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Sample records for impaired glucose tolerance the

  1. The "muffin test"--an alternative to the oral glucose tolerance test for detecting impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Traub, Michael L; Jain, Akas; Maslow, Bat-Sheva; Pal, Lubna; Stein, Daniel T; Santoro, Nanette; Freeman, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of the "muffin test" (MT) with that of the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in diagnosing impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). This is a cross-sectional study in a single academic institution. The participants were 73 women aged 42 to 58 years, less than 36 months after menopause, recruited for the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study Trial. After a 10-hour fasting blood draw, the participants were provided a muffin and a beverage. Two-hour glucose levels were assessed. A subset underwent metabolic testing consisting of an OGTT (n = 12) and a mixed-meal tolerance test (n = 10). The main outcome measures were the prevalence of IGT and 2-hour glucose measurements after each testing method. Two-hour glucose levels were linearly related to fasting values by multivariable linear regression. This association was exaggerated in overweight (body mass index, 25 kg/m2) women (coefficient, 1.43; P < 0.001). Two-hour OGTT and MT glucose levels were comparable (P > 0.05); 2-hour glucose levels after OGTT were slightly lower than after the mixed-meal tolerance test (P < 0.05). The prevalence of IGT was 11% (8 of 73). Fasting plasma glucose alone would have missed 63% of cases (five of eight cases). The MT demonstrated 100% sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing IGT compared with the gold standard OGTT. This small pilot study should be confirmed in a larger prospective group of participants.

  2. The hypertriglyceridemia is associated with isolated impaired glucose tolerance in subjects without insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Simental-Mendía, Luis E; Rodríguez-Morán, Martha; Guerrero-Romero, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if hypertriglyceridemia is associated with isolated impaired glucose tolerance in subjects without insulin resistance. A total of 365 apparently healthy individuals aged 20-65 years were enrolled in a population-based cross-sectional study. Subjects were allocated into the groups with and without hypertriglyceridemia. Age, gender, body mass index, and waist circumference were matched criteria. Individuals with impaired fasting glucose, impaired fasting glucose+impaired glucose tolerance, diabetes, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index ≥ 2.5, and/or chronic illnesses such as renal disease or malignancy were excluded. Hypertriglyceridemia was defined by triglycerides levels ≥ 150 mg/dL. Impaired glucose tolerance was defined by plasma glucose concentration 2-h post-load glucose ≥ 140 mg/dL <200 mg/dL. Subjects with impaired glucose tolerance were required to have fasting plasma glucose levels <100 mg/dL. Logistic regression analysis was used to compute the odds ratio between hypertriglyceridemia (independent variable) and impaired glucose tolerance (dependent variable). A total of 132 and 233 subjects were allocated into the groups with and without hypertriglyceridemia, respectively. The frequency of impaired glucose tolerance was 13.6% and 5.6% in the individuals with and without hypertriglyceridemia, p = 0.01. The logistic regression analysis adjusted by gender, blood pressure, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol showed that hypertriglyceridemia is significantly associated with impaired glucose tolerance (OR 2.34; 95% CI: 1.02-5.32, p = 0.04). Results of this study indicate that hypertriglyceridemia is independently associated with isolated impaired glucose tolerance in subjects without insulin resistance.

  3. Sodium salicylate restores the impaired insulin response to glucose and improves glucose tolerance in heroin addicts.

    PubMed

    Giugliano, D; Quatraro, A; Consoli, G; Stante, A; Simeone, V; Ceriello, A; Paolisso, G; Torella, R

    1987-01-01

    Plasma glucose, insulin, C-peptide, glucagon and growth hormone responses to intravenous glucose were evaluated in 10 heroin addicts in the basal state and during an infusion of sodium salicylate, an inhibitor of endogenous prostaglandin synthesis. Ten normal subjects, matched for age, sex and weight served as controls. In the basal state, the heroin addicts had markedly reduced insulin responses to intravenous glucose and low glucose disappearance rates (p less than 0.01 vs controls). The infusion of sodium salicylate caused a striking increase of the acute insulin response to intravenous glucose (from 14.5 +/- 4 microU/ml to 88 +/- 11 microU/ml, p less than 0.001) and restored to normal the reduced glucose tolerance (KG from 1.10 +/- 0.1% min-1 to 2.04 +/- 0.19% min-1). Hypoglycemic values were found in all addicts at the end of the test during salicylate infusion. Indomethacin pretreatment in five additional addicts also caused normalization of the impaired insulin responses to the intravenous glucose challenge and restored to normal the reduced glucose disappearance rate. Plasma glucagon and growth hormone levels were normally suppressed by glucose in addicts in basal conditions; sodium salicylate infusion completely overturned these hormonal responses which became positive in the first 15 min following the glucose challenge. These results demonstrate that the two prostaglandin synthesis inhibitors can restore the impaired B-cell response to glucose in heroin addicts to normal, indicating that this response is not lost but is inhibited by heroin itself or by other substances, perhaps by the endogenous prostaglandins.

  4. Different levels of thyroid hormones between impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance: free T3 affects the prevalence of impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance in opposite ways.

    PubMed

    Jing, Su; Xiaoying, Ding; Ying, Xu; Rui, Liu; Mingyu, Gu; Yuting, Chen; Yanhua, Yin; Yufan, Wang; Haiyan, Sun; Yongde, Peng

    2014-06-01

    There is an association between thyroid disorders and diabetes mellitus. To investigate thyroid hormone levels in different glucose metabolic statuses, analyse relationships between thyroid hormone levels and different categories of prediabetes and metabolic parameters within a large euthyroid nondiabetic population. A total of 3328 subjects without diabetes or thyroid dysfunction were included in this cross-sectional study. Subjects were divided in to four groups [normal glucose tolerance (NGR), impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and combined glucose intolerance (CGI)] according to the results of oral glucose tolerance test. Participants were then divided into four groups according to the quartile of free T3 (FT3) in their blood. Subjects with IFG had higher levels of FT3 and ratio of FT3 to FT4 (FT3/FT4), but lower level of free T4 (FT4) than subjects with IGT. FT3/FT4 was negatively associated with postprandial plasma glucose (PPG) [standardized β (β) = -0·087; P < 0·001]. The prevalence of IFG and CGI was increased with the level of FT3, while the prevalence of IGT was decreased with the level of FT3 (P for trend: <0·001, 0·003 and <0·001, respectively). FT3 was negatively associated with the risk of IGT (OR = 0·409, 95% CI 0·179-0·935), whereas FT4 was positively associated with the risk of IGT (OR = 1·296, 95% CI 1·004-1·673). Free thyroid hormone levels were different between subjects with IFG and IGT. FT3 affects the prevalence of IFG and IGT in opposite ways. The difference in thyroid hormone levels may play an important role in the different pathological mechanisms of IFG and IGT. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Obesity is the predominant predictor of impaired glucose tolerance and metabolic disturbance in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liang, So-Jung; Liou, Tsan-Hon; Lin, Hui-Wen; Hsu, Chun-Sen; Tzeng, Chii-Ruey; Hsu, Ming-I

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate the contribution to glucose intolerance and metabolic syndrome of obesity combined with the diagnostic criteria of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Prospective study. University teaching hospital from 31 August 2010 to 31 August 2011. Two hundred and twenty women with PCOS and seventy normal control women. The clinical and biochemical characteristics of women with PCOS and control women were evaluated. Main outcome measures. The impact of obesity, hyperandrogenism, oligo-anovulation and polycystic ovary morphology on impaired glucose tolerance and metabolic disturbances. Obese women with PCOS had significantly higher insulin resistance than obese normal control women. Logistic regression analysis showed that obesity was the only factor that predicted impaired glucose tolerance and metabolic syndrome. Use of the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) for the body mass index to predict impaired glucose tolerance and metabolic syndrome was more accurate than AUROCs for serum total testosterone level and the average menstrual interval. Body weight status was the major factor determining the risk of impaired glucose tolerance and metabolic syndrome in women with PCOS. Obesity should be treated as the major factor determining long-term health consequences associated with PCOS. © 2012 The Authors Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica© 2012 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  6. Distribution of fasting plasma glucose and prevalence of impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes in the Mexican paediatric population.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Romero, Fernando; Violante, Rafael; Rodríguez-Morán, Martha

    2009-07-01

    Published data on the distribution of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) in children are scarce. We therefore set out to examine the distribution of FPG and determine the prevalence of impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and type 2 diabetes (T2-DM) in Mexican children aged 6-18 years in a community-based cross-sectional study. A total of 1534 apparently healthy children were randomly enrolled and underwent an oral glucose tolerance test. IFG was defined by an FPG value between >or=100 and <126 mg/dL, IGT by glucose concentration 2-h post-load between >or=140 and <200 mg/dL, and T2-DM by glucose concentration 2-h post-load >or=200 mg/dL. The FPG level at the 75(th) percentile of distribution was 98.0, 100.0 and 99.0 mg/dL for children aged 6-9, 10-14 and 15-18 years, respectively; the 95(th) percentile of FPG was greater than 100 mg/dL for all the age strata. In the population overall, the prevalences of IFG, IGT, and T2-DM were 18.3%, 5.2% and 0.6%, respectively. Among obese children and adolescents, the prevalences of IFG, IGT, IFG + IGT and T2-DM were 19.1%, 5.7%, 2.5% and 1.3%. Our study shows a high prevalence of prediabetes and is the first that reports the distribution of FPG in Mexican children and adolescents.

  7. Prevention of diabetes and cardiovascular disease in patients with impaired glucose tolerance: rationale and design of the Nateglinide And Valsartan in Impaired Glucose Tolerance Outcomes Research (NAVIGATOR) Trial.

    PubMed

    Califf, Robert M; Boolell, Mitradev; Haffner, Steven M; Bethel, M Angelyn; McMurray, John; Duggal, Anil; Holman, Rury R

    2008-10-01

    Patients with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) have increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Lifestyle modification and medication can prevent or delay progression to diabetes (PD), but whether such interventions also reduce the risk of CVD has not been rigorously tested. The Nateglinide And Valsartan in Impaired Glucose Tolerance Outcomes Research (NAVIGATOR) trial is a multinational, randomized, double-blind, 2 x 2 factorial trial in subjects with IGT (on a screening oral glucose tolerance test [OGTT]) aged > or = 50 years with known CVD or aged > or = 55 years with > or = 1 CVD risk factor. Enrollment began in January 2002 and was completed January 2004, with 9,518 patients randomized to receive 1 of 4 possible treatment combinations as follows: nateglinide with valsartan, nateglinide with valsartan-placebo, nateglinide-placebo with valsartan, or nateglinide-placebo with valsartan-placebo. All subjects are participating in a clinic-based and telephone-based lifestyle intervention aimed at reducing weight and dietary fat and increasing physical activity. The 3 coprimary end points are new onset of T2DM, a "core" composite of major cardiovascular events (death, myocardial infarction, stroke, or hospitalization for heart failure), and an "extended" composite including the components of the core composite plus coronary revascularization and hospitalization for unstable angina. The study was designed to evaluate whether reducing postprandial hyperglycemia, blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, or both interventions reduce the risk of T2DM or cardiovascular events in patients with IGT.

  8. Impaired glucose tolerance in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pradat, Pierre-Francois; Bruneteau, Gaelle; Gordon, Paul H; Dupuis, Luc; Bonnefont-Rousselot, Dominique; Simon, Dominique; Salachas, Francois; Corcia, Philippe; Frochot, Vincent; Lacorte, Jean-Marc; Jardel, Claude; Coussieu, Christiane; Le Forestier, Nadine; Lacomblez, Lucette; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe; Meininger, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Our objectives were to analyse carbohydrate metabolism in a series of ALS patients and to examine potential association with parameters of lipid metabolism and clinical features. Glucose tolerance was assessed by the oral glucose tolerance test in 21 non-diabetic ALS patients and compared with 21 age- and sex-matched normal subjects. Lipids and lactate/pyruvate ratio, levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6) and adipocytokines (leptin and adiponectin) were also measured in ALS patients. Mann-Whitney U-tests analysed continuous data and Fisher's exact tests assessed categorical data. Blood glucose determined 120 min after the glucose bolus was significantly higher in patients with ALS (7.41 mmol/l+/-1.68) compared to controls (6.05+/-1.44, p=0.006). ALS patients with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) according to WHO criteria (n=7, 33%) were more likely to have elevated free fatty acids (FFA) levels compared to patients with normal glucose tolerance (0.77 nmol/l+/-0.30 vs. 0.57+/-0.19, p=0.04). IGT was not associated with disease duration or severity. In conclusion, patients with ALS show abnormal glucose tolerance that could be associated with increased FFA levels, a key determinant of insulin resistance. The origin of glucose homeostasis abnormalities in ALS may be multifactorial and deserves further investigation.

  9. Random plasma glucose in serendipitous screening for glucose intolerance: screening for impaired glucose tolerance study 2.

    PubMed

    Ziemer, David C; Kolm, Paul; Foster, Jovonne K; Weintraub, William S; Vaccarino, Viola; Rhee, Mary K; Varughese, Rincy M; Tsui, Circe W; Koch, David D; Twombly, Jennifer G; Narayan, K M Venkat; Phillips, Lawrence S

    2008-05-01

    With positive results from diabetes prevention studies, there is interest in convenient ways to incorporate screening for glucose intolerance into routine care and to limit the need for fasting diagnostic tests. The aim of this study is to determine whether random plasma glucose (RPG) could be used to screen for glucose intolerance. This is a cross-sectional study. The participants of this study include a voluntary sample of 990 adults not known to have diabetes. RPG was measured, and each subject had a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test several weeks later. Glucose intolerance targets included diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and impaired fasting glucose(110) (IFG(110); fasting glucose, 110-125 mg/dl, and 2 h glucose < 140 mg/dl). Screening performance was measured by area under receiver operating characteristic curves (AROC). Mean age was 48 years, and body mass index (BMI) was 30.4 kg/m(2); 66% were women, and 52% were black; 5.1% had previously unrecognized diabetes, and 24.0% had any "high-risk" glucose intolerance (diabetes or IGT or IFG(110)). The AROC was 0.80 (95% CI 0.74-0.86) for RPG to identify diabetes and 0.72 (0.68-0.75) to identify any glucose intolerance, both highly significant (p < 0.001). Screening performance was generally consistent at different times of the day, regardless of meal status, and across a range of risk factors such as age, BMI, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and blood pressure. RPG values should be considered by health care providers to be an opportunistic initial screening test and used to prompt further evaluation of patients at risk of glucose intolerance. Such "serendipitous screening" could help to identify unrecognized diabetes and prediabetes.

  10. The role of physical activity in the management of impaired glucose tolerance: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Khunti, K.; Bull, F.; Gorely, T.; Davies, M. J.

    2007-01-01

    Although physical activity is widely reported to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes in individuals with prediabetes, few studies have examined this issue independently of other lifestyle modifications. The aim of this review is to conduct a systematic review of controlled trials to determine the independent effect of exercise on glucose levels and risk of type 2 diabetes in people with prediabetes (IGT and/or IFG). A detailed search of MEDLINE (1966–2006) and EMBASE (1980–2006) found 279 potentially relevant studies, eight of which met the inclusion criteria for this review. All eight studies were controlled trials in individuals with impaired glucose tolerance. Seven studies used a multi-component lifestyle intervention that included exercise, diet and weight loss goals and one used a structured exercise training intervention. Four studies used the incidence of diabetes over the course of the study as an outcome variable and four relied on 2-h plasma glucose as an outcome measure. In the four studies that measured the incidence of diabetes as an outcome, the risk of diabetes was reduced by approximately 50% (range 42–63%); as these studies reported only small changes in physical activity levels, the reduced risk of diabetes is likely to be attributable to factors other than physical activity. In the remaining four studies, only one reported significant improvements in 2-h plasma glucose even though all but one reported small to moderate increases in maximal oxygen uptake. These results indicate that the contribution of physical activity independent of dietary or weight loss changes to the prevention of type 2 diabetes in people with prediabetes is equivocal. PMID:17415549

  11. Periodontal Infection, Impaired Fasting Glucose and Impaired Glucose Tolerance: Results from The Continuous National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009–2010

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Nidhi; Papapanou, Panos N.; Rosenbaum, Michael; Jacobs, David R.; Desvarieux, Moïse; Demmer, Ryan T.

    2014-01-01

    Aim We investigated the relationship between periodontal disease, a clinical manifestation of periodontal infection, and prediabetes. Methods The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2009–2010 enrolled 1,165 diabetes-free adults (51% female) aged 30–80 years (mean ± SD=50±14) who received a full-mouth periodontal examination and an oral glucose tolerance test. Participants were classified as having none/mild, moderate or severe periodontitis and also according to mean probing depth≥2.19 mm or attachment loss≥1.78 mm, (respective 75th percentiles). Pre-diabetes was defined according to ADA criteria as either: i) impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). In multivariable logistic regression models, the odds of IFG and IGT were regressed on levels of periodontitis category. Results The odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for having IGT among participants with moderate or severe periodontitis, relative to participants with none/mild periodontitis were 1.07[0.50,2.25] and 1.93[1.18,3.17], P=0.02. The ORs for having IFG were 1.14[0.74, 1.77] and 1.12[0.58, 2.18], P =0.84. PD≥75th percentile was related to a 105% increase in the odds of IGT: OR[95%CI] =2.05[1.24, 3.39], P=0.005. Conclusions Periodontal infection was positively associated with prevalent impaired glucose tolerance in a cross-sectional study among a nationally representative sample. PMID:24708451

  12. Random Plasma Glucose in Serendipitous Screening for Glucose Intolerance: Screening for Impaired Glucose Tolerance Study 2

    PubMed Central

    Ziemer, David C.; Kolm, Paul; Foster, Jovonne K.; Weintraub, William S.; Vaccarino, Viola; Rhee, Mary K.; Varughese, Rincy M.; Tsui, Circe W.; Koch, David D.; Twombly, Jennifer G.; Venkat Narayan, K. M.

    2008-01-01

    Background With positive results from diabetes prevention studies, there is interest in convenient ways to incorporate screening for glucose intolerance into routine care and to limit the need for fasting diagnostic tests. Objective The aim of this study is to determine whether random plasma glucose (RPG) could be used to screen for glucose intolerance. Design This is a cross-sectional study. Participants The participants of this study include a voluntary sample of 990 adults not known to have diabetes. Measurements RPG was measured, and each subject had a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test several weeks later. Glucose intolerance targets included diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and impaired fasting glucose110 (IFG110; fasting glucose, 110–125 mg/dl, and 2 h glucose < 140 mg/dl). Screening performance was measured by area under receiver operating characteristic curves (AROC). Results Mean age was 48 years, and body mass index (BMI) was 30.4 kg/m2; 66% were women, and 52% were black; 5.1% had previously unrecognized diabetes, and 24.0% had any “high-risk” glucose intolerance (diabetes or IGT or IFG110). The AROC was 0.80 (95% CI 0.74–0.86) for RPG to identify diabetes and 0.72 (0.68–0.75) to identify any glucose intolerance, both highly significant (p < 0.001). Screening performance was generally consistent at different times of the day, regardless of meal status, and across a range of risk factors such as age, BMI, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and blood pressure. Conclusions RPG values should be considered by health care providers to be an opportunistic initial screening test and used to prompt further evaluation of patients at risk of glucose intolerance. Such “serendipitous screening” could help to identify unrecognized diabetes and prediabetes. PMID:18335280

  13. Risk of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in individuals with diabetes mellitus, impaired fasting glucose, and impaired glucose tolerance: the Australian Diabetes, Obesity, and Lifestyle Study (AusDiab).

    PubMed

    Barr, Elizabeth L M; Zimmet, Paul Z; Welborn, Timothy A; Jolley, Damien; Magliano, Dianna J; Dunstan, David W; Cameron, Adrian J; Dwyer, Terry; Taylor, Hugh R; Tonkin, Andrew M; Wong, Tien Y; McNeil, John; Shaw, Jonathan E

    2007-07-10

    Diabetes mellitus increases the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all-cause mortality. The relationship between milder elevations of blood glucose and mortality is less clear. This study investigated whether impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance, as well as diabetes mellitus, increase the risk of all-cause and CVD mortality. In 1999 to 2000, glucose tolerance status was determined in 10,428 participants of the Australian Diabetes, Obesity, and Lifestyle Study (AusDiab). After a median follow-up of 5.2 years, 298 deaths occurred (88 CVD deaths). Compared with those with normal glucose tolerance, the adjusted all-cause mortality hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for known diabetes mellitus and newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus were 2.3 (1.6 to 3.2) and 1.3 (0.9 to 2.0), respectively. The risk of death was also increased in those with impaired fasting glucose (HR 1.6, 95% CI 1.0 to 2.4) and impaired glucose tolerance (HR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1 to 2.0). Sixty-five percent of all those who died of CVD had known diabetes mellitus, newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus, impaired fasting glucose, or impaired glucose tolerance at baseline. Known diabetes mellitus (HR 2.6, 95% CI 1.4 to 4.7) and impaired fasting glucose (HR 2.5, 95% CI 1.2 to 5.1) were independent predictors for CVD mortality after adjustment for age, sex, and other traditional CVD risk factors, but impaired glucose tolerance was not (HR 1.2, 95% CI 0.7 to 2.2). This study emphasizes the strong association between abnormal glucose metabolism and mortality, and it suggests that this condition contributes to a large number of CVD deaths in the general population. CVD prevention may be warranted in people with all categories of abnormal glucose metabolism.

  14. Determinants of Glycated Hemoglobin in Subjects With Impaired Glucose Tolerance: Subanalysis of the Japan Diabetes Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Sakane, Naoki; Sato, Juichi; Tsushita, Kazuyo; Tsujii, Satoru; Kotani, Kazuhiko; Tominaga, Makoto; Kawazu, Shoji; Sato, Yuzo; Usui, Takeshi; Kamae, Isao; Yoshida, Toshihide; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Sato, Shigeaki; Tsuzaki, Kokoro; Nirengi, Shinsuke; Takahashi, Kaoru; Kuzuya, Hideshi; Group, JDPP Research

    2017-01-01

    Background Limited evidence is available about the relationship of lifestyle factors with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance. The aim of study was to identify such determinant factors of HbA1c in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance. Methods This cross-sectional study included 121 men and 124 women with impaired glucose tolerance, who were diagnosed based on a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. Demographic and biochemical parameters, including the body mass index (BMI), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2-h post-load glucose (2-h PG), and HbA1c, were measured. The pancreatic β-cell function and insulin resistance were assessed using homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-β). Dietary intake was assessed by a food frequency questionnaire. Results The levels of FPG, 2-h PG, and carbohydrate intake were correlated with the HbA1c level in men, while the FPG and 2-h PG levels were correlated with the HbA1c level in women. In multiple regression analyses, BMI, FPG, 2-h PG, and white rice intake were associated with HbA1c levels in men, while BMI, FPG, HOMA-β, and bread intake were associated with HbA1c levels in women. Conclusions The present findings suggest that a substantial portion of HbA1c may be composed of not only glycemic but also several lifestyle factors in men with impaired glucose tolerance. These factors can be taken into consideration as modifiable determinants in assessing the HbA1c level for the diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of the disease course. PMID:28270897

  15. Lack of agreement between the revised criteria of impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance in children with excess body weight.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Díaz, Rita; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A; Morán-Villota, Segundo; Barradas-González, Rosalinda; Herrera-Márquez, Rocio; Cruz López, Miguel; Kumate, Jesus; Wacher, Niels H

    2004-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the agreement between impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) in children with excess body weight using the original and the revised definitions of IFG. Obese and overweight children aged 4-17 years were included (n = 533). Anthropometric parameters and biochemical tests (fasting and 2-h glucose tests after an oral glucose load [1.75 g/kg]) were performed. Case subjects with a fasting plasma glucose >/=126 mg/dl were excluded. The diagnostic parameters of the original and the revised definitions of IFG for detecting IGT were estimated. The analysis of agreement between these categories was made using the kappa test. The prevalence of IFG increased from 6.2 to 13.3% using the new criteria. The prevalence of IFG became closer to the prevalence of IGT (14.8%). The revised criteria increased the sensitivity from 26.6 to 36.7%. However, the new IFG definition was not useful for identifying IGT cases. Of the 71 case subjects with IFG, only 29 (40.8%) had IGT. In addition, 50 case subjects with IGT (9.4%) and 13 with diabetes (2.4%) had a fasting glycemia <100 mg/dl. A poor agreement was found between the 2003 IFG definition and abnormal 2-h postchallenge plasma glucose (kappa = 0.359). The proportion of false-positive cases increased (36.3-59.1%) under the new definition. The new definition modestly increases the sensitivity of IFG for detecting IGT in children with excess body weight. Despite this, more than one-half of these cases are not detected. In addition, the false-positive rate was increased by 61%.

  16. Maternal Arsenic Exposure and Impaired Glucose Tolerance during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ettinger, Adrienne S.; Zota, Ami R.; Amarasiriwardena, Chitra J.; Hopkins, Marianne R.; Schwartz, Joel; Hu, Howard; Wright, Robert O.

    2009-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence has shown an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in general populations exposed to arsenic, but little is known about exposures during pregnancy and the association with gestational diabetes (GD). Objectives We studied 532 women living proximate to the Tar Creek Superfund Site to investigate whether arsenic exposure is associated with impaired glucose tolerance during pregnancy. Methods Blood glucose was measured between 24 and 28 weeks gestation after a 1-hr oral glucose tolerance test (GTT) as part of routine prenatal care. Blood and hair were collected at delivery and analyzed for arsenic using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with dynamic reaction cell. Results Arsenic concentrations ranged from 0.2 to 24.1 μg/L (ppb) (mean ± SD, 1.7 ±1.5) and 1.1 to 724.4 ng/g (ppb) (mean ± SD, 27.4 ± 61.6) in blood and hair, respectively. One-hour glucose levels ranged from 40 to 284 mg/dL (mean ± SD, 108.7 ± 29.5); impaired glucose tolerance was observed in 11.9% of women when using standard screening criterion (> 140 mg/dL). Adjusting for age, Native-American race, prepregnancy body mass index, Medicaid use, and marital status, women in the highest quartile of blood arsenic exposure had 2.8 higher odds of impaired GTT than women in the lowest quartile of exposure (95% confidence interval, 1.1–6.9) (p-trend = 0.008). Conclusions Among this population of pregnant women, arsenic exposure was associated with increased risk of impaired GTT at 24–28 weeks gestation and therefore may be associated with increased risk of GD. PMID:19654913

  17. Diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance, and metabolic biomarkers in individuals with normal glucose tolerance are inversely associated with lung function: the Jackson Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Hickson, DeMarc A; Burchfiel, Cecil M; Liu, Jiankang; Petrini, Marcy F; Harrison, Kimystian; White, Wendy B; Sarpong, Daniel F

    2011-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to test the hypothesis that diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), diabetes control and diabetes duration, and metabolic biomarkers in adults with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) are inversely associated with spirometry-measured lung function. We conducted a cross-sectional observational cohort study that included nonsmoking African American adults (n = 2,945; mean age = 52.5 ± 12.6 years; 69.2% female), who were free of cardiovascular disease, from the Jackson Heart Study. The interventions were diabetes, metabolic biomarkers and lung function. We measured the associations of glycemia with forced expiratory volume (FEV) in 1 s, FEV in 6 s, and vital capacity. Multivariable adjusted mean lung function values were lower among adults with diabetes and IGT (in women only, but not after adjustment for waist circumference) than adults with NGT. Among adults with diabetes, no associations were observed between lung function and diabetes control or duration. In women with NGT, lower lung function was consistently associated with higher glucose levels and less consistently with higher insulin levels and insulin resistance. Lower lung function was consistently associated with higher insulin levels and insulin resistance and less consistently associated with insulin and hemoglobin A1c in men with NGT. Overall, our findings generally support the hypothesis that diabetes, IGT, and increased levels of metabolic biomarkers in individuals with NGT are inversely associated with lung function in African Americans, independent of adiposity.

  18. Coffee consumption and incidence of impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, and type 2 diabetes: the Hoorn Study.

    PubMed

    van Dam, R M; Dekker, J M; Nijpels, G; Stehouwer, C D A; Bouter, L M; Heine, R J

    2004-12-01

    Coffee contains several substances that may affect glucose metabolism. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between habitual coffee consumption and the incidence of IFG, IGT and type 2 diabetes. We used cross-sectional and prospective data from the population-based Hoorn Study, which included Dutch men and women aged 50-74 years. An OGTT was performed at baseline and after a mean follow-up period of 6.4 years. Associations were adjusted for potential confounders including BMI, cigarette smoking, physical activity, alcohol consumption and dietary factors. At baseline, a 5 cup per day higher coffee consumption was significantly associated with lower fasting insulin concentrations (-5.6%, 95% CI -9.3 to -1.6%) and 2-h glucose concentrations (-8.8%, 95% CI -11.8 to -5.6%), but was not associated with lower fasting glucose concentrations (-0.8%, 95% CI -2.1 to 0.6%). In the prospective analyses, the odds ratio (OR) for IGT was 0.59 (95% CI 0.36-0.97) for 3-4 cups per day, 0.46 (95% CI 0.26-0.81) for 5-6 cups per day, and 0.37 (95% CI 0.16-0.84) for 7 or more cups per day, as compared with the corresponding values for the consumption of 2 or fewer cups of coffee per day (p=0.001 for trend). Higher coffee consumption also tended to be associated with a lower incidence of type 2 diabetes (OR 0.69, CI 0.31-1.51 for >/=7 vs the incidence of IFG (OR 1.35, CI 0.80-2.27 for >/=7 vs the risk of IGT, and affects post-load rather than fasting glucose metabolism.

  19. Impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance in children and adolescents with overweight/obesity.

    PubMed

    Di Bonito, P; Pacifico, L; Chiesa, C; Valerio, G; Miraglia Del Giudice, E; Maffeis, C; Morandi, A; Invitti, C; Licenziati, M R; Loche, S; Tornese, G; Franco, F; Manco, M; Baroni, M G

    2017-04-01

    To investigate in a large sample of overweight/obese (OW/OB) children and adolescents the prevalence of prediabetic phenotypes such as impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and to assess their association with cardiometabolic risk (CMR) factors including hepatic steatosis (HS). Population data were obtained from the CARdiometabolic risk factors in children and adolescents in ITALY study. Between 2003 and 2013, 3088 youths (972 children and 2116 adolescents) received oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and were included in the study. In 798 individuals, abdominal ultrasound for identification of HS was available. The prevalence of IFG (3.2 vs. 3.3%) and IGT (4.6 vs. 5.0%) was similar between children and adolescents. Children with isolated IGT had a 2-11 fold increased risk of high LDL-C, non-HDL-C, Tg/HDL-C ratio, and low insulin sensitivity, when compared to those with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). No significant association of IFG with any CMR factor was found in children. Among adolescents, IGT subjects, and to a lesser extent those with IFG, showed a worse CMR profile compared to NGT subgroup. In the overall sample, IGT phenotype showed a twofold increased risk of HS compared to NGT subgroup. Our study shows an unexpected similar prevalence of IFG and IGT between children and adolescents with overweight/obesity. The IGT phenotype was associated with a worse CMR profile in both children and adolescents. Phenotyping prediabetes conditions by OGTT should be done as part of prediction and prevention of cardiometabolic diseases in OW/OB youth since early childhood.

  20. Influence of the ACE gene insertion/deletion polymorphism on insulin sensitivity and impaired glucose tolerance in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Fabrice; Patel, Sheila; Laville, Martine; Balkau, Beverley; Favuzzi, Angela; Monti, Lucilla D; Lalic, Nebojsa; Walker, Mark

    2008-04-01

    Recent studies suggested that the blockade of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) may be associated with metabolic benefits. However, data about the potential influence of the ACE insertion/deletion (I/D) genotype on insulin resistance have been contradictory with studies of limited sample sizes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the ACE gene I/D polymorphism and both insulin sensitivity and glucose intolerance in a large cohort of healthy subjects. A total of 1,286 participants in the Relationship Between Insulin Sensitivity and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Study had a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test and a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp to assess whole-body insulin sensitivity. Age, BMI, waist, fat-free mass (ffm), and physical activity did not differ by ACE genotype. Fasting glucose and insulin were similar among genotypes, but 2-h glucose levels were higher in DD than in ID and II subjects (DD: 5.9 +/- 1.7; ID: 5.7 +/- 1.5; II: 5.6 +/- 1.5 mmol/l) (P = 0.004). Participants with the DD genotype were more likely to have impaired glucose tolerance than those with the ID and II genotypes (13.1 vs. 8.7%; P = 0.02). Insulin sensitivity was lower in participants with the DD genotype than in those with the II genotype (136 +/- 63 vs. 147 +/- 65 micromol x min(-1)x kg ffm(-1) x mmol(-1) x l(-1); P = 0.02). The presence of the D allele was associated with a trend, albeit not significant, for reduced insulin secretion during the oral glucose tolerance test (P = 0.07). The ACE I/D polymorphism is associated with whole-body insulin sensitivity and with impaired glucose tolerance in our healthy population. These findings confirm potential interactions between the RAS and glucose metabolism.

  1. Chinese herbal medicines for people with impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting blood glucose.

    PubMed

    Grant, Suzanne J; Bensoussan, Alan; Chang, Dennis; Kiat, Hosen; Klupp, Nerida L; Liu, Jian Ping; Li, Xun

    2009-10-07

    Around 308 million people worldwide are estimated to have impaired glucose tolerance (IGT); 25% to 75% of these will develop diabetes within a decade of initial diagnosis. At diagnosis, half will have tissue-related damage and all have an increased risk for coronary heart disease. The objective of this review was to assess the effects and safety of Chinese herbal medicines for the treatment of people with impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose (IFG). We searched the following databases: The Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, AMED, a range of Chinese language databases, SIGLE and databases of ongoing trials. Randomised clinical trials comparing Chinese herbal medicines with placebo, no treatment, pharmacological or non-pharmacological interventions in people with IGT or IFG were considered. Two authors independently extracted data. Trials were assessed for risk of bias against key criteria: random sequence generation, allocation concealment, blinding of participants, outcome assessors and intervention providers, incomplete outcome data, selective outcome reporting and other sources of bias. This review examined 16 trials lasting four weeks to two years involving 1391 participants receiving 15 different Chinese herbal medicines in eight different comparisons. No trial reported on mortality, morbidity or costs. No serious adverse events like severe hypoglycaemia were observed. Meta-analysis of eight trials showed that those receiving Chinese herbal medicines combined with lifestyle modification were more than twice as likely to have their fasting plasma glucose levels return to normal levels (i.e. fasting plasma glucose <7.8 mmol/L and 2hr blood glucose <11.1 mmol/L) compared to lifestyle modification alone (RR 2.07; 95% confidence intervall (CI) 1.52 to 2.82). Those receiving Chinese herbs were less likely to progress to diabetes over the duration of the trial (RR 0.33; 95% CI 0.19 to 0.58). However, all trials had a considerable risk of bias and none

  2. Chinese herbal medicines for people with impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting blood glucose

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Suzanne J; Bensoussan, Alan; Chang, Dennis; Kiat, Hosen; Klupp, Nerida L; Liu, Jian Ping; Li, Xun

    2011-01-01

    Background Around 308 million people worldwide are estimated to have impaired glucose tolerance (IGT); 25% to 75% of these will develop diabetes within a decade of initial diagnosis. At diagnosis, half will have tissue-related damage and all have an increased risk for coronary heart disease. Objectives The objective of this review was to assess the effects and safety of Chinese herbal medicines for the treatment of people with impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose (IFG). Search strategy We searched the following databases: The Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, AMED, a range of Chinese language databases, SIGLE and databases of ongoing trials. Selection criteria Randomised clinical trials comparing Chinese herbal medicines with placebo, no treatment, pharmacological or non-pharmacological interventions in people with IGT or IFG were considered. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently extracted data. Trials were assessed for risk of bias against key criteria: random sequence generation, allocation concealment, blinding of participants, outcome assessors and intervention providers, incomplete outcome data, selective outcome reporting and other sources of bias. Main results This review examined 16 trials lasting four weeks to two years involving 1391 participants receiving 15 different Chinese herbal medicines in eight different comparisons. No trial reported on mortality, morbidity or costs. No serious adverse events like severe hypoglycaemia were observed. Meta-analysis of eight trials showed that those receiving Chinese herbal medicines combined with lifestyle modification were more than twice as likely to have their fasting plasma glucose levels return to normal levels (i.e. fasting plasma glucose <7.8 mmol/L and 2hr blood glucose <11.1 mmol/L) compared to lifestyle modification alone (RR 2.07; 95% confidence intervall (CI) 1.52 to 2.82). Those receiving Chinese herbs were less likely to progress to diabetes over the duration of the

  3. Effect of Rosiglitazone and Ramipril on {beta}-cell function in people with impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose: the DREAM trial.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Anthony J; Zinman, Bernard; Sheridan, Patrick; Yusuf, Salim; Gerstein, Hertzel C

    2010-03-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to determine the degree to which ramipril and/or rosiglitazone changed beta-cell function over time among individuals with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and/or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) who participated in the Diabetes Reduction Assessment With Ramipril and Rosiglitazone Medication (DREAM) Trial, which evaluated whether ramipril and/or rosiglitazone could prevent or delay type 2 diabetes in high-risk individuals. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The present analysis included subjects (n = 982) from DREAM trial centers in Canada who had oral glucose tolerance tests at baseline, after 2 years, and at the end of the study. beta-Cell function was assessed using the fasting proinsulin-to-C-peptide ratio (PI/C) and the insulinogenic index (defined as 30-0 min insulin/30-0 min glucose) divided by homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (insulinogenic index [IGI]/insulin resistance [IR]). RESULTS Subjects receiving rosiglitazone had a significant increase in IGI/IR between baseline and end of study compared with the placebo group (25.59 vs. 1.94, P < 0.0001) and a significant decrease in PI/C (-0.010 vs. -0.006, P < 0.0001). In contrast, there were no significant changes in IGI/IR or PI/C in subjects receiving ramipril compared with placebo (11.71 vs. 18.15, P = 0.89, and -0.007 vs. -0.008, P = 0.64, respectively). The impact of rosiglitazone on IGI/IR and PI/C was similar within subgroups of isolated IGT and IFG + IGT (all P < 0.001). Effects were more modest in those with isolated IFG (IGI/IR: 8.95 vs. 2.13, P = 0.03; PI/C: -0.003 vs. -0.001, P = 0.07). CONCLUSIONS Treatment with rosiglitazone, but not ramipril, resulted in significant improvements in measures of beta-cell function over time in pre-diabetic subjects. Although the long-term sustainability of these improvements cannot be determined from the present study, these findings demonstrate that the diabetes preventive effect of rosiglitazone was in part a

  4. Skeletal muscle signaling associated with impaired glucose tolerance in spinal cord-injured men and the effects of contractile activity

    PubMed Central

    Yarar-Fisher, Ceren; Bickel, C. Scott; Windham, Samuel T.; McLain, Amie B.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying poor glucose tolerance in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI), along with its improvement after several weeks of neuromuscular electrical stimulation-induced resistance exercise (NMES-RE) training, remain unclear, but presumably involve the affected skeletal musculature. We, therefore, investigated skeletal muscle signaling pathways associated with glucose transporter 4 (GLUT-4) translocation at rest and shortly after a single bout of NMES-RE in SCI (n = 12) vs. able-bodied (AB, n = 12) men. Subjects completed an oral glucose tolerance test during visit 1 and ≈90 NMES-RE isometric contractions of the quadriceps during visit 2. Muscle biopsies were collected before, and 10 and 60 min after, NMES-RE. We assessed transcript levels of GLUT-4 by quantitative PCR and protein levels of GLUT-4 and phosphorylated- and total AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-α, CaMKII, Akt, and AS160 by immunoblotting. Impaired glucose tolerance in SCI was confirmed by higher (P < 0.05) plasma glucose concentrations than AB at all time points after glucose ingestion, despite equivalent insulin responses to the glucose load. GLUT-4 protein content was lower (P < 0.05) in SCI vs. AB at baseline. Main group effects revealed higher phosphorylation in SCI of AMPK-α, CaMKII, and Akt (P < 0.05), and Akt phosphorylation increased robustly (P < 0.05) following NMES-RE in SCI only. In SCI, low skeletal muscle GLUT-4 protein concentration may, in part, explain poor glucose tolerance, whereas heightened phosphorylation of relevant signaling proteins (AMPK-α, CaMKII) suggests a compensatory effort. Finally, it is encouraging to find (based on Akt) that SCI muscle remains both sensitive and responsive to mechanical loading (NMES-RE) even ≈22 yr after injury. PMID:23766505

  5. Impaired glucose tolerance in pediatric burn patients at discharge from the acute hospital stay.

    PubMed

    Fram, Ricki Y; Cree, Melanie G; Wolfe, Robert R; Barr, David; Herndon, David N

    2010-01-01

    Hyperglycemia, secondary to the hypermetabolic stress response, is a common occurrence after thermal injury. This stress response has been documented to persist up to 9 months postburn. The purpose of this study was to measure insulin sensitivity in severely burned children before discharge when wounds are 95% healed. Twenty-four children, aged 4 to 17 years, with burns > or = 40% TBSA underwent a 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test before discharge from the acute pediatric burn unit. Plasma glucose and insulin levels as well as the Homeostasis Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance (HOMAIR) were compared with published oral glucose tolerance test data from healthy, nonburned children. There was a significant difference between severely burned children and nonburned, healthy children with respect to the HOMAIR. Severely burned children had a HOMAIR of 3.53 +/- 1.62 compared with the value in nonburned, healthy children of 1.28 +/- 0.16 (P < .05). Insulin resistance secondary to the hypermetabolic stress response persists in severely burned children when burn wounds are at least 95% healed. The results of this study warrant future investigations into therapeutic options for the burned child during the rehabilitative phase of their care after injury.

  6. Insulin Secretory Defect and Insulin Resistance in Isolated Impaired Fasting Glucose and Isolated Impaired Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Aoyama-Sasabe, Sae; Fukushima, Mitsuo; Xin, Xin; Taniguchi, Ataru; Nakai, Yoshikatsu; Mitsui, Rie; Takahashi, Yoshitaka; Tsuji, Hideaki; Yabe, Daisuke; Yasuda, Koichiro; Kurose, Takeshi; Inagaki, Nobuya; Seino, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the characteristics of isolated impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and isolated impaired fasting glucose (IFG), we analyzed the factors responsible for elevation of 2-hour postchallenge plasma glucose (2 h PG) and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels. Methods. We investigated the relationship between 2 h PG and FPG levels who underwent 75 g OGTT in 5620 Japanese subjects at initial examination for medical check-up. We compared clinical characteristics between isolated IGT and isolated IFG and analyzed the relationships of 2 h PG and FPG with clinical characteristics, the indices of insulin secretory capacity, and insulin sensitivity. Results. In a comparison between isolated IGT and isolated IFG, insulinogenic index was lower in isolated IGT than that of isolated IFG (0.43 ± 0.34 versus 0.50 ± 0.47, resp.; p < 0.01). ISI composite was lower in isolated IFG than that of isolated IGT (6.87 ± 3.38 versus 7.98 ± 4.03, resp.; p < 0.0001). In isolated IGT group, insulinogenic index showed a significant correlation with 2 h PG (r = −0.245, p < 0.0001) and had the strongest correlation with 2 h PG (β = −0.290). In isolated IFG group, ISI composite showed a significant correlation with FPG (r = −0.162, p < 0.0001) and had the strongest correlation with FPG (β = −0.214). Conclusions. We have elucidated that decreased early-phase insulin secretion is the most important factor responsible for elevation of 2 h PG levels in isolated IGT subjects, and decreased insulin sensitivity is the most important factor responsible for elevation of FPG levels in isolated IFG subjects. PMID:26788515

  7. Improved fibrinolysis by an intensive lifestyle intervention in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance. The Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study.

    PubMed

    Hämäläinen, H; Rönnemaa, T; Virtanen, A; Lindström, J; Eriksson, J G; Valle, T T; Ilanne-Parikka, P; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, S; Rastas, M; Aunola, S; Uusitupa, M; Tuomilehto, J

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of lifestyle intervention on the levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) and fibrinogen in subjects participating in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study (DPS). In five DPS centres, 321 subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (intervention group, n=163; control group, n=158) had their PAI-1 and fibrinogen levels measured at baseline and at the 1-year follow-up. Additional 3-year follow-up assessments were carried out in a sample of 97 subjects in one of the DPS centres (Turku). The intervention programme included an intensive lifestyle intervention aiming at weight reduction, healthy diet and increased physical activity. During the first intervention year, PAI-1 decreased by 31% in the intervention group but showed no change in the control group (p<0.0001). In the Turku subgroup, the decrease in PAI-1 persisted throughout the 3-year follow-up. Changes in PAI-1 were associated with the number of lifestyle changes made during the first year (p=0.008). Weight reduction was the most important factor explaining the decrease in PAI-1. Changes in fibrinogen levels did not differ between the groups. In addition to the previously reported reduction in the risk of type 2 diabetes in DPS participants with impaired glucose tolerance, the intensive dietary and exercise intervention had beneficial long-term effects on fibrinolysis as indicated by the reduced levels of PAI-1. These results suggest that elevated PAI-1 levels in obese subjects with impaired glucose tolerance are mostly reversible by lifestyle changes, especially those geared to weight reduction.

  8. Ceylon cinnamon does not affect postprandial plasma glucose or insulin in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wickenberg, Jennie; Lindstedt, Sandra; Berntorp, Kerstin; Nilsson, Jan; Hlebowicz, Joanna

    2012-06-01

    Previous studies on healthy subjects have shown that the intake of 6 g Cinnamomum cassia reduces postprandial glucose and that the intake of 3 g C. cassia reduces insulin response, without affecting postprandial glucose concentrations. Coumarin, which may damage the liver, is present in C. cassia, but not in Cinnamomum zeylanicum. The aim of the present study was to study the effect of C. zeylanicum on postprandial concentrations of plasma glucose, insulin, glycaemic index (GI) and insulinaemic index (GII) in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). A total of ten subjects with IGT were assessed in a crossover trial. A standard 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was administered together with placebo or C. zeylanicum capsules. Finger-prick capillary blood samples were taken for glucose measurements and venous blood for insulin measurements, before and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 min after the start of the OGTT. The ingestion of 6 g C. zeylanicum had no significant effect on glucose level, insulin response, GI or GII. Ingestion of C. zeylanicum does not affect postprandial plasma glucose or insulin levels in human subjects. The Federal Institute for Risk Assessment in Europe has suggested the replacement of C. cassia by C. zeylanicum or the use of aqueous extracts of C. cassia to lower coumarin exposure. However, the positive effects seen with C. cassia in subjects with poor glycaemic control would then be lost.

  9. Impaired glucose tolerance in pediatric burn patients at discharge from the acute hospital stay

    PubMed Central

    Fram, Ricki Y.; Cree, Melanie G.; Wolfe, Robert R.; Barr, David; Herndon, David N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Hyperglycemia, secondary to the hypermetabolic stress response, is a common occurrence after thermal injury. This stress response has been documented to persist up to 9 months post burn. The purpose of this study was to measure insulin sensitivity in severely burned children prior to discharge when wounds are 95% healed. Methods Twenty-four children, aged 4–17 years, with burns ≥ 40% total body surface area (TBSA) underwent a 2 hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) prior to discharge from the acute pediatric burn unit. Plasma glucose and insulin levels, as well as the Homeostasis Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance (HOMAIR) were compared to published OGTT data from healthy, non-burned children. Results There was a significant difference between severely burned children and non-burned, healthy children with respect to the HOMAIR. Severely burned children had a HOMAIR of 3.53±1.62 compared to the value in non-burned healthy children was 1.28±0.16 (p<0.05). Conclusion Insulin resistance secondary to the hypermetabolic stress response persists in severely burned children when burn wounds are at least 95% healed. The results of this study warrant future investigations into therapeutic options for the burned child during the rehabilitative phase of their care after injury. PMID:20634704

  10. Differences by sex in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus, impaired fasting glycaemia and impaired glucose tolerance in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yatsuya, Hiroshi; Kawaguchi, Leo; Aoyama, Atsuko

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess differences between men and women in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus, impaired fasting glycaemia and impaired glucose tolerance in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods In September 2011, the PubMed and Web of Science databases were searched for community-based, cross-sectional studies providing sex-specific prevalences of any of the three study conditions among adults living in parts of sub-Saharan Africa (i.e. in Eastern, Middle and Southern Africa according to the United Nations subregional classification for African countries). A random-effects model was then used to calculate and compare the odds of men and women having each condition. Findings In a meta-analysis of the 36 relevant, cross-sectional data sets that were identified, impaired fasting glycaemia was found to be more common in men than in women (OR: 1.56; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.20–2.03), whereas impaired glucose tolerance was found to be less common in men than in women (OR: 0.84; 95% CI: 0.72–0.98). The prevalence of diabetes mellitus – which was generally similar in both sexes (OR: 1.01; 95% CI: 0.91–1.11) – was higher among the women in Southern Africa than among the men from the same subregion and lower among the women from Eastern and Middle Africa and from low-income countries of sub-Saharan Africa than among the corresponding men. Conclusion Compared with women in the same subregions, men in Eastern, Middle and Southern Africa were found to have a similar overall prevalence of diabetes mellitus but were more likely to have impaired fasting glycaemia and less likely to have impaired glucose tolerance. PMID:24101783

  11. [The influence of physical training on metabolic indices in men with myocardial infarction and impaired glucose tolerance].

    PubMed

    Stochmal, Anna; Jasiak-Tyrkalska, Bozena; Stochmal, Ewa; Huszno, Bohdan; Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina

    2007-01-01

    Body mass reduction and regular physical training form part of a strategy to treat disorders of carbohydrate metabolism associated with obesity. Evidence shows that even a slight reduction in body mass may improve carbohydrate tolerance, lipid profile and insulin resistance, reduce insulin levels and finally delay or reduce risk of diabetes mellitus. Multiple studies, including prospective studies confirm the independent protective effects of physical training against future development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Myocardial infarction is a severe complication of atherosclerosis. Patients with glucose intolerance have a 2-fold higher risk of dying. Impaired glucose tolerance is negatively associated with prognosis in patients after myocardial infarction. Glucose intolerance accompanies hyperinsulinemia, a major indicator of insulin resistance. The aim of the study was to analyze the effect of physical training on hyperinsulinemia/ insulin resistance in patients after myocardial infarction (MI) with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). 31 men aged 37-69 years (mean 51 +/- 7.4) with IGT 3.5 years after MI, in NYHA class I and II participated in the study. Group A (n=16 men) underwent supervised physical training and group B (n=15) received standard information on physical training. Tissue glucose disposal using normoglycemic glucose clamp technique, fasting insulinemia, glycemia during OGTT, lipid profile, BMI and body mass composition were obtained in all patients. The groups were matched for age. There were no differences in BMI, percent fat content, blood pressure, diet, smoking status and pharmacotherapy. Glycemia during baseline OGTT did not differentiate the groups, either. Analysis of insulinemia and glycemia during OGTT at baseline and at 12 weeks after regular physical training showed lower levels of insulinemia and glycemia compared with baseline levels in group A (fasting glycemia 6.41+/-0.46 vs. 4.8+/-0.32 mmol/l, p<0.001; fasting insulinemia 59

  12. The role of acetic acid on glucose uptake and blood flow rates in the skeletal muscle in humans with impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Mitrou, P; Petsiou, E; Papakonstantinou, E; Maratou, E; Lambadiari, V; Dimitriadis, P; Spanoudi, F; Raptis, S A; Dimitriadis, G

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies support the glucose-lowering effect of vinegar. However, the effect of vinegar on muscle glucose metabolism and endothelial function has not been studied in humans. This open, randomized, crossover, placebo-controlled study aims to investigate the effects of vinegar on muscle glucose metabolism, endothelial function and circulating lipid levels in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) using the arteriovenous difference technique. Eight subjects with IGT (4 males, age 46±10 years, body mass index 30±5) were randomised to consume 0.50 mmol vinegar (6% acetic acid) or placebo before a mixed meal. Plasma samples were taken for 300 min from the radial artery and the forearm vein for measurements of glucose, insulin, triglycerides, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs) and glycerol. Muscle blood flow was measured with strain gauge plethysmography. Glucose flux was calculated as the arteriovenous difference of glucose multiplied by the blood flow rates. Vinegar compared with placebo: (1) decreased arterial plasma insulin (Poverall<0.001; P75 min=0.014, β=-42), (2) increased forearm blood flow (Poverall<0.001; P240 min=0.011, β=1.53; P300 min=0.023, β=1.37), (3) increased muscle glucose uptake (Poverall<0.001; P60 min=0.029, β=2.78) and (4) decreased arterial plasma triglycerides (Poverall=0.005; P240 min<0.001, β=-344; P300 min<0.001, β=-373), without changing NEFA and glycerol. In individuals with IGT, vinegar ingestion before a mixed meal results in an enhancement of muscle blood flow, an improvement of glucose uptake by the forearm muscle and a reduction of postprandial hyperinsulinaemia and hypertriglyceridaemia. From this point of view, vinegar may be considered beneficial for improving insulin resistance and metabolic abnormalities in the atherogenic prediabetic state.

  13. Metabolic syndrome and the early detection of impaired glucose tolerance among professionals living in Beijing, China: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to investigate the association of metabolic syndrome (MS) and its components with the risk of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) in high risk urban professionals. The goal is to improve the selection of candidates who would most benefit from an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Methods This is a cross sectional study in which MS was identified by both the definitions proposed by the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). Results There were 928 eligible subjects in the study, and 23.9% of them failed in OGTT. The odds ratio of IGT was increased 3.16-fold for MS defined by the NCEP criteria and 2.79-fold for the hyperglycemia factor alone. Both MS and hyperglycemia were shown to be acceptable measures to discriminate subjects with IGT from those with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). The clustering of any 1, 2, or ≥3 metabolic components resulted in increased odds ratios for IGT: i.e., 1.71, 2.38 and 5.92, respectively. Even without hyperglycemia in the cluster, an increased odds ratio was still observed. The risk of IGT increased dramatically when the fasting plasma glucose and waist circumference were both at their highest defined level. Conclusions MS and its components are associated with the increased risk of IGT. People with MS, one of its components, especially hyperglycemia and central obesity, or a cluster of its components are strong candidates for an OGTT in order to achieve early cost-effective detection of IGT. PMID:24499585

  14. Limited value of the homeostasis model assessment to predict insulin resistance in older men with impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, C M; Goldberg, A P

    2001-02-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) in older individuals is associated with risk factors for coronary artery disease. The glucose clamp measures IR directly, but the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) of IR, referred to here as HOMA-IR, is based on fasting glucose and insulin and is less invasive and labor intensive. This method requires validation in the elderly. We assessed the validity of HOMA-IR as an index of IR by comparing it to glucose infusion rates (GIRs) measured by a glucose clamp (600 pmol x m(-2) x min(-1)) in 45 obese men (61 +/- 8 years of age, mean +/- SD) with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) (n = 21) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) (n = 24). We also evaluated relationships between body composition, exercise capacity, and IR. Subjects with NGT had lower BMI (28 +/- 3 vs. 31 +/- 3 kg/m2), waist circumference (97 +/- 9 vs. 105 +/- 9 cm), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) (0.93 +/- 0.06 vs. 0.97 +/- 0.05), and percent body fat (25 +/- 6 vs. 30 +/- 6) than subjects with IGT. Subjects with NGT also had lower areas above basal during the 2-h oral glucose tolerance test for glucose (274 +/- 95 vs. 419 +/- 124 mmol x min/l) and insulin (38,142 +/- 18,206 vs. 58,383 +/- 34,408 pmol x min/l) and lower HOMA-IR values (2.2 +/- 0.8 vs. 4.2 +/- 2.6) than subjects with IGT. GIR (micromol x kg(-1) FFM x min(-1)) was higher in subjects with NGT than in subjects with IGT (53 +/- 11 vs. 43 +/- 14). HOMA-IR correlated with GIR in subjects with NGT (r = -0.59), but not in subjects with IGT (r = -0.13). GIR correlated with VO2max in subjects with NGT (r = 0.58) and IGT (r = 0.42), but with WHR only in subjects with NGT (r = -0.53). HOMA-IR correlated with VO2max (r = -0.57) and waist circumference (r = 0.54) in subjects with NGT, but with percent body fat in subjects with IGT (r = 0.54). These findings indicate that HOMA-IR should not be used as an index of IR in older individuals who may be at risk for IGT, and suggest that lifestyle changes that increase VO2max and decrease body fat

  15. Differences in the prevalence of diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance according to maternal or paternal history of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, B D; Valdez, R; Hazuda, H P; Haffner, S M; Monterrosa, A; Stern, M P

    1993-09-01

    To determine whether diabetes risk is influenced by which parent (a parental history of diabetes is a well-documented risk factor for NIDDM) is reported to have diabetes. We compared the prevalence of NIDDM and IGT for 4914 subjects according to their parental history of diabetes (mother only, father only, both parents, neither parent). Subjects were drawn from the San Antonio Heart Study, a population-based survey of diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors conducted in Mexican American and non-Hispanic white individuals between 1979-1988. Men with a parental history of diabetes had a higher prevalence of both NIDDM and impaired glucose tolerance than men reporting no parental history of diabetes. Prevalence was equally high regardless of which parent, or whether both parents, had diabetes. In contrast, in women, only a maternal history of diabetes was associated with a higher prevalence of NIDDM and impaired glucose tolerance. Virtually no difference in NIDDM prevalence was found between women with a paternal-only history of diabetes and women with no parental history of diabetes. Results differed markedly between men and women. The reason for this sex difference is unclear. It may represent a measurement bias, a sex-specific environmental effect, or a genetic effect that is expressed or transmitted differently between the sexes.

  16. Impaired glucose tolerance and predisposition to the fasted state in liver glycogen synthase knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Irimia, Jose M; Meyer, Catalina M; Peper, Caron L; Zhai, Lanmin; Bock, Cheryl B; Previs, Stephen F; McGuinness, Owen P; DePaoli-Roach, Anna; Roach, Peter J

    2010-04-23

    Conversion to glycogen is a major fate of ingested glucose in the body. A rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of glycogen is glycogen synthase encoded by two genes, GYS1, expressed in muscle and other tissues, and GYS2, primarily expressed in liver (liver glycogen synthase). Defects in GYS2 cause the inherited monogenic disease glycogen storage disease 0. We have generated mice with a liver-specific disruption of the Gys2 gene (liver glycogen synthase knock-out (LGSKO) mice), using Lox-P/Cre technology. Conditional mice carrying floxed Gys2 were crossed with mice expressing Cre recombinase under the albumin promoter. The resulting LGSKO mice are viable, develop liver glycogen synthase deficiency, and have a 95% reduction in fed liver glycogen content. They have mild hypoglycemia but dispose glucose less well in a glucose tolerance test. Fed, LGSKO mice also have a reduced capacity for exhaustive exercise compared with mice carrying floxed alleles, but the difference disappears after an overnight fast. Upon fasting, LGSKO mice reach within 4 h decreased blood glucose levels attained by control floxed mice only after 24 h of food deprivation. The LGSKO mice maintain this low blood glucose for at least 24 h. Basal gluconeogenesis is increased in LGSKO mice, and insulin suppression of endogenous glucose production is impaired as assessed by euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. This observation correlates with an increase in the liver gluconeogenic enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase expression and activity. This mouse model mimics the pathophysiology of glycogen storage disease 0 patients and highlights the importance of liver glycogen stores in whole body glucose homeostasis.

  17. Clinical Neuropathy Scales in Neuropathy Associated with Impaired Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Zilliox, Lindsay A.; Ruby, Sandra K.; Singh, Sujal; Zhan, Min; Russell, James W.

    2015-01-01

    AIMS Disagreement exists on effective and sensitive outcome measures in neuropathy associated with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Nerve conduction studies and skin biopsies are costly, invasive and may have their problems with reproducibility and clinical applicability. A clinical measure of neuropathy that has sufficient sensitivity and correlates to invasive measures would enable significant future research. METHODS Data was collected prospectively on patients with IGT and symptomatic early neuropathy (neuropathy symptoms < 2 years) and normal controls. The seven scales that were examined were the Neuropathy Impairment Score of the Lower Limb (NIS-LL), Michigan Diabetic Neuropathy Score (MNDS), modified Toronto Clinical Neuropathy Scale (mTCNS), Total Neuropathy Score (Clinical) (TNSc), The Utah Early Neuropathy Scale (UENS), the Early Neuropathy Score (ENS), and the Neuropathy Disability Score (NDS). RESULTS All seven clinical scales were determined to be excellent in discriminating between patients with neuropathy from controls without neuropathy. The strongest discrimination was seen with the mTCNS. The best sensitivity and specificity for the range of scores obtained, as determined by using receiver operating characteristic curves, was seen for the mTCNS followed by the TNSc. Most scales show a stronger correlation with measures of large than small fiber neuropathy. CONCULSIONS All seven scales identify patients with neuropathy. For the purpose of screening potential patients for a clinical study, the mTCNS followed by the TNSc would be most helpful to select patients with neuropathy. PMID:25690405

  18. Estimating risk factors and perinatal outcomes for gestational diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance in teen mothers.

    PubMed

    Baker, Arthur M; Haeri, Sina

    2012-11-01

    Our objective was to identify potentially modifiable risk factors and outcomes for gestational diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance in a contemporary American teen population. We conducted a retrospective cohort analysis of all teenage deliveries (≤18 years old) at one institution over a 4-year period with documented oral glucose tolerance testing. All cases of gestational diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance were identified using the Carpenter and Coustan diagnostic criteria and compared with teenage mothers with normal glucose tolerance testing. Of the 670 included teen deliveries, 668 were either African American or Hispanic/Latino; 31 (5%) were diagnosed with gestational diabetes (n = 5) or impaired glucose tolerance (n = 26). Higher maternal prepregnancy body mass index (34.3 ± 7.8 vs 30.3 ± 6.4, p = 0.001) and morbid obesity (body mass index ≥ 35 kg/m(2) , RR 2.0, 95% CI 1.1-3.6) were associated with gestational diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance. There was no association with weight gain above the Institute of Medicine recommended levels (RR 1.6, 95% CI 0.77-3.4). On postpregnancy follow up, three of the five (60%) teens with gestational diabetes and none of the 26 (0%) teens with impaired glucose tolerance were diagnosed with diabetes mellitus. Higher prepregnancy body mass index, especially morbid obesity, places the gravid teen at higher risk for development of gestational diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance in pregnancy. The potentially modifiable nature of these risk factors coupled with the emerging teen obesity epidemic underscores the need for increased public health focus on this problem. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Noninvasive fat quantification of the liver and pancreas may provide potential biomarkers of impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zhi; Luo, Yanji; Cai, Huasong; Zhang, Zhongwei; Peng, Zhenpeng; Jiang, Mengjie; Li, Yanbing; Li, Chang; Li, Zi-Ping; Feng, Shi-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study is to investigate if the fat content of the liver and pancreas may indicate impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A total of 83 subjects (34 men; aged 46.5 ± 13.5 years) were characterized as T2DM, IGT, or normal glucose tolerant (NGT). NGT individuals were stratified as <40 or ≥40 years. Standard laboratory tests were conducted for insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction. The magnetic resonance imaging Dixon technique was used to determine fat distribution in the liver and pancreas. Correlations among liver and pancreatic fat volume fractions (LFVFs and PFVFs, respectively) and laboratory parameters were analyzed. Among the groups, fat distribution was consistent throughout sections of the liver and pancreas, and LFVFs closely correlated with PFVFs. LFVFs correlated more closely than PFVFs with insulin resistance and β-cell function. Both the LFVFs and PFVFs were the highest in the T2DM patients, less in the IGT, and least in the NGT; all differences were significant. The PFVFs of the NGT subjects ≥40 years were significantly higher than that of those <40 years. The fat content of the liver and pancreas, particularly the liver, may be a biomarker for IGT and T2DM. PMID:27281097

  20. Subscapular skinfold thickness distinguishes between transient and persistent impaired glucose tolerance: Study on Lifestyle-Intervention and Impaired Glucose Tolerance Maastricht (SLIM).

    PubMed

    Mensink, M; Feskens, E J M; Kruijshoop, M; de Bruin, T W A; Saris, W H M; Blaak, E E

    2003-07-01

    To assess whether adding anthropometric measurements to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) can help to distinguish between transient and persistent impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). From the SLIM project (Study on Lifestyle-Intervention and IGT Maastricht), a study designed to evaluate whether diet and physical activity intervention can improve glucose tolerance in subjects at risk for diabetes, 108 subjects with IGT underwent a repeated OGTT 2-4 months after the initial OGTT. Following the second test, subjects were classified as transient IGT, or persistent IGT. Anthropometric measurements, including body mass index, waist and hip circumference, sagittal and transverse abdominal diameters and skinfold thickness measurements, were done during the second OGTT. Persistent IGT was diagnosed in 47 subjects (44%), transient IGT in 40 (37%), impaired fasting glucose in eight subjects (7%), and diabetes in 13 cases (12%). Two-hour blood glucose levels at the initial OGTT and subscapular skinfold thickness were significantly higher in subjects with persistent IGT (2-h blood glucose 9.8+/-0.1 mmol/l vs. 10.2+/-0.1 mmol/l for transient IGT and persistent IGT, respectively; subscapular skinfold thickness 25.4+/-1.4 mm vs. 29.8+/-1.2 mm for transient IGT and persistent IGT, respectively). After adjustment for age, sex and family history of diabetes mellitus, logistic regression indicated that 2-h blood glucose level during the initial OGTT represented the strongest predictor of persistent IGT (P<0.02), followed by subscapular skinfold thickness (P<0.05). After adjustment for 2-h blood glucose levels during the first OGTT, subscapular skinfold thickness remained significantly associated with persistent IGT (odds ratio 1.84; P<0.05). In addition to the 2-h blood glucose level, subscapular skinfold thickness was the best predictor of persistent IGT, suggesting that adding simple anthropometric measures to oral glucose tolerance testing may improve the distinction between

  1. Pregnane X receptor agonists impair postprandial glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Rysä, J; Buler, M; Savolainen, M J; Ruskoaho, H; Hakkola, J; Hukkanen, J

    2013-06-01

    We conducted a randomized, open, placebo-controlled crossover trial to investigate the effects of the pregnane X receptor (PXR) agonist rifampin on an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in 12 healthy volunteers. The subjects were administered 600 mg rifampin or placebo once daily for 7 days, and OGTT was performed on the eighth day. The mean incremental glucose and insulin areas under the plasma concentration-time curves (AUC(incr)) increased by 192% (P = 0.008) and 45% (P = 0.031), respectively. The fasting glucose, insulin, and C-peptide, and the homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance, were not affected. The glucose AUC(incr) during OGTT was significantly increased in rats after 4-day treatment with pregnenolone 16α-carbonitrile (PCN), an agonist of the rat PXR. The hepatic level of glucose transporter 2 (Glut2) mRNA was downregulated by PCN. In conclusion, both human and rat PXR agonists elicited postprandial hyperglycemia, suggesting a detrimental role of PXR activation on glucose tolerance.

  2. Noncardiovascular deaths are more common than cardiovascular deaths in patients with cardiovascular disease or cardiovascular risk factors and impaired glucose tolerance: Insights from the Nateglinide and Valsartan in Impaired Glucose Tolerance Outcomes Research (NAVIGATOR) trial.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Abhinav; de Souza Brito, Flávio; Sun, Jie-Lena; Thomas, Laine; Haffner, Steven; Holman, Rury R; Lopes, Renato D

    2017-04-01

    Patients with impaired glucose tolerance have an elevated risk of cardiovascular (CV) death; however, the causes and risk factors associated with non-CV deaths are poorly understood. The NAVIGATOR trial enrolled 9,306 participants with impaired glucose tolerance and CV disease or at high CV risk, with a median follow-up of 6.4years. Using this population, we identified (1) the proportion of deaths attributed to CV, non-CV, and unknown causes, and (2) the risk factors associated with non-CV death. During the NAVIGATOR trial follow-up, 622 patients died. Investigators reported 244 (39.2%) CV deaths, 313 (50.3%) non-CV deaths, and 65 (10.5%) deaths of unknown cause. Myocardial infarction was the leading cause of investigator-reported death (57/622 [9.2%]). Among non-CV deaths, the most commonly identified cause related to malignancy (177/313 [56.5%]). Using adjudicated causes of death, Cox proportional hazard models identified 3 independent prognostic markers that increased the risk of non-CV death: history of non-melanoma skin cancer (hazard ratio 2.67 [95% CI 1.65-4.33]; P<.0001), white blood cell count (1 unit >5000/mm(3); 1.10 [1.02-1.18]; P=.011), and serum potassium levels (per 1mmol/L above any value; 1.67 [1.302.15]; P<.0001). Despite the high baseline CV risk among patients in the NAVIGATOR trial, the most common cause of death was non-CV. The high burden of non-CV death in this population has potential implications for future CV event-driven trials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Impaired glucose tolerance and metabolic syndrome in idiopathic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Smith, A Gordon

    2012-05-01

    Idiopathic neuropathy is one of the most common clinical problems encountered in general medical and neurological practices, accounting for up to 40% of all neuropathies in referral series. Several groups have reported an elevated prevalence of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) in idiopathic neuropathy subjects, although the only carefully conducted case-control study suggested hypertriglyceridemia was a more important risk factor. The nature of the relationship between IGT and neuropathy is a subject of active debate. An evolving literature suggests metabolic syndrome, particularly dyslipidemia and obesity, are potent neuropathy risk factors for both idiopathic and diabetic neuropathy patients. Once established, diabetic neuropathy is likely to be very difficult to reverse. IGT-associated neuropathy, however, may be more amenable to therapy and could represent an ideal population in which to examine potential therapies for diabetes and obesity related neuropathies. Further research is needed to better define the epidemiological relation between IGT, metabolic syndrome, and neuropathy, its underlying pathophysiology, and to develop appropriate surrogate measures and clinical trials strategies.

