Previous studies showed a close relationship between Spi-1 and Fli-1, which belong to the same ETS family, Spi-1 activating fli-1 gene, and both Spi-1 and Fli-1 activating multiple common target genes involved in ribosome biogenesis. In this study, we demonstrated that Spi-1 and Fli-1 are also involved in direct miR-17-92 transcriptional activation through their binding to a conserved ETS binding site in its promoter. Moreover, we demonstrated that physiological re-expression of exogenous miR-17 and miR-20a are able to partially rescue the proliferation loss induced by Fli-1 knock-down and identified HBP1 as a target of these miRNA in erythroleukemic cells. These results establish that three of the most recurrently activated oncogenes in Friend erythroleukemia are actually involved in a same oncogenic network controlling cell proliferation. The putative contribution of a similar ETS-miR-17-92 network module in other normal or pathological proliferative contexts is discussed.

  5. Spi-1, Fli-1 and Fli-3 (miR-17-92) Oncogenes Contribute to a Single Oncogenic Network Controlling Cell Proliferation in Friend Erythroleukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kayali, Samer; Giraud, Guillaume; Morlé, François; Guyot, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Clonal erythroleukemia developing in susceptible mice infected by Friend virus complex are associated with highly recurrent proviral insertions at one of three loci called Spi-1, Fli-1 or Fli-3, leading to deregulated expression of oncogenic Spi-1 or Fli-1 transcription factors or miR-17-92 miRNA cluster, respectively. Deregulated expression of each of these three oncogenes has been independently shown to contribute to cell proliferation of erythroleukemic clones. Previous studies showed a close relationship between Spi-1 and Fli-1, which belong to the same ETS family, Spi-1 activating fli-1 gene, and both Spi-1 and Fli-1 activating multiple common target genes involved in ribosome biogenesis. In this study, we demonstrated that Spi-1 and Fli-1 are also involved in direct miR-17-92 transcriptional activation through their binding to a conserved ETS binding site in its promoter. Moreover, we demonstrated that physiological re-expression of exogenous miR-17 and miR-20a are able to partially rescue the proliferation loss induced by Fli-1 knock-down and identified HBP1 as a target of these miRNA in erythroleukemic cells. These results establish that three of the most recurrently activated oncogenes in Friend erythroleukemia are actually involved in a same oncogenic network controlling cell proliferation. The putative contribution of a similar ETS-miR-17-92 network module in other normal or pathological proliferative contexts is discussed. PMID:23056458

  6. CCAT1: an oncogenic long noncoding RNA in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoqiang; Hua, Yuming

    2017-04-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a new class of noncoding RNAs that participate in a variety of biological processes such as cell proliferation, cell cycle, differentiation and apoptosis, mainly by regulation of gene expression at various levels, including chromatin, splicing, transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. CCAT1 is a recently identified oncogenic lncRNA, which has been reported to be consistently upregulated in multiple cancer tissues and closely correlated with initiation and progression of cancers. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of various roles of CCAT1 in human cancers. We searched studies in electronic databases. Studies have shown the high expression pattern and oncogenic role of CCAT1 in different types of cancer, and aberrant expression of CCAT1 is involved in several processes correlated with carcinogenesis such as cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration and invasion by regulating different target genes and pathways. LncRNA CCAT1 promises to be a novel diagnostic biomarker, therapeutic target, as well as prognostic biomarker in human cancers.

  7. Multiple Threats to Child Health from Fossil Fuel Combustion: Impacts of Air Pollution and Climate Change.

    PubMed

    Perera, Frederica P

    2017-02-01

    Approaches to estimating and addressing the risk to children from fossil fuel combustion have been fragmented, tending to focus either on the toxic air emissions or on climate change. Yet developing children, and especially poor children, now bear a disproportionate burden of disease from both environmental pollution and climate change due to fossil fuel combustion. This commentary summarizes the robust scientific evidence regarding the multiple current and projected health impacts of fossil fuel combustion on the young to make the case for a holistic, child-centered energy and climate policy that addresses the full array of physical and psychosocial stressors resulting from fossil fuel pollution. The data summarized here show that by sharply reducing our dependence on fossil fuels we would achieve highly significant health and economic benefits for our children and their future. These benefits would occur immediately and also play out over the life course and potentially across generations. Going beyond the powerful scientific and economic arguments for urgent action to reduce the burning of fossil fuels is the strong moral imperative to protect our most vulnerable populations. Citation: Perera FP. 2017. Multiple threats to child health from fossil fuel combustion: impacts of air pollution and climate change. Environ Health Perspect 125:141-148; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP299.

  8. Multiple Threats to Child Health from Fossil Fuel Combustion: Impacts of Air Pollution and Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Frederica P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Approaches to estimating and addressing the risk to children from fossil fuel combustion have been fragmented, tending to focus either on the toxic air emissions or on climate change. Yet developing children, and especially poor children, now bear a disproportionate burden of disease from both environmental pollution and climate change due to fossil fuel combustion. Objective: This commentary summarizes the robust scientific evidence regarding the multiple current and projected health impacts of fossil fuel combustion on the young to make the case for a holistic, child-centered energy and climate policy that addresses the full array of physical and psychosocial stressors resulting from fossil fuel pollution. Discussion: The data summarized here show that by sharply reducing our dependence on fossil fuels we would achieve highly significant health and economic benefits for our children and their future. These benefits would occur immediately and also play out over the life course and potentially across generations. Conclusion: Going beyond the powerful scientific and economic arguments for urgent action to reduce the burning of fossil fuels is the strong moral imperative to protect our most vulnerable populations. Citation: Perera FP. 2017. Multiple threats to child health from fossil fuel combustion: impacts of air pollution and climate change. Environ Health Perspect 125:141–148; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP299 PMID:27323709

  9. Variations in Multiple Birth Rates and Impact on Perinatal Outcomes in Europe.

    PubMed

    Heino, Anna; Gissler, Mika; Hindori-Mohangoo, Ashna D; Blondel, Béatrice; Klungsøyr, Kari; Verdenik, Ivan; Mierzejewska, Ewa; Velebil, Petr; Sól Ólafsdóttir, Helga; Macfarlane, Alison; Zeitlin, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Infants from multiple pregnancies have higher rates of preterm birth, stillbirth and neonatal death and differences in multiple birth rates (MBR) exist between countries. We aimed to describe differences in MBR in Europe and to investigate the impact of these differences on adverse perinatal outcomes at a population level. We used national aggregate birth data on multiple pregnancies, maternal age, gestational age (GA), stillbirth and neonatal death collected in the Euro-Peristat project (29 countries in 2010, N = 5 074 643 births). We also used European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) data on assisted conception and single embryo transfer (SET). The impact of MBR on outcomes was studied using meta-analysis techniques with random-effects models to derive pooled risk ratios (pRR) overall and for four groups of country defined by their MBR. We computed population attributable risks (PAR) for these groups. In 2010, the average MBR was 16.8 per 1000 women giving birth, ranging from 9.1 (Romania) to 26.5 (Cyprus). Compared to singletons, multiples had a nine-fold increased risk (pRR 9.4, 95% Cl 9.1-9.8) of preterm birth (<37 weeks GA), an almost 12-fold increased risk (pRR 11.7, 95% CI 11.0-12.4) of very preterm birth (<32 weeks GA). Pooled RR were 2.4 (95% Cl 1.5-3.6) for fetal mortality at or after 28 weeks GA and 7.0 (95% Cl 6.1-8.0) for neonatal mortality. PAR of neonatal death and very preterm birth were higher in countries with high MBR compared to low MBR (17.1% (95% CI 13.8-20.2) versus 9.8% (95% Cl 9.6-11.0) for neonatal death and 29.6% (96% CI 28.5-30.6) versus 17.5% (95% CI 15.7-18.3) for very preterm births, respectively). Wide variations in MBR and their impact on population outcomes imply that efforts by countries to reduce MBR could improve perinatal outcomes, enabling better long-term child health.

  10. Variations in Multiple Birth Rates and Impact on Perinatal Outcomes in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Heino, Anna; Gissler, Mika; Hindori-Mohangoo, Ashna D.; Blondel, Béatrice; Klungsøyr, Kari; Verdenik, Ivan; Mierzejewska, Ewa; Velebil, Petr; Sól Ólafsdóttir, Helga; Macfarlane, Alison; Zeitlin, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Objective Infants from multiple pregnancies have higher rates of preterm birth, stillbirth and neonatal death and differences in multiple birth rates (MBR) exist between countries. We aimed to describe differences in MBR in Europe and to investigate the impact of these differences on adverse perinatal outcomes at a population level. Methods We used national aggregate birth data on multiple pregnancies, maternal age, gestational age (GA), stillbirth and neonatal death collected in the Euro-Peristat project (29 countries in 2010, N = 5 074 643 births). We also used European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) data on assisted conception and single embryo transfer (SET). The impact of MBR on outcomes was studied using meta-analysis techniques with random-effects models to derive pooled risk ratios (pRR) overall and for four groups of country defined by their MBR. We computed population attributable risks (PAR) for these groups. Results In 2010, the average MBR was 16.8 per 1000 women giving birth, ranging from 9.1 (Romania) to 26.5 (Cyprus). Compared to singletons, multiples had a nine-fold increased risk (pRR 9.4, 95% Cl 9.1–9.8) of preterm birth (<37 weeks GA), an almost 12-fold increased risk (pRR 11.7, 95% CI 11.0–12.4) of very preterm birth (<32 weeks GA). Pooled RR were 2.4 (95% Cl 1.5–3.6) for fetal mortality at or after 28 weeks GA and 7.0 (95% Cl 6.1–8.0) for neonatal mortality. PAR of neonatal death and very preterm birth were higher in countries with high MBR compared to low MBR (17.1% (95% CI 13.8–20.2) versus 9.8% (95% Cl 9.6–11.0) for neonatal death and 29.6% (96% CI 28.5–30.6) versus 17.5% (95% CI 15.7–18.3) for very preterm births, respectively). Conclusions Wide variations in MBR and their impact on population outcomes imply that efforts by countries to reduce MBR could improve perinatal outcomes, enabling better long-term child health. PMID:26930069

  11. Impact of Natalizumab on Ambulatory Improvement in Secondary Progressive and Disabled Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Cadavid, Diego; Jurgensen, Stephanie; Lee, Sophia

    2013-01-01

    Background There is an unmet need for disease-modifying therapies to improve ambulatory function in disabled subjects with multiple sclerosis. Objectives: Assess the effects of natalizumab on ambulatory function in disabled subjects with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) or secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS). Methods We retrospectively reviewed ambulatory function as measured by timed 25-foot walk (T25FW) in clinical trial subjects with an Expanded Disability Status Scale score ≥3.5, including RRMS subjects from the phase 3 AFFIRM and SENTINEL trials, relapsing SPMS subjects from the phase 2 MS231 study, and nonrelapsing SPMS subjects from the phase 1b DELIVER study. For comparison, SPMS subjects from the intramuscular interferon beta-1a (IM IFNβ-1a) IMPACT study were also analyzed. Improvement in ambulation was measured using T25FW responder status; response was defined as faster walking times over shorter (6–9-month) or longer (24–30-month) treatment periods relative to subjects’ best predose walking times. Results There were two to four times more T25FW responders among disabled MS subjects in the natalizumab arms than in the placebo or IM IFNβ-1a arms. Responders walked 25 feet an average of 24%–45% faster than nonresponders. Conclusion Natalizumab improves ambulatory function in disabled RRMS subjects and may have efficacy in disabled SPMS subjects. Confirmation of the latter finding in a prospective SPMS study is warranted. PMID:23308186

  12. Oncogenic mechanisms of HOXB13 missense mutations in prostate carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Marta; Maia, Sofia; Paulo, Paula; Teixeira, Manuel R.

    2016-01-01

    The recurrent germline mutation HOXB13 p.(Gly84Glu) (G84E) has recently been identified as a risk factor for prostate cancer. In a recent study, we have performed full sequencing of the HOXB13 gene in 462 Portuguese prostate cancer patients with early-onset and/or familial/hereditary disease, and identified two novel missense mutations, p.(Ala128Asp) (A128D) and p.(Phe240Leu) (F240L), that were predicted to be damaging to protein function. In the present work we aimed to investigate the potential oncogenic role of these mutations, comparing to that of the recurrent G84E mutation and wild-type HOXB13. We induced site-directed mutagenesis in a HOXB13 expression vector and established in vitro cell models of prostate carcinogenesis with stable overexpression of either the wild-type or the mutated HOXB13 variants. By performing in vitro assays we observed that, while the wild-type promotes proliferation, also observed with the F240L variant along with a decrease in apoptosis, the A128D mutation decreases apoptosis and promotes anchorage independent growth. No phenotypic impact was observed for the G84E mutation in the cell line model used. Our data show that specific HOXB13 mutations are involved in the acquisition of different cancer-associated capabilities and further support an oncogenic role for HOXB13 in prostate carcinogenesis. PMID:28050579

  13. Natural killer T cell defects in multiple myeloma and the impact of lenalidomide therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chan, A C; Neeson, P; Leeansyah, E; Tainton, K; Quach, H; Prince, H M; Harrison, S J; Godfrey, D I; Ritchie, D; Berzins, S P

    2014-01-01

    The causes of multiple myeloma (MM) remain obscure and there are few known risk factors; however, natural killer T (NKT) cell abnormalities have been reported in patients with MM, and therapeutic targeting of NKT cells is promoted as a potential treatment. We characterized NKT cell defects in treated and untreated patients with MM and determined the impact of lenalidomide therapy on the NKT cell pool. Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory drug with co-stimulatory effects on NKT cells in vitro and is an approved treatment for MM, although its mode of action in that context is not well defined. We find that patients with relapsed/progressive MM had a marked deficiency in NKT cell numbers. In contrast, newly diagnosed patients had relatively normal NKT cell frequency and function prior to treatment, although a specific NKT cell deficiency emerged after high-dose melphalan and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) regimen. This also impacted NK cells and conventional T cells, but the recovery of NKT cells was considerably delayed, resulting in a prolonged, treatment-induced NKT cell deficit. Longitudinal analysis of individual patients revealed that lenalidomide therapy had no in-vivo impact on NKT cell numbers or cytokine production, either as induction therapy, or as maintenance therapy following ASCT, indicating that its clinical benefits in this setting are independent of NKT cell modulation. PMID:24032527

  14. Function of oncogenes in cancer development: a changing paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Romero-Camarero, Isabel; Cobaleda, Cesar; Sánchez-García, Isidro

    2013-01-01

    Tumour-associated oncogenes induce unscheduled proliferation as well as genomic and chromosomal instability. According to current models, therapeutic strategies that block oncogene activity are likely to selectively target tumour cells. However, recent evidences have revealed that oncogenes are only essential for the proliferation of some specific tumour cell types, but not all. Indeed, the latest studies of the interactions between the oncogene and its target cell have shown that oncogenes contribute to cancer development not only by inducing proliferation but also by developmental reprogramming of the epigenome. This provides the first evidence that tumorigenesis can be initiated by stem cell reprogramming, and uncovers a new role for oncogenes in the origin of cancer. Here we analyse these evidences and propose an updated model of oncogene function that can explain the full range of genotype–phenotype associations found in human cancer. Finally, we discuss how this vision opens new avenues for developing novel anti-cancer interventions. PMID:23632857

  15. Ras oncogene and inflammation: partners in crime.

    PubMed

    Sparmann, Anke; Bar-Sagi, Dafna

    2005-06-01

    It is well established that Ras oncogenes facilitate neoplastic conversion by stimulating tumor cell growth, survival and motility. However, current studies have indicated that the role of Ras in malignant transformation extends beyond these cell-intrinsic effects to include the establishment of a pro-tumorigenic host environment. We have recently demonstrated that Ras-induced secretion of the chemokine Interleukin-8 (CXCL-8/IL-8) elicits a local inflammatory reaction that is critical for neo-vascularization and sustained tumor growth. Our data identify a novel mechanism by which the Ras oncogene promotes tumor-host interactions that are essential for cancer progression, and suggest that CXCL-8 could serve as a surrogate marker for in-vivo Ras activity.

  16. Multiple 3.47-Ga-old asteroid impact fallout units, Pilbara Craton, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glikson, A. Y.; Allen, C.; Vickers, J.

    2004-04-01

    A new microkrystite spherule-bearing diamictite is reported from below the impact spherule-bearing 3.47 Ga Antarctic Chert Member (ACM) at the base of the Apex Basalt, central Pilbara Craton, Western Australia [1,5]. The diamictite, defined as ACM-S2, consists of 0.6-0.8-m-thick spherule-bearing pebble to cobble-size chert-intraclast conglomerate separated from the main ACM-S3 by a ˜200-m-thick dolerite and ˜30-m-thick felsic hypabyssals. The microkrystite spherules are discriminated from angular to subangular detrital volcanic fragments by their high sphericities, inward-radiating fans of sericite pseudomorphs after K-feldspar, relic quench textures and Ni-Cr-Co relations. Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with E-probe (EDS) and laser ICPMS analysis indicate high Ni and Cr in sericite-dominated spherules, suggesting mafic composition of source crust. Ni/Cr and Ni/Co ratios of the spherules are higher than in associated Archaean tholeiitic basalts and high-Mg basalts, rendering possible contamination by high Ni/Cr and Ni/Co chondritic components. The presence of multiple bands and lenses of spherules within chert and scattered spherules in arenite bands within S3 may signify redeposition of a single impact fallout unit or, alternatively, multiple impacts. Controlling parameters include: (1) spherule atmospheric residence time; (2) precipitation rates of colloidal silica; (3) solidification rates of colloidal silica; (4) arenite and spherule redeposition rates, and (5) arrival of the tsunami. The presence of spherule-bearing chert fragments in S3 may hint at an older spherule-bearing chert (?S1). Only a minor proportion of spherules is broken and the near-perfect sphericities of chert-hosted spherules and arenite-hosted spherules constrain the extent of shallow water winnowing of the originally delicate glass spherules. It is suggested that the spherules were either protected by rapid burial or, alternatively, disturbance was limited to a short term high energy

  17. Oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes.

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, T A; Reddel, R; Peiifer, A M; Spillare, E; Kaighn, M E; Weston, A; Gerwin, B I; Harris, C C

    1991-01-01

    The functional role of oncogenes in human lung carcinogenesis has been investigated by transfer of activated oncogenes into normal cells or an immortalized bronchial epithelial cell line, BEAS-2B. Transfection of v-Ha-ras, Ki-ras, or the combination of myc and raf into BEAS-2B cells produced tumorigenic cell lines, while transfection of raf or myc alone produced nontumorigenic cell lines. In addition to studying the pathogenic role of oncogenes, we are attempting to define negative growth-regulating genes that have tumor-suppressive effects for human lung carcinomas. Our strategy to identify tumor-suppressor genes involves loss of heterozygosity studies, monochromosome-cell fusion, and cell-cell fusion studies. Loss of heterozygosity studies have revealed consistent allelic DNA sequence deletions on chromosome 17p in squamous cell carcinomas, while large cell carcinomas and adenocarcinomas retained this locus. Mutations in p53, a tumor-suppressor gene located on chromosome 17p, have been observed. Cell-cell hybrid clones produced from fusion of nontumorigenic BEAS-2B cells with tumorigenic HuT292DM cells generally are nontumorigenic. The mechanistic role of the known tumor-suppressor genes Rb-1 and p53 in the development of human lung carcinomas is being investigated in this epithelial cell model of human bronchogenic carcinogenesis. PMID:1685442

  18. Experimental determination of multiple ionization cross sections in Si by electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Pablo Daniel; Sepúlveda, Andrés; Castellano, Gustavo; Trincavelli, Jorge

    2015-12-01

    The thin sample method is often used to experimentally determine ionization cross sections, especially when focusing on the low overvoltage region. The simplicity of the formalism involved in this method is very appealing, but some experimental complications arise in the preparation of thin films. In this work, a thick sample method was used to measure the Si-K x-ray production cross section by electron impact. The good agreement between the results obtained and the values reported in the literature validates the method and the parameters used. The advantages and disadvantages of the method are discussed and its application is extended to the determination of Si multiple-ionization cross sections, where the very low emission rates (around two orders of magnitude lower than the single-ionization case) make the use of the thin sample method impracticable.

  19. CUL4A as a marker and potential therapeutic target in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yougang; Wang, Shanan; Li, Jinghong; Qi, Shipeng; Zhang, Debing

    2017-07-01

    Multiple myeloma is the most common cause of death of hematological malignancy worldwide. Cullin 4A has been proposed as oncogene in several types of human cancer, but the expression and function of cullin 4A in multiple myeloma remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that cullin 4A plays an oncogenic role in multiple myeloma development. The expression of cullin 4A was detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in multiple myeloma patients and multiple myeloma cell lines. In addition, silencing of cullin 4A with small interfering RNA was performed in human multiple myeloma cells, and the impact on proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, migration, and invasion of the multiple myeloma cells was analyzed. We found that the level of cullin 4A in serum samples was significantly upregulated in patients with multiple myeloma compared with healthy control subjects. Knockdown of cullin 4A via small interfering RNA inhibited the proliferation of the multiple myeloma cell lines by delaying cell-cycle progression and increasing apoptosis. cullin 4A downregulation inhibited multiple myeloma cell migration and invasion in vitro. Our results suggested that cullin 4A could be a promising therapy target in multiple myeloma patients.

  20. The first year after diagnosis: psychological impact on people with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Possa, M F; Minacapelli, E; Canale, S; Comi, G; Martinelli, V; Falautano, M

    2017-10-01

    The impact of multiple sclerosis (MS) diagnosis on newly diagnosed individuals remains so far little explored. Our aim is to outline affective, personality and quality of life (QoL) correlates of MS patients shortly after MS diagnosis. Thirty-eight (22 F and 16 M) newly-diagnosed MS patients (mean interval from diagnosis communication 4.7 ± 3.8 months, range 1-12 months) underwent the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale and a comprehensive psychological evaluation: Beck Depression Inventory-II, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Psychophysiological Questionnaire-Revised, Fear Survey Schedule, Maudsley Obsessional-Compulsive Questionnaire, Impact of Event Scale-Revised, Personal Meaning Questionnaire, Problem Solving Inventory and Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life-54. The Expanded Disability Status Scale was assessed during the neurological examination. Depressive symptomatology, only partially related to disability, was observed in approximately 40% of patients. The prevalent approach to MS diagnosis was one of avoidance in 65.8% of cases. QoL reductions in self-perception and psychological well-being emerged, together with a peculiar perception of change in health that was not related to neurological disability. With regard to personality assessment, depressive personal meaning organization correlates inversely with important QoL measures. Newly-diagnosed patients go through a complex network of psychological changes still in the initial phases immediately after diagnosis. A thorough understanding of these adjusting aspects by the neurologist could be crucial in improving patients' QoL, participation in relevant disease decisions and adherence to pharmacological therapy.

  1. Impact of Multiple En Face Image Averaging on Quantitative Assessment from Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography Images.

    PubMed

    Uji, Akihito; Balasubramanian, Siva; Lei, Jianqin; Baghdasaryan, Elmira; Al-Sheikh, Mayss; Sadda, SriniVas R

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the impact of multiple en face image averaging on quantitative measurements of the retinal microvasculature using optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA). Prospective, observational, cross-sectional case series. Twenty-one healthy individuals with normal eyes. Macular OCTA images were acquired from all participants using the Zeiss Cirrus 5000 with Angioplex OCTA software (Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA). Nine OCTA cube scans per eye were obtained and 9 superficial retinal layer (SRL) and deep retinal layer (DRL) en face OCTA image slabs were averaged individually after registration. Quantitative parameters from the retinal microvasculature were measured on binarized and skeletonized OCTA images and compared with single OCTA images without averaging. Vessel density (VD), vessel length density (VLD), vessel diameter index (VDI), and fractal dimension (FD). Participants with artifact or poor image quality were excluded, leaving 18 eyes for the analysis. After averaging, qualitatively there was apparent reduction in background noise, and fragmented vessels in the images before averaging became continuous with smoother walls and showed sharper contrast in both the SRL and DRL. Binarized and skeletonized derivates of these averaged images also showed fewer line fragments and dots in nonvascular areas and more continuous vessel images than those of images without averaging. In both SRL and DRL, VD (P = 0.0010 and P = 0.0003, respectively), VLD (P < 0.0001 for both), and FD (P < 0.0001 for both) significantly decreased and VDI significantly increased after averaging (P < 0.0001 for both). Averaging of multiple en face OCTA images improves image quality and also significantly impacts quantitative measurements. Reducing noise that could be misinterpreted as flow and annealing discontinuous vessel segments seem to be major mechanisms by which averaging may be of benefit. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc

  2. microRNAs with AAGUGC seed motif constitute an integral part of an oncogenic signaling network

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Y; Frings, O; Branca, R M; Boekel, J; le Sage, C; Fredlund, E; Agami, R; Orre, L M

    2017-01-01

    microRNA (miRNA) dysregulation is a common feature of cancer cells, but the complex roles of miRNAs in cancer are not fully elucidated. Here, we used functional genomics to identify oncogenic miRNAs in non-small cell lung cancer and evaluate their impact on response to epidermal growth factor (EGFR)-targeting therapy. Our data demonstrate that miRNAs with an AAGUGC motif in their seed sequence increase both cancer cell proliferation and sensitivity to EGFR inhibitors. Global transcriptomics, proteomics and target prediction resulted in the identification of several tumor suppressors involved in the G1/S transition as AAGUGC-miRNA targets. The clinical implications of our findings were evaluated by analysis of AAGUGC-miRNA expression in multiple cancer types, supporting the link between this miRNA seed family, their tumor suppressor targets and cancer cell proliferation. In conclusion, we propose the AAGUGC seed motif as an oncomotif and that oncomotif-miRNAs promote cancer cell proliferation. These findings have potential therapeutic implications, especially in selecting patients for EGFR-targeting therapy. PMID:27477696

  3. A newly identified RET proto-oncogene polymorphism is found in a high number of endocrine tumor patients.

    PubMed

    Gartner, Wolfgang; Mineva, Ivelina; Daneva, Teodora; Baumgartner-Parzer, Sabina; Niederle, Bruno; Vierhapper, Heinrich; Weissel, Michael; Wagner, Ludwig

    2005-07-01

    Multiple RET proto-oncogene transcripts, due to genomic variations and alternate splicing, have been described. To investigate endocrine tumor tissue characteristic RET proto-oncogene expression, we performed quantitative RT-PCR, Northern blot and Southern blot analyses of benign and malignant endocrine-derived tissues. We newly describe RET proto-oncogene expression in carcinoid-, gastrinoma- and insulinoma-derived tissue samples. In addition, the presence of a 3'-terminally truncated RET proto-oncogene mRNA variant in benign and malignant thyroid neoplasias, as well as in a pheochromocytoma, an ovarian carcinoma and a medullary thyroid carcinoma, is demonstrated. Southern blot analysis revealed no evidence of gross RET proto-oncogene rearrangements or deletions. As the underlying cause for a bi-allelic TaqI restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), a C (allele 1)/T (allele 2) transition within intron 19, was characterized. This polymorphism is close to a recently described polyadenylation site and lies within a binding site for the nucleic acid binding protein Pbx-1. Screening of healthy subjects and of patients suffering from various endocrine malignancies revealed exclusively allele 1 homozygous and allele 1/allele 2 heterozygous genotypes. Heterozygous genotypes were found in a significantly higher percentage in samples derived from endocrine tumor patients when compared with those from healthy control subjects. Homozygosity for allele 2 was found exclusively in somatic DNA derived from endocrine tumors with high malignant potential. Analysis of DNA derived from varying regions within individual anaplastic thyroid carcinomas revealed an allele 1/allele 2 switch of the RFLP banding pattern, indicating loss of heterozygosity at the RET proto-oncogene locus. In conclusion, our data demonstrate presence of a 5'-terminal RET proto-oncogene transcript in endocrine tissues and reveal a bi-allelic RET proto-oncogene polymorphism. A heterozygous genotype for

  4. Fisetin Acts on Multiple Pathways to Reduce the Impact of Age and Disease on CNS Function

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Pamela

    2017-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that neurological diseases are multi-factorial involving disruptions in multiple cellular systems. Thus, while each disease has its own initiating mechanisms and pathologies, certain common pathways appear to be involved in most, if not all, neurological diseases described to date. Thus, it is unlikely that modulating only a single factor will be effective at either preventing disease development or slowing disease progression. A better approach is to identify small (< 900 daltons) molecules that have multiple biological activities relevant to the maintenance of brain function. Over the last few years, we have identified an orally active, novel neuroprotective and cognition-enhancing molecule, the flavonoid fisetin. Fisetin not only has direct antioxidant activity but it can also increase the intracellular levels of glutathione, the major intracellular antioxidant. Fisetin can also activate key neurotrophic factor signaling pathways. In addition, it has anti-inflammatory activity against microglial cells and inhibits the activity of lipoxygenases, thereby reducing the production of pro-inflammatory eicosanoids and their by-products. This wide range of actions suggests that fisetin has the ability to reduce the impact of age-related neurological diseases on brain function. PMID:25961687

  5. The impact of relative intensity noise on the signal in multiple reference optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhaus, Kai; Subhash, Hrebesh; Alexandrov, Sergey; Dsouza, Roshan; Hogan, Josh; Wilson, Carol; Leahy, Martin; Slepneva, Svetlana; Huyet, Guillaume

    2016-03-01

    Multiple reference optical coherence tomography (MR-OCT) applies a unique low-cost solution to enhance the scanning depth of standard time domain OCT by inserting an partial mirror into the reference arm of the interferometric system. This novel approach achieves multiple reflections for different layers and depths of an sample with minimal effort of engineering and provides an excellent platform for low-cost OCT systems based on well understood production methods for micro-mechanical systems such as CD/DVD pick-up systems. The direct integration of a superluminescent light-emitting diode (SLED) is a preferable solution to reduce the form- factor of an MR-OCT system. Such direct integration exposes the light source to environmental conditions that can increase fluctuations in heat dissipation and vibrations and affect the noise characteristics of the output spectrum. This work describes the impact of relative intensity noise (RIN) on the quality of the interference signal of MR-OCT related to a variety of environmental conditions, such as temperature.

  6. Dynamics and anthropogenic impacts of multiple karst flow systems in a mountainous area of South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Mingming; Chen, Zhihua; Criss, Robert E.; Zhou, Hong; Huang, He; Han, Zhaofeng; Shi, Tingting

    2016-12-01

    The Xiangxi River basin, South China, is a steep terrane with well-developed karst features and an important Cambrian-Ordovician aquifer. Meteoric water in this mountainous area features a mean δ18O elevation gradient of -2.4 ‰/km. This gradient was used to estimate mean recharge elevations of 760 m for Shuimoxi (SMX) spring, 1,060 m for Xiangshuidong (XSD) spring, and 1,430 m for drill hole ZK03, indicating multiple flow paths in the Cambrian-Ordovician karst aquifer. Mean residence times of 230 and 320 days and ˜2 years were estimated for these features, respectively, using the damped running average model that predicts the isotopic variations in groundwater from those in precipitation. Groundwater in the regional karst flow system has the longest residence time, the highest recharge elevation, the longest flow paths, the lowest addition of anthropogenic components, and the greatest amount of water-rock interaction as indicated by its higher dissolved solids, Mg2+ concentrations and Mg/Ca ratios than the springs. In contrast, the local and shallow karst flow systems respond rapidly to recharge events. Artificial tracer tests prove that these shallow karst systems can also quickly transmit anthropogenic contaminants, indicating that they are highly vulnerable to human impacts, which include the enrichment of NO3 -. The intensity of water-rock interaction and groundwater vulnerability are mainly determined by the structure and dynamics of the multiple karst flow systems.

  7. The impact of multiple low-level BCR-ABL1 mutations on response to ponatinib

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, David T. O.; Yeoman, Alexandra L.; Altamura, Haley K.; Jamison, Bronte A.; Field, Chani R.; Hodgson, J. Graeme; Lustgarten, Stephanie; Rivera, Victor M.; Hughes, Timothy P.; Branford, Susan

    2016-01-01

    The third-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) ponatinib shows activity against all common BCR-ABL1 single mutants, including the highly resistant BCR-ABL1-T315I mutant, improving outcome for patients with refractory chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, responses are variable, and causal baseline factors have not been well-studied. The type and number of low-level BCR-ABL1 mutations present after imatinib resistance has prognostic significance for subsequent treatment with nilotinib or dasatinib as second-line therapy. We therefore investigated the impact of low-level mutations detected by sensitive mass-spectrometry before ponatinib initiation (baseline) on treatment response in 363 TKI-resistant patients enrolled in the PONATINIB for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Evaluation and Ph+ Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia trial, including 231 patients in chronic phase (CP-CML). Low-level mutations were detected in 53 patients (15%, including low-level T315I in 14 patients); most, however, did not undergo clonal expansion during ponatinib treatment and, moreover, no specific individual mutations were associated with inferior outcome. We demonstrate however, that the number of mutations detectable by mass spectrometry after TKI resistance is associated with response to ponatinib treatment and could be used to refine the therapeutic approach. Although CP-CML patients with T315I (63/231, 27%) had superior responses overall, those with multiple mutations detectable by mass spectrometry (20, 32%) had substantially inferior responses compared with those with T315I as the sole mutation detected (43, 68%). In contrast, for CP-CML patients without T315I, the inferior responses previously observed with nilotinib/dasatinib therapy for imatinib-resistant patients with multiple mutations were not seen with ponatinib treatment, suggesting that ponatinib may prove to be particularly advantageous for patients with multiple mutations detectable by mass spectrometry after TKI resistance

  8. Modeling the impacts of multiple environmental stress factors on estuarine copepod populations.

    PubMed

    Korsman, John C; Schipper, Aafke M; De Hoop, Lisette; Mialet, Benoit; Maris, Tom; Tackx, Micky L M; Hendriks, A Jan

    2014-05-20

    Many studies have focused on natural stress factors that shape the spatial and temporal distribution of calanoid copepods, but bioassays have shown that copepods are also sensitive to a broad range of contaminants. Although both anthropogenic and natural stress factors are obviously at play in natural copepod communities, most studies consider only one or the other. In the present investigation, we modeled the combined impact of both anthropogenic and natural stress factors on copepod populations. The model was applied to estimate Eurytemora affinis densities in the contaminated Scheldt estuary and the relatively uncontaminated Darß-Zingst estuary in relation to temperature, salinity, chlorophyll a, and sediment concentrations of cadmium, copper, and zinc. The results indicated that temperature was largely responsible for seasonal fluctuations of E. affinis densities. Our model results further suggested that exposure to zinc and copper was largely responsible for the reduced population densities in the contaminated estuary. The model provides a consistent framework for integrating and quantifying the impacts of multiple anthropogenic and natural stress factors on copepod populations. It facilitates the extrapolation of laboratory experiments to ecologically relevant end points pertaining to population viability.

  9. The impact of multiple sclerosis on family members: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Uccelli, Michele Messmer

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is one of the most common neurological diseases in young adults and involves inflammatory demyelination of the CNS. MS typically manifests between 20 and 40 years of age, and can lead to significant disability in some cases. The disease course is unpredictable. MS has a significant impact on families, influencing their wellbeing and quality of life, often creating psychological stress in each family member as well as on family functioning in general. Common themes include the impact of the emotional state of the person with MS on family members, the role of the healthy parent on how children cope, the effect of a lack of information about MS, communication within the family and with healthcare professionals, and the importance of assessing and treating families as a dynamic unit in order to assure comprehensive intervention plans. The current literature review is based on 30 full research articles meeting inclusion criteria related to partners/couples, family caregivers, children with a parent with MS and parents of young children with MS.

  10. Multiple Imputation for Estimating the Risk of Developing Dementia and Its Impact on Survival

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Binbing; Saczynski, Jane S.; Launer, Lenore J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Dementia, Alzheimer’s disease in particular, is one of the major causes of disability and decreased quality of life among the elderly and a leading obstacle to successful aging. Given the profound impact on public health, much research has focused on the age-specific risk of developing dementia and the impact on survival. Early work has discussed various methods of estimating age-specific incidence of dementia, among which the illness-death model is popular for modeling disease progression. In this article we use multiple imputation to fit multi-state models for survival data with interval censoring and left truncation. This approach allows semi-Markov models in which survival after dementia may depend on onset age. Such models can be used to estimate the cumulative risk of developing dementia in the presence of the competing risk of dementia-free death. Simulations are carried out to examine the performance of the proposed method. We analyze data from the Honolulu Asia Aging Study to estimate the age-specific and cumulative risks of dementia and to examine the effect of major risk factors on dementia onset and death. PMID:20976693

  11. Evaluation of the Impact of Alveolar Nitrogen Excretion on Indices Derived from Multiple Breath Nitrogen Washout

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Niklas; Nielsen, Jorgen G.; Horsley, Alex R.

    2013-01-01

    Background A large body of evidence has now accumulated describing the advantages of multiple breath washout tests over conventional spirometry in cystic fibrosis (CF). Although the majority of studies have used exogenous sulphur hexafluoride (SF6) as the tracer gas this has also led to an increased interest in nitrogen washout tests, despite the differences between these methods. The impact of body nitrogen excreted across the alveoli has previously been ignored. Methods A two-compartment lung model was developed that included ventilation heterogeneity and dead space (DS) effects, but also incorporated experimental data on nitrogen excretion. The model was used to assess the impact of nitrogen excretion on washout progress and accuracy of functional residual capacity (FRC) and lung clearance index (LCI) measurements. Results Excreted nitrogen had a small effect on accuracy of FRC (1.8%) in the healthy adult model. The error in LCI calculated with true FRC was greater (6.3%), and excreted nitrogen contributed 21% of the total nitrogen concentration at the end of the washout. Increasing DS and ventilation heterogeneity both caused further increase in measurement error. LCI was increased by 6–13% in a CF child model, and excreted nitrogen increased the end of washout nitrogen concentration by 24–49%. Conclusions Excreted nitrogen appears to have complex but clinically significant effects on washout progress, particularly in the presence of abnormal gas mixing. This may explain much of the previously described differences in washout outcomes between SF6 and nitrogen. PMID:24039916

  12. Evaluation of the impact of alveolar nitrogen excretion on indices derived from multiple breath nitrogen washout.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Niklas; Nielsen, Jorgen G; Horsley, Alex R

    2013-01-01

    A large body of evidence has now accumulated describing the advantages of multiple breath washout tests over conventional spirometry in cystic fibrosis (CF). Although the majority of studies have used exogenous sulphur hexafluoride (SF6) as the tracer gas this has also led to an increased interest in nitrogen washout tests, despite the differences between these methods. The impact of body nitrogen excreted across the alveoli has previously been ignored. A two-compartment lung model was developed that included ventilation heterogeneity and dead space (DS) effects, but also incorporated experimental data on nitrogen excretion. The model was used to assess the impact of nitrogen excretion on washout progress and accuracy of functional residual capacity (FRC) and lung clearance index (LCI) measurements. Excreted nitrogen had a small effect on accuracy of FRC (1.8%) in the healthy adult model. The error in LCI calculated with true FRC was greater (6.3%), and excreted nitrogen contributed 21% of the total nitrogen concentration at the end of the washout. Increasing DS and ventilation heterogeneity both caused further increase in measurement error. LCI was increased by 6-13% in a CF child model, and excreted nitrogen increased the end of washout nitrogen concentration by 24-49%. Excreted nitrogen appears to have complex but clinically significant effects on washout progress, particularly in the presence of abnormal gas mixing. This may explain much of the previously described differences in washout outcomes between SF6 and nitrogen.

  13. Impacts of Variability and Uncertainty in Solar Photovoltaic Generation at Multiple Timescales

    SciTech Connect

    Ela, E.; Diakov, V.; Ibanez, E.; Heaney, M.

    2013-05-01

    The characteristics of variability and uncertainty of PV solar power have been studied extensively. These characteristics can create challenges for system operators who must ensure a balance between generation and demand while obeying power system constraints at the lowest possible cost. A number of studies have looked at the impact of wind power plants, and some recent studies have also included solar PV. The simulations that are used in these studies, however, are typically fixed to one time resolution. This makes it difficult to analyze the variability across several timescales. In this study, we use a simulation tool that has the ability to evaluate both the economic and reliability impacts of PV variability and uncertainty at multiple timescales. This information should help system operators better prepare for increases of PV on their systems and develop improved mitigation strategies to better integrate PV with enhanced reliability. Another goal of this study is to understand how different mitigation strategies and methods can improve the integration of solar power more reliably and efficiently.

  14. Multiple Trigger Points for Quantifying Heat-Health Impacts: New Evidence from a Hot Climate

    PubMed Central

    Petitti, Diana B.; Hondula, David M.; Yang, Shuo; Harlan, Sharon L.; Chowell, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Background Extreme heat is a public health challenge. The scarcity of directly comparable studies on the association of heat with morbidity and mortality and the inconsistent identification of threshold temperatures for severe impacts hampers the development of comprehensive strategies aimed at reducing adverse heat-health events. Objectives This quantitative study was designed to link temperature with mortality and morbidity events in Maricopa County, Arizona, USA, with a focus on the summer season. Methods Using Poisson regression models that controlled for temporal confounders, we assessed daily temperature–health associations for a suite of mortality and morbidity events, diagnoses, and temperature metrics. Minimum risk temperatures, increasing risk temperatures, and excess risk temperatures were statistically identified to represent different “trigger points” at which heat-health intervention measures might be activated. Results We found significant and consistent associations of high environmental temperature with all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, heat-related mortality, and mortality resulting from conditions that are consequences of heat and dehydration. Hospitalizations and emergency department visits due to heat-related conditions and conditions associated with consequences of heat and dehydration were also strongly associated with high temperatures, and there were several times more of those events than there were deaths. For each temperature metric, we observed large contrasts in trigger points (up to 22°C) across multiple health events and diagnoses. Conclusion Consideration of multiple health events and diagnoses together with a comprehensive approach to identifying threshold temperatures revealed large differences in trigger points for possible interventions related to heat. Providing an array of heat trigger points applicable for different end-users may improve the public health response to a problem that is projected to worsen

  15. The impacts of multiple rest-break periods on commercial truck driver's crash risk.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Xie, Yuanchang

    2014-02-01

    Driver fatigue has been a major contributing factor to fatal commercial truck crashes, which accounted for about 10% of all fatal motor vehicle crashes that happened between 2009 and 2011. Commercial truck drivers' safety performance can deteriorate easily due to fatigue caused by long driving hours and irregular working schedules. To ensure safety, truck drivers often use off-duty time and short rest breaks during a trip to recover from fatigue. This study thoroughly investigates the impacts of off-duty time prior to a trip and short rest breaks on commercial truck safety by using Cox proportional hazards model and Andersen-Gill model. It is found that increasing total rest-break duration can consistently reduce fatigue-related crash risk. Similarly, taking more rest breaks can help to reduce crash risk. The results suggest that two rest breaks are generally considered enough for a 10-hour trip, as three or more rest breaks may not further reduce crash risk substantially. Also, the length of each rest break does not need to be very long and 30min is usually adequate. In addition, this study investigates the safety impacts of when to take rest breaks. It is found that taking rest breaks too soon after a trip starts will cause the rest breaks to be less effective. The findings of this research can help policy makers and trucking companies better understand the impacts of multiple rest-break periods and develop more effective rules to improve the safety of truck drivers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and National Safety Council. All rights reserved.

  16. Surgical management of multiple supernumerary teeth and an impacted maxillary permanent central incisor.

    PubMed

    Rallan, Mandeep; Rallan, Neelakshi Singh; Goswami, Mousumi; Rawat, Kamini

    2013-05-22

    Hyperdontia is the condition of having supernumerary teeth, or teeth which appear in addition to the regular number of teeth. It is a developmental anomaly and has been argued to arise from multiple aetiologies. The most common site is the maxillary incisor region; but the prevalence of more than three teeth supernumerary tooth is less than 1%. A case of 13 year male patient is reported with a multiple impacted supernumerary tooth in maxillary anterior region hindering the eruption of right permanent central incisor. The supernumerary tooth was treated via surgical approach followed by an interim prosthesis for permanent central incisor which later on erupted in due course of time. Background Supernumerary teeth may be defined as any teeth or tooth substance in excess of the usual configuration of 20 deciduous and 32 permanent teeth. The presence of supernumerary teeth in the premaxillary region often poses unique diagnostic and managerial concerns for the practitioner. Rarely is the surplus number compensated by an absence or deficiency of other teeth. Therefore, the dysfunctional nature of supernumerary teeth and their ability to create a variety of pathological disturbances in the normal eruption and position of adjacent teeth warrants their early detection and prudent management. Approximately 76-86% of cases represent single-tooth hyperdontia, with two supernumerary teeth noted in 12-23% and three or more extra teeth noted in less than 1% of cases. Multiple supernumerary teeth are also associated with many syndromes like cleidocranial dysplasia and Gardner’s syndrome etc. However, it is rare to find multiple supernumeraries in individuals with no other associated disease or syndrome. In such cases, the maxillary anterior region is the common site of occurrence. The exact aetiology is not clearly understood. The supernumerary teeth result from any disturbance in the initiation and proliferation stages of odontogenesis. There are several theories regarding the

  17. Power of PTEN/AKT: Molecular switch between tumor suppressors and oncogenes

    PubMed Central

    XIE, YINGQIU; NAIZABEKOV, SANZHAR; CHEN, ZHANLIN; TOKAY, TURSONJAN

    2016-01-01

    An increasing amount of evidence has shown that tumor suppressors can become oncogenes, or vice versa, but the mechanism behind this is unclear. Recent findings have suggested that phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is one of the powerful switches for the conversion between tumor suppressors and oncogenes. PTEN regulates a number of cellular processes, including cell death and proliferation, through the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) pathway. Furthermore, a number of studies have suggested that PTEN deletions may alter various functions of certain tumor suppressor and oncogenic proteins. The aim of the present review was to analyze specific cases driven by PTEN loss/AKT activation, including aberrant signaling pathways and novel drug targets for clinical application in personalized medicine. The findings illustrate how PTEN loss and/or AKT activation switches MDM2-dependent p53 downregulation, and induces conversion between oncogene and tumor suppressor in enhancer of zeste homolog 2, BTB domain-containing 7A, alternative reading frame 2, p27 and breast cancer 1, early onset, through multiple mechanisms. This review highlights the genetic basis of complex drug targets and provides insights into the rationale of precision cancer therapy. PMID:27347153

  18. The oncogene HER2; Its signaling and transforming functions and its role in human cancer pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Moasser, Mark M.