  4. Hepatic portal vein denervation impairs oral glucose tolerance but not exenatide's effect on glycemia.

    PubMed

    Ionut, Viorica; Castro, Ana Valeria B; Woolcott, Orison O; Stefanovski, Darko; Iyer, Malini S; Broussard, Josiane L; Burch, Miguel; Elazary, Ram; Kolka, Cathryn M; Mkrtchyan, Hasmik; Bediako, Isaac Asare; Bergman, Richard N

    2014-10-15

    The hepatoportal area is an important glucohomeostatic metabolic sensor, sensing hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, and hormones such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). We have reported previously that activation of hepatoportal sensors by intraportal infusion of glucose and GLP-1 or by subcutaneous administration of GLP-1 receptor activator exenatide and of intraportal glucose improved glycemia independent of corresponding changes in pancreatic hormones. It is not clear whether this effect is mediated via the portal vein (PV) or by direct action on the liver itself. To test whether receptors in the PV mediate exenatide's beneficial effect on glucose tolerance, we performed 1) paired oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) with and without exenatide and 2) intravenous glucose tolerance tests before and after PV denervation in canines. Denervation of the portal vein affected oral glucose tolerance; post-denervation (POST-DEN) OGTT glucose and insulin AUC were 50% higher than before denervation (P = 0.01). However, portal denervation did not impair exenatide's effect to improve oral glucose tolerance (exenatide effect: 48 ± 12 mmol·l⁻¹·min before vs. 64 ± 26 mmol·l⁻¹·min after, P = 0.67). There were no changes in insulin sensitivity or secretion during IVGTTs. Portal vein sensing might play a role in controlling oral glucose tolerance during physiological conditions but not in pharmacological activation of GLP-1 receptors by exenatide.

  5. Impaired Glucose Tolerance in Healthy Men Treated with St. John's Wort.

    PubMed

    Stage, Tore Bjerregaard; Damkier, Per; Christensen, Mette Marie Hougaard; Nielsen, Lene Buch-Krogh; Højlund, Kurt; Brøsen, Kim

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether the over-the-counter herbal medicinal plant St. John's wort affects glucose tolerance in healthy men. To do this, we included 10 healthy men who were examined by a 2-hr oral glucose tolerance test on three occasions: A: baseline; B: after 21 days of treatment with St. John's wort; and C: at least 6 weeks after the last capsule of St. John's wort was ingested. Plasma glucose, serum insulin and C-peptide levels were measured during an oral glucose tolerance test and used for estimation of area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) as well as indices of insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion. We found that treatment with St. John's wort increased total and incremental glucose AUC and 2-hr plasma glucose levels. Surprisingly, this effect was sustained and even further increased 6 weeks after the last capsule of St. John's wort was taken. No effect on indices of insulin sensitivity was seen, but indices of insulin secretion were reduced even after adjustment for insulin sensitivity. In conclusion, this study indicates that long-term treatment with St. John's wort may impair glucose tolerance by reducing insulin secretion in young, healthy men. The unregulated use of this over-the-counter drug might be a risk factor for impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes.

  6. A Novel Animal Model of Impaired Glucose Tolerance Induced by the Interaction of Vitamin E Deficiency and 60Co Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yue; Cheng, Yan; Yin, Ying; Duan, Jialin; Wei, Guo; Weng, Yan; Guo, Chao; Zhu, Yanrong; Wang, Yanhua; Xi, Miaomiao; Wen, Aidong

    2015-01-01

    Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), known as the prediabetes stage, is usually induced by habits of life or environmental factors. Established IGT animal models are mostly conducted with chemical compounds such as streptozocin or genetic modification. However, the occasion of exposure to these factors in daily life is seldom. The objective of this study was to establish a new animal model of IGT induced by VE deficiency in diet and exposure to radiation. SD rats were treated individually or in combination of these two factors. In the combination group, the calculated insulin sensitivity index decreased; then HOMA-β value increased. Oxidative damage and IGT were observed. Insulin secretion level in perfusate from pancreas response to glucose was characterized by a rapid but reduced first phase and an obviously defective second phase upon pancreas perfusion. Histopathological images demonstrated the pathological changes. Western blotting analysis showed that the insulin signaling pathway was downregulated. The interaction of VE deficiency in diet and exposure to radiation could break the equilibrium of oxidation and antioxidation and result in IGT. More importantly, a new IGT model was successfully established which may be conducive to further research into development of drugs against human IGT. PMID:25954750

  7. [Prevalence of diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance in the urban population of 30 to 79 years of the city of São Carlos, São Paulo].

    PubMed

    Bosi, Paula Lima; Carvalho, Arlety Morais; Contrera, Daniele; Casale, Guilherme; Pereira, Marina Alexandre; Gronner, Matheus Ferreira; Diogo, Thatiana Melo; Torquarto, Maria Tereza da Costa Gonçalves; Oishi, Jorge; Leal, Angela Merice de Oliveira

    2009-08-01

    To assess the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) in the urban population aged 30-79 years of the city of São Carlos, São Paulo, Brazil. It was performed a population survey, from August 2007 to June 2008. Non diabetic individuals, excluding pregnant women, and those with fasting capillary glycemia glucose tolerance test and classified as diabetic, with IGT or with normal glucose tolerance. The number of individuals who participated in the study was 1,116. The overall rates of DM and IGT were 13.5% and 5%, respectively. DM and IGT were associated with age, education, body mass index and waist. They were not associated with gender, race or income. The prevalence of DM has increased when compared with previous studies in Brazil and in the state. Improvement in the diagnosis has occurred, however, treatment requires optimization.

  8. Role of diuretics, β blockers, and statins in increasing the risk of diabetes in patients with impaired glucose tolerance: reanalysis of data from the NAVIGATOR study.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lan; Shah, Bimal R; Reyes, Eric M; Thomas, Laine; Wojdyla, Daniel; Diem, Peter; Leiter, Lawrence A; Charbonnel, Bernard; Mareev, Viacheslav; Horton, Edward S; Haffner, Steven M; Soska, Vladimir; Holman, Rury; Bethel, M Angelyn; Schaper, Frank; Sun, Jie-Lena; McMurray, John J V; Califf, Robert M; Krum, Henry

    2013-12-09

    To examine the degree to which use of β blockers, statins, and diuretics in patients with impaired glucose tolerance and other cardiovascular risk factors is associated with new onset diabetes. Reanalysis of data from the Nateglinide and Valsartan in Impaired Glucose Tolerance Outcomes Research (NAVIGATOR) trial. NAVIGATOR trial. Patients who at baseline (enrolment) were treatment naïve to β blockers (n=5640), diuretics (n=6346), statins (n=6146), and calcium channel blockers (n=6294). Use of calcium channel blocker was used as a metabolically neutral control. Development of new onset diabetes diagnosed by standard plasma glucose level in all participants and confirmed with glucose tolerance testing within 12 weeks after the increased glucose value was recorded. The relation between each treatment and new onset diabetes was evaluated using marginal structural models for causal inference, to account for time dependent confounding in treatment assignment. During the median five years of follow-up, β blockers were started in 915 (16.2%) patients, diuretics in 1316 (20.7%), statins in 1353 (22.0%), and calcium channel blockers in 1171 (18.6%). After adjusting for baseline characteristics and time varying confounders, diuretics and statins were both associated with an increased risk of new onset diabetes (hazard ratio 1.23, 95% confidence interval 1.06 to 1.44, and 1.32, 1.14 to 1.48, respectively), whereas β blockers and calcium channel blockers were not associated with new onset diabetes (1.10, 0.92 to 1.31, and 0.95, 0.79 to 1.13, respectively). Among people with impaired glucose tolerance and other cardiovascular risk factors and with serial glucose measurements, diuretics and statins were associated with an increased risk of new onset diabetes, whereas the effect of β blockers was non-significant. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00097786.

  9. Age, BMI, and race are less important than random plasma glucose in identifying risk of glucose intolerance: the Screening for Impaired Glucose Tolerance Study (SIGT 5).

    PubMed

    Ziemer, David C; Kolm, Paul; Weintraub, William S; Vaccarino, Viola; Rhee, Mary K; Caudle, Jane M; Irving, Jade M; Koch, David D; Narayan, K M Venkat; Phillips, Lawrence S

    2008-05-01

    Age, BMI, and race/ethnicity are used in National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) and American Diabetes Association (ADA) guidelines to prompt screening for pre-diabetes and diabetes, but cutoffs have not been evaluated rigorously. Random plasma glucose (RPG) was measured and 75-g oral glucose tolerance tests were performed in 1,139 individuals without known diabetes. Screening performance was assessed by logistic regression and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AROC). NIDDK/ADA indicators age >45 years and BMI >25 kg/m(2) provided significant detection of both diabetes and dysglycemia (both AROCs 0.63), but screening was better with continuous-variable models of age, BMI, and race and better still with models of age, BMI, race, sex, and family history (AROC 0.78 and 0.72). However, screening was even better with RPG alone (AROCs 0.81 and 0.72). RPG >125 mg/dl could be used to prompt further evaluation with an OGTT. Use of age, BMI, and race/ethnicity in guidelines for screening to detect diabetes and pre-diabetes may be less important than evaluation of RPG. RPG should be investigated further as a convenient, inexpensive screen with good predictive utility.

  10. Rosiglitazone improves glucose metabolism in obese adolescents with impaired glucose tolerance: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Cali, Anna M G; Pierpont, Bridget M; Taksali, Sara E; Allen, Karin; Shaw, Melissa M; Savoye, Mary; Caprio, Sonia

    2011-01-01

    Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) is a prediabetic state fueling the rising prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in adolescents with marked obesity. Given the importance of insulin resistance, the poor β-cell compensation and the altered fat partitioning as underlying defects associated with this condition, it is crucial to determine the extent to which these underlying abnormalities can be reversed in obese adolescents. We tested, in a pilot study, whether rosiglitazone (ROSI) restores normal glucose tolerance (NGT) in obese adolescents with IGT by improving insulin sensitivity and β-cell function. In a small randomized, double-blind, placebo (PLA)-controlled study, lasting 4 months, 21 obese adolescents with IGT received either ROSI (8 mg daily) (n = 12, 5M/7F, BMI z-score 2.44 ± 0.11) or PLA (n = 9, 4M/5F, BMI z-score 2.41 ± 0.09). Before and after treatment, all subjects underwent oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, magnetic resonance imaging, and (1)H NMR assessment. After ROSI treatment, 58% of the subjects converted to NGT compared to 44% in the PLA group (P = 0.528). Restoration of NGT was associated with a significant increase in insulin sensitivity (P < 0.04) and a doubling in the disposition index (DI) (P < 0.04), whereas in the PLA group, these changes were not significant. The short-term use of ROSI appears to be safe in obese adolescents with IGT. ROSI restores NGT by increasing peripheral insulin sensitivity and β-cell function, two principal pathophysiological abnormalities of IGT.

  11. Impaired glucose tolerance in rats fed low-carbohydrate, high-fat diets.

    PubMed

    Bielohuby, Maximilian; Sisley, Stephanie; Sandoval, Darleen; Herbach, Nadja; Zengin, Ayse; Fischereder, Michael; Menhofer, Dominik; Stoehr, Barbara J M; Stemmer, Kerstin; Wanke, Rüdiger; Tschöp, Matthias H; Seeley, Randy J; Bidlingmaier, Martin

    2013-11-01

    Moderate low-carbohydrate/high-fat (LC-HF) diets are widely used to induce weight loss in overweight subjects, whereas extreme ketogenic LC-HF diets are used to treat neurological disorders like pediatric epilepsy. Usage of LC-HF diets for improvement of glucose metabolism is highly controversial; some studies suggest that LC-HF diets ameliorate glucose tolerance, whereas other investigations could not identify positive effects of these diets or reported impaired insulin sensitivity. Here, we investigate the effects of LC-HF diets on glucose and insulin metabolism in a well-characterized animal model. Male rats were fed isoenergetic or hypocaloric amounts of standard control diet, a high-protein "Atkins-style" LC-HF diet, or a low-protein, ketogenic, LC-HF diet. Both LC-HF diets induced lower fasting glucose and insulin levels associated with lower pancreatic β-cell volumes. However, dynamic challenge tests (oral and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests, insulin-tolerance tests, and hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps) revealed that LC-HF pair-fed rats exhibited impaired glucose tolerance and impaired hepatic and peripheral tissue insulin sensitivity, the latter potentially being mediated by elevated intramyocellular lipids. Adjusting visceral fat mass in LC-HF groups to that of controls by reducing the intake of LC-HF diets to 80% of the pair-fed groups did not prevent glucose intolerance. Taken together, these data show that lack of dietary carbohydrates leads to glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in rats despite causing a reduction in fasting glucose and insulin concentrations. Our results argue against a beneficial effect of LC-HF diets on glucose and insulin metabolism, at least under physiological conditions. Therefore, use of LC-HF diets for weight loss or other therapeutic purposes should be balanced against potentially harmful metabolic side effects.

  12. Epidemiological evidence of altered cardiac autonomic function in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance but not isolated impaired fasting glucose.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jin-Shang; Yang, Yi-Ching; Lin, Thy-Sheng; Huang, Ying-Hsiang; Chen, Jia-Jin; Lu, Feng-Hwa; Wu, Chih-Hsing; Chang, Chih-Jen

    2007-10-01

    Autonomic dysfunction is present in diabetes mellitus (DM), but no study is available on alteration in cardiac autonomic function (CAF) across different glycemic statuses including normal glucose tolerance (NGT), isolated impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and DM. Our objective was to examine whether CAF is altered in subjects with IGT and isolated IFG. The study was a stratified systematic cluster sampling design within the general community. A total of 1440 subjects were classified as NGT (n = 983), isolated IFG (n = 163), IGT (n = 188), and DM (n = 106). CAF was determined by 1) standard deviation of normal-to-normal (SDNN) or RR interval, power spectrum in low and high frequency (LF, 0.04-0.15 Hz; HF, 0.15-0.40 Hz), and LF/HF ratio in supine position for 5 min; 2) ratio between 30th and 15th RR interval after standing from supine position (30/15 ratio); and 3) average heart rate change during breathing of six deep breaths for 1 min (HR(DB)). Univariate analysis showed significant differences in SDNN, 30/15 ratio, HR(DB), HF power, and LF/HF ratio among subjects with NGT, isolated IFG, IGT, and DM. In multivariate analysis, none of the indices of CAF was related to isolated IFG in the reference group of NGT. IGT and DM were negatively associated with 30/15 ratio and HF power but positively associated with LF/HF ratio. In addition, DM was also related to a lower SDNN. DM and IGT subjects had an impaired CAF independent of other cardiovascular risk factors. The risk of altered CAF is not apparent in subjects with isolated IFG.

  13. Elevated 1-h post-challenge plasma glucose levels in subjects with normal glucose tolerance or impaired glucose tolerance are associated with whole blood viscosity.

    PubMed

    Marini, Maria Adelaide; Fiorentino, Teresa Vanessa; Andreozzi, Francesco; Mannino, Gaia Chiara; Perticone, Maria; Sciacqua, Angela; Perticone, Francesco; Sesti, Giorgio

    2017-08-01

    It has been suggested that glucose levels ≥155 mg/dl at 1-h during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) may predict development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular events among adults with normal glucose tolerance (NGT 1 h-high). Studies showed a link between increased blood viscosity and type 2 diabetes. However, whether blood viscosity is associated with dysglycemic conditions such as NGT 1 h-high, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) or impaired fasting glucose (IFG) is unsettled. 1723 non-diabetic adults underwent biochemical evaluation and OGTT. A validated formula based on hematocrit and total plasma proteins was employed to estimate whole blood viscosity. Subjects were categorized into NGT with 1 h glucose <155 mg/dL (NGT-1 h-low), NGT-1 h-high, IFG and/or IGT. Hematocrit and blood viscosity values appeared significantly higher in individuals with NGT 1 h-high, IFG and/or IGT as compared to NGT 1 h-low subjects. Blood viscosity was significantly correlated with age, waist circumference, blood pressure, HbA1c, fasting, 1- and 2-h post-challenge insulin levels, total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein, triglycerides, fibrinogen, white blood cell, and inversely correlated with high-density lipoprotein and insulin sensitivity. Of the four glycemic parameters, 1-h post-challenge glucose showed the strongest correlation with blood viscosity (β = 0.158, P < 0.0001) in a multivariate regression analysis model including several atherosclerosis risk factors. Our results demonstrate a positive relationship between blood viscosity and 1-h post-challenge plasma glucose. They also suggest that a subgroup of NGT individuals with 1-h post-challenge plasma >155 mg/dl have increased blood viscosity comparable to that observed in subjects with IFG and/or IGT.

  14. Brain GLUT4 Knockout Mice Have Impaired Glucose Tolerance, Decreased Insulin Sensitivity, and Impaired Hypoglycemic Counterregulation.

    PubMed

    Reno, Candace M; Puente, Erwin C; Sheng, Zhenyu; Daphna-Iken, Dorit; Bree, Adam J; Routh, Vanessa H; Kahn, Barbara B; Fisher, Simon J

    2017-03-01

    GLUT4 in muscle and adipose tissue is important in maintaining glucose homeostasis. However, the role of insulin-responsive GLUT4 in the central nervous system has not been well characterized. To assess its importance, a selective knockout of brain GLUT4 (BG4KO) was generated by crossing Nestin-Cre mice with GLUT4-floxed mice. BG4KO mice had a 99% reduction in GLUT4 protein expression throughout the brain. Despite normal feeding and fasting glycemia, BG4KO mice were glucose intolerant, demonstrated hepatic insulin resistance, and had reduced glucose uptake in the brain. In response to hypoglycemia, BG4KO mice had impaired glucose sensing, noted by impaired epinephrine and glucagon responses and impaired c-fos activation in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. Moreover, in vitro glucose sensing of glucose-inhibitory neurons from the ventromedial hypothalamus was impaired in BG4KO mice. In summary, BG4KO mice are glucose intolerant, insulin resistant, and have impaired glucose sensing, indicating a critical role for brain GLUT4 in sensing and responding to changes in blood glucose.

  15. Primary Defects in β-Cell Function Further Exacerbated by Worsening of Insulin Resistance Mark the Development of Impaired Glucose Tolerance in Obese Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Cali, Anna M.G.; Man, Chiara Dalla; Cobelli, Claudio; Dziura, James; Seyal, Aisha; Shaw, Melissa; Allen, Karin; Chen, Shu; Caprio, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) is a pre-diabetic state of increasing prevalence among obese adolescents. The purpose of this study was to determine the natural history of progression from normal glucose tolerance (NGT) to IGT in obese adolescents. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—We determined the evolution of β-cell function, insulin sensitivity (SI), and glucose tolerance in a multiethnic group of 60 obese adolescents over the course of approximately 30 months. Each subject underwent three serial 3-h oral glucose tolerance tests. Dynamic, static, and total β-cell responsivity (Φd, Φs, and Φtot, respectively) and Si were assessed by oral C-peptide and glucose minimal models. The disposition index (DI), which adjusts insulin secretion for Si, was calculated. RESULTS—At baseline, all 60 subjects had NGT. Seventy-seven percent (46 subjects) maintained NGT over the three testing periods (nonprogressors), whereas 23% (14 subjects) developed IGT over time (progressors). At baseline, percent fat and BMI Z score were comparable between the groups. Fasting plasma glucose, 2-h glucose, glucose area under the curve at 180 min, and Φd were significantly different between the two groups at baseline, whereas Si was comparable between the two groups. Over time, although Si remained unchanged in nonprogressors, it steadily worsened by ∼45% (P > 0.04) in progressors. β-Cell responsivity decreased by 20% in progressors, whereas it remained stable in nonprogressors. The DI showed a progressive decline in progressors compared with a modest improvement in nonprogressors (P = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS—Obese adolescents who progress to IGT may manifest primary defects in β-cell function. In addition, progressive decline in Si further aggravates β-cell function, contributing to the worsening of glucose intolerance. PMID:19106382

  16. Primary defects in beta-cell function further exacerbated by worsening of insulin resistance mark the development of impaired glucose tolerance in obese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Cali, Anna M G; Man, Chiara Dalla; Cobelli, Claudio; Dziura, James; Seyal, Aisha; Shaw, Melissa; Allen, Karin; Chen, Shu; Caprio, Sonia

    2009-03-01

    Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) is a pre-diabetic state of increasing prevalence among obese adolescents. The purpose of this study was to determine the natural history of progression from normal glucose tolerance (NGT) to IGT in obese adolescents. We determined the evolution of beta-cell function, insulin sensitivity (S(I)), and glucose tolerance in a multiethnic group of 60 obese adolescents over the course of approximately 30 months. Each subject underwent three serial 3-h oral glucose tolerance tests. Dynamic, static, and total beta-cell responsivity (Phi(d), Phi(s), and Phi(tot), respectively) and S(i) were assessed by oral C-peptide and glucose minimal models. The disposition index (DI), which adjusts insulin secretion for S(i), was calculated. At baseline, all 60 subjects had NGT. Seventy-seven percent (46 subjects) maintained NGT over the three testing periods (nonprogressors), whereas 23% (14 subjects) developed IGT over time (progressors). At baseline, percent fat and BMI Z score were comparable between the groups. Fasting plasma glucose, 2-h glucose, glucose area under the curve at 180 min, and Phi(d) were significantly different between the two groups at baseline, whereas S(i) was comparable between the two groups. Over time, although S(i) remained unchanged in nonprogressors, it steadily worsened by approximately 45% (P > 0.04) in progressors. beta-Cell responsivity decreased by 20% in progressors, whereas it remained stable in nonprogressors. The DI showed a progressive decline in progressors compared with a modest improvement in nonprogressors (P = 0.02). Obese adolescents who progress to IGT may manifest primary defects in beta-cell function. In addition, progressive decline in S(i) further aggravates beta-cell function, contributing to the worsening of glucose intolerance.

  17. Physicochemical characteristics of polysaccharide conjugates prepared from fresh tea leaves and their improving impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoqiang; Fang, Yapeng; Nishinari, Katsuyoshi; We, Heng; Sun, Chaochao; Li, Jianrong; Jiang, Yongwen

    2014-11-04

    Hot-water extracts were prepared from fresh tea leaves and fractionated by DEAE-cellulose DE-52 column chromatography to yield one unexplored polysaccharide-conjugate fraction TPC-L (tea polysaccharide conjugates). Chemical components, molecular weight and its distribution, water vapor sorption properties, zeta potentials and optical characteristics of TPC-L were investigated. As compared with injured cell group, the two dosages of TPC-L (150 and 300 μg/mL) were discovered to possess remarkably protective effect on human umbilical vein endothelial cells against impairments induced by high glucose in a dose-dependent manner (p < 0.05, p < 0.001, respectively). Compared with group NC (normal control), the ingestion of 40 mg/kg of TPC-L could significantly reduce blood glucose levels of normal mice ingesting starch, and significant difference of AUC (area under the curve of blood glucose) and ΔAUC (p < 0.05, p < 0.01) at the postprandial time point of 0.5 and 1.0 h were observed. The three dosages of TPC-L (10, 40 and 160 mg/kg) did not significantly lower postprandial blood glucose levels of normal mice ingesting glucose. TPC-L could improve starch tolerance to prevent impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) from developing into diabetes as well as protective effects on HUVE cells against impairments induced by high glucose It was suggested that TPC-L improved IGT through its capability of inhibition on digestive enzymes.

  18. Dietary trimethylamine N-oxide exacerbates impaired glucose tolerance in mice fed a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Liu, Xiaofang; Xu, Jie; Xue, Changhu; Xue, Yong; Wang, Yuming

    2014-10-01

    Trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) is an oxidation product of trimethylamine (TMA) and is present in many aquatic foods. Here, we investigated the effects of TMAO on glucose tolerance in high fat diet (HFD)-fed mice. Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to the control, high fat (HF), and TMAO groups. The HF group was fed a diet containing 25% fat, and the TMAO group was fed the HFD plus 0.2% TMAO for 4 weeks. After 3 weeks of feeding, oral glucose tolerance tests were performed. Dietary TMAO increased fasting insulin levels and homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and exacerbated the impaired glucose tolerance in HFD-fed mice. These effects were associated with the expression of genes related to the insulin signal pathway, glycogen synthesis, gluconeogenesis and glucose transport in liver. mRNA levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine MCP-1 increased significantly and of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 greatly decreased in adipose tissue. Our results suggest that dietary TMAO exacerbates impaired glucose tolerance, obstructs the hepatic insulin signaling pathway, and causes adipose tissue inflammation in mice fed a high fat diet.

  19. Diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance are underdiagnosed in intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Ladeira, Renata Teixeira; Simioni, Ana Cinthia Marques; Bafi, Antonio Tonete; Nascente, Ana Paula Metran; Freitas, Flavio Geraldo Resende; Machado, Flávia Ribeiro

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the presence of diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance in intensive care unit inpatients. Methods The study included patients in post-surgical care for elective and emergency surgery and excluded those patients with known diabetes mellitus. To diagnose prior serum glucose level disorders, we considered the value of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) at the time of admission, classifying the patients as normal (<5.7%), glucose intolerant (5.7-6.4%) or diabetic (>6.4%). During the first 3 days of the patient's hospital stay, glycemic control and clinical complications were assessed. Mortality was monitored for 28 days. For the statistical analyses, chi-square, ANOVA, student's t, Kruskal-Wallis or Mann Whitney tests were used. Results Thirty patients were included in the present study, 53% of whom were women; the patients had a mean age of 53.4±19.7 years and an APACHE II score of 13.6±6.6. The majority of patients were admitted for severe sepsis or septic shock followed by post-operative care for elective surgery, oncological surgery, multiple traumas and emergency surgery. When classifying these patients according to HbA1c, despite the absence of a prior history of diabetes mellitus, only 13.3% had a normal HbA1c level, 23.3% had levels compatible with the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and 63.3% had levels compatible with impaired glucose tolerance. We found a significant association between the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus or impaired glucose tolerance and the use of vasoactive drugs (p=0.04). Conclusion A high prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance was observed in inpatients at a general intensive care unit. PMID:23917931

  20. Diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance are underdiagnosed in intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Ladeira, Renata Teixeira; Simioni, Ana Cinthia Marques; Bafi, Antonio Tonete; Nascente, Ana Paula Metran; Freitas, Flavio Geraldo Resende; Machado, Flávia Ribeiro

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the presence of diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance in intensive care unit inpatients. The study included patients in post-surgical care for elective and emergency surgery and excluded those patients with known diabetes mellitus. To diagnose prior serum glucose level disorders, we considered the value of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) at the time of admission, classifying the patients as normal (<5.7%), glucose intolerant (5.7-6.4%) or diabetic (>6.4%). During the first 3 days of the patient's hospital stay, glycemic control and clinical complications were assessed. Mortality was monitored for 28 days. For the statistical analyses, chi-square, ANOVA, student's t, Kruskal-Wallis or Mann Whitney tests were used. Thirty patients were included in the present study, 53% of whom were women; the patients had a mean age of 53.4±19.7 years and an APACHE II score of 13.6±6.6. The majority of patients were admitted for severe sepsis or septic shock followed by post-operative care for elective surgery, oncological surgery, multiple traumas and emergency surgery. When classifying these patients according to HbA1c, despite the absence of a prior history of diabetes mellitus, only 13.3% had a normal HbA1c level, 23.3% had levels compatible with the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and 63.3% had levels compatible with impaired glucose tolerance. We found a significant association between the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus or impaired glucose tolerance and the use of vasoactive drugs (p=0.04). A high prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance was observed in inpatients at a general intensive care unit.

  1. Metformin modifies the exercise training effects on risk factors for cardiovascular disease in impaired glucose tolerant adults.

    PubMed

    Malin, Steven K; Nightingale, Joy; Choi, Sung-Eun; Chipkin, Stuart R; Braun, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Impaired glucose tolerant (IGT) adults are at elevated risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Exercise or metformin reduce CVD risk, but the efficacy of combining treatments is unclear. To determine the effects of exercise training plus metformin (EM), compared with each treatment alone, on CVD risk factors in IGT adults. Subjects were assigned to placebo (P), metformin (M), exercise training plus placebo (EP), or EM (8/group). In a double-blind design, P or 2,000 mg/d of M were administered for 12 weeks and half performed aerobic and resistance training 3 days/week for ≈ 60 min/day at 70% pretraining heart rate peak. Outcomes included adiposity, blood pressure (BP), lipids, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). Z-scores were calculated to determine metabolic syndrome severity. M and EM, but not EP, decreased body weight compared with P (P < 0.05). M and EP lowered systolic blood pressure by 6% (P < 0.05), diastolic blood pressure by 6% (P < 0.05), and hs-CRP by 20% (M: trend P = 0.06; EP: P < 0.05) compared with P. Treatments raised high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P < 0.05; EM: trend P = 0.06) compared with P and lowered triacyglycerol (P < 0.05) and metabolic syndrome Z-score compared with baseline (EP; trend P = 0.07 and EM or M; P < 0.05). Although exercise and/or metformin improve some CVD risk factors, only training or metformin alone lowered hs-CRP and BP. Thus, metformin may attenuate the effects of training on some CVD risk factors and metabolic syndrome severity in IGT adults. Copyright © 2012 The Obesity Society.

  2. Metformin modifies the exercise training effects on risk factors for cardiovascular disease in impaired glucose tolerant adults

    PubMed Central

    Malin, Steven K.; Nightingale, Joy; Choi, Sung-Eun; Chipkin, Stuart R.; Braun, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Impaired glucose tolerant (IGT) adults are at elevated risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Exercise or metformin reduce CVD risk, but the efficacy of combining treatments is unclear. To determine the effects of exercise training plus metformin, compared to each treatment alone, on CVD risk factors in IGT adults. Subjects were assigned to: placebo (P), metformin (M), exercise plus placebo (EP), or exercise plus metformin (EM) (8/group). In a double-blind design, P or 2000mg/d of M were administered for 12 weeks and half performed aerobic and resistance training 3 days/week for approximately 60 minutes/day at 70% pre-training heart rate peak. Outcomes included: adiposity, blood pressure (BP), lipids and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). Z-scores were calculated to determine metabolic syndrome severity. M and EM, but not EP, decreased body weight compared to P (p <0.05). M and EP lowered systolic BP by 6% (p < 0.05), diastolic BP by 6% (p < 0.05), and hs-CRP by 20% (M: trend p = 0.06; EP: p < 0.05) compared to P. Treatments raised HDL-cholesterol (p < 0.05; EM: trend p = 0.06) compared to P and lowered triacyglycerol (p < 0.05) and metabolic syndrome Z-score compared to baseline (EP; trend p = 0.07 and EM or M; p < 0.05). Although exercise and/or metformin improve some CVD risk factors, only training or metformin alone lowered hs-CRP and BP. Thus, metformin may attenuate the effects of training on some CVD risk factors and metabolic syndrome severity in IGT adults. PMID:23505172

  3. Spontaneous hyperglycemia and impaired glucose tolerance in athymic nude BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Zeidler, A; Tosco, C; Kumar, D; Slavin, B; Parker, J

    1982-09-01

    Basal plasma glucose, glucose tolerance, and insulin secretion were investigated in young and mature athymic nude BALB/c mice and in age-matched controls. Basal plasma glucose levels in male athymic nude mice were similar to those of controls at 1, 3, and 4 wk of age. At 6, 8, and 12 wk of age, male athymic nudes had significantly higher basal plasma glucose levels when compared with controls (P less than 0.01). Plasma immunoreactive insulin concentrations were similar in athymic nudes and controls at 1 wk of age, but at 3 wk of age and subsequently at 6, 8, and 12 wk athymic nude mice had significantly decreased insulin levels when compared with their age-matched controls (P less than 0.05). We found impaired glucose tolerance in male athymic nude mice at all age groups when compared with both female athymic nudes and control BALB/c mice. The discovery of a spontaneous diabetic syndrome (hyperglycemia, impaired glucose tolerance, and decreased insulin secretion) in a colony of athymic nude mice may provide an excellent model for studying the genetics and interactions between the immune and endocrine systems.

  4. The blood pressure response to exercise in youth with impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yardley, Jane E; MacMillan, Freya; Hay, Jacqueline; Wittmeier, Kristy; Wicklow, Brandy; MacIntosh, Andrea C; McGavock, Jonathan

    2015-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes is associated with hypertension and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. In adults, blood pressure (BP) responses to exercise are predictive of these complications. To determine if the hemodynamic response to exercise is exaggerated in youth with dysglycemia (DG) compared with normoglycemic overweight/ obese (OB) and healthy weight (HW) controls a cross-sectional comparison of BP and heart rate (HR) responses to graded exercise to exhaustion in participants was performed. DG and OB youth were matched for age, BMI z-score, height and sex. Systolic (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) were measured every 2 min, and HR was measured every 1 min. SBP was higher in OB and DG compared with HW youth at rest (p < .001). Despite working at lower relative workloads compared with HW, the BP response was elevated during exercise in OB and DG. For similar HR and oxygen consumption rates, BP responses to exercise were slightly higher in OB and DG compared with HW. OB and DG youth both display elevated resting and exercise BP relative to HW peers. Obesity may play a greater role than dysglycemia in the exaggerated BP response to exercise in youth.

  5. The effect of short-term metformin treatment on plasma prolactin levels in bromocriptine-treated patients with hyperprolactinaemia and impaired glucose tolerance: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Krysiak, Robert; Okrzesik, Joanna; Okopien, Boguslaw

    2015-05-01

    Metformin was found to affect plasma levels of some pituitary hormones. This study was aimed at investigating whether metformin treatment has an impact on plasma prolactin levels in bromocriptine-treated patients with hyperprolactinaemia and impaired glucose tolerance. The study included 27 patients with hyperprolactinaemia, who had been treated for at least 6 months with bromocriptine. Based on prolactin levels, bromocriptine-treated patients were divided into two groups: patients with elevated (group A, n = 12) and patients with normal (group B, n = 15) prolactin levels. The control group included 16 age-, sex- and weight-matched hyperprolactinaemia-free individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (group C).The lipid profile, fasting plasma glucose levels, the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance ratio (HOMA-IR), glycated haemoglobin, as well as plasma levels of prolactin, thyrotropin and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) were assessed at baseline and after 4 months of metformin treatment (2.55-3 g daily). In all treatment groups, metformin reduced HOMA-IR, plasma triglycerides and 2-h postchallenge plasma glucose. In patients with hyperprolactinaemia, but not in the other groups of patients, metformin slightly reduced plasma levels of prolactin, and this effect correlated weakly with the metabolic effects of this drug. Our study shows that metformin decreases plasma prolactin levels only in patients with elevated levels of this hormone. The obtained results suggest that metformin treatment may bring some benefits to hyperprolactinaemic patients with coexisting glucose metabolism disturbances already receiving dopamine agonist therapy.

  6. Visceral, subcutaneous abdominal adiposity and liver fat content distribution in normal glucose tolerance, impaired fasting glucose and/or impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Borel, A L; Nazare, J A; Smith, J; Aschner, P; Barter, P; Van Gaal, L; Eng Tan, C; Wittchen, H U; Matsuzawa, Y; Kadowaki, T; Ross, R; Brulle-Wohlhueter, C; Alméras, N; Haffner, S M; Balkau, B; Després, J P

    2015-03-01

    To examine the specific distribution of liver fat content, visceral and subcutaneous adiposity in normal glucose tolerance (NGT/NGT), isolated impaired fasting glucose (iIFG), isolated impaired glucose tolerance (iIGT) and combined conditions (IFG+IGT), as well as with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (nT2D). Multicenter, international observational study: cross-sectional analysis. Two thousand five hundred and fifteen patients (50.0% women, 54.5% non-Caucasian) without previously known diabetes were recruited from 29 countries. Abdominal fat distribution was measured by computed tomography (CT). Liver fat was estimated using the CT-liver mean attenuation. Compared with NGT/NGT patients, increased visceral adiposity was found in iIFG, iIGT, IFG+IGT and nT2D; estimated liver fat progressively increased across these conditions. A one-s.d. increase in visceral adiposity was associated with an increased risk of having iIFG (men: odds ratio (OR) 1.41 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.15-1.74), women: OR 1.62 (1.29-2.04)), iIGT (men: OR 1.59 (1.15-2.01), women: OR 1.30 (0.96-1.76)), IFG+IGT (men: OR 1.64 (1.27-2.13), women: OR 1.83 (1.36-2.48)) and nT2D (men: OR 1.80 (1.35-2.42), women: OR 1.73 (1.25-2.41)). A one-s.d. increase in estimated liver fat was associated with iIGT (men: OR 1.46 (1.12-1.90), women: OR 1.81 (1.41-2.35)), IFG+IGT (men: OR 1.42 (1.14-1.77), women: OR 1.74 (1.35-2.26)) and nT2D (men: OR 1.77 (1.40-2.27), women: OR 2.38 (1.81-3.18)). Subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue showed an inverse relationship with nT2D in women (OR 0.63 (0.45-0.88)). Liver fat was associated with iIGT but not with iIFG, whereas visceral adiposity was associated with both. Liver fat and visceral adiposity were associated with nT2D, whereas subcutaneous adiposity showed an inverse relationship with nT2D in women.

  7. Senescence marker protein-30/gluconolactonase deletion worsens glucose tolerance through impairment of acute insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Goji; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Kadono, Mayuko; Tanaka, Muhei; Asano, Mai; Senmaru, Takafumi; Kondo, Yoshitaka; Fukui, Michiaki; Obayashi, Hiroshi; Maruyama, Naoki; Nakamura, Naoto; Ishigami, Akihito

    2010-02-01

    Senescence marker protein-30 (SMP30) is an androgen-independent factor that decreases with age. We recently identified SMP30 as the lactone-hydrolyzing enzyme gluconolactonase (GNL), which is involved in vitamin C biosynthesis in animal species. To examine whether the age-related decrease in SMP30/GNL has effects on glucose homeostasis, we used SMP30/GNL knockout (KO) mice treated with L-ascorbic acid. In an ip glucose tolerance test at 15 wk of age, blood glucose levels in SMP30/GNL KO mice were significantly increased by 25% at 30 min after glucose administration compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Insulin levels in SMP30/GNL KO mice were significantly decreased by 37% at 30 min after glucose compared with WT mice. Interestingly, an insulin tolerance test showed a greater glucose-lowering effect in SMP30/GNL KO mice. High-fat diet feeding severely worsened glucose tolerance in both WT and SMP30/GNL KO mice. Morphometric analysis revealed no differences in the degree of high-fat diet-induced compensatory increase in beta-cell mass and proliferation. In the static incubation study of islets, insulin secretion in response to 20 mm glucose or KCl was significantly decreased in SMP30/GNL KO mice. On the other hand, islet ATP content at 20 mm in SMP30/GNL KO mice was similar to that in WT mice. Collectively, these data indicate that impairment of the early phase of insulin secretion due to dysfunction of the distal portion of the secretion pathway underlies glucose intolerance in SMP30/GNL KO mice. Decreased SMP30/GNL may contribute to the worsening of glucose tolerance that occurs in normal aging.

  8. Effect of Rosiglitazone and Ramipril on β-Cell Function in People With Impaired Glucose Tolerance or Impaired Fasting Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Anthony J.; Zinman, Bernard; Sheridan, Patrick; Yusuf, Salim; Gerstein, Hertzel C.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to determine the degree to which ramipril and/or rosiglitazone changed β-cell function over time among individuals with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and/or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) who participated in the Diabetes Reduction Assessment With Ramipril and Rosiglitazone Medication (DREAM) Trial, which evaluated whether ramipril and/or rosiglitazone could prevent or delay type 2 diabetes in high-risk individuals. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The present analysis included subjects (n = 982) from DREAM trial centers in Canada who had oral glucose tolerance tests at baseline, after 2 years, and at the end of the study. β-Cell function was assessed using the fasting proinsulin–to–C-peptide ratio (PI/C) and the insulinogenic index (defined as 30–0 min insulin/30–0 min glucose) divided by homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (insulinogenic index [IGI]/insulin resistance [IR]). RESULTS Subjects receiving rosiglitazone had a significant increase in IGI/IR between baseline and end of study compared with the placebo group (25.59 vs. 1.94, P < 0.0001) and a significant decrease in PI/C (−0.010 vs. −0.006, P < 0.0001). In contrast, there were no significant changes in IGI/IR or PI/C in subjects receiving ramipril compared with placebo (11.71 vs. 18.15, P = 0.89, and −0.007 vs. −0.008, P = 0.64, respectively). The impact of rosiglitazone on IGI/IR and PI/C was similar within subgroups of isolated IGT and IFG + IGT (all P < 0.001). Effects were more modest in those with isolated IFG (IGI/IR: 8.95 vs. 2.13, P = 0.03; PI/C: −0.003 vs. −0.001, P = 0.07). CONCLUSIONS Treatment with rosiglitazone, but not ramipril, resulted in significant improvements in measures of β-cell function over time in pre-diabetic subjects. Although the long-term sustainability of these improvements cannot be determined from the present study, these findings demonstrate that the diabetes preventive effect of rosiglitazone was

  9. Knockdown of neuropeptide Y in the dorsomedial hypothalamus reverses high-fat diet-induced obesity and impaired glucose tolerance in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yonwook J; Bi, Sheng

    2016-01-15

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) plays an important role in the regulation of energy balance. While DMH NPY overexpression causes hyperphagia and obesity in rats, knockdown of NPY in the DMH via adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated RNAi (AAVshNPY) ameliorates these alterations. Whether this knockdown has a therapeutic effect on obesity and glycemic disorder has yet to be determined. The present study sought to test this potential using a rat model of high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity and insulin resistance, mimicking human obesity with impaired glucose homeostasis. Rats had ad libitum access to rodent regular chow (RC) or HFD. Six weeks later, an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed for verifying HFD-induced glucose intolerance. After verification, obese rats received bilateral DMH injections of AAVshNPY or the control vector AAVshCTL, and OGTT and insulin tolerance test (ITT) were performed at 16 and 18 wk after viral injection (23 and 25 wk on HFD), respectively. Rats were killed at 26 wk on HFD. We found that AAVshCTL rats on HFD remained hyperphagic, obese, glucose intolerant, and insulin resistant relative to lean control RC-fed rats receiving DMH injection of AAVshCTL, whereas these alterations were reversed in NPY knockdown rats fed a HFD. NPY knockdown rats exhibited normal food intake, body weight, glucose tolerance, and insulin sensitivity, as seen in lean control rats. Together, these results demonstrate a therapeutic action of DMH NPY knockdown against obesity and impaired glucose homeostasis in rats, providing a potential target for the treatment of obesity and diabetes. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Serum high-molecular weight adiponectin decreases abruptly after an oral glucose load in subjects with normal glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose, but not those with impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, Noriyuki; Hara, Kenji; Yatsuka, Chikako; Nakano, Tomoki; Matsumoto, Sachiko; Suetsugu, Mariko; Nakamachi, Takafumi; Takebayashi, Kohzo; Inukai, Toshihiko; Haruki, Kohsuke; Aso, Yoshimasa

    2009-10-01

    Adiponectin exists in the blood as 3 forms, which are a trimer, a hexamer, and a high-molecular weight (HMW) form. We investigated whether circulating HMW adiponectin levels were altered by oral glucose or fat ingestion. Forty male subjects underwent a 75-g oral glucose loading test (OGTT), and 11 healthy subjects (5 women and 6 men) received a fat loading test. Serum levels of HMW and total adiponectin were measured during the OGTT and the fat loading test. The fat loading test was performed for at least 8 hours. Among the 40 male subjects, 11 had normal glucose tolerance (NGT), 9 had impaired fasting glucose (IFG), 11 had impaired glucose tolerance, and 9 had diabetes mellitus (DM). In all 40 subjects, the serum total adiponectin level did not change significantly, whereas serum HMW adiponectin decreased significantly after a glucose load and reached 92.2% of the basal level at 120 minutes after the OGTT (P < .01). The HMW to total adiponectin ratio decreased significantly from 0.47 +/- 0.15 at baseline to 0.43 +/- 0.13 at 120 minutes after a glucose load (P < .05). Serum HMW adiponectin measured at 120 minutes after the OGTT decreased significantly to 86.0% and 85.6% of the basal level in subjects with NGT or IFG, respectively (both P < .01). In subjects with impaired glucose tolerance or DM, however, serum HMW adiponectin did not change. The area under the curve for insulin at 30 minutes after a glucose load during the OGTT was significantly larger in subjects with NGT or IFG than in those with DM (P < .05). In addition, the insulinogenic index (DeltaI(0-30)/DeltaG(0-30)) was significantly higher in subjects with NGT or IFG than in those with DM (P < .001). Percentage changes in serum HMW adiponectin of the baseline at 120 minutes correlated negatively with those in serum insulin (r = -0.468, P = .0023), but not plasma glucose, of the baseline at 30 minutes in 40 subjects. On the other hand, serum triglycerides increased significantly after an oral fat load in

  11. Altered Skeletal Muscle Fatty Acid Handling in Subjects with Impaired Glucose Tolerance as Compared to Impaired Fasting Glucose.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Gijs H; Moors, Chantalle C M; Jocken, Johan W E; van der Zijl, Nynke J; Jans, Anneke; Konings, Ellen; Diamant, Michaela; Blaak, Ellen E

    2016-03-14

    Altered skeletal muscle fatty acid (FA) metabolism contributes to insulin resistance. Here, we compared skeletal muscle FA handling between subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG; n = 12 (7 males)) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT; n = 14 (7 males)) by measuring arterio-venous concentration differences across forearm muscle. [²H₂]-palmitate was infused intravenously, labeling circulating endogenous triacylglycerol (TAG) and free fatty acids (FFA), whereas [U-(13)C]-palmitate was incorporated in a high-fat mixed-meal, labeling chylomicron-TAG. Skeletal muscle biopsies were taken to determine muscle TAG, diacylglycerol (DAG), FFA, and phospholipid content, their fractional synthetic rate (FSR) and degree of saturation, and gene expression. Insulin sensitivity was assessed using a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Net skeletal muscle glucose uptake was lower (p = 0.018) and peripheral insulin sensitivity tended to be reduced (p = 0.064) in IGT as compared to IFG subjects. Furthermore, IGT showed higher skeletal muscle extraction of VLDL-TAG (p = 0.043), higher muscle TAG content (p = 0.025), higher saturation of FFA (p = 0.004), lower saturation of TAG (p = 0.017) and a tendency towards a lower TAG FSR (p = 0.073) and a lower saturation of DAG (p = 0.059) versus IFG individuals. Muscle oxidative gene expression was lower in IGT subjects. In conclusion, increased liver-derived TAG extraction and reduced lipid turnover of saturated FA, rather than DAG content, in skeletal muscle accompany the more pronounced insulin resistance in IGT versus IFG subjects.

  12. Altered Skeletal Muscle Fatty Acid Handling in Subjects with Impaired Glucose Tolerance as Compared to Impaired Fasting Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Goossens, Gijs H.; Moors, Chantalle C. M.; Jocken, Johan W. E.; van der Zijl, Nynke J.; Jans, Anneke; Konings, Ellen; Diamant, Michaela; Blaak, Ellen E.

    2016-01-01

    Altered skeletal muscle fatty acid (FA) metabolism contributes to insulin resistance. Here, we compared skeletal muscle FA handling between subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG; n = 12 (7 males)) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT; n = 14 (7 males)) by measuring arterio-venous concentration differences across forearm muscle. [2H2]-palmitate was infused intravenously, labeling circulating endogenous triacylglycerol (TAG) and free fatty acids (FFA), whereas [U-13C]-palmitate was incorporated in a high-fat mixed-meal, labeling chylomicron-TAG. Skeletal muscle biopsies were taken to determine muscle TAG, diacylglycerol (DAG), FFA, and phospholipid content, their fractional synthetic rate (FSR) and degree of saturation, and gene expression. Insulin sensitivity was assessed using a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Net skeletal muscle glucose uptake was lower (p = 0.018) and peripheral insulin sensitivity tended to be reduced (p = 0.064) in IGT as compared to IFG subjects. Furthermore, IGT showed higher skeletal muscle extraction of VLDL-TAG (p = 0.043), higher muscle TAG content (p = 0.025), higher saturation of FFA (p = 0.004), lower saturation of TAG (p = 0.017) and a tendency towards a lower TAG FSR (p = 0.073) and a lower saturation of DAG (p = 0.059) versus IFG individuals. Muscle oxidative gene expression was lower in IGT subjects. In conclusion, increased liver-derived TAG extraction and reduced lipid turnover of saturated FA, rather than DAG content, in skeletal muscle accompany the more pronounced insulin resistance in IGT versus IFG subjects. PMID:26985905

  13. The interleukin-1 receptor antagonist anakinra improves first-phase insulin secretion and insulinogenic index in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    van Poppel, P C M; van Asseldonk, E J P; Holst, J J; Vilsbøll, T; Netea, M G; Tack, C J

    2014-12-01

    Inflammation at the level of the β cell appears to be involved in progressive β-cell dysfunction in type 2 diabetes. We assessed the effect of blocking interleukin-1 (IL-1) by anakinra [recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra)] on β-cell function. Sixteen participants with impaired glucose tolerance were treated with 150 mg anakinra daily for 4 weeks in a double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled cross-over study with a wash-out period of 4 weeks. At the end of each treatment period, oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) and hyperglycaemic clamps were performed. First-phase insulin secretion improved after anakinra treatment compared with placebo, 148 ± 20 versus 123 ± 14 mU/l, respectively (p = 0.03), and the insulinogenic index was higher after anakinra treatment. These results support the concept of involvement of IL-1β in the (progressive) decrease of insulin secretion capacity associated with type 2 diabetes.

  14. Distinguishing between persistent and transient impaired glucose tolerance using a prediction model.

    PubMed

    Bourn, D M; Williams, S M; Mann, J I

    1992-10-01

    Screening for impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and Type 2 (non-insulin dependent) diabetes was carried out in 777 people and those with high blood glucose levels completed three 2-h oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT). Blood lipid levels, fasting and 2-h insulin levels, body mass index, and blood pressure were also measured and family history of Type 2 diabetes recorded. Fifty people were identified with IGT and of these 21 were found to have persistent IGT and 29 transient IGT. A model including the variables body mass index, fasting and 2-h insulin levels, fasting triglycerides and family history of Type 2 diabetes was developed using the Speigelhalter-Knill-Jones weighting method to predict subjects with persistent IGT. This model could be useful in identifying people with persistent IGT and therefore eliminate the need for repeat OGTTs which are time consuming and expensive.

  15. High-normal fasting glucose levels are associated with increased prevalence of impaired glucose tolerance in obese children.

    PubMed

    Grandone, A; Amato, A; Luongo, C; Santoro, N; Perrone, L; del Giudice, E Miraglia

    2008-12-01

    The natural history of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and Type 2 diabetes among obese children is not clear. Although the cut-off for impaired fasting glucose (IFG) has recently been changed from 110 (6.1 mmol/l) to 100 mg/dl (5.6 mmol/l), it does not seem a reliable way to find all subjects with impaired glucose homeostasis. The aim of our study was to determine whether high-normal fasting glucose level could predict the occurrence of IGT and metabolic syndrome. Three hundred and twenty-three Italian obese children and adolescents were included in the study (176 females, mean age 11+/-2.9 yr; mean body mass index z-score: 3+/-0.6). Waist circumference, serum glucose, insulin, triglyceride, cholesterol HDL, blood pressure were evaluated and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed. The prevalence of IFG and IGT were respectively 1.5% (5 subjects) and 5% (18 patients); no diabetic patients were found. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in 20% of patients. Fasting glycemia values <100 mg/dl (5.6 mmol/l) have been divided in quintiles. Metabolic syndrome prevalence increased across quintiles, although not in a statistically significantly manner, but it could depend on the selected diagnostic criteria as no univocal definition exists for metabolic syndrome in youths. Interestingly high-normal fasting plasma glucose levels constitute an independent risk factor for IGT among obese children and adolescents; therefore, this very easy-to-use parameter may help to identify obese patients at increased risk of diabetes or at least could suggest in which subjects to perform an OGTT.

  16. Sitagliptin improves glycaemic excursion after a meal or after an oral glucose load in Japanese subjects with impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Kaku, K; Kadowaki, T; Terauchi, Y; Okamoto, T; Sato, A; Okuyama, K; Arjona Ferreira, J C; Goldstein, B J

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of sitagliptin in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). In a double-blind, parallel-group study, 242 Japanese subjects with IGT, determined by a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) at week -1, were randomized (1 : 1 : 1) to placebo (n = 83), sitagliptin 25 mg (n = 82) or 50 mg (n = 77) once daily for 8 weeks. Glycaemic variables were assessed using another OGTT at week 7 and meal tolerance tests (MTTs) at weeks 0 and 8. Primary and secondary endpoints were percent change from baseline in glucose total area under the curve 0-2 h (AUC(0 -2 h)) during the MTT and OGTT, respectively. Least squares mean percent change from baseline in glucose AUC(0 -2 h) during the MTT were -2.4, -9.5 and -11.5%, and during the OGTT were -3.7, -21.4 and -20.1% with placebo, sitagliptin 25 mg once daily, and 50 mg once daily, respectively (p < 0.001 for either sitagliptin dose vs placebo in both tests). Sitagliptin treatment enhanced early insulin response during the OGTT and decreased total insulin response, assessed as the total AUC(0 -2 h) during the MTT. Sitagliptin treatment also suppressed glucagon response during the MTT. The incidence of adverse events, including hypoglycaemia, was low and generally similar in all treatment groups. Treatment with sitagliptin significantly reduced glucose excursions during both an MTT and an OGTT; this effect was associated with an increase in early insulin secretion after oral glucose loading as well as a blunted glucagon response during an MTT. Sitagliptin was generally well tolerated in subjects with IGT. © 2015 The Authors. Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Blunted brain energy consumption relates to insula atrophy and impaired glucose tolerance in obesity.

    PubMed

    Jauch-Chara, Kamila; Binkofski, Ferdinand; Loebig, Michaela; Reetz, Kathrin; Jahn, Gianna; Melchert, Uwe H; Schweiger, Ulrich; Oltmanns, Kerstin M

    2015-06-01

    Brain energy consumption induced by electrical stimulation increases systemic glucose tolerance in normal-weight men. In obesity, fundamental reductions in brain energy levels, gray matter density, and cortical metabolism, as well as chronically impaired glucose tolerance, suggest that disturbed neuroenergetic regulation may be involved in the development of overweight and obesity. Here, we induced neuronal excitation by anodal transcranial direct current stimulation versus sham, examined cerebral energy consumption with (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and determined systemic glucose uptake by euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic glucose clamp in 15 normal-weight and 15 obese participants. We demonstrate blunted brain energy consumption and impaired systemic glucose uptake in obese compared with normal-weight volunteers, indicating neuroenergetic dysregulation in obese humans. Broadening our understanding of reduced multifocal gray matter volumes in obesity, our findings show that reduced appetite- and taste-processing area morphometry is associated with decreased brain energy levels. Specifically, gray matter volumes of the insula relate to brain energy content in obese participants. Overall, our results imply that a diminished cerebral energy supply may underlie the decline in brain areas assigned to food intake regulation and therefore the development of obesity. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  18. Impaired glucose tolerance in midlife and longitudinal changes in brain function during aging.

    PubMed

    Thambisetty, Madhav; Beason-Held, Lori L; An, Yang; Kraut, Michael; Metter, Jeffrey; Egan, Josephine; Ferrucci, Luigi; O'Brien, Richard; Resnick, Susan M

    2013-10-01

    We investigated whether individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) in midlife subsequently show regionally specific longitudinal changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) relative to those with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). Sixty-four cognitively normal participants in the neuroimaging substudy of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging underwent serial (15)O-water positron emission tomography scans (age at first scan, 69.6 ± 7.5 years) and oral glucose tolerance tests 12 years earlier (age at first oral glucose tolerance test, 57.2 ± 11.1 years). Using voxel-based analysis, we compared changes in rCBF over an 8-year period between 15 participants with IGT in midlife and 49 with NGT. Significant differences were observed in longitudinal change in rCBF between the IGT and NGT groups. The predominant pattern was greater rCBF decline in the IGT group in the frontal, parietal, and temporal cortices. Some brain regions in the frontal and temporal cortices also showed greater longitudinal increments in rCBF in the IGT group. Our findings suggest that IGT in midlife is associated with subsequent longitudinal changes in brain function during aging even in cognitively normal older individuals.

  19. The immediate effects of a single bout of aerobic exercise on oral glucose tolerance across the glucose tolerance continuum

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Sine H.; Karstoft, Kristian; Pedersen, Bente K.; van Hall, Gerrit; Solomon, Thomas P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We investigated glucose tolerance and postprandial glucose fluxes immediately after a single bout of aerobic exercise in subjects representing the entire glucose tolerance continuum. Twenty‐four men with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), or type 2 diabetes (T2D; age: 56 ± 1 years; body mass index: 27.8 ± 0.7 kg/m2, P > 0.05) underwent a 180‐min oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) combined with constant intravenous infusion of [6,6‐2H2]glucose and ingestion of [U‐13C]glucose, following 1 h of exercise (50% of peak aerobic power) or rest. In both trials, plasma glucose concentrations and kinetics, insulin, C‐peptide, and glucagon were measured. Rates (mg kg−1 min−1) of glucose appearance from endogenous (RaEndo) and exogenous (oral glucose; RaOGTT) sources, and glucose disappearance (Rd) were determined. We found that exercise increased RaEndo, RaOGTT, and Rd (all P < 0.0001) in all groups with a tendency for a greater (~20%) peak RaOGTT value in NGT subjects when compared to IGT and T2D subjects. Accordingly, following exercise, the plasma glucose concentration during the OGTT was increased in NGT subjects (P < 0.05), while unchanged in subjects with IGT and T2D. In conclusion, while a single bout of moderate‐intensity exercise increased the postprandial glucose response in NGT subjects, glucose tolerance following exercise was preserved in the two hyperglycemic groups. Thus, postprandial plasma glucose responses immediately following exercise are dependent on the underlying degree of glycemic control. PMID:25168869

  20. Effect of acacia polyphenol on glucose homeostasis in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance: A randomized multicenter feeding trial

    PubMed Central

    OGAWA, SOSUKE; MATSUMAE, TOMOYUKI; KATAOKA, TAKESHI; YAZAKI, YOSHIKAZU; YAMAGUCHI, HIDEYO

    2013-01-01

    Numerous in vitro and animal studies, as well as clinical trials have indicated that plant-derived polyphenols exert beneficial effects on glucose intolerance or type 2 diabetes. This clinical study aimed to investigate the effects of acacia polyphenol (AP) on glucose and insulin responses to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in non-diabetic subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in a total of 34 enrolled subjects. The subjects were randomly assigned to the AP-containing dietary supplement (AP supplement; in a daily dose of 250 mg as AP; n=17) or placebo (n=17) and the intervention was continued for 8 weeks. Prior to the start of the intervention (baseline) and after 4 and 8 weeks of intervention, plasma glucose and insulin were measured during a two-hour OGTT. Compared with the baseline, plasma glucose and insulin levels at 90 and/or 120 min, as well as the total area under the curve values during the OGTT (AUC0→2h) for glucose and insulin, were significantly reduced in the AP group, but not in the placebo group after intervention for 8 weeks. The decline from baseline in plasma glucose and insulin at 90 or 120 min of the OGTT for the AP group was significantly greater compared with that of the placebo group after 8 weeks of intervention. No AP supplement-related adverse side-effects nor any abnormal changes in routine laboratory tests and anthropometric parameters were observed throughout the study period. The AP supplement may have the potential to improve glucose homeostasis in subjects with IGT. PMID:23837032

  1. Pulsatile insulin secretion, impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Satin, Leslie S.; Butler, Peter C.; Ha, Joon; Sherman, Arthur S.

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) results when increases in beta cell function and/or mass cannot compensate for rising insulin resistance. Numerous studies have documented the longitudinal changes in metabolism that occur during the development of glucose intolerance and lead to T2DM. However, the role of changes in insulin secretion, both amount and temporal pattern has been understudied. Most of the insulin secreted from pancreatic beta cells of the pancreas is released in a pulsatile pattern, which is disrupted in T2DM. Here we review the evidence that changes in beta cell pulsatility occur during the progression from glucose intolerance to T2DM in humans, and contribute significantly to the etiology of the disease. We review the evidence that insulin pulsatility improves the efficacy of secreted insulin on its targets, particularly hepatic glucose production, but also examine evidence that pulsatility alters or is altered by changes in peripheral glucose uptake. Finally, we summarize our current understanding of the biophysical mechanisms responsible for oscillatory insulin secretion. Understanding how insulin pulsatility contributes to normal glucose homeostasis and is altered in metabolic disease states may help improve the treatment of T2DM. PMID:25637831

  2. Clofibrate-induced reduction of plasma branched-chain amino acid concentrations impairs glucose tolerance in rats.

    PubMed

    Kadota, Yoshihiro; Kazama, Shunsuke; Bajotto, Gustavo; Kitaura, Yasuyuki; Shimomura, Yoshiharu

    2012-05-01

    It has been reported that branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) administration stimulates glucose uptake into muscles and whole body glucose oxidation in rats. The authors examined the effect of decreased plasma BCAA concentrations induced by clofibrate treatment on glucose tolerance in rats. Since clofibrate, a drug for hyperlipidemia (high serum triglyceride concentration), is a potent inhibitor of the branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase kinase, clofibrate treatment (0.2 g/kg body weight) activated the hepatic branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase complex, resulting in decreased plasma BCAA concentrations by 30% to 50% from the normal level. An intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test was conducted after clofibrate administration, and the results showed that peak plasma glucose concentration and the area under the curve of glucose concentration during the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test were significantly higher in clofibrate-treated rats than in control rats. This impaired glucose tolerance in the clofibrate-treated rats was ameliorated by administration of BCAAs (0.45 g/kg body weight, leucine:isoleucine:valine = 2:1:1), which kept plasma BCAA concentrations at normal levels during the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. These results suggest that plasma BCAAs play an important role in maintaining normal glucose tolerance in rats.

  3. New insulin sensitivity index from the oral glucose tolerance test.

    PubMed

    Kazama, Youichiro; Takamura, Toshinari; Sakurai, Masaru; Shindo, Hisakazu; Ohkubo, Eizho; Aida, Kaoru; Harii, Norikazu; Taki, Katsumi; Kaneshige, Masahiro; Tanaka, Shoichiro; Shimura, Hiroki; Endo, Toyoshi; Kobayashi, Tetsuro

    2008-01-01

    A new insulin sensitivity index was devised on the basis of an autoregressive model and its validity was investigated. Using data from the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), 115 subjects were divided into 3 groups: 40 with normal glucose tolerance, 34 with impaired glucose tolerance, and 41 with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The new insulin sensitivity index: oral glucose insulin sensitivity index (GSI) was calculated from five sets of plasma glucose and insulin levels obtained at 0, 30, 60, 90 and 120 min during OGTT using a formula based on an autoregressive model. Forty-three of the 115 subjects were examined for insulin sensitivity index (ISI) by euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp. GSI decreased in the order of normal glucose tolerance group>impaired glucose tolerance group>diabetic group. There was a significant correlation between GSI and the ISI derived from euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp study data in all 43 subjects who underwent both tests (r=0.72; P<0.0001). The ISI calculated by previous methods poorly correlated with the ISIs obtained by euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp study. In conclusion, this new insulin sensitivity index based on the data obtained from OGTT using an autoregressive model is comparable to an insulin sensitivity index by euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp technique and may be superior to previous indexes that have been devised to determine insulin sensitivity from OGTT data.

  4. Prediabetes in obese youth: a syndrome of impaired glucose tolerance, severe insulin resistance, and altered myocellular and abdominal fat partitioning

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Ram; Dufour, Sylvie; Taksali, Sara E; Tambortlane, William V; Petersen, Kitt F; Bonadonna, Riccardo C; Boselli, Linda; Barbetta, Gina; Alle, Karin; Rife, Francis; Savoye, Mary; Dziura, James; Sherwin, Robert; Shulman, Gerald I; Caprio, Sonia

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Impaired glucose tolerance is common among obese adolescents, but the changes in insulin sensitivity and secretion that lead to this prediabetic state are unknown. We investigated whether altered partitioning of myocellular and abdominal fat relates to abnormalities in glucose homoeostasis in obese adolescents with prediabetes. Methods We studied 14 obese children with impaired glucose tolerance and 14 with normal glucose tolerance, of similar ages, sex distribution, and degree of obesity. Insulin sensitivity and secretion were assessed by the euglycaemichyperinsulinaemic clamp and the hyperglycaemic clamp. Intramyocellular lipid was assessed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and abdominal fat distribution by magnetic resonance imaging. Findings Peripheral glucose disposal was significantly lower in individuals with impaired than in those with normal glucose tolerance (mean 35·4 [SE 4·0] vs 60·6 [7·2] μmoles per kg lean body mass per min; p=0·023) owing to a reduction in non-oxidative glucose disposal metabolism (storage). Individuals with impaired glucose tolerance had higher intramyocellular lipid content (3·04 [0·43] vs 1·99 [0·19]%, p=0·03), lower abdominal subcutaneous fat (460 [47] vs 626 [39] cm2, p=0·04), and slightly higher visceral fat than the controls (70 [11] vs 47 [6] cm2, p=0·065), resulting in a higher ratio of visceral to subcutaneous fat (0·15 [0·02] vs 0·07 [0·01], p=0·002). Intramyocellular and visceral lipid contents were inversely related to the glucose disposal and non-oxidative glucose metabolism and positively related to the 2 h plasma glucose concentration. Interpretation In obese children and adolescents with prediabetes, intramyocellular and intra-abdominal lipid accumulation is closely linked to the development of severe peripheral insulin resistance. PMID:14511928

  5. Prediabetes in obese youth: a syndrome of impaired glucose tolerance, severe insulin resistance, and altered myocellular and abdominal fat partitioning.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Ram; Dufour, Sylvie; Taksali, Sara E; Tamborlane, William V; Petersen, Kitt F; Bonadonna, Riccardo C; Boselli, Linda; Barbetta, Gina; Allen, Karin; Rife, Francis; Savoye, Mary; Dziura, James; Sherwin, Robert; Shulman, Gerald I; Caprio, Sonia

    2003-09-20

    Impaired glucose tolerance is common among obese adolescents, but the changes in insulin sensitivity and secretion that lead to this prediabetic state are unknown. We investigated whether altered partitioning of myocellular and abdominal fat relates to abnormalities in glucose homoeostasis in obese adolescents with prediabetes. We studied 14 obese children with impaired glucose tolerance and 14 with normal glucose tolerance, of similar ages, sex distribution, and degree of obesity. Insulin sensitivity and secretion were assessed by the euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp and the hyperglycaemic clamp. Intramyocellular lipid was assessed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and abdominal fat distribution by magnetic resonance imaging. Peripheral glucose disposal was significantly lower in individuals with impaired than in those with normal glucose tolerance (mean 35.4 [SE 4.0] vs 60.6 [7.2] micromoles per kg lean body mass per min; p=0.023) owing to a reduction in non-oxidative glucose disposal metabolism (storage). Individuals with impaired glucose tolerance had higher intramyocellular lipid content (3.04 [0.43] vs 1.99 [0.19]%, p=0.03), lower abdominal subcutaneous fat (460 [47] vs 626 [39] cm2, p=0.04), and slightly higher visceral fat than the controls (70 [11] vs 47 [6] cm2, p=0.065), resulting in a higher ratio of visceral to subcutaneous fat (0.15 [0.02] vs 0.07 [0.01], p=0.002). Intramyocellular and visceral lipid contents were inversely related to the glucose disposal and non-oxidative glucose metabolism and positively related to the 2 h plasma glucose concentration. In obese children and adolescents with prediabetes, intramyocellular and intra-abdominal lipid accumulation is closely linked to the development of severe peripheral insulin resistance.

  6. A low glycaemic load breakfast can attenuate cognitive impairments observed in middle aged obese females with impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Lamport, D J; Chadwick, H K; Dye, L; Mansfield, M W; Lawton, C L

    2014-10-01

    There has been no systematic investigation of the individual and combined effects of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and obesity on cognitive function in the absence of ageing. The aims were to examine the effects of IGT and increased waist circumference on cognitive function in ostensibly healthy adults, and to investigate whether a low glycaemic load (GL) breakfast can attenuate cognitive impairments in these populations. Sixty five females aged 30-50 years were classified into one of four groups following waist circumference (WC) measurements and an oral glucose tolerance test: NGT/low WC (n = 25), NGT/high WC (n = 22), IGT/low WC (n = 9), IGT/high WC (n = 9). Memory, psychomotor and executive functions were examined 30 and 120 min after consuming low GL, high GL and water breakfasts according to a randomised, crossover, counterbalanced design. IGT was associated with impairment of verbal and spatial memory, and psychomotor function relative to females with NGT, independent of waist circumference. Increased waist circumference was associated with impairment of verbal memory and executive function relative to females with low WC, independent of IGT. Consumption of the LGL breakfast attenuated verbal memory impairment in the IGT/high WC group relative to the HGL breakfast and no energy control. Increased central adiposity and abnormalities in glucose tolerance preceding type 2 diabetes can have demonstrable negative effects on cognitive function, even in ostensibly healthy, middle-aged females. The potential for GL manipulations to modulate glycaemic response and cognitive function in type 2 diabetes and obesity merits further investigation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of Chinese Herbal Medicine Jinlida Granule in Treatment of Patients with Impaired Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ya-Lin; Liu, Wen-Juan; Zhang, Xiao-Fang; Su, Wei-Juan; Chen, Ning-Ning; Lu, Shu-Hua; Wang, Li-Ying; Shi, Xiu-Lin; Li, Zhi-Bin; Yang, Shu-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM) remains a major health problem worldwide. Several clinical trials have shown the superiority of the Traditional Chinese Medicine in delaying or reversing the development and progression of DM. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of Jinlida (JLD) granule, a Chinese herbal recipe, in the treatment of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and its effect on the prevention of DM. Methods: Sixty-five IGT patients were randomized to receive one bag of JLD granules three times daily (JLD group, n = 34) or no drug intervention (control group, n = 31) for 12 weeks. Oral glucose tolerance test, glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), body mass index, blood lipids levels, fasting insulin, and insulin resistance calculated using homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR) of all the patients were observed and compared before and after the treatment. Results: Sixty-one participants completed the trial (32 in JLD group and 29 in the control group). There were statistically significant decreases in HbA1c (P < 0.001), 2-h plasma glucose (P < 0.001), and HOMA-IR (P = 0.029) in JLD group compared with the control group after 12 weeks of treatment. After 12 weeks of treatment, two (6.9%) patients returned to normal blood glucose, and five (17.2%) patients turned into DM in control group, while in the JLD group, 14 (43.8%) returned to normal blood glucose and 2 (6.2%) turned into DM. There was a significant difference in the number of subjects who had normal glucose at the end of the study between two groups (P = 0.001). Conclusions: JLD granule effectively improved glucose control, increased the conversion of IGT to normal glucose, and improved the insulin resistance in patients with IGT. This Chinese herbal medicine may have a clinical value for IGT. PMID:27647185

  8. Effect of Chinese Herbal Medicine Jinlida Granule in Treatment of Patients with Impaired Glucose Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ya-Lin; Liu, Wen-Juan; Zhang, Xiao-Fang; Su, Wei-Juan; Chen, Ning-Ning; Lu, Shu-Hua; Wang, Li-Ying; Shi, Xiu-Lin; Li, Zhi-Bin; Yang, Shu-Yu

    2016-10-05

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) remains a major health problem worldwide. Several clinical trials have shown the superiority of the Traditional Chinese Medicine in delaying or reversing the development and progression of DM. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of Jinlida (JLD) granule, a Chinese herbal recipe, in the treatment of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and its effect on the prevention of DM. Sixty-five IGT patients were randomized to receive one bag of JLD granules three times daily (JLD group, n = 34) or no drug intervention (control group, n = 31) for 12 weeks. Oral glucose tolerance test, glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), body mass index, blood lipids levels, fasting insulin, and insulin resistance calculated using homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR) of all the patients were observed and compared before and after the treatment. Sixty-one participants completed the trial (32 in JLD group and 29 in the control group). There were statistically significant decreases in HbA1c (P < 0.001), 2-h plasma glucose (P < 0.001), and HOMA-IR (P = 0.029) in JLD group compared with the control group after 12 weeks of treatment. After 12 weeks of treatment, two (6.9%) patients returned to normal blood glucose, and five (17.2%) patients turned into DM in control group, while in the JLD group, 14 (43.8%) returned to normal blood glucose and 2 (6.2%) turned into DM. There was a significant difference in the number of subjects who had normal glucose at the end of the study between two groups (P = 0.001). JLD granule effectively improved glucose control, increased the conversion of IGT to normal glucose, and improved the insulin resistance in patients with IGT. This Chinese herbal medicine may have a clinical value for IGT.

  9. Effects of ramipril and rosiglitazone on cardiovascular and renal outcomes in people with impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose: results of the Diabetes REduction Assessment with ramipril and rosiglitazone Medication (DREAM) trial.

    PubMed

    Dagenais, G R; Gerstein, H C; Holman, R; Budaj, A; Escalante, A; Hedner, T; Keltai, M; Lonn, E; McFarlane, S; McQueen, M; Teo, K; Sheridan, P; Bosch, J; Pogue, J; Yusuf, S

    2008-05-01

    Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and/or impaired fasting glucose (IFG) are risk factors for diabetes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and kidney disease. We determined the effects of ramipril and rosiglitazone on combined and individual CVD and renal outcomes in people with IGT and/or IFG in the Diabetes REduction Assessment With ramipril and rosiglitazone Medication (DREAM) trial. A total of 5,269 people aged >or=30 years, with IGT and/or IFG without known CVD or renal insufficiency, were randomized to 15 mg/day ramipril versus placebo and 8 mg/day rosiglitazone versus placebo. A composite cardiorenal outcome and its CVD and renal components were assessed during the 3-year follow-up. Compared with placebo, neither ramipril (15.7% [412 of 2,623] vs. 16.0% [424 of 2,646]; hazard ratio [HR] 0.98 [95% CI 0.84-1.13]; P = 0.75) nor rosiglitazone (15.0% [394 of 2,635] vs. 16.8% [442 of 2,634]; 0.87 [0.75-1.01]; P = 0.07) reduced the risk of the cardiorenal composite outcome. Ramipril had no impact on the CVD and renal components. Rosiglitazone increased heart failure (0.53 vs. 0.08%; HR 7.04 [95% CI 1.60-31.0]; P = 0.01) but reduced the risk of the renal component (0.80 [0.68-0.93]; P = 0.005); prevention of diabetes was independently associated with prevention of the renal component (P < 0.001). Ramipril did not alter the cardiorenal outcome or its components. Rosiglitazone, which reduced diabetes, also reduced the development of renal disease but not the cardiorenal outcome and increased the risk of heart failure.

  10. Deletion of the G protein-coupled receptor 30 impairs glucose tolerance, reduces bone growth, increases blood pressure, and eliminates estradiol-stimulated insulin release in female mice.

    PubMed

    Mårtensson, Ulrika E A; Salehi, S Albert; Windahl, Sara; Gomez, Maria F; Swärd, Karl; Daszkiewicz-Nilsson, Joanna; Wendt, Anna; Andersson, Niklas; Hellstrand, Per; Grände, Per-Olof; Owman, Christer; Rosen, Clifford J; Adamo, Martin L; Lundquist, Ingmar; Rorsman, Patrik; Nilsson, Bengt-Olof; Ohlsson, Claes; Olde, Björn; Leeb-Lundberg, L M Fredrik

    2009-02-01

    In vitro studies suggest that the G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 30 is a functional estrogen receptor. However, the physiological role of GPR30 in vivo is unknown, and it remains to be determined whether GPR30 is an estrogen receptor also in vivo. To this end, we studied the effects of disrupting the GPR30 gene in female and male mice. Female GPR30((-/-)) mice had hyperglycemia and impaired glucose tolerance, reduced body growth, increased blood pressure, and reduced serum IGF-I levels. The reduced growth correlated with a proportional decrease in skeletal development. The elevated blood pressure was associated with an increased vascular resistance manifested as an increased media to lumen ratio of the resistance arteries. The hyperglycemia and impaired glucose tolerance in vivo were associated with decreased insulin expression and release in vivo and in vitro in isolated pancreatic islets. GPR30 is expressed in islets, and GPR30 deletion abolished estradiol-stimulated insulin release both in vivo in ovariectomized adult mice and in vitro in isolated islets. Our findings show that GPR30 is important for several metabolic functions in female mice, including estradiol-stimulated insulin release.

  11. High prevalence of abnormal circadian blood pressure regulation and impaired glucose tolerance in adults with hypopituitarism.

    PubMed

    Krzyzanowska, K; Schnack, C; Mittermayer, F; Kopp, H P; Hofer, M; Kann, T; Schernthaner, G

    2005-09-01

    Patients with hypopituitarism have an increased mortality from cardiovascular events. Reduced nocturnal blood pressure decline (non-dipping) and impaired glucose tolerance are considered as cardiovascular risk factors. To evaluate the role of these risk factors in patients with hypopituitarism we determined the 24-hour blood pressure regulation and glucose tolerance status in hypopituitary patients with and without growth hormone (GH) deficiency. Sixty-one hypopituitary subjects 5 +/- 3 years after brain surgery because of macroadenoma, 61 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and 20 healthy controls were included. Forty-four hypopituitary patients were GH deficient and 28 of these on GH treatment. Non-dipping was observed in 41 % (n = 7) of hypopituitary subjects with normal GH release, in 46 % (n = 13) of patients on GH therapy, and in 69 % (n = 11) of untreated GH deficient patients. Untreated GH deficient patients had a higher systolic night/day ratio (1.00 +/- 0.03) compared to non GH deficient (0.92 +/- 0.02; p < 0.02) and GH treated hypopituitary patients (0.93 +/- 0.01; p < 0.02). The rate of non-dipping in hypopituitarism was comparable to that in T2DM. Pathologic glucose tolerance was diagnosed in 30 % of the hypopituitary patients. The prevalence of non-dipping was independent of glucose metabolism in hypopituitary patients. All controls had normal night time blood pressure fall and glucose metabolism. The high prevalence of nocturnal non-dipping and glucose intolerance detected in this cohort might contribute to the increased cardiovascular risk of hypopituitary patients.

  12. Selective slow wave sleep but not rapid eye movement sleep suppression impairs morning glucose tolerance in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Nina; Jauch-Chara, Kamila; Hyzy, Franziska; Richter, Annekatrin; Friedrich, Alexia; Benedict, Christian; Oltmanns, Kerstin M

    2013-10-01

    Shortened nocturnal sleep impairs morning glucose tolerance. The underlying mechanism of this effect is supposed to involve a reduced fraction of slow wave sleep (SWS). However, it remains unanswered if impaired glucose tolerance occurs due to specific SWS reduction or a general disturbance of sleep. Sixteen healthy men participated in three experimental conditions in a crossover design: SWS suppression, rapid eye movement (REM)-sleep disturbance, and regular sleep. Selective sleep stage disturbance was performed by means of an acoustic tone (532Hz) with gradually rising sound intensity. Blood concentrations of glucoregulatory parameters were measured upon an oral glucose tolerance test the next morning. Our data show that morning plasma glucose and serum insulin responses were significantly increased after selective SWS suppression. Moreover, SWS suppression reduced postprandial insulin sensitivity up to 20%, as determined by Matsuda Index. Contrastingly, disturbed REM-sleep did not affect glucose homeostasis. We conclude that specifically SWS reduction is critically involved in the impairment of glucose tolerance associated with disturbed sleep. Therefore, glucose metabolism in subjects predisposed to reduced SWS (e.g. depression, aging, obstructive sleep apnea, pharmacological treatment) should be thoroughly monitored.

  13. Risk of impaired glucose tolerance in normal weight hirsute women during four years observation.

    PubMed

    Andries, Magdalene; Glintborg, Dorte; Andersen, Marianne

    2010-08-01

    Hirsutism is a common disorder affecting 5-20% of women in reproductive age. Only limited follow-up data exist regarding the prognosis for glucose tolerance and metabolic risk factors in hirsutism. Sixty-nine Caucasian hirsute women underwent a clinical examination and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) during 1997-2002 (baseline) and during 2003-2004 (re-evaluation). The observation period was (median; range) 4 (2-7) years. During re-evaluation, body mass index (BMI) was 24.9 (22.4-29.0) kg/m(2) and total Ferriman-Gallwey score was 10 (7-15) (median; 25-75% quartile). The women had unchanged BMI compared to baseline but increased fasting and 2 hour glucose levels. Impaired OGTT outcome during follow-up was seen in 14/66 (21.2%) women, 5/66 (7.6%) developed diabetes. Women who took oral contraceptives had a significantly decreased area under the curve (AUC) for insulin during follow-up, whereas AUC glucose levels increased. The present data supported a high risk of diabetes in only moderately overweight hirsute women.

  14. Physical activity in elderly subjects with impaired glucose tolerance and newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Baan, C A; Stolk, R P; Grobbee, D E; Witteman, J C; Feskens, E J

    1999-02-01

    The authors carried out a study to investigate the association between different indicators of physical activity and the prevalence of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and newly diagnosed diabetes (nDM) in a population-based cohort of elderly men and women in the Netherlands. A sample of participants of the Rotterdam Study (n = 1,016) aged 55-75 years who were not known to have diabetes mellitus underwent an oral glucose tolerance test. Physical activity was assessed by means of a self-administered questionnaire and expressed as time spent on activities per week. Associations with the prevalence of IGT and nDM were assessed by logistic regression analysis after adjustment for age, body mass index, waist-hip ratio, family history of diabetes, and smoking. A total of 745 subjects had normal glucose tolerance, 153 IGT, and 118 nDM. The total amount of time spent on physical activity decreased with increasing glucose intolerance. Adjusted for main confounders, vigorous activities such as bicycling (men: odds ratio (OR) = 0.26, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.14-0.49; women: OR = 0.37, 95% CI 0.18-0.78) and sports (men: OR = 0.28, 95% CI 0.11-0.74) showed an inverse association with the presence of nDM. For IGT, the associations pointed in the same direction but did not reach statistical significance. These results indicate that physical inactivity and glucose intolerance are associated among older adults similar to the way they are associated among middle-aged adults.

  15. International Variation in Outcomes Among People with Cardiovascular Disease or Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Impaired Glucose Tolerance: Insights from the NAVIGATOR Trial.

    PubMed

    Harumi Higuchi Dos Santos, Marilia; Sharma, Abhinav; Sun, Jie-Lena; Pieper, Karen; McMurray, John J V; Holman, Rury R; Lopes, Renato D

    2017-01-13

    Regional differences in risk of diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular outcomes in people with impaired glucose tolerance are poorly characterized. Our objective was to evaluate regional variation in risk of new-onset diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular outcomes, and treatment effects in participants from the NAVIGATOR (Nateglinide and Valsartan in Impaired Glucose Tolerance Outcomes Research) trial. NAVIGATOR randomized people with impaired glucose tolerance and cardiovascular risk factors or with established cardiovascular disease to valsartan (or placebo) and to nateglinide (or placebo) with a median 5-year follow-up. Data from the 9306 participants were categorized by 5 regions: Asia (n=552); Europe (n=4909); Latin America (n=1406); North America (n=2146); and Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa (n=293). Analyzed outcomes included new-onset diabetes mellitus; cardiovascular death; a composite cardiovascular outcome of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or nonfatal stroke; and treatment effects of valsartan and nateglinide. Respective unadjusted 5-year risks for new-onset diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular death, and the composite cardiovascular outcome were 33%, 0.4%, and 4% for Asia; 34%, 2%, and 6% for Europe; 37%, 4%, and 8% for Latin America; 38%, 2%, and 6% for North America; and 32%, 4%, and 8% for Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa. After adjustment, compared with North America, European participants had a lower risk of new-onset diabetes mellitus (hazard ratio 0.86, 95% CI 0.78-0.94; P=0.001), whereas Latin American participants had a higher risk of cardiovascular death (hazard ratio 2.68, 95% CI 1.82-3.96; P<0.0001) and the composite cardiovascular outcome (hazard ratio 1.48, 95% CI 1.15-1.92; P=0.003). No differential interactions between treatment and geographic location were identified. Major regional differences regarding the risk of new-onset diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular outcomes in NAVIGATOR participants were

  16. Dosakaya Juice Assuages Development of Sucrose Induced Impaired Glucose Tolerance and Imbalance in Antioxidant Defense

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Dommati Anand; Sweeya, Pisupati S. R.; Shukla, Srishti; Anusha, Sanga Venkata; Akshara, Dasari; Madhusudana, Kuncha; Tiwari, Ashok Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to explore the effect of Dosakaya (DK) (Cucumis melo var. chito) juice on sucrose induced dysglycemia and disturbances in antioxidant defense in rats. Materials and Methods: Rats were preconditioned with DK juice before administration of sucrose beverage continuously for 1-month. Blood glucose tolerance test and glutathione (GSH) homeostasis pathways in kidney were analyzed in different group of animals at the end of the study. Results: DK juice diffused (P < 0.001) hypertriglyceridemia inducing effect of sucrose and arrested sucrose induced weight gain. It improved glucose tolerance ability by significantly reducing (P < 0.05) first-hour glycemic excursion and decreasing 2 h glycemic load (P < 0.05) following oral glucose tolerance test in sucrose fed animals. Furthermore, disturbances in antioxidant defense mechanisms in terms of GSH homeostasis in kidney were restored due to juice feeding. DK juice administration checked reduction in GSH-S-transferase and glyoxalase-I activity, thus, significantly mitigated lipid peroxidation (P < 0.05), and formation of advanced glycation end-products (P < 0.001) in kidney and serum (P < 0.01). Quantitative analysis of juice found it a rich source of protein and polyphenols. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis revealed the presence of multiple protein bands in whole fruit juice. Therefore, SDS-PAGE protein fingerprint of DK juice may serve as a quality control tool for standardization of juice. Conclusion: The whole fruit juice of DK may become cost-effective, affordable health beverage in extenuating ill-health effects of sugar consumption. This is the first report identifying DK juice in preventing development dysglycemia, dyslipidemia, and oxidative stress induced due to chronic sucrose feeding in rats. SUMMARY Chronic sucrose consumption induced development of dysglycemia and also impaired antioxidant defense mechanism in rats. The oral administration of

  17. Dosakaya Juice Assuages Development of Sucrose Induced Impaired Glucose Tolerance and Imbalance in Antioxidant Defense.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dommati Anand; Sweeya, Pisupati S R; Shukla, Srishti; Anusha, Sanga Venkata; Akshara, Dasari; Madhusudana, Kuncha; Tiwari, Ashok Kumar

    2015-10-01

    The objective was to explore the effect of Dosakaya (DK) (Cucumis melo var. chito) juice on sucrose induced dysglycemia and disturbances in antioxidant defense in rats. Rats were preconditioned with DK juice before administration of sucrose beverage continuously for 1-month. Blood glucose tolerance test and glutathione (GSH) homeostasis pathways in kidney were analyzed in different group of animals at the end of the study. DK juice diffused (P < 0.001) hypertriglyceridemia inducing effect of sucrose and arrested sucrose induced weight gain. It improved glucose tolerance ability by significantly reducing (P < 0.05) first-hour glycemic excursion and decreasing 2 h glycemic load (P < 0.05) following oral glucose tolerance test in sucrose fed animals. Furthermore, disturbances in antioxidant defense mechanisms in terms of GSH homeostasis in kidney were restored due to juice feeding. DK juice administration checked reduction in GSH-S-transferase and glyoxalase-I activity, thus, significantly mitigated lipid peroxidation (P < 0.05), and formation of advanced glycation end-products (P < 0.001) in kidney and serum (P < 0.01). Quantitative analysis of juice found it a rich source of protein and polyphenols. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis revealed the presence of multiple protein bands in whole fruit juice. Therefore, SDS-PAGE protein fingerprint of DK juice may serve as a quality control tool for standardization of juice. The whole fruit juice of DK may become cost-effective, affordable health beverage in extenuating ill-health effects of sugar consumption. This is the first report identifying DK juice in preventing development dysglycemia, dyslipidemia, and oxidative stress induced due to chronic sucrose feeding in rats. Chronic sucrose consumption induced development of dysglycemia and also impaired antioxidant defense mechanism in rats. The oral administration of Dosakaya juice prior to sucrose feeding however, mitigated the

  18. Overexpression of a proton-coupled vacuolar glucose exporter impairs freezing tolerance and seed germination.

    PubMed

    Klemens, Patrick A W; Patzke, Kathrin; Trentmann, Oliver; Poschet, Gernot; Büttner, Michael; Schulz, Alexander; Marten, Irene; Hedrich, Rainer; Neuhaus, H Ekkehard

    2014-04-01

    Arabidopsis vacuoles harbor, besides sugar transporter of the TMT-type, an early response to dehydration like 6 (ERDL6) protein involved in glucose export into the cytosol. However, the mode of transport of ERDL6 and the plant's feedback to overexpression of its activity on essential properties such as, for example, seed germination or freezing tolerance, remain unexplored. Using patch-clamp studies on vacuoles expressing AtERDL6 we demonstrated directly that this carrier operates as a proton-driven glucose exporter. Overexpression of BvIMP, the closest sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) homolog to AtERDL6, in Arabidopsis leads surprisingly to impaired seed germination under both conditions, sugar application and low environmental temperatures, but not under standard conditions. Upon cold treatment, BvIMP overexpressor plants accumulated lower quantities of monosaccharides than the wild-type, a response in line with the reduced frost tolerance of the transgenic Arabidopsis plants, and the fact that cold temperatures inhibits BvIMP transcription in sugar beet leaves. With these findings we show that the tight control of vacuolar sugar import and export is a key requisite for cold tolerance and seed germination of plants.

  19. Sourdough-leavened bread improves postprandial glucose and insulin plasma levels in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Maioli, Mario; Pes, Giovanni Mario; Sanna, Manuela; Cherchi, Sara; Dettori, Mariella; Manca, Elena; Farris, Giovanni Antonio

    2008-06-01

    Sourdough bread has been reported to improve glucose metabolism in healthy subjects. In this study postprandial glycaemic and insulinaemic responses were evaluated in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) who had a meal containing sourdough bread leavened with lactobacilli, in comparison to a reference meal containing bread leavened with baker yeast. Sixteen IGT subjects (age range 52-75, average BMI 29.9 +/- 4.2 kg/ m2) were randomly given a meal containing sourdough bread (A) and a meal containing the reference bread (B) in two separate occasions at the beginning of the study and after 7 days. Sourdough bread was leavened for 8 h using a starter containing autochthonous Saccharomyces cerevisiae and several bacilli able to produce a significant amount of D-and L-lactic acid, whereas the reference bread was leavened for 2 h with commercial baker yeast containing Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Plasma glucose and insulin levels were measured at time 0, 30, 60, 120, and 180 min. In IGT subjects sourdough bread induced a significantly lower plasma glucose response at 30 minutes (p = 0.048) and a smaller incremental area under curve (AUC) delta 0-30 and delta 0-60 min (p = 0.020 and 0.018 respectively) in comparison to the bread leavened with baker yeast. Plasma insulin response to this type of bread showed lower values at 30 min (p = 0.045) and a smaller AUC delta 0-30 min (p = 0.018). This study shows that in subjects with IGT glycaemic and insulinaemic responses after the consumption of sourdough bread are lower than after the bread leavened with baker yeast. This effect is likely due to the lactic acid produced during dough leavening as well as the reduced availability of simple carbohydrates. Thus, sour-dough bread may potentially be of benefit in subjects with impaired glucose metabolism.

  20. Gut-derived lipopolysaccharide augments adipose macrophage accumulation but is not essential for impaired glucose or insulin tolerance in mice.

    PubMed

    Caesar, Robert; Reigstad, Christopher S; Bäckhed, Helene Kling; Reinhardt, Christoph; Ketonen, Maria; Lundén, Gunnel Östergren; Cani, Patrice D; Bäckhed, Fredrik

    2012-12-01

    Obesity is associated with accumulation of macrophages in white adipose tissue (WAT), which contribute to the development of insulin resistance. Germ-free (GF) mice have reduced adiposity and are protected against diet-induced obesity, To investigate whether the gut microbiota and, specifically, gut-derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS) promote WAT inflammation and contribute to impaired glucose metabolism. Macrophage composition and expression of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory markers were compared in WAT of GF, conventionally raised and Escherichia coli-monocolonised mice. Additionally, glucose and insulin tolerance in these mice was determined. The presence of a gut microbiota resulted in impaired glucose metabolism and increased macrophage accumulation and polarisation towards the proinflammatory M1 phenotype in WAT. Monocolonisation of GF mice for 4 weeks with E. coli W3110 or the isogenic strain MLK1067 (which expresses LPS with reduced immunogenicity) resulted in impaired glucose and insulin tolerance and promoted M1 polarisation of CD11b cells in WAT. However, colonisation with E. coli W3110 but not MLK1067 promoted macrophage accumulation and upregulation of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory gene expression as well as JNK phosphorylation. Gut microbiota induced LPS-dependent macrophage accumulation in WAT, whereas impairment of systemic glucose metabolism was not dependent on LPS. These results indicate that macrophage accumulation in WAT does not always correlate with impaired glucose metabolism.

  1. Short-term glucose metabolism and gut hormone modulations after Billroth II gastrojejunostomy in nonobese gastric cancer patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, impaired glucose tolerance and normal glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-juan; Xiao, Zhu; Yu, Hong-ling; Zhang, Xiang-xun; Cheng, Zhong; Tian, Hao-ming

    2013-08-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is effective in controlling blood glucose in obese patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). The alterations of gut hormones involving in glucose metabolism may play an important role. Our aim was to explore the short-term effects of Billroth II gastrojejunostomy (a similar type of RYGB) on glucose metabolism and gut hormone modulations in nonobese patients with different levels of blood glucose tolerance. Twenty one nonobese gastric cancer patients with different levels of blood glucose tolerance were submitted to Billroth II gastrojejunostomy. Among them, seven had T2DM, seven with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and the other seven had normal glucose tolerance (NGT). Body weight, glucose parameters, responses of plasma glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), peptide YY (PYY) and gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) to 75 g glucose were measured at baseline and 3 months after surgery. Similar weight losses were observed in all groups. Blood glucose was reduced in T2DM and IGT patients. Fasting and 30-min plasma glucose were increased significantly in NGT. GLP-1 showed insignificant alterations in all groups. PYY was evaluated in T2DM and IGT but remained unchanged in the NGT group. Decreased fasting and AUC GIP were observed in patients with T2DM; however, fasting and 30-min GIP were increased in NGT patients. Billroth II gastrojejunostomy is effective in reducing blood glucose in nonobese patients with T2DM and IGT but could deteriorate early blood glucose in nonobese NGT in a 3-month time period. Variations of glucose and gut hormone changes in the three groups suggest a role of proximal intestine in the pathophysiology of T2DM. Copyright © 2013 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A novel risk classification paradigm for patients with impaired glucose tolerance and high cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Bethel, M Angelyn; Chacra, Antonio R; Deedwania, Prakash; Fulcher, Gregory R; Holman, Rury R; Jenssen, Trond; Kahn, Steven E; Levitt, Naomi S; McMurray, John J V; Califf, Robert M; Raptis, Sotirios A; Thomas, Laine; Sun, Jie-Lena; Haffner, Steven M

    2013-07-15

    We used baseline data from the NAVIGATOR trial to (1) identify risk factors for diabetes progression in those with impaired glucose tolerance and high cardiovascular risk, (2) create models predicting 5-year incident diabetes, and (3) provide risk classification tools to guide clinical interventions. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models estimated 5-year incident diabetes risk and simplified models examined the relative importance of measures of glycemia in assessing diabetes risk. The C-statistic was used to compare models; reclassification analyses compare the models' ability to identify risk groups defined by potential therapies (routine or intensive lifestyle advice or pharmacologic therapy). Diabetes developed in 3,254 (35%) participants over 5 years median follow-up. The full prediction model included fasting and 2-hour glucose and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) values but demonstrated only moderate discrimination for diabetes (C = 0.70). Simplified models with only fasting glucose (C = 0.67) or oral glucose tolerance test values (C = 0.68) had higher C statistics than models with HbA1c alone (C = 0.63). The models were unlikely to inappropriately reclassify participants to risk groups that might receive pharmacologic therapy. Our results confirm that in a population with dysglycemia and high cardiovascular risk, traditional risk factors are appropriate predictors and glucose values are better predictors than HbA1c, but discrimination is moderate at best, illustrating the challenges of predicting diabetes in a high-risk population. In conclusion, our novel risk classification paradigm based on potential treatment could be used to guide clinical practice based on cost and availability of screening tests. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of sugar-sweetened beverage intake on the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance: the Mihama diabetes prevention study.

    PubMed

    Teshima, Nobuko; Shimo, Miho; Miyazawa, Kae; Konegawa, Sachi; Matsumoto, Aki; Onishi, Yuki; Sasaki, Ryoma; Suzuki, Toshinari; Yano, Yutaka; Matsumoto, Kazutaka; Yamada, Tomomi; Gabazza, Esteban Cesar; Takei, Yoshiyuki; Sumida, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    In Japan, the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is increasing for several reasons, including increased consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs). However, whether SSBs cause T2DM by excess of energy production resulting in obesity remains unclear. Therefore, the present study was designed to evaluate the effects of SSB intake on the development of T2DM in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Ninety-three subjects (30 males and 63 females) with IGT aged 40-69 y and residing in the Mihama district (southern Mie Prefecture, Japan) were included in the study. The mean observational period was 3.6 y. All subjects underwent the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and completed a lifestyle questionnaire survey related to SSB intake. OGTT results and SSB intake were evaluated before and after the observational period. In addition, the correlation between SSB intake and development of T2DM was investigated. Of the 93 subjects, 20 (21.5%) developed T2DM (T2DM group) and demonstrated a significantly high SSB intake compared with the group that did not develop the disease (non-T2DM group). The odds ratio for the incidence of T2DM based on SSB intake was 3.26 (95% confidence interval, 1.17-9.06). The body mass index (BMI; kg/m(2)) and the homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-R) values was significantly higher in the T2DM group than in the non-T2DM group, while the insulinogenic indices were significantly lower in the former than in the latter group. The sum of insulin secretion levels during OGTT was not significantly different between groups. SSB intake correlated with the predisposition for developing T2DM, possibly by influencing body weight, insulin resistance, and the ability of the pancreatic beta cells to effectively compensate for the insulin resistance.

  4. Defective liver disposal of free fatty acids in patients with impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Iozzo, Patricia; Turpeinen, Anu K; Takala, Teemu; Oikonen, Vesa; Bergman, Jörgen; Grönroos, Tove; Ferrannini, Ele; Nuutila, Pirjo; Knuuti, Juhani

    2004-07-01

    The liver exchanges high fluxes of glucose and free fatty acids (FFA) and is one main site of their reciprocal regulation. Acute exposure to hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia has been shown to reduce splanchnic beta-oxidation in healthy humans. We investigated whether a spontaneous condition of chronic mild hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia affects liver FFA uptake. Hepatic FFA influx rate constant (LKi) was measured after a 12-15-h fast in 10 patients with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and eight control subjects using positron emission tomography in combination with the long-chain FFA analog 14(R,S)-[18F]fluoro-6-thia-heptadecanoic acid. Compared with controls, IGT patients had higher serum insulin, glucose, and triglyceride levels (1.71 +/- 0.24 vs. 0.59 +/- 0.06 mmol/liter, P < 0.001), lower high-density lipoprotein (1.04 +/- 0.11 vs. 1.42 +/- 0.13 mmol/liter, P < 0.05), and similar FFA levels (0.59 +/- 0.06 vs. 0.56 +/- 0.05 mmol/liter(-1), P = not significant). LKi was significantly reduced in IGT (0.288 +/- 0.014 min(-1)) compared with control subjects (0.341 +/- 0.014 min(-1), P < 0.02). LKi was negatively correlated with plasma glucose (r = 0.51, P < 0.03), glycosylated hemoglobin (r = 0.55, P < 0.02), and blood lactate levels (r = 0.52, P < 0.03). We conclude that, in IGT patients, the ability of the liver to extract FFA from the circulation appears to be impaired. The reciprocal relationship between hepatic FFA extraction and glucose/lactate flux may derive from intrahepatic substrate competition.

  5. Baseline characteristics of the Nateglinide and Valsartan Impaired Glucose Tolerance Outcomes Research (NAVIGATOR) trial population: comparison with other diabetes prevention trials.

    PubMed

    Krum, Henry; McMurray, John J V; Horton, Edward; Gerlock, Teresa; Holzhauer, Bjoern; Zuurman, Lineke; Haffner, Steven M; Bethel, M Angelyn; Holman, Rury R; Califf, Robert M

    2010-04-01

    The Nateglinide and Valsartan Impaired Glucose Tolerance Outcomes Research (NAVIGATOR) trial is exploring two pharmacological strategies (nateglinide and valsartan, both alone and in combination) in the prevention of overt diabetes mellitus (DM) and the reduction of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in subjects at high risk for these events. In this analysis, we provide baseline characteristics of the randomized NAVIGATOR study population and contrast them with those from other trials of DM prevention. Key eligibility criteria include impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and impaired fasting glucose (IFG), a history of CVD (in patients aged > or =50 years), and > or =1 cardiovascular risk factor (in patients aged > or =55 years). Baseline demographic characteristics, laboratory findings, cardiovascular risk factors, CVD history, and medication use are described and compared with other trials of DM prevention. The full analysis set of subjects (N = 9306) showed a clustering of risk factors consistent with the metabolic syndrome: high rates of hypertension (77.5%), dyslipidemia (44.7%), increased waist circumference (101.0 cm), and high body mass index (BMI) (47.5% with BMI > or =30 kg/m(2)). A minority of patients had a history of CVD (24.3%); of these, 11.7% had a history of myocardial infarction and most of the remainder had evidence of coronary artery disease. Subjects also had elevated blood pressure (BP) (predominantly systolic) (139.7/82.6 mm Hg), increased serum low-density lipoproteins cholesterol levels (3.27 mmol/L), and borderline elevation of triglyceride levels (1.97 mmol/L). Demographic data, BP, and lipid profiles in NAVIGATOR were similar to those of previous DM prevention trials, which were also based largely on meeting criteria for IGT. Medication use at baseline among NAVIGATOR subjects, which frequently included aspirin, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, diuretics, and lipid-lowering agents, reflects enhanced CVD risk. However, little prescribing

  6. Effects of pioglitazone on bone in postmenopausal women with impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Bone, Henry G; Lindsay, Robert; McClung, Michael R; Perez, Alfonso T; Raanan, Marsha G; Spanheimer, Robert G

    2013-12-01

    Meta-analyses of clinical studies have suggested an increased incidence of peripheral fractures in postmenopausal women with type 2 diabetes mellitus taking pioglitazone. The mechanism behind this apparent increase is unknown. The objective of the study was to examine the effects of pioglitazone on bone mineral density (BMD) and turnover. Twenty-five sites (in the United States) enrolled participants in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Postmenopausal women (n = 156) with impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance participated in the study. The intervention consisted of pioglitazone 30 mg/d (n = 78) or placebo (n = 78), increased to 45 mg/d after 1 month, for 12 months of treatment total, followed by 6 months of washout/follow-up. Percentage changes from baseline to month 12 and from month 12 to month18 in BMD in total proximal femur (primary end point), total body, femoral neck, lumbar spine, and radius were measured. Least squares mean changes from baseline to month 12 in total proximal femur BMD were -0.69% for pioglitazone and -0.14% for placebo (P = .170). No statistically significant between-group differences were observed for any BMD or bone remodeling marker end point. We observed improved glycemic control and insulin sensitivity with pioglitazone treatment. In addition, pioglitazone appeared to increase body fat, which may affect bone density measurements, especially in the lumbar spine. One pioglitazone-treated and three placebo-treated women experienced confirmed fractures. Over 18 months, one pioglitazone-treated (1.3%) and eight placebo-treated women (10.3%) developed overt type 2 diabetes mellitus. The pattern and incidence of adverse events with pioglitazone were consistent with clinical experience with thiazolidinediones. Maximal-dose pioglitazone had no effects on BMD or bone turnover, while improving glycemic control as expected, in postmenopausal women with impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance.

  7. Caffeine ingestion before an oral glucose tolerance test impairs blood glucose management in men with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Lindsay E; Savani, Sonali; Battram, Danielle S; McLaren, Drew H; Sathasivam, Premila; Graham, Terry E

    2004-10-01

    Caffeine ingestion negatively affects insulin sensitivity during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in lean and obese men, but this has not been studied in individuals with type 2 diabetes. We examined the effects of caffeine ingestion on insulin and glucose homeostasis in obese men with type 2 diabetes. Men (n = 12) with type 2 diabetes (age = 49 +/- 2 y, BMI = 32 +/- 1 kg/m(2)) underwent 2 trials, 1 wk apart, in a randomized, double-blind design. Each trial was conducted after withdrawal from caffeine, alcohol, exercise, and oral hypoglycemic agents for 48 h and an overnight fast. Subjects randomly ingested caffeine (5 mg/kg body weight) or placebo capsules and 1 h later began a 3 h 75 g OGTT. Caffeine increased (P < 0.05) serum insulin, proinsulin, and C-peptide concentrations during the OGTT relative to placebo. Insulin area under the curve was 25% greater (P < 0.05) after caffeine than after placebo ingestion. Despite this, blood glucose concentration was also increased (P < 0.01) in the caffeine trial. After caffeine ingestion, blood glucose remained elevated (P < 0.01) at 3 h postglucose load (8.9 +/- 0.7 mmol/L) compared with baseline (6.7 +/- 0.4 mmol/L). The insulin sensitivity index was lower (14%, P = 0.02) after caffeine than after placebo ingestion. Overall, despite elevated and prolonged proinsulin, C-peptide, and insulin responses after caffeine ingestion, blood glucose was also increased, suggesting an acute caffeine-induced impairment in blood glucose management in men with type 2 diabetes.

  8. Effect of transcutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulation on impaired glucose tolerance: a pilot randomized study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) is a pre-diabetic state of hyperglycemia that is associated with insulin resistance, increased risk of type II diabetes, and cardiovascular pathology. Recently, investigators hypothesized that decreased vagus nerve activity may be the underlying mechanism of metabolic syndrome including obesity, elevated glucose levels, and high blood pressure. Methods In this pilot randomized clinical trial, we compared the efficacy of transcutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulation (taVNS) and sham taVNS on patients with IGT. 72 participants with IGT were single-blinded and were randomly allocated by computer-generated envelope to either taVNS or sham taVNS treatment groups. In addition, 30 IGT adults were recruited as a control population and not assigned treatment so as to monitor the natural fluctuation of glucose tolerance in IGT patients. All treatments were self-administered by the patients at home after training at the hospital. Patients were instructed to fill in a patient diary booklet each day to describe any side effects after each treatment. The treatment period was 12 weeks in duration. Baseline comparison between treatment and control group showed no difference in weight, BMI, or measures of systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2-hour plasma glucose (2hPG), or glycosylated hemoglobin (HbAlc). Results 100 participants completed the study and were included in data analysis. Two female patients (one in the taVNS group, one in the sham taVNS group) dropped out of the study due to stimulation-evoked dizziness. The symptoms were relieved after stopping treatment. Compared with sham taVNS, taVNS significantly reduced the two-hour glucose tolerance (F(2) = 5.79, p = 0.004). In addition, we found that taVNS significantly decreased (F(1) = 4.21, p = 0.044) systolic blood pressure over time compared with sham taVNS. Compared with the no-treatment control group, patients

  9. Prevention of diabetes mellitus in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study: results from a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Jaana; Eriksson, Johan G; Valle, Timo T; Aunola, Sirkka; Cepaitis, Zygimantas; Hakumäki, Martti; Hämäläinen, Helena; Ilanne-Parikka, Pirjo; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Laakso, Mauri; Louheranta, Anne; Mannelin, Marjo; Martikkala, Vesa; Moltchanov, Vladislav; Rastas, Merja; Salminen, Virpi; Sundvall, Jouko; Uusitupa, Matti; Tuomilehto, Jaakko

    2003-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is increasing worldwide largely as a result from increasing obesity and sedentary lifestyle. The Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study (DPS) is the first individually randomized controlled clinical trial to test the feasibility and efficacy of lifestyle modification in high-risk subjects. We randomly assigned 522 (172 men, 350 women) middle-aged (mean age 55 yr), overweight (mean body mass index 31 kg/m(2)) subjects with impaired glucose tolerance either to the lifestyle intervention or control group. Each subject in the intervention group received individualized counseling aimed at reducing weight and intake of total and saturated fat, and increasing intake of fiber and physical activity. An oral glucose tolerance test was performed annually to detect incident cases of diabetes and to measure changes in metabolic parameters. The mean (+/- SD) weight reduction from baseline to year 1 and to year 2, respectively, was 4.2 +/- 5.1 kg and 3.5 +/- 5.5 in the intervention group and 0.8 +/- 3.7 kg and 0.8 +/- 4.4 in the control group (P < 0.001 between the groups). At the time of first analysis of the outcome data the mean duration of follow-up was 3.2 yr. The risk of diabetes was reduced by 58% (P < 0.001) in the intervention group compared with the control group. The reduction in the incidence of diabetes was directly associated with number and magnitude of lifestyle changes made. In conclusion, the DPS is the first controlled trial demonstrating that type 2 diabetes can be prevented by changes in lifestyle in high-risk subjects.

  10. Diagnosing impaired glucose tolerance using direct infusion mass spectrometry of blood plasma.

    PubMed

    Lokhov, Petr G; Trifonova, Oxana P; Maslov, Dmitry L; Balashova, Elena E; Archakov, Alexander I; Shestakova, Ekaterina A; Shestakova, Marina V; Dedov, Ivan I

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the capacity for mass spectrometry of blood plasma to diagnose impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). For this study, blood plasma samples from control subjects (n = 30) and patients with IGT (n = 20) were treated with methanol and low molecular weight fraction were then analyzed by direct infusion mass spectrometry. A total of 51 metabolite ions strongly associated with IGT were detected. The area under a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) for diagnosing IGT that was based on an analysis of all these metabolites was 0.93 (accuracy 90%, specificity 90%, and sensitivity 90%). The associated reproducibility was 85%. The metabolites identified were also consistent with risk factors previously associated with the development of diabetes. Thus, direct infusion mass spectrometry of blood plasma metabolites represents a rapid, single-step, and reproducible method for the analysis of metabolites. Moreover, this method has the potential to serve as a prototype for clinical analyses that could replace the currently used glucose tolerance test with a more patient-friendly assay.

  11. Diagnosing Impaired Glucose Tolerance Using Direct Infusion Mass Spectrometry of Blood Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Lokhov, Petr G.; Trifonova, Oxana P.; Maslov, Dmitry L.; Balashova, Elena E.; Archakov, Alexander I.; Shestakova, Ekaterina A.; Shestakova, Marina V.; Dedov, Ivan I.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the capacity for mass spectrometry of blood plasma to diagnose impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). For this study, blood plasma samples from control subjects (n = 30) and patients with IGT (n = 20) were treated with methanol and low molecular weight fraction were then analyzed by direct infusion mass spectrometry. A total of 51 metabolite ions strongly associated with IGT were detected. The area under a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) for diagnosing IGT that was based on an analysis of all these metabolites was 0.93 (accuracy 90%, specificity 90%, and sensitivity 90%). The associated reproducibility was 85%. The metabolites identified were also consistent with risk factors previously associated with the development of diabetes. Thus, direct infusion mass spectrometry of blood plasma metabolites represents a rapid, single-step, and reproducible method for the analysis of metabolites. Moreover, this method has the potential to serve as a prototype for clinical analyses that could replace the currently used glucose tolerance test with a more patient-friendly assay. PMID:25202985

  12. Assessment of endothelial dysfunction in patients with impaired glucose tolerance during a cold pressor test.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Elena; Podtaev, Sergey; Mizeva, Irina; Loran, Evgenia

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study is to explore changes in microvascular tone during a contralateral cold pressor test and to compare the results obtained in healthy subjects and in patients with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and type 2 diabetes. Low-amplitude fluctuations of skin temperature in the appropriate frequency ranges were used as a characteristic for the mechanism for vascular tone regulation. In total, 13 adults with type 2 diabetes aged 40-67 years and 18 adults with IGT aged 31-60 years participated in this pilot study. The control group included 12 healthy men and women aged 39-60 years. The response to the cold pressor test in patients with type 2 diabetes and with IGT differs essentially from that of healthy subjects in the endothelial frequency range. Endothelial dysfunction occurs in the preclinical stage of diabetes and manifests, in particular, as a disturbance of the endothelial part of vascular tone regulation.

  13. Chromium Supplementation Reduces Resting Heart Rate in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome and Impaired Glucose Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Nussbaumerova, Barbora; Rosolova, Hana; Krizek, Miroslav; Sefrna, Frantisek; Racek, Jaroslav; Müller, Ludek; Sindberg, Christian

    2017-08-30

    Chromium (Cr) is considered as an important mineral, involved in biochemical reactions in human metabolic pathways. Organically bound Cr supplementation has been suggested to improve glycemia especially in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, but there are conflicting reports on efficacy. Effect of Cr is not clear in prediabetes status. Seventy patients with metabolic syndrome and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), who are observed and treated in the Center of Preventive Cardiology of the University Hospital in Pilsen, were included in the prospective, randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled clinical study. Effect of Cr-enriched yeast (200 μg of elementary Cr in the morning and 100 μg in the evening) on glucose, lipid metabolism, fat tissue hormones, oxidative stress, and DNA damage markers was analyzed. There were no significant changes in glucose and lipid parameters, oxidative stress, or other laboratory markers. Only resting heart rate was significantly reduced in patients treated by Cr yeast, reflecting reduced sympathetic activity. This could represent an important cardiovascular risk reduction in patients with high cardiometabolic risk.

  14. Attitudes of GPs to the diagnosis and management of impaired glucose tolerance: the practitioners' attitudes to hyperglycaemia (PAtH) questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Fearn-Smith, J D G; Evans, P H; Harding, G; Campbell, J L

    2007-02-01

    To develop and pilot a survey instrument assessing general practitioners' (GP) attitudes to the diagnosis and management of one form of pre-diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and to assess the performance of the questionnaire. Qualitative data together with an audit were used to generate questionnaire items, which were then subjected to a process of pre-piloting and piloting to generate a finalised item list. The pilot questionnaire was sent to 222 principal GPs in three PCTs in South West England. The first fifty responders were asked to complete the questionnaire again 2 weeks later. Principal components analysis with a Varimax rotation was used to detect latent factors within the data that may help to explain the attitudes of GPs. The response rate after one reminder was 54.1%. Four robust factors were identified which were internally consistent (range of Cronbach's alpha=0.79-0.65), homogeneous (item-total correlations=0.60-0.21), and stable (test-retest correlation=0.74-0.58) accounting for 31.1% of the variance. The predictive validity of the item list was assessed (P=0.02 for factor 1). The PAtH questionnaire identifies four factors that help to describe GPs attitudes to the diagnosis and management of IGT.

  15. Autoreactive Human TCR Initiate Insulitis and Impaired Glucose Tolerance in HLA DR4 Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gebe, John A.; Unrath, Kellee A.; Yue, Betty B.; Miyake, Tom; Falk, Ben A.; Nepom, Gerald T.

    2008-01-01

    A human TcR derived from an autoreactive T cell specific for GAD65, from a subject at high risk for autoimmune diabetes, was introduced into HLA-DR4 transgenic mice. The source of TCR was a CD4+ TH1+T cell clone which responded to an immunodominant epitope of the human islet protein GAD65, an epitope shared with both GAD65 and GAD67 in the mouse. The resulting HLA-DR4/GAD-TcR transgenic mice on a Rag2o/o/I-Abo/o/B6 background exhibited a CD4+ infiltrate into pancreatic islets that correlated with a loss of insulin in infiltrated islets. These mice also exhibited a subclinical impaired tolerance to exogenously fed glucose as assayed by an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. T cells containing the GAD65/67 (555–567) responsive TcR undergo strong negative selection as evidenced by a 10-fold lower thymocyte cellularity compared to non-TcR transgenic mice, and clonotype peripheral T cells represented approximately 1 percent of CD4+ T cells in Rag2 sufficient mice. Upon in vitro stimulation, GAD65/67 555–567 responsive T cells secrete IFN-γ, minimal IL2 and TNFα and no IL4, IL5, IL10, or IL17, consistent with a TH1 profile. These data demonstrate that CD4+ T cells specific for a naturally processed epitope within GAD can specifically home to pancreatic islets and lead to impaired islet beta cell function in diabetes-associated HLA-DR4 transgenic mice on the relatively non-autoimmune C57BL/6 background. The relatively slow progression and patchy insulitis are reminiscent of the chronic pre-clinical phase similar to a majority of human at-risk subjects, and models these indolent features of human T1D. PMID:17949947

  16. Associations of Green Tea and Rock Tea Consumption with Risk of Impaired Fasting Glucose and Impaired Glucose Tolerance in Chinese Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Huibin; Guo, Qiuxuan; Qiu, Changsheng; Huang, Baoying; Fu, Xianguo; Yao, Jin; Liang, Jixing; Li, Liantao; Chen, Ling; Tang, Kaka; Lin, Lixiang; Lu, Jieli; Bi, Yufang; Ning, Guang; Wen, Junping; Lin, Caijing; Chen, Gang

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the associations of green tea and rock tea consumption with risk of impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Methods A multistage, stratified, cluster, random-sampling method was used to select a representative sample from Fujian Province in China. In total, 4808 subjects without cardiovascular disease, hypertension, cancer, or pancreatic, liver, kidney, or gastrointestinal diseases were enrolled in the study. A standard questionnaire was used to gather data on tea (green, rock, and black) consumption and other relevant factors. The assessment of impaired glucose regulation (IGR) was using 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), the diagnostic criteria of normal glucose tolerance was according to American Diabetes Association. Results Green tea consumption was associated with a lower risk of IFG, while rock tea consumption was associated with a lower risk of IGT. The adjusted odds ratios for IFG for green tea consumption of <1, 1–15, 16–30, and >30 cups per week were 1.0 (reference), 0.42 (95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.27–0.65), 0.23 (95% CI, 0.12–0.46), and 0.41 (95% CI, 0.17–0.93), respectively. The adjusted odds ratios for IGT for rock tea consumption of <1, 1–15, 16–30, and >30 cups per week were 1.0 (reference), 0.69 (95% CI, 0.48–0.98), 0.59 (95% CI, 0.39–0.90), and 0.64 (95% CI, 0.43–0.97), respectively. A U-shaped association was observed, subjects who consumed 16–30 cups of green or rock tea per week having the lowest odds ratios for IFG or IGT. Conclusions Consumption of green or rock tea may protect against the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus in Chinese men and women, particularly in those who drink 16–30 cups per week. PMID:24260170

  17. The Preventive Effect of Zuogui Wan on Offspring Rats' Impaired Glucose Tolerance Whose Mothers Had Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Qianjin; Niu, Xin; Xu, Kaixia; Wang, Yingli; Wang, Jinlong; Mao, Yingqiu; Gao, Shuangrong

    2016-01-01

    In this experiment, we used streptozotocin (STZ) to establish a model of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) rats, where Zuogui Wan was given to GDM rats. After pregnancy, offspring rats were divided into 4 groups: control group, high fat and sugar as the control group, GDM group, and Zuogui Wan GDM group. Rats in high fat and sugar as the control group, GDM group, and Zuogui Wan GDM group were fed with high fat and sugar diet. Rats in control group were fed the basic diet. The means of 2hPG were higher than 7.8 mmol·L−1 and lower than 11.1 mmol·L−1 on the rats of GDM group on week 15, and IGT models were successful. Body weight, abdominal fat weight, the ratio of abdominal fat weight and body weight, fasting plasma glucose, 2hPG, insulin, leptin, total cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein (LDL) of Zuogui Wan GDM group were significantly lower than GDM group. The level of adiponectin in Zuogui Wan GDM group was significantly higher than GDM group. And we concluded that giving Zuogui Wan to GDM rats can have a preventive effect on the offsprings' IGT induced by high fat and sugar diet. PMID:27034700

  18. Assessment of the Medial Dorsal Cutaneous, Dorsal Sural, and Medial Plantar Nerves in Impaired Glucose Tolerance and Diabetic Patients With Normal Sural and Superficial Peroneal Nerve Responses

    PubMed Central

    Im, Sun; Kim, Sung-Rae; Park, Joo Hyun; Kim, Yang Soo; Park, Geun-Young

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study evaluated the nerve conduction study (NCS) parameters of the most distal sensory nerves of the lower extremities—namely, the medial dorsal cutaneous (MDC), dorsal sural (DS), and medial plantar (MP) nerves—in diabetic (DM) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) patients who displayed normal findings on their routine NCSs. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Standard NCSs were performed on healthy control (HC), DM, and IGT groups (N = 147). The bilateral NCS parameters of the MDC, DS, and MP nerves were investigated. The Toronto Clinical Scoring System (TCSS) was assessed for the DM and IGT groups. RESULTS The mean TCSS scores of the IGT and DM groups were 2.5 ± 2.3 and 2.8 ± 2.2, respectively. No significant differences between the two groups were observed. After adjustment of age and BMI, the DM group showed significant NCS differences in DS and MDC nerves compared with the HC group (P < 0.05). These differences were also exhibited in the left DS of the IGT group (P = 0.0003). More advanced NCS findings were observed in the DM group. Bilateral abnormal NCS responses in these distal sensory nerves were found in 40 and 16% of DM and IGT patients, respectively. CONCLUSIONS These results showed that the simultaneous assessment of the most distal sensory nerves allowed the detection of early NCS changes in the IGT and DM groups, even when the routine NCS showed normal findings. PMID:22100966

  19. Assessment of the medial dorsal cutaneous, dorsal sural, and medial plantar nerves in impaired glucose tolerance and diabetic patients with normal sural and superficial peroneal nerve responses.

    PubMed

    Im, Sun; Kim, Sung-Rae; Park, Joo Hyun; Kim, Yang Soo; Park, Geun-Young

    2012-04-01

    This study evaluated the nerve conduction study (NCS) parameters of the most distal sensory nerves of the lower extremities-namely, the medial dorsal cutaneous (MDC), dorsal sural (DS), and medial plantar (MP) nerves-in diabetic (DM) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) patients who displayed normal findings on their routine NCSs. Standard NCSs were performed on healthy control (HC), DM, and IGT groups (N = 147). The bilateral NCS parameters of the MDC, DS, and MP nerves were investigated. The Toronto Clinical Scoring System (TCSS) was assessed for the DM and IGT groups. The mean TCSS scores of the IGT and DM groups were 2.5 ± 2.3 and 2.8 ± 2.2, respectively. No significant differences between the two groups were observed. After adjustment of age and BMI, the DM group showed significant NCS differences in DS and MDC nerves compared with the HC group (P < 0.05). These differences were also exhibited in the left DS of the IGT group (P = 0.0003). More advanced NCS findings were observed in the DM group. Bilateral abnormal NCS responses in these distal sensory nerves were found in 40 and 16% of DM and IGT patients, respectively. These results showed that the simultaneous assessment of the most distal sensory nerves allowed the detection of early NCS changes in the IGT and DM groups, even when the routine NCS showed normal findings.

  20. Leu7Pro polymorphism in the neuropeptide Y (NPY) gene is associated with impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes in Swedish men.

    PubMed

    Nordman, S; Ding, B; Ostenson, C-G; Kärvestedt, L; Brismar, K; Efendic, S; Gu, H F

    2005-05-01

    The neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a neuropeptide with a role in the regulation of satiety and energy balance of body weight, insulin release, cardiovascular and central endocrine systems. In order to evaluate whether the NPY gene variations contribute to development of type 2 diabetes (T2DM), we have performed a genetic association study for Leu7Pro (T1128 C) polymorphism of the NPY gene in impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and T2DM. Genotyping experiments for this non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in 263 patients with T2DM, 309 subjects with IGT and 469 non-diabetic healthy individuals in Swedish Caucasians were performed by using Dynamic Allele Specific Hybridisation (DASH). We found that the frequencies of the "risk" allele C in the subjects with IGT and the patients with T2DM in Swedish men were 13 % (p = 0.002, OR = 3.70, 1.65 - 8.29 95 % CI) and 10 % (p = 0.007, OR = 4.80, 1.47 - 11.33 95 % CI) respectively, which were significantly higher than the C allele frequency in non-diabetic controls (6 %). Furthermore, we found that the carriers with TC and CC genotypes in the subjects with IGT in Swedish men had significantly higher fasting plasma glucose in comparison with the TT carriers (5.6 +/- 0.7 mmol/l vs. 5.2 +/- 0.7 mmol/l, p = 0.021). The present study thus provides the evidence that Leu7Pro polymorphism in the NPY gene is associated with IGT and T2DM in Swedish men, and indicates that the NPY gene variations contribute to development of T2DM. Questions of gender specificity may be explained by genetic backgrounds, sense of coherence for stress and other factors in environment.

  1. Prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus by changes in lifestyle among subjects with impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Tuomilehto, J; Lindström, J; Eriksson, J G; Valle, T T; Hämäläinen, H; Ilanne-Parikka, P; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, S; Laakso, M; Louheranta, A; Rastas, M; Salminen, V; Uusitupa, M

    2001-05-03

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is increasingly common, primarily because of increases in the prevalence of a sedentary lifestyle and obesity. Whether type 2 diabetes can be prevented by interventions that affect the lifestyles of subjects at high risk for the disease is not known. We randomly assigned 522 middle-aged, overweight subjects (172 men and 350 women; mean age, 55 years; mean body-mass index [weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters], 31) with impaired glucose tolerance to either the intervention group or the control group. Each subject in the intervention group received individualized counseling aimed at reducing weight, total intake of fat, and intake of saturated fat and increasing intake of fiber and physical activity. An oral glucose-tolerance test was performed annually; the diagnosis of diabetes was confirmed by a second test. The mean duration of follow-up was 3.2 years. The mean (+/-SD) amount of weight lost between base line and the end of year 1 was 4.2+/-5.1 kg in the intervention group and 0.8+/-3.7 kg in the control group; the net loss by the end of year 2 was 3.5+/-5.5 kg in the intervention group and 0.8+/-4.4 kg in the control group (P<0.001 for both comparisons between the groups). The cumulative incidence of diabetes after four years was 11 percent (95 percent confidence interval, 6 to 15 percent) in the intervention group and 23 percent (95 percent confidence interval, 17 to 29 percent) in the control group. During the trial, the risk of diabetes was reduced by 58 percent (P<0.001) in the intervention group. The reduction in the incidence of diabetes was directly associated with changes in lifestyle. Type 2 diabetes can be prevented by changes in the lifestyles of high-risk subjects.

  2. Prevention of Type II diabetes in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance: the Diabetes Prevention Study (DPS) in Finland. Study design and 1-year interim report on the feasibility of the lifestyle intervention programme.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, J; Lindström, J; Valle, T; Aunola, S; Hämäläinen, H; Ilanne-Parikka, P; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, S; Laakso, M; Lauhkonen, M; Lehto, P; Lehtonen, A; Louheranta, A; Mannelin, M; Martikkala, V; Rastas, M; Sundvall, J; Turpeinen, A; Viljanen, T; Uusitupa, M; Tuomilehto, J

    1999-07-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS; The aim of the Diabetes Prevention Study is to assess the efficacy of an intensive diet-exercise programme in preventing or delaying Type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance, to evaluate the effects of the intervention programme on cardiovascular risk factors and to assess the determinants for the progression to diabetes in persons with impaired glucose tolerance. A total of 523 overweight subjects with impaired glucose tolerance ascertained by two oral glucose tolerance tests were randomised to either a control or intervention group. The control subjects received general information at the start of the trial about the lifestyle changes necessary to prevent diabetes and about annual follow-up visits. The intervention subjects had seven sessions with a nutritionist during the first year and a visit every 3 months thereafter aimed at reducing weight, the intake of saturated fat and increasing the intake of dietary fibre. Intervention subjects were also guided individually to increase their physical activity. During the first year, weight loss in the first 212 study subjects was 4.7 +/- 5.5 vs 0.9 +/- 4.1 kg in the intervention and control group, respectively (p < 0.001). The plasma glucose concentrations (fasting: 5.9 +/- 0.7 vs 6.4 +/- 0.8 mmol/l, p < 0.001; and 2-h 7.8 +/- 1.8 vs 8.5 +/- 2.3 mmol/l, p < 0.05) were significantly lower in the intervention group after the first year of intervention. Favourable changes were also found in blood pressure, serum lipids and anthropometric indices in the intervention group. The interim results show the efficacy and feasibility of the lifestyle intervention programme.

  3. Plaque Characteristics in Coronary Artery Disease Patients with Impaired Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Keishi; Takano, Hitoshi; Kubota, Yoshiaki; Inui, Keisuke; Nakamura, Shunichi; Tokita, Yukichi; Kato, Koji; Asai, Kuniya; Shimizu, Wataru

    2016-01-01

    Background Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) patients are known to have a high risk of cardiovascular events and their prognosis has been reported to be poor. The present study aimed to compare coronary plaque characteristics among coronary artery disease (CAD) patients with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), those with IGT, and those with diabetes mellitus (DM) by using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Methods The present study included 101 coronary artery disease patients (mean age, 67.9 ± 10.4 years; 82.4% male). OCT was performed for target and non-target vessels during percutaneous coronary intervention. The patients were divided into the following 3 groups: the NGT, IGT, and DM groups. Results A total of 136 non-target residual plaques were found in 101 patients (27, 30, and 44 in the NGT, IGT, and DM groups, respectively). The size of the lipid core expressed as the mean angle of the lipid arc was significantly greater in the IGT and DM groups than in the NGT group (163.0 ± 58.7°, 170.1 ± 59.3°, and 130.9 ± 37.7°, respectively, P < 0.05). The fibrous cap covering the lipid core was significantly thinner in the IGT group than in the NGT group (77.0 ± 23.4 μm vs. 105.6 ± 47.0 μm, P = 0.040). Conclusion The coronary plaques in CAD patients are more vulnerable when having IGT compared to those with NGT, and similar to those with DM. This finding may explain the high risk of cardiovascular events in CAD patients with IGT. PMID:27936195

  4. Long-term clinical effect of Tangyiping Granules () on patients with impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan-Qin; Yang, Qing-Feng; Wang, Hua; Xu, Yun-Sheng; Peng, Wei; Jiang, Yue-Hua

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the long-term clinical effect of Tangyiping Granules (, TYP) on patients with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) to achieve normal glucose tolerance (NGT) and hence preventing them from conversion to diabetes mellitus (DM). In total, 127 participants with IGT were randomly assigned to the control (63 cases, 3 lost to follow-up) and treatment groups (64 cases, 4 lost to follow-up) according to the random number table. The control group received lifestyle intervention alone, while the patients in the treatment group took orally 10 g of TYP twice daily in addition to lifestyle intervention for 12 weeks. The rates of patients achieving NGT or experiencing conversion to DM as main outcome measure were observed at 3, 12, and 24 months after TYP treatment. The secondary outcome measures included fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2-h postprandial plasma glucose (2hPG), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting insulin (FINS), 2-h insulin (2hINS), homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), blood lipid and patients' complains of Chinese medicine (CM) symptoms before and after treatment. A higher proportion of the treatment group achieved NGT compared with the control group after 3-, 12- and 24-month follow-up (75.00% vs. 43.33%, 58.33% vs. 35.00%, 46.67% vs. 26.67%, respectively, P<0.05). The IGT to DM conversion rate of the treatment group was significantly lower than that of the control group at the end of 24-month follow-up (16.67% vs. 31.67%, P<0.05). Before treatment, FPG, 2hPG, HbA1c, FINS, 2hINS, HOMA-IR, triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol, low- and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels had no statistical difference between the two groups (P>0.05). After treatment, the 2hPG, HbA1c, HOMA-IR, and TG levels of the treatment group decreased significantly compared with those of the control group (P<0.05). CM symptoms such as exhaustion, irritability, chest tightness and breathless, spontaneous sweating, constipation, and dark thick and

  5. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis in pregnancy with impaired glucose tolerance: a case report and discussion of management issues.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Lois; Parkins, Vicky M; Mahalingham, Aishling

    2007-06-01

    Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP) is an unusual presentation of hyperthyroidism in women. The occurrence of this condition in the context of pregnancy is even more uncommon. Impaired glucose tolerance, pregnancy, and TPP impact overall management of thyrotoxicosis. There is little guidance in the literature for management under this constellation of circumstances. This is a case report of a previously healthy 36-year-old Filipino female presenting at 15 weeks gestation with tetraparesis, hypokalemia, and new onset Graves' disease with impaired glucose tolerance. Normal thyroid function was achieved in the mother without further episodes of TPP and a healthy, euthyroid male was delivered at 38 weeks gestation. Acute and long-term management strategies used in this case are described in detail. A synthesis of the available literature allowed development of a practical management strategy applicable to a variety of situations involving TPP in pregnancy.

  6. Standing balance and trunk position sense in impaired glucose tolerance (IGT)-related peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Allon; Russell, James William; Alexander, Neil Burton

    2008-07-15

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and pre-diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) affect a large segment of the population. Peripheral neuropathy (PN) is a common complication of T2DM, leading to sensory and motor deficits. While T2DM-related PN often results in balance- and mobility-related dysfunction which manifests as gait instability and falls, little is known about balance capabilities in patients who have evidence of PN related to IGT (IGT-PN). We evaluated patients with IGT-PN on commonly-used clinical balance and mobility tests as well as a new test of trunk position sense and balance impairment, trunk repositioning errors (TREs). Eight participants aged 50-72 years with IGT-PN, and eight age- and gender-matched controls underwent balance, mobility and trunk repositioning accuracy tests at a university neurology clinic and mobility research laboratory. Compared to controls, IGT-PN participants had as much as twice the magnitude of TREs and stood approximately half as long on the single leg balance test. People with IGT-PN exhibit deficits in standing balance and trunk position sense. Furthermore, there was a significant association between performance on commonly-used clinical balance and mobility tests, and electrophysiological and clinical measures of neuropathy in IGT-PN participants. Because IGT-related neuropathy represents the earliest stage of diabetic neuropathy, deficits in IGT-PN participants highlight the importance of early screening in the dysglycemic process for neuropathy and associated balance deficits.

  7. Exercise training with dietary counselling increases mitochondrial chaperone expression in middle-aged subjects with impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Venojärvi, Mika; Aunola, Sirkka; Puhke, Raivo; Marniemi, Jukka; Hämäläinen, Helena; Halonen, Jukka-Pekka; Lindström, Jaana; Rastas, Merja; Hällsten, Kirsti; Nuutila, Pirjo; Hänninen, Osmo; Atalay, Mustafa

    2008-03-27

    Insulin resistance and diabetes are associated with increased oxidative stress and impairment of cellular defence systems. Our purpose was to investigate the interaction between glucose metabolism, antioxidative capacity and heat shock protein (HSP) defence in different skeletal muscle phenotypes among middle-aged obese subjects during a long-term exercise and dietary intervention. As a sub-study of the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study (DPS), 22 persons with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) taking part in the intervention volunteered to give samples from the vastus lateralis muscle. Subjects were divided into two sub-groups (IGTslow and IGTfast) on the basis of their baseline myosin heavy chain profile. Glucose metabolism, oxidative stress and HSP expressions were measured before and after the 2-year intervention. Exercise training, combined with dietary counselling, increased the expression of mitochondrial chaperones HSP60 and glucose-regulated protein 75 (GRP75) in the vastus lateralis muscle in the IGTslow group and that of HSP60 in the IGTfast group. In cytoplasmic chaperones HSP72 or HSP90 no changes took place. In the IGTslow group, a significant positive correlation between the increased muscle content of HSP60 and the oxygen radical absorbing capacity values and, in the IGTfast group, between the improved VO2max value and the increased protein expression of GRP75 were found. Serum uric acid concentrations decreased in both sub-groups and serum protein carbonyl concentrations decreased in the IGTfast group. The 2-year intervention up-regulated mitochondrial HSP expressions in middle-aged subjects with impaired glucose tolerance. These improvements, however, were not correlated directly with enhanced glucose tolerance.

  8. Exercise training with dietary counselling increases mitochondrial chaperone expression in middle-aged subjects with impaired glucose tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Venojärvi, Mika; Aunola, Sirkka; Puhke, Raivo; Marniemi, Jukka; Hämäläinen, Helena; Halonen, Jukka-Pekka; Lindström, Jaana; Rastas, Merja; Hällsten, Kirsti; Nuutila, Pirjo; Hänninen, Osmo; Atalay, Mustafa

    2008-01-01

    Background Insulin resistance and diabetes are associated with increased oxidative stress and impairment of cellular defence systems. Our purpose was to investigate the interaction between glucose metabolism, antioxidative capacity and heat shock protein (HSP) defence in different skeletal muscle phenotypes among middle-aged obese subjects during a long-term exercise and dietary intervention. As a sub-study of the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study (DPS), 22 persons with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) taking part in the intervention volunteered to give samples from the vastus lateralis muscle. Subjects were divided into two sub-groups (IGTslow and IGTfast) on the basis of their baseline myosin heavy chain profile. Glucose metabolism, oxidative stress and HSP expressions were measured before and after the 2-year intervention. Results Exercise training, combined with dietary counselling, increased the expression of mitochondrial chaperones HSP60 and glucose-regulated protein 75 (GRP75) in the vastus lateralis muscle in the IGTslow group and that of HSP60 in the IGTfast group. In cytoplasmic chaperones HSP72 or HSP90 no changes took place. In the IGTslow group, a significant positive correlation between the increased muscle content of HSP60 and the oxygen radical absorbing capacity values and, in the IGTfast group, between the improved VO2max value and the increased protein expression of GRP75 were found. Serum uric acid concentrations decreased in both sub-groups and serum protein carbonyl concentrations decreased in the IGTfast group. Conclusion The 2-year intervention up-regulated mitochondrial HSP expressions in middle-aged subjects with impaired glucose tolerance. These improvements, however, were not correlated directly with enhanced glucose tolerance. PMID:18371210

  9. Exposure to phthalates, bisphenol A and metals in pregnancy and the association with impaired glucose tolerance and gestational diabetes mellitus: The MIREC study.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, G D; Dodds, L; Arbuckle, T E; Ashley-Martin, J; Fraser, W; Fisher, M; Taback, S; Keely, E; Bouchard, M F; Monnier, P; Dallaire, R; Morisset, As; Ettinger, A S

    2015-10-01

    Studies from several countries report increases in rates of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) over recent decades. Exposure to environmental chemicals could contribute to this trend. To determine the associations between plasticisers and metals measured in early pregnancy with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and GDM in a Canadian pregnancy cohort. Women enrolled in the Maternal-Infant Research on Environmental Chemicals (MIREC) Study were included if they had a singleton delivery and did not have pre-existing diabetes. Eleven phthalate metabolites and total bisphenol A (BPA) were measured in first-trimester urine samples, and four metals (lead, cadmium, mercury and arsenic) were measured in first-trimester blood samples. IGT and GDM were assessed in accordance with standard guidelines by chart review. Chemical concentrations were grouped by quartiles, and associations with outcomes were examined using logistic regression with adjustment for maternal age, race, pre-pregnancy BMI, and education. Restricted cubic spline analysis was performed to help assess linearity and nature of any dose-response relationships. Of 2001 women recruited into the MIREC cohort, 1274 met the inclusion criteria and had outcome data and biomonitoring data measured for at least one of the chemicals we examined. Elevated odds of GDM were observed in the highest quartile of arsenic exposure (OR = 3.7, 95% CI = 1.4-9.6) in the adjusted analyses. A significant dose-response relationship was observed in a cubic spline model between arsenic and odds of GDM (p < 0.01). No statistically significant associations were observed between phthalates or BPA or other metals with IGT or GDM. Our findings add to the growing body of evidence supporting the role of maternal arsenic exposure as a risk factor for gestational diabetes. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. The effect of defective early phase insulin secretion on postload glucose intolerance in impaired fasting glucose.