    2011-01-01

    The year 2007 marks exactly two decades since HER2 was functionally implicated in the pathogenesis of human breast cancer (Slamon et al. 1987). This finding established the HER2 oncogene hypothesis for the development of some human cancers. The subsequent two decades have brought about an explosion of information about the biology of HER2 and the Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (HER) family. An abundance of experimental evidence now solidly supports the HER2 oncogene hypothesis and etiologically links amplification of the HER2 gene locus with human cancer pathogenesis. The molecular mechanisms underlying HER2 tumorigenesis appear to be complex and a unified mechanistic model of HER2 induced transformation has not emerged. Numerous hypotheses implicating diverse transforming pathways have been proposed and are individually supported by experimental models and HER2 may indeed induce cell transformation through multiple mechanisms. Here I review the evidence supporting the oncogenic function of HER2, the mechanisms that are felt to mediate its oncogenic functions, and the evidence that links the experimental evidence with human cancer pathogenesis. PMID:17471238

  19. The RUNX Genes as Conditional Oncogenes: Insights from Retroviral Targeting and Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Neil, James C; Gilroy, Kathryn; Borland, Gillian; Hay, Jodie; Terry, Anne; Kilbey, Anna

    2017-01-01

    The observation that the Runx genes act as targets for transcriptional activation by retroviral insertion identified a new family of dominant oncogenes. However, it is now clear that Runx genes are 'conditional' oncogenes whose over-expression is growth inhibitory unless accompanied by another event such as concomitant over-expression of MYC or loss of p53 function. Remarkably, while the oncogenic activities of either MYC or RUNX over-expression are suppressed while p53 is intact, the combination of both neutralises p53 tumour suppression in vivo by as yet unknown mechanisms. Moreover, there is emerging evidence that endogenous, basal RUNX activity is important to maintain the viability and proliferation of MYC-driven lymphoma cells. There is also growing evidence that the human RUNX genes play a similar conditional oncogenic role and are selected for over-expression in end-stage cancers of multiple types. Paradoxically, reduced RUNX activity can also predispose to cell immortalisation and transformation, particularly by mutant Ras. These apparently conflicting observations may be reconciled in a stage-specific model of RUNX involvement in cancer. A question that has yet to be fully addressed is the extent to which the three Runx genes are functionally redundant in cancer promotion and suppression.

  20. Direct reprogramming by oncogenic Ras and Myc.

    PubMed

    Ischenko, Irene; Zhi, Jizu; Moll, Ute M; Nemajerova, Alice; Petrenko, Oleksi

    2013-03-05

    Genetically or epigenetically defined reprogramming is a hallmark of cancer cells. However, a causal association between genome reprogramming and cancer has not yet been conclusively established. In particular, little is known about the mechanisms that underlie metastasis of cancer, and even less is known about the identity of metastasizing cancer cells. In this study, we used a model of conditional expression of oncogenic KrasG12D allele in primary mouse cells to show that reprogramming and dedifferentiation is a fundamental early step in malignant transformation and cancer initiation. Our data indicate that stable expression of activated KrasG12D confers on cells a large degree of phenotypic plasticity that predisposes them to neoplastic transformation and acquisition of stem cell characteristics. We have developed a genetically tractable model system to investigate the origins and evolution of metastatic pancreatic cancer cells. We show that metastatic conversion of KrasG12D-expressing cells that exhibit different degrees of differentiation and malignancy can be reconstructed in cell culture, and that the proto-oncogene c-Myc controls the generation of self-renewing metastatic cancer cells. Collectively, our results support a model wherein non-stem cancer cells have the potential to dedifferentiate and acquire stem cell properties as a direct consequence of oncogene-induced plasticity. Moreover, the disturbance in the normally existing dynamic equilibrium between cancer stem cells and non-stem cancer cells allows the formation of cancer stem cells with high metastatic capacity at any time during cancer progression.

  1. Impact of Groundwater Flow and Energy Load on Multiple Borehole Heat Exchangers.

    PubMed

    Dehkordi, S Emad; Schincariol, Robert A; Olofsson, Bo

    2015-01-01

    The effect of array configuration, that is, number, layout, and spacing, on the performance of multiple borehole heat exchangers (BHEs) is generally known under the assumption of fully conductive transport. The effect of groundwater flow on BHE performance is also well established, but most commonly for single BHEs. In multiple-BHE systems the effect of groundwater advection can be more complicated due to the induced thermal interference between the boreholes. To ascertain the influence of groundwater flow and borehole arrangement, this study investigates single- and multi-BHE systems of various configurations. Moreover, the influence of energy load balance is also examined. The results from corresponding cases with and without groundwater flow as well as balanced and unbalanced energy loads are cross-compared. The groundwater flux value, 10(-7) m/s, is chosen based on the findings of previous studies on groundwater flow interaction with BHEs and thermal response tests. It is observed that multi-BHE systems with balanced loads are less sensitive to array configuration attributes and groundwater flow, in the long-term. Conversely, multi-BHE systems with unbalanced loads are influenced by borehole array configuration as well as groundwater flow; these effects become more pronounced with time, unlike when the load is balanced. Groundwater flow has more influence on stabilizing loop temperatures, compared to array characteristics. Although borehole thermal energy storage (BTES) systems have a balanced energy load function, preliminary investigation on their efficiency shows a negative impact by groundwater which is due to their dependency on high temperature gradients between the boreholes and surroundings.

  2. Impact of deprivation on occurrence, outcomes and health care costs of people with multiple morbidity.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Judith; Rudisill, Caroline; Bhattarai, Nawaraj; Gulliford, Martin

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to estimate the impact of deprivation on the occurrence, health outcomes and health care costs of people with multiple morbidity in England. Cohort study in the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink, using deprivation quintile (IMD2010) at individual postcode level. Incidence and mortality from diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease, stroke and colorectal cancer, and prevalence of depression, were used to define multidisease states. Costs of health care use were estimated for each state from a two-part model. Data were analysed for 141,535 men and 141,352 women aged ≥30 years, with 33,862 disease incidence events, and 13,933 deaths. Among incidences of single conditions, 22% were in the most deprived quintile and 19% in the least deprived; dual conditions, most deprived 26%, least deprived 16% and triple conditions, most deprived 29%, least deprived 14%. Deaths in participants without disease were distributed most deprived 22%, least deprived 19%; in participants with single conditions, most deprived 24%, least deprived 18%; dual conditions, most deprived 27%, least deprived 15%, and triple conditions, most deprived 33%, least deprived 17%. The relative rate of depression in most deprived participants with triple conditions, compared with least deprived and no disease, was 2.48 (1.74 to 3.54). Costs of health care use were associated with increasing deprivation and level of morbidity. The higher incidence of disease, associated with deprivation, channels deprived populations into categories of multiple morbidity with a greater prevalence of depression, higher mortality and higher costs. This has implications for the way that resources are allocated in England's National Health Service.

  3. Melanoma: oncogenic drivers and the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Karachaliou, Niki; Pilotto, Sara; Teixidó, Cristina; Viteri, Santiago; González-Cao, María; Riso, Aldo; Morales-Espinosa, Daniela; Molina, Miguel Angel; Chaib, Imane; Santarpia, Mariacarmela; Richardet, Eduardo; Bria, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Advances and in-depth understanding of the biology of melanoma over the past 30 years have contributed to a change in the consideration of melanoma as one of the most therapy-resistant malignancies. The finding that oncogenic BRAF mutations drive tumor growth in up to 50% of melanomas led to a molecular therapy revolution for unresectable and metastatic disease. Moving beyond BRAF, inactivation of immune regulatory checkpoints that limit T cell responses to melanoma has provided targets for cancer immunotherapy. In this review, we discuss the molecular biology of melanoma and we focus on the recent advances of molecularly targeted and immunotherapeutic approaches. PMID:26605311

  4. Oncogenic viruses and tumor glucose metabolism: like kids in a candy store.

    PubMed

    Noch, Evan; Khalili, Kamel

    2012-01-01

    Oncogenic viruses represent a significant public health burden in light of the multitude of malignancies that result from chronic or spontaneous viral infection and transformation. Although many of the molecular signaling pathways that underlie virus-mediated cellular transformation are known, the impact of these viruses on metabolic signaling and phenotype within proliferating tumor cells is less well understood. Whether the interaction of oncogenic viruses with metabolic signaling pathways involves enhanced glucose uptake and glycolysis (both hallmark features of transformed cells) or dysregulation of molecular pathways that regulate oxidative stress, viruses are adept at facilitating tumor expansion. Through their effects on cell proliferation pathways, such as the PI3K and MAPK pathways, the cell cycle regulatory proteins p53 and ATM, and the cell stress response proteins HIF-1α and AMPK, viruses exert control over critical metabolic signaling cascades. Additionally, oncogenic viruses modulate the tumor metabolomic profile through direct and indirect interactions with glucose transporters, such as GLUT1, and specific glycolytic enzymes, including pyruvate kinase, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and hexokinase. Through these pathways, oncogenic viruses alter the phenotypic characteristics and energy-use methods of transformed cells; therefore, it may be possible to develop novel antiglycolytic therapies to target these dysregulated pathways in virus-derived malignancies.

  5. Oncogenic Viruses and Tumor Glucose Metabolism: Like Kids in a Candy Store

    PubMed Central

    Noch, Evan; Khalili, Kamel

    2011-01-01

    Oncogenic viruses represent a significant public health burden in light of the multitude of malignancies resulting from chronic or spontaneous viral infection and transformation. Though many of the molecular signaling pathways underlying virus-mediated cellular transformation are known, the impact of these viruses on metabolic signaling and phenotype within proliferating tumor cells is less well understood. Whether the interaction of oncogenic viruses with metabolic signaling pathways involves enhanced glucose uptake and glycolysis, both hallmark features of transformed cells, or dysregulation of molecular pathways regulating oxidative stress, viruses are adept at facilitating tumor expansion. Through their effects on cell proliferation pathways, such as the PI3K and MAPK pathways, the cell cycle regulatory proteins, p53 and ATM, and the cell stress response proteins, HIF-1α and AMPK, viruses exert control over critical metabolic signaling cascades. Additionally, oncogenic viruses modulate the tumor metabolomic profile through direct and indirect interaction with glucose transporters, such as GLUT1, and specific glycolytic enzymes, including pyruvate kinase, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and hexokinase. Through these pathways, oncogenic viruses alter the phenotypic characteristics of transformed cells and their methods of energy utilization, and it may be possible to develop novel anti-glycolytic therapies to target these dysregulated pathways in virus-derived malignancies. PMID:22234809

  6. Oncogene amplification pattern in adenoid cystic carcinoma of the salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Sequeiros-Santiago, Guadalupe; García-Carracedo, Dario; Fresno, Manuel F; Suarez, Carlos; Rodrigo, Juan P; Gonzalez, M Victoria

    2009-05-01

    The aim of the present study was the search of molecular alterations (oncogene amplification or protein overexpression) that could have an impact on the outcome of ACC patients. For this purpose, paraffin-embedded tissue samples of primary ACC of 24 patients were collected. Oncogenic amplification status of six targets previously described to be involved in human carcinogenesis (ERBB1, KIT, PIK3CA, CCND1, MYC and MDM2) were studied by a PCR-based semiquantitative approach. C-Kit, cyclin D1 and EGFR protein levels were immunohistochemically assessed. ERBB1, CCND1 and PIK3CA were frequent targets of oncogene amplification (67, 46 and 38%, respectively). C-Kit and cyclin D1 were overexpressed in 57 and 82%, respectively. CCND1 amplification was associated with advanced tumour stage and ERBB1 amplification to distant metastasis. ERBB1/CCND1/PIK3CA coamplification was the most consistently observed pattern (29%). The cases with this amplification pattern presented a reduced survival. This study points to the importance of ERBB1, CCND1 and PIK3CA oncogenic amplification status in ACC carcinogenesis.

  7. Myc and Ras oncogenes engage different energy metabolism programs and evoke distinct patterns of oxidative and DNA replication stress.

    PubMed

    Maya-Mendoza, Apolinar; Ostrakova, Jitka; Kosar, Martin; Hall, Arnaldur; Duskova, Pavlina; Mistrik, Martin; Merchut-Maya, Joanna Maria; Hodny, Zdenek; Bartkova, Jirina; Christensen, Claus; Bartek, Jiri

    2015-03-01

    Both Myc and Ras oncogenes impact cellular metabolism, deregulate redox homeostasis and trigger DNA replication stress (RS) that compromises genomic integrity. However, how are such oncogene-induced effects evoked and temporally related, to what extent are these kinetic parameters shared by Myc and Ras, and how are these cellular changes linked with oncogene-induced cellular senescence in different cell context(s) remain poorly understood. Here, we addressed the above-mentioned open questions by multifaceted comparative analyses of human cellular models with inducible expression of c-Myc and H-RasV12 (Ras), two commonly deregulated oncoproteins operating in a functionally connected signaling network. Our study of DNA replication parameters using the DNA fiber approach and time-course assessment of perturbations in glycolytic flux, oxygen consumption and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) revealed the following results. First, overabundance of nuclear Myc triggered RS promptly, already after one day of Myc induction, causing slow replication fork progression and fork asymmetry, even before any metabolic changes occurred. In contrast, Ras overexpression initially induced a burst of cell proliferation and increased the speed of replication fork progression. However, after several days of induction Ras caused bioenergetic metabolic changes that correlated with slower DNA replication fork progression and the ensuing cell cycle arrest, gradually leading to senescence. Second, the observed oncogene-induced RS and metabolic alterations were cell-type/context dependent, as shown by comparative analyses of normal human BJ fibroblasts versus U2-OS sarcoma cells. Third, the energy metabolic reprogramming triggered by Ras was more robust compared to impact of Myc. Fourth, the detected oncogene-induced oxidative stress was due to ROS (superoxide) of non-mitochondrial origin and mitochondrial OXPHOS was reduced (Crabtree effect). Overall, our study provides novel

  8. Pro-oncogenic and anti-oncogenic pathways: opportunities and challenges of cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiao; Chen, Yan-Hua; Lu, Qun

    2010-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is the uncontrolled growth of cells gaining the potential to invade and disrupt vital tissue functions. This malignant process includes the occurrence of ‘unwanted’ gene mutations that induce the transformation of normal cells, for example, by overactivation of pro-oncogenic pathways and inactivation of tumor-suppressive or anti-oncogenic pathways. It is now recognized that the number of major signaling pathways that control oncogenesis is not unlimited; therefore, suppressing these pathways can conceivably lead to a cancer cure. However, the clinical application of cancer intervention has not matched up to scientific expectations. Increasing numbers of studies have revealed that many oncogenic-signaling elements show double faces, in which they can promote or suppress cancer pathogenesis depending on tissue type, cancer stage, gene dosage and their interaction with other players in carcinogenesis. This complexity of oncogenic signaling poses challenges to traditional cancer therapy and calls for considerable caution when designing an anticancer drug strategy. We propose future oncology interventions with the concept of integrative cancer therapy. PMID:20373871

  9. Oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes as paradigms in oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2007-09-01

    Cancer is the result of genetic and epigenetic changes that occur mainly in stem (precursor) cells of various cell types. Two main categories of genes are involved in the process of carcinogenesis. Oncogenes are activated proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes are inactivated by mutation in the global sense, that is point mutation, deletion, rearrangement, and duplication. Both types of genes are required for normal cell proliferation and differentiation and aberrant expression leads to abnormal cell proliferation. Ras and p53 genes are the paradigms for oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, respectively, whereas the oncogenes carried by the human papillomaviruses (HPV) comprise the best example of tumor viruses involvement in human cancer.

  10. The Impact of an Open Loop Geothermal System with Multiple Wells on Groundwater Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susanto, S.

    2015-12-01

    As the demand of groundwater as a source of energy has increased in recent years, the Upper Carbonate Aquifer beneath the City of Winnipeg is heavily utilized for cooling and heating. Majority open loop systems discharge thermal wastewater into the aquifer and increase the groundwater temperature. A numerical model was developed to study the impact of a geothermal system with multiple wells located in the Tuxedo area on groundwater temperature. Analysis was performed using SEAWAT with GUI Visual MODFLOW. Surface elevation, model boundary and wells locations were developed using ArcGIS. The model was run in steady state flow for static water level calibration and in transient mode for calibration using data of a pumping test. Preliminary investigation with three years simulation predicts a 600 m by 660 m area of temperature increase. Groundwater temperature in production wells will increase 0.5°C within 2 years and 1°C within 3 years. Factors that influence the temperature changes and its distribution in the groundwater are production flow rate, recharge flow rate, groundwater flow, return water distribution into recharge wells, distance between production wells and recharge wells, spacing between recharge wells, and layout of geothermal pumping wells. The simulated and observed temperature increase is mainly caused by higher production rate for cooling than for heating. The result from this study will strongly contribute knowledge in the development of a 3D numerical model of the Upper Carbonate Aquifer beneath the City of Winnipeg to investigate the impact of geothermal systems to the groundwater temperature.

  11. Chronic, low concentration exposure to pharmaceuticals impacts multiple organ systems in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Galus, Michal; Kirischian, Nina; Higgins, Sarah; Purdy, James; Chow, Justin; Rangaranjan, Sahaana; Li, Hongxia; Metcalfe, Chris; Wilson, Joanna Y

    2013-05-15

    Pharmaceuticals are found in both receiving and drinking water due to their persistent release in waste-water effluents, raising concerns for environmental and human health. Chronic, aqueous exposure of zebrafish (Danio rerio) to environmentally relevant concentrations of acetaminophen (ACE), venlafaxaine (VEN) (10μgL(-1)), carbamazepine (CBZ) and gemfibrozil (GEM) (0.5 and 10μgL(-1)) decreased reproductive output. Atretic oocytes and altered ovarian histology were seen in female zebrafish exposed to CBZ and GEM, suggesting a direct effect on oocyte development that may account for the reduced fecundity. Apoptosis within the theca and granulosa cells was identified in exposed female zebrafish with atretic oocytes by TUNEL positive staining. The incidence of follicular apoptosis was nearly 2-fold higher in exposed females than the controls. All compounds significantly altered kidney proximal tubule morphology but there was no difference in the incidence of apoptotic cells within the kidney between control and exposed in either males or females. Liver histology was altered by ACE and GEM exposure. Parental exposure to pharmaceuticals did not increase developmental abnormalities, hatching success, or mortality in embryos. Yet, direct exposure of embryos to ACE increased developmental abnormalities and mortality; exposure to 0.5μgL(-1) of all pharmaceuticals increased mortality. CBZ decreased plasma 11-ketotestosterone concentrations in males and females. Overall, these data suggest that low concentration, chronic exposure of fish to pharmaceuticals impacts fish development as well as multiple organ systems in adult fish, leading to effects on reproduction and histology of liver and kidney. These results are significant in understanding the consequences of chronic, low concentration pharmaceutical exposure to fish and suggest that exposed populations are at risk of negative impacts to reproduction and health. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. "Naming and Framing": The Impact of Labeling on Health State Values for Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Green, Colin; Goodwin, Elizabeth; Hawton, Annie

    2017-08-01

    Health state valuation is a key input in many economic evaluations that inform resource allocation across competing healthcare interventions. Empirical evidence has shown that, in preference elicitation surveys, respondents may value a health state differently if they are aware of the condition causing it ('labeling effects'). This study investigates the impact of including a multiple sclerosis (MS) label for valuation of MS health states. Health state values for MS were elicited using two internet-based surveys in representative samples of the UK population ( n = 1702; n = 1788). In one survey respondents were not informed that health states were caused by MS. The second survey included a condition label for MS. Surveys were identical in all other ways. Health states were described using a MS-specific eight-dimensional classification system (MSIS-8D), and the time trade-off valuation technique was used. Differences between values for labeled and unlabeled states were assessed using descriptive statistics and multivariate regression methods. Adding a MS condition label had a statistically significant effect on mean health state values, resulting in lower values for labeled MS states v. unlabeled states. The data suggest that the MS label had a more significant effect on values for less severe states, and no significant effect on values for the most severe states. The inclusion of the MS label had a differential impact across the dimensions of the MSIS-8D. Across the MSIS-8D, predicted values ranged from 0.079 to 0.883 for unlabeled states, and 0.066 to 0.861 for labeled states. Differences reported in health state values, using labeled and unlabeled states, demonstrate that condition labels affect the results of valuation studies, and can have important implications in decision-analytic modelling and in economic evaluations.

  13. Adverse Prognostic Impact of Bone Marrow Microvessel Density in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nuri; Lee, Hyewon; Moon, Soo Young; Sohn, Ji Yeon; Hwang, Sang Mee; Yoon, Ok Jin; Youn, Hye Sun

    2015-01-01

    Background Angiogenesis is important for the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma (MM) cells. Bone marrow (BM) microvessel density (MVD) is a useful marker of angiogenesis and is determined by immunohistochemical staining with anti-CD34 antibody. This study investigated the prognostic impact of MVD and demonstrated the relationship between MVD and previously mentioned prognostic factors in patients with MM. Methods The study included 107 patients with MM. MVD was assessed at initial diagnosis in a blinded manner by two hematopathologists who examined three CD34-positive hot spots per patient and counted the number of vessels in BM samples. Patients were divided into three groups according to MVD tertiles. Cumulative progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) curves, calculated by using Kaplan-Meier method, were compared among the three groups. Prognostic impact of MVD was assessed by calculating Cox proportional hazard ratio (HR). Results Median MVDs in the three groups were 16.8, 33.9, and 54.7. MVDs were correlated with other prognostic factors, including β2-microglobulin concentration, plasma cell percentage in the BM, and cancer stage according to the International Staging System. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that high MVD was an independent predictor of PFS (HR=2.57; 95% confidence interval, 1.22-5.42; P=0.013). PFS was significantly lower in the high MVD group than in the low MVD group (P=0.025). However, no difference was observed in the OS (P=0.428). Conclusions Increased BM MVD is a marker of poor prognosis in patients newly diagnosed with MM. BM MVD should be assessed at the initial diagnosis of MM. PMID:26354343

  14. Frequency and economic impact of comorbid cardiac conditions with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Meg A; Happe, Laura E; Dillman, Rachel; Marshall, Landon Z

    2014-08-01

    Fingolimod, an oral immunomodulatory therapy approved to treat multiple sclerosis (MS) is contraindicated in patients with certain cardiac conditions, yet the frequency of these conditions in patients with MS is not known. This study assessed the frequency and economic impact of cardiac conditions among hospitalizations of patients with MS. To determine the frequency and economic impact of selected comorbid cardiac conditions among hospitalizations of patients with a diagnosis of MS. This was a retrospective, discharge-level cohort study of hospital discharge data from 2006-2010. The frequencies of cardiac conditions of interest (based on contraindications to fingolimod in the prescribing information) were reported among all discharges with a diagnosis of MS. Two cohorts were defined: (1) MS with cardiac condition of interest and (2) MS with no cardiac condition of interest. The mean adjusted cost per discharge and incremental cost per hospital day were reported. Among 136,542 discharges with a diagnosis of MS, 9.2% (n = 12,504) had a comorbid cardiac condition of interest based on contraindications to fingolimod in the prescribing information. Heart failure (59.4%), myocardial infarction (17.2%), and occlusion of cerebral arteries (12.4%) were the most common cardiac conditions. The mean adjusted cost per discharge was significantly higher for the MS with cardiac condition cohort compared with the MS with no cardiac condition cohort ($17,623 vs. $11,663, P  less than  0.0001). The incremental cost per hospital day was $6,479 for the MS with cardiac condition cohort.  The presence of comorbid cardiac conditions among hospital discharges in patients with MS is substantial and associated with higher hospitalization costs. Health plans should give consideration to the overlapping presence of these diseases when determining coverage criteria for immunomodulatory therapies and designing clinical programs for MS.

  15. Targeting CK2-driven non-oncogene addiction in B-cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Mandato, E; Manni, S; Zaffino, F; Semenzato, G; Piazza, F

    2016-11-24

    Genetic mutations of oncogenes often underlie deranged cell growth and altered differentiation pathways leading to malignant transformation of B-lymphocytes. However, addiction to oncogenes is not the only drive to lymphoid tumor pathogenesis. Dependence on non-oncogenes, which act by propelling basic mechanisms of cell proliferation and survival, has also been recognized in the pathobiology of lymphoid leukemias, lymphomas and multiple myeloma. Among the growing number of molecules that may uphold non-oncogene addiction, a key place is increasingly being recognized to the serine-threonine kinase CK2. This enzyme is overexpressed and overactive in B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia, multiple myeloma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and non-Hodgkin lymphomas, such as mantle cell, follicular, Burkitt's and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. In these tumors, CK2 may serve the activity of oncogenes, similar to BCR-ABL and c-MYC, control the activation of critical signaling cascades, such as NF-κB (nuclear factor-κB), STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) and PTEN/PI3K/AKT (phosphatase and tensin homolog protein/phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKR thymoma), and sustain multiple cellular stress-elicited pathways, such as the proteotoxic stress, unfolded protein and DNA-damage responses. CK2 has also been shown to have an essential role in tuning signals derived from the stromal tumor microenvironment. Not surprisingly, targeting CK2 in lymphoid tumor cell lines or mouse xenograft models can boost the cytotoxic effects of both conventional chemotherapeutics and novel agents, similar to heat-shock protein 90, proteasome and tyrosine kinases inhibitors. In this review, we summarize the evidence indicating how CK2 embodies most of the features of a cancer growth-promoting non-oncogene, focusing on lymphoid tumors. We further discuss the preclinical data of the use of small ATP-competitive CK2 inhibitors, which hold the promise to be additional options in novel drug

  16. “Hit-and-Run” Transformation by Adenovirus Oncogenes

    PubMed Central

    Nevels, Michael; Täuber, Birgitt; Spruss, Thilo; Wolf, Hans; Dobner, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    According to classical concepts of viral oncogenesis, the persistence of virus-specific oncogenes is required to maintain the transformed cellular phenotype. In contrast, the “hit-and-run” hypothesis claims that viruses can mediate cellular transformation through an initial “hit,” while maintenance of the transformed state is compatible with the loss (“run”) of viral molecules. It is well established that the adenovirus E1A and E1B gene products can cooperatively transform primary human and rodent cells to a tumorigenic phenotype and that these cells permanently express the viral oncogenes. Additionally, recent studies have shown that the adenovirus E4 region encodes two novel oncoproteins, the products of E4orf6 and E4orf3, which cooperate with the viral E1A proteins to transform primary rat cells in an E1B-like fashion. Unexpectedly, however, cells transformed by E1A and either E4orf6 or E4orf3 fail to express the viral E4 gene products, and only a subset contain E1A proteins. In fact, the majority of these cells lack E4- and E1A-specific DNA sequences, indicating that transformation occurred through a hit-and-run mechanism. We provide evidence that the unusual transforming activities of the adenoviral oncoproteins may be due to their mutagenic potential. Our results strongly support the possibility that even tumors that lack any detectable virus-specific molecules can be of viral origin, which could have a significant impact on the use of adenoviral vectors for gene therapy. PMID:11238835

  17. Impact of a 5-day expedition to machu picchu on persons with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    D'hooghe, Marie Beatrice; Feys, Peter; Deltour, Sam; Van de Putte, Isabelle; De Meue, Jan; Kos, Daphne; O Eijnde, Bert; Van Asch, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) are less physically active than nondiseased persons and often report low self-efficacy levels. In the context of an awareness project to promote physical activity and participation in MS, we addressed the impact of training for and participation in a unique expedition. Medical events, relapses, and self-reported neurological worsening were followed from 6 months before and up to 4 months afterwards. Validated patient-reported outcome measures were used to assess fatigue, self-efficacy in exercising, walking abilities, and illness perception. Nine participants completed the training, expedition, and observational study. Minor events, relapses, and/or neurological worsening were reported in six participants. The three participants with mild disability and no cardiovascular risk factors or comorbidities were free of medical and neurological events. We found a significant reduction of motor fatigue at last when compared with the first assessment. The reduction tended to be more evident in participants with mild disability (Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) <4 at baseline). Cognitive fatigue, self-efficacy, and self-reported walking abilities did not change significantly. Illness perceptions tended to be reduced over time in the domains of consequences, identity, and concerns. Overall, no major adverse events occurred.

  18. Impact of pretransplant therapy and depth of disease response before autologous transplantation for multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Vij, Ravi; Kumar, Shaji; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Zhong, Xiaobo; Huang, Jiaxing; Dispenzieri, Angela; Abidi, Muneer H; Bird, Jennifer M; Freytes, César O; Gale, Robert Peter; Kindwall-Keller, Tamila L; Kyle, Robert A; Landsburg, Daniel J; Lazarus, Hillard M; Munker, Reinhold; Roy, Vivek; Sharma, Manish; Vogl, Dan T; Wirk, Baldeep; Hari, Parameswaran N

    2015-02-01

    Patients with multiple myeloma (MM) who are eligible for autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) typically receive a finite period of initial therapy before ASCT. It is not clear if patients with suboptimal (less than a partial) response to initial therapy benefit from additional alternative therapy with intent to maximize pretransplant response. We identified 539 patients with MM who had an ASCT after having achieved less than a partial response (PR) to first-line induction chemotherapy between 1995 and 2010. These patients were then divided into 2 groups: those who received additional salvage chemotherapy before ASCT (n = 324) and those who had no additional salvage chemotherapy immediately before ASCT (n = 215). Additional pretransplant chemotherapy resulted in deepening responses in 68% (complete response in 8% and PR in 60%). On multivariate analysis there was no impact of pretransplant salvage chemotherapy on treatment-related mortality, risk for relapse, progression-free survival, or overall survival. In conclusion, for patients achieving less than a PR to initial induction therapy, including with novel agent combinations, additional pre-ASCT salvage chemotherapy improved the depth of response and pre-ASCT disease status but was not associated with survival benefit.

  19. Impact of Exercise on Innate Immunity in Multiple Sclerosis Progression and Symptomatology

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Alison; Cronin, Owen; Ryan, Aisling M.; Sweeney, Brian; Yap, Siew M.; O'Toole, Orna; Allen, Andrew P.; Clarke, Gerard; O'Halloran, Ken D.; Downer, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS), an idiopathic progressive immune-mediated neurological disorder of the central nervous system (CNS), is characterized by recurrent episodes of inflammatory demyelination and consequent axonal deterioration. It accounts for functional deterioration and lasting disability among young adults. A body of literature demonstrates that physical activity counteracts fatigue and depression and may improve overall quality of life in MS patients. Furthermore, much data indicates that exercise ameliorates chronic neuroinflammation and its related pathologies by tipping cytokine profiles toward an anti-inflammatory signature. Recent data has focused on the direct impact of exercise training on the innate immune system by targeting toll-like receptors (TLRs), signaling pattern recognition receptors that govern the innate immune response, shedding light on the physiological role of TLRs in health and disease. Indeed, TLRs continue to emerge as players in the neuroinflammatory processes underpinning MS. This review will highlight evidence that physical activity and exercise are potential immunomodulatory therapies, targeting innate signaling mechanism(s) to modulate MS symptom development and progression. PMID:27313534

  20. Multiple imputation to evaluate the impact of an assay change in national surveys.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Maya

    2017-07-30

    National health surveys, such as the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, are used to monitor trends of nutritional biomarkers. These surveys try to maintain the same biomarker assay over time, but there are a variety of reasons why the assay may change. In these cases, it is important to evaluate the potential impact of a change so that any observed fluctuations in concentrations over time are not confounded by changes in the assay. To this end, a subset of stored specimens previously analyzed with the old assay is retested using the new assay. These paired data are used to estimate an adjustment equation, which is then used to 'adjust' all the old assay results and convert them into 'equivalent' units of the new assay. In this paper, we present a new way of approaching this problem using modern statistical methods designed for missing data. Using simulations, we compare the proposed multiple imputation approach with the adjustment equation approach currently in use. We also compare these approaches using real National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data for 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  1. Impact of a 5-Day Expedition to Machu Picchu on Persons with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    D'hooghe, Marie Beatrice; Feys, Peter; Deltour, Sam; Van de Putte, Isabelle; De Meue, Jan; Kos, Daphne; O Eijnde, Bert; Van Asch, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) are less physically active than nondiseased persons and often report low self-efficacy levels. In the context of an awareness project to promote physical activity and participation in MS, we addressed the impact of training for and participation in a unique expedition. Medical events, relapses, and self-reported neurological worsening were followed from 6 months before and up to 4 months afterwards. Validated patient-reported outcome measures were used to assess fatigue, self-efficacy in exercising, walking abilities, and illness perception. Nine participants completed the training, expedition, and observational study. Minor events, relapses, and/or neurological worsening were reported in six participants. The three participants with mild disability and no cardiovascular risk factors or comorbidities were free of medical and neurological events. We found a significant reduction of motor fatigue at last when compared with the first assessment. The reduction tended to be more evident in participants with mild disability (Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) <4 at baseline). Cognitive fatigue, self-efficacy, and self-reported walking abilities did not change significantly. Illness perceptions tended to be reduced over time in the domains of consequences, identity, and concerns. Overall, no major adverse events occurred. PMID:24967103

  2. Oncogenic regulation of tumor metabolic reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Tarrado-Castellarnau, Míriam; de Atauri, Pedro; Cascante, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Development of malignancy is accompanied by a complete metabolic reprogramming closely related to the acquisition of most of cancer hallmarks. In fact, key oncogenic pathways converge to adapt the metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids and nucleic acids to the dynamic tumor microenvironment, conferring a selective advantage to cancer cells. Therefore, metabolic properties of tumor cells are significantly different from those of non-transformed cells. In addition, tumor metabolic reprogramming is linked to drug resistance in cancer treatment. Accordingly, metabolic adaptations are specific vulnerabilities that can be used in different therapeutic approaches for cancer therapy. In this review, we discuss the dysregulation of the main metabolic pathways that enable cell transformation and its association with oncogenic signaling pathways, focusing on the effects of c-MYC, hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF1), phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K), and the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) on cancer cell metabolism. Elucidating these connections is of crucial importance to identify new targets and develop selective cancer treatments that improve response to therapy and overcome the emerging resistance to chemotherapeutics. PMID:28040803

  3. Oncogenic KRAS signalling in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Eser, S; Schnieke, A; Schneider, G; Saur, D

    2014-08-26

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is almost universally fatal. The annual number of deaths equals the number of newly diagnosed cases, despite maximal treatment. The overall 5-year survival rate of <5% has remained stubbornly unchanged over the last 30 years, despite tremendous efforts in preclinical and clinical science. There is unquestionably an urgent need to further improve our understanding of pancreatic cancer biology, treatment response and relapse, and to identify novel therapeutic targets. Rigorous research in the field has uncovered genetic aberrations that occur during PDAC development and progression. In most cases, PDAC is initiated by oncogenic mutant KRAS, which has been shown to drive pancreatic neoplasia. However, all attempts to target KRAS directly have failed in the clinic and KRAS is widely assumed to be undruggable. This has led to intense efforts to identify druggable critical downstream targets and nodes orchestrated by mutationally activated KRAS. This includes context-specific KRAS effector pathways, synthetic lethal interaction partners and KRAS-driven metabolic changes. Here, we review recent advances in oncogenic KRAS signalling and discuss how these might benefit PDAC treatment in the future.

  4. The modulation of apoptosis by oncogenic viruses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Transforming viruses can change a normal cell into a cancer cell during their normal life cycle. Persistent infections with these viruses have been recognized to cause some types of cancer. These viruses have been implicated in the modulation of various biological processes, such as proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. The study of infections caused by oncogenic viruses had helped in our understanding of several mechanisms that regulate cell growth, as well as the molecular alterations leading to cancer. Therefore, transforming viruses provide models of study that have enabled the advances in cancer research. Viruses with transforming abilities, include different members of the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) family, Hepatitis C virus (HCV), Human T-cell Leukemia virus (HTLV-1), Epstein Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi’s Sarcoma Herpesvirus (KSHV). Apoptosis, or programmed cell death, is a tightly regulated process that plays an important role in development and homeostasis. Additionally, it functions as an antiviral defense mechanism. The deregulation of apoptosis has been implicated in the etiology of diverse diseases, including cancer. Oncogenic viruses employ different mechanisms to inhibit the apoptotic process, allowing the propagation of infected and damaged cells. During this process, some viral proteins are able to evade the immune system, while others can directly interact with the caspases involved in apoptotic signaling. In some instances, viral proteins can also promote apoptosis, which may be necessary for an accurate regulation of the initial stages of infection. PMID:23741982

  5. Assessing the Impact of Faking on Binary Personality Measures: An IRT-Based Multiple-Group Factor Analytic Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrando, Pere J.; Anguiano-Carrasco, Cristina

    2009-01-01

    This article proposes a model-based multiple-group procedure for assessing the impact of faking on personality measures and the scores derived from these measures. The assessment is at the item level and the base model, which is intended for binary items, can be parameterized both as an Item Response Theory (IRT) model and as an Item…

  6. Orthodontic Management with Traction and Asymmetric Extraction for Multiple Impacted Permanent Maxillary Teeth – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Qiannan; Zhang, Liang; Dai, Juan; Li, Feifei; Feng, Xue

    2016-01-01

    Multiple impacted teeth are a rare eruption disturbance that increases the case complexity. In this article, we described a 13-year-old boy whose 5 permanent maxillary teeth were not erupted although their root formation was complete. The orthodontic treatment with traction and asymmetric extraction was performed to achieve a significantly improved functional and esthetic result. PMID:27857816

  7. The Impact of Multiple Intelligences-Based Instruction on Developing Speaking Skills of the Pre-Service Teachers of English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salem, Ashraf Atta M. S.

    2013-01-01

    The current study investigates the impact of multiple intelligences-based Instruction on developing speaking skills of the pre-service teachers of English. Therefore, the problem of the current study can be stated in the lack of speaking skills of the pre-service teachers of English in Hurgada faculty of Education, South Valley University. To…

  8. The Impact of Embedding Multiple Modes of Representation within Writing Tasks on High School Students' Chemistry Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Mark A.; Hand, Brian

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the impact on chemistry learning of the degree to which students embedded or integrated multiple modes of representation in end of unit writing-to-learn activities. A multi-case study approach utilizing quasi-experimental methodology involving intact high school chemistry classes taught by two different teachers was…

  9. The Impact of Multiple Endpoint Dependency on "Q" and "I"[superscript 2] in Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Christopher Glen; Becker, Betsy Jane

    2014-01-01

    A common assumption in meta-analysis is that effect sizes are independent. When correlated effect sizes are analyzed using traditional univariate techniques, this assumption is violated. This research assesses the impact of dependence arising from treatment-control studies with multiple endpoints on homogeneity measures "Q" and…

  10. Teaching Multiple Modes of Representation in Middle-School Science Classrooms: Impact on Student Learning and Multimodal Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nixon, Ryan S.; Smith, Leigh K.; Wimmer, Jennifer J.

    2015-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study investigated how explicit instruction about multiple modes of representation (MMR) impacted grades 7 (n = 61) and 8 (n = 141) students' learning and multimodal use on end-of-unit assessments. Half of each teacher's (n = 3) students received an intervention consisting of explicit instruction on MMR in science…

  11. Impact of Stimulation versus Microswitch-based Programs on Indices of Happiness of People with Profound Multiple Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; Oliva, Doretta; Groeneweg, Jop

    2002-01-01

    A study assessed whether the impact of a microswitch-based program on indices of happiness would be comparable with that of a stimulation program on three persons with profound multiple disabilities. The microswitch-based program produced increases that were fairly clear for two participants and quite modest for the third. (Contains references.)…

  12. The Impact of Multiple Endpoint Dependency on "Q" and "I"[superscript 2] in Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Christopher Glen; Becker, Betsy Jane

    2014-01-01

    A common assumption in meta-analysis is that effect sizes are independent. When correlated effect sizes are analyzed using traditional univariate techniques, this assumption is violated. This research assesses the impact of dependence arising from treatment-control studies with multiple endpoints on homogeneity measures "Q" and…

  13. Absence of RET proto-oncogene abnormalities in sporadic parathyroid tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Pausova, Z.; Janicic, N.; Konrad, E.

    1994-09-01

    Parathyroid tumors can occur either sporadically or as a part of inherited cancer syndromes such as multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) type 2A. Recently, development of this syndrome has been shown to be related to specific mutations in the RET proto-oncogene, a putative receptor tyrosine kinase. Activation of this proto-oncogene has been demonstrated not only in tumors of the MEN 2A syndrome, but also in other neoplasia of neuroectoderm origin, namely papillary thyroid carcinoma where a rearrangement of the RET proto-oncogene has been found. In the present study, a role of the RET proto-oncogene in the development of sporadic parathyroid tumors was investigated by analyzing DNA samples obtained from 13 parathyroid adenomas and 6 parathyroid hyperplasias. Southern blot, using BamHI restricted DNA, did not reveal any gross alteration of the gene. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was then employed to amplify DNA fragments corresponding to exons 10 and 11 in which all MEN 2A mutations have been identified. Amplified DNA fragments were all of expected size (exon 10, 182 bp; exon 11, 233 bp). Since a single point mutation at codon 634 has been found to be associated in close to 90% of cases with development of parathyroid tumors in patients with the MEN 2A syndrome, exon 11, containing this codon, was further examined by direct sequence analysis. Sequences obtained from all tumors tested, however, did not differ from the wild type sequence. Therefore, the mutation of the RET proto-oncogene commonly associated with parathyroid neoplasias in MEN 2A is uncommon in sporadic parathyroid tumors. This suggests that the pathogenesis of parathyroid tumors occurring sporadically may be different from those occurring in patients with the MEN 2A syndrome.

  14. Therapeutic strategies impacting cancer cell glutamine metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lukey, Michael J; Wilson, Kristin F; Cerione, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    The metabolic adaptations that support oncogenic growth can also render cancer cells dependent on certain nutrients. Along with the Warburg effect, increased utilization of glutamine is one of the metabolic hallmarks of the transformed state. Glutamine catabolism is positively regulated by multiple oncogenic signals, including those transmitted by the Rho family of GTPases and by c-Myc. The recent identification of mechanistically distinct inhibitors of glutaminase, which can selectively block cellular transformation, has revived interest in the possibility of targeting glutamine metabolism in cancer therapy. Here, we outline the regulation and roles of glutamine metabolism within cancer cells and discuss possible strategies for, and the consequences of, impacting these processes therapeutically. PMID:24047273

  15. Single and multiple objective biomass-to-biofuel supply chain optimization considering environmental impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valles Sosa, Claudia Evangelina

    respond to these new challenges, the Modified Multiple Objective Evolutionary Algorithm for the design optimization of a biomass to bio-refinery logistic system that considers the simultaneous maximization of the total profit and the minimization of three environmental impacts is presented. Sustainability balances economic, social and environmental goals and objectives. There exist several works in the literature that have considered economic and environmental objectives for the presented supply chain problem. However, there is a lack of research performed in the social aspect of a sustainable logistics system. This work proposes a methodology to integrate social aspect assessment, based on employment creation. Finally, most of the assessment methodologies considered in the literature only contemplate deterministic values, when in realistic situations uncertainties in the supply chain are present. In this work, Value-at-Risk, an advanced risk measure commonly used in portfolio optimization is included to consider the uncertainties in biofuel prices, among the others.

  16. Impact of concurrent PIK3CA mutations on response to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibition in EGFR-mutant lung cancers and on prognosis in oncogene-driven lung adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Juliana; Woo, Kaitlin M.; Sima, Camelia S.; Plodkowski, Andrew; Hellmann, Matthew D.; Chaft, Jamie; Kris, Mark G.; Arcila, Maria E.; Ladanyi, Marc; Drilon, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION In patients with EGFR or KRAS-mutant lung adenocarcinomas, the prognostic impact of a concurrent PIK3CA mutation remains unclear. Although preclinical data suggest that sensitivity to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibition (TKI) is decreased in EGFR-mutant lung cancers also harboring a PIK3CA mutation, this interaction has not been explored clinically. METHODS Patients with lung adenocarcinomas harboring a PIK3CA mutation concurrent with a separate driver mutation were identified via mutational hotspot testing, multiplex sizing assays, and FISH. Overall survival (OS) and outcomes with EGFR TKI monotherapy (EGFR-mutant) were estimated using Kaplan-Meier methods and compared between double mutant (EGFR or KRAS-mutant, concurrent PIK3C-mutant) and single mutant patients (EGFR or KRAS-mutant, PI3KCA wild-type) using log-rank tests. RESULTS In EGFR and KRAS-mutant lung cancers, a concurrent PIK3CA mutation was associated with a decrease in median OS: 18 vs 33 months (EGFR double n=10 vs single n=43 mutant, p=0.006), and 9 vs 16 months (KRAS double n=16 vs single n=47 mutant, p=0.020). In EGFR-mutant lung cancers, a concurrent PIK3CA mutation did not impact benefit from EGFR TKI monotherapy. Single vs double mutant: objective response rate 83% (n=29) vs 62% (n=6, p=0.80), median time to progression 11 (n=29) vs 8 months (n=6, p=0.84), and median duration of TKI therapy 15 (n=32) vs 15 months (n=10, p=0.65). CONCLUSION A concurrent PIK3CA mutation is a poor prognostic factor in patients with advanced EGFR- or KRAS-mutant lung adenocarcinomas. There was no evidence that clinical benefit from EGFR TKI monotherapy is affected by a concurrent PIK3CA mutation in EGFR-mutant lung cancers. PMID:26334752

  17. [Oncogenes and the origin of leukemia. Acute avian leukemia viruses].

    PubMed

    Graf, T

    1988-03-01

    Oncogenes have been intimately associated with the genesis of human neoplasms. A particularly useful system to study the mechanism of tumorigenesis is a small group of avian retroviruses that carry two oncogenes. These viruses causes acute leukemias and can transform hematopoietic cells in vitro. The mechanisms by which viral oncogenes affect the growth control and differentiation of their target cells is now understood in fair detail for two of these virus strains. In the avian erythroblastosis virus AEV, the v-erbB oncogene deregulates the growth control of erythroid precursors, while verbA blocks their terminal differentiation into erythrocytes. Based on the findings that v-erbB oncogene corresponds to a mutated growth factor receptor gene and that v-erbA corresponds to a mutated hormone receptor gene, models have been developed that explain the function of these two oncogenes on a molecular basis. The myelomonocytic leukemia virus MH2 acts by a completely different mechanism. In this case, the v-myc oncogene stimulates the proliferation of macrophage-like cells, while the v-mil gene stimulates them to produce their own growth factor, thus leading to autocrine growth. It will be interesting to determine whether the type of mechanisms of oncogene cooperativity elucidated for acute leukemia viruses are also operative during leukemogenesis in humans.

  18. Oncogenic Transformation of Human-Derived Gastric Organoids.

    PubMed

    Bertaux-Skeirik, Nina; Centeno, Jomaris; Gao, Jian; Gabre, Joel; Zavros, Yana

    2016-08-19

    The culture of organoids has represented a significant advancement in the gastrointestinal research field. Previous research studies have described the oncogenic transformation of human intestinal and mouse gastric organoids. Here we detail the protocol for the oncogenic transformation and orthotopic transplantation of human-derived gastric organoids.