    PubMed

    Sargin, Mehmet; Ikiişik, Murat; Sargin, Haluk; Orçun, Asuman; Kaya, Müjgan; Gözü, Hülya; Dabak, Reşat; Bayramiçli, Oya Uygur; Yayla, Ali

    2005-10-01

    Impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) are two risk groups for type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by both impaired insulin secretion and insulin resistance but their relative contribution to the development of hyperglycemia may differ due to heterogeneity of the disease. Combined glucose intolerance (CGI), on the other hand, seems to represent a more advanced stage of prediabetes that bears a distinctly higher risk of progression to diabetes and its comorbidities. This study has the aim to compare isolated IFG and CGI categories with respect to the degree of early phase insulin secretion abnormalities and insulin resistance. Subjects who had IFG (fasting glucose: 110-126 mg/dl) were included in the study. A 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) with insulin response was done and subjects were classified according to the WHO criteria. Six subjects were excluded because they had diabetic glucose tolerance. A total of 66 patients (53.4 +/- 11.1 years, female/male: 48/18) were divided into two groups according to their glucose tolerance in OGGT (Group 1: isolated IFG and group 2: CGI). Early phase insulin secretion was measured by intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) and OGTT. Insulin resistance was assessed by the R value of the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA). We did not find any statistically significant difference between groups according to age, gender, body mass index (BMI), fasting glucose, fasting insulin, insulin-AUC (0-180 min) and HOMA-R values. In OGGT there was no statistically significant difference between 0', 30', 60' and 90' insulin levels of the groups; only 120' and 180' insulin levels were higher in CGI than in IFG group (p<0.05). In IVGTT, there was no statistically significant difference between glucose levels of the groups. Furthermore, insulin response to intravenous glucose was higher in IFG than in CGI (p<0.05). Our data demonstrate that isolated IFG and CGI are similar with respect to

  11. U. S. Army Aviation Epidemiology Data Registry: Army Aviators with Diabetes Mellitus and Impaired Glucose Tolerance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    glucose tolerance (IGT), diabetes mellitus (DM), use of oral hypoglycemic agents, or use of insulin for the period 1988 to 1992. The paper reviewed the...incidence and prevalence of diabetes mellitus in Army aviators. The study tabulated the incidence and age-specific annual rates of diabetes mellitus and

  12. Relation of Serial Changes in Childhood Body-Mass Index to Impaired Glucose Tolerance in Young Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Santosh K.; Sachdev, Harshpal Singh; Fall, Caroline H.D.; Osmond, Clive; Lakshmy, Ramakrishnan; Barker, David J.P.; Biswas, Sushant K. Dey; Ramji, Siddharth; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Reddy, Kolli Srinath

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND The risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus is increased in people who have low birth weights and who subsequently become obese as adults. Whether their obesity originates in childhood and, if so, at what age are unknown. Understanding the origin of obesity may be especially important in developing countries, where type 2 diabetes is rapidly increasing yet public health messages still focus on reducing childhood “undernutrition.” METHODS We evaluated glucose tolerance and plasma insulin concentrations in 1492 men and women 26 to 32 years of age who had been measured at birth and at intervals of three to six months throughout infancy, childhood, and adolescence in a prospective, population-based study. RESULTS The prevalence of impaired glucose tolerance was 10.8 percent, and that of diabetes was 4.4 percent. Subjects with impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes typically had a low body-mass index up to the age of two years, followed by an early adiposity rebound (the age after infancy when body mass starts to rise) and an accelerated increase in body-mass index until adulthood. However, despite an increase in body-mass index between the ages of 2 and 12 years, none of these subjects were obese at the age of 12 years. The odds ratio for disease associated with an increase in the body-mass index of 1 SD from 2 to 12 years of age was 1.36 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.18 to 1.57; P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS There is an association between thinness in infancy and the presence of impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes in young adulthood. Crossing into higher categories of body-mass index after the age of two years is also associated with these disorders. PMID:14985484

  13. Effects of lifestyle intervention on weight and metabolic parameters in patients with impaired glucose tolerance related to beta-3 adrenergic receptor gene polymorphism Trp64Arg(C/T): Results from the Japan Diabetes Prevention Program.

    PubMed

    Sakane, Naoki; Sato, Juichi; Tsushita, Kazuyo; Tsujii, Satoru; Kotani, Kazuhiko; Tominaga, Makoto; Kawazu, Shoji; Sato, Yuzo; Usui, Takeshi; Kamae, Isao; Yoshida, Toshihide; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Sato, Shigeaki; Tsuzaki, Kokoro; Takahashi, Kaoru; Kuzuya, Hideshi

    2016-05-01

    The beta-3 adrenergic receptor (ADRB3), primarily expressed in adipose tissue, is involved in the regulation of energy metabolism. The present study hypothesized that ADRB3 (Trp64Arg, rs4994) polymorphisms modulate the effects of lifestyle intervention on weight and metabolic parameters in patients with impaired glucose tolerance. Data were analyzed from 112 patients with impaired glucose tolerance in the Japan Diabetes Prevention Program, a lifestyle intervention trial, randomized to either an intensive lifestyle intervention group or usual care group. Changes in weight and metabolic parameters were measured after the 6-month intervention. The ADRB3 polymorphisms were determined using the polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Non-carriers showed a greater weight reduction compared with the carriers in both the lifestyle intervention group and usual care group, and a greater increase of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels than the carriers only in the lifestyle intervention group. ADRB3 polymorphisms could influence the effects of lifestyle interventions on weight and lipid parameters in impaired glucose tolerance patients.

  14. [Diabetic cardiomyopathy in medical examination patients with impaired glucose tolerance and Type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaqin; Yang, Pingting; Cao, Xia; Liu, Meilin; Chen, Zhiheng

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the change of diabetic cardiomyopathy in patients with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and its influencing factors. Patients with IGT and T2DM were divided into an IGT group (n=314), a T2DM group (n=368) and an NC group (400 normal subjects). The left ventricular ejection fractions (LVEF) and the interventricular septal depth (IVSd) were measured by Doppler echocardiography. The general information and blood biochemistry were also collected during the corresponding time period. Compared with the NC group, waist circumference (WC), bodymass index (BMI), premature family history of cardiovascular disease, the serum levels of fasting plasma glucose (FPG), HbA1c, TC, TG, hyperlipidemia, BUN and Cr significantly increased (P<0.01) in the IGT and T2DM groups. Compared with the NC group and the IGT group, the LVEF significantly decreased (P<0.01) and the IVSd significantly increased (P<0.01) in the T2DM group. The LVEF and IVSd did not have obvious difference between the NC group and the IGT group. Pearson correlation analysis showed a negative correlation between LVEF and HbA1c, TC and duration of disease (P<0.01); but a positive correlation between IVSd and WC, BMI, HbA1c and duration of disease, and a negative correlation between IVSd and HDL (P<0.05). In the multiple linear stepwise regression, HbA1c and duration of disease showed a significant association with both LVEF and IVSd (P<0.05). T2DM has a close association with cardiomyopathy. HbA1c and duration of disease are the independent predictors for LVEF and IVSd.

  15. Calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase mediates the intracellular signaling pathways of cardiac apoptosis in mice with impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Federico, Marilen; Portiansky, Enrique L; Sommese, Leandro; Alvarado, Francisco J; Blanco, Paula G; Zanuzzi, Carolina N; Dedman, John; Kaetzel, Marcia; Wehrens, Xander H T; Mattiazzi, Alicia; Palomeque, Julieta

    2017-01-20

    Background The impact of cardiac apoptosis in pre-diabetic stages of diabetic cardiomyopathy is unknown. We described that myocytes from fructose-rich diet (FRD) animals exhibit arrhythmias produced by exacerbated Ca(2+) /calmodulin-protein kinase (CaMKII) activity, ryanodine receptors (RyR2) phosphorylation and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) leak. We tested the hypothesis that this mechanism also underlies cardiac apoptosis in pre-diabetes. Methods and Results We generated a pre-diabetic model in mice fed with FRD. FRD-mice showed an increase in oxidative stress, hypertrophy and systolic dysfunction. FRD myocytes exhibited enhanced SR Ca(2+) spontaneous events in the absence of SR Ca(2+) load alterations vs. control-diet (CD) myocytes. In HEK293 cells, hyperglycemia significantly enhanced [(3) H]Ryanodine binding and CaMKII phosphorylation of RyR2-S2814 residue vs. normoglycemia. CaMKII-inhibition prevented hyperglycemia-induced alterations. FRD also evoked cardiac apoptosis in WT mice vs. CD-WT mice. Co-treatment with the ROS scavenger Tempol prevented FRD-induced apoptosis in WT-mice. In contrast, FRD enhanced oxidative stress but not apoptosis in FRD-SR-AIP mice, in which a CaMKII inhibitor is targeted to the SR. FRD produced mitochondrial membrane depolarization in WT mice but not in S2814A mice, in which the CaMKII phosphorylation site on RyR2 was ablated. Furthermore, FRD decreased mitochondrial area, mean Feret diameter and mean SR-mitochondrial distance vs. CD-WT hearts. This remodeling was prevented in AC3I mice, with cardiac-targeted CaMKII inhibition. Conclusions CaMKII phosphorylation of RyR2, SR Ca(2+) leak and mitochondrial membrane depolarization are critically involved in the apoptotic pathway of pre-diabetic heart. The FRD-induced decrease in SR-mitochondrial distance is likely to additionally favor Ca(2+) transit between both organelles. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Th1/Th17 Plasticity Is a Marker of Advanced β Cell Autoimmunity and Impaired Glucose Tolerance in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Reinert-Hartwall, Linnea; Honkanen, Jarno; Salo, Harri M.; Nieminen, Janne K.; Luopajärvi, Kristiina; Härkönen, Taina; Veijola, Riitta; Simell, Olli; Ilonen, Jorma; Peet, Aleksandr; Tillmann, Vallo; Knip, Mikael; Knip, Mikael; Koski, Katriina; Koski, Matti; Härkönen, Taina; Ryhänen, Samppa; Hämäläinen, Anu-Maaria; Ormisson, Anne; Peet, Aleksandr; Tillmann, Vallo; Ulich, Valentina; Kuzmicheva, Elena; Mokurov, Sergei; Markova, Svetlana; Pylova, Svetlana; Isakova, Marina; Shakurova, Elena; Petrov, Vladimir; Dorshakova, Natalya V.; Karapetyan, Tatyana; Varlamova, Tatyana; Ilonen, Jorma; Kiviniemi, Minna; Alnek, Kristi; Janson, Helis; Uibo, Raivo; Salum, Tiit; von Mutius, Erika; Weber, Juliane; Ahlfors, Helena; Kallionpää, Henna; Laajala, Essi; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Moulder, Robert; Nieminen, Janne; Ruohtula, Terhi; Vaarala, Outi; Honkanen, Hanna; Hyöty, Heikki; Kondrashova, Anita; Oikarinen, Sami; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.; De Goffau, Marcus C.; Welling, Gjalt; Alahuhta, Kirsi; Virtanen, Suvi M.

    2015-01-01

    Upregulation of IL-17 immunity and detrimental effects of IL-17 on human islets have been implicated in human type 1 diabetes. In animal models, the plasticity of Th1/Th17 cells contributes to the development of autoimmune diabetes. In this study, we demonstrate that the upregulation of the IL-17 pathway and Th1/Th17 plasticity in peripheral blood are markers of advanced β cell autoimmunity and impaired β cell function in human type 1 diabetes. Activated Th17 immunity was observed in the late stage of preclinical diabetes in children with β cell autoimmunity and impaired glucose tolerance, but not in children with early β cell autoimmunity. We found an increased ratio of IFN-γ/IL-17 expression in Th17 cells in children with advanced β cell autoimmunity, which correlated with HbA1c and plasma glucose concentrations in an oral glucose tolerance test, and thus impaired β cell function. Low expression of Helios was seen in Th17 cells, suggesting that Th1/Th17 cells are not converted thymus-derived regulatory T cells. Our results suggest that the development of Th1/Th17 plasticity may serve as a biomarker of disease progression from β cell autoantibody positivity to type 1 diabetes. These data in human type 1 diabetes emphasize the role of Th1/Th17 plasticity as a potential contributor to tissue destruction in autoimmune conditions. PMID:25480564

  17. [HbA1c is not enough in screening for impaired glucose metabolism. Glucose tolerance tests are also needed, as shown in Swedish prospective epidemiological study].

    PubMed

    Hellgren, Margareta; Daka, Bledar; Larsson, Charlotte

    2015-09-29

    An HbA1c threshold of ≥ 42 mmol/mol has been proposed to diagnose prediabetes. The sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of the proposed threshold for detection of individuals with prediabetes was examined in a study of 573 randomly selected individuals from Vara and Skövde. In addition, the utility of the FINDRISC questionnaire and of a fasting glucose test in combination with three short questions concerning BMI, heredity for type 2 diabetes and known hypertension was examined. Results from an oral glucose tolerance test were used as reference. The sensitivity of HbA1c and FINDRISC to detect individuals with IGT was 16 and 26 per cent respectively. Questions regarding BMI, heredity and hypertension together with a fasting glucose test yielded a sensitivity of 50%, but a lower specificity and positive predictive value. We conclude that HbA1c inefficiently detected individuals with impaired glucose tolerance and that oral glucose tolerance tests can still preferably be recommended.

  18. A trial of simple versus intensified dietary modification for prevention of progression to diabetes mellitus in women with impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wein, P; Beischer, N; Harris, C; Permezel, M

    1999-05-01

    Women with impaired glucose tolerance are at high risk of developing noninsulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). The Mercy Hospital for Women has a long-term follow-up programme for women with gestational diabetes, which identifies many women with impaired glucose tolerance. Two hundred of these women were entered into a randomized controlled trial of intensive versus routine dietary advice. Seven women were lost to follow-up. The annual incidence rates of diabetes mellitus for the 2 groups were 6.1% (intervention) and 7.3% (control), an incident rate ratio of 0.83, 95% confidence interval 0.47-1.48, p = 0.50. Overall, there was a return to normal glucose tolerance in 44% of patients. Multivariate analysis showed that body mass index, fasting and 2-hour plasma glucose levels at trial entry were significantly associated with an increased risk of diabetes mellitus. Impaired glucose tolerance is an important condition that should be treated with advice about lifestyle modification (diet and/or exercise). We consider that future trials in the management of women with previous gestational diabetes who have impaired glucose tolerance should investigate the effect of pharmacological intervention in addition to diet and/or exercise, the latter providing a therapy that it would be unethical to exclude on the evidence presently available.

  19. Steroid-induced impairment of glucose tolerance: Prevalence among pediatric patients on long-term steroid use in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Chikani, U N; Ibekwe, M U; Oguonu, T; Mungai, L; Bisi-Onyemaechi, A I; Ugege, O M; Ogbonna, I F; de Beaufort, Carine

    2017-03-06

    Glucocorticoid (referred to from here on as simply steroid) is used for effective treatment of various inflammatory disorders since its discovery in 1940s. However, these useful drugs cause important side effects, such as impairment of glucose tolerance. We sought to determine the prevalence of steroid-induced impairment of glucose tolerance in pediatric patients on long-term steroid use. A cross-sectional, descriptive and hospital-based study. Consenting subjects who met the inclusion criteria were screened with random glucometer measurements repeated twice. An average of both readings obtained from the initial measurement of their random blood glucose (RBG) and a repeat during the next clinic visit was taken as the RBG. Hundred patients were studied, 66 males/34 females. Subjects with nephrotic syndrome were 61 while 39 had asthma. Mean age of 10.13 years (range: 0.5-18 years); mean body mass index (BMI): 18.2 kg/m(2) (range: 6.6 to 26.30 kg/m(2) ). The subjects with nephrotic syndrome were on oral prednisolone while the asthmatics were on inhaled fluticasone, budesonide and oral methylprednisolone. Mean (range) duration of steroid use was 9.74 (0.5-72) months. Mean (range) RBG was 3.49 (3.3-7.5) mmol/L. None of the subjects showed abnormal RBG. However, the RBG was further categorized into low, moderate and high normal RBG. A positive correlation between longer duration of steroid use as well as high doses of both oral and inhaled steroids, and high normal RBG existed (P = .015). No statistically significant relationship existed between body mass index (BMI) percentile and RBG (P = .437). Low to moderate doses of oral and inhaled steroids should be used when indicated as they are associated with lesser risk of impairment of glucose tolerance in the pediatric population. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The Fruiting Bodies, Submerged Culture Biomass, and Acidic Polysaccharide Glucuronoxylomannan of Yellow Brain Mushroom Tremella mesenterica Modulate the Immunity of Peripheral Blood Leukocytes and Splenocytes in Rats with Impaired Glucose Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Tai-Hao; Lee, Chien-Hsing; Lin, Fang-Yi; Wasser, Solomon P; Lo, Hui-Chen

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM), a chronic disease with hyperglycemia and impaired immune function, is increasing worldwide. Progression from impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) to type 2 DM has recently become a target for early intervention. The fruiting bodies (FB) and submerged culture mycelium (CM) of Tremella mesenterica, an edible and medicinal mushroom, have been demonstrated to have antihyperglycemic and immunomodulatory activities in type 1 DM rats. Herein, we investigated the effects of acidic polysaccharide glucuronoxylomannan (GX) extracted from CM on the immunocyte responses. Male Wistar rats were injected with streptozotocin (65 mg/kg) plus nicotinamide (200 mg/kg) for the induction of IGT, and gavaged daily with vehicle, FB, CM, or GX (1 g/kg/day). Rats injected with saline and gavaged vehicle were used as controls. Two weeks later, peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) and splenocytes were collected. Ingestion of FB, CM, and GX significantly decreased blood glucose levels in the postprandial period and in oral glucose tolerance test, and partially reversed T-splenocytic proliferation in IGT rats. CM significantly decreased T-helper lymphocytes in the PBLs and B-splenocytes. In addition, FB, CM, and GX significantly reversed the IGT-induced decreases in tumor necrosis factor-α production; GX significantly increased interleukin-6 production in T-lymphocytes in the PBLs and splenocytes; and CM and GX significantly reversed IGT-induced decrease in interferon-γ production in T-lymphocytes in the spleen. In conclusion, FB, CM, and acidic polysaccharide GX of T. mesenterica may increase T-cell immunity via the elevation of proinflammatory and T-helper cytokine production in rats with impaired glucose tolerance.

  1. The Fruiting Bodies, Submerged Culture Biomass, and Acidic Polysaccharide Glucuronoxylomannan of Yellow Brain Mushroom Tremella mesenterica Modulate the Immunity of Peripheral Blood Leukocytes and Splenocytes in Rats with Impaired Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Tai-Hao; Lee, Chien-Hsing; Lin, Fang-Yi; Wasser, Solomon P.; Lo, Hui-Chen

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM), a chronic disease with hyperglycemia and impaired immune function, is increasing worldwide. Progression from impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) to type 2 DM has recently become a target for early intervention. The fruiting bodies (FB) and submerged culture mycelium (CM) of Tremella mesenterica, an edible and medicinal mushroom, have been demonstrated to have antihyperglycemic and immunomodulatory activities in type 1 DM rats. Herein, we investigated the effects of acidic polysaccharide glucuronoxylomannan (GX) extracted from CM on the immunocyte responses. Male Wistar rats were injected with streptozotocin (65 mg/kg) plus nicotinamide (200 mg/kg) for the induction of IGT, and gavaged daily with vehicle, FB, CM, or GX (1 g/kg/day). Rats injected with saline and gavaged vehicle were used as controls. Two weeks later, peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) and splenocytes were collected. Ingestion of FB, CM, and GX significantly decreased blood glucose levels in the postprandial period and in oral glucose tolerance test, and partially reversed T-splenocytic proliferation in IGT rats. CM significantly decreased T-helper lymphocytes in the PBLs and B-splenocytes. In addition, FB, CM, and GX significantly reversed the IGT-induced decreases in tumor necrosis factor-α production; GX significantly increased interleukin-6 production in T-lymphocytes in the PBLs and splenocytes; and CM and GX significantly reversed IGT-induced decrease in interferon-γ production in T-lymphocytes in the spleen. In conclusion, FB, CM, and acidic polysaccharide GX of T. mesenterica may increase T-cell immunity via the elevation of proinflammatory and T-helper cytokine production in rats with impaired glucose tolerance. PMID:24872934

  2. Monitoring breath during oral glucose tolerance tests.

    PubMed

    Ghimenti, S; Tabucchi, S; Lomonaco, T; Di Francesco, F; Fuoco, R; Onor, M; Lenzi, S; Trivella, M G

    2013-03-01

    The evolution of breath composition during oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) was analysed by thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in 16 subjects and correlated to blood glucose levels. The glucose tolerance tests classified five of the subjects as diabetics, eight as affected by impaired glucose tolerance and three as normoglycaemic. Acetone levels were generally higher in diabetics (average concentration values: diabetics, 300 ± 40 ppbv; impaired glucose tolerance, 350 ± 30 ppbv; normoglycaemic, 230 ± 20 ppbv) but the large inter-individual variability did not allow us to identify the three groups by this parameter alone. The exhalation of 3-hydroxy-butan-2-one and butane-2,3-dione, likely due to the metabolization of glucose by bacteria in the mouth, was also observed. Future work will involve the extension of the analyses to other volatile compounds by attempting to improve the level of discrimination between the various classes of subjects.

  3. The variation of glucose tolerance in a multi racial population.

    PubMed

    Ch'ng, S L; Chandrasekharan, N

    1985-04-01

    The pattern of plasma and urine sugar changes after 50g glucose load in 1900 Malaysians (522 males and 1378 females) consisting predominantly of Malays, Chinese and Indians were studied. The data were analysed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS). The results show bimodal distribution of 120 min. plasma sugar values in the age groups 21 years and above and trimodal distribution in most groups above 40 years. The mean 120 minutes plasma sugar cut-off values for nondiabetics (ND), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and diabetics (DM) of 8.4 and 11.1 mmol/l respectively were close to the values recommended by the National Diabetic Data Group (NDDG). Fifty two percent of all subjects showed peaked plasma sugar values at 60 minutes (14% of them had IGT, 12% DM), 25% peaked at 30 minutes (98% of them were ND). The rest showed peaked values at 90 minutes (17%), 120 minutes (4%) and 150 minutes (2%) and from this group forty two percent were DM and 23% had IGT. Reliance on urine sugar qualitative tests could misclassify 7.3% of subjects (predominantly elderly females) with hyperglycaemia of greater than 11 mmol/l. This study shows that in the 50 g glucose tolerance test, the NDDG criteria for ND, IGT, DM is still applicable to the Malaysian population. The sampling time could be reduced to four points at 0, 60, 90, and 120 minutes. Blood analysis is the preferred method for the diagnosis of hyperglycaemia in elderly females.

  4. Production of a mouse strain with impaired glucose tolerance by systemic heterozygous knockout of the glucokinase gene and its feasibility as a prediabetes model

    PubMed Central

    SAITO, Mikako; KANEDA, Asako; SUGIYAMA, Tae; IIDA, Ryousuke; OTOKUNI, Keiko; KABURAGI, Misako; MATSUOKA, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Exon II of glucokinase (Gk) was deleted to produce a systemic heterozygous Gk knockout (Gk+/−) mouse. The relative expression levels of Gk in the heart, lung, liver, stomach, and pancreas in Gk+/− mice ranged from 0.41–0.68 versus that in wild (Gk+/+) mice. On the other hand, its expression levels in the brain, adipose tissue, and muscle ranged from 0.95–1.03, and its expression levels in the spleen and kidney were nearly zero. Gk knockout caused no remarkable off-target effect on the expression of 7 diabetes causing genes (Shp, Hnf1a, Hnf1b, Irs1, Irs2, Kir6.2, and Pdx1) in 10 organs. The glucose tolerance test was conducted to determine the blood glucose concentrations just after fasting for 24 h (FBG) and at 2 h after high-glucose application (GTT2h). The FBG-GTT2h plots obtained with the wild strain fed the control diet (CD), Gk+/− strain fed the CD, and Gk+/− strain fed the HFD were distributed in separate areas in the FBG-GTT2h diagram. The respective areas could be defined as the normal state, prediabetes state, and diabetes state, respectively. Based on the results, the criteria for prediabetes could be defined for the Gk+/− strain developed in this study. PMID:25765873

  5. Sleep Duration, Lifestyle Intervention, and Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes in Impaired Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Tuomilehto, Henri; Peltonen, Markku; Partinen, Markku; Lavigne, Gilles; Eriksson, Johan G.; Herder, Christian; Aunola, Sirkka; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Ilanne-Parikka, Pirjo; Uusitupa, Matti; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Lindström, Jaana

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Both short and long sleep duration have frequently been found to be associated with an increased risk for diabetes. The aim of the present exploratory analysis was to examine the association between sleep duration and type 2 diabetes after lifestyle intervention in overweight individuals with impaired glucose tolerance in a 7-year prospective follow-up. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 522 individuals (aged 40–64 years) were randomly allocated either to an intensive diet-exercise counseling group or to a control group. Diabetes incidence during follow-up was calculated according to sleep duration at baseline. Sleep duration was obtained for a 24-h period. Physical activity, dietary intakes, body weight, and immune mediators (C-reactive protein and interleukin-6) were measured. RESULTS Interaction between sleep duration and treatment group was statistically significant (P = 0.003). In the control group, the adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) (95% CI) for diabetes were 2.29 (1.38–3.80) and 2.74 (1.67–4.50) in the sleep duration groups 9–9.5 h and ≥10 h, respectively, compared with for that of the 7–8.5 h group. In contrast, sleep duration did not influence the incidence of diabetes in the intervention group; for sleep duration groups 9–9.5 h and ≥10 h, the adjusted HRs (95% CI) were 1.10 (0.60–2.01) and 0.73 (0.34–1.56), respectively, compared with that in the reference group (7–8.5 h sleep). Lifestyle intervention resulted in similar improvement in body weight, insulin sensitivity, and immune mediator levels regardless of sleep duration. CONCLUSIONS Long sleep duration is associated with increased type 2 diabetes risk. Lifestyle intervention with the aim of weight reduction, healthy diet, and increased physical activity may ameliorate some of this excess risk. PMID:19651919

  6. High serum ferritin levels are associated with insulin resistance but not with impaired glucose tolerance in a healthy people population.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Luis G; Urrunaga-Pastor, Diego; Moncada-Mapelli, Enrique; Guarnizo-Poma, Mirella; Lazaro-Alcantara, Herbert; Benites-Zapata, Vicente A

    2017-07-20

    To assess the association between elevated serum ferritin levels and the presence of insulin resistance (IR) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) in a population of individuals with no endocrine or metabolic disorders background. Analytical cross-sectional study, carried out in adults of both sexes with no medical history of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) or other metabolic or endocrine disorder, who attended the outpatient service of a private clinic in Lima-Peru during 2012-2014 period. Impaired serum ferritin levels were defined as serum ferritin values >300μg/L in men and >200μg/L in women. IR was defined as a Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA-IR) value ≥3.8 and IGT was defined as an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) value between 126mg/dL and 199mg/dL. The reported association measure was the prevalence ratio (PR) with their respective 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). We analyzed 213 participants, the average age was 35.8±11.1years and 35.7% were males. The prevalence of impaired serum ferritin levels, IR and IGT in the population was 12.7%, 33.3% and 9.9% respectively. In the adjusted Poisson regression models, the prevalence of IR was higher among the group with impaired serum ferritin levels (PR=1.74; 95%CI:1.18-2.56); however, we found no association between impaired serum ferritin levels and IGT (PR=1.42; 95%CI:0.47-4.30). Impaired levels of serum ferritin are associated with IR, nevertheless, not with IGT in a metabolically healthy population. Serum ferritin could be considered as an early marker of IR prior to the onset of glycaemia disorders. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Behaviour change among people with impaired glucose tolerance: Comparison of telephone-based and face-to-face advice.

    PubMed

    Betzlbacher, Anna-Franziska; Grady, Katherine; Savas, Linda; Cotterill, Sarah; Boaden, Ruth; Summers, Lucinda; Gibson, Martin

    2013-04-01

    To develop, implement and compare two lifestyle services for people at risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Two localities were selected to implement two different service delivery models, telephone-based and face-to-face, supporting people at risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Impact was assessed by comparing weight, fasting plasma glucose and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) results at baseline and six months later. Both services were associated with an improvement in OGTT 2-h plasma glucose and weight. In the telephone intervention, 47.3% of participants who completed the project achieved both normal fasting plasma glucose (≤6.0 mmol/l) and normal plasma glucose levels (≤7.7 mmol/l). Participants had a mean weight loss of 3.3 kg (SD 4.3), equating to 3.4% of body weight (p < 0.001). In the face-to-face intervention, 46.3% of participants achieved normal plasma glucose (≤7.7 mmol/l) and a mean weight loss of 2.9 kg (SD 4.5), equating to 3.1% of bodyweight (p < 0.001). Local health providers can adapt existing service provision and tailor it to provide lifestyle programmes for people with impaired glucose tolerance. Both service delivery models offer effective diabetes prevention although each model may cater for different population needs and a choice of services might be the preferred option. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  8. Altered walking strategy and increased unsteadiness in participants with impaired glucose tolerance and Type 2 diabetes relates to small-fibre neuropathy but not vitamin D deficiency.

    PubMed

    Almurdhi, M M; Brown, S J; Bowling, F L; Boulton, A J M; Jeziorska, M; Malik, R A; Reeves, N D

    2017-06-01

    To investigate alterations in walking strategy and dynamic sway (unsteadiness) in people with impaired glucose tolerance and people with Type 2 diabetes in relation to severity of neuropathy and vitamin D levels. A total of 20 people with Type 2 diabetes, 20 people with impaired glucose tolerance and 20 people without either Type 2 diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance (control group) underwent gait analysis using a motion analysis system and force platforms, and detailed assessment of neuropathy and serum 25 hydroxy-vitamin D levels. Ankle strength (P = 0.01) and power (P = 0.003) during walking and walking speed (P = 0.008) were preserved in participants with impaired glucose tolerance but significantly lower in participants with Type 2 diabetes compared with control participants; however, step width (P = 0.005) and dynamic medio-lateral sway (P = 0.007) were significantly higher and posterior maximal movement (P = 0.000) was lower in participants with impaired glucose tolerance, but preserved in those with Type 2 diabetes compared with the control group. Dynamic medio-lateral sway correlated with corneal nerve fibre length (P = 0.001) and corneal nerve branch density (P = 0.001), but not with vibration perception threshold (P = 0.19). Serum 25 hydroxy-vitamin D levels did not differ significantly among the groups (P = 0.10) and did not correlate with any walking variables or measures of dynamic sway. Early abnormalities in walking strategy and dynamic sway were evident in participants with impaired glucose tolerance, whilst there was a reduction in ankle strength, power and walking speed in participants with Type 2 diabetes. Unsteadiness correlated with small-, but not large-fibre neuropathy and there was no relationship between vitamin D levels and walking variables. © 2017 Diabetes UK.

  9. PICK1 Deficiency Impairs Secretory Vesicle Biogenesis and Leads to Growth Retardation and Decreased Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Anna M.; Jin, Chunyu; Rickhag, Mattias; Lund, Viktor K.; Jensen, Morten; Bhatia, Vikram; Sørensen, Gunnar; Madsen, Andreas N.; Xue, Zhichao; Møller, Siri K.; Woldbye, David; Qvortrup, Klaus; Huganir, Richard; Stamou, Dimitrios; Kjærulff, Ole; Gether, Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    Secretory vesicles in endocrine cells store hormones such as growth hormone (GH) and insulin before their release into the bloodstream. The molecular mechanisms governing budding of immature secretory vesicles from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and their subsequent maturation remain unclear. Here, we identify the lipid binding BAR (Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs) domain protein PICK1 (protein interacting with C kinase 1) as a key component early in the biogenesis of secretory vesicles in GH-producing cells. Both PICK1-deficient Drosophila and mice displayed somatic growth retardation. Growth retardation was rescued in flies by reintroducing PICK1 in neurosecretory cells producing somatotropic peptides. PICK1-deficient mice were characterized by decreased body weight and length, increased fat accumulation, impaired GH secretion, and decreased storage of GH in the pituitary. Decreased GH storage was supported by electron microscopy showing prominent reduction in secretory vesicle number. Evidence was also obtained for impaired insulin secretion associated with decreased glucose tolerance. PICK1 localized in cells to immature secretory vesicles, and the PICK1 BAR domain was shown by live imaging to associate with vesicles budding from the TGN and to possess membrane-sculpting properties in vitro. In mouse pituitary, PICK1 co-localized with the BAR domain protein ICA69, and PICK1 deficiency abolished ICA69 protein expression. In the Drosophila brain, PICK1 and ICA69 co-immunoprecipitated and showed mutually dependent expression. Finally, both in a Drosophila model of type 2 diabetes and in high-fat-diet-induced obese mice, we observed up-regulation of PICK1 mRNA expression. Our findings suggest that PICK1, together with ICA69, is critical during budding of immature secretory vesicles from the TGN and thus for vesicular storage of GH and possibly other hormones. The data link two BAR domain proteins to membrane remodeling processes in the secretory pathway of peptidergic endocrine

  10. PICK1 deficiency impairs secretory vesicle biogenesis and leads to growth retardation and decreased glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Holst, Birgitte; Madsen, Kenneth L; Jansen, Anna M; Jin, Chunyu; Rickhag, Mattias; Lund, Viktor K; Jensen, Morten; Bhatia, Vikram; Sørensen, Gunnar; Madsen, Andreas N; Xue, Zhichao; Møller, Siri K; Woldbye, David; Qvortrup, Klaus; Huganir, Richard; Stamou, Dimitrios; Kjærulff, Ole; Gether, Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    Secretory vesicles in endocrine cells store hormones such as growth hormone (GH) and insulin before their release into the bloodstream. The molecular mechanisms governing budding of immature secretory vesicles from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and their subsequent maturation remain unclear. Here, we identify the lipid binding BAR (Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs) domain protein PICK1 (protein interacting with C kinase 1) as a key component early in the biogenesis of secretory vesicles in GH-producing cells. Both PICK1-deficient Drosophila and mice displayed somatic growth retardation. Growth retardation was rescued in flies by reintroducing PICK1 in neurosecretory cells producing somatotropic peptides. PICK1-deficient mice were characterized by decreased body weight and length, increased fat accumulation, impaired GH secretion, and decreased storage of GH in the pituitary. Decreased GH storage was supported by electron microscopy showing prominent reduction in secretory vesicle number. Evidence was also obtained for impaired insulin secretion associated with decreased glucose tolerance. PICK1 localized in cells to immature secretory vesicles, and the PICK1 BAR domain was shown by live imaging to associate with vesicles budding from the TGN and to possess membrane-sculpting properties in vitro. In mouse pituitary, PICK1 co-localized with the BAR domain protein ICA69, and PICK1 deficiency abolished ICA69 protein expression. In the Drosophila brain, PICK1 and ICA69 co-immunoprecipitated and showed mutually dependent expression. Finally, both in a Drosophila model of type 2 diabetes and in high-fat-diet-induced obese mice, we observed up-regulation of PICK1 mRNA expression. Our findings suggest that PICK1, together with ICA69, is critical during budding of immature secretory vesicles from the TGN and thus for vesicular storage of GH and possibly other hormones. The data link two BAR domain proteins to membrane remodeling processes in the secretory pathway of peptidergic endocrine

  11. The unfolded protein response in human skeletal muscle is not involved in the onset of glucose tolerance impairment induced by a fat-rich diet.

    PubMed

    Deldicque, Louise; Van Proeyen, Karen; Francaux, Marc; Hespel, Peter

    2011-07-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in pancreas, liver, and adipose tissue is a key event in the pathogenesis of obesity-related metabolic disease. Lipid-induced ER stress in liver and adipose tissue leads to inhibition of insulin signaling. Whether this mechanism exists in skeletal muscle is currently unknown. The present study aimed at assessing the ER stress response in skeletal muscle of subjects receiving a hyper-caloric fat-rich diet (HFD). Seven healthy males (20.6 ± 0.5 years; 70.9 ± 3.4 kg) volunteered to participate in the study. They received a hyper-caloric (+30% kcal) fat-rich (50% kcal) diet for 6 weeks. An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed, and muscle biopsies were taken before and after HFD. HFD increased body mass by ~3 kg (P = 0.007) and the sum of skinfolds by 15% (P = 0.003). After HFD, blood glucose concentrations were higher during OGTT (two-way ANOVA, P = 0.023; +45% at 20 min, P = 0.002), and fasting plasma insulin level tended to be higher (+20%). HFD increased intramyocellular lipids content by ~50 and 75% in type I (P = 0.0009) and IIa fibers (P = 0.002), respectively. The protein expression of inositol-requiring enzyme 1α, protein kinase R-like ER protein kinase, BiP and calnexin and the mRNA level of spliced X box binding protein-1, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein homologous protein and activating transcription factor 4 were not changed after HFD. Despite the increase in body mass, subcutaneous fat deposits, and intramyocellular lipids content, ER stress markers were unchanged in skeletal muscle of subjects receiving a HFD for 6 weeks. This suggests that the onset of glucose intolerance is not related to ER stress in skeletal muscle.

  12. Assessment of Insulin Resistance in Subjects with Normal Glucose Tolerance, Hyperinsulinemia with Normal Blood Glucose Tolerance, Impaired Glucose Tolerance, and Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes (Prediabetes Insulin Resistance Research)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guang; Li, Chunlin; Gong, Yanping; Fang, Fusheng; Tian, Hui; Li, Jian; Cheng, Xiaoling

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the differences in insulin resistance (IR) among subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), hyperinsulinemia with NGT (HINS), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods. 5 NGT, 25 HINS, 25 IGT, and 25 T2DM subjects participated in this research. The hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp technique (HECT) was performed in all of them to evaluate IR levels. The relative factors influencing IR were evaluated. The simple insulin sensitivity indices were calculated, and the correlation between each index and the M value was analyzed. Results. The M values of NGT, HINS, IGT, and T2DM groups were 11.88 ± 2.93 mg·kg−1·min−1, 6.23 ± 1.73 mg·kg−1·min−1, 6.37 ± 2.12 mg·kg−1·min−1, and 6.19 ± 1.89 mg·kg−1·min−1, respectively. M values in HINS, IGT, and T2DM groups were lower than those in the NGT group (P = 0.005); however, the differences among the HINS, IGT, and T2DM groups were not statistically significant (P = 0.835). The independent factors influencing the M value were waistline and fasting insulin level (FINS). The simple insulin sensitivity indices, especially Matsuda and Gutt index, were significantly associated with the M value (P < 0.01). Conclusion. IR existed in the HINS, IGT, and T2DM groups, and IR levels were consistent in the three groups. The independent factors influencing IR were waistline and FINS. PMID:26770991

  13. The impact of ageing, fasting and high-fat diet on central and peripheral glucose tolerance and glucose-sensing neural networks in the arcuate nucleus.

    PubMed

    van den Top, Marco; Zhao, Fei-Yue; Pattaranit, Ratchada; Michael, Natalie J; Munder, Astrid; Pryor, Jack T; Renaud, Leo P; Spanswick, David

    2017-08-23

    Obesity and aging are risk factors for diabetes. Here we investigated effects of aging, obesity and fasting on central and peripheral glucose tolerance and on glucose-sensing neuronal function in the arcuate nucleus of rats, with a view to providing insight into central mechanisms regulating glucose homeostasis and how they change or are subject to dysfunction with aging and obesity. We show that following a glucose load, central glucose tolerance at the level of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma is significantly reduced in rats maintained on high fat diet (HFD). With aging, up to 2 years, central glucose tolerance was impaired in an age-dependent manner whilst peripheral glucose tolerance remained unaffected. Aging-induced peripheral glucose intolerance was improved by a 24 hour fast, whilst central glucose tolerance was not corrected. Pre-wean, immature animals have elevated basal plasma glucose levels and a delayed increase in central glucose levels following peripheral glucose injection compared to mature animals. Electrophysiological recording techniques revealed an energy-status-dependent role for glucose excited, inhibited and adapting neurons along with glucose-induced changes in synaptic transmission. We conclude that aging affects central whilst HFD profoundly affects central and peripheral glucose tolerance, and glucose-sensing neurons adapt function in an energy-status-dependent manner. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of physical restraint on glucose tolerance in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Shirasaki, Yasufumi; Yoshioka, Naoya; Kanazawa, Kanpei; Maekawa, Tsuyoshi; Horikawa, Tadahiro; Hayashi, Toshiaki

    2013-06-01

    Physiologic stress has been demonstrated to impair glucose tolerance. Glucose tolerance tests were performed using six cynomolgus monkeys. Chair-restrained subjects elicited higher elevations of plasma glucose and cortisol compared with squeezing device-restrained subjects. The responses to a glucose challenge are altered by different restraint procedures.

  15. Impaired glucose tolerance after brief heat exposure: a randomized crossover study in healthy young men.

    PubMed

    Faure, Cécile; Charlot, Keyne; Henri, Stéphane; Hardy-Dessources, Marie-Dominique; Hue, Olivier; Antoine-Jonville, Sophie

    2016-06-01

    A high demand on thermoregulatory processes may challenge homoeostasis, particularly regarding glucose regulation. This has been understudied, although it might concern millions of humans. The objective of this project was to examine the isolated and combined effects of experimental short-term mild heat exposure and metabolic level on glucoregulation. Two experimental randomized crossover studies were conducted. Ten healthy young men participated in study A, which comprises four sessions in a fasting state at two metabolic levels [rest and exercise at 60% of maximal oxygen uptake (O2) for 40 min] in two environmental temperatures (warm: 31°C and control: 22°C). Each session ended with an ad libitum meal, resulting in similar energy intake across sessions. In study B, 12 healthy young men underwent two 3 h oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) in warm and control environmental temperatures. Venous blood was sampled at several time points. In study A, repeated measure ANOVAs revealed higher postprandial serum glucose and insulin levels with heat exposure. Glycaemia following the OGTT was higher in the warm temperature compared with control. The kinetics of the serum glucose response to the glucose load was also affected by the environmental temperature (temperature-by-time interaction, P=0.030), with differences between the warm and control conditions observed up to 90 min after the glucose load (all P<0.033). These studies provide evidence that heat exposure alters short-term glucoregulation. The implication of this environmental factor in the physiopathology of Type 2 diabetes has yet to be investigated.

  16. Associations of lipid profiles with insulin resistance and β cell function in adults with normal glucose tolerance and different categories of impaired glucose regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xingxing; Han, Tingting; Chen, Yawen; Qiu, Huiying; Wu, Peihong; Zheng, Jun; Wang, Lihua; Liu, Wei; Hu, Yaomin

    2017-01-01

    Aims To investigate the associations of dyslipidemia with insulin resistance and β cell function in individuals with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) and different categories of impaired glucose regulation (IGR). Methods 544 subjects (365 with dyslipidemia and/or IGR and 179 with normal lipid and glucose tolerance) were enrolled in the study. All subjects underwent oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). HOMA-IR was used to evaluate insulin sensitivity. Disposition index (DI) was used to evaluate β cell function. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to assess correlations among lipid profiles, insulin resistance and β cell function. Results Among subjects with NGT, those with dyslipidemia had higher level of HOMA-IR but lower level of DI. While among subjects with different categories of IGR, those with dyslipidemia and CGI had significantly decreased DI. No obvious differences of insulin resistance or β cell function were found in IFG or IGT subjects with or without dyslipidemia. TG and HDL-C were correlated with HOMA-IR (β = 0.79, p <0.001; β = -0.38, p = 0.027, respectively, compared with subjects in the low level groups). Moreover, TG and TC were negatively correlated with DI (β = -2.17, p = 0.013; β = -2.01, p = 0.034 respectively, compared with subjects in the low level groups) after adjusting for confounding parameters. Conclusions Dyslipidemia induces insulin resistance and impaired β cell response to insulin resistance in individuals with NGT. Furthermore, dyslipidemia diminishes β cell function in subjects with CGI. TG and HDL-C were correlated with insulin resistance, and TG, TC were negatively correlated with β cell response to insulin resistance in non-diabetic individuals. PMID:28199386

  17. The Relationships between Metabolic Disorders (Hypertension, Dyslipidemia, and Impaired Glucose Tolerance) and Computed Tomography-Based Indices of Hepatic Steatosis or Visceral Fat Accumulation in Middle-Aged Japanese Men

    PubMed Central

    Yokokawa, Hirohide; Naito, Toshio; Sasabe, Noriko; Okumura, Mitsue; Iijima, Kimiko; Shibuya, Katsuhiko; Hisaoka, Teruhiko; Fukuda, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Background Most studies on the relationships between metabolic disorders (hypertension, dyslipidemia, and impaired glucose tolerance) and hepatic steatosis (HS) or visceral fat accumulation (VFA) have been cross-sectional, and thus, these relationships remain unclear. We conducted a retrospective cohort study to clarify the relationships between components of metabolic disorders and HS/VFA. Methods The participants were 615 middle-aged men who were free from serious liver disorders, diabetes, and HS/VFA and underwent multiple general health check-ups at our institution between 2009 and 2013. The data from the initial and final check-ups were used. HS and VFA were assessed by computed tomography. HS was defined as a liver to spleen attenuation ratio of ≤1.0. VFA was defined as a visceral fat cross-sectional area of ≥100 cm2 at the level of the navel. Metabolic disorders were defined using Japan’s metabolic syndrome diagnostic criteria. The participants were divided into four groups based on the presence (+) or absence (-) of HS/VFA. The onset rates of each metabolic disorder were compared among the four groups. Results Among the participants, 521, 55, 24, and 15 were classified as HS(-)/VFA(-), HS(-)/VFA(+), HS(+)/VFA(-), and HS(+)/VFA(+), respectively, at the end of the study. Impaired glucose tolerance was more common among the participants that exhibited HS or VFA (p = 0.05). On the other hand, dyslipidemia was more common among the participants that displayed VFA (p = 0.01). Conclusions It is likely that VFA is associated with impaired glucose tolerance and dyslipidemia, while HS might be associated with impaired glucose tolerance. Unfortunately, our study failed to detect associations between HS/VFA and metabolic disorders due to the low number of subjects that exhibited fat accumulation. Although our observational study had major limitations, we consider that it obtained some interesting results. HS and VFA might affect different metabolic disorders

  18. Long-Term Feeding of Chitosan Ameliorates Glucose and Lipid Metabolism in a High-Fructose-Diet-Impaired Rat Model of Glucose Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shing-Hwa; Cai, Fang-Ying; Chiang, Meng-Tsan

    2015-12-10

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of long-term feeding of chitosan on plasma glucose and lipids in rats fed a high-fructose (HF) diet (63.1%). Male Sprague-Dawley rats aged seven weeks were used as experimental animals. Rats were divided into three groups: (1) normal group (normal); (2) HF group; (3) chitosan + HF group (HF + C). The rats were fed the experimental diets and drinking water ad libitum for 21 weeks. The results showed that chitosan (average molecular weight was about 3.8 × 10⁵ Dalton and degree of deacetylation was about 89.8%) significantly decreased body weight, paraepididymal fat mass, and retroperitoneal fat mass weight, but elevated the lipolysis rate in retroperitoneal fats of HF diet-fed rats. Supplementation of chitosan causes a decrease in plasma insulin, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, Interleukin (IL)-6, and leptin, and an increase in plasma adiponectin. The HF diet increased hepatic lipids. However, intake of chitosan reduced the accumulation of hepatic lipids, including total cholesterol (TC) and triglyceride (TG) contents. In addition, chitosan elevated the excretion of fecal lipids in HF diet-fed rats. Furthermore, chitosan significantly decreased plasma TC, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-C), the TC/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) ratio, and increased the HDL-C/(LDL-C + VLDL-C) ratio, but elevated the plasma TG and free fatty acids concentrations in HF diet-fed rats. Plasma angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4) protein expression was not affected by the HF diet, but it was significantly increased in chitosan-supplemented, HF-diet-fed rats. The high-fructose diet induced an increase in plasma glucose and impaired glucose tolerance, but chitosan supplementation decreased plasma glucose and improved impairment of glucose tolerance and insulin tolerance. Taken together, these results indicate that supplementation with chitosan can improve the impairment of

  19. An elevated 1-h post- load glucose level during the oral glucose tolerance test detects prediabetes.

    PubMed

    Buysschaert, Martin; Bergman, Michael; Yanogo, Donald; Jagannathan, Ram; Buysschaert, Benoit; Preumont, Vanessa

    The objective of the study was to compare the diagnosis of dysglycemic states by conventional oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) criteria (fasting and 2-h plasma glucose) with the 1-h post-load plasma glucose level. 34 individuals (mean age: 55±13years; BMI: 27.7±6.3kg/m(2)) at risk for prediabetes were administered a 75g OGTT. Individuals with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) or prediabetes were identified according to fasting and/or 2-h plasma glucose (PG) concentrations. Subsequently, subjects were divided in 2 groups: group 1 (n=21) with a 1-h PG<155mg/dl and group 2 (n=13) with a 1-h PG≥155mg/dl. HOMA was performed to assess β-cell function and insulin sensitivity. NGT or prediabetes based on conventional criteria correlated with the 1-h PGthe 1-h PG≥155mg/dl was associated with higher HbA1c levels (6.1±0.5 vs. 5.5±0.3%, p<0.001) and significantly impaired insulin secretion and hyperbolic product (BxS) on HOMA test vs. 1-h PG<155mg/dl. The 1-h post-load plasma glucose value ≥155mg/dl is strongly associated with conventional criteria for (pre)diabetes and alterations of β-cell function. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Agrimonia pilosa Ledeb. aqueous extract improves impaired glucose tolerance in high-fat diet-fed rats by decreasing the inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hwan Hee; Nam, Song Yee; Kim, Mi Ju; Kim, Jung Bong; Choi, Jeong Sook; Kim, Haeng Ran; Lee, Young Min

    2017-09-05

    Agrimonia pilosa Ledeb. is a medicinal plant with physiological activities such as anti-cancer, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory activities and in vitro anti-diabetic activity. However, the effects of aqueous extracts from A. pilosa on insulin-resistant rats have not yet been examined. We investigated the effects of aqueous extract from A. pilosa on impaired glucose metabolism induced by a high-fat diet in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to the following groups: normal-fat diet (NF, n = 9); high-fat diet (HF, n = 9); high-fat diet with 0.1% A. pilosa aqueous extract (HFA, n = 10). Experimental diets were administered for 16 weeks. At the end of the treatment, liver and fat tissues were isolated, and serum was collected for biochemical analysis. The HF group rats had a significantly higher liver weight than the NF group rats did, and increased hepatic lipid accumulation (p < 0.05); however, supplementation with A. pilosa decreased liver weight. Blood glucose levels in the HFA group were lower than levels measured in the HF group 30, 60, and 120 min after glucose administration (p < 0.05). In addition, dietary A. pilosa supplementation decreased tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 6 levels, while increasing serum adiponectin concentrations (p < 0.05 vs. the HF group). These effects were accompanied by reduced hepatic and adipose tissue expression of inflammation-related genes such as Tnf and Il1b (p < 0.05). Our findings indicate that A. pilosa aqueous extract can ameliorate insulin resistance in high-fat diet-fed rats by decreasing the inflammatory response.

  1. Machine learning to predict rapid progression of carotid atherosclerosis in patients with impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xia; Reaven, Peter D; Saremi, Aramesh; Liu, Ninghao; Abbasi, Mohammad Ali; Liu, Huan; Migrino, Raymond Q

    2016-12-01

    Prediabetes is a major epidemic and is associated with adverse cardio-cerebrovascular outcomes. Early identification of patients who will develop rapid progression of atherosclerosis could be beneficial for improved risk stratification. In this paper, we investigate important factors impacting the prediction, using several machine learning methods, of rapid progression of carotid intima-media thickness in impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) participants. In the Actos Now for Prevention of Diabetes (ACT NOW) study, 382 participants with IGT underwent carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) ultrasound evaluation at baseline and at 15-18 months, and were divided into rapid progressors (RP, n = 39, 58 ± 17.5 μM change) and non-rapid progressors (NRP, n = 343, 5.8 ± 20 μM change, p < 0.001 versus RP). To deal with complex multi-modal data consisting of demographic, clinical, and laboratory variables, we propose a general data-driven framework to investigate the ACT NOW dataset. In particular, we first employed a Fisher Score-based feature selection method to identify the most effective variables and then proposed a probabilistic Bayes-based learning method for the prediction. Comparison of the methods and factors was conducted using area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) analyses and Brier score. The experimental results show that the proposed learning methods performed well in identifying or predicting RP. Among the methods, the performance of Naïve Bayes was the best (AUC 0.797, Brier score 0.085) compared to multilayer perceptron (0.729, 0.086) and random forest (0.642, 0.10). The results also show that feature selection has a significant positive impact on the data prediction performance. By dealing with multi-modal data, the proposed learning methods show effectiveness in predicting prediabetics at risk for rapid atherosclerosis progression. The proposed framework demonstrated utility in outcome prediction in a typical

  2. Serum metabolic variables associated with impaired glucose tolerance induced by high-fat-high-cholesterol diet in Macaca mulatta.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinli; Chen, Younan; Liu, Jingping; Yang, Guang; Zhao, Jiuming; Liao, Guangneng; Shi, Meimei; Yuan, Yujia; He, Sirong; Lu, Yanrong; Cheng, Jingqiu

    2012-11-01

    Dyslipidemia caused by 'Western-diet pattern' is a strong risk factor for the onset of diabetes. This study aimed to disclose the relationship between the serum metabolite changes induced by habitual intake of high-fat and high-cholesterol (HFHC) diet and the development of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and insulin resistance through animal models of Macaca mulatta. Sixteen M. mulatta (six months old) were fed a control diet or a HFHC diet for 18 months. The diet effect on serum metabolic profiles was investigated by longitudinal research. Islet function was assessed by intravenous glucose tolerance and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp test. Metabonomics were determined by (1)H proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Prolonged diet-dependent hyperlipidemia facilitated visceral fat accumulation in liver and skeletal muscle and disorder of glucose homeostasis in juvenile monkeys. Glucose disappearance rate (K(Glu)) and insulin response to the glucose challenge effects in HFHC monkeys were significantly lower than in control monkeys. Otherwise, serum trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), lactate and leucine/isoleucine were significantly higher in HFHC monkeys. Sphingomyelin and choline were the most positively correlated with K(Glu) (R(2) = 0.778), as well as negative correlation (R(2) = 0.64) with total cholesterol. The HFHC diet induced visceral fat, abnormal lipid metabolism and IGT prior to weight gain and body fat content increase in juvenile monkeys. We suggest that increased serum metabolites, such as TMAO, lactate, branched-chain amino acids and decreased sphingomyelin and choline, may serve as possible predictors for the evaluation of IGT and insulin resistance risks in the prediabetic state.

  3. Pioglitazone is equally effective for diabetes prevention in older versus younger adults with impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Sara E; Wang, Chen-Pin; Tripathy, Devjit; Clement, Stephen C; Schwenke, Dawn C; Banerji, Mary Ann; Bray, George A; Buchanan, Thomas A; Henry, Robert R; Kitabchi, Abbas E; Mudaliar, Sunder; Stentz, Frankie B; Reaven, Peter D; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Musi, Nicolas

    2016-12-01

    To determine the efficacy of pioglitazone to prevent type 2 diabetes in older compared to younger adults with pre-diabetes. Six hundred two participants with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) were randomized in double blind fashion to placebo or pioglitazone for diabetes prevention in the ACT NOW study (NEJM 364:1104-1115, 2011). Cox proportional hazard regression was used to compare time to development of diabetes over a mean of 2 years between older (≥61 years) and younger participants. We compared effects of pioglitazone versus placebo on metabolic profiles, inflammatory markers, adipokines, β cell function (disposition index), insulin sensitivity (Matsuda index), and body composition by ANOVA. Diabetes incidence was reduced by 85 % in older and 69 % in younger subjects (p = 0.41). β cell function (disposition index) increased by 35.0 % in the older and 26.7 % in younger subjects (p = 0.83). Insulin sensitivity (Matsuda index) increased by 3.07 (5.2-fold) in older and by 2.54 (3.8-fold) in younger participants (p = 0.58). Pioglitazone more effectively increased adiponectin in older versus younger subjects (22.9 ± 3.2 μg/mL [2.7-fold] vs. 12.7 ± 1.4 μg/mL [2.2-fold], respectively; p = 0.04). Younger subjects tended to have a greater increase in whole body fat mass compared to older subjects (3.6 vs. 3.1 kg; p = 0.061). Younger and older subjects had similar decreases in bone mineral density (0.018 ± 0.0071 vs. 0.0138 ± 0.021 g/cm(2)). Younger and older pre-diabetic adults taking pioglitazone had similar reductions in conversion to diabetes and older adults had similar or greater improvements in metabolic risk factors, demonstrating that pioglitazone is useful in preventing diabetes in older adults.

  4. Self-reported fast eating is a potent predictor of development of impaired glucose tolerance in Japanese men and women: Tsukuba Medical Center Study.

    PubMed

    Totsuka, Kumiko; Maeno, Takami; Saito, Kazumi; Kodama, Satoru; Asumi, Mihoko; Yachi, Yoko; Hiranuma, Yuri; Shimano, Hitoshi; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Ono, Yukio; Naito, Takashi; Sone, Hirohito

    2011-12-01

    We recorded self-reported eating patterns in 172 Japanese men and women who were subsequently followed for 3 years for the occurrence of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Incidence of IGT was significantly higher in those who reported eating fast. Self-reported eating fast is a potent risk factor for development of IGT.

  5. Diabetes, glucose tolerance, and the risk of sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Eranti, Antti; Kerola, Tuomas; Aro, Aapo L; Tikkanen, Jani T; Rissanen, Harri A; Anttonen, Olli; Junttila, M Juhani; Knekt, Paul; Huikuri, Heikki V

    2016-02-24

    Diabetes predisposes to sudden cardiac death (SCD). However, it is uncertain whether greater proportion of cardiac deaths are sudden among diabetes patients than other subjects. It is also unclear whether the risk of SCD is pronounced already early in the course of the disease. The relationship of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and SCD is scarcely documented. A general population cohort of 10594 middle-aged subjects (mean age 44 years, 52.6 % male, follow-up duration 35-41 years) was divided into diabetes patients (n = 82), subjects with IGT (n = 3806, plasma glucose ≥9.58 mmol/l in one-hour glucose tolerance test), and controls (n = 6706). Diabetes patients had an increased risk of SCD after adjustment confounders (hazard ratio 2.62, 95 % confidence interval 1.46-4.70, p = 0.001) but risk for non-sudden cardiac death was similarly increased and the proportion of SCD of cardiac deaths was not increased. The SCD risk persisted after exclusion of subjects with baseline cardiac disease or non-fatal cardiac events during the follow-up. Subjects with IGT were at increased risk for SCD (univariate hazard ratio 1.51; 95 % confidence interval 1.31-1.74; p < 0.001) and also for non-sudden cardiac deaths and non-fatal cardiac events but adjustments for other risk factors attenuated these effects. Diabetes was associated with increased risk of SCD but also the risk of non-sudden cardiac death was similarly increased. The proportion of cardiac deaths being sudden in subjects with diabetes was not increased. The higher SCD risk in diabetes patients was independent of known cardiac disease at baseline or occurrence of non-fatal cardiac event during the follow-up.

  6. Association between HbA1c and peripheral neuropathy in a 10-year follow-up study of people with normal glucose tolerance, impaired glucose tolerance and Type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Peterson, M; Pingel, R; Lagali, N; Dahlin, L B; Rolandsson, O

    2017-09-20

    To explore the association between HbA1c and sural nerve function in a group of people with normal glucose tolerance, impaired glucose tolerance or Type 2 diabetes. We conducted a 10-year follow-up study in 87 out of an original 119 participants. At study commencement (2004), 64 men and 55 women (mean age 61.1 years) with normal glucose tolerance (n=39), impaired glucose tolerance (n=29), or Type 2 diabetes (n=51) were enrolled. At the 2014 follow-up (men, n=46, women, n=41; mean age 71.1 years), 36, nine and 42 participants in the normal glucose tolerance, impaired glucose tolerance and Type 2 diabetes categories, respectively, were re-tested. Biometric data and blood samples were collected, with an electrophysiological examination performed on both occasions. At follow-up, we measured the amplitude of the sural nerve in 74 of the 87 participants. The mean amplitude had decreased from 10.9 μV (2004) to 7.0 μV (2014; P<0.001). A 1% increase in HbA1c was associated with a ~1% average decrease in the amplitude of the sural nerve, irrespective of group classification. Crude and adjusted estimates ranged from -0.84 (95% CI -1.32, -0.37) to -1.25 (95% CI -2.31, -0.18). Although the mean conduction velocity of those measured at both occasions (n=73) decreased from 47.6 m/s to 45.8 m/s (P=0.009), any association with HbA1c level was weak. Results were robust with regard to potential confounders and missing data. Our data suggest an association between sural nerve amplitude and HbA1c  at all levels of HbA1c . Decreased amplitude was more pronounced than was diminished conduction velocity, supporting the notion that axonal degeneration is an earlier and more prominent effect of hyperglycaemia than demyelination. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Gestational diabetes and gestational impaired glucose tolerance in 1653 teenage pregnancies: prevalence, risk factors and pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Karcaaltincaba, Deniz; Buyukkaragoz, Bahar; Kandemir, Omer; Yalvac, Serdar; Kıykac-Altınbaş, Sadiman; Haberal, Ali

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and gestational impaired glucose tolerance (GIGT) in adolescent pregnancies, associated risk factors, and pregnancy complications. Retrospective study. Community-based teaching hospital. Results of 1653 pregnant women age ≤ 19 years in 2005-2007 were reviewed. All pregnant women screened with 50-g glucose challenge test (GCT) and patients with a GCT result ≥ 140 mg/dl underwent a 3-hour 100-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). GDM was diagnosed with at least two abnormal results and GIGT was diagnosed with one abnormal result. GDM and GIGT cases were evaluated for the presence of any associated risk factors and effects of presence of risk factors on pregnancy outcomes. The prevalence of GDM was 0.85% (95% CI, 0.41-1.29), GIGT was 0.5% (95% CI, 0.15-0.81) and GDM+GIGT was 1.35% (95% CI, 0.78-1.88) by Carpenter and Coustan criteria. 68% of patients had at least one of the risk factors including body mass index ≥ 25, family history of diabetes and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Only 9.1% (n = 2) of them required insulin for glucose regulation during pregnancy with 9.1% (n = 2) macrosomia rate. All patients were primiparous and cesarean delivery rate was 27.3% (n = 6). We could not find any effect of presence of risk factors on pregnancy outcomes in GDM and GIGT cases. We demonstrated that GDM and GIGT are strongly associated with high BMI before pregnancy, PCOS, and family history of diabetes. Since GDM is a state of prediabetes, it is important to diagnose in adolescent pregnancies considering their life expectancy to take preventive measures to avoid diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2011 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of pioglitazone on visceral fat metabolic activity in impaired glucose tolerance or type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Norihiro; Tahara, Nobuhiro; Tahara, Atsuko; Honda, Akihiro; Nitta, Yoshikazu; Mizoguchi, Minori; Kaida, Hayato; Ishibashi, Masatoshi; Abe, Toshi; Ikeda, Hisao; Narula, Jagat; Fukumoto, Yoshihiro; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi; Imaizumi, Tsutomu

    2013-11-01

    Excess visceral fat is associated with chronic systemic inflammation and cardiovascular complications. Pioglitazone has been reported to variably influence visceral fat volume; however, its effect on metabolic activity of the visceral fat remains uncharacterized. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of pioglitazone on glucose metabolism of fat tissue by using (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography imaging. FDG-PET and computed tomography imaging were performed in 56 patients with impaired glucose tolerance or type 2 diabetes mellitus; lipid and glycemic profiles and inflammatory biomarkers were obtained in all patients. These patients were randomized to treatment with either pioglitazone or glimepiride for 16 weeks. The metabolic activity of the visceral fat tissues as assessed by FDG uptake was expressed as a target-to-background ratio (TBR) of blood-normalized standardized uptake value. The study was completed in 32 pioglitazone-treated and 21 glimepiride-treated patients (40 men and 13 women; mean age, 67.7 ± 8.1 y; body mass index, 25.0 ± 3.6 kg/m(2); glycated hemoglobin, 6.78 ± 0.70%). Both treatments were well-tolerated and comparably improved glycemic control. At baseline, visceral fat exhibited a higher TBR value than subcutaneous fat (0.55 ± 0.14 vs 0.30 ± 0.07, P < .001). Pioglitazone, but not glimepiride, significantly decreased the visceral fat volume (130.5 ± 53.0 to 122.1 ± 51.0 cm(2), P = .013) and TBR values (0.57 ± 0.16 to 0.50 ± 0.11, P = .007). Neither pioglitazone nor glimepiride treatment showed any effect on the volume or TBR values of subcutaneous fat. After 16 weeks of treatment with pioglitazone, reduction in visceral fat TBR was correlated to the increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Our study indicated that pioglitazone decreased the visceral fat volume and its metabolic activity in patients with impaired glucose tolerance or type 2 diabetes mellitus

  9. Glucose tolerance test - non-pregnant

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/003466.htm Glucose tolerance test - non-pregnant To use the sharing features on this ... is broken) Alternative Names Oral glucose tolerance test - non-pregnant; OGTT - non-pregnant; Diabetes - glucose tolerance test; ...

  10. Obese Neuronal PPARγ Knockout Mice Are Leptin Sensitive but Show Impaired Glucose Tolerance and Fertility.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Marina O; Sharma, Shweta; Kim, Sun; Rickert, Emily; Hsueh, Katherine; Hwang, Vicky; Olefsky, Jerrold M; Webster, Nicholas J G

    2017-01-01

    The peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is expressed in the hypothalamus in areas involved in energy homeostasis and glucose metabolism. In this study, we created a deletion of PPARγ brain-knockout (BKO) in mature neurons in female mice to investigate its involvement in metabolism and reproduction. We observed that there was no difference in age at puberty onset between female BKOs and littermate controls, but the BKOs gave smaller litters when mated and fewer oocytes when ovulated. The female BKO mice had regular cycles but showed an increase in the number of cycles with prolonged estrus. The mice also had increased luteinizing hormone (LH) levels during the LH surge and histological examination showed hemorrhagic corpora lutea. The mice were challenged with a 60% high-fat diet (HFD). Metabolically, the female BKO mice showed normal body weight, glucose and insulin tolerance, and leptin levels but were protected from obesity-induced leptin resistance. The neuronal knockout also prevented the reduction in estrous cycles due to the HFD. Examination of ovarian histology showed a decrease in the number of primary and secondary follicles in both genotypes due to the HFD, but the BKO ovaries showed an increase in the number of hemorrhagic follicles. In summary, our results show that neuronal PPARγ is required for optimal female fertility but is also involved in the adverse effects of diet-induced obesity by creating leptin resistance potentially through induction of the repressor Socs3. Copyright © 2017 by the Endocrine Society.

  11. Adaptations to exercise training within skeletal muscle in adults with type 2 diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Simar, David; Fiatarone Singh, Maria A

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to review morphological and metabolic adaptations within skeletal muscle to exercise training in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). A comprehensive, systematic database search for manuscripts was performed from 1966 to March 2008 using computerized databases, including Medline, Premedline, CINAHL, AMED, EMBASE and SportDiscus. Three reviewers independently assessed studies for potential inclusion (exposure to exercise training, T2DM or IGT, muscle biopsy performed). A total of 18 exercise training studies were reviewed. All morphological and metabolic outcomes from muscle biopsies were collected. The metabolic outcomes were divided into six domains: glycogen, glucose facilitated transporter 4 (GLUT4) and insulin signalling, enzymes, markers of inflammation, lipids metabolism and so on. Beneficial adaptations to exercise were seen primarily in muscle fiber area and capillary density, glycogen, glycogen synthase and GLUT4 protein expressions. Few randomized controlled trials including muscle biopsy data existed, with a small number of subjects involved. More trials, especially robustly designed exercise training studies, are needed in this field. Future research should focus on the insulin signalling pathway to better understand the mechanism of the improvements in insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis in response to various modalities and doses of exercise in this cohort.

  12. Impact of exercise on diurnal and nocturnal markers of glycaemic variability and oxidative stress in obese individuals with type 2 diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Farabi, Sarah S; Carley, David W; Smith, Donald; Quinn, Lauretta

    2015-09-01

    We measured the effects of a single bout of exercise on diurnal and nocturnal oxidative stress and glycaemic variability in obese subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus or impaired glucose tolerance versus obese healthy controls. Subjects (in random order) performed either a single 30-min bout of moderate-intensity exercise or remained sedentary for 30 min at two separate visits. To quantify glycaemic variability, standard deviation of glucose (measured by continuous glucose monitoring system) and continuous overlapping net glycaemic action of 1-h intervals (CONGA-1) were calculated for three 12-h intervals during each visit. Oxidative stress was measured by 15-isoprostane F(2t) levels in urine collections for matching 12-h intervals. Exercise reduced daytime glycaemic variability (ΔCONGA-1 = -12.62 ± 5.31 mg/dL, p = 0.04) and urinary isoprostanes (ΔCONGA-1 = -0.26 ± 0.12 ng/mg, p = 0.04) in the type 2 diabetes mellitus/impaired glucose tolerance group. Daytime exercise-induced change in urinary 15-isoprostane F(2t) was significantly correlated with both daytime standard deviation (r = 0.68, p = 0.03) and with subsequent overnight standard deviation (r = 0.73, p = 0.027) in the type 2 diabetes mellitus/impaired glucose tolerance group. Exercise significantly impacts the relationship between diurnal oxidative stress and nocturnal glycaemic variability in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus/impaired glucose tolerance. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Glucose Tolerance and Hyperkinesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langseth, Lillian; Dowd, Judith

    Examined were medical records of 265 hyperkinetic children (7-9 years old). Clinical blood chemistries, hematology, and 5-hour glucose tolerance test (GTT) results indicated that hematocrit levels were low in 27% of the Ss, eosinophil levels were abnormally high in 86% of the Ss, and GTT results were abnormal in a maority of Ss. (CL)

  14. Glucose Tolerance and Hyperkinesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langseth, Lillian; Dowd, Judith

    Examined were medical records of 265 hyperkinetic children (7-9 years old). Clinical blood chemistries, hematology, and 5-hour glucose tolerance test (GTT) results indicated that hematocrit levels were low in 27% of the Ss, eosinophil levels were abnormally high in 86% of the Ss, and GTT results were abnormal in a maority of Ss. (CL)

  15. Triglycerides to High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Ratio Can Predict Impaired Glucose Tolerance in Young Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Song, Do Kyeong; Lee, Hyejin; Sung, Yeon-Ah

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The triglycerides to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (TG/HDL-C) ratio could be related to insulin resistance (IR). We previously reported that Korean women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) had a high prevalence of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). We aimed to determine the cutoff value of the TG/HDL-C ratio for predicting IR and to examine whether the TG/HDL-C ratio is useful for identifying individuals at risk of IGT in young Korean women with PCOS. Materials and Methods We recruited 450 women with PCOS (24±5 yrs) and performed a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). IR was assessed by a homeostasis model assessment index over that of the 95th percentile of regular-cycling women who served as the controls (n=450, 24±4 yrs). Results The cutoff value of the TG/HDL-C ratio for predicting IR was 2.5 in women with PCOS. Among the women with PCOS who had normal fasting glucose (NFG), the prevalence of IGT was significantly higher in the women with PCOS who had a high TG/HDL-C ratio compared with those with a low TG/HDL-C ratio (15.6% vs. 5.6%, p<0.05). Conclusion The cutoff value of the TG/HDL-C ratio for predicting IR was 2.5 in young Korean women with PCOS, and women with NFG and a high TG/HDL-C ratio had a higher prevalence of IGT. Therefore, Korean women with PCOS with a TG/HDL-C ratio >2.5 are recommended to be administered an OGTT to detect IGT even if they have NFG. PMID:27593868

  16. Triglycerides to High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Ratio Can Predict Impaired Glucose Tolerance in Young Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Song, Do Kyeong; Lee, Hyejin; Sung, Yeon Ah; Oh, Jee Young

    2016-11-01

    The triglycerides to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (TG/HDL-C) ratio could be related to insulin resistance (IR). We previously reported that Korean women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) had a high prevalence of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). We aimed to determine the cutoff value of the TG/HDL-C ratio for predicting IR and to examine whether the TG/HDL-C ratio is useful for identifying individuals at risk of IGT in young Korean women with PCOS. We recruited 450 women with PCOS (24±5 yrs) and performed a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). IR was assessed by a homeostasis model assessment index over that of the 95th percentile of regular-cycling women who served as the controls (n=450, 24±4 yrs). The cutoff value of the TG/HDL-C ratio for predicting IR was 2.5 in women with PCOS. Among the women with PCOS who had normal fasting glucose (NFG), the prevalence of IGT was significantly higher in the women with PCOS who had a high TG/HDL-C ratio compared with those with a low TG/HDL-C ratio (15.6% vs. 5.6%, p<0.05). The cutoff value of the TG/HDL-C ratio for predicting IR was 2.5 in young Korean women with PCOS, and women with NFG and a high TG/HDL-C ratio had a higher prevalence of IGT. Therefore, Korean women with PCOS with a TG/HDL-C ratio >2.5 are recommended to be administered an OGTT to detect IGT even if they have NFG.

  17. Glucose effectiveness is the major determinant of intravenous glucose tolerance in the rat.

    PubMed

    McArthur, M D; You, D; Klapstein, K; Finegood, D T

    1999-04-01

    To determine the importance of insulin for glucose disposal during an intravenous glucose tolerance test in rats, experiments were performed in four cohorts of conscious unrestrained rats fasted overnight. In cohorts 1-3, a bolus of tracer ([3-3H]glucose, 50 microCi) was given alone, with glucose (0.3 g/kg) to induce an endogenous insulin response (approximately 1,100 pmol/l), or with exogenous insulin to give physiological (1,700 pmol/l) or supraphysiological (12,000 pmol/l) plasma levels. Raising plasma insulin within the physiological range had no effect (P > 0.05), but supraphysiological levels induced hypoglycemia (7.3 +/- 0.2 to 3.6 +/- 0.2 mmol/l) and increased [3H]glucose disappearance rate (P < 0.001). In cohort 4, a primed, continuous tracer infusion was started 120 min before saline or glucose bolus injection. [3H]glucose levels fell 15-20%, and the disappearance rate rose 36% (P < 0.05) after glucose injection. These results indicate that in fasted rats a tracer bolus injection protocol is not sufficiently sensitive to measure the physiological effect of insulin released in response to a bolus of glucose because this effect of insulin is small. Glucose itself is the predominant mediator of glucose disposal after a bolus of glucose in the fasted rat.

  18. Oligomeric cocoa procyanidins possess enhanced bioactivity compared to monomeric and polymeric cocoa procyanidins for preventing the development of obesity, insulin resistance, and impaired glucose tolerance during high-fat feeding.

    PubMed

    Dorenkott, Melanie R; Griffin, Laura E; Goodrich, Katheryn M; Thompson-Witrick, Katherine A; Fundaro, Gabrielle; Ye, Liyun; Stevens, Joseph R; Ali, Mostafa; O'Keefe, Sean F; Hulver, Matthew W; Neilson, Andrew P

    2014-03-12

    There is interest in the potential of cocoa flavanols, including monomers and procyanidins, to prevent obesity and type-2 diabetes. Fermentation and processing of cocoa beans influence the qualitative and quantitative profiles of individual cocoa constituents. Little is known regarding how different cocoa flavanols contribute to inhibition of obesity and type-2 diabetes. The objective of this study was to compare the impacts of long-term dietary exposure to cocoa flavanol monomers, oligomers, and polymers on the effects of high-fat feeding. Mice were fed a high-fat diet supplemented with either a cocoa flavanol extract or a flavanol fraction enriched with monomeric, oligomeric, or polymeric procyanidins for 12 weeks. The oligomer-rich fraction proved to be most effective in preventing weight gain, fat mass, impaired glucose tolerance, and insulin resistance in this model. This is the first long-term feeding study to examine the relative activities of cocoa constituents on diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance.

  19. Effects of Nordic walking on health-related quality of life in overweight individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus, impaired or normal glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Fritz, T; Caidahl, K; Osler, M; Ostenson, C G; Zierath, J R; Wändell, P

    2011-11-01

    To assess the effects of 4 months of increased physical activity on health-related quality of life in overweight individuals with Type 2 diabetes mellitus, normal or impaired glucose tolerance. We included 212 individuals without severe physical or cardiovascular impairments aged 61 (57-64) years, with BMI of 29 (27.5-32) kg/m². Numbers are median (25th-75th percentile). Subjects were stratified based on normal glucose tolerance (n = 128), impaired glucose tolerance (n = 34) or Type 2 diabetes mellitus (n = 50). They were randomized into either a control group (n= 125), who maintained unaltered habitual lifestyle, or an exercise intervention group (n = 87), who were directed to engage in Nordic walking with walking poles, 5 h per week over 4 months. Self-reported physical activity and health-related quality of life was assessed at the time of inclusion and after 4 months. Baseline health-related quality of life of this study cohort was similar to, or better than, an age- and sex-matched Swedish population sample, for 12 of 13 scales. Quality of sleep and BMI were improved for participants with normal glucose tolerance after 4 months of Nordic walking, with little or no musculoskeletal pain as compared with control subjects. No correlation was evident between improved quality of sleep and improved BMI. Quality of sleep improved in the group with normal glucose tolerance following 4 months of Nordic walking. BMI reduction did not account for this improvement. Nordic walking can be introduced in a primary health care setting as a low-cost mode of exercise that promotes weight loss and improved health satisfaction. © 2011 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2011 Diabetes UK.

  20. The impact of low and no-caloric sweeteners on glucose absorption, incretin secretion and glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Chan, Catherine B; Hashemi, Zohre; Subhan, Fatheema Begum

    2017-04-13

    The consumption of non-nutritive, low or no-calorie sweeteners (LCS) is increasing globally. Previously thought to be physiologically inert, there is a growing body of evidence that LCS not only provide a sweet taste but may also elicit metabolic effects in the gastrointestinal tract. This review provides a brief overview of the chemical and receptor-binding properties and effects on chemosensation of different LCS but focuses on the extent to which LCS stimulates glucose transport, incretin and insulin secretion, and effects on glucose tolerance. Aspartame and sucralose both bind to a similar region of the sweet receptor. For sucralose, the data are contradictory regarding effects on glucose tolerance in humans and may depend on the food or beverage matrix and the duration of administration, as suggested by longer-term rodent studies. For aspartame, there are fewer data. On the other hand, acesulfame-potassium (Ace-K) and saccharin have similar binding characteristics to each other but, while Ace-K may increase incretin secretion and glucose responses in humans, there are no data on saccharin except in rats, which show impaired glucose tolerance after chronic administration. Additional research, particularly of the effects of chronic consumption, is needed to provide concrete evidence for beneficial or detrimental effects of LCS on blood glucose regulation in humans.

  1. Increased Short-Term Beat-to-Beat QT Interval Variability in Patients with Impaired Glucose Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Orosz, Andrea; Baczkó, István; Nyiraty, Szabolcs; Körei, Anna E; Putz, Zsuzsanna; Takács, Róbert; Nemes, Attila; Várkonyi, Tamás T; Balogh, László; Ábrahám, György; Kempler, Péter; Papp, Julius Gy; Varró, András; Lengyel, Csaba

    2017-01-01

    Prediabetic states and diabetes are important risk factors for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Determination of short-term QT interval variability (STVQT) is a non-invasive method for assessment of proarrhythmic risk. The aim of the study was to evaluate the STVQT in patients with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). 18 IGT patients [age: 63 ± 11 years, body mass index (BMI): 31 ± 6 kg/m(2), fasting glucose: 6.0 ± 0.4 mmol/l, 120 min postload glucose: 9.0 ± 1.0 mmol/l, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c): 5.9 ± 0.4%; mean ± SD] and 18 healthy controls (age: 56 ± 9 years, BMI: 27 ± 5 kg/m(2), fasting glucose: 5.2 ± 0.4 mmol/l, 120 min postload glucose: 5.5 ± 1.3 mmol/l, HbA1c: 5.4 ± 0.3%) were enrolled into the study. ECGs were recorded, processed, and analyzed off-line. The RR and QT intervals were expressed as the average of 30 consecutive beats, the temporal instability of beat-to-beat repolarization was characterized by calculating STVQT as follows: STVQT = Σ|QTn + 1 - QTn| (30x√2)(-1). Autonomic function was assessed by means of standard cardiovascular reflex tests. There were no differences between IGT and control groups in QT (411 ± 43 vs 402 ± 39 ms) and QTc (431 ± 25 vs 424 ± 19 ms) intervals or QT dispersion (44 ± 13 vs 42 ± 17 ms). However, STVQT was significantly higher in IGT patients (5.0 ± 0.7 vs 3.7 ± 0.7, P < 0.0001). The elevated temporal STVQT in patients with IGT may be an early indicator of increased instability of cardiac repolarization during prediabetic conditions.

  2. Comparable Attenuation of Sympathetic Nervous System Activity in Obese Subjects with Normal Glucose Tolerance, Impaired Glucose Tolerance, and Treatment Naïve Type 2 Diabetes following Equivalent Weight Loss

    PubMed Central

    Straznicky, Nora E.; Grima, Mariee T.; Sari, Carolina I.; Lambert, Elisabeth A.; Phillips, Sarah E.; Eikelis, Nina; Mariani, Justin A.; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Hering, Dagmara; Dixon, John B.; Lambert, Gavin W.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Elevated sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity is a characteristic of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) that contributes to target organ damage and cardiovascular risk. In this study we examined whether baseline metabolic status influences the degree of sympathoinhibition attained following equivalent dietary weight loss. Methods: Un-medicated obese individuals categorized as normal glucose tolerant (NGT, n = 15), impaired glucose tolerant (IGT, n = 24), and newly-diagnosed T2D (n = 15) consumed a hypocaloric diet (29% fat, 23% protein, 45% carbohydrate) for 4-months. The three groups were matched for baseline age (56 ± 1 years), body mass index (BMI, 32.9 ± 0.7 kg/m2), and gender. Clinical measurements included whole-body norepinephrine kinetics, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA, by microneurography), spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), and oral glucose tolerance test. Results: Weight loss averaged −7.5 ± 0.8, −8.1 ± 0.5, and −8.0 ± 0.9% of body weight in NGT, IGT, and T2D groups, respectively. T2D subjects had significantly greater reductions in fasting glucose, 2-h glucose and glucose area under the curve (AUC0−120) compared to NGT and IGT (group effect, P <0.001). Insulinogenic index decreased in IGT and NGT groups and increased in T2D (group × time, P = 0.04). The magnitude of reduction in MSNA (−7 ± 3, −8 ± 4, −15 ± 4 burst/100 hb, respectively) and whole-body norepinephrine spillover rate (−28 ± 8, −18 ± 6, and −25 ± 7%, respectively), time effect both P <0.001, did not differ between groups. After adjustment for age and change in body weight, Δ insulin AUC0−120 was independently associated with reduction in arterial norepinephrine concentration, whilst Δ LDL-cholesterol and improvement in BRS were independently associated with decrease in MSNA. Conclusions: Equivalent weight loss through hypocaloric diet is accompanied by similar sympathoinhibition in matched obese subjects

  3. Comparable Attenuation of Sympathetic Nervous System Activity in Obese Subjects with Normal Glucose Tolerance, Impaired Glucose Tolerance, and Treatment Naïve Type 2 Diabetes following Equivalent Weight Loss.

    PubMed

    Straznicky, Nora E; Grima, Mariee T; Sari, Carolina I; Lambert, Elisabeth A; Phillips, Sarah E; Eikelis, Nina; Mariani, Justin A; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Hering, Dagmara; Dixon, John B; Lambert, Gavin W

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Elevated sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity is a characteristic of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) that contributes to target organ damage and cardiovascular risk. In this study we examined whether baseline metabolic status influences the degree of sympathoinhibition attained following equivalent dietary weight loss. Methods: Un-medicated obese individuals categorized as normal glucose tolerant (NGT, n = 15), impaired glucose tolerant (IGT, n = 24), and newly-diagnosed T2D (n = 15) consumed a hypocaloric diet (29% fat, 23% protein, 45% carbohydrate) for 4-months. The three groups were matched for baseline age (56 ± 1 years), body mass index (BMI, 32.9 ± 0.7 kg/m(2)), and gender. Clinical measurements included whole-body norepinephrine kinetics, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA, by microneurography), spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), and oral glucose tolerance test. Results: Weight loss averaged -7.5 ± 0.8, -8.1 ± 0.5, and -8.0 ± 0.9% of body weight in NGT, IGT, and T2D groups, respectively. T2D subjects had significantly greater reductions in fasting glucose, 2-h glucose and glucose area under the curve (AUC0-120) compared to NGT and IGT (group effect, P <0.001). Insulinogenic index decreased in IGT and NGT groups and increased in T2D (group × time, P = 0.04). The magnitude of reduction in MSNA (-7 ± 3, -8 ± 4, -15 ± 4 burst/100 hb, respectively) and whole-body norepinephrine spillover rate (-28 ± 8, -18 ± 6, and -25 ± 7%, respectively), time effect both P <0.001, did not differ between groups. After adjustment for age and change in body weight, Δ insulin AUC0-120 was independently associated with reduction in arterial norepinephrine concentration, whilst Δ LDL-cholesterol and improvement in BRS were independently associated with decrease in MSNA. Conclusions: Equivalent weight loss through hypocaloric diet is accompanied by similar sympathoinhibition in matched obese subjects with different

  4. The effect of low-oestrogen combined pill, progestogen-only pill and medroxyprogesterone acetate on oral glucose tolerance test.

    PubMed

    Kamau, R K; Maina, F W; Kigondu, C; Mati, J K

    1990-08-01

    The effect of a low-oestrogen combined pill, progestogen-only pill and medroxyprogesterone acetate on oral glucose tolerance test was studied in 29, 30 and 9 indigenous Kenyan women respectively. Glucose tolerance test was performed before treatment was started and then after 1,3 and 6 months in microgynon users. The mean areas under the glucose curves were also significantly elevated. Significant increase in blood glucose values were noted only at 30 minutes after 6 months of use of the progestogen-only oral contraceptive but the mean blood glucose values were higher than in the control after 1,3 and 6 months of use. However, the mean values of the areas under the glucose curves were significantly elevated after 1,3, and 6 months of use. Medroxyprogesterone acetate users showed significantly lower fasting blood glucose values at 60 and 90 minutes after 1 month of use, after which the blood glucose values returned to the pre-treatment values. The mean values of the glucose curve areas showed no significant change. It is concluded that both microgynon and minipill cause relative impairment of glucose tolerance test as early as after 1 month of use. Medroxyprogesterone acetate does not impair oral glucose tolerance for at least the first 6 months of use. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  5. Autoreactive human T-cell receptor initiates insulitis and impaired glucose tolerance in HLA DR4 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Gebe, John A; Unrath, Kellee A; Yue, Betty B; Miyake, Tom; Falk, Ben A; Nepom, Gerald T

    2008-06-01

    A human T-cell receptor (TcR) derived from an autoreactive T-cell specific for GAD65, from a subject at high risk for autoimmune diabetes, was introduced into HLA-DR4 transgenic mice. The source of TcR was a CD4(+) T(H)1(+) T-cell clone which responded to an immunodominant epitope of the human islet protein GAD65, an epitope shared with both GAD65 and GAD67 in the mouse. The resulting HLA-DR4/GAD-TcR transgenic mice on a Rag2(o/o)/I-Ab(o/o)/B6 background exhibited a CD4(+) infiltrate into pancreatic islets that correlated with a loss of insulin in infiltrated islets. These mice also exhibited a subclinical impaired tolerance to exogenously fed glucose as assayed by an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. T cells containing the GAD65/67 (555-567) responsive TcR undergo strong negative selection as evidenced by a 10-fold lower thymocyte cellularity compared to non-TcR transgenic mice, and clonotype peripheral T cells represented approximately 1% of CD4(+) T cells in Rag2 sufficient mice. Upon in vitro stimulation, GAD65/67 555-567 responsive T cells secrete interferon-gamma, minimal interleukin (IL)-2 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and no IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, or IL-17, consistent with a T(H)1 profile. These data demonstrate that CD4(+) T cells specific for a naturally processed epitope within GAD can specifically home to pancreatic islets and lead to impaired islet beta-cell function in diabetes-associated HLA-DR4 transgenic mice on the relatively non-autoimmune C57BL/6 background. The relatively slow progression and patchy insulitis are reminiscent of the chronic pre-clinical phase similar to a majority of human at-risk subjects, and models these indolent features of human T1D.

  6. Triglycerides-to-HDL cholesterol ratio as screening tool for impaired glucose tolerance in obese children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Manco, Melania; Grugni, Graziano; Di Pietro, Mario; Balsamo, Antonio; Di Candia, Stefania; Morino, Giuseppe Stefano; Franzese, Adriana; Di Bonito, Procolo; Maffeis, Claudio; Valerio, Giuliana

    2016-06-01

    To identify metabolic phenotypes at increased risk of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) in Italian overweight/obese children (n = 148, age 5-10 years) and adolescents (n = 531, age 10-17.9 year). Phenotypes were defined as follows: obesity by the 95th cut-points of the Center for Disease Control body mass index reference standards, impaired fasting glucose (fasting plasma glucose ≥100 mg/dl), high circulating triglycerides (TG), TG/HDL cholesterol ≥2.2, waist-to-height ratio (WTHR) >0.6, and combination of the latter with high TG or TG/HDL cholesterol ≥2.2. In the 148 obese children, TG/HDL-C ≥ 2.2 (OR 20.19; 95 % CI 2.50-163.28, p = 0.005) and the combination of TG/HDL-C ≥ 2.2 and WTHR > 0.60 (OR 14.97; 95 % CI 2.18-102.76, p = 0.006) were significantly associated with IGT. In the 531 adolescents, TG/HDL-C ≥ 2.2 (OR 1.991; 95 % CI 1.243-3.191, p = 0.004) and the combination with WTHR > 0.60 (OR 2.24; 95 % CI 1.29-3.87, p = 0.004) were associated with significantly increased risk of IGT. In the whole sample, having high TG levels according to the NIH National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute Expert Panel was not associated with an increased risk of presenting IGT. TG/HDL-C ratio can be useful, particularly in children, to identify obese young patients at risk of IGT. Its accuracy as screening tool in a general population needs to be verified. The combination of TG/HDL-C ratio and WTHR > 0.6 did not improve prediction. Having high TG according to the NIH definition was not associated with increased risk of developing IGT.

  7. Cost-Effectiveness of a Short Message Service Intervention to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes from Impaired Glucose Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wong, Carlos K H; Jiao, Fang-Fang; Siu, Shing-Chung; Fung, Colman S C; Fong, Daniel Y T; Wong, Ka-Wai; Yu, Esther Y T; Lo, Yvonne Y C; Lam, Cindy L K

    2016-01-01

    Aims. To investigate the costs and cost-effectiveness of a short message service (SMS) intervention to prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Methods. A Markov model was developed to simulate the cost and effectiveness outcomes of the SMS intervention and usual clinical practice from the health provider's perspective. The direct programme costs and the two-year SMS intervention costs were evaluated in subjects with IGT. All costs were expressed in 2011 US dollars. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was calculated as cost per T2DM onset prevented, cost per life year gained, and cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained. Results. Within the two-year trial period, the net intervention cost of the SMS group was $42.03 per subject. The SMS intervention managed to reduce 5.05% onset of diabetes, resulting in saving $118.39 per subject over two years. In the lifetime model, the SMS intervention dominated the control by gaining an additional 0.071 QALY and saving $1020.35 per person. The SMS intervention remained dominant in all sensitivity analyses. Conclusions. The SMS intervention for IGT subjects had the superiority of lower monetary cost and a considerable improvement in preventing or delaying the T2DM onset. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01556880.

  8. [Effects of coca chewing on the glucose tolerance test].

    PubMed

    Galarza Guzmán, M; Peñaloza Imaña, R; Echalar Afcha, L; Aguilar Valerio, M; Spielvogel, H; Sauvain, M

    1997-01-01

    The effects of coca chewing on the glucose tolerance test were measured. The subjects were 14 habitual coca chewers and 14 non-chewers. All were of Aymara ancestry and came from a rural community from the "Altiplano" close to the city of La Paz. The coca users chewed coca leaves during 3 1/2 hours of the test. The non-chewers showed a significant hypoglycemia at 120 minutes of the test. This effect was not observed in the coca chewers. The hormonal counter-regulation response to hypoglycemia worked perfectly in non-chewers, since glucose levels reached normal values at 180 minutes of the test. These results suggest that coca chewers, at high altitude do not present hypoglycemia, due to an antagonic action of coca metabolites on insulin; allowing a greater availability of glucose in the organism. This would have a positive effect on metabolism in an environment of hypobaric hypoxia, known to lead to situations of hypoglycemia.

  9. DEXA MEASURED VISCERAL ADIPOSE TISSUE PREDICTS IMPAIRED GLUCOSE TOLERANCE AND METABOLIC SYNDROME IN OBESE CAUCASIAN AND AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN

    PubMed Central

    Bi, X; Seabolt, L; Shibao, C; Buchowski, M; Kang, H; Keil, CD; Tyree, R; Silver, HJ

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims New methods to measure visceral adipose tissue (VAT) by DEXA may help discern sex, race and phenotype differences in the role of VAT in cardiometabolic risk. This study was designed to: a) compare relationships between cardiometabolic risk factors and DEXA-VAT, anthropometric and body composition measures; b) determine thresholds for DEXA-VAT by race; and c) determine the most robust predictors of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and metabolic syndrome (MetSx) in obese women. Methods VAT area (cm2) was measured using Lunar iDXA scanner in 229 obese (BMI 30-49.9) women age 21–69 years of European American (EA = 123) and African American (AA = 106) descent. Linear regression modeling and areas under the curve (AUC) compared relationships with cardiometabolic risk. Bootstrapping with LASSO regression modeling determined thresholds and predictors of IGT and MetSx. Results DEXA-VAT explained more of the variance in triglycerides, blood pressure, glucose and HOMA-IR compared to anthropometric and body composition variables. DEXA-VAT had the highest AUC for IGT (0.767) and MetSx (0.749). Including race and interactionXrace terms in modeling did not significantly change results. Thresholds at which probability was ≥ 50% for IGT or MetSx were lower in AA women (IGT: 2120cm2 AA vs 2550cm2 EA; MetSx: 1320cm2 AA vs 1713cm2 EA). The odds for IGT or MetSx was 3-fold greater with each standard deviation increase in DEXA-VAT. Conclusion DEXA-VAT provides robust clinical information regarding cardiometabolic risk in AA and EA women and has great potential in risk reduction efforts. PMID:25335442

  10. Framingham risk score in impaired glucose tolerant population: A sub analysis of Diabetes Prevention and Awareness Program of Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Fawwad, Asher; Moin, Hassan; Siddiqui, Iftikhar Ahmed; Hydrie, Muhammad Zafar Iqbal; Basit, Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the 10-year risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) using Framingham risk score. Methods: Data for this study was collected from Diabetes Prevention and Awareness Program. Primary prevention team visited different primary health care centers, factories, service organizations and offices within Karachi, Pakistan. IGT was diagnosed according to World Health Organization criteria after taking informed consent. Information regarding social-demography, dietary habits and physical activities were obtained by a designed questionnaire on one-to-one based interview. Framingham risk score (FRS) was used to assess risk of developing CAD. Results: A total of 315 subjects with IGT were recruited for the study. Mean age of subjects was 44.1 ± 9.8 years and mean BMI was 27.3 ± 5.0 kg/m2. Overall, 31.4% of the participants were at risk of having CAD. Males were 6.4 times and hypertensive subjects were 2.44 times more likely to have CAD in next 10 years. Conclusion: According to the findings of the study, male and hypertensive IGT subjects were more likely to develop CAD in next 10 years. Community based awareness programs are needed to educate people regarding healthy lifestyle in order to reduce the risk of IGT and CAD. PMID:27882006

  11. Fasting for 3 days during the suckling-weaning transient period in male rats induces metabolic abnormalities in the liver and is associated with impaired glucose tolerance in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Misa; Honma, Kazue; Mochizuki, Kazuki; Goda, Toshinao

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies suggest that nutritional status during developmental periods is associated with subsequent development of metabolic abnormalities. In this study, we examined whether malnutrition by fasting for 3 days during the suckling-weaning transient period induces subsequent development of metabolic abnormalities in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fasted for 3 days during the suckling-weaning transient period. They are subsequently fed a high-fat, high-sucrose (HF) or low-fat, high-starch (LF) diet for 14 weeks from 17 weeks of age, and the liver and blood samples were collected for measuring mRNA and protein levels of metabolic genes and blood concentrations of glucose and insulin, respectively. Fasting for 3 days during the suckling-weaning transient period induced impaired glucose tolerance in rats fed the LF diet in adulthood. Liver triglycerides in rats fed the HF diet in adulthood increased to 140 % in rats fasted for 3 days during the suckling-weaning transient period compared with those non-fasted. Furthermore, liver expression of FBP1 and ACCα genes in adult rats fed the LF diet increased to 125 and 145 %, respectively, in rats fasted for 3 days during the suckling-weaning transient period compared to non-fasted rats. PEPCK1 protein expression levels in rats fed the LF diet were higher in rats fasted for 3 days during the suckling-weaning transient period than in non-fasted rats. Fasting for 3 days in rats during the suckling-weaning transient period enhances metabolic abnormalities in animals fed a HF or LF diet in adulthood by confounding metabolism of lipid and sugar in the liver.

  12. Exercise with calorie restriction improves insulin sensitivity and glycogen synthase activity in obese postmenopausal women with impaired glucose tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Ortmeyer, Heidi K.; Sorkin, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Our objective was to compare the effects of in vivo insulin on skeletal muscle glycogen synthase (GS) activity in normal (NGT) vs. impaired glucose-tolerant (IGT) obese postmenopausal women and to determine whether an increase in insulin activation of GS is associated with an improvement in insulin sensitivity (M) following calorie restriction (CR) and/or aerobic exercise plus calorie restriction (AEX + CR) in women with NGT and IGT. We did a longitudinal, clinical intervention study of CR compared with AEX + CR. Overweight and obese women, 49–76 yr old, completed 6 mo of CR (n = 46) or AEX + CR (n = 50) with V̇o2 max, body composition, and glucose tolerance testing. Hyperinsulinemic euglycemic (80 mU·m−2·min−1) clamps (n = 73) and skeletal muscle biopsies (before and during clamp) (n = 58) were performed before and after the interventions (n = 50). After 120 min of hyperinsulinemia during the clamp, GS fractional activity and insulin's effect to increase GS fractional activity (insulin − basal) were significantly lower in IGT vs. NGT (P < 0.01) at baseline. GS total activity increased during the clamp in NGT (P < 0.05), but not IGT, at baseline. CR and AEX + CR resulted in a significant 8% weight loss with reductions in total fat mass, visceral fat, subcutaneous fat, and intramuscular fat. Overall, M increased (P < 0.01), and the change in M (postintervention − preintervention) was associated with the change in insulin-stimulated GS fractional activity (partial r = 0.44, P < 0.005). In IGT, the change (postintervention − preintervention) in insulin-stimulated GS total activity was greater following AEX + CR than CR alone (P < 0.05). In IGT, insulin-stimulated GS-independent (P < 0.005) and fractional activity (P = 0.06) increased following AEX + CR. We conclude that the greatest benefits at the whole body and cellular level (insulin activation of GS) in older women at highest risk for diabetes are derived from a lifestyle intervention that

  13. Characterization of the intravenous glucose tolerance test and the combined glucose-insulin test in donkeys.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, F J; Aguilera-Aguilera, R; Gonzalez-De Cara, C A; Toribio, R E; Estepa, J C; Perez-Ecija, A

    2015-12-01

    Glucose-insulin dynamic challenges such as the intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) and combined glucose-insulin test (CGIT) have not been described in donkeys. The objectives of this study were (1) to characterize the IVGTT and CGIT in healthy adult donkeys, and (2) to establish normal glucose-insulin proxies. Sixteen donkeys were used and body morphometric variables obtained each. For the IVGTT, glucose (300 mg/kg) was given IV. For the CGIT, glucose (150 mg/kg) followed by recombinant insulin (0.1 IU/kg) were administered IV. Blood samples for glucose and insulin determinations were collected over 300 min. In the IVGTT the positive phase lasted 160.9 ± 13.3 min, glucose concentration peaked at 323.1 ± 9.2 mg/dL and declined at a rate of 1.28 ± 0.15 mg/dL/min. The glucose area under the curve (AUC) was 21.4 ± 1.9 × 10(3) mg/dL/min and the insulin AUC was 7.2 ± 0.9 × 10(3) µIU/mL/min. The positive phase of the CGIT curve lasted 44 ± 3 min, with a glucose clearance rate of 2.01 ± 0.18 mg/dL/min. The negative phase lasted 255.9 ± 3 min, decreasing glucose concentration at rate of -0.63 ± 0.06 mg/dL/min, and reaching a nadir (33.1 ± 3.6 mg/dL) at 118.3 ± 6.3 min. The glucose and insulin AUC values were 15.2 ± 0.9 × 10(3) mg/dL/min and 13.2 ± 0.9 × 10(3) µIU/mL/min. This is the first study characterizing CGIT and IVGTT, and glucose-insulin proxies in healthy adult donkeys. Distinct glucose dynamics, when compared with horses, support the use of species-specific protocols to assess endocrine function.

  14. [Effects of barley flake on metabolism of glucose and lipids in the patients with impaired fasting glucose].

    PubMed

    Bi, Mingxin; Niu, Yucun; Li, Xue; Li, Ying; Sun, Changhao

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the effects of barley flake (BF) on the glucose-lipid metabolism in patients with impaired fasting glucose (IFG). 100 patients with IFG were divided into the oat meal (OM) control group and barley flake experimental group for three months intervention according to randomized controlled trail (RCT). Biochemical indicators, glucose-lipid metabolism related enzymes, the area under curve (AUC) of blood glucose and insulin after oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) were assessed before and after intervention. In addition, the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated by FBG (mmol/L) x INS (microU/L)/ 22.5. At the end of the three month active intervention, the mean fasting blood glucose (FBG) and insulin (INS) in the patients with BF treatment decreased by 9.26% (P < 0.001) and 13.37% (P = 0.001) separately compared with that in patients with OM treatment; meanwhile, total cholesterol (TC) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in patients with BF treatment also decreased by 7.20% (P < 0.001) and 9.42% (P = 0. 002), respectively. Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), HOMA-IR, total glyceride (TG), Apo-B, the AUC of blood glucose and insulin after OGTT were also significantly decreased separately (P < 0.01 or < 0.05 ). However, statistically significant differences failed to be found in HDL-C, Apo-A, ALP and SOD between these two groups. BF had favorable effect on improvement of glucose-lipid metabolism in the patients with impaired fasting glucose.

  15. Use of anesthesia dramatically alters the oral glucose tolerance and insulin secretion in C57Bl/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Windeløv, Johanne A; Pedersen, Jens; Holst, Jens J

    2016-06-01

    Evaluation of the impact of anesthesia on oral glucose tolerance in mice. Anesthesia is often used when performing OGTT in mice to avoid the stress of gavage and blood sampling, although anesthesia may influence gastrointestinal motility, blood glucose, and plasma insulin dynamics. C57Bl/6 mice were anesthetized using the following commonly used regimens: (1) hypnorm/midazolam repetitive or single injection; (2) ketamine/xylazine; (3) isoflurane; (4) pentobarbital; and (5) A saline injected, nonanesthetized group. Oral glucose was administered at time 0 min and blood glucose measured in the time frame -15 to +150 min. Plasma insulin concentration was measured at time 0 and 20 min. All four anesthetic regimens resulted in impaired glucose tolerance compared to saline/no anesthesia. (1) hypnorm/midazolam increased insulin concentrations and caused an altered glucose tolerance; (2) ketamine/xylazine lowered insulin responses and resulted in severe hyperglycemia throughout the experiment; (3) isoflurane did not only alter the insulin secretion but also resulted in severe hyperglycemia; (4) pentobarbital resulted in both increased insulin secretion and impaired glucose tolerance. All four anesthetic regimens altered the oral glucose tolerance, and we conclude that anesthesia should not be used when performing metabolic studies in mice.

  16. Impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance in heart failure: underrecognized and undertreated?

    PubMed

    Mamas, Mamas A; Deaton, Christi; Rutter, Martin K; Yuille, Martin; Williams, Simon G; Ray, Simon G; New, John; Gibson, J Martin; Neyses, Ludwig

    2010-09-01

    A link between diabetes mellitus (DM) and heart failure (HF) has been well-recognized for more than a century. HF is also closely linked to abnormal glucose regulation (AGR) and insulin resistance (IR) in patients without DM and, similarly, these conditions commonly coexist. In epidemiological studies, each condition appears to predict the other. The prevalence of AGR/IR in HF patients without DM is significantly underrecognized and, as yet, the optimal method for screening for these abnormalities in the outpatient setting is unclear. The purpose of this review is to overview the prevalence and prognostic impact of AGR and IR in HF patients without DM and discuss potential pathophysiological pathways that link these conditions with HF. The severity of glucose intolerance in patients with HF correlates with functional and clinical severity of HF and is an independent predictor of an adverse outcome. It is thought that changes in cardiac metabolism, including a switch from glucose metabolism toward fatty acid metabolism, may in part contribute to the pathophysiological processes associated with HF patients with AGR/IR. We discuss how pharmacological targeting of metabolic pathways in the myocardium of these patients with HF may represent novel therapeutic strategies in these at-risk patients. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Glucose and insulin tolerance throughout the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Fioretti, P; Genazzani, A R; Felber, J P; Facchini, V; Onano, A M; Romagnino, S; Facchinetti, F; Piras, G L

    1975-03-01

    On the basis of the behaviour during menstrual cycle of the pituitary hormones plasma levels, the Authors have studied during the different periods of the cycle (follicular, ovulatory and luteal) the effects of OGTT and ITT's on the plasma levels of Glucose, insulin, HGH and Cortisol. Significantly lower levels of IRI, HGH and Cortisol were found in follicular phase compared to ovulatory period and luteal phase except for Cortisol in luteal phase. A slightly higher glucose tolerance was found in follicular phase as well as a reduced hypoglicemia under insulin load. Reduced HGH response to ITT was found in follicular phase as well as a reduced Cortisol response compared to the results observed in ovulatory and luteal phase. These data sustain the concept that hormonal variations occurring in an ovulatory cycle are also capable of modifying the woman's body response to various stimuli such as OGTT and ITT.

  18. Intermittent Hypoxia Impairs Glucose Homeostasis in C57BL6/J Mice: Partial Improvement with Cessation of the Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Polak, Jan; Shimoda, Larissa A.; Drager, Luciano F.; Undem, Clark; McHugh, Holly; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y.; Punjabi, Naresh M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Although several studies have suggested that intermittent hypoxia in obstructive sleep apnea may induce abnormalities in glucose homeostasis, it remains to be determined whether these abnormalities improve after discontinuation of the exposure. The objective of this study was to delineate the effects of intermittent hypoxia on glucose homeostasis, beta cell function, and liver glucose metabolism and to investigate whether the impairments improve after the hypoxic exposure is discontinued. Interventions: C57BL6/J mice were exposed to 14 days of intermittent hypoxia, 14 days of intermittent air, or 7 days of intermittent hypoxia followed by 7 days of intermittent air (recovery paradigm). Glucose and insulin tolerance tests were performed to estimate whole-body insulin sensitivity and calculate measures of beta cell function. Oxidative stress in pancreatic tissue and glucose output from isolated hepatocytes were also assessed. Results: Intermittent hypoxia increased fasting glucose levels and worsened glucose tolerance by 67% and 27%, respectively. Furthermore, intermittent hypoxia exposure was associated with impairments in insulin sensitivity and beta cell function, an increase in liver glycogen, higher hepatocyte glucose output, and an increase in oxidative stress in the pancreas. While fasting glucose levels and hepatic glucose output normalized after discontinuation of the hypoxic exposure, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, and impairments in beta cell function persisted. Conclusions: Intermittent hypoxia induces insulin resistance, impairs beta cell function, enhances hepatocyte glucose output, and increases oxidative stress in the pancreas. Cessation of the hypoxic exposure does not fully reverse the observed changes in glucose metabolism. Citation: Polak J; Shimoda LA; Drager LF; Undem C; McHugh H; Polotsky VY; Punjabi NM

  19. Limited OXPHOS capacity in white adipocytes is a hallmark of obesity in laboratory mice irrespective of the glucose tolerance status

    PubMed Central

    Schöttl, Theresa; Kappler, Lisa; Fromme, Tobias; Klingenspor, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Objective Several human and rodent obesity studies speculate on a causal link between altered white adipocyte mitochondria in the obese state and changes in glucose homeostasis. We here aimed to dissect whether alterations in white adipocyte mitochondrial respiratory function are a specific phenomenon of obesity or impaired glucose tolerance or both. Methods Mature white adipocytes were purified from posterior subcutaneous and intraabdominal epididymal fat of four murine obesity models characterized by either impaired or normal oral glucose tolerance. Bioenergetic profiles, including basal, leak, and maximal respiration, were generated using high-resolution respirometry. Cell respiratory control ratios were calculated to evaluate mitochondrial respiratory function. Results Maximal respiration capacity and cell respiratory control ratios were diminished in white adipocytes of each of the four murine obesity models, both in the absence and the presence of impaired glucose tolerance. Limitation was more pronounced in adipocytes of intraabdominal versus subcutaneous fat. Conclusion Reduced mitochondrial respiratory capacity in white adipocytes is a hallmark of murine obesity irrespective of the glucose tolerance status. Impaired respiratory capacity in white adipocytes solely is not sufficient for the development of systemic glucose intolerance. PMID:26413469

  20. New paradigms in PCOS: impaired glucose tolerance and cardiovascular risk. Clinical approach.

    PubMed

    Ravn, P

    2015-04-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder amongst women of reproductive age and is associated with various metabolic risk factors, in addition to chronic anovulation and factors related to androgen excess. Women with PCOS have a higher risk of insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia, and an increased prothrombotic state, resulting in a higher risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus, subclinical atherosclerosis, vascular dysfunction, and apparently cardiovascular disease and mortality. The aim of the present article was to summarize current knowledge with focus on a suggestion to the clinical approach and handling of these metabolic risk factors.

  1. High prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes and abnormal glucose tolerance in the Iranian urban population: Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study

    PubMed Central

    Hadaegh, Farzad; Bozorgmanesh, Mohammad Reza; Ghasemi, Asghar; Harati, Hadi; Saadat, Navid; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2008-01-01

    Background To estimate the prevalence of diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes mellitus, impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and combined IFG/IGT in a large urban Iranian population aged ≥ 20 years. Methods The study population included 9,489 participants of the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study with full relevant clinical data. Age-standardized prevalence of diabetes and glucose intolerance categories were reported according to the 2003 American Diabetes Association definitions. Age-adjusted logistic regression models were used to estimate the numbers needed to screen (NNTS) to find one person with undiagnosed diabetes. Results The prevalence of diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes, isolated IFG, isolated IGT, and combined IFG/IGT were 8.1%, 5.1%, 8.7%, 5.4% and 4.0% in men and 10%, 4.7%, 6.3%, 7.6%, and 4.5% in women respectively. Participants with undiagnosed diabetes had higher age, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, triglycerides (all p values <0.001) and lower HDL-cholesterol (only in women, p < 0.01) compared to normoglycemic subjects. Undiagnosed diabetes was associated with family history of diabetes, increased BMI (≥ 25 kg/m2), abdominal obesity, hypertriglyceridemia, hypertension and low HDL-cholesterol levels. Among men, a combination of increased BMI, hypertension, and family history of diabetes led to a NNTS of 1.6 (95% CI: 1.57–1.71) and among women a combination of family history of diabetes and abdominal obesity, yielded a NNTS of 2.2 (95% CI: 2.1–2.4). Conclusion In conclusion, about one third of Tehranian adults had disturbed glucose tolerance or diabetes. One- third of total cases with diabetes were undiagnosed. Screening individuals with BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 (men), hypertension (men), abdominal obesity (women) and family history of diabetes may be more efficient. PMID:18501007

  2. Hepatic glucose sensing is impaired, but can be normalized, in people with impaired fasting glucose.

    PubMed

    Perreault, Leigh; Færch, Kristine; Kerege, Anna A; Bacon, Samantha D; Bergman, Bryan C

    2014-07-01

    Abnormal endogenous glucose production (EGP) is a characteristic feature in people with impaired fasting glucose (IFG). We sought to determine whether impaired hepatic glucose sensing contributes to abnormal EGP in IFG and whether it could be experimentally restored. Glucose production (rate of appearance; Ra) and flux (glucose cycling) were assessed during a hyperglycemic-euinsulinemic somatostatin clamp with an infusion of [6,6-(2)H2-]glucose and [2-(2)H]glucose before and after enhanced hepatic glucokinase activity via an infusion of low-dose fructose in people with IFG and normal glucose tolerance (NGT). During euglycemia, neither endogenous glucose production [(6,6-(2)H2)-glucose Ra; P = 0.53] or total glucose output (TGO; [2-(2)H]-glucose Ra; P = .12) was different between groups, but glucose cycling ([2-(2)H]glucose Ra to [6,6-(2)H2-]glucose Ra; a surrogate measure of hepatic glucokinase activity in the postabsorptive state) was lower in IFG than NGT (P = .04). Hyperglycemia suppressed EGP more in NGT than IFG (P < .01 for absolute or relative suppression, NGT vs IFG), whereas TGO decreased similarly in both groups (P = .77). The addition of fructose completely suppressed EGP in IFG (P < .01) and tended to do the same to TGO (P = .01; no such changes in NGT, P = .39-.55). Glucose cycling (which reflects glucose-6-phosphatase activity during glucose infusion) was similar in IFG and NGT (P = .51) during hyperglycemia and was unchanged and comparable between groups with the addition of fructose (P = .24). In summary, glucose sensing is impaired in IFG but can be experimentally restored with low-dose fructose. Glucokinase activation may prove to be a novel strategy for the prevention of diabetes in this high-risk group.

  3. Seven-Day Caloric and Saturated Fat Restriction Increases Myocardial Dietary Fatty Acid Partitioning in Impaired Glucose-Tolerant Subjects.

    PubMed

    Noll, Christophe; Kunach, Margaret; Frisch, Frédérique; Bouffard, Lucie; Dubreuil, Stéphanie; Jean-Denis, Farrah; Phoenix, Serge; Cunnane, Stephen C; Guérin, Brigitte; Turcotte, Eric E; Carpentier, André C

    2015-11-01

    Subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) have increased myocardial partitioning of dietary fatty acids (DFAs) with left ventricular dysfunction, both of which are improved by modest weight loss over 1 year induced by lifestyle changes. Here, we determined the effects of a 7-day hypocaloric diet (-500 kcal/day) low in saturated fat (<7% of energy) (LOWCAL study) versus isocaloric with the usual amount saturated fat (∼10% of energy) diet (ISOCAL) on DFA metabolism in subjects with IGT. Organ-specific DFA partitioning and cardiac and hepatic DFA fractional uptake rates were measured in 15 IGT subjects (7 males/8 females) using the oral 14(R,S)-[18F]-fluoro-6-thia-heptadecanoic acid positron emission tomography method after 7 days of an ISOCAL diet versus a LOWCAL diet using a randomized crossover design. The LOWCAL diet led to reductions in weight and postprandial insulin area under the curve. Myocardial DFA partitioning over 6 h was increased after the LOWCAL diet (2.3 ± 0.1 vs. 1.9 ± 0.2 mean standard uptake value, P < 0.04). However, the early (90-120 min) myocardial DFA fractional uptake was unchanged after the LOWCAL diet (0.055 ± 0.025 vs. 0.046 ± 0.009 min(-1), P = 0.7). Liver DFA partitioning was unchanged, but liver fractional uptake of DFA tended to be increased. Very short-term caloric and saturated fat dietary restrictions do not lead to the same changes in organ-specific DFA metabolism as those associated with weight loss in subjects with IGT.

  4. Lifestyle changes and lipid metabolism gene expression and protein content in skeletal muscle of subjects with impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Mensink, M; Blaak, E E; Vidal, H; De Bruin, T W A; Glatz, J F C; Saris, W H M

    2003-08-01

    Skeletal muscle of pre-diabetic patients is characterised by a diminished capacity to handle fatty acids. A diminished content of several enzymes involved in fatty-acid transport and oxidation have been suggested to underlie these defects. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the combination of dietary advice, increased physical activity and weight loss improves lipid metabolic gene and protein expression in skeletal muscle of subjects with impaired glucose tolerance. Before and after 1 year of a lifestyle-intervention programme, expression of several genes and proteins involved in lipid metabolism were measured in vastus lateralis muscle biopsies from subjects in the intervention ( n=7) and control group ( n=6). After 1 year the intervention group had an improved glycaemic control and reduced body fat compared to the control group. Significant differences were observed for acetyl CoA-carboxylase 2 and uncoupling protein 2 expression (ACC2: -16.8+/-12.4% vs +51.5+/-32.3% for the intervention and control group respectively; p<0.05) (UCP2: -26.9+/-10.3% vs +10.5+/-6.2% for the intervention and control group respectively; p<0.05). Change in 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase protein content tended to be different between groups (+3.2+/-1.1 vs -0.9+/-1.9 U/mg.ww for the intervention and control group, p=0.07). Lifestyle changes leading to an improved glycaemic control and reduced adiposity, resulted in a down-regulation of ACC-2 and UCP2 expression and in an increase in HAD protein content, reflecting a better capacity to utilise fatty acids.

  5. Beta-cell function, incretin effect, and incretin hormones in obese youth along the span of glucose tolerance from normal to prediabetes to Type 2 diabetes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Using the hyperglycemic and euglycemic clamp, we demonstrated impaired Beta-cell function in obese youth with increasing dysglycemia. Herein we describe oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)-modeled Beta-cell function and incretin effect in obese adolescents spanning the range of glucose tolerance. Bet...

  6. Effects of rosglitazone on plasma adiponectin, insulin sensitivity, and insulin secretion in high-risk African Americans with impaired glucose tolerance test and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Osei, Kwame; Gaillard, Trudy; Kaplow, June; Bullock, Matthew; Schuster, Dara

    2004-12-01

    We examined the metabolic effects of rosiglitazone therapy on glucose control, insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion, and adiponectin in first-degree relatives of African Americans with type 2 diabetes (DM) with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and DM for 3 months. The study was comprised of 12 first-degree relatives with IGT, 17 newly diagnosed DM, and 19 healthy relatives with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed before and after 3 months of rosiglitazone therapy (4 to 8 mg/d) in patients with IGT and DM. Serum glucose, insulin, C-peptide, and adiponectin levels were measured before and 2 hours during OGTT in the NGT and patients with IGT and DM. Insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) and beta-cell function (HOMA-%B) were calculated in each subject using homeostasis model assessment (HOMA). Rosglitazone improved the overall glycemic control in the IGT and DM groups. Following rosiglitazone, the beta-cell secretion remained unchanged, while HOMR-IR was reduced in DM by 30% (4.12 +/- 1.95 v 6.33 +/- 3.54, P < .05) and the IGT group (3.78 +/- 2.45 v 4.81 +/- 3.49, P = not significant [NS]). Mean plasma adiponectin levels were significantly (P < .05) lower in the DM (6.74 +/- 1.95 microg/mL) when compared with the NGT group(9.61 +/- 5.09). Rosiglitazone significantly (P < .001) increased adiponectin levels by 2-fold in patients with IGT (22.2 +/- 10.97 microg/mL) and 2.5-fold greater in DM (15.68 +/- 8.23 microg/mL) at 3 months when compared with the 0 month. We conclude that adiponectin could play a significant role (1) in the pathogenesis of IGT and DM and (2) the beneficial metabolic effects of thiazolidinediones (TZDs) in high-risk African American patients.

  7. Effect of Progression From Impaired Glucose Tolerance to Diabetes on Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Its Amelioration by Lifestyle and Metformin Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Ronald B.; Temprosa, Marinella; Haffner, Steven; Orchard, Trevor J.; Ratner, Robert E.; Fowler, Sarah E.; Mather, Kieren; Marcovina, Santica; Saudek, Chris; Matulik, Margaret J.; Price, David

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Although subjects with diabetes have increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), the evolution of this increased risk as pre-diabetic individuals progress to diabetes is not understood. This study examines the longitudinal relationship between selected CVD risk factors (blood pressure, triglycerides, HDL and LDL cholesterol, and LDL peak particle density [PPD]) and glycemia in the three treatment groups of the Diabetes Prevention Program. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 3,234 participants with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) were followed for a mean of 3.2 years after randomization to intensive lifestyle intervention (ILS), metformin, or placebo. Using repeated-measures models, adjusted mean levels of risk factors were estimated for an annual change in glycemic status. Tests were also conducted to assess the risk factor trends with improvement or worsening of glycemic status. RESULTS CVD risk factor values and changes from baseline became more unfavorable as glucose tolerance status deteriorated but improved with reversion to normal glucose tolerance (NGT), especially in the ILS intervention group (trend test P < 0.001 for all risk factors except for LDL PPD [P = 0.02] in ILS and HDL cholesterol [P = 0.02] in placebo). Although there were few significant differences in the transition from IGT to diabetes, there were strong relationships between risk factors and continuous measures of glycemia. CONCLUSIONS Progression from IGT to diabetes is associated with mild deterioration, whereas reversion to NGT is associated with improvement in risk factors. Early intervention with ILS, but less so with metformin, in participants at high risk for diabetes improves the cardiovascular risk and glucose tolerance profile simultaneously. PMID:19171717

  8. Exogenous citrate impairs glucose tolerance and promotes visceral adipose tissue inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Leandro, João G B; Espindola-Netto, Jair M; Vianna, Maria Carolina F; Gomez, Lilian S; DeMaria, Thaina M; Marinho-Carvalho, Monica M; Zancan, Patricia; Paula Neto, Heitor A; Sola-Penna, Mauro

    2016-03-28

    Overweight and obesity have become epidemic worldwide and are linked to sedentary lifestyle and the consumption of processed foods and drinks. Citrate is a metabolite that plays central roles in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. In addition, citrate is the additive most commonly used by the food industry, and therefore is highly consumed. Extracellular citrate can freely enter the cells via the constitutively expressed plasma membrane citrate transporter. Within the cytosol, citrate is readily metabolised by ATP-citrate lyase into acetyl-CoA - the metabolic precursor of endogenously produced lipids and cholesterol. We therefore hypothesised that the citrate ingested from processed foods and drinks could contribute to increased postprandial fat production and weight gain. To test our hypothesis, we administered citrate to mice through their drinking water with or without sucrose and monitored their weight gain and other metabolic parameters. Our results showed that mice receiving citrate or citrate+sucrose did not show increased weight gain or an increase in the weight of the liver, skeletal muscles or adipose tissues (AT). Moreover, the plasma lipid profiles (TAG, total cholesterol, LDL and HDL) were similar across all groups. However, the group receiving citrate+sucrose showed augmented fasting glycaemia, glucose intolerance and the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-10) in their AT. Therefore, our results suggest that citrate consumption contributes to increased AT inflammation and altered glucose metabolism, which is indicative of initial insulin resistance. Thus, citrate consumption could be a previously unknown causative agent for the complications associated with obesity.

  9. Metformin and sitAgliptin in patients with impAired glucose tolerance and a recent TIA or minor ischemic Stroke (MAAS): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Osei, Elizabeth; Fonville, Susanne; Zandbergen, Adrienne A M; Brouwers, Paul J A M; Mulder, Laus J M M; Lingsma, Hester F; Dippel, Diederik W J; Koudstaal, Peter J; den Hertog, Heleen M

    2015-08-05

    Impaired glucose tolerance is present in one third of patients with a TIA or ischemic stroke and is associated with a two-fold risk of recurrent stroke. Metformin improves glucose tolerance, but often leads to side effects. The aim of this study is to explore the feasibility, safety, and effects on glucose metabolism of metformin and sitagliptin in patients with TIA or minor ischemic stroke and impaired glucose tolerance. We will also assess whether a slow increase in metformin dose and better support and information on this treatment will reduce the incidence of side effects in these patients. The Metformin and sitAgliptin in patients with impAired glucose tolerance and a recent TIA or minor ischemic Stroke trial (MAAS trial) is a phase II, multicenter, randomized, controlled, open-label trial with blinded outcome assessment. Non-diabetic patients (n = 100) with a recent (<6 months) TIA, amaurosis fugax or minor ischemic stroke (modified Rankin scale ≤ 3) and impaired glucose tolerance, defined as 2-hour post-load glucose levels between 7.8 and 11.0 mmol/L after repeated standard oral glucose tolerance test, will be included. Patients with renal or liver impairment, heart failure, chronic hypoxic lung disease stage III-IV, history of lactate acidosis or diabetic ketoacidosis, pregnancy or breastfeeding, pancreatitis and use of digoxin will be excluded. The patients will be randomly assigned in a 1:1:2 ratio to metformin, sitagliptin or "no treatment." Patients allocated to metformin will start with 500 mg twice daily, which will be slowly increased during a 6-week period to a twice daily dose of 1000 mg. Patients allocated to sitagliptin will be treated with a daily fixed dose of 100 mg. The study has been registered as NTR 3196 in The Netherlands Trial Register. Primary outcomes include percentage still on treatment, percentage of (serious) adverse events, and the baseline adjusted difference in 2-hour post-load glucose levels at 6 months. This study will give

  10. PPAR-α Agonist Fenofibrate Reduces Insulin Resistance in Impaired Glucose Tolerance Patients with Hypertriglyceridemia: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaomeng; Gao, Xia; Jia, Yumei; Xu, Yuan

    2017-04-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) agonists can regulate metabolism and protect the cardiovascular system. This study investigated the effects of PPAR-α agonist fenofibrate on insulin resistance in patients with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). This research evaluated cross-sectional and interventional studies. 191 subjects with IGT were divided into a hypertriglyceridemia group (HTG group, n = 118) and a normal triglyceride (TG) group (NTG group, n = 73). 79 subjects with normal glucose tolerance were recruited as a control group. The HTG group was treated with fenofibrate (200 mg/day) for 12 weeks. The homeostatic model assessment index 2 (HOMA2) and the McAuley index (McA) were calculated. HOMA2 for β-cell function (HOMA2-%B) was 93.47 ± 26.28, 68.47 ± 21.29, and 79.92 ± 23.15 in HTG, NTG, and control groups, respectively. HOMA2 for insulin sensitivity (HOMA2-%S) was 48.40 (39.70, 68.70), 110.20 (62.55, 141.95), and 101.20 (79.90, 140.10) in HTG, NTG, and control groups, respectively. HOMA2 for insulin resistance (HOMA2-IR) was 2.09 (1.46, 2.52), 0.92 (0.70, 1.61), and 0.99 (0.71, 1.25) in HTG, NTG, and control groups, respectively. McA was 5.05 ± 0.76, 7.99 ± 1.79, and 8.34 ± 1.55 in HTG, NTG, and control groups, respectively. The HTG group had higher HOMA2-%B and HOMA2-IR, and lower HOMA2-%S and McA than NTG and control groups (P < 0.001 for all). Fenofibrate decreased HOMA2-%B and HOMA2-IR and increased HOMA2-%S and McA in the HTG group (HOMA2-%B: from 93.47 ± 26.28 to 89.34 ± 23.53, P = 0.018; HOMA2-%S: from 48.40 (39.70, 68.70) to 56.75 (44.88, 72.53), P < 0.001; HOMA2-IR: from 2.07 (1.46, 2.52) to 1.76 (1.38, 2.30), P < 0.001; McA: from 5.05 ± 0.76 to 9.34 ± 0.88, P < 0.001). PPAR-α agonists improve parameters of glucoregulation in IGT patients with hypertriglyceridemia.

  11. Lack of REDD1 reduces whole body glucose and insulin tolerance, and impairs skeletal muscle insulin signaling.

    PubMed

    Dungan, Cory M; Wright, David C; Williamson, David L

    2014-10-31

    A lack of the REDD1 promotes dysregulated growth signaling, though little has been established with respect to the metabolic role of REDD1. Therefore, the goal of this study was to determine the role of REDD1 on glucose and insulin tolerance, as well as insulin stimulated growth signaling pathway activation in skeletal muscle. First, intraperitoneal (IP) injection of glucose or insulin were administered to REDD1 wildtype (WT) versus knockout (KO) mice to examine changes in blood glucose over time. Next, alterations in skeletal muscle insulin (IRS-1, Akt, ERK 1/2) and growth (4E-BP1, S6K1, REDD1) signaling intermediates were determined before and after IP insulin treatment (10min). REDD1 KO mice were both glucose and insulin intolerant when compared to WT mice, evident by higher circulating blood glucose concentrations and a greater area under the curve following IP injections of glucose or insulin. While the REDD1 KO exhibited significant though blunted insulin-stimulated increases (p<0.05) in Akt S473 and T308 phosphorylation versus the WT mice, acute insulin treatment has no effect (p<0.05) on REDD1 KO skeletal muscle 4E-BP1 T37/46, S6K1 T389, IRS-1 Y1222, and ERK 1/2 T202/Y204 phosphorylation versus the WT mice. Collectively, these novel data suggest that REDD1 has a more distinct role in whole body and skeletal muscle metabolism and insulin action than previously thought. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Type II diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance due to severe hyperinsulinism in patients with 1p36 deletion syndrome and a Prader-Willi-like phenotype

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Deletion of the subtelomeric region of 1p36 is one of the most common subtelomeric deletion syndromes. In monosomy 1p36, the presence of obesity is poorly defined, and glucose metabolism deficiency is rarely reported. However, the presence of a typical Prader-Willi-like phenotype in patients with monosomy 1p36 is controversial. Case presentation In this report, we describe two female patients, one who is 6 years 2 months of age and another who is 10 years 1 month of age, both referred to our hospital for obesity and a Prader-Willi-like phenotype. These patients presented with severe obesity (body mass index [BMI] was 26.4 and 27.7, respectively), hyperphagia and developmental delay. Analysis of basal hormone levels showed normal thyroid function and adrenal function but considerable basal hyperinsulinism (the insulin levels were 54.5 and 49.2 μU/ml, respectively). In patient 1, glycaemia was 75 mg/dl (HOMA-R 10.09), and the HbA1c level was 6.1%; in patient 2, glycaemia was 122 mg/dl, and the HbA1c level was 6.6% (HOMA-R 14.82). An oral glucose tolerance test demonstrated impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes mellitus with marked insulin resistance (the peak insulin level for each patient was 197 and 279 μU/mL, respectively, while the 120’ insulin level of each patient was 167 and 234 μU/mL, respectively). Conclusion some patients with monosomy 1p36 may show Prader-Willi-like physical and physiologic characteristics such as obesity and hyperinsulinism with impaired glucose metabolism, which can cause type II diabetes mellitus. Further studies are necessary to evaluate these findings. PMID:24479866

  13. Oleylethanolamide impairs glucose tolerance and inhibits insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in rat adipocytes through p38 and JNK MAPK pathways.

    PubMed

    González-Yanes, Carmen; Serrano, Antonia; Bermúdez-Silva, Francisco Javier; Hernández-Dominguez, María; Páez-Ochoa, María Angeles; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Sánchez-Margalet, Víctor

    2005-11-01

    Oleylethanolamide (OEA) is a lipid mediator that inhibits food intake and body weight gain and also exhibits hypolipemiant actions. OEA exerts its anorectic effects peripherally through the stimulation of C-fibers. OEA is synthesized in the intestine in response to feeding, increasing its levels in portal blood after the meal. Moreover, OEA is produced by adipose tissue, and a lipolytic effect has been found. In this work, we have examined the effect of OEA on glucose metabolism in rats in vivo and in isolated adipocytes. In vivo studies showed that acute administration (30 min and 6 h) of OEA produced glucose intolerance without decreasing insulin levels. Ex vivo, we found that 10 min of preincubation with OEA inhibited 30% insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in isolated adipocytes. Maximal effect was achieved at 1 microM OEA. The related compounds palmitylethanolamide and oleic acid had no effect, suggesting a specific mechanism. Insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation was not affected, but OEA promoted Ser/Thr phosphorylation of GLUT4, which may impair transport activity. This phosphorylation may be partly mediated by p38 and JNK kinases, since specific inhibitors (SB-203580 and SP-600125) partly reverted the inhibitory effect of OEA on insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. These results suggest that the lipid mediator OEA inhibits insulin action in the adipocyte, impairing glucose uptake via p38 and JNK kinases, and these effects may at least in part explain the glucose intolerance produced in rats in vivo. These effects of OEA may contribute to the anorectic effects induced by this mediator, and they might be also relevant for insulin resistance in adipose tissue.

  14. Experience with the high-intensity sweetener saccharin impairs glucose homeostasis and GLP-1 release in rats.

    PubMed

    Swithers, Susan E; Laboy, Alycia F; Clark, Kiely; Cooper, Stephanie; Davidson, T L

    2012-07-15

    Previous work from our lab has demonstrated that experience with high-intensity sweeteners in rats leads to increased food intake, body weight gain and adiposity, along with diminished caloric compensation and decreased thermic effect of food. These changes may occur as a result of interfering with learned relations between the sweet taste of food and the caloric or nutritive consequences of consuming those foods. The present experiments determined whether experience with the high-intensity sweetener saccharin versus the caloric sweetener glucose affected blood glucose homeostasis. The results demonstrated that during oral glucose tolerance tests, blood glucose levels were more elevated in animals that had previously consumed the saccharin-sweetened supplements. In contrast, during glucose tolerance tests when a glucose solution was delivered directly into the stomach, no differences in blood glucose levels between the groups were observed. Differences in oral glucose tolerance responses were not accompanied by differences in insulin release; insulin release was similar in animals previously exposed to saccharin and those previously exposed to glucose. However, release of GLP-1 in response to an oral glucose tolerance test, but not to glucose tolerance tests delivered by gavage, was significantly lower in saccharin-exposed animals compared to glucose-exposed animals. Differences in both blood glucose and GLP-1 release in saccharin animals were rapid and transient, and suggest that one mechanism by which exposure to high-intensity sweeteners that interfere with a predictive relation between sweet tastes and calories may impair energy balance is by suppressing GLP-1 release, which could alter glucose homeostasis and reduce satiety.

  15. Experience with the high-intensity sweetener saccharin impairs glucose homeostasis and GLP-1 release in rats

    PubMed Central

    Swithers, Susan E.; Laboy, Alycia F.; Clark, Kiely; Cooper, Stephanie; Davidson, T.L.

    2012-01-01

    Previous work from our lab has demonstrated that experience with high-intensity sweeteners in rats leads to increased food intake, body weight gain and adiposity, along with diminished caloric compensation and decreased thermic effect of food. These changes may occur as a result of interfering with learned relations between the sweet taste of food and the caloric or nutritive consequences of consuming those foods. The present experiments determined whether experience with the high-intensity sweetener saccharin versus the caloric sweetener glucose affected blood glucose homeostasis. The results demonstrated that during oral glucose tolerance tests, blood glucose levels were more elevated in animals that had previously consumed the saccharin-sweetened supplements. In contrast, during glucose tolerance tests when a glucose solution was delivered directly into the stomach, no differences in blood glucose levels between the groups were observed. Differences in oral glucose tolerance responses were not accompanied by differences in insulin release; insulin release was similar in animals previously exposed to saccharin and those previously exposed to glucose. However, release of GLP-1 in response to an oral glucose tolerance test, but not to glucose tolerance tests delivered by gavage, was significantly lower in saccharin-exposed animals compared to glucose-exposed animals. Differences in both blood glucose and GLP-1 release in saccharin animals were rapid and transient, and suggest that one mechanism by which exposure to high-intensity sweeteners that interfere with a predictive relation between sweet tastes and calories may impair energy balance is by suppressing GLP-1 release, which could alter glucose homeostasis and reduce satiety. PMID:22561130

  16. Comparing glucose and insulin data from the two-hour oral glucose tolerance test in metabolic syndrome subjects and marathon runners.

    PubMed

    Altuve, Miguel; Perpinan, Gilberto; Severeyn, Erika; Wong, Sara

    2016-08-01

    Glucose is the main energy source of the body's cells and is essential for normal metabolism. Two pancreatic hormones, insulin and glucagon, are involved in glucose home-ostasis. Alteration in the plasma glucose and insulin concentrations could lead to distinct symptoms and diseases, ranging from mental function impairment to coma and even death. Type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome are typical examples of abnormal glucose metabolism that increase the risk for cardiovascular disease and mortality. The oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) is a medical test used to screen for prediabetes, type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance. In the 5-sample 2-hour OGTT, plasma glucose and insulin concentrations are measured after a fast and then after oral intake of glucose, at intervals of 30 minutes. In this work, a statistical analysis is carried out to find significant differences between the five stages of the OGTT for plasma glucose and insulin data. In addition, the behavior of the glucose and insulin data is compared between subjects with the metabolic syndrome and marathon runners. Results show that marathon runners have plasma glucose and insulin levels significantly lower (p <; 0.05) than people with the metabolic syndrome in all the stages of the OGTT. Insulin secretion decreases in marathon runners due to a significant reduction in plasma glucose concentration, but insulin secretion does not decrease in metabolic syndrome subjects due to insulin resistance, consequently plasma glucose concentration does not achieve normal levels.

  17. Impaired glucose regulation in a Sherpa indigenous population living in the Everest region of Nepal and in Kathmandu Valley.

    PubMed

    Lhamo, Sherpa Y; Supamai, Soonthornpun; Virasakdi, Chongsuvivatwong

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of impaired glucose regulation status in Sherpa adults living in the Everest area and in Kathmandu valley. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Chaurikharka village (Everest area) and Kathmandu city on 119 and 121 randomly selected individuals, aged 30-70 years. They were assessed on conventional risk factors for diabetes, and an oral glucose tolerance test was performed. Based on the 2003 American Diabetes Association criteria, the prevalence in the Kathmandu city and Everest region of any impaired glucose regulation (IGR), isolated impaired fasting plasma glucose (isolated IFG), isolated impaired glucose tolerance (isolated IGT), and combined isolated IFG and isolated IGT were 55.4% vs. 23.5%, 42.1% vs. 14.3%, 1.7% vs. 0.8%, 11.6 vs. 8.4%, respectively. Using the subjects with normal glucose tolerance as the referent group and after adjusting for age, sex, physical activity, calories, and waist circumference, the odds ratios for isolated IFG and combined isolated IFG and isolated IGT of living in the highland region were 0.19 (0.08-0.44) and 0.33 (0.09-1.18), respectively. Isolated IFG was more common among the lowland Sherpas. Unlike combined isolated IFG and isolated IGT, this isolated IFG difference could not be explained by the difference of conventional diabetes mellitus risk factors.