  19. Oncogenic pathways implicated in ovarian epithelial cancer.

    PubMed

    Nicosia, Santo V; Bai, Wenlong; Cheng, Jin Q; Coppola, Domenico; Kruk, Patricia A

    2003-08-01

    Characterization of intracellular signaling pathways should lead to a better understanding of ovarian epithelial carcinogenesis and provide an opportunity to interfere with signal transduction targets involved in ovarian tumor cell growth, survival, and progression. Challenges toward such an effort are significant because many of these signals are part of cascades within an intricate and likely redundant intracellular signaling network (Fig.1). For instance, a given signal may activate a dual intracellular pathway (ie, MEK1-MAPK and PI3K/Akt required for fibronectin-dependent activation of matrix metalloproteinase 9). A single pathway also may transduce more than one biologic or oncogenic signal (ie, PI3K signaling in epithelial and endothelial cell growth and sprouting of neovessels). Despite these challenges, evidence for therapeutic targeting of signal transduction pathways is accumulating in human cancer. For instance, the EGF-specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor ZD 1839 (Iressa) may have a beneficial therapeutic effect on ovarian epithelial cancer. Therapy of this cancer may include inhibitors of PI kinase (quercetin), ezrin and PIP kinase (genistein). The G protein-coupled family of receptors, including LPA, also is an attractive target to drugs, although their frequent pleiotropic functions may be at times toxic and lack specificity. Because of the lack of notable toxicity, PI3K/Akt pathway inhibitors such as FTIs are a promising targeted therapy of ovarian epithelial cancer. Increasing insight into the oncogenic pathways involved in ovarian epithelial cancer also is helping clinicians to understand better the phenomenon of chemoresistance in this malignancy. Oncogenic activation of gamma-synuclein promotes cell survival and provides resistance to paclitaxel, but such a resistance is partially overcome by an MEK inhibitor that suppresses ERK activity. Ovarian epithelial cancer is a complex group of neoplasms with an overall poor prognosis. Comprehension of

  20. The Impact of the Rate Prior on Bayesian Estimation of Divergence Times with Multiple Loci

    PubMed Central

    Dos Reis, Mario; Zhu, Tianqi; Yang, Ziheng

    2014-01-01

    Bayesian methods provide a powerful way to estimate species divergence times by combining information from molecular sequences with information from the fossil record. With the explosive increase of genomic data, divergence time estimation increasingly uses data of multiple loci (genes or site partitions). Widely used computer programs to estimate divergence times use independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.) priors on the substitution rates for different loci. The i.i.d. prior is problematic. As the number of loci (L) increases, the prior variance of the average rate across all loci goes to zero at the rate 1/L. As a consequence, the rate prior dominates posterior time estimates when many loci are analyzed, and if the rate prior is misspecified, the estimated divergence times will converge to wrong values with very narrow credibility intervals. Here we develop a new prior on the locus rates based on the Dirichlet distribution that corrects the problematic behavior of the i.i.d. prior. We use computer simulation and real data analysis to highlight the differences between the old and new priors. For a dataset for six primate species, we show that with the old i.i.d. prior, if the prior rate is too high (or too low), the estimated divergence times are too young (or too old), outside the bounds imposed by the fossil calibrations. In contrast, with the new Dirichlet prior, posterior time estimates are insensitive to the rate prior and are compatible with the fossil calibrations. We re-analyzed a phylogenomic data set of 36 mammal species and show that using many fossil calibrations can alleviate the adverse impact of a misspecified rate prior to some extent. We recommend the use of the new Dirichlet prior in Bayesian divergence time estimation. [Bayesian inference, divergence time, relaxed clock, rate prior, partition analysis.] PMID:24658316

  1. Habitat-specific impacts of multiple consumers on plant population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Maron, John L; Kauffman, Matthew J

    2006-01-01

    Multiple consumers often attack seeds, seedlings, and adult plants, but their population-level consequences remain uncertain. We examined how insect and small mammal consumers influenced the demography and abundance of the perennial shrub, bush lupine (Lupinus arboreus). In grassland and dune habitats we established replicate experimental lupine populations in 81-m2 plots that were either protected from, or exposed to, herbivorous voles and granivorous mice (via fencing) and/or root feeding insects (via insecticide treatment). Populations were initiated with transplanted seedlings in 1999 and 2000. We followed the demography of these cohorts, subsequent generations, and the seed bank for 5.5 years. Voles and insects killed many seedlings in dune (1999 only) and grassland (1999 and 2000) habitats. After 2000, insects and voles had minimal effects on seedling or adult survival. Seed predation by granivorous mice, however, greatly depressed seedling recruitment, resulting in lower adult lupine abundance in control plots vs. those protected from rodents. In grasslands, initial effects of voles and insects on seedling survival produced large differences among treatments in adult plant density and the cumulative number of seeds produced throughout the experiment. Differences among grassland populations in seed rain, however, had little influence on the magnitude of seedling recruitment into this habitat. Instead, recruitment out of a preexisting seed bank compensated for the lack of seed production in populations exposed to consumers. Shading by dense adults in plots protected from consumers limited seedling establishment within these populations. Although differences among populations in cumulative seed rain did not influence adult establishment, populations protected from consumers accumulated substantially larger seed banks than controls. These results illustrate how density dependence, habitat-specific seed dynamics, and particular demographic impacts of consumers

  2. A One-Day Dental Faculty Workshop in Writing Multiple-Choice Questions: An Impact Evaluation.

    PubMed

    AlFaris, Eiad; Naeem, Naghma; Irfan, Farhana; Qureshi, Riaz; Saad, Hussain; Al Sadhan, Ra'ed; Abdulghani, Hamza Mohammad; Van der Vleuten, Cees

    2015-11-01

    Long training workshops on the writing of exam questions have been shown to be effective; however, the effectiveness of short workshops needs to be demonstrated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a one-day, seven-hour faculty development workshop at the College of Dentistry, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia, on the quality of multiple-choice questions (MCQs). Kirkpatrick's four-level evaluation model was used. Participants' satisfaction (Kirkpatrick's Level 1) was evaluated with a post-workshop questionnaire. A quasi-experimental, randomized separate sample, pretest-posttest design was used to assess the learning effect (Kirkpatrick's Level 2). To evaluate transfer of learning to practice (Kirkpatrick's Level 3), MCQs created by ten faculty members as a result of the training were assessed. To assess Kirkpatrick's Level 4 regarding institutional change, interviews with three key leaders of the school were conducted, coded, and analyzed. A total of 72 course directors were invited to and attended some part of the workshop; all 52 who attended the entire workshop completed the satisfaction form; and 22 of the 36 participants in the experimental group completed the posttest. The results showed that all 52 participants were highly satisfied with the workshop, and significant positive changes were found in the faculty members' knowledge and the quality of their MCQs with effect sizes of 0.7 and 0.28, respectively. At the institutional level, the interviews demonstrated positive structural changes in the school's assessment system. Overall, this one-day item-writing faculty workshop resulted in positive changes at all four of Kirkpatrick's levels; these effects suggest that even a short training session can improve a dental school's assessment of its students.

  3. The impact of outpatient rehabilitation on quality of life in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Patti, Francesco; Ciancio, Maria Rita; Reggio, Ester; Lopes, Rossella; Palermo, Filippo; Cacopardo, Manuela; Reggio, Arturo

    2002-08-01

    It is well accepted that rehabilitative treatment can be effective in reducing disability and optimizing quality of life (QoL) of people with multiple sclerosis (MS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a comprehensive outpatient rehabilitative treatment on QoL in patients suffering from MS. We selected 111 patients from a sample of 407 patients who had consecutively entered the MS Center of Catania (which is located in southern Italy) in 1998. Fifty-eight were randomly assigned to the study treatment and 53 to a waiting list (control treatment). Kurtzke's EDSS and quality of Life (QoL)were the primary endpoints. QoL was measured with the generic multi-item SF-36 scales. We also used: the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) for depression, the Tempelaar Social Experience Check-list (SET) for social activities and the Fatigue Impact Scale (FIS). The study treatment group was treated for 6 consecutive weeks, 6 days a week with a comprehensive rehabilitative outpatient model. The control treatment group was in a waiting list and was trained to self-exercises at home. EDSS remained unchanged in both groups. All health related QoL domains significantly improved in the study treatment (p < 0.001 in physical functioning, role physical, bodily pain, general health, and social functioning; p < 0.05 in vitality, role emotional and mental health). FIS, SET and BDI also improved significantly after the rehabilitative treatment in the study group (p < 0.001). The results of this study confirm the effectiveness of a short comprehensive outpatient model of rehabilitative treatment in people with MS and in particular in their QoL.

  4. Impact of genetic abnormalities on survival after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Schilling, G; Hansen, T; Shimoni, A; Zabelina, T; Pérez-Simón, J-A; Simon-Perez, J-A; Gutierrez, N C; Bethge, W; Liebisch, P; Schwerdtfeger, R; Bornhäuser, M; Otterstetter, S; Penas, E M M; Dierlamm, J; Ayuk, F; Atanackovic, D; Bacher, U; Bokemeyer, C; Zander, A; San Miguel, J; Miguel, J S; Nagler, A; Kröger, N

    2008-06-01

    We analyzed the prognostic impact of the most frequent genetic abnormalities detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization in 101 patients with multiple myeloma, who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) after melphalan/fludarabine-based reduced conditioning. The incidences of abnormalities in the present analysis were as follows: del(13q14) (61%), t(11;14)(q13;q32) (14%), t(4;14)(p16.3;q32) (19%), MYC-gain gains (8q24) (21%), del(17p13) (16%) and t(14;16)(q32;q23) (5%). None of the patients had t(6;14)(p25;q32). The overall complete remission (CR) rate was 50% with no differences between the genetic abnormalities except for patients with del(17p13) who achieved less CR (7 vs 56%; P=0.001). Univariate analysis revealed a higher relapse rate in patients aged >50 years (P=0.002), patients with del(13q14) (P=0.006) and patients with del(17p13) (P=0.003). In multivariate analyses, only del(13q14) (HR: 2.34, P=0.03) and del(17p13) (HR: 2.24; P=0.04) significantly influenced the incidence of relapse, whereas for event-free survival, only age (HR 2.8; P=0.01) and del(17p13) (HR: 2.05; P=0.03) retained their negative prognostic value. These data show that del(17p13) is a negative prognostic factor for achieving CR as well as for event-free survival after HSCT. Translocation t(4;14) might be overcome by allogeneic HSCT, which will have implication for risk-adapted strategies.

  5. The Impact of Multiple Roles on Psychological Distress among Japanese Workers

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Ayumi; Abe, Yasuyo; Date, Yutaka; Honda, Sumihisa

    2015-01-01

    Background There has been considerable interest in Japanese society in the problem of work-related stress leading to depressive symptoms, and an increasing number of primary houseworkers maintain paid employment. The purpose of this study was to examine the differential impact of multiple roles associated with psychological distress among Japanese workers. Methods We studied 722 men and women aged 18–83 years in a cross-sectional study. The K10 questionnaire was used to examine psychological distress. Results The proportion of participants with psychological distress was higher in women (17.8%) compared with men (11.5%). Having three roles significantly decreased the risk of psychological distress [women: odds ratio (OR), 0.37-fold; men: OR, 0.41] compared with only one role. In working married women, there was significantly less psychological distress (OR, 0.27), and those with childrearing or caregiving responsibilities for elderly parents had significantly less psychological distress (OR, 0.38) than those with only an employment role. Similarly, working married men who had childrearing or caregiving responsibilities for elderly parents had significantly less psychological distress (OR, 0.41) than those who had only an employment role. Conclusion The present study demonstrated that participants who had only an employment role had an increased risk of psychological distress. The degree of psychological distress was not determined solely by the number of roles. It is important to have balance between work and family life to reduce role conflict and/or role submersion, which in turn may reduce the risk of psychological distress. PMID:26106510

  6. The Impact of Ambulance and Patient Diversion on Crowdedness of Multiple Emergency Departments in a Region

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Chung-Yao; Yang, Jhen-Ci; Lin, Chih-Hao

    2015-01-01

    Emergency department (ED) overcrowding threatens healthcare quality. Ambulance diversion (AD) may relieve ED overcrowding; however, diverting patients from an overcrowded ED will load neighboring EDs with more patients and may result in regional overcrowding. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of different diversion strategies on the crowdedness of multiple EDs in a region. The importance of regional coordination was also explored. A queuing model for patient flow was utilized to develop a computer program for simulating AD among EDs in a region. Key parameters, including patient arrival rates, percentages of patients of different acuity levels, percentage of patients transported by ambulance, and total resources of EDs, were assigned based on real data. The crowdedness indices of each ED and the regional crowdedness index were assessed to evaluate the effectiveness of various AD strategies. Diverting patients equally to all other EDs in a region is better than diverting patients only to EDs with more resources. The effect of diverting all ambulance-transported patients is similar to that of diverting only low-acuity patients. To minimize regional crowdedness, ambulatory patients should be sent to proper EDs when AD is initiated. Based on a queuing model with parameters calibrated by real data, patient flows of EDs in a region were simulated by a computer program. From a regional point of view, randomly diverting ambulatory patients provides almost no benefit. With regards to minimizing the crowdedness of the whole region, the most promising strategy is to divert all patients equally to all other EDs that are not already crowded. This result implies that communication and coordination among regional hospitals are crucial to relieve overall crowdedness. A regional coordination center may prioritize AD strategies to optimize ED utility. PMID:26659589

  7. Impact of Helicobacter pylori on multiple sclerosis-related clinically isolated syndrome.

    PubMed

    Deretzi, G; Gavalas, E; Boziki, M; Tsiptsios, D; Polyzos, S A; Venizelos, I; Zavos, C; Koutlas, E; Tsiptsios, I; Katsinelos, P; Kountouras, J

    2016-04-01

    There are no data regarding the relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection (Hp-I) and clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) suggestive of multiple sclerosis. The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the association between active Hp-I, confirmed by histology, and CIS and to evaluate the impact of Hp eradication on the CIS clinical course. We conducted a study on 48 patients with CIS and 20 matched controls. At baseline, apart from histology, serum anti-Hp-specific IgG titer, inflammatory mediators, and HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-DR genetic polymorphisms were estimated. Hp-positive patients received standard triple eradication regimen, and all patients were followed up for 2 years. The prevalence of Hp-I was significantly higher in patients with CIS (43/48, 89.6%) than in control (10/20, 50%) (P < 0.001, OR: 8.6, 95% CI: 2.4-30.8). When compared with controls, patients with CIS also showed significantly higher serum anti-Hp IgG titer and HLA-A26, HLA-A30, and HLA-B57 frequencies. Hp-positive patients also showed higher serum concentrations of inflammatory cytokines and homocysteine. At 2-year clinical endpoint, in the subgroup of CIS patients with successful Hp eradication, the number of patients who presented with a second episode was significantly lower accompanied by significant improvement in mean Expanded Disability Status Scale score. Hp-I seems more frequent in a Greek CIS cohort and its eradication might delay CIS progression, suggesting a possible link between Hp-I and CIS. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Enhancer hijacking activates GFI1 family oncogenes in medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Northcott, Paul A; Lee, Catherine; Zichner, Thomas; Stütz, Adrian M; Erkek, Serap; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Shih, David J H; Hovestadt, Volker; Zapatka, Marc; Sturm, Dominik; Jones, David T W; Kool, Marcel; Remke, Marc; Cavalli, Florence M G; Zuyderduyn, Scott; Bader, Gary D; VandenBerg, Scott; Esparza, Lourdes Adriana; Ryzhova, Marina; Wang, Wei; Wittmann, Andrea; Stark, Sebastian; Sieber, Laura; Seker-Cin, Huriye; Linke, Linda; Kratochwil, Fabian; Jäger, Natalie; Buchhalter, Ivo; Imbusch, Charles D; Zipprich, Gideon; Raeder, Benjamin; Schmidt, Sabine; Diessl, Nicolle; Wolf, Stephan; Wiemann, Stefan; Brors, Benedikt; Lawerenz, Chris; Eils, Jürgen; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Risch, Thomas; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Weber, Ursula D; Bartholomae, Cynthia C; von Kalle, Christof; Turányi, Eszter; Hauser, Peter; Sanden, Emma; Darabi, Anna; Siesjö, Peter; Sterba, Jaroslav; Zitterbart, Karel; Sumerauer, David; van Sluis, Peter; Versteeg, Rogier; Volckmann, Richard; Koster, Jan; Schuhmann, Martin U; Ebinger, Martin; Grimes, H Leighton; Robinson, Giles W; Gajjar, Amar; Mynarek, Martin; von Hoff, Katja; Rutkowski, Stefan; Pietsch, Torsten; Scheurlen, Wolfram; Felsberg, Jörg; Reifenberger, Guido; Kulozik, Andreas E; von Deimling, Andreas; Witt, Olaf; Eils, Roland; Gilbertson, Richard J; Korshunov, Andrey; Taylor, Michael D; Lichter, Peter; Korbel, Jan O; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J; Pfister, Stefan M

    2014-07-24

    Medulloblastoma is a highly malignant paediatric brain tumour currently treated with a combination of surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, posing a considerable burden of toxicity to the developing child. Genomics has illuminated the extensive intertumoral heterogeneity of medulloblastoma, identifying four distinct molecular subgroups. Group 3 and group 4 subgroup medulloblastomas account for most paediatric cases; yet, oncogenic drivers for these subtypes remain largely unidentified. Here we describe a series of prevalent, highly disparate genomic structural variants, restricted to groups 3 and 4, resulting in specific and mutually exclusive activation of the growth factor independent 1 family proto-oncogenes, GFI1 and GFI1B. Somatic structural variants juxtapose GFI1 or GFI1B coding sequences proximal to active enhancer elements, including super-enhancers, instigating oncogenic activity. Our results, supported by evidence from mouse models, identify GFI1 and GFI1B as prominent medulloblastoma oncogenes and implicate 'enhancer hijacking' as an efficient mechanism driving oncogene activation in a childhood cancer.

  9. A RAS oncogene imparts growth factor independence to myeloid cells that abnormally regulate protein kinase C: a nonautocrine transformation pathway.

    PubMed

    Boswell, H S; Nahreini, T S; Burgess, G S; Srivastava, A; Gabig, T G; Inhorn, L; Srour, E F; Harrington, M A

    1990-06-01

    The factor-dependent cell line FDC-P1 has been utilized as a model of interleukin 3 (IL-3)-dependent myeloid cell proliferation. However, it has been recently observed that active phorbol esters (e.g., phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate) may entirely replace IL-3 to promote its proliferation. These observations reveal abnormal regulation of protein kinase C (pkC) (absence of downregulation or overexpression). This property allowed a test of the hypothesis that the T24 RAS (codon 12) oncogene acts by constitutive and persistent pkC activation, driving proliferation. FDC-P1 cells were transfected by electroporation with the T24 RAS-containing vector pAL 8, or with a control vector pSVX Zip Neo, and neomycin-resistant clones were selected. Multiple RAS-transfectant clones were categorized for their growth factor requirement and incorporation of the 6.6-kb human mutant H-RAS genome. IL-3-independent clones had incorporated multiple (more than two) copies of the entire 6.6-kb RAS genome. The incorporation of multiple 6.6-kb RAS genomes was correlated with high-level p21 RAS expression. No evidence for autostimulatory growth factor production by clones containing the RAS oncogene was observed. Thus, acquisition of growth factor independence in myeloid cells by abundant expression of a RAS oncogene is linked, in part, to abnormal regulation of pkC, which acts as a collaborating oncogene.

  10. Oncogenic MAGEA-TRIM28 ubiquitin ligase downregulates autophagy by ubiquitinating and degrading AMPK in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pineda, Carlos T; Potts, Patrick Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is commonly altered in cancer and has a complicated, but important role in regulation of tumor growth. Autophagy is often tumor suppressive in the early stages of cancer development, but contributes to the late stages of tumor growth. Because of this, putative oncogenes that modulate autophagy signaling are especially interesting. Here we discuss our recent work detailing the function of the MAGEA-TRIM28 ubiquitin ligase as an oncogene product that targets PRKAA1/AMPKα1 for ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation. Degradation of AMPK, a master cellular energy sensor and regulator, by MAGEA-TRIM28 results in significantly reduced autophagy and changes in cellular metabolism, including upregulation of MTOR signaling. Overall, expression of MAGEA3 (or MAGEA6) and degradation of AMPK is sufficient to induce transformation of normal cells and promote multiple hallmarks of cancer. PMID:25945414

  11. The Exceptional Oncogenicity of HTLV-1.

    PubMed

    Tagaya, Yutaka; Gallo, Robert C

    2017-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus-1 (HTLV-1) is the first pathogenic human retrovirus identified in 1979 by the Gallo group. HTLV-1 causes fatal T-cell leukemia (adult T cell leukemia) and a progressive myelopahy (HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/ tropical spastic paraparesis, HAM/TSP) and other disorders. Since the discovery of HTLV-1, several other microorganisms are demonstrated to cause cancer in humans. In this article, we investigated the oncogenic capacity of HTLV-1, in comparison with those of other oncoviruses and one oncobacterium (Helicobacter pylori, H. Pylori) based on published literature. We conclude here that HTLV-1 is one of the most and may be the most carcinogenic among them and arguably one of the most potent of the known human carcinogens. This fact has not been noted before and is particularly important to justify why we need to study HTLV-1 as an important model of human viral oncogenesis.

  12. Hedgehog Cholesterolysis: Specialized Gatekeeper to Oncogenic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Brian P.; Wang, Chunyu

    2015-01-01

    Discussions of therapeutic suppression of hedgehog (Hh) signaling almost exclusively focus on receptor antagonism; however, hedgehog’s biosynthesis represents a unique and potentially targetable aspect of this oncogenic signaling pathway. Here, we review a key biosynthetic step called cholesterolysis from the perspectives of structure/function and small molecule inhibition. Cholesterolysis, also called cholesteroylation, generates cholesterol-modified Hh ligand via autoprocessing of a hedgehog precursor protein. Post-translational modification by cholesterol appears to be restricted to proteins in the hedgehog family. The transformation is essential for Hh biological activity and upstream of signaling events. Despite its decisive role in generating ligand, cholesterolysis remains conspicuously unexplored as a therapeutic target. PMID:26473928

  13. CDC25 phosphatases as potential human oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Galaktionov, K; Lee, A K; Eckstein, J; Draetta, G; Meckler, J; Loda, M; Beach, D

    1995-09-15

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are activated by CDC25 phosphatases, which remove inhibitory phosphate from tyrosine and threonine residues. In human cells, CDC25 proteins are encoded by a multigene family, consisting of CDC25A, CDC25B, and CDC25C. In rodent cells, human CDC25A or CDC25B but not CDC25C phosphatases cooperate with either Ha-RASG12V or loss of RB1 in oncogenic focus formation. Such transformants were highly aneuploid, grew in soft agar, and formed high-grade tumors in nude mice. Overexpression of CDC25B was detected in 32 percent of human primary breast cancers tested. The CDC25 phosphatases may contribute to the development of human cancer.

  14. Competitive migration behaviors of multiple ions and their impacts on ion-exchange resin packed microbial desalination cell.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Kuichang; Yuan, Lulu; Wei, Jincheng; Liang, Peng; Huang, Xia

    2013-10-01

    Mixed ion-exchange resins packed microbial desalination cell (R-MDC) could stabilize the internal resistance, however, the impacts of multiple ions on R-MDC performance was unclear. This study investigated the desalination performance, multiple ions migration behaviors and their impacts on R-MDCs fed with salt solution containing multiple anions and cations. Results showed that R-MDC removed multiple anions better than multiple cations with desalination efficiency of 99% (effluent conductivity <0.05 ms/cm) at hydraulic retention time of 50 h. Competitive migration order was SO4(2-)>NO3(-)>Cl(-) for anions and Ca(2+)≈Mg(2+)>NH4(+)>Na(+) for cations, jointly affected by both their molar conductivity and exchange selectivity on resins. After long-term operation, the existence of higher concentration Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) caused the electric conductivity of mixed resins decrease and scaling on the surface of cation-exchange membrane adjoined with cathode chamber, suggesting that R-MDC would be more suitable for desalination of water with lower hardness.

  15. K-ras oncogene mutation in pterygium.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, B T; Yıldırım, M S; Zamani, A; Bozkurt, B

    2017-03-01

    PurposePterygium is claimed to be a benign proliferation triggered by prolonged exposure to ultraviolet radiation. The frequency of K-ras oncogene mutation, which is among the initial mutations in tumorigenesis, is evaluated in this study.Patients and methodsIn this prospective randomized clinical, trial pterygium tissues and normal conjunctiva tissue specimens are obtained from the superotemporal quadrant of patients who underwent primary pterygium excision with autograft transplantation. DNA extraction from tissues was performed using the QIAamp DNA FFPE tissue kit. A PCR reaction was performed to amplify sequences containing codons 12, 13, and 61 of the K-ras gene in DNA. These PCR products then underwent the 'pyrosequencing' procedure for mutations at these codons.ResultsPterygium and normal conjunctival tissue samples of 25 patients (10 females, 15 males) were evaluated in the study. The mean age of the patients was 54.54±13.13 years. Genetic analysis revealed no K-ras mutations in normal conjunctival tissues, whereas pterygium tissues of the same cases demonstrated mutation at codon 12 in one case and mutations at codon 61 in seven cases, which was statistically significant (P<0.05). The point missense mutations at codon 61 were glutamine to arginine (Glu61Arg CAA>CGA) in four cases and glutamine to leucine (Glu61Leu CAA>CTA) in three cases.ConclusionThe significantly higher frequency of codon 61 mutation of the ras oncogene in primary and bilateral pterygium specimens compared with normal conjunctiva supports the tumoral origin of pterygium, and thus set the stage for research into a targeted therapy for pterygium with better outcomes than surgical excision.

  16. Glycerophospholipid profile in oncogene-induced senescence.

    PubMed

    Cadenas, Cristina; Vosbeck, Sonja; Hein, Eva-Maria; Hellwig, Birte; Langer, Alice; Hayen, Heiko; Franckenstein, Dennis; Büttner, Bettina; Hammad, Seddik; Marchan, Rosemarie; Hermes, Matthias; Selinski, Silvia; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Peksel, Begüm; Török, Zsolt; Vígh, László; Hengstler, Jan G

    2012-09-01

    Alterations in lipid metabolism and in the lipid composition of cellular membranes are linked to the pathology of numerous diseases including cancer. However, the influence of oncogene expression on cellular lipid profile is currently unknown. In this work we analyzed changes in lipid profiles that are induced in the course of ERBB2-expression mediated premature senescence. As a model system we used MCF-7 breast cancer cells with doxycycline-inducible expression of NeuT, an oncogenic ERBB2 variant. Affymetrix gene array data showed NeuT-induced alterations in the transcription of many enzymes involved in lipid metabolism, several of which (ACSL3, CHPT1, PLD1, LIPG, MGLL, LDL and NPC1) could be confirmed by quantitative realtime PCR. A study of the glycerophospholipid and lyso-glycerophospholipid profiles, obtained by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometry revealed senescence-associated changes in numerous lipid species, including mitochondrial lipids. The most prominent changes were found in PG(34:1), PG(36:1) (increased) and LPE(18:1), PG(40:7) and PI(36:1) (decreased). Statistical analysis revealed a general trend towards shortened phospholipid acyl chains in senescence and a significant trend to more saturated acyl chains in the class of phosphatidylglycerol. Additionally, the cellular cholesterol content was elevated and accumulated in vacuoles in senescent cells. These changes were accompanied by increased membrane fluidity. In mitochondria, loss of membrane potential along with altered intracellular distribution was observed. In conclusion, we present a comprehensive overview of altered cholesterol and glycerophospholipid patterns in senescence, showing that predominantly mitochondrial lipids are affected and lipid species less susceptible to peroxidation are increased.

  17. SU-E-T-428: Dosimetric Impact of Multileaf Collimator Leaf Width On Single and multiple Isocenter Stereotactic IMRT Treatment Plans for multiple Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Giem, J; Algan, O; Ahmad, S; Ali, I; Young, J; Hossain, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the impacts that multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf width has on the dose conformity and normal brain tissue doses of single and multiple isocenter stereotactic IMRT (SRT) plans for multiple intracranial tumors. Methods: Fourteen patients with 2–3 targets were studied retrospectively. Patients treated with multiple isocenter treatment plans using 9 to 12 non-coplanar beams per lesion underwent repeat planning using single isocenter and 10 to 12 non-coplanar beams with 2.5mm, 3mm and 5mm MLC leaf widths. Brainlab iPlan treatment planning system for delivery with the 2.5mm MLC served as reference. Identical contour sets and dose-volume constraints were applied. The prescribed dose to each target was 25 Gy to be delivered over 5 fractions with a minimum of 99% dose to cover ≥ 95% of the target volume. Results: The lesions and normal brains ranged in size from 0.11 to 51.67cc (median, 2.75cc) and 1090 to 1641cc (median, 1401cc), respectively. The Paddick conformity index for single and multiple isocenter (2.5mm vs. 3mm and 5mm MLCs) was (0.79±0.08 vs. 0.79±0.07 and 0.77±0.08) and (0.79±0.09 vs. 0.77±0.09 and 0.76±0.08), respectively. The average normal brain volumes receiving 15 Gy for single and multiple isocenter (2.5mm vs. 3mm and 5mm MLCs) were (3.65% vs. 3.95% and 4.09%) and (2.89% vs. 2.91% and 2.92%), respectively. Conclusion: The average dose conformity observed for the different leaf width for single and multiple isocenter plans were similar, throughout. However, the average normal brain volumes receiving 2.5 to 15 Gy were consistently lower for the 2.5mm MLC leaf width, especially for single isocenter plans. The clinical consequences of these integral normal brain tissue doses are still unknown, but employing the use of the 2.5mm MLC option is desirable at sparing normal brain tissue for both single and multiple isocenter cases.

  18. Mathematical simulation of the behavior of materials and structural elements under multiple impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, N. N.; Yugov, N. T.; Kopanitsa, D. G.; Tabachenko, A. N.; Afanas'eva, S. A.; Yugov, A. A.; Arkhipov, I. N.

    2010-06-01

    A method of computer simulation is used to investigate the processes of compact cylindrical projectile penetration into steel specimens separated by air gaps during successive group impacts, impact interaction of long steel bars with an explosive screened by a system of spatially separated multilayered screens, and fracture of ferroconcrete columns under repeated longitudinal and transverse impact loading.

  19. The Impact of Exercise Training on Living Quality in Multiple Sclerosis Individuals

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-27

    Multiple Sclerosis; Fatigue; Mental Status Change; Physical Disability; Physical Activity; Mental Impairment; Quality of Life; Disabilities Psychological; Disability Physical; Pain; Energy Supply; Deficiency; Motivation

  20. Mutant allele specific imbalance in oncogenes with copy number alterations: Occurrence, mechanisms, and potential clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chih-Chieh; Qiu, Wanglong; Juang, Caroline S; Mansukhani, Mahesh M; Halmos, Balazs; Su, Gloria H

    2017-01-01

    Mutant allele specific imbalance (MASI) was initially coined to describe copy number alterations associated with the mutant allele of an oncogene. The copy number gain (CNG) specific to the mutant allele can be readily observed in electropherograms. With the development of genome-wide analyses at base-pair resolution with copy number counts, we can now further differentiate MASI into those with CNG, with copy neutral alteration (also termed acquired uniparental disomy; UPD), or with loss of heterozygosity (LOH) due to the loss of the wild-type (WT) allele. Here we summarize the occurrence of MASI with CNG, aUPD, or MASI with LOH in some major oncogenes (such as EGFR, KRAS, PIK3CA, and BRAF). We also discuss how these various classifications of MASI have been demonstrated to impact tumorigenesis, progression, metastasis, prognosis, and potentially therapeutic responses in cancer, notably in lung, colorectal, and pancreatic cancers.

  1. Impact of psychotherapy on insomnia symptoms in patients with depression and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Baron, Kelly Glazer; Corden, Marya; Jin, Ling; Mohr, David C

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of insomnia in multiple sclerosis patients with comorbid depression, associations between psychological symptoms, multiple sclerosis symptoms and insomnia, and to test effects of a 16-week protocol-based psychotherapy intervention for depression on insomnia symptoms. Participants with multiple sclerosis and depression (n = 127) were randomized to telephone administered cognitive behavioral therapy and telephone administered supportive emotion-focused therapy. Multiple sclerosis functional limitation was measured at baseline. Depression, insomnia, anxiety and quality of life were evaluated at pre treatment, mid treatment (8 weeks), and post treatment (16 weeks). Prevalence of insomnia ≥3 times per week was 78% at pre treatment and 43% at post treatment. Insomnia at baseline was associated with depression, multiple sclerosis related mood symptoms and anxiety. Middle of the night awakenings were associated with swallowing and speech problems. Improvements in insomnia were associated with improvement in depression and anxiety. Participants with residual insomnia were more likely to have major depressive disorder, greater multiple sclerosis severity, elevated anxiety and lower mental components of quality of life. Results demonstrate rates of insomnia in patients with comorbid multiple sclerosis and depression are higher than those reported in the general multiple sclerosis population and additional insomnia treatment is indicated beyond the treatment of comorbid psychological disorders.

  2. Evidence for Multiple Holocene Marine Impact Events: Ejecta in a Bog Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, D. H.; Courty, M.; Breger, D.; Costa, S.; Gerard-Little, P.; Burckle, L.; Pekar, S.

    2006-12-01

    In a core from Tamarack Pond (a former bog) in the Hudson Highlands of New York, we found two layers containing marine microfossils. Because carbon rich sediments can be bioturbated over 20 cm depths, we give the layer thicknesses as 20 cm. The first layer is at 332-354 cm depth. It contains a radiolarian with a splashed on coating of Fe-Cr-Ni metal. It also contains a benthonic foraminiferal fossil. The second layer is at 432-454 cm depth. The second layer contains a degraded radiolarian fossil, a silicate with a splashed on coating of Fe-Cr-Ni metal, a carbon rich spherule containing Fe-Cr-Ni metal, and a grain of titanomagnetite with multiple craters. It also contains organic matter with Sn in it. As Tamarack Pond is quite far from the ocean, the marine fossils in the cores are unlikely to be windblown debris of Holocene age. A benthonic foraminifera is particularly unlikely to be blown by the wind. This conclusion is strengthened by the observation that the splashed on coating of Fe-Cr-Ni metal occurs in chondritic relative abundances with Fe>Cr>Ni. In grains with a thick layer of splashed metal, the Ni is sufficiently abundant to produce 3 distinct Ni peaks in the X-ray analysis. Such a high abundance of Ni coupled with chondritic relative abundances suggests that the Fe-Cr- Ni splash is derived from the vaporization of an extraterrestrial impactor. If we assume that the sedimentation rate of the Tamarack Pond core is the same as that of a previously dated core from nearby Sutherland Pond, the two layers have an uncorrected C-14 age of around 900-1200 B.C. for the layer at 332-354 cm and 2100 to 2400 B.C. for the layer at 432-454 cm. Both ages have a rough correspondence with times of climate downturn recorded in tree ring data (1159 and 2354 B.C.). These climate downturns cannot be explained by volcanic eruptions and are proposed to be cosmogenic in origin[1]. The older layer also corresponds in components to a previously studied circa 2350 B.C. impact ejecta

  3. The impact of hereditary multiple exostoses on quality of life, satisfaction, global health status, and pain.

    PubMed

    D'Ambrosi, Riccardo; Ragone, Vincenza; Caldarini, Camilla; Serra, Nicola; Usuelli, Federico Giuseppe; Facchini, Renato Mario

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate quality of life (QOL), global health status, pain, and level of satisfaction in patients with hereditary multiple exostoses (HME), and to correlate the association between the severity of diseases and age, sex, number of surgical procedures, and number of exostoses. The data of 50 patients with HME were retrospectively evaluated and recorded. QOL was evaluated with the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12) questionnaire, the 12-Item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), and Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire (Q-LES-Q-SF); intensity of pain was measured using the visual analogue scale (VAS). The association of age, gender, pain, quality of life, number of exostoses, and number of surgical procedures were evaluated and correlated. Mean number of exostoses in our patient's cohort resulted 18.12 ± 8.60, and every patient underwent to a mean of 5.62 ± 5.74 surgical procedures for the exostoses. Mean VAS resulted 5.16 ± 2.90. Considering SF-12, mental (MCS) and physical (PCS) component resulted, respectively, 45.36 ± 10.76 and 38.73 ± 11.09, while GHQ-12 and Q-LES-Q-SF were 15.48 ± 4.70 and 45.28 ± 9.55, respectively. We found a significant positive correlation between the number of exostoses and the number of surgical procedures (p < 0.001), a significant positive correlation between the number of surgical procedures and GHQ-12 (p = 0.422) and VAS (p = 0.0011), and a negative correlation between the number of surgical procedures and PCS (p = 0.0257) and between age and GHQ-12 (p = 0.0385). We can conclude that HME impact on patient quality of life as measured by the MCS and PCS scores similar to the disability associated with osteoarthritis in the mental component and tumors or diabetes as regards the physical component. Moreover, we found no difference in patients' quality of life as regards number of exostoses, age, and surgical procedure, but we found that women have a worse

  4. Characterization of dissolved organic matter in drinking water sources impacted by multiple tributaries.

    PubMed

    Rosario-Ortiz, Fernando L; Snyder, Shane A; Suffet, I H

    2007-10-01

    The characterization of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in drinking water sources is important as this material contributes to the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) and affects how water treatment unit operations are optimized. Drinking water utilities often draw water from sources impacted by multiple tributaries, with possible shifts in DOM concentrations and reactivity over time, depending on specific environmental conditions. In this study, results are presented on the characterization of DOM under varying ambient conditions from the four main tributaries of Lake Mead, a large reservoir in the southwest United States. The tributaries include the Las Vegas Wash (LVW), Muddy River (MR), Virgin River (VR) and the upper Colorado River (UCR). One additional sample was collected at the outflow of the reservoir (lower Colorado River (LCR)). The DOM was characterized by both bulk parameters (specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA)) and specific physicochemical properties, i.e. size, polarity and fluorescence. The analyses were performed emphasizing limited changes in its natural configuration by eliminating analytical preparation steps, excluding sample filtration (0.45 microm filter). Results indicate that each tributary had a different molecular weight distribution, as well as fluorescence properties, which helped in the identification of the relative source of DOM (allochthonous versus autochthonous). The largest apparent molecular weight distribution was observed for DOM samples collected at the MR site, which is fed mostly by groundwater seepage. The smallest apparent molecular weight was observed for DOM collected at the LCR site, suggesting that retention in the reservoir resulted in a decrease in molecular weight as a probable result of photo oxidation and microbial processes. Fluorescence analysis aided the differentiation of DOM by clearly identifying waters that were affected by microbial activity (LVW, UCR, and LCR), either by wastewater influence

  5. Activation of ras oncogenes preceding the onset of neoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Barbacid, M. ); Sukumar, S. )

    1990-06-01

    The identification of ras oncogenes in human and animal cancers including precancerous lesions indicates that these genes participate in the early stages of neoplastic development. Yet, these observations do not define the timing of ras oncogene activation in the multistep process of carcinogenesis. To ascertain the timing of ras oncogene activation, an animal model system was devised that involves the induction of mammary carcinomas in rats exposed at birth to the carcinogen nitrosomethylurea. High-resolution restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of polymerase chain reaction-amplified ras sequences revealed the presence of both H-ras and K-ras oncogenes in normal mammary glands 2 weeks after carcinogen treatment and at least 2 months before the onset of neoplasia. These ras oncogenes can remain latent within the mammary gland until exposure to estrogens, demonstrating that activation of ras oncogenes can precede the onset of neoplasia and suggesting that normal physiological proliferative processes such as estrogen-induced mammary gland development may lead to neoplasia if the targeted cells harbor latent ras oncogenes.

  6. Control of autophagy by oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes.

    PubMed

    Maiuri, M C; Tasdemir, E; Criollo, A; Morselli, E; Vicencio, J M; Carnuccio, R; Kroemer, G

    2009-01-01

    Multiple oncogenes (in particular phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, PI3K; activated Akt1; antiapoptotic proteins from the Bcl-2 family) inhibit autophagy. Similarly, several tumor suppressor proteins (such as BH3-only proteins; death-associated protein kinase-1, DAPK1; the phosphatase that antagonizes PI3K, PTEN; tuberous sclerosic complex 1 and 2, TSC1 and TSC2; as well as LKB1/STK11) induce autophagy, meaning that their loss reduces autophagy. Beclin-1, which is required for autophagy induction acts as a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor protein, and other essential autophagy mediators (such as Atg4c, UVRAG and Bif-1) are bona fide oncosuppressors. One of the central tumor suppressor proteins, p53 exerts an ambiguous function in the regulation of autophagy. Within the nucleus, p53 can act as an autophagy-inducing transcription factor. Within the cytoplasm, p53 exerts a tonic autophagy-inhibitory function, and its degradation is actually required for the induction of autophagy. The role of autophagy in oncogenesis and anticancer therapy is contradictory. Chronic suppression of autophagy may stimulate oncogenesis. However, once a tumor is formed, autophagy inhibition may be a therapeutic goal for radiosensitization and chemosensitization. Altogether, the current state-of-the art suggests a complex relationship between cancer and deregulated autophagy that must be disentangled by further in-depth investigation.

  7. Impact of multiple micronutrient versus iron-folic acid supplements on maternal anemia and micronutrient status in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Allen, Lindsay H; Peerson, Janet M

    2009-12-01

    Multiple micronutrient supplements could increase hemoglobin and improve micronutrient status of pregnant women more than iron supplements alone or iron with folic acid. To compare the effects of multiple micronutrients with those of iron supplements alone or iron with folic acid, on hemoglobin and micronutrient status of pregnant women. Studies were identified in which pregnant women were randomized to treatment with multiple micronutrients, or with iron with or without folic acid. A pooled analysis was conducted to compare the effects of these supplements on maternal hemoglobin, anemia, and micronutrient status. Effect size was calculated for individual and combined studies, based on mean change from baseline to final measure in the group receiving iron, with or without folic acid, minus the mean change in the group, divided by the pooled standard deviation of the two groups. The effect on the relative risk of anemia or iron deficiency was calculated as the probability of anemia or iron deficiency in the group receiving multiple micronutrients divided by the probability in the group receiving iron, with or without folic acid. Multiple micronutrient supplements had the same impact on hemoglobin and iron status indicators as iron with or without folic acid. There was no overall effect on serum retinol or zinc. In the only study in which status of other micronutrients was analyzed, a high prevalence of multiple deficiencies persisted in the group receiving multiple micronutrients provided with daily recommended intakes of each nutrient. Multiple micronutrient supplements increased hemoglobin synthesis to the same extent as supplementation with iron with or without folic acid, although often they contained lower amounts of iron. The amount of supplemental iron and other nutrients that can enable pregnant women with micronutrient deficiencies to achieve adequate status remains to be determined.

  8. [A study of various scales of fatigue and impact on the quality of life among patients with multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Casanova, B; Coret, F; Landete, L

    To explore fatigue in multiple sclerosis and evaluate the specificity of three fatigue scales in this condition: the fatigue severity scale, the specific fatigue scale and the fatigue impact scale. We sent out 60 questionnaires with the three scales and the quality of life scale, the Nottingham Health Profile, to patients with multiple sclerosis as clinically defined by Poser's criteria. Answers were received to 58 questionnaires and the data correlated by Sperman's correlation and the Student t test, with demographic variables (age, age of onset and sex) and clinical variables (clinical form, time the disease was present, period of time since the previous episode and Kurtzke scale (EDSS). Fatigue was present in 78% of the patients. There was correlation between fatigue severity scale and EDSS, pyramidal function, cerebellar function, the period of time the illness was present and the clinical form. We found that the specific fatigue scale is independent of EDSS. The fatigue impact scale was correlated with the EDSS apart from the questions concerning cognitive function. Fatigue is a common symptom of multiple sclerosis which has an independent effect on cognitive function. It is also related to involvement of the pyramidal and cerebellar systems, and depends on the degree of disability and time the disease has been present. The specific fatigue scale is a good tool for exploration of this symptom of multiple sclerosis.

  9. Context-dependent signal integration by the GLI code: the oncogenic load, pathways, modifiers and implications for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Aberger, Fritz; Ruiz I Altaba, Ariel

    2014-09-01

    Canonical Hedgehog (HH) signaling leads to the regulation of the GLI code: the sum of all positive and negative functions of all GLI proteins. In humans, the three GLI factors encode context-dependent activities with GLI1 being mostly an activator and GLI3 often a repressor. Modulation of GLI activity occurs at multiple levels, including by co-factors and by direct modification of GLI structure. Surprisingly, the GLI proteins, and thus the GLI code, is also regulated by multiple inputs beyond HH signaling. In normal development and homeostasis these include a multitude of signaling pathways that regulate proto-oncogenes, which boost positive GLI function, as well as tumor suppressors, which restrict positive GLI activity. In cancer, the acquisition of oncogenic mutations and the loss of tumor suppressors - the oncogenic load - regulates the GLI code toward progressively more activating states. The fine and reversible balance of GLI activating GLI(A) and GLI repressing GLI(R) states is lost in cancer. Here, the acquisition of GLI(A) levels above a given threshold is predicted to lead to advanced malignant stages. In this review we highlight the concepts of the GLI code, the oncogenic load, the context-dependency of GLI action, and different modes of signaling integration such as that of HH and EGF. Targeting the GLI code directly or indirectly promises therapeutic benefits beyond the direct blockade of individual pathways.

  10. Deciphering and Targeting Oncogenic Mutations and Pathways in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bottai, Giulia; Kelly, Catherine M.; Győrffy, Balázs; Székely, Borbala

    2016-01-01

    Advances in DNA and RNA sequencing revealed substantially greater genomic complexity in breast cancer than simple models of a few driver mutations would suggest. Only very few, recurrent mutations or copy-number variations in cancer-causing genes have been identified. The two most common alterations in breast cancer are TP53 (affecting the majority of triple-negative breast cancers) and PIK3CA (affecting almost half of estrogen receptor-positive cancers) mutations, followed by a long tail of individually rare mutations affecting <1%–20% of cases. Each cancer harbors from a few dozen to a few hundred potentially high-functional impact somatic variants, along with a much larger number of potentially high-functional impact germline variants. It is likely that it is the combined effect of all genomic variations that drives the clinical behavior of a given cancer. Furthermore, entirely new classes of oncogenic events are being discovered in the noncoding areas of the genome and in noncoding RNA species driven by errors in RNA editing. In light of this complexity, it is not unexpected that, with the exception of HER2 amplification, no robust molecular predictors of benefit from targeted therapies have been identified. In this review, we summarize the current genomic portrait of breast cancer, focusing on genetic aberrations that are actively being targeted with investigational drugs. Implications for Practice: Next-generation sequencing is now widely available in the clinic, but interpretation of the results is challenging, and its impact on treatment selection is often limited. This work provides an overview of frequently encountered molecular abnormalities in breast cancer and discusses their potential therapeutic implications. This review emphasizes the importance of administering investigational targeted therapies, or off-label use of approved targeted drugs, in the context of a formal clinical trial or registry programs to facilitate learning about the clinical

  11. The Impact of Conservation Management on the Community Composition of Multiple Organism Groups in Eutrophic Interconnected Man-Made Ponds.

    PubMed

    Lemmens, Pieter; Mergeay, Joachim; Van Wichelen, Jeroen; De Meester, Luc; Declerck, Steven A J

    2015-01-01

    Ponds throughout the world are subjected to a variety of management measures for purposes of biodiversity conservation. Current conservation efforts typically comprise a combination of multiple measures that directly and indirectly impact a wide range of organism groups. Knowledge of the relative impact of individual measures on different taxonomic groups is important for the development of effective conservation programs. We conducted a field study of 28 man-made ponds, representing four management types differing in the frequency of periodic pond drainage and the intensity of fish stock management. We disentangled the relative importance of direct and indirect effects of pond management measures on the community composition of phytoplankton, zooplankton, aquatic macro-invertebrates, submerged and emergent vascular plants. With the exception of phytoplankton, pond management had strong effects on the community composition of all investigated biota. Whether management affected communities directly or indirectly through its impact on fish communities or local environmental conditions in the pond varied between organism groups. Overall, the impact of pond drainage regime and fish community characteristics on the community composition of target organism groups were more important than local environmental conditions. The majority of taxa were negatively associated with fish density, whereas multiple emergent plant species and several taxa of aquatic macro-invertebrates were positively affected by increased drainage frequency. The effects of fish community and drainage tended to be largely independent. The present study indicates that pond drainage is an important element for biodiversity conservation in eutrophicated shallow and interconnected man-made ponds.