  18. Effect of α-lipoic acid and exercise training on cardiovascular disease risk in obesity with impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    McNeilly, Andrea M; Davison, Gareth W; Murphy, Marie H; Nadeem, Nida; Trinick, Tom; Duly, Ellie; Novials, Anna; McEneny, Jane

    2011-11-22

    Obese subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) are more susceptible than healthy individuals to oxidative stress and cardiovascular disease. This randomised controlled investigation was designed to test the hypothesis that α-lipoic acid supplementation and exercise training may elicit favourable clinical changes in obese subjects with IGT. All data were collected from 24 obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) IGT patients. Following participant randomisation into two groups, fasting venous blood samples were obtained at baseline, and before and following intervention. The first group consisted of 12 participants who completed a 12 week control phase followed by 12 weeks of chronic exercise at 65% HRmax for 30 minutes a day, 5 days per week, while ingesting 1 gram per day of α-lipoic acid for 12 weeks. The second group consisted of 12 participants who completed the same 12 week control phase, but this was followed by 12 weeks of 1 gram per day of α-lipoic acid supplementation only (no exercise). The main findings show a comparatively greater rate of low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation in the group consisting of α-lipoic acid only (p < 0.05 vs. pre intervention), although total oxidant status was lower post intervention (p < 0.05 vs. baseline) in this group. However, exercise and α-lipoic acid in combination attenuates LDL oxidation. Furthermore, in the α-lipoic acid supplement plus exercise training group, total antioxidant capacity was significantly increased (p < 0.05 vs. baseline and pre intervention). Body fat percentage and waist and hip circumference decreased following exercise training (p < 0.05 vs. post intervention). There were no selective treatment differences for a range of other clinical outcomes including glycaemic regulation (p > 0.05). These findings report that α-lipoic acid ingestion may increase the atherogenicity of LDL when ingested in isolation of exercise, suggesting that in IGT the use of this antioxidant treatment does not ameliorate

  19. Impact of Glucose Tolerance Status, Sex, and Body Size on Glucose Absorption Patterns During OGTTs

    PubMed Central

    Færch, Kristine; Pacini, Giovanni; Nolan, John J.; Hansen, Torben; Tura, Andrea; Vistisen, Dorte

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We studied whether patterns of glucose absorption during oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) were abnormal in individuals with impaired glucose regulation and whether they were related to sex and body size (height and fat-free mass). We also examined how well differences in insulin sensitivity and β-cell function measured by gold-standard tests were reflected in the corresponding OGTT-derived estimates. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS With validated methods, various aspects of glucose absorption were estimated from 12-point, 3-h, 75-g OGTTs in 66 individuals with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), isolated impaired fasting glucose (i-IFG), or isolated impaired glucose tolerance (i-IGT). Insulin sensitivity and β-cell function were measured with the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp and intravenous glucose tolerance tests, respectively. Surrogate markers of both conditions were calculated from OGTTs. RESULTS More rapid glucose absorption (P ≤ 0.036) and reduced late glucose absorption (P ≤ 0.039) were observed in the i-IFG group relative to NGT and i-IGT groups. Women with i-IGT had a lower early glucose absorption than did men with i-IGT (P = 0.041); however, this difference did not persist when differences in body size were taken into account (P > 0.28). Faster glucose absorption was related to higher fasting (P = 0.001) and lower 2-h (P = 0.001) glucose levels and to greater height and fat-free mass (P < 0.001). All OGTT-derived measures of insulin sensitivity, but only one of three measures of β-cell function, reflected the differences for these parameters between those with normal and impaired glucose regulation as measured by gold-standard tests. CONCLUSIONS Glucose absorption patterns during an OGTT are significantly related to plasma glucose levels and body size, which should be taken into account when estimating β-cell function from OGTTs in epidemiological studies. PMID:24062321

  20. Long-term administration of PACAP receptor antagonist, PACAP(6-27), impairs glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in obese diabetic ob/ob mice.

    PubMed

    Green, Brian D; Irwin, Nigel; Cassidy, Roslyn S; Gault, Victor A; Flatt, Peter R

    2006-09-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) is a ubiquitous peptide of the glucagon superfamily that is involved in glucose homeostasis and regulation of insulin secretion. This study employed the PACAP receptor antagonist, PACAP(6-27) to evaluate the role of endogenous PACAP in genetic obesity-related diabetes and related metabolic abnormalities using ob/ob mice. Acute in vivo antagonistic potency of PACAP(6-27) was confirmed in ob/ob mice by blockade of the insulin-releasing action but not hyperglycaemia. In longer-term studies, ob/ob mice were given once daily injections of PACAP(6-27) or vehicle for 14 days. Feeding activity, body weight, basal plasma glucose and plasma insulin concentrations were not significantly affected by chronic PACAP(6-27) treatment. However, PACAP(6-27) treatment impaired glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity and the glycaemic response to feeding. Plasma glucagon and lipids were unchanged. These observations indicate a role of endogenous PACAP for normal glucose homeostasis, but indicate a minor involvement in the regulation of insulin secretion in ob/ob mice.

  1. Thiazolidinediones increase hepatic insulin extraction in African Americans with impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. A pilot study of rosiglitazone.

    PubMed

    Osei, Kwame; Gaillard, Trudy; Schuster, Dara

    2007-01-01

    Peripheral insulin levels are determined by beta-cell secretion, insulin sensitivity, and hepatic insulin extraction (HIE). We have previously shown that whereas sulfonylureas reduce insulin extraction, metformin enhances HIE. However, the effects of thiazolidinediones (TZDs) on HIE remain uncertain. Thus, we investigated the potential contribution of hepatic insulin clearance to peripheral insulin levels during rosiglitazone therapy in African Americans with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). The study was composed of 12 first-degree relatives with IGT and 17 patients with newly diagnosed type 2 DM. Nineteen healthy relatives with normal glucose tolerance served as controls. Serum glucose, insulin, and C-peptide, and HIE (C-peptide-insulin molar ratios) were measured at t = 0 and 120 minutes during oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in all the subjects. The OGTT was performed before and after 3 months of rosiglitazone therapy (4 mg/d x 4 weeks and >8 mg/d x 8 weeks) in patients with IGT and type 2 DM. Insulin resistance index and beta-cell function were calculated in each subject using homeostasis model assessment (HOMA). Rosiglitazone therapy improved but did not normalize the overall glycemic control in the IGT and type 2 DM groups. After rosiglitazone therapy, the mean serum insulin and C-peptide levels at fasting remained unchanged. However, the 2-hour serum glucose and insulin were lower, whereas serum C-peptide was unchanged during 3 months of rosiglitazone treatment. Mean insulin resistance index of HOMA was reduced by 30% (4.12 +/- 1.95 vs 6.33 +/- 3.54, P < .05) in the type 2 DM group and by 21% (3.78 +/- 2.45 vs 4.81 +/- 3.49, P = NS) in the IGT group. Mean HIE values were significantly lower (70%) in the type 2 DM and IGT groups when compared with the normal glucose tolerance group. At 3 months, basal HIE was not significantly changed by rosiglitazone therapy in IGT and type 2 DM groups when compared with the baseline (0

  2. Effects of acarbose on cardiovascular and diabetes outcomes in patients with coronary heart disease and impaired glucose tolerance (ACE): a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Holman, Rury R; Coleman, Ruth L; Chan, Juliana C N; Chiasson, Jean-Louis; Feng, Huimei; Ge, Junbo; Gerstein, Hertzel C; Gray, Richard; Huo, Yong; Lang, Zhihui; McMurray, John J; Rydén, Lars; Schröder, Stefan; Sun, Yihong; Theodorakis, Michael J; Tendera, Michal; Tucker, Lynne; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Wei, Yidong; Yang, Wenying; Wang, Duolao; Hu, Dayi; Pan, Changyu

    2017-09-12

    The effect of the α-glucosidase inhibitor acarbose on cardiovascular outcomes in patients with coronary heart disease and impaired glucose tolerance is unknown. We aimed to assess whether acarbose could reduce the frequency of cardiovascular events in Chinese patients with established coronary heart disease and impaired glucose tolerance, and whether the incidence of type 2 diabetes could be reduced. The Acarbose Cardiovascular Evaluation (ACE) trial was a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 4 trial, with patients recruited from 176 hospital outpatient clinics in China. Chinese patients with coronary heart disease and impaired glucose tolerance were randomly assigned (1:1), in blocks by site, by a centralised computer system to receive oral acarbose (50 mg three times a day) or matched placebo, which was added to standardised cardiovascular secondary prevention therapy. All study staff and patients were masked to treatment group allocation. The primary outcome was a five-point composite of cardiovascular death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, non-fatal stroke, hospital admission for unstable angina, and hospital admission for heart failure, analysed in the intention-to-treat population (all participants randomly assigned to treatment who provided written informed consent). The secondary outcomes were a three-point composite outcome (cardiovascular death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, and non-fatal stroke), death from any cause, cardiovascular death, fatal or non-fatal myocardial infarction, fatal or non-fatal stroke, hospital admission for unstable angina, hospital admission for heart failure, development of diabetes, and development of impaired renal function. The safety population comprised all patients who received at least one dose of study medication. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00829660, and the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number registry, number ISRCTN91899513. Between March 20, 2009

  3. Modest Salt Reduction Lowers Blood Pressure and Albumin Excretion in Impaired Glucose Tolerance and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomized Double-Blind Trial.

    PubMed

    Suckling, Rebecca J; He, Feng J; Markandu, Nirmala D; MacGregor, Graham A

    2016-06-01

    The role of salt restriction in patients with impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes mellitus is controversial, with a lack of well controlled, longer term, modest salt reduction trials in this group of patients, in spite of the marked increase in cardiovascular risk. We carried out a 12-week randomized double-blind, crossover trial of salt restriction with salt or placebo tablets, each for 6 weeks, in 46 individuals with diet-controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus or impaired glucose tolerance and untreated normal or high normal blood pressure (BP). From salt to placebo, 24-hour urinary sodium was reduced by 49±9 mmol (2.9 g salt). This reduction in salt intake led to fall in clinic BP from 136/81±2/1 mm Hg to 131/80±2/1 mm Hg, (systolic BP; P<0.01). Mean ambulatory 24-hour BP was reduced by 3/2±1/1 mm Hg (systolic BP, P<0.01 and diastolic BP, P<0.05), and albumin/creatinine ratio was reduced from 0.73 mg/mmol (0.5-1.5) to 0.64 mg/mmol (0.3-1.1; P<0.05). There was no significant change in fasting glucose, hemoglobin A1c, or insulin sensitivity. These results demonstrate that a modest reduction in salt intake, to approximately the amount recommended in public health guidelines, leads to significant and clinically relevant falls in BP in individuals who are early on in the progression of diabetes mellitus with normal or mildly raised BP. The reduction in urinary albumin excretion may carry additional benefits in reducing cardiovascular disease above the effects on BP. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in subjects with reduced glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes - the Tromsø OGTT-study.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Moira S; Figenschau, Yngve; Almås, Bjørg; Njølstad, Inger; Jorde, Rolf

    2011-09-01

    The relationships between vitamin D concentrations, hyperglycemia, and insulin resistance remain uncertain. During 2008 - 2010, an oral glucose tolerance test was performed in 3520 subjects from Tromsø, Norway. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] was measured in 1193 subjects with normal glucose tolerance, in 304 with isolated impaired fasting glucose, in 254 with isolated impaired glucose tolerance, in 139 with a combination of the two, and in 194 subjects with type 2 diabetes. Serum 25(OH)D did not differ between subjects with isolated impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance, but was lower in all groups of deranged glucose metabolism as compared with normal subjects. These differences could not be explained by differences in intakes of vitamin D from cod liver oil or other supplements and remained statistically significant after adjustment for gender, age, body mass index, physical activity score, and month of examination. When the cohort was divided according to serum 25(OH)D quartiles, there was an improvement in all measures of glucose metabolism (fasting and 2-hour plasma glucose, serum insulin, HbA(1c)) and estimates of insulin resistance (QUICKI , HOMA-IR, ISI(0.120)) with increasing serum 25(OH)D quartile. However, interventional studies are needed to prove a causal relationship between vitamin D and glucose metabolism.

  5. Fructose, but not glucose, impairs insulin signaling in the three major insulin-sensitive tissues

    PubMed Central

    Baena, Miguel; Sangüesa, Gemma; Dávalos, Alberto; Latasa, María-Jesús; Sala-Vila, Aleix; Sánchez, Rosa María; Roglans, Núria; Laguna, Juan Carlos; Alegret, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Human studies support the relationship between high intake of fructose-sweetened beverages and type 2 diabetes, but there is a debate on whether this effect is fructose-specific or it is merely associated to an excessive caloric intake. Here we investigate the effects of 2 months’ supplementation to female rats of equicaloric 10% w/v fructose or glucose solutions on insulin sensitivity in target tissues. Fructose supplementation caused hepatic deposition of triglycerides and changed the fatty acid profile of this fraction, with an increase in monounsaturated and a decrease in polyunsaturated species, but did not cause inflammation and oxidative stress. Fructose but not glucose-supplemented rats displayed an abnormal glucose tolerance test, and did not show increased phosphorylation of V-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog-2 (Akt) in white adipose tissue and liver after insulin administration. In skeletal muscle, phosphorylation of Akt and of Akt substrate of 160 kDA (AS160) was not impaired but the expression of the glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) in the plasma membrane was reduced only in fructose-fed rats. In conclusion, fructose but not glucose supplementation causes fatty liver without inflammation and oxidative stress and impairs insulin signaling in the three major insulin-responsive tissues independently from the increase in energy intake. PMID:27194405

  6. Fructose, but not glucose, impairs insulin signaling in the three major insulin-sensitive tissues.

    PubMed

    Baena, Miguel; Sangüesa, Gemma; Dávalos, Alberto; Latasa, María-Jesús; Sala-Vila, Aleix; Sánchez, Rosa María; Roglans, Núria; Laguna, Juan Carlos; Alegret, Marta

    2016-05-19

    Human studies support the relationship between high intake of fructose-sweetened beverages and type 2 diabetes, but there is a debate on whether this effect is fructose-specific or it is merely associated to an excessive caloric intake. Here we investigate the effects of 2 months' supplementation to female rats of equicaloric 10% w/v fructose or glucose solutions on insulin sensitivity in target tissues. Fructose supplementation caused hepatic deposition of triglycerides and changed the fatty acid profile of this fraction, with an increase in monounsaturated and a decrease in polyunsaturated species, but did not cause inflammation and oxidative stress. Fructose but not glucose-supplemented rats displayed an abnormal glucose tolerance test, and did not show increased phosphorylation of V-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog-2 (Akt) in white adipose tissue and liver after insulin administration. In skeletal muscle, phosphorylation of Akt and of Akt substrate of 160 kDA (AS160) was not impaired but the expression of the glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) in the plasma membrane was reduced only in fructose-fed rats. In conclusion, fructose but not glucose supplementation causes fatty liver without inflammation and oxidative stress and impairs insulin signaling in the three major insulin-responsive tissues independently from the increase in energy intake.

  7. Long-term effects of leisure time physical activity on risk of insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance, allowing for body weight history, in Danish men.

    PubMed

    Berentzen, T; Petersen, L; Pedersen, O; Black, E; Astrup, A; Sørensen, T I A

    2007-01-01

    To determine if the level of leisure time physical activity (LTPA) in young adulthood in obese and non-obese men reduces the risk of insulin resistance (IR) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) in middle age, and if such an effect is explained by the current level of LTPA, or by the body mass index (BMI) history preceding and subsequent to the assessment of LTPA. Longitudinal study of groups of obese and randomly selected non-obese men identified at around age 19, and re-examined at mean ages of 32, 44 and 51. BMI was measured at all four examinations. LTPA was assessed by self-administrated questionnaires at the last three examinations. IR and the presence of IGT was determined by an oral glucose tolerance test at the last examination. LTPA in young adulthood reduced the risk of IR and IGT in middle age throughout the range of BMI. Adjustment for the BMI history preceding and subsequent to the assessment of LTPA attenuated the association with IR and IGT, but active men remained at low risk of IR and IGT. Adjustment for subsequent and current levels of LTPA, smoking habits, alcohol intake, educational level and family history of diabetes had no notable influence on the results. LTPA appears to reduce the risk of IR and IGT, an effect which is not explained by the current level of physical activity, and only partially explained by the BMI history preceding and subsequent to the assessment of LTPA.

  8. Safety and feasibiLIty of Metformin in patients with Impaired glucose Tolerance and a recent TIA or minor ischemic stroke (LIMIT) trial - a multicenter, randomized, open-label phase II trial.

    PubMed

    den Hertog, Heleen M; Vermeer, S E; Zandbergen, A A M; Achterberg, Sefanja; Dippel, Diederik W J; Algra, Ale; Kappelle, L J; Koudstaal, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to assess the safety, feasibility, and effects on glucose metabolism of treatment with metformin in patients with TIA or minor ischemic stroke and impaired glucose tolerance. We performed a multicenter, randomized, controlled, open-label phase II trial with blinded outcome assessment. Patients with TIA or minor ischemic stroke in the previous six months and impaired glucose tolerance (2-hour post-load glucose levels of 7.8-11.0 mmol/l) were randomized to metformin, in a daily dose of 2 g, or no metformin, for three months. Primary outcome measures were safety and feasibility of metformin, and the adjusted difference in 2-hour post-load glucose levels at three months. This trial is registered as an International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number 54960762. Forty patients were enrolled; 19 patients were randomly assigned metformin. Nine patients in the metformin group had side effects, mostly gastrointestinal, leading to permanent discontinuation in four patients after 3-10 weeks. Treatment with metformin was associated with a significant reduction in 2-hour post-load glucose levels of 0·97 mmol/l (95% CI 0·11-1·83) in the on-treatment analysis, but not in the intention-to-treat analysis (0·71 mmol/l; 95% CI -0·36 to 1·78). Treatment with metformin in patients with TIA or minor ischemic stroke and impaired glucose tolerance is safe, but leads to minor side effects. If tolerated, it may lead to a significant reduction in post-load glucose levels. This suggests that the role of metformin as potential therapeutic agent for secondary stroke prevention should be further explored. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2013 World Stroke Organization.

  9. The role of α1-adrenergic receptors in regulating metabolism: increased glucose tolerance, leptin secretion and lipid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ting; Papay, Robert S; Perez, Dianne M

    2017-04-01

    The role of α1-adrenergic receptors (α1-ARs) and their subtypes in metabolism is not well known. Most previous studies were performed before the advent of transgenic mouse models and utilized transformed cell lines and poorly selective antagonists. We have now studied the metabolic regulation of the α1A- and α1B-AR subtypes in vivo using knock-out (KO) and transgenic mice that express a constitutively active mutant (CAM) form of the receptor, assessing subtype-selective functions. CAM mice increased glucose tolerance while KO mice display impaired glucose tolerance. CAM mice increased while KO decreased glucose uptake into white fat tissue and skeletal muscle with the CAM α1A-AR showing selective glucose uptake into the heart. Using indirect calorimetry, both CAM mice demonstrated increased whole body fatty acid oxidation, while KO mice preferentially oxidized carbohydrate. CAM α1A-AR mice displayed significantly decreased fasting plasma triglycerides and glucose levels while α1A-AR KO displayed increased levels of triglycerides and glucose. Both CAM mice displayed increased plasma levels of leptin while KO mice decreased leptin levels. Most metabolic effects were more efficacious with the α1A-AR subtype. Our results suggest that stimulation of α1-ARs results in a favorable metabolic profile of increased glucose tolerance, cardiac glucose uptake, leptin secretion and increased whole body lipid metabolism that may contribute to its previously recognized cardioprotective and neuroprotective benefits.

  10. Improvement of glucose metabolism in patients with impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes by long-term administration of a palatinose-based liquid formula as a part of breakfast.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Masae; Arai, Hidekazu; Mizuno, Akira; Fukaya, Makiko; Matsuura, Motoi; Sasaki, Hajime; Yamanaka-Okumura, Hisami; Yamamoto, Hironori; Taketani, Yutaka; Doi, Toshio; Takeda, Eiji

    2009-09-01

    A palatinose-based liquid formula (palatinose-formula), suppresses postprandial plasma glucose and insulin levels in healthy men. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of long-term palatinose-formula ingestion on glucose metabolism in patients with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) or type 2 diabetes. Two patients with IGT and 7 patients with type 2 diabetes participated in the palatinose-formula and dextrin-based liquid formula (dextrin-formula) loading test and long-term palatinose-formula administration study. After a 3-month control period, palatinose-formula (1046 kJ) was ingested daily by patients as a part of breakfast for 5 months. In the loading test, palatinose-formula suppressed postprandial plasma glucose and insulin levels and areas under the curve compared with those after dextrin-formula ingestion. In the long-term study, glycated hemoglobin levels (after 3 months and 5 months of treatment) and serum 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine levels (after 5 months of treatment) were markedly decreased comparing with those at baseline. Intake of 1046 kJ palatinose-formula as a part of breakfast over a long-term period may be effective for improvement of glucose metabolism in patients with IGT or type 2 diabetes.

  11. Colonic delivery of docosahexaenoic acid improves impaired glucose tolerance via GLP-1 secretion and suppresses pancreatic islet hyperplasia in diabetic KK-A(y) mice.

    PubMed

    Shida, Takayuki; Kamei, Noriyasu; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko; Isowa, Koichi; Takayama, Kozo

    2013-06-25

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone that regulates the insulin secretion depending on blood glucose level. Recent studies show that the unsaturated fatty acids can promote GLP-1 secretion from intestinal L-cells. We have shown previously that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) administered into a mouse closed intestinal loop, especially into the colonic segment, stimulate GLP-1 and insulin secretion and have a hypoglycemic effect, suggesting that DHA and EPA have potential as antidiabetic agents. The present study examined the antidiabetic effect of DHA following long-term in vivo delivery to the colon using normal ddY and diabetic KK-A(y) mice. The plasma GLP-1 concentration of KK-A(y) mice increased after long-term DHA administration, and this had a significant hypoglycemic effect. In contrast, although GLP-1 secretion in ddY mice tended to increase after DHA administration, blood glucose concentration did not differ between vehicle- and DHA-treated ddY mice. Immunostaining of the pancreas after long-term DHA administration showed that continuous DHA treatment stimulated β-cell apoptosis and accordingly suppressed islet cell growth in KK-A(y) mice. Colon targeting of DHA may provide a new strategy for improving impaired glucose tolerance in type 2 diabetes mellitus by stimulating GLP-1 secretion, which may subsequently suppress the compensatory hyperplasia of pancreatic islets. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Decreased senescence marker protein-30 could be a factor that contributes to the worsening of glucose tolerance in normal aging.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Goji

    2010-01-01

    In our recent paper, we proposed that senescence marker protein-30 (SMP30) could be a novel molecule which was involved in an impairment of β-cell function with aging. SMP30 knockout (KO) mice and wild-type (WT) mice were fed a standard diet (SD) or a high fat diet (HFD) for 8 weeks from 7 weeks of age. In an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test at 15 weeks of age, blood glucose levels in SD-fed KO mice were significantly increased by 25% at 30 min after glucose administration compared to SD-fed WT mice. Insulin levels in SD-fed KO mice were significantly decreased by 37% at 30 min postglucose compared to SD-fed WT mice. Interestingly, an insulin tolerance test showed a greater glucose lowering effect in SD-fed KO mice. Morphometric analysis revealed no differences in the degree of HFD-induced compensatory increase in β-cell mass and proliferation. Collectively, these data indicate that impairment of the early phase of insulin secretion underlies glucose intolerance in KO mice. Decreased SMP30 may contribute to the worsening of glucose tolerance that occurs in normal aging.

  13. Lowered fasting chenodeoxycholic acid correlated with the decrease of fibroblast growth factor 19 in Chinese subjects with impaired fasting glucose.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Li, Huating; Zhou, Hu; Fang, Li; Xu, Jingjing; Yan, Han; Chen, Shuqin; Song, Qianqian; Zhang, Yinan; Xu, Aimin; Fang, Qichen; Ye, Yang; Jia, Weiping

    2017-07-20

    The gut-derived hormone Fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) could regulate glucose metabolism and is induced by bile acids (BAs) through activating Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR). FGF19 was found to decrease in subjects with isolated-impaired fasting glucose (I-IFG) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, the reason for the change of FGF19 in subjects with different glucometabolic status remained unclear. Here we measured six BAs including chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), cholic acid, deoxycholic acid, their glycine conjugates and FGF19 levels during oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in normal glucose tolerance (NGT), isolated-impaired glucose tolerance, I-IFG, combined glucose intolerance (CGI) and T2DM subjects. After OGTT, serum FGF19 peaked at 120 min in all subjects. Glycine conjugated BAs peaked at 30 min, while free BAs did not elevated significantly. Consistent with the decrease trend in FGF19 levels, fasting serum CDCA levels in subjects with I-IFG, CGI and T2DM were significantly lower than NGT subjects (P < 0.05). Fasting serum CDCA was independently associated with FGF19. CDCA strongly upregulated FGF19 mRNA levels in LS174T cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. These results suggest that the decrease of FGF19 in subjects with I-IFG was at least partially due to their decrease of CDCA acting via FXR.

  14. Impaired Glucose Metabolism in Mice Lacking the Tas1r3 Taste Receptor Gene.

    PubMed

    Murovets, Vladimir O; Bachmanov, Alexander A; Zolotarev, Vasiliy A

    2015-01-01

    The G-protein-coupled sweet taste receptor dimer T1R2/T1R3 is expressed in taste bud cells in the oral cavity. In recent years, its involvement in membrane glucose sensing was discovered in endocrine cells regulating glucose homeostasis. We investigated importance of extraorally expressed T1R3 taste receptor protein in age-dependent control of blood glucose homeostasis in vivo, using nonfasted mice with a targeted mutation of the Tas1r3 gene that encodes the T1R3 protein. Glucose and insulin tolerance tests, as well as behavioral tests measuring taste responses to sucrose solutions, were performed with C57BL/6ByJ (Tas1r3+/+) inbred mice bearing the wild-type allele and C57BL/6J-Tas1r3tm1Rfm mice lacking the entire Tas1r3 coding region and devoid of the T1R3 protein (Tas1r3-/-). Compared with Tas1r3+/+ mice, Tas1r3-/- mice lacked attraction to sucrose in brief-access licking tests, had diminished taste preferences for sucrose solutions in the two-bottle tests, and had reduced insulin sensitivity and tolerance to glucose administered intraperitoneally or intragastrically, which suggests that these effects are due to absence of T1R3. Impairment of glucose clearance in Tas1r3-/- mice was exacerbated with age after intraperitoneal but not intragastric administration of glucose, pointing to a compensatory role of extraoral T1R3-dependent mechanisms in offsetting age-dependent decline in regulation of glucose homeostasis. Incretin effects were similar in Tas1r3+/+ and Tas1r3-/- mice, which suggests that control of blood glucose clearance is associated with effects of extraoral T1R3 in tissues other than the gastrointestinal tract. Collectively, the obtained data demonstrate that the T1R3 receptor protein plays an important role in control of glucose homeostasis not only by regulating sugar intake but also via its extraoral function, probably in the pancreas and brain.

  15. Impaired Glucose Metabolism in Mice Lacking the Tas1r3 Taste Receptor Gene

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The G-protein-coupled sweet taste receptor dimer T1R2/T1R3 is expressed in taste bud cells in the oral cavity. In recent years, its involvement in membrane glucose sensing was discovered in endocrine cells regulating glucose homeostasis. We investigated importance of extraorally expressed T1R3 taste receptor protein in age-dependent control of blood glucose homeostasis in vivo, using nonfasted mice with a targeted mutation of the Tas1r3 gene that encodes the T1R3 protein. Glucose and insulin tolerance tests, as well as behavioral tests measuring taste responses to sucrose solutions, were performed with C57BL/6ByJ (Tas1r3+/+) inbred mice bearing the wild-type allele and C57BL/6J-Tas1r3tm1Rfm mice lacking the entire Tas1r3 coding region and devoid of the T1R3 protein (Tas1r3-/-). Compared with Tas1r3+/+ mice, Tas1r3-/- mice lacked attraction to sucrose in brief-access licking tests, had diminished taste preferences for sucrose solutions in the two-bottle tests, and had reduced insulin sensitivity and tolerance to glucose administered intraperitoneally or intragastrically, which suggests that these effects are due to absence of T1R3. Impairment of glucose clearance in Tas1r3-/- mice was exacerbated with age after intraperitoneal but not intragastric administration of glucose, pointing to a compensatory role of extraoral T1R3-dependent mechanisms in offsetting age-dependent decline in regulation of glucose homeostasis. Incretin effects were similar in Tas1r3+/+ and Tas1r3-/- mice, which suggests that control of blood glucose clearance is associated with effects of extraoral T1R3 in tissues other than the gastrointestinal tract. Collectively, the obtained data demonstrate that the T1R3 receptor protein plays an important role in control of glucose homeostasis not only by regulating sugar intake but also via its extraoral function, probably in the pancreas and brain. PMID:26107521

  16. Effects of an oral glucose tolerance test on the myogenic response in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Lott, Mary E J; Hogeman, Cynthia; Herr, Michael; Gabbay, Robert; Sinoway, Lawrence I

    2007-01-01

    The myogenic response, the inherent ability of blood vessels to rapidly respond to changes in transmural pressure, is involved in local blood flow autoregulation. Animal studies suggest that both acute hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia may impair myogenic vasoconstriction. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an oral glucose load on brachial mean blood velocity (MBV) during increases in forearm transmural pressure in humans. Eight healthy men and women (38 +/- 5 yr) underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). MBV (in cm/s; Doppler ultrasound) responses to a rise in forearm transmural pressure (arm tank suction, -50 mmHg) were studied before and every 30 min for 120 min during the OGTT. Before the start of the OGTT, MBV was lower than baseline values 30 and 60 s after the application of negative pressure. This suggests that myogenic constriction was present. During the OGTT, blood glucose rose from 88 +/- 2 to 120 +/- 6 mg/dl (P < 0.05) and insulin rose from 14 +/- 1 to 101 +/- 32 microU/ml (P < 0.05). Glucose loading attenuated the reduction in MBV with arm suction (Delta-0.73 +/- 0.14 vs. Delta-1.67 +/- 0.43 cm/s and Delta-1.07 +/- 0.14 vs. Delta-2.38 +/- 0.54 cm/s, respectively, during 30 and 60 s of suction postglucose compared with preglucose values; all P < 0.05). We observed no such time effect for myogenic responses during a sham OGTT. In an additional 5 subjects, glucose loading had no effect on brachial diameters with the application of negative pressure. Oral glucose loading leads to attenuated myogenic vasoconstriction in healthy individuals. The role that this diminished postglucose reactivity plays in mediating postprandial hypotension and/or orthostasis needs to be further explored.

  17. Biomarkers in Fasting Serum to Estimate Glucose Tolerance, Insulin Sensitivity, and Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Goldfine, Allison B.; Gerwien, Robert W.; Kolberg, Janice A.; O’Shea, Sheila; Hamren, Sarah; Hein, Glenn P.; Xu, Xiaomei M.; Patti, Mary Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Biomarkers for estimating reduced glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, or impaired insulin secretion would be clinically useful, since these physiologic measures are important in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. METHODS We conducted a cross-sectional study in which 94 individuals, of whom 84 had 1 or more risk factors and 10 had no known risk factors for diabetes, underwent oral glucose tolerance testing. We measured 34 protein biomarkers associated with diabetes risk in 250-μL fasting serum samples. We applied multiple regression selection techniques to identify the most informative biomarkers and develop multivariate models to estimate glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and insulin secretion. The ability of the glucose tolerance model to discriminate between diabetic individuals and those with impaired or normal glucose tolerance was evaluated by area under the ROC curve (AUC) analysis. RESULTS Of the at-risk participants, 25 (30%) were found to have impaired glucose tolerance, and 11 (13%) diabetes. Using molecular counting technology, we assessed multiple biomarkers with high accuracy in small volume samples. Multivariate biomarker models derived from fasting samples correlated strongly with 2-h postload glucose tolerance (R2 = 0.45, P < 0.0001), composite insulin sensitivity index (R2 = 0.91, P < 0.0001), and insulin secretion (R2 = 0.45, P < 0.0001). Additionally, the glucose tolerance model provided strong discrimination between diabetes vs impaired or normal glucose tolerance (AUC 0.89) and between diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance vs normal tolerance (AUC 0.78). CONCLUSIONS Biomarkers in fasting blood samples may be useful in estimating glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and insulin secretion. PMID:21149503

  18. Glucose tolerance during pregnancy in Asian women.

    PubMed

    Samanta, A; Burden, M L; Burden, A C; Jones, G R

    1989-08-01

    The present study was aimed at examining differences in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) between two ethnic populations (immigrant Asians and indigenous White Caucasians) residing in Leicester, U.K. The study was divided into two parts: to determine the prevalence of GDM and to determine the level at which glycaemia may impose a risk to the mother and the foetus. Of a total of 12,005 pregnancies (4561 Asian and 7444 White Caucasian), over a 3-year period, 314 (6.8%) Asian and 504 (6.7%) White Caucasian were given a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) at 28-32 weeks for indications of 'large for date' pregnancies, hydramnios, glycosuria, a history of previous abortions, stillbirths, congenital abnormalities or glucose intolerance, and family history of diabetes. Abnormal glucose tolerance (AGT) was taken as a 2-h venous plasma glucose greater than or equal to 7.8 mmol/l which reverted to normal when formally tested during the puerperium (WHO criteria, 1985). AGT was found in 1.38% Asian and 0.87% White Caucasian pregnancies (P less than 0.01). This was further divided into impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) (2-h value 7.8-11.1 mmol/l) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) (2-h value greater than or equal to 11.1 mmol/l). IGT was found in 1.2% Asian and 0.84% White Caucasian pregnancies (P less than 0.01), and GDM in 0.18% and 0.02% respectively (P less than 0.01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Glucose intolerance in uremic patients: the relative contributions of impaired beta-cell function and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Alvestrand, A; Mujagic, M; Wajngot, A; Efendic, S

    1989-04-01

    Glucose tolerance and tissue sensitivity to insulin were examined in 19 renal failure patients on chronic regular hemodialysis (group U) and in 6 matched control subjects with normal renal function (group A). Based on glucose tolerance as assessed by an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), glucose tolerance was normal in 5 (group U:N), borderline in 5 (group U:BL) and decreased in 9 uremic subjects (group U:D). Compared with group A the uremics demonstrated significantly (p less than 0.01) impaired insulin sensitivity as assessed by a continuous mixed infusion of somatostatin, insulin and glucose (SIGIT). In addition 19 non-diabetic subjects with normal fasting blood glucose and normal renal function, matching the uremic patients with respect to glucose tolerance as assessed by OGTT, were studied (group B). In group B impairments in both insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity tended to be more pronounced in subjects with decreased OGTT as compared with those with borderline OGTT. In contrast, insulin resistance was present to a similar degree in uremic subjects of group U:N, U:BL and U:D. During SIGIT endogenous insulin, glucagon and growth hormone (GH) were suppressed in both uremic and control subjects. This implies that insulin resistance in uremia is most likely not due to hyperglucagonemia or abnormal GH metabolism. During OGTT subjects of group U:N had significantly higher insulin response than subjects of group U:BL (p less than 0.02) and group U:D (p less than 0.01). Insulinogenic index was significantly higher in group U:N than in group U:BL (p less than 0.02) and group U:D (p = 0.01) and was higher in group U:BL than in group U:D (p less than 0.02).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Reduced plasma levels of glucagon-like peptide-1 in elderly men are associated with impaired glucose tolerance but not with coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Nathanson, D; Zethelius, B; Berne, C; Holst, J J; Sjöholm, A; Nyström, T

    2010-02-01

    Besides the insulinotropic effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) mimetics, their effects on endothelial dysfunction and myocardial ischaemia are of interest. No previous study has investigated associations between plasma levels of GLP-1 and CHD. We investigated longitudinal relationships of fasting GLP-1 with the dynamic GLP-1 response after OGTT (difference between 60 min OGTT-stimulated and fasting GLP-1 levels [DeltaGLP-1]) and CHD in a population-based cohort of 71-year-old men. In the same cohort, we also cross-sectionally investigated the association between stimulated GLP-1 levels and: (1) cardiovascular risk factors (blood pressure, lipids, urinary albumin, waist circumference and insulin sensitivity index [M/I] assessed by euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp); and (2) impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and type 2 diabetes mellitus. During the follow-up period (maximum 13.8 years), of 294 participants with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), 69 experienced a CHD event (13.8 years), as did 42 of 141 with IGT and 32 of 74 with type 2 diabetes mellitus. DeltaGLP-1 did not predict CHD (HR 1.0, 95% CI 0.52-2.28). The prevalence of IGT was associated with DeltaGLP-1, lowest vs highest quartile (OR 0.3, 95% CI 0.12-0.58), with no such association for type 2 diabetes mellitus (OR 1.0, 95% CI 0.38-2.86). M/I was significantly associated with DeltaGLP-1 in the type 2 diabetes mellitus group (r = 0.38, p < 0.01), but not in the IGT (r = 0.11, p = 0.28) or NGT (r = 0.10, p = 0.16) groups. Impaired GLP-1 secretion is associated with IGT, but not with type 2 diabetes mellitus. This finding in the latter group might be confounded by oral glucose-lowering treatment. GLP-1 does not predict CHD. Although DeltaGLP-1 was associated with insulin sensitivity in the type 2 diabetes mellitus group, GLP-1 does not seem to be a predictor of CHD in insulin-resistant patients.

  1. The effect of short-term dietary supplementation with glucose on gastric emptying of glucose and fructose and oral glucose tolerance in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, M; Cunningham, K M; Wishart, J M; Jones, K L; Read, N W

    1996-04-01

    Recent observations indicate that gastric emptying may be influenced by patterns of previous nutrient intake. The aims of this study were to determine the effects of a high glucose diet on gastric emptying of glucose and fructose, and the impact of any changes in gastric emptying on plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin and gastric inhibitory polypeptide in response to glucose and fructose loads. Gastric emptying of glucose and fructose (both 75 g dissolved in 350 ml water) were measured in seven normal volunteers on separate days while each was on a "standard' diet and an identical diet supplemented with 440 g/day of glucose for 4-7 days. Venous blood samples for measurement of plasma glucose, insulin and gastric inhibitory polypeptide levels were taken immediately before and for 180 min after ingestion of glucose and fructose loads. Dietary glucose supplementation accelerated gastric emptying of glucose (50% emptying time 82 +/- 8 vs 106 +/- 10 min, p = 0.004) and fructose (73 +/- 9 vs 106 +/- 9 min, p = 0.001). After ingestion of glucose, plasma concentrations of insulin (p < 0.05) and gastric inhibitory polypeptide (p < 0.05) were higher during the glucose-supplemented diet. In contrast, plasma glucose concentrations at 60 min and 75 min were lower (p < 0.05) on the glucose-supplemented diet. We conclude that short-term supplementation of the diet with glucose accelerates gastric emptying of glucose and fructose, presumably as a result of reduced feedback inhibition of gastric emptying from small intestinal luminal receptors. More rapid gastric emptying of glucose has a significant impact on glucose tolerance.

  2. Changes in the serum composition of free-fatty acids during an intravenous glucose tolerance test.

    PubMed

    Soriguer, Federico; García-Serrano, Sara; García-Almeida, Jose M; Garrido-Sánchez, Lourdes; García-Arnés, Juan; Tinahones, Francisco J; Cardona, Isabel; Rivas-Marín, Jose; Gallego-Perales, Jose L; García-Fuentes, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that measuring the free-fatty acids (FFA) during an intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) may provide information about the metabolic associations between serum FFA and carbohydrate and insulin metabolism. We evaluated the FFA profile during an IVGTT and determined whether this test changes the composition and concentration of FFA. An IVGTT was given to 38 severely obese persons before and 7 months after undergoing bariatric surgery and also to 12 healthy, nonobese persons. The concentration and composition of the FFA were studied at different times during the test. The concentration of FFA fell significantly faster during the IVGTT in the controls and in the severely obese persons with normal-fasting glucose (NFG) than in the severely obese persons with impaired-fasting glucose (IFG) or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) (P < 0.05). Significant differences were found in the time to minimum serum concentrations of FFA (control = NFG < IFG < T2DM) (P < 0.001). These variables improved after bariatric surgery in the three groups. The percentage of monounsaturated and n-6 polyunsaturated FFA in the control subjects and in the obese persons, both before and after surgery, decreased significantly during the IVGTT. In conclusion, during an IVGTT, severely obese persons with IFG or T2DM experienced a lower fall in the FFA than the severely obese persons with NFG and the controls, becoming normal after bariatric surgery.

  3. Simulation of oral glucose tolerance tests and the corresponding isoglycemic intravenous glucose infusion studies for calculation of the incretin effect.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myeungseon; Oh, Tae Jung; Lee, Jung Chan; Choi, Karam; Kim, Min Young; Kim, Hee Chan; Cho, Young Min; Kim, Sungwan

    2014-03-01

    The incretin effect, which is a unique stimulus of insulin secretion in response to oral ingestion of nutrients, is calculated by the difference in insulin secretory responses from an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and a corresponding isoglycemic intravenous glucose infusion (IIGI) study. The OGTT model of this study, which is individualized by fitting the glucose profiles during an OGTT, was developed to predict the glucose profile during an IIGI study in the same subject. Also, the model predicts the insulin and incretin profiles during both studies. The incretin effect, estimated by simulation, was compared with that measured by physiologic studies from eight human subjects with normal glucose tolerance, and the result exhibited a good correlation (r > 0.8); the incretin effect from the simulation was 56.5% ± 10.6% while the one from the measured data was 52.5% ± 19.6%. In conclusion, the parameters of the OGTT model have been successfully estimated to predict the profiles of both OGTTs and IIGI studies. Therefore, with glucose data from the OGTT alone, this model could control and predict the physiologic responses, including insulin secretion during OGTTs and IIGI studies, which could eventually eliminate the need for complex and cumbersome IIGI studies in incretin research.

  4. Impaired glucose homeostasis in transgenic mice expressing the human transient neonatal diabetes mellitus locus, TNDM

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Dan; Shield, Julian P.H.; Dean, Wendy; Leclerc, Isabelle; Knauf, Claude; Burcelin, Rémy; Rutter, Guy A.; Kelsey, Gavin

    2004-01-01

    Transient neonatal diabetes mellitus (TNDM) is a rare inherited diabetic syndrome apparent in the first weeks of life and again during early adulthood. The relative contributions of reduced islet β cell number and impaired β cell function to the observed hypoinsulinemia are unclear. The inheritance pattern of this imprinted disorder implicates overexpression of one or both genes within the TNDM locus: ZAC, which encodes a proapoptotic zinc finger protein, and HYMAI, which encodes an untranslated mRNA. To investigate the consequences for pancreatic function, we have developed a high-copy transgenic mouse line, TNDM29, carrying the human TNDM locus. TNDM29 neonates display hyperglycemia, and older adults, impaired glucose tolerance. Neonatal hyperglycemia occurs only on paternal transmission, analogous to paternal dependence of TNDM in humans. Embryonic pancreata of TNDM29 mice showed reductions in expression of endocrine differentiation factors and numbers of insulin-staining structures. By contrast, β cell mass was normal or elevated at all postnatal stages, whereas pancreatic insulin content in neonates and peak serum insulin levels after glucose infusion in adults were reduced. Expression of human ZAC and HYMAI in these transgenic mice thus recapitulates key features of TNDM and implicates impaired development of the endocrine pancreas and β cell function in disease pathogenesis. PMID:15286800

  5. Acute fructose administration decreases the glycemic response to an oral glucose tolerance test in normal adults.

    PubMed

    Moore, M C; Cherrington, A D; Mann, S L; Davis, S N

    2000-12-01

    In animal models, a small (catalytic) dose of fructose administered with glucose decreases the glycemic response to the glucose load. Therefore, we examined the effect of fructose on glucose tolerance in 11 healthy human volunteers (5 men and 6 women). Each subject underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) on 2 separate occasions, at least 1 week apart. Each OGTT consisted of 75 g glucose with or without 7.5 g fructose (OGTT+F or OGTT-F), in random order. Arterialized blood samples were obtained from a heated dorsal hand vein twice before ingestion of the carbohydrate and every 15 min for 2 h afterward. The area under the curve (AUC) of the change in plasma glucose was 19% less in OGTT+F vs. OGTT-F (P: < 0.05). Glucose tolerance was improved by fructose in 9 subjects and worsened in 2. All 6 subjects with the largest glucose AUC during OGTT-F had a decreased response during OGTT+F (31 +/- 5% decrease). The insulin AUC did not differ between the 2 studies. Of the 9 subjects with improved glucose tolerance during the OGTT+F, 5 had smaller insulin AUC during the OGTT+F than the OGTT-F. Plasma glucagon concentrations declined similarly during OGTT-F and OGTT+F. The blood lactate response was about 50% greater during the OGTT+F (P: < 0.05). Neither nonesterified fatty acid nor triglyceride concentrations differed between the two OGTT. In conclusion, low dose fructose improves the glycemic response to an oral glucose load in normal adults without significantly enhancing the insulin or triglyceride response. Fructose appears most effective in those normal individuals who have the poorest glucose tolerance.

  6. Impaired Glucose Tolerance and Insulin Resistance Are Associated With Increased Adipose 11β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 1 Expression and Elevated Hepatic 5α-Reductase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Tomlinson, Jeremy W.; Finney, Joanne; Gay, Christopher; Hughes, Beverly A.; Hughes, Susan V.; Stewart, Paul M.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—The precise molecular mechanisms contributing to the development of insulin resistance, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and type 2 diabetes are largely unknown. Altered endogenous glucocorticoid metabolism, including 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1), which generates active cortisol from cortisone, and 5α-reductase (5αR), which inactivates cortisol, has been implicated. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—A total of 101 obese patients (mean age 48 ± 7 years, BMI 34.4 ± 4.3 kg/m2, 66 women, 35 men) underwent 75-g oral glucose tolerance testing (OGTT), body composition analysis (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), assessment of glucocorticoid metabolism (24-h urine steroid metabolite analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry), and subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue biopsies. RESULTS—A total of 22.7% of women had IGT compared with 34.2% of men. Two women and five men were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. In women, adipose 11β-HSD1 expression was increased in patients with IGT and correlated with glucose levels across the OGTT (R = 0.44, P < 0.001) but was independent of fat mass. Total glucocorticoid secretion was higher in men with and without IGT (normal 13,743 ± 863 vs. 7,453 ± 469 μg/24 h, P < 0.001; IGT 16,871 ± 2,113 vs. 10,133 ± 1,488 μg/24 h, P < 0.05), and in women, it was higher in those with IGT (7,453 ± 469 vs. 10,133 ± 1,488 μg/24 h, P < 0.001). In both sexes, 5αR activity correlated with fasting insulin (men R = 0.53, P = 0.003; women R = 0.33, P = 0.02), insulin secretion across an OGTT (men R = 0.46, P = 0.01; women R = 0.40, P = 0.004), and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (men R = 0.52, P = 0.004; women R = 0.33, P = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS—Increased adipose 11β-HSD1 expression in women may contribute to glucose intolerance. Enhanced 5αR activity in both sexes is associated with insulin resistance but not body composition. Augmented glucocorticoid inactivation may serve as a

  7. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial comparing the effects of amiloride and hydrochlorothiazide on glucose tolerance in patients with essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Stears, Anna J; Woods, Sarah H; Watts, Michaela M; Burton, Timothy J; Graggaber, Johann; Mir, Fraz A; Brown, Morris J

    2012-05-01

    Hypertension guidelines advise limiting the dose of thiazide diuretics and avoiding combination with β-blockade, because of increased risk of diabetes mellitus. We tested whether changes in the 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test could be detected after 4 weeks of treatment with a thiazide and could be avoided by switching to amiloride. Two double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover studies were performed. In study 1 (41 patients), we found that changes in glucose during a 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test could be detected after 4 weeks of treatment with bendroflumethiazide. In study 2, 37 patients with essential hypertension received, in random order, 4 weeks of once-daily treatment with hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) 25 to 50 mg, nebivolol 5 to 10 mg, combination (HCTZ 25-50 mg+nebivolol 5-10 mg), amiloride (10-20 mg), and placebo. Each drug was force titrated at 2 weeks and separated by a 4-week placebo washout. At each visit, we recorded blood pressure and performed a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. Primary outcome was the difference in glucose (over the 2 hours of the oral glucose tolerance test) between 0 and 4 weeks, when HCTZ and amiloride were compared by repeated-measures analysis. For similar blood pressure reductions, there were opposite changes in glucose between the 2 diuretics (P<0.0001). Nebivolol did not impair glucose tolerance, either alone or in combination. There was a negative correlation between Δpotassium and Δ2-hour glucose (r=-0.28; P<0.0001). In 2 crossover studies, 4 weeks of treatment with a thiazide diuretic impaired glucose tolerance. No impairment was seen with K(+)-sparing diuretic or β(1)-selective blockade. Substitution or addition of amiloride may be the solution to preventing thiazide-induced diabetes mellitus.

  8. Evaluation of a Standardized Extract from Morus alba against α-Glucosidase Inhibitory Effect and Postprandial Antihyperglycemic in Patients with Impaired Glucose Tolerance: A Randomized Double-Blind Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Seung Hwan; Li, Hong Mei; Wang, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the antihyperglycemic effect of a standardized extract of the leaves of Morus alba (SEMA), the present study was designed to investigate the α-glucosidase inhibitory effect and acute single oral toxicity as well as evaluate blood glucose reduction in animals and in patients with impaired glucose tolerance in a randomized double-blind clinical trial. SEMA was found to inhibit α-glucosidase at a fourfold higher level than the positive control (acarbose), in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, blood glucose concentration was suppressed by SEMA in vivo. Clinical signs and weight changes were observed when conducting an evaluation of the acute toxicity of SEMA through a single-time administration, with clinical observation conducted more than once each day. After administration of the SEMA, observation was for 14 days; all of the animals did not die and did not show any abnormal symptoms. In addition, the inhibitory effects of rice coated with SEMA were evaluated in a group of impaired glucose tolerance patients on postprandial glucose and a group of normal persons, and results showed that SEMA had a clear inhibitory effect on postprandial hyperglycemia in both groups. Overall, SEMA showed excellent potential in the present study as a material for improving postprandial hyperglycemia. PMID:27974904

  9. Glucose concentration regulates freeze tolerance in the wood frog Rana sylvatica.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, J P; Lee, R E; Lortz, P H

    1993-08-01

    In spring, the lowest temperature during freezing that can be survived by wood frogs (Rana sylvatica) from southern Ohio is approximately -3 degrees C. We investigated whether the thermal limit of freeze tolerance in these frogs is regulated by tissue levels of glucose, a putative cryoprotectant that is distributed to tissues during freezing. Frogs receiving exogenous glucose injections prior to freezing showed dose-dependent increases in glucose within the heart, liver, skeletal muscle and blood. Tissue glucose concentrations were further elevated during freezing by the production of endogenous glucose. Most glucose-loaded frogs survived freezing to -5 degrees C, whereas all control (saline-injected) frogs succumbed. Further, we investigated some mechanisms by which glucose might function as a cryoprotectant in R. sylvatica. Organ dehydration, a normal, beneficial response that reduces freezing injury to tissues, occurred independently of tissue glucose concentrations. However, elevated glucose levels reduced both body ice content and in vivo erythrocyte injury. These results not only provided conclusive evidence for glucose's cryoprotective role in R. sylvatica, but also revealed that tissue glucose level is a critical determinant of freeze tolerance capacity in this species.

  10. Continuous glucose monitoring, oral glucose tolerance, and insulin - glucose parameters in adolescents with simple obesity.

    PubMed

    El Awwa, A; Soliman, A; Al-Ali, M; Yassin, M; De Sanctis, V

    2012-09-01

    In obese adolescents pancreatic beta-cells may not be able to cope with insulin resistance leading to hyperglycemia and type2 diabetes (T2DM To assess oral glucose tolerance, 72-h continuous blood glucose concentrations (CGM) and calculate homeostatic model assessment (HOMA), and the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) in 13 adolescents with simple obesity (BMI SDS=4 ± 1.06). OGTT performed in 13 obese adolescents (13.47 ± 3 years) revealed 3 cases (23%) with impaired fasting glucose (IFG: fasting glucose >5.6 mmol/L), 4 cases (30%) with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT: 2h blood glucose >7.8 <11.1 mmol/L), and none with diabetes. Using the continuous glucose monitoring system ( CGMS), IFG was detected in 4 cases, the maximum serum blood glucose (BG : 2h or more after meal) was >7.8 and <11.1 mmol/L (IGT) in 9 children (69%) and >11.1 mmol/L (diabetes) in one case (7.6%). Five cases had a minimum BG recorded of <2.7 mmol/L (hypoglycemia). No glycemic abnormality was detected using HbA1C (5.7 ± 0.3%). 11/13 patients had HOMA values >2.6 and QUICKI values <0.35 denoting insulin resistance. Beta cell mass percent (B %) = 200 ± 94.8% and insulin sensitivity values (IS)=50.4 ± 45.5% denoted insulin resistance with hyper-insulinaemia and preserved beta cell mass. In obese adolescents, CGMS is superior to OGTT and HbA1C in detecting glycemic abnormalities, which appears to be secondary to insulin resistance.

  11. Involvement of pregnane X receptor in the impaired glucose utilization induced by atorvastatin in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ling, Zhaoli; Shu, Nan; Xu, Ping; Wang, Fan; Zhong, Zeyu; Sun, Binbin; Li, Feng; Zhang, Mian; Zhao, Kaijing; Tang, Xiange; Wang, Zhongjian; Zhu, Liang; Liu, Li; Liu, Xiaodong

    2016-01-15

    Accumulating evidences demonstrated that statins impaired glucose utilization. This study was aimed to investigate whether PXR was involved in the atorvastatin-impaired glucose utilization. Rifampicin/PCN served as PXR activator control. Glucose utilization, glucose uptake, protein levels of GLUT2, GCK, PDK2, PEPCK1 and G6Pase in HepG2 cells were measured. PXR inhibitors, PXR overexpression and PXR siRNA were applied to verify the role of PXR in atorvastatin-impaired glucose utilization in cells. Hypercholesterolemia rats induced by high fat diet feeding, orally received atorvastatin (5 and 10 mg/kg), pravastatin (10 mg/kg) for 14 days, or intraperitoneally received PCN (35 mg/kg) for 4 days. Results showed that glucose utilization was markedly inhibited by atorvastatin, simvastatin, pitavastatin, lovastatin and rifampicin. Neither rosuvastatin nor pravastatin showed the similar effect. Atorvastatin and pravastatin were selected for the following study. Atorvastatin and rifampicin significantly inhibited glucose uptake and down-regulated GLUT2 and GCK expressions. Similarly, overexpressed PXR significantly down-regulated GLUT2 and GCK expressions and impaired glucose utilization. Ketoconazole and resveratrol attenuated the impaired glucose utilization by atorvastatin and rifampicin in both parental and overexpressed PXR cells. PXR knockdown significantly up-regulated GLUT2 and GCK proteins and abolished the decreased glucose consumption and uptake by atorvastatin and rifampicin. Animal experiments showed that atorvastatin and PCN significantly elicited postprandial hyperglycemia, leading to increase in glucose AUC. Expressions of GLUT2 and GCK in rat livers were markedly down-regulated by atorvastatin and PCN. In conclusion, atorvastatin impaired glucose utilization in hepatocytes via repressing GLUT2 and GCK expressions, which may be partly due to PXR activation.

  12. Glucose tolerance in mice is linked to the dose of the p53 transactivation domain

    PubMed Central

    Franck, Debra; Tracy, Laura; Armata, Heather L.; Delaney, Christine L.; Jung, Dae Young; Ko, Hwi Jin; Ong, Helena; Kim, Jason K.; Scrable, Heidi; Sluss, Hayla K.

    2016-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 has a critical role in maintenance of glucose homeostasis. Phosphorylation of Ser18 in the transaction domain of p53 controls the expression of Zpf385a, a zinc finger protein that regulates adipogenesis and adipose function. Mice with a mutation in p53Ser18 exhibit reduced Zpf385a expression in adipose tissue, adipose tissue-specific insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance. Mice with relative deficits in the transactivation domain of p53 exhibit similar defects in glucose homeostasis, while “Super p53” mice with an increased dosage of p53 exhibit improved glucose tolerance. These data support the role of an ATM—p53 cellular stress axis that helps combat glucose intolerance and insulin resistance and regulates glucose homeostasis. PMID:23102272

  13. Effect of lifestyle interventions on cardiovascular risk factors among adults without impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuanping; Devlin, Heather M; Smith, Bryce; Imperatore, Giuseppina; Thomas, William; Lobelo, Felipe; Ali, Mohammed K; Norris, Keri; Gruss, Stephanie; Bardenheier, Barbara; Cho, Pyone; Garcia de Quevedo, Isabel; Mudaliar, Uma; Jones, Christopher D; Durthaler, Jeffrey M; Saaddine, Jinan; Geiss, Linda S; Gregg, Edward W

    2017-01-01

    Structured lifestyle interventions can reduce diabetes incidence and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk among persons with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), but it is unclear whether they should be implemented among persons without IGT. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analyses to assess the effectiveness of lifestyle interventions on CVD risk among adults without IGT or diabetes. We systematically searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, and PsychInfo databases, from inception to May 4, 2016. We selected randomized controlled trials of lifestyle interventions, involving physical activity (PA), dietary (D), or combined strategies (PA+D) with follow-up duration ≥12 months. We excluded all studies that included individuals with IGT, confirmed by 2-hours oral glucose tolerance test (75g), but included all other studies recruiting populations with different glycemic levels. We stratified studies by baseline glycemic levels: (1) low-range group with mean fasting plasma glucose (FPG) <5.5mmol/L or glycated hemoglobin (A1C) <5.5%, and (2) high-range group with FPG ≥5.5mmol/L or A1C ≥5.5%, and synthesized data using random-effects models. Primary outcomes in this review included systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides (TG). Totally 79 studies met inclusion criteria. Compared to usual care (UC), lifestyle interventions achieved significant improvements in SBP (-2.16mmHg[95%CI, -2.93, -1.39]), DBP (-1.83mmHg[-2.34, -1.31]), TC (-0.10mmol/L[-0.15, -0.05]), LDL-C (-0.09mmol/L[-0.13, -0.04]), HDL-C (0.03mmol/L[0.01, 0.04]), and TG (-0.08mmol/L[-0.14, -0.03]). Similar effects were observed among both low-and high-range study groups except for TC and TG. Similar effects also appeared in SBP and DBP categories regardless of follow-up duration. PA+D interventions had larger

  14. Reduced glycaemic and insulinaemic responses following trehalose and isomaltulose ingestion: implications for postprandial substrate use in impaired glucose-tolerant subjects.

    PubMed

    van Can, Judith G P; van Loon, Luc J C; Brouns, Fred; Blaak, Ellen E

    2012-10-01

    The impact of slowly digestible sugars in reducing the risk of developing obesity and related metabolic disorders remains unclear. We hypothesised that such carbohydrates (CHO), resulting in a lower glycaemic and insulinaemic response, may lead to greater postprandial fat oxidation rates in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). The present study intends to compare the postprandial metabolic responses to the ingestion of glucose (GLUC) v. trehalose (TRE) and sucrose (SUC) v. isomaltulose (IMU). In a randomised, single-blind, cross-over design, ten overweight IGT subjects were studied four times, following ingestion of different CHO drinks either at breakfast or in combination with a mixed meal at lunch. Before and 3 h after CHO ingestion, energy expenditure, substrate utilisation and circulating metabolite concentrations were determined. Ingestion of CHO drinks with a meal resulted in an attenuated rise in GLUC (-33 %) and insulin (-14 %) concentrations following TRE when compared with GLUC and following IMU, an attenuation of 43 and 34 % when compared with SUC ingestion, respectively. Additionally, there was less inhibition of the rise in NEFA concentrations and less decline in postprandial fat oxidation (22 %) after IMU when compared with SUC, whereas TRE did not differ from GLUC. The attenuated rise in GLUC and insulin concentrations following IMU ingestion attenuated the postprandial inhibition of fat oxidation compared with SUC when co-ingested with a meal. This suggests that exchange of SUC in the diet for IMU may result in a more favourable metabolic response and may help to reduce the risks associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  15. Intestinal transit of a glucose bolus and incretin kinetics: a mathematical model with application to the oral glucose tolerance test.

    PubMed

    Salinari, Serenella; Bertuzzi, Alessandro; Mingrone, Geltrude

    2011-06-01

    The rate of appearance (R(a)) of exogenous glucose in plasma after glucose ingestion is presently measured by tracer techniques that cannot be used in standard clinical testing such as the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). We propose a mathematical model that represents in a simple way the gastric emptying, the transport of glucose along the intestinal tract, and its absorption from gut lumen into portal blood. The model gives the R(a) time course in terms of parameters with a physiological counterpart and provides an expression for the release of incretin hormones as related to glucose transit into gut lumen. Glucose absorption was represented by assuming two components related to a proximal and a distal transporter. Model performance was evaluated by numerical simulations. The model was then validated by fitting OGTT glucose and GLP-1 data in healthy controls and type 2 diabetic patients, and useful information was obtained for the rate of gastric emptying, the rate of glucose absorption, the R(a) profile, the insulin sensitivity, and the glucose effectiveness. Model-derived estimates of insulin sensitivity were well correlated (r = 0.929 in controls and 0.886 in diabetic patients) to data obtained from the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp. Although the proposed OGTT analysis requires the measurement of an additional hormone concentration (GLP-1), it appears to be a reasonable choice since it avoids complex and expensive techniques, such as isotopes for glucose R(a) measurement and direct assessment of gastric emptying and intestinal transit, and gives additional correlated information, thus largely compensating for the extra expense.

  16. Metabolic syndrome components and their response to lifestyle and metformin interventions are associated with differences in diabetes risk in persons with impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Florez, H; Temprosa, M G; Orchard, T J; Mather, K J; Marcovina, S M; Barrett-Connor, E; Horton, E; Saudek, C; Pi-Sunyer, X F; Ratner, R E; Goldberg, R B

    2014-04-01

    To determine the association of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components with diabetes risk in participants with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and whether intervention-related changes in MetS lead to differences in diabetes incidence. We used the National Cholesterol Education Program/Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP/ATP III) revised MetS definition at baseline and intervention-related changes of its components to predict incident diabetes using Cox models in 3234 Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) participants with IGT over an average follow-up of 3.2 years. In an intention-to-treat analysis, the demographic-adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) for diabetes in those with MetS (vs. no MetS) at baseline were 1.7 (1.3-2.3), 1.7 (1.2-2.3) and 2.0 (1.3-3.0) for placebo, metformin and lifestyle groups, respectively. Higher levels of fasting plasma glucose and triglycerides at baseline were independently associated with increased risk of diabetes. Greater waist circumference (WC) was associated with higher risk in placebo and lifestyle groups, but not in the metformin group. In a multivariate model, favourable changes in WC (placebo and lifestyle) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (placebo and metformin) contributed to reduced diabetes risk. MetS and some of its components are associated with increased diabetes incidence in persons with IGT in a manner that differed according to DPP intervention. After hyperglycaemia, the most predictive factors for diabetes were baseline hypertriglyceridaemia and both baseline and lifestyle-associated changes in WC. Targeting these cardiometabolic risk factors may help to assess the benefits of interventions that reduce diabetes incidence. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  17. Role of skeletal muscle-fibre type in regulation of glucose metabolism in middle-aged subjects with impaired glucose tolerance during a long-term exercise and dietary intervention.

    PubMed

    Venojärvi, M; Puhke, R; Hämäläinen, H; Marniemi, J; Rastas, M; Rusko, H; Nuutila, P; Hänninen, O; Aunola, S

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of skeletal muscle fibre type in the regulation of glucose metabolism in middle-aged obese subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) during a 2-year exercise and dietary intervention. Muscle biopsies (musculus vastus lateralis) were taken from 22 subjects belonging to the intervention group of the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study [1]. According to their myosin heavy chain (MHC) profile at the baseline, the subjects were divided into two groups: IGT(slow) (n=10) with a high proportion of MHC I isoforms and IGT(fast) (n=12) with a high proportion of MHC II isoforms in the vastus lateralis muscle. The intervention consisted of dietary counselling, strength and power training and/or aerobic exercise. The amount of exercise was the same in both groups; the exercise frequency was 5.1+/-2.7 h/week in the IGT(slow) and 5.1+/-2.8 h/week in the IGT(fast) group. Fasting glucose (p<0.05), 2-h glucose (p<0.05), fasting insulin (p<0.05), haemoglobin A1c (HbA(1c)) (p<0.01) and insulin resistance (p<0.05) [homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)] decreased in the IGT(fast) group, whereas only the 2-h glucose and HbA(1c) concentrations decreased in the IGT(slow) group. The amount of the glycogen synthase kinase-3-alphabeta (GSK-3-alphabeta) decreased in the IGT(fast) group (p<0.05). Exercise training increased the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) (p<0.01), LDH-1 (p<0.05) and citrate synthase (CS) (p<0.05) activities in the vastus lateralis muscle in the IGT(slow) group, but only the CS activity (p<0.05) in the IGT(fast) group. The glucose metabolism improved both in the IGT(slow) and IGT(fast) group during the 2-year exercise and dietary intervention. The change was more prominent in the IGT(fast) group than in the IGT(slow) group, associated with the decrease of the GSK-alphabeta protein expression in skeletal muscle. The exercise training improved both glycolytic and oxidative capacity in the vastus

  18. Metabolic Syndrome Components and Their Response to Lifestyle and Metformin Interventions are Associated with Differences in Diabetes Risk in Persons with Impaired Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Florez, Hermes; Temprosa, Marinella G; Orchard, Trevor J; Mather, Kieren J; Marcovina, Santica M; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Horton, Edward; Saudek, Christopher; Pi-Sunyer, Xavier F; Ratner, Robert E; Goldberg, Ronald B

    2013-01-01

    Aims To determine the association of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components with diabetes risk in participants with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and whether intervention-related changes in MetS lead to differences in diabetes incidence. Methods We used the NCEP/ATP III revised MetS definition at baseline and intervention-related changes of its components to predict incident diabetes using Cox models in 3234 Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) participants with IGT over an average follow-up of 3.2 years. Results In an intention-to-treat analysis, the demographic-adjusted hazard ratios (95%CI) for diabetes in those with MetS (versus no MetS) at baseline were 1.7(1.3-2.3), 1.7(1.2-2.3), and 2.0(1.3-3.0) for placebo, metformin, and lifestyle groups, respectively. Higher levels of fasting plasma glucose and triglycerides at baseline were independently associated with increased risk of diabetes. Greater waist circumference (WC) was associated with higher risk in placebo and lifestyle groups, but not in the metformin group. In a multivariate model, favorable changes in WC (placebo and lifestyle) and HDLc (placebo and metformin) contributed to reduced diabetes risk. Conclusions MetS and some of its components are associated with increased diabetes incidence in persons with IGT in a manner that differed according to DPP intervention. After hyperglycemia, the most predictive factors for diabetes were baseline hypertriglyceridemia and both baseline and lifestyle-associated changes in waist circumference. Targeting these cardio-metabolic risk factors may help to assess the benefits of interventions that reduce diabetes incidence. PMID:24118860

  19. The Effect of Environmental Temperature on Glucose and Insulin After an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test in Healthy Young Men.

    PubMed

    Dumke, Charles L; Slivka, Dustin R; Cuddy, John S; Hailes, Walter S; Rose, Shawn M; Ruby, Brent C

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare glucose and insulin responses during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in cold (C), neutral (N), and hot (H) environments. Eleven males completed three 4-hour climate-controlled OGTT trials (C, 7.2°C; N, 22°C; and H, 43°C). Participants remained semireclined for 60 minutes before ingesting a 1.8 g/kg glucose beverage. Skin and rectal core temperatures were continuously monitored. Blood was collected just before glucose ingestion (time 0) and at 15, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 180 minutes, and analyzed for serum glucose, insulin, hematocrit, and hemoglobin. Expired gases were collected upon entering the chamber (-60 minutes), before glucose ingestion (0 minutes), and at 60, 120, and 180 minutes to determine V(O2) and respiratory exchange ratio. Rectal core temperature was greater in the H condition compared with both C and N (P < .001). Rectal core temperature was not different between C and N, whereas skin temperature was different across all trials (H greater than N greater than C). The V(O2) was greater in C than in both H and N during all time points. Carbohydrate oxidation was greater in C compared with H and N (P < 0.001). Glucose was higher during H compared with C and N (P ≤ 0.002). Glucose was elevated in C compared with N. Insulin was higher in H compared with C (P = 0.009). Area under the curve for serum glucose was greater in H compared with C and N (P ≤ 0.001); however, there was no significant difference in area under the curve for insulin. These data indicate that after an OGTT, glucose and insulin are elevated in a hot environment. Copyright © 2015 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of long-term feeding of chitosan on postprandial lipid responses and lipid metabolism in a high-sucrose-diet-impaired glucose-tolerant rat model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shing-Hwa; He, Sih-Pin; Chiang, Meng-Tsan

    2012-05-02

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of long-term feeding of chitosan on postprandial lipid response and lipid metabolism in a high-sucrose (HS)-diet-impaired glucose-tolerant rat model. As the results, HS-diet-fed rats supplemented with 5 and 7% chitosan in diets for 9 weeks had lower postprandial plasma total cholesterol (TC) levels, but 7% chitosan in the diet had higher postprandial plasma triglyceride (TG) and TG-rich lipoprotein TG levels. Supplementation of chitosan significantly decreased the postprandial ratio of apolipoprotein B (apoB)48/apoB100 in TG-rich lipoprotein fractions of HS-diet-fed rats. Long-term supplementation of 5 and 7% chitosan in diets for 16 weeks had lower plasma TC, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) + very low density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-C), TC/high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C) ratio, leptin, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels in HS-diet-fed rats. Moreover, it was noticed that the VLDL receptor (VLDLR) protein expression in skeletal muscles of HS-diet-fed rats was significantly decreased, which could be significantly reversed by supplementation of 5 and 7% chitosan. Rats supplemented with 7% chitosan in the diet significantly elevated the lipolysis rate and decreased the accumulation of TG in epididymal fat pads of HS-diet-fed rats. The plasma angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4) protein expression was not affected in HS-diet-fed rats, but it was significantly increased in 7% chitosan-supplemented HS-diet-fed rats. Taken together, these results indicate that supplementation of chitosan in the diet can improve the impairment of lipid metabolism in a HS-diet-fed rat model, but long-term high-dose chitosan feeding may enhance postprandial plasma TG and TG-rich lipoprotein TG levels in HS-diet-fed rats through an ANGPTL4-regulated pathway.