  12. The Impact of Conservation Management on the Community Composition of Multiple Organism Groups in Eutrophic Interconnected Man-Made Ponds

    PubMed Central

    Lemmens, Pieter; Mergeay, Joachim; Van Wichelen, Jeroen; De Meester, Luc; Declerck, Steven A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Ponds throughout the world are subjected to a variety of management measures for purposes of biodiversity conservation. Current conservation efforts typically comprise a combination of multiple measures that directly and indirectly impact a wide range of organism groups. Knowledge of the relative impact of individual measures on different taxonomic groups is important for the development of effective conservation programs. We conducted a field study of 28 man-made ponds, representing four management types differing in the frequency of periodic pond drainage and the intensity of fish stock management. We disentangled the relative importance of direct and indirect effects of pond management measures on the community composition of phytoplankton, zooplankton, aquatic macro-invertebrates, submerged and emergent vascular plants. With the exception of phytoplankton, pond management had strong effects on the community composition of all investigated biota. Whether management affected communities directly or indirectly through its impact on fish communities or local environmental conditions in the pond varied between organism groups. Overall, the impact of pond drainage regime and fish community characteristics on the community composition of target organism groups were more important than local environmental conditions. The majority of taxa were negatively associated with fish density, whereas multiple emergent plant species and several taxa of aquatic macro-invertebrates were positively affected by increased drainage frequency. The effects of fish community and drainage tended to be largely independent. The present study indicates that pond drainage is an important element for biodiversity conservation in eutrophicated shallow and interconnected man-made ponds. PMID:26422390

  13. DEK Proto-Oncogene Expression Interferes with the Normal Epithelial Differentiation Program

    PubMed Central

    Wise-Draper, Trisha M.; Morreale, Richard J.; Morris, Teresa A.; Mintz-Cole, Rachael A.; Hoskins, Elizabeth E.; Balsitis, Scott J.; Husseinzadeh, Nader; Witte, David P.; Wikenheiser-Brokamp, Kathryn A.; Lambert, Paul F.; Wells, Susanne I.

    2009-01-01

    Overexpression of the DEK gene is associated with multiple human cancers, but its specific roles as a putative oncogene are not well defined. DEK transcription was previously shown to be induced by the high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) E7 oncogene via E2F and Rb pathways. Transient DEK overexpression was able to inhibit both senescence and apoptosis in cultured cells. In at least the latter case, this mechanism involved the destabilization of p53 and the decreased expression of p53 target genes. We show here that DEK overexpression disrupts the normal differentiation program in a manner that is independent of either p53 or cell death. DEK expression was distinctly repressed upon the differentiation of cultured primary human keratinocytes, and stable DEK overexpression caused epidermal thickening in an organotypic raft model system. The observed hyperplasia involved a delay in keratinocyte differentiation toward a more undifferentiated state, and expansion of the basal cell compartment was due to increased proliferation, but not apoptosis. These phenotypes were accompanied by elevated p63 expression in the absence of p53 destabilization. In further support of bona fide oncogenic DEK activities, we report here up-regulated DEK protein levels in both human papilloma virus-positive hyperplastic murine skin and a subset of human squamous cell carcinomas. We suggest that DEK up-regulation may contribute to carcinoma development at least in part through increased proliferation and retardation of differentiation. PMID:19036808

  14. The Impact of Disability on the Career Development of People with Multiple Sclerosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomone, Paul R.; O'Connell, Kathryn R.

    1998-01-01

    Interviews with 12 people with multiple sclerosis explored the meaning of career and work in their lives and the implications of living with a disability, as well as barriers they faced, particularly environmental barriers and societal attitudes. (SK)

  15. Coeval ages of Australasian, Central American and Western Canadian tektites reveal multiple impacts 790 ka ago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Winfried H.; Trieloff, Mario; Bollinger, Klemens; Gantert, Niklas; Fernandes, Vera A.; Meyer, Hans-Peter; Povenmire, Hal; Jessberger, Elmar K.; Guglielmino, Massimo; Koeberl, Christian

    2016-04-01

    High resolution 40Ar-39Ar step heating dating of australites and indochinites, representing a large area of the Australasian strewn field, and more recently discovered tektite-like glasses from Central America (Belize) and Western Canada, were carried out. Precise plateau ages were obtained in all cases, yielding indistinguishable ages of 789 ± 9 ka for four australites, 783 ± 5 ka for four indochinites, 783 ± 17 ka for one Western Canadian and 769 ± 16 ka for one Belize impact glass. Concerning major elements and REEs, australites and the Western Canadian impact glass are indistinguishable. If the Western Canadian sample was transported by impact ejection and belongs to the Australasian strewn field, this implies extremely far ballistic transport of 9000 km distance, assuming a source crater in southern Asia. The distinct major element and REE composition of the Belize impact glass suggests formation in another separate impact event. We conclude that the Australasian/Western Canadian impact glasses formed 785 ± 7 ka ago in a single event and Belize impact glass in a separate event 769 ± 16 ka ago. The two impact events forming these two strewn fields occurred remarkably closely related in time, i.e., separated by <30 ka.

  16. Assessing the Impact of the 4MAT Teaching Model across Multiple Disciplines in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicoll-Senft, Joan M.; Seider, Susan N.

    2010-01-01

    Much attention has focused on learning styles and their impact on the teaching and learning process; however, little has been done to systematically incorporate learning style theory into actual teaching, nor to systematically examine its potential impact on student learning in higher education. As part of a Scholarship of Teaching and Learning…

  17. Assessing the Impact of the 4MAT Teaching Model across Multiple Disciplines in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicoll-Senft, Joan M.; Seider, Susan N.

    2010-01-01

    Much attention has focused on learning styles and their impact on the teaching and learning process; however, little has been done to systematically incorporate learning style theory into actual teaching, nor to systematically examine its potential impact on student learning in higher education. As part of a Scholarship of Teaching and Learning…

  18. Impact of assisted reproductive technology on the incidence of multiple-gestation infants: a population perspective.

    PubMed

    Scholten, Irma; Chambers, Georgina M; van Loendersloot, Laura; van der Veen, Fulco; Repping, Sjoerd; Gianotten, Judith; Hompes, Peter G A; Ledger, William; Mol, Ben W J

    2015-01-01

    To study the value of a population view in assessing assisted reproductive technology (ART) multiple-gestation infants. Descriptive comparison of ART treatment and population statistics in seven developed countries (United States [U.S.], South Korea, United Kingdom, the Netherlands, Australia, Belgium, Denmark) with varying ART utilization and single-embryo transfer (SET) rates. Not applicable. Not applicable. None. The contribution of ART multiple-gestation infants to the total number of multiple-gestation infants in a population was calculated in relation to utilization of ART and SET rates. The number of ART treatments leading to embryo transfer varied from 304 per million inhabitants in the U.S. to 1,518 in Denmark. The percentage of ART cycles that utilized SET varied from 8.8% in South Korea to 53.3% in Australia. Reflecting both utilization rates and SET rates, the percentage of multiple-gestation infants in the population attributed to ART ranged from 14.7% in South Korea to 29.0% in Denmark. In seven countries, the contribution of ART multiple-gestation infants to all multiple-gestation infants varies from 14.7% to 29.0%, a percentage that was influenced by both the SET rate per cycle and ART utilization rates. In the monitoring of safety and efficacy of fertility treatment, registration of the percentage of SET cycles alone might not be sufficient. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Change in disability profile and quality of life in multiple sclerosis patients: a five-year longitudinal study using the Multiple Sclerosis Impact Profile (MSIP).

    PubMed

    Wynia, K; van Wijlen, A T; Middel, B; Reijneveld, S A; Meilof, J F

    2012-05-01

    Evidence on the progress of disease severity in multiple sclerosis (MS) is generally limited in scope. To examine the course of a broad spectrum of MS-related disabilities and quality of life (QOL) in relation to disease severity, and responsiveness of the Multiple Sclerosis Impact Profile (MSIP). The mortality rate was calculated after checking the national population register for vital status of the initial cohort. We performed a longitudinal study among 245 patients with MS attending the Groningen MS Center in the Netherlands. We assessed these patients in 2004 and 2009 using a postal survey including the MSIP to evaluate disabilities, the World Health Organization Quality of Life-Abbreviation version (WHOQOL-BREF) to evaluate QOL, and the ambulation question of the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) to evaluate disease severity. Responsiveness of the MSIP was estimated using standardized response mean (SRM). Increase of disability in the MSIP disability domains and loss of QOL were most prevalent and pronounced in patients with EDSS 0 to < 4.5 in 2004. MSIP and QOL scores were remarkably stable in the higher disease severity groups. Mortality rates were highest (24%) in patients with EDSS ≥ 7 to < 10 in 2004. SRM indices for the MSIP ranged between 0.26 and 0.56. Prominent increases in multiple aspects of disability and loss of QOL occur especially in the early stages in MS. Health care interventions may lead to health and QOL gains, in particular when offered to patients in the first stage of the MS process. Responsiveness was sufficient for nine of the 11 MSIP domains.

  20. Sensitizers, protectors and oncogenic transformation in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.C.; Osmak, R.; Zimmerman, M.; Hall, E.J.

    1982-03-01

    Systems developed to assay oncogenic transformation in vitro represent a rapid and powerful tool to screen and compare new radiosensitizers in their carcinogenic potential, and to search for compounds that reduce or inhibit carcinogenesis produced by both radiation and sensitizers. An established line of mouse embryo fibroblasts (C3H/10T1/2 cells) has been used to determine the incidence of transformation produced by a variety of 2 and 5 substituted nitroimidazoles; these include metronidazole, desmethylmisonidazle, misonidazole, SR 2508, SR 2555, R0-07-0741, RSU-1047 and RSU-1021. Most of these sensitizers produce a similar level of transformation; for example a three day exposure of aerated cells to a concentration of 1 mM of the drug results in a transformation incidence comparable to 1 Gy of X rays. The notable exception is SR 2508 which produces a five-fold higher incidence of transformation. The potential carcinogenicity of sensitizers must be considered in choosing which of the currently available new drugs is to be used in clinical trials as an alternative to misonidazle. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), a known free radical scavenger, has been shown to reduce the level of transformation produced by radiation and sensitizers. To be effective, SOD must be present for prolonged periods during the fixation and expression period of the transformation process.

  1. SBRT for oligoprogressive oncogene addicted NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Basler, L; Kroeze, S G C; Guckenberger, M

    2017-04-01

    Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death in men and women and treatment outcome continues to lag behind other common cancer types. A subset of lung adenocarcinoma patients exhibit a somatic mutation in EGFR or an ALK rearrangement. In these patients, targeted TKI therapy results in higher response rates, improved PFS and reduced side effects compared with platinum-based chemotherapy. Despite initial activity of the TKIs, ultimately all patients present with disease progression after about a year on TKI therapy due to resistance development. About 15-47% of patients present with limited oligoprogressive disease (OPD): such patients show only a limited number of metastases with progression in radiological imaging. Radical local treatment to all oligoprogressive lesions is thought to eradicate the de-differentiated clones and restore overall sensitivity of the metastatic disease. Retrospective studies suggest that aggressive local treatment using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), surgery or others can be used to eradicate TKI-resistant subpopulations enabling prolonged TKI treatment "beyond progression", which may lead to increased PFS and overall survival. This review focuses on the biological background of resistance development, systemic and local treatment options with a focus on SBRT, as well as challenges in defining the state of OPD and current clinical studies in oligoprogressive oncogene addicted NSCLC.

  2. Oncogenic senescence: a multi-functional perspective

    PubMed Central

    van Deursen, Jan M.; Campisi, Judith; Hildesheim, Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    Cellular senescence is defined as an irreversible growth arrest with the acquisition of a distinctive secretome. The growth arrest is a potent anticancer mechanism whereas the secretome facilitates wound healing, tissue repair, and development. The senescence response has also become increasingly recognized as an important contributor to aging and age-related diseases, including cancer. Although oncogenic mutations are capable of inducing a beneficial senescence response that prevents the growth of premalignant cells and promotes cancer immune-surveillance, the secretome of senescent cells also includes factors with pro-tumorigenic properties. On June 23rd and 24th, 2016, the Division of Cancer Biology of the National Cancer Institute sponsored a workshop to discuss the complex role of cellular senescence in tumorigenesis with the goal to define the major challenges and opportunities within this important field of cancer research. Additionally, it was noted how the development of novel tools and technologies are required to accelerate research into a mechanistic understanding of senescent cells in carcinogenesis in order to overcome the current limitations in this exciting, yet ill-defined area. PMID:28416761

  3. Impact excitation and electron-hole multiplication in graphene and carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Gabor, Nathaniel M

    2013-06-18

    In semiconductor photovoltaics, photoconversion efficiency is governed by a simple competition: the incident photon energy is either transferred to the crystal lattice (heat) or transferred to electrons. In conventional materials, energy loss to the lattice is more efficient than energy transferred to electrons, thus limiting the power conversion efficiency. Quantum electronic systems, such as quantum dots, nanowires, and two-dimensional electronic membranes, promise to tip the balance in this competition by simultaneously limiting energy transfer to the lattice and enhancing energy transfer to electrons. By exploring the optical, thermal, and electronic properties of quantum materials, we may perhaps find an ideal optoelectronic material that provides low cost fabrication, facile systems integration, and a means to surpass the standard limit for photoconversion efficiency. Nanoscale carbon materials, such as graphene and carbon nanotubes, provide ideal experimental quantum systems in which to explore optoelectronic behavior for applications in solar energy harvesting. Within essentially the same material, researchers can achieve a broad spectrum of energetic configurations, from a gapless semimetal to a large band-gap semiconducting nanowire. Owing to their nanoscale dimensions, graphene and carbon nanotubes exhibit electronic and optical properties that reflect strong electron-electron interactions. Such strong interactions may lead to exotic low-energy electron transport behavior and high-energy electron scattering processes such as impact excitation and the inverse process of Auger recombination. High-energy processes, which become very important under photoexcitation, may be particularly efficient in nanoscale carbon materials due to the relativistic-like, charged particle band structure and sensitivity to the dielectric environment. In addition, due to the covalently bonded carbon framework that makes up these materials, electron-phonon coupling is very weak

  4. Detection and characterization of impact damage in composite panels using multiple ultrasonic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Westin B.; Michaels, Thomas E.; Michaels, Jennifer E.

    2015-03-01

    Abrupt impacts to solid laminate composite panels often produce internal damage that is not visible on the impacted surface. It is important that such damage be promptly detected since it can compromise the strength of composite structures. Ultrasonic C-scan imaging has been extensively used to detect and characterize impact damage using both pulse-echo and through-transmission methods. More recently developed guided wave imaging methods, such as sparse array imaging with baseline subtraction and wavefield imaging, have also been used to successfully detect damage in composite panels; however, their performance is generally not comparable to that achieved with bulk wave C-scans. For this study, various force impacts were used to create defect conditions ranging from barely detectable damage to extensive damage that was visible on the impact surface. Guided wave signals were recorded from an attached sparse transducer array before and after the impacts, and panels were scanned using both conventional ultrasonic C-scan methods and acoustic wavefield imaging. For each method, imaging results are presented and compared in terms of their ability to locate and characterize impact damage.

  5. Concurrent Oncogene Mutation Profile in Chinese Patients With Stage Ib Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ying-Sheng; Cai, Ling; Zhang, Xue-wen; Zhu, Jian-fei; Zhang, Zi-chen; Shao, Jian-yong; Zhang, Lan-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Molecular characteristics in lung cancer are associated with carcinogenesis, response to targeted therapies, and prognosis. With concurrent oncogene mutations being reported more often, the adjustment of treatment based on the driver gene mutations would improve therapy. We proposed to investigate the distribution of concurrent oncogene mutations in stage Ib lung adenocarcinoma in a Chinese population and find out the correlation between survival outcome and the most frequently mutated genes in EGFR and KRAS in Chinese population. Simultaneously, we tried to validate the Sequenom method by real time fluoresce qualification reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in oncogene detection. One hundred fifty-six patients who underwent complete surgical resection in our hospital between 1999 and 2007 were retrospectively investigated. Using time-of-flight mass spectrometry, 238 mutation hotspots in 19 oncogenes were examined. Genetic mutations occurred in 86 of 156 patients (55.13%). EGFR was most frequently gene contained driver mutations, with a rate of 44.23%, followed by KRAS (8.33%), PIK3CA (3.84%), KIT (3.20%), BRAF (2.56%), AKT (1.28%), MET (0.64%), NRAS (0.64%), HRAS (0.64%), and ERBB2 (0.64%). No mutations were found in the RET, PDGFRA, FGFR1, FGFR3, FLT3, ABL, CDK, or JAK2 oncogenes. Thirteen patients (8.3%) were detected in multiple gene mutations. Six patients had PIK3CA mutations in addition to mutations in EGFR and KRAS. EGFR mutations can coexist with mutations in NRAS, KIT, ERBB2, and BRAF. Only one case was found to have a KRAS mutation coexisting with the EGFR T790M mutation. Otherwise, mutations in EGFR and KRAS seem to be mutually exclusive. There is no survival benefit in favor of EGFR/KRAS mutation. Several concomitant driver gene mutations were observed in our study. None of EFGR/KRAS mutation was demonstrated as a prognostic factor. Polygenic mutation testing by time-of-flight mass spectrometry was validated by RT

  6. Role of Notch and its oncogenic signaling crosstalk in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shanchun; Liu, Mingli; Gonzalez-Perez, Ruben R.

    2011-01-01

    The Notch signaling plays a key role in cell differentiation, survival, and proliferation through diverse mechanisms. Notch signaling is also involved in vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. Moreover, Notch expression is regulated by hypoxia and inflammatory cytokines (IL-1, IL-6 and leptin). Entangled crosstalk between Notch and other developmental signaling (Hedgehog and Wnt), and signaling triggered by growth factors, estrogens and oncogenic kinases, could impact on Notch targeted genes. Thus, alterations of the Notch signaling can lead to a variety of disorders, including human malignancies. Notch signaling is activated by ligand binding, followed by ADAM/Tumor necrosis factor-α-converting enzyme (TACE) metalloprotease and γ-secretase cleavages that produce the Notch intracellular domain (NICD). Translocation of NICD into the nucleus induces the transcriptional activation of Notch target genes. The relationships between Notch deregulated signaling, cancer stem cells and the carcinogenesis process reinforced by Notch crosstalk with many oncogenic signaling pathways suggest that Notch signaling may be a critical drug target for breast and other cancers. Since current status of knowledge in this field changes quickly, our insight should be continuously revised. In this review, we will focus on recent advancements in identification of aberrant Notch signaling in breast cancer and the possible underlying mechanisms, including potential role of Notch in breast cancer stem cells, tumor angiogenesis, as well as its crosstalk with other oncogenic signaling pathways in breast cancer. We will also discuss the prognostic value of Notch proteins and therapeutic potential of targeting Notch signaling for cancer treatment. PMID:21193018

  7. Ganglioside synthase knockout in oncogene-transformed fibroblasts depletes gangliosides and impairs tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Yan, S; Wondimu, A; Bob, D; Weiss, M; Sliwinski, K; Villar, J; Notario, V; Sutherland, M; Colberg-Poley, A M; Ladisch, S

    2010-06-03

    Biologically active membrane gangliosides, expressed and released by many human tumors, are hypothesized to significantly impact tumor progression. Lack of a model of complete and specific tumor ganglioside depletion in vivo, however, has hampered elucidation of their role. Here, we report the creation of a novel, stable, genetically induced tumor cell system resulting in specific and complete blockade of ganglioside synthesis. Wild-type (WT) and GM3 synthase/GM2 synthase double knockout (DKO) murine embryonic fibroblasts were transformed using amphotropic retrovirus-transduced oncogenes (pBABE-c-Myc(T58A)+H-RasG12V). The transformed cells, WT(t) and DKO(t) respectively, evidenced comparable integrated copy numbers and oncogene expression. Ganglioside synthesis was completely blocked in the DKO(t) cells, importantly without triggering an alternate pathway of ganglioside synthesis. Ganglioside depletion (to <0.5 nmol/10(7) cells from 9 to 11 nmol/10(7) WT(t) or untransfected normal fibroblasts) did not adversely affect cell proliferation kinetics but did reduce cell migration on fibronectin-coated wells, consistent with our previous observations in ganglioside-depleted normal human fibroblasts. Strikingly, despite similar oncogene expression and growth kinetics, DKO(t) cells evidenced significantly impaired tumor growth in syngeneic immunocompetent mice, underscoring the pivotal role of tumor cell gangliosides and providing an ideal system for probing their mechanisms of action in vivo.

  8. Ganglioside synthase knockout in oncogene-transformed fibroblasts depletes gangliosides and impairs tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yihui; Yan, Su; Wondimu, Assefa; Bob, Daniel; Weiss, Michael; Sliwinski, Konrad; Villar, Joaquín; Notario, Vicente; Sutherland, Margaret; Colberg-Poley, Anamaris M.; Ladisch, Stephan

    2010-01-01

    Biologically active membrane gangliosides, expressed and released by many human tumors, are hypothesized to significantly impact tumor progression. Lack of a model of complete and specific tumor ganglioside depletion in vivo, however, has hampered elucidation of their role. Here we report the creation of a novel, stable, genetically induced tumor cell system resulting in specific and complete blockade of ganglioside synthesis. Wild type (WT) and GM3 synthase/GM2 synthase double knockout (DKO) murine embryonic fibroblasts were transformed using amphotropic retrovirus-transduced oncogenes (pBABE-c-MycT58A+H-RasG12V). The transformed cells, WTt and DKOt respectively, evidenced comparable integrated copy numbers and oncogene expression. Ganglioside synthesis was completely blocked in the DKOt cells, importantly without triggering an alternate pathway of ganglioside synthesis. Ganglioside depletion (to <0.5 nmol/107 cells from 9-11 nmol/107 WTt or untransfected normal fibroblasts) did not adversely affect cell proliferation kinetics but did reduce cell migration on fibronectin-coated wells, consistent with our previous observations in ganglioside-depleted normal human fibroblasts. Strikingly, despite similar oncogene expression and growth kinetics, DKOt cells evidenced significantly impaired tumor growth in syngeneic immunocompetent mice, underscoring the pivotal role of tumor cell gangliosides and providing an ideal system for probing their mechanisms of action in vivo. PMID:20305696

  9. Know thy neighbor: stromal cells can contribute oncogenic signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tlsty, T. D.; Hein, P. W.

    2001-01-01

    Although the stroma within carcinogenic lesions is known to be supportive and responsive to tumors, new data increasingly show that the stroma also has a more active, oncogenic role in tumorigenesis. Stromal cells and their products can transform adjacent tissues in the absence of pre-existing tumor cells by inciting phenotypic and genomic changes in the epithelial cells. The oncogenic action of distinctive stromal components has been demonstrated through a variety of approaches, which provide clues about the cellular pathways involved.

  10. Know thy neighbor: stromal cells can contribute oncogenic signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tlsty, T. D.; Hein, P. W.

    2001-01-01

    Although the stroma within carcinogenic lesions is known to be supportive and responsive to tumors, new data increasingly show that the stroma also has a more active, oncogenic role in tumorigenesis. Stromal cells and their products can transform adjacent tissues in the absence of pre-existing tumor cells by inciting phenotypic and genomic changes in the epithelial cells. The oncogenic action of distinctive stromal components has been demonstrated through a variety of approaches, which provide clues about the cellular pathways involved.

  11. Mutations of codon 918 in the RET proto-oncogene correlate to poor prognosis in sporadic medullary thyroid carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Zedenius, J.; Svensson, A.; Baeckdahl, M.; Wallin, G.

    1995-10-01

    The hereditary multiple endocrine neoplasia syndromes types 2A and B (MEN 2A and B) were recently linked to germline mutations in the RET proto-oncogene, altering one of five cysteine residues in exon 10 or 11 (MEN 2A), or substituting a methionine for a threonine at codon 918 in exon 16 (MEN 2B). The latter mutation also occurs somatically in some sporadic medullary thyroid carcinomas (MTC), and has in a previous study been correlated with a less favorable clinical outcome. In the present study, 46 MTCs were selected for investigation of the codon 918 mutation. The mutation was found in 29 tumors (63%), and was significantly correlated with a poor outcome, with regard to distant metastasis or tumor recurrence (p<10{sup 4}). Two tumors showed multifocal growth and C-cell hyperplasia, and these patients were therefore also investigated for germline mutations in exons 10, 11 and 16. The codon 918 mutation was found only in the tumors, thus of somatic origin. The RET codon 918 mutation may have prognostic impact, and therefore preoperative assessment may influence decision-making in the treatment of patients suffering from MTC. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  12. Prognostic impact of circulating plasma cells in patients with multiple myeloma: implications for plasma cell leukaemia definition.

    PubMed

    Granell, Miquel; Calvo, Xavier; Garcia-Guiñón, Antoni; Escoda, Lourdes; Abella, Eugènia; Martínez, Clara M; Teixidó, Montserrat; Gimenez, Maria Teresa; Senín, Alicia; Sanz, Patricia; Campoy, Desirée; Vicent, Ana; Arenillas, Leonor; Rosiñol, Laura; Sierra, Jorge; Blade, Joan; Fernández de Larrea, Carlos

    2017-03-02

    The presence of circulating plasma cells in patients with multiple myeloma is considered a marker for highly proliferative disease. In the present study, the impact of circulating plasma cells assessed by cytology on survival of patients with multiple myeloma was analysed. Wright-Giemsa stained peripheral blood smears of 482 patients with newly diagnosed myeloma or plasma cell leukaemia were reviewed and patients were classified in four categories according to the percentage of circulating plasma cells: 0%, 1-4%, 5-20% and plasma cell leukemia with the following frequencies: 382 (79.2%), 83 (17.2%), 12 (2.5%) and 5 (1.0%) respectively. Median overall survival according to the circulating plasma cells group was 47, 50, 6 and 14 months, respectively. At multivariate analysis, presence of 5 to 20% circulating plasma cells was associated with a worse overall survival (relative risk 4.9, 95%CI 2.6-9.3) independently of age, creatinine, Durie-Salmon and international stage. Patients with ≥5% circulating plasma cells had lower platelet counts (median 86x109/L vs. 214x109/L, p<0.0001) and higher bone marrow plasma cells (median 53% vs. 36%, p=0.004). The presence of ≥5% circulating plasma cells in patients with multiple myeloma has similar adverse prognostic impact as plasma cell leukemia.

  13. Identification of Tumor Suppressors and Oncogenes from Genomic and Epigenetic Features in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wrzeszczynski, Kazimierz O.; Varadan, Vinay; Byrnes, James; Lum, Elena; Kamalakaran, Sitharthan; Levine, Douglas A.; Dimitrova, Nevenka; Zhang, Michael Q.; Lucito, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The identification of genetic and epigenetic alterations from primary tumor cells has become a common method to identify genes critical to the development and progression of cancer. We seek to identify those genetic and epigenetic aberrations that have the most impact on gene function within the tumor. First, we perform a bioinformatic analysis of copy number variation (CNV) and DNA methylation covering the genetic landscape of ovarian cancer tumor cells. We separately examined CNV and DNA methylation for 42 primary serous ovarian cancer samples using MOMA-ROMA assays and 379 tumor samples analyzed by The Cancer Genome Atlas. We have identified 346 genes with significant deletions or amplifications among the tumor samples. Utilizing associated gene expression data we predict 156 genes with altered copy number and correlated changes in expression. Among these genes CCNE1, POP4, UQCRB, PHF20L1 and C19orf2 were identified within both data sets. We were specifically interested in copy number variation as our base genomic property in the prediction of tumor suppressors and oncogenes in the altered ovarian tumor. We therefore identify changes in DNA methylation and expression for all amplified and deleted genes. We statistically define tumor suppressor and oncogenic features for these modalities and perform a correlation analysis with expression. We predicted 611 potential oncogenes and tumor suppressors candidates by integrating these data types. Genes with a strong correlation for methylation dependent expression changes exhibited at varying copy number aberrations include CDCA8, ATAD2, CDKN2A, RAB25, AURKA, BOP1 and EIF2C3. We provide copy number variation and DNA methylation analysis for over 11,500 individual genes covering the genetic landscape of ovarian cancer tumors. We show the extent of genomic and epigenetic alterations for known tumor suppressors and oncogenes and also use these defined features to identify potential ovarian cancer gene candidates. PMID

  14. Expression Profiling of Circulating Microvesicles Reveals Intercellular Transmission of Oncogenic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Milani, Gloria; Lana, Tobia; Bresolin, Silvia; Aveic, Sanja; Pastò, Anna; Frasson, Chiara; Te Kronnie, Geertruy

    2017-06-01

    Circulating microvesicles have been described as important players in cell-to-cell communication carrying biological information under normal or pathologic condition. Microvesicles released by cancer cells may incorporate diverse biomolecules (e.g., active lipids, proteins, and RNA), which can be delivered and internalized by recipient cells, potentially altering the gene expression of recipient cells and eventually impacting disease progression. Leukemia in vitro model systems were used to investigate microvesicles as vehicles of protein-coding messages. Several leukemic cells (K562, LAMA-87, TOM-1, REH, and SHI-1), each carrying a specific chromosomal translocation, were analyzed. In the leukemic cells, these chromosomal translocations are transcribed into oncogenic fusion transcripts and the transfer of these transcripts was monitored from leukemic cells to microvesicles for each of the cell lines. Microarray gene expression profiling was performed to compare transcriptomes of K562-derived microvesicles and parental K562 cells. The data show that oncogenic BCR-ABL1 transcripts and mRNAs related to basic functions of leukemic cells were included in microvesicles. Further analysis of microvesicles cargo revealed a remarkable enrichment of transcripts related to cell membrane activity, cell surface receptors, and extracellular communication when compared with parental K562 cells. Finally, coculturing of healthy mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) with K562-derived microvesicles displayed the transfer of the oncogenic message, and confirmed the increase of target cell proliferation as a function of microvesicle dosage.Implications: This study provides novel insight into tumor-derived microvesicles as carriers of oncogenic protein-coding messages that can potentially jeopardize cell-directed therapy, and spread to other compartments of the body. Mol Cancer Res; 15(6); 683-95. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Biological basis of personalized anticoagulation in cancer: oncogene and oncomir networks as putative regulators of coagulopathy.

    PubMed

    D'Asti, Esterina; Rak, Janusz

    2016-04-01

    Activation of stromal response pathways in cancer is increasingly viewed as both a local and systemic extension of molecular alterations driving malignant transformation. Rather than reflecting passive and unspecific responses to anatomical abnormalities, the coagulation system is a target of oncogenic deregulation, impacting the role of clotting and fibrinolytic proteins, and integrating hemostasis, inflammation, angiogenesis and cellular growth effects in cancer. These processes signify, but do not depend on, the clinically manifest coagulopathy and thrombosis. In this regard, the role of driver mutations affecting oncoprotein coding genes such as RAS, EGFR or MET and tumour suppressors (PTEN, TP53) are well described as regulators of tissue factor (TF), protease activated receptors (PAR-1/2) and ectopic coagulation factors (FVII). Indeed, in both adult and pediatric brain tumours the expression patterns of coagulation and angiogenesis regulators (coagulome and angiome, respectively) reflect the molecular subtypes of the underlying diseases (glioblastoma or medulloblastoma) as defined by their oncogenic classifiers and clinical course. This emerging understanding is still poorly established in relation to the transforming effects of non-coding genes, including those responsible for the expression of microRNA (miR). Indeed, several miRs have been recently found to regulate TF and other effectors. We recently documented that in the context of the aggressive embryonal tumour with multilayered rosettes (ETMR) the oncogenic driver miR (miR-520g) suppresses the expression of TF and correlates with hypocoagulant tumour characteristics. Unlike in adult cancers, the growth of pediatric embryonal brain tumour cells as spheres (to maintain stem cell properties) results in upregulation of miR-520g and downregulation of TF expression and activity. We postulate that oncogenic protein and miR coding genes form alternative pathways of coagulation system regulation in different

  16. A database of breast oncogenic specific siRNAs.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Atul; Semwal, Manoj; Sharma, Ashok

    2017-08-18

    Breast cancer is a serious problem causing the death of women across the world. At present, one of the major challenges is to design drugs to target breast cancer specific gene(s). RNA interference (RNAi) is an important technique for targeted gene silencing that may lead to promising novel therapeutic strategies for breast cancer. Therefore, identification of such molecules having high oncogene specificity is the need of the hour. Here, we have developed a database named as Breast Oncogenic Specific siRNAs (BOSS, http://bioinformatics.cimap.res.in/sharma/boss/ ) on the basis of the current research status on siRNA-mediated repression of oncogenes in different breast cancer cell lines. BOSS is a resource of experimentally validated breast oncogenic siRNAs, collected from research articles and patents published yet. The present database contains information on 865 breast oncogenic siRNA entries. Each entry provides comprehensive information of an siRNA that includes its name, sequence, target gene, type of cells, and inhibition value, etc. Additionally, some useful tools like siRNAMAP and BOSS BLAST were also developed and linked with the database. siRNAMAP can be used for the selection of best siRNA against a target gene while BOSS BLAST tool helps to locate the siRNA sequences in deferent oncogenes.

  17. Enhanced plasticity of bulk metallic glass in different aspect ratios via laser shock peening with multiple impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jie; Zhu, Yunhu; Zheng, Chao; Liu, Ren; Ji, Zhong

    2016-09-01

    In this study laser shock peening (LSP) with multiple laser impacts was used to improve the mechanical properties especially the plasticity of Zr35Ti30Cu8.25Be26.75 bulk metallic glass (BMG) pillars in two aspect ratios (1:1 and 2:1). It was found that, with increasing laser impacts up to 5, the compression plastic strain of BMG pillar with aspect ratio of 1:1 increased from 0 to 1.48% and the compression strength increased significantly from 1569 MPa to 1721 MPa. With further laser impacts beyond 5, the changes in the plasticity and the compression strength were observed to be insignificant. Considering the effect of sample geometry at the same laser impacts, it could be concluded that the BMG pillars with smaller aspect ratio of 1:1 had better mechanical properties than that of the lager BMG pillars with aspect ratio of 2:1. Besides, the elastic strain limit of BMG pillars with LSP was not only independent of the laser impacts, but also irrelevant to the aspect ratio. At last, we discussed the reason for the increase of plasticity in view of the creation of excess free volume during LSP.

  18. Effect of cellular determination on oncogenic transformation by chemicals and oncogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, M A; Gonzales, F; Jones, P A

    1988-01-01

    Three developmentally determined myogenic cell lines derived from C3H 10T1/2 C18 (10T1/2) mouse embryo cells treated with 5-azacytidine were compared with the parental 10T1/2 line for their susceptibility to oncogenic transformation by 3-methylcholanthrene or the activated human c-Ha-ras oncogene. Neither the 10T1/2 cells nor the myogenic derivatives grew in soft agar or formed tumors in nude mice. In contrast to 10T1/2 cells, the three myogenic derivatives were not susceptible to transformation by 3-methylcholanthrene, so that cellular determination altered the response of 10T1/2 cells to chemical carcinogen. On the other hand, all cell types were transformed to a tumorigenic phenotype following transfection with the activated c-Ha-ras gene. The transfected myogenic cells expressed both the c-Ha-ras gene and the muscle determination gene MyoD1. In contrast to other reports, the presence of as many as six copies of the c-Ha-ras gene per genome did not prevent the formation of striated muscle cells which expressed immunologically detectable muscle-specific myosin. The expression of the c-Ha-ras gene does not therefore necessarily preclude the expression of the determination gene for myogenesis or prevent end-stage myogenic differentiation. Images PMID:2460742

  19. Study of impact demagnetization at Mars using Monte Carlo modeling and multiple altitude data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillis, Robert J.; Purucker, Michael E.; Halekas, Jasper S.; Louzada, Karin L.; Stewart-Mukhopadhyay, Sarah T.; Manga, Michael; Frey, Herbert V.

    2010-07-01

    The magnetic field signatures of large demagnetized impact basins on Mars offer a unique opportunity to study the magnetic properties of the crust and the processes of basin formation and impact shock demagnetization. We present a framework for determining the effects on such signatures due to the dominant direction, strength, thickness, and vertical and horizontal coherence wavelengths of the surrounding crustal magnetization, as well as the demagnetization radius and the width of the demagnetization gradient zone caused by impact shock. By comparing model results with observed magnetic field profiles at 185 km and 400 km over the five largest apparently demagnetized impact structures, we find that (1) the dominant lateral size of coherently magnetized regions of crust falls in the range ˜325 km to 600 km, (2) the magnetic field observed over a circular demagnetized region is such that clear demagnetization signatures should only be visible in magnetic field maps at 185 km and 400 km altitude for demagnetization diameters larger than ˜600 km and ˜1000 km, respectively, (3) demagnetization radii can be meaningfully constrained despite relatively poor constraints on associated demagnetization gradient zone widths, (4) the ratio of demagnetization diameter to the outer topographic ring diameter is close to 0.8 for the Isidis, Hellas, Argyre, and Utopia basins, suggesting that similar basin-forming and shock demagnetization processes occurred in each of these four ancient impacts, and (5) if used in conjunction with impact simulations, such modeling may lead to improved constraints on peak pressure contours and impact energies for these basins.

  20. Oncogenic mechanisms of Lin28 in breast cancer: new functions and therapeutic opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Seifer, Benjamin J.; Ye, Chenyang; Chen, Yongxia; Jia, Yunlu; Chen, Cong; Shen, Jianguo; Wang, Linbo; Sui, Xinbing; Zhou, Jichun

    2017-01-01

    The RNA binding protein Lin28 is best known for the critical role in cell development, recent researches also have implied its oncogenic function in various human cancers, including breast cancer. Specifically, aberrant Lin28 participates in multiple pathological processes, such as proliferation, metastasis, radiotherapy and chemotherapy resistance, metabolism, immunity and inflammation as well as stemness. In this review, we summarize the let-7-dependent and let-7-independent mechanism regulated by Lin28, focusing on its relation with tumor hallmarks in breast cancer, and subsequently discuss our present knowledge of Lin28 to develop a molecular-based therapeutic strategy against breast cancer. PMID:28147339

  1. Oncogenic mechanisms of Lin28 in breast cancer: new functions and therapeutic opportunities.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Hanchu; Zhao, Wenhe; Wang, Ji; Seifer, Benjamin J; Ye, Chenyang; Chen, Yongxia; Jia, Yunlu; Chen, Cong; Shen, Jianguo; Wang, Linbo; Sui, Xinbing; Zhou, Jichun

    2017-04-11

    The RNA binding protein Lin28 is best known for the critical role in cell development, recent researches also have implied its oncogenic function in various human cancers, including breast cancer. Specifically, aberrant Lin28 participates in multiple pathological processes, such as proliferation, metastasis, radiotherapy and chemotherapy resistance, metabolism, immunity and inflammation as well as stemness. In this review, we summarize the let-7-dependent and let-7-independent mechanism regulated by Lin28, focusing on its relation with tumor hallmarks in breast cancer, and subsequently discuss our present knowledge of Lin28 to develop a molecular-based therapeutic strategy against breast cancer.

  2. Some aspects of oncogenic virus-host cell and virus-tumor cell antigenic relationships.

    PubMed

    Nastac, E

    1982-01-01

    Some viewpoints are presented as regards the virus-host cell relationship within the framework of carcinogenesis. Data are reviewed which point out the possibility of the transfer of cellular antigenic fractions from the tumor cell to the virus that grows in it, as well as of a hybridization between the virus genome and the genome of the tumoral host cell. Such a hybridization may have multiple consequences, among which the appearance of new oncogenic variants of viruses so far known to be nononcogenic ones.

  3. Exploring the Impact of Classified Staff Interactions on the Student Experience: A Multiple Case Study Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Mary Ann

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative multiple case study explored front-line classified staff interactions with students as a possible strategy for increasing student success. The study was based on the premise that too few students stay at a community college long enough to achieve their academic goals. Therefore, college leaders must identify new strategies to…

  4. Development and Field Test of the Multiple Intelligences Learning Instruction Congruency Impact Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peifer, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to contribute to the academic discussion regarding the validity of Multiple Intelligences (MI) theory through focusing on the validity of an important construct embedded in the theory, that of congruence between instructional style and preferred MI style for optimal learning. Currently there is insufficient empirical…

  5. Development and Field Test of the Multiple Intelligences Learning Instruction Congruency Impact Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peifer, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to contribute to the academic discussion regarding the validity of Multiple Intelligences (MI) theory through focusing on the validity of an important construct embedded in the theory, that of congruence between instructional style and preferred MI style for optimal learning. Currently there is insufficient empirical…

  6. Acquisition of Alphabet Knowledge in Kindergarten: Impact of Multiple Means of Representation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, La'Tondra; Stone, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Learning the alphabet is essential to learning how to read. This study focuses on teaching Kindergarten students the alphabet using multiple means of representation. The 24 Kindergarten students in this study have been exposed to activities that reflect their learning styles, interaction among various group settings, and they have been allowed to…

  7. Quality of Life in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis: The Impact of Depression, Fatigue, and Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goksel Karatepe, Altlnay; Kaya, Taciser; Gunaydn, Rezzan; Demirhan, Aylin; Ce, Plnar; Gedizlioglu, Muhtesem

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the quality of life (QoL) in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), and to evaluate its association with disability and psychosocial factors especially depression and fatigue. Methods: Demographic characteristics, education level, disease severity, and disease duration were documented for each patient. QoL,…

  8. The Impact of Parental Multiple Sclerosis on the Adjustment of Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Judicibus, Margaret A.; McCabe, Marita P.

    2004-01-01

    Thirty-one parents with multiple sclerosis (MS) participated in a study to investigate the adjustment of their children, 24 boys and 24 girls aged 4 to 16 years. The majority of parents believed that their illness had an effect on their children. The perception of parents regarding their children's problems in the areas of emotions, concentration,…

  9. Exploring the Impact of Sports Participation on Multiple Intelligence Development of High School Female Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kul, Marat

    2015-01-01

    After Gardner had introduced the Multiple Intelligence (MI) theory, many researchers tried to find out the possibilities of applying this theory in the education domain. Moreover, the effects of different kinds of athletic applications on intelligence development within the framework of this theory have also been under investigation. This study…

  10. Exploring the Impact of Sports Participation on Multiple Intelligence Development of High School Female Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kul, Marat

    2015-01-01

    After Gardner had introduced the Multiple Intelligence (MI) theory, many researchers tried to find out the possibilities of applying this theory in the education domain. Moreover, the effects of different kinds of athletic applications on intelligence development within the framework of this theory have also been under investigation. This study…

  11. Assessing the Impact of Influential Observations on Multiple Regression Analysis on Human Resource Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Reid A.; Holton, Elwood F., III; Burnett, Michael F.

    1999-01-01

    A case study of learning transfer demonstrates the possible effect of influential observation on linear regression analysis. A diagnostic method that tests for violation of assumptions, multicollinearity, and individual and multiple influential observations helps determine which observation to delete to eliminate bias. (SK)

  12. The Impact of Parental Multiple Sclerosis on the Adjustment of Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Judicibus, Margaret A.; McCabe, Marita P.

    2004-01-01

    Thirty-one parents with multiple sclerosis (MS) participated in a study to investigate the adjustment of their children, 24 boys and 24 girls aged 4 to 16 years. The majority of parents believed that their illness had an effect on their children. The perception of parents regarding their children's problems in the areas of emotions, concentration,…

  13. Quality of Life in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis: The Impact of Depression, Fatigue, and Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goksel Karatepe, Altlnay; Kaya, Taciser; Gunaydn, Rezzan; Demirhan, Aylin; Ce, Plnar; Gedizlioglu, Muhtesem

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the quality of life (QoL) in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), and to evaluate its association with disability and psychosocial factors especially depression and fatigue. Methods: Demographic characteristics, education level, disease severity, and disease duration were documented for each patient. QoL,…

  14. Impact of the Body Mass on Complications and Outcome in Multiple Trauma Patients: What Does the Weight Weigh?

    PubMed Central

    Andruszkow, Hagen; Mommsen, Philipp; Zeckey, Christian; Frink, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is known as an independent risk factor for various morbidities. The influence of an increased body mass index (BMI) on morbidity and mortality in critically injured patients has been investigated with conflicting results. To verify the impact of weight disorders in multiple traumatized patients, 586 patients with an injury severity score >16 points treated at a level I trauma center between 2005 and 2011 were differentiated according to the BMI and analyzed regarding morbidity and outcome. Plasma levels of interleukin- (IL-) 6 and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured during clinical course to evaluate the inflammatory response to the “double hit” of weight disorders and multiple trauma. In brief, obesity was the highest risk factor for development of a multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) (OR 4.209, 95%-CI 1.515–11.692) besides injury severity (OR 1.054, 95%-CI 1.020–1.089) and APACHE II score (OR 1.059, 95%-CI 1.001–1.121). In obese patients as compared to those with overweight, normal weight, and underweight, the highest levels of CRP were continuously present while increased systemic IL-6 levels were found until day 4. In conclusion, an altered posttraumatic inflammatory response in obese patients seems to determine the risk for multiple organ failure after severe trauma. PMID:24023413

  15. Impact of the body mass on complications and outcome in multiple trauma patients: what does the weight weigh?

    PubMed

    Andruszkow, Hagen; Veh, Juliane; Mommsen, Philipp; Zeckey, Christian; Hildebrand, Frank; Frink, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is known as an independent risk factor for various morbidities. The influence of an increased body mass index (BMI) on morbidity and mortality in critically injured patients has been investigated with conflicting results. To verify the impact of weight disorders in multiple traumatized patients, 586 patients with an injury severity score >16 points treated at a level I trauma center between 2005 and 2011 were differentiated according to the BMI and analyzed regarding morbidity and outcome. Plasma levels of interleukin- (IL-) 6 and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured during clinical course to evaluate the inflammatory response to the "double hit" of weight disorders and multiple trauma. In brief, obesity was the highest risk factor for development of a multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) (OR 4.209, 95%-CI 1.515-11.692) besides injury severity (OR 1.054, 95%-CI 1.020-1.089) and APACHE II score (OR 1.059, 95%-CI 1.001-1.121). In obese patients as compared to those with overweight, normal weight, and underweight, the highest levels of CRP were continuously present while increased systemic IL-6 levels were found until day 4. In conclusion, an altered posttraumatic inflammatory response in obese patients seems to determine the risk for multiple organ failure after severe trauma.

  16. Impacts of education level and employment status on health-related quality of life in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Šabanagić-Hajrić, Selma; Alajbegović, Azra

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the impacts of education level and employment status on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in multiple sclerosis patients. This study included 100 multiple sclerosis patients treated at the Department of Neurology, Clinical Center of the University of Sarajevo. Inclusion criteria were the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score between 1.0 and 6.5, age between 18 and 65 years, stable disease on enrollment. Quality of life (QoL) was evaluated by the Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life-54 questionnaire (MSQoL-54). Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis test were used for comparisons. Linear regression analyses were performed to evaluate prediction value of educational level and employment status in predicting MSQOL-54 physical and mental composite scores. Full employment status had positive impact on physical health (54.85 vs. 37.90; p les than 0.001) and mental health (59.55 vs. 45.90; p les than 0.001) composite scores. Employment status retained its independent predictability for both physical (r(2)=0.105) and mental (r(2)=0.076) composite scores in linear regression analysis. Patients with college degree had slightly higher median value of physical (49.36 vs. 45.30) and mental health composite score (66.74 vs. 55.62) comparing to others, without statistically significant difference. Employment proved to be an important factor in predicting quality of life in multiple sclerosis patients. Higher education level may determine better QOL but without significant predictive value. Sustained employment and development of vocational rehabilitation programs for MS patients living in the country with high unemployment level is an important factor in improving both physical and mental health outcomes in MS patients.

  17. Evolution of stress state of granular medium under multiple dynamic impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobryakov, AP; Kosykh, VP; Revuzhenko, AF

    2017-02-01

    The paper describes experimental measurement of pressure in marble chips placed in cylindrical reservoir subjected to weak impacting within a long time. It is found that pressure in the granular material changes non-monotonically but fluctuates relative to hydrostatic pressure with the amplitude equaling order of magnitude of the latter. The fractal analysis of the experimental curves of pressure and number of impacts is performed. The Hurst exponent ranges as 0.67–0.73, and the process of pressure variation is fractal and possesses long-term “memory.”

  18. Amelogenesis imperfecta with multiple impacted teeth and skeletal class III malocclusion: complete mouth rehabilitation of a young adult.

    PubMed

    Patil, Pravinkumar G; Patil, Smita P

    2014-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is an autosomal dominant disorder. It is a group of hereditary diseases showing abnormal enamel density and crown malformation. This clinical report describes the oral rehabilitation of a young adult diagnosed with a variant of hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta with multiple impacted teeth and skeletal class III malocclusion. The treatment procedures of teeth extractions, endodontic treatment of remaining teeth followed by post and core restorations, esthetic and functional crown lengthening, and metal ceramic fixed dental prostheses were performed sequentially in the maxillary arch. The mandibular arch was restored with an overdenture. One-year follow-up revealed satisfactory results.

  19. Assessment of human health impact from exposure to multiple air pollutants in China based on satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Tao; Wang, Wen; Ciren, Pubu; Zhu, Yan

    2016-10-01

    Assessment of human health impact caused by air pollution is crucial for evaluating environmental hazards. In this paper, concentrations of six air pollutants (PM10, PM2.5, NO2, SO2, O3, and CO) were first derived from satellite observations, and then the overall human health risks in China caused by multiple air pollutants were assessed using an aggregated health risks index. Unlike traditional approach for human health risks assessment, which relied on the in-situ air pollution measurements, the spatial distribution of aggregated human health risks in China were obtained using satellite observations in this research. It was indicated that the remote sensing data have advantages over in-situ data in accessing human health impact caused by air pollution.

  20. The strength and cooperativity of KIT ectodomain contacts determine normal ligand-dependent stimulation or oncogenic activation in cancer.

    PubMed

    Reshetnyak, Andrey V; Opatowsky, Yarden; Boggon, Titus J; Folta-Stogniew, Ewa; Tome, Francisco; Lax, Irit; Schlessinger, Joseph

    2015-01-08

    The receptor tyrosine kinase KIT plays an important role in development of germ cells, hematopoietic cells, and interstitial pacemaker cells. Oncogenic KIT mutations play an important "driver" role in gastrointestinal stromal tumors, acute myeloid leukemias, and melanoma, among other cancers. Here we describe the crystal structure of a recurring somatic oncogenic mutation located in the C-terminal Ig-like domain (D5) of the ectodomain, rendering KIT tyrosine kinase activity constitutively activated. The structural analysis, together with biochemical and biophysical experiments and detailed analyses of the activities of a variety of oncogenic KIT mutations, reveals that the strength of homotypic contacts and the cooperativity in the action of D4D5 regions determines whether KIT is normally regulated or constitutively activated in cancers. We propose that cooperative interactions mediated by multiple weak homotypic contacts between receptor molecules are responsible for regulating normal ligand-dependent or oncogenic RTK activation via a "zipper-like" mechanism for receptor activation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of multiple. 30-caliber bullet impacts on steel-encased explosives: Experimental Report I

    SciTech Connect

    Honodel, C A

    1984-12-01

    Thirty-one experiments have been performed in a series where typical explosive formulations for weapons were encased in steel vessels and impacted by up to six .30-caliber bullets fired at 1.2-s intervals. We have observed that detonation can occur on the second bullet impact if the high-explosive configuration (detonator, booster, and main charge) is complete and tested at an elevated temperature. So far, shots with some mock parts have exploded (no detonation) after several bullet impacts, where the response to preceeding bullets ranged from no reaction to violent deflagration. When RX-26-AF was substituted for the booster explosive LX-10, there was reduced violence. Conversely, when we completely replaced all the high-explosive components with a solid filling of LX-10, we discovered a charge-size limitation where detonation occurred on the first bullet impact. To help quantify the violence exhibited by these detonations, we purposely detonated one shot and compared the high-speed camera records and recovery samples.

  2. Assessing the Impact of Temperature on Grape Phenolic Metabolism Using Multiple Chromatographic Approaches

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study assessed the impact of fruit temperature on the phenolic metabolism of grape berries (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Merlot) grown under field conditions with controlled exposure to sunlight. Individual cluster temperatures were manipulated in situ. Diurnal temperature fluctuation was damped by ...

  3. Disruptive Promise: The Links Intervention and Its Impact on Multiple, Multimodal, Internet Text Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schira Hagerman, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation study presents an instructional intervention called LINKS: Learning to Integrate InterNet Knowledge Strategically. It reports evidence of the intervention's impact on two variables: (a) ninth graders' use of ten online reading and integration strategies while engaged in dyadic online inquiry on science topics in school, and (b)…

  4. Trend and uncertainty analysis of simulated climate change impacts with multiple GCMs and emission scenarios

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Impacts of climate change on hydrology, soil erosion, and wheat production during 2010-2039 at El Reno in central Oklahoma, USA, were simulated using the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model. Projections from four GCMs (CCSR/NIES, CGCM2, CSIRO-Mk2, and HadCM3) under three emissions scenari...

  5. Impacts of multiple stresses on water demand and supply across the southeastern United States

    Treesearch

    Ge Sun; Steven G. McNulty; Jennifer A. Moore Myers; Erika C. Cohen

    2008-01-01

    Assessment of long-term impacts of projected changes in climate, population, and land use and land cover on regional water resource is critical to the sustainable development of the southeastern United States. The objective of this study was to fully budget annual water availability for water supply (precipitation ) evapotranspiration + groundwater supply + return flow...

  6. Impact of multiple types of childhood trauma exposure on risk of psychiatric comorbidity among alcoholic inpatients.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ming-Chyi; Schwandt, Melanie L; Ramchandani, Vijay A; George, David T; Heilig, Markus

    2012-06-01

    This study examined the prevalence of single- and multiple-type childhood trauma exposure (CTE) among alcoholic patients undergoing inpatient detoxification and treatment. The relationships between various types of CTE and lifetime psychiatric comorbidities and suicide attempts were also explored. A total of 196 alcoholic inpatients were assessed by Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders and Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) for CTE history. The overall prevalence of CTE in the entire sample was high (55.1%). Specifically, the prevalence of emotional abuse was 21.4%, physical abuse 31.1%, sexual abuse 24.0%, emotional neglect 20.4%, and physical neglect 19.9%. Regarding multiple types of CTE, 31.7 and 18.9% reported at least 2 and at least 3 CTE types, respectively. Strikingly, among those with at least 1 positive CTQ category, more than half reported 2 or more CTE types. A history of emotional abuse increased the risk of mood disorder, in particular major depressive disorder, as well as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Physical abuse contributed to the prediction of suicide attempts, while sexual abuse was associated with a diagnosis of anxiety disorder, PTSD, and multiple comobidities (e.g., anxiety and mood disorder). The number of reported CTE types or the total score of the CTQ predicted an increased risk of having single or multiple psychiatric comorbidities as well as suicide attempts. We observed high rates of a broad range of CTE types and a trend for CTE-specific enhancement of risk for various psychiatric outcomes among alcoholic inpatients. Of note, a dose-response relationship between number of CTE types and risk of psychiatric comorbidities as well as suicide attempts was found. We suggest a wide range of CTE should be included when exploring the effects of CTE or developing prevention and treatment strategies among alcoholic subjects. Copyright © 2012 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  7. Impact of Multiple Types of Childhood Trauma Exposure on Risk of Psychiatric Comorbidity among Alcoholic Inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ming-Chyi; Schwandt, Melanie L; Ramchandani, Vijay A; George, David T; Heilig, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Background This study examined the prevalence of single- and multiple-type childhood trauma exposure (CTE) among alcoholic patients undergoing in-patient detoxification and treatment. The relationships between various types of CTE and lifetime psychiatric comorbidites and suicide attempts were also explored. Methods A total of 196 alcoholic inpatients were assessed by Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID) and Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) for CTE history. Results The overall prevalence of CTE of the entire sample was high (55.1%). Specifically, the prevalence of emotional abuse was 21.4%, physical abuse 31.1%, sexual abuse 24.0%, emotional neglect 20.4%, and physical neglect 19.9%. Regarding multiple types of CTE, 31.7% and 18.9% reported at least two and at least three CTE types respectively. Strikingly, among those with at least one positive CTQ category, more than half reported two or more CTE types. A history of emotional abuse increased the risk of mood disorder, in particular major depressive disorder, as well as PTSD. Physical abuse contributed to the prediction of suicide attempts, while sexual abuse was associated with a diagnosis of anxiety disorder, PTSD, and multiple comobidities (e.g., anxiety and mood disorder).The number of reported CTE types or the total scores of the CTQ predicted an increased risk of having single or multiple psychiatric comorbidities as well as suicide attempts. Conclusions We observed high rates of a broad range of CTE types and a trend for CTE-specific enhancement of risk for various psychiatric outcomes among alcoholic inpatients. Of notion, a dose-response relationship between number of CTE types and risk of psychiatric comorbidities as well as suicide attempts was found. We suggest a wide range of CTE should be included when exploring the effects of CTE or developing prevention and treatment strategies among alcoholic subjects. PMID:22420670

  8. Impact of a multiple-micronutrient fortified salt on the nutritional status and memory of schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Vinodkumar, Malavika; Erhardt, Juergen G; Rajagopalan, S

    2009-09-01

    This study was conducted to test the efficacy of a multiple micronutrient-fortified cooking salt. A randomized controlled trial with a pre- and post-test design was used to study children 5 to 18 years of age, with an experimental (n=213) and control group (n=189). The children were sampled from 3 residential schools and were studied for 9 months. The experimental group received a multiple micronutrient-fortified salt containing vitamins A, B(1), B(2), B(6), B(12), as well as folic acid, niacin, iron, iodine, and zinc. The control group received iodized salt. Biochemical measurements [hemoglobin, serum ferritin (SF), serum transferrin receptor (sTfR), C-reactive protein (CRP), alpha-1 acid glycoprotein (AGP), serum retinol, serum vitamin B(12), serum folic acid, serum zinc, and urinary iodine (UI)] were measured at baseline and post-intervention. Hemoglobin was measured in all the children three times during the study period, while the remaining biochemical measurements were performed in a subsample of children. Children between 11 and 18 years of age were given cognitive tests to assess memory and attention. There was a significant improvement (p<0.05) in all the biochemical measurements and memory tests in the experimental group when compared with the control group. Post-intervention in the experimental group, the increase in hemoglobin was 0.67 g/dL (p<0.05). Iron status and body iron stores increased significantly (p<0.05) in the experimental group compared to the control group, while serum zinc increased by 50 mug/dL (p<0.05), and the prevalence of retinol deficiency decreased from 57.1 % at baseline to 16 % post-intervention (p<0.05). The multiple micronutrients from the multiple micronutrient-fortified cooking salt were absorbed in the children and helped in combating micronutrient deficiencies.

  9. Experimental and numerical study of single and multiple impacts of angular particles on ductile metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaffoli, Mahdi

    Solid particle erosion occurs when small high speed particles impact surfaces. It can be either destructive such as in the erosion of oil pipelines by corrosion byproducts, or constructive such as in abrasive jet machining processes. Two dimensional finite element (FE) models of single rhomboid particles impact on a copper target were developed using two different techniques to deal with the problem of element distortion: (i) element deletion, and (ii) remeshing. It was found that the chip formation and the material pile-up, two phenomena that cannot be simulated using a previously developed rigid-plastic model, could be simulated using the FE models, resulting in a good agreement with experiments performed using a gas gun. However, remeshing in conjunction with a failure model caused numerical instabilities. The element deletion approach also induced errors in mass loss due to the removal of distorted elements. To address the limitations of the FE approach, smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) which can better accommodate large deformations, was used in the simulation of the impact of single rhomboid particles on an aluminum alloy target. With appropriate constitutive and failure parameters, SPH was demonstrated to be suitable for simulating all of the relevant damage phenomena observed during impact experiments. A new methodology was developed for generating realistic three dimensional particle geometries based on measurements of the size and shape parameter distributions for a sample of 150 microm nominal diameter angular aluminum oxide powder. The FE models of these generated particles were implemented in a SPH/FE model to simulate non-overlapping particle impacts. It was shown that the simulated particles produced distributions of crater and crater lip dimensions that agreed well with those measured from particle blasting experiments. Finally, a numerical model for simulating overlapping impacts of angular particles was developed and compared to experimental

  10. Preparation and impact of multiple (water-in-oil-in-water) emulsions in meat systems.

    PubMed

    Cofrades, S; Antoniou, I; Solas, M T; Herrero, A M; Jiménez-Colmenero, F

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this paper was to prepare and characterise multiple emulsions and assess their utility as pork backfat replacers in meat gel/emulsion model systems. In order to improve the fat content (in quantitative and qualitative terms) pork backfat was replaced by a water-in-oil-in-water emulsion (W1/O/W2) prepared with olive oil (as lipid phase), polyglycerol ester of polyricinoleic acid (PGPR) as a lipophilic emulsifier, and sodium caseinate (SC) and whey protein concentrate (WP) as hydrophilic emulsifiers. The emulsion properties (particle size and distribution, stability, microstructure) and meat model system characteristics (composition, texture, fat and water binding properties, and colour) of the W1/O/W2, as affected by reformulation, were evaluated. Multiple emulsions showed a well-defined monomodal distribution. Freshly prepared multiple emulsions showed good thermal stability (better using SC) with no creaming. The meat systems had good water and fat binding properties irrespective of formulation. The effect on texture by replacement of pork backfat by W1/O/W2 emulsions generally depends on the type of double emulsion (associated with the hydrophilic emulsifier used in its formulation) and the fat level in the meat system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Exploring the role of asexual multiplication in poplar rust epidemics: impact on diversity and genetic structure.

    PubMed

    Barrès, Benoît; Dutech, Cyril; Andrieux, Axelle; Halkett, Fabien; Frey, Pascal

    2012-10-01

    Fungal plant pathogens, especially rust fungi (Pucciniales), are well known for their complex life cycles, which include phases of sexual and asexual reproduction. The effect of asexual multiplication on population genetic diversity has been investigated in the poplar rust fungus Melampsora larici-populina using a nested hierarchical sampling scheme. Four hierarchical levels were considered: leaf, twig, tree and site. Both cultivated and wild poplar stands were sampled at two time points at the start and end of rust epidemics. A total of 641 fungal isolates was analysed using nine microsatellite markers. This study revealed that the genetic signature of asexual multiplication in the wild poplar stand was seen only at lower hierarchical levels (leaf and twig). Moreover, we observed an erosion of clonal structure through time, with an increase in both gene and genotypic diversity. New genotypes contributed to host infection over time, which demonstrates the importance of allo-infection in the epidemic process in this host-pathogen system. Compared with the wild stands, the nearly lack of detection of clonal structure in the cultivated stands reflects the higher infection level on cultivated poplars. More generally, this genetic analysis illustrates the utility of population genetics approach for elucidating the proportion of asexual reproduction in the multiplication of isolates during an epidemic, and for proper quantification of asexual dispersal in plant pathogens.

  12. Assessing the impacts of nonrandom seed dispersal by multiple frugivore partners on plant recruitment.

    PubMed

    Razafindratsima, Onja H; Dunham, Amy E

    2015-01-01

    Directed dispersal is defined as enhanced dispersal of seeds into suitable microhabitats, resulting in higher recruitment than if seeds were dispersed randomly. While this constitutes one of the main explanations for the adaptive value of frugivore-mediated seed dispersal, the generality of this advantage has received little study, particularly when multiple dispersers are involved. We used probability recruitment models of a long-lived rainforest tree in Madagascar to compare recruitment success under dispersal by multiple frugivores, no dispersal, and random dispersal. Models were parameterized using a three-year recruitment experiment and observational data of dispersal events by three frugivorous lemur species that commonly disperse its seeds. Frugivore-mediated seed dispersal was nonrandom with respect to canopy cover and increased modeled per-seed sapling recruitment fourfold compared to no dispersal. Seeds dispersed by one frugivore, Eulemur rubriventer, had higher modeled recruitment probability than seeds dispersed randomly. However, as a group, our models suggest that seeds dispersed by lemurs would have lower recruitment than if dispersal were random. Results demonstrate the importance of evaluating the contribution of multiple frugivores to plant recruitment for understanding plant population dynamics and the ecological and evolutionary significance of seed dispersal.

  13. [Impact of TDZ and NAA on adventitious bud induction and cluster bud multiplication in Tulipa edulis].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li-Fang; Xu, Chao; Zhu, Zai-Biao; Yang, He-Tong; Guo, Qiao-Sheng; Xu, Hong-jian; Ma, Hong-Jian; Zhao, Gui-Hua

    2014-08-01

    To explore the method of explants directly induced bud and establish the tissue culture system of mutiple shoot by means of direct organogenesis, core bud and daughter bulbs (the top of bud stem expanded to form daughter bulb) of T. edulis were used as explants and treated with thidiazuron (TDZ) and 1-naphthlcetic acid (NAA). The results showed that the optimal medium for bud inducted form core bud and daughter bulb were MS + TDZ 2.0 mg x L(-1) + NAA 4.0 mg x L(-1) and MS +TDZ 2.0 mg x L(-1) + NAA 2.0 mg x L(-1) respectively, both of them had a bud induction rate of 72.92%, 79.22%. The optimal medium for cluster buds multiplication was MS + TDZ 0.2 mg x L(-1) + NAA 0.2 mg x L(-1), and proliferation coefficient was 2.23. After proliferation, cluster buds rooting occurred on MS medium with IBA 1.0 mg x L(-1) and the rooting rate was 52.6%, three to five seedlings in each plant. Using core bud and daughter bulb of T. edulis, the optimum medium for adventitious bud directly inducted from daughter bulb, core bud and cluster bud multiplication were screened out and the tissue culture system of multiple shoot by means of direct organogenesis was established.

  14. Impact of oral health in patients with multiple sclerosis and epilepsy: a survey in a neurology clinic.

    PubMed

    Koffman, Boyd M; Khuder, Sadik; Mutgi, Sunil; Crooks, Ryan; Herial, Nabeel

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of oral health on neurological disorders using the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP). A total of 460 subjects completed the OHIP, including 141 control subjects who did not have any neurological conditions. Of the 319 subjects with a neurological diagnosis who were enrolled in the study, 31% had multiple sclerosis (MS), 34% had epilepsy, and 34% had other neurological conditions. Compared to the control group, mean age (p = .001), education (p = .003), and household income levels (p ≤ .001) were statistically significantly lower among subjects with epilepsy than in the other two groups. The majority of the study populations were Caucasian and the percentage was highest in those with MS (87%). Patients with any neurologic diagnosis had greater physical pain and disability than controls. Adjusting for demographic variables, the impact of physical disability was statistically significantly higher in patients with any neurological diagnosis (including MS and epilepsy) (OR = 4.49). In multinomial regression, the strongest association of physical disability impact was noted in patients with epilepsy (OR = 5.17). The physical disability domain of the OHIP is more commonly associated with a neurological diagnosis, including MS, and the association is strongest in patients with diagnosis of epilepsy. © 2012 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Identification of Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors of Oncogenic RET Kinase.

    PubMed

    Moccia, Marialuisa; Liu, Qingsong; Guida, Teresa; Federico, Giorgia; Brescia, Annalisa; Zhao, Zheng; Choi, Hwan Geun; Deng, Xianming; Tan, Li; Wang, Jinhua; Billaud, Marc; Gray, Nathanael S; Carlomagno, Francesca; Santoro, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic mutation of the RET receptor tyrosine kinase is observed in several human malignancies. Here, we describe three novel type II RET tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that inhibit the cellular activity of oncogenic RET mutants at two digit nanomolar concentration. These three compounds shared a 3-trifluoromethyl-4-methylpiperazinephenyl pharmacophore that stabilizes the 'DFG-out' inactive conformation of RET activation loop. They blocked RET-mediated signaling and proliferation with an IC50 in the nM range in fibroblasts transformed by the RET/C634R and RET/M918T oncogenes. They also inhibited autophosphorylation of several additional oncogenic RET-derived point mutants and chimeric oncogenes. At a concentration of 10 nM, ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01 inhibited RET kinase and signaling in human thyroid cancer cell lines carrying oncogenic RET alleles; they also inhibited proliferation of cancer, but not non-tumoral Nthy-ori-3-1, thyroid cells, with an IC50 in the nM range. The three compounds were capable of inhibiting the 'gatekeeper' V804M mutant which confers substantial resistance to established RET inhibitors. In conclusion, we have identified a type II TKI scaffold, shared by ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that may be used as novel lead for the development of novel agents for the treatment of cancers harboring oncogenic activation of RET.

  16. Identification of Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors of Oncogenic RET Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Moccia, Marialuisa; Liu, Qingsong; Guida, Teresa; Federico, Giorgia; Brescia, Annalisa; Zhao, Zheng; Choi, Hwan Geun; Deng, Xianming; Tan, Li; Wang, Jinhua; Billaud, Marc; Gray, Nathanael S.

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic mutation of the RET receptor tyrosine kinase is observed in several human malignancies. Here, we describe three novel type II RET tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that inhibit the cellular activity of oncogenic RET mutants at two digit nanomolar concentration. These three compounds shared a 3-trifluoromethyl-4-methylpiperazinephenyl pharmacophore that stabilizes the ‘DFG-out’ inactive conformation of RET activation loop. They blocked RET-mediated signaling and proliferation with an IC50 in the nM range in fibroblasts transformed by the RET/C634R and RET/M918T oncogenes. They also inhibited autophosphorylation of several additional oncogenic RET-derived point mutants and chimeric oncogenes. At a concentration of 10 nM, ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01 inhibited RET kinase and signaling in human thyroid cancer cell lines carrying oncogenic RET alleles; they also inhibited proliferation of cancer, but not non-tumoral Nthy-ori-3-1, thyroid cells, with an IC50 in the nM range. The three compounds were capable of inhibiting the ‘gatekeeper’ V804M mutant which confers substantial resistance to established RET inhibitors. In conclusion, we have identified a type II TKI scaffold, shared by ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that may be used as novel lead for the development of novel agents for the treatment of cancers harboring oncogenic activation of RET. PMID:26046350

  17. The Impact of Escape Alternative Position Change in Multiple-Choice Test on the Psychometric Properties of a Test and Its Items Parameters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamadneh, Iyad Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the impact changing of escape alternative position in multiple-choice test on the psychometric properties of a test and it's items parameters (difficulty, discrimination & guessing), and estimation of examinee ability. To achieve the study objectives, a 4-alternative multiple choice type achievement test…

  18. Identification and analysis of mutational hotspots in oncogenes and tumour suppressors

    PubMed Central

    Baeissa, Hanadi; Benstead-Hume, Graeme; Richardson, Christopher J.; Pearl, Frances M.G

    2017-01-01

    Background The key to interpreting the contribution of a disease-associated mutation in the development and progression of cancer is an understanding of the consequences of that mutation both on the function of the affected protein and on the pathways in which that protein is involved. Protein domains encapsulate function and position-specific domain based analysis of mutations have been shown to help elucidate their phenotypes. Results In this paper we examine the domain biases in oncogenes and tumour suppressors, and find that their domain compositions substantially differ. Using data from over 30 different cancers from whole-exome sequencing cancer genomic projects we mapped over one million mutations to their respective Pfam domains to identify which domains are enriched in any of three different classes of mutation; missense, indels or truncations. Next, we identified the mutational hotspots within domain families by mapping small mutations to equivalent positions in multiple sequence alignments of protein domains We find that gain of function mutations from oncogenes and loss of function mutations from tumour suppressors are normally found in different domain families and when observed in the same domain families, hotspot mutations are located at different positions within the multiple sequence alignment of the domain. Conclusions By considering hotspots in tumour suppressors and oncogenes independently, we find that there are different specific positions within domain families that are particularly suited to accommodate either a loss or a gain of function mutation. The position is also dependent on the class of mutation. We find rare mutations co-located with well-known functional mutation hotspots, in members of homologous domain superfamilies, and we detect novel mutation hotspots in domain families previously unconnected with cancer. The results of this analysis can be accessed through the MOKCa database (http://strubiol.icr.ac.uk/extra/MOKCa). PMID

  19. Massive reshaping of genome-nuclear lamina interactions during oncogene-induced senescence.

    PubMed

    Lenain, Christelle; de Graaf, Carolyn A; Pagie, Ludo; Visser, Nils L; de Haas, Marcel; de Vries, Sandra S; Peric-Hupkes, Daniel; van Steensel, Bas; Peeper, Daniel S

    2017-10-01

    Cellular senescence is a mechanism that virtually irreversibly suppresses the proliferative capacity of cells in response to various stress signals. This includes the expression of activated oncogenes, which causes Oncogene-Induced Senescence (OIS). A body of evidence points to the involvement in OIS of chromatin reorganization, including the formation of senescence-associated heterochromatic foci (SAHF). The nuclear lamina (NL) is an important contributor to genome organization and has been implicated in cellular senescence and organismal aging. It interacts with multiple regions of the genome called lamina-associated domains (LADs). Some LADs are cell-type specific, whereas others are conserved between cell types and are referred to as constitutive LADs (cLADs). Here, we used DamID to investigate the changes in genome-NL interactions in a model of OIS triggered by the expression of the common BRAF(V600E) oncogene. We found that OIS cells lose most of their cLADS, suggesting the loss of a specific mechanism that targets cLADs to the NL. In addition, multiple genes relocated to the NL. Unexpectedly, they were not repressed, implying the abrogation of the repressive activity of the NL during OIS. Finally, OIS cells displayed an increased association of telomeres with the NL. Our study reveals that senescent cells acquire a new type of LAD organization and suggests the existence of as yet unknown mechanisms that tether cLADs to the NL and repress gene expression at the NL. © 2017 Lenain et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  20. Latent cellular oncogenes: the paradox dissolves.

    PubMed

    Duesberg, P H

    1987-01-01

    The 20 known transforming onc genes of retroviruses are defined by sequences which are transduced from cellular genes, termed proto-onc genes. Based on these sequences, viral onc genes have been postulated to be transduced cellular cancer genes and proto-onc genes have been postulated to be latent cancer genes that can be activated from within the cell, to cause virus-negative tumours. The hypothesis is popular because it promises direct access to cellular cancer genes. However the existence of latent cancer genes presents a paradox since such genes would be most undesirable for eukaryotes. The hypothesis predicts (i) that viral onc genes and proto-onc genes are isogenic, (ii) that expression of proto-onc genes induces tumours, (iii) that activated proto-onc genes transform diploid cells upon transfection, like viral onc genes, and (iv) it predicts diploid tumours. As yet, none of these predictions is confirmed. Instead: (i) Structural comparisons between viral onc genes, essential retroviral genes, and the proto-onc genes show that all viral onc genes are indeed new genes, rather than transduced cellular cancer genes. They are genetic hybrids put together from truncated viral and truncated proto-onc genes. (ii) Proto-onc genes are frequently expressed in normal cells. (iii) To date, not one activated proto-onc gene has been isolated that transforms diploid cells. (iv) Above all, no diploid tumours with activated proto-onc genes have been found. Moreover the probability of spontaneous transformation in vivo is at least 10(9) times lower than predicted from the mechanisms thought to activate proto-onc genes. Therefore the hypothesis, that proto-onc genes are latent cellular oncogenes, appears to be an over-interpretation of sequence homology to structural and functional homology with viral onc genes. Here is is proposed that only rare truncations and recombinations, that alter the germline configuration of cellular genes, generate viral and possibly cellular cancer

  1. Multiple impacts of epilepsy and contributing factors: findings from an ethnographic study in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Aydemir, Nuran; Trung, Dang Vu; Snape, Dee; Baker, Gus A; Jacoby, Ann

    2009-11-01

    We investigated issues related to treatment, impact of epilepsy, attitudes toward epilepsy, and disclosure in Vietnam through in-depth interviews with people with epilepsy (PWE) and their family members. We found that although participants prefer Western to traditional treatment, they experience problems in accessing different kinds of antiepileptic drugs and higher-level treatment facilities and with respect to treatment expenses. The impact of epilepsy can be observed in a wide range of daily living activities which include working, education, marriage, and family formation. Although both families and society at large do not hold negative attitudes toward epilepsy, most PWE reported a sense of burden to others. Both PWE and family members generally prefer disclosing epilepsy rather than concealing it from others. Our findings strongly suggest a need in Vietnam for different types of antiepileptic drugs and epilepsy support information for PWE, family members, and the general public.

  2. Multiple impacts of epilepsy and contributing factors: findings from an ethnographic study in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Aydemir, Nuran; Vu Trung, Dang; Snape, Dee; Baker, Gus A; Jacoby, Ann

    2009-01-01

    We investigated issues related to treatment, impact of epilepsy, attitudes toward epilepsy and disclosure in Vietnam by using in depth interviews with people with epilepsy (PWE) and their family members. We found that although participants prefer Western treatment methods more than traditional ones, they experience problems in accessing different kinds of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) and higher-level treatment facilities and with respect to treatment expenses. The impact of epilepsy can be observed in a wide range of daily living activities which include working, education, marriage prospects and family formation. Although both families and society at large do not hold negative attitudes toward epilepsy, most PWE reported a sense of burden to others. Both PWE and family members generally prefer disclosing epilepsy rather than concealing it from others. Our findings strongly suggest a need for different types of AEDs, and supporting information for PWE, family members and general public about epilepsy. PMID:19800851

  3. Disentangling the impact of multiple innovations to reduce delayed hospital discharges.

    PubMed

    Manzano-Santaella, Ana

    2010-01-01

    Delayed hospital discharges are often blamed for interrupting the smooth operation of hospitals. In England, the Community Care Act in 2003 introduced fines to social services departments to resolve this issue. Evaluations of this policy reported success in the reduction of delays. However, this policy was an amalgam of several innovations, not just the introduction of fines. This simultaneity makes attribution of impact of fines a difficult task because of the potential impact of those other measures. All the other designed organizational changes contain as much mechanisms of change as the more advertised fines. The exploration of how all these elements are connected unravels the inner workings of the programme as a whole, and by default, of the fines. This theoretical analysis also demonstrates how the reduction of some delays is based on the re-definition of key concepts for delayed discharges such as 'safe to transfer', team decision-making and causes for delays.

  4. The Impact of Hope and Resilience on Multiple Factors in Neurosurgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Duggal, Devika; Sacks-Zimmerman, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present article is to outline and review the impact of stable psychological characteristics on the emotional and functional outcomes of neurosurgical patients. Neurosurgical patients face adversity as inherent to their diagnoses and, consequently, experience emotional distress. Despite commonalities in diagnoses, diverse outcomes are seen post-neurosurgery, which are influenced by psychological factors. Therefore, an understanding of neurosurgical patients’ behavior, thoughts, and feelings surrounding their diagnoses, informed by psychological concepts, is important for both neuropsychology and neurosurgery. PMID:27909637

  5. The impact of local processes and the prohibition of multiple links in the topological properties of directed complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esquivel-Gómez, J.; Arjona-Villicaña, P. D.; Acosta-Elías, J.

    2015-05-01

    Local processes exert influence on the growth and evolution of complex networks, which in turn shape the topological and dynamic properties of these networks. Some local processes have been researched, for example: Addition of nodes and links, rewiring of links between nodes, accelerated growth, link removal, aging, copying and multiple links prohibition. These processes impact directly into the topological and dynamical properties of complex networks. This paper introduces a new model for growth of directed complex networks which incorporates the prohibition of multiple links, addition of nodes and links, and rewiring of links. This paper also reports on the impact that these processes have in the topological properties of the networks generated with the proposed model. Numerical simulation shows that, when the frequency of rewiring increases in the proposed model, the γ exponent of the in-degree distribution approaches a value of 1.1. When the frequency of adding new links increases, the γ exponent approaches 1. That is the proposed model is able to generate all exponent values documented in real-world networks which range 1.05 < γ < 8.94.

  6. Impact of food choice on sodium intake patterns from multiple NHANES surveys.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zefeng; Gao, Zhifeng; McFadden, Brandon

    2017-02-01

    To examine how the food consumption from various food groups would impact American adults' sodium intake and whether this impact structurally changes over time, data were obtained from six-cycle National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999-2010. Foods were categorized by the first two digits of the USDA food code. Regression models were employed to investigate the associations between the consumption of each food group and sodium intake, and whether there were changes in the associations in consecutive six cycles. Results show that the calorie consumption of oils, beverages and water, fruit juices, fruits, lamb, fruit products, and sugars and sweets had no significant impact on individuals' sodium intake, while calorie consumption of tomatoes, fish, dark-green vegetables, and crackers contributes the most to sodium intake. The contribution to sodium intake of most food groups does not change significantly over time, with the exception of salad dressing whose contribution to sodium intake increased in four consecutive years when compared to that of 1999-2000. The sodium amount contributed by one calorie consumption (sodium density) of most food was above the daily recommendation level, 1.2 mg per calorie per day. Lowering individuals' sodium intake involves either guiding individuals to consume more fruit related products or decreasing the amount of sodium in most food groups at the production or food preparation stages. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Multiple night-time light-emitting diode lighting strategies impact grassland invertebrate assemblages.

    PubMed

    Davies, Thomas W; Bennie, Jonathan; Cruse, Dave; Blumgart, Dan; Inger, Richard; Gaston, Kevin J

    2017-07-01

    White light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are rapidly replacing conventional outdoor lighting technologies around the world. Despite rising concerns over their impact on the environment and human health, the flexibility of LEDs has been advocated as a means of mitigating the ecological impacts of globally widespread outdoor night-time lighting through spectral manipulation, dimming and switching lights off during periods of low demand. We conducted a three-year field experiment in which each of these lighting strategies was simulated in a previously artificial light naïve grassland ecosystem. White LEDs both increased the total abundance and changed the assemblage composition of adult spiders and beetles. Dimming LEDs by 50% or manipulating their spectra to reduce ecologically damaging wavelengths partially reduced the number of commoner species affected from seven to four. A combination of dimming by 50% and switching lights off between midnight and 04:00 am showed the most promise for reducing the ecological costs of LEDs, but the abundances of two otherwise common species were still affected. The environmental consequences of using alternative lighting technologies are increasingly well established. These results suggest that while management strategies using LEDs can be an effective means of reducing the number of taxa affected, averting the ecological impacts of night-time lighting may ultimately require avoiding its use altogether. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Impact of airway gas exchange on the multiple inert gas elimination technique: theory.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Joseph C; Hlastala, Michael P

    2010-03-01

    The multiple inert gas elimination technique (MIGET) provides a method for estimating alveolar gas exchange efficiency. Six soluble inert gases are infused into a peripheral vein. Measurements of these gases in breath, arterial blood, and venous blood are interpreted using a mathematical model of alveolar gas exchange (MIGET model) that neglects airway gas exchange. A mathematical model describing airway and alveolar gas exchange predicts that two of these gases, ether and acetone, exchange primarily within the airways. To determine the effect of airway gas exchange on the MIGET, we selected two additional gases, toluene and m-dichlorobenzene, that have the same blood solubility as ether and acetone and minimize airway gas exchange via their low water solubility. The airway-alveolar gas exchange model simulated the exchange of toluene, m-dichlorobenzene, and the six MIGET gases under multiple conditions of alveolar ventilation-to-perfusion, VA/Q, heterogeneity. We increased the importance of airway gas exchange by changing bronchial blood flow, Qbr. From these simulations, we calculated the excretion and retention of the eight inert gases and divided the results into two groups: (1) the standard MIGET gases which included acetone and ether and (2) the modified MIGET gases which included toluene and m-dichlorobenzene. The MIGET mathematical model predicted distributions of ventilation and perfusion for each grouping of gases and multiple perturbations of VA/Q and Qbr. Using the modified MIGET gases, MIGET predicted a smaller dead space fraction, greater mean VA, greater log(SDVA), and more closely matched the imposed VA distribution than that using the standard MIGET gases. Perfusion distributions were relatively unaffected.

  9. Impact of Airway Gas Exchange on the Multiple Inert Gas Elimination Technique: Theory

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Joseph C.; Hlastala, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    The multiple inert gas elimination technique (MIGET) provides a method for estimating alveolar gas exchange efficiency. Six soluble inert gases are infused into a peripheral vein. Measurements of these gases in breath, arterial blood, and venous blood are interpreted using a mathematical model of alveolar gas exchange (MIGET model) that neglects airway gas exchange. A mathematical model describing airway and alveolar gas exchange predicts that two of these gases, ether and acetone, exchange primarily within the airways. To determine the effect of airway gas exchange on the MIGET, we selected two additional gases, toluene and m-dichlorobenzene, that have the same blood solubility as ether and acetone and minimize airway gas exchange via their low water solubility. The airway-alveolar gas exchange model simulated the exchange of toluene, m-dichlorobenzene, and the six MIGET gases under multiple conditions of alveolar ventilation-to-perfusion, V̇A/Q̇, heterogeneity. We increased the importance of airway gas exchange by changing bronchial blood flow, Q̇br. From these simulations, we calculated the excretion and retention of the eight inert gases and divided the results into two groups: 1) the standard MIGET gases which included acetone and ether and 2) the modified MIGET gases which included toluene and m-dichlorobenzene. The MIGET mathematical model predicted distributions of ventilation and perfusion for each grouping of gases and multiple perturbations of V̇A/Q̇ and Q̇br. Using the modified MIGET gases, MIGET predicted a smaller dead space fraction, greater mean V̇A, greater log(SDVA), and more closely matched the imposed V̇A distribution than that using the standard MIGET gases. Perfusion distributions were relatively unaffected. PMID:20336837

  10. Natural history of multiple sclerosis: have available therapies impacted long-term prognosis?

    PubMed

    Trojano, Maria; Paolicelli, Damiano; Tortorella, Carla; Iaffaldano, Piero; Lucchese, Guglielmo; Di Renzo, Vita; D'Onghia, Mariangela

    2011-05-01

    Since the mid-1990s several disease-modifying drugs (DMDs), such as β-interferons and glatiramer acetate, have become available to treat patients with relapse-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). These therapies have known short- and medium-term benefit in reducing relapses, disability progression, and accrual of new inflammatory lesions. However, the short duration of the randomized pivotal MS trials have provided little to no information about benefit from such treatment over periods of extended (>5 years) use. Whether DMDs may significantly alter the development of long-term disability remains uncertain, thus it remains challenging how to best approach the issue of long-term benefits from these treatments.

  11. Oncogenes and RNA splicing of human tumor viruses.

    PubMed

    Ajiro, Masahiko; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-09-01

    Approximately 10.8% of human cancers are associated with infection by an oncogenic virus. These viruses include human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), human T-cell leukemia virus 1 (HTLV-1), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). These oncogenic viruses, with the exception of HCV, require the host RNA splicing machinery in order to exercise their oncogenic activities, a strategy that allows the viruses to efficiently export and stabilize viral RNA and to produce spliced RNA isoforms from a bicistronic or polycistronic RNA transcript for efficient protein translation. Infection with a tumor virus affects the expression of host genes, including host RNA splicing factors, which play a key role in regulating viral RNA splicing of oncogene transcripts. A current prospective focus is to explore how alternative RNA splicing and the expression of viral oncogenes take place in a cell- or tissue-specific manner in virus-induced human carcinogenesis.

  12. Oncogenes and RNA splicing of human tumor viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ajiro, Masahiko; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 10.8% of human cancers are associated with infection by an oncogenic virus. These viruses include human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein–Barr virus (EBV), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), human T-cell leukemia virus 1 (HTLV-1), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). These oncogenic viruses, with the exception of HCV, require the host RNA splicing machinery in order to exercise their oncogenic activities, a strategy that allows the viruses to efficiently export and stabilize viral RNA and to produce spliced RNA isoforms from a bicistronic or polycistronic RNA transcript for efficient protein translation. Infection with a tumor virus affects the expression of host genes, including host RNA splicing factors, which play a key role in regulating viral RNA splicing of oncogene transcripts. A current prospective focus is to explore how alternative RNA splicing and the expression of viral oncogenes take place in a cell- or tissue-specific manner in virus-induced human carcinogenesis. PMID:26038756

  13. The Physics of Protoplanetesimal Dust Agglomerates. V. Multiple Impacts of Dusty Agglomerates at Velocities Above the Fragmentation Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothe, Stefan; Güttler, Carsten; Blum, Jürgen

    2010-12-01

    In recent years, a number of new experiments have advanced our knowledge on the early growth phases of protoplanetary dust aggregates. Some of these experiments have shown that collisions between porous and compacted agglomerates at velocities above the fragmentation threshold velocity can lead to growth of the compact body, when the porous collision partner fragments upon impact and transfers mass to the compact agglomerate. To obtain a deeper understanding of this potentially important growth process, we performed laboratory and drop tower experiments to study multiple impacts of small, highly porous dust-aggregate projectiles onto sintered dust targets. The projectile and target consisted of 1.5 μm monodisperse, spherical SiO2 monomers with volume filling factors of 0.15 ± 0.01 and 0.45 ± 0.05, respectively. The fragile projectiles were accelerated by a solenoid magnet and combined with a projectile magazine with which 25 impacts onto the same spot on the target could be performed in vacuum. We measured the mass-accretion efficiency and the volume filling factor for different impact velocities between 1.5 and 6.0 m s^{-1}. The experiments at the lowest impact speeds were performed in the Bremen drop tower under microgravity conditions to allow partial mass transfer also for the lowest adhesion case. Within this velocity range, we found a linear increase of the accretion efficiency with increasing velocity. In the laboratory experiments, the accretion efficiency increases from 0.12 to 0.21 in units of the projectile mass. The recorded images of the impacts showed that the mass transfer from the projectile to the target leads to the growth of a conical structure on the target after less than 100 impacts. From the images, we also measured the volume filling factors of the grown structures, which ranged from 0.15 (uncompacted) to 0.40 (significantly compacted) with increasing impact speed. The velocity dependency of the mass-transfer efficiency and the packing

  14. Preliminary Investigation of Impact on Multiple-Sheet Structures and an Evaluation of the Meteoroid Hazard to Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nysmith, C. Robert; Summers, James L.

    1961-01-01

    Small pyrex glass spheres, representative of stoney meteoroids, were fired into 2024-T3 aluminum alclad multiple-sheet structures at velocities to 11,000 feet per second to evaluate the effectiveness of multisheet hull construction as a means of increasing the resistance of a spacecraft to meteoroid penetrations. The results of these tests indicate that increasing the number of sheets in a structure while keeping the total sheet thickness constant and increasing the spacing between sheets both tend to increase the penetration resistance of a structure of constant weight per unit area. In addition, filling the space between the sheets with a light filler material was found to substantially increase structure penetration resistance with a small increase in weight. An evaluation of the meteoroid hazard to space vehicles is presented in the form of an illustrative-example for two specific lunar mission vehicles, a single-sheet, monocoque hull vehicle and a glass-wool filled, double-sheet hull vehicle. The evaluation is presented in terms of the "best" and the "worst" conditions that might be expected as determined from astronomical and satellite measurements, high-speed impact data, and hypothesized meteoroid structures and compositions. It was observed that the vehicle flight time without penetration can be increased significantly by use of multiple-sheet rather than single-sheet hull construction with no increase in hull weight. Nevertheless, it is evident that a meteoroid hazard exists, even for the vehicle with the selected multiple-sheet hull.

  15. Novel Oncogenic PDGFRA Mutations in Pediatric High-Grade Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Paugh, Barbara S.; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Qu, Chunxu; Endersby, Raelene; Diaz, Alexander K.; Zhang, Junyuan; Bax, Dorine A.; Carvalho, Diana; Reis, Rui M.; Onar-Thomas, Arzu; Broniscer, Alberto; Wetmore, Cynthia; Zhang, Jinghui; Jones, Chris; Ellison, David W.; Baker, Suzanne J.

    2013-01-01

    The outcome for children with high-grade gliomas (HGG) remains dismal, with a two-year survival rate of only 10–30%. Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) comprise a subset of HGG that arise in brainstem almost exclusively in children. Genome-wide analyses of copy number imbalances previously showed that platelet derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) is the most frequent target of focal amplification in pediatric HGGs, including DIPGs. To determine whether PDGFRA is also targeted by more subtle mutations missed by copy number analysis, we sequenced all PDGFRA coding exons from a cohort of pediatric HGGs. Somatic activating mutations were identified in 14.4% (13/90) of non-brainstem pediatric HGGs and 4.7% (2/43) of DIPGs, including missense mutations and in-frame deletions and insertions not previously described. 40% of tumors with mutation showed concurrent amplification, while 60% carried heterozygous mutations. Six different mutations impacting different domains all resulted in ligand-independent receptor activation that was blocked by small molecule inhibitors of PDGFR. Expression of mutants in p53-null primary mouse astrocytes conferred a proliferative advantage in vitro, and generated HGGs in vivo with complete penetrance when implanted into brain. The gene expression signatures of these murine HGGs reflected the spectrum of human diffuse HGGs. PDGFRA intragenic deletion of exons 8 and 9 were previously shown in adult HGG, but were not detected in 83 non-brainstem pediatric HGG and 57 DIPGs. Thus, a distinct spectrum of mutations confers constitutive receptor activation and oncogenic activity to PDGFRα in childhood HGG. PMID:23970477

  16. Impact of Depression, Fatigue, and Global Measure of Cortical Volume on Cognitive Impairment in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    De Cola, Maria Cristina; D'Aleo, Giangaetano; Sessa, Edoardo; Marino, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the influence of demographic and clinical variables, such as depression, fatigue, and quantitative MRI marker on cognitive performances in a sample of patients affected by multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods. 60 MS patients (52 relapsing remitting and 8 primary progressive) underwent neuropsychological assessments using Rao's Brief Repeatable Battery of Neuropsychological Tests (BRB-N), the Beck Depression Inventory-second edition (BDI-II), and the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS). We performed magnetic resonance imaging to all subjects using a 3 T scanner and obtained tissue-specific volumes (normalized brain volume and cortical brain volume). We used Student's t-test to compare depressed and nondepressed MS patients. Finally, we performed a multivariate regression analysis in order to assess possible predictors of patients' cognitive outcome among demographic and clinical variables. Results. 27.12% of the sample (16/59) was cognitively impaired, especially in tasks requiring attention and information processing speed. From between group comparison, we find that depressed patients had worse performances on BRB-N score, greater disability and disease duration, and brain volume decrease. According to multiple regression analysis, the BDI-II score was a significant predictor for most of the neuropsychological tests. Conclusions. Our findings suggest that the presence of depressive symptoms is an important determinant of cognitive performance in MS patients. PMID:25861633

  17. Quality of life in patients with multiple sclerosis: the impact of depression, fatigue, and disability.

    PubMed

    Göksel Karatepe, Altlnay; Kaya, Taciser; Günaydn, Rezzan; Demirhan, Aylin; Ce, Plnar; Gedizlioğlu, Muhteşem

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the quality of life (QoL) in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), and to evaluate its association with disability and psychosocial factors especially depression and fatigue. Demographic characteristics, education level, disease severity, and disease duration were documented for each patient. QoL, fatigue level, cognitive status, and depression level of patients were assessed by Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life-54, Fatigue Severity Scale, Mini Mental State Scale, and Beck Depression Inventory, respectively. Seventy-nine patients with MS were included in the study. There was a moderate degree of impairment in the QoL scores of MS patients. The most affected parts of QoL were included: role limitation-related physical and emotional problems and physical and social functions. Both physical and mental health components of QoL showed a positive correlation with the educational level and employment status; a negative correlation with the level of disability, fatigue, and depression. Depression, disability level, and fatigue were the strongest variables associated with QoL, and the most important predictor of QoL was depression. Our results have shown that both physical and mental health components of QoL were negatively affected by MS. The most important predictor of QoL was depression followed by disability and fatigue. To improve the QoL for MS patients, in addition to physical disability, the influences of depression and fatigue on QoL should be taken into consideration.