  1. The shape of the glucose response curve during an oral glucose tolerance test heralds biomarkers of type 2 diabetes risk in obese youth

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The shape of the glucose response curve during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), monophasic versus biphasic, identifies physiologically distinct groups of individuals with differences in insulin secretion and sensitivity. We aimed to verify the value of the OGTT-glucose response curve against m...

  2. Impaired glucose metabolism in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Fragachan, F; Perez-Acuña, F; Monsalve, P; Sanabria, A

    1990-01-01

    We have studied glucose tolerance under carefully controlled conditions in 79 patients with arterial hypertension. The results show that, in patients with arterial hypertension but without clinical diabetes mellitus, the glucose tolerance was abnormal in 77.3% and normal in 22.3%. The corresponding figure in the control group of normotensive subjects was 0%. In each test the responses to glucose administration were analyzed by plotting the logarithm of the blood glucose concentration against time. For the points between 60 and 120 min, corresponding to the periods following glucose administration, a linear relationship was obtained and showed a decline at an exponential rate, as noted by other observers. An estimate of the volume of distribution of glucose was obtained as follows. Values observed in hypertensives with a pathological percent fall in blood glucose per minute (Kg) were 29.8 +/- 12.0 (mean +/- SD) liters and those in normal subjects with normal Kg values had a mean of 14.35 +/- 2.98, the difference being highly significant (p less than 0.0001). The results of the theoretical glucose concentration are also presented. Those obtained from subjects with normal Kg values (359.0 +/- 58.4 mg/dl) are significantly higher than in subjects with pathological Kg values (257.6 +/- 51.3 mg/dl; p less than 0.0001). All patients with either pathological or normal Kg values had normal glucose concentration levels, fasting blood sugar and no glucose in the urine specimen. The difference between pathological Kg values (107.0 +/- 25.8 mg/dl) and normal Kg values (90.6 +/- 13.0 mg/dl) was not found to be statistically different (p greater than 0.05). The distribution and means of glucose half time in controls with normal Kg values and hypertensives with pathological Kg values were: 63.5 +/- 11.5 and 137.8 +/- 48.1 min, respectively. The difference between normal and pathological Kg values being statistically significant at a confidence level above 99.5%. We also studied

  3. Metabolic Profiling of the Response to an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test Detects Subtle Metabolic Changes

    PubMed Central

    Wopereis, Suzan; Rubingh, Carina M.; van Erk, Marjan J.; Verheij, Elwin R.; van Vliet, Trinette; Cnubben, Nicole H. P.; Smilde, Age K.; van der Greef, Jan; van Ommen, Ben; Hendriks, Henk F. J.

    2009-01-01

    Background The prevalence of overweight is increasing globally and has become a serious health problem. Low-grade chronic inflammation in overweight subjects is thought to play an important role in disease development. Novel tools to understand these processes are needed. Metabolic profiling is one such tool that can provide novel insights into the impact of treatments on metabolism. Methodology To study the metabolic changes induced by a mild anti-inflammatory drug intervention, plasma metabolic profiling was applied in overweight human volunteers with elevated levels of the inflammatory plasma marker C-reactive protein. Liquid and gas chromatography mass spectrometric methods were used to detect high and low abundant plasma metabolites both in fasted conditions and during an oral glucose tolerance test. This is based on the concept that the resilience of the system can be assessed after perturbing a homeostatic situation. Conclusions Metabolic changes were subtle and were only detected using metabolic profiling in combination with an oral glucose tolerance test. The repeated measurements during the oral glucose tolerance test increased statistical power, but the metabolic perturbation also revealed metabolites that respond differentially to the oral glucose tolerance test. Specifically, multiple metabolic intermediates of the glutathione synthesis pathway showed time-dependent suppression in response to the glucose challenge test. The fact that this is an insulin sensitive pathway suggests that inflammatory modulation may alter insulin signaling in overweight men. PMID:19242536

  4. Metformin decreases plasma resistin concentrations in pediatric patients with impaired glucose tolerance: a placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Díaz, Rita A; Talavera, Juan O; Pool, Elsy Canché; Ortiz-Navarrete, Francisco Vianney; Solórzano-Santos, Fortino; Mondragón-González, Rafael; Valladares-Salgado, Adan; Cruz, Miguel; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A; Wacher, Niels H

    2012-09-01

    The objective was to determine the effect of metformin on the concentrations of resistin and other markers of insulin resistance or inflammation (C-reactive protein, cytokines, body weight, HbA1c, among others) in minors with glucose intolerance. Patients aged 4 to 17 years with glucose intolerance were studied. They were randomized to receive 850 mg of either metformin or placebo twice daily for 12 weeks, during which all followed an iso-caloric diet and an exercise program. High sensitivity C-reactive protein, TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL1-beta, resistin, leptin, adiponectin, glucose, insulin, HbA1c, lipid profile and transaminases were measured at the beginning and at the end of the period. Fifty-two patients were included, 11.9±2.6 years old; 28 (12 males/16 females) received metformin and 24 placebo (11 males/13 females). Baseline characteristics were similar between groups (except for body mass index, which in the metformin group was slightly higher). Percentage weight loss was greater in the metformin group (-5.86% vs 2.75%, P<.05). At study end, there were statistically significant differences in resistin concentrations, even after adjusting for confounding variables (F=7.714; P<.006). Also, metformin was associated with a significant decrease in HOMA-IR index (P=.032) and HbA1c levels (P=.001), but no change was observed in the concentration of other markers of inflammation. Metformin resulted in significant reductions of plasma resistin levels in minors with glucose intolerance. This change is independent of its effects on body weight. In contrast, metformin did not alter the concentration of inflammatory markers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Development and assessment of the disposition index based on the oral glucose tolerance test in subjects with different glycaemic status.

    PubMed

    Santos, J L; Yévenes, I; Cataldo, L R; Morales, M; Galgani, J; Arancibia, C; Vega, J; Olmos, P; Flores, M; Valderas, J P; Pollak, F

    2016-06-01

    Insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity indexes are related by hyperbolic functions, allowing the calculation of the disposition index (DI) as the product of the acute insulin response (AIR) and the insulin sensitivity index (Si) from intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT). Our objective was to develop an oral-DI based on the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and to assess its association with glucose tolerance status. This research is structured in three studies. Study 1: OGTT were performed in 833 non-diabetic Chilean women (18-60 years) without family history of diabetes mellitus. Study 2: an independent group of n = 57 non-diabetic (18-46 years) without family history of diabetes mellitus carried out an OGTT and an abbreviated IVGTT. Study 3: a sample of 1674 Chilean adults (18-60 years) with different glycaemic status performed an OGTT. An adequate statistical fit for a rectangular hyperbola was found between the area under the curve of insulin-to-glucose ratio (AUCI/G-R) and the Matsuda ISI-COMP index (study 1). The oral-DI derived as AUCI/G-R × ISI-COMP was previously termed insulin-secretion-sensitivity index-2 (ISSI-2). ISSI-2 significantly correlated with DI from IVGTT (rho = 0.34; p = 0.009) (study 2). ISSI-2 shows important differences across groups of subjects with different glycaemic status (study 3). We have confirmed that ISSI-2 replicates the mathematical properties of DI, showing significant correlations with DI from the abbreviated MM-IVGTT. These results indicate that ISSI-2 constitutes a surrogate measure of insulin secretion relative to insulin sensitivity and emphasizes the pivotal role of impaired insulin secretion in the development of glucose homeostasis dysregulation.

  6. Peripheral activation of the Y2-receptor promotes secretion of GLP-1 and improves glucose tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Chandarana, Keval; Gelegen, Cigdem; Irvine, Elaine E.; Choudhury, Agharul I.; Amouyal, Chloé; Andreelli, Fabrizio; Withers, Dominic J.; Batterham, Rachel L.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of peptide tyrosine–tyrosine (PYY) on feeding is well established but currently its role in glucose homeostasis is poorly defined. Here we show in mice, that intraperitoneal (ip) injection of PYY3-36 or Y2R agonist improves nutrient-stimulated glucose tolerance and enhances insulin secretion; an effect blocked by peripheral, but not central, Y2R antagonist administration. Studies on isolated mouse islets revealed no direct effect of PYY3-36 on insulin secretion. Bariatric surgery in mice, enterogastric anastomosis (EGA), improved glucose tolerance in wild-type mice and increased circulating PYY and active GLP-1. In contrast, in Pyy-null mice, post-operative glucose tolerance and active GLP-1 levels were similar in EGA and sham-operated groups. PYY3-36 ip increased hepato-portal active GLP-1 plasma levels, an effect blocked by ip Y2R antagonist. Collectively, these data suggest that PYY3-36 therefore acting via peripheral Y2R increases hepato-portal active GLP-1 plasma levels and improves nutrient-stimulated glucose tolerance. PMID:24049729

  7. Beyond glucose: metabolic shifts in responses to the effects of the oral glucose tolerance test and the high-fructose diet in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuhai; Yang, Zhu; Liu, Hongde; Tang, Leihan; Cai, Zongwei

    2011-05-01

    High-fructose diet-fed rats as one of the insulin resistant models was used widely for understanding the mechanisms of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Systems-level metabolic profiling of the rat model, however, has not been deciphered clearly. To address this issue, mass spectrometry-based metabolomics was employed to unlock the metabolic snapshots of the oral glucose tolerance test (oGTT) effect in either healthy or diabetic rats, as well as to delineate the metabolic signatures in tissues of rats fed with high-fructose diet. Several differentiating metabolites were highlighted to reveal the metabolic perturbation of the oGTT effects in healthy and diabetic rats, which involved amino acid biosynthesis, polyunsaturated fatty acids, phospholipids and purine metabolism. Surprisingly, the patterns of relationships for the metabolic phenotypes by using data mining revealed that glucose ingestion might induce the healthy group to display its trajectory towards diabetic status, while only a very slight influence was observed on the high-fructose diet-fed rats 120 min after glucose ingestion. The data treatment for liver, skeletal muscle and brain tissues suggested that oxidative stress, such as lipid peroxidation and the declined antioxidant, the elevated amino acids and the perturbation of fatty acids, were caused by the high-fructose diet in liver and skeletal muscle tissues. On the other hand, the up-regulation in purine biosynthesis and the decreased concentrations for amino acids were observed in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus tissues. Collectively, the obtained results might provide a new insight not only for the impairment of glucose tolerance but also for the dietary style in rats.

  8. Heritability of metabolic response to the intravenous glucose tolerance test in German Holstein Friesian bulls.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Laura; Staufenbiel, Rudolf; Christ, Jana; Panicke, Lothar; Müller, Uwe; Brockmann, Gudrun A

    2016-09-01

    Selection for improved health and welfare in farm animals is of increasing interest worldwide. Peripartum energy balance is a key factor for pathogenesis of diseases in dairy cows. The intravenous glucose tolerance test (ivGTT) can be used to study the metabolic response to a glucose stimulus. The aim of this study was to estimate heritability of ivGTT traits in German Holstein bulls. A total of 541 Holstein bulls aged 7 to 17 mo from 2 breeding stations were subjected to the ivGTT. Serum glucose concentrations were measured at 0, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42, 49, 56, and 63 min relative to glucose infusion. The maximum increase in blood glucose concentration, glucose area equivalent, and blood glucose half-life period were calculated. Heritabilities were estimated using a univariate animal model including station-year-season and age as fixed effects, and animal additive genetic and residual as random effects. The estimated heritabilities were 0.19 for fasting glucose concentration, 0.43 for glucose area equivalent, 0.40 for glucose half-life period, 0.14 for the peak glucose concentration, and 0.12 for the maximum increase of blood glucose concentration. Correlations between ivGTT traits and breeding values for milk yield and composition were not found. The results indicate that heritability for response to glucose is high, which warrants further investigation of this trait for genetic improvement of metabolic disorders. Research is necessary to determine the target levels of ivGTT traits and potential associations between ivGTT traits in breeding bulls and periparturient diseases in their offspring. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Glucose tolerance in depressed inpatients, under treatment with mirtazapine and in healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Hennings, J M; Ising, M; Grautoff, S; Himmerich, H; Pollmächer, T; Schaaf, L

    2010-02-01

    Impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes have been associated with depression, and antidepressant treatment is assumed to improve impaired glucose tolerance. However, antidepressant treatment is also considered as a risk factor for the development of diabetes. Reports about glucose tolerance under antidepressant treatment frequently lack appropriate control groups. We conducted the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in 10 healthy controls selected from an epidemiological sample with a negative lifetime history of mental Axis I disorder. Controls were carefully matched to a sample of inpatients with major depression that participated in an OGTT before and after antidepressant treatment with mirtazapine. All participants underwent a standard OGTT protocol. In patients, a second (after 2 weeks) and a third (after 4-6 weeks) OGTT was performed under treatment with mirtazapine. Compared to healthy controls, we observed significantly impaired glucose tolerance in acutely depressed patients. Effect size calculation indicated a moderate to large effects on glucose and insulin concentrations in response to an OGTT. Although glucose tolerance improved under mirtazapine treatment, insulin sensitivity was still impaired and remained significantly lower in patients compared to controls.

  10. The Preventive Effects of 8 Weeks of Resistance Training on Glucose Tolerance and Muscle Fiber Type Composition in Zucker Rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Yeon; Choi, Mi Jung; So, Byunghun; Kim, Hee-Jae; Seong, Je Kyung; Song, Wook

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the therapeutic effects of resistance training on Zucker rats before and after the onset of diabetes to understand the importance of the timing of exercise intervention. We assessed whether 8 weeks of resistance training ameliorated impaired glucose tolerance and altered muscle fiber type composition in Zucker rats. Five-week-old male Zucker rats were divided into Zucker lean control (ZLC-Con), non-exercised Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF-Con), and exercised Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF-Ex) groups. The ZDF-Ex rats climbed a ladder three times a week for 8 weeks. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests (IPGTT) were performed on the 1st and 8th weeks of training, and grip strength was measured during the last week. We also measured glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) expression by Western blot and immunofluorescence. Moreover, immunohistochemistry was performed to assess muscle fiber type composition. Fasting glucose levels and area under the curve responses to IPGTTs gradually increased as diabetes progressed in the ZDF-Con rats but decreased in the ZDF-Ex rats. Grip strength decreased in the ZDF-Con rats. However, resistance training did not improve grip strength in the ZDF-Ex rats. GLUT4 expression in the ZLC-Con and the ZDF-Con rats did not differ, but it increased in the ZDF-Ex rats. The proportions of myosin heavy chain I and II were lower and higher, respectively, in the ZDF-Con rats compared to the ZLC-Con rats. Muscle fiber type composition did not change in the ZDF-Ex rats. Our results suggest that regular resistance training initiated at the onset of diabetes can improve glucose tolerance and GLUT4 expression without changing muscle morphology in Zucker rats.

  11. Maternal glucose tolerance status influences the risk of macrosomia in male but not in female fetuses.

    PubMed

    Ricart, W; López, J; Mozas, J; Pericot, A; Sancho, M A; González, N; Balsells, M; Luna, R; Cortázar, A; Navarro, P; Ramírez, O; Flández, B; Pallardo, L F; Hernández, A; Ampudia, J; Fernández-Real, J M; Hernández-Aguado, I; Corcoy, R

    2009-01-01

    To elucidate whether the risk of macrosomia, large for gestational age (LGA) and small for gestational age (SGA) is influenced by maternal body mass index and glucose tolerance differently in male and female fetuses. A population study was conducted in 16 general hospitals from the Spanish National Health Service that included 9270 consecutive women with singleton pregnancies and without a former diagnosis of diabetes mellitus who delivered 4793 male and 4477 female newborns. Logistic regression analyses were performed to predict the effect of body mass index (BMI) category and glucose tolerance on macrosomia, large for gestational age newborns (LGA) and small for gestational age newborns (SGA) Separate analyses according to foetal sex were carried out for each outcome. The results were adjusted for maternal age, gestational age and pregnancy-induced hypertension. There were significant differences between males and females in the percentage of infants who had macrosomia, LGA or SGA. Maternal BMI category was positively associated with the risk of macrosomia and LGA in both male and female newborns. In addition, there was a negative association between maternal BMI and SGA that only reached significance in males. In contrast, gestational diabetes was only a predictor of macrosomia exclusively in male fetuses (OR 1.67, 95% CI 1.12 to 2.49) There is sexual dimorphism in the risk of abnormal birth weight attributed to maternal glucose tolerance status. A closer surveillance of foetal growth might be warranted in pregnant women with abnormal glucose tolerance carrying a male fetus.

  12. Comparison of the effects of fetal hypothyroidism on glucose tolerance in male and female rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Bagheripuor, Fatemeh; Ghanbari, Mahboubeh; Zahediasl, Saleh; Ghasemi, Asghar

    2015-03-01

    Thyroid hormones are vital for survival of mammalian species and play critical roles in growth, development, and metabolism. Both fetal hypothyroidism and sex can affect carbohydrate metabolism during adult life. This study aims to assess carbohydrate metabolism in male and female offspring born from mothers who were hypothyroid during pregnancy. Pregnant rats were divided into two groups; the controls consumed water and the hypothyroid group received water containing 0.025 % 6-propyl-2-thiouracial throughout gestation. The intravenous glucose tolerance test (0.5 g/kg glucose) was carried out in 3-month-old offspring. Findings showed that compared to controls, male fetal hypothyroid rats during adulthood had glucose intolerance (area under the curve: 446.4 ± 9.7 vs. 486.4 ± 8.8, p < 0.01 in control and fetal hypothyroid groups, respectively) whereas females had improved glucose tolerance (478.1 ± 7.0 vs. 455.9 ± 8.5, p < 0.01). In conclusion, sex could modulate the effects of fetal hypothyroidism on glucose tolerance in rats.

  13. The association between HbA1c, fasting glucose, 1-hour glucose and 2-hour glucose during an oral glucose tolerance test and cardiovascular disease in individuals with elevated risk for diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lind, Marcus; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; Nerman, Olle; Eriksson, Johan; Ilanne-Parikka, Pirjo; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Peltonen, Markku; Pivodic, Aldina; Lindström, Jaana

    2014-01-01

    To determine the association between HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 1-hour (1 hPG) and 2-hour (2 hPG) glucose after an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and cardiovascular disease in individuals with elevated risk for diabetes. We studied the relationship between baseline, updated mean and updated (last) value of HbA1c, FPG, 1 hPG and 2 hPG after an oral 75 g glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and acute CVD events in 504 individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) at baseline enrolled in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study. Follow-up of clinical trial. 504 individuals with IGT were followed with yearly evaluations with OGTT, FPG and HbA1c. Relative risk of CVD. Over a median follow-up of 9.0 years 34 (6.7%) participants had a CVD event, which increased to 52 (10.3%) over a median follow-up of 13.0 years when including events that occurred among participants following a diagnosis of diabetes. Updated mean HbA1c, 1 hPG and 2 hPG, HR per 1 unit SD of 1.57 (95% CI 1.16 to 2.11), p = 0.0032, 1.51 (1.03 to 2.23), p = 0.036 and 1.60 (1.10 to 2.34), p = 0.014, respectively, but not FPG (p = 0.11), were related to CVD. In analyses of the last value prior to the CVD event the same three glycaemic measurements were associated with the CVD events, with HRs per 1 unit SD of 1.45 (1.06 to 1.98), p = 0.020, 1.55 (1.04 to 2.29), p = 0.030 and 2.19 (1.51 to 3.18), p<0.0001, respectively but only 2 hPG remained significant in pairwise comparisons. Including the follow-up period after diabetes onset updated 2 hPG (p = 0.003) but not updated mean HbA1c (p = 0.08) was related to CVD. Current 2 hPG level in people with IGT is associated with increased risk of CVD. This supports its use in screening for prediabetes and monitoring glycaemic levels of people with prediabetes.

  14. DXA-measured visceral adipose tissue predicts impaired glucose tolerance and metabolic syndrome in obese Caucasian and African-American women.

    PubMed

    Bi, X; Seabolt, L; Shibao, C; Buchowski, M; Kang, H; Keil, C D; Tyree, R; Silver, H J

    2015-03-01

    New methods to measure visceral adipose tissue (VAT) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) may help discern sex, race and phenotype differences in the role of VAT in cardiometabolic risk. This study was designed (1) to compare relationships of DXA-VAT, anthropometric and body composition variables with cardiometabolic risk factors in obese women; (2) to determine which variables most robustly predict impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and metabolic syndrome (MetSx); and (3) to determine thresholds for DXA-VAT by race. VAT mass (g) and volume (cm(3)) were measured in 229 obese (body mass index (BMI), 30-49.9) women aged 21-69 years of European-American (EA=123) and African-American (AA=106) descent using the CoreScan algorithm on a Lunar iDXA scanner. Linear regression modeling and areas under the curve (AUC of ROC (receiver operating characteristic) curves) compared relationships with cardiometabolic risk. Bootstrapping with LASSO (least absolute shrinkage and selection operator) regression modeling determined thresholds and predictors of IGT and MetSx. DXA-VAT explained more of the variance in triglycerides, blood pressure, glucose and homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) compared with anthropometric and other body composition variables. DXA-VAT also had the highest AUC for IGT (0.767) and MetSx (0.749). Including race as a variable and the interaction between VAT and race in modeling did not significantly change the results. Thresholds at which the probability of developing IGT or MetSx was⩾50% were determined separately for AA women (IGT: 2120 cm(3); MetSx: 1320 cm(3)) and EA women (IGT: 2550 cm(3); MetSx: 1713 cm(3)). The odds for IGT or MetSx were fourfold greater with each standard deviation increase in DXA-VAT. DXA-VAT provides robust clinical information regarding cardiometabolic risk in AA and EA obese women and offers potential utility in the risk reduction interventions.

  15. Effects of Polar Compounds Generated from the Deep-Frying Process of Palm Oil on Lipid Metabolism and Glucose Tolerance in Kunming Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaodan; Yu, Xiaoyan; Sun, Dewei; Li, Jinwei; Wang, Yong; Cao, Peirang; Liu, Yuanfa

    2017-01-11

    In the present study, effects of deep-fried palm oil, specifically polar compounds generated during the frying process, on animal health including lipid and glucose metabolism and liver functions were investigated. Kunming mice were fed a high-fat diet containing deep-fried palm oil or purified polar compounds for 12 weeks. Their effects on animal health including hepatic lipid profile, antioxidant enzyme activity, serum biochemistry, and glucose tolerance were analyzed. Our results revealed that the consumption of polar compounds was related to the change of lipid deposition in liver and adipose tissue, as well as glucose tolerance alteration in Kunming mice. Correspondingly, the transcription study of genes involved in lipid metabolism including PPARα, Acox1, and Cpt1α indicated that polar compounds probably facilitated the fatty acid oxidation on peroxisomes, whereas lipid oxidation in mitochondria was suppressed. Furthermore, glucose tolerance test (GTT) revealed that a high amount of polar compound intake impaired glucose tolerance, indicating its effect on glucose metabolism in vivo. Our results provide critical information on the effects of polar compounds generated from the deep-frying process of palm oil on animal health, particularly liver functions and lipid and glucose metabolism, which is important for the evaluation of the biosafety of frying oil.

  16. Effect of glycemia on plasma incretins and the incretin effect during oral glucose tolerance test.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Marzieh; Aulinger, Benedict; D'Alessio, David A

    2012-11-01

    The incretin effect, reflecting the enhancement of postprandial insulin secretion by factors including the intestinal hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, increases in proportion to meal size. However, it is unknown whether the incretin effect is dependent on ambient glucose. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of plasma glycemia on the incretin effect. Thirteen healthy subjects consumed 50 g oral glucose solution mixed with d-xylose during fixed hyperglycemia at 8 and 10.5 mmol/L, on 3 separate days, twice at lower glycemia (LOW) and once at higher values (HIGH). The relative increase in insulin release after glucose ingestion at fixed hyperglycemia, a surrogate for the incretin effect, was similar among all three studies. The GLP-1 response to oral glucose was significantly lower at higher plasma glycemia, as was the appearance of d-xylose after the meal. Between the two LOW studies, the reproducibility of insulin release in response to intravenous glucose alone and intravenous plus ingested glucose was similar. These findings indicate that the incretin contribution to postprandial insulin release is independent of glycemia in healthy individuals, despite differences in GLP-1 secretion. The incretin effect is a reproducible trait among humans with normal glucose tolerance.

  17. The effect of age and diet on the oral glucose tolerance test in ponies.

    PubMed

    Murphy, D; Reid, S W; Love, S

    1997-11-01

    To evaluate the effects of age and diet on the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in healthy ponies, OGTTs were performed on 2 groups of British native breed ponies (Group A: 7 foals [6-9 months], Group B: 7 mature individuals [6-13 years]) when maintained on either a high fibre pelleted ration only (Groups A and B) or a hay only diet (Group B). Plasma glucose response, following oral glucose administration, for Group A (basal plasma glucose concentration [Glu0] 4.6 +/- 0.4 mmol/l (mean +/- s.d.) increasing to 11.5 +/- 1.3 mmol/l at 90 min) was significantly different (P < 0.05) from that observed for Group B (Glu0 of 4.3 +/- 0.2 mmol/l increasing to 6.8 +/- 1.3 mmol/l at 90 min), when fed the same diet. For Group B ponies, the plasma glucose response, following oral glucose administration, was significantly different (P < 0.05) when fed hay only (Glu0 4.6 +/- 0.4 mmol/l increasing to 9.6 +/- 2.1 mmol/l at 150 min) compared to when fed the high fibre pelleted ration. These results indicate that both age and diet have a significant effect on plasma glucose concentrations measured during an OGTT.

  18. Regulation of glucose tolerance and sympathetic activity by MC4R signaling in the lateral hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Donald A; McDaniel, Latisha N; Yin, Terry; Khan, Michael; Jiang, Jingwei; Acevedo, Michael R; Walsh, Susan A; Ponto, Laura L Boles; Norris, Andrew W; Lutter, Michael; Rahmouni, Kamal; Cui, Huxing

    2015-06-01

    Melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) signaling mediates diverse physiological functions, including energy balance, glucose homeostasis, and autonomic activity. Although the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) is known to express MC4Rs and to receive input from leptin-responsive arcuate proopiomelanocortin neurons, the physiological functions of MC4Rs in the LHA are incompletely understood. We report that MC4R(LHA) signaling regulates glucose tolerance and sympathetic nerve activity. Restoring expression of MC4Rs specifically in the LHA improves glucose intolerance in obese MC4R-null mice without affecting body weight or circulating insulin levels. Fluorodeoxyglucose-mediated tracing of whole-body glucose uptake identifies the interscapular brown adipose tissue (iBAT) as a primary source where glucose uptake is increased in MC4R(LHA) mice. Direct multifiber sympathetic nerve recording further reveals that sympathetic traffic to iBAT is significantly increased in MC4R(LHA) mice, which accompanies a significant elevation of Glut4 expression in iBAT. Finally, bilateral iBAT denervation prevents the glucoregulatory effect of MC4R(LHA) signaling. These results identify a novel role for MC4R(LHA) signaling in the control of sympathetic nerve activity and glucose tolerance independent of energy balance. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  19. Type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance are associated with word memory source monitoring recollection deficits but not simple recognition familiarity deficits following water, low glycaemic load, and high glycaemic load breakfasts.

    PubMed

    Lamport, Daniel J; Lawton, Clare L; Mansfield, Michael W; Moulin, Chris A J; Dye, Louise

    2014-01-30

    It has been established that type 2 diabetes, and to some extent, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), are associated with general neuropsychological impairments in episodic memory. However, the effect of abnormalities in glucose metabolism on specific retrieval processes such as source monitoring has not been investigated. The primary aim was to investigate the impact of type 2 diabetes and IGT on simple word recognition (familiarity) and complex source monitoring (recollection). A secondary aim was to examine the effect of acute breakfast glycaemic load manipulations on episodic memory. Data are presented from two separate studies; (i) 24 adults with type 2 diabetes and 12 controls aged 45-75years, (ii) 18 females with IGT and 47 female controls aged 30-50years. Controls were matched for age, IQ, BMI, waist circumference, and depression. Recognition of previously learned words and memory for specifically which list a previously learned word had appeared in (source monitoring) was examined at two test sessions during the morning after consumption of low glycaemic load, high glycaemic load and water breakfasts according to a counterbalanced, crossover design. Type 2 diabetes (p<0.05) and IGT (p<0.01) were associated with significant source monitoring recollection deficits but not impairments in familiarity. Impairments were only observed in the late postprandial stage at the second test session. These impairments were not attenuated by the breakfast glycaemic load manipulations. Isolated source monitoring recollection deficits indicate that abnormalities in glucose metabolism are not detrimental for global episodic memory processes. This enhances our understanding of how metabolic disorders are associated with memory impairments. © 2013.

  20. An amino acid mixture improves glucose tolerance and lowers insulin resistance in the obese Zucker rat.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Jeffrey R; Liao, Yi-Hung; Ding, Zhenping; Hara, Daisuke; Kleinert, Maximilian; Nelson, Jeffrey L; Ivy, John L

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to test an amino acid mixture on glucose tolerance in obese Zucker rats [experiment (Exp)-1] and determine whether differences in blood glucose were associated with alterations in muscle glucose uptake [experiment (Exp)-2]. Exp-1 rats were gavaged with either carbohydrate (OB-CHO), carbohydrate plus amino acid mixture (OB-AA-1), carbohydrate plus amino acid mixture with increased leucine concentration (OB-AA-2) or water (OB-PLA). The glucose response in OB-AA-1 and OB-AA-2 were similar, and both were lower compared to OB-CHO. This effect of the amino acid mixtures did not appear to be solely attributable to an increase in plasma insulin. Rats in Exp-2 were gavaged with carbohydrate (OB-CHO), carbohydrate plus amino acid mixture (OB-AA-1) or water (OB-PLA). Lean Zuckers were gavaged with carbohydrate (LN-CHO). Fifteen minutes after gavage, a radiolabeled glucose analog was infused through a catheter previously implanted in the right jugular vein. Blood glucose was significantly lower in OB-AA-1 compared to OB-CHO while the insulin responses were similar. Glucose uptake was greater in OB-AA-1 compared with OB-CHO, and similar to that in LN-CHO in red gastrocnemius muscle (5.15 ± 0.29, 3.8 ± 0.27, 5.18 ± 0.34 µmol/100 g/min, respectively). Western blot analysis showed that Akt substrate of 160 kDa (AS160) phosphorylation was enhanced for OB-AA-1 and LN-CHO compared to OB-CHO. These findings suggest that an amino acid mixture improves glucose tolerance in an insulin resistant model and that these improvements are associated with an increase in skeletal muscle glucose uptake possibly due to improved intracellular signaling.

  1. Angelica dahurica Extracts Improve Glucose Tolerance through the Activation of GPR119.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Young; Kim, Eung-Hwi; Kim, Chul-Young; Kim, Mi-Hwi; Choung, Jin-Seung; Oh, Yoon-Sin; Moon, Hong-Sub; Jun, Hee-Sook

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 119 is expressed in pancreatic β-cells and intestinal L cells, and is involved in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) release, respectively. Therefore, the development of GPR119 agonists is a potential treatment for type 2 diabetes. We screened 1500 natural plant extracts for GPR119 agonistic actions and investigated the most promising extract, that from Angelica dahurica (AD), for hypoglycemic actions in vitro and in vivo. Human GPR119 activation was measured in GeneBLAzer T-Rex GPR119-CRE-bla CHO-K1 cells; intracellular cAMP levels and insulin secretion were measured in INS-1 cells; and GLP-1 release was measured in GLUTag cells. Glucose tolerance tests and serum plasma insulin levels were measured in normal C57BL6 mice and diabetic db/db mice. AD extract-treated cells showed significant increases in GPR119 activation, intracellular cAMP levels, GLP-1 levels and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion as compared with controls. In normal mice, a single treatment with AD extract improved glucose tolerance and increased insulin secretion. Treatment with multiple doses of AD extract or n-hexane fraction improved glucose tolerance in diabetic db/db mice. Imperatorin, phellopterin and isoimperatorin were identified in the active fraction of AD extract. Among these, phellopterin activated GPR119 and increased active GLP-1 and insulin secretion in vitro and enhanced glucose tolerance in normal and db/db mice. We suggest that phellopterin might have a therapeutic potential for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  2. Ameliorating effect and potential mechanism of Rehmannia glutinosa oligosaccharides on the impaired glucose metabolism in chronic stress rats fed with high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruxue; Zhou, Jun; Li, Maoxing; Ma, Haigang; Qiu, Jianguo; Luo, Xiaohong; Jia, Zhengping

    2014-04-15

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the Rehmannia glutinosa oligosaccharides (ROS) ameliorate the impaired glucose metabolism and the potential mechanism in chronic stress rats fed with high-fat diet. The rats were fed by a high-fat diet and simultaneously stimulated by chronic stress over 5 weeks. Body weight, fasting plasma glucose, intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT), plasma lipids, gluconeogenesis test (GGT), glycogen content, and corticosterone, insulin and leptin levels were measured. The results showed that ROS administration (100, 200 mg/kg, i.g.) for 5 weeks exerted the effects of increasing the organ weights of thymus and spleen, lowering the fasting plasma glucose level, improving impaired glucose tolerance, increasing the contents of liver and muscle glycogen, decreasing the gluconeogenesis ability, plasma-free fatty acid's level, as well as plasma triglyceride and total cholesterol levels in chronic stress and high-fat fed rats, especially in the group of 200mg/kg; while the plasma corticosterone level was decreased, and plasma leptin level was increased. These results suggest that ROS exert an ameliorating effect of impaired glucose metabolism in chronic stress rats fed with high-fat diet, and the potential mechanism may be mediated through rebuilding the glucose homeostasis in the neuroendocrine immuno-modulation (NIM) network through multilinks and multitargets. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Hyperuricemia Is a Risk Factor for the Onset of Impaired Fasting Glucose in Men with a High Plasma Glucose Level: A Community-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Miyake, Teruki; Kumagi, Teru; Furukawa, Shinya; Hirooka, Masashi; Kawasaki, Keitarou; Koizumi, Mitsuhito; Todo, Yasuhiko; Yamamoto, Shin; Abe, Masanori; Kitai, Kohichiro; Matsuura, Bunzo; Hiasa, Yoichi

    2014-01-01

    Background It is not clear whether elevated uric acid is a risk factor for the onset of impaired fasting glucose after stratifying by baseline fasting plasma glucose levels. We conducted a community-based retrospective longitudinal cohort study to clarify the relationship between uric acid levels and the onset of impaired fasting glucose, according to baseline fasting plasma glucose levels. Methods We enrolled 6,403 persons (3,194 men and 3,209 women), each of whom was 18–80 years old and had >2 annual check-ups during 2003–2010. After excluding persons who had fasting plasma glucose levels ≥6.11 mM and/or were currently taking anti-diabetic agents, the remaining 5,924 subjects were classified into quartiles according to baseline fasting plasma glucose levels. The onset of impaired fasting glucose was defined as fasting plasma glucose ≥6.11 mM during the observation period. Results In the quartile groups, 0.9%, 2.1%, 3.4%, and 20.2% of the men developed impaired fasting glucose, respectively, and 0.1%, 0.3%, 0.5%, and 5.6% of the women developed impaired fasting glucose, respectively (P trend <0.001). After adjusting for age, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, triacylglycerols, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol, creatinine, fatty liver, family history of diabetes, alcohol consumption, and current smoking, uric acid levels were positively associated with onset of impaired fasting glucose in men with highest-quartile fasting plasma glucose levels (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.003; 95% confidence interval, 1.0001–1.005, P = 0.041). Conclusions Among men with high fasting plasma glucose, hyperuricemia may be independently associated with an elevated risk of developing impaired fasting glucose. PMID:25237894

  4. Amino acid mixture acutely improves the glucose tolerance of healthy overweight adults.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bei; Kammer, Lynne M; Ding, Zhenping; Lassiter, David G; Hwang, Jungyun; Nelson, Jeffrey L; Ivy, John L

    2012-01-01

    Certain amino acids have been reported to influence carbohydrate metabolism and blood glucose clearance, as well as improve the glucose tolerance in animal models. We hypothesized that an amino acid mixture consisting of isoleucine and 4 additional amino acids would improve the glucose response of healthy overweight men and women to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Twenty-two overweight healthy subjects completed 2 OGTTs after consuming 2 different test beverages. The amino acid mixture beverage (CHO/AA) consisted of 0.088 g cystine 2HCl, 0.043 g methionine, 0.086 g valine, 12.094 g isoleucine, 0.084 g leucine, and 100 g dextrose. The control beverage (CHO) consisted of 100 g dextrose only. Venous blood samples were drawn 10 minutes before the start of ingesting the drinks and 15, 30, 60, 120, and 180 minutes after the completion of the drinks. During the OGTT, the plasma glucose response for the CHO/AA treatment was significantly lower than that of the CHO treatment (P < .01), as was the plasma glucose area under the curve (CHO/AA 806 ± 31 mmol/L·3 hours vs CHO 942 ± 40 mmol/L·3 hours). Differences in plasma glucose between treatments occurred at 30, 60, 120, and 180 minutes after supplement ingestion. Plasma glucagon during the CHO/AA treatment was significantly higher than during the CHO treatment. However, there were no significant differences in plasma insulin or C-peptide responses between treatments. These results suggest that the amino acid mixture lowers the glucose response to an OGTT in healthy overweight subjects in an insulin-independent manner.

  5. Glucosamine enhances body weight gain and reduces insulin response in mice fed chow diet but mitigates obesity, insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance in mice high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ji-Sun; Park, Ji-Won; Nam, Moon-Suk; Cho, Hyeongjin; Han, Inn-Oc

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the potential of glucosamine (GlcN) to affect body weight gain and insulin sensitivity in mice normal and at risk for developing diabetes. Male C57BL/6J mice were fed either chow diet (CD) or a high fat diet (HFD) and the half of mice from CD and HFD provided with a solution of 10% (w/v) GlcN. Total cholesterol and nonesterified free fatty acid levels were determined. Glucose tolerance test and insulin tolerance test were performed. HepG2 human hepatoma cells or differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes were stimulated with insulin under normal (5 mM) or high glucose (25 mM) conditions. Effect of GlcN on 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) uptake was determined. JNK and Akt phosphorylation and nucleocytoplasmic protein O-GlcNAcylation were assayed by Western blotting. GlcN administration stimulated body weight gain (6.58±0.82 g vs. 11.1±0.42 g), increased white adipose tissue fat mass (percentage of bodyweight, 3.7±0.32 g vs. 5.61±0.34 g), and impaired the insulin response in livers of mice fed CD. However, GlcN treatment in mice fed HFD led to reduction of body weight gain (18.02±0.66 g vs. 16.22±0.96 g) and liver weight (2.27±0.1 vs. 1.85±0.12 g). Furthermore, obesity-induced insulin resistance and impaired Akt insulin signaling in the liver were alleviated by GlcN administration. GlcN inhibited the insulin response under low (5 mM) glucose conditions, whereas it restored the insulin response for Akt phosphorylation under high (25 mM) glucose conditions in HepG2 and 3T3-L1 cells. Uptake of 2-DG increased upon GlcN treatment under 5 mM glucose compared to control, whereas insulin-stimulated 2-DG uptake decreased under 5 mM and increased under 25 mM glucose in differentiated 3T3-L1 cells. Our results show that GlcN increased body weight gain and reduced the insulin response for glucose maintenance when fed to normal CD mice, whereas it alleviated body weight gain and insulin resistance in HFD mice. Therefore, the current data support the integrative

  6. Natural history and physiological determinants of changes in glucose tolerance in a non-diabetic population: the RISC Study.

    PubMed

    Ferrannini, E; Natali, A; Muscelli, E; Nilsson, P M; Golay, A; Laakso, M; Beck-Nielsen, H; Mari, A

    2011-06-01

    The natural history and physiological determinants of glucose intolerance in subjects living in Europe have not been investigated. The aim of this study was to increase our understanding of this area. We analysed the data from a population-based cohort of 1,048 non-diabetic, normotensive men and women (aged 30-60 years) in whom insulin sensitivity was measured by the glucose clamp technique (M/I index; average glucose infusion rate/steady-state insulin concentration) and beta cell function was estimated by mathematical modelling of the oral glucose tolerance test at baseline and 3 years later. Seventy-seven per cent of the participants had normal glucose tolerance (NGT) and 5% were glucose intolerant both at baseline and follow up; glucose tolerance worsened in 13% (progressors) and improved in 6% (regressors). The metabolic phenotype of the latter three groups was similar (higher prevalence of familial diabetes, older age, higher waist-to-hip ratio, higher fasting and 2 h plasma glucose, higher fasting and 2 h plasma insulin, lower insulin sensitivity and reduced beta cell glucose sensitivity with increased absolute insulin secretion). Adjusting for these factors in a logistic model, progression was predicted by insulin resistance (bottom M/I quartile, OR 2.52 [95% CI 1.51-4.21]) and beta cell glucose insensitivity (bottom quartile, OR 2.39 [95% CI 1.6-3.93]) independently of waist-to-hip ratio (OR 1.44 [95% CI 1.13-1.84] for one SD). At follow up, insulin sensitivity and beta cell glucose sensitivity were unchanged in the stable NGT and stable non-NGT groups, worsened in progressors and improved in regressors. Glucose tolerance deteriorates over time in young, healthy Europids. Progressors, regressors and glucose-intolerant participants share a common baseline phenotype. Insulin sensitivity and beta cell glucose sensitivity predict and track changes in glucose tolerance independently of sex, age and obesity.

  7. The role of ranitidine infusion on glucose, insulin and C-peptide serum levels induced by oral glucose tolerance test in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Gentile, S; Marmo, R; Costume, A; Orlando, C; D'Alessandro, R; De Bellis, G; Porcellini, M; Coltorti, M

    1986-01-01

    In 9 healthy subjects we evaluated the effect of a constant ranitidine infusion (100 mg) on glucose (mg/dl), insulin (microU/ml) and C-peptide (ng/ml) serum levels promoted by oral glucose tolerance test (75 g). Ranitidine significantly increased the area under concentration/time curves for glucose and insulin but not that of C-peptide. Our data indicate that ranitidine does not affect pancreatic insulin release nor peripheral glucose utilization and are consistent with the hypothesis that ranitidine influences the hepatic clearance of glucose and insulin both of which undergo high first-pass liver extraction.

  8. Effect of lifestyle interventions on glucose regulation among adults without impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuanping; Imperatore, Giuseppina; Thomas, William; Cheng, Yiling J; Lobelo, Felipe; Norris, Keri; Devlin, Heather M; Ali, Mohammed K; Gruss, Stephanie; Bardenheier, Barbara; Cho, Pyone; Garcia de Quevedo, Isabel; Mudaliar, Uma; Saaddine, Jinan; Geiss, Linda S; Gregg, Edward W

    2017-01-01

    This study systematically assessed the effectiveness of lifestyle interventions on glycemic indicators among adults (⩾18years) without IGT or diabetes. Randomized controlled trials using physical activity (PA), diet (D), or their combined strategies (PA+D) with follow-up ⩾12months were systematically searched from multiple electronic-databases between inception and May 4, 2016. Outcome measures included fasting plasma glucose (FPG), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting insulin (FI), homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and bodyweight. Included studies were divided into low-range (FPG <5.5mmol/L or HbA1c <5.5%) and high-range (FPG ⩾5.5mmol/L or HbA1c ⩾5.5%) groups according to baseline glycemic levels. Seventy-nine studies met inclusion criteria. Random-effect models demonstrated that compared with usual care, lifestyle interventions achieved significant reductions in FPG (-0.14mmol/L [95%CI, -0.19, -0.10]), HbA1c (-0.06% [-0.09, -0.03]), FI (%change: -15.18% [-20.01, -10.35]), HOMA-IR (%change: -22.82% [-29.14, -16.51]), and bodyweight (%change: -3.99% [-4.69, -3.29]). The same effect sizes in FPG reduction (0.07) appeared among both low-range and high-range groups. Similar effects were observed among all groups regardless of lengths of follow-up. D and PA+D interventions had larger effects on glucose reduction than PA alone. Lifestyle interventions significantly improved FPG, HbA1c, FI, HOMA-IR, and bodyweight among adults without IGT or diabetes, and might reduce progression of hyperglycemia to type 2 diabetes mellitus. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Lipid storage by adipose tissue macrophages regulates systemic glucose tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Aouadi, Myriam; Vangala, Pranitha; Yawe, Joseph C.; Tencerova, Michaela; Nicoloro, Sarah M.; Cohen, Jessica L.; Shen, Yuefei

    2014-01-01

    Proinflammatory pathways in adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) can impair glucose tolerance in obesity, but ATMs may also be beneficial as repositories for excess lipid that adipocytes are unable to store. To test this hypothesis, we selectively targeted visceral ATMs in obese mice with siRNA against lipoprotein lipase (LPL), leaving macrophages within other organs unaffected. Selective silencing of ATM LPL decreased foam cell formation in visceral adipose tissue of obese mice, consistent with a reduced supply of fatty acids from VLDL hydrolysis. Unexpectedly, silencing LPL also decreased the expression of genes involved in fatty acid uptake (CD36) and esterification in ATMs. This deficit in fatty acid uptake capacity was associated with increased circulating serum free fatty acids. Importantly, ATM LPL silencing also caused a marked increase in circulating fatty acid-binding protein-4, an adipocyte-derived lipid chaperone previously reported to induce liver insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. Consistent with this concept, obese mice with LPL-depleted ATMs exhibited higher hepatic glucose production from pyruvate and glucose intolerance. Silencing CD36 in ATMs also promoted glucose intolerance. Taken together, the data indicate that LPL secreted by ATMs enhances their ability to sequester excess lipid in obese mice, promoting systemic glucose tolerance. PMID:24986598

  10. The Association between Impaired Glucose Regulation and Prognosis of Chinese Patients with Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shichao; Pan, Yuesong; Zhao, Xingquan; Liu, Liping; Li, Hao; He, Yan; Guo, Li; Wang, Yilong; Wang, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at observing the influence of impaired glucose regulation (IGR) on 1-year outcomes in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Patients hospitalized for ICH from 2008 to 2009 were recruited consecutively at 35 centres across China. A standard oral glucose tolerance test at day 14 ± 3 after stroke onset or before discharge was performed to identify IGR. The outcomes were death (modified Rankin scale [mRS] score of 6), dependency (mRS score of 2 to 5) and poor outcome (mRS score of 2 to 6) at 1 year. Cox proportion hazard model for death and logistic regression model for dependency and poor outcome were performed to investigate the influence of IGR on 1-year outcomes. A total of 288 non-diabetic ICH patients were included in this analysis, among which 150 (52.1%) were IGR. IGR was associated with 1-year dependency (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 2.18, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.19–3.99; P = 0.01) and poor outcome (adjusted OR 2.17; 95% CI, 1.24–3.80; P = 0.007) of patients with ICH. However, IGR showed no significant association with 1-year death (adjusted hazard ratio 1.49, 95% CI, 0.60–3.67; P = 0.39). IGR was independently associated with 1-year poor outcome of ICH in Chinese patients, with more important influence on dependency than death. PMID:27796374

  11. [Effectiveness of acarbose in the control of glucose tolerance worsening in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Zárate, A; Ochoa, R; Hernández, M; Basurto, L

    2000-01-01

    Gestational diabetes is considered as a carbohydrate intolerance, first diagnosed during pregnancy. A previous stage of carbohydrate impairement may precede its abnormality; therefore it may be convenient to establish some management in order to avoid the gestational diabetes. Six pregnant women who had moderate elevated level of blood glucose at fasting and postprandial were treated with acarbose, alpha-glucosidase inhibitor agent, given three times a day before meals. In all patients fasting and postprandial glucose levels were normalized; pregnancies went uneventful and the newborns were considered normal. Acarbose was associated with intestinal discomfort which persisted during the whole pregnancy.

  12. High frequency of diabetes and impaired fasting glucose in patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in the Western brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Santana, Marli S; Monteiro, Wuelton M; Costa, Mônica R F; Sampaio, Vanderson S; Brito, Marcelo A M; Lacerda, Marcus V G; Alecrim, Maria G C

    2014-07-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is one of the most common human genetic abnormalities, and it has a significant prevalence in the male population (X chromosome linked). The purpose of this study was to estimate the frequency of impaired fasting glucose and diabetes among G6PD-deficient persons in Manaus, Brazil, an area in the Western Brazilian Amazon to which malaria is endemic. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient males had more impaired fasting glucose and diabetes. This feature could be used as a screening tool for G6PD-deficient persons who are unable to use primaquine for the radical cure of Plasmodium vivax malaria.

  13. Abnormal Glucose Tolerance in Infants and Young Children with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yi, Yaling; Norris, Andrew W; Wang, Kai; Sun, Xingshen; Uc, Aliye; Moran, Antoinette; Engelhardt, John F; Ode, Katie Larson

    2016-10-15

    In cystic fibrosis, abnormal glucose tolerance is associated with decreased lung function and worsened outcomes. Translational evidence indicates that abnormal glucose tolerance may begin in early life. To determine whether very young children with cystic fibrosis have increased abnormal glucose tolerance prevalence compared with control subjects. The secondary objective was to compare area under the curve for glucose and insulin in children with cystic fibrosis with control subjects. This is a prospective multicenter study in children ages 3 months to 5 years with and without cystic fibrosis. Oral glucose tolerance testing with glucose, insulin, and C-peptide was sampled at 0, 10, 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes. Twenty-three children with cystic fibrosis and nine control subjects had complete data. All control subjects had normal glucose tolerance. Nine of 23 subjects with cystic fibrosis had abnormal glucose tolerance (39%; P = 0.03). Of those, two met criteria for cystic fibrosis-related diabetes, two indeterminate glycemia, and six impaired glucose tolerance. Children with cystic fibrosis failed to exhibit the normal increase in area under the curve insulin with age observed in control subjects (P < 0.01), despite increased area under the curve glucose (P = 0.02). Abnormal glucose tolerance is notably prevalent among young children with cystic fibrosis. Children with cystic fibrosis lack the normal increase in insulin secretion that occurs in early childhood despite increased glucose. These findings demonstrate that glycemic abnormalities begin very early in cystic fibrosis, possibly because of insufficient insulin secretion.

  14. Sexual dimorphism of hyperglycemia and glucose tolerance in Wistar fatty rats.

    PubMed

    Kava, R A; West, D B; Lukasik, V A; Greenwood, M R

    1989-02-01

    Obese and lean male and female Wistar fatty rats were fed a high-sucrose (68% of calories) diet from 5 to 22 wk of age. Obese males, but not obese females, developed hyperglycemia in the fed state and were more glucose intolerant during an intragastric glucose tolerance test than obese females. Lean Wistar fatty rats did not become hyperglycemic on the sucrose diet. Obese males also showed a smaller insulin response during the glucose tolerance test than did obese females. The Wistar fatty rat is a sexually dimorphic model of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in which the male but not the female obese rats become diabetic. The diabetic condition and impaired glucose tolerance in the obese male Wistar fatty rat may be related to impaired pancreatic insulin release and peripheral insulin resistance.

  15. How Tom Moon's research highlighted the question of glucose tolerance in carnivorous fish.

    PubMed

    Polakof, S; Panserat, S

    2016-09-01

    Fifteen years ago, Tom Moon wrote a review on this journal in order to propose some explanations to the exacerbated glycaemic response after a glucose load or a carbohydrate meal intake observed in fish, the so-called intolerance to glucose. Before, but in most of cases after this paper, several laboratories worldwide started to make important efforts in order to better understand this strange phenotype observed in fish and that so far seemed to belong to diabetic humans only. Tom had been worked on fish metabolism for at least 30years when he proposed that mini-review and the paths opened by him in 2001 were followed by tens of fish researchers, making this paper a breaking point on the field. Fifteen years later, we propose not only to have a look to the answers given to the questions rose in that paper, but also to summarize how his career over all these years impacted the domain of glucose metabolism in fish. In the review, we will show how Tom Moon analysed at different levels (from genes up to the whole organism), using distinct experimental tools (cells, hormone or glucose injection, pumps, drugs) the questions of glucose metabolism, tolerance and nutrition in fish species.

  16. Dosing obese cats based on body weight spuriously affects some measures of glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Reeve-Johnson, M K; Rand, J S; Anderson, S T; Appleton, D J; Morton, J M; Vankan, D

    2016-10-01

    The primary objective was to investigate whether dosing glucose by body weight results in spurious effects on measures of glucose tolerance in obese cats because volume of distribution does not increase linearly with body weight. Healthy research cats (n = 16; 6 castrated males, 10 spayed females) were used. A retrospective study was performed using glucose concentration data from glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity tests before and after cats were fed ad libitum for 9 to 12 mo to promote weight gain. The higher dose of glucose (0.5 vs 0.3 g/kg body weight) in the glucose tolerance tests increased 2-min glucose concentrations (P < 0.001), and there was a positive correlation between 2-min and 2-h glucose (r = 0.65, P = 0.006). Two-min (P = 0.016 and 0.019, respectively), and 2-h (P = 0.057 and 0.003, respectively) glucose concentrations, and glucose half-life (T1/2; P = 0.034 and <0.001 respectively) were positively associated with body weight and body condition score. Glucose dose should be decreased by 0.05 g for every kg above ideal body weight. Alternatively, for every unit of body condition score above 5 on a 9-point scale, observed 2-h glucose concentration should be adjusted down by 0.1 mmol/L. Dosing glucose based on body weight spuriously increases glucose concentrations at 2 h in obese cats and could lead to cats being incorrectly classified as having impaired glucose tolerance. This has important implications for clinical studies assessing the effect of interventions on glucose tolerance when lean and obese cats are compared.

  17. Detection of abnormal glucose tolerance in Africans is improved by combining A1C with fasting glucose: the Africans in America Study.

    PubMed

    Sumner, Anne E; Thoreson, Caroline K; O'Connor, Michelle Y; Ricks, Madia; Chung, Stephanie T; Tulloch-Reid, Marshall K; Lozier, Jay N; Sacks, David B

    2015-02-01

    Abnormal glucose tolerance is rising in sub-Saharan Africa. Hemoglobin A1c by itself and in combination with fasting plasma glucose (FPG) is used to diagnose abnormal glucose tolerance. The diagnostic ability of A1C in Africans with heterozygous variant hemoglobin, such as sickle cell trait or hemoglobin C trait, has not been rigorously evaluated. In U.S.-based Africans, we determined by hemoglobin status the sensitivities of 1) FPG ≥5.6 mmol/L, 2) A1C ≥ 5.7% (39 mmol/mol), and 3) FPG combined with A1C (FPG ≥5.6 mmol/L and/or A1C ≥5.7% [39 mmol/mol]) for the detection of abnormal glucose tolerance. An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed in 216 African immigrants (68% male, age 37 ± 10 years [mean ± SD], range 20-64 years). Abnormal glucose tolerance was defined as 2-h glucose ≥7.8 mmol/L. Variant hemoglobin was identified in 21% (46 of 216). Abnormal glucose tolerance occurred in 33% (72 of 216). When determining abnormal glucose tolerance from the OGTT (2-h glucose ≥7.8 mmol/L), sensitivities of FPG for the total, normal, and variant hemoglobin groups were 32%, 32%, and 33%, respectively. Sensitivities for A1C were 53%, 54%, and 47%. For FPG and A1C combined, sensitivities were 64%, 63%, and 67%. Sensitivities for FPG and A1C and the combination did not vary by hemoglobin status (all P > 0.6). For the entire cohort, sensitivity was higher for A1C than FPG and for both tests combined than for either test alone (all P values ≤ 0.01). No significant difference in sensitivity of A1C by variant hemoglobin status was detected. For the diagnosis of abnormal glucose tolerance in Africans, the sensitivity of A1C combined with FPG is significantly superior to either test alone. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  18. A study of the effect of diet on glycosylated haemoglobin and albumin levels and glucose tolerance in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Ryle, A J; Davie, S; Gould, B J; Yudkin, J S

    1990-12-01

    As factors other than the degree of glucose tolerance or ambient blood glucose may determine glycosylated haemoglobin levels, we have investigated the effects of dietary glucose and soluble fibre supplementation on glucose tolerance, glycosylated haemoglobin and glycosylated albumin in non-diabetic subjects. Eleven non-diabetic subjects (7 M, 4 F; age 26.5 +/- 6.5 (+/- SD) yr; BMI 21.6 +/- 3.1 kg m-2) followed a high-soluble-fibre (5 g guar gum thrice daily)/low-glucose diet, or a low-soluble-fibre/high-glucose (500 ml glucose drink providing 100 g glucose per day) diet, each for 6 weeks, in randomized order. A 75 g oral glucose tolerance test was performed at recruitment and after each diet period, and fasting blood was assayed for glycosylated albumin by affinity chromatography, and glycosylated haemoglobin by four different methods. Adherence to guar and glucose supplementation was assessed at 89.5 +/- 7.5% and 97.1 +/- 3.5%, respectively. There was no significant effect of either diet on mean fasting, 1-h or 2-h plasma glucose concentration, or glycosylated haemoglobin levels by any assay. Glycosylated albumin was 1.71 +/- 0.35% at entry, fell to 1.33 +/- 0.30% (p less than 0.01) with high-fibre and rose to 1.95 +/- 0.23% (p less than 0.02) after a high-glucose diet. Insulin, total- and HDL-cholesterol and triglyceride levels were unaffected by either diet. A high-glucose diet increases, and a high-soluble-fibre diet decreases, levels of glycosylated albumin without effects on glucose tolerance or glycosylated haemoglobin.

  19. Detection of Abnormal Glucose Tolerance in Africans Is Improved by Combining A1C With Fasting Glucose: The Africans in America Study

    PubMed Central

    Thoreson, Caroline K.; O'Connor, Michelle Y.; Ricks, Madia; Chung, Stephanie T.; Tulloch-Reid, Marshall K.; Lozier, Jay N.; Sacks, David B.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Abnormal glucose tolerance is rising in sub-Saharan Africa. Hemoglobin A1c by itself and in combination with fasting plasma glucose (FPG) is used to diagnose abnormal glucose tolerance. The diagnostic ability of A1C in Africans with heterozygous variant hemoglobin, such as sickle cell trait or hemoglobin C trait, has not been rigorously evaluated. In U.S.-based Africans, we determined by hemoglobin status the sensitivities of 1) FPG ≥5.6 mmol/L, 2) A1C ≥ 5.7% (39 mmol/mol), and 3) FPG combined with A1C (FPG ≥5.6 mmol/L and/or A1C ≥5.7% [39 mmol/mol]) for the detection of abnormal glucose tolerance. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed in 216 African immigrants (68% male, age 37 ± 10 years [mean ± SD], range 20–64 years). Abnormal glucose tolerance was defined as 2-h glucose ≥7.8 mmol/L. RESULTS Variant hemoglobin was identified in 21% (46 of 216). Abnormal glucose tolerance occurred in 33% (72 of 216). When determining abnormal glucose tolerance from the OGTT (2-h glucose ≥7.8 mmol/L), sensitivities of FPG for the total, normal, and variant hemoglobin groups were 32%, 32%, and 33%, respectively. Sensitivities for A1C were 53%, 54%, and 47%. For FPG and A1C combined, sensitivities were 64%, 63%, and 67%. Sensitivities for FPG and A1C and the combination did not vary by hemoglobin status (all P > 0.6). For the entire cohort, sensitivity was higher for A1C than FPG and for both tests combined than for either test alone (all P values ≤ 0.01). CONCLUSIONS No significant difference in sensitivity of A1C by variant hemoglobin status was detected. For the diagnosis of abnormal glucose tolerance in Africans, the sensitivity of A1C combined with FPG is significantly superior to either test alone. PMID:25338926

  20. Neonatal Exendin-4 Reduces Growth, Fat Deposition and Glucose Tolerance during Treatment in the Intrauterine Growth-Restricted Lamb

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Saidatul N. B.; De Blasio, Miles J.; Harland, M. Lyn; Simmons, Rebecca A.; Owens, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Background IUGR increases the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in later life, due to reduced insulin sensitivity and impaired adaptation of insulin secretion. In IUGR rats, development of T2DM can be prevented by neonatal administration of the GLP-1 analogue exendin-4. We therefore investigated effects of neonatal exendin-4 administration on insulin action and β-cell mass and function in the IUGR neonate in the sheep, a species with a more developed pancreas at birth. Methods Twin IUGR lambs were injected s.c. daily with vehicle (IUGR+Veh, n = 8) or exendin-4 (1 nmol.kg-1, IUGR+Ex-4, n = 8), and singleton control lambs were injected with vehicle (CON, n = 7), from d 1 to 16 of age. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity were measured in vivo during treatment (d 12–14). Body composition, β-cell mass and in vitro insulin secretion of isolated pancreatic islets were measured at d 16. Principal Findings IUGR+Veh did not alter in vivo insulin secretion or insulin sensitivity or β-cell mass, but increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in vitro. Exendin-4 treatment of the IUGR lamb impaired glucose tolerance in vivo, reflecting reduced insulin sensitivity, and normalised glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in vitro. Exendin-4 also reduced neonatal growth and visceral fat accumulation in IUGR lambs, known risk factors for later T2DM. Conclusions Neonatal exendin-4 induces changes in IUGR lambs that might improve later insulin action. Whether these effects of exendin-4 lead to improved insulin action in adult life after IUGR in the sheep, as in the PR rat, requires further investigation. PMID:23424667

  1. Evaluation of a Self-Administered Oral Glucose Tolerance Test

    PubMed Central

    Bethel, M. Angelyn; Price, Hermione C.; Sourij, Harald; White, Sarah; Coleman, Ruth L.; Ring, Arne; Kennedy, Irene E.C.; Tucker, Lynne; Holman, Rury R.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the feasibility of using a disposable, self-administered, capillary blood sampling oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) device in a community setting. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Eighteen healthy and 12 type 2 diabetic volunteers underwent six 75-g OGTTs using a prototype device in the following three settings: unaided at home (twice); unaided but observed in clinic (twice); and performed by a nurse with simultaneous laboratory glucose assays of 0- and 120-min venous plasma samples (twice). The device displayed no results. A detachable data recorder returned to the clinic provided plasma-equivalent 0- and 120-min glucose values and key parameters, including test date, start and end times, and time taken to consume the glucose drink. RESULTS The device was universally popular with participants and was perceived as easy to use, and the ability to test at home was well liked. Device failures meant that 0- and 120-min glucose values were obtained for only 141 (78%) of the 180 OGTTs performed, independent of setting. Device glucose measurements showed a mean bias compared with laboratory-measured values of +0.9 at 5.0 mmol/L increasing to +4.4 at 15.0 mmol/L. Paired device glucose values were equally reproducible across settings, with repeat testing showing no training effect regardless of setting order. CONCLUSIONS Self-administered OGTTs can be performed successfully by untrained individuals in a community setting. With improved device reliability and appropriate calibration, this novel technology could be used in routine practice to screen people who might need a formal OGTT to confirm the presence of impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes. PMID:23321216

  2. Evaluation of a self-administered oral glucose tolerance test.

    PubMed

    Bethel, M Angelyn; Price, Hermione C; Sourij, Harald; White, Sarah; Coleman, Ruth L; Ring, Arne; Kennedy, Irene E C; Tucker, Lynne; Holman, Rury R

    2013-06-01

    To assess the feasibility of using a disposable, self-administered, capillary blood sampling oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) device in a community setting. Eighteen healthy and 12 type 2 diabetic volunteers underwent six 75-g OGTTs using a prototype device in the following three settings: unaided at home (twice); unaided but observed in clinic (twice); and performed by a nurse with simultaneous laboratory glucose assays of 0- and 120-min venous plasma samples (twice). The device displayed no results. A detachable data recorder returned to the clinic provided plasma-equivalent 0- and 120-min glucose values and key parameters, including test date, start and end times, and time taken to consume the glucose drink. The device was universally popular with participants and was perceived as easy to use, and the ability to test at home was well liked. Device failures meant that 0- and 120-min glucose values were obtained for only 141 (78%) of the 180 OGTTs performed, independent of setting. Device glucose measurements showed a mean bias compared with laboratory-measured values of +0.9 at 5.0 mmol/L increasing to +4.4 at 15.0 mmol/L. Paired device glucose values were equally reproducible across settings, with repeat testing showing no training effect regardless of setting order. Self-administered OGTTs can be performed successfully by untrained individuals in a community setting. With improved device reliability and appropriate calibration, this novel technology could be used in routine practice to screen people who might need a formal OGTT to confirm the presence of impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes.

  3. Glycemic variability in relation to oral disposition index in the subjects with different stages of glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tong; Xu, Feng; Su, Jian-Bin; Wang, Xue-Qin; Chen, Jin-Feng; Wu, Gang; Jin, Yan; Wang, Xiao-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Glucose variability could be an independent risk factor for diabetes complications in addition to average glucose. The deficiency in islet β cell secretion and insulin sensitivity, the two important pathophysiological mechanisms of diabetes, are responsible for glycemic disorders. The oral disposition index evaluated by product of insulin secretion and sensitivity is a useful marker of islet β cell function. The aim of the study is to investigate glycemic variability in relation to oral disposition index in the subjects across a range of glucose tolerance from the normal to overt type 2 diabetes. 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed in total 220 subjects: 47 with normal glucose regulation (NGR), 52 with impaired glucose metabolism (IGM, 8 with isolated impaired fasting glucose [IFG], 18 with isolated impaired glucose tolerance [IGT] and 26 with combined IFG and IGT), 61 screen-diagnosed diabetes by isolated 2-h glucose (DM2h) and 60 newly diagnosed diabetes by both fasting and 2-h glucose (DM). Insulin sensitivity index (Matsuda index, ISI), insulin secretion index (ΔI30/ΔG30), and integrated β cell function measured by the oral disposition index (ΔI30/ΔG30 multiplied by the ISI) were derived from OGTT. All subjects were monitored using the continuous glucose monitoring system for consecutive 72 hours. The multiple parameters of glycemic variability included the standard deviation of blood glucose (SD), mean of blood glucose (MBG), high blood glucose index (HBGI), continuous overlapping net glycemic action calculated every 1 h (CONGA1), mean of daily differences (MODD) and mean amplitude of glycemic excursions (MAGE). From the NGR to IGM to DM2h to DM group, the respective values of SD (mean ± SD) (0.9 ± 0.3, 1.5 ± 0.5, 1.9 ± 0.6 and 2.2 ± 0.6 mmol/), MBG (5.9 ± 0.5, 6.7 ± 0.7, 7.7 ± 1.0 and 8.7 ± 1.5 mmol/L), HGBI [median(Q1-Q3)][0.8(0.2-1.2), 2.0(1.2-3.7), 3.8(2.4-5.6) and 6

  4. Glycemic variability in relation to oral disposition index in the subjects with different stages of glucose tolerance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glucose variability could be an independent risk factor for diabetes complications in addition to average glucose. The deficiency in islet β cell secretion and insulin sensitivity, the two important pathophysiological mechanisms of diabetes, are responsible for glycemic disorders. The oral disposition index evaluated by product of insulin secretion and sensitivity is a useful marker of islet β cell function. The aim of the study is to investigate glycemic variability in relation to oral disposition index in the subjects across a range of glucose tolerance from the normal to overt type 2 diabetes. Methods 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed in total 220 subjects: 47 with normal glucose regulation (NGR), 52 with impaired glucose metabolism (IGM, 8 with isolated impaired fasting glucose [IFG], 18 with isolated impaired glucose tolerance [IGT] and 26 with combined IFG and IGT), 61 screen-diagnosed diabetes by isolated 2-h glucose (DM2h) and 60 newly diagnosed diabetes by both fasting and 2-h glucose (DM). Insulin sensitivity index (Matsuda index, ISI), insulin secretion index (ΔI30/ΔG30), and integrated β cell function measured by the oral disposition index (ΔI30/ΔG30 multiplied by the ISI) were derived from OGTT. All subjects were monitored using the continuous glucose monitoring system for consecutive 72 hours. The multiple parameters of glycemic variability included the standard deviation of blood glucose (SD), mean of blood glucose (MBG), high blood glucose index (HBGI), continuous overlapping net glycemic action calculated every 1 h (CONGA1), mean of daily differences (MODD) and mean amplitude of glycemic excursions (MAGE). Results From the NGR to IGM to DM2h to DM group, the respective values of SD (mean ± SD) (0.9 ± 0.3, 1.5 ± 0.5, 1.9 ± 0.6 and 2.2 ± 0.6 mmol/), MBG (5.9 ± 0.5, 6.7 ± 0.7, 7.7 ± 1.0 and 8.7 ± 1.5 mmol/L), HGBI [median(Q1–Q3)][0.8(0.2–1.2), 2.0(1.2–3.7), 3

  5. Effect of malnutrition during the first year of life on adult plasma insulin and glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    González-Barranco, J; Ríos-Torres, J M; Castillo-Martínez, L; López-Alvarenga, J C; Aguilar-Salinas, C A; Bouchard, C; Deprès, J P; Tremblay, A

    2003-08-01

    There is evidence linking intrauterine growth retardation with increased cardiovascular risk and diabetes mellitus (DM) later in life. However, little is known about the association between malnutrition during the first year of life and metabolic abnormalities in adulthood. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of documented malnutrition during the first year of life on glucose tolerance, plasma insulin, lipid profile, and blood pressure in early adulthood, as well as to assess the interaction between body mass index (BMI) and malnutrition on these variables. A study group of young men with a documented history of malnutrition during their first year of life was recruited from 4 pediatric hospitals in Mexico City and compared with a control group. Subjects included were 52 men, aged 20.2 +/- 3.6 years, with a mean birth weight of 3.0 +/- 0.7 kg and documented malnutrition in their first year of life; controls were 50 men, aged 23.3 +/- 1.8 years, with a mean birth weight of 3.2 +/- 0.5 kg. Insulin and glucose concentrations, fasting and in response to an oral glucose load, plasma lipids, blood pressure, and an insulin sensitivity index (ISI) were measured. The areas under the curves of glucose (AUCG) and insulin (AUCI) were significantly higher in cases (P =.012 and <.002, respectively), independent of birth weight, BMI, or age. BMI was significantly associated with fasting plasma insulin (FPI), AUCI, ISI, triglyceride, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol concentrations in cases, but not in controls. These data suggest that early malnutrition in extrauterine life, independently of birth weight, has an adverse effect on insulin metabolism and glucose tolerance in young men, and it worsens as body mass increases even within the normal range of BMI. Therefore, it is advisable to prevent obesity in individuals exposed to early malnutrition.