  18. The impact of multiple show-ups on eyewitness decision-making and innocence risk.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew M; Bertrand, Michelle; Lindsay, R C L; Kalmet, Natalie; Grossman, Deborah; Provenzano, Daniel

    2014-09-01

    If an eyewitness rejects a show-up, police may respond by finding a new suspect and conducting a second show-up with the same eyewitness. Police may continue finding suspects and conducting show-ups until the eyewitness makes an identification (Study 1). Relatively low criterion-setting eyewitnesses filter themselves out of the multiple show-ups procedure by choosing the first suspect with whom they are presented (Studies 2 and 3). Accordingly, response bias was more stringent on the second show-up when compared with the first, but became no more stringent with additional show-ups. Despite this stringent shift in response bias, innocence risk increased with additional show-ups, as false alarms cumulate (Studies 2 and 3). Although unbiased show-up instructions decreased innocent suspect identifications, the numbers were still discouraging (Study 4). Given the high number of innocent suspects who would be mistakenly identified through the use of multiple show-up procedures, using such identifications as evidence of guilt is questionable. Although evidence of guilt is limited to identifications from a single show-up, practical constraints might sometimes require police to use additional show-ups. Accordingly, we propose a stronger partition between evidentiary and investigative procedures. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  19. The impact of napping on memory for future-relevant stimuli: Prioritization among multiple salience cues.

    PubMed

    Bennion, Kelly A; Payne, Jessica D; Kensinger, Elizabeth A

    2016-06-01

    Prior research has demonstrated that sleep enhances memory for future-relevant information, including memory for information that is salient due to emotion, reward, or knowledge of a later memory test. Although sleep has been shown to prioritize information with any of these characteristics, the present study investigates the novel question of how sleep prioritizes information when multiple salience cues exist. Participants encoded scenes that were future-relevant based on emotion (emotional vs. neutral), reward (rewarded vs. unrewarded), and instructed learning (intentionally vs. incidentally encoded), preceding a delay consisting of a nap, an equivalent time period spent awake, or a nap followed by wakefulness (to control for effects of interference). Recognition testing revealed that when multiple dimensions of future relevance co-occur, sleep prioritizes top-down, goal-directed cues (instructed learning, and to a lesser degree, reward) over bottom-up, stimulus-driven characteristics (emotion). Further, results showed that these factors interact; the effect of a nap on intentionally encoded information was especially strong for neutral (relative to emotional) information, suggesting that once one cue for future relevance is present, there are diminishing returns with additional cues. Sleep may binarize information based on whether it is future-relevant or not, preferentially consolidating memory for the former category. Potential neural mechanisms underlying these selective effects and the implications of this research for educational and vocational domains are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record

  20. The impact of disease characteristics on multiple sclerosis patients' quality of life.

    PubMed

    Rezapour, Aziz; Almasian Kia, Abdollah; Goodarzi, Sahar; Hasoumi, Mojtaba; Nouraei Motlagh, Soraya; Vahedi, Sajad

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the quality of life (QoL) of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), and to investigate the effects of characteristics of MS such as disease course, severity, and relapses on patients' QoL. This was a cross-sectional study, in which 171 patients were enrolled. Health-related QoL was assessed using the Persian version of the Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life-54 questionnaire. To measure patients' disability status, we used the Expanded Disability Status Scale. Other variables included in the study were disease course and relapses of the disease. The average scores for patients' physical and mental QoL were 60.9±22.3 and 59.5±21.4, respectively. In a bivariate analysis, disease course, severity of the disease, and relapses were significantly associated with the physical and mental health composite scores. In a hierarchal regression analysis, disease course, severity of the disease, and relapses were responsible for 38 and 16% of the variance in physical and mental QoL, respectively. It was also observed that relapses were a strong predictor of both physical and mental QoL. Our results showed that disease characteristics significantly affected both dimensions of QoL. It is therefore suggested that health care providers should be aware of these characteristics of MS to more successfully improve MS patients' QoL.

  1. Employment status in multiple sclerosis: impact of disease-specific and non-disease-specific factors.

    PubMed

    Krause, Ivonne; Kern, Simone; Horntrich, Antje; Ziemssen, Tjalf

    2013-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated with high rates of early retirement (ER). A German cohort of MS patients and healthy control subjects (HCs) were compared cross-sectionally to investigate disease- and non-disease-specific factors that are associated with employment status (ES) in MS and to identify predictors of ES in MS. A total of 39 ER MS patients, 48 employed MS patients, and 37 HCs completed a brief neuropsychological battery and questionnaires related to depressive symptoms, fatigue, health-related quality of life (HrQoL) and health locus of control (HLC). Neurological disability was assessed by the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and the Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite (MSFC). ER compared with employed MS patients scored significantly higher in neurological disability, depressive symptoms and fatigue and significantly lower in cognitive functioning and HrQoL. Further, both groups differed with regard to age, education, disease course and duration but not in HLC. Neurological disability, age and fatigue were identified as significant predictors of ES in MS. ES in MS was associated with demographic aspects, neurological and cognitive status, depressive symptoms, fatigue and HrQoL but was not associated with HLC. Findings confirm neurological disability, age and fatigue as independent predictors of ES in MS.

  2. Impact of Time-Varying Treatment Exposures on the Risk of Venous Thromboembolism in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Joshua D.; Adams, Val R.; Moga, Daniela C.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) has one of the highest risks of venous thromboembolism (VTE) of all cancers due to pathologic changes and treatment-related exposures. This study assessed the one-year incidence of VTE in newly diagnosed MM and to determine the baseline and time-varying treatment-related factors associated with VTE risk in a U.S.-based cohort. MM patients were identified and age, gender, and baseline comorbidities were determined. Treatment-related exposures included thalidomide derivatives (IMIDs), proteasome inhibitors, cytotoxic chemotherapy, steroids, erythropoietin-stimulating agents (ESAs), stem cell transplants (SCT), hospitalizations, infection, and central venous catheters (CVC). Multiple statistical models were used including a baseline competing risks model, a time-varying exposure Cox proportional hazard (CPH) model, and a case-time-control analysis. The overall incidence of VTE was 107.2 per 1000 person-years with one-half of the VTEs occurring in the first 90 days. The baseline model showed that increasing age, heart failure, and hypertension were associated with one-year incidence of VTE. MM-specific IMID treatment had lower than expected associations with VTE based on prior literature. Instead, exposure to ESAs, SCT, CVC, and infection had higher associations. Based on these results, VTE risk in MM may be less straightforward than considering only chemotherapy exposures, and other treatment-related exposures should be considered to determine patient risk. PMID:27999418

  3. Untangling the effects of multiple human stressors and their impacts on fish assemblages in European running waters.

    PubMed

    Schinegger, Rafaela; Palt, Martin; Segurado, Pedro; Schmutz, Stefan

    2016-12-15

    This work addresses human stressors and their impacts on fish assemblages at pan-European scale by analysing single and multiple stressors and their interactions. Based on an extensive dataset with 3105 fish sampling sites, patterns of stressors, their combination and nature of interactions, i.e. synergistic, antagonistic and additive were investigated. Geographical distribution and patterns of seven human stressor variables, belonging to four stressor groups (hydrological-, morphological-, water quality- and connectivity stressors), were examined, considering both single and multiple stressor combinations. To quantify the stressors' ecological impact, a set of 22 fish metrics for various fish assemblage types (headwaters, medium gradient rivers, lowland rivers and Mediterranean streams) was analysed by comparing their observed and expected response to different stressors, both acting individually and in combination. Overall, investigated fish sampling sites are affected by 15 different stressor combinations, including 4 stressors acting individually and 11 combinations of two or more stressors; up to 4 stressor groups per fish sampling site occur. Stressor-response analysis shows divergent results among different stressor categories, even though a general trend of decreasing ecological integrity with increasing stressor quantity can be observed. Fish metrics based on density of species 'intolerant to water quality degradation' and 'intolerant to oxygen depletion" responded best to single and multiple stressors and their interactions. Interactions of stressors were additive (40%), synergistic (30%) or antagonistic (30%), emphasizing the importance to consider interactions in multi-stressor analyses. While antagonistic effects are only observed in headwaters and medium-gradient rivers, synergistic effects increase from headwaters over medium gradient rivers and Mediterranean streams to large lowland rivers. The knowledge gained in this work provides a basis for

  4. Diversity of mutations in the RET proto-oncogene and its oncogenic mechanism in medullary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Hedayati, Mehdi; Zarif Yeganeh, Marjan; Sheikholeslami, Sara; Afsari, Farinaz

    2016-08-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy and accounts for nearly 1% of all of human cancer. Thyroid cancer has four main histological types: papillary, follicular, medullary, and anaplastic. Papillary, follicular, and anaplastic thyroid carcinomas are derived from follicular thyroid cells, whereas medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) originates from the neural crest parafollicular cells or C-cells of the thyroid gland. MTC represents a neuroendocrine tumor and differs considerably from differentiated thyroid carcinoma. MTC is one of the aggressive types of thyroid cancer, which represents 3-10% of all thyroid cancers. It occurs in hereditary (25%) and sporadic (75%) forms. The hereditary form of MTC has an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. According to the present classification, hereditary MTC is classified as a multiple endocrine neoplasi type 2 A & B (MEN2A & MEN2B) and familial MTC (FMTC). The RET proto-oncogene is located on chromosome 10q11.21. It is composed of 21 exons and encodes a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase. RET regulates a complex network of signal transduction pathways during development, survival, proliferation, differentiation, and migration of the enteric nervous system progenitor cells. Gain of function mutations in RET have been well demonstrated in MTC development. Variants of MTC result from different RET mutations, and they have a good genotype-phenotype correlation. Various MTC related mutations have been reported in different exons of the RET gene. We proposed that RET genetic mutations may be different in distinct populations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to find a geographical pattern of RET mutations in different populations.

  5. Post hoc analysis of the PATRICIA randomized trial of the efficacy of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16)/HPV-18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine against incident and persistent infection with nonvaccine oncogenic HPV types using an alternative multiplex type-specific PCR assay for HPV DNA.

    PubMed

    Struyf, Frank; Colau, Brigitte; Wheeler, Cosette M; Naud, Paulo; Garland, Suzanne; Quint, Wim; Chow, Song-Nan; Salmerón, Jorge; Lehtinen, Matti; Del Rosario-Raymundo, M Rowena; Paavonen, Jorma; Teixeira, Júlio C; Germar, Maria Julieta; Peters, Klaus; Skinner, S Rachel; Limson, Genara; Castellsagué, Xavier; Poppe, Willy A J; Ramjattan, Brian; Klein, Terry D; Schwarz, Tino F; Chatterjee, Archana; Tjalma, Wiebren A A; Diaz-Mitoma, Francisco; Lewis, David J M; Harper, Diane M; Molijn, Anco; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; David, Marie-Pierre; Dubin, Gary

    2015-02-01

    The efficacy of the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16)/HPV-18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine against cervical infections with HPV in the Papilloma Trial against Cancer in Young Adults (PATRICIA) was evaluated using a combination of the broad-spectrum L1-based SPF10 PCR-DNA enzyme immunoassay (DEIA)/line probe assay (LiPA25) system with type-specific PCRs for HPV-16 and -18. Broad-spectrum PCR assays may underestimate the presence of HPV genotypes present at relatively low concentrations in multiple infections, due to competition between genotypes. Therefore, samples were retrospectively reanalyzed using a testing algorithm incorporating the SPF10 PCR-DEIA/LiPA25 plus a novel E6-based multiplex type-specific PCR and reverse hybridization assay (MPTS12 RHA), which permits detection of a panel of nine oncogenic HPV genotypes (types 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 45, 52, 58, and 59). For the vaccine against HPV types 16 and 18, there was no major impact on estimates of vaccine efficacy (VE) for incident or 6-month or 12-month persistent infections when the MPTS12 RHA was included in the testing algorithm versus estimates with the protocol-specified algorithm. However, the alternative testing algorithm showed greater sensitivity than the protocol-specified algorithm for detection of some nonvaccine oncogenic HPV types. More cases were gained in the control group than in the vaccine group, leading to higher point estimates of VE for 6-month and 12-month persistent infections for the nonvaccine oncogenic types included in the MPTS12 RHA assay (types 31, 33, 35, 45, 52, 58, and 59). This post hoc analysis indicates that the per-protocol testing algorithm used in PATRICIA underestimated the VE against some nonvaccine oncogenic HPV types and that the choice of the HPV DNA testing methodology is important for the evaluation of VE in clinical trials. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00122681.).

  6. The impact of health anxiety in patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis: Misperception, misattribution and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Hayter, Aimee L; Salkovskis, Paul M; Silber, Eli; Morris, Robin G

    2016-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a progressive disease with an unpredictable prognosis. Previous studies have reported health anxiety within the MS population. This study examines the effect of health anxiety on MS patients' quality of life (QoL) and evaluates the potential contribution of cognitive factors in maintaining health anxiety. A total of 84 patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) were screened for health anxiety. From this sample, a group with relatively high and another group with low anxiety (n = 21 in each group) were identified. A further 21 healthy controls were recruited for comparison. A measure of QoL was then completed. Cognitive biases were investigated by measuring perception and attribution of common bodily symptoms as well as appraisal of performance on neuropsychological and physical fatigue tests. The high health anxiety group reported poorer QoL relative to the other groups, independent of level of disability. They were also more likely to misattribute common bodily changes to MS, and perceive their (objectively intact) performance on tests of cognition and fatigue as being impaired, attributing the cause of impairment to MS. Health anxiety may be a factor in mediating the psychosocial impact of MS. Skilled psychological treatment which changes misperception and misattribution may significantly benefit patients with MS and elevated health anxiety. Clinical implications Health anxiety impacts on quality of life in patients with MS even when disability and other measures of psychological distress are taken into account. High levels of health anxiety distort perceptions of symptoms in patients with MS in line with the predictions made by the cognitive model of health anxiety. Limitations of study This study is limited to patients with RRMS within the relatively early stages of their disease and is based on a small sample size. Health anxiety is correlated with measures of generalized anxiety, depression, and worry, although

  7. The impact of lower urinary tract symptoms on health-related quality of life among patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Khalaf, Kristin M; Coyne, Karin S; Globe, Denise R; Malone, Daniel C; Armstrong, Edward P; Patel, Vaishali; Burks, Jack

    2016-01-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms are commonly experienced among patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), however, their impact on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) has not been well characterized. Herein the incremental impact of lower urinary tract symptoms on HRQOL among patients with MS has been evaluated. A cross-sectional online survey was administered to US residents with a self-reported MS diagnosis. Data pertaining to demographics, disease history, urinary symptoms, and HRQOL, including the Short Form 36, version 2 (SF-36v2), were collected. Patients were stratified into four urinary symptom groups: no/minimal urinary symptoms, urinary urgency (UU), urinary urgency incontinence (UUI), and other lower urinary tract symptoms. Multiple linear regression models evaluated the impact of these symptoms. Out of the 1,052 respondents, mean age was 47.8 ± 10.6 years; mean time since MS diagnosis was 8.5 ± 7.8 years. UUI and UU subgroups showed the greatest adjusted HRQOL decrement compared with the no/minimal urinary symptoms group, scoring 2.8 (SE ± 0.7, UUI) and 3.5 (SE ± 0.8, UU) points lower on SF-36v2 Physical Component Summary, respectively, and 3.7 (SE ± 1.0, UUI) and 5.0 (SE ± 1.2, UU) points lower on SF-36v2 Mental Component Summary (P < 0.001 for all), respectively. Both UU and UUI symptoms contribute to a decrement in HRQOL among patients with MS. The Authors. Neurourology and Urodynamics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Patient-reported outcomes and survival in multiple sclerosis: A 10-year retrospective cohort study using the Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale-29.

    PubMed

    Raffel, Joel; Wallace, Alison; Gveric, Djordje; Reynolds, Richard; Friede, Tim; Nicholas, Richard

    2017-07-01

    There is increasing emphasis on using patient-reported outcomes (PROs) to complement traditional clinical outcomes in medical research, including in multiple sclerosis (MS). Research, particularly in oncology and heart failure, has shown that PROs can be prognostic of hard clinical endpoints such as survival time (time from study entry until death). However, unlike in oncology or cardiology, it is unknown whether PROs are associated with survival time in neurological diseases. The Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale-29 (MSIS-29) is a PRO sensitive to short-term change in MS, with questions covering both physical and psychological quality of life. This study aimed to investigate whether MSIS-29 scores can be prognostic for survival time in MS, using a large observational cohort of people with MS. From 15 July 2004 onwards, MSIS-29 questionnaires were completed by people with MS registered with the MS Society Tissue Bank (n = 2,126, repeated 1 year later with n = 872 of the original respondents). By 2014, 264 participants (12.4%) had died. Higher baseline MSIS-29 physical (MSIS-29-PHYS) score was associated with reduced survival time (subgroup with highest scores versus subgroup with lowest scores: hazard ratio [HR] 5.7, 95% CI 3.1-10.5, p < 0.001). Higher baseline MSIS-29 psychological score was also associated with reduced survival time (subgroup with highest scores versus subgroup with lowest scores: HR 2.8, 95% CI 1.8-4.4, p < 0.001). In those with high baseline MSIS-29 scores, mortality risk was even greater if the MSIS-29 score worsened over 1 year (HR 2.3, 95% CI 1.2-4.4, p = 0.02). MSIS-29-PHYS scores were associated with survival time independent of age, sex, and patient-reported Expanded Disability Status Scale score in a Cox regression analysis (per 1-SD increase in MSIS-29-PHYS score: HR 1.8, 95% CI 1.1-2.9, p = 0.03). A limitation of the study is that this cohort had high baseline age and disability levels; the prognostic value of MSIS-29 for survival time

  9. Impact of fire-fighters training on a female with smoldering multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Boullosa, D A; Leicht, A S; Tuimil, J L

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of a fire-fighting training regime on the cardiac autonomic control of a middle-aged female diagnosed with smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM). Cardiac autonomic control was monitored by heart rate variability (HRV) analysis in the patient during the last six-week period of a one and half year training period. Compared with healthy, physically active age-matched females, the patient demonstrated similar HRV parameters. Furthermore, the patient experienced a positive evolution of the SMM during this training period. These findings indicate: 1) the beneficial effects of high intensity physical training on cardiac autonomic function in a SMM patient; 2) the potential value of HRV monitoring in cancer patients undertaking regular physical activity.

  10. Efficacy and Safety of Alemtuzumab in Multiple Sclerosis and Impact on Nursing Role

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Cathy; Mayer, Lori; Smith, M. Shelton

    2013-01-01

    Alemtuzumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody, has shown efficacy for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) in phase 2 and phase 3 trials. Compared with subcutaneous interferon beta-1a, alemtuzumab significantly reduced the risk for accumulation of disability and the rate of relapse, and improved mean disability level from baseline. Notable safety and tolerability concerns include infusion-associated reactions, infections of predominantly mild-to-moderate severity, and autoimmune adverse events, principally thyroid disorders and immune thrombocytopenia. As emerging therapies such as alemtuzumab are approved for the treatment of MS, nurses specializing in the care of MS patients will make increasingly significant contributions to the education of patients, caregivers, and other health-care providers about these therapies' efficacy, tolerability, safety, and administration. This article reviews the phase 2 and phase 3 efficacy and safety results for alemtuzumab, with an emphasis on the role of nurses in communication about this treatment option for those with MS. PMID:24453779

  11. Minimal residual disease detection in lymphoma and multiple myeloma: impact on therapeutic paradigms.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Simone; Drandi, Daniela; Mantoan, Barbara; Ghione, Paola; Omedè, Paola; Ladetto, Marco

    2011-12-01

    Early identification of patients at high risk of relapse is a major goal of current translational research in oncohematology. Minimal residual disease (MRD) detection by polymerase chain reaction-based methods is currently part of the routine clinical management of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, the current knowledge indicates that it is also a useful prognostic tool in several mature lymphoproliferative disorders. Its utility is currently well established in follicular lymphoma, mantle cell lymphoma, and multiple myeloma. In some of these entities, clinical trials employing MRD as a decision-making tool are currently ongoing. In the present review, we will discuss the 'state of the art' of MRD evaluation in these three neoplasms with the ultimate aim of providing critical take-home messages for clinicians working in the field. Moreover, we will outline the role of MRD detection in the design of future clinical trials. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Transferring Transformations: Learning Gains, Student Attitudes, and the Impacts of Multiple Instructors in Large Lecture Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, Steven J.

    2006-02-01

    We have implemented several research-based transformations in our introductory calculus-based physics course at CU Boulder. These include Peer Instruction with student response system in lecture, Tutorials with trained undergraduate learning assistants in recitations, and personalized computer assignments. In an effort to distinguish the effects of instructor, TA preparation, and particular research-based activities, we present extensive new measurements from six courses representing a spectrum of reforms. This study includes data from Physics I with and without Tutorials, and Physics II with Tutorials. We present multiple quantitative and qualitative measures of success, including validated pre/post content- and attitude-surveys and common exam questions. We investigate the hand-off of reforms between faculty implementing different suites of activities, and begin to assess elements and requirements for success with these transformations. We present evidence that combining research-based interactive engagement methods in lecture, Tutorials, and homework plays a significant positive role in conceptual and attitudinal development.

  13. Numerical simulation of drop impact on a liquid-liquid interface with a multiple marker front-capturing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coyajee, Emil; Boersma, Bendiks Jan

    2009-07-01

    The gravity-driven motion of a droplet impacting on a liquid-liquid interface is studied. The full Navier-Stokes equations are solved on a fixed, uniform grid using a finite difference/front-capturing method. For the representation of fluid-fluid interfaces, a coupled Level-Set/Volume-Of-Fluid method [M. Sussman, E.G. Puckett, A coupled Level-Set and Volume-of-Fluid method for computing 3D and axisymmetric incompressible two-phase flows, J. Comp. Phys. 162 (2000) 301-337] is used, in which we introduce the novel approach of describing separate interfaces with different marker functions. As a consequence, we prevent numerical coalescence of the droplet and the liquid-liquid interface without excessive (local) grid refinement. To validate our method, numerical simulations of the drop impact event are compared with experiments [Z. Mohamed-Kassim, E.K. Longmire, Drop impact on a liquid-liquid interface, Phys. Fluids 15 (2003) 3263-3273]. Furthermore, a comparison is made with the numerical results of [A. Esmaeeli, G. Tryggvason, Direct numerical simulations of bubbly flows. Part 2. Moderate Reynolds number arrays, J. Fluid Mech. 385 (1999) 325-358] for an array of rising bubbles. The investigation shows that the multiple marker approach successfully prevents numerical coalescence of interfaces and adequately captures the effect of surface tension.

  14. Procedural Variations in the Stroop and the Symbol Digit Modalities Test: impact on patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Abbey J; Denney, Douglas R; Owens, Emily M; Lynch, Sharon G

    2013-08-01

    Decreased information processing speed is often cited as the primary cognitive deficit occurring in conjunction with multiple sclerosis (MS). Two common tools for assessing this deficit are the Stroop Test and the Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT). However, there are procedural variations in these rapid serial processing (RSP) tests pertaining to the response format (e.g., verbal or manual) and the administration format (e.g., paper-based or computerized). The present study was designed to assess whether such variations impact MS patients' and healthy individuals' performance on these tests. In Experiment 1, we showed that response formats in which either the experimenter or the participant was responsible for advancing the items on computerized versions of the Stroop Test and the SDMT were basically equivalent in terms of distinguishing between patients and controls. In Experiment 2, we found differences between administration formats that appear to interact with some of the disease-related features of MS. Understanding how procedural variations differentially impact patients and controls can be useful for interpreting what RSP tests reveal about the cognitive impact of MS.

  15. Examining the Impact of Prior Models in Transmural Electrophysiological Imaging: A Hierarchical Multiple-Model Bayesian Approach

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Azar; Sapp, John; Xu, Jingjia; Bajorski, Peter; Horacek, Milan; Wang, Linwei

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive cardiac electrophysiological (EP) imaging aims to mathematically reconstruct the spatiotemporal dynamics of cardiac sources from body-surface electrocardiographic (ECG) data. This ill-posed problem is often regularized by a fixed constraining model. However, a fixed-model approach enforces the source distribution to follow a pre-assumed structure that does not always match the varying spatiotemporal distribution of actual sources. To understand the model-data relation and examine the impact of prior models, we present a multiple-model approach for volumetric cardiac EP imaging where multiple prior models are included and automatically picked by the available ECG data. Multiple models are incorporated as an Lp-norm prior for sources, where p is an unknown hyperparameter with a prior uniform distribution. To examine how different combinations of models may be favored by different measurement data, the posterior distribution of cardiac sources and hyperparameter p is calculated using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique. The importance of multiple-model prior was assessed in two sets of synthetic and real-data experiments, compared to fixed-model priors (using Laplace and Gaussian priors). The results showed that the posterior combination of models (the posterior distribution of p) as determined by the ECG data differed substantially when reconstructing sources with different sizes and structures. While the use of fixed models is best suited in situations where the prior assumption fits the actual source structures, the use of an automatically adaptive set of models may have the ability to better address model-data mismatch and to provide consistent performance in reconstructing sources with different properties. PMID:26259018

  16. Measuring the impact of multiple sclerosis on psychosocial functioning: the development of a new self-efficacy scale.

    PubMed

    Airlie, J; Baker, G A; Smith, S J; Young, C A

    2001-06-01

    To develop a scale to measure self-efficacy in neurologically impaired patients with multiple sclerosis and to assess the scale's psychometric properties. Cross-sectional questionnaire study in a clinical setting, the retest questionnaire returned by mail after completion at home. Regional multiple sclerosis (MS) outpatient clinic or the Clinical Trials Unit (CTU) at a large neuroscience centre in the UK. One hundred persons with MS attending the Walton Centre for Neurology and Neurosurgery and Clatterbridge Hospital, Wirral, as outpatients. Cognitively impaired patients were excluded at an initial clinic assessment. Patients were asked to provide demographic data and complete the self-efficacy scale along with the following validated scales: Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, Impact, Stigma and Mastery and Rankin Scales. The Rankin Scale and Barthel Index were also assessed by the physician. A new 11-item self-efficacy scale was constructed consisting of two domains of control and personal agency. The validity of the scale was confirmed using Cronbach's alpha analysis of internal consistency (alpha = 0.81). The test-retest reliability of the scale over two weeks was acceptable with an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.79. Construct validity was investigated using Pearson's product moment correlation coefficient resulting in significant correlations with depression (r= -0.52) anxiety (r =-0.50) and mastery (r= 0.73). Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that these factors accounted for 70% of the variance of scores on the self-efficacy scale, with scores on mastery, anxiety and perceived disability being independently significant. Assessment of the psychometric properties of this new self-efficacy scale suggest that it possesses good validity and reliability in patients with multiple sclerosis.

  17. Examining the Impact of Prior Models in Transmural Electrophysiological Imaging: A Hierarchical Multiple-Model Bayesian Approach.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Azar; Sapp, John; Xu, Jingjia; Bajorski, Peter; Horacek, Milan; Wang, Linwei

    2016-01-01

    Noninvasive cardiac electrophysiological (EP) imaging aims to mathematically reconstruct the spatiotemporal dynamics of cardiac sources from body-surface electrocardiographic (ECG) data. This ill-posed problem is often regularized by a fixed constraining model. However, a fixed-model approach enforces the source distribution to follow a pre-assumed structure that does not always match the varying spatiotemporal distribution of actual sources. To understand the model-data relation and examine the impact of prior models, we present a multiple-model approach for volumetric cardiac EP imaging where multiple prior models are included and automatically picked by the available ECG data. Multiple models are incorporated as an Lp-norm prior for sources, where p is an unknown hyperparameter with a prior uniform distribution. To examine how different combinations of models may be favored by different measurement data, the posterior distribution of cardiac sources and hyperparameter p is calculated using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique. The importance of multiple-model prior was assessed in two sets of synthetic and real-data experiments, compared to fixed-model priors (using Laplace and Gaussian priors). The results showed that the posterior combination of models (the posterior distribution of p) as determined by the ECG data differed substantially when reconstructing sources with different sizes and structures. While the use of fixed models is best suited in situations where the prior assumption fits the actual source structures, the use of an automatically adaptive set of models may have the ability to better address model-data mismatch and to provide consistent performance in reconstructing sources with different properties.

  18. Impacts of multiple stressors on ecosystem function: Leaf decomposition in constructed urban wetlands.

    PubMed

    Mackintosh, Teresa J; Davis, Jenny A; Thompson, Ross M

    2016-01-01

    The impact of stormwater on stream biota is well documented, but less is known about the impacts on ecosystem processes, such as the breakdown of organic matter. This study sought to establish whether the degree of urbanisation affected rates of leaf-litter breakdown within constructed wetlands. A litter bag method was used to ascertain rate of decomposition along a gradient of urbanisation (total imperviousness, TI), in constructed wetlands in western and south-eastern Melbourne. A significant positive relationship between TI and breakdown rate was found in the south-eastern wetlands. The significant reduction in rate of invertebrate-mediated breakdown with increasing concentration of certain metals was consistent with other studies. However, overall there was an increase in rate of breakdown. Studies have shown that the effects of heavy metals can be negated if nutrient levels are high. Our results suggest that other parameters besides exposure to contaminants are likely to affect leaf litter breakdown. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Analytical and experimental investigation on a multiple-mass-element pendulum impact damper for vibration mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egger, Philipp; Caracoglia, Luca

    2015-09-01

    Impact dampers are often used in the field of civil, mechanical and aerospace engineering for reducing structural vibrations. The behavior of this type of passive control device has been investigated for several decades. In this research a distributed-mass impact damper, similar to the "chain damper" used in wind engineering, has been examined and applied to the vibration reduction on a slender line-like structural element (stay-cable). This study is motivated by a practical problem and describes the derivation of a reduced-order model for explaining the behavior, observed during a field experiment on a prototype system. In its simplest form, the dynamics of the apparatus is modeled as a "resilient damper", composed of mass-spring-dashpot secondary elements, attached to the primary structure. Various sources of excitation are analyzed: free vibration, external harmonic force and random excitation. The proposed model is general and potentially applicable to the analysis of several structural systems. The study also shows that the model can adequately describe and explain the experimentally observed behavior.

  20. The impact of response on bone-directed therapy in patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Larocca, Alessandra; Child, J Anthony; Cook, Gordon; Jackson, Graham H; Russell, Nigel; Szubert, Alexander; Gregory, Walter M; Brioli, Annamaria; Owen, Roger G; Drayson, Mark T; Wu, Ping; Palumbo, Antonio; Boccadoro, Mario; Davies, Faith E; Morgan, Gareth J

    2013-10-24

    Significant benefits for zoledronic acid (ZOL) over clodronate acid (CLO) were seen in the Medical Research Council Myeloma IX randomized trial. ZOL significantly reduced skeletal-related events (SREs), and improved progression-free survival and overall survival (OS), making it the bisphosphonate of choice for newly diagnosed myeloma patients. In this analysis of Myeloma IX data, we have investigated the impact of response on bone disease in 1111 transplant-eligible patients. At posttransplant day 100, complete response (CR) was seen in 48% of patients, very good partial response (VGPR) in 20%, and partial response (PR) in 23%. For patients in VGPR or less, ZOL was superior to CLO in reducing SREs (P = .048), whereas for patients in CR, both agents were equivalent (P = .83). For OS, ZOL was associated with a significant benefit in patients in PR (P = .0091). No difference in OS was seen with patients in CR (P = .91) or VGPR (P = .74). These findings indicate that response category posttransplant may influence the impact of bisphosphonate therapy.

  1. Plantarflexor weakness negatively impacts walking in persons with multiple sclerosis more than plantarflexor spasticity

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Joanne M.; Kremer, Theodore R.; Van Dillen, Linda R.; Naismith, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine if plantarflexor (PF) spasticity or ankle strength best predicts variance in walking capacity or self-perceived limitations in walking in persons with multiple sclerosis (pwMS), and if pwMS with PF spasticity are weaker and have greater walking dysfunction than pwMS without PF spasticity. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting University research laboratory. Participants Forty-two pwMS (age: 42.9 ± 10.1 years; Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS): median = 3.0, range = 0–6) and 14 adults without disability (WD) (age: 41.9 ± 10.1 years). Intervention Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures PF spasticity and dorsiflexion (DF) and PF maximum voluntary isometric torque (MVIT) were assessed using the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) and a computerized dynamometer, respectively. The Timed 25-Foot Walk Test (T25FWT) was the primary outcome measure of walking capacity. Secondary measures included the Six Minute Walk Test (6MWT) and 12-item Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale (MSWS-12). Results PF strength was the most consistent predictor of the variance in walking capacity (T25FWT: R2 change = 0.23 to 0.29, p ≤ 0.001; 6MWT: R2 change = 0.12 to 0.29, p ≤ 0.012), and self-perceived limitations of walking (MSWS-12: R2 change = 0.04 to 0.14, p < 0.18). There were no significant differences (p > 0.05) between the pwMS with PF spasticity and pwMS without PF spasticity for any of the outcome measures. Conclusions Our study suggests a unique contribution of PF weakness to walking dysfunction in pwMS, and highlights the importance of evaluating PF strength in this clinical population. PMID:24582617

  2. Therapeutic Impact of Sphingosine 1-phosphate Receptor Signaling in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Candido, Kristina; Soufi, Henry; Bandyopadhyay, Mausumi; Dasgupta, Subhajit

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a female predominant autoimmune demyelinating disease of central nervous system. The proper etiology is not clear. The existing therapies with interferon beta (Betaseron, Rebif), glatiramer acetate (copolymer 1, copaxone) are found to be promising for MS patients. The alpha-4 integrin antagonist monoclonal antibody Natalizumab has been found to decrease brain inflammation in relapsing-remitting MS via inhibition of alpha-4 beta- 1 integrinmediated mode of action of antigen -primed T cells to enter into central nervous system through blood brain barrier. The advancement of drug development introduced prospects of CD52 monoclonal antibody Alemtuzumab and CD20 monoclonal antibody Rituximab in MS therapy. The benefit versus risk ratios of these therapeutic monoclonal antibodies are currently under clinical trial. The ongoing researches demonstrated the importance of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor statins, NF-κBp65 inhibitor NBD peptide, and antagonist of poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), animal model for MS. Recently, the clinical trials indicated the therapeutic prospect of G-protein coupled sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor (S1PR) in MS patients. Recent studies showed remyelination through selective activation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. In the context, role of S1PR-mediated signals following interaction with natural ligand S1P and agonist Fingolimod (FTY720) gain profound therapeutic importance in prevention of demyelination in MS brain. The S1PR agonist Fingolimod (FTY 720) has recently been approved by Food and Drug Administration for MS therapy. In the review, we provided an insight on S1PR mode of action in the aspect of treatment of autoimmune disorder, re-myelination and regeneration of axons in damaged central nervous system in multiple sclerosis.

  3. Impact of low vision care on reading performance in children with multiple disabilities and visual impairment

    PubMed Central

    Ramani, Krishna Kumar; Police, Shailaja Reddy; Jacob, Namita

    2014-01-01

    Background: Lack of evidence in literature to show low vision care enhances the reading performance in children with Multiple Disabilities and Visual Impairment (MDVI). Aim: To evaluate the effectiveness of Low Vision Care intervention on the reading performance of children with MDVI. Materials and Methods: Three subjects who were diagnosed to have cerebral palsy and visual impairment, studying in a special school were recruited for the study. All of them underwent detailed eye examination and low vision care evaluation at a tertiary eye care hospital. A single subject multiple baseline (study) design was adopted and the study period was 16 weeks. The reading performance (reading speed, reading accuracy, reading fluency) was evaluated during the baseline phase and the intervention phase. The median of all the reading parameters for each week was noted. The trend of the reading performance was graphically represented in both the phases. Results: Reading speed increased by 37 Word per minute, 37 Letters per minute and 5 letters per minute for the subject 1, 2 and 3 respectively after the intervention. Reading accuracy was 84%, 91% and 86.4% at the end of the baseline period and 98.7%, 98.4% and 99% at the end of 16 weeks for subject 1, 2 and 3 respectively. Average reading fluency score was 8.3, 7.1 and 5.5 in the baseline period and 10.2, 10.2 and 8.7 in the intervention period. Conclusion: This study shows evidence of noticeable improvement in reading performance of children with MDVI using a novel study design. PMID:23619499

  4. Impact of primary molecular cytogenetic abnormalities and risk of progression in smoldering multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Rajkumar, S V; Gupta, V; Fonseca, R; Dispenzieri, A; Gonsalves, W I; Larson, D; Ketterling, R P; Lust, J A; Kyle, R A; Kumar, S K

    2013-08-01

    We studied 351 patients with smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) in whom the underlying primary molecular cytogenetic subtype could be determined based on cytoplasmic immunoglobulin fluorescent in situ hybridization studies. Hundred and fifty-four patients (43.9%) had trisomies, 127 (36.2%) had immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) translocations, 14 (4%) both trisomies and IgH translocations, 53 (15.1%) no abnormalities detected and 3 (0.9%) had monosomy13/del(13q) in the absence of any other abnormality. Among 127 patients with IgH translocations, 57 were t(11;14), 36 t(4;14), 11 musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma (MAF) translocations, and 23 other or unknown IgH translocation partner. Time to progression (TTP) to symptomatic multiple myeloma was significantly shorter in patients with the t(4;14) compared with patients with t(11;14), median 28 versus 55 months, respectively, P=0.025. The median TTP was 28 months with t(4;14) (high-risk), 34 months with trisomies alone (intermediate-risk), 55 months with t(11;14), MAF translocations, other/unknown IgH translocations, monosomy13/del(13q) without other abnormalities, and those with both trisomies and IgH translocations (standard-risk), and not reached in patients with no detectable abnormalities (low-risk), P=0.001. There was a trend to shorter TTP with deletion 17p (median TTP, 24 months). Overall survival from diagnosis of SMM was significantly inferior with t(4;14) compared with t(11;14), median 105 versus 147 months, respectively, P=0.036.

  5. Impact of primary molecular cytogenetic abnormalities and risk of progression in smoldering multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumar, SV; Gupta, V; Fonseca, R; Dispenzieri, A; Gonsalves, WI; Larson, D; Ketterling, RP; Lust, JA; Kyle, RA; Kumar, SK

    2013-01-01

    We studied 351 patients with smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) in whom the underlying primary molecular cytogenetic subtype could be determined based on cytoplasmic immunoglobulin fluorescent in situ hybridization studies. Hundred and fifty-four patients (43.9%) had trisomies, 127 (36.2%) had immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) translocations, 14 (4%) both trisomies and IgH translocations, 53 (15.1%) no abnormalities detected and 3 (0.9%) had monosomy13/del(13q) in the absence of any other abnormality. Among 127 patients with IgH translocations, 57 were t(11;14), 36 t(4;14), 11 musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma (MAF) translocations, and 23 other or unknown IgH translocation partner. Time to progression (TTP) to symptomatic multiple myeloma was significantly shorter in patients with the t(4;14) compared with patients with t(11;14), median 28 versus 55 months, respectively, P = 0.025. The median TTP was 28 months with t(4;14) (high-risk), 34 months with trisomies alone (intermediate-risk), 55 months with t(11;14), MAF translocations, other/unknown IgH translocations, monosomy13/del(13q) without other abnormalities, and those with both trisomies and IgH translocations (standard-risk), and not reached in patients with no detectable abnormalities (low-risk), P = 0.001. There was a trend to shorter TTP with deletion 17p (median TTP, 24 months). Overall survival from diagnosis of SMM was significantly inferior with t(4;14) compared with t(11;14), median 105 versus 147 months, respectively, P = 0.036. PMID:23515097

  6. Dependence of the multiplicities of secondary particles on the impact parameter in collisions of high-energy neon and iron nuclei with photoemulsion nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Dudkin, V.E.; Kovalev, E.E.; Nefedov, N.A.; Antonchik, V.A.; Bogdanov, S.D.; Kosmach, V.F.; Likhachev, A.Yu.; Benton, E.V.; Crawford, H.J. ||

    1995-03-01

    A method is proposed for finding the dependence of mean multiplicities of secondaries on the nucleus-collision impact parameter from the data on the total interaction ensemble. The impact parameter has been shown to completely define the mean characteristics of an individual interaction event. A difference has been found between experimental results and the data calculated in terms of the cascade-evaporation model at impact-parameter values below 3 fm.

  7. Dependence of the multiplicities of secondary particles on the impact parameter in collisions of high-energy neon and iron nuclei with photoemulsion nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudkin, V. E.; Kovalev, E. E.; Nefedov, N. A.; Antonchik, V. A.; Bogdanov, S. D.; Kosmach, V. F.; Likhachev, A. YU.; Benton, E. V.; Crawford, H. J.

    1995-01-01

    A method is proposed for finding the dependence of mean multiplicities of secondaries on the nucleus-collision impact parameter from the data on the total interaction ensemble. The impact parameter has been shown to completely define the mean characteristics of an individual interaction event. A difference has been found between experimental results and the data calculated in terms of the cascade-evaporation model at impact-parameter values below 3 fm.

  8. Dependence of the multiplicities of secondary particles on the impact parameter in collisions of high-energy neon and iron nuclei with photoemulsion nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudkin, V. E.; Kovalev, E. E.; Nefedov, N. A.; Antonchik, V. A.; Bogdanov, S. D.; Kosmach, V. F.; Benton, E. V.; Crawford, H. J.

    1993-01-01

    A method is proposed for finding the dependence of mean multiplicities of secondaries on the nucleus-collision impact parameter from the data on the total interaction ensemble. The impact parameter has been shown to completely define the mean characteristics of an individual interaction event. A difference has been found between experimental results and the data calculated in terms of the cascade-evaporation model at impact-parameter values below 3 fm.

  9. Dependence of the multiplicities of secondary particles on the impact parameter in collisions of high-energy neon and iron nuclei with photoemulsion nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudkin, V. E.; Kovalev, E. E.; Nefedov, N. A.; Antonchik, V. A.; Bogdanov, S. D.; Kosmach, V. F.; Benton, E. V.; Crawford, H. J.

    1993-01-01

    A method is proposed for finding the dependence of mean multiplicities of secondaries on the nucleus-collision impact parameter from the data on the total interaction ensemble. The impact parameter has been shown to completely define the mean characteristics of an individual interaction event. A difference has been found between experimental results and the data calculated in terms of the cascade-evaporation model at impact-parameter values below 3 fm.

  10. Developmental-stage-dependent transcriptional response to leukaemic oncogene expression

    PubMed Central

    Regha, Kakkad; Assi, Salam A.; Tsoulaki, Olga; Gilmour, Jane; Lacaud, Georges; Bonifer, Constanze

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is characterized by a block in myeloid differentiation the stage of which is dependent on the nature of the transforming oncogene and the developmental stage of the oncogenic hit. This is also true for the t(8;21) translocation that gives rise to the RUNX1-ETO fusion protein and initiates the most common form of human AML. Here we study the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells expressing an inducible RUNX1-ETO gene into blood cells as a model, combined with genome-wide analyses of transcription factor binding and gene expression. RUNX1-ETO interferes with both the activating and repressive function of its normal counterpart, RUNX1, at early and late stages of blood cell development. However, the response of the transcriptional network to RUNX1-ETO expression is developmental stage specific, highlighting the molecular mechanisms determining specific target cell expansion after an oncogenic hit. PMID:26018585

  11. In vitro irradiation is able to cause RET oncogene rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Ito, T; Seyama, T; Iwamoto, K S; Hayashi, T; Mizuno, T; Tsuyama, N; Dohi, K; Nakamura, N; Akiyama, M

    1993-07-01

    Elevated risk of thyroid cancers among the atomic bomb survivors as compared to the nonexposed population suggests that some genetic events related to thyroid cancer must be caused by ionizing radiation. Accordingly, inducibility of RET oncogene rearrangements, i.e., the generation of the RET-PTC oncogene, specific for thyroid cancer, was investigated among human undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma cells (8505C), which do not have RET oncogene rearrangement, after 0, 10, 50, and 100 Gy of in vitro X-irradiation by means of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. After testing 10(8) cells at each dose point, 3 independent samples obtained with 50 Gy of X-irradiation and 6 independent samples obtained with 100 Gy of X-irradiation showed a rearranged RET oncogene amplified band. No rearranged transcripts were obtained from cells irradiated with 0 or 10 Gy. All of the transcripts were sequenced and found to contain the D10S170 and RET sequence. Interestingly, two types of rearrangements were included in these transcripts: one is specific for thyroid cancer and the other, which contains a 150-base pair insert, is atypical, not usually seen in vivo. This insert was found to be the exon of D10S170. Furthermore, in fibrosarcoma cells (HT1080), X-irradiation also induced RET oncogene rearrangements, which included the same two types of rearrangements observed in the X-irradiated thyroid cells (8505C). These results are in favor of the hypothesis that some radiation-induced thyroid cancers, including those among atomic bomb survivors, might have developed when a growth advantage was obtained through a specific form of RET oncogene rearrangement induced by radiation exposure.

  12. Oncogene-mediated transformation of fetal rat colon in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pories, S; Jaros, K; Steele, G; Pauley, A; Summerhayes, I C

    1992-05-01

    Short-term maintenance of fetal rat colonic tissue in vitro has been demonstrated using a collagen matrix organ culture system. The introduction of single (v-myc, v-rasH, v-src) oncogenes or combinations of oncogenes (v-myc/rasH, v-myc/src) into normal colon mucosal elements was established using retroviral vectors, resulting in enhanced proliferation and migration of epithelial cells from the lumen of tissue implants. Expression of a single oncogene in normal colon epithelium did not result in the establishment of cell lines. In contrast, expression of cooperating oncogenic elements resulted in cell lines in greater than 80% of experiments, revealing different morphological characteristics dependent upon the oncogene combination used. Confirmation of the expression of viral transcripts was determined using Northern blot analysis and viral oncoprotein expression using Western blot analysis (p21) and an immunoprecipitation kinase assay (src). Expression of keratin filaments was lost following passaging of cell lines but could be induced by the myc/ras transformants by growth on Rat-1 feeder layers. This induction phenomenon was not observed with myc/src lines, and although these expressed high levels of sucrase isomaltase the epithelial origin of these cells is unclear. Karyotypic analysis performed on three myc/ras-transformed cell lines revealed a normal chromosome complement associated with transformation. In this report we describe a novel in vitro transformation system for normal rat colonic epithelium mediated by the introduction of oncogene elements using different retroviral vector constructs. The potential to generate cell lines representing different stages of neoplastic progression using relevant genetic components presents significant advantages for the study of cellular and molecular interactions underlying colon neoplastic progression.

  13. Molecular biology of oncogenic inflammatory processes. I. Non-oncogenic and oncogenic pathogens, intrinsic inflammatory reactions without pathogens, and microRNA/DNA interactions (Review).

    PubMed

    Sinkovics, Joseph G

    2012-02-01

    In some inflammasomes tumor cells are generated. The internal environment of the inflammasome is conducive to the induction of malignant transformation. Epigenetic changes initiate this process. The subverted stromal connective tissue cells act to promote and sustain the process of malignant trans-formation. In its early stages, the premalignant cells depend on paracrine circuitries for the reception of growth factors. The ligands are derived from the connective tissue, and the receptors are expressed on the recipient premalignant cells. The initial events are not a direct attack on the proto-oncogenes, and thus it may be entirely reversible. Epigenetic processes of hypermethylation of the genes at the promoters of tumor suppressor genes (to silence them), and deacetylation of the histones aimed at the promoters of proto-oncogenes (to activate them) are on-going. A large number of short RNA sequences (interfering, micro-, short hairpin, non-coding RNAs) silence tumor suppressor genes, by neutralizing their mRNAs. In a serial sequence oncogenes undergo amplifications, point-mutations, translocations and fusions. In its earliest stage, the process is reversible by demethylation of the silenced suppressor gene promoters (to reactivate them), or re-acetylation of the histones of the oncogene promoters, thus de-activating them. The external administration of histone deacetylase inhibitors usually leads to the restoration of histone acetylation. In time, the uncorrected processes solidify into constitutive and irreversible gene mutations. Some of the pathogens inducing inflammations with consquential malignant transformation contain oncogenic gene sequences (papilloma viruses, Epstein-Barr virus, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, hepatitis B and C viruses, Merkel cell polyoma virus, Helicobacter pylori, enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis). These induced malignancies may be multifocal. Other pathogens are devoid of any known oncogenic genomic sequences

  14. Markers for Sebaceoma Show a Spectrum of Cell Cycle Regulators, Tumor Suppressor Genes, and Oncogenes

    PubMed Central

    Velez, Ana Maria Abreu; Howard, Michael S; Kim, Jinah; Googe, Paul B

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sebaceoma is a tumor for which the causative oncogenes are not well-understood. Sebaceomas demonstrate some histopathologic features similar to basal cell carcinoma (BCC), such as palisading borders and basaloid cells with additional features, including foamy cytoplasm and indented nuclei. Aims: We examine multiple cell-cycle, oncogene, and tumor suppressor gene markers in sebaceomas, to try to find some suitable biological markers for this tumor, and compare with other published studies. Materials and Methods: We investigated a panel of immunohistochemical (IHC) stains that are important for cellular signaling, including a cell cycle regulator, tumor suppressor gene, oncogene, hormone receptor, and genomic stability markers in our cohort of sebaceomas. We collected 30 sebaceomas from three separate USA dermatopathology laboratories. The following IHC panel: Epithelial membrane antigen (EMA)/CD227, cytokeratin AE1/AE3, cyclin D1, human breast cancer 1 protein (BRCA-1), C-erb-2, Bcl-2, human androgen receptor (AR), cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (p27kip1), p53, topoisomerase II alpha, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and Ki-67 were tested in our cases. Results: EMA/CD227 was positive in the well-differentiated sebaceomas (13/30). Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B was positive in tumors with intermediate differentiation (22/30). The less well-differentiated tumors failed to stain with EMA and AR. Most of the tumors with well-differentiated palisaded areas demonstrated positive staining for topoisomerase II alpha, p27kip1, and p53, with positive staining in tumoral basaloid areas (22/30). Numerous tumors were focally positive with multiple markers, indicating a significant degree of variability in the complete group. Conclusions: Oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, cell cycle regulators, and hormone receptors are variably expressed in sebaceomas. Our results suggest that in these tumors, selected marker staining seems to correlate with tumor

  15. K/T boundary stratigraphy: Evidence for multiple impacts and a possible comet stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoemaker, E. M.; Izett, G. A.

    1992-01-01

    A critical set of observations bearing on the K/T boundary events were obtained from several dozen sites in western North America. Thin strata at and adjacent to the K/T boundary are locally preserved in association with coal beds at these sites. The strata were laid down in local shallow basins that were either intermittently flooded or occupied by very shallow ponds. Detailed examination of the stratigraphy at numerous sites led to the recognition of two distinct strata at the boundary. From the time that the two strata were first recognized, E.M. Shoemaker has maintained that they record two impact events. We report some of the evidence that supports this conclusion.

  16. Multiple mining impacts induce widespread changes in ecosystem dynamics in a boreal lake.

    PubMed

    Leppänen, Jaakko Johannes; Weckström, Jan; Korhola, Atte

    2017-09-05

    In order to satisfy the needs of constant economic growth, the pressure to exploit natural resources has increased. Since accessible mineral resources are becoming scarce, the mining industry is constantly looking for novel techniques to allow commercial exploitation of lower-grade deposits. However, mining can have considerable impacts on freshwater ecosystems. Here, we present the ecological damage inflicted by mine water originating from the massive Terrafame Talvivaara polymetal mine (central Finland), where bioheap leaching is being applied to high-sulphur low-grade ore. We found that saline mine water has turned the lake meromictic, and sediment is heavily contaminated. As a result, important zooplankton and phytoplankton groups have been significantly altered. As the exploitation of poor-grade deposits is the future of the mining industry globally, water management should be taken to a higher level in order to proceed towards a sustainable mining sector.

  17. In vivo evolution of c-rel oncogenic potential.

    PubMed

    Hrdlicková, R; Nehyba, J; Humphries, E H

    1994-04-01

    The c-rel proto-oncogene belongs to the NF-kappa B/rel and I kappa B gene families, which regulate several inducible processes, including self-defense/repair and embryogenesis. Transduction of the c-rel transcription factor by the avian retrovirus resulted in the formation of a highly oncogenic virus, reticuloendotheliosis virus strain T (REV-T), that encodes the oncogene v-rel. To examine the oncogenic potential of c-rel, we inserted it into a REV-T-based retroviral vector, rescued virus [REV-C(CSV)], and infected 1-day-old chicks. All birds developed tumors, and all cell lines established from REV-C-induced tumors expressed c-rel proteins that lacked C-terminal sequences. These proteins, responsible for both in vivo and in vitro cell proliferation, were apparently selected for their oncogenic potential. In order to examine the cooperation of C-terminal deletions with other oncogenic alterations in vivo, point mutations present in the N-terminal and middle regions of v-rel were analyzed by a similar protocol. The data obtained support four conclusions. (i) c-rel proteins bearing any of three single-amino-acid mutations present in the N-terminal portion of v-rel were sufficiently oncogenic to induce tumor development in the absence of additional mutations. (ii) Combining a mutation from the N-terminal region of v-rel with a deletion of the C-terminal sequences of c-rel increases the oncogenicity of the protein in an additive manner. (iii) Mutations present in the middle of v-rel cooperated synergistically with C-terminal deletions to produce highly transforming viruses. (iv) Deletion of c-rel produced a variety of transforming rel proteins with sizes that extended from 42 to 65 kDa. The most frequently isolated rel deletion was 62 kDa in size. To examine the basis for the selection of different rel mutants, their ability to induce immunoregulatory surface receptors was analyzed. The data revealed a correlation between the induction capacity of these mutants and

  18. Advancing Understanding of Multiple-Land-Use Impacts on Urban Floodplain Groundwater Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellner, R. E.; Hubbart, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    Considering the increasing number of mixed-land-use watersheds globally, and dependence of communities on groundwater resources, there is an ongoing urgent need to improve quantitative understanding of land-use impacts on floodplain groundwater regimes. A study was implemented in Missouri, USA, investigating a remnant bottomland hardwood forest (BHF) and a historical agricultural field (Ag). A gridded sampling design was used to monitor continuous, automated, in situ shallow groundwater depth, to facilitate detailed spatiotemporal analysis of water table response to precipitation events, and calculation of groundwater flow via a Darcian model. Groundwater level data were collected at 30 min. intervals for the duration of the 2011-2014 water years. Results show significantly (p<0.001) greater magnitude water table response at the Ag site, relative to the BHF. The Ag water table also responded to a greater number of precipitation events (including smaller events), and responded more quickly to events than the BHF, indicating reduced relative flood attenuation and routing capacity. Groundwater flow results indicate a significantly (p<0.001) more dynamic and seasonally-responsive flow regime at the BHF, with higher maximum and lower minimum flow values, relative to the Ag site. Moreover, the BHF showed greater magnitude, longer duration, and more frequent base-flow reversals, indicating greater stream-buffering and high-flow attenuation capacity, relative to the Ag site. Results are by majority attributable to greater rates of plant water use by woody vegetation and preferential subsurface flow at the BHF site. Collectively, results suggest greater flood attenuation capacity and streamwater buffering potential by the BHF floodplain, relative to the Ag. Observed differences highlight the various impacts of forest vegetation on groundwater regimes and emphasize the benefit of floodplain forests as a water resource management tool in mixed-land-use urbanized watersheds.

  19. Multiple-dose pharmacokinetics of cefprozil and its impact on intestinal flora of volunteers.

    PubMed Central

    Lode, H; Müller, C; Borner, K; Nord, C E; Koeppe, P

    1992-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of cefprozil were determined with 12 volunteers (8 received cefprozil and 4 received a placebo) after oral administration of 500 mg every 12 h over an 8-day period in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design. Concentrations in serum and urine were measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography and bioassay. The pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated on the basis of an open one-compartment model. The mean maximum concentration in serum on day 1 was 11.5 +/- 2.6 mg/liter, and the time to reach maximum concentration was 122.3 +/- 30 min after administration. Bioavailability parameters (area under the concentration-time curve from zero to infinity, maximum concentration of the drug in serum, and urinary recovery) indicated an excellent absorption. No accumulation over the 8-day period was registered. Cefprozil had a short biological elimination half-life of 58 +/- 10 min and a renal clearance of 210 +/- 51 ml/min, indicating high rates of renal excretion and tubular secretion. Analysis of the fecal flora showed an ecological impact of cefprozil on the intestinal microflora, such as a moderate decrease in enterobacteria and a slight increase in enterococci, staphylococci, and bacteroides during the study. The number of all bacterial species was already normalized 4 days after the administration period. The tolerance of cefprozil proved to be excellent; only a slight and reversible increase of liver enzymes (in two volunteers), mild cephalalgia, tiredness, and soft stool were registered during the 8-day period. Cefprozil had excellent absorption, no accumulation over an 8-day period, and only a limited impact on the intestinal microflora. PMID:1590680

  20. Multiple interaction types determine the impact of ant predation of caterpillars in a forest community.

    PubMed

    Clark, Robert E; Farkas, Timothy E; Lichter-Marck, Isaac; Johnson, Emily R; Singer, Michael S

    2016-12-01

    Direct and indirect effects of predators are highly variable in complex communities, and understanding the sources of this variation is a research priority in community ecology. Recent evidence indicates that herbivore community structure is a primary determinant of predation strength and its cascading impacts on plants. In this study, we use variation in herbivore community structure among plant species to experimentally test two hypotheses in a temperate forest food web. First, variation in the strength of predator effects, such as ant predation of caterpillars, is predicted to be density dependent, exhibiting stronger effects when prey abundance is high (density-dependent predation hypothesis). Second, mutualistic interactions between ants and sap-feeding herbivores are expected to increase the abundance of predatory ants, strengthening predation effects on herbivores with cascading effects on host plants (keystone mutualism hypothesis). Using a large-scale predator exclusion experiment across eight dominant tree species, we tracked changes in insect density on 862 plants across two years, recording 2,322 ants, 1,062 sap-feeders, 5,322 caterpillars, and quantifying herbivory on 199, 338 leaves. In this experiment, density-dependent predation did not explain variation in the direct or indirect effects of ants on caterpillars and herbivory. In partial support of the keystone mutualism hypothesis, sap-feeders strengthened top-down effects of ants on caterpillars under some conditions. However, stronger ant predation of caterpillars did not lead to measurable trophic cascades on trees occupied by sap-feeders. Instead, the presence of sap-feeders was associated with increased per capita feeding damage by caterpillars, and this bottom-up effect attenuated the indirect effects of ants on host plants. These findings demonstrate that examining the multi-trophic impacts of mutualisms and predation in the context of the broader community can reveal patterns otherwise

  1. Upper limb motor rehabilitation impacts white matter microstructure in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bonzano, Laura; Tacchino, Andrea; Brichetto, Giampaolo; Roccatagliata, Luca; Dessypris, Adriano; Feraco, Paola; Lopes De Carvalho, Maria L; Battaglia, Mario A; Mancardi, Giovanni L; Bove, Marco

    2014-04-15

    Upper limb impairments can occur in patients with multiple sclerosis, affecting daily living activities; however there is at present no definite agreement on the best rehabilitation treatment strategy to pursue. Moreover, motor training has been shown to induce changes in white matter architecture in healthy subjects. This study aimed at evaluating the motor behavioral and white matter microstructural changes following a 2-month upper limb motor rehabilitation treatment based on task-oriented exercises in patients with multiple sclerosis. Thirty patients (18 females and 12 males; age=43.3 ± 8.7 years) in a stable phase of the disease presenting with mild or moderate upper limb sensorimotor deficits were randomized into two groups of 15 patients each. Both groups underwent twenty 1-hour treatment sessions, three times a week. The "treatment group" received an active motor rehabilitation treatment, based on voluntary exercises including task-oriented exercises, while the "control group" underwent passive mobilization of the shoulder, elbow, wrist and fingers. Before and after the rehabilitation protocols, motor performance was evaluated in all patients with standard tests. Additionally, finger motor performance accuracy was assessed by an engineered glove. In the same sessions, every patient underwent diffusion tensor imaging to obtain parametric maps of fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, axial diffusivity, and radial diffusivity. The mean value of each parameter was separately calculated within regions of interest including the fiber bundles connecting brain areas involved in voluntary movement control: the corpus callosum, the corticospinal tracts and the superior longitudinal fasciculi. The two rehabilitation protocols induced similar effects on unimanual motor performance, but the bimanual coordination task revealed that the residual coordination abilities were maintained in the treated patients while they significantly worsened in the control group (p=0

  2. Role of race in oncogenic driver prevalence and outcomes in lung adenocarcinoma: Results from the Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium.

    PubMed

    Steuer, Conor E; Behera, Madhusmita; Berry, Lynne; Kim, Sungjin; Rossi, Michael; Sica, Gabriel; Owonikoko, Taofeek K; Johnson, Bruce E; Kris, Mark G; Bunn, Paul A; Khuri, Fadlo R; Garon, Edward B; Ramalingam, Suresh S

    2016-03-01

    The discovery of oncogenic drivers has ushered in a new era for lung cancer, but the role of these mutations in different racial/ethnic minorities has been understudied. The Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium 1 (LCMC1) database was investigated to evaluate the frequency and impact of oncogenic drivers in lung adenocarcinomas in the racial/ethnic minority patient population. Patients with metastatic lung adenocarcinomas from 14 US sites were enrolled in the LCMC1. Tumor samples were collected from 2009 through 2012 with multiplex genotyping performed on 10 oncogenic drivers (KRAS, epidermal growth factor receptor [EGFR], anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangements, ERBB2 [formerly human epidermal growth factor receptor 2], BRAF, PIK3CA, MET amplification, NRAS, MEK1, and AKT1). Patients were classified as white, Asian, African American (AA), or Latino. The driver mutation frequency, the treatments, and the survival from diagnosis were determined. One thousand seven patients were included. Whites represented the majority (n = 838); there were 60 AAs, 48 Asians, and 28 Latinos. Asian patients had the highest rate of oncogenic drivers with 81% (n = 39), and they were followed by Latinos with 68% (n = 19), whites with 61% (n = 511), and AAs with 53% (n = 32). For AAs, the EGFR mutation frequency was 22%, the KRAS frequency was 17%, and the ALK frequency was 4%. Asian patients were most likely to receive targeted therapies (51% vs 27% for AAs). There were no significant differences in overall survival. Differences were observed in the prevalence of oncogenic drivers in lung adenocarcinomas and in subsequent treatments among racial groups. The lowest frequency of drivers was seen for AA patients; however, more than half of AA patients had a driver, and those treated with targeted therapy had outcomes similar to those of other races. Cancer 2016;122:766-772. © 2015 American Cancer Society. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  3. Impact of multiple bird partners on the seed dispersal effectiveness of China’s relic trees

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Li, Xin-hai; An, Shu-qing; Lu, Chang-hu

    2016-01-01

    Frugivorous birds generally exhibit an unequal contribution to dispersal effectiveness of plant species as a function of their habitat adaptation and body size. In our study, we compared the effectiveness of multiple bird species that contribute to the dispersal of the endangered relic Chinese yew, Taxus chinensis. Seven bird species dispersed T. chinensis seeds, with Picus canus, Turdus hortulorum, and Urocissa erythrorhyncha being the main dispersers. The quantity part of dispersal effectiveness was strongly influenced by two inherent characteristics of disperser species: body size and habitat adaptation. However, the quality part of dispersal effectiveness was only influenced by disperser type. For instance, small generalist birds and large specialist birds removed more seeds than other type dispersers. Moreover, small birds and specialist birds contributed slightly more to the dispersal quality of T. chinensis than large birds and generalist birds respectively; however, these differences were not significant. Our results suggest that dispersal effectiveness is affected by variety in the body size and habitat adaptation of different dispersers. Therefore, such variation should be incorporated into spatial and temporal management actions of relic plant species in patchy, human-disturbed habitats. PMID:26725517

  4. Impact of supported housing on clinical outcomes: analysis of a randomized trial using multiple imputation technique.

    PubMed

    Cheng, An-Lin; Lin, Haiqun; Kasprow, Wesley; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2007-01-01

    In 1992, the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) established the HUD-VA Supported Housing (HUD-VASH) Program to provide integrated clinical and housing services to homeless veterans with psychiatric and/or substance abuse disorders at 19 sites. At four sites, 460 subjects were randomly assigned to one of the three groups: (1) HUD-VASH, with both Section 8 vouchers and intensive case management; (2) case management only; and (3) standard VA care. A previous publication found HUD-VASH resulted in superior housing outcomes but yielded no benefits on clinical outcomes. Since many participants missed prescheduled visits during the follow-up period and follow-up rates were quite different across the groups, we reanalyzed these data using multiple imputation statistical methods to account for the missing observations. Significant benefits were found for HUD-VASH in drug and alcohol abuse outcomes that had not previously been identified.

  5. Impact of concomitant dexamethasone dosing schedule on bortezomib-induced peripheral neuropathy in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shaji K; Laubach, Jacob P; Giove, Thomas J; Quick, Maureen; Neuwirth, Rachel; Yung, Godwin; Rajkumar, S Vincent; Richardson, Paul G

    2017-09-01

    Peripheral neuropathy (PN) is the most troublesome adverse event associated with the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. Studies suggest an inflammatory aetiology for bortezomib-induced PN (BiPN) and it has been hypothesized that reducing inflammation with concomitant dexamethasone may reduce BiPN incidence and/or severity. We retrospectively analysed PN rates from 32 studies (2697 patients with previously untreated multiple myeloma) incorporating bortezomib and differing dexamethasone schedules: partnered dosing (days of and after bortezomib), weekly dosing, and other dosing schedules (e.g. days 1-4, 8-11). Pooled overall PN rates were 45·5%, 63·9%, and 47·5%, respectively, with 5·3%, 11·0%, and 9·6% grade ≥3. Adjusting for potential confounders (age, gender, presence of thalidomide, bortezomib treatment duration), PN rates in patients on partnered dosing schedules appeared lower than in patients on weekly or other dosing schedules. Analyses conducted using patient-level data suggest that cumulative dexamethasone dose, a potential confounding factor, is unlikely to have influenced the analyses. Findings were similar in a separate pooled analysis excluding data from regimens incorporating thalidomide, when pooled overall PN rates were 50·1%, 63·9%, and 48·3%, respectively, with 4·2%, 11·0%, and 8·6% grade ≥3. These findings suggest that partnered dexamethasone dosing may result in less severe BiPN compared with alternative dexamethasone dosing schedules. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Fertility, pregnancy and childbirth in patients with multiple sclerosis: impact of disease-modifying drugs.

    PubMed

    Amato, Maria Pia; Portaccio, Emilio

    2015-03-01

    In recent decades, pregnancy-related issues in multiple sclerosis (MS) have received growing interest. MS is more frequent in women than in men and typically starts during child-bearing age. An increasing number of disease-modifying drugs (DMDs) for the treatment of MS are becoming available. Gathering information on their influences on pregnancy-related issues is of crucial importance for the counselling of MS patients. As for the immunomodulatory drugs (interferons and glatiramer acetate), accumulating evidence points to the relative safety of pregnancy exposure in terms of maternal and foetal outcomes. In case of higher clinical disease activity before pregnancy, these drugs could be continued until conception. As for the 'newer' drugs (fingolimod, natalizumab, teriflunomide, dimethyl fumarate and alemtuzumab), the information is more limited. Whereas fingolimod and teriflunomide are likely associated with an increased risk of foetal malformations, the effects of natalizumab, dimethyl fumarate and alemtuzumab still need to be ascertained. This article provides a review of the available information on the use of DMDs during pregnancy, with a specific focus on fertility, foetal development, delivery and breast-feeding.

  7. Climate change and freshwater ecosystems: impacts across multiple levels of organization

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Guy; Perkins, Daniel M.; Brown, Lee E.

    2010-01-01

    Fresh waters are particularly vulnerable to climate change because (i) many species within these fragmented habitats have limited abilities to disperse as the environment changes; (ii) water temperature and availability are climate-dependent; and (iii) many systems are already exposed to numerous anthropogenic stressors. Most climate change studies to date have focused on individuals or species populations, rather than the higher levels of organization (i.e. communities, food webs, ecosystems). We propose that an understanding of the connections between these different levels, which are all ultimately based on individuals, can help to develop a more coherent theoretical framework based on metabolic scaling, foraging theory and ecological stoichiometry, to predict the ecological consequences of climate change. For instance, individual basal metabolic rate scales with body size (which also constrains food web structure and dynamics) and temperature (which determines many ecosystem processes and key aspects of foraging behaviour). In addition, increasing atmospheric CO2 is predicted to alter molar CNP ratios of detrital inputs, which could lead to profound shifts in the stoichiometry of elemental fluxes between consumers and resources at the base of the food web. The different components of climate change (e.g. temperature, hydrology and atmospheric composition) not only affect multiple levels of biological organization, but they may also interact with the many other stressors to which fresh waters are exposed, and future research needs to address these potentially important synergies. PMID:20513717

  8. The impact of osteopontin gene variations on multiple sclerosis development and progression.

    PubMed

    Comi, Cristoforo; Cappellano, Giuseppe; Chiocchetti, Annalisa; Orilieri, Elisabetta; Buttini, Sara; Ghezzi, Laura; Galimberti, Daniela; Guerini, Franca; Barizzone, Nadia; Perla, Franco; Leone, Maurizio; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Caputo, Domenico; Scarpini, Elio; Cantello, Roberto; Dianzani, Umberto

    2012-01-01

    Osteopontin is a proinflammatory molecule, modulating TH1 and TH17 responses. Several reports suggest its involvement in multiple sclerosis (MS) pathogenesis. We previously reported that OPN gene variations at the 3' end are a predisposing factor for MS development and evolution. In this paper, we extended our analysis to a gene variation at the 5' end on the -156G > GG single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and replicated our previous findings at the 3' end on the +1239A > C SNP. We found that only +1239A > C SNP displayed a statistically significant association with MS development, but both +1239A > C and -156G > GG had an influence on MS progression, since patients homozygous for both +1239A and -156GG alleles displayed slower progression of disability and slower switch to secondary progression than those carrying +1239C and/or -156G and those homozygous for +1239A only. Moreover, patients homozygous for +1239A also displayed a significantly lower relapse rate than those carrying +1239C, which is in line with the established role of OPN in MS relapses.

  9. Multiple Spacecraft Study of the Impact of Turbulence on Reconnection Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wendel, Deirdre; Goldstein, Melvyn; Figueroa-Vinas, Adolfo; Adrian, Mark; Sahraoui, Fouad

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic turbulence and secondary island formation have reemerged as possible explanations for fast reconnection. Recent three-dimensional simulations reveal the formation of secondary islands that serve to shorten the current sheet and increase the accelerating electric field, while both simulations and observations witness electron holes whose collapse energizes electrons. However, few data studies have explicitly investigated the effect of turbulence and islands on the reconnection rate. We present a more comprehensive analysis of the effect of turbulence and islands on reconnection rates observed in space. Our approach takes advantage of multiple spacecraft to find the location of the spacecraft relative to the inflow and the outflow, to estimate the reconnection electric field, to indicate the presence and size of islands, and to determine wave vectors indicating turbulence. A superposed epoch analysis provides independent estimates of spatial scales and a reconnection electric field. We apply k-filtering and a new method adopted from seismological analyses to identify the wavevectors. From several case studies of reconnection events, we obtain preliminary estimates of the spectral scaling law, identify wave modes, and present a method for finding the reconnection electric field associated with the wave modes.

  10. The Eyjabakkajökull glacial landsystem, Iceland: Geomorphic impact of multiple surges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schomacker, Anders; Benediktsson, Ívar Örn; Ingólfsson, Ólafur

    2014-08-01

    A new glacial geomorphological map of the Eyjabakkajökull forefield in Iceland is presented. The map covers c. 60 km2 and is based on high-resolution aerial photographs recorded in August 2008 as well as field checking. Landforms are manually registered in a geographical information system (ArcGIS) based on inspection of orthorectified imagery and digital elevation models of the area. We mapped subglacially streamlined landforms such as flutes and drumlins on the till plain, supraglacial landforms such as ice-cored moraine, pitted outwash, and concertina eskers, and ice-marginal landforms such as the large, multi-crested 1890 surge end moraine and smaller single-crested end moraines. The glaciofluvial landforms are represented by outwash plains, minor outwash fans, and sinuous eskers. Extramarginal sediments were also registered and consist mainly of old sediments in wetlands or locally weathered bedrock. Eyjabakkajökull has behaved as a surge-type glacier for 2200 years; hence, the mapped landforms originate from multiple surges. Landforms such as large glaciotectonic end moraines, hummocky moraine, long flutes, crevasse-fill ridges, and concertina eskers are characteristic for surge-type glaciers. The surging glacier landsystem of Eyjabakkajökull serves as a modern analog to the landsystems of terrestrial paleo-ice streams.

  11. Impact of multiple matched controls on design sensitivity in observational studies.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Paul R

    2013-03-01

    In an observational study, one treated subject may be matched for observed covariates to either one or several untreated controls. The common motivation for using several controls rather than one is to increase the power of a test of no effect under the doubtful assumption that matching for observed covariates suffices to remove bias from nonrandom treatment assignment. Does the choice between one or several matched controls affect the sensitivity of conclusions to violations of this doubtful assumption? With continuous responses, it is known that reducing the heterogeneity of matched pair differences reduces sensitivity to unmeasured biases, but increasing the sample size has a highly circumscribed effect on sensitivity to bias. Is the use of several controls rather than one analogous to a reduction in heterogeneity or to an increase in sample size? The issue is examined for Huber's m-statistics, including the t-test, the examination having three components: an example, asymptotic calculations using design sensitivity, and a simulation. Use of multiple controls with continuous responses yields a nontrivial reduction in sensitivity to unmeasured biases. An example looks at lead and cadmium in the blood of smokers from the 2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. A by-product of the discussion is a new result giving the design sensitivity for the permutation distribution of m-statistics.

  12. The Impact of Osteopontin Gene Variations on Multiple Sclerosis Development and Progression

    PubMed Central

    Comi, Cristoforo; Cappellano, Giuseppe; Chiocchetti, Annalisa; Orilieri, Elisabetta; Buttini, Sara; Ghezzi, Laura; Galimberti, Daniela; Guerini, Franca; Barizzone, Nadia; Perla, Franco; Leone, Maurizio; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Caputo, Domenico; Scarpini, Elio; Cantello, Roberto; Dianzani, Umberto

    2012-01-01

    Osteopontin is a proinflammatory molecule, modulating TH1 and TH17 responses. Several reports suggest its involvement in multiple sclerosis (MS) pathogenesis. We previously reported that OPN gene variations at the 3′ end are a predisposing factor for MS development and evolution. In this paper, we extended our analysis to a gene variation at the 5′ end on the −156G > GG single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and replicated our previous findings at the 3′ end on the +1239A > C SNP. We found that only +1239A > C SNP displayed a statistically significant association with MS development, but both +1239A > C and −156G > GG had an influence on MS progression, since patients homozygous for both +1239A and −156GG alleles displayed slower progression of disability and slower switch to secondary progression than those carrying +1239C and/or −156G and those homozygous for +1239A only. Moreover, patients homozygous for +1239A also displayed a significantly lower relapse rate than those carrying +1239C, which is in line with the established role of OPN in MS relapses. PMID:23008732

  13. Impact of multiple insertions of two retroelements, ZAM and Idefix at an euchromatic locus.

    PubMed

    Conte, C; Calco, V; Desset, S; Leblanc, P; Dastugue, B; Vaury, C

    2000-01-01

    Transposable elements represent a large fraction of eukaryotic genomes and they are thought to play an important role in chromatin structure. ZAM and Idefix are two LTR-retrotransposons from Drosophila melanogaster very similar in structure to vertebrate retroviruses. In all the strains where their distribution has been studied, ZAM appears to be present exclusively in the intercalary heterochromatin while Idefix copies are mainly found in the centromeric heterochromatin with very few copies in euchromatin. Their distribution varies in a specific strain called RevI in which the mobilization of ZAM and Idefix is highly induced. In this strain, 15 copies of ZAM and 30 copies of Idefix are found on the chromosomal arms in addition to their usual distribution. Amongst the loci where new copies are detected, a hotspot for their insertion has been detected at the white locus where up to four elements occurred within a 3-kb fragment at the 5' end of this gene. This property of ZAM and Idefix to accumulate at a defined site provides an interesting paradigm to bring insight into the effect exerted by multiple insertions of transposable elements at an euchromatic locus.

  14. No Single Cause: Learning Gains, Student Attitudes, and the Impacts of Multiple Effective Reforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, Steven J.

    2005-09-01

    We examine the effects of, and interplay among, several proven research-based reforms implemented in an introductory large enrollment (500+) calculus-based physics course. These interventions included Peer Instruction with student response system in lecture, Tutorials with trained undergrad learning assistants in recitations, and personalized computer assignments. We collected extensive informal online survey data along with validated pre/post content- and attitude-surveys, and long answer pre/post content questions designed to assess learning gains and near transfer, to investigate complementary effects of these multiple reforms, and to begin to understand which features are necessary and effective for high fidelity replication. Our average [median] normalized gain was .62 [0.67] on the FCI, .66 [0.77] on the FMCE, yet we find we cannot uniquely associate these gains with any individual isolated course components. We also investigate the population of students with low final conceptual scores, with an emphasis on the roles played by demographics, preparation, and self-reported attitudes and beliefs about learning.

  15. Impact of Supported Housing on Clinical Outcomes Analysis of a Randomized Trial Using Multiple Imputation Technique

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, An-Lin; Lin, Haiqun; Kasprow, Wesley; Rosenheck, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    In 1992, the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) established the HUD-VA Supported Housing (HUD-VASH) Program to provide integrated clinical and housing services to homeless veterans with psychiatric and/or substance abuse disorders at 19 sites. At four sites, 460 subjects were randomly assigned to one of the three groups: (1) HUD-VASH, with both Section 8 vouchers and intensive case management; (2) case management only; and (3) standard VA care. A previous publication found HUD-VASH resulted in superior housing outcomes but yielded no benefits on clinical outcomes. Since many participants missed prescheduled visits during the follow-up period and follow-up rates were quite different across the groups, we reanalyzed these data using multiple imputation statistical methods to account for the missing observations. Significant benefits were found for HUD-VASH in drug and alcohol abuse outcomes that had not previously been identified. PMID:17220745

  16. Impact of multiple bird partners on the seed dispersal effectiveness of China's relic trees.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Li, Xin-Hai; An, Shu-Qing; Lu, Chang-Hu

    2016-01-04

    Frugivorous birds generally exhibit an unequal contribution to dispersal effectiveness of plant species as a function of their habitat adaptation and body size. In our study, we compared the effectiveness of multiple bird species that contribute to the dispersal of the endangered relic Chinese yew, Taxus chinensis. Seven bird species dispersed T. chinensis seeds, with Picus canus, Turdus hortulorum, and Urocissa erythrorhyncha being the main dispersers. The quantity part of dispersal effectiveness was strongly influenced by two inherent characteristics of disperser species: body size and habitat adaptation. However, the quality part of dispersal effectiveness was only influenced by disperser type. For instance, small generalist birds and large specialist birds removed more seeds than other type dispersers. Moreover, small birds and specialist birds contributed slightly more to the dispersal quality of T. chinensis than large birds and generalist birds respectively; however, these differences were not significant. Our results suggest that dispersal effectiveness is affected by variety in the body size and habitat adaptation of different dispersers. Therefore, such variation should be incorporated into spatial and temporal management actions of relic plant species in patchy, human-disturbed habitats.

  17. The Impact of Heterogeneous Thresholds on Social Contagion with Multiple Initiators

    PubMed Central

    Karampourniotis, Panagiotis D.; Sreenivasan, Sameet; Szymanski, Boleslaw K.; Korniss, Gyorgy

    2015-01-01

    The threshold model is a simple but classic model of contagion spreading in complex social systems. To capture the complex nature of social influencing we investigate numerically and analytically the transition in the behavior of threshold-limited cascades in the presence of multiple initiators as the distribution of thresholds is varied between the two extreme cases of identical thresholds and a uniform distribution. We accomplish this by employing a truncated normal distribution of the nodes’ thresholds and observe a non-monotonic change in the cascade size as we vary the standard deviation. Further, for a sufficiently large spread in the threshold distribution, the tipping-point behavior of the social influencing process disappears and is replaced by a smooth crossover governed by the size of initiator set. We demonstrate that for a given size of the initiator set, there is a specific variance of the threshold distribution for which an opinion spreads optimally. Furthermore, in the case of synthetic graphs we show that the spread asymptotically becomes independent of the system size, and that global cascades can arise just by the addition of a single node to the initiator set. PMID:26571486

  18. Multiple approaches to valuation of conservation design and low-impact development features in residential subdivisions.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Troy; Tyndall, John C; Thompson, Janette; Kliebenstein, James; Colletti, Joe P

    2012-08-15

    Residents, developers and civic officials are often faced with difficult decisions about appropriate land uses in and around metropolitan boundaries. Urban expansion brings with it the potential for negative environmental impacts, but there are alternatives, such as conservation subdivision design (CSD) or low-impact development (LID), which offer the possibility of mitigating some of these effects at the development site. Many urban planning jurisdictions across the Midwest do not currently have any examples of these designs and lack information to identify public support or barriers to use of these methods. This is a case study examining consumer value for conservation and low-impact design features in one housing market by using four different valuation techniques to estimate residents' willingness to pay for CSD and LID features in residential subdivisions. A contingent valuation survey of 1804 residents in Ames, IA assessed familiarity with and perceptions of subdivision development and used an ordered value approach to estimate willingness to pay for CSD and LID features. A majority of residents were not familiar with CSD or LID practices. Residents indicated a willingness to pay for most CSD and LID features with the exception of clustered housing. Gender, age, income, familiarity with LID practices, perceptions of attractiveness of features and the perceived effect of CSD and LID features on ease of future home sales were important factors influencing residents' willingness to pay. A hypothetical referendum measured willingness to pay for tax-funded conservation land purchases and estimated that a property tax of around $50 would be the maximum increase that would pass. Twenty-seven survey respondents participated in a subsequent series of experimental real estate negotiations that used an experimental auction mechanism to estimate willingness to pay for CSD and LID features. Participants indicated that clustered housing (with interspersed preserved forest

  19. Exploiting oncogene-induced replicative stress for the selective killing of Myc-driven tumors.

    PubMed

    Murga, Matilde; Campaner, Stefano; Lopez-Contreras, Andres J; Toledo, Luis I; Soria, Rebeca; Montaña, Maria F; Artista, Luana D'; Schleker, Thomas; Guerra, Carmen; Garcia, Elena; Barbacid, Mariano; Hidalgo, Manuel; Amati, Bruno; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar

    2011-11-27

    Oncogene-induced replicative stress activates an Atr- and Chk1-dependent response, which has been proposed to be widespread in tumors. We explored whether the presence of replicative stress could be exploited for the selective elimination of cancer cells. To this end, we evaluated the impact of targeting the replicative stress-response on cancer development. In mice (Mus musculus), the reduced levels of Atr found on a mouse model of the Atr-Seckel syndrome completely prevented the development of Myc-induced lymphomas or pancreatic tumors, both of which showed abundant levels of replicative stress. Moreover, Chk1 inhibitors were highly effective in killing Myc-driven lymphomas. By contrast, pancreatic adenocarcinomas initiated by K-Ras(G12V) showed no detectable evidence of replicative stress and were nonresponsive to this therapy. Besides its impact on cancer, Myc overexpression aggravated the phenotypes of Atr-Seckel mice, revealing that oncogenes can modulate the severity of replicative stress-associated diseases.

  20. Oncogenic potential of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and its relation with cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common cause of cervical cancer. Cervical cancer being the second most common cancer after lung cancer, affecting women of different age groups; has a prevalence of about 20% in young sexually active women. Among different types of HPV, HPV16 the major strain causing this cancer and is sexually transmitted had been unnoticed for decades. Keeping in mind the multiple risk factors related with cervical cancer such as early age sexual activities, teenage pregnancies, smoking, use of oral contraceptives, having multiple sex partners, hormone replacement therapies and various other unknown factors lead to the onset of the disease. Awareness for various diagnostic procedures such as Pap smears screening prove to be an effective way in eradicating the oncogenic potential of HPV. PMID:21635792

  1. INFLUENCE OF ELECTRON-IMPACT MULTIPLE IONIZATION ON EQUILIBRIUM AND DYNAMIC CHARGE STATE DISTRIBUTIONS: A CASE STUDY USING IRON

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, M.; Savin, D. W.

    2015-02-10

    We describe the influence of electron-impact multiple ionization (EIMI) on the ionization balance of collisionally ionized plasmas. Previous ionization balance calculations have largely neglected EIMI. Here, EIMI cross-section data are incorporated into calculations of both equilibrium and non-equilibrium charge-state distributions (CSDs). For equilibrium CSDs, we find that EIMI has only a small effect and can usually be ignored. However, for non-equilibrium plasmas the influence of EIMI can be important. In particular, we find that for plasmas in which the temperature oscillates there are significant differences in the CSD when including versus neglecting EIMI. These results have implications for modeling and spectroscopy of impulsively heated plasmas, such as nanoflare heating of the solar corona.

  2. Impacts of urbanization on stream habitat and fish across multiple spatial scales.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Lyons, J; Kanehl, P; Bannerman, R

    2001-08-01

    We analyzed the relation of the amount and spatial pattern of land cover with stream fish communities, in-stream habitat, and baseflow in 47 small southeastern Wisconsin, USA, watersheds encompassing a gradient of predominantly agricultural to predominantly urban land uses. The amount of connected impervious surface in the watershed was the best measure of urbanization for predicting fish density, species richness, diversity, and index of biotic integrity (IBI) score; bank erosion; and base flow. However, connected imperviousness was not significantly correlated with overall habitat quality for fish. Nonlinear models were developed using quantile regression to predict the maximum possible number of fish species, IBI score, and base flow for a given level of imperviousness. At watershed connected imperviousness levels less than about 8%, all three variables could have high values, whereas at connected imperviousness levels greater than 12% their values were inevitably low. Connected imperviousness levels between 8 and 12% represented a threshold region where minor changes in urbanization could result in major changes in stream condition. In a spatial analysis, connected imperviousness within a 50-m buffer along the stream or within a 1.6-km radius upstream of the sampling site had more influence on stream fish and base flow than did comparable amounts of imperviousness further away. Our results suggest that urban development that minimizes amount of connected impervious surface and establishes undeveloped buffer areas along streams should have less impact than conventional types of development.

  3. Mutations affecting a putative MutLα endonuclease motif impact multiple mismatch repair functions

    PubMed Central

    Erdeniz, Naz; Nguyen, Megan; Deschênes, Suzanne M.; Liskay, R. Michael

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) lead to increased mutation rates and higher recombination between similar, but not identical sequences, as well as resistance to certain DNA methylating agents. Recently, a component of human MMR machinery, MutLα, has been shown to display a latent endonuclease activity. The endonuclease active site appears to include a conserved motif, DQHA(X)2E(X)4E, within the COOH-terminus of human PMS2. Substitution of the glutamic acid residue (E705) abolished the endonuclease activity and mismatch-dependent excision in vitro. Previously, we showed that the PMS2-E705K mutation and the corresponding mutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae were both recessive loss of function alleles for mutation avoidance in vivo. Here, we show that mutations impacting this endonuclease motif also significantly affect MMR-dependent suppression of homeologous recombination in yeast and responses to Sn1-type methylating agents in both yeast and mammalian cells. Thus, our in vivo results suggest that the endonuclease activity of MutLα is important not only in MMR-dependent mutation avoidance but also for recombination and damage response functions. PMID:17567544

  4. Strong nonlinear electron multiplication without impact ionization in dielectric nanoparticles embedded in optical materials

    SciTech Connect

    Duchateau, Guillaume

    2013-02-15

    The interaction of a dielectric nano-particle or nano-defect, embedded in the bulk of an optical material, with an intense and short laser pulse is addressed. Due to the finite size of the target and the possible large production of electrons in the conduction band, large electric field enhancement or surintensity may be induced inside the particle. Since ionization rates also depend on the instantaneous electric field, a strong time-dependent connection between electron production and surintensity may take place. Such a connection is shown to possibly lead to a nonlinear temporal increase in the free electron density relevant from an avalanche process, called optical avalanche, similar to the one induced by electron impact ionization. However, the present build-up in the electron density clearly exhibits more nonlinear features than traditional collisional avalanche, which is shown to induce an exponential growth of the density: when the optical avalanche is engaged, the temporal electron evolution exhibits an explosive behavior. That leads to a nanometric plasma at solid density whose subsequent laser heating may lead locally to matter under extreme conditions. Furthermore, we show that the defect induces a change in the ionization mechanism in the course of interaction: a transition from multiphoton to tunnel ionization may take place.

  5. The impact of multiple splice sites in human L1 elements

    PubMed Central

    Belancio, V. P.; Roy-Engel, A. M.; Deininger, P.

    2008-01-01

    LINE-1 elements represent a significant proportion of mammalian genomes. The impact of their activity on the structure and function of the host genomes has been recognized from the time of their discovery as an endogenous source of insertional mutagenesis. L1 elements contain numerous functional internal polyadenylation signals and splice sites that generate a variety of processed L1 transcripts. These sites are also reported to contribute to the generation of hybrid transcripts between L1 elements and host genes. Using northern blot analysis we demonstrate that L1 splicing, but not L1 polyadenylation, is delayed during the course of L1 expression. L1 splicing can also be negatively regulated by EBV SM protein known to alter mRNA splicing. These results suggest a potential for L1 mRNA processing to be regulated in a tissue- and/or development-specific manner. The delay in L1 splicing may also serve to protect host genes from the excessive burden of L1 interference with their normal expression via aberrant splicing. PMID:18261861

  6. Shrub Encroachment Impacts the Potential for Multiple Use Conflicts on Public Land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkinshaw, Angela M.; Bork, Edward W.

    2009-09-01

    Public rangelands in North America are typically managed under a multiple use policy that includes livestock grazing and wildlife management. In this article we report on the landscape level extent of grassland loss to shrub encroachment in a portion of the Rocky Mountain Forest Reserve in southwestern Alberta, Canada, and review the associated implications for simultaneously supporting livestock and wildlife populations while maintaining range health on this diminishing vegetation type. Digitized aerial photographs of 12 km of valley bottom from 1958 and 1974 were co-registered to ortho-rectified digital imagery taken in 1998, and an un-supervised classification used to determine areas associated with grassland and shrubland in each year. Field data from 2002 were over-layed using GPS coordinates to refine the classification using a calibration-validation procedure. Over the 40-year study period, open grasslands declined from 1,111 ha in 1958 to 465 ha in 1998, representing a 58% decrease. Using mean production data for grass and shrub dominated areas we then quantified aggregate changes in grazing capacity of both primary (grassland) and secondary (shrubland) habitats for livestock and wildlife. Total declines in grazing capacity from 1958 to 1998 totaled 2,744 Animal Unit Months (AUMs) of forage (-39%), including a 58% decrease in primary (i.e., open grassland) range, which was only partly offset by the availability of 1,357 AUMs within less productive and less accessible shrubland habitats. Our results indicate shrub encroachment has been extensive and significantly reduced forage availability to domestic livestock and wildlife, and will increase the difficulty of conserving remaining grasslands. Although current grazing capacities remain marginally above those specified by regulated grazing policies, it is clear that continued habitat change and decreases in forage availability are likely to threaten the condition of remaining grasslands. Unless shrub

  7. The Impact of Gait Disability on the Calibration of Accelerometer Output in Adults with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Weikert, Madeline; Dlugonski, Deirdre; Suh, Yoojin; Fernhall, Bo

    2011-01-01

    Accelerometer activity counts have been correlated with energy expenditure during treadmill walking among ambulatory adults with multiple sclerosis (MS). This study examined the effects of gait disability on 1) the association between rates of energy expenditure and accelerometer output in overground walking and 2) the calibration of accelerometer output for quantifying time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in people with MS. The sample consisted of 24 individuals with MS, of whom 10 reported gait disability based on Patient-Determined Disease Steps (PDDS) scores. The participants undertook three 6-minute periods of overground walking while wearing an accelerometer and a portable metabolic unit (K4b2, Cosmed, Rome, Italy). In the first period of walking, the participants walked at a self-selected, comfortable speed. In the two subsequent walking periods, participants walked at speeds above and below (±0.5 mph) the comfortable walking speed, respectively. Strong linear relationships were observed between rates of accelerometer activity counts and energy expenditure during walking in the overall sample (R2 = 0.90) and subsamples with (R2 = 0.88) and without gait disability (R2 = 0.91). The slope of the relationship was significantly steeper in the subsample with gait disability (β= 0.0049) than in the subsample without gait disability (β= 0.0026). The difference in slopes resulted in a significantly lower cut-point for MVPA (1886 vs. 2717 counts/min) in those with gait disability. These findings provide a metabolic cut-point for quantifying time spent in MVPA in people with MS, both with and without gait disability. PMID:24453722

  8. Auxiliary nurses in Mexico: impact of multiple roles on their health.

    PubMed

    Douglas, M K; Meleis, A I; Paul, S M

    1997-01-01

    As more women worldwide enter the labor force, debate has been generated over how this additional work role influences women's health. In this study, we explored the work, maternal, and spousal roles of 59 auxiliary nurses in two university-affiliated Mexican hospitals. Participants completed questionnaires that included demographics, a women's roles interview protocol, a self-rating of health status, and the Cornell Medical Index (CMI). No significant correlation was found between the perception of their health status and the number of roles, amount of role involvement, or their perceived levels of stress and satisfaction in any of their three roles. Work stress was significantly correlated with the number of physical symptoms (r = .30, p < .05), longer periods of standing (r = .31, p < .05), more muscle strain (r = .53, p < .01), eye problems (r = .43, p < .01), frequent changes in environmental temperature (r = .30, p < .05), and perceptions of economic inadequacy (r = .37, p < .01). Years of education was not related to any health measure or degree of stress or satisfaction in any of the roles. The greater the degree of role integration, that is, the greater the sum of satisfactions minus stresses of each role, the fewer the physical symptoms (r = .48, p < .05) and the fewer total symptoms (r = .43, p < .05) reported on the CMI. Those with more spousal stress reported more work-related muscle strain (r = .35, p < .05), and working mothers with three or more children tended to perceive themselves as less healthy (r = .75, p < .01). Thus, analyzing the interrelationship of women's multiple roles is a better predictor of health than examining specific role stresses in isolation.