  6. Changes of the plasma metabolome during an oral glucose tolerance test: is there more than glucose to look at?

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinjie; Peter, Andreas; Fritsche, Jens; Elcnerova, Michaela; Fritsche, Andreas; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Schleicher, Erwin D; Xu, Guowang; Lehmann, Rainer

    2009-02-01

    The oral glucose tolerance test (oGTT) is a common tool to provoke a metabolic challenge for scientific purposes, as well as for diagnostic reasons, to monitor the kinetics of glucose and insulin. Here, we aimed to follow the variety of physiological changes of the whole metabolic pattern in plasma during an oGTT in healthy subjects in a nontargeted reversed-phase ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometric metabolomics approach. We detected 11,500 metabolite ion masses/individual. Applying multivariate data analysis, four major groups of metabolites have been detected as the most discriminating oGTT biomarkers: free fatty acids (FFA), acylcarnitines, bile acids, and lysophosphatidylcholines. We found in detail 1) a strong decrease of all saturated and monounsaturated FFA studied during the oGTT; 2) a significant faster decline of palmitoleate (C16:1) and oleate (C18:1) FFA levels than their saturated counterparts; 3) a strong relative increase of polyunsaturated fatty acids in the fatty acid pattern at 120 min; and 4) a clear decrease in plasma C10:0, C12:0, and C14:1 acylcarnitine levels. These data reflect the switch from beta-oxidation to glycolysis and fat storage during the oGTT. Moreover, the bile acids glycocholic acid, glycochenodeoxycholic acid, and glycodeoxycholic acid were highly discriminative, showing a biphasic kinetic with a maximum of a 4.5- to 6-fold increase at 30 min after glucose ingestion, a significant decrease over the next 60 min followed by an increase until the end of the oGTT. Lysophosphatidylcholines were also increased significantly. The findings of our metabolomics study reveal detailed insights in the complex physiological regulation of the metabolism during an oGTT offering novel perspectives of this widely used procedure.

  7. Diurnal Cortisol Patterns, Future Diabetes, and Impaired Glucose Metabolism in the Whitehall II Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Hackett, Ruth A; Kivimäki, Mika; Kumari, Meena; Steptoe, Andrew

    2016-02-01

    The hypothalamic pituitary-adrenal axis is thought to play a role in type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, evidence for an association between cortisol and future glucose disturbance is sparse. The aim was to examine the association of diurnal cortisol secretion with future T2D and impaired glucose metabolism in a community-dwelling population. This is a prospective cohort study of salivary cortisol measured at the 2002-2004 clinical examination of the Whitehall II study, United Kingdom. We measured cortisol (nmol/l) from six saliva samples obtained over the course of a day: at waking, +30 minutes, +2.5 hours, +8 hours, +12 hours, and bedtime. Participants who were normoglycemic in 2002-2004 (phase 7) were reexamined in 2012-2013 (phase 11). The occupational cohort was originally recruited in 1985-1988. A total of 3270 men and women with an average age of 60.85 years at phase 7 (2002-2004). Incident T2D and impaired fasting glucose in 2012-2013 were measured. Raised evening cortisol at phase 7 was predictive of new-onset T2D at phase 11 (odds ratio [OR], 1.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.37) with a trend for a flatter slope in participants with incident T2D (odds ratio, 1.15; 95% CI, 0.99-1.33). When expanding this analysis to a broader category of glucose disturbance we found that a flattened diurnal cortisol slope at phase 7 was predictive of future impaired fasting glucose or T2D at phase 11 (OR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.02-1.22), as was high bedtime cortisol (OR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.01-1.20). In this nonclinical population, alterations in diurnal cortisol patterns were predictive of future glucose disturbance.

  8. Monitoring changes in the scattering properties of mouse skin with optical coherence tomography during an in vivo glucose tolerance test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinnunen, M.; Tausta, S.; Myllylä, R.; Vainio, S.

    2007-05-01

    A non-invasive glucose monitoring technique would make evaluation of blood glucose values easier and more convenient. This would help diabetic patients to control their blood glucose values more regularly. A few years ago optical coherence tomography (OCT) was proposed as a non-invasive sensor for monitoring changes in blood glucose concentration. The method is based on monitoring glucose-induced changes in the scattering properties of the target. This article describes how OCT was used to monitor changes in the scattering properties of mouse skin during an in vivo glucose tolerance test. The results show that OCT has the potential to register glucose-induced changes in the optical properties of the sample. However, a commercial OCT device with a probe designed for imaging is not very suitable for non-invasive monitoring of glucose-induced changes in scattering. The problems confronted in this study, possibly originating from the small size of the animals, are discussed in the article.

  9. Decrease of serum S100B during an oral glucose tolerance test correlates inversely with the insulin response.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Johann; Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Schiltz, Kolja; Haase, Thekla; Meyer-Lotz, Gabriela; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Müller, Ulf J; Martins-de-Souza, Daniel; Borucki, Katrin; Schroeter, Matthias L; Isermann, Berend; Bogerts, Bernhard; Westphal, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Increased S100B serum levels have been considered as a marker of glial pathology, brain damage, and blood-brain-barrier impairment. However, S100B expression has also been detected outside the nervous system, suggesting that altered S100B serum levels may not exclusively reflect brain-specific pathologies. Notably, S100B secretion in adipocytes seems to be down-regulated by insulin, and up-regulated by stress and fasting. Therefore, we assumed that dynamic changes of S100B could be observed by challenging healthy subjects with an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). OGTT was performed in 17 healthy adult test persons (9 male and 8 female). Apart from S100B, glucose, free fatty acids, insulin, C-peptide, and cortisol were determined in all samples after an overnight fast (0 h), as well as 1h and 2h after ingestion of 75 g glucose. Mean S100B concentrations decreased about 20% during the first hour after glucose ingestion (P<0.001). This decrease of S100B levels was not related to the declining morning peak of cortisol. However, the decrease of serum-S100B 1h after glucose ingestion correlated inversely with the respective changes of serum-insulin (r = -0.484, P=0.049) and serum-C-peptide (r = -0.570, P = 0.017). Our study suggests an inverse correlation between insulin secretion and S100B release after a standardized OGTT. Additional experiments, including the administration of insulin and the measurement of other food intake-related factors are important to ascertain an insulin-regulated S100B release in vivo. To improve comparability between clinical studies assessing conditions with rather mild changes of serum S100B, blood should be taken in a more standardized way (e.g., after fasting overnight).

  10. [The role of alterations in the brain signaling systems regulated by insulin, IGF-1 and leptin in the transition of impaired glucose tolerance to overt type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Shpakov, A O

    2014-01-01

    One of the crucial factors leading to the development of pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) are the disturbances in the brain hormonal signaling systems regulated by insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and leptin. The causes of these disturbances are the changes in the redox balance and lipid metabolism leading to lipotoxicity and endoplasmic reticulum stress in neuronal cells, as well as the dysfunctions in neurotransmitter systems of the brain that are functionally associated with insulin, IGF-1 and leptin signaling systems. The identification of molecular disturbances in insulin, IGF-1 and leptin systems of the brain in pre-diabetes and DM2 can be used for early diagnostics of these diseases, and to develop new strategies for preventive treatment of DM2 at the pre-diabetic stage. In the review, the literature data and the results of own investigations concerning the changes in the insulin, IGF-1 and leptin systems of the brain in pre-diabetes and DM2 and their role in the etiology and pathogenesis of DM2 are analyzed, and the approaches to restore the functional activity of these systems are discussed.

  11. Investigation on the acute toxic effect of pyrethrum on the blood glucose and of glucose administration on the acute pyrethrum toxicity in Meriones hurrianae Jerdon (Rodentia).

    PubMed

    Karel, A K; Saxena, S C

    1975-02-01

    The effect of different doses of pyrethrum on the blood glucose level and glucose tolerance in pytethrum-administered gerbils, were investigated. Pyrethrum produces hyperglycemia and lowers the glucose tolerance indicating an impairment in the uptake and utilization of glucose. The possible reasons for these effects are discussed.

  12. FFA2 Contribution to Gestational Glucose Tolerance Is Not Disrupted by Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoran; Fisch, Robert; Bughara, Moneb; Wicksteed, Barton; Kovatcheva-Datchary, Petia; Layden, Brian T.

    2016-01-01

    During the insulin resistant phase of pregnancy, the mRNA expression of free fatty acid 2 receptor (Ffar2) is upregulated and as we recently reported, this receptor contributes to insulin secretion and pancreatic beta cell mass expansion in order to maintain normal glucose homeostasis during pregnancy. As impaired gestational glucose levels can affect metabolic health of offspring, we aimed to explore the role of maternal Ffar2 expression during pregnancy on the metabolic health of offspring and also the effects of antibiotics, which have been shown to disrupt gut microbiota fermentative activity (the source of the FFA2 ligands) on gestational glucose homeostasis. We found that maternal Ffar2 expression and impaired glucose tolerance during pregnancy had no effect on the growth rates, ad lib glucose and glucose tolerance in the offspring between 3 and 6 weeks of age. To disrupt short chain fatty acid production, we chronically treated WT mice and Ffar2-/- mice with broad range antibiotics and further compared their glucose tolerance prior to pregnancy and at gestational day 15, and also quantified cecum and plasma SCFAs. We found that during pregnancy antibiotic treatment reduced the levels of SCFAs in the cecum of the mice, but resulted in elevated levels of plasma SCFAs and altered concentrations of individual SCFAs. Along with these changes, gestational glucose tolerance in WT mice, but not Ffar2-/- mice improved while on antibiotics. Additional data showed that gestational glucose tolerance worsened in Ffar2-/- mice during a second pregnancy. Together, these results indicate that antibiotic treatment alone is inadequate to deplete plasma SCFA concentrations, and that modulation of gut microbiota by antibiotics does not disrupt the contribution of FFA2 to gestational glucose tolerance. PMID:27959892

  13. Long-term nutrition education reduces several risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus in Brazilians with impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Gustavo D; Portero-McLellan, Kátia C; Oliveira, Erick P; Spada, Ana P M; Oshiiwa, Marie; Zemdegs, Juliane C S; Barbalho, Sandra M

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a nutrition education program (NEP) on anthropometric, dietetic, and metabolic parameters in high-risk subjects for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Fifty-one participants, both sexes, were randomly assigned to either the control (58.8%) or the intervention (NEP) group. The intervention group received frequent individual and group nutritional counseling from a team of nutritionists. Participants were assessed at baseline (M0) and after 12 months (M1) for anthropometric, dietetic, and metabolic parameters. The hypothesis was that high-risk subjects for type 2 diabetes mellitus participating in NEP would show an improvement in these parameters. At M1, the intervention group showed a significant decline in body weight (-3.4%), body mass index (-5.7%), cholesterol intake (-49.5%), fasting glycemia (-14.0%), fasting insulin (-9.0%), postprandial glycemia (-21.0%), postprandial insulin (-71.0%), total serum cholesterol (-23.0%), and glycated hemoglobin (-24.0%). A decrease in energy intake (5%, P = .06) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (25%, P = .07) was observed in the interventional group, although it did not reach statistical significance. In contrast, the control group presented a significantly higher energy intake (19%, P = .04) and a nonsignificant increase in consumption of all macronutrients. The long-term NEP was found to improve anthropometric, dietary, and metabolic parameters in high-risk subjects for type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  14. The effects of renal impairment on the pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of naloxegol.

    PubMed

    Bui, Khanh; She, Fahua; Sostek, Mark

    2014-12-01

    The impact of renal impairment on the pharmacokinetics of a 25-mg oral dose of naloxegol was examined in patients with renal impairment classified as moderate, severe, or end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and compared with healthy subjects (n = 8/group). Geometric mean area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) was increased in patients with moderate (1.7-fold) or severe (2.2-fold) impairment, and maximum plasma concentrations (Cmax ) were elevated in patients with moderate (1.1-fold) or severe (1.8-fold) impairment. These findings were driven by higher exposures in two patients in each of the moderate and severe impairment groups; exposures in all other patients were similar to the control group. Overall exposures in ESRD patients were similar and Cmax was 29% lower versus normal subjects. Renal impairment minimally affected other plasma pharmacokinetic parameters. As renal clearance was a minor component of total clearance, exposure to naloxegol was unaffected by the degree of renal impairment, with no correlation between either AUC or Cmax and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Hemodialysis was an ineffective means to remove naloxegol. Naloxegol was generally well tolerated in all groups. Renal impairment could adversely affect clearance by hepatic and gut metabolism, resulting in the increased exposures observed in outliers of the moderate and severe renal impairment groups.

  15. Optimization of the intravenous glucose tolerance test in T2DM patients using optimal experimental design.

    PubMed

    Silber, Hanna E; Nyberg, Joakim; Hooker, Andrew C; Karlsson, Mats O

    2009-06-01

    Intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) provocations are informative, but complex and laborious, for studying the glucose-insulin system. The objective of this study was to evaluate, through optimal design methodology, the possibilities of more informative and/or less laborious study design of the insulin modified IVGTT in type 2 diabetic patients. A previously developed model for glucose and insulin regulation was implemented in the optimal design software PopED 2.0. The following aspects of the study design of the insulin modified IVGTT were evaluated; (1) glucose dose, (2) insulin infusion, (3) combination of (1) and (2), (4) sampling times, (5) exclusion of labeled glucose. Constraints were incorporated to avoid prolonged hyper- and/or hypoglycemia and a reduced design was used to decrease run times. Design efficiency was calculated as a measure of the improvement with an optimal design compared to the basic design. The results showed that the design of the insulin modified IVGTT could be substantially improved by the use of an optimized design compared to the standard design and that it was possible to use a reduced number of samples. Optimization of sample times gave the largest improvement followed by insulin dose. The results further showed that it was possible to reduce the total sample time with only a minor loss in efficiency. Simulations confirmed the predictions from PopED. The predicted uncertainty of parameter estimates (CV) was low in all tested cases, despite the reduction in the number of samples/subject. The best design had a predicted average CV of parameter estimates of 19.5%. We conclude that improvement can be made to the design of the insulin modified IVGTT and that the most important design factor was the placement of sample times followed by the use of an optimal insulin dose. This paper illustrates how complex provocation experiments can be improved by sequential modeling and optimal design.

  16. The oral glucose tolerance test is frequently abnormal in patients with uncontrolled epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Vianna, J B M; Atallah, A N; Prado, G F; Valente, O; Duarte-Barros, M L; Vianna, E C S; Mello, L E A M

    2006-08-01

    The clinical efficacy of the ketogenic diet as therapy for patients with difficult-to-treat epilepsy prompted us to investigate the glucose metabolism of these patients under an oral overload of glucose, that is, in the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Thirty patients (12 males, 18 females; age range: 17-59, mean: 35.1) with difficult-to-treat epilepsy, 23 patients with controlled epilepsy (11 males, 12 females; age range: 14-66, mean: 36.9), and 39 control subjects (18 males, 21 females; age range: 16-58, mean: 33.3) were evaluated with the OGTT. For patients with epilepsy, we also measured C-peptide and glycosylated hemoglobin in the fasting state. Glucose levels lower than 70 mg/dL at any point of the curve were considered to be abnormal. All subjects in the control group and the group with controlled epilepsy had a normal OGTT. In contrast, all 30 patients with difficult-to-treat epilepsy had at least one point on the OGTT curve below the normal range (P<0.001), most often 180 and 240 minutes after the oral glucose load (P<0.001). C-peptide levels were significantly lower in the group with difficult-to-treat epilepsy as compared with the group with controlled epilepsy. Fasting glycohemoglobin and insulin levels did not differ between the two patient groups. We suggest that undiagnosed metabolic disturbances in patients with difficult-to-treat epilepsy may somehow contribute to their refractoriness to conventional pharmacological therapy. We propose the hypothesis that calorie-restricted diets aimed at correcting OGTT curves may prove beneficial in treating patients with difficult-to-treat epilepsy. Our hypothesis generates a clear endpoint for the diet, and its demonstration would provide new standards for diet-based antiepileptic regimens. Accordingly, our results may help in understanding the positive consequences of ketogenic or calorie-restricted diets in persons with seizures.

  17. Effect of Different Periods of Fasting on Oral Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, C. H.; O'Regan, J.; O'Sullivan, D. J

    1973-01-01

    The effect of different periods of fasting on oral glucose tolerance was investigated in 33 subjects. It was found that glucose tolerance deteriorated as the fasting period became shorter. This effect was seen almost exclusively in subjects over 40 years of age. Only the fasting blood sugar was affected by the duration of the pretest fast in younger subjects. PMID:4733248

  18. Functional changes of the coronary microvasculature with aging regarding glucose tolerance, energy metabolism, and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Mourmoura, Evangelia; Couturier, Karine; Hininger-Favier, Isabelle; Malpuech-Brugère, Corinne; Azarnoush, Kasra; Richardson, Melanie; Demaison, Luc

    2014-01-01

    This study was aimed at characterizing the functional progression of the endothelial (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) of the coronary microvasculature between youth and old age, as well as at determining the mechanisms of the observed changes on the basis of the glucose tolerance, mitochondrial energy metabolism, and oxidative stress. Male rats were divided into four age groups (3, 6, 11, and 17 months for the young (Y), young adult (YA), middle-aged (MA), and old (O) animals). The cardiac mechanical function, endothelial-dependent dilatation (EDD) and endothelial-independent dilatation (EID) of the coronary microvasculature were determined in a Langendorff preparation. The mitochondrial respiration and H2O2 production were evaluated and completed by ex vivo measurements of oxidative stress. EDD progressively decreased from youth to old age. The relaxation properties of the SMCs, although high in the Y rats, decreased drastically between youth and young adulthood and stabilized thereafter, paralleling the reduction of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. The ECs dilatation activity, low at youth, was stimulated in YA animals and returned to their initial level at middle age. That parameter followed faithfully the progression of the amount of active cardiac endothelial nitric oxide synthase and whole body glucose intolerance. In conclusion, the progressive decrease in EDD occurring with aging is due to different functional behaviors of the ECs and SMCs, which appear to be associated with the systemic glucose intolerance and cardiac energy metabolism.

  19. The Chinese Pueraria root extract (Pueraria lobota) ameliorates impaired glucose and lipid metabolism in obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Prasain, Jeevan K.; Peng, Ning; Rajbhandari, Rajani; Wyss, J. Michael

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes and metabolic disease is rapidly increasing, but effective therapies for their prevention and treatment have been poorly tolerated or minimally effective. In this study, chronic administration of kudzu root extract (8 months, 0.2% w/w in diet) decreased baseline fasting plasma glucose (183±14 vs 148±11 mg/dl) and improved glucose and insulin tolerance in C57BL/6J ob/ob mice (1.67±0.17 ng/ml [kudzu treated] vs. 2.35±0.63 ng/ml [control]), but such treatment did not alter these parameters in lean control mice. Among the mice on the kudzu supplementation, plasma levels of isoflavone metabolites were significantly higher in ob/ob versus lean control mice, and unmetabolized puerarin (11.50±5.63 ng/gram) was found in adipose tissue only in the treated mice. Together, these data demonstrate that a puerarin containing kudzu diet improves glucose and insulin responsiveness in ob/ob mice, suggesting that puerarin may be a beneficial adjuvant for treating metabolic disease. PMID:23123226

  20. The Chinese Pueraria root extract (Pueraria lobata) ameliorates impaired glucose and lipid metabolism in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Prasain, Jeevan K; Peng, Ning; Rajbhandari, Rajani; Wyss, J Michael

    2012-12-15

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes and metabolic disease is rapidly increasing, but effective therapies for their prevention and treatment have been poorly tolerated or minimally effective. In this study, chronic administration of kudzu root extract (8 months, 0.2%, w/w, in diet) decreased baseline fasting plasma glucose (183±14 vs. 148±11 mg/dl) and improved glucose and insulin tolerance in C57BL/6J ob/ob mice (1.67±0.17 ng/ml [kudzu treated] vs. 2.35±0.63 ng/ml [control]), but such treatment did not alter these parameters in lean control mice. Among the mice on the kudzu supplementation, plasma levels of isoflavone metabolites were significantly higher in ob/ob versus lean control mice, and unmetabolized puerarin (11.50±5.63 ng/g) was found in adipose tissue only in the treated mice. Together, these data demonstrate that a puerarin containing kudzu diet improves glucose and insulin responsiveness in ob/ob mice, suggesting that puerarin may be a beneficial adjuvant for treating metabolic disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of hepatic or renal impairment on the pharmacokinetics of canagliflozin, a sodium glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Devineni, Damayanthi; Curtin, Christopher R; Marbury, Thomas C; Smith, William; Vaccaro, Nicole; Wexler, David; Vandebosch, An; Rusch, Sarah; Stieltjes, Hans; Wajs, Ewa

    2015-03-01

    Canagliflozin is a sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Because T2DM is often associated with renal or hepatic impairment, understanding the effects of these comorbid conditions on the pharmacokinetics of canagliflozin, and further assessing its safety, in these special populations is essential. Two open-label studies evaluated the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics (renal study only), and safety of canagliflozin in participants with hepatic or renal impairment. Participants in the hepatic study (8 in each group) were categorized based on their Child-Pugh score (normal hepatic function, mild impairment [Child-Pugh score of 5 or 6], and moderate impairment [Child-Pugh score of 7-9]) and received a single oral dose of canagliflozin 300 mg. Participants in the renal study (8 in each group) were categorized based on their creatinine clearance (CLCR) (normal renal function [CLCR ≥80 mL/min]; mild [CLCR 50 to <80 mL/min], moderate [CLCR 30 to <50 mL/min], or severe [CLCR <30 mL/min] renal impairment; and end-stage renal disease [ESRD]) and received a single oral dose of canagliflozin 200 mg; the exception was those with ESRD, who received 1 dose postdialysis and 1 dose predialysis (10 days later). Canagliflozin's pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (urinary glucose excretion [UGE] and renal threshold for glucose excretion [RTG]) were assessed at predetermined time points. Mean maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) and area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero to infinite (AUC)0-∞ values differed by <11% between the group with normal hepatic function and those with mild and moderate hepatic impairment. In the renal study, the mean Cmax values were 13%, 29%, and 29% higher and the mean AUC0-∞ values were 17%, 63%, and 50% higher in participants with mild, moderate, and severe renal impairment, respectively; values were similar in the ESRD group relative to the group with normal

  2. Improvement in glucose tolerance due to Momordica charantia (karela).

    PubMed

    Leatherdale, B A; Panesar, R K; Singh, G; Atkins, T W; Bailey, C J; Bignell, A H

    1981-06-06

    The effect of karela (Momordica charantia), a fruit indigenous to South America and Asia, on glucose and insulin concentrations was studied in nine non-insulin-dependent diabetics and six non-diabetic laboratory rats. A water-soluble extract of the fruits significantly reduced blood glucose concentrations during a 50 g oral glucose tolerance test in the diabetics and after force-feeding in the rats. Fried karela fruits consumed as a daily supplement to the diet produced a small but significant improvement in glucose tolerance. Improvement in glucose tolerance was not associated with an increase in serum insulin responses. These results show that karela improves glucose tolerance in diabetes. Doctors supervising Asian diabetics should be aware of the fruit's hypoglycaemic properties.

  3. Improvement in glucose tolerance due to Momordica charantia (karela).

    PubMed Central

    Leatherdale, B A; Panesar, R K; Singh, G; Atkins, T W; Bailey, C J; Bignell, A H

    1981-01-01

    The effect of karela (Momordica charantia), a fruit indigenous to South America and Asia, on glucose and insulin concentrations was studied in nine non-insulin-dependent diabetics and six non-diabetic laboratory rats. A water-soluble extract of the fruits significantly reduced blood glucose concentrations during a 50 g oral glucose tolerance test in the diabetics and after force-feeding in the rats. Fried karela fruits consumed as a daily supplement to the diet produced a small but significant improvement in glucose tolerance. Improvement in glucose tolerance was not associated with an increase in serum insulin responses. These results show that karela improves glucose tolerance in diabetes. Doctors supervising Asian diabetics should be aware of the fruit's hypoglycaemic properties. PMID:6786635

  4. Hyperproinsulinemia in a three-generation Caucasian family due to mutant proinsulin (Arg65-His) not associated with imparied glucose tolerance: the contribution of mutant proinsulin to insulin bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Röder, M E; Vissing, H; Nauck, M A

    1996-04-01

    Familial hyperproinsulinemia is a genetic abnormality characterized by an increased proportion of proinsulin immunoreactivity in the circulation due to mutations affecting the posttranslational processing of proinsulin. In affected Japanese families, this has been associated with noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus or impaired glucose tolerance. A three-generation Caucasian family with hyperproinsulinemia was identified through unexplained hyperinsulinemia in a normal volunteer participating in a metabolic study. High pressure liquid chromatography analysis of fasting plasma revealed a major peak eluting close to the position of proinsulin. Direct sequencing of the proinsulin gene exon 3 showed a heterozygous point mutation (CGT-->CAT) resulting in the substitution of Arg-->His in position 65 (corresponding to the AC cleavage site) in the index case, his mother, and his maternal grandmother. Using specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods to quantify insulin and proinsulin (including its conversion intermediates), the impact of this mutation on B cell secretion and glucose tolerance was studied. All affected subjects had normal oral glucose tolerance. In the basal state and after oral glucose administration, their proinsulin responses were immense, but intact insulin responses were slightly reduced. However, when calculating insulin bioactivity by assuming 9% activity for mutant Arg65-->His proinsulin, responses in affected subjects were comparable to those in normal subjects. In conclusion, our data demonstrate hyperproinsulinemia in a three-generation Caucasian family due to heterozygous mutant Arg65-->His proinsulin. This was not associated with impaired glucose tolerance. These results suggest that this mutation in the heterozygous state per se does not affect glucose tolerance and that the biological activity of mutant proinsulin contributes to glucose homeostasis in this family. The association of the same mutation with impaired glucose tolerance

  5. An integrated glucose-insulin model to describe oral glucose tolerance test data in type 2 diabetics.

    PubMed

    Jauslin, Petra M; Silber, Hanna E; Frey, Nicolas; Gieschke, Ronald; Simonsson, Ulrika S H; Jorga, Karin; Karlsson, Mats O

    2007-10-01

    An integrated model for the glucose-insulin system describing oral glucose tolerance test data was developed, extending on a previously introduced model for intravenous glucose provocations. Model extensions comprised the description of glucose absorption by a chain of transit compartments with a mean transit time of 35 minutes, a bioavailability of 80%, and a representation of the incretin effect, expressed as a direct effect of the glucose absorption rate on insulin secretion. The ability of the model to predict the incretin effect was assessed by simulating the observed difference in insulin response following an oral glucose tolerance test compared with an isoglycemic glucose infusion mimicking an oral glucose tolerance test profile. The extension of the integrated glucose-insulin model to gain information from oral glucose tolerance test data considerably expands its range of applications because the oral glucose tolerance test is one of the most common glucose challenge experiments for assessing the efficacy of hypoglycemic agents in clinical drug development.

  6. Impaired glucose homeostasis in non-diabetic Greek hypertensives with diabetes family history. Effect of the obesity status.

    PubMed

    Vyssoulis, Gregory P; Liakos, Charalampos I; Karpanou, Eva A; Triantafyllou, Athanasios I; Michaelides, Andreas P; Tzamou, Vanessa E; Markou, Maria I; Stefanadis, Christodoulos I

    2013-01-01

    Arterial hypertension (AH) and diabetes mellitus (DM) are established cardiovascular risk factors. Impaired glucose homeostasis (IGH; impaired fasting glucose or/and impaired glucose tolerance) or pre-diabetes, obesity, and DM family history identify individuals at risk for type 2 DM in whom preventive interventions are necessary. The aim of this study was to determine the glycemic profile in non-diabetic Greek adult hypertensive men and women according to DM family history and the obesity status. Diabetes family history, obesity markers (waist-to-hip ratio, WHR; body mass index, BMI), glycemic parameters (fasting and 2-hour post-load plasma glucose, if necessary; glycated hemoglobin, HbA1c; fasting insulin), insulin resistance indices (homeostasis model assessment, HOMA; quantitative insulin sensitivity check index, QUICKI; Bennett; McAuley), and IGH prevalence were determined in a large cohort of 11,540 Greek hypertensives referred to our institutions. Positive DM family history was associated with elevated fasting glucose (98.6 ± 13.1 vs 96.5 ± 12.3 mg/dL), HbA1c (5.58% ± 0.49% vs 5.50% ± 0.46%), fasting insulin (9.74 ± 4.20 vs 9.21 ± 3.63 μU/mL) and HOMA (2.43 ± 1.19 vs 2.24 ± 1.01) values, lower QUICKI (0.342 ± 0.025 vs 0.345 ± 0.023), Bennett (0.285 ± 0.081 vs 0.292 ± 0.078) and McAuley (6.73 ± 3.43 vs 6.95 ± 3.44) values, and higher IGH prevalence (45.3% vs 38.7%); P < .01 for all comparisons. The difference in the prevalence of IGH according to DM family history was significant (P < .01) in both genders and every WHR and BMI subgroup (except for women with BMI <20 kg/m(2)). Non-diabetic hypertensives with positive DM family history present with higher IGH prevalence and worse glycemic indices levels compared with those with negative family history, especially in the higher WHR/BMI subgroups. Copyright © 2013 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Do type 2 diabetes patients without diabetic retinopathy or subjects with impaired fasting glucose have impaired colour vision? The Okubo Color Study Report.

    PubMed

    Shoji, T; Sakurai, Y; Sato, H; Chihara, E; Takeuchi, M

    2011-07-01

    To investigate associations between fasting plasma glucose level and the prevalence of acquired colour vision impairment in type 2 diabetes patients without diabetic retinopathy. Participants in this cross-sectional study of male officials aged 20-60 yr in the Japanese Self Defence Force, underwent colour vision testing, ophthalmic examination, a standardized interview and examination of venous blood samples. Ishihara plates, a Lanthony 15-hue desaturated panel and Standard Pseudoisochromatic Plates Part 2 were used to examine colour vision. The Farnsworth-Munsell 100-hue test was performed to define acquired colour vision impairment. Cardiovascular disease risk factors were determined from serum blood samples, physical records and an interview. We performed logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, diagnosed hypertension, dyslipidaemia, cataract, glaucoma, being overweight, smoking status and alcohol intake. Crude and adjusted odds ratios were calculated for three glucose levels, which included normal fasting glucose, impaired fasting glucose and diabetes. Out of a total of 1042 men enrolled, 872 were eligible for the study, and 31 were diagnosed with acquired colour vision impairment. As compared with the subjects with normal fasting glucose (< 5.6 mmol/l), the crude odds ratio for acquired colour vision impairment was 0.93 (95% CI 0.32-2.74) for the subjects with impaired fasting glucose (5.6-6.9 mmol/l) and 8.07 (95% CI 2.48-26.22) for the patients with type 2 diabetes. The multiple-adjusted odds ratios were 0.77 (95% CI 0.25-2.34) for the subjects with impaired fasting glucose and 5.89 (95% CI 1.55-22.40) for the patients with type 2 diabetes. Our findings suggest that there is a dramatically increased prevalence of acquired colour vision impairment in type 2 diabetes patients without diabetic retinopathy which might be attributable to another pathogenesis associated with diabetic retinopathy. © 2011 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2011 Diabetes UK.

  8. Impaired glucose tolerance and elevated blood pressure in low birth weight, nonobese, young south african adults: early programming of cortisol axis.

    PubMed

    Levitt, N S; Lambert, E V; Woods, D; Hales, C N; Andrew, R; Seckl, J R

    2000-12-01

    Low birth weight is associated with increased cardiovascular and metabolic disorders in adult life, although the mechanisms of this effect remain uncertain. There is one report of increased morning plasma cortisol levels in an elderly low birth weight cohort, but whether this is primary or secondary to other aspects of the phenotype is unclear. We investigated the association between low birth weight and glucose intolerance, blood pressure, and dyslipidemia in young, nonobese adults from a community undergoing the health transition with a high prevalence of both noncommunicable diseases and low birth weight. Additionally, we investigated whether altered basal and stimulated cortisol levels as a marker of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal responsiveness or cortisol metabolism were associated with low birth weight in these young adults. Twenty-year-old, historically disadvantaged, urbanized South Africans (n = 137) with birth weights either below the 10th percentile [underweight for age (UFA)] or between the 25th and 75th percentiles [appropriate for gestational age (AFA)] had anthropometry, blood pressure, lipid levels, and glucose tolerance measured. In a subset (n = 62), 0900 h plasma cortisol concentrations, cortisol responses to 1 microg ACTH, and urinary glucocorticoid metabolites were measured. The mothers of UFA infants were themselves lighter and had a lower body mass index (P: = 0. 0016). At age 20 yr, although the UFA group was still smaller and lighter, with a lower body mass index, they had higher fasting plasma glucose levels (P: = 0.047), and a greater proportion demonstrated glucose intolerance (11.9% vs. 0%; P: < 0.01). The UFA group also had higher systolic [UFA, 126.0 +/- 13.3 (+/-SD); AFA, 122.0 +/- 11.7 mm Hg; P: = 0.007] and diastolic (72.3 +/- 8.4 vs. 69. 5 +/- 8.7 mm Hg; P: = 0.02) blood pressures, after covarying for current weight and gender. Plasma cortisol levels determined at 0900 h were higher in the UFA group (484.9 +/- 166.3 vs. 418

  9. The shape of the glucose concentration curve during an oral glucose tolerance test predicts risk for type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Heba M; Xu, Ping; Libman, Ingrid M; Becker, Dorothy J; Marks, Jennifer B; Skyler, Jay S; Palmer, Jerry P; Sosenko, Jay M

    2017-09-27

    We aimed to examine: (1) whether specific glucose-response curve shapes during OGTTs are predictive of type 1 diabetes development; and (2) the extent to which the glucose-response curve is influenced by insulin secretion. Autoantibody-positive relatives of people with type 1 diabetes whose baseline OGTT met the definition of a monophasic or biphasic glucose-response curve were followed for the development of type 1 diabetes (n = 2627). A monophasic curve was defined as an increase in OGTT glucose between 30 and 90 min followed by a decline of ≥ 0.25 mmol/l between 90 and 120 min. A biphasic response curve was defined as a decrease in glucose after an initial increase, followed by a second increase of ≥ 0.25 mmol/l. Associations of type 1 diabetes risk with glucose curve shapes were examined using cumulative incidence curve comparisons and proportional hazards regression. C-peptide responses were compared with and without adjustments for potential confounders. The majority of participants had a monophasic curve at baseline (n = 1732 [66%] vs n = 895 [34%]). The biphasic group had a lower cumulative incidence of type 1 diabetes (p < 0.001), which persisted after adjustments for age, sex, BMI z score and number of autoantibodies (p < 0.001). Among the monophasic group, the risk of type 1 diabetes was greater for those with a glucose peak at 90 min than for those with a peak at 30 min; the difference persisted after adjustments (p < 0.001). Compared with the biphasic group, the monophasic group had a lower early C-peptide (30-0 min) response, a lower C-peptide index (30-0 min C-peptide/30-0 min glucose), as well as a greater 2 h C-peptide level (p < 0.001 for all). Those with biphasic glucose curves have a lower risk of progression to type 1 diabetes than those with monophasic curves, and the risk among the monophasic group is increased when the glucose peak occurs at 90 min than at 30 min. Differences in glucose curve shapes between

  10. Association between Advanced Glycation End Products and Impaired Fasting Glucose: Results from the SALIA Study

    PubMed Central

    Teichert, Tom; Hellwig, Anne; Peßler, Annette; Hellwig, Michael; Vossoughi, Mohammad; Sugiri, Dorothea; Vierkötter, Andrea; Schulte, Thomas; Freund, Juliane; Roden, Michael; Hoffmann, Barbara; Schikowski, Tamara; Luckhaus, Christian; Krämer, Ursula; Henle, Thomas; Herder, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) may contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes and related complications, whereas their role in the early deterioration of glycaemia is unknown. While previous studies used antibody-based methods to quantify AGEs, data from tandem mass spectrometry coupled liquid chromatography (LC-MS/MS)-based measurements are limited to patients with known diabetes. Here, we used the LC-MS/MS method to test the hypothesis that plasma AGE levels are higher in individuals with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) than in those with normal fasting glucose (NFG). Secondary aims were to assess correlations of plasma AGEs with quantitative markers of glucose metabolism and biomarkers of subclinical inflammation. This study included on 60 women with NFG or IFG (n = 30 each, mean age 74 years) from the German SALIA cohort. Plasma levels of free metabolites (3-deoxyfructose, 3-deoxypentosone, 3-deoxypentulose), two hydroimidazolones, oxidised adducts (carboxymethyllysine, carboxyethyllysine, methionine sulfoxide) and Nε-fructosyllysine were measured using LC-MS/MS. Plasma concentrations of all tested AGEs did not differ between the NFG and IFG groups (all p>0.05). Associations between plasma levels of AGEs and fasting glucose, insulin and HOMA-IR as a measure of insulin resistance were weak (r between -0.2 and 0.2, all p>0.05). The association between 3-deoxyglucosone-derived hydroimidazolone with several proinflammatory biomarkers disappeared upon adjustment for multiple testing. In conclusion, plasma AGEs assessed by LC-MS/MS were neither increased in IFG nor associated with parameters of glucose metabolism and subclinical inflammation in our study. Thus, these data argue against strong effects of AGEs in the early stages of deterioration of glucose metabolism. PMID:26018950

  11. [Life style interventions study on the effects of impaired glucose regulations in Shanghai urban communities].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianjun

    2011-05-01

    To access the effects of life style interventions on impaired glucose regulation (IGR) in Shanghai urban communities, China. Two communities were randomly cluster-sampled to be carried out epidemiological intervention trial. Totally, 232 subjects with IGR were randomly allocated into 4 groups: control group,sports intervention group, diet intervention group, and sports and diet intervention group with the physical examinations in the baseline and end of this study respectively. Tests for fasting blood glucose, OGTT, HbA1c, total cholesterol,etc. were done. Data statistical analysis was occupied in SPSS 16.0. Compared to subjects of control group,fasting blood glucose, OGTT, HbAlc,total cholesterol,BMI,waist hip ratio and blood pressures were significantly decreased among subjects with three interventions (P < 0.05). Triglyceride were significantly decreased among subjects with sports intervention and sports and diet intervention (P < 0.05). High density lipids was significantly increased among subjects with sports and diet intervention (P < 0.05). There was a significant difference in 6 months cumulative incidence of diabetes mellitus between control group and interventions groups (8.6% vs. 0, Fisher' s exact P = 0.002), and the rate of transferring into normal blood glucose levels (fasting blood glucose < 5.6 mmol/L and 2 hours OGTT < 7.8 mmol/L) in control group was lower than those in three interventions group (3.4% vs. 8.6%, 14.0% and 16.9%, respectively) but only significant difference was observed between control group and sports and diet intervention group (OR = 5.74, 95% CI 1. 19-27. 64, P = 0.029). The life style interventions could decrease the risk of diabetes mellitus, help their transferring into normal blood glucose, and improve diabetic measures for the IGR population in Shanghai urban communities.

  12. Restoring HSP70 deficiencies improves glucose tolerance in diabetic monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, David M.; Jenkins, Kurt A.; Zhang, Li; Wagner, Janice D.

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) changes in diabetes mellitus (DM) in a nonhuman primate model. To this end, two studies were conducted in DM vervet monkeys. 1) Normal control and streptozotocin-induced DM monkeys (Stz-DM) that were differentiated into moderately or poorly controlled DM by judicious insulin administration were evaluated. Liver was collected at 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20 wk after streptozotocin, exposed to ex vivo heat shock at 42°C, and immunoblotted for heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), HSP70, and phosphorylated HSF1. 2) Spontaneous DM monkeys that were not pharmacologically induced were included in a crossover study of the HSP70-inducing drug geranylgeranylacetone (GGA). GGA at 20 mg/kg was given for 14 days with a 6-wk washout period. Glucose tolerance testing and plasma and muscle HSP70 were the primary outcome measurements. In Stz-DM, hyperglycemia reduced hepatic HSP70 in a dose-dependent fashion. HSF1 was increased in livers of monkeys with Stz-DM, but responses to ex vivo heat shock were impaired vs. normal monkeys. Activation of HSF1 appears to be important, because the phosphorylation change with heat stress was nearly perfectly correlated with HSP70 increases. Impaired HSF1 activation was also seen in Stz-DM after chronic hyperglycemia (>12 wk). In naturally occurring DM, increased circulating HSP70 resulted in significantly improved glucose tolerance and significant, positive trends in other measurements of insulin resistance. No change in muscle HSP70 content was observed. We conclude that increasing HSP70, potentially through targeting hyperglycemia-related deficits in HSF1 induction and activation in the liver, is a potent and viable strategy to improve glucose tolerance. PMID:21325107

  13. Glucose tolerance testing in panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Uhde, T W; Vittone, B J; Post, R M

    1984-11-01

    Seven of nine patients with panic disorder given a standard glucose tolerance test developed symptomatic hypoglycemia but not panic attacks. These findings suggest that hypoglycemia is an unlikely cause of "spontaneous" panic attacks in this population.

  14. Overexpression of the ped/pea-15 gene causes diabetes by impairing glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in addition to insulin action.

    PubMed

    Vigliotta, Giovanni; Miele, Claudia; Santopietro, Stefania; Portella, Giuseppe; Perfetti, Anna; Maitan, Maria Alessandra; Cassese, Angela; Oriente, Francesco; Trencia, Alessandra; Fiory, Francesca; Romano, Chiara; Tiveron, Cecilia; Tatangelo, Laura; Troncone, Giancarlo; Formisano, Pietro; Beguinot, Francesco

    2004-06-01

    Overexpression of the ped/pea-15 gene is a common feature of type 2 diabetes. In the present work, we show that transgenic mice ubiquitously overexpressing ped/pea-15 exhibited mildly elevated random-fed blood glucose levels and decreased glucose tolerance. Treatment with a 60% fat diet led ped/pea-15 transgenic mice to develop diabetes. Consistent with insulin resistance in these mice, insulin administration reduced glucose levels by only 35% after 45 min, compared to 70% in control mice. In vivo, insulin-stimulated glucose uptake was decreased by almost 50% in fat and muscle tissues of the ped/pea-15 transgenic mice, accompanied by protein kinase Calpha activation and block of insulin induction of protein kinase Czeta. These changes persisted in isolated adipocytes from the transgenic mice and were rescued by the protein kinase C inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide. In addition to insulin resistance, ped/pea-15 transgenic mice showed a 70% reduction in insulin response to glucose loading. Stable overexpression of ped/pea-15 in the glucose-responsive MIN6 beta-cell line also caused protein kinase Calpha activation and a marked decline in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Antisense block of endogenous ped/pea-15 increased glucose sensitivity by 2.5-fold in these cells. Thus, in vivo, overexpression of ped/pea-15 may lead to diabetes by impairing insulin secretion in addition to insulin action.

  15. Nonsuppressed Glucagon After Glucose Challenge as a Potential Predictor for Glucose Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Róbert; Hakaste, Liisa H; Ahlqvist, Emma; Heni, Martin; Machann, Jürgen; Schick, Fritz; Van Obberghen, Emmanuel; Stefan, Norbert; Gallwitz, Baptist; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Groop, Leif; Fritsche, Andreas

    2017-05-01

    Glucagon levels are classically suppressed after glucose challenge. It is still not clear as to whether a lack of suppression contributes to hyperglycemia and thus to the development of diabetes. We investigated the association of postchallenge change in glucagon during oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs), hypothesizing that higher postchallenge glucagon levels are observed in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Glucagon levels were measured during OGTT in a total of 4,194 individuals without diabetes in three large European cohorts. Longitudinal changes in glucagon suppression were investigated in 50 participants undergoing a lifestyle intervention. Only 66-79% of participants showed suppression of glucagon at 120 min (fold change glucagon120/0 <1) during OGTT, whereas 21-34% presented with increasing glucagon levels (fold change glucagon120/0 ≥1). Participants with nonsuppressed glucagon120 had a lower risk of IGT in all cohorts (odds ratio 0.44-0.53, P < 0.01). They were also leaner and more insulin sensitive and had lower liver fat contents. In the longitudinal study, an increase of fold change glucagon120/0 was associated with an improvement in insulin sensitivity (P = 0.003). We characterize nonsuppressed glucagon120 during the OGTT. Lower glucagon suppression after oral glucose administration is associated with a metabolically healthier phenotype, suggesting that it is not an adverse phenomenon. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  16. Dual roles of glucose in the freeze-tolerant earthworm Dendrobaena octaedra: cryoprotection and fuel for metabolism.

    PubMed

    Calderon, Sofia; Holmstrup, Martin; Westh, Peter; Overgaard, Johannes

    2009-03-01

    Ectothermic animals inhabiting the subarctic and temperate regions have evolved strategies to deal with periods of continuous frost during winter. The earthworm Dendrobaena octaedra is freeze tolerant and accumulates large concentrations of glucose upon freezing. The present study investigates the roles of glucose accumulation for long-term freeze tolerance in worms kept frozen at -2 degrees C for 47 days. During this period, worms were sampled periodically for determination of survival and for measurements of glucose, glycogen, lactate, alanine and succinate. In addition we performed calorimetric measurements to assess metabolic rate of frozen and unfrozen worms. Long-term freezing was associated with a gradual depletion of glucose and worms that succumbed during this period were always characterised by low glucose and glycogen levels. The anaerobic waste products lactate and alanine increased slightly whereas succinate levels remained constant. However, it is argued that other waste products (particularly propionate) could be the primary end product of a continued anaerobic metabolism. Calorimetric measures of the metabolic rate of frozen worms were in accord with values calculated from the reduction in glucose assuming that most ( approximately 90%) glucose was metabolised anaerobically. Both estimates of metabolic rate demonstrated a 10-fold metabolic depression associated with freezing. Thus, in addition to the suspected role of glucose as cryoprotectant, the present study demonstrates that glucose accumulation is vital to ensure substrate for long-term anaerobic metabolism in frozen worms. On the basis of the estimated metabolite levels, we calculate that the combined effect of metabolic depression and large glucose stores enables a projected 3 months survival of freezing at -2 degrees C of the ;average' D. octaedra. Such conditions are very likely to occur in the northern distribution ranges of this stress-tolerant earthworm.

  17. Evidence that the oral glucose-tolerance test does not provide a uniform stimulus to pancreatic islets in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    de Leacy, E A; Cowley, D M

    1989-07-01

    Fifty consecutive pregnant patients referred for a glucose-tolerance test were classified on the basis of increasing (n = 20) or decreasing (n = 28) hematocrit after an oral 75-g glucose load. (The hematocrit did not change in the other two patients.) Patients with increasing hematocrit, a response previously seen in patients with the dumping syndrome, showed significantly flatter increases in glucose concentrations in plasma after the load. The mean decrease in the concentration of phosphate in plasma, measured as an index of glucose uptake by cells, was significantly less (P less than 0.05) 2 h after the load in the group with flatter glucose responses, suggesting that the flat response is ascribable to poor glucose absorption rather than to an exaggerated insulin response. These results indicate that the oral glucose-tolerance test stresses the pancreatic islets differently in different pregnant subjects, owing to individual variations in the gastrointestinal handling of the glucose load. Consequently, patients may give a "normal" result who might otherwise become hyperglycemic after normal meals. We suggest that alternative screening procedures be investigated to assess pregnant patients postprandially.

  18. Insulin resistance, β-cell dysfunction and differences in curves of plasma glucose and insulin in the intermediate points of the standard glucose tolerance test in adults with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Cano Megías, Marta; González Albarrán, Olga; Guisado Vasco, Pablo; Lamas Ferreiro, Adelaida; Máiz Carro, Luis

    2015-02-01

    diabetes has become a co-morbidity with a negative impact on nutritional status, lung function and survival in cystic fibrosis. To identify any changes in intermediate points after a 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), pancreatic β-cell dysfunction, and insulin resistance in cystic fibrosis-related diabetes. It was carried out a retrospective analysis in a cohort of 64 patients affected of cystic fibrosis, older than 14 years, using the first pathological OGTT. Peripheral insulin resistance was measured using the homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA- IR), and pancreatic β-cell function was calculated according to Wareham. Time to maximum plasma insulin and glucose levels and area under the curve (AUC0-120) were also measured. Twenty-eight women and 36 men with a mean age of 26.8 years were enrolled, of whom 26.7% had normal glucose tolerance (NGT), 18.3% cystic fibrosis-related diabetes without fasting hyperglycemia (CFRD w/o FPG), 10% indeterminate (INDET), and 45% impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). HOMA-IR values were not significantly different between the diagnostic categories. Patients with any pathological change had worse β cell function, with a significant delay in insulin secretion, although there were no differences in total insulin production (AUC0-120). Time to maximum glucose levels was significantly shorter in NGT patients as compared to other categories, with glucose AUC0-120 being higher in the different diagnostic categories as compared to NGT. In over half the cases, peak blood glucose levels during a standard OGTT are reached in the intermediate time points, rather than at the usual time of 120minutes. Patients with cystic fibrosis and impaired glucose metabolism have a delayed insulin secretion during the standard OGTT due to loss of first-phase insulin secretion, with no differences in total insulin production. Absence of significant changes in HOMA-IR suggests that β-cell dysfunction is the main pathogenetic

  19. Consumption of dairy foods in relation to impaired glucose metabolism and type 2 diabetes mellitus: the Maastricht Study.

    PubMed

    Eussen, Simone J P M; van Dongen, Martien C J M; Wijckmans, Nicole; den Biggelaar, Louise; Oude Elferink, Stefanie J W H; Singh-Povel, Cécile M; Schram, Miranda T; Sep, Simone J S; van der Kallen, Carla J; Koster, Annemarie; Schaper, Nicolaas; Henry, Ronald M A; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Dagnelie, Pieter C

    2016-04-01

    Observational studies suggest an inverse association between total dairy product intake and diabetes risk. However, there is a lack of information on the relationship of specific dairy products with impaired glucose metabolism (IGM) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Individuals aged 40-75 years were recruited for the Maastricht Study. All the participants filled out a 253-food item FFQ, covering fifty specific dairy items that captured differences between full-fat, semi-skimmed and skimmed products, as well as fermented and non-fermented products. Glucose metabolism status was assessed by an oral glucose tolerance test, and participants were informed on their glucose metabolism status after returning the FFQ. Data of 2391 individuals were available to estimate OR (95 % CI) for IGM (n 470) and newly diagnosed (ND) T2DM (n 125), with adjustment for age, sex, BMI, physical activity, smoking status, education, energy intake and intakes of vegetables, fruits, meat and fish. For IGM, fully adjusted analyses revealed inverse associations, with OR comparing the highest with the lowest tertile of intake of 0·73 (95 % CI 0·55, 0·96) for skimmed products and 0·74 (95 % CI 0·54, 0·99) for fermented products. These dairy products were not associated with ND T2DM. In contrast, full-fat products were positively associated with ND T2DM (OR 2·01; 95 % CI 1·16, 3·47), whereas total dairy product intake was inversely associated with ND T2DM (OR 0·50; 95 % CI 0·26, 0·93). In conclusion, individuals with a high consumption of skimmed and fermented products had lower odds of having IGM, and individuals with a high consumption of total dairy products had lower odds of having ND T2DM. High intake of full-fat products was not related to IGM but was positively related to ND T2DM.

  20. Oleuropein improves glucose tolerance and lipid profile in rats with simultaneous renovascular hypertension and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Khalili, Azadeh; Nekooeian, Ali Akbar; Khosravi, Mohammad Bagher

    2017-10-01

    Oleuropein mediates most of the beneficial effects of olive products. This study examined the role of oxidative stress in the effects of oleuropein on lipid profile and blood glucose in rats with simultaneous renovascular hypertension and type 2 diabetes. Eight groups (n = 7-9 each) of male Sprague-Dawley rats including a control, a type 2 diabetic, a renovascular hypertensive, a sham, a simultaneously hypertensive diabetic receiving vehicle, and 3 simultaneously hypertensive-diabetic receiving 20, 40, or 60 mg/kg/day oleuropein were used. Four weeks after treatment, blood glucose, lipid profile, and biomarkers of oxidative stress were measured, and glucose tolerance test (GTT) was performed. Simultaneously hypertensive diabetic rats had significantly higher blood pressure, blood glucose, and serum total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglyceride and malondialdehyde. They also had lower serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, erythrocyte superoxide dismutase, and impaired glucose tolerance. Oleuropein significantly reduced blood pressure, blood glucose, and serum total cholesterol, LDL-C, triglyceride and malondoaldehyde. It also increased serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, erythrocyte superoxide dismutase, and improved glucose tolerance. The findings show that the model is associated with impaired glucose tolerance, and adverse lipid profile. They also show that oleuropein, partly by an antioxidant mechanism, improves glucose tolerance and changed lipid profile favorably.

  1. Role of various indices derived from an oral glucose tolerance test in the prediction of conversion from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ye An; Ku, Eu Jeong; Khang, Ah Reum; Hong, Eun Shil; Kim, Kyoung Min; Moon, Jae Hoon; Choi, Sung Hee; Park, Kyong Soo; Jang, Hak Chul; Lim, Soo

    2014-11-01

    The clinical implications of prediabetes for development of type 2 diabetes may differ for Asian ethnicity. We investigated various indices derived from a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in people with prediabetes to predict their future risk of diabetes. We recruited 406 consecutive subjects with prediabetes from 2005 to 2006 and followed them up every 3-6 months for up to 9 years. Prediabetes was defined as isolated impaired fasting glucose (IFG), isolated impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), combined glucose intolerance (CGI), or isolated elevated HbA1c (5.7-6.4%, 39-46 mmol/mol) without IFG or IGT. The rate of diabetes conversion was compared between prediabetes categories. The association of glycemic indices with development of diabetes was also investigated. Eighty-one patients were diagnosed with diabetes during the 9-year follow-up (median 46.0 months). The rate of diabetes conversion was higher in subjects with CGI (31.9%), or isolated IGT (18.5%) than in those with isolated IFG (15.2%) or isolated elevated HbA1c (10.9%). Surrogate markers reflecting β-cell dysfunction were more closely associated with diabetes conversion than insulin resistance indices. Subjects with a 30-min postload glucose ≥ 165 mg/dL and a 30-min C-peptide < 5 ng/mL had 8.83 times greater risk (95% confidence interval 2.98-26.16) of developing diabetes than other prediabetic subjects. In Asians, at least Koreans, β-cell dysfunction seems to be the major determinant for diabetes conversion. A combination of high glucose and low C-peptide levels at 30 min after OGTT may be a good predictor for diabetes conversion in this population. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  2. Three-year's changes in glucose tolerance status in the Bellville South cohort: rates and phenotypes associated with progression.

    PubMed

    Matsha, T E; Soita, D J; Hassan, M S; Hon, G M; Yako, Y Y; Kengne, A P; Erasmus, R T

    2013-02-01

    To determine the phenotypes associated with progression to type 2 diabetes or worsening in glucose tolerance during a 3-year follow-up of a community-based cohort in Cape Town, South Africa. A total of 198 eligible subjects (72.3% women) aged 55.2 years, from the Bellville-South community were followed-up between 2008 and 2011. Baseline and follow-up data collections included glucose tolerance status, anthropometric, blood pressure, lipids, insulin, γ-glutamyltransferase, cotinine, creatinine and HbA1c. Progression in glucose tolerance status at 3-year was the composite of new-onset diabetes and any worsening in glucose tolerance status. The cumulative incidence of progression in glucose tolerance status was: 16.2% (32 participants including 11 with new-onset diabetes), and increased in a stepwise fashion with the number of components of metabolic syndrome (MetS). In age and sex-adjusted logistic regression analyses, MetS [odd ratio: 3.08 (95% CI: 1.34-7.10)], HbA1c [5.26 (1.94-14.24)], HDL-cholesterol [0.05 (0.01-0.33)], γ-glutamyltransferase [1.99 (1.07-3.67)], triglycerides [1.71 (1.13-2.58)] and total/HDL-cholesterol [1.45 (1.08-1.93)] were significant predictors of progression, while borderline effects were observed for baseline glucose and diastolic blood pressure. Markers of adiposity were mostly stable or improved among non-progressors during follow-up, but deteriorated significantly among progressors, resulting in significant statistical interactions. High rates of deterioration of glucose status over time were found in our population, with nearly one-fifth of them acquiring a glucose tolerance worse status within a very short follow-up. Our study extends to this setting the well-known utility of phenotypes of MetS single or in combination, in predicting worsening in glucose tolerance status. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Glucose tolerance, insulin release, and insulin binding to monocytes in kidney transplant recipients

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, W.A.; Wielechowski, K.S.; Mahajan, S.K.; Migdal, S.D.; McDonald, F.D.

    1982-03-01

    In order to evaluate glucose tolerance following renal transplantation, intravenous glucose tolerance tests (IVGTT), with evaluation of hormonal responses to the intravenous glucose load and percent specific /sup 125/I-insulin binding to peripheral blood monocytes, were studied in eight clinically stable kidney transplant recipients. For comparison purposes, identical studies were done in eight control subjects and seven clinically stable hemodialysis patients. One transplant recipient was glucose intolerant, with fasting hyperglycemia, elevated HbA1C, and abnormal glucose decay constant. Impaired pancreatic insulin release appeared to be the major factor accounting for his glucose intolerance. The seven glucose-tolerant transplant recipients had significantly increased insulin release during IVGTT compared to control subjects, and significant correlations were found among insulin release, glucose decay constant, and fasting blood sugar in those patients. Insulin binding to monocytes was significantly greater in transplant recipients than control subjects due to an increase in insulin binding capacity per cell. A significant correlation was found between percent specific /sup 125/I-insulin binding and steroid dose, expressed as mg/kg body weight/day, in those patients. Thus, chronic steroid administration does not cause glucose intolerance in transplant recipients who manifest steroid-associated increases in pancreatic insulin release and cellular insulin binding capacity.

  4. Exercise Tolerance and the Post Exercise Diastolic Filling Pattern in Patients With the Resting Impaired Relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Lavine, Steven J.; Walsh, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Background In patients with normal LV systolic function, cardiac output increases with exercise mediated by increased stroke volume early in exercise and an increase in heart rate later in exercise. Despite normal LV systolic function, patients who display an impaired relaxation pattern may have a reduced exercise tolerance. We hypothesized that the resting impaired relaxation pattern that persists during exercise results in reduced LV filling volume and reduced exercise tolerance. Methods We evaluated consecutive exercise echocardiograms performed at Harper Hospital from 1998-2000 for patients with sinus rhythm, normal resting wall motion and ejection fraction (> 55%), evidence of resting impaired relaxation, and a negative exercise echocardiogram. There were 49 patients fitting the above criteria who were compared with a group of age and sex matched patients (43 patients) with a normal rest and exercise echocardiogram with normal resting transmitral Doppler. Rest and post exercise echocardiography and Doppler parameters were obtained. Results Patients in the impaired relaxation group demonstrated shorter exercise times as compared to the normal control group (8.8 ± 1.6 versus 9.7 ± 2.0 minutes, P < 0.001). In patients with normal resting transmitral diastolic filling, there was an increased the extent of atrial contribution to LV filling volume post exercise associated with shortening of isovolumic relaxation. Two patterns were seen in the impaired relaxation group post exercise. In 1 subgroup in which E/A ratio decreased post exercise, exercise duration was reduced (7.4 ± 1.3 minutes, P < 0.001) as compared to the subgroup with E/A increase (9.6 ± 1.2 minutes) post exercise which was similar to normal controls. Forward stepwise regression indicated that exercise time was primarily related to E/A change post exercise for all patient groups (r = 0.625, P = 0.0008). Specifically, this was true for patients with E/A reversal at rest (r = 0.584, P = 0

  5. Seasonal variations in plasma glucose and insulin concentrations after glucose loading in the edible dormouse (Glis glis L.).

    PubMed

    Castex, C; Donnio, R; Sutter, B C

    1979-01-01

    Glucose tolerance tests made in the Edible dormouse showed annual variations in B cell secretory capacity, associated with glucose tolerance changes. 1. During autumn and winter, the B cell is sensitive to glucose, and insulin regulates the high peripheral consumption of this hexose. 2. At the beginning of spring, insulin secretion decreases and glucose tolerance is impaired. In June, the B cell response si low or absent and a poor tolerance to glucose still persists. 3. The variations in B cell activity can be related to changing energy requirements during the year.

  6. Brain glucose metabolism: Role of Wnt signaling in the metabolic impairment in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cisternas, Pedro; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2017-06-15

    The brain is an organ that has a high demand for glucose. In the brain, glucose is predominantly used in energy production, with almost 70% of the energy used by neurons. The importance of the energy requirement in neurons is clearly demonstrated by the fact that all neurodegenerative disorders exhibit a critical metabolic impairment that includes decreased glucose uptake/utilization and decreased mitochondrial activity, with a consequent diminution in ATP production. In fact, in Alzheimer's disease, the measurement of the general metabolic rate of the brain has been reported to be an accurate tool for diagnosis. Additionally, the administration of metabolic activators such as insulin/glucagon-like peptide 1 can improve memory/learning performance. Despite the importance of energy metabolism in the brain, little is known about the cellular pathways involved in the regulation of this process. Several reports postulate a role for Wnt signaling as a general metabolic regulator. Thus, in the present review, we discuss the antecedents that support the relationship between Wnt signaling and energy metabolism in the Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Impaired fasting blood glucose is associated to cognitive impairment and cerebral atrophy in middle-aged non-human primates

    PubMed Central

    Djelti, Fathia; Dhenain, Marc; Terrien, Jérémy; Picq, Jean-Luc; Hardy, Isabelle; Champeval, Delphine; Perret, Martine; Schenker, Esther; Epelbaum, Jacques; Aujard, Fabienne

    2017-01-01

    Age-associated cognitive impairment is a major health and social issue because of increasing aged population. Cognitive decline is not homogeneous in humans and the determinants leading to differences between subjects are not fully understood. In middle-aged healthy humans, fasting blood glucose levels in the upper normal range are associated with memory impairment and cerebral atrophy. Due to a close evolutional similarity to Man, non-human primates may be useful to investigate the relationships between glucose homeostasis, cognitive deficits and structural brain alterations. In the grey mouse lemur, Microcebus murinus, spatial memory deficits have been associated with age and cerebral atrophy but the origin of these alterations have not been clearly identified. Herein, we showed that, on 28 female grey mouse lemurs (age range 2.4-6.1 years-old), age correlated with impaired fasting blood glucose (rs=0.37) but not with impaired glucose tolerance or insulin resistance. In middle-aged animals (4.1-6.1 years-old), fasting blood glucose was inversely and closely linked with spatial memory performance (rs=0.56) and hippocampus (rs=−0.62) or septum (rs=−0.55) volumes. These findings corroborate observations in humans and further support the grey mouse lemur as a natural model to unravel mechanisms which link impaired glucose homeostasis, brain atrophy and cognitive processes. PMID:28039490

  8. Nuclear Factor Erythroid 2-Related Factor 2 Deletion Impairs Glucose Tolerance and Exacerbates Hyperglycemia in Type 1 Diabetic MiceS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Reisman, Scott A.; Yeager, Ronnie L.; Goedken, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) induces a battery of cytoprotective genes after oxidative stress. Nrf2 aids in liver regeneration by altering insulin signaling; however, whether Nrf2 participates in hepatic glucose homeostasis is unknown. Compared with wild-type mice, mice lacking Nrf2 (Nrf2-null) have lower basal serum insulin and prolonged hyperglycemia in response to an intraperitoneal glucose challenge. In the present study, blood glucose, serum insulin, urine flow rate, and hepatic expression of glucose-related genes were quantified in male diabetic wild-type and Nrf2-null mice. Type 1 diabetes was induced with a single intraperitoneal dose (200 mg/kg) of streptozotocin (STZ). Histopathology and serum insulin levels confirmed depleted pancreatic β-cells in STZ-treated mice of both genotypes. Five days after STZ, Nrf2-null mice had higher blood glucose levels than wild-type mice. Nine days after STZ, polyuria occurred in both genotypes with more urine output from Nrf2-null mice (11-fold) than wild-type mice (7-fold). Moreover, STZ-treated Nrf2-null mice had higher levels of serum β-hydroxybutyrate, triglycerides, and fatty acids 10 days after STZ compared with wild-type mice. STZ reduced hepatic glycogen in both genotypes, with less observed in Nrf2-null mice. Increased urine output and blood glucose in STZ-treated Nrf2-null mice corresponded with enhanced gluconeogenesis (glucose-6-phosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase)- and reduced glycolysis (pyruvate kinase)-related mRNA expression in their livers. Furthermore, the Nrf2 activator oltipraz lowered blood glucose in wild-type but not Nrf2-null mice administered STZ. Collectively, these data indicate that the absence of Nrf2 worsens hyperglycemia in type I diabetic mice and Nrf2 may represent a therapeutic target for reducing circulating glucose levels. PMID:20086057

  9. A prospective study of impaired fasting glucose and type 2 diabetes in China: The Kailuan study.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Anand; Cui, Liufu; Sun, Lixia; Lu, Bing; Chen, Shuohua; Liu, Xing; Zhou, Yong; Liu, Xiurong; Xie, Xiaobing; Hu, Frank B; Wu, Shouling; Gao, Xiang

    2016-11-01

    The worldwide prevalence and incidence of diabetes and obesity are increasing in pandemic proportions. This is particularly relevant for China, where an extremely large population is growing, aging, and urbanizing. We thus conducted a prospective study to examine the prevalence and incidence of impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and diabetes, the rate at which fasting blood glucose rises, and the major modifiable risk factors associated with these outcomes in a large Chinese population from the Kailuan prospective study.A prospective cohort included 100,279 Chinese participants, aged 18 years or more, who had available information on fasting blood glucose concentrations at the start of the study (2006). Examination surveys were conducted every 2 years in 2008 and 2010. For the analyses of incident diabetes, we included 76,869 participants who were free of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer at the baseline and participants in the 2008 and/or 2010 follow-up. Diabetes was defined by a fasting blood glucose concentration ≥7 mmol/L, self-reported history, or active treatment with insulin or any oral hypoglycemic agent. IFG was defined by a fasting blood glucose concentration between 5.6 and 6.9 mmol/L.During the 4-year study, the prevalence of diabetes and IFG rose from 6.6% to 7.7%, and 17.3% to 22.6%, respectively. There were 17,811 incident cases of IFG and 4867 incident cases of diabetes. The age-standardized incident rate of IFG and diabetes were 62.6/1000 person-years (51.2/1000 person-years in women and 73.8/1000 person-years in men) and 10.0/1000 person-years (7.8/1000 person-years in women and 12.1/1000 person-years in men), respectively. We observed steady increases in fasting blood glucose with body anthropometrics and in every defined category of body mass index, including in those traditionally considered to be well within the "normal" range.In this large longitudinal study of Chinese adults, we observed a high prevalence and incidence of IFG

  10. Imparied glucose tolerance in long-term lithium-treated patients.

    PubMed

    Müller-Oerlinghausen, B; Passoth, P M; Poser, W; Pudel, V

    1979-01-01

    The oral glucose tolerance test (oGTT) was performed twice in patients under long-term lithium treatment. Blood glucose and plasma insulin were determined. The oGTT results were evaluated by three criteria (Köbberling-Creutzfeldt, WHO, and Epidemiological Study Group of the European Diabetes Association) and were compared to two representative reference studies from normal populations. The frequency of impaired glucose tolerance in the patients was three times higher than expected on the basis of the studies on normal populations. The variability of the oGTT curves between the first and second tests as well as the steepness of the time-course of the 'insulinogenic index' suggested mild disturbances of carbohydrate metabolism (mild diabetes) in some of the patients. It is considered unlikely that the impairment of glucose tolerance in the patients was a direct pharmacological effect of lithium salts. The possible role of age, sex, manic-depressive disease, additional medication, and particularly obesity in the effects of long-term lithium treatment on glucose tolerance is discussed. The authors suggest that the oGTT should be carried out periodically in long-term, lithium-treated patients over the age of 40 years in order to detect abnormalities in their carbohydrate metabolism.

  11. Prevalence of abnormal glucose tolerance and risk factors in urban and rural Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Norlaila; Kamarudin, Nor Azmi; Ismail, Ab Aziz; Khir, Amir Sharifuddin; Ismail, Ikram Shah; Musa, Kamarul Imran; Kadir, Khalid Abdul; Yaacob, Nor Azwany; Ali, Osman; Isa, Siti Harnida Md; Wan Bebakar, Wan Mohamad; wan Mohamud, Wan Nazaimoon

    2011-06-01

    To determine the prevalence of prediabetes and diabetes among rural and urban Malaysians. This cross-sectional survey was conducted among 3,879 Malaysian adults (1,335 men and 2,544 women). All subjects underwent the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). The overall prevalence of prediabetes was 22.1% (30.2% in men and 69.8% in women). Isolated impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) were found in 3.4 and 16.1% of the study population, respectively, whereas 2.6% of the subjects had both IFG and IGT. Based on an OGTT, the prevalence of newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes was 12.6% (31.0% in men and 69.0% in women). The prediabetic subjects also had an increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease risk factors. The large proportion of undiagnosed cases of prediabetes and diabetes reflects the lack of public awareness of the disease.

  12. Urinary N-acetyl-β-d-Glucosaminidase Levels are Positively Correlated With 2-Hr Plasma Glucose Levels During Oral Glucose Tolerance Testing in Prediabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ouchi, Motoshi; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Hashimoto, Masao; Motoyama, Masayuki; Ohara, Makoto; Suzuki, Kazunari; Igari, Yoshimasa; Watanabe, Kentaro; Nakano, Hiroshi; Oba, Kenzo

    2012-01-01

    Background Urinary N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) excretion is increased in patients with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). This study investigated when during the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) the plasma