  9. Oncogenic Kras is required for both the initiation and maintenance of pancreatic cancer in mice

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Meredith A.; Bednar, Filip; Zhang, Yaqing; Brisset, Jean-Christophe; Galbán, Stefanie; Galbán, Craig J.; Rakshit, Sabita; Flannagan, Karen S.; Adsay, N. Volkan; Pasca di Magliano, Marina

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is almost invariably associated with mutations in the KRAS gene, most commonly KRASG12D, that result in a dominant-active form of the KRAS GTPase. However, how KRAS mutations promote pancreatic carcinogenesis is not fully understood, and whether oncogenic KRAS is required for the maintenance of pancreatic cancer has not been established. To address these questions, we generated two mouse models of pancreatic tumorigenesis: mice transgenic for inducible KrasG12D, which allows for inducible, pancreas-specific, and reversible expression of the oncogenic KrasG12D, with or without inactivation of one allele of the tumor suppressor gene p53. Here, we report that, early in tumorigenesis, induction of oncogenic KrasG12D reversibly altered normal epithelial differentiation following tissue damage, leading to precancerous lesions. Inactivation of KrasG12D in established precursor lesions and during progression to cancer led to regression of the lesions, indicating that KrasG12D was required for tumor cell survival. Strikingly, during all stages of carcinogenesis, KrasG12D upregulated Hedgehog signaling, inflammatory pathways, and several pathways known to mediate paracrine interactions between epithelial cells and their surrounding microenvironment, thus promoting formation and maintenance of the fibroinflammatory stroma that plays a pivotal role in pancreatic cancer. Our data establish that epithelial KrasG12D influences multiple cell types to drive pancreatic tumorigenesis and is essential for tumor maintenance. They also strongly support the notion that inhibiting KrasG12D, or its downstream effectors, could provide a new approach for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:22232209

  10. Sure, or unsure? Measuring students' confidence and the potential impact on patient safety in multiple-choice questions.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Rafael Henrique; Möller, Leona; Sitter, Helmut; Stibane, Tina; Strzelczyk, Adam

    2017-08-11

    Multiple-choice questions (MCQs) provide useful information about correct and incorrect answers, but they do not offer information about students' confidence. Ninety and another 81 medical students participated each in a curricular neurology multiple-choice exam and indicated their confidence for every single MCQ. Each MCQ had a defined level of potential clinical impact on patient safety (uncritical, risky, harmful). Our first objective was to detect informed (IF), guessed (GU), misinformed (MI), and uninformed (UI) answers. Further, we evaluated whether there were significant differences for confidence at correct and incorrect answers. Then, we explored if clinical impact had a significant influence on students' confidence. There were 1818 IF, 635 GU, 71 MI, and 176 UI answers in exam I and 1453 IF, 613 GU, 92 MI, and 191 UI answers in exam II. Students' confidence was significantly higher for correct than for incorrect answers at both exams (p < 0.001). For exam I, students' confidence was significantly higher for incorrect harmful than for incorrect risky classified MCQs (p = 0.01). At exam II, students' confidence was significantly higher for incorrect harmful than for incorrect benign (p < 0.01) and significantly higher for correct benign than for correct harmful categorized MCQs (p = 0.01). We were pleased to see that there were more informed than guessed, more uninformed than misinformed answers and higher students' confidence for correct than for incorrect answers. Our expectation that students state higher confidence in correct and harmful and lower confidence in incorrect and harmful MCQs could not be confirmed.

  11. Impact of daclizumab versus interferon beta-1a on patient-reported outcomes in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Vollmer, Timothy; Havrdova, Eva; Riester, Katherine; Lee, Andrew; Phillips, Glenn; Wang, Ping; Sabatella, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) provide information on treatment effects from the patient's perspective that complement outcomes on clinical measures. In DECIDE, daclizumab demonstrated superior efficacy in reducing relapses, 24-week confirmed disability progression, and brain lesions (assessed by magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]) versus intramuscular interferon beta-1a in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. To examine the impact of daclizumab versus interferon beta-1a on PROs in DECIDE. DECIDE was a randomized, double-blind, active-controlled, phase 3 study comparing daclizumab 150mg subcutaneous every 4 weeks with interferon beta-1a 30mcg intramuscular once weekly. The 29-item Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale (MSIS-29) and EuroQoL 5-Dimensions (EQ-5D) were assessed at baseline and every 24 weeks. Mean changes from baseline were analyzed using analysis of covariance models. Individual items for the MSIS-29 physical (PHYS) and psychological (PSYCH) subscales were analyzed post hoc. Daclizumab treatment resulted in greater mean improvements relative to baseline in MSIS-29 PHYS and PSYCH scores starting at week 24 that persisted over 96 weeks. Mean improvements from baseline in MSIS-29 PHYS and PSYCH scores were significantly greater for daclizumab versus intramuscular interferon beta-1a at week 96. Daclizumab-treated patients showed steady improvements in EQ-5D health utility index and EQ-5D visual analog scale scores over the study period, with significantly greater improvements versus intramuscular interferon beta-1a at week 96 (p=0.0048 and p=0.0006, respectively). Improvements in patient-reported physical and psychological functioning and general health status with daclizumab compared with intramuscular interferon beta-1a are consistent with outcomes on clinical and brain MRI lesion measures in DECIDE (NCT01064401). Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Mouse Elk oncogene maps to chromosome X and a novel Elk oncogene (Elk3) maps to chromosome 10

    SciTech Connect

    Tamai, Yoshitaka; Taketo, Makoto; Nozaki, Masami

    1995-03-20

    The Elk protein is a member of the Ets family found in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Human ELK1 encoded by ELK1 binds alone or together with serum response factor to DNA and regulates gene expression in a variety of biological processes. Using a panel of interspecific backcross mice, we have mapped the Elk oncogene (Elk) and a novel type Elk oncogene (Elk3), closely related to ELK1. Elk maps to Chr X, and Elk3 maps to the proximal region of Chr 10. 18 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. Activity-Based Protein Profiling of Oncogene-Driven Changes in Metabolism Reveals Broad Dysregulation of PAFAH1B2 and 1B3 in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kohnz, Rebecca A.; Mulvihill, Melinda M.; Chang, Jae Won; Hsu, Ku-Lung; Sorrentino, Antonio; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Bandyopadhyay, Sourav; Goga, Andrei; Nomura, Daniel K.

    2015-01-01

    Targeting dysregulated metabolic pathways is a promising therapeutic strategy for eradicating cancer. Understanding how frequently altered oncogenes regulate metabolic enzyme targets would be useful in identifying both broad-spectrum and targeted metabolic therapies for cancer. Here, we used activity-based protein profiling to identify serine hydrolase activities that were consistently upregulated by various human oncogenes. Through this profiling effort, we found oncogenic regulatory mechanisms for several cancer-relevant serine hydrolases and discovered that platelet activating factor acetylhydrolase 1B2 and 1B3 (PAFAH1B2 and PAFAH1B3) activities were consistently upregulated by several oncogenes, alongside previously discovered cancer-relevant hydrolases fatty acid synthase and monoacylglycerol lipase. While we previously showed that PAFAH1B2 and 1B3 were important in breast cancer our most recent profiling studies have revealed that these enzymes may be dysregulated broadly across many types of cancers. Here, we find that pharmacological blockade of both enzymes impairs cancer pathogenicity across multiple different types of cancer cells, including breast, ovarian, melanoma, and prostate cancer. We also show that pharmacological blockade of PAFAH1B2 and 1B3 cause unique changes in lipid metabolism, including heightened levels of tumor-suppressing lipids. Our results reveal oncogenic regulatory mechanisms of several cancer-relevant serine hydrolases using activity-based protein profiling and we show that PAFAH1B2 and 1B3 are important in maintaining cancer pathogenicity across a wide spectrum of cancer types. PMID:25945974

  14. Latitude has more significant impact on prevalence of multiple sclerosis than ultraviolet level or sunshine duration in Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Masako; Obata, Kaoru; Tanaka, Masami

    2015-07-01

    Higher latitude is known to be associated with higher prevalence of multiple sclerosis (MS). We investigated the degree of impact of latitude, ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and sunshine on the prevalence of MS in Japan, which has 47 prefectures with a variety of climates. MS prevalence in each prefecture was collected from database of the Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare of Japan. Latitude of each prefecture was represented by that of the capital city. Data of UV radiation level and annual actual sunshine duration were obtained from databases of Japan Meteorological Agency. We performed linear correlation analyses of MS prevalence against latitude, UV radiation, and annual actual sunshine duration. MS prevalence significantly correlated to latitude (Pearson's correlation, r = 0.69, p < 0.001) and UV radiation level (r = -0.65, p < 0.001) but not to annual actual sunshine duration (r = -0.37, p = 0.011). Stepwise multiple linear regression analyses revealed significant correlation between MS prevalence and only latitude (p < 0.001). While our result shows that both latitude and the UV intensity have significant relationship to MS prevalence, the stronger relevance of the former suggests an existence of risk factors other than UV radiation.

  15. Multiple stressor effects of predation by rotifers and herbicide pollution on different Chlamydomonas strains and potential impacts on population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Beat B; Roffler, Severin; Eggen, Rik I L

    2012-12-01

    Environmental factors can interact with the effects of chemical pollutants on natural systems by inducing multiple stressor effects in individual organisms as well as by altering selection pressure on tolerant strains in heterogeneous populations. Predation is a stressful environmental factor relevant for many species. Therefore, the impact of predation by the rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus on tolerance of eight genetically different strains of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to simultaneous exposure to each of the three herbicides (diuron, paraquat, and S-metolachlor) was tested. Interactions of combined stressors were analyzed based on the independent action model; additive, synergistic, and antagonistic effects of the combined exposure could be detected depending on the herbicide and strain tested. If cultures were acclimated (pre-exposed) to one stressor, tolerance to the second stressor could be increased. This indicates that physiological changes can induce cotolerance of predation-exposed algae to herbicides and of herbicide-treated algae to predation depending on the combination of stressors. The strain-specific differences in multiple stressor effects also changed the correlation of strains' tolerances to individual stressors determined during combined and single-stressor exposure. Changes in cotolerance to stressors affect selection pressure and population dynamics during long-term exposure. This shows that predation stress can have adverse effects on the toxicity of chemical pollutants to microalgae on the organism and population levels.

  16. The Impact of Age upon Contingency Planning for Multiple-casualty Incidents Based on a Single Center's Experience.

    PubMed

    Ashkenazi, Itamar; Einav, Sharon; Olsha, Oded; Turegano-Fuentes, Fernando; Krausz, Michael M; Alfici, Ricardo

    2016-10-01

    Introduction Trauma patients in the extremes of age may require a specialized approach during a multiple-casualty incident (MCI). Problem The aim of this study was to examine the type of injuries encountered in children and elderly patients and the implications of these injuries for treatment and organization. A review of medical record files of patients admitted in MCIs in one Level II trauma center was conducted. Patients were classified according to age: children (≤12 years), adults (between 12-65 years), and elders (≥65 years). The files of 534 were screened: 31 (5.8%) children and 54 (10.1%) elderly patients. One-third of the elderly patients were either moderately or severely injured, compared to only 6.5% of the children and 11.1% of the adults (P<.001). Elderly patients required more blood transfusions (P=.0001), more computed tomography imaging (P=.0001), and underwent more surgery (P=.0004). Elders were hospitalized longer (P=.0003). There was no mortality among injured children, compared to nine (2.0%) of the adults and seven (13.0%) of the elderly patients (P<.0001). All the adult deaths occurred early and directly related to their injuries, whereas most of the deaths among the elderly patients (four out of seven) occurred late and were due to complications and multiple organ failure. Injury at an older age confers an increased risk of complications and death in victims of MCIs. Ashkenazi I , Einav S , Olsha O , Turegano-Fuentes F , Krausz MM , Alfici R . The impact of age upon contingency planning for multiple-casualty incidents based on a single center's experience. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2016;31(5):492-497.

  17. Feasibility and Impact of an 8-Week Integrative Yoga Program in People with Moderate Multiple Sclerosis–Related Disability

    PubMed Central

    Kietrys, David; Fogerite, Susan Gould; Silva, Mariella; Logan, Kristen; Barone, Donald A.; Parrott, J. Scott

    2017-01-01

    Background: This pilot study determined the feasibility of a specifically designed 8-week yoga program for people with moderate multiple sclerosis (MS)–related disability. We explored the program's effect on quality of life (QOL) and physical and mental performance. Methods: We used a single-group design with repeated measurements at baseline, postintervention, and 8-week follow-up. Feasibility was examined through cost, recruitment, retention, attendance, and safety. Outcomes included the Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life Inventory (MSQLI), 12-item Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale (MSWS-12), Timed 25-Foot Walk test (T25FW), 6-Minute Walk Test (6MWT), Nine-Hole Peg Test (NHPT), Five-Times Sit-to-Stand Test (FTSTS), Multidirectional Reach Test (MDRT), maximum expiratory pressure, and Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test-3″ (PASAT-3″). Results: Fourteen participants completed the study. The program was feasible. There were significant main effects on the 36-item Short Form Health Status Survey Mental Component Summary (SF-36 MCS), Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS), Bladder Control Scale (BLCS), Perceived Deficits Questionnaire (PDQ), Mental Health Inventory (MHI), MSWS-12, T25FW, NHPT, PASAT-3″, 6MWT, FTSTS, and MDRT-Back. Improvements were found on the SF-36 MCS, MFIS, BLCS, PDQ, MHI, and MSWS-12 between baseline and postintervention. The effect on PDQ persisted at follow-up. Improvements were found on the T25FW, NHPT, 6MWT, FTSTS, and MDRT-Back between baseline and postintervention that persisted at follow-up. The PASAT-3″ did not change between baseline and postintervention but did between postintervention and follow-up. Conclusions: The yoga program was safe and feasible. Improvements in certain measures of QOL and performance were seen at postintervention and follow-up. PMID:28243184

  18. The Nicotinic Receptor Alpha7 Impacts the Mouse Lung Response to LPS through Multiple Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Enioutina, Elena Y.; Myers, Elizabeth J.; Tvrdik, Petr; Hoidal, John R.; Rogers, Scott W.; Gahring, Lorise C.

    2015-01-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha7 (α7) is expressed by neuronal and non-neuronal cells throughout the body. We examined the mechanisms of the lung inflammatory response to intranasal (i.n.) lipopolysaccharide (LPS) regulated by α7. This was done in mice using homologous recombination to introduce a point mutation in the α7 receptor that replaces the glutamate residue 260 that lines the pore with alanine (α7E260A), which has been implicated in controlling the exceptional calcium ion conductance of this receptor. The α7E260A mice exhibit normal inflammatory cell recruitment to the blood in response to i.n. LPS administration. This differs from the α7knock-out (α7KO) in which upstream signaling to initiate the recruitment to the blood following i.n. LPS is significantly impaired. While hematopoietic cells are recruited to the bloodstream in the α7E260A mouse, they fail to be recruited efficiently into both the interstitium and alveolar spaces of the lung. Bone marrow reconstitution experiments demonstrate that the responsiveness of both CD45+ and CD45- cells of the α7E260A mouse are impaired. The expression of several pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine RNAs including TNFα, IL-1α, Ccl2 and Cxcl10 are decreased in the α7E260A mouse. However, there is a substantial increase in IL-13 expression by CD45- lung interstitial cells in the α7E260A mouse. Our results support the conclusion that α7 functional pleiotropy contributes to modulating the tissue response to an inflammatory insult through impacting upon a variety of mechanisms reflecting the individual cell composition of the lung. PMID:25803612

  19. Multiple sevoflurane exposures in infant monkeys do not impact the mother-infant bond.

    PubMed

    Raper, Jessica; Bush, Angela; Murphy, Kathy L; Baxter, Mark G; Alvarado, Maria C

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to general anesthesia during the postnatal period is associated with death of brain cells as well as long-term impairments in cognitive and emotional behavior in animal models. These models are critical for investigating mechanisms of pediatric anesthetic neurotoxicity as well as for testing potential strategies for preventing or mitigating this toxicity. Control conditions for anesthesia exposure involve separation of conscious infants from their mothers for variable periods of time, which could have its own effect on subsequent behavior because of stress to the mother and/or infant as a consequence of separation.We are conducting a long-term study of infant rhesus monkeys exposed three times for 4h each to sevoflurane anesthesia during the first six postnatal weeks, with a comparison condition of control infant monkeys that undergo brief maternal separations on the same schedule, to equate the period of time each infant is conscious and separated from its mother. Because mothers are separated from their infants longer for infants in the anesthesia condition, this could modify maternal behavior toward the infant, which may influence subsequent socioemotional behavior in the infants. In this study, we analyzed maternal behavior immediately after the first post-anesthesia (or control) reunion, as well as during reintroduction of the mother-infant pair to the larger social group 24 hpost-anesthesia or control separation, and found no differences between the conditions with mothers spending most of their time in contact with infants in all conditions analyzed. This indicates that the different durations of maternal separation in this study design do not impact the mother-infant bond, strengthening conclusions that subsequent differences in behavior between monkeys exposed to anesthesia compared to controls are a consequence of anesthesia exposure and not differential maternal behavior in the two conditions.

  20. Impact of elimination diets on growth and nutritional status in children with multiple food allergies.

    PubMed

    Berry, Melissa J; Adams, Jennifer; Voutilainen, Helena; Feustel, Paul J; Celestin, Jocelyn; Järvinen, Kirsi M

    2015-03-01

    Impairment of growth has been reported in food-allergic children. It is not known whether this is related to the extent of food allergies. We sought to compare growth, nutritional status, and nutrient intake in children with food allergy either avoiding cow's milk or avoiding cow's milk and wheat, which are staples of the diet in young children. Infants and young children with challenge-proven allergy were recruited to this prospective study. They were strictly avoiding their allergic food triggers, either cow's milk, or cow's milk and wheat. They were counseled by a dietitian specialized in food allergies on food avoidance diets and nutritionally adequate supplementation at regular intervals. A 3-day food diary was kept. Children's height, weight, and laboratory data for nutritional parameters were monitored at 8-month intervals. A total of 18 patients avoiding milk and 28 patients avoiding milk and wheat were evaluated at an average of 12, 21, and 28 months of age. During the follow-up, the markers of nutritional status, nutrient intake or height for age, and weight for height were comparable between the two groups, although the means for anthropometric measures were below the average for age in both groups. The extent of food elimination diet has no impact on growth or nutritional status of food-allergic children, when diet is adequately supplemented. Close physician and dietitian follow-up are essential for food-allergic children when avoiding one or more foods, which are staples of the diet. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The mystery of oncogenic KRAS: Lessons from studying its wild-type counter part.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yuan-I; Damnernsawad, Alisa; Kong, Guangyao; You, Xiaona; Wang, Demin; Zhang, Jing

    2016-07-22

    Using conditional knock-in mouse models, we and others have shown that despite the very high sequence identity between Nras and Kras proteins, oncogenic Kras displays a much stronger leukemogenic activity than oncogenic Nras in vivo. In this manuscript, we will summarize our recent work of characterizing wild-type Kras function in adult hematopoiesis and in oncogenic Kras-induced leukemogenesis. We attribute the strong leukemogenic activity of oncogenic Kras to 2 unique aspects of Kras signaling. First, Kras is required in mediating cell type- and cytokine-specific ERK1/2 signaling. Second, oncogenic Kras, but not oncogenic Nras, induces hyperactivation of wild-type Ras, which significantly enhances Ras signaling in vivo. We will also discuss a possible mechanism that mediates oncogenic Kras-evoked hyperactivation of wild-type Ras and a potential approach to down-regulate oncogenic Kras signaling.

  2. Oncogenic KRAS Regulates Tumor Cell Signaling via Stromal Reciprocation

    PubMed Central

    Tape, Christopher J.; Ling, Stephanie; Dimitriadi, Maria; McMahon, Kelly M.; Worboys, Jonathan D.; Leong, Hui Sun; Norrie, Ida C.; Miller, Crispin J.; Poulogiannis, George; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Jørgensen, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Summary Oncogenic mutations regulate signaling within both tumor cells and adjacent stromal cells. Here, we show that oncogenic KRAS (KRASG12D) also regulates tumor cell signaling via stromal cells. By combining cell-specific proteome labeling with multivariate phosphoproteomics, we analyzed heterocellular KRASG12D signaling in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) cells. Tumor cell KRASG12D engages heterotypic fibroblasts, which subsequently instigate reciprocal signaling in the tumor cells. Reciprocal signaling employs additional kinases and doubles the number of regulated signaling nodes from cell-autonomous KRASG12D. Consequently, reciprocal KRASG12D produces a tumor cell phosphoproteome and total proteome that is distinct from cell-autonomous KRASG12D alone. Reciprocal signaling regulates tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis and increases mitochondrial capacity via an IGF1R/AXL-AKT axis. These results demonstrate that oncogene signaling should be viewed as a heterocellular process and that our existing cell-autonomous perspective underrepresents the extent of oncogene signaling in cancer. Video Abstract PMID:27087446

  3. c-Abl antagonizes the YAP oncogenic function

    PubMed Central

    Keshet, R; Adler, J; Ricardo Lax, I; Shanzer, M; Porat, Z; Reuven, N; Shaul, Y

    2015-01-01

    YES-associated protein (YAP) is a central transcription coactivator that functions as an oncogene in a number of experimental systems. However, under DNA damage, YAP activates pro-apoptotic genes in conjunction with p73. This program switching is mediated by c-Abl (Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene) via phosphorylation of YAP at the Y357 residue (pY357). YAP as an oncogene coactivates the TEAD (transcriptional enhancer activator domain) family transcription factors. Here we asked whether c-Abl regulates the YAP–TEAD functional module. We found that DNA damage, through c-Abl activation, specifically depressed YAP–TEAD-induced transcription. Remarkably, c-Abl counteracts YAP-induced transformation by interfering with the YAP–TEAD transcriptional program. c-Abl induced TEAD1 phosphorylation, but the YAP–TEAD complex remained unaffected. In contrast, TEAD coactivation was compromised by phosphomimetic YAP Y357E mutation but not Y357F, as demonstrated at the level of reporter genes and endogenous TEAD target genes. Furthermore, YAP Y357E also severely compromised the role of YAP in cell transformation, migration, anchorage-independent growth, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in human mammary MCF10A cells. These results suggest that YAP pY357 lost TEAD transcription activation function. Our results demonstrate that YAP pY357 inactivates YAP oncogenic function and establish a role for YAP Y357 phosphorylation in cell-fate decision. PMID:25361080

  4. c-Abl antagonizes the YAP oncogenic function.

    PubMed

    Keshet, R; Adler, J; Ricardo Lax, I; Shanzer, M; Porat, Z; Reuven, N; Shaul, Y

    2015-06-01

    YES-associated protein (YAP) is a central transcription coactivator that functions as an oncogene in a number of experimental systems. However, under DNA damage, YAP activates pro-apoptotic genes in conjunction with p73. This program switching is mediated by c-Abl (Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene) via phosphorylation of YAP at the Y357 residue (pY357). YAP as an oncogene coactivates the TEAD (transcriptional enhancer activator domain) family transcription factors. Here we asked whether c-Abl regulates the YAP-TEAD functional module. We found that DNA damage, through c-Abl activation, specifically depressed YAP-TEAD-induced transcription. Remarkably, c-Abl counteracts YAP-induced transformation by interfering with the YAP-TEAD transcriptional program. c-Abl induced TEAD1 phosphorylation, but the YAP-TEAD complex remained unaffected. In contrast, TEAD coactivation was compromised by phosphomimetic YAP Y357E mutation but not Y357F, as demonstrated at the level of reporter genes and endogenous TEAD target genes. Furthermore, YAP Y357E also severely compromised the role of YAP in cell transformation, migration, anchorage-independent growth, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in human mammary MCF10A cells. These results suggest that YAP pY357 lost TEAD transcription activation function. Our results demonstrate that YAP pY357 inactivates YAP oncogenic function and establish a role for YAP Y357 phosphorylation in cell-fate decision.

  5. Targeting Oncogenic Mutant p53 for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Parrales, Alejandro; Iwakuma, Tomoo

    2015-01-01

    Among genetic alterations in human cancers, mutations in the tumor suppressor p53 gene are the most common, occurring in over 50% of human cancers. The majority of p53 mutations are missense mutations and result in the accumulation of dysfunctional p53 protein in tumors. These mutants frequently have oncogenic gain-of-function activities and exacerbate malignant properties of cancer cells, such as metastasis and drug resistance. Increasing evidence reveals that stabilization of mutant p53 in tumors is crucial for its oncogenic activities, while depletion of mutant p53 attenuates malignant properties of cancer cells. Thus, mutant p53 is an attractive druggable target for cancer therapy. Different approaches have been taken to develop small-molecule compounds that specifically target mutant p53. These include compounds that restore wild-type conformation and transcriptional activity of mutant p53, induce depletion of mutant p53, inhibit downstream pathways of oncogenic mutant p53, and induce synthetic lethality to mutant p53. In this review article, we comprehensively discuss the current strategies targeting oncogenic mutant p53 in cancers, with special focus on compounds that restore wild-type p53 transcriptional activity of mutant p53 and those reducing mutant p53 levels.

  6. Role of ets Oncogenes in the Progression of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-10-01

    Mazabraud A. (1988). Cancer Kato J, Matsuoka M, Polyak K, Massague J and Sherr CJ. Genet. Cytogenet., 32, 229-238. (1994). Cell, 79, 487-496. Vairo G...Francisco LV , Roach JC, Argonza R, D, Weber BL and EI-Deiryh WS. (1998). Oncogene, 16, King MC and Ostrander EA. (1996). Human Mol. Genet., 1713-1721. 5

  7. Oncogenic cancer/testis antigens: prime candidates for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gjerstorff, Morten F; Andersen, Mads H; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2015-06-30

    Recent developments have set the stage for immunotherapy as a supplement to conventional cancer treatment. Consequently, a significant effort is required to further improve efficacy and specificity, particularly the identification of optimal therapeutic targets for clinical testing. Cancer/testis antigens are immunogenic, highly cancer-specific, and frequently expressed in various types of cancer, which make them promising candidate targets for cancer immunotherapy, including cancer vaccination and adoptive T-cell transfer with chimeric T-cell receptors. Our current understanding of tumor immunology and immune escape suggests that targeting oncogenic antigens may be beneficial, meaning that identification of cancer/testis antigens with oncogenic properties is of high priority. Recent work from our lab and others provide evidence that many cancer/testis antigens, in fact, have oncogenic functions, including support of growth, survival and metastasis. This novel insight into the function of cancer/testis antigens has the potential to deliver more effective cancer vaccines. Moreover, immune targeting of oncogenic cancer/testis antigens in combination with conventional cytotoxic therapies or novel immunotherapies such as checkpoint blockade or adoptive transfer, represents a highly synergistic approach with the potential to improve patient survival.

  8. Folate levels modulate oncogene-induced replication stress and tumorigenicity

    PubMed Central

    Lamm, Noa; Maoz, Karin; Bester, Assaf C; Im, Michael M; Shewach, Donna S; Karni, Rotem; Kerem, Batsheva

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal instability in early cancer stages is caused by replication stress. One mechanism by which oncogene expression induces replication stress is to drive cell proliferation with insufficient nucleotide levels. Cancer development is driven by alterations in both genetic and environmental factors. Here, we investigated whether replication stress can be modulated by both genetic and non-genetic factors and whether the extent of replication stress affects the probability of neoplastic transformation. To do so, we studied the effect of folate, a micronutrient that is essential for nucleotide biosynthesis, on oncogene-induced tumorigenicity. We show that folate deficiency by itself leads to replication stress in a concentration-dependent manner. Folate deficiency significantly enhances oncogene-induced replication stress, leading to increased DNA damage and tumorigenicity in vitro. Importantly, oncogene-expressing cells, when grown under folate deficiency, exhibit a significantly increased frequency of tumor development in mice. These findings suggest that replication stress is a quantitative trait affected by both genetic and non-genetic factors and that the extent of replication stress plays an important role in cancer development. PMID:26197802

  9. The Oncogenic Hazard from Chronic Inhalation of Hydrazine,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    kidneys, thyroids, adrenals; and liver hemosiderosis, kidney mineralization, general degeneration of the adrenals; and senile atrophy ...nasal polyps. Small numbers of villous nasal polyps, muco-epidermoid papillomas, and squamous cell papillomas were also noted. The incidence of these...unexposed controls that are usually associated with aging such as amyloidosis and senile atrophy of the testes. Analysis of the oncogenic changes and other

  10. Activation of oncogenes by radon progeny and x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    The overall goal of this proposal is to study the carcinogenic effect of both high and low LET radiation at the molecular level, utilizing techniques developed in molecular biology, cancer cell biology and radiation biology. The underlying assumption is that malignant transformation of normal cells is a multistep process requiring two or more molecular events in the genomic DNA. These events are most likely the activation of proto-oncogenes, or the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. We hypothesize that radiation may induce such events in one or more steps of the multistep process. We will use in vitro models of transformation that reproduce the stepwise progression of normal cells towards the transformed phenotype and ask whether radiation can provide the necessary activating function at discrete steps along this path. Our strategy involves transfecting into normal primary cells a variety of cloned oncogenes that are known to supply only some of the functions necessary for full transformation. These partially transformed'' cells will be the targets for irradiation by x-rays and alpha particles. The results will provide the basis for assessing the ability of ionizing radiation to activate oncogenic functions that complement'' the oncogene already present in the transfected ells and produce the fully transformed phenotype. 121 refs.

  11. Mutagen and Oncogen Study on Nitroguanidine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-09-01

    tests measuring potential germ cell effects in mice and rats. Nitroguanidine produced no evidence of genetic activity in any of the studies comprising...vitro assays employing microbial cells, mammalian cells in culture and in vivo tests measuring potential germ cell effects in mice and rats. This...negative the impact of the positive response will be reduced. Conversely, if all tests show positive effects , the application of this broad-based response

  12. Impact of neighbourhood land-cover in epiphytic lichen diversity: analysis of multiple factors working at different spatial scales.

    PubMed

    Pinho, P; Augusto, S; Máguas, C; Pereira, M J; Soares, A; Branquinho, C

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the impact of neighbourhood land-cover in epiphytic lichen diversity. We used geostatistics to analyse the spatial structure of lichen-indicators (number of lichen species and Lichen Diversity Value) and correlate them to land-cover considering different distances from the observed data. The results showed that lichen diversity was influenced by different environmental factors that act in the same territory but impact lichens at different distances from the source. The differences in the distance of influence of the several land-cover types seem to be related to the size of pollutants/particles that predominantly are dispersed by each land-cover type. We also showed that a local scale of analysis gives a deeper insight into the understanding of lichen richness and abundance in the region. This work highlighted the importance of a multiple spatial scale of analysis to deeply interpret the relation between lichen diversity and the underling environmental factors.

  13. Relationships among multiple aspects of agriculture's environmental impact and productivity: a meta-analysis to guide sustainable agriculture.

    PubMed

    German, Richard N; Thompson, Catherine E; Benton, Tim G

    2017-05-01

    Given the pressures on land to produce ever more food, doing it 'sustainably' is growing in importance. However, 'sustainable agriculture' is complex to define, not least because agriculture impacts in many different ways and it is not clear how different aspects of sustainability may be in synergy or trade off against each other. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess the relationships between multiple measures of sustainability using novel analytical methods, based around defining the efficiency frontier in the relationship between variables, as well as using correlation analysis. We define 20 grouped variables of agriculture's impact (e.g. on soil, greenhouse gas, water, biodiversity) and find evidence of both strong positive and negative correlations between them. Analysis based on the efficiency frontier suggests that trade-offs can be 'softened' by exploiting the natural between-study variation that arises from a combination of farming best practice and context. Nonetheless, the literature provides strong evidence of the relationship between yields and the negative externalities created by farming across a range of measures. © 2016 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  14. Validity and reliability of the Serbian version of Patient-Reported Impact of Spasticity Measure in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Knezevic, Tatjana; Konstantinovic, Ljubica; Rodic, Sindi; Foti, Calogero; Drulovic, Jelena; Dackovic, Jelena; Nikolic, Dejan; Petronic, Ivana; Stokic, Dobrivoje S

    2015-09-01

    The Patient-Reported Impact of Spasticity Measure (PRISM) has been developed recently to assess the impact of spasticity on quality of life after spinal cord injury. Although PRISM may also be useful in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), its psychometric properties in MS have not been established and PRISM is currently available only in English. The aims of this cross-sectional study were to translate PRISM into the Serbian language (PRISMSR) and examine its validity (construct, convergent, divergent) and reliability (internal consistency, test-retest reliability) in 48 patients with spasticity because of MS diagnosed at least 1 year earlier and in remission at least 3 months. PRISMSR was administered twice 3 days apart. The validity of seven PRISMSR subscales was examined against the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), the Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) for spasticity, sex, and education. Internal consistency was assessed with Cronbach α and test-retest reliability with intraclass correlation coefficient for agreement (ICC2,1). During the forward-backward translation, only one PRISM item required minor cultural adaption. Almost all PRISMSR scores correlated significantly with MAS and NRS scores (r=0.29-0.51, 0.001≤P≤0.043). They were all significantly higher for MAS≥2 group versus the MAS<2 group (0.003≤P≤0.035) and for the NRS≥7 group versus the NRS<7 group (0.001≤P≤0.042), except for the Social Embarrassment subscale (P=0.083). The PRISMSR scores were not significantly different between sexes (P≥0.104) or those with high school versus college degree (P≥0.139). Both Cronbach α (0.78-0.93) and test-retest ICC2,1 (0.82-0.90) were high. The original PRISM may be translated successfully into other languages. PRISMSR shows adequate validity and reliability for assessing the impact of spasticity on quality of life in patients with MS.

  15. Inhibition of the Pim1 Oncogene Results in Diminished Visual Function

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jun; Shine, Lisa; Raycroft, Francis; Deeti, Sudhakar; Reynolds, Alison; Ackerman, Kristin M.; Glaviano, Antonino; O'Farrell, Sean; O'Leary, Olivia; Kilty, Claire; Kennedy, Ciaran; McLoughlin, Sarah; Rice, Megan; Russell, Eileen; Higgins, Desmond G.; Hyde, David R.; Kennedy, Breandan N.

    2012-01-01

    Our objective was to profile genetic pathways whose differential expression correlates with maturation of visual function in zebrafish. Bioinformatic analysis of transcriptomic data revealed Jak-Stat signalling as the pathway most enriched in the eye, as visual function develops. Real-time PCR, western blotting, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization data confirm that multiple Jak-Stat pathway genes are up-regulated in the zebrafish eye between 3–5 days post-fertilisation, times associated with significant maturation of vision. One of the most up-regulated Jak-Stat genes is the proto-oncogene Pim1 kinase, previously associated with haematological malignancies and cancer. Loss of function experiments using Pim1 morpholinos or Pim1 inhibitors result in significant diminishment of visual behaviour and function. In summary, we have identified that enhanced expression of Jak-Stat pathway genes correlates with maturation of visual function and that the Pim1 oncogene is required for normal visual function. PMID:23300608

  16. Beyond ALK-RET, ROS1 and other oncogene fusions in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nakaoku, Takashi; Tsuta, Koji; Tsuchihara, Katsuya; Matsumoto, Shingo; Yoh, Kiyotaka; Goto, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Fusions of the RET and ROS1 protein tyrosine kinase oncogenes with several partner genes were recently identified as new targetable genetic aberrations in cases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) lacking activating EGFR, KRAS, ALK, BRAF, or HER2 oncogene aberrations. RET and ROS1 fusion-positive tumors are mainly observed in young, female, and/or never smoking patients. Studies based on in vitro and in vivo (i.e., mouse) models and studies of several fusion-positive patients indicate that inhibiting the kinase activity of the RET and ROS1 fusion proteins is a promising therapeutic strategy. Accordingly, there are several ongoing clinical trials aimed at examining the efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) against RET and ROS1 proteins in patients with fusion-positive lung cancer. Other gene fusions (NTRK1, NRG1, and FGFR1/2/3) that are targetable by existing TKIs have also been identified in NSCLCs. Options for personalized lung cancer therapy will be increased with the help of multiplex diagnosis systems able to detect multiple druggable gene fusions. PMID:25870798

  17. Simultaneous detection, typing and quantitation of oncogenic human papillomavirus by multiplex consensus real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Andrew; Allum, Anne-Gry; Strand, Linda; Aakre, Randi Kersten

    2013-02-01

    A consensus multiplex real-time PCR test (PT13-RT) for the oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59 and 66 is described. The test targets the L1 gene. Analytical sensitivity is between 4 and 400 GU (genomic units) in the presence of 500 ng of human DNA, corresponding to 75,000 human cells. HPV types are grouped into multiplex groups of 3 or 4 resulting in the use of 4 wells per sample and permitting up to 24 samples per run (including controls) in a standard 96-well real-time PCR instrument. False negative results are avoided by (a) measuring sample DNA concentration to control that sufficient cellular material is present and (b) including HPV type 6 as a homologous internal control in order to detect PCR inhibition or competition from other (non-oncogenic) HPV types. Analysis time from refrigerator to report is 8 h, including 2.5 h hands-on time. Relative to the HC2 test, the sensitivity and specificity were respectively 98% and 83%, the lower specificity being attributable to the higher analytical sensitivity of PT13-RT. To assess type determination comparison was made with a reversed line-blot test. Type concordance was high (κ=0.79) with discrepancies occurring mostly in multiple-positive samples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Strategies of oncogenic microbes to deal with WW domain-containing oxidoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Yu-Yan; Hsiao, Jenn-Ren; Chang, Nan-Shan

    2015-01-01

    WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) is a well-documented tumor suppressor protein that controls growth, survival, and metastasis of malignant cells. To counteract WWOX’s suppressive effects, cancer cells have developed many strategies either to downregulate WWOX expression or to functionally inactivate WWOX. Relatively unknown is, in the context of those cancers associated with certain viruses or bacteria, how the oncogenic pathogens deal with WWOX. Here we review recent studies showing different strategies utilized by three cancer-associated pathogens. Helicobactor pylori reduces WWOX expression through promoter hypermethylation, an epigenetic mechanism also occurring in many other cancer cells. WWOX has a potential to block canonical NF-κB activation and tumorigenesis induced by Tax, an oncoprotein of human T-cell leukemia virus. Tax successfully overcomes the blockage by inhibiting WWOX expression through activation of the non-canonical NF-κB pathway. On the other hand, latent membrane protein 2A of Epstein–Barr virus physically interacts with WWOX and redirects its function to trigger a signaling pathway that upregulates matrix metalloproteinase 9 and cancer cell invasion. These reports may be just “the tip of the iceberg” regarding multiple interactions between WWOX and oncogenic microbes. Further studies in this direction should expand our understanding of infection-driven oncogenesis. PMID:25488911

  19. The use of Gene Ontology terms and KEGG pathways for analysis and prediction of oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Xing, Zhihao; Chu, Chen; Chen, Lei; Kong, Xiangyin

    2016-11-01

    Oncogenes are a type of genes that have the potential to cause cancer. Most normal cells undergo programmed cell death, namely apoptosis, but activated oncogenes can help cells avoid apoptosis and survive. Thus, studying oncogenes is helpful for obtaining a good understanding of the formation and development of various types of cancers. In this study, we proposed a computational method, called OPM, for investigating oncogenes from the view of Gene Ontology (GO) and biological pathways. All investigated genes, including validated oncogenes retrieved from some public databases and other genes that have not been reported to be oncogenes thus far, were encoded into numeric vectors according to the enrichment theory of GO terms and KEGG pathways. Some popular feature selection methods, minimum redundancy maximum relevance and incremental feature selection, and an advanced machine learning algorithm, random forest, were adopted to analyze the numeric vectors to extract key GO terms and KEGG pathways. Along with the oncogenes, GO terms and KEGG pathways were discussed in terms of their relevance in this study. Some important GO terms and KEGG pathways were extracted using feature selection methods and were confirmed to be highly related to oncogenes. Additionally, the importance of these terms and pathways in predicting oncogenes was further demonstrated by finding new putative oncogenes based on them. This study investigated oncogenes based on GO terms and KEGG pathways. Some important GO terms and KEGG pathways were confirmed to be highly related to oncogenes. We hope that these GO terms and KEGG pathways can provide new insight for the study of oncogenes, particularly for building more effective prediction models to identify novel oncogenes. The program is available upon request. We hope that the new findings listed in this study may provide a new insight for the investigation of oncogenes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "System Genetics" Guest Editor

  20. Examination of Health Effects and Long-Term Impacts of Deployments of Multiple Tag Types on Blue, Humpback, and Gray Whales in the Eastern North Pacific

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    1 Examination of health effects and long-term impacts of deployments of multiple tag types on blue, humpback , and gray whales in the eastern...blue, humpback , and gray whales by conducting long term follow up of previously tagged individuals in the eastern North Pacific. We examine the long...term impacts on health, reproduction, and mortality unitizing the past deployments of implant and suction cup tags on blue, humpback , and gray whales

  1. DNA polymorphism analysis of hereditary multiple exostoses in horses.

    PubMed

    Li, J K; Moloney, B K; Shupe, J L; Gardner, E J; Leone, N C; Elsner, Y

    1989-06-01

    Genomic DNA polymorphisms obtained by restriction fragment-length polymorphism from healthy horses and horses with hereditary multiple exostoses were analyzed. These DNA were digested by 12 restriction enzymes and were hybridized against 6 isotopically labeled oncogene probes. Hybridization was not detected with the viral oncogene, v-ras, which indicated this oncogene was absent in the equine genome. Oncogenes (c-raf-1, c-fes, c-myb, c-myc, and c-sis) were present and had similar hybridization patterns and signal intensities in DNA from healthy horses and horses with hereditary multiple exostoses. Unique and distinct restriction fragment-length polymorphisms were detected with the c-raf-1 probe only in BamHI- and PstI-digested equine DNA.

  2. The impact of chemical pollution on the resilience of soils under multiple stresses: A conceptual framework for future research.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, Andreas; Amelung, Wulf; Hollert, Henner; Kaestner, Matthias; Kandeler, Ellen; Kruse, Jens; Miltner, Anja; Ottermanns, Richard; Pagel, Holger; Peth, Stephan; Poll, Christian; Rambold, Gerhard; Schloter, Michael; Schulz, Stefanie; Streck, Thilo; Roß-Nickoll, Martina

    2016-10-15

    Soils are faced with man-made chemical stress factors, such as the input of organic or metal-containing pesticides, in combination with non-chemical stressors like soil compaction and natural disturbance like drought. Although multiple stress factors are typically co-occurring in soil ecosystems, research in soil sciences on this aspect is limited and focuses mostly on single structural or functional endpoints. A mechanistic understanding of the reaction of soils to multiple stressors is currently lacking. Based on a review of resilience theory, we introduce a new concept for research on the ability of polluted soil (xenobiotics or other chemical pollutants as one stressor) to resist further natural or anthropogenic stress and to retain its functions and structure. There is strong indication that pollution as a primary stressor will change the system reaction of soil, i.e., its resilience, stability and resistance. It can be expected that pollution affects the physiological adaption of organisms and the functional redundancy of the soil to further stress. We hypothesize that the recovery of organisms and chemical-physical properties after impact of a follow-up stressor is faster in polluted soil than in non-polluted soil, i.e., polluted soil has a higher dynamical stability (dynamical stability=1/recovery time), whereas resilience of the contaminated soil is lower compared to that of not or less contaminated soil. Thus, a polluted soil might be more prone to change into another system regime after occurrence of further stress. We highlight this issue by compiling the literature exemplarily for the effects of Cu contamination and compaction on soil functions and structure. We propose to intensify research on effects of combined stresses involving a multidisciplinary team of experts and provide suggestions for corresponding experiments. Our concept offers thus a framework for system level analysis of soils paving the way to enhance ecological theory.

  3. Role of executive functions in prospective memory in multiple sclerosis: Impact of the strength of cue-action association.

    PubMed

    Dagenais, Emmanuelle; Rouleau, Isabelle; Tremblay, Alexandra; Demers, Mélanie; Roger, Élaine; Jobin, Céline; Duquette, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Patients diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) often report prospective memory (PM) deficits. Although PM is important for daily functioning, it is not formally assessed in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to examine the role of executive functions in MS patients' PM revealed by the effect of strength of cue-action association on PM performance. Thirty-nine MS patients were compared to 18 healthy controls matched for age, gender, and education on a PM task modulating the strength of association between the cue and the intended action. Deficits in MS patients affecting both prospective and retrospective components of PM were confirmed using 2 × 2 × 2 mixed analyses of variance (ANOVAs). Among patients, multiple regression analyses revealed that the impairment was modulated by the efficiency of executive functions, whereas retrospective memory seemed to have little impact on PM performance, contrary to expectation. More specifically, results of 2 × 2 × 2 mixed-model analyses of covariance (ANCOVAs) showed that low-executive patients had more difficulty detecting and, especially, retrieving the appropriate action when the cue and the action were unrelated, whereas high-executive patients' performance seemed to be virtually unaffected by the cue-action association. Using an objective measure, these findings confirm the presence of PM deficits in MS. They also suggest that such deficits depend on executive functioning and can be reduced when automatic PM processes are engaged through semantic cue-action association. They underscore the importance of assessing PM in clinical settings through a cognitive evaluation and offer an interesting avenue for rehabilitation.

  4. Impact of mobility impairment on indirect costs and health-related quality of life in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Craig I; Sidovar, Matthew F; Roberts, Matthew S; Kohn, Christine

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to estimate the indirect costs and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) (utilities) of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients in the United States (US), and to determine the impact of worsening mobility on these parameters. In collaboration with the North American Research Committee on Multiple Sclerosis (NARCOMS) registry we conducted a cross-sectional study of participants who completed the biannual update and supplemental spring 2010 survey. Demographic, employment status, income, mobility impairment, and health utility data were collected from a sample of registry participants who met the study criteria and agreed to participate in the supplemental Mobility Study. Mean annual indirect costs per participant in 2011US$ and mean utilities for the population and for cohorts reporting different levels of mobility impairment were estimated. Analyses included 3,484 to 3,611 participants, based on survey completeness. Thirty-seven percent of registrants were not working or attending school and 46.7% of these reported retiring early. Indirect costs per participant per year, not including informal caregiver cost, were estimated at $30,601±31,184. The largest relative increase in indirect costs occurred at earlier mobility impairment stages, regardless of the measure used. Participants' mean utility score (0.73±0.18) was lower than that of a similarly aged sample from the general US population (0.87). As with indirect costs, larger decrements in utility were seen at earlier mobility impairment stages. These results suggest that mobility impairment may contribute to increases in indirect costs and declines in HRQoL in MS patients